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Sample records for activated killer lak

  1. Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell phenomenon in cluster headache. "In vitro" activation by recombinant interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Giacovazzo, M; Stirparo, G; DeStefano, L; Martelletti, P; Rinaldi-Garaci, C

    1989-03-01

    Previous studies showed that the Natural Killer (NK) activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from cluster headache (CH) patients is lower than that of controls. This decreased activity seems to be independent of the cluster period. beta-interferon has been shown to be more effective in increasing NK activity when incubated with PBL from CH patients, than with PBL from control donors. Lymphokine-Activated Killer (LAK) cells can be generated by incubation of human PBL in recombinant Interleukin-2 (rIL-2). This phenomenon was studied in 10 CH patients and 8 healthy volunteers. PBL were activated to LAK cells by "in vitro" incubation for 72 hours in Control Medium containing rIL-2 (1000 I.U./ml). A four hour Chromium 51 release was used to measure LAK Cell Killing of K562 target cells. The released radioactivity was measured in a gamma scintillation counter. The CH patients showed a marked increase of LAK generation compared to control subjects. This effect seems to be augmented during the cluster period. PMID:2785095

  2. Suppression of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell function by neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dallegri, F; Dapino, P; Patrone, F; Sacchetti, C

    1991-01-01

    Peripheral blood neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were found to inhibit the cytolytic efficiency of interleukin 2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes (LAK cells) in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory activity of PMN was not merely due to PMN acting as cold alternative targets, PMN ingestion of the label released by target cells or cell overcrowding in test wells. Heat-treated (50 degrees C, 30 min) lysates from PMN maintained their ability to inhibit LAK cell cytotoxicity, whereas PMN supernatants were completely ineffective. Oxidant scavengers (catalase, superoxide, dismutase) did not affect the PMN-mediated inhibition of LAK cell function. The results suggest that PMN contain heat-stable factor(s) able to suppress LAK cytotoxicity and potentially capable of limiting the therapeutic efficacy of IL-2 and/or LAK cells. PMID:1667940

  3. Interleukin-2 (rIL-2)-induced lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and their precursors express the VGO1 antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Denegri, J.F.; Peterson, J.; Tilley, P. )

    1989-07-01

    Precursor and effector cells of recombinant interleukin-2 (r-IL-2)-induced lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activity were investigated for their expression of VGO1. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from normal donors were purified and separated in a FACS 420 into VGO1+- and VGO1- cell fractions before and after culture for 96 hr with 100 U/ml of r-IL-2. Their lytic activity against K 562 and Daudi cells was measured in a 51Cr release assay. The majority, if not all, of the LAK effector and precursor cells was VGO1+ lymphocytes. The expression of VGO1 by LAK precursor cells remained stable under the culture conditions used in our experiments. VGO1- lymphocytes cultured with r-IL-2 demonstrated neither LAK-induced activity nor expression of VGO1 antigen.

  4. Evaluation of NK and LAK cell activities in neoplastic patients during treatment with morphine.

    PubMed

    Provinciali, M; Di Stefano, G; Raffaeli, W; Pari, G; Desiderio, F; Fabris, N

    1991-07-01

    The cytotoxic activity of Natural Killer (NK) and Lymphokine Activated Killer (LAK) cells in neoplastic patients with or without antalgic treatment was studied. NK cell activity was found reduced in untreated neoplastic patients when compared to healthy subjects. The atalgic treatment with morphine (orally or intrathecally administered) was able to significantly reduce the mean values of NK cell activity found in cancer patients. In three patients the cytotoxicity of NK cells significantly decreased during transfer from oral to intrathecal administration of morphine. In contrast to the NK cell function, the development of LAK cell activity significantly increased in neoplastic patients when compared to healthy controls. Further increments were obtained during treatment with morphine. The oral treatment with morphine was able to determine a higher induction of LAK cells than the intrathecal administration of the drug. Besides providing new knowledge on the effect of morphine on immune system our findings suggest that, in order to include neoplastic patients in clinical trials of adoptive immunotherapy with LAK cells and interleukin-2 (IL-2), the antalgic therapy with oral administration of morphine may represent a better solution than the intrathecal administration of the drug. PMID:1774133

  5. Role of prolactin in the modulation of NK and LAK cell activity after short- or long-term morphine administration in neoplastic patients.

    PubMed

    Provinciali, M; Di Stefano, G; Stronati, S; Raffaeli, W; Pari, G; Fabris, N

    1996-10-01

    In a previous work we demonstrated that chronic in vivo antalgic therapy of cancer patients with morphine reduced the endogenous cytotoxic activity of natural killer (NK) cells, while increasing the development of lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell cytotoxicity. In order to investigate the mechanisms by which morphine affects NK and LAK cell function further, we evaluated the modulation exerted by short- or long-term morphine administration on either NK/LAK cell cytotoxicities or plasma levels of prolactin (PRL) and other immunomodulating neurohormones. An intravenous morphine injection (10 mg) significantly increased the plasma levels of PRL, reduced the cytotoxic activity of NK cells, and increased the development of LAK cell activity 30 min after drug injection in neoplastic patients. The administration of bromocriptine before the injection of morphine prevented both PRL augmentation and the increase in LAK cell activation, although it did not prevent the inhibition of NK cytotoxicity. The chronic oral administration of morphine (90 +/- 30 mg/day for 1 month) also resulted in higher PRL levels; the NK and LAK cell activities were, respectively, lower than or higher than those found in neoplastic patients untreated with morphine. The plasma levels of thyrotropin (TSH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol were not significantly modified in either short- or long-term experiments. The absolute number and the percentages of lymphocyte populations, as well as the percentage of IL-2 receptors, were not modified after short-term morphine administration whereas little changes of T lymphocyte populations and NK cell number were observed after oral treatment with morphine. In vitro morphine did not affect the development of LAK cell activity. In conclusion, our findings indicate that morphine reduces NK cytotoxicity and increases the development of LAK cell cytotoxicity after short- and long-term administration. The effect of morphine on LAK cell activation

  6. Immune activation by combination human lymphokine-activated killer and dendritic cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    West, E J; Scott, K J; Jennings, V A; Melcher, A A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Optimal cellular immunotherapy for cancer should ideally harness both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. Lymphokine-activated killer cells (LAKs) can trigger early innate killing of tumour targets, whereas long-term adaptive-specific tumour control requires priming of CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) following acquisition of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). As DCs stimulate both innate and adaptive effectors, combination cell therapy using LAKs and DCs has the potential to maximise anti-tumour immune priming. Methods: Reciprocal activation between human clinical grade LAKs and DCs on co-culture, and its immune consequences, was monitored by cell phenotype, cytokine release and priming of both innate and adaptive cytotoxicity against melanoma targets. Results: Co-culture of DCs and LAKs led to phenotypic activation of natural killer (NK) cells within the LAK population, which was associated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines and enhanced innate cytotoxicity against tumour cell targets. The LAKs reciprocally matured DCs, and the combination of LAKs and DCs, on addition of melanoma cells, supported priming of specific anti-tumour CTLs better than DCs alone. Conclusion: Clinical-grade LAKs/DCs represents a practical, effective combination cell immunotherapy for stimulation of both innate and adaptive anti-tumour immunity in cancer patients. PMID:21847125

  7. [Preparation of NK-enriched LAK cells--their potential cytotoxic and ADCC activities].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasunobu; Sudo, Toshimi; Matsushita, Norimasa; Nakao, Masanobu; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Kouichi; Tanigawa, Keishi; Aruga, Atsushi

    2003-10-01

    We examined several culture methods to induce proliferation of natural killer (NK) cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In the presence of IL-2, a remarkable proliferation of NK cells was observed when PBMC were co-cultured with MMC-treated K562, which is known as a highly sensitive in vitro target cell for the NK assay. Addition of OK-432 or TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta also induced marked NK proliferation in a dose dependent manner. These NK-enriched lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells showed highly cytotoxic activities against various MHC class I positive or negative tumor cells. They also showed potent ADCC activities against Herceptin-coated SK-BR-3, a HER2/neu positive breast cancer cell line. These results indicated that NK-enriched LAK cells are potent effector cells, and suggested novel therapeutic strategies for nonspecific immunotherapy as well as target immunotherapy in combination with anticancer antibodies, such as Herceptin. PMID:14619517

  8. Indomethacin augments lymphokine-activated killer cell generation by patients with malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, L.S.; Bowman, R.V.; Davis, M.R.; Musk, A.W.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1989-10-01

    Human malignant mesothelioma (MM) cells are resistant to natural killer (NK) cell lysis but susceptible to lysis by lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from control individuals. The present study was performed to determine the capacity of patients with MM (n = 22) and individuals occupationally exposed to asbestos (the major population at risk of developing this disease, n = 52) to generate LAK cells capable of effectively lysing human mesothelioma cells. Compared to controls (n = 20), both patient groups demonstrated significantly depressed LAK cell activity against mesothelioma tumor cell targets (55 +/- 3% lysis by controls vs 34 +/- 3% lysis by patients with MM, P less than 0.005; and 45 +/- 3% lysis by asbestos-exposed individuals, P less than 0.025). Addition of 10 micrograms/ml indomethacin during LAK cell generation restored normal LAK cell activity for patients with MM (52 +/- 6% lysis of cultured human MM cells, P = NS compared to controls), suggesting that the defective cytolytic cell function observed in some patients with MM is a result of prostaglandin-induced immunosuppression. The ability of indomethacin to restore suppressed LAK cell activity in patients with MM suggests that the concomitant use of this agent in ex vivo LAK cell generation and in patients undergoing interleukin/LAK cell therapy may be beneficial.

  9. Organophosphorus pesticides markedly inhibit the activities of natural killer, cytotoxic T lymphocyte and lymphokine-activated killer: a proposed inhibiting mechanism via granzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Nagahara, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Hidemi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Ko; Minami, Masayasu

    2002-04-01

    We have previously found that diisopropyl methylphosphonate, an organophosphorus by-product generated during sarin synthesis in the Tokyo sarin disaster, significantly inhibited natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activities. In the present study, to investigate whether organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) also affect NK and CTL activities, we firstly examined the effect of five OPs on human NK activity, and then the effect of Dimethyl 2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphate (DDVP), an OP on murine splenic NK, CTL and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK), and human LAK activities in vitro. To explore the underlying mechanism of decreased NK activity, we also investigated the effect of 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride-HCl (p-ABSF), an inhibitor of serine proteases on NK, LAK and CTL activities, and the effect of DDVP on the activity of granzymes (serine proteases). We found that OPs significantly decreased human NK activity in a dose-dependent manner, but the degree of decrease in NK activity differed among the OPs investigated, and that DDVP significantly decreased NK, LAK and CTL activities in a dose-dependent manner, but the degree of decrease in these activities differed. p-ABSF showed a similar inhibitory pattern to DDVP, and had an additive inhibitory effect with DDVP on NK, LAK and CTL activities. We also found that DDVP significantly inhibited granzyme activity in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicate that OPs significantly decrease NK, LAK and CTL activities in vitro via granzyme inhibition. PMID:11893417

  10. Lymphokine-activated killer cell phenomenon. Lysis of natural killer-resistant fresh solid tumor cells by interleukin 2-activated autologous human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, E.A.; Mazumder, A.; Zhang, H.Z.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1982-06-01

    Activation in lectin-free interleukin 2 (IL-2) containing supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBL) from cancer patients or normal individuals resulted in expression of cytotoxicity toward 20 of 21 natural killer (NK)-resistant fresh solid tumor cells tested. Fresh solid tumor cells were resistant to NK-mediated lysis in 10 autologous patients' PBL-tumor interactions, and from 17 normal individuals tested against 13 allogeneic fresh tumors. Culture of PBL in IL-2 for 2-3 d was required for the lymphokine activated killers (LAK) to be expressed, and lytic activity toward a variety of NK-resistant fresh and cultured tumor targets developed in parallel. Autologous IL-2 was functional in LAK activation, as well as interferon-depleted IL-2 preparations. Irradiation of responder PBL before culture in IL-2 prevented LAK development. Precursors of LAK were present in PBL depleted of adherent cells and in NK-void thoracic duct lymphocytes, suggesting that the precursor is neither a monocyte nor an NK cell. LAK effectors expressed the serologically defined T cell markers of OKT.3, Leu-1, and 4F2, but did not express the monocyte/NK marker OKM-1. Lysis of autologous fresh solid tumors by LAK from cancer patients' PBL was demonstrated in 85% of the patient-fresh tumor combinations. Our data present evidence that the LAK system is a phenomenon distinct from either NK or CTL systems that probably accounts for a large number of reported nonclassical cytotoxicities. The biological role of LAK cells is not yet known, although it is suggested that these cells may be functional in immune surveillance against human solid tumors.

  11. Inhibition of Human Colon Cancer Growth by Antibody-Directed Human LAK Cells in SCID Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nakada, Tetsuya; Puisieux, Isabelle

    1993-03-01

    Advanced human colon cancer does not respond to lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. In order to direct cytotoxic cells to the tumor, human LAK cells linked with antibodies to a tumor cell surface antigen were tested with established hepatic metastases in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These cells had increased uptake into the tumor and suppression of tumor growth as compared with LAK cells alone, thereby improving the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Thus, tumor growth can be inhibited by targeted LAK cells, and SCID mice can be used to test the antitumor properties of human effector cells.

  12. Change in peripheral blood lymphocyte count in dogs following adoptive immunotherapy using lymphokine-activated T killer cells combined with palliative tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Mie, Keiichiro; Shimada, Terumasa; Akiyoshi, Hideo; Hayashi, Akiyoshi; Ohashi, Fumihito

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated changes in peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) count in dogs following adoptive immunotherapy using lymphokine-activated T killer cells (T-LAK) in combination with surgery. Fifteen tumor-bearing dogs treated with T-LAK therapy combined with palliative resection of tumors were enrolled in the present study. T-LAK were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by culture with recombinant human interleukin -2 (rhIL-2) and solid phase anti-canine cluster of differentiation (CD)3 antibody. T-LAK were administrated intravenously at 2-4-week intervals. After the first administration of T-LAK, counts of PBL and T lymphocyte subsets (CD3(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells) increased and the CD4/CD8 ratio decreased, with significant increases in CD8(+) cells (P<0.05). In 8 tumor-bearing dogs that were administered sequential T-LAK, available data on changes in PBL and T lymphocyte phenotypes until the fifth administration were also analyzed. In tumor-bearing dogs administered 5 rounds of T-LAK, CD8(+) cell counts were maintained high until the fifth administration of T-LAK. Moreover, the CD4/CD8 ratio remained low until the fifth administration of T-LAK. These results indicate that T-LAK therapy combined with surgery may increase peripheral blood T lymphocytes, particularly CD8(+) cells, in tumor-bearing dogs. PMID:27436446

  13. Effect of different levels of alcohol consumption on natural killer and lymphokine activated killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, L.W.; DeVasure, J.M.; Lemley-Gillespie, S.D.; Thiele, G.M. Omaha VA Hospital, NE )

    1991-03-11

    The effect of alcohol consumption on natural killer (NK) cell activity is controversial as both increased and decreased levels have been reported. It was the purpose of this study to determine the effects of feeding BDF1 mice different levels of alcohol on NK and lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell activity. After four-six weeks of chronic alcohol feeding, mice were sacrificed, spleen cells obtained and assayed for NK and IL-2 boosted NK activity against YAC-1 cells in a traditional {sup 51}chromium release assay. Cells were also cultured in the presence of IL-2 for five days and tested for cytolytic activity using P815 cells as targets. Cells from each group were passed over a nylon wool column and the adherent (AD) and nonadherent (NAD) populations collected and tested as above. Increased NK, 24 hour IL-2 boosted NK and 5 day LAK activity were observed only in the spleen cells obtained from mice on 20% alcohol. Also, NAD populations had a 2-4 fold higher lytic unit values (LU{sub 20}) at all levels of alcohol consumption and in all assays, as compared with the unseparated spleen cells. Analysis of cell surface markers on these three populations of cells show that there were differences in MAC-2, Asialo GM-1, Thy 1.2, B220 and NK 1.1 that may correlate with the differences observed in the cytolytic assays. These data suggest that different levels of alcohol affect the cytolytic activity of NK and LAK cells and may result from alterations in the cell subset populations.

  14. Use of lymphokine-activated killer cells to prevent bone marrow graft rejection and lethal graft-vs-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Kaplan, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Prompted by our recent finding that lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells mediate both veto and natural suppression, we tested the ability of adoptively transferred LAK cells to block two in vivo alloreactions which complicate bone marrow transplantation: resistance to transplanted allogeneic bone marrow cells, and lethal graft-vs-host disease. Adoptive transfer of either donor type B6D2 or recipient-type B6 lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells, cells found to have strong LAK activity, abrogated or inhibited the resistance of irradiated B6 mice to both B6D2 marrow and third party-unrelated C3H marrow as measured by CFU in spleen on day 7. The ability of lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells to abrogate allogeneic resistance was eliminated by C lysis depletion of cells expressing asialo-GM1, NK1.1, and, to a variable degree, Thy-1, but not by depletion of cells expressing Lyt-2, indicating that the responsible cells had a LAK cell phenotype. Similar findings were obtained by using splenic LAK cells generated by 3 to 7 days of culture with rIL-2. Demonstration that allogeneic resistance could be blocked by a cloned LAK cell line provided direct evidence that LAK cells inhibit allogeneic resistance. In addition to inhibiting allogeneic resistance, adoptively transferred recipient-type LAK cells prevented lethal graft-vs-host disease, and permitted long term engraftment of allogeneic marrow. Irradiation prevented LAK cell inhibition of both allogeneic resistance and lethal graft-vs-host disease. These findings suggest that adoptive immunotherapy with LAK cells may prove useful in preventing graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease in human bone marrow transplant recipients.

  15. Assessment of human natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer cell cytotoxicity against Toxoplasma gondii trophozoites and brain cysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dannemann, B.R.; Morris, V.A.; Araujo, F.G.; Remington, J.S. )

    1989-10-15

    Because previous work has suggested that NK cells may be important in host resistance against the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii we examined whether human NK cells and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells have activity against trophozoites and cysts of this organism in vitro. A method to radiolabel Toxoplasma trophozoites with 51Cr was developed and direct cytotoxic activity was determined by using modifications of the standard 51Cr release assay. Viability of 51Cr-labeled trophozoites assessed by both methylene blue staining and trypan blue exclusion was greater than 90%. Significantly more 51Cr was released by anti-Toxoplasma antibody and C than by antibody in the absence of C. Incubation of trophozoites with freshly isolated human NK cells or NK cells activated with either rIL-2 or rIFN-alpha did not result in significant release of 51Cr (specific lysis was 0 to 2.3%). In contrast, the average specific lysis of radiolabeled trophozoites by LAK cells was significant. In a series of separate experiments, preincubation of radiolabeled trophozoites with heat-inactivated normal or Toxoplasma antibody-positive human serum increased the cytotoxicity of LAK cells from a mean specific lysis of 15% +/- 4.5 to 39% +/- 8.5, respectively, as assessed by 51Cr release. Because previous work has shown that radioisotope release from parasites may be nonspecific, separate experiments were performed to determine the cytotoxicity of LAK cells against antibody-coated trophozoites by using ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining to assess effector cell damage. LAK cells had a mean specific lysis of 51% against antibody-coated trophozoites by ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining. Preincubation with heat-inactivated Toxoplasma-antibody positive human serum did not increase activity of rIL-2-activated NK cells against 51CR-labeled trophozoites.

  16. Effects of cryopreservation and phenylacetate on biological characters of adherent LAK cells from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ning; Ye, Sheng-Long; Sun, Rui-Xia; Zhao, Yan; Tang, Zhao-You

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To improve the preparation of adherent lymphokine-activated killer (A-LAK) cells and to study the effects of cryopreservation and phenylacetate (PA) on biological characters of A-LAK cells. METHODS: A-LAK cells were obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by using L-phenylalanine methyl ester (PME) to deplete immunosuppressive monocytes. Proliferative activity of SMMC7721 cell line after treatment with phenylacetate (PA) was observed. A-LAK cells were treated with the supernatant of SMMC7721 cells that had been pretreated with PA. The changes of proliferation, cytotoxicity and phenotype of A-LAK cells were investigated after cryopreservation. RESULTS: The expansion of A-LAK cells (96.79 ± 69.10 folds on Day 14) was significantly higher than that of non-adherent LAK (NA-LAK) cells (22.77 ± 13.20) as well as conventional LAK cells (4.64 ± 0.91). PA significantly suppressed the growth of SMMC7721 cells, and the inhibitor ratio was 46%. The supernatant of cultured tumor cells intensively suppressed the proliferation and cytotoxicity of A-LAK cells, but the suppressive effect of the supernatant was previously decreased after treatment with PA. Impairments in proliferation and cytotoxicity of A-LAK cells immediately after thawing of cryopreservation and recovery after reincubation with IL-2 were observed. The cytotoxicity of thawed A-LAK cells on Day 5 was significantly higher than that of fresh A-LAK before freezing (54.8% ± 10.2% vs 40.5% ± 6.4%). No significant change in the percentage of lymphocyte subsets was identified in frozen A-LAK cells as compared with that in the fresh control cells. CONCLUSION: A-LAK cells can be simply prepared by using PME, and showed a synergistic anti-tumor effect with the combination of PA. Cryopreservation can increase the immunoactivities of A-LAK cells from the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:11925598

  17. Up‐modulation of interferon‐γ mediates the enhancement of spontanous cytotoxicity in prolactin‐activated natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Matera, L; Contarini, M; Bellone, G; Forno, B; Biglino, A

    1999-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) has been shown to participate in lymphocyte activation. In particular, the constitutive natural killer (NK) and the lymphokine‐activated killer (LAK) cytotoxicity of CD56+ CD16+ cells is increased by its physiological to supraphysiological concentrations. As PRL has been shown to up‐regulate the production of interferon‐γ (IFN‐γ) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we studied its effect on IFN‐γ production by NK cells as a possible mechanism of autocrine activation of cytotoxicity. Released and intracellular IFN‐γ, as well as IFN‐γ mRNA expression, were increased by pituitary and recombinant human PRL, which stimulated optimal NK and LAK cytotoxicity. Treatment with blocking anti‐IFN‐γ monoclonal antibody (mAb) selectively affected PRL‐increased killing of K562 targets, demonstrating that PRL‐mediated enhancement of spontaneous cytotoxicity depends, at least in part, on up‐regulation of IFN‐γ. PMID:10583598

  18. Therapeutic effect of lymphokine-activated killer cells treated with low-dose ionizing radiation on osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LEI; LV, MING; SAYIMU, WULIYA; LIU, WEI; ZHANG, HUAWU; JIANG, BO; WANG, DONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells, which received low-dose ionizing radiation, on the treatment of osteosarcoma in rats. The cultured UMR-106 cells were inoculated under the anterior chest skin of 24 rats to establish an osteosarcoma model. In addition, the LAK cells from 24 mice were exposed to doses of 0 (control group), 0.65 or 3.25 mGy X-ray radiation. The tritiated thymidine (3H-TdR) release method and Winn assay were performed to determine the antitumor effects of the LAK cells. The proliferation of the mouse LAK cells treated with 3.25 mGy radiation was significantly higher than that for those treated with 0 or 0.65 mGy radiation, which suggested that low-dose ionizing radiation stimulates the proliferation of LAK cells. The tumor-bearing rats were divided into three groups and injected with LAK cells that had already received 0, 0.65 or 3.25 mGy radiation. The mean survival time of the 3.25-mGy group was longer than that of the 0- and 0.65-mGy groups. After 30 days, tumors with weights of ~6.25 and 2.0 g were identified in the rats of the 0- and 0.65-mGy groups, respectively. However, tumor proliferation was not detectable in the rats of the 3.25-mGy radiation group. Therefore, low-dose ionizing radiation effectively kills osteosarcoma cells in rats by stimulating the proliferation and enhancing the cytotoxicity of LAK cells. PMID:26622587

  19. Celecoxib increases lung cancer cell lysis by lymphokine-activated killer cells via upregulation of ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Marcus; Linnebacher, Michael; Hinz, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    The antitumorigenic mechanism of the selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib is still a matter of debate. Using lung cancer cell lines (A549, H460) and metastatic cells derived from a lung cancer patient, the present study investigates the impact of celecoxib on the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and cancer cell lysis by lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. Celecoxib, but not other structurally related selective COX-2 inhibitors (i.e., etoricoxib, rofecoxib, valdecoxib), was found to cause a substantial upregulation of ICAM-1 protein levels. Likewise, ICAM-1 mRNA expression was increased by celecoxib. Celecoxib enhanced the susceptibility of cancer cells to be lysed by LAK cells with the respective effect being reversed by a neutralizing ICAM-1 antibody. In addition, enhanced killing of celecoxib-treated cancer cells was reversed by preincubation of LAK cells with an antibody to lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 (LFA-1), suggesting intercellular ICAM-1/LFA-1 crosslink as crucial event within this process. Finally, celecoxib elicited no significant increase of LAK cell-mediated lysis of non-tumor bronchial epithelial cells, BEAS-2B, associated with a far less ICAM-1 induction as compared to cancer cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate celecoxib-induced upregulation of ICAM-1 on lung cancer cells to be responsible for intercellular ICAM-1/LFA-1 crosslink that confers increased cancer cell lysis by LAK cells. These findings provide proof for a novel antitumorigenic mechanism of celecoxib. PMID:26513172

  20. Immunotherapy of murine sarcomas with interleukin 2. II. Activation of killer cells by human recombinant IL-2.

    PubMed

    Indrová, M; Bubeník, J; Toulcová, A

    1986-01-01

    Highly purified human recombinant interleukin 2 induced cytotoxicity in mouse spleen cells against mouse sarcoma cells when added during the 51Cr microcytotoxicity assay. It elicited similar levels of killer cell activation as did human lymphoid (Jurkat leukaemia-derived) or mouse lymphoid (EL-4 leukaemia-derived) IL-2 preparations. The susceptibility of six MC-induced mouse sarcomas to the cytolytic effect of lymphokine-activated killer cells was compared. Five (MC11, MC13, MC14, MC15, MC16) of six mouse sarcoma cell lines examined were sensitive in vitro to the LAK cell effect, whereas one cell line (MC12) was resistant. Since the sensitive and resistant target cell lines had been induced with the same carcinogen and in mice of the same genotype, they represent a very useful model for investigation of target cell structures responsible for the sensitivity to the LAK cell effect. PMID:3492397

  1. Adoptive Immunotherapy of Established Pulmonary Metastases with LAK Cells and Recombinant Interleukin-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mule, James J.; Shu, Suyu; Schwarz, Susan L.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    1984-09-01

    The activation of human peripheral blood leukocytes or murine splenocytes with interleukin-2 (IL-2) generated cells that were lytic in vitro for a variety of fresh tumor cells. The adoptive transfer of such lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells to mice with established pulmonary sarcoma metastases was highly effective in reducing the number (and size) of these tumor nodules when combined with repeated injections of recombinant IL-2. These findings provide a rationale for clinical trials of the infusion of human LAK cells generated with recombinant IL-2 as well as Phase I trials of the infusion of recombinant IL-2 systemically into humans.

  2. Influence of transfusion of lymphokine-activated T killer cells on inflammatory responses in dogs after laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Mie, Keiichiro; Tomihari, Mizuki; Hoshi, Kiyotaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Miyahara, Kazuro; Shimada, Terumasa

    2016-05-01

    The influence of transfusion of lymphokine-activated T killer cells (T-LAK) on inflammatory responses was examined in dogs after laparotomy. Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) level, cell numbers of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and T lymphocyte subsets (CD3(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+)) and mRNA expression levels of cytokines including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12, IL-4, IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were measured in dogs with (T-LAK group) or without (control group) a single T-LAK administration immediately after laparotomy. The plasma CRP level initially increased and then decreased to the normal range at 7 days after laparotomy in the T-LAK group, which was earlier than in the control group. The expression level of IL-10 mRNA showed a marked postoperative increase and was significantly higher than the preoperative level on day 7 (P<0.05), whereas the level in the control group showed no clear change after laparotomy. A significant increase in IL-2 mRNA expression level in the T-LAK group was observed on day 14, which was two weeks earlier than in the control group (P<0.05). These results suggest that T-LAK therapy in dogs after laparotomy leads to earlier resolution of postoperative inflammation by production of an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) in the early phase of the postoperative period and earlier restoration of cell-mediated immunity related to cytokine production by PBMCs. PMID:26727638

  3. Influence of transfusion of lymphokine-activated T killer cells on inflammatory responses in dogs after laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    MIE, Keiichiro; TOMIHARI, Mizuki; HOSHI, Kiyotaka; NAKAMURA, Takashi; YAMAGUCHI, Tomohiro; MIYAHARA, Kazuro; SHIMADA, Terumasa

    2016-01-01

    The influence of transfusion of lymphokine-activated T killer cells (T-LAK) on inflammatory responses was examined in dogs after laparotomy. Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) level, cell numbers of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and T lymphocyte subsets (CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+) and mRNA expression levels of cytokines including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12, IL-4, IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were measured in dogs with (T-LAK group) or without (control group) a single T-LAK administration immediately after laparotomy. The plasma CRP level initially increased and then decreased to the normal range at 7 days after laparotomy in the T-LAK group, which was earlier than in the control group. The expression level of IL-10 mRNA showed a marked postoperative increase and was significantly higher than the preoperative level on day 7 (P<0.05), whereas the level in the control group showed no clear change after laparotomy. A significant increase in IL-2 mRNA expression level in the T-LAK group was observed on day 14, which was two weeks earlier than in the control group (P<0.05). These results suggest that T-LAK therapy in dogs after laparotomy leads to earlier resolution of postoperative inflammation by production of an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) in the early phase of the postoperative period and earlier restoration of cell-mediated immunity related to cytokine production by PBMCs. PMID:26727638

  4. Lymphokine-activated killer cell function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, spleen cells and regional lymph node cells in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Karimine, N; Arinaga, S; Inoue, H; Nanbara, S; Ueo, H; Akiyoshi, T

    1994-01-01

    Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells generated by culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), spleen cells (SPC) and regional lymph node cells (LNC) with IL-2 for 4 days were examined for their functional capabilities in 29 patients with gastric carcinoma. The cytotoxic activity of LAK cells induced from LNC was significantly lower than that from either PBMC or SPC, although there was no difference between PBMC or SPC. The induction of mRNA of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and the production of these cytokines in the non-adherent LAK cells from LNC were also significantly reduced compared with those from PBMC or SPC. Further, the LAK cells from LNC secreted significantly lower levels of these cytokines when stimulated with tumour target, Raji cells, although the production of these cytokines was markedly increased by stimulation with the targets in all three cell populations. Phenotypic analysis of each cell population revealed a decreased proportion of the cells mediating natural killer (NK) activity, including CD16+, CD56+, and CD57+ cells in LNC either before or after culture, although OKIa1+ and CD25+ cells were uniformly increased in all cell populations after culture. Changes in subpopulations of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in LNC were not apparently different from PBMC or SPC. These results indicated the differential reactivity of each lymphocyte population to IL-2 and the reduced LAK cell function of LNC compared with PBMC or SPC in patients with gastric carcinoma. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8004819

  5. Natural killer cell activity during measles.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, D E; Ward, B J; Jauregui, E; Johnson, R T; Vaisberg, A

    1990-01-01

    Natural killer cells are postulated to play an important role in host anti-viral defences. We measured natural killer cell activity in 30 individuals with acute measles (73 +/- 21 lytic units (LU)/10(7) cells) and 16 individuals with other infectious diseases (149 +/- 95 LU) and found it reduced compared with values for adults (375 +/- 70 LU; P less than 0.001) or children (300 +/- 73 LU, P less than 0.01) without infection. Reduced natural killer cell activity was found in measles patients with (84 +/- 30 LU) and without (55 +/- 18 LU) complications and was present for at least 3 weeks after the onset of the rash. Activity was increased by in vitro exposure of cells to interleukin-2. Depressed natural killer cell activity parallels in time the suppression of other parameters of cell-mediated immunity that occurs during measles. PMID:1696863

  6. Lymphocytes expressing type 3 complement receptors proliferate in response to interleukin 2 and are the precursors of lymphokine-activated killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J D; Horwitz, D A

    1988-01-01

    In the absence of antigenic or mitogenic stimulation, certain peripheral blood lymphocytes exhibit proliferative and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell activities when cultured with recombinant IL-2. Both activities were found to be an exclusive property of lymphocytes expressing type 3 complement receptors (CR3) identified by anti-CD11 monoclonal antibodies. CD11+ lymphocytes were then fractionated into three subsets by two-color flow cytometry. These included CD16+ cells, which display distinctive Fc receptors for IgG (CD16). Using anti-CD5, the CD11+ CD16- lymphocytes were separated into non-T cell and T cell subsets. The two non-T cell subsets (CD11+ CD16+ and CD11+ CD16- CD5-), but not the T cell subset (CD11+ CD16- CD5+), could proliferate in response to IL-2. Both CD11+ non-T cell subsets, but not the CD11+ T cell subset, had the capacity to mediate natural killer cell activity. However, all three CD11+ lymphocyte subsets were capable of generating LAK activity. These findings are consistent with the concept that two signals are required to stimulate T cells to proliferate. However, at least a small subset of blood T cells can be activated by IL-2 to become LAK cells. PMID:2965164

  7. Lysis of typhus-group rickettsia-infected targets by lymphokine activated killers

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, M.; Dasch, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    The authors recently described a subset of OKT8, OKT3-positive lymphocytes from typhus-group rickettsia immune individuals which were capable of lysing autologous PHA-blasts or Epstein-Barr virus transformed B cells (LCL) infected with typhus-group rickettsiae. In order to determine if killing by these effectors was HLA-restricted, they stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from typhus-group rickettsia immune individuals in vitro with typhus-group rickettsia-derived antigen for one week and then measured lysis of autologous LCL or HLA-mismatched LCL in a 4-6 hour Cr/sup 51/-release assay. There was significant lysis of both the autologous and the HLA-mismatched infected targets as compared to the corresponding uninfected targets. Since this suggested that the effectors were lymphokine activated killers (LAK) rather than cytotoxic T lymphocytes, they then tested this hypothesis by stimulating PBMC from both immune and non-immune individuals in vitro for one week with purified interleukin 2 and measuring lysis of infected, autologous LCL. PBMC thus treated, from both immune and non-immune individuals, were capable of significantly lysing autologous, infected LCL as compared to the non-infected control. They therefore conclude that targets infected with typhus-group rickettsiae are susceptible to lysis to LAK.

  8. Adoptive immunotherapy of human pancreatic cancer with lymphokine-activated killer cells and interleukin-2 in a nude mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Marincola, F.M.; Da Pozzo, L.F.; Drucker, B.J.; Holder, W.D. Jr. )

    1990-11-01

    A pancreatic cancer cell line was grown in orthotopic and heterotopic positions in young Swiss/NIH nude mice, which were tested with adoptive immunotherapy. Mice were injected with 1 x 10(7) human cancer cells in the subcutaneous tissue and duodenal lobe of the pancreas. The mice were randomly divided into four groups: group IA (LAK + IL-2) (N = 25) received 2 X 10(7) human lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from normal donors by tail vein injection followed by 10,000 units of human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) given intraperitoneally every 12 hours for 28 days; group IB (IL-2) (N = 27) was given the same dose of IL-2 alone; group IC (RPMI-1640) (N = 18) received a placebo consisting of 1 ml of RPMI-1640 intraperitoneally every 12 hours; and group ID (LAK) (N = 14) received 2 X 10(7) LAK cells but no IL-2. Toxicity was significantly higher in group IB, with a mortality rate of 45.5% (10/22 animals) versus a 0% mortality (0/25) in group IA. None of the group IA or IB animals died of pancreatic cancer during the experiment. The animals that did not receive IL-2 died before 28 days in 14.2% of group IC and in 16.7% of group ID. The area under the growth curve of subcutaneous tumors during the course of treatment and the pancreatic tumor weight at the end of treatment were compared in each group. Subcutaneous tumors had a reduced rate of growth in group IA animals compared to all the other treatments. Pancreatic tumor growth was slowed in group IA. The animals treated with IL-2 alone (group IB) showed some slowing of tumor growth that was intermediate between group IA, group IC, and group ID. A similar experiment was done with irradiated (375 rad) mice. Nine nude mice with tumors were treated with LAK + IL-2 (group IIA), eight received IL-2 alone (group IIB), and seven received placebo (group IIC).

  9. Reduced LAK cytotoxicity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with bladder cancer: Decreased LAK cytotoxicity caused by a low incidence of CD56+ and CD57+ mononuclear blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, G.G.; Petersen, K.R.; Steven, K.; Zeuthen, J. )

    1990-11-01

    The cytotoxicity of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (US-PBMC), phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC (PS-PBMC) and interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated PBMC (LAK cells) was assessed in patients with noninvasive and invasive transitional-cell bladder cancer and compared with those determined in healthy controls. The differences in the cytotoxicities were correlated with specific changes in the subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). PBMC from 37 patients and 13 healthy controls were tested against the bladder cancer cell line T24 in {sup 51}Cr-release assays. The PBMC subsets were analyzed using monoclonal antibodies against T cells, natural killer (NK) -cells, monocytes, and activation markers. The cytotoxicities of US-PBMC, PS-PBMC, and LAK cells were all significantly lower in the cancer patients than in the controls (P less than 0.05). The percentages of PBMC positive for the NK-cell markers CD56 and CD57 were lowest in the patients and were correlated to the decrease in cytotoxicity. Depletion of CD56+ or CD57+ cells from PBMC prior to or after 2 days stimulation with IL-2 demonstrated that these cells are the major source of LAK-cell cytotoxicity and showed that the reduced ability of bladder cancer patient PBMC to develop LAK-cell cytotoxicity is a result of a low incidence of CD56+ and CD57+ cells in the blood. These findings indicate that IL-2 therapy alone might not be a sufficient therapy of bladder cancer patients.

  10. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  11. Immune function of patients receiving recombinant human interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a phase I clinical study: induction of C-reactive protein and IgE and inhibition of natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Scheid, C; Young, R; McDermott, R; Fitzsimmons, L; Scarffe, J H; Stern, P L

    1994-02-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a cytokine that acts on a variety of cell types, including myeloid progenitor cells and B and T lymphocytes. It has been found to activate cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and to induce T-cell-mediated antitumour effects in animal models. In a phase I clinical trial of recombinant human IL-6, 20 patients with advanced cancer were entered to receive daily subcutaneous injections of IL-6 over 7 days followed by a 2-week observation period and another 4 weeks of daily IL-6 injections. Doses varied between 0.5 microgram/kg and 20 micrograms/kg body weight and immune functions were monitored throughout. At all dose levels IL-6 administration led to a marked increase in serum levels of C-reactive protein and a moderate rise in complement factor C3. The proportions of CD4, CD8 or HLA-DR lymphocytes in peripheral blood did not alter with IL-6 treatment nor did the in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells induced by either phytohaemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen or fixed Staphylococcus aureus. By contrast, NK cell activity, lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell activity and proliferation induced by in vitro culture with interleukin-2 (IL-2) were suppressed at doses exceeding 2.5 micrograms/kg. Serum IgE levels were consistently elevated over the IL-6 dose range but IgM, IgG and IgA levels were unaffected. In summary there is a dose-dependent induction of acute-phase proteins by in vivo IL-6 treatment. At higher IL-6 doses there is a suppressive effect on NK and LAK activity measured in vitro. IL-6 may thus be useful in combination cytokine therapies that seek to suppress LAK and favour cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. The rise in IgE levels in response to IL-6 was unexpected and suggests a more pivotal role than previously known for the control of IgE production; this could include IgE-related diseases. PMID:8306367

  12. All-trans retinoic acid decreases susceptibility of a gastric cancer cell line to lymphokine-activated killer cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, T. Y.; Jiang, S. Y.; Shyu, R. Y.; Yeh, M. Y.; Chu, T. M.

    1997-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (RA) was previously shown to regulate the growth of gastric cancer cells derived from the cell line SC-M1. This study was designed to investigate the effect of RA on the sensitivity of SC-M1 cells to lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activity. RA at the concentration range of 0.001-10 microM was shown to induce SC-M1 cells to exhibit resistance to LAK activity in a dose-dependent manner. A kinetics study indicated that a significantly increased resistance was detected after 2 days of co-culturing SC-M1 cells with RA and reached a maximum after 6 days of culture. Similar results were obtained from two other cancer cell lines: promyelocytic leukaemia HL-60 and hepatic cancer Hep 3B. A binding assay demonstrated that the binding efficacy between target SC-M1 cells and effector LAK cells was not altered by RA. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that RA exhibited no effect on the expression of cell surface molecules, including HLA class I and class II antigens, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and -2, and lymphocyte function antigen-3. Cell cycle analysis revealed that culture of SC-M1 cells with RA resulted in an increase in G0/G1 phase and a decrease in S phase, accompanied by a decrease in cyclin A and cyclin B1 mRNA as determined by Northern blot analysis. Additionally, RA was shown to enhance the expression of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) in SC-M1 cells, and to have no effect on the expression of RARbeta or RARgamma. Taken together, these results indicate that RA can significantly increase gastric cancer cells SC-M1 to resist LAK cytotoxicity by means of a cytostatic effect through a mechanism relating to cell cycle regulation. The prevailing ideas, such as a decrease in effector to target cell binding, a reduced MHC class I antigen expression or an altered RARbeta expression, are not involved. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9155047

  13. A Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae Killer Strain Secreting the X Factor Related to Killer Activity and Inhibition of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 Killer Toxins.

    PubMed

    Melvydas, Vytautas; Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Gedminienė, Genovaitė; Šiekštelė, Rimantas

    2016-09-01

    It was determined that Kx strains secrete an X factor which can inhibit all known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer toxins (K1, K2, K28) and some toxins of other yeast species-the phenomenon not yet described in the scientific literature. It was shown that Kx type yeast strains posess a killer phenotype producing small but clear lysis zones not only on the sensitive strain α'1 but also on the lawn of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 type killer strains at temperatures between 20 and 30 °C. The pH at which killer/antikiller effect of Kx strain reaches its maximum is about 5.0-5.2. The Kx yeast were identified as to belong to S. cerevisiae species. Another newly identified S. cerevisiae killer strain N1 has killer activity but shows no antikilller properties against standard K1, K2 and K28 killer toxins. The genetic basis for Kx killer/antikiller phenotype was associated with the presence of M-dsRNA which is bigger than M-dsRNA of standard S. cerevisiae K1, K2, K28 type killer strains. Killer and antikiller features should be encoded by dsRNA. The phenomenon of antikiller (inhibition) properties was observed against some killer toxins of other yeast species. The molecular weight of newly identified killer toxins which produces Kx type strains might be about 45 kDa. PMID:27407298

  14. Killer toxin from a novel killer yeast Pichia kudriavzevii RY55 with idiosyncratic antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Bijender Kumar; Raina, Sandeepu; Singh, Satbir

    2013-08-01

    The killer phenomenon of yeast may have technological implications in many areas like beverage fermentation, food technology, biological control in agriculture, and in medicine. In the present study the killer phenomenon in Pichia kudriavzevii (P. kudriavzevii RY55) is being reported for the first time. The P. kudriavzevii RY55 toxin exhibited excellent antibacterial activity against several pathogens of human health significance such as Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella sp., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas alcaligenes. Killer toxin was purified to homogeneity by using ammonium sulphate precipitation and ion exchange chromatography and characterized for few properties. P. kudriavzevii RY55 killer toxin may be of vast significance in the development of novel antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, new bio-based safer candidates for food preservation and biocontrol, and starter cultures for fermentation industries. PMID:22961241

  15. EFFECT OF NICKEL AND MANGANESE ON NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of NiCl2 causes a suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity, while a single injection of MnCl2 enhances NK activity. When injected together Mn preempts the suppressive effect of Ni on NK activity.

  16. AUGMENTATION OF MURINE NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY BY MANGANESE CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural Killer (NK) cell activity of spleen cells from male CBA/J mice was augmented by a single parenteral injection of MnCl2 administered 1 day prior to testing by in vitro and in vivo isotope release assays. Increased cytotoxic activity was observed in vitro against both NK-se...

  17. Suppression of newborn natural killer cell activity by prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Milch, P.O.; Salvatore, W.; Luft, B.; Baker, D.A.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 on natural killer cell activity of cord blood was examined. Natural killer cell activity, determined by chromium 51 release, was significantly reduced after prostaglandin E2 (1 microgram/ml) treatment. Prostaglandin E2 has been found to enhance the cellular spread of herpesvirus. Thus prostaglandins may enhance viral infections indirectly by suppressing natural killer cell activity.

  18. Functional Assessment of NK and LAK Cells Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaur, Indreshpal; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Space flight associated stress alters some aspects of the human immune response. In this study, we determined the effects of 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle on the cytotoxic activity of NK and LAK cells. PBMCs were collected from 10-ml blood specimens from 5 astronauts 10 days before launch, immediately after landing, and again at 3 days after landing and stored at -80 C. All PBMCs were thawed simultaneously, and the cytotoxic activities of NK and LAK cells were measured by a 4 hour Cr-51 release assay. K562 cells were used to assess NK cell cytotoxicity. Following 4 days of IL-2 activation, the LAK cell cytotoxic activity was determined using K562 cells and Daudi cells as the target cells. NK cell cytotoxicity decreased at landing (p<.05) in 3/5 astronauts, and recovered to preflight levels by 3 days following landing; NK cell cytotoxicity was increased (p=0.1) in the remaining 2 astronauts at landing. In 4/5 astronauts, LAK cytotoxic activity was decreased at landing against K562 cells (p = 0.13) and Daudi cells (p = 0.08). Phenotyping of PBMC's and LAK cells showed alterations in some surface markers and adhesion molecules (CD11b, CD11c, CD11a, CD16, L-selectin, and CD3).

  19. IMMUNOSUPPRESSION OF PULMONARY NATURAL KILLER ACTIVITY BY EXPOSURE TO OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is an oxidant gas and an ubiquitous oxidant air pollutant with the potential to adversely affect pulmonary immune function with a consequent increase in disease susceptibility. ulmonary atural killer (NK) activity was measured in order to assess the pulmonary immunotoxicity...

  20. KillerOrange, a Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer Activated by Blue and Green Light

    PubMed Central

    Bozhanova, Nina G.; Sharonov, George V.; Staroverov, Dmitriy B.; Egorov, Evgeny S.; Ryabova, Anastasia V.; Solntsev, Kyril M.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded photosensitizers, proteins that produce reactive oxygen species when illuminated with visible light, are increasingly used as optogenetic tools. Their applications range from ablation of specific cell populations to precise optical inactivation of cellular proteins. Here, we report an orange mutant of red fluorescent protein KillerRed that becomes toxic when illuminated with blue or green light. This new protein, KillerOrange, carries a tryptophan-based chromophore that is novel for photosensitizers. We show that KillerOrange can be used simultaneously and independently from KillerRed in both bacterial and mammalian cells offering chromatic orthogonality for light-activated toxicity. PMID:26679300

  1. PGC-1α-Dependent Mitochondrial Adaptation Is Necessary to Sustain IL-2-Induced Activities in Human NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Claudia; Ibañez, Jorge; Ahumada, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Martin, Adrian; Córdova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Human Natural Killer (NK) cells are a specialized heterogeneous subpopulation of lymphocytes involved in antitumor defense reactions. NK cell effector functions are critically dependent on cytokines and metabolic activity. Among various cytokines modulating NK cell function, interleukin-2 (IL-2) can induce a more potent cytotoxic activity defined as lymphokine activated killer activity (LAK). Our aim was to determine if IL-2 induces changes at the mitochondrial level in NK cells to support the bioenergetic demand for performing this enhanced cytotoxic activity more efficiently. Purified human NK cells were cultured with high IL-2 concentrations to develop LAK activity, which was assessed by the ability of NK cells to lyse NK-resistant Daudi cells. Here we show that, after 72 h of culture of purified human NK cells with enough IL-2 to induce LAK activity, both the mitochondrial mass and the mitochondrial membrane potential increased in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. In addition, oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, inhibited IL-2-induced LAK activity at 48 and 72 h of culture. Moreover, the secretion of IFN-γ from NK cells with LAK activity was also partially dependent on PGC-1α expression. These results indicate that PGC-1α plays a crucial role in regulating mitochondrial function involved in the maintenance of LAK activity in human NK cells stimulated with IL-2. PMID:27413259

  2. PGC-1α-Dependent Mitochondrial Adaptation Is Necessary to Sustain IL-2-Induced Activities in Human NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Dante; Jara, Claudia; Ibañez, Jorge; Ahumada, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Martin, Adrian; Córdova, Alexandra; Montoya, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Human Natural Killer (NK) cells are a specialized heterogeneous subpopulation of lymphocytes involved in antitumor defense reactions. NK cell effector functions are critically dependent on cytokines and metabolic activity. Among various cytokines modulating NK cell function, interleukin-2 (IL-2) can induce a more potent cytotoxic activity defined as lymphokine activated killer activity (LAK). Our aim was to determine if IL-2 induces changes at the mitochondrial level in NK cells to support the bioenergetic demand for performing this enhanced cytotoxic activity more efficiently. Purified human NK cells were cultured with high IL-2 concentrations to develop LAK activity, which was assessed by the ability of NK cells to lyse NK-resistant Daudi cells. Here we show that, after 72 h of culture of purified human NK cells with enough IL-2 to induce LAK activity, both the mitochondrial mass and the mitochondrial membrane potential increased in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. In addition, oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, inhibited IL-2-induced LAK activity at 48 and 72 h of culture. Moreover, the secretion of IFN-γ from NK cells with LAK activity was also partially dependent on PGC-1α expression. These results indicate that PGC-1α plays a crucial role in regulating mitochondrial function involved in the maintenance of LAK activity in human NK cells stimulated with IL-2. PMID:27413259

  3. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, R.; Vitale, M.; Mazzotti, G.; Manzoli, L.; Papa, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly the lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.

  4. Immunosuppression of pulmonary natural killer activity by exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, G.R.; Keyes, L.L.; Stutzman, J.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Ozone is an oxidant gas and an ubiquitous oxidant air pollutant with the potential to adversely affect pulmonary immune function with a consequent increase in disease susceptibility. Pulmonary natural killer (NK) activity was measured in order to assess the pulmonary immunotoxicity of continuous ozone exposure. Continuous ozone exposures at 1.0 ppm were performed for 23.5 hours per day for either 1, 5, 7, or 10 consecutive days. Pulmonary immune function was assessed by measuring natural killer (NK) activity from whole-lung homogenates of male Fischer-344 rats. Results of this study indicated that continuous ozone exposure for 1, 5, or 7 days resulted in a significant decrease in pulmonary NK activity. This suppressed pulmonary NK activity returned to control levels after continuous exposure to ozone for 10 days. The suppressed pulmonary NK response was thus attenuated and returned to normal values in the continued presence of ozone gas. This attenuation process is dynamic, complex, and doubtless involves several cell types and/or products of these cells. Pulmonary NK activity was also suppressed at 0.5 ppm ozone, but not at 0.1 ppm ozone, following 23.5 hours of exposure. NK activity is important for defense against viral, bacterial, and neoplastic disease. The depressed NK activity resulting from continuous ozone exposure could therefore result in a compromised ability to defend against pulmonary diseases.

  5. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, John K; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states. PMID:26967308

  6. Hypothalamic modulation of splenic natural killer cell activity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Katafuchi, T; Ichijo, T; Take, S; Hori, T

    1993-01-01

    1. The cytotoxic activity of splenic natural killer cells measured by a standard chromium release assay in urethane and alpha-chloralose-anaesthetized rats was significantly suppressed 20 min after bilateral ablation of the medial part of the preoptic hypothalamus (MPO). The suppression was completely blocked by prior splenic denervation. The splenic natural killer cell activity of MPO sham-lesioned rats or thalamus-lesioned rats, both having an intact splenic innervation, were not different from that of a non-treated control group. 2. Electrical stimulation of the bilateral MPO (0.1 ms, 0.1-0.3 mA, 5-100 Hz) suppressed the efferent activity of the splenic nerve in all six rats examined. The reduction of the nerve activity was accompanied by a transient fall in blood pressure. An I.V. injection of phenylephrine (3 micrograms/0.3 ml) also evoked a suppression of the nerve activity, which was accompanied by transient hypertension, suggesting that the suppressive effect of the MPO stimulation was independent of changes in blood pressure. On the other hand, a bilateral lesion of the MPO resulted in a sustained increase in the electrical activity of the splenic sympathetic nerve filaments which lasted for more than 2 h. 3. Microinjection of monosodium-L-glutamate (0.1 and 0.01 M in 0.1 microliters saline) unilaterally into the MPO evoked a transient suppression of the efferent discharge rate of the splenic nerve activity within 1 min, which was also accompanied by a decrease in blood pressure. The injection of saline (0.1 microliter) into the MPO had no effect. The microinjection of recombinant human interferon-alpha (200 and 2000 U in 0.1 microliter saline) into the MPO dose dependently increased the splenic nerve activity without any change in blood pressure. 4. In contrast, microinjection of interferon-alpha into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) had no effect on splenic nerve activity, although an injection of glutamate increased the nerve

  7. Functional impairment of natural killer cells in active ulcerative colitis: reversion of the defective natural killer activity by interleukin 2.

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, L; Alvarez-Mon, M; Abreu, L; Antonio Vargas, J; de la Morena, E; Corugedo, F; Duràntez, A

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the functional characteristics and clinical importance of the natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) from patients with ulcerative colitis. Normal NK activity was observed in PBMNC from patients with inactive disease, but a pronounced decrease was found in those with active disease. Clinical change from active to inactive disease was associated with enhancement of the depressed NK activity. The impairment of NK cytotoxicity found in patients with active disese could not be ascribed to a deficient number of NK cells as the amounts of HNK-1+, CD16+ (Leu 11), and CD11b (OKM1) cells in PBMNC were within normal ranges. This defective cytotoxic PBMNC activity was normalised by short term (18 hour) incubation with recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2). Moreover, long term (5 day) incubation of these effector cells with rIL-2 induced strong cytotoxic activity against NK resistant and NK sensitive target cells in patients with active and inactive disease. We also found that both precursors and effectors of cytotoxic activity promoted by short term and long term incubation with rIL-2 of PBMNC from the patients showed the phenotype of NK cells (CD16+, CD3-). Taken together, these results show that active ulcerative colitis is associated with a defective function of NK cells that is found to be normal in the inactive stage of the disease. The possible pathogenic and therapeutic implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:1541421

  8. The anti-tumour efficacy of human recombinant interleukin 2. Correlation between sensitivity of tumours to the cytolytic effect of LAK cells in vitro and their susceptibility to interleukin 2 immunotherapy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bubeník, J; Indrová, M

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were designed to test what percentage of experimental MC-induced murine sarcomas were sensitive to the local tumour inhibitory effect of IL-2 and whether any correlation existed between the sensitivity of these sarcomas to the immunotherapeutic effect of IL-2 and their susceptibility to the cytolytic effect of IL-2-activated killer cells. It was found that the sensitivity of MC-induced sarcomas to local IL-2 immunotherapy was a general phenomenon. Repeated peri-tumoural injections of RIL-2 inhibited the growth of five (MC11, MC13, MC14, MC15, MC16) out of six sarcomas in syngeneic mice. The sixth murine sarcoma (MC12) was found to be resistant to the tumour inhibitory effect of IL-2. Similarly, five (MC11, MC13, MC14, MC15, MC16) out of six murine sarcoma cell lines were sensitive to the cytolytic effect of IL-2-activated syngeneic killer spleen cells when examined in vitro, whereas the sixth (MC12) sarcoma cell line was resistant. These results suggest that LAK cells represent the effector cell mechanism responsible for the anti-tumour efficacy of local IL-2 immunotherapy and that in vitro testing of sensitivity to the LAK cell-mediated cytolysis may be used to detect tumours responding to IL-2 immunotherapy in vivo. PMID:3496154

  9. Utilizing Chimeric Antigen Receptors to Direct Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hermanson, David L.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells represent an attractive lymphocyte population for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to lyse tumor targets without prior sensitization and without need for human leukocyte antigens-matching. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are able to enhance lymphocyte targeting and activation toward diverse malignancies. CARs consist of an external recognition domain (typically a small chain variable fragment) directed at a specific tumor antigen that is linked with one or more intracellular signaling domains that mediate lymphocyte activation. Most CAR studies have focused on their expression in T cells. However, use of CARs in NK cells is starting to gain traction because they provide a method to redirect these cells more specifically to target refractory cancers. CAR-mediated anti-tumor activity has been demonstrated using NK cell lines, as well as NK cells isolated from peripheral blood, and NK cells produced from human pluripotent stem cells. This review will outline the CAR constructs that have been reported in NK cells with a focus on comparing the use of different signaling domains in combination with other co-activating domains. PMID:25972867

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Syndromes Affecting Human Natural Killer Cell Cytolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hyoungjun; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor-dependent fusion, promotes the release of the lytic granule contents into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process. PMID:24478771

  11. Influence of malignant cell clonogenic capacities and position along the maturation pathway on their susceptibility to lymphokine-activated killer cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, X; Anglaret, B; Adeleine, P; Maritaz, O; Bailly, M; Fiere, D; Archimbaud, E

    1998-01-01

    In order to investigate the sensitivity of malignant target cells to lysis by LAK cells according to their clonogenic capacities and their position along the maturation pathway, we compared clonogenic and chromium release cytotoxicity assays performed on human hematopoietic cell lines using Effector: Target ratios of 1:1, 3:1, 6:1, 12:1, 24:1, 48:1 and 96:1, and studied the sensitivity of HL-60 and U937 human cell lines after exposure to different factors including GM-CSF, SCF, IFN, Retinoic acid (RA), DMSO, and TPA which are able to recruit cells into the cell cycle or to induce cell differentiation. There was a good correlation between the lysis of the target cells using 51Cr release and the growth inhibition in semisolid medium. The degree of inhibition was significantly higher using the colony growth assay (p = 0.006). Regarding the effects of culturing cell lines with proliferating and differentiating agents on the sensitivity of these cell lines to LAK cytolysis, a correlation was noted between the proliferative response of the U937 cell line and susceptibility to LAK cell lysis (p = 0.01), while results appeared close to significance with HL-60. The most significant effects were a decreased sensitivity of HL-60 to LAK lysis with RA (p < 0.001) and TPA (p < 0.001), and an increased susceptibility of U937 to LAK lysis with GM-CSF (p < 0.0001). In studies planned to investigate whether susceptibility of treated cells to LAK activity was a consequence of a downregulation of adhesion molecules expressed on target cell surface, the proportion of cells expressing adhesion molecules was not significantly changed, except for CD54 expression on HL-60 cells which showed a higher expression, after cells were treated with RA or DMSO. We conclude that clonogenic cells are more sensitive to LAK cell lysis and that cell line sensitivity to LAK cytolysis can be modulated by a variety of agents of potential therapeutic use. The poor correlation between adhesion molecules

  12. Positioning Effects of KillerRed inside of Cells correlate with DNA Strand Breaks after Activation with Visible Light

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck, Waldemar; Mueller, Gabriele; Wiessler, Manfred; Tóth, Katalin; Braun, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are established tools for new applications, not-restricted to the cell biological research. They could also be ideal in surgery enhancing the precision to differentiate between the target tissue and the surrounding healthy tissue. FPs like the KillerRed (KRED), used here, can be activated by excitation with visible day-light for emitting active electrons which produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in photokilling processes. It is a given that the extent of the KRED's cell toxicity depends on its subcellular localization. Evidences are documented that the nuclear lamina as well as especially the chromatin are critical targets for KRED-mediated ROS-based DNA damaging. Here we investigated the damaging effects of the KRED protein fused to the nuclear lamina and to the histone H2A DNA-binding protein. We detected a frequency of DNA strand breaks, dependent first on the illumination time, and second on the spatial distance between the localization at the chromatin and the site of ROS production. As a consequence we could identify defined DNA bands with 200, 400 and (600) bps as most prominent degradation products, presumably representing an internucleosomal DNA cleavage induced by KRED. These findings are not restricted to the detection of programmed cell death processes in the therapeutic field like PDT, but they can also contribute to a better understanding of the structure-function relations in the epigenomic world. PMID:21278894

  13. Influence of natural and recombinant interferons on development of antiviral condition and activity of natural killers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.P.; Avdeev, G.I.; Vyadro, M.M.; Leikin, Yu.D.; Frolova, I.S.

    1986-03-01

    For the purpose of a preliminary estimate of the therapeutic potential of domestic recombinant alpha/sub 2/-component of human leukocytic interferon (rl) in vitro tests, the authors studied its ability to induce development of antiviral condition in diploid culture of human embryo fibroblasts and to activate the cytolytic effect of natural killers in relation to tumor cells, of the K-562 leukemia line and cells of lung adenocarcinoma. The authors used a medicinal form of rL which was derived by expression of a reconstructed gene in Escherichia coli cells. Part of the tests were conducted with an analogous preparation synthesized using another producer, Pseudomonas sp). The biological effect of both preparations was the same. For comparison, a natural preparation was used in all tests: human leukocytic interferon for injection, II(le). The authors studied activity of natural killers in a fraction of mononuclears isolated from blood of essentially healthy donors and from cancer patients. Cells were incubated for 2 h with various concentrations of interferons, then combined in a ratio of 25-50:1 with target cells labeled with /sup 51/Cr. Cytotoxic reaction was conducted for 4 (4-CTR) or 18 h (18-CTR) at 37/sup 0/C. Natural killers could thus be divided into two subpopulations: killer (4-CTR) and cytotoxic (18-CTR) cells. In preliminary tests, both preparations possessed the ability to active natural killers. The effective concentration for rL was within the limits of 1000-2000 IU/ml, and 50-200 Iu/ml for Le. The data on activation of natural killers in 16 oncological patients (primarily with lung cancer), the authors established that both rL and Le induced activation of natural killers in the overwhelming majority of cases in relation to K-562 target cells and adenocarcinomas of the lung.

  14. Effect of Spaceflight on the Functions of NK and LAK Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Spaceflight-associated stress alters some aspects of the human immune response. In this study, we determined the effects of 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle on the cytotoxic activity of NK and LAK cells. The subjects of this study were crewmembers of two 10-day shuttle flights. Ten-ml blood specimens were obtained from ten astronauts 10 days before launch, immediately after landing, and 3 days after landing. PBMCs were separated from the blood specimens and stored at -800 C. All PBMCs were thawed simultaneously, and the cytotoxic activities of NK and LAK cells were measured by a 4-hour Cr-51 release assay. K562 cells were used to assess NK-cell cytotoxicity. After 4 days of IL-2 activation, the LAK cell cytotoxic activity was determined using K562 and Daudi cells as the target cells. NK-cell cytotoxicity was decreased at landing (p less than 0.0005) in 9/10 astronauts, and in most cases recovered to preflight levels by 3 days after landing; NK-cell cytotoxicity was increased in one astronaut at landing. LAK cytotoxic activity against K562 cells was decreased at landing in 6/10 astronauts (p=0.018), and activity against Daudi cells was decreased in 7/10 astronauts (p=0.01). Phenotyping of PBMCs and LAK cells showed alterations in some surface markers and adhesion molecules (CD1 1 b, CD1 1 c, CD1 1 a, CD1 6, L-Selectin and CD3). Thus spaceflight leads to a decrease in the functions of NK and LAK cells in most astronauts.

  15. Design and operation specifications of an active monitoring system for detecting southern resident killer whales

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Weiland, Mark A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Myers, Joshua R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Before final approval is given to the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 for deploying the first tidal power devices in the United States in an open water environment, a system to manage the potential risk of injury to killer whales due to collision with moving turbine blades must be demonstrated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with establishing the performance requirements for, constructing, and testing a prototype marine animal alert system for triggering temporary turbine shutdown when there is risk of collision with a killer whale. To develop a system that relies on active sonar two critical areas must be investigated - the target strength of killer whales and the frequency content of commercially available active sonar units. PNNL studied three target strength models: a simple model, the Fourier matching model, and the Kirchoff-ray mode model. Using target strength measurements of bottlenose dolphins obtained by previous researchers and assuming killer whales share similar morphology and structure, PNNL extrapolated the target strength of an adult killer whale 7.5 m in length at a frequency of 67 kHz. To study the frequency content of a commercially available sonar unit, direct measurements of the signal transmitted by the sonar were obtained by using a hydrophone connected to a data acquisition system in both laboratory and field conditions. The measurements revealed that in addition to the primary frequency of 200 kHz, there is a secondary frequency component at 90 kHz, which is within the hearing range of killer whales. The amplitude of the 90-kHz frequency component is above the hearing threshold of killer whales but below the threshold for potential injuries.

  16. Effect of spaceflight on natural killer cell activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rykova, Marina P.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Lesniak, A. T.; Taylor, Gerald R.; Meshkov, Dimitrii O.; Mandel, Adrian D.; Medvedev, Andrei E.; Berry, Wallace D.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Konstantinova, Irina V.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on immune cell function were determined in rats flown on Cosmos 2044. Control groups included vivarium, synchronous, and antiorthostatically suspended rats. The ability of natural killer cells to lyse two different target cell lines was determined. Spleen and bone marrow cells obtained from flight rats showed significantly inhibited cytotoxicity for YAC-1 target cells compared with cells from synchronous control rats. This could have been due to exposure of the rats to microgravity. Antiorthostatic suspension did not affect the level of cytotoxicity from spleen cells of suspended rats for YAC-1 cells. On the other hand, cells from rats flown in space showed no significant differences from vivarium and synchronous control rats in cytotoxicity for K-562 target cells. Binding of natural killer cells to K-562 target cells was unaffected by spaceflight. Antiorthostatic suspension resulted in higher levels of cytotoxicity from spleen cells for Cr-51-labeled K-562 cells. The results indicate differential effects of spaceflight on function of natural killer cells. This shows that spaceflight has selective effects on the immune response.

  17. IN VITRO AUGMENTATION OF NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY BY MANGANESE CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The in vitro cultivation of murine spleen cells with MnCl2 resulted in the enhancement of natural killer (NK) cell activity as measured in a 4-h (51)Cr-release assay. Optimal enhancement of NK activity was observed at concentrations of 10-20 micrograms MnCl2 culture (72-144 micro...

  18. INHIBITION OF HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY FOLLOWING IN VITRO EXPOSURE TO OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we have examined the effect of in vitro ozone exposure on human peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cell activity measured against K562 tumor cells. he data showed that NK activity was nhibited in a time dependent manner with marked suppression observed after 6 hou...

  19. IMMUNOLOGIC EFFECTS OF NICKEL: 2. SUPPRESSION OF NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of nickel chloride (18.3 mg/kg) caused a significant reduction in murine splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity. This reduction in NK activity was not associated with a significant reduction in spleen cellularity nor in the production of suppre...

  20. Induction of LAK-like cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice by inactivated Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Scaringi, L; Cornacchione, P; Rosati, E; Boccanera, M; Cassone, A; Bistoni, F; Marconi, P

    1990-09-01

    of antitumor cytotoxic activity induced by fungal cells was due to lymphokine-activated killer (LAK)-like effectors. PMID:2166624

  1. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells. PMID:24979331

  2. ENHANCEMENT OF NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY AND INTERFERON PRODUCTION BY MANGANESE IN YOUNG MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect that MnCl2 has on murine splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity was investigated in infant (10 days old), pre-weanling (18 days old) and weanling (24 days old) C57BL/6J mice. Both MnCl2 and Poly I:C caused elevations in serum interferon levels. Time-course studies r...

  3. Neoadjuvant immunotherapy enhances radiosensitivity through natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chau-Hwa; Wang, Yu-Shan; Yang, Chieh-Han; Chi, Kwan-Hwa

    2010-02-01

    We investigated whether natural killer (NK) cells in the tumor microenvironment have a radiosensitization effect. The radiosensitization effect of combined CpG and Herceptin((R)) (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA) (CpG/Herceptin), given before or after radiation, was evaluated by using a murine colon cancer cell line overexpressing human HER2/neu, CT26HER2/neu. In vitro radiosensitization effects were investigated by coculture of CT26HER2/neu with splenocytes, CpG, and Herceptin before applying radiation. Tumor cells, cocultured with CpG-pretreated splenocytes and Herceptin, were more vulnerable to radiation damage. In BALB/c mice injected with CT26HER2/neu, CpG/Herceptin administered before radiotherapy was associated with a better retardation of tumor growth than when administered after radiotherapy. The radiosensitization effect was significantly abrogated by NK-cell depletion, indicating that NK cells play an essential role in it. Further, surviving mice treated with CpG or CpG/Herceptin and reverse transcriptase were resistant to renewed tumor challenge, suggesting the presence of an induced immune response to the tumor. Neoadjuvant immunotherapy with CpG/Herceptin may improve response to radiotherapy of HER2/neu-expressing tumors. PMID:20187795

  4. MULT1E/mIL-12: a novel bifunctional protein for natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tietje, A; Li, J; Yu, X; Wei, Y

    2014-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to be effective killers of tumor cells. They are governed by inhibitory and activating receptors like NKG2D, whose ligands are normally upregulated in cells that are stressed, like cancer cells. Advanced cancer cells, however, have ways to reduce these ligands' expression, leaving them less detectable by NK cells. Along with these receptors, NK cells also require activating cytokines, like interleukin 12 (IL-12). The goal of this study is to develop a novel bi-functional fusion protein for enhanced NK cell activation. The proposed protein combines the extracellular domain of the NKG2D ligand Mouse UL-16-binding protein-like transcript 1 (MULT1E) and mouse IL-12 (mIL-12). It is hypothesized that when expressed by tumor cells, the protein will activate NK and other killer cells using the NKG2D receptor, and deliver mIL-12 to the NK cells where it can interact with the IL-12R and enhance cytotoxicity. The fusion protein, when expressed by engineered tumor cells, indeed activated NK cells in vitro as assayed by increased production of interferon-γ and cytotoxicity and significantly reduced tumor growth in vivo. Although the study is preliminary, the data suggest that the MULT1E/mIL-12 bi-functional fusion protein is an effective activator of NK cells for cancer treatment. PMID:24572784

  5. Phenotypic analysis of nylon-wool-adherent suppressor cells that inhibit the effector process of tumour cell lysis by lymphokine-activated killer cells in patients with advanced gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koyama, S; Fukao, K

    1994-01-01

    The causes of down-regulation of cytotoxic immune responses in cancer patients have not been fully evaluated. We previously demonstrated that T-cell-growth-factor-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) with the surface phenotype CD8+ CD11b-, from patients with widespread metastasis of gastric carcinoma, inhibited the effector process of lymphokine-activated-killer(LAK)-cell-mediated cytolysis. In this study, we examined suppressor cell activity in freshly prepared PBL from 18 patients with advanced gastric carcinoma, and 10 normal healthy individuals. The suppressor cell activity was assayed by recording whether or not PBL inhibited directly the effector process of LAK cell cytotoxicity. Most of the PBL suspensions from cancer patients showed that they contained a population of cells that can directly inhibit the effector phase of tumor cell lysis of the cytotoxic cells. To analyze further the PBL responsible for the suppression, the cells were passed over a nylon-wool column. Nylon-wool-adherent cells significantly augmented the suppression, while the cells passing through abrogated the suppressive effect. Most nylon-wool-adherent cells from 10 normal healthy controls did not inhibit the cytotoxic reaction. To determine further the suppressor-effector population in nylon-wool-adherent cells, negative-selection studies using CD8-, CD4- or CD11b-coated magnetic beads, and positive-selection studies using CD8- or CD4-coated magnetic beads were performed. Finally the results suggest that the suppressor-effector cells comprise at least two different surface phenotypes: CD8+ T and CD8-CD11b+ cells. The possible role of CD4+ T cells and HLA-DR+ LeuM3+ macrophages as suppressor cells was ruled out in nylon-wool-adherent cells. CD8+ T and possibly CD8-CD11b+ cells apparently suppressed the efferent limb of the antitumor immunity. The selective immune suppression mediated by these cells may partly be concerned with escape mechanisms of gastric carcinoma from the host

  6. Activation of natural killer cells and cytokine production in humans by bacterial extracts (OM-85 BV).

    PubMed

    Wybran, J; Libin, M; Schandene, L

    1990-01-01

    The influence of Broncho-Vaxom (BV) on different immune parameters was investigated in vitro on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). It was found that BV enhances the natural killer (NK) activity of PBMC and increases their spontaneous and phytohemagglutin (PHA)-induced production of tumor-necrosis factor--alpha and interleukin-2 as well as the PHA-stimulated production of interferon-gamma. These immunostimulating actions of BV on NK activity and cytokine production can contribute to the understanding of the enhancement of the body's defense mechanisms against respiratory tract infections. PMID:2117183

  7. Regulation of natural killer activity of lymphocytes from normal subjects and patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia by interaction between T and non-T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khonina, N.A.; Shubinskii, G.Z.; Lozovoi, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of culture of human cells on functional activity of natural killer cells and investigate the possible mechanisms of regulation of natural killer activity by acting on cytodifferentiation of lymphocytes in normal subjects and in patients with the B-cell variant of chromic lymphatic leukemia. To estimate natural killer cell function, a membranotoxic test was carried out, using cells of the transplantable line K-562, labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine as the targets.

  8. Cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer cells on U251 glioma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Wu, Tingting; Wan, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to observe the cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells on U251 glioma cells and to investigate their mechanism of action to establish an effective treatment strategy for neuroglioma. Cell survival curves, colony formation assays and karyotype analysis were performed to investigate the characteristics of U251 glioma cells. The present study demonstrated that natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D)‑major histocompatibility complex class I‑related chain A/B (MICA/B) interactions contributed to the cytotoxic effect of NK cells on K562 and U251 cells. In antibody‑blocking assays to inhibit NKG2D ligands, the cytotoxic activity was not completely attenuated, which suggested that other signaling pathways contribute to the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on tumor cells in addition to the NKG2D‑mediated activity. The present study identified that the expression levels of NKG2D ligands on the surface of target cells influenced the strength of the NK cell immune response. Furthermore, allogeneic NK cells were observed to kill glioma cells in vitro, and this anticancer activity is associated with the rate of NKG2D expression on the surface of glioma cells. PMID:27175912

  9. Activation of natural killer cells and cytokine production in man by bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Wybran, J; Libin, M; Schandene, L

    1989-01-01

    Broncho-Vaxon (OM-85 BV) is a bacterial extract of eight bacterias usually involved in the respiratory tract infections. Since Broncho-Vaxom is clinically active in decreasing the incidence of such infections, its immunological effect was investigated, in vitro, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The experimental data indicate that Broncho-Vaxom can modulate various immune functions. It was shown, using a radioimmunoassay for these cytokines, that Broncho-Vaxom will spontaneously enhance TNF alpha and IL-2 production whereas it has no action on IF gamma production. However, when the PBMC are stimulated with PHA, an increased production for IF gamma, TNF alpha and IL-2 was observed suggesting that, under appropriate conditions, Broncho-Vaxom enhances the production of these cytokines. In other experiments, Broncho-Vaxom was shown to markedly increase the natural killer activity of PBMC. All these results demonstrate that Broncho-Vaxom is an immunomodulator affecting multiple immunological mechanisms including the activation of natural killer cells, of monocytes and of T cells through direct mechanisms or through the cytokine cascade. PMID:2503554

  10. The neurological significance of abnormal natural killer cell activity in chronic toxigenic mold exposures.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, Ebere; Campbell, Andrew W; Jones, Joseph; Ehiri, John E; Akpan, Akpan I

    2003-11-13

    Toxigenic mold activities produce metabolites that are either broad-spectrum antibiotics or mycotoxins that are cytotoxic. Indoor environmental exposure to these toxigenic molds leads to adverse health conditions with the main outcome measure of frequent neuroimmunologic and behavioral consequences. One of the immune system disorders found in patients presenting with toxigenic mold exposure is an abnormal natural killer cell activity. This paper presents an overview of the neurological significance of abnormal natural killer cell (NKC) activity in chronic toxigenic mold exposure. A comprehensive review of the literature was carried out to evaluate and assess the conditions under which the immune system could be dysfunctionally interfered with leading to abnormal NKC activity and the involvement of mycotoxins in these processes. The functions, mechanism, the factors that influence NKC activities, and the roles of mycotoxins in NKCs were cited wherever necessary. The major presentations are headache, general debilitating pains, nose bleeding, fevers with body temperatures up to 40 degrees C (104 degrees F), cough, memory loss, depression, mood swings, sleep disturbances, anxiety, chronic fatigue, vertigo/dizziness, and in some cases, seizures. Although sleep is commonly considered a restorative process that is important for the proper functioning of the immune system, it could be disturbed by mycotoxins. Most likely, mycotoxins exert some rigorous effects on the circadian rhythmic processes resulting in sleep deprivation to which an acute and transient increase in NKC activity is observed. Depression, psychological stress, tissue injuries, malignancies, carcinogenesis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis could be induced at very low physiological concentrations by mycotoxin-induced NKC activity. In the light of this review, it is concluded that chronic exposures to toxigenic mold could lead to abnormal NKC activity with a wide range

  11. Differential loss of natural killer cell activity in patients with acute myocardial infarction and stable angina pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenwen; Zhou, Lin; Wen, Siwan; Duan, Qianglin; Huang, Feifei; Tang, Yu; Liu, Xiaohong; Chai, Yongyan; Wang, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the activity of natural killer cells through their inhibitory and activating receptors and quantity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells extracted from patients with acute myocardial infarction, stable angina pectoris and the controls. Methods: 100 patients with myocardial infarction, 100 with stable angina, and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited into the study. 20 randomly chosen people per group were examined for the whole human genome microarray analysis to detect the gene expressions of all 40 inhibitory and activating natural killer cell receptors. Flow cytometry analysis was applied to all 200 patients to measure the quantity of natural killer cells. Results: In myocardial infarction group, the mRNA expressions of six inhibitory receptors KIR2DL2, KIR3DL3, CD94, NKG2A, KLRB1, KLRG1, and eight activating receptors KIR2DS3, KIR2DS5, NKp30, NTB-A, CRACC, CD2, CD7 and CD96 were significantly down-regulated (P<0.05) compared with both angina patients and the controls. There was no statistical difference in receptor expressions between angina patients and control group. The quantity of natural killer cells was significantly decreased in both infarction and angina patients compared with normal range (P<0.001). Conclusions: The significant mRNAs down-regulation of several receptors in myocardial infarction group and reduction in the quantity of natural killer cells in both myocardial infarction and angina patients showed a quantitative loss and dysfunction of natural killer cells in myocardial infarction patients. PMID:26823790

  12. Elevated levels of invariant natural killer T-cell and natural killer cell activation correlate with disease progression in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, Susanna M.; Malone, David F.G.; Buggert, Marcus; Karlsson, Annika C.; Isberg, Per-Erik; Biague, Antonio J.; Norrgren, Hans; Medstrand, Patrik; Moll, Markus; Sandberg, Johan K.; Jansson, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency and activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and natural killer (NK) cells among HIV-1, HIV-2, or dually HIV-1/HIV-2 (HIV-D)-infected individuals, in relation to markers of disease progression. Design: Whole blood samples were collected from treatment-naive HIV-1 (n = 23), HIV-2 (n = 34), and HIV-D (n = 11) infected individuals, as well as HIV-seronegative controls (n = 25), belonging to an occupational cohort in Guinea-Bissau. Methods: Frequencies and activation levels of iNKT and NK cell subsets were analysed using multicolour flow cytometry, and results were related to HIV-status, CD4+ T-cell levels, viral load, and T-cell activation. Results: HIV-1, HIV-D, and viremic HIV-2 individuals had lower numbers of CD4+ iNKT cells in circulation compared with seronegative controls. Numbers of CD56bright NK cells were also reduced in HIV-infected individuals as compared with control study participants. Notably, iNKT cell and NK cell activation levels, assessed by CD38 expression, were increased in HIV-1 and HIV-2 single, as well as dual, infections. HIV-2 viremia was associated with elevated activation levels in CD4+ iNKT cells, CD56bright, and CD56dim NK cells, as compared with aviremic HIV-2 infection. Additionally, disease markers such as CD4+ T-cell percentages, viral load, and CD4+ T-cell activation were associated with CD38 expression levels of both iNKT and NK cells, which activation levels also correlated with each other. Conclusion: Our data indicate that elevated levels of iNKT-cell and NK-cell activation are associated with viremia and disease progression markers in both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. PMID:27163705

  13. Nitrogen availability of grape juice limits killer yeast growth and fermentation activity during mixed-culture fermentation with sensitive commercial yeast strains.

    PubMed Central

    Medina, K; Carrau, F M; Gioia, O; Bracesco, N

    1997-01-01

    The competition between selected or commercial killer strains of type K2 and sensitive commercial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied under various conditions in sterile grape juice fermentations. The focus of this study was the effect of yeast inoculation levels and the role of assimilable nitrogen nutrition on killer activity. A study of the consumption of free amino nitrogen (FAN) by pure and mixed cultures of killer and sensitive cells showed no differences between the profiles of nitrogen assimilation in all cases, and FAN was practically depleted in the first 2 days of fermentation. The effect of the addition of assimilable nitrogen and the size of inoculum was examined in mixed killer and sensitive strain competitions. Stuck and sluggish wine fermentations were observed to depend on nitrogen availability when the ratio of killer to sensitive cells was low (1:10 to 1:100). A relationship between the initial assimilable nitrogen content of must and the proportion of killer cells during fermentation was shown. An indirect relationship was found between inoculum size and the percentage of killer cells: a smaller inoculum resulted in a higher proportion of killer cells in grape juice fermentations. In all cases, wines obtained with pure-culture fermentations were preferred to mixed-culture fermentations by sensory analysis. The reasons why killer cells do not finish fermentation under competitive conditions with sensitive cells are discussed. PMID:9212430

  14. A shed NKG2D ligand that promotes natural killer cell activation and tumor rejection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Weiwen; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Zhang, Li; Wang, Lin; Lau, Stephanie; Iannello, Alexandre; Xu, Jianfeng; Rovis, Tihana L.; Xiong, Na; Raulet, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, recognize transformed cells and eliminate them in a process termed immunosurveillance. It is thought that tumor cells evade immunosurveillance by shedding membrane ligands that bind to the NKG2D activating receptor on NK cells and/or T cells, and desensitize these cells. In contrast, we show that in mice, shedding of MULT1, a high affinity NKG2D ligand, causes NK cell activation and tumor rejection. Recombinant soluble MULT1 stimulated tumor rejection in mice. Soluble MULT1 functions, at least in part, by competitively reversing a global desensitization of NK cells imposed by engagement of membrane NKG2D ligands on tumor-associated cells, such as myeloid cells. The results overturn conventional wisdom that soluble ligands are inhibitory, and suggest a new approach for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25745066

  15. Long-term changes in natural killer activity after external pelvic radiotherapy. [X ray

    SciTech Connect

    Onsrud, M.; Thorsby, E.

    1981-05-01

    Peripheral lymphocytes from 24 Stage I endometrial cancer patients treated 3 to 5 years earlier were tested for their natural killer (NK) cell activity against K562 cell line targets and for surface markers. The patients were free of recurrence at the time of investigation. They belonged to a clinical trial where group A (control) received surgery only and group B also received 4000 rad external pelvic field irradiation post surgery. Lymphocyte suspensions from group B patients showed, on a per cell basis, a higher NK activity and a higher percentage of cells bearing receptors for the Fc part of immunoglobulin G than did group A lymphocytes. Expressed per volume unit of blood, however, these differences were insignificant. A depletion of T lymphocytes from the peripheral circulation was seen 3 to 5 years after radiotherapy. On a per cell basis, however, the T cell functional capacity, as estimated from the mitogenic (PHA) response, seemed unaffected.

  16. EFFECTS OF MANGANESE, CALCIUM, MAGNESIUM, AND ZINC ON NICKEL-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF MURINE NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects that divalent metals have on nickel-induced suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity were studied in mice. Male CBA/J mice were given a single intramuscular injection of nickel chloride (4.5-36 micrograms NiCl2/g), manganese chloride (20-80 micrograms MnCl2/g)...

  17. Glucocorticoid cell reception in mice of different strains with natural killer cell activity depressed during immobilization stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lyashko, V.N.; Sukhikh, G.T.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study differences in stress-induced depression of natural killer cell activity in mice of different inbred lines, depending on parameters of glucocorticoid binding with glucorticoid receptors of spleen cells and on the hormonal status of the animals. In determining the parameters of glucocorticoid binding on intact splenocytes, aliquots of a suspension of washed splenocytes were incubated with tritium-labeled dexamethasone.

  18. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, two alternative mechanisms for PMKT2 killer activity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Antonio; Alonso, Alejandro; Belda, Ignacio; Marquina, Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Pichia membranifaciens CYC 1086 secretes a unique 30kDa killer toxin (PMKT2) that inhibits a variety of spoilage yeasts and fungi of agronomical interest. The cytocidal effect of PMKT2 on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells was studied. Metabolic events associated with the loss of S. cerevisiae viability caused by PMKT2 were qualitatively identical to those reported for K28 killer toxin activity, but different to those reported for PMKT. At higher doses, none of the cellular events accounting for the action of PMKT, the killer toxin secreted by P. membranifaciens CYC 1106, was observed for PMKT2. Potassium leakage, sodium influx and the decrease of intracellular pH were not among the primary effects of PMKT2. We report here that this protein is unable to form ion-permeable channels in liposome membranes, suggesting that channel formation is not the mechanism of cytotoxic action of PMKT2. Nevertheless, flow cytometry studies have revealed a cell cycle arrest at an early S-phase with an immature bud and pre-replicated 1n DNA content. By testing the sensitivity of cells arrested at different stages in the cell cycle, we hoped to identify the execution point for lethality more precisely. Cells arrested at the G1-phase by α-factor or arrested at G2-phase by the spindle poison methyl benzimidazol-2-yl-carbamate (MBC) were protected against the toxin. Cells released from the arrest in both cases were killed by PMKT2 at a similar rate. Nevertheless, cells released from MBC-arrest were able to grow for a short time, and then viability dropped rapidly. These findings suggest that cells released from G2-phase are initially able to divide, but die in the presence of PMKT2 after initiating the S-phase in a new cycle, adopting a terminal phenotype within that cycle. By contrast, low doses of PMKT and PMKT2 were able to generate the same cellular response. The evidence presented here shows that treating yeast with low doses of PMKT2 leads to the typical membranous, cytoplasmic

  19. Natural Killer Cell Receptors and Cytotoxic Activity in Phosphomannomutase 2 Deficiency (PMM2-CDG)

    PubMed Central

    García-López, Roberto; de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Alsina, Laia; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén; Jaeken, Jaak; Serrano, Mercedes; Casado, Mercedes; Hernández-Caselles, Trinidad

    2016-01-01

    Background PMM2-CDG is the most common N-glycosylation defect and shows an increased risk of recurrent and/or severe, sometimes fatal, infections in early life. We hypothesized that natural killer (NK) cells, as important mediators of the immune response against microbial pathogens and regulators of adaptive immunity, might be affected in this genetic disorder. Objective To evaluate possible defects on PMM2-CDG NK peripheral blood cell number, killing activity and expression of membrane receptors. Methods We studied fresh and activated NK cells from twelve PMM2-CDG cells. The number and expression of lymphoid surface receptors were studied by flow cytometry. The NK responsiveness (frequency of degranulated NK cells) and killing activity against K562 target cells was determined in the NK cytotoxicity assay. Results We found an increase of blood NK cells in three patients with a severe phenotype. Two of them, who had suffered from moderate/severe viral infections during their first year of life, also had reduced T lymphocyte numbers. Patient activated NK cells showed increased expression of CD54 adhesion molecule and NKG2D and NKp46 activating receptors. NKp46 and 2B4 expression was inversely correlated with the expression of NKG2D in activated PMM2-CDG cells. Maximal NK activity against K562 target cells was similar in control and PMM2-CDG cells. Interestingly, the NK cell responsiveness was higher in patient cells. NKG2D and specially CD54 increased surface expression significantly correlated with the increased NK cell cytolytic activity according to the modulation of the killer activity by expression of triggering receptors and adhesion molecules. Conclusions Our results indicate that hypoglycosylation in PMM2-CDG altered NK cell reactivity against target cells and the expression of CD54 and NKG2D, NKp46 and 2B4 activating receptors during NK cell activation. This suggests a defective control of NK cell killing activity and the overall anti-viral immune response

  20. A species of human alpha interferon that lacks the ability to boost human natural killer activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ortaldo, J R; Herberman, R B; Harvey, C; Osheroff, P; Pan, Y C; Kelder, B; Pestka, S

    1984-01-01

    Most species of recombinant leukocyte interferons (IFN-alpha A, -alpha B, -alpha C, -alpha D, -alpha F, -alpha I, and -alpha K) were capable of boosting human natural killer (NK) activity after a 2-hr treatment of cells at a concentration of 1-80 units/ml. In contrast, recombinant human IFN-alpha J was found to be incapable of augmenting NK activity after exposure of cells for 2 hr to concentrations as high as 10,000 units/ml. This inability of IFN-alpha J to boost NK activity was not complete because, after exposure of cells to a high concentration of IFN-alpha J (10,000 units/ml) for 18 hr, boosting of cytolysis was observed. IFN-alpha J appeared to interact with receptors for IFN on NK cells since it was found to interfere with the boosting of NK activity by other species of IFN-alpha. In contrast to its deficient ability to augment NK activity, IFN-alpha J has potent antiviral and antiproliferative activities. Such extensive dissociation of these biological activities has not been observed previously with any other natural or recombinant IFN species. Thus, this IFN species may be useful for evaluating the relative importance of various biological activities on the therapeutic effects of IFN, for understanding structure-function relationships, and for determining the biochemical pathways related to the various biological effects of IFN. PMID:6589637

  1. What Lies Beneath: Antibody Dependent Natural Killer Cell Activation by Antibodies to Internal Influenza Virus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Vanderven, Hillary A; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Rockman, Steven; Laurie, Karen; Barr, Ian; Chen, Weisan; Wines, Bruce; Hogarth, P Mark; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C; Parsons, Matthew S; Kent, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    The conserved internal influenza proteins nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 1 (M1) are well characterised for T cell immunity, but whether they also elicit functional antibodies capable of activating natural killer (NK) cells has not been explored. We studied NP and M1-specific ADCC activity using biochemical, NK cell activation and killing assays with plasma from healthy and influenza-infected subjects. Healthy adults had antibodies to M1 and NP capable of binding dimeric FcγRIIIa and activating NK cells. Natural symptomatic and experimental influenza infections resulted in a rise in antibody dependent NK cell activation post-infection to the hemagglutinin of the infecting strain, but changes in NK cell activation to M1 and NP were variable. Although antibody dependent killing of target cells infected with vaccinia viruses expressing internal influenza proteins was not detected, opsonising antibodies to NP and M1 likely contribute to an antiviral microenvironment by stimulating innate immune cells to secrete cytokines early in infection. We conclude that effector cell activating antibodies to conserved internal influenza proteins are common in healthy and influenza-infected adults. Given the significance of such antibodies in animal models of heterologous influenza infection, the definition of their importance and mechanism of action in human immunity to influenza is essential. PMID:27428437

  2. Selective effects of Lactobacillus casei Shirota on T cell activation, natural killer cell activity and cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Dong, H; Rowland, I; Tuohy, K M; Thomas, L V; Yaqoob, P

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of host immunity is an important potential mechanism by which probiotics confer health benefits. This study was designed to investigate the effects of a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS), on immune function using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro. In addition, the role of monocytes in LcS-induced immunity was also explored. LcS promoted natural killer (NK) cell activity and preferentially induced expression of CD69 and CD25 on CD8+ and CD56+ subsets in the absence of any other stimulus. LcS also induced production of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-12 and IL-10 in the absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the presence of LPS, LcS enhanced IL-1β production but inhibited LPS-induced IL-10 and IL-6 production, and had no further effect on TNF-α and IL-12 production. Monocyte depletion reduced significantly the impact of LcS on lymphocyte activation, cytokine production and natural killer (NK) cell activity. In conclusion, LcS activated cytotoxic lymphocytes preferentially in both the innate and specific immune systems, which suggests that LcS could potentiate the destruction of infected cells in the body. LcS also induced both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production in the absence of LPS, but in some cases inhibited LPS-induced cytokine production. Monocytes play an important role in LcS-induced immunological responses. PMID:20456417

  3. Identification of a novel gene expressed in activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, C.A.; Schall, R.P.; He, H.; Cairns, J.S. )

    1992-01-15

    The authors have isolated a cDNA clone from a human activated NK cell-derived cDNA library that identifies a transcript [NK4] that is selectively expressed in lymphocytes. The expression of this transcript is increased after activation of T cells by mitogens or activation of NK cells by IL-2 (lymphokine-activated killer cells). The transcript levels demonstrated by Northern blot analysis increase by 12 h after activation, remain high for at least 48 h, and require protein synthesis for expression. Southern blot analysis of B lymphoblastoid lines derived from 18 unrelated individuals reveal variable banding patterns suggestive of polymorphism within the NK4 gene. No homology was found between the sequence of the coding region of this transcript and any sequences in the GenBank data base. Sequence homology to the U1 small nuclear RNA was found within the 3[prime] untranslated region immediately upstream of the site of polyadenylation, suggesting a possible role for U1 in the polyadenylation process. Sequence analysis indicates the transcript would encode a protein having a mass of 27 kDa. The presence of a signal sequence and lack of a transmembrane region suggests that the protein is secreted. In addition, the protein contains an RGD sequence that may be involved in cellular adhesion. This transcript appears to encode a novel product common to the activation pathways of both NK cells and T cells. 50 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Interferon-γ-Mediated Natural Killer Cell Activation by an Aqueous Panax ginseng Extract

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Panax ginseng extracts are used in traditional herbal medicines, particularly in eastern Asia, but their effect on natural killer (NK) cell activity is not completely understood. This study aimed to examine the effects of P. ginseng extracts on the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. We orally administered P. ginseng extracts or ginsenosides to wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 (B6) and BALB/c mice and to B6 mice deficient in either recombination activating gene 2 (RAG-2) or interferon-γ (IFN-γ). We then tested the cytotoxic activity of NK cells (of spleen and liver mononuclear cells) against NK-sensitive YAC-1 cells. Oral administration of P. ginseng aqueous extract augmented the cytotoxicity of NK cells in WT B6 and BALB/c mice and in RAG-2-deficient B6 mice, but not in IFN-γ-deficient B6 mice. This effect was only observed with the aqueous extract of P. ginseng. Interestingly, the ginsenosides Rb1 and Rg1 did not augment NK cell cytotoxicity. These results demonstrated that the aqueous P. ginseng extract augmented NK cell activation in vivo via an IFN-γ-dependent pathway. PMID:26649061

  5. Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide Induced Proliferation and Activation of Natural Killer Cells in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Li; Jin, Jun-O

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promoted different innate immune activation than that promoted by Escherichia coli (E. coli) LPS. In this study, we examined the effect of P. gingivalis LPS on the proliferation and activation of natural killer (NK) cells in vivo and compared that function with that of E. coli LPS. Administration of P. gingivalis LPS to C57BL/6 mice induced stronger proliferation of NK cells in the spleen and submandibular lymph nodes (sLNs) and increased the number of circulating NK cells in blood compared to those treated with E. coli LPS. However, P. gingivalis LPS did not induce interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production and CD69 expression in the spleen and sLN NK cells in vivo, and this was attributed to the minimal activation of the spleen and sLN dendritic cells (DCs), including low levels of co-stimulatory molecule expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, P. gingivalis LPS-treated NK cells showed less cytotoxic activity against Yac-1 target cells than E. coli LPS-treated NK cells. Hence, these data demonstrated that P. gingivalis LPS promoted limited activation of spleen and sLN NK cells in vivo, and this may play a role in the chronic inflammatory state observed in periodontal disease. PMID:27548133

  6. All-trans retinoic acid negatively regulates cytotoxic activities of nature killer cell line 92

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ang . E-mail: liang3829@sina.com.cn; He Meilan; Wang Hui; Qiao Bin; Chen Ping; Gu Hua; Zhang Mengjie; He Shengxiang

    2007-01-05

    NK cells are key components of innate immune systems and their activities are regulated by cytokines and hormones. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), as a metabolite of vitamin A and an immunomodulatory hormone, plays an important role in regulating immune responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ATRA on human NK cell line NK92. We found that ATRA dose-dependently suppressed cytotoxic activities of NK92 cells without affecting their proliferation. To explore the mechanisms underlying the ATRA influence on NK92 cells, we examined the production of cytokines (TNF-{alpha}, IFN-{gamma}), gene expression of cytotoxic-associated molecules (perforin, granzyme B, nature killer receptors (NCRs), and NKG2D), and the activation of NF-{kappa}B pathways related with immune response. Our results demonstrated that ATRA suppressed NF-{kappa}B activity and prevented I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation in a dose-dependent way, inhibited IFN-{gamma} production and gene expression of granzyme B and NKp46. Our findings suggest that ATRA is a negative regulator of NK92 cell activation and may act as a potential regulator of anti-inflammatory functions in vivo.

  7. Biological Character of RetroNectin Activated Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising treatment for metastatic carcinomas. In this study, we investigated the impact of RetroNectin on the proliferation, phenotype alternation, cytokine secretion, and cytotoxic activity of CIK cells from pancreatic cancer patients. Furthermore, we treated 13 patients with metastatic or locally advanced pancreatic cancer using autologous RetroNectin-activated CIK cells (R-CIK cells) alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Compared with only CD3 activated CIK cells (OKT-CIK cells), R-CIK cells showed stronger and faster proliferative ability, with a lower ratio of spontaneous apoptosis. Moreover, this ability continued after IL-2 was withdrawn from the culture system. R-CIK cells could also secrete higher levels of IL-2 and lower levels of IL-4 and IL-5 versus OKT-CIK cells. There was no difference between OKT-CIK and R-CIK cells in cytotoxic ability against lymphoma cell line K562. In patients who received auto-R-CIK cell infusion therapy, the overall objective response rate was 23.1%. Median survival time (mOS) after first R-CIK cell infusion was 10.57 months; the 1-year survival rate was 38.5%. No serious toxicity was associated with R-CIK cell infusion. In conclusion, RetroNectin may enhance antitumor activity of CIK cells: it is safe for use in treating pancreatic cancer. PMID:27433478

  8. beta. -endorphin augments the cytolytic activity and interferon production of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mandler, R.N.; Biddison, W.E.; Mandler, R.; Serrate, S.A.

    1986-02-01

    The in vitro effects of the neurohormone ..beta..-endorphin (b-end) on natural killer (NK) activity and interferon (IFN) production mediated by large granular lymphocytes (LGL) were investigated. LGL-enriched fractions from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal human volunteers were obtained by fractionation over discontinuous Percoll gradients. LGL were preincubated with or without various concentrations of b-end or the closely related peptides ..cap alpha..-endorphin (a-end), ..gamma..-endorphin (g-end), or D-ALA/sub 2/-..beta..-endorphin (D-ALA/sub 2/-b-end), a synthetic b-end analogue. NK activity was assayed on /sup 51/Cr-labeled K562 target cells. Preincubation of LGL effectors (but not K562 targets) for 2 to 18 hr with concentrations of b-end between 10/sup -7/ M and 10/sup -10/ M produced significant augmentation of NK cytolytic activity (mean percentage increase: 63%). The classic opiate antagonist naloxone blocked the enhancing effect when used at a 100-fold molar excess relative to b-end. These findings demonstrate that b-end enhances NK activity and IFN production of purified LGL, and suggests that b-end might bind to an opioid receptor on LGL that can be blocked by naloxone. These results lend support to the concepts of regulation of the immune response by neurohormones and the functional relationship between the nervous and immune systems.

  9. Synthetic glycolipid activators of natural killer T cells as immunotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Carreño, Leandro J; Saavedra-Ávila, Noemí A; Porcelli, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Certain types of glycolipids have been found to have remarkable immunomodulatory properties as a result of their ability to activate specific T lymphocyte populations with an extremely wide range of immune effector properties. The most extensively studied glycolipid reactive T cells are known as invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. The antigen receptors of these cells specifically recognize certain glycolipids, most notably glycosphingolipids with α-anomeric monosaccharides, presented by the major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule CD1d. Once activated, iNKT cells can secrete a very diverse array of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, glycolipid-mediated activation of iNKT cells has been explored for immunotherapy in a variety of disease states, including cancer and a range of infections. In this review, we discuss the design of synthetic glycolipid activators for iNKT cells, their impact on adaptive immune responses and their use to modulate iNKT cell responses to improve immunity against infections and cancer. Current challenges in translating results from preclinical animal studies to humans are also discussed. PMID:27195112

  10. Natural Killer Cell Immunomodulation: Targeting Activating, Inhibitory, and Co-stimulatory Receptor Signaling for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Cariad; Fritsch, Katherine; Kohrt, Holbrook E.

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in the recognition and eradication of tumors. Efforts at using NK cells as antitumor agents began over two decades ago, but recent advances in elucidating NK cell biology have accelerated the development of NK cell-targeting therapeutics. NK cell activation and the triggering of effector functions is governed by a complex set of activating and inhibitory receptors. In the early phases of cancer immune surveillance, NK cells directly identify and lyse cancer cells. Nascent transformed cells elicit NK cell activation and are eliminated. However, as tumors progress, cancerous cells develop immunosuppressive mechanisms that circumvent NK cell-mediated killing, allowing for tumor escape and proliferation. Therapeutic intervention aims to reverse tumor-induced NK cell suppression and sustain NK cells’ tumorlytic capacities. Here, we review tumor–NK cell interactions, discuss the mechanisms by which NK cells generate an antitumor immune response, and discuss NK cell-based therapeutic strategies targeting activating, inhibitory, and co-stimulatory receptors. PMID:26697006

  11. [CELLS FORM AND THEIR SENSITIVITY TO LYTIC ACTIVITY OF NATURAL KILLER CELLS UNDER THE ANTIOXIDANT ACTION].

    PubMed

    Kirpichnikova, K M; Petrov, Yu P; Filatova, N A; Gamaley, I A

    2015-01-01

    The present paper is an attempt to estimate the influence of cell surface morphology changes to functional activity under the effect of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), and alpha-lipoic asid (ALA). Two experimental parameters were used to characterize transformed fibroblasts 3T3-SV40 status. The functional one was the cell sensitivity to lysis by natural killer (NK) mouse splenocytes, and morphology index (cell form index) was a cell area. We showed that addition of NAC or ALA to the cell medium caused fast decrease of cell area and changes of cell form. On the other hand, their sensitivity to lysis NK cells gradually and significantly decreased. Then we compared NAC or ALA effect with the effects of other substances, which were non-antioxidants but caused cell responses which concurred with of antioxidants, at least partly. They were: latrunculin B, desorganizing actin filaments (as both antioxidants), OTZ reducing ROS level in the cell (as NAC), BSO (inhibitor of glutathione synthesis), increasing ROS level in the cell (as ALA), antibodies to gelatinases, MMP-2 and MMP-9 inactivating their activities (as both antioxidants). The results obtained showed a correlation between changes of morphology index and functional activity, sensitivity to lysis by NK cells. We suppose that geometry of cell surface might be a functional indicator of cell reaction to the antioxidant. PMID:26591569

  12. Daily intake of Lactobacillus casei Shirota increases natural killer cell activity in smokers.

    PubMed

    Reale, Marcella; Boscolo, Paolo; Bellante, Veronica; Tarantelli, Chiara; Di Nicola, Marta; Forcella, Laura; Li, Qing; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Muraro, Raffaella

    2012-07-01

    Dietary probiotics supplementation exerts beneficial health effects. Since cigarette smoking reduces natural killer (NK) activity, we evaluated the effect of Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) intake on NK cytotoxic activity in male smokers. The double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised study was conducted on seventy-two healthy Italian blue-collar male smokers randomly divided for daily intake of LcS powder or placebo. Before and after 3 weeks of intake, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and NK activity and CD16⁺ cells' number were assessed. Daily LcS intake for 3 weeks significantly increased NK activity (P < 0.001). The increase in NK activity was paralleled by an increase in CD16⁺ cells (P < 0.001). Before intake, NK cytotoxic activity inversely correlated with the number of cigarettes smoked (R - 0.064). LcS intake prevented the smoke-dependent expected NK activity reduction. The analysis of the distribution of changes in smoke-adjusted NK activity demonstrated that the positive variations were significantly associated with LcS intake, while the negative variations were associated with placebo intake (median value of distributions of differences, 20.98 lytic unit (LU)/10⁷ cells for LcS v. - 4.38 LU/10⁷ cells for placebo, P = 0.039). In conclusion, 3 weeks of daily LcS intake in Italian male smokers was associated with a higher increase in cytotoxic activity and CD16⁺ cells' number in comparison to the placebo intake group. PMID:22142891

  13. Salivary gland extracts of partially fed Dermacentor reticulatus ticks decrease natural killer cell activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kubes, M; Fuchsberger, N; Labuda, M; Zuffová, E; Nuttall, P A

    1994-01-01

    The salivary glands and saliva of ticks (Arachnida, Acari, Ixodida) play a vital role in blood feeding, including manipulation of the host's immune response to tick infestation. Furthermore, a diverse number of tick-borne pathogens are transmitted to vertebrate hosts via tick saliva. A factor synthesized in the salivary glands of feeding ticks potentiates the transmission of certain tick-borne viruses. We show that salivary gland extracts (SGE) derived from Dermacentor reticulatus female ticks fed for 6 days on laboratory mice (SGED6) induced a decrease in the natural killer (NK) activity of effector cells obtained from 16 healthy blood donors. The decreased activity ranged from 14 to 69% of NK activity observed with the respective untreated effector cells. Such a decrease was not observed after treatment of effector cells with SGE from unfed ticks. Ten-fold dilution of SGED6 significantly reduced the capacity to decrease NK activity and a further 10-fold dilution almost eliminated the effect. After addition of IFN-alpha 2, the SGED6-induced decrease in NK activity was restored to activity levels approaching those of untreated cells. The apparent reversibility of the inhibition indicates that the effect of SGED6 on NK activity was not due to cytotoxicity. The results demonstrate the presence of a factor(s) in the salivary gland products of feeding D. reticulatus female ticks that influences human NK activity in vitro. These data suggest a possible mechanism by which tick SGE potentiates the transmission of some tick-borne viruses through suppression of NK activity. PMID:8045588

  14. Mechanisms of Innate Lymphoid Cell and Natural Killer T Cell Activation during Mucosal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Altmayer, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces in the airways and the gastrointestinal tract are critical for the interactions of the host with its environment. Due to their abundance at mucosal tissue sites and their powerful immunomodulatory capacities, the role of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and natural killer T (NKT) cells in the maintenance of mucosal tolerance has recently moved into the focus of attention. While NKT cells as well as ILCs utilize distinct transcription factors for their development and lineage diversification, both cell populations can be further divided into three polarized subpopulations reflecting the distinction into Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells in the adaptive immune system. While bystander activation through cytokines mediates the induction of ILC and NKT cell responses, NKT cells become activated also through the engagement of their canonical T cell receptors (TCRs) by (glyco)lipid antigens (cognate recognition) presented by the atypical MHC I like molecule CD1d on antigen presenting cells (APCs). As both innate lymphocyte populations influence inflammatory responses due to the explosive release of copious amounts of different cytokines, they might represent interesting targets for clinical intervention. Thus, we will provide an outlook on pathways that might be interesting to evaluate in this context. PMID:24987710

  15. Retargeting cytokine-induced killer cell activity by CD16 engagement with clinical-grade antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cappuzzello, Elisa; Tosi, Anna; Zanovello, Paola; Sommaggio, Roberta; Rosato, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytokine-induced Killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of ex vivo expanded T lymphocytes capable of MHC-unrestricted antitumor activity, which share phenotypic and functional features with both NK and T cells. Preclinical data and initial clinical studies demonstrated their high tolerability in vivo, supporting CIK cells as a promising cell population for adoptive cell immunotherapy. In this study, we report for the first time that CIK cells display a donor-dependent expression of CD16, which can be engaged by trastuzumab or cetuximab to exert a potent antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against ovarian and breast cancer cell lines, leading to an increased lytic activity in vitro, and an enhanced therapeutic efficacy in vivo. Thus, an efficient tumor antigen-specific retargeting can be achieved by a combination therapy with clinical-grade monoclonal antibodies already widely used in cancer therapy, and CIK cell populations that are easily expandable in very large numbers, inexpensive, safe and do not require genetic manipulations. Overall, these data provide a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Her2 and EGFR expressing tumors by adoptive cell therapy, which could find wide implementation and application, and could also be expanded to the use of additional therapeutic antibodies.

  16. Retargeting cytokine-induced killer cell activity by CD16 engagement with clinical-grade antibodies.

    PubMed

    Cappuzzello, Elisa; Tosi, Anna; Zanovello, Paola; Sommaggio, Roberta; Rosato, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Cytokine-induced Killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of ex vivo expanded T lymphocytes capable of MHC-unrestricted antitumor activity, which share phenotypic and functional features with both NK and T cells. Preclinical data and initial clinical studies demonstrated their high tolerability in vivo, supporting CIK cells as a promising cell population for adoptive cell immunotherapy. In this study, we report for the first time that CIK cells display a donor-dependent expression of CD16, which can be engaged by trastuzumab or cetuximab to exert a potent antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against ovarian and breast cancer cell lines, leading to an increased lytic activity in vitro, and an enhanced therapeutic efficacy in vivo. Thus, an efficient tumor antigen-specific retargeting can be achieved by a combination therapy with clinical-grade monoclonal antibodies already widely used in cancer therapy, and CIK cell populations that are easily expandable in very large numbers, inexpensive, safe and do not require genetic manipulations. Overall, these data provide a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Her2 and EGFR expressing tumors by adoptive cell therapy, which could find wide implementation and application, and could also be expanded to the use of additional therapeutic antibodies. PMID:27622068

  17. Safety and Efficacy of Activated Transfected Killer Cells for Neutropenic Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Baquir, Beverlie; Fu, Yue; Applebaum, David; Schwartz, Julie; Wang, Amy; Avanesian, Valentina; Spellberg, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality in neutropenic patients. White blood cell transfusions are a promising treatment for such infections, but technical barriers have prevented their widespread use. Methods To recapitulate white blood cell transfusions, we are developing a cell-based immunotherapy using a phagocytic cell line, HL-60. We sought to stably transfect HL-60 cells with a suicide trap (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase), to enable purging of the cells when desired, and a bioluminescence marker, to track the cells in vivo in mice. Results Transfection was stable despite 20 months of continuous culture or storage in liquid nitrogen. Activation of these transfected cells with retinoic acid and dimethyl sulfamethoxazole enhanced their microbicidal effects. Activated transfected killer (ATAK) cells were completely eliminated after exposure to ganciclovir, confirming function of the suicide trap. ATAK cells improved the survival of neutropenic mice with lethal disseminated candidiasis and inhalational aspergillosis. Bioluminescence and histopathologic analysis confirmed that the cells were purged from surviving mice after ganciclovir treatment. Comprehensive necropsy, histopathology, and metabolomic analysis revealed no toxicity of the cells. Conclusions These results lay the groundwork for continued translational development of this promising, novel technology for the treatment of refractory infections in neutropenic hosts. PMID:20397927

  18. Effects of phenytoin and carbamazepine on human natural killer cell activity and genotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Margaretten, N C; Hincks, J R; Warren, R P; Coulombe, R A

    1987-01-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from healthy volunteers and exposed in vitro to phenytoin or carbamazepine, two widely used antiepileptic drugs (AED). This study investigated the effects of these drugs on natural killer (NK) cell activity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), which are both thought to protect against developing neoplasms. Also, the genotoxicity of phenytoin on human PBMC was investigated by gravity-flow alkaline elution. Concentrations of phenytoin considered therapeutic (10 and 20 micrograms/ml) and a dose considered acutely toxic (40 micrograms/ml) were used while carbamazepine levels of 8 micrograms/ml (therapeutic) and 10 and 16 micrograms/ml (acutely toxic) were tested. Phenytoin at all three concentrations significantly suppressed NK cell activity in a dose-dependent manner. Carbamazepine had no significant effect on NK cell activity at the dose levels studied. Incubation in propylene glycol, the diluent for carbamazepine, significantly decreased NK cell activity compared to saline. Phenytoin also significantly depressed interferon augmentation of NK cell cytotoxicity in a dose dependent manner. ADCC activity was significantly depressed with 20 and 40 micrograms/ml phenytoin. Alkaline elution showed a slight but significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks of PBMC exposed to 40 micrograms/ml phenytoin for 18 or 72 hr. These results show phenytoin may induce pronounced immunosuppression of NK cell and ADCC activity in patients receiving antiepileptic therapy and that this agent has a potential for genotoxic side effects. Phenytoin may also increase the potential for neoplasm development by a direct interaction with cellular DNA and/or an indirect mechanism by immunosuppression. PMID:3798446

  19. Distinct Migration and Contact Dynamics of Resting and IL-2-Activated Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Per E.; Forslund, Elin; Vanherberghen, Bruno; Chechet, Ksenia; Mickelin, Oscar; Ahlin, Alexander Rivera; Everhorn, Tobias; Önfelt, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells serve as one of the first lines of defense against viral infections and transformed cells. NK cell cytotoxicity is not dependent on antigen presentation by target cells, but is dependent on integration of activating and inhibitory signals triggered by receptor–ligand interactions formed at a tight intercellular contact between the NK and target cell, i.e., the immune synapse. We have studied the single-cell migration behavior and target-cell contact dynamics of resting and interleukin (IL)-2-activated human peripheral blood NK cells. Small populations of NK cells and target cells were confined in microwells and imaged by fluorescence microscopy for >8 h. Only the IL-2-activated population of NK cells showed efficient cytotoxicity against the human embryonic kidney 293T target cells. We found that although the average migration speeds were comparable, activated NK cells showed significantly more dynamic migration behavior, with more frequent transitions between periods of low and high motility. Resting NK cells formed fewer and weaker contacts with target cells, which manifested as shorter conjugation times and in many cases a complete lack of post-conjugation attachment to target cells. Activated NK cells were approximately twice as big as the resting cells, displayed a more migratory phenotype, and were more likely to employ “motile scanning” of the target-cell surface during conjugation. Taken together, our experiments quantify, at the single-cell level, how activation by IL-2 leads to altered NK cell cytotoxicity, migration behavior, and contact dynamics. PMID:24639676

  20. Expansion of highly activated invariant natural killer T cells with altered phenotype in acute dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Kamaladasa, A; Wickramasinghe, N; Adikari, T N; Gomes, L; Shyamali, N L A; Salio, M; Cerundolo, V; Ogg, G S; Malavige, G Neelika

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are capable of rapid activation and production of cytokines upon recognition of antigenic lipids presented by CD1d molecules. They have been shown to play a significant role in many viral infections and were observed to be highly activated in patients with acute dengue infection. In order to characterize further their role in dengue infection, we investigated the proportion of iNKT cells and their phenotype in adult patients with acute dengue infection. The functionality of iNKT cells in patients was investigated by both interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 ex-vivo enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays following stimulation with alpha-galactosyl-ceramide (αGalCer). We found that circulating iNKT cell proportions were significantly higher (P = 0·03) in patients with acute dengue when compared to healthy individuals and were predominantly of the CD4(+) subset. iNKT cells of patients with acute dengue had reduced proportions expressing CD8α and CD161 when compared to healthy individuals. The iNKT cells of patients were highly activated and iNKT activation correlated significantly with dengue virus-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels. iNKT cells expressing Bcl-6 (P = 0·0003) and both Bcl-6 and inducible T cell co-stimulator (ICOS) (P = 0·006) were increased significantly in patients when compared to healthy individuals. Therefore, our data suggest that in acute dengue infection there is an expansion of highly activated CD4(+) iNKT cells, with reduced expression of CD161 markers. PMID:26874822

  1. Expanded and Activated Natural Killer Cells for Immunotherapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Takahiro; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Campana, Dario

    2016-07-01

    Viral infection of the liver is a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Natural killer (NK) cells recognize virally infected and oncogenically transformed cells, suggesting a therapeutic role for NK-cell infusions in HCC. Using the K562-mb15-41BBL cell line as a stimulus, we obtained large numbers of activated NK cells from the peripheral blood of healthy donors. Expanded NK cells exerted remarkably high cytotoxicity against HCC cell lines, which was generally much higher than that of unstimulated or IL2-activated NK cells. In immunodeficient NOD/scid IL2RGnull mice engrafted with Hep3B, treatment with expanded NK cells markedly reduced tumor growth and improved overall survival. HCC cells exposed for 48 hours to 5 μmol/L of sorafenib, a kinase inhibitor currently used for HCC treatment, remained highly sensitive to expanded NK cells. HCC cell reductions of 39.2% to 53.8% caused by sorafenib in three cell lines further increased to 80.5% to 87.6% after 4 hours of culture with NK cells at a 1:1 effector-to-target ratio. NK-cell cytotoxicity persisted even in the presence of sorafenib. We found that NKG2D, an NK-cell-activating receptor, was an important mediator of anti-HCC activity. We therefore enhanced its signaling capacity with a chimeric NKG2D-CD3ζ-DAP10 receptor. This considerably increased the anti-HCC cytotoxicity of expanded NK cells in vitro and in immunodeficient mice. The NK expansion and activation method applied in this study has been adapted to clinical-grade conditions. Hence, these results warrant clinical testing of expanded NK-cell infusions in patients with HCC, possibly after genetic modification with NKG2D-CD3ζ-DAP10. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(7); 574-81. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197065

  2. Ezh2 regulates differentiation and function of natural killer cells through histone methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Leavenworth, Jianmei W; Li, Yang; Luo, Qi; Xie, Huafeng; Liu, Xinhua; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Liyun Y; Zhang, Litao; Hao, Junwei; Wu, Xudong; Deng, Xianming; Roberts, Charles W M; Orkin, Stuart H; Cantor, Harvey; Wang, Xi

    2015-12-29

    Changes of histone modification status at critical lineage-specifying gene loci in multipotent precursors can influence cell fate commitment. The contribution of these epigenetic mechanisms to natural killer (NK) cell lineage determination from common lymphoid precursors is not understood. Here we investigate the impact of histone methylation repressive marks (H3 Lys27 trimethylation; H3K27(me3)) on early NK cell differentiation. We demonstrate that selective loss of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase Ezh2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) or inhibition of its enzymatic activity with small molecules unexpectedly increased generation of the IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) CD122(+) NK precursors and mature NK progeny from both mouse and human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that enhanced NK cell expansion and cytotoxicity against tumor cells were associated with up-regulation of CD122 and the C-type lectin receptor NKG2D. Moreover, NKG2D deficiency diminished the positive effects of Ezh2 inhibitors on NK cell commitment. Identification of the contribution of Ezh2 to NK lineage specification and function reveals an epigenetic-based mechanism that regulates NK cell development and provides insight into the clinical application of Ezh2 inhibitors in NK-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26668377

  3. CD45 Isoform Profile Identifies Natural Killer (NK) Subsets with Differential Activity

    PubMed Central

    Krzywinska, Ewelina; Cornillon, Amelie; Allende-Vega, Nerea; Vo, Dang-Nghiem; Rene, Celine; Lu, Zhao-Yang; Pasero, Christine; Olive, Daniel; Fegueux, Nathalie; Ceballos, Patrick; Hicheri, Yosr; Sobecki, Michal; Rossi, Jean-François; Cartron, Guillaume; Villalba, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The leucocyte-specific phosphatase CD45 is present in two main isoforms: the large CD45RA and the short CD45RO. We have recently shown that distinctive expression of these isoforms distinguishes natural killer (NK) populations. For example, co-expression of both isoforms identifies in vivo the anti tumor NK cells in hematological cancer patients. Here we show that low CD45 expression associates with less mature, CD56bright, NK cells. Most NK cells in healthy human donors are CD45RA+CD45RO-. The CD45RA-RO+ phenotype, CD45RO cells, is extremely uncommon in B or NK cells, in contrast to T cells. However, healthy donors possess CD45RAdimRO- (CD45RAdim cells), which show immature markers and are largely expanded in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Blood borne cancer patients also have more CD45RAdim cells that carry several features of immature NK cells. However, and in opposition to their association to NK cell progenitors, they do not proliferate and show low expression of the transferrin receptor protein 1/CD71, suggesting low metabolic activity. Moreover, CD45RAdim cells properly respond to in vitro encounter with target cells by degranulating or gaining CD69 expression. In summary, they are quiescent NK cells, with low metabolic status that can, however, respond after encounter with target cells. PMID:27100180

  4. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  5. Ezh2 regulates differentiation and function of natural killer cells through histone methyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jie; Leavenworth, Jianmei W.; Li, Yang; Luo, Qi; Xie, Huafeng; Liu, Xinhua; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Liyun Y.; Zhang, Litao; Hao, Junwei; Wu, Xudong; Deng, Xianming; Roberts, Charles W. M.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Cantor, Harvey; Wang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Changes of histone modification status at critical lineage-specifying gene loci in multipotent precursors can influence cell fate commitment. The contribution of these epigenetic mechanisms to natural killer (NK) cell lineage determination from common lymphoid precursors is not understood. Here we investigate the impact of histone methylation repressive marks (H3 Lys27 trimethylation; H3K27me3) on early NK cell differentiation. We demonstrate that selective loss of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase Ezh2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) or inhibition of its enzymatic activity with small molecules unexpectedly increased generation of the IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) CD122+ NK precursors and mature NK progeny from both mouse and human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that enhanced NK cell expansion and cytotoxicity against tumor cells were associated with up-regulation of CD122 and the C-type lectin receptor NKG2D. Moreover, NKG2D deficiency diminished the positive effects of Ezh2 inhibitors on NK cell commitment. Identification of the contribution of Ezh2 to NK lineage specification and function reveals an epigenetic-based mechanism that regulates NK cell development and provides insight into the clinical application of Ezh2 inhibitors in NK-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26668377

  6. Effect of elevated serum prolactin concentrations on cytokine production and natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Clodi, M; Svoboda, T; Kotzmann, H; Deyssig, R; Woloszczuk, W; Zielinski, C C; Luger, A

    1992-12-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies in rodents and human suggested an immunostimulatory effect of prolactin. The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of chronically elevated serum prolactin concentrations on the immune system in patients with prolactinomas. For this purpose parameters of the humoral and cellular immune system were studied in seven patients with prolactinomas on two occasions (1) when their serum prolactin concentration had been normalized through treatment with dopamine agonists and (2) when their serum prolactin concentration was high. Serum concentrations of immunoglobulines, interleukin 1, 3 and 6, TNF-alpha, interferon-gamma and the soluble interleukin 2 receptor, leukocyte subsets and the natural killer cell activity were found to be within the normal range on both occasions, i.e. at normal and at high serum prolactin concentrations. The assumption could be made that long-lasting elevation of serum prolactin concentration induces adaptive changes when the acute stimulatory effects of prolactin on several parameters of the immune system have subsided. PMID:1369584

  7. The anti-canine distemper virus activities of ex vivo-expanded canine natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yun; Shin, Dong-Jun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Je-Jung; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Cho, Duck; Kim, Sang-Ki

    2015-04-17

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in induction of antiviral effects against various viruses of humans and animals. However, few data on NK cell activities during canine distemper virus (CDV) infections are available. Recently, we established a culture system allowing activation and expansion of canine non-B, non-T, large granular NK lymphocytes from PBMCs of normal dogs. In the present study, we explored the ability of such expanded NK cells to inhibit CDV infection in vitro. Cultured CD3-CD5-CD21- NK cells produced large amounts of IFN-γ, exhibited highly upregulated expression of mRNAs encoding NK-cell-associated receptors, and demonstrated strong natural killing activity against canine tumor cells. Although the expanded NK cells were dose-dependently cytotoxic to both normal and CDV-infected Vero cells, CDV infection rendered Vero cells more susceptible to NK cells. Pretreatment with anti-CDV serum from hyperimmunized dogs enhanced the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of NK cells against CDV-infected Vero cells. The culture supernatants of NK cells, added before or after infection, dose-dependently inhibited both CDV replication and development of CDV-induced cytopathic effects (CPEs) in Vero cells. Anti-IFN-γ antibody neutralized the inhibitory effects of NK cell culture supernatants on CDV replication and CPE induction in Vero cells. Such results emphasize the potential significance of NK cells in controlling CDV infection, and indicate that NK cells may play roles both during CDV infection and in combating such infections, under certain conditions. PMID:25680810

  8. Biology Myth-Killers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Evan

    2014-01-01

    "Biology Myth-Killers" is an activity designed to identify and correct common misconceptions for high school and college introductory biology courses. Students identify common myths, which double as biology misconceptions, and use appropriate sources to share the "truth" about the myths. This learner-centered activity is a fun…

  9. Pollen Killer Gene S35 Function Requires Interaction with an Activator That Maps Close to S24, Another Pollen Killer Gene in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Kurata, Nori

    2016-01-01

    Pollen killer genes disable noncarrier pollens, and are responsible for male sterility and segregation distortion in hybrid populations of distantly related plant species. The genetic networks and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pollen killer system remain largely unknown. Two pollen killer genes, S24 and S35, have been found in an intersubspecific cross of Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica. The effect of S24 is counteracted by an unlinked locus EFS. Additionally, S35 has been proposed to interact with S24 to induce pollen sterility. These genetic interactions are suggestive of a single S24-centric genetic pathway (EFS–S24–S35) for the pollen killer system. To examine this hypothetical genetic pathway, the S35 and the S24 regions were further characterized and genetically dissected in this study. Our results indicated that S35 causes pollen sterility independently of both the EFS and S24 genes, but is dependent on a novel gene close to the S24 locus, named incentive for killing pollen (INK). We confirmed the phenotypic effect of the INK gene separately from the S24 gene, and identified the INK locus within an interval of less than 0.6 Mb on rice chromosome 5. This study characterized the genetic effect of the two independent genetic pathways of INK–S35 and EFS–S24 in indica–japonica hybrid progeny. Our results provide clear evidence that hybrid male sterility in rice is caused by several pollen killer networks with multiple factors positively and negatively regulating pollen killer genes. PMID:27172610

  10. Pollen Killer Gene S35 Function Requires Interaction with an Activator That Maps Close to S24, Another Pollen Killer Gene in Rice.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takahiko; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Kurata, Nori

    2016-01-01

    Pollen killer genes disable noncarrier pollens, and are responsible for male sterility and segregation distortion in hybrid populations of distantly related plant species. The genetic networks and the molecular mechanisms underlying the pollen killer system remain largely unknown. Two pollen killer genes, S24 and S35, have been found in an intersubspecific cross of Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica The effect of S24 is counteracted by an unlinked locus EFS Additionally, S35 has been proposed to interact with S24 to induce pollen sterility. These genetic interactions are suggestive of a single S24-centric genetic pathway (EFS-S24-S35) for the pollen killer system. To examine this hypothetical genetic pathway, the S35 and the S24 regions were further characterized and genetically dissected in this study. Our results indicated that S35 causes pollen sterility independently of both the EFS and S24 genes, but is dependent on a novel gene close to the S24 locus, named incentive for killing pollen (INK). We confirmed the phenotypic effect of the INK gene separately from the S24 gene, and identified the INK locus within an interval of less than 0.6 Mb on rice chromosome 5. This study characterized the genetic effect of the two independent genetic pathways of INK-S35 and EFS-S24 in indica-japonica hybrid progeny. Our results provide clear evidence that hybrid male sterility in rice is caused by several pollen killer networks with multiple factors positively and negatively regulating pollen killer genes. PMID:27172610

  11. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Yeon-Jae; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Su-Hyung; Park, Young Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  12. Analysis of sphingosine kinase activity in single natural killer cells from peripheral blood†

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Alexandra J.; Meyer, Megan; Pawlak, Erica A.; Gomez, Shawn; Jaspers, Ilona; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid second messenger formed upon phosphorylation of sphingosine by sphingosine kinase (SK), plays a crucial role in natural killer (NK) cell proliferation, migration, and cytotoxicity. Dysregulation of the S1P pathway has been linked to a number of immune system disorders and therapeutic manipulation of the pathway has been proposed as a method of disease intervention. However, peripheral blood NK cells, as identified by surface markers (CD56+CD45+CD3−CD16) consist of a highly diverse population with distinct phenotypes and functions and it is unknown whether the S1P pathway is similarly diverse across peripheral blood NK cells. In this work, we measured the phosphorylation of sphingosine–fluorescein (SF) and subsequent metabolism of S1P fluorescein (S1PF) to form hexadecanoic acid fluorescein (HAF) in 111 single NK cells obtained from the peripheral blood of four healthy human subjects. The percentage of SF converted to S1PF or HAF was highly variable amongst the cells ranging from 0% to 100% (S1PF) and 0% to 97% (HAF). Subpopulations of cells with varying levels of S1PF formation and metabolism were readily identified. Across all subjects, the average percentage of SF converted to S1PF or HAF was 37 ± 36% and 12 ± 19%, respectively. NK cell metabolism of SF by the different subjects was also distinct with hierarchical clustering suggesting two possible phenotypes: low (<20%) or high (>50%) producers of S1PF. The heterogeneity of SK and downstream enzyme activity in NK cells may enable NK cells to respond effectively to a diverse array of pathogens as well as incipient tumor cells. NK cells from two subjects were also loaded with S1PF to assess the activity of S1P phosphatase (S1PP), which converts S1P to sphingosine. No NK cells (n = 41) formed sphingosine, suggesting that S1PP was minimally active in peripheral blood NK cells. In contrast to the SK activity, S1PP activity was homogeneous across the peripheral blood NK

  13. Natural cytotoxicity in immunodeficiency diseases: preservation of natural killer activity and the in vivo appearance of radioresistant killing

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.F.; Polmar, S.H.; Schacter, B.Z.; Brovall, C.; Hornick, D.L.; Sorensen, R.U.

    1986-01-01

    We studied spontaneous natural killer (NK) cell activity and radiation-resistant NK mediated cytotoxicity in four patients with clinically documented severe combined immune deficiency disease (SCID), and in one subject each with intestinal lymphangiectasia and cartilage-hair hypoplasia. We observed the preservation of spontaneous NK activity in all patients despite the presence of profound B- and T-lymphocytopenia and clinical immunodeficiency. NK activity was associated with relatively normal circulating numbers of OKM1+ lymphocytes, a population known to contain NK effectors. Spontaneous NK activity resistant to 3000 rad was increased in all patients, indicating the presence of activated natural killer cells in vivo. The concept of a chronically activated immune system in these patients was further supported by the presence of increased Ia positive T cells in all subjects tested, suggesting that radioresistant NK activity may be a useful parameter to measure when assessing in vivo immune activation. Our data, as well as that of others, supports the hypothesis that at least one population of NK cells is a distinct lineage arising at the differentiation level of myeloid and lymphoid stem cells in the bone marrow.

  14. Posttransplant adoptive immunotherapy with activated natural killer cells in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    deMagalhaes-Silverman, M; Donnenberg, A; Lembersky, B; Elder, E; Lister, J; Rybka, W; Whiteside, T; Ball, E

    2000-01-01

    Relapse after high-dose chemotherapy is the main cause of therapeutic failure in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Adoptive immunotherapy with interleukin-2 (IL-2) plus activated natural killer cells may eliminate residual disease without excessive toxicity. The authors sought to determine if immunotherapy immediately after transplantation would affect engraftment and the toxicity associated with transplantation. Fifteen consecutive patients with metastatic breast cancer were allocated to three cohorts. Cohort 1 (five patients) received high-dose cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin (CTCb) followed by peripheral blood stem cell infusion and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor at 10 micrograms/kg. Cohort 2 (five patients) received in addition rhIL-2 (2 x 10(6) IU/m2/day) for 4 days intravenously via continuous infusion after peripheral blood stem cell infusion. In cohort 3 (five patients), peripheral blood stem cell transplant was followed by infusion of autologous activated NK cells and rhIL-2 (2 x 10(6) IU/m2/day) for 4 days (via continuous intravenous infusion). Generation of activated NK cells was possible in all patients in cohort 3. All patients has successful engraftment. Median time to absolute neutrophil count more than 0.5 x 10(9)/L was 8 days (range, 8 to 11 days) in cohort 1, 9 days (range, 7 to 11 days) in cohort 2, and 9 days (range, 8 to 9 days) in cohort 3. Median time until the platelet count was more than 20 x 10(9)/L was 14 days (range, 9 to 22 days) in cohort 1, 11 days (range, 6 to 14 days) in cohort 2, and 12 days (range, 11 to 21 days) in cohort 3. All patients developed neutropenic fevers, but the overall toxicity associated with the infusion of IL-2 (cohort 2) or IL-2 plus activated NK cells (cohort 3) did not differ from that observed in cohort 1. Complete responses were achieved in one patient in cohort 1, in two patients in cohort 2, and in one patient in cohort 3. In conclusion, post-transplant adoptive immunotherapy with

  15. Early inhibition of natural and interferon-activated killers in endometrial cancer patients treated with local radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mandeville, R.; Sidrac-Ghali, S.; Ajdukovic, I.; Vidal, D.; Ayoub, J.

    1987-01-01

    The present study was aimed at comparing the effect of clinical staging and radiotherapy on natural killer (NK) and interferon-activated killer (IAK) cell activity in a group of endometrial cancer patients receiving a total dose of 5,000 to 8,000 rads. We report that when compared to age-matched women, a significantly higher number and percentage of patients show low NK and IAK cell activity. At diagnosis, diminished NK activity was seen in about 20% of the patients, while IAK activity was low in 49% of these patients. There was no correlation between these deficiencies and the grade or stage of the disease. In contrast, radiotherapy induced deleterious effects on both populations of NK and IAK cells. These deleterious effects were more pronounced in patients showing a low level of spontaneous NK activity. In an attempt to understand better the mechanism by which the presence of cancer itself and/or radiotherapy affects these activities, we studied in greater detail changes in peripheral blood T-cell numbers and subsets. Before radiotherapy, all lymphocyte counts were within the normal range. In contrast, after radiotherapy the absolute numbers of all T-cell subsets were significantly decreased in the majority of the patients tested, OKT4+ cells being the most radiosensitive and Leu 7+ cells the most radioresistant.

  16. Activity of continuous infusion + pulse interleukin-2 with famotidine in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter D Y; Quan, Francine M

    2009-02-01

    High-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2), given via continuous intravenous (i.v.) infusion, induces lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell cytotoxicity against tumor cells. These LAKs exhibit enhanced cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro when they are subsequently pulsed with additional IL-2. Famotidine may increase LAK cytotoxicity against neoplastic cells by allowing for greater IL-2 uptake at the IL-2 receptor on lymphocytes. Twenty-three (23) patients received famotidine 20 mg i.v. twice per day and continuous-infusion IL-2 (18 MIU/m(2)/24 hours) for 72 hours, followed by a 24-hour rest, then 1-3 daily-pulse IL-2 doses of 18 MIU/m(2) over 15-30 minutes preceded by famotidine 20 mg i.v. Cycles were repeated every 3 weeks. The most common metastatic sites were lung, lymph node, and subcutaneous/soft tissue. The most common toxicities were fever, rigor, nausea/emesis, hypophosphatemia, hypotension, elevated creatinine, and pulmonary edema. There were no treatment-related deaths. One (1) complete (4%) and 9 partial responses (39%) were seen (43% total response rate; 95% confidence interval: 22%-65%). Median survival for all patients is 13 months. The combination of famotidine and high-dose continuous infusion + pulse IL-2 is active in metastatic melanoma. PMID:19243244

  17. Anti-herpes Activity of Vinegar-processed Daphne genkwa Flos Via Enhancement of Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Choi, Jin Young; Ryu, Hyung Won; Oh, Sei-Ryang

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a common causative agent of genital ulceration and can lead to subsequent neurological disease in some cases. Here, using a genital infection model, we tested the efficacy of vinegar-processed flos of Daphne genkwa (vp-genkwa) to modulate vaginal inflammation caused by HSV-1 infection. Our data revealed that treatment with optimal doses of vp-genkwa after, but not before, HSV-1 infection provided enhanced resistance against HSV-1 infection, as corroborated by reduced mortality and clinical signs. Consistent with these results, treatment with vp-genkwa after HSV-1 infection reduced viral replication in the vaginal tract. Furthermore, somewhat intriguingly, treatment of vp-genkwa after HSV-1 infection increased the frequency and absolute number of CD3-NK1.1+NKp46+ natural killer (NK) cells producing interferon (IFN)-γ and granyzme B, which indicates that vp-genkwa treatment induces the activation of NK cells. Supportively, secreted IFN-γ was detected at an increased level in vaginal lavages of mice treated with vp-genkwa after HSV-1 infection. These results indicate that enhanced resistance to HSV-1 infection by treatment with vp-genkwa is associated with NK cell activation. Therefore, our data provide a valuable insight into the use of vp-genkwa to control clinical severity in HSV infection through NK cell activation. PMID:25922598

  18. Green Tea Catechin Metabolites Exert Immunoregulatory Effects on CD4(+) T Cell and Natural Killer Cell Activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Won, Yeong-Seon; Yang, Xue; Kumazoe, Motofumi; Yamashita, Shuya; Hara, Aya; Takagaki, Akiko; Goto, Keiichi; Nanjo, Fumio; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2016-05-11

    Tea catechins, such as (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), have been shown to effectively enhance immune activity and prevent cancer, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Green tea catechins are instead converted to catechin metabolites in the intestine. Here, we show that these green tea catechin metabolites enhance CD4(+) T cell activity as well as natural killer (NK) cell activity. Our data suggest that the absence of a 4'-hydroxyl on this phenyl group (B ring) is important for the effect on immune activity. In particular, 5-(3',5'-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone (EGC-M5), a major metabolite of EGCG, not only increased the activity of CD4(+) T cells but also enhanced the cytotoxic activity of NK cells in vivo. These data suggest that EGC-M5 might show immunostimulatory activity. PMID:27112424

  19. Effect of Helixor A on Natural Killer Cell Activity in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeung, In-Cheul; Chung, Youn-Jee; Chae, Boah; Kang, So-Yeon; Song, Jae-Yen; Jo, Hyun-Hee; Lew, Young-Ok; Kim, Jang-Heub; Kim, Mee-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: NK cells are one of the major immune cells in endometriosis pathogenesis. While previous clinical studies have shown that helixor A to be an effective treatment for endometriosis, little is known about its mechanism of action, or its relationship with immune cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of helixor A on Natural killer cell (NK cell) cytotoxicity in endometriosis Materials and Methods: We performed an experimental study. Samples of peritoneal fluid were obtained from January 2011 to December 2011 from 50 women with endometriosis and 50 women with other benign ovarian cysts (control). Peritoneal fluid of normal control group and endometriosis group was collected during laparoscopy. Baseline cytotoxicity levels of NK cells were measured with the peritoneal fluid of control group and endometriosis group. Next, cytotoxicity of NK cells was evaluated before and after treatment with helixor A. NK-cell activity was determined based upon the expression of CD107a, as an activation marker. Results: NK cells cytotoxicity was 79.38±2.13% in control cells, 75.55±2.89% in the control peritoneal fluid, 69.59±4.96% in endometriosis stage I/II endometriosis, and 63.88±5.75% in stage III/IV endometriosis. A significant difference in cytotoxicity was observed between the control cells and stage III/IV endometriosis, consistent with a significant decrease in the cytotoxicity of NK cells in advanced stages of endometriosis; these levels increased significantly after treatment with helixor A; 78.30% vs. 86.40% (p = 0.003) in stage I/II endometriosis, and 73.67% vs. 84.54% (p = 0.024) in stage III/IV. The percentage of cells expressing CD107a was increased significantly in each group after helixor A treatment; 0.59% vs. 1.10% (p = 0.002) in stage I/II endometriosis, and 0.79% vs. 1.40% (p = 0.014) in stage III/IV. Conclusions: Helixor A directly influenced NK-cell cytotoxicity through direct induction of CD107a expression. Our results

  20. Staphylococcus-mediated T-cell activation and spontaneous natural killer cell activity in the absence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Hoynowski, S. M.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    We used major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-deficient transgenic mice to show that in vitro natural killer cell cytotoxicity and T-cell activation by staphylococcal exotoxins (superantigens) are not dependent upon the presence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. T cells can be activated by exotoxins in the presence of exogenously added interleukin 1 or 2 or in the presence of specific antibody without exogenously added cytokines.

  1. Isolation, identification, and activity in vitro of killer yeasts against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Jaqueline Rabelo; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros; Brandão, Luciana Rocha; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Viana, Francisco Marto Pinto

    2013-07-01

    A total of 580 yeasts strains, isolated from Ceara State of Brasil, were evaluated for their ability to produce killer toxin. Of these strains, 29 tested positive for the killer phenotype and were further evaluated for their ability to control Colletotrichum gloeosporioides germination in vitro. All yeast strains that expressed the killer phenotype were characterized by sequencing the D1/D2 regions of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Five yeast strains provided a significant reduction in mycelial growth and conidial germination of C. gloeosporioides in vitro, especially Meyerozyma guilliermondii, which was able to reduce the fungal mycelial growth on solid medium (potato dextrose agar (PDA)) by 60% and block 100% of conidia germination in liquid media (potato dextrose broth (PDB)). Filtering and autoclaving the liquid cultures had no effect on the growth of the pathogen. These results indicate the potential use of antagonist yeasts isolated from tropical fruits in the control of anthracnose caused by C. gloeosporioides in papaya. Further elucidation of main mechanisms involved on anthracnose control by these yeasts could be helpful for the development of biocontrol techniques related to the management of this disease in tropical fruits. PMID:22915228

  2. Functional characteristics of lymphocytes isolated from the rat large intestine. Response to T-cell mitogens and natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Nauss, K M; Pavlina, T M; Kumar, V; Newberne, P M

    1984-03-01

    Using successive ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and collagenase treatments, two fractions of mucosal lymphocytes have been isolated from the rat large intestine that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Intraepithelial lymphocytes consisted largely of granular lymphocytes (91 +/- 6%) that did not respond to stimulation with phytohemagglutinin or concanavalin A, but had natural killer cytotoxic activity against the YAC-1 cell line. The natural killer cytotoxicity of the intraepithelial lymphocytes was specifically reduced by the addition of increasing numbers of unlabeled homologous tumor cells but not by unlabeled thymocytes. The sensitivity of different target cell lines to lysis by intraepithelial lymphocytes was the same as splenocytes from the same rat strain. Lymphocytes from the lamina propria contained 21 +/- 4% granular cells with the remainder being typical small lymphocytes. The lamina propria fraction responded well to stimulation with concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, and pokeweek mitogen, and also had natural killer activity against YAC-1 cells. PMID:6607187

  3. Immunobiology of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book combines research from many disciplines into a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volumes include: Volume I: Assays for NK Cell Cytotoxicity; Their Values and Pitfalls. Separation and Characterization of Phenotypically Distinct Subsets of NK Cells. Ultrastructure and Cytochemistry of the Human Large Granular Lymphocytes. Phylogeny and Ontogeny of NK Cells. Tissue and Organ distribution of NK Cells. Genetic Control of NK Cell Activity in Rodents. Phenotype, Functional Heterogeneity, and Lineage of Natural Killer Cells. Target Cell Structures, Recognition Sites, and the Mechanism of NK Cytotoxicity. Natural Killer Cytotoxic Factors (NKCF) Role in Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity. Characteristics of Cultured NK Cells. Lectin-Dependent Killer Cells. MLC-Induced Cytotoxicity as a Model for the Development and Regulation of NK Cytotoxicity. LGL Lymphoproliferative Diseases in Man and Experimental Animals: The Characteristics of These Cells and Their Potential Experimental Uses. Index.

  4. Yeast killer plasmid mutations affecting toxin secretion and activity and toxin immunity function

    SciTech Connect

    Bussey, H.; Sacks, W.; Galley, D.; Saville, D.

    1982-04-01

    M double-stranded RNA (MdsRNA) plasmid mutants were obtained by mutagenesis and screening of a diploid killer culture partially heat cured of the plasmid, so that a high proportion of the cells could be expected to have only one M plasmid. Mutants with neutral (K/sup -/), immune (R/sup +/) or suicide (killer (K/sup +/), sensitive (R/sup -/)) phenotypes were examined. All mutants became K/sup -/ R/sup -/ sensitives on heat curing of the MdsRNA plasmid, and showed cytoplasmic inheritance by random spore analysis. In some cases, M plasmid mutations were indicated by altered mobility of the MdsRNA by agarose gel electrophoresis or by altered size of in vitro translation products from denatured dsRNA. Neutral mutants were of two types: nonsecretors of the toxin protein or secretors of an inactive toxin. Of three neutral nonsecretors examined, one (NLP-1), probably a nonsense mutation, made a smaller protoxin precursor in vitro and in vivo, and two made full-size protoxin molecules. The in vivo protoxin of 43,000 molecular weight was unstable in the wild type and kinetically showed a precursor product relationship to the processed, secreted 11,000-molecular-weight toxin. In one nonsecretor (N1), the protoxin appeared more stable in a pulse-chase experiment, and could be altered in a recognition site required for protein processing.

  5. Gut-targeted immunonutrition boosting natural killer cell activity using Saccharomyces boulardii lysates in immuno-compromised healthy elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yasuhiro; Marotta, Francesco; Kantah, Makoto K; Zerbinati, Nicola; Kushugulova, Almagul; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Illuzzi, Nicola; Sapienza, Chiara; Takadanohara, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Riyichi; Catanzaro, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the immunomodulatory effect of KC-1317 (a symbiotic mixture containing Saccharomyces boulardii lysate in a cranberry, colostrum-derived lactoferrin, fragaria, and lactose mixture) supplementation in immune-compromised but otherwise healthy elderly subjects. A liquid formulation of KC-1317 was administered in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) fashion to healthy volunteers (65-79 years) previously selected for low natural killer (NK) cell activity, and this parameter was checked at the completion of the study. A significant improvement in NK cell activity of KC-1317 consumers was observed as compared to placebo at the end of 2 months. Although preliminary, these beneficial immune-modulatory effects of KC-1317 in aged individuals might indicate its employment within a wider age-management strategy. PMID:24059806

  6. Effects of 5-azacytidine on natural killer cell activating receptor expression in patients with refractory anemia with excess of blasts.

    PubMed

    Costello, Régis T; Leclercq, Amélie; Treut, Thérèse Le; Sanchez, Carole; Mercier, Delphine; Sébahoun, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic drugs modify DNA methylation and are used in refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB). These drugs may reactivate anti-oncogene expression and restore a normal phenotype instead of inducing antitumor toxicity, although they also have immunosuppressive effects on T-lymphocytes [1] In RAEB and acute myeloid leukemia, a defect in natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity has been shown, which relies on abnormal expression of activating receptors. Previous study has shown that 5-azacytidine impaired mRNA synthesis and induced apoptosis in NK cells [2]. In this study we investigated the effect of the demethylating drug 5-azacytidine (Vidaza(®)) on NK receptors with the hypothesis that demethylation of the promoters of activating NK receptor genes induces gene reactivation and thus may increase their expression. PMID:25709892

  7. Effects of 5-azacytidine on natural killer cell activating receptor expression in patients with refractory anemia with excess of blasts

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Régis T.; Leclercq, Amélie; Treut, Thérèse Le; Sanchez, Carole; Mercier, Delphine; Sébahoun, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic drugs modify DNA methylation and are used in refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB). These drugs may reactivate anti-oncogene expression and restore a normal phenotype instead of inducing antitumor toxicity, although they also have immunosuppressive effects on T-lymphocytes [1] In RAEB and acute myeloid leukemia, a defect in natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity has been shown, which relies on abnormal expression of activating receptors. Previous study has shown that 5-azacytidine impaired mRNA synthesis and induced apoptosis in NK cells [2]. In this study we investigated the effect of the demethylating drug 5-azacytidine (Vidaza®) on NK receptors with the hypothesis that demethylation of the promoters of activating NK receptor genes induces gene reactivation and thus may increase their expression. PMID:25709892

  8. Unusual Indolent Course of a Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Natural Killer Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Farsi, Khalil; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Hadabbi, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell lymphoproliferative disorders are uncommon and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays an important aetiological role in their pathogenesis. We report a 20-year-old male with a chronic active EBV infection associated with a NK cell lymphoproliferative disorder which had an unusual indolent course. He presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in December 2011 with a history of intermittent fever and coughing. Examinations revealed generalised lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, transaminitis, diffuse bilateral lung infiltrates and bone marrow lymphocyte involvement. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test revealed a high EBV viral load in the peripheral blood cells. The patient received a course of piperacillin-tazobactam for Klebsiella pneumoniae, but no active treatment for the lymphoproliferative disorder. However, his lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase and liver enzymes dropped spontaneously. In addition, EBV PCR copies fluctuated and then decreased significantly. He remained clinically asymptomatic over the following four years. PMID:27226916

  9. Interleukin-2 from Adaptive T Cells Enhances Natural Killer Cell Activity against Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeguang; Frascaroli, Giada; Bayer, Carina; Schmal, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) requires a continuous immune surveillance, thus HCMV is the most important viral pathogen in severely immunocompromised individuals. Both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to the control of HCMV. Here, we report that peripheral blood natural killer cells (PBNKs) from HCMV-seropositive donors showed an enhanced activity toward HCMV-infected autologous macrophages. However, this enhanced response was abolished when purified NK cells were applied as effectors. We demonstrate that this enhanced PBNK activity was dependent on the interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion of CD4+ T cells when reexposed to the virus. Purified T cells enhanced the activity of purified NK cells in response to HCMV-infected macrophages. This effect could be suppressed by IL-2 blocking. Our findings not only extend the knowledge on the immune surveillance in HCMV—namely, that NK cell-mediated innate immunity can be enhanced by a preexisting T cell antiviral immunity—but also indicate a potential clinical implication for patients at risk for severe HCMV manifestations due to immunosuppressive drugs, which mainly suppress IL-2 production and T cell responsiveness. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is never cleared by the host after primary infection but instead establishes a lifelong latent infection with possible reactivations when the host′s immunity becomes suppressed. Both innate immunity and adaptive immunity are important for the control of viral infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are main innate effectors providing a rapid response to virus-infected cells. Virus-specific T cells are the main adaptive effectors that are critical for the control of the latent infection and limitation of reinfection. In this study, we found that IL-2 secreted by adaptive CD4+ T cells after reexposure to HCMV enhances the activity of NK cells in response to HCMV-infected target cells. This is the first direct evidence that the adaptive T cells can

  10. [Modification of a method for determining the cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes--natural killers in space experiments].

    PubMed

    Buravkova, L B; Rykova, M P; Antropova, E N; Grigor'eva, O V

    2005-01-01

    A space modification of a method for determining the cytotoxic activity of natural killers (NK) uses cultures of human lymphocytes and re-inoculated suspension of tumorous myeloblasts K-562. The 3H-uridine labeled target-cells fixated in 0.1 % formalin solution proved to be best suited to the conditions prohibiting regular recharge of cultural medium and utilization of radioactive agents. The following practical conclusions were made from the space-flown experiment: pre-launch procedures (lymphocyte isolation and delivery to the launch site) and time period till dock must not be longer than 5 days (1) and during transportation to the orbiting vehicle cell cultures must be kept at 18-20 degrees C (2). The modified method can be employed to study various aspects of cell interaction such as the NK ability to destroy target-cells in suspension cultured exposed in microgravity. PMID:15909849

  11. Rhomboid domain-containing protein 3 is a negative regulator of TLR3-triggered natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Liu, Shuxun; Xia, Meng; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Chunmei; Bao, Yan; Jiang, Minghong; Wu, Yue; Xu, Tian; Cao, Xuetao

    2013-05-01

    Rhomboid domain-containing protein 3 (Rhbdd3), which belongs to a family of proteins with rhomboid domain, is widely expressed in immune cells; however, the roles of the Rhbdd members, including Rhbdd3, in immunity remain unknown. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical for host immune defense and also can mediate inflammatory diseases such as hepatitis. Although much is known about how NK cells are activated, the detailed mechanisms for negative regulation of NK cell activation remain to be fully understood. Using Rhbdd3-deficient mice, we reveal that Rhbdd3, selectively up-regulated in NK cells upon Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) stimulation, negatively regulates TLR3-mediated NK cell activation in a feedback manner. Rhbdd3 inhibits TLR3-triggered IFN-γ and granzyme B expression of NK cells in cell-cell contact dependence of accessory cells such as dendritic cells and Kupffer cells. Rhbdd3 interacts with DNAX activation protein of 12 kDa and promotes its degradation, inhibiting MAPK activation in TLR3-triggered NK cells. Furthermore, Rhbdd3 plays a critical role in attenuating TLR3-triggered acute inflammation by controlling NK cell activation and accumulation in liver and disrupting NK cell-Kupffer cell interaction. Therefore, Rhbdd3 is a feedback inhibitor of TLR3-triggered NK cell activation. Our study outlines a mechanism for the negative regulation of NK cell activation and also provides clues for the function of the rhomboid proteins in immunity. PMID:23610400

  12. Suppressing the killer instinct.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kerry S

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells that have adopted activating and inhibitory signaling mechanisms enabling them to be tolerant of normal cells but to distinguish and eliminate tumor cells and virus-infected cells. In this issue of Science Signaling, Matalon et al show how inhibitory receptors disrupt NK cell activation by stimulating dephosphorylation of the adaptor protein LAT (linker of activated T cells) and phospholipase C-γ by the phosphatase SHP-1 [Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1], as well as ubiquitylation of LAT by Cbl family E3 ubiquitin ligases. PMID:27221707

  13. Augmentation of natural killer cell activity in mice by oral administration of transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Ishizaka, S; Kimoto, M; Kanda, S; Saito, S

    1998-01-01

    The latent form of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in human milk and platelets was converted to the active form when conscious, pylorus-ligated mice were given human milk and platelets by intragastric intubation. Oral administration of TGF-beta exerted enhancing effects on the natural killer (NK)-cell activities in spleen and liver. Augmentation of NK-cell activities in spleen was observed for 7 days after oral administration of TGF-beta. TGF-beta at concentrations of 5 and 20 ng produced the greatest augmentation of NK-cell activities in spleen. However, NK-cell activities in spleen were unaffected when TGF-beta was given intravenously. Interleukin (IL)-12 production in spleen was enhanced by oral administration of TGF-beta, but not by intravenous administration of TGF-beta. These findings suggest that large amounts of TGF-beta in human milk are involved in early antiviral protection through the augmentation of NK-cell activities. PMID:9824511

  14. Lack of correlation between natural killer activity and tumor growth control in nude mice with different immune defects.

    PubMed

    Fodstad, O; Hansen, C T; Cannon, G B; Statham, C N; Lichtenstein, G R; Boyd, M R

    1984-10-01

    To elucidate the in vivo role of natural killer (NK) cells, the growth of several murine and human tumors was studied in four variants of athymic, nude mice with different levels of NK activity. Beige-nude mice, homozygous for both the beige and the nude genes, had very low levels of NK activity, and their response to the B-cell mitogen, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, was lower than that of high-NK, adult NIH nude mice. Young and adult NIH nudes had different NK levels and showed different response in assays for K-cell, T-cell, and B-cell activity. The B-cell-defective NIH-II mice had slightly lower NK levels than adult NIH animals, but much lower response in the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. No correlation was found between host NK activity and the s.c. growth of various human (LOX, CEM, K562) and murine (YAC-1) tumor cells. Low NK activity was not associated with increased lung colony formation in a metastasis model using i.v.-injected human (LOX) and murine (B16F10) melanoma cells. No relationship was found between host NK activity and the rate of elimination of i.v.-injected 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled LOX, B16F10, and YAC-1 cells from lungs, liver, or spleen. The results fail to support the view that NK cells exert significant direct effects on tumor cells in vivo. PMID:6467201

  15. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). NK cell priming with activated pDCs resulted in TRAIL and CD69 up-regulation on NK cells and IFN-γ production. NK cell activation was dependent on IFN-α produced by pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α alone. ALL killing was further enhanced by inhibition of KIR engagement. We showed that ALL lysis was mainly mediated by TRAIL engagement, while the release of cytolytic granules was involved when ALL expressed NK cell activating receptor ligands. Finally, adoptive transfers of activated-pDCs in ALL-bearing humanized mice delayed the leukemia onset and cure 30% of mice. Our data therefore demonstrate that TLR-9 activated pDCs are a powerful tool to overcome ALL resistance to NK cell-mediated killing and to reinforce the GvL effect of HSCT. These results open new therapeutic avenues to prevent relapse in children with ALL. PMID:26320191

  16. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). NK cell priming with activated pDCs resulted in TRAIL and CD69 up-regulation on NK cells and IFN-γ production. NK cell activation was dependent on IFN-α produced by pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α alone. ALL killing was further enhanced by inhibition of KIR engagement. We showed that ALL lysis was mainly mediated by TRAIL engagement, while the release of cytolytic granules was involved when ALL expressed NK cell activating receptor ligands. Finally, adoptive transfers of activated-pDCs in ALL-bearing humanized mice delayed the leukemia onset and cure 30% of mice. Our data therefore demonstrate that TLR-9 activated pDCs are a powerful tool to overcome ALL resistance to NK cell-mediated killing and to reinforce the GvL effect of HSCT. These results open new therapeutic avenues to prevent relapse in children with ALL. PMID:26320191

  17. Functional advantage of educated KIR2DL1(+) natural killer cells for anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, S L; Center, R J; Kent, S J; Parsons, M S

    2016-04-01

    Evidence from the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial implicates anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vaccine-conferred protection from infection. Among effector cells that mediate ADCC are natural killer (NK) cells. The ability of NK cells to be activated in an antibody-dependent manner is reliant upon several factors. In general, NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent activation is most robust in terminally differentiated CD57(+) NK cells, as well as NK cells educated through ontological interactions between inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and their major histocompatibility complex class I [MHC-I or human leucocyte antigen (HLA-I)] ligands. With regard to anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell activation, previous research has demonstrated that the epidemiologically relevant KIR3DL1/HLA-Bw4 receptor/ligand combination confers enhanced activation potential. In the present study we assessed the ability of the KIR2DL1/HLA-C2 receptor/ligand combination to confer enhanced activation upon direct stimulation with HLA-I-devoid target cells or antibody-dependent stimulation with HIV-1 gp140-pulsed CEM.NKr-CCR5 target cells in the presence of an anti-HIV-1 antibody source. Among donors carrying the HLA-C2 ligand for KIR2DL1, higher interferon (IFN)-γ production was observed within KIR2DL1(+) NK cells than in KIR2DL1(-) NK cells upon both direct and antibody-dependent stimulation. No differences in KIR2DL1(+) and KIR2DL1(-) NK cell activation were observed in HLA-C1 homozygous donors. Additionally, higher activation in KIR2DL1(+) than KIR2DL1(-) NK cells from HLA-C2 carrying donors was observed within less differentiated CD57(-) NK cells, demonstrating that the observed differences were due to education and not an overabundance of KIR2DL1(+) NK cells within differentiated CD57(+) NK cells. These observations are relevant for understanding the regulation of anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell responses. PMID:26647083

  18. Natural Killer T Cells in Adipose Tissue Are Activated in Lean Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Taisuke; Toyoshima, Yujiro; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Kyuwa, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissues are closely connected with the immune system. It has been suggested that metabolic syndromes such as type 2 diabetes, arteriosclerosis and liver steatosis can be attributed to adipose tissue inflammation characterized by macrophage infiltration. To understand a physiological and pathological role of natural killer T (NKT) cells on inflammation in adipose tissue, we characterized a subset of NKT cells in abdominal and subcutaneous adipose tissues in C57BL/6J mice fed normal or high-fat diets. NKT cells comprised a larger portion of lymphocytes in adipose tissues compared with the spleen and peripheral blood, with epididymal adipose tissue having the highest number of NKT cells. Furthermore, some NKT cells in adipose tissues expressed higher levels of CD69 and intracellular interferon-γ, whereas the Vβ repertoires of NKT cells in adipose tissues were similar to other cells. In obese mice fed a high-fat diet, adipose tissue inflammation had little effect on the Vβ repertoire of NKT cells in epididymal adipose tissues. We speculate that the NKT cells in adipose tissues may form an equivalent subset in other tissues and that these subsets are likely to participate in adipose tissue inflammation. Additionally, the high expression level of CD69 and intracellular IFN-γ raises the possibility that NKT cells in adipose tissue may be stimulated by some physiological mechanism. PMID:24172196

  19. Structural Basis for Phototoxicity of the Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Gurskaya, Nadya G.; Pletneva, Nadya V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Chudakov, Dmitri M.; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Popov, Vladimir O.; Kovalchuk, Mikhail V.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir

    2009-11-23

    KillerRed is the only known fluorescent protein that demonstrates notable phototoxicity, exceeding that of the other green and red fluorescent proteins by at least 1,000-fold. KillerRed could serve as an instrument to inactivate target proteins or to kill cell populations in photodynamic therapy. However, the nature of KillerRed phototoxicity has remained unclear, impeding the development of more phototoxic variants. Here we present the results of a high resolution crystallographic study of KillerRed in the active fluorescent and in the photobleached non-fluorescent states. A unique and striking feature of the structure is a water-filled channel reaching the chromophore area from the end cap of the {beta}-barrel that is probably one of the key structural features responsible for phototoxicity. A study of the structure-function relationship of KillerRed, supported by structure-based, site-directed mutagenesis, has also revealed the key residues most likely responsible for the phototoxic effect. In particular, Glu68 and Ser119, located adjacent to the chromophore, have been assigned as the primary trigger of the reaction chain.

  20. Superresolution microscopy reveals nanometer-scale reorganization of inhibitory natural killer cell receptors upon activation of NKG2D.

    PubMed

    Pageon, Sophie V; Cordoba, Shaun-Paul; Owen, Dylan M; Rothery, Stephen M; Oszmiana, Anna; Davis, Daniel M

    2013-07-23

    Natural killer (NK) cell responses are regulated by a dynamic equilibrium between activating and inhibitory receptor signals at the immune synapse (or interface) with target cells. Although the organization of receptors at the immune synapse is important for appropriate integration of these signals, there is little understanding of this in detail, because research has been hampered by the limited resolution of light microscopy. Through the use of superresolution single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to reveal the organization of the NK cell surface at the single-protein level, we report that the inhibitory receptor KIR2DL1 is organized in nanometer-scale clusters at the surface of human resting NK cells. Nanoclusters of KIR2DL1 became smaller and denser upon engagement of the activating receptor NKG2D, establishing an unexpected crosstalk between activating receptor signals and the positioning of inhibitory receptors. These rearrangements in the nanoscale organization of surface NK cell receptors were dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. Together, these data establish that NK cell activation involves a nanometer-scale reorganization of surface receptors, which in turn affects models for signal integration and thresholds that control NK cell effector functions and NK cell development. PMID:23882121

  1. Lipid and Carbohydrate Modifications of α-Galactosylceramide Differently Influence Mouse and Human Type I Natural Killer T Cell Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, Alysia; Nemčovič, Marek; Yu, Esther Dawen; Girardi, Enrico; Wang, Jing; Khurana, Archana; Pauwels, Nora; Farber, Elisa; Chitale, Sampada; Franck, Richard W.; Tsuji, Moriya; Howell, Amy; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of different glycosphingolipids (GSLs) to activate type I natural killer T cells (NKT cells) has been known for 2 decades. The possible therapeutic use of these GSLs has been studied in many ways; however, studies are needed in which the efficacy of promising GSLs is compared under identical conditions. Here, we compare five unique GSLs structurally derived from α-galactosylceramide. We employed biophysical and biological assays, as well as x-ray crystallography to study the impact of the chemical modifications of the antigen on type I NKT cell activation. Although all glycolipids are bound by the T cell receptor of type I NKT cells in real time binding assays with high affinity, only a few activate type I NKT cells in in vivo or in vitro experiments. The differences in biological responses are likely a result of different pharmacokinetic properties of each lipid, which carry modifications at different parts of the molecule. Our results indicate a need to perform a variety of assays to ascertain the therapeutic potential of type I NKT cell GSL activators. PMID:26018083

  2. Lipid and Carbohydrate Modifications of α-Galactosylceramide Differently Influence Mouse and Human Type I Natural Killer T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia; Nemčovič, Marek; Yu, Esther Dawen; Girardi, Enrico; Wang, Jing; Khurana, Archana; Pauwels, Nora; Farber, Elisa; Chitale, Sampada; Franck, Richard W; Tsuji, Moriya; Howell, Amy; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Zajonc, Dirk M

    2015-07-10

    The ability of different glycosphingolipids (GSLs) to activate type I natural killer T cells (NKT cells) has been known for 2 decades. The possible therapeutic use of these GSLs has been studied in many ways; however, studies are needed in which the efficacy of promising GSLs is compared under identical conditions. Here, we compare five unique GSLs structurally derived from α-galactosylceramide. We employed biophysical and biological assays, as well as x-ray crystallography to study the impact of the chemical modifications of the antigen on type I NKT cell activation. Although all glycolipids are bound by the T cell receptor of type I NKT cells in real time binding assays with high affinity, only a few activate type I NKT cells in in vivo or in vitro experiments. The differences in biological responses are likely a result of different pharmacokinetic properties of each lipid, which carry modifications at different parts of the molecule. Our results indicate a need to perform a variety of assays to ascertain the therapeutic potential of type I NKT cell GSL activators. PMID:26018083

  3. Impaired culture generated cytotoxicity with preservation of spontaneous natural killer-cell activity in cartilage-hair hypoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.F.; Brovall, C.; Schacter, B.Z.; Polmar, S.H.

    1983-06-01

    Recent studies of cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH), a form of short-limbed dwarfism, have shown that all affected individuals have a cellular proliferation defect that results in a cellular immunodeficiency. However, only a minority of CHH individuals suffer from severe, life-threatening infections. For this reason, relevant immune defense mechanisms that may be responsible for maintaining intact host defenses in the majority of CHH individuals were studied. Spontaneous and allogeneic culture-induced (mixed lymphocyte response-MLR) specific and nonspecific (NK-like) cytotoxic mechanisms were analyzed and correlated with lymphocyte subpopulations present in CHH and normal individuals. Spontaneous natural-killer (NK) activity was present at or above normal levels, but culture-induced specific cytotoxicity and NK-like cytotoxicity as well as NK-like activity by T cell lines were significantly reduced in CHH individuals. The generation of radiation-resistant cytotoxicity, which normally occurs during allogeneic MLR, was markedly diminished in CHH, and was correlated with the decreased proliferation observed in CHH cultures. Preservation of spontaneous NK activity and loss of all forms of culture-induced cytotoxicity was associated with an increase in the proportion of lymphocytes bearing a thymic independent NK phenotype, and a significant decrease in thymic derived cytolytic T cell sub-populations in CHH individuals. Therefore, an intact cellular cytotoxic effector mechanism has been identified in CHH (i.e., NK activity).

  4. [The natural killer activity and indices of the interferon status of patients with recurrent genital herpes being treated with ridostin].

    PubMed

    Cheknev, S B; Mikovskaia, O I; Meshkova, E N; Khaldin, A A; Samgin, M A; Malinovskaia, V V

    1994-01-01

    Natural killer cell activity (NK) in parallel with the interferon (IFN)-alpha and IFN-gamma production as well as with a level of IFN in the blood serum were studied in 15 patients with relapsing herpes genitalis (RHG). Rhidostin, well known as an IFN-alpha inducer, was used in a dose of 2 mg once daily for 3 days subcutaneously up to a total dose of 8 mg of the preparation. The NK cell activity and IFN-alpha production were shown to decrease in RHG more significantly in the stage of remission than during the relapse of the process. As a result of rhidostin therapy the NK cell activity was restored simultaneously with the positive clinical effect of the drug. Rhidostin was found to be an efficient modifier of the IFN system functioning in patients with RHG. The above data allow a conclusion that rhidostin exhibiting an independent antiviral and immunostimulating action might be useful in patients with a remission of RHG for prevention of its relapses. PMID:8091753

  5. Absence of circulating natural killer (NK) cells in a child with erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis lacking NK cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, H.; Komiyama, A.; Aoyama, K.; Miyagawa, Y.; Akabane, T.

    1988-06-01

    A 5-year-old girl who was diagnosed as having erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis died at age 9 years. Peripheral lymphocytes from the patient persistently lacked natural killer (NK) cell activity during the 4-year observation period: the percent lysis values as measured by a 4-hr /sup 51/Cr release assay at a 40:1 effector:target ratio were below 1.0% against K562 and Molt-4 cells as compared with the normal lymphocyte value (mean +/- SD) of 46.2% +/- 5.8% and 43.9% +/- 6.7%, respectively. The patient's lymphocytes never developed NK cell activity by their incubation with target cells for longer time periods or by their stimulation with interferon-alpha, interleukin-2, or polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid. Single cell-in-agarose assay showed the absence of target-binding cells (TBCs): TBC numbers were below 0.3% as compared with the normal lymphocyte value of 8.1% +/- 1.3% (mean +/- SD). Flow cytometry showed a marked decrease in Leu-7+ cells (1.7%) and the absence of Leu-11+ cells (0.4%) in the peripheral blood. These results first demonstrate a case of erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in which there is the lack of NK cell activity due to the absence of circulating NK cells.

  6. Identification of putative novel O-glycosylations in the NK killer receptor Ncr1 essential for its activity

    PubMed Central

    Glasner, Ariella; Roth, Ziv; Varvak, Alexander; Miletic, Antonija; Isaacson, Batya; Bar-On, Yotam; Jonjic, Stipan; Khalaila, Isam; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells kill tumor and virus-infected cells using activating NK cell receptors. One of the major NK-activating receptors is NKp46 and its mouse ortholog Ncr1. NKp46/Ncr1 is expressed exclusively on NK cells and on a subset of innate lymphoid cells. NKp46/Ncr1 was shown to be involved in a myriad of pathologies and immunological settings. Specifically, NKp46/Ncr1 was shown to interact with the viral hemagglutinin (HA) protein and with an unknown tumor/cellular ligand. NKp46 and Ncr1 are structurally similar; however, they are substantially different in their glycosylation patterns. Although the human NKp46 carries both O- and N-glycosylations that are essential for its activity, the mouse Ncr1 was predicted to have N-linked glycosylations only. Here we discovered using prediction algorithms and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis that Ncr1 carries two putative novel O-glycosylations, one of which (Thr 225) is conserved in NKp46. We next used surface plasmon resonance, biochemical, mutational and functional in vitro and in vivo assays to demonstrate that the putative O-glycosylations of Ncr1 are critical for its function.

  7. Keiko, Killer Whale. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    This lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Keiko, the killer whale, lived for a long time in an aquarium and had to be taught to live independently; and that computer users can get updates on how Keiko is doing. The main activity of the lesson involves middle school students working in small groups to produce a…

  8. Isolation and functional characterization of chicken intestinal intra-epithelial lymphocytes showing natural killer cell activity against tumour target cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chai, J Y; Lillehoj, H S

    1988-01-01

    Intestinal intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IEL) of SC or FP chickens were isolated and examined for their natural killer (NK)-cell activity against chicken tumour cell lines, LSCC-RP9 (RP9), LSCC-RP12 (RP12), MDCC-MSB-1 (MSB-1) and MDCC-CU36 (CU36). In general, IEL of satisfactory yield and of good viability were obtained with EDTA treatment of the gut tissues, followed by rapid passages of the resultant cells through nylon-wool columns and centrifugation on two-step Percoll density gradients (45% and 80%). In 4-hr and 16-hr 51Cr-release assays, the NK-cell activity of chicken IEL depended not only upon the type of target cells but also upon the incubation time and the host genetic background. RP9, MSB-1 and CU36 were susceptible to NK lysis by IEL and by spleen cells, while RP12 was resistant to lysis even after a prolonged incubation. In kinetic studies the cytotoxicity was detactable from 2 hr after incubation and progressively increased up to 16 or 18 hr. The IEL of SC chickens revealed significantly higher levels of NK-cell activity against RP9 than FP-strain chickens, whereas their splenic NK-cell activity was not significantly different. Against MSB-1 targets, however, IEL of SC and FP chickens showed similar levels of NK-cell activity while their spleens did not (being higher in FP). When tested in FP chickens, IEL NK-cell activity was inhibited by the addition of unlabelled homologous target cells. In general, NK-cell activity was higher in the jejunum and ileum than in the duodenum and caecum. Efforts to enrich IEL NK-effector cells by discontinuous Percoll gradients were not successful. The results of the present study show that IEL of chicken intestine contain effector cells that can mediate NK-cell activity against chicken tumour cells. PMID:3338816

  9. Natural killer cell activity and autologous mixed lymphocyte response of splenic, mesenteric lymph node, and colonic lymphocytes during DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Nauss, K M; Newberne, P M

    1987-07-01

    Two in vitro models of immune surveillance were used to examine the immune status of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, mesenteric lymph nodes, and spleen during the early stages of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMN)-induced colon tumorigenesis. DMH- and vehicle-treated Fischer rats were sacrificed at one of three time points: one week, two months, or five months after cessation of treatment. Colonic, lymph node, and splenic natural killer cell cytolytic activity toward YAC-1 tumor targets and T-cell response to autologous Ia-induced blastogenesis were measured at each time point. We found little change in natural killer cell activity or T-cell proliferation induced by autologous Ia gene products at these time periods. PMID:2954798

  10. Variation in the emission rate of sounds in a captive group of false killer whales Pseudorca crassidens during feedings: possible food anticipatory vocal activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platto, Sara; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong

    2015-11-01

    This study examines whether a group of captive false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens ) showed variations in the vocal rate around feeding times. The high level of motivation to express appetitive behaviors in captive animals may lead them to respond with changes of the behavioral activities during the time prior to food deliveries which are referred to as food anticipatory activity. False killer whales at Qingdao Polar Ocean World (Qingdao, China) showed significant variations of the rates of both the total sounds and sound classes (whistles, clicks, and burst pulses) around feedings. Precisely, from the Transition interval that recorded the lowest vocalization rate (3.40 s/m/d), the whales increased their acoustic emissions upon trainers' arrival (13.08 s/m/d). The high rate was maintained or intensified throughout the food delivery (25.12 s/m/d), and then reduced immediately after the animals were fed (9.91 s/m/d). These changes in the false killer whales sound production rates around feeding times supports the hypothesis of the presence of a food anticipatory vocal activity. Although sound rates may not give detailed information regarding referential aspects of the animal communication it might still shed light about the arousal levels of the individuals during different social or environmental conditions. Further experiments should be performed to assess if variations of the time of feeding routines may affect the vocal activity of cetaceans in captivity as well as their welfare.

  11. Fate of gamma-interferon-activated killer blood monocytes adoptively transferred into the abdominal cavity of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, H.C.; Keenan, A.M.; Woodhouse, C.; Ottow, R.T.; Miller, P.; Steller, E.P.; Foon, K.A.; Abrams, P.G.; Beman, J.; Larson, S.M.

    1987-11-15

    Five patients with colorectal cancer widely metastatic to peritoneal surfaces have been treated i.p. with infusions of autologous blood monocytes made cytotoxic by in vitro incubation with human gamma-interferon. The monocytes were purified by a combination of cytapheresis and counter-current centrifugal elutriation procedures; each week approximately 350 million activated monocytes were given to patients as adoptive immunotherapy by a single i.p. instillation. On the eighth cycle of treatment the trafficking of i.p. infused blood monocytes was studied in two patients by prelabeling the cells with /sup 111/In. These activated cells became distributed widely within the peritoneal cavity. Two and 5 days after infusion their position within the peritoneum had not changed. When peritoneal specimens were obtained 36 h after /sup 111/In-labeled monocyte infusion, labeled monocytes were demonstrated to be associated with the serosal surfaces by autoradiographic analysis. Scintiscanning structures outside the abdominal cavity revealed that /sup 111/In-labeled monocytes infused i.p. did not traffic to other organs during the 5 days of the study. We conclude that i.p. adoptive transfer of autologous killer blood monocytes is an effective way of delivering these cytotoxic cells to sites of tumor burden on peritoneal surfaces in these cancer patients.

  12. Effect of anti-asthma Chinese medicine Chuankezhi on the anti-tumor activity of cytokine-induced killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing-Jing; Pan, Ke; Wang, Qi-Jing; Xu, Zheng-Di; Weng, De-Sheng; Li, Jian-Jun; Li, Yong-Qiang; Xia, Jian-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Chuankezhi (CKZ), a new Chinese medicine, plays an important role in immunoregulation. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells have been commonly used for immunotherapy in recent years. In this study, we aimed to investigate the immunoregulatory effect of CKZ on CIK cells. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy donors, and CIK cells were generated by culturing monocytes with interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin 2. Different concentrations of CKZ were added on day 2. After incubation for 14 days in culture, the antitumor effects of CIK cells were measured by cytotoxicity assay. Flow cytometry was used to explore the effect of CKZ on CIK cell immunophenotype, intracellular cytokine production, and apoptosis. The effect of CKZ on the antitumor activity of CIK cells in nude mice was also investigated. CKZ increased the percentage of CD3+CD56+ CIK cells but did not significantly change the percentage of CD4+, CD8+, or CD4+CD25+ CIK cells. CKZ-conditioned CIK cells showed a greater ability to kill tumor cells, as well as a higher frequency of IFN-γ and TNF-α production, compared with the CIK cells in the control group. CKZ also suppressed the apoptosis of CIK cells in vitro. Furthermore, CKZ combined with CIK cells had a stronger suppressive effect on tumor growth in vivo than the CIK, CKZ, or normal saline control groups. Our results indicate that CKZ enhances the antitumor activity of CIK cells and is a potential medicine for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:23470144

  13. Antimicrobial activity of various immunomodulators: independence from normal levels of circulating monocytes and natural killer cells. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Morahan, P.S.; Dempsey, W.L.; Volkman, A.; Connor, J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of /sup 89/Sr treatment on the natural host resistance of CD-1 mice and the enhancement of resistance by immunomodulators to infection with Listeria monocytogenes or herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) were determined. In the CD-1 mouse, single-dose treatment with /sup 89/Sr caused a profound decrease in the number of circulating monocytes (Mo), lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) within 1 week. There was also marked functional impairment of the Mo inflammatory response, as well as markedly decreased spontaneous and activatable cytoxicity by splenic natural killer (NK) cells. Despite this profound cellular suppression, there was no significant change in natural resistance of CD-1 mice to L. monocytogenes of HSV-2 infection. Furthermore, prophylactic treatment of mice with the biologic immunomodulator Corynebacterium parvum or the synthetic immunomodulators maleic anhydride-divinyl ether or avridine in liposomes resulted in comparable enhancement of resistance in /sup 89/Sr-treated and normal mice. These data indicate that natural and immunomodulator-enhanced resistance of CD-1 mice to microbail infections do not depend on normal levels of Mo, PMN, or NK cells. The resistance enhancement may rely on activated tissue macrophages. In contrast to the early changes in circulating leukocytes, the residenet peritoneal cell populations were not markedly altered until after day 30. There then was a distinct decline in lymphocytes and a gradual decline in activated tissue macrophages.

  14. Scorpion venom activates natural killer cells in hepatocellular carcinoma via the NKG2D-MICA pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; Zhidan, Wang; Xia, Ren; Zhaoxia, Wang; Qing, Jia; Qiang, Guo; Haipeng, Yin; Hengxiao, Wang

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that polypeptides extracted from scorpion venom (PESV) inhibited cell proliferation in several tumors, however, the effect on dysfunctional and exhausted natural killer cells which contribute to tumor escape from immune surveillance remain to be elucidated. In this study, we determined the effect of PESV on NK infiltration into H22 cells orthotopic transplantation tumors and on the expression of MHC class I chain-related proteins A (MICA) in HepG2 cells. We found that tumor growth in mice was significantly inhibited by PESV and the survival time of tumor-bearing mice treated with PESV was significantly prolonged. Moreover, levels of tumor-infiltrating NK cells, NKG2D protein, perforin and granzyme B mRNA were significantly increased in the group treated with PESV compared with the tumor-bearing control group. In addition, In addition, up-regulation of MICA by PESV enhances the susceptibility of HepG2 cells to NK lysis in vitro. These results indicate that the inhibitory effects of PESV on hepatic carcinoma are likely mediated by up-regulation of NK cell activity via the MICA-NKG2D pathway. PMID:27089390

  15. Early activation of natural killer and B cells in response to primary dengue virus infection in A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Shresta, Sujan; Kyle, Jennifer L; Robert Beatty, P; Harris, Eva

    2004-02-20

    Dengue virus (DEN) causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral illness in humans worldwide. Immune mechanisms that are involved in protection and pathogenesis of DEN infection have not been fully elucidated due largely to the lack of an adequate animal model. Therefore, as a first step, we characterized the primary immune response in immunocompetent inbred A/J mice that were infected intravenously with a non-mouse-adapted DEN type 2 (DEN2) strain. A subset (55%) of infected mice developed paralysis by 14 days post-infection (p.i.), harbored infectious DEN in the central nervous system (CNS), and had an elevated hematocrit and a decreased white blood cell (WBC) count. Immunologic studies detected (i). increased numbers of CD69(+) splenic natural killer (NK) and B cells at day 3 p.i., (ii). DEN-specific IgM and IgG responses by days 3 and 7 p.i., respectively, and (iii). splenocyte production of IFNgamma at day 14 p.i. We conclude that the early activities of NK cells, B cells and IgM, and later actions of IFNgamma and IgG likely play a role in the defense against DEN infection. PMID:14980486

  16. A forward genetic screen reveals novel independent regulators of ULBP1, an activating ligand for natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, Benjamin G; Chim, Bryan; Marceau, Caleb D; Greene, Trever T; Burr, Patrick; Gonzalez, Jeanmarie R; Hesser, Charles R; Dietzen, Peter A; Russell, Teal; Iannello, Alexandre; Coscoy, Laurent; Sentman, Charles L; Carette, Jan E; Muljo, Stefan A; Raulet, David H

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and elimination of tumor cells by the immune system is crucial for limiting tumor growth. Natural killer (NK) cells become activated when the receptor NKG2D is engaged by ligands that are frequently upregulated in primary tumors and on cancer cell lines. However, the molecular mechanisms driving NKG2D ligand expression on tumor cells are not well defined. Using a forward genetic screen in a tumor-derived human cell line, we identified several novel factors supporting expression of the NKG2D ligand ULBP1. Our results show stepwise contributions of independent pathways working at multiple stages of ULBP1 biogenesis. Deeper investigation of selected hits from the screen showed that the transcription factor ATF4 drives ULBP1 gene expression in cancer cell lines, while the RNA-binding protein RBM4 supports ULBP1 expression by suppressing a novel alternatively spliced isoform of ULBP1 mRNA. These findings offer insight into the stress pathways that alert the immune system to danger. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08474.001 PMID:26565589

  17. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    SciTech Connect

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  18. Effects of exercise and training on natural killer cell counts and cytolytic activity: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J; Shek, P N

    1999-09-01

    Meta-analysis techniques have been used to accumulate data from 94 studies describing the natural killer (NK) cell response of some 900 volunteers to acute and chronic exercise. NK cell numbers have been indicated in terms of CD3-CD16+CD56+, CD16+ or CD56+ phenotypes, and cytolytic activity has been expressed per 10,000 peripheral blood mononuclear cells or in terms of lytic units. Acute exercise has been categorised as sustained moderate (50 to 65% of aerobic power), sustained vigorous (>75% of aerobic power), brief maximal or 'supramaximal', prolonged, eccentric or resistance, and repeated exercise. In general, there was a marked increase in NK cell count at the end of exercise, probably attributable to a catecholamine-mediated demargination of cells. Following exercise, cell counts dropped to less than half of normal levels for a couple of hours but, except in unusual circumstances (e.g. prolonged, intense and stressful exercise), normal resting values are restored within 24 hours. If activity is both prolonged and vigorous, the decrease in NK cell counts and cytolytic activity may begin during the exercise session. Although the usual depression of NK cell count seems too brief to have major practical importance for health, there could be a cumulative adverse effect on immunosurveillance and health experience in athletes who induce such changes several times per week. There is a weak suggestion of an offsetting increase in resting NK cell counts and cytolytic action in trained individuals, and this merits further exploration in studies where effects of recent training sessions are carefully controlled. PMID:10541441

  19. Supplemental growth hormone increases the tumor cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells in healthy adults with normal growth hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Crist, D M; Kraner, J C

    1990-12-01

    Using double-blind, placebo-controlled procedures, the effects of methionyl-human growth hormone (met-hGH) on the tumor cytotoxic activity of natural killer (NK) cells were studied in seven healthy adults using a repeated measures experiment. Subjects were assigned at random to either a placebo (bacteriostatic water) treatment condition or a met-hGH (16.0 mg/wk of Protropin) treatment condition, then crossed-over to the alternative treatment. Treatments were delivered on alternate days (3 d/wk) for 6 weeks. Without bias from the met-hGH treatment, there was no evidence for GH hyposecretion as measured by the peak circulating GH response to exercise stimulation (14.1 +/- 3.1 ng/mL) or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) levels (0.82 +/- 0.09 U/mL). When compared with placebo, met-hGH induced a significant overall increase in the percent specific lysis (%SL) of K562 tumor target cells (placebo 22.2 +/- 1.7 v met-hGH 28.5 +/- 2.1 %SL; P = .008). NK activity was increased within the first week of treatment and this level was maintained throughout the remaining period of supplementation. There was a trend (P = .057) for the met-hGH-induced percent change in NK activity (NK%) to be inversely related to placebo IGF-I levels (r = -.761), while there were significant positive correlations between NK% and the met-hGH-induced percent changes in IGF-I (r = .727; P = .035), the fat-free mass (FFM)/fat mass (FM) ratio derived by hydrodensitometry (r = .792; P = .012), and the endogenous GH response to exercise (r = .469; P = .034).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2246974

  20. Possible association of decreased NKG2D expression levels and suppression of the activity of natural killer cells in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajuan; Lu, Chao; Tian, Wenjun; Wang, Laicheng; Cui, Bin; Jiao, Yulian; Ma, Chunyan; Ju, Ying; Zhu, Ling; Shao, Chunhong; Liu, Xinqi; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Bingchang; Lu, Zhiming

    2012-04-01

    Natural-killer group 2 (NKG2), a natural killer (NK) cell receptor, plays a critical role in regulating NK cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of natural killer group 2 member A (NKG2A) and natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) in NK cells as well as the regulatory function of NKG2D in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Sixty-two CRC patients and 32 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The expression levels of NKG2A and NKG2D mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were investigated using real-time PCR. Flow cytometry was performed to assay the levels of NKG2A and NKG2D proteins in NK cells. The levels of NKG2D mRNA in PBMCs in the patients were significantly lower than those in the controls [mean ± SD, 1.11 ± 0.60 (CRC patients) vs. 1.65 ± 0.71 (healthy controls); p < 0.01], whereas the 2 groups showed no apparent difference in the levels of NKG2A mRNA (p>0.05). In addition, the patients showed significantly lower NKG2D levels in NK cells than the controls did (71.23% ± 8.31% [CRC patients] vs. 79.39% ± 5.58% [healthy controls]; p < 0.01). However, we observed no distinct difference in the NKG2A expression levels in NK cells between the 2 groups (p> 0.05). Notably, blockage of NKG2D signaling with anti-NKG2D antibodies ex vivo resulted in decreased cytotoxicity and CD107a degranulation. Our data revealed that the decrease in NKG2D expression levels may have been associated with suppression of NK cell activity in CRC patients. PMID:22200673

  1. Activating and inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) in haploidentical haemopoietic stem cell transplantation to cure high-risk leukaemias.

    PubMed

    Moretta, A; Pende, D; Locatelli, F; Moretta, L

    2009-09-01

    A number of experimental studies have shown that natural killer (NK) cells can eliminate cancer cells and the mechanisms involved in this effect have been uncovered during the last two decades. Clinical data from haploidentical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) revealed that NK cells were responsible for remarkably favourable effects in both adult and paediatric high-risk leukaemias. NK receptors specific for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, including killer immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptors (KIR) and CD94/NKG2A, play a major role in the anti-leukaemia effect (mediating either inhibitory or activating signals). Haplo- HSCT requires a heavy conditioning regimen for the patient and the use of large numbers of T cell-depleted HSC to be grafted. After transplantation, natural killer cells develop from HSC shortly after engraftment and may include 'alloreactive' NK cells that kill leukaemic cells and prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Alloreactive NK cells are characterized by the expression of KIR that are not engaged by any of the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles expressed by the patient. Their generation is dependent upon the existence of a KIR/HLA class I mismatch between donor and recipient. Novel important information on the function and specificity of different KIR has been obtained recently by the analysis of donor-derived alloreactive NK cells in a cohort of paediatric patients given haplo-HSCT to cure acute, high-risk leukaemias. PMID:19664139

  2. NKR-P1A is a target-specific receptor that activates natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J C; Niemi, E C; Nakamura, M C; Seaman, W E

    1995-05-01

    NKR-P1A is a lectinlike surface molecule expressed on rat natural killer (NK) cells. NKR-P1A has structural and functional features of an activating NK cell receptor, but a requirement for NKR-P1A in target cell lysis has not been determined. To define the role of NKR-P1A in natural killing, we have generated a mutant of the rat NK cell line, RNK-16, lacking expression of all members of the NKR-P1 receptor family. Although these NKR-P1-deficient NK cells were able to kill many standard tumor targets, including YAC-1, they were selectively deficient in the lysis of IC-21 macrophage, B-16 melanoma, and C1498 lymphoma targets. Reexpression of a single member of the NKR-P1 family, NKR-P1A, on mutant cells restored lysis of IC-21, and killing of IC-21 targets through rat NKR-P1A was completely blocked by F(ab')2 anti-NKR-P1A. Reexpression of NKR-P1A also restored transmembrane signaling to IC-21, as assessed by the generation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate. The generation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate was also restored in response to B-16 targets, but both B-16 and C1498 cells remained resistant to lysis, indicating that other NK cell molecules, perhaps within the NKR-P1 family, are required for the efficient killing of these tumors. These results are the first to demonstrate that NKR-P1A is a target-specific receptor that activates natural killing. PMID:7722466

  3. NKR-P1A is a target-specific receptor that activates natural killer cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    NKR-P1A is a lectinlike surface molecule expressed on rat natural killer (NK) cells. NKR-P1A has structural and functional features of an activating NK cell receptor, but a requirement for NKR-P1A in target cell lysis has not been determined. To define the role of NKR-P1A in natural killing, we have generated a mutant of the rat NK cell line, RNK-16, lacking expression of all members of the NKR-P1 receptor family. Although these NKR-P1-deficient NK cells were able to kill many standard tumor targets, including YAC-1, they were selectively deficient in the lysis of IC-21 macrophage, B-16 melanoma, and C1498 lymphoma targets. Reexpression of a single member of the NKR-P1 family, NKR-P1A, on mutant cells restored lysis of IC-21, and killing of IC-21 targets through rat NKR-P1A was completely blocked by F(ab')2 anti-NKR- P1A. Reexpression of NKR-P1A also restored transmembrane signaling to IC-21, as assessed by the generation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate. The generation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate was also restored in response to B-16 targets, but both B-16 and C1498 cells remained resistant to lysis, indicating that other NK cell molecules, perhaps within the NKR-P1 family, are required for the efficient killing of these tumors. These results are the first to demonstrate that NKR-P1A is a target-specific receptor that activates natural killing. PMID:7722466

  4. Natural Killer T Cells Activated by a Lipopeptidophosphoglycan from Entamoeba histolytica Are Critically Important To Control Amebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Buko; Winau, Florian; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Lafont, Martha; Ulmer, Artur J.; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert; Jacobs, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune response is supposed to play an essential role in the control of amebic liver abscess (ALA), a severe form of invasive amoebiasis due to infection with the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In a mouse model for the disease, we previously demonstrated that Jα18-/- mice, lacking invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, suffer from more severe abscess development. Here we show that the specific activation of iNKT cells using α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) induces a significant reduction in the sizes of ALA lesions, whereas CD1d−/− mice develop more severe abscesses. We identified a lipopeptidophosphoglycan from E. histolytica membranes (EhLPPG) as a possible natural NKT cell ligand and show that the purified phosphoinositol (PI) moiety of this molecule induces protective IFN-γ but not IL-4 production in NKT cells. The main component of EhLPPG responsible for NKT cell activation is a diacylated PI, (1-O-[(28∶0)-lyso-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-]2-O-(C16:0)-Ins). IFN-γ production by NKT cells requires the presence of CD1d and simultaneously TLR receptor signalling through MyD88 and secretion of IL-12. Similar to α-GalCer application, EhLPPG treatment significantly reduces the severity of ALA in ameba-infected mice. Our results suggest that EhLPPG is an amebic molecule that is important for the limitation of ALA development and may explain why the majority of E. histolytica-infected individuals do not develop amebic liver abscess. PMID:19436711

  5. Natural killer T cells activated by a lipopeptidophosphoglycan from Entamoeba histolytica are critically important to control amebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Hannelore; González-Roldán, Nestor; Lindner, Buko; Winau, Florian; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Lafont, Martha; Ulmer, Artur J; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert; Jacobs, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    The innate immune response is supposed to play an essential role in the control of amebic liver abscess (ALA), a severe form of invasive amoebiasis due to infection with the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In a mouse model for the disease, we previously demonstrated that Jalpha18(-/-) mice, lacking invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, suffer from more severe abscess development. Here we show that the specific activation of iNKT cells using alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) induces a significant reduction in the sizes of ALA lesions, whereas CD1d(-/-) mice develop more severe abscesses. We identified a lipopeptidophosphoglycan from E. histolytica membranes (EhLPPG) as a possible natural NKT cell ligand and show that the purified phosphoinositol (PI) moiety of this molecule induces protective IFN-gamma but not IL-4 production in NKT cells. The main component of EhLPPG responsible for NKT cell activation is a diacylated PI, (1-O-[(28:0)-lyso-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-]2-O-(C16:0)-Ins). IFN-gamma production by NKT cells requires the presence of CD1d and simultaneously TLR receptor signalling through MyD88 and secretion of IL-12. Similar to alpha-GalCer application, EhLPPG treatment significantly reduces the severity of ALA in ameba-infected mice. Our results suggest that EhLPPG is an amebic molecule that is important for the limitation of ALA development and may explain why the majority of E. histolytica-infected individuals do not develop amebic liver abscess. PMID:19436711

  6. High-dose intensity pulse interleukin-2 with famotidine has activity in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter D Y; Walker, Paul R; Picton, Maria; Quan, Francine M; King, Linda A; Tyre, Charley; Liles, Darla K

    2008-10-01

    Daily short intravenous (i.v.) infusions (pulses) of interleukin-2 (IL-2) have been developed to decrease toxicity while maintaining anticancer activity of this agent against melanoma. Such IL-2 schedules have previously been shown to promote lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell activity. Famotidine may increase LAK activity by increasing IL-2 internalization by the IL-2 receptor on lymphocytes. We treated 16 patients with metastatic melanoma using pulse IL-2 18 (15 patients) or 9 million IU/M2 (1 patient) i.v. over 15-30 minutes preceded by famotidine 20 mg i.v. daily for 5 days on an oncology inpatient unit. Cycles were repeated every 3 weeks until disease progression. Patient characteristics were as follows: 11 males, median age, 66, median ECOG performance status, 1; common metastatic sites: lymph nodes, lungs, subcutaneous, liver, and bone. Median number of cycles received was 3. Overall, 93% of planned doses were delivered. Most common toxicities were hypomagnesemia, fever, rigors, hypophosphatemia, and nausea/emesis. Three (3) patients had partial responses (19% response rate; 95% confidence interval: 6%-44%). A fourth patient, after resection of residual disease, remains a surgical complete responder at > 12 months. Responses occurred in lung, liver, lymph nodes, bone, and subcutaneous sites. Median response duration was 7 months. Pulse IL-2 with famotidine has activity in melanoma. PMID:18999936

  7. Design of natural killer T cell activators: Structure and function of a microbial glycosphingolipid bound to mouse CD1d

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Douglass; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Fujio, Masakazu; Sullivan, Barbara A.; Kinjo, Yuki; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Wilson, Ian A.; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2006-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells provide an innate-type immune response upon T cell receptor interaction with CD1d-presented antigens. We demonstrate through equilibrium tetramer binding and antigen presentation assays with Vα14i-positive NKT cell hybridomas that the Sphingomonas glycolipid α-galacturonosyl ceramide (GalA-GSL) is a NKT cell agonist that is significantly weaker than α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), the most potent known NKT agonist. For GalA-GSL, a shorter fatty acyl chain, an absence of the 4-OH on the sphingosine tail and a 6′-COOH group on the galactose moiety account for its observed antigenic potency. We further determined the crystal structure of mCD1d in complex with GalA-GSL at 1.8-Å resolution. The overall binding mode of GalA-GSL to mCD1d is similar to that of the short-chain α-GalCer ligand PBS-25, but its sphinganine chain is more deeply inserted into the F′ pocket due to alternate hydrogen-bonding interactions between the sphinganine 3-OH with Asp-80. Subsequently, a slight lateral shift (>1 Å) of the galacturonosyl head group is noted at the CD1 surface compared with the galactose of α-GalCer. Because the relatively short C14 fatty acid of GalA-GSL does not fully occupy the A′ pocket, a spacer lipid is found that stabilizes this pocket. The lipid spacer was identified by GC/MS as a mixture of saturated and monounsaturated palmitic acid (C16). Comparison of available crystal structures of α-anomeric glycosphingolipids now sheds light on the structural basis of their differential antigenic potency and has led to the design and synthesis of NKT cell agonists with enhanced cell-based stimulatory activities compared with α-GalCer. PMID:16537470

  8. Influence of autologous dendritic cells on cytokine-induced killer cell proliferation, cell phenotype and antitumor activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jingsong; Chen, Cong; Wang, Yuhuan; Chen, Xuecheng; Chen, Zeying; Luo, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DCs) are essential antigen processing and presentation cells that play a key role in the immune response. In this study, DCs were co-cultured with cytokine-induced killer cells (DC-CIKs) in vitro to detect changes in cell proliferation, cell phenotype and cell cytotoxicity. The results revealed that the DCs were suitable for co-culture with CIKs at day 7, and that cell quantity of DC-CIKs was lower than that of CIKs until day 11, but it was significantly improved to 1.17-fold that of CIKs at day 13. Flow cytometry was used to detect the cell phenotype of CIKs and DC-CIKs. Compared with CIKs at day 13, the percentage of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD56+ T cells in DC-CIKs was significantly improved 1.02, 1.79, 1.26 and 2.44-fold, respectively. In addition, trypan blue staining analysis demonstrated that the cell viability of CIKs and DC-CIKs was 96% and 98%, respectively. Furthermore, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis verified that CIK and DC-CIK cytotoxicity in Hela cells was 58% and 80%, respectively, with a significant difference. Taken together, our results indicate that the cell proliferation, cell phenotype and antitumor activity of CIKs were all enhanced following co-culture with DCs in vitro. These results are likely to be useful for DC-CIK application in antitumor therapies. PMID:27602134

  9. Effects of in vivo hyperthermia on natural killer cell activity, in vitro proliferative responses and blood mononuclear cell subpopulations.

    PubMed Central

    Kappel, M; Stadeager, C; Tvede, N; Galbo, H; Pedersen, B K

    1991-01-01

    This work was designed to test the hypothesis that elevations in body temperature of humans induce immunostimulation. Eight healthy volunteers were immersed in a water bath (water temperature 39.5 degrees C) for 2 h, during which their rectal temperature rose to 39.5 degrees C. On a later day they served as their own controls, being immersed into thermoneutral water (34.5 degrees C) for 2 h. Blood samples were collected before immersion, at body temperatures of 38 degree C, 39 degree C and 39.5 degree C, and 2 h after water immersion. The interleukin-2 (IL-2) enhanced natural killer (NK) cell activity (lysis per fixed number of mononuclear cells), as well as the proportion and total number of NK cells (CD16+ cells), increased significantly during hyperthermia compared with control values. The lymphocyte proliferative responses did not differ significantly between hyperthermia and thermoneutral conditions. The proportion of pan-T (CD3+) cells was maximally depressed 2 h after water immersion. The decreased proportion of CD3+ cells was mainly due to a decreased percentage of CD4+ cells (not significant). The proportion of B cells (CD19+ cells) did not fluctuate significantly, while a marked and significant increase in monocyte proportion (CD14+ cells) was found 2 h after hyperthermia. Two hours after hot water immersion the lymphocyte concentration declined while the neutrophil and monocyte concentrations were augmented. Induced hyperthermia causes significantly increased serum cortisol, plasma norepinephrine and plasma epinephrine concentrations compared to controls. It is possible that the altered immune functions induced by elevated body temperature can be ascribed to altered composition and function of blood mononuclear cells induced by elevated levels of stress hormones. PMID:2015709

  10. Enhanced natural killer cell activation by exopolysaccharides derived from yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1.

    PubMed

    Makino, Seiya; Sato, Asako; Goto, Ayako; Nakamura, Marie; Ogawa, Miho; Chiba, Yoshika; Hemmi, Jun; Kano, Hiroshi; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Ko; Asami, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    Yogurt is generally recognized as a beneficial food for our health, but research into its physiological effects has focused mainly on intestinal dysfunctions such as constipation and diarrhea. We previously found yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 (hereafter OLL1073R-1) could reduce risks of catching the common cold and flu in human trials. It was assumed that immunostimulatory exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced from OLL1073R-1 play an important role in this context. However, few studies have examined the immunostimulatory effects of traditional Bulgarian yogurts fermented with different strains of lactobacilli and their metabolites. Therefore, we screened 139 L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus strains and identified OLL1073R-1 as the most robust producer of EPS. This strain was also the only strain that induced the production of IFN-γ in vitro. Oral administration of the EPS or yogurt fermented with OLL1073R-1 and Streptococcus thermophilus OLS3059 (OLL1073R-1 yogurt) augmented natural killer (NK) cell activity and induced IFN-γ production in spleen cells in mice, whereas 2 other yogurts fermented with other strains had no effect on NK cell activity. Cellular preparations of the OLL1073R-1 strain also slightly augmented NK cell activity, but were less effective than EPS itself. The EPS-dependent stimulation of NK cell activity was abrogated in IFN-γ knockout mice and in myeloid differentiation factor 88 knockout mice. Furthermore, IFN-γ production from spleen cells stimulated with EPS was completely blocked with both anti-IL-12 and anti-IL-18 antibodies in vitro. These findings suggest that NK cell activation by OLL1073R-1 yogurt is EPS-dependent, occurs via IL-12- and IL-18-mediated IFN-γ production, and requires myeloid differentiation factor 88. We showed that traditional Bulgarian yogurt could exert immunostimulatory effects by selecting starter strains and part of the mechanisms depend on IFN-γ inducible EPS produced

  11. Natural killer (NK) activity of pit cells perfused from livers of rats treated with ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Albornoz, L.; Jones, J.M.; Crutchfield, C.; Veech, R.L. Univ. of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock )

    1991-03-11

    The liver is the major site of ethanol (ETOH) metabolism. Liver sinusoids contain lymphocytes with NK activity. The authors treated LEW rats for 2 weeks with i.p. injection of 1.25 ml 25% ETOH/kg 3 times/week and 5% ETOH in drinking water. Livers were perfused at 5-fold physiological pressure and cells obtained were banded on 1.077 density Ficoll. Their cytotoxicity was tested against {sup 51}Cr-labeled YAC-1 or U937 and compared to spleen and blood lymphocytes. In untreated rats, pit cell NK activity was 2-fold that of splenic lymphocytes and 4-fold that of blood lymphocytes. Compared to controls, ETOH-treated rats exhibited a 30 to 90% rise in pit cell NK activity detected with YAC-1 or U937 targets. The pit cell enhanced NK activity in ETOH-treated rats was further increased if polyinosinicpolycytidilic acid was injection i.p. 18 hours before the assay. Blood and spleen lymphocyte NK activity of ETOH-treated rats was also greater than in controls. There was no evidence that ETOH merely redistributed lymphocytes among the tissues. Although ETOH acutely inhibits NK activity in vitro, chronic ETOH increases in vivo.

  12. Coordinated Activation of Toll-Like Receptor8 (TLR8) and NLRP3 by the TLR8 Agonist, VTX-2337, Ignites Tumoricidal Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dietsch, Gregory N.; Lu, Hailing; Yang, Yi; Morishima, Chihiro; Chow, Laura Q.; Disis, Mary L.; Hershberg, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    VTX-2337 (USAN: motolimod) is a selective toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8) agonist, which is in clinical development as an immunotherapy for multiple oncology indications, including squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Activation of TLR8 enhances natural killer cell activation, increases antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and induces Th1 polarizing cytokines. Here, we show that VTX-2337 stimulates the release of mature IL-1β and IL-18 from monocytic cells through coordinated actions on both TLR8 and the NOD-like receptor pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome complex. In vitro, VTX-2337 primed monocytic cells to produce pro-IL-1β, pro-IL-18, and caspase-1, and also activated the NLRP3 inflammasome, thereby mediating the release of mature IL-1β family cytokines. Inhibition of caspase-1 blocked VTX-2337-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation, but had little impact on production of other TLR8-induced mediators such as TNFα. IL-18 activated natural killer cells and complemented other stimulatory pathways, including FcγRIII and NKG2D, resulting in IFNγ production and expression of CD107a. NLRP3 activation in vivo was confirmed by a dose-related increase in plasma IL-1β and IL-18 levels in cynomolgus monkeys administered VTX-2337. These results are highly relevant to clinical studies of combination VTX-2337/cetuximab treatment. Cetuximab, a clinically approved, epidermal growth factor receptor-specific monoclonal antibody, activates NK cells through interactions with FcγRIII and facilitates ADCC of tumor cells. Our preliminary findings from a Phase I open-label, dose-escalation, trial that enrolled 13 patients with recurrent or metastatic SCCHN show that patient NK cells become more responsive to stimulation by NKG2D or FcγRIII following VTX-2337 treatment. Together, these results indicate that TLR8 stimulation and inflammasome activation by VTX-2337 can complement FcγRIII engagement and may augment clinical responses in SCCHN

  13. Activity of outpatient intravenous interleukin-2 and famotidine in metastatic clear cell kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter D Y; Quan, Francine Marie

    2014-03-01

    Outpatient daily intravenous infusions of interleukin-2 (IL-2) have been developed to maintain anticancer activity and decrease toxicity of this agent against kidney cancer. Lymphokine activated killer cell (LAK) numbers are increased with these IL-2 schedules. Famotidine may enhance the LAK activity by increasing IL-2 internalization by the IL-2 receptor on lymphocytes. Fifteen patients with metastatic clear cell kidney cancer received IL-2 18 million IU/M² intravenously over 15-30 minutes preceded by famotidine 20 mg IV daily for 3 days for 6 consecutive weeks as outpatients. Cycles were repeated every 8 weeks. Patient characteristics were seven males/eight females, median age 59 (range: 28-70), median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status-1; common metastatic sites were lungs (14), lymph nodes (9), liver (4), bone (4), and pancreas (4). Prior systemic therapies were oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (8), IL-2 (6), and mTor inhibitor (2). Most common toxicities were rigors, arthralgia/myalgia, nausea/emesis, fever, and hypotension. All episodes of hypotension were reversible with intravenous fluid. No patients required hospitalization due to toxicity. One complete response (7%) and four partial responses (26%) were seen (total response rate=33%; 95% confidence interval: 15%-59%). Responses occurred in the lungs, liver, lymph nodes, and bone. Outpatient intravenous IL-2 with famotidine has activity in metastatic clear cell kidney cancer. PMID:24251758

  14. INDUCTION OF ACTIVATION ANTIGENS ON HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS MODIFIED THROUGH THE FC-Y RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    NK cells, defined here as lymphocytes bearing the CD16 Ag found on the NK cell Fc-y receptor (FcR), are known to enter a proliferative and activated state in response to stimulation with IL-2 as assessed by clonal expansion, short-term DNA synthesis, and de novo expression of lym...

  15. Natural killer (NK) and mitogen (OKT3) augmented NK activity in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.; Schwartz, S.

    1986-03-01

    The authors examined NK and OKT3 augmented NK activity in 14 IDDM patients and 15 age matched controls (28 +/- 6 vs 28.5 +/- 6 yrs respectively) to evaluate this aspect of antigen nonspecific immunity. NK and augmented NK function were examined at various target to effector cell ratios (E/T) using the K562 cell line (as target) in a 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assay. Islet cell antibodies (ICA) were determined by standard methods. All of the diabetics (mean duration of disease 16 yrs) and controls were ICA (-). Their observations indicate that there is no significant difference between diabetic and control subjects in NK activity. The ability of OKT3 to augment NK activity (by a T-cell mediated process) is also not significantly different between the two groups. An abnormal immune response to beta cells has a central role in the pathogenesis of IDDM. The nature of this autoimmune defect is unclear. The authors' present observations indicate that antigen nonspecific immune function may be normal in patients with IDDM. They propose that IDDM is a disease only of abnormal antigen specific immunoregulation.

  16. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M; Yang, Enjun; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  17. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M.; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K.; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  18. An Improved Flow Cytometry Method For Precise Quantitation Of Natural-Killer Cell Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Nehlsen-Cannarella, Sandra; Sams, Clarence

    2006-01-01

    The ability to assess NK cell cytotoxicity using flow cytometry has been previously described and can serve as a powerful tool to evaluate effector immune function in the clinical setting. Previous methods used membrane permeable dyes to identify target cells. The use of these dyes requires great care to achieve optimal staining and results in a broad spectral emission that can make multicolor cytometry difficult. Previous methods have also used negative staining (the elimination of target cells) to identify effector cells. This makes a precise quantitation of effector NK cells impossible due to the interfering presence of T and B lymphocytes, and the data highly subjective to the variable levels of NK cells normally found in human peripheral blood. In this study an improved version of the standard flow cytometry assay for NK activity is described that has several advantages of previous methods. Fluorescent antibody staining (CD45FITC) is used to positively identify target cells in place of membranepermeable dyes. Fluorescent antibody staining of target cells is less labor intensive and more easily reproducible than membrane dyes. NK cells (true effector lymphocytes) are also positively identified by fluorescent antibody staining (CD56PE) allowing a simultaneous absolute count assessment of both NK cells and target cells. Dead cells are identified by membrane disruption using the DNA intercalating dye PI. Using this method, an exact NK:target ratio may be determined for each assessment, including quantitation of NK target complexes. Backimmunoscatter gating may be used to track live vs. dead Target cells via scatter properties. If desired, NK activity may then be normalized to standardized ratios for clinical comparisons between patients, making the determination of PBMC counts or NK cell percentages prior to testing unnecessary. This method provides an exact cytometric determination of NK activity that highly reproducible and may be suitable for routine use in the

  19. Standardization of a micro-cytotoxicity assay for human natural killer cell lytic activity.

    PubMed

    Mariani, E; Monaco, M C; Sgobbi, S; de Zwart, J F; Mariani, A R; Facchini, A

    1994-06-24

    Cytotoxicity assays are widely used to evaluate the functional activity of NK and T cells against tumour target cells and the release of radioactive sodium chromate from labelled target cells is still the most commonly used marker of target lysis in culture supernatants. We describe here the standardization of a micro-cytotoxicity test in which the number of cytolytic effector and tumour target cells have been decreased by a factor of 10. The release obtained by 500 tumour target cells was compared with the release obtained by 5000 target cells in the standard cytotoxicity assay for target:effector cell ratios from 1:1 to 1:100. Both gamma and beta emissions of the 51Cr isotope were evaluated to determine the assay release. The results obtained by the micro-cytotoxicity assay (500 target cells) were comparable to those of the standard assay (5000 target cells) and 51Cr release evaluation using the gamma counter was the most sensitive method of determining lytic activity using 500 tumour target cells. beta counter evaluation using solid phase scintillation was found to be a reproducible alternative method, even if the lytic curves cannot be compared with those obtained using the traditional method. PMID:8034970

  20. Giant cavernous hemangioma of the liver and multiple primary malignant tumors in a patient with suspected familial inhibition of natural killer cell activity--a case report.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, T; Uchida, K; Yoshida, K; Muto, T; Saito, H; Nemoto, K; Inoue, Z; Morita, T; Miyakoshi, H; Tamura, K

    1989-03-01

    A woman was operated on for a nonepithelial malignant tumor of the left leg and subsequently, for an epithelial carcinoma of the right breast and a borderline malignant tumor of the right ovary. She also developed a giant cavernous hemangioma that caused disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome, which necessitated a left trisegmentectomy of the liver. Her family history suggested a hereditary predisposition to diverse malignant neoplasms, and also to giant cavernous hemangioma of the liver. Immunological evaluation disclosed selective inhibition of natural killer cell activity. Hormonal and hereditary factors are discussed in relation to the development of multiple primary tumors and giant cavernous hemangioma of the liver. PMID:2724721

  1. Natural Killer Cell-Based Therapies Targeting Cancer: Possible Strategies to Gain and Sustain Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Sarhan, Dhifaf; Chrobok, Michael; Duru, Adil D.; Alici, Evren

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were discovered 40 years ago, by their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure. Since then, NK cells have been seen as promising agents for cell-based cancer therapies. However, NK cells represent only a minor fraction of the human lymphocyte population. Their skewed phenotype and impaired functionality during cancer progression necessitates the development of clinical protocols to activate and expand to high numbers ex vivo to be able to infuse sufficient numbers of functional NK cells to the cancer patients. Initial NK cell-based clinical trials suggested that NK cell-infusion is safe and feasible with almost no NK cell-related toxicity, including graft-versus-host disease. Complete remission and increased disease-free survival is shown in a small number of patients with hematological malignances. Furthermore, successful adoptive NK cell-based therapies from haploidentical donors have been demonstrated. Disappointingly, only limited anti-tumor effects have been demonstrated following NK cell infusion in patients with solid tumors. While NK cells have great potential in targeting tumor cells, the efficiency of NK cell functions in the tumor microenvironment is yet unclear. The failure of immune surveillance may in part be due to sustained immunological pressure on tumor cells resulting in the development of tumor escape variants that are invisible to the immune system. Alternatively, this could be due to the complex network of immune-suppressive compartments in the tumor microenvironment, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and regulatory T cells. Although the negative effect of the tumor microenvironment on NK cells can be transiently reverted by ex vivo expansion and long-term activation, the aforementioned NK cell/tumor microenvironment interactions upon reinfusion are not fully elucidated. Within this context, genetic modification of NK cells

  2. Natural Killer Cell-Based Therapies Targeting Cancer: Possible Strategies to Gain and Sustain Anti-Tumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Carin I M; Sarhan, Dhifaf; Chrobok, Michael; Duru, Adil D; Alici, Evren

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were discovered 40 years ago, by their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure. Since then, NK cells have been seen as promising agents for cell-based cancer therapies. However, NK cells represent only a minor fraction of the human lymphocyte population. Their skewed phenotype and impaired functionality during cancer progression necessitates the development of clinical protocols to activate and expand to high numbers ex vivo to be able to infuse sufficient numbers of functional NK cells to the cancer patients. Initial NK cell-based clinical trials suggested that NK cell-infusion is safe and feasible with almost no NK cell-related toxicity, including graft-versus-host disease. Complete remission and increased disease-free survival is shown in a small number of patients with hematological malignances. Furthermore, successful adoptive NK cell-based therapies from haploidentical donors have been demonstrated. Disappointingly, only limited anti-tumor effects have been demonstrated following NK cell infusion in patients with solid tumors. While NK cells have great potential in targeting tumor cells, the efficiency of NK cell functions in the tumor microenvironment is yet unclear. The failure of immune surveillance may in part be due to sustained immunological pressure on tumor cells resulting in the development of tumor escape variants that are invisible to the immune system. Alternatively, this could be due to the complex network of immune-suppressive compartments in the tumor microenvironment, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and regulatory T cells. Although the negative effect of the tumor microenvironment on NK cells can be transiently reverted by ex vivo expansion and long-term activation, the aforementioned NK cell/tumor microenvironment interactions upon reinfusion are not fully elucidated. Within this context, genetic modification of NK cells

  3. Added effects of dexamethasone and mesenchymal stem cells on early Natural Killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Michelo, Clive M; Fasse, Esther; van Cranenbroek, Bram; Linda, Katrin; van der Meer, Arnold; Abdelrazik, Heba; Joosten, Irma

    2016-07-01

    Graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease are leading causes of transplant related mortality despite advancements in immunosuppressive therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offer a promising addition to immunosuppressive drugs (ISD), while NK-cells are increasingly used as effector cells in graft-versus-leukemia. Combined therapy of ISD, NK-cells and/or MSCs is used in clinical practice. Here, we examined the effects of MSCs and selected ISD (tacrolimus, cyclosporin A, mycophenolic acid, dexamethasone) treatment on early NK-cell activation. We assessed STAT4 and STAT5 phosphorylation triggered by IL-12 and IL-2, respectively. Furthermore, we determined IFNγ, perforin production and the expression pattern of selected NK-cell receptors. Of all drugs tested, only dexamethasone inhibited NK-cell STAT4 and STAT5 phosphorylation. All ISD, with the exception of MPA, significantly inhibited IFNγ, and only dexamethasone inhibited upregulation of early activation markers CD69 and CD25 (IL-2 condition only). MSCs inhibited IL-2 induced NK cell STAT5 phosphorylation, IFNγ production and CD69 upregulation, and IL-12 induced IFNγ and perforin production. While MSCs mediated inhibition of CD69 expression was cell contact dependent, inhibition of IFNγ and perforin production, as well as STAT5 phosphorylation was cell-contact independent. Importantly, dexamethasone augmented MSCs mediated inhibition of both IL-12 and IL-2 induced CD69 expression and IFNγ production, as well as IL-2 induced STAT5 phosphorylation. Taken together, these novel insights may help the design of future NK-cell and MSCs based immunotherapy. PMID:27142560

  4. G1-4A, a polysaccharide from Tinospora cordifolia induces peroxynitrite dependent killer dendritic cell (KDC) activity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vipul K; Amin, Prayag J; Shankar, Bhavani S

    2014-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in the development of an adaptive immune response against tumor. In addition to its role in antigen presentation, DC also possesses cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. We have earlier shown phenotypic and functional maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) by G1-4A, an arabinogalactan derived from Tinospora cordifolia. In this study, we have investigated the killer phenotype of BMDC matured in the presence of G1-4A, [mBMDC (G1-4A)] on tumor cells. We have observed several fold increase in killing of tumor cells by mBMDC (G1-4A). The tumoricidal activity was not specific to syngeneic tumors cells but could kill xenogenic tumors also. Nitric oxide released by mBMDC (G1-4A) generates peroxynitrite in tumor cells and is responsible for killing of target cells. This killing was completely abrogated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor 1400W and NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocyanin. The killed target cells are phagocytosed by BMDC which further activate syngeneic cytotoxic T cells. These results thus show that G1-4A treated mBMDC acquire killer phenotype along with maturation which plays an important role in activation of cytotoxic T cells. PMID:25278461

  5. Increasing the immune activity of exosomes: the effect of miRNA-depleted exosome proteins on activating dendritic cell/cytokine-induced killer cells against pancreatic cancer* #

    PubMed Central

    Que, Ri-sheng; Lin, Cheng; Ding, Guo-ping; Wu, Zheng-rong; Cao, Li-ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumor-derived exosomes were considered to be potential candidates for tumor vaccines because they are abundant in immune-regulating proteins, whereas tumor exosomal miRNAs may induce immune tolerance, thereby having an opposite immune function. Objective: This study was designed to separate exosomal protein and depleted exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs), increasing the immune activity of exosomes for activating dendritic cell/cytokine-induced killer cells (DC/CIKs) against pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods: PC-derived exosomes (PEs) were extracted from cultured PANC-1 cell supernatants and then ruptured; this was followed by ultrafiltered exosome lysates (UELs). DCs were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), PE, and UEL, followed by co-culture with CIKs. The anti-tumor effects of DC/CIKs against PC were evaluated by proliferation and killing rates, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and perforin secretion. Exosomal miRNAs were depleted after lysis and ultrafiltration, while 128 proteins were retained, including several immune-activating proteins. Results: UEL-stimulated DC/CIKs showed a higher killing rate than LPS- and PE-stimulated DC/CIKs. Conclusions: miRNA-depleted exosome proteins may be promising agonists for specifically activating DC/CIKs against PC. PMID:27143262

  6. Lonely killers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The majority of the most effective monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) currently in the clinics bind to cancer or immune cells. Classic mechanisms of cell killing by therapeutic mAbs include antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement-dependent cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis by engagement of specific cell ligands. A few reports have described mAbs whose cytotoxic activity is Fc-independent and that do not induce the morphological and biochemical changes associated with the apoptosis-type of cell death. Even fewer works describe mAbs able to directly induce membrane lesions. Here, we discuss the available data on those molecules and their cell killing activity, with particular attention to the case of a mAb specific for the tumor-associated N-glycolyl (Neu5Gc)-GM3 ganglioside [GM3(Neu5Gc)]. Some similarities are found in the cell death pathways triggered by these mAbs, but data are not abundant. We conclude that the usefulness of mAbs with a direct cytotoxic activity for immunotherapeutic strategies deserves deeper research. PMID:22123064

  7. Activation of natural killer cells and dendritic cells upon recognition of a novel CD99-like ligand by paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Ikuo; Ogasawara, Kouetsu; Saito, Takashi; Lanier, Lewis L; Arase, Hisashi

    2004-02-16

    Paired receptors that consist of highly related activating and inhibitory receptors are widely involved in the regulation of the immune system. Here, we report a mouse orthologue of the human activating paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor (PILR) beta, which was cloned from a cDNA library of natural killer (NK) cells based on its ability to associate with the DAP12 signaling adaptor protein. The activating PILRbeta was expressed not only on NK cells but also on dendritic cells and macrophages. Furthermore, we have identified a novel CD99-like molecule as a ligand for the activating PILRbeta and inhibitory PILRalpha receptors. Transcripts of PILR ligand are present in many tissues, including some T cell lines. Cells expressing the PILR ligand specifically activated NK cells and dendritic cells that express the activating PILRbeta. Our findings reveal a new regulatory mechanism of innate immunity by PILR and its CD99-like ligand. PMID:14970179

  8. Efficacy of RetroNectin-activated cytokine-induced killer cell therapy in the treatment of advanced hepatocelluar carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, WEI; WANG, YAOMEI; KELLNER, DANIEL B.; ZHAO, LINGDI; XU, LINPING; GAO, QUANLI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of RetroNectin-activated cytokine-induced killer cell (R-CIK) therapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients as compared with conventional chemotherapy, a comparison that has not yet been thoroughly studied. From January 2010 to October 2013, 74 patients with an initial diagnosis of advanced hepatocelluar carcinoma were enrolled in the study. Patients were assigned to one of two treatment arms: patients in arm 1 (n=37) received R-CIK treatment as the first line therapy, whereas those in arm 2 (n=37) received chemotherapy as the first line treatment. The primary end point measured in this study was median overall survival (mOS). Median progression-free survival time (mPFS) and 1- and 2-year survival rates were recorded as secondary end points. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed on all mOS and mPFS data, and treatment hazard ratios were established using the Cox proportional hazards model. The 1-year survival rate in treatment arm 1 was 42.47% vs. 24.89% in arm 2 (95% CI, 24.91–59.01% vs. 12.10–40.02%, P=0.066); the 2-year survival rates were 21.24 and 5.53% (95% CI, 4.60–45.86 vs. 0.46–21.06%, P=0.106) in arms 1 and 2, respectively; the mPFS in arm 1 was 4.37 vs. 3.90 (x2=0.182, P=0.670) in arm 2; and the mOS in arm 1 was 14.03 months vs. 9.46 months(x2=4.406, P=0.036) in arm 2. Calculations of univariate analyses of arm 1, R-CIK cycles ≥6, KPS >70, AFP ≤400 ng/ml, and findings of no vascular invasion and no extra-hepatic metastasis were potential predictive factors (P<0.05). Calculations from multivariate analyses similarly identified these factors as potentially having predictive value (P<0.05). The main adverse effects of R-CIK therapy included fever and headache pain. R-CIK treatment may prolong mOS in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients compared with conventional chemotherapy. Patients who underwent ≥6 cycles of R-CIK, had KPS scores >70, AFP ≤400 ng/ml, displayed no evidence of

  9. Characterization of a novel maitake (Grifola frondosa) protein that activates natural killer and dendritic cells and enhances antitumor immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Yao-Wei; Kuan, Yen-Chou; Wang, Jia-Lin; Sheu, Fuu

    2013-10-16

    Grifola frondosa, also known as maitake, is a culinary mushroom with immune-enhancing and antitumor effects. Numerous studies have investigated the activity of maitake polysaccharide extracts, but studies of maitake proteins are scarce. In this study, we purified and characterized a new G. frondosa protein, GFP, from maitake fruiting bodies. GFP is a nonglucan heterodimeric 83 kDa protein that consists of two 41 kDa subunits. GFP induced interferon-γ secretion by murine splenocytes and natural killer cells and activated the maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) via a TLR4-dependent mechanism. GFP-treated BMDCs promoted a Th1 response and exhibited significant antitumor activity when transferred into tumor-bearing mice. In conclusion, we are the first to reveal the critical role of GFP in modulating the immune response and to link the immune-enhancing effects of maitake to its antitumor activities. PMID:24020458

  10. The Size of Activating and Inhibitory Killer Ig-like Receptor Nanoclusters Is Controlled by the Transmembrane Sequence and Affects Signaling.

    PubMed

    Oszmiana, Anna; Williamson, David J; Cordoba, Shaun-Paul; Morgan, David J; Kennedy, Philippa R; Stacey, Kevin; Davis, Daniel M

    2016-05-31

    Super-resolution microscopy has revealed that immune cell receptors are organized in nanoscale clusters at cell surfaces and immune synapses. However, mechanisms and functions for this nanoscale organization remain unclear. Here, we used super-resolution microscopy to compare the surface organization of paired killer Ig-like receptors (KIR), KIR2DL1 and KIR2DS1, on human primary natural killer cells and cell lines. Activating KIR2DS1 assembled in clusters two-fold larger than its inhibitory counterpart KIR2DL1. Site-directed mutagenesis established that the size of nanoclusters is controlled by transmembrane amino acid 233, a lysine in KIR2DS1. Super-resolution microscopy also revealed two ways in which the nanoscale clustering of KIR affects signaling. First, KIR2DS1 and DAP12 nanoclusters are juxtaposed in the resting cell state but coalesce upon receptor ligation. Second, quantitative super-resolution microscopy revealed that phosphorylation of the kinase ZAP-70 or phosphatase SHP-1 is favored in larger KIR nanoclusters. Thus, the size of KIR nanoclusters depends on the transmembrane sequence and affects downstream signaling. PMID:27210755

  11. Yeast killer systems.

    PubMed Central

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Gerloni, M; Bertolotti, D; Polonelli, L

    1997-01-01

    The killer phenomenon in yeasts has been revealed to be a multicentric model for molecular biologists, virologists, phytopathologists, epidemiologists, industrial and medical microbiologists, mycologists, and pharmacologists. The surprisingly widespread occurrence of the killer phenomenon among taxonomically unrelated microorganisms, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, has engendered a new interest in its biological significance as well as its theoretical and practical applications. The search for therapeutic opportunities by using yeast killer systems has conceptually opened new avenues for the prevention and control of life-threatening fungal diseases through the idiotypic network that is apparently exploited by the immune system in the course of natural infections. In this review, the biology, ecology, epidemiology, therapeutics, serology, and idiotypy of yeast killer systems are discussed. PMID:9227858

  12. Investigation of the pharmacokinetics and mechanism of the action of Eleutherococcus glycosides. VIII. Investigation of the activation of natural killers by Eleutherococcus extract

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, G.M.; Sterlina, A.G.; Bebyakova, N.V.; Ribokas, A.A.; Fuks, B.B.

    1987-06-01

    The authors studied whether there is activation of the cells of natural resistance in intact mice that have received Eleutherococcus extract (EE) as well as how EE influences the activity of the normal killers, proliferation of splenocytes of mice, and the synthesis of lymphokines (interferon, interleukin-2). The proliferation of splenocytes with concanavalin A was estimated according to the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine in a 96-well plate. Titration of interleukin-2 was performed on three-day concanavalin A partially in the presence of (/sup 3/H)thymidine. Splenocytes of intact mice were cultured for five days in the presence of various doses of Eleutherococcus preparation in RPMI-1640 medium with 10% fetal serum then used as effectors in the membranotoxic text and the level of proliferation was determined.

  13. Stochastic modeling of a serial killer.

    PubMed

    Simkin, M V; Roychowdhury, V P

    2014-08-21

    We analyze the time pattern of the activity of a serial killer, who during 12 years had murdered 53 people. The plot of the cumulative number of murders as a function of time is of "Devil's staircase" type. The distribution of the intervals between murders (step length) follows a power law with the exponent of 1.4. We propose a model according to which the serial killer commits murders when neuronal excitation in his brain exceeds certain threshold. We model this neural activity as a branching process, which in turn is approximated by a random walk. As the distribution of the random walk return times is a power law with the exponent 1.5, the distribution of the inter-murder intervals is thus explained. We illustrate analytical results by numerical simulation. Time pattern activity data from two other serial killers further substantiate our analysis. PMID:24721476

  14. Stochastic modeling of a serial killer

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, M.V.; Roychowdhury, V.P.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the time pattern of the activity of a serial killer, who during twelve years had murdered 53 people. The plot of the cumulative number of murders as a function of time is of “Devil’s staircase” type. The distribution of the intervals between murders (step length) follows a power law with the exponent of 1.4. We propose a model according to which the serial killer commits murders when neuronal excitation in his brain exceeds certain threshold. We model this neural activity as a branching process, which in turn is approximated by a random walk. As the distribution of the random walk return times is a power law with the exponent 1.5, the distribution of the inter-murder intervals is thus explained. We illustrate analytical results by numerical simulation. Time pattern activity data from two other serial killers further substantiate our analysis. PMID:24721476

  15. Brominated Flame Retardants, Tetrabromobisphenol A and Hexabromocyclododecane, Activate Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) in Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cato, Anita; Celada, Lindsay; Kibakaya, Esther Caroline; Simmons, Nadia; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    NK cells provide a vital surveillance against virally infected cells, tumor cells, and antibody-coated cells through the release of cytolytic mediators and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant used primarily in expanded (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams for thermal insulation in the building and construction industry. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is used both as a reactive and an additive flame retardant in a variety of materials. HBCD and TBBPA contaminate the environment and are found in human blood samples. In previous studies, we have shown that other environmental contaminants, such as the dibutyltin (DBT) and tributyltin (TBT), decrease NK lytic function by activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the NK cells. HBCD and TBBPA also interfere with NK cell(s) lytic function. The current study evaluates whether HBCD and/or TBBPA have the capacity to activate MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks). The effects of concentrations of HBCD and TBBPA that inhibited lytic function on the phosphorylation state and total levels of the MAPKs (p44/42, p38, and JNK) and the phosphorylation and total levels of the MAP2Ks (MEK1/2 and MKK3/6) were examined. Results indicate that exposure of human NK cells to 10-0.5 µM HBCD or TBBPA activate MAPKs and MAP2Ks. This HBCD and TBBPA-induced activation of MAPKs may leave them unavailable for activation by virally infected or tumor target cells and thus contributes to the observed decreases in lytic function seen in NK cells exposed to HBCD and TBBPA. PMID:25341744

  16. The Violence of Collection: "Indian Killer"'s Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Janet

    2008-01-01

    At the close of Sherman Alexie's "Indian Killer," in a final chapter titled "Creation Story," a killer carries a backpack containing, among other things, "dozens of owl feathers, a scrapbook, and two bloody scalps in a plastic bag." Readers schooled in the psychopathologies of real and fictional serial killers will be familiar with the detail:…

  17. Grass and weed killer poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Weedoff poisoning; Roundup poisoning ... Glyphosate is the poisonous ingredient in some weed killers. ... Glyphosate is in weed killers with these brand names: Roundup Bronco Glifonox Kleen-up Rodeo Weedoff Other ...

  18. Application of non-radioactive europium (Eu3+) release assay to a measurement of human natural killer activity of healthy and patient populations.

    PubMed

    Nagao, F; Yabe, T; Xu, M; Yokoyama, K; Saito, K; Okumura, K

    1996-01-01

    Europium (Eu3+) release assay is a non-radioactive method for a measurement of cytotoxicity of lymphocytes and has several advantages compared with a conventional 51Cr release assay. However, the Eu3+ release assay has not been applied to a natural killer (NK) activity measurement of a large number of the human population mainly due to a lack of comparability with the 51Cr release assay. With some modifications of the procedures and careful manipulation of cells, constant and reproducible results were obtained by the Eu3+ release assay. NK activity of several individuals was measured by the Eu3+ release assay and was compared with data obtained by 51Cr release assay performed simultaneously. The obtained values by the two methods were almost identical. We applied the Eu3+ method to measure NK activity of a large number of individuals, including 68 apparently healthy donors and 36 autoimmune and 21 cancer patients. Some of these diseases are known to show abnormal NK activity. The obtained cytotoxicities were mostly consistent with the previously reported data obtained by the 51Cr release assay. These results indicated that the Eu3+ release assay could be used as an alternative method for a measurement of human NK activity of mass population including patients. PMID:8915687

  19. The by-products generated during sarin synthesis in the Tokyo sarin disaster induced inhibition of natural killer and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Hirata, Y; Piao, S; Minami, M

    2000-05-01

    More than 5000 passengers on Tokyo subway trains were injured by the nerve gas, sarin and its by-products. Analysis of phosphor-carrying metabolites of sarin and its by-products in urine samples from the victims suggested that they were exposed not only to sarin, but also by-products generated during sarin synthesis, i.e. diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) and diethyl methylphosphonate (DEMP). We suspected genetic after-effects due to sarin by-products, thus, we checked the frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and found that SCE was significantly higher in the victims than in a control group, and that DIMP and DEMP significantly induced human lymphocyte SCE in vitro. In the present study, to explore whether DIMP and DEMP, which induced a high frequency of SCE of lymphocytes, also affected the lymphocyte functions, we examined the effect of DIMP and DEMP on splenic natural killer (NK) and splenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in mice, and NK activity of human lymphocytes in vitro. We found that DIMP and DEMP significantly inhibited NK and CTL activity in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition induced by DIMP was stronger than that by DEMP. The effect of DIMP and DEMP on the splenic NK activity of mice was stronger than on the splenic CTL activity, and the human lymphocytes is more sensitive to DIMP and DEMP than the splenocytes of mice. PMID:10814853

  20. Endogenous production of interleukin 15 by activated human monocytes is critical for optimal production of interferon-gamma by natural killer cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, W E; Ross, M E; Baiocchi, R A; Marien, M J; Boiani, N; Grabstein, K; Caligiuri, M A

    1995-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes that constitutively express functional IL-2 receptors. We have shown that recombinant human IL-15 uses the IL-2 receptor to activate human NK cells and can synergize with recombinant human IL-12 to stimulate NK cell production of IFN-gamma in vitro. IFN-gamma production by NK cells is critical in the prevention of overwhelming infection by obligate intracellular microbial pathogens in several experimental animal models. Herein, we demonstrate that human monocytes produce IL-15 protein within 5 h of activation with LPS. Using an IL-15-neutralizing antiserum in a coculture of LPS-activated monocytes and NK cells, we demonstrate that monocyte-derived IL-15 is critical for optimal NK cell production of IFN-gamma. Endogenous IL-15 activates NK cells through the IL-2 receptor, and with endogenous IL-12, regulates NK cell IFN-gamma after monocyte activation by LPS. These in vitro studies are the first to characterize a function for endogenous IL-15, and as such, suggest an important role for IL-15 during the innate immune response. IL-15 may be an important ligand for the NK cell IL-2 receptor in vivo. Images PMID:8675621

  1. Natural killer cell activation enhances immune pathology and promotes chronic infection by limiting CD8+ T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S; Xu, Haifeng C; Grusdat, Melanie; Parish, Ian A; Recher, Mike; Elford, Alisha R; Dhanji, Salim; Shaabani, Namir; Tran, Charles W; Dissanayake, Dilan; Rahbar, Ramtin; Ghazarian, Magar; Brüstle, Anne; Fine, Jason; Chen, Peter; Weaver, Casey T; Klose, Christoph; Diefenbach, Andreas; Häussinger, Dieter; Carlyle, James R; Kaech, Susan M; Mak, Tak W; Ohashi, Pamela S

    2012-01-24

    Infections with HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus can turn into chronic infections, which currently affect more than 500 million patients worldwide. It is generally thought that virus-mediated T-cell exhaustion limits T-cell function, thus promoting chronic disease. Here we demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells have a negative impact on the development of T-cell immunity by using the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. NK cell-deficient (Nfil3(-/-), E4BP4(-/-)) mice exhibited a higher virus-specific T-cell response. In addition, NK cell depletion caused enhanced T-cell immunity in WT mice, which led to rapid virus control and prevented chronic infection in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13- and reduced viral load in DOCILE-infected animals. Further experiments showed that NKG2D triggered regulatory NK cell functions, which were mediated by perforin, and limited T-cell responses. Therefore, we identified an important role of regulatory NK cells in limiting T-cell immunity during virus infection. PMID:22167808

  2. Clemency Pogue: Fairy Killer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    This young adult author claims his most enjoyable task as a writer is "intellectual danger, getting into other people's trouble." He asks his readers not to trust him, and then, as evidence, tempts us with a look at a chapter from "Clemency Pogue: Fairy Killer."

  3. Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hyeok-Ran; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Kyung Bok; Oh, Sang-Muk

    2010-01-01

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-{kappa}B activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-{kappa}B-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

  4. Activation of invariant Natural Killer T lymphocytes in response to the α-galactosylceramide analogue KRN7000 encapsulated in PLGA-based nanoparticles and microparticles.

    PubMed

    Macho Fernandez, Elodie; Chang, Jiang; Fontaine, Josette; Bialecki, Emilie; Rodriguez, Fabien; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Krieger, Vanessa; Ehret, Christophe; Heurtault, Béatrice; Fournel, Sylvie; Frisch, Benoit; Betbeder, Didier; Faveeuw, Christelle; Trottein, François

    2012-02-14

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells have potent immunostimulatory activities that could be exploited for human therapies. The high-affinity CD1d antigen α-galactosylceramide analogue KRN7000 (KRN) activates a cascade of anti-tumor effector cells and clinical studies have already had some initial success. To improve the efficacy of the treatment, strategies that aim to vectorize KRN would be valuable. In this study, we intended to characterize and compare the effect of KRN encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-based nanoparticles (NPs, 90nm) and microparticles instead of macroparticles (MPs, 715nm) on the iNKT cell response. Our data show that whatever the size of the particles, vectorized KRN induced potent primary activation of iNKT cells in vitro and in vivo. We show that endocytosis of PLGA-based particles by dendritic cells is mediated by a clathrin-dependent manner and that this event is important to stimulate iNKT cells. Finally, we report that KRN vectorized in NPs and MPs exhibited different behaviours in vivo in terms of iNKT cell expansion and responsiveness to a recall stimulation. Collectively, our data validate the concept that KRN encapsulated in PLGA-based particles can be used as delivery systems to activate iNKT cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21575695

  5. Interleukin-15-activated natural killer cells kill autologous osteoclasts via LFA-1, DNAM-1 and TRAIL, and inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone erosion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shan; Madsen, Suzi H; Viller, Natasja N; Neutzsky-Wulff, Anita V; Geisler, Carsten; Karlsson, Lars; Söderström, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts reside on bone and are the main bone resorbing cells playing an important role in bone homeostasis, while natural killer (NK) cells are bone-marrow-derived cells known to play a crucial role in immune defence against viral infections. Although mature NK cells traffic through bone marrow as well as to inflammatory sites associated with enhanced bone erosion, including the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, little is known about the impact NK cells may have on mature osteoclasts and bone erosion. We studied the interaction between human NK cells and autologous monocyte-derived osteoclasts from healthy donors in vitro. We show that osteoclasts express numerous ligands for receptors present on activated NK cells. Co-culture experiments revealed that interleukin-15-activated, but not resting, NK cells trigger osteoclast apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in drastically decreased bone erosion. Suppression of bone erosion requires contact between NK cells and osteoclasts, but soluble factors also play a minor role. Antibodies masking leucocyte function-associated antigen-1, DNAX accessory molecule-1 or tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand enhance osteoclast survival when co-cultured with activated NK cells and restore the capacity of osteoclasts to erode bone. These results suggest that interleukin-15-activated NK cells may directly affect bone erosion under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25684021

  6. Helminth-Induced Interleukin-4 Abrogates Invariant Natural Killer T Cell Activation-Associated Clearance of Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yi-Ju; Fu, Chi-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Helminth infections affect 1 billion people worldwide and render these individuals susceptible to bacterial coinfection through incompletely understood mechanisms. This includes urinary tract coinfection by bacteria and Schistosoma haematobium worms, the etiologic agent of urogenital schistosomiasis. To study the mechanisms of S. haematobium-bacterial urinary tract coinfections, we combined the first tractable model of urogenital schistosomiasis with an established mouse model of bacterial urinary tract infection (UTI). A single bladder exposure to S. haematobium eggs triggers interleukin-4 (IL-4) production and makes BALB/c mice susceptible to bacterial UTI when they are otherwise resistant. Ablation of IL-4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) signaling restored the baseline resistance of BALB/c mice to bacterial UTI despite prior exposure to S. haematobium eggs. Interestingly, numbers of NKT cells were decreased in coexposed versus bacterially monoinfected bladders. Given that schistosome-induced, non-natural killer T (NKT) cell leukocyte infiltration may dilute NKT cell numbers in the bladders of coexposed mice without exerting a specific functional effect on these cells, we next examined NKT cell biology on a per-cell basis. Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells from coexposed mice expressed less gamma interferon (IFN-γ) per cell than did those from mice with UTI alone. Moreover, coexposure resulted in lower CD1d expression in bladder antigen-presenting cells (APC) than did bacterial UTI alone in an IL-4Rα-dependent fashion. Finally, coexposed mice were protected from prolonged bacterial infection by administration of α-galactosylceramide, an iNKT cell agonist. Our findings point to a previously unappreciated role for helminth-induced IL-4 in impairment of iNKT cell-mediated clearance of bacterial coexposure. PMID:24643536

  7. New Indole Tubulin Assembly Inhibitors Cause Stable Arrest of Mitotic Progression, Enhanced Stimulation of Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxic Activity, and Repression of Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Verrico, Annalisa; Miele, Andrea; Monti, Ludovica; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Ricci, Biancamaria; Soriani, Alessandra; Santoni, Angela; Caraglia, Michele; Porto, Stefania; Pozzo, Eleonora Da; Martini, Claudia; Brancale, Andrea; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Bigogno, Chiara; Dondio, Giulio; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2015-01-01

    We designed 39 new 2-phenylindole derivatives as potential anticancer agents bearing the 3,4,5-trimethox-yphenyl moiety with a sulfur, ketone, or methylene bridging group at position 3 of the indole and with halogen or methoxy substituent(s) at positions 4–7. Compounds 33 and 44 strongly inhibited the growth of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing multi-drug-resistant cell lines NCI/ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5. At 10 nM, 33 and 44 stimulated the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. At 20–50 nM, 33 and 44 arrested >80% of HeLa cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, with stable arrest of mitotic progression. Cell cycle arrest was followed by cell death. Indoles 33, 44, and 81 showed strong inhibition of the SAG-induced Hedgehog signaling activation in NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells with IC50 values of 19, 72, and 38 nM, respectively. Compounds of this class potently inhibited tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth, including stimulation of natural killer cell cytotoxic activity and repression of Hedgehog-dependent cancer. PMID:26132075

  8. Activated and expanded natural killer cells target osteosarcoma tumor initiating cells in an NKG2D-NKG2DL dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fernández, L; Valentín, J; Zalacain, M; Leung, W; Patiño-García, A; Pérez-Martínez, A

    2015-11-01

    Current therapies fail to cure most metastatic or recurrent bone cancer. We explored the efficacy and the pathways involved in natural killer (NK) cells' elimination of osteosarcoma (OS) cells, including tumor initiating cells (TICs), which are responsible for chemotherapy resistance, recurrence, and metastasis. The expression of ligands for NK cell receptors was studied in primary OS cell lines by flow cytometry. In vitro cytotoxicity of activated and expanded NK (NKAE) cells against OS was tested, and the pathways involved explored by using specific antibody blockade. NKAE cells' ability to target OS TICs was analyzed by flow cytometry and sphere formation assays. Spironolactone (SPIR) was tested for its ability to increase OS cells' susceptibility to NK cell lysis in vitro and in vivo. We found OS cells were susceptible to NKAE cells' lysis both in vivo and in vitro, and this cytolytic activity relied on interaction between NKG2D receptor and NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL). SPIR increased OS cells' susceptibility to lysis by NKAE cells, and could shrink the OS TICs. Our results show NKAE cells target OS cells including the TICs compartment, supporting the use of NK-cell based immunotherapies for OS. PMID:26276724

  9. A novel killer protein from Pichia kluyveri isolated from an Algerian soil: purification and characterization of its in vitro activity against food and beverage spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Labbani, Fatima-Zohra Kenza; Turchetti, Benedetta; Bennamoun, Leila; Dakhmouche, Scheherazad; Roberti, Rita; Corazzi, Lanfranco; Meraihi, Zahia; Buzzini, Pietro

    2015-04-01

    A novel killer protein (Pkkp) secreted by a Pichia kluyveri strain isolated from an Algerian soil was active against food and beverage spoilage yeasts of the genera Dekkera, Kluyveromyces, Pichia, Saccharomyces, Torulaspora, Wickerhamomyces and Zygosaccharomyces. After purification by gel filtration chromatography Pkkp revealed an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa with SDS-PAGE. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of purified Pkkp exhibited a high in vitro activity against Dekkera bruxellensis (MICs from 64,000- to 256,000-fold lower than that exhibited by potassium metabisulphite) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (MICs from 32,000- to 64,000- fold lower than potassium sorbate). No in vitro synergistic interactions (calculated by FIC index - Σ FIC) were observed when Pkkp was used in combination with potassium metabisulphite, potassium sorbate, or ethanol. Pkkp exhibited a dose-response effect against D. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae in a low-alcoholic drink and fruit juice, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that Pkkp could be proposed as a novel food-grade compound useful for the control of food and beverage spoilage yeasts. PMID:25618417

  10. Analysis of the effect of a sunscreen agent on the suppression of natural killer cell activity induced in human subjects by radiation from solarium lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, P.; MacDonald, M.; Burns, C.; Schibeci, S.; Matthews, H.; Wilkinson, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies in rodents have shown that ultraviolet radiation (UVR) may have direct effects on the immune system in the skin and at higher doses may induce systemic suppression of immune responses. We have previously shown that UVR from sun or solarium beds may induce systemic effects in human subjects. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether these systemic effects in human subjects could be prevented by use of commercially available sunscreen agents. Groups of 12 normal subjects were exposed to radiation from solarium lamps after application of a sunscreen agent or the base used in its preparation. Twelve half-hourly exposures induced a depression of natural killer (NK) cell activity against a melanoma and the K562 target cell which was not prevented by use of the sunscreen agent. Changes in functional activity were accompanied by a reduction in NK cell numbers assessed by Leu-11 monoclonal antibodies against the labile Fc receptor. Application of the sunscreen agent also did not protect against effects of solarium exposure on recall antigen skin tests and immunoglobulin production in vitro in pokeweed mitogen-stimulated cultures of B and T cells. These results suggest that further evaluation of the wave-length spectrum of UVR and the effectiveness of sunscreen agents in prevention of UVR-induced effects on the immune system is needed.

  11. Preconditioning chemotherapy with paclitaxel and cisplatin enhances the antitumor activity of cytokine induced-killer cells in a murine lung carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang; Huang, Guichun; Song, Haizhu; Chen, Longbang

    2011-08-01

    Adoptive cell therapy involving the use of ex vivo generated cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) provides a promising approach to immunotherapy. However, the therapeutic activity of CIKs is limited by the immunosuppressive factors active in the host. It has become increasingly apparent that manipulation of the recipient immune system with the preconditioning regimen is essential to guarantee the antitumor effect of subsequent adoptive cell therapy. In our study, paclitaxel (PTX) and cisplatin (DDP) were used as preconditioning drugs combined with CIKs to illustrate the potential mechanisms underlying the synergic antitumor effect against Lewis lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that 3LL cells displayed an increased sensitization to CIKs-induced lysis after treatment with PTX or DDP in vitro. Significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed in mice treated with combinatorial chemo-immunotherapy with respect to untreated or single regimen treated ones. Prior chemotherapy markedly enhanced the intratumoral accumulation of CD3(+) T lymphocytes and the homing of CIKs to the spleen and tumor. Moreover, the frequencies of intratumoral and splenic regulatory T cells (Tregs) were significantly decreased after chemotherapy pretreatment. Our findings provide a new rationale for combining immunotherapy and chemotherapy to induce a synergistic antitumor response in patients with lung cancer. PMID:20878978

  12. Lymphocyte subset distribution and natural killer activity in growth hormone deficiency before and during short-term treatment with growth hormone releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Kiess, W; Malozowski, S; Gelato, M; Butenand, O; Doerr, H; Crisp, B; Eisl, E; Maluish, A; Belohradsky, B H

    1988-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity was assessed in the peripheral blood of 20 patients with growth hormone (GH) deficiency due to a hypothalamic deficit of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH). All patients failed to respond to at least two provocative tests of GH secretion (GH below 7 ng/ml) but responded to a single GHRH iv bolus injection (1 microgram/kg body wt). In 14 of the 20 patients (20 determinations), lymphocyte subsets were also measured; in all patients the distribution of lymphocyte subsets was within the normal range. More importantly, NK cell activity in the 20 patients was significantly lower than in controls (P less than 0.01). To assess the in vivo effect of GH and GHRH on NK activity and lymphocyte subset distribution, immunologic tests were performed (i) before and after a single iv bolus injection of GHRH (1 microgram/kg body wt) in six patients; (ii) before and after 3 weeks of GHRH treatment (3-9 micrograms/kg body wt, one to four times daily) in five patients; and (iii) after 6 weeks of GH treatment (5 IU sc every alternate day) in one patient. Neither NK activity nor the distribution of lymphocyte subsets was altered during short-term GHRH administration. In conclusion, low NK activity is found in GH-deficient patients, and short-term administration of GH or GHRH fails to restore this immunological abnormality. This result suggests that the hypothalamus may be a regulator of NK activity in the human and that patients with hypothalamic deficiencies should be monitored for the development of discrete immunodeficiencies. PMID:3133146

  13. Aureobasidium-Derived Soluble Branched (1,3-1,6) β-Glucan (Sophy β-glucan) Enhances Natural Killer Activity in Leishmania amazonensis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yatawara, Lalani; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Nagataki, Mitsuru; Takamoto, Misa; Nomura, Haruka; Ikeue, Yasunori; Watanabe, Yoshiya

    2009-01-01

    The β-glucans derived from yeast cell walls have been reported for having many immunomodulatory activities in vivo and in vitro. In this study, Aureobasidium-derived soluble branched (1,3-1,6) β-glucan (Sophy β-glucan) was checked for natural killer (NK) activity and for the production of IFN-γ and IL-4 in Leishmania amazonensis infection. The main experiment was performed with a group of female C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, orally supplemented with 5% of Sophy β-glucan and infected with promastogotes of L. amazonensis (1 × 107) into the footpad. Increase in the footpad thickness with time was observed in BALB/c mice in spite of the oral Sophy β-glucan supplement, but it was less in C57BL/6 mice. The difference in overall mean footpad thickness between 'infection only' versus 'infection + glucan' groups was statistically significant (P < 0.001). High NK activity in C57BL/6 than BALB/c mice was observed in 'glucan only' group compared to the control group and also in 'infection + glucan' group compared to 'infection only' group. The difference in the NK activity among these groups was significant (P < 0.05). The IFN-γ level increased at weeks 7 and 8 post-infection in C57BL/6 mice and was significantly high in 'infection + glucan' group compared to the 'infection only' group (P < 0.05). IL-4 levels did not increase up to detectable levels throughout the study. The results led a conclusion that Sophy β-glucan enhances NK activity and cellular immunity in L. amazonensis-infected mice. PMID:19967081

  14. Activation of CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells can inhibit cancer cell proliferation during chemotherapy by promoting the immune responses in murine mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Licun; Yun, Zhihong; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; De la Maza, Luis; Wu, Matthew Onn; Yu, Julie; Zhao, Yidan; de Perrot, Marc

    2014-12-01

    We studied the impact of natural killer T (NKT) cell activation by alpha-galactocysylceramide (α-GalCer, α-GC) on cancer cell repopulation during chemotherapy in murine mesothelioma. The number of NKT cells was found to be increased during the development of murine mesothelioma. NKT cells specifically recognize α-GC through CD1d resulting in their activation and expansion. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with chemotherapy once weekly, and α-GC was followed after each cycle of chemotherapy. Anti-tumor effect was evaluated on wild-type (WT) and CD1d knockout (CD1dKO) mice. Cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by Ki67 and TUNEL immunohistochemistry. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proportion and activation in tumor, spleen, draining lymph node and peripheral blood were determined by flow cytometry, and gene expression of activated T cell-related cytokines was quantified by reverse transcription PCR. NKT cells were identified by CD1d-α-GC-tetramer staining. In WT mice, tumor growth delay was achieved by cisplatin (Cis), and this effect was improved in combination with α-GC, but α-GC alone had little effect. Cancer cell proliferation during chemotherapy was significantly inhibited by α-GC, while cancer cell death was significantly upregulated. α-GC following chemotherapy resulted in NKT cell expansion and an increase of interferon-γ production in the draining lymph node, blood and spleen. Gene expression of immune-associated cytokines was upregulated. Strikingly, the percentage of inducible T cell co-stimulator(+)CD4 T cells, Th17/Tc17 cells increased in splenocytes. In CD1d KO mice, however, Cis alone was less effective and Cis + α-GC provided no additional benefit over Cis alone. α-GC alone had minimal effect in both mice. NKT activation between cycles of chemotherapy could improve the outcome of mesothelioma treatment. PMID:25183171

  15. Opioid peptides mediate the suppressive effect of stress on natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shavit, Y; Lewis, J W; Terman, G W; Gale, R P; Liebeskind, J C

    1984-01-13

    The cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells was investigated in rats subjected to one of two inescapable footshock stress paradigms, both of which induce analgesia, but only one via activation of opioid mechanisms. Splenic natural killer cell activity was suppressed by the opioid, but not the nonopioid, form of stress. This suppression was blocked by the opioid antagonist naltrexone. Similar suppression of natural killer activity was induced by high doses of morphine. These results suggest that endogenous opioid peptides mediate the suppressive effect of certain forms of stress on natural killer cell cytotoxicity. PMID:6691146

  16. Crude extract of Polygonum cuspidatum promotes immune responses in leukemic mice through enhancing phagocytosis of macrophage and natural killer cell activities in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chueh, Fu-Shin; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lin, Jing-Pin; Yu, Fu-Shun; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Polygonum cuspidatum is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine used in the treatment of various diseases. In the present study, we investigated whether the crude extract of Polygonum cuspidatum (CEPC) could affect immune responses of murine leukemia cells in vivo. Normal BALB/c mice were i.p. injected with WEHI-3 cells to generate leukemic mice and then were treated orally with CEPC at 0, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg for three weeks. Animals were weighed and blood, liver, spleen samples were collected for further analyses. Results indicated that CEPC did not significantly affect the body and liver weight of animals, but reduced the weight of spleen when compared to control groups. Flow cytometric assay demonstrated that CEPC increased the percentage of CD3- (T-cell marker) and CD19- (B-cell marker) positive cells, but reduced that of CD11b-positive ones (monocytes). However, it did not significantly affect the proportion of Mac-3-positive cells (macrophages), compared to control groups. Results indicated that CEPC promoted phagocytosis by macrophages from blood samples at all examined doses but did not affect that of macrophages from the peritoneal cavity. CEPC also promoted natural killer cell activity of splenocytes at 200 mg/kg of CEPC. CEPC promoted B-cell proliferation at 200 mg/kg treatment when cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharides but did not promote T-cell proliferation at three doses of CEPC treatment on concanavalin A stimulation. PMID:25792654

  17. Cloning and characterization of the 2B4 gene encoding a molecule associated with non-MHC-restricted killing mediated by activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, P.A.; Garni-Wagner, B.A.; Land, K.; Takashima, A.; Stoneman, E.; Bennett, M.; Kumar, V. )

    1993-11-15

    The authors have recently described a signal transducing molecule, 2B4, expressed on all NK and T cells that mediate non-MHC-restricted killing. The gene encoding this molecule was cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. The encoded protein of 398 amino acids has a leader peptide of 18 amino acids and a transmembrane region of 24 amino acids. The predicted protein has eight N-linked glycosylation sites, suggesting that it is highly glycosylated. Comparison of 2B4 with sequences in the databanks indicates that 2B4 is a member of the Ig supergene family, and it shows homology to murine and rat CD48 and human LFA-3. Northern blot analysis has shown at least three transcripts for 2B4 in adherent lymphokine-activated killer cells of several mouse strains and TCR-[gamma]/[delta] dendritic epidermal T cell lines but not in allospecific T cell clones. These three mRNA are the products of differential splicing of heterogeneous nuclear RNA. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from several mouse strains revealed that 2B4 belongs to a family of closely related genes. The 2B4 gene has been mapped to mouse chromosome 1 by analysis of 2B4 expression in recombinant inbred mouse strains. 48 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Human cancer cells with stem cell-like phenotype exhibit enhanced sensitivity to the cytotoxicity of IL-2 and IL-15 activated natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Wang, Guoping; He, Sisi; Liu, Qin; Sun, Jianhong; Wang, Yongsheng

    2016-02-01

    Tumors harbor a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) which can drive tumor progression and therapeutical resistance. Nature killer (NK) cells are best known for their ability to directly recognize and kill malignant cells. However, the susceptibility of cancer stem cells to NK cells is not fully understood. Here we demonstrated that human CD44+CD24- breast CSCs were shown enhanced sensitivity to IL-2 and IL-15 activated NK cells. CD44+CD24- CSCs expressed higher levels of NKG2D ligands ULBP1, ULBP2 and MICA. Blockade assay showed that the sensitivity of CSCs to NK cells-mediated lysis was mainly dependent on NKG2D. Furthermore, redox oxygen species (ROS)-low tumor cells were more sensitive to NK cells. The presence of antioxidant enzymes inhibitor L-S,R-buthionine sulfoximine or H2O2 retarded the cytotoxicity of NK cells to CD44+CD24- CSCs. In addition, NK cells could readily target CD133+ colonal CSCs. Our findings provide novel targets for NK cells-based immunotherapy and are of great importance for translational medicine. PMID:26677760

  19. Structure of Natural Killer Receptor 2B4 Bound to CD48 Reveals Basis for Heterophilic Recognition in Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule Family

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovsky,C.; Deng, L.; Chlewicki, L.; Fernandez, M.; Kumar, V.; Mariuzza, R.

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells eliminate virally infected and tumor cells. Among the receptors regulating NK cell function is 2B4 (CD244), a member of the signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule (SLAM) family that binds CD48. 2B4 is the only heterophilic receptor of the SLAM family, whose other members, e.g., NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A), are self-ligands. We determined the structure of the complex between the N-terminal domains of mouse 2B4 and CD48, as well as the structures of unbound 2B4 and CD48. The complex displayed an association mode related to, yet distinct from, that of the NTB-A dimer. Binding was accompanied by the rigidification of flexible 2B4 regions containing most of the polymorphic residues across different species and receptor isoforms. We propose a model for 2B4-CD48 interactions that permits the intermixing of SLAM receptors with major histocompatibility complex-specific receptors in the NK cell immune synapse. This analysis revealed the basis for heterophilic recognition within the SLAM family.

  20. Inhibition of postbinding target cell lysis and of lymphokine-induced enhancement of human natural killer cell activity by in vitro exposure to ultraviolet B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elmets, C.A.; Larson, K.; Urda, G.A.; Schacter, B.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to ultraviolet B (uvB) radiation has been shown to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent fashion. The purpose of this study was to examine the manner by which uvB produced these deleterious effects. Inhibition of NK activity was not due to lethal injury to NK cells since the viability of cell populations enriched for NK activity was greater than 90% with the uvB doses employed. uvB appeared to directly affect NK cells since procedures which removed suppressor mechanisms, such as removal of monocytes and pharmacologic inhibition of the cyclooxygenase pathway, failed to reverse the response. Furthermore, no suppression of activity of unirradiated NK cells could be produced by coincubation of unirradiated NK cells with uv-irradiated NK cells. When the single cell assay for binding and killing was employed to determine at which stage in the lytic sequence inhibition occurred, it was found that binding was normal but lysis of bound targets and the recycling capacity of active NK cells were markedly reduced. At uvB doses above 50 J/m2, both interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) were ineffective in augmenting NK cell-mediated cytotoxic reactions after cells had been irradiated with uvB. Furthermore, incubation of NK cells with IFN-alpha prior to irradiation failed to protect against the inhibitory effects. These studies provide evidence that in vitro exposure of NK cells to uvB radiation inhibits their function by a direct nonlethal effect and that this inhibition occurs selectively at the postbinding stage of target cell lysis.

  1. Retargeting of natural killer-cell cytolytic activity to ErbB2-expressing cancer cells results in efficient and selective tumor cell destruction.

    PubMed

    Uherek, Christoph; Tonn, Torsten; Uherek, Barbara; Becker, Sven; Schnierle, Barbara; Klingemann, Hans-Georg; Wels, Winfried

    2002-08-15

    The continuously growing natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 is highly cytotoxic against malignant cells of various origins without affecting normal human cells. Based on this selectivity, the potential of NK-92 cells for adoptive therapy is currently being investigated in phase I clinical studies. To further enhance the antitumoral activity of NK-92 cells and expand the range of tumor entities suitable for NK-92-based therapies, here by transduction with a retroviral vector we have generated genetically modified NK-92 cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor specific for the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen, which is overexpressed by many tumors of epithelial origin. The chimeric antigen receptor consists of the ErbB2-specific scFv(FRP5) antibody fragment, a flexible hinge region derived from CD8, and transmembrane and intracellular regions of the CD3 zeta chain. Transduced NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells express high levels of the fusion protein on the cell surface as determined by fluorescence-activated cell-scanning (FACS) analysis. In europium release assays, no difference in cytotoxic activity of NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells toward ErbB2-negative targets was found. However, even at low effector-to-target ratios, NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells specifically and efficiently lysed established and primary ErbB2-expressing tumor cells that were completely resistant to cytolytic activity of parental NK-92 cells. These results demonstrate that efficient retargeting of NK-92 cytotoxicity can be achieved and might allow the generation of potent cell-based therapeutics for the treatment of ErbB2-expressing malignancies. PMID:12149207

  2. Orally Administered Salacia reticulata Extract Reduces H1N1 Influenza Clinical Symptoms in Murine Lung Tissues Putatively Due to Enhanced Natural Killer Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A; Egashira, Masayo; Harada, Yuri; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory tract infection. Although most cases do not require further hospitalization, influenza periodically causes epidemics in humans that can potentially infect and kill millions of people. To countermeasure this threat, new vaccines need to be developed annually to match emerging influenza viral strains with increased resistance to existing vaccines. Thus, there is a need for finding and developing new anti-influenza viral agents as alternatives to current treatments. Here, we tested the antiviral effects of an extract from the stems and roots of Salacia reticulata (SSRE), a plant rich in phytochemicals, such as salacinol, kotalanol, and catechins, on H1N1 influenza virus-infected mice. Following oral administration of 0.6 mg/day of SSRE, the incidence of coughing decreased in 80% of mice, and only one case of severe pulmonary inflammation was detected. Moreover, when compared with mice given Lactobacillus casei JCM1134, a strain previously shown to help increase in vitro natural killer (NK) cell activity, SSRE-administered mice showed greater and equal NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells, respectively, at high effector cell:target cell ratios. Next, to test whether or not SSRE would exert protective effects against influenza in the absence of gut microbiota, mice were given antibiotics before being inoculated influenza virus and subsequently administered SSRE. SSRE administration induced an increase in NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells at levels similar to those detected in mice not treated with antibiotics. Based on our results, it can be concluded that phytochemicals in the SSRE exerted protective effects against influenza infection putatively via modulation of the immune response, including enhancement of NK cell activity, although some protective effects were not necessarily through modulation of gut microbiota. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms

  3. Natural Killer Cell Activating Receptor NKG2D Is Involved in the Immunosuppressant Effect of Mycophenolate Mofetil and Infection of Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Dong, S; Geng, L; Shen, M-D; Zheng, S-S

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a new immunosuppressant, and its metabolite mycophenolic acid (MPA) influence the activity of liver resident natural killer (NK) cells, resulting in increased susceptibility to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. We isolated the hepatic NK cells of C57BL/6 and C57BL/6JTgN (A1b1HBV) 44Bri) transgenic mice administered MMF in the presence or absence of interleukin (IL)-15, or incubated isolated hepatic NK cells in the presence or absence of MPA and used RT-PCR, immunolabeling to assess the expression of NK receptors Ly49A, NKG2A and NKG2D, and cytokine ELISA and [(3)H]-TdR-release assay to assess the activation and cytotoxic capacity of NK cells. After treatment of MMF in the presence or absence of IL-15, HBsAg titer was also measured in C57BL/6JTgN (A1b1HBV) 44Bri) transgenic mice. After both MPA and MMF treatments, NK cytotoxicity was reduced, NKG2D and Ly49A expression was down-regulated, but NKG2A was up-regulated. Down-regulation of NKG2D could be ameliorated by IL-15, and in HBV-transgenic mice, MMF treatment impaired NK cell activity, but did not influence virus replication, whereas IL-15 treatment depressed HBsAg titer. MPA and MMF mediate down-regulation of NKG2D in vitro and vivo, restricting the cytotoxic capacity of NK cells. Regulation of NKG2D may be important in the effect of immunosuppressant on NK cell activity and involved in HBV infection. PMID:26293053

  4. Orally Administered Salacia reticulata Extract Reduces H1N1 Influenza Clinical Symptoms in Murine Lung Tissues Putatively Due to Enhanced Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A.; Egashira, Masayo; Harada, Yuri; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory tract infection. Although most cases do not require further hospitalization, influenza periodically causes epidemics in humans that can potentially infect and kill millions of people. To countermeasure this threat, new vaccines need to be developed annually to match emerging influenza viral strains with increased resistance to existing vaccines. Thus, there is a need for finding and developing new anti-influenza viral agents as alternatives to current treatments. Here, we tested the antiviral effects of an extract from the stems and roots of Salacia reticulata (SSRE), a plant rich in phytochemicals, such as salacinol, kotalanol, and catechins, on H1N1 influenza virus-infected mice. Following oral administration of 0.6 mg/day of SSRE, the incidence of coughing decreased in 80% of mice, and only one case of severe pulmonary inflammation was detected. Moreover, when compared with mice given Lactobacillus casei JCM1134, a strain previously shown to help increase in vitro natural killer (NK) cell activity, SSRE-administered mice showed greater and equal NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells, respectively, at high effector cell:target cell ratios. Next, to test whether or not SSRE would exert protective effects against influenza in the absence of gut microbiota, mice were given antibiotics before being inoculated influenza virus and subsequently administered SSRE. SSRE administration induced an increase in NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells at levels similar to those detected in mice not treated with antibiotics. Based on our results, it can be concluded that phytochemicals in the SSRE exerted protective effects against influenza infection putatively via modulation of the immune response, including enhancement of NK cell activity, although some protective effects were not necessarily through modulation of gut microbiota. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms

  5. Natural killer group 2D and CD28 receptors differentially activate mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin to alter murine effector CD8+ T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Bryan; Trace, Kelsey; Whitman, Emily; Bedsworth, Taylor; Barber, Amorette

    2016-03-01

    Memory CD8+ T cells are an essential component of anti-tumour and anti-viral immunity. Activation of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been implicated in regulating the differentiation of effector and memory T cells. However, the mechanisms that control mTOR activity during immunity to tumours and infections are not well known. Activation of co-stimulatory receptors, including CD28 and natural killer group 2D (NKG2D), activate phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and subsequently may activate the mTOR pathway in CD8+ T cells. This study compared the activation of the mTOR signalling pathway after co-stimulation through CD28 or NKG2D receptors in murine effector CD8+ T cells. Compared with CD28 co-stimulation, activation through CD3 and NKG2D receptors had weaker activation of mTORc1, as shown by decreased phosphorylation of mTORc1 targets S6K1, ribosomal protein S6 and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1. NKG2D co-stimulation also showed increased gene expression of tuberous sclerosis protein 2, a negative regulator of mTORc1, whereas CD28 co-stimulation increased gene expression of Ras homologue enriched in brain, an activator of mTORc1, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor-α, pro-angiogenic factors downstream of mTORc1. Strong mTORc1 activation in CD28-co-stimulated cells also increased expression of transcription factors that support effector cell differentiation, namely T-bet, B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein (BLIMP-1), interferon regulatory factor 4, and inhibitor of DNA binding 2, whereas low levels of mTORc1 activation allowed for the expression of Eomes, B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6), and inhibitor of DNA binding 3 during NKG2D stimulation, and increased expression of memory markers CD62 ligand and CD127. These data show that compared with CD28, co-stimulation through the NKG2D receptor leads to the differential activation of the mTOR signalling pathway and potentially supports

  6. Distribution of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles in Lak population of Iran.

    PubMed

    Varzi, Ali Mohammad; Shahsavar, Farhad; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad

    2016-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are the most polymorphic loci in the human genome and encode the highly polymorphic molecules critically involved in immune responses. Anthropological studies based on highly polymorphic HLA genes provide useful information for bone marrow donor registry, forensic medicine, disease association studies, as well as designing peptide vaccines against tumors, and infectious or autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies in 100 unrelated Lak individuals from Lorestan province of Iran. Finally, we compared the results with those previously described in four other Iranian populations. Commercial HLA-Type kits were used for determination of the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies. Differences between populations in the distribution of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles were estimated by χ2 test with Yate's correction and Fisher's exact test. The most frequent HLA-DRB1 alleles were (*)1103=4 (23%), (*)1502 (9.5%), (*)0701 (9%), (*)0301 (8.5%), (*)1101 (7.5%) and (*)1501 (6%) while HLA-DQB1(*)0301 (40%), (*)0201 (15%), (*)0502 (10.5%), (*)0303 (10%), (*)0602=3 (9.5%), and (*)0501 (7.5%) were the most frequent alleles in Lak population. HLA-DRB1(*)0409, (*)0804, (*)1102, (*)1112, (*)1405, and HLA-DQB1(*)0503, (*)0604 were the least observed frequencies in Lak population. Our results based on HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies showed that the Lak population possesses the previously reported general features of the Lur and Kurd populations but still with unique, decreased or increased frequencies of several alleles. In other words, the Lak population is close to Lurs Khorramabadi and Kurd but far from Lurs Kohkiloyeh/Boyerahmad and Bakhtiari. PMID:27189628

  7. Bispecific and trispecific killer cell engagers directly activate human NK cells through CD16 signaling and induce cytotoxicity and cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Michelle K.; Verneris, Michael R.; Todhunter, Deborah A.; Zhang, Bin; McCullar, Valarie; Zhou, Sophia X.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Weiner, Louis M.; Vallera, Daniel A.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the mechanism by which bispecific and trispecific killer cell engagers (BiKEs and TriKEs) act to trigger human NK cell effector function and investigates their ability to induce NK cell cytokine and chemokine production against human B-cell leukemia. We examined the ability of BiKEs and TriKEs to trigger NK cell activation through direct CD16 signaling, measuring intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, secretion of lytic granules, induction of target cell apoptosis and production of cytokine and chemokines in response to the Raji cell line and primary leukemia targets. Resting NK cells triggered by the recombinant reagents led to intracellular Ca2+ mobilization through direct CD16 signaling. Co-culture of reagent-treated resting NK cells with Raji targets resulted in significant increases in NK cell degranulation and target cell death. BiKEs and TriKEs effectively mediated NK cytotoxicity of Raji targets at high and low effector-to-target (E:T) ratios and maintained functional stability after 24 and 48 hours of culture in human serum. NK cell production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF, IL-8, MIP-1α and RANTES was differentially induced in the presence of recombinant reagents and Raji targets. Moreover, significant increases in NK cell degranulation and enhancement of IFN-γ production against primary ALL and CLL targets were induced with reagent treatment of resting NK cells. In conclusion, BiKEs and TriKEs directly trigger NK cell activation through CD16, significantly increasing NK cell cytolytic activity and cytokine production against tumor targets, demonstrating their therapeutic potential for enhancing NK cell immunotherapies for leukemias and lymphomas. PMID:23075808

  8. Conditioned tolerance to drug-induced (poly I:C) natural killer cell activation: effects of drug-dosage and context-specificity parameters.

    PubMed

    Dyck, D G; Driedger, S M; Nemeth, R; Osachuk, T A; Greenberg, A H

    1987-09-01

    Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the role of drug-dosage and stimulus-specificity parameters on the tolerance of drug-induced (poly I:C) natural killer (NK) cell activity. In the first experiment a protocol which provided mice with four weekly 20 micrograms/mouse ip injections of the immunostimulatory synthetic polynucleotide (poly I:C) following exposure to either a simple odor cue or a complex cue resulted in tolerance of NK cell activity. The identical protocol with a higher drug dose (50 micrograms/mouse) did not produce tolerance. In a second experiment, the stimulus specificity of tolerance was assessed by giving two groups of mice repeated signaled drug injections. For one of these groups the final poly I:C injection of the series was signaled, while for the other group it was not. Although both groups were tolerant relative to controls not previously exposed to the drug, indirect evidence of conditioning was obtained. Specifically, it was found that tolerance among mice receiving the signal on the test was such that they were not different from undrugged controls, while uncued mice had significantly higher levels of NK cell activity. The third experiment evaluated the role of stimulus specificity within an extinction paradigm. It was found that tolerance was reversed in mice provided with repeated nonreinforced reexposure to drug-signaling cues, while mice exposed to novel cues remained tolerant. These results further support the hypothesis that associative factors contribute to the tolerance of a drug-induced immune response. PMID:3505759

  9. Natural Killer Cell Activating Receptor NKG2D Is Involved in the Immunosuppressive Effects of Mycophenolate Mofetil and Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuai; Geng, Lei; Shen, Miao-Da; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a new immunosuppressant, and its metabolite mycophenolic acid (MPA) affect the activity of liver resident natural killer (NK) cells, resulting in increased susceptibility to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Hepatic NK cells were isolated from C57BL/6 and C57BL/6JTgN (A1b1HBV) 44Bri transgenic mice treated with MMF in the presence or absence of IL-15. After incubation of isolated hepatic NK cells in the presence or absence of MPA, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunolabeling were used to assess the expression of NK receptors Ly49A, NKG2A and NKG2D. In addition, cytokine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and [H]-TdR-release assay were carried out to assess NK cell activation and cytotoxic capacity. After treatment with MMF in the presence or absence of IL-15, HBsAg titers were measured in C57BL/6JTgN (A1b1HBV) 44Bri transgenic mice. Treatment with either MPA or MMF resulted in reduced NK cell cytotoxicity, downregulated NKG2D and Ly49A expression and upregulated NKG2A. Interestingly, NKG2D downregulation was ameliorated by IL-15. In HBV-transgenic mice, MMF treatment impaired NK cell activity but did not affect virus replication, whereas IL-15 treatment reduced HBsAg titers. MPA and MMF mediate NKG2D downregulation both in vitro and in vivo, reducing the cytotoxic capacity of NK cells. These findings indicate that NKG2D regulation may be important in the immunosuppressive effect NK cells and involved in HBV infection. PMID:25828197

  10. Lysis of pig endothelium by IL-2 activated human natural killer cells is inhibited by swine and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene products.

    PubMed

    Itescu, S; Artrip, J H; Kwiatkowski, P A; Wang, S F; Minanov, O P; Morgenthau, A S; Michler, R E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described a form of xenograft rejection, mediated by natural killer (NK) cells, occurring in pig-to-primate organ transplants beyond the period of antibody-mediated hyperacute rejection. In this study, two distinct NK activation pathways were identified as mechanisms of pig aortic endotheliual cell (PAEC) lysis by human NK cells. Using an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, a progressive increase in human NK lysis of PAEC was observed following incubation with human IgG at increasing serum titer. In the absence of IgG, a second mechanism of PAEC lysis by human NK cells was observed following activation with IL-2. IL-2 activation of human NK cells increased lysis of PAEC by over 3-fold compared with ADCC. These results indicate that IL-2 activation of human NK cells induces significantly higher levels of lytic activity than does conventional ADCC involving IgG and FcRIII. We next investigated the role of MHC class I molecules in the regulation of NK lysis following IL-2 activation. PAEC expression of SLA class I molecules was increased by up to 75% by treatment with human TNFa. Following treatment with TNFa at 1 u/ml, IL-2 activated human NK lysis of PAEC was inhibited at every effector:target (E:T) ratio tested. Maximal effect occurred at an E:T ratio of 10:1, with TNFa inhibiting specific lysis by 59% (p < 0.01). Incubation with an anti-SLA class I Mab, but not IgG isotype control, abrogated the protective effects of TNFa on NK lysis of PAEC, suggesting direct inhibitory effects of SLA class I molecules on human NK function. To investigate whether human MHC class I molecules might have similar effects on human NK lysis of PAEC, further experiments were performed using a soluble peptide derived from the alpha-helical region of HLA-B7. Incubation with the HLA-B7 derived peptide significantly reduced the IL-2 activated NK lytic activity against PAEC in a dose-dependent fashion. Maximal effect occurred at a concentration of 10 mg

  11. Sulforaphane promotes immune responses in a WEHI‑3‑induced leukemia mouse model through enhanced phagocytosis of macrophages and natural killer cell activities in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yung-Luen; Wu, Lung-Yuan; Lee, Ching-Hsiao; Chen, Yung-Liang; Hsueh, Shu-Ching; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Liao, Nien-Chieh; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-05-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an isothiocyanate, inducing cytotoxic effects in various human cancer cells, including leukemia cells through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the effect of SFN on the immune responses in a leukemia mouse model remains to be investigated. The present study investigated whether SFN has an effect on the immune responses in a WEHI‑3‑induced leukemia mouse model in vivo. Normal BALB/c mice were injected with WEHI‑3 cells to generate the leukemia mouse model, and were subsequently treated with placebo or SFN (0, 285, 570 and 1,140 mg/kg) for 3 weeks. Following treatment, all mice were weighted and blood samples were collected. In addition, liver and spleen samples were isolated to determine cell markers, phagocytosis and natural killer (NK) cell activities, and cell proliferation was examined using flow cytometry. The results indicated that SFN treatment had no significant effect on the spleen weight, however it decreased liver and body weight. Furthermore, SFN treatment increased the percentage levels of CD3 (T cells) and CD19 (B cell maker), however had no effect on the levels of CD11b (monocytes) or Mac‑3 (macrophages), compared with the WEHI‑3 control groups. The administration of SFN increased the phagocytosis of macrophages from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and peritoneal cavity, and increased the activity of NK cells from splenocytes. Administration of SFN promoted T and B cell proliferation following stimulation with concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide, respectively. PMID:27035756

  12. Copy number variations of HLA-I and activation of NKp30 pathway determine the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to the cytotoxicity of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, R; Li, L; Chen, L; Gao, Z; Wang, H; Li, W; Cui, J; Tian, G; Liang, Q; Yu, J; Sung, J J; Luo, G; Gao, H; Xu, X; Yang, H; Wang, J; Zhang, X; Wang, J M; Huang, J; Yu, Y; Wang, J; Lu, Y

    2016-05-19

    Nude mice are important in vivo model for characterization of cell malignancy behavior; however, many cancer cells fail to form tumors in it. Understanding this defective mechanism may provide novel insights into tumorigenesis and how tumor cells escape innate immunity. Whole-genome sequencing was conducted on two gastric cancer (GC) cells, BGC823 and AGS, which do and do not form tumors in nude mice, to identify their genomic differences relevant to natural killer (NK) cells. We found that the tumorigenic capacity of human GC cell lines was dependent on the recruitment and activation of NK cells in xenograft tumors. We used whole-genome sequence (WGS) on GC cell lines to identify potential genes controlling susceptibility to NK-mediated killing. The tumorigenic cell line BGC823 expressed high levels of HLA-I because of copy gain and was resistant to NK cell killing. In contrast, another cell line AGS expressing low levels of HLA-I with activated NKp30/MAPK/IL-12 (interleukin-12) or IL-2 (interleukin-2) pathway was susceptible to NK lysis. Treatment of tumor bearing mice with systemic administration of IL-12 in combination with intratumor injection of anti-HLA-I antibody significantly increased NK cell recruitment into xenograft tumors, which became sensitive to NK killing, resulting in reduced tumor progression. In human GC specimens, decreased HLA-I expression and increased NK cells surrounding tumor cells were correlated with decreased metastasis potential and better prognosis of patients. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for GC cells to escape NK lysis and a promising prospect of NK immunotherapy for GC cells. PMID:26364607

  13. Cystine and theanine supplementation restores high-intensity resistance exercise-induced attenuation of natural killer cell activity in well-trained men.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Kando; Ohtani, Masaru; Fukusaki, Chiho

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the effects of supplementation with cystine, a dipeptide of cysteine, and theanine (CT), a precursor of glutamate, on immune variables during high-intensity resistance exercise. Cysteine and glutamate are involved in the formation of glutathione, which modulates the activity of natural killer (NK) cells. In this double-blinded clinical trial, 15 well-trained men (aged 22.8 +/- 4.0 years) were divided into 2 groups: placebo (n = 7) and CT (n = 8). The placebo group was administered a powder containing cellulose (950 mg) and glutamate (30 mg), whereas the CT group was administered a powder containing cystine (700 mg) and theanine (280 mg), once daily for 2 weeks. The subjects trained according to their normal schedule (3 times per week) in the first week and trained at double the frequency (6 times per week) in the second week. Concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig)M, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and salivary IgA and the leukocyte count did not change significantly in either group. There was a significant decrease (p < or = 0.05) in the NK cell activity (NKCA) in the placebo group after the second week compared with that in the CT group (placebo: 69.2 +/- 16.1% vs. CT: 101.7 +/- 38.7%). Phytohemagglutinin-induced lymphocyte blastoid transformation did not change significantly in either group. These results suggest that NKCA is not affected in a normal training schedule with or without CT supplementation. However, high-intensity and high-frequency resistance exercises cause attenuation of NKCA, which CT supplementation appears to restore. Therefore, in practical application, CT supplementation would be useful for athletes to restore the attenuation of NKCA during high-intensity and high-frequency training. PMID:20145562

  14. Conversion of adipose-derived stem cells into natural killer-like cells with anti-tumor activities in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Ning, Hongxiu; Lei, Hong-En; Xu, Yong-De; Guan, Rui-Li; Venstrom, Jeffrey M; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F; Xin, Zhongcheng; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to develop peripheral blood-derived nature killer (NK) cells into therapeutic products have been hampered by these cells' low abundance and histoincompatibility. On the other hand, derivation of NK-like cells from more abundant cell sources such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and umbilical cord blood (UCB) requires the selection of rare CD34+ cells. Thus, we sought to convert adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), which are abundant and natively CD34+, into NK-like cells. When grown in hematopoietic induction medium, ADSCs formed sphere clusters and expressed hematopoietic markers CD34, CD45, and KDR. Further induction in NK cell-specific medium resulted in a population of cells that expressed NK cell marker CD56, and thus termed ADSC-NK. Alternatively, the hematopoietically induced ADSCs were transduced with NK cell-specific transcription factor E4BP4 prior to induction in NK cell-specific medium. This latter population of cells, termed ADSC-NKE, expressed CD56 and additional NK cell markers such as CD16, CD94, CD158, CD314, FasL, and NKp46. ADSC-NKE was as potent as NK leukemia cell NKL in killing breast cancer cell MCF7 and prostate cancer cells DU145, PC3, LnCap, DuPro, C4-2 and CWR22, but exhibited no killing activity toward normal endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In nude mice test ADSC-NKE was able to significantly delay the progression of tumors formed by MCF7 and PC3. When injected into immunocompetent rats, ADSC-NKE was detectable in bone marrow and spleen for at least 5 weeks. Together, these results suggest that ADSCs can be converted into NK-like cells with anti-tumor activities. PMID:25162225

  15. The eyeball killer: serial killings with postmortem globe enucleation.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Julie; Ross, Karen F; Barnard, Jeffrey J; Peacock, Elizabeth; Linch, Charles A; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2015-05-01

    Although serial killings are relatively rare, they can be the cause of a great deal of anxiety while the killer remains at-large. Despite the fact that the motivations for serial killings are typically quite complex, the psychological analysis of a serial killer can provide valuable insight into how and why certain individuals become serial killers. Such knowledge may be instrumental in preventing future serial killings or in solving ongoing cases. In certain serial killings, the various incidents have a variety of similar features. Identification of similarities between separate homicidal incidents is necessary to recognize that a serial killer may be actively killing. In this report, the authors present a group of serial killings involving three prostitutes who were shot to death over a 3-month period. Scene and autopsy findings, including the unusual finding of postmortem enucleation of the eyes, led investigators to recognize the serial nature of the homicides. PMID:25682709

  16. Irradiation-Induced Up-Regulation of HLA-E on Macrovascular Endothelial Cells Confers Protection against Killing by Activated Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Riederer, Isabelle; Sievert, Wolfgang; Eissner, Günther; Molls, Michael; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    Background Apart from the platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, CD31), endoglin (CD105) and a positive factor VIII-related antigen staining, human primary and immortalized macro- and microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) differ in their cell surface expression of activating and inhibitory ligands for natural killer (NK) cells. Here we comparatively study the effects of irradiation on the phenotype of ECs and their interaction with resting and activated NK cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Primary macrovascular human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) only express UL16 binding protein 2 (ULBP2) and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related protein MIC-A (MIC-A) as activating signals for NK cells, whereas the corresponding immortalized EA.hy926 EC cell line additionally present ULBP3, membrane heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), intercellular adhesion molecule ICAM-1 (CD54) and HLA-E. Apart from MIC-B, the immortalized human microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC, resembles the phenotype of EA.hy926. Surprisingly, primary HUVECs are more sensitive to Hsp70 peptide (TKD) plus IL-2 (TKD/IL-2)-activated NK cells than their immortalized EC counterpatrs. This finding is most likely due to the absence of the inhibitory ligand HLA-E, since the activating ligands are shared among the ECs. The co-culture of HUVECs with activated NK cells induces ICAM-1 (CD54) and HLA-E expression on the former which drops to the initial low levels (below 5%) when NK cells are removed. Sublethal irradiation of HUVECs induces similar but less pronounced effects on HUVECs. Along with these findings, irradiation also induces HLA-E expression on macrovascular ECs and this correlates with an increased resistance to killing by activated NK cells. Irradiation had no effect on HLA-E expression on microvascular ECs and the sensitivity of these cells to NK cells remained unaffected. Conclusion/Significance These data emphasize that an irradiation

  17. Activation of Human T-Helper/Inducer Cell, T-Cytotoxic Cell, B-Cell, and Natural Killer (NK)-Cells and induction of Natural Killer Cell Activity against K562 Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells with Modified Citrus Pectin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modified citrus pectin (MCP) is known for its anti-cancer effects and its ability to be absorbed and circulated in the human body. In this report we tested the ability of MCP to induce the activation of human blood lymphocyte subsets like T, B and NK-cells. Methods MCP treated human blood samples were incubated with specific antibody combinations and analyzed in a flow cytometer using a 3-color protocol. To test functionality of the activated NK-cells, isolated normal lymphocytes were treated with increasing concentrations of MCP. Log-phase PKH26-labeled K562 leukemic cells were added to the lymphocytes and incubated for 4 h. The mixture was stained with FITC-labeled active form of caspase 3 antibody and analyzed by a 2-color flow cytometry protocol. The percentage of K562 cells positive for PKH26 and FITC were calculated as the dead cells induced by NK-cells. Monosaccharide analysis of the MCP was performed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulse amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). Results MCP activated T-cytotoxic cells and B-cell in a dose-dependent manner, and induced significant dose-dependent activation of NK-cells. MCP-activated NK-cells demonstrated functionality in inducing cancer cell death. MCP consisted of oligogalacturonic acids with some containing 4,5-unsaturated non-reducing ends. Conclusions MCP has immunostimulatory properties in human blood samples, including the activation of functional NK cells against K562 leukemic cells in culture. Unsaturated oligogalacturonic acids appear to be the immunostimulatory carbohydrates in MCP. PMID:21816083

  18. Partial Activation of Natural Killer and γδ T Cells by Classical Swine Fever Viruses Is Associated with Type I Interferon Elicited from Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Franzoni, Giulia; Edwards, Jane C.; Kurkure, Nitin V.; Edgar, Daniel S.; Sanchez-Cordon, Pedro J.; Haines, Felicity J.; Salguero, Francisco J.; Everett, Helen E.; Bodman-Smith, Kikki B.; Crooke, Helen R.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with live attenuated classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccines can rapidly confer protection in the absence of neutralizing antibodies. With an aim of providing information on the cellular mechanisms that may mediate this protection, we explored the interaction of porcine natural killer (NK) cells and γδ T cells with CSFV. Both NK and γδ T cells were refractory to infection with attenuated or virulent CSFV, and no stimulatory effects, as assessed by the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II (MHC-II), perforin, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), were observed when the cells were cultured in the presence of CSFV. Coculture with CSFV and myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) or plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) showed that pDCs led to a partial activation of both NK and γδ T cells, with upregulation of MHC-II being observed. An analysis of cytokine expression by infected DC subsets suggested that this effect was due to IFN-α secreted by infected pDCs. These results were supported by ex vivo analyses of NK and γδ T cells in the tonsils and retropharyngeal lymph nodes from pigs that had been vaccinated with live attenuated CSFV and/or virulent CSFV. At 5 days postchallenge, there was evidence of significant upregulation of MHC-II but not perforin on NK and γδ T cells, which was observed only following a challenge of the unvaccinated pigs and correlated with increased CSFV replication and IFN-α expression in both the tonsils and serum. Together, these data suggest that it is unlikely that NK or γδ T cells contribute to the cellular effector mechanisms induced by live attenuated CSFV. PMID:25080554

  19. Effect of invariant natural killer T cells with IL-5 and activated IL-6 receptor in ventilator-associated lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Yuka; Sugamata, Ryuichi; Iwamura, Chiaki; Nagao, Tomokazu; Zao, Jun; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Kawachi, Shoji; Nakayama, Toshinori; Suzuki, Kazuo

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is well known to potentially cause ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI). It has also been reported recently that activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells is involved in the onset/progression of airway inflammation. We analyzed the roles of inflammatory cells, including iNKT cells, and cytokines/chemokines in a mouse model of VALI. C57BL/6 and Vα14(+)NKT cell-deficient (Jα18KO) female mice were subjected to MV for 5 hours. The MV induced lung injury in the mice, with severe histological abnormalities, elevation in the percentages of neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and increase in the number of iNKT cells in the lung. Jα18KO mice subjected to MV for 5 hours also showed lung injury, with decrease of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio (P/F ratio) and elevation of the levels of total protein, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12p40, and keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC) in the BALF. Intranasal administration of anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or anti-IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) mAb into the Jα18KO mice prior to the start of MV resulted in significant improvement in the blood oxygenation. In addition, the anti-IL-5 mAb administration was associated with a decrease in the levels of IL-5, IL-9, and IL-6R in the BALF, and anti-IL-6R mAb administration suppressed the mRNA expressions of IL-5, IL-6, IL-6R, and KC. These results suggest that iNKT cells may play a role in attenuating the inflammatory caused by ventilation through IL-5 and IL-6R. PMID:24246030

  20. Effects of dendritic cell-activated and cytokine-induced killer cell therapy on 22 children with acute myeloid leukemia after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Zheng, Jin-e; Wang, Nan; Cai, He-hua; Zhai, Li-na; Wu, Yao-hui; Wang, Fang; Jin, Run-ming; Zhou, Dong-feng

    2015-10-01

    The efficiency of dendritic cell-activated and cytokine-induced killer cell (DC-CIK) therapy on children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after chemotherapy was investigated. Mononuclear cells were collected from children achieving complete remission after chemotherapy, cultured in vitro and transfused back into the same patient. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) was injected subcutaneously every other day 10 times at the dose of 1 × 10(6) units. Peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets and minimal residual disease (MRD) were detected by flow cytometry. Function of bone marrow was monitored by methods of morphology, immunology, cytogenetics and molecular biology. The side effects were also observed during the treatment. The average follow-up period for all the 22 patients was 71 months and relapse occurred in two AML patients (9.1%). The percentage of CD3(+)/CD8(+) cells in peripheral blood of 15 patients at the 3rd month after DC-CIK treatment (36.73% ± 12.51%) was dramatically higher than that before treatment (29.20% ± 8.34%, P < 0.05). The MRD rate was >0.1% in 5 patients before the treatment, and became lower than 0.1% 3 months after the treatment. During the transfusion of DC-CIK, side effects including fever, chills and hives appeared in 7 out of 22 (31.82%) cases but disappeared quickly after symptomatic treatments. There were no changes in electrocardiography and liver-renal functions after the treatment. MRD in children with AML can be eliminated by DC-CIK therapy which is safe and has fewer side effects. PMID:26489623

  1. Adenovirus E1A gene induction of susceptibility to lysis by natural killer cells and activated macrophages in infected rodent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J L; May, D L; Lewis, A M; Walker, T A

    1987-01-01

    Rodent cells immortalized by the E1A gene of nononcogenic adenoviruses are susceptible to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells and activated macrophages. This cytolysis-susceptible phenotype may contribute to the rejection of adenovirus-transformed cells by immunocompetent animals. Such increased cytolytic susceptibility has also been observed with infected rodent cells. This infection model provided a means to study the role of E1A gene products in induction of cytolytic susceptibility without cell selection during transformation. Deletion mutations outside of the E1A gene had no effect on adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) or Ad5 induction of cytolytic susceptibility in infected hamster cells, while E1A-minus mutant viruses could not induce this phenotype. E1A mutant viruses that induced expression of either E1A 12S or 13S mRNA in infected cells were competent to induce cytolytic susceptibility. Furthermore, there was a correlation between the accumulation of E1A gene products in Ad5-infected cells and the level of susceptibility of such target cells to lysis by NK cells. The results of coinfection studies indicated that the E1A gene products of highly oncogenic Ad12 could not complement the lack of induction of cytolytic susceptibility by E1A-minus Ad5 virus in infected cells and also could not block induction of this infected-cell phenotype by Ad5. These data suggest that expression of the E1A gene of nononcogenic adenoviruses may cause the elimination of infected cells by the immunologically nonspecific host inflammatory cell response prior to cellular transformation. The lack of induction of this cytolysis-susceptible phenotype by Ad12 E1A may result in an increased persistence of Ad12-infected cells in vivo and may lead to an increased Ad12-transformed cell burden for the host. Images PMID:2959793

  2. Arsenic: The Silent Killer

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Andrea

    2006-02-28

    Andrea Foster uses x-rays to determine the forms of potentially toxic elements in environmentally-important matrices such as water, sediments, plants, and microorganisms. In this free public lecture, Foster will discuss her research on arsenic, which is called the silent killer because dissolved in water, it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, yet consumption of relatively small doses of this element in its most toxic forms can cause rapid and violent death. Arsenic is a well-known poison, and has been used as such since ancient times. Less well known is the fact that much lower doses of the element, consumed over years, can lead to a variety of skin and internal cancers that can also be fatal. Currently, what has been called the largest mass poisoning in history is occurring in Bangladesh, where most people are by necessity drinking ground water that is contaminated with arsenic far in excess of the maximum amounts determined to be safe by the World Health Organization. This presentation will review the long and complicated history with arsenic, describe how x-rays have helped explain the high yet spatially variable arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh, discuss the ways in which land use in Bangladesh may be exacerbating the problem, and summarize the impact of this silent killer on drinking water systems worldwide.

  3. Immunomodulatory effect of prednisolone (PRD) induced soluble suppressor factor(s) (PRD-SSF) on natural killer (NK) cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M.P.N.; Cilik, J.M.; Schwartz, S.A.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously reported that peripheral blood lymphocytes precultured for 24 hrs with PRD showed significant suppression of their NK activity. Purified HNK-1/sup +/ lymphocytes were treated either directly with PRD or with supernates from allogeneic lymphocytes precultured with 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -9/M PRD and examined for any inhibition of NK activity. For the NK assay K562 and U937 cell lines were used as targets in a 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assay. HNK-1/sup +/ lymphocytes precultured with PRD showed significantly lower level of NK activity. In a single cell assay, both HNK-1/sup +/ and HNK-1/sup -/ subpopulations of PBL precultured with PRD also suppressed the target binding and lytic capacity of allogeneic fresh large granular lymphocytes, suggesting that NK cells/T cells or their precursors can be stimulated by PRD to inhibit NK activity. PBL precultured with increasing concentrations of culture supernates containing PRD-SSF showed a dose dependent inhibitory effect of their NK activity. This data suggest that PRD activated suppressor cells function through the release of soluble mediators. These findings may be of clinical significance to patients receiving corticosteroids for a variety of disorders including malignant, autoimmune and atopic diseases.

  4. Cholangiocarcinoma-derived exosomes inhibit the antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer cells by down-regulating the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α and perforin*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiong-huang; Xiang, Jian-yang; Ding, Guo-ping; Cao, Li-ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study is to observe the impact of cholangiocarcinoma-derived exosomes on the antitumor activities of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells and then demonstrate the appropriate mechanism. Methods: Tumor-derived exosomes (TEXs), which are derived from RBE cells (human cholangiocarcinoma line), were collected by ultracentrifugation. CIK cells induced from peripheral blood were stimulated by TEXs. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was performed to determine the phenotypes of TEX-CIK and N-CIK (normal CIK) cells. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and perforin in the culture medium supernatant were examined by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. A CCK-8 kit was used to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of the CIK cells to the RBE cell line. Results: The concentrations of TNF-α and perforin of the group TEX-CIK were 138.61 pg/ml and 2.41 ng/ml, respectively, lower than those of the group N-CIK 194.08 pg/ml (P<0.01) and 3.39 ng/ml (P<0.05). The killing rate of the group TEX-CIK was 33.35%, lower than that of the group N-CIK (47.35% (P<0.01)). The population of CD3+, CD8+, NK (CD56+), and CD3+CD56+ cells decreased in the TEX-CIK group ((63.2±6.8)%, (2.5±1.0)%, (0.53±0.49)%, (0.45±0.42)%) compared with the N-CIK group ((90.3±7.3)%, (65.7±3.3)%, (4.2±1.2)%, (15.2±2.7)%), P<0.01. Conclusions: Our results suggest that RBE cells-derived exosomes inhibit the antitumor activity of CIK cells by down-regulating the population of CD3+, CD8+, NK (CD56+), and CD3+CD56+ cells and the secretion of TNF-α and perforin. TEX may play an important role in cholangiocarcinoma immune escape. PMID:27381730

  5. 2B4 expression on natural killer cells increases in HIV-1 infected patients followed prospectively during highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, S R; Ullum, H; Pedersen, B K; Gerstoft, J; Katzenstein, T L

    2005-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection influences natural killer (NK) cell expression of inhibitory NK receptors and activating natural cytotoxicity receptors. It is unknown whether expression of the co-stimulatory NK cell receptor 2B4 (CD244) on NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells are affected by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), low-level viraemia, proviral-DNA or immune activation in HIV-1 infected patients. A total of 101 HAART-treated HIV-1 infected patients with < or = 200 HIV-RNA copies/ml were followed prospectively for 24 months. HIV-RNA was investigated 3-monthly and 2B4 expression on CD3- CD16+ NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells, proviral-DNA and plasma soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor (sTNFr)-II were investigated 6-monthly. For comparison, 2B4 expression was investigated in 20 healthy individuals. The concentration of 2B4+ NK cells was initially reduced in HIV-1 infected patients (P < 0.001) but increased to a normal level during the 24 months' follow-up. The concentration of CD3+ CD8+ 2B4+ cells in HIV-1 infected patients was normal and did not change during follow-up. The relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) of 2B4 increased on both NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells during follow-up (both P < 0.001). Higher levels of proviral-DNA carrying cells and plasma sTNFrII were associated with reductions in the concentration of 2B4+ NK cells (all P < 0.05). HIV-RNA had no effect on 2B4 expression on NK cells or CD3+ CD8+ cells. These findings demonstrate that the concentration of 2B4+ NK cells normalizes during long-term HAART in HIV-1 infected patients. The finding that proviral-DNA and sTNFrII were associated negatively with the concentration of 2B4+ NK cells suggests that immune activation in HIV-1 infected patients receiving HAART influences the target cell recognition by NK cells. PMID:16045743

  6. The Human Natural Killer Cell Immune Synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Daniel M.; Chiu, Isaac; Fassett, Marlys; Cohen, George B.; Mandelboim, Ofer; Strominger, Jack L.

    1999-12-01

    Inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) at the surface of natural killer (NK) cells induced clustering of HLA-C at the contacting surface of target cells. In this manner, inhibitory immune synapses were formed as human NK cells surveyed target cells. At target/NK cell synapses, HLA-C/KIR distributed into rings around central patches of intercellular adhesion molecule-1/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, the opposite orientation to mature murine T cell-activating synapses. This organization of protein was stable for at least 20 min. Cells could support multiple synapses simultaneously, and clusters of HLA-C moved as NK cells crawled over target cells. Clustering required a divalent metal cation, explaining how metal chelators inhibit KIR function. Surprisingly, however, formation of inhibitory synapses was unaffected by ATP depletion and the cytoskeletal inhibitors, colchicine and cytochalsins B and D. Clearly, supramolecular organization within plasma membranes is critical for NK cell immunosurveillance.

  7. Killing of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected fibroblasts during latent infection by activated natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Nick C; Goodier, Martin R; Robey, Rebecca C; Bower, Mark; Gotch, Frances M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes life-long infection by evading clearance by the host immune system. In de novo infection and lytic replication, KSHV escapes cytotoxic T cells and NK cells through downregulation of MHC class-I and ICAM-1 molecules and associated antigens involved in forming and sustaining the immunological synapse. However, the efficacy of such mechanisms in the context of the predominantly latent KSHV infection reported in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesions is unclear. Using primary dermal fibroblasts in a novel in vitro model of chronic latent KSHV infection, we generated target cells with viral loads similar to those in spindle cells extracted from KS lesions. We show that latently KSHV-infected fibroblasts had normal levels of MHC-class I, ICAM-1, HLA-E and NKG2D ligand expression, were resistant to NK-cell natural cytotoxicity and were highly susceptible to killing by cytokine-activated immunocompetent NK cells. KSHV-infected fibroblasts expressed normal levels of IFN-γR1 and responded to exogenous IFN-γ by upregulating MHC class I, ICAM-1 and HLA-E and resisting activated NK-cell killing. These data demonstrate that physiologically relevant levels of latent KSHV infection in primary cells cause limited activation of resting NK cells and confer little specific resistance to control by activated NK cells. PMID:21509779

  8. Correlation of natural killer cell activity and clearance of Cryptococcus neoformans from mice after adoptive transfer of splenic nylon wool-nonadherent cells.

    PubMed

    Hidore, M R; Murphy, J W

    1986-02-01

    Previous reports demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells inhibit the growth of Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro, but conclusive evidence supporting the effectiveness of NK cells in host resistance to cryptococci is not available. The objective of these studies was to assess the ability of NK cells to clear C. neoformans from the lungs, livers, and spleens of infected mice. CBA/J mice were depleted of NK cells, as well as other natural effector cells, by an intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide (Cy), 240 mg/kg of body weight. One day later, 7.5 X 10(7) nylon wool-nonadherent (NWN) spleen cells, either untreated or treated with anti-asialo GM1 and complement to remove NK cells, were adoptively transferred to Cy-pretreated mice. On day 2 after Cy treatment, the mice were injected intravenously with 2 X 10(4) cryptococci. At 4 and 6 days after Cy treatment, tissues were assayed for NK reactivity, using a 4-h 51Cr-release assay, and for in vivo clearance of cryptococci as reflected by mean log10 CFU per organ. We observed that Cy treatment depleted NK activity against YAC-1 targets and reduced in vivo clearance of C. neoformans from the tissues of infected mice. Additionally, Cy treatment depleted the total lung and spleen cellularity and the total number of peripheral blood lymphocytes when compared with those in normal untreated control mice. Also, spleen weights were significantly decreased in comparison with those of untreated animals 4 days after Cy treatment. Adoptive transfer of untreated NWN spleen cells into Cy-depressed mice restored the NK cell activity which correlated with enhanced clearance of cryptococci from lungs, livers, and spleens. In contrast, treatment of NWN spleen cells with anti-asialo GM1 and complement before adoptive transfer abrogated the ability of these cells to restore NK activity or reduce the numbers of cryptococci present in tissues of infected mice. Taken together, these data indicate that NK cells are the cells effective

  9. Cultured Mycelium Cordyceps sinensis allevi¬ates CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis in mice by activating hepatic natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yuan; Huang, Kai; Shen, Li; Tao, Yan-yan; Liu, Cheng-hai

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent evidence shows that cultured mycelium Cordyceps sinensis (CMCS) effectively protects against liver fibrosis in mice. Here, we investigated whether the anti-fibrotic action of CMCS was related to its regulation of the activity of hepatic natural killer (NK) cells in CCl4-treated mice. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were injected with 10% CCl4 (2 mL/kg, ip) 3 times per week for 4 weeks, and received CMCS (120 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) during this period. In another part of experiments, the mice were also injected with an NK cell-deleting antibody ASGM-1 (20 μg, ip) 5 times in the first 3 weeks. After the mice were sacrificed, serum liver function, and liver inflammation, hydroxyproline content and collagen deposition were assessed. The numbers of hepatic NK cells and expression of NKG2D (activation receptor of NK cells) on isolated liver lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry. Desmin expression and cell apoptosis in liver tissues were studied using desmin staining and TUNEL assay, respectively. The levels of α-SMA, TGF-β, RAE-1δ and RAE-1ε in liver tissues were determined by RT-qPCR. Results: In CCl4-treated mice, CMCS administration significantly improved liver function, attenuated liver inflammation and fibrosis, and increased the numbers of hepatic NK cells and expression level of NKG2D on hepatic NK cells. Furthermore, CMCS administration significantly decreased desmin expression in liver tissues, and increased TUNEL staining adjacent to hepatic stellate cells. Injection with NK cell-deleting ASGM-1 not only diminished the numbers of hepatic NK cells, but also greatly accelerated liver inflammation and fibrosis in CCl4-treated mice. In CCl4-treated mice with NK cell depletion, CMCS administration decelerated the rate of liver fibrosis development, and mildly upregulated the numbers of hepatic NK cells but without changing NKG2D expression. Conclusion: CMCS allevi¬ates CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis via promoting activation of hepatic

  10. The Nlrp3 Inflammasome Suppresses Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Growth in the Liver by Promoting Natural Killer Cell Tumoricidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Dupaul-Chicoine, Jeremy; Arabzadeh, Azadeh; Dagenais, Maryse; Douglas, Todd; Champagne, Claudia; Morizot, Alexandre; Rodrigue-Gervais, Ian Gaël; Breton, Valérie; Colpitts, Sara L; Beauchemin, Nicole; Saleh, Maya

    2015-10-20

    The crosstalk between inflammation and tumorigenesis is now clearly established. However, how inflammation is elicited in the metastatic environment and the corresponding contribution of innate immunity pathways in suppressing tumor growth at secondary sites are poorly understood. Here, we show that mice deficient in Nlrp3 inflammasome components had exacerbated liver colorectal cancer metastatic growth, which was mediated by impaired interleukin-18 (IL-18) signaling. Control of tumor growth was independent of differential cancer cell colonization or proliferation, intestinal microbiota effects, or tumoricidal activity by the adaptive immune system. Instead, the inflammasome-IL-18 pathway impacted maturation of hepatic NK cells, surface expression of the death ligand FasL, and capacity to kill FasL-sensitive tumors. Our results define a regulatory signaling circuit within the innate immune system linking inflammasome activation to effective NK-cell-mediated tumor attack required to suppress colorectal cancer growth in the liver. PMID:26384545

  11. Imaging Lung Clearance of Radiolabeled Tumor Cells to Study Mice with Normal, Activated or Depleted Natural Killer (NK) Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, P.V.; Bennett, M.; Constantinescu, A.; Arora, V.; Viguet, M.; Antich, P.; Parkey, R.W.; Mathews, D.; Mason, R.P.; Oz, O.K.

    2003-08-26

    Lung clearance of 51CR and 125I iododeoxyuridine (IUDR) labeled cancer cells assess NK cell activity. It is desirable to develop noninvasive imaging technique to assess NK activity in mice. We labeled target YAC-1 tumor cells with 125I, 111In, 99mTc, or 67Ga and injected I.V. into three groups of BALB/c mice. Animals were treated with medium (group I), 300mg/kg cyclophosmamide (CY) to kill NK cell (group II), or anti-LY49C/1) (ab')2 mAb to augment NK function (group III). Lungs were removed 15 min or 2 h later for tissue counting. Control and treated mice were imaged every 5 min with a scintillating camera for 1 h after 15 min of infusion of the 111In labeled cells. Lung clearance increased after 15 min (lodging: 60-80%) and (2 h retention: 3-7%). Similar results were obtained with all the isotopes studied. Images distinguished the control and treated mice for lung activity. Cells labeled with 111In, 99mTc or 67Ga are cleared similar to those labeled with 51Cr or 125I. NK cell destruction of tumor cells may be assessed by noninvasive imaging method either by SPECT (99mTc, 111In, 67Ga) or by PET (68Ga)

  12. Imaging Lung Clearance of Radiolabeled Tumor Cells to Study Mice with Normal, Activated or Depleted Natural Killer (NK) Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P. V.; Bennett, M.; Constantinescu, A.; Arora, V.; Viguet, M.; Antich, P.; Parkey, R. W.; Mathews, D.; Mason, R. P.; Oz, O. K.

    2003-08-01

    Lung clearance of 51CR and 125I iododeoxyuridine (IUDR) labeled cancer cells assess NK cell activity. It is desirable to develop noninvasive imaging technique to assess NK activity in mice. We labeled target YAC-1 tumor cells with 125I, 111In, 99mTc, or 67Ga and injected I.V. into three groups of BALB/c mice. Animals were treated with medium (group I), 300mg/kg cyclophosmamide (CY) to kill NK cell (group II), or anti-LY49C/1) (ab')2 mAb to augment NK function (group III). Lungs were removed 15 min or 2 h later for tissue counting. Control and treated mice were imaged every 5 min with a scintillating camera for 1 h after 15 min of infusion of the 111In labeled cells. Lung clearance increased after 15 min (lodging: 60-80%) and (2 h retention: 3-7%). Similar results were obtained with all the isotopes studied. Images distinguished the control and treated mice for lung activity. Cells labeled with 111In, 99mTc or 67Ga are cleared similar to those labeled with 51Cr or 125I. NK cell destruction of tumor cells may be assessed by noninvasive imaging method either by SPECT (99mTc, 111In, 67Ga) or by PET (68Ga).

  13. Natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer, and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of individuals who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically-defined congenital immunodeficiency of which there are over forty presently known to impair NK cells. The abnormality of NK cells, however, in certain cases represents the majority immunological defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in three different genes that can cause NK cell deficiency as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation. PMID:23993353

  14. Probiotic Lactobacillus casei Shirota supplementation does not modulate immunity in healthy men with reduced natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Stephanie; Bub, Achim; Franz, Charles M A P; Watzl, Bernhard

    2011-05-01

    Oral intake of probiotic bacteria may beneficially modulate functions of NK cells. In healthy individuals, contradictory results exist as to whether NK cell functions can be modulated by probiotic bacteria. Therefore, the primary objective of our randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was to determine the effects of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) on the activity of NK cells in healthy men who had been preselected for a reduced lytic function of their NK cells. Study participants (n = 68) were supplemented for 4 wk with a probiotic drink providing 1.95 × 10(10) CFU LcS/d or with a similar milk drink without probiotic additive. A run-in period of 2 wk preceded the probiotic supplementation followed by a 2-wk follow-up phase without the probiotic or control drink. Changes in the relative proportions of NK cells and other leukocytes as well as multiple functional measurements were determined longitudinally at baseline, after the 4-wk supplementation, and at the end of the follow-up. The probiotic supplementation had no significant effect on NK cell numbers and function or on phagocytosis, respiratory burst, or cytokine secretion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In conclusion, 4 wk of supplementation with LcS does not increase NK cell activity in healthy men with a reduced NK cell lytic activity. However, other doses of LcS, time of intervention, or differences, e.g. in the background diet, may result in a different outcome. PMID:21430250

  15. A new wine Torulaspora delbrueckii killer strain with broad antifungal activity and its toxin-encoding double-stranded RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Manuel; Velázquez, Rocío; Maqueda, Matilde; López-Piñeiro, Antonio; Ribas, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Wine Torulaspora delbrueckii strains producing a new killer toxin (Kbarr-1) were isolated and selected for wine making. They killed all the previously known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains, in addition to other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. The Kbarr-1 phenotype is encoded by a medium-size 1.7 kb dsRNA, TdV-Mbarr-1, which seems to depend on a large-size 4.6 kb dsRNA virus (TdV-LAbarr) for stable maintenance and replication. The TdV-Mbarr-1 dsRNA was sequenced by new generation sequencing techniques. Its genome structure is similar to those of S. cerevisiae killer M dsRNAs, with a 5'-end coding region followed by an internal A-rich sequence and a 3'-end non-coding region. Mbarr-1 RNA positive strand carries cis acting signals at its 5' and 3' termini for transcription and replication respectively, similar to those RNAs of yeast killer viruses. The ORF at the 5' region codes for a putative preprotoxin with an N-terminal secretion signal, potential Kex2p/Kexlp processing sites, and N-glycosylation sites. No relevant sequence identity was found either between the full sequence of Mbarr-1 dsRNA and other yeast M dsRNAs, or between their respective toxin-encoded proteins. However, a relevant identity of TdV-Mbarr-1 RNA regions to the putative replication and packaging signals of most of the M-virus RNAs suggests that they are all evolutionarily related. PMID:26441913

  16. A new wine Torulaspora delbrueckii killer strain with broad antifungal activity and its toxin-encoding double-stranded RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Manuel; Velázquez, Rocío; Maqueda, Matilde; López-Piñeiro, Antonio; Ribas, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Wine Torulaspora delbrueckii strains producing a new killer toxin (Kbarr-1) were isolated and selected for wine making. They killed all the previously known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains, in addition to other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. The Kbarr-1 phenotype is encoded by a medium-size 1.7 kb dsRNA, TdV-Mbarr-1, which seems to depend on a large-size 4.6 kb dsRNA virus (TdV-LAbarr) for stable maintenance and replication. The TdV-Mbarr-1 dsRNA was sequenced by new generation sequencing techniques. Its genome structure is similar to those of S. cerevisiae killer M dsRNAs, with a 5′-end coding region followed by an internal A-rich sequence and a 3′-end non-coding region. Mbarr-1 RNA positive strand carries cis acting signals at its 5′ and 3′ termini for transcription and replication respectively, similar to those RNAs of yeast killer viruses. The ORF at the 5′ region codes for a putative preprotoxin with an N-terminal secretion signal, potential Kex2p/Kexlp processing sites, and N-glycosylation sites. No relevant sequence identity was found either between the full sequence of Mbarr-1 dsRNA and other yeast M dsRNAs, or between their respective toxin-encoded proteins. However, a relevant identity of TdV-Mbarr-1 RNA regions to the putative replication and packaging signals of most of the M-virus RNAs suggests that they are all evolutionarily related. PMID:26441913

  17. Antigen-Addicted T Cell Reserves Trickle Charge the Frontline Killers.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vandana; Sarkar, Surojit

    2016-07-19

    Highly active killer T cells mediate a stable standoff during controlled persistent infections. In this issue of Immunity, Robey and colleagues describe a unique antigen-addicted T cell population bearing characteristics of both effector and memory CD8(+) T cells that provides a continuous supply of potent killer T cells to curb Toxoplasma gondii growth during latency. PMID:27438762

  18. T-cell receptor. gamma. chain-CD3 complex: implication in the cytotoxic activity of a CD3/sup +/ CD4/sup -/ CD8/sup -/ human natural killer clone

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, B.; De Vries, J.; Pettey, C.; Boylston, A.; Yssel, H.; Terhorst, C.; Spits, H.

    1987-06-01

    A subset of human T cells has recently been described. These cells express the CD3 complex but they do not carry the classical T-cell receptor (TCR)-..gamma../-..beta.. heterodimer on their surface (WT31/sup -/ CD3/sup +/). Instead, they express a TCR-..gamma.. chain associated with another type of polypeptide termed TCR-delta. The authors report here that a T-cell clone with natural killer (NK)-like activity, WM-14, had a disulfide bridged TCR-..gamma.. homodimer associated with CD3 on its surface. The TCR-..gamma.. chains of WM-14 cells were present in three different glycosylation forms of 43, 40, and 38 kDa, but they appeared to contain the same polypeptide backbone. Since cytotoxicity by WM-14 could be inhibited by anti-CD3 antibodies, they concluded that the TCR-..gamma..-CD3 complex was involved in the NK-like unrestricted killer activity. Although normal CD3-..gamma.., CD3-delta, and CD3-element of chains were present in this clone, the association with the TCR-..gamma.. homodimer may be the cause of a complete processing of the N-linked oligosaccharides attached to the CD3-delta chain.

  19. Natural killer cells: remembrances of things past.

    PubMed

    Raulet, David H

    2009-04-14

    Recent work has revealed that natural killer cells exhibit a form of memory, previously considered an exclusive property of adaptive immunity. While protective, natural killer cell memory is probably hazier and more fleeting than T cell memory. PMID:19368874

  20. Activity of continuous infusion plus pulse interleukin-2 with famotidine in patients with metastatic kidney cancer or melanoma previously treated with interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter D Y; Walker, Paul R; Quan, Francine M; Ramirez, Maria; Elsamaloty, Haitham M; Ghai, Vikas; Vinogradov, Mikhail; Liles, Darla K

    2006-10-01

    Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells generated by high-dose continuous infusion interleukin-2 (IL-2) are able to nonspecifically lyse melanoma and kidney cancer cells. In vitro famotidine enhances cytotoxicity of LAK against tumor cells, possibly by increasing IL-2 uptake at the IL-2 receptor on lymphocytes. Outpatient IL-2 regimens typically have response rates of 15% or less, with most patients eventually experiencing progressive disease. Second-line therapy is, therefore, needed. We treated 11 patients (6 with metastatic melanoma; 5 having metastatic kidney cancer) who had previously experienced progressive disease on prior IL-2 regimens, with a combination of famotidine 20 mg intravenously (i.v.) twice per day and continuous-infusion IL-2 18 MIU/M2/24 hours x 72 hours, followed 24 hours later by a pulse IL-2 dose (18 MIU/M2 over 15 minutes). Cycles were repeated every 3 weeks. Patient characteristics were: 9 males, median age 63 years (range, 57-75), median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status: 1; most common metastatic sites: lungs, lymph nodes, and soft tissue/subcutaneous (s.c.); median number of cycles received: 4; most common toxicities were fever, nausea/emesis, hypophosphatemia, and hypomagnesemia. Five (5) patients (3 with melanoma, 2 with kidney cancer) have had partial responses. Two (2) patients with kidney cancer have been converted to complete responders with resection of residual disease, remaining without relapse at 5+ and 20+ months. Responding sites are lungs, lymph nodes, abdominal mass, and s.c. Median duration of response was 9.5 months. Median survival was 12 months. This combination has activity in patients with metastatic kidney cancer or melanoma who have received prior IL-2. PMID:17105418

  1. Immunobiology of natural killer cells. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volume include: In vivo activities of NK cells against primary and metastatic tumors in experimental animals; involvement of NK cells in human malignant disease; impaired NK cell profile in leukemia patients; in vivo modulation of NK activity in cancer patients; implications of aberrant NK cell activity in nonmalignant, chronic diseases; NK cell role in regulation of the growth and functions of hemopoietic and lymphoid cells; NK cells active against viral, bacterial, protozoan, and fungal infections; cytokine secretion and noncytotoxic functions of human large granular lymphocytes; augmentation of NK activity; regulation of NK cell activity by suppressor cells; NK cell cloning technology and characteristics of NK cell clones; comparison of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity, and index.

  2. Two chromosomal genes required for killing expression in killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wickner, R B; Leibowitz, M J

    1976-03-25

    The killer character of yeast is determined by a 1.4 X 10(6) molecular weight double-stranded RNA plasmid and at least 12 chromosomal genes. Wild-type strains of yeast that carry this plasmid (killers) secret a toxin which is lethal only to strains not carrying this plasmid (sensitives).--We have isolated 28 independent recessive chromosomal mutants of a killer strain that have lost the ability to secrete an active toxin but remain resistant to the effects of the toxin and continue to carry the complete cytoplasmic killer genome. These mutants define two complementation groups, kex1 and kex2. Kex1 is located on chromosome VII between ade5 and lys5. Kex2 is located on chromosome XIV, but it does not show meiotic linkage to any gene previously located on this chromosome.--When the killer plasmid of kex1 or kex2 strains is eliminated by curing with heat or cycloheximide, the strains become sensitive to killing. The mutant phenotype reappears among the meiotic segregants in a cross with a normal killer. Thus, the kex phenotype does not require an alteration of the killer plasmid.--Kex1 and kex2 strains each contain near-normal levels of the 1.4 x 10(6) molecular weight double-stranded RNA, whose presence is correlated with the presence of the killer genome. PMID:773743

  3. T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase presents a novel therapeutic target in FLT3-ITD mutated acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Alachkar, Houda; Mutonga, Martin; Malnassy, Gregory; Park, Jae-Hyun; Fulton, Noreen; Woods, Alex; Meng, Liping; Kline, Justin; Raca, Gordana; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Takamatsu, Naofumi; Miyamoto, Takashi; Matsuo, Yo; Stock, Wendy; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations of FLT3 (FLT3-ITD), comprises up to 30% of normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is associated with an adverse prognosis. Current FLT3 kinase inhibitors have been tested extensively, but have not yet resulted in a survival benefit and novel therapies are awaited. Here we show that T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK), a mitotic kinase highly expressed in and correlated with more aggressive phenotype in several types of cancer, is expressed in AML but not in normal CD34+ cells and that TOPK knockdown decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. Treatment of AML cells with TOPK inhibitor (OTS514) resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability with lower IC50 in FLT3-mutated cells, including blasts obtained from patients relapsed after FLT3-inhibitor treatment. Using a MV4-11-engrafted mouse model, we found that mice treated with 7.5 mg/kg IV daily for 3 weeks survived significantly longer than vehicle treated mice (median survival 46 vs 29 days, P < 0.001). Importantly, we identified TOPK as a FLT3-ITD and CEBPA regulated kinase, and that modulating TOPK expression or activity resulted in significant decrease of FLT3 expression and CEBPA phosphorylation. Thus, targeting TOPK in FLT3-ITD AML represents a novel therapeutic approach for this adverse risk subset of AML. PMID:26450903

  4. Killer toxin from several food-derived Debaryomyces hansenii strains effective against pathogenic Candida yeasts.

    PubMed

    Banjara, Nabaraj; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Suhr, Mallory J; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2016-04-01

    Candida yeasts are the dominant fungi in the healthy human microbiome, but are well-known for causing disease following a variety of perturbations. Evaluation of fungal populations from the healthy human gut revealed a significant negative correlation between the foodborne yeast, Debaryomyces hansenii, and Candida species. D. hansenii is reported to produce killer toxins (mycocins) effective against other yeast species. In order to better understand this phenomenon, a collection of 42 D. hansenii isolates was obtained from 22 cheeses and evaluated for killer activity against Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis over a range of temperatures and pH values. Twenty three strains demonstrated killer activity against both C. albicans and C. tropicalis, which was pH- and temperature-dependent, with no killer activity observed for any strain at pH6.5 or higher, or at ≥35°C (physiological conditions in the human gastrointestinal tract). A cell-free mycocin preparation showed transient killer activity against C. albicans at 35°C and a cheese sample containing a killer D. hansenii strain demonstrated sustained killer activity against both C. albicans and C. tropicalis. Together, these observations raise the possibility that D. hansenii could influence Candida populations in the gut. PMID:26828815

  5. Lack of correlation between mycoplasma induced IFN-gamma production in vitro and natural killer cell activity against FLD-3 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, V.; Lust, J.; Gifaldi, A.; Bennett, M.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1983-01-01

    The role of interferon (IFN) in the normal-killer-cell (NK) mediated lysis of tumor cells in vitro is investigated experimentally. Normal mouse spleen cells and spleen cells treated with anti-Thy-1.2 serum are cultured for 24 h with Friend erythroleukemia (FLD-3) cells in RPMI 1640 medium; supernatant fluid from cultures with FLD-3 lysis are assayed for IFN-gamma, and it is found that pretreatment with anti-Thy-1.2 suppresses IFN-gamma generation without affecting the ability of NK to mediate the lysis of FLD-3. Further tests indicate that the generation of IFN-gamma is stimulated by the presence of Mycoplasma arginini in the FLD-3 cells.

  6. On the communicative significance of whistles in wild killer whales (Orcinus orca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Frank; Franck, Dierk; Ford, John

    2002-08-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) use pulsed calls and whistles in underwater communication. Unlike pulsed calls, whistles have received little study and thus their function is poorly known. In this study, whistle activities of groups of individually known killer whales were compared quantitatively across behavioural categories. Acoustic recordings and simultaneous behavioural observations were made of northern resident killer whales off Vancouver Island in 1996 and 1997. Whistles were produced at greater rates than discrete calls during close-range behavioural activities than during long-range activities. They were the predominant sound-type recorded during socializing. The number of whistles per animal per minute was significantly higher during close-range behavioural activities than during long-range activities. Evidently, whistles play an important role in the close-range acoustic communication in northern resident killer whales.

  7. Targeting natural killer cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Huntington, Nicholas D; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-08-19

    Alteration in the expression of cell-surface proteins is a common consequence of malignant transformation. Natural killer (NK) cells use an array of germline-encoded activating and inhibitory receptors that scan for altered protein-expression patterns, but tumor evasion of detection by the immune system is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer. NK cells display rapid and potent immunity to metastasis or hematological cancers, and major efforts are now being undertaken to fully exploit NK cell anti-tumor properties in the clinic. Diverse approaches encompass the development of large-scale NK cell-expansion protocols for adoptive transfer, the establishment of a microenvironment favorable to NK cell activity, the redirection of NK cell activity against tumor cells and the release of inhibitory signals that limit NK cell function. In this Review we detail recent advances in NK cell-based immunotherapies and discuss the advantages and limitations of these strategies. PMID:27540992

  8. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26029215

  9. Revving up Natural Killer Cells and Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pittari, Gianfranco; Filippini, Perla; Gentilcore, Giusy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to innate immunity and exhibit cytolytic activity against infectious pathogens and tumor cells. NK-cell function is finely tuned by receptors that transduce inhibitory or activating signals, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, NK Group 2 member D (NKG2D), NKG2A/CD94, NKp46, and others, and recognize both foreign and self-antigens expressed by NK-susceptible targets. Recent insights into NK-cell developmental intermediates have translated into a more accurate definition of culture conditions for the in vitro generation and propagation of human NK cells. In this respect, interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-21 are instrumental in driving NK-cell differentiation and maturation, and hold great promise for the design of optimal NK-cell culture protocols. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells possess phenotypic and functional hallmarks of both T cells and NK cells. Similar to T cells, they express CD3 and are expandable in culture, while not requiring functional priming for in vivo activity, like NK cells. CIK cells may offer some advantages over other cell therapy products, including ease of in vitro propagation and no need for exogenous administration of IL-2 for in vivo priming. NK cells and CIK cells can be expanded using a variety of clinical-grade approaches, before their infusion into patients with cancer. Herein, we discuss GMP-compliant strategies to isolate and expand human NK and CIK cells for immunotherapy purposes, focusing on clinical trials of adoptive transfer to patients with hematological malignancies. PMID:26029215

  10. Natural Killer Cells and Antifungal Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Stanislaw; Zimmermann, Stefanie-Yvonne; Tramsen, Lars; Koehl, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    As a result of improved experimental methodologies and a better understanding of the immune system, there is increasing insight into the antifungal activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Murine and human NK cells are able to damage fungi of different genera and species in vitro, and they exert both direct and indirect antifungal activity through cytotoxic molecules such as perforin and through cytokines and interferons, respectively. On the other hand, recent data suggest that fungi exhibit immunosuppressive effects on NK cells. Whereas clear in vivo data are lacking in humans, the importance of NK cells in the host response against fungi has been demonstrated in animal models. Further knowledge of the interaction of NK cells with fungi might help to better understand the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections and to improve treatment strategies. PMID:23365210

  11. Molecular identification and expression analysis of a natural killer cell enhancing factor (NKEF) from rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus and the biological activity of its recombinant protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Won; Choi, Hye-Sung; Kwon, Mun-Gyeong; Park, Myoung-Ae; Hwang, Jee-Youn; Kim, Do-Hyung; Park, Chan-Il

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer cell enhancing factor (NKEF) belongs to the defined peroxiredoxin (Prx) family. Rock bream NKEF cDNA was identified by expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of rock bream liver that was stimulated with the LPS. The full-length RbNKEF cDNA (1062 bp) contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 594 bp encoding 198 amino acids. RbNKEF was significantly expressed in the gill, liver, and intestine. mRNA expression of NKEF in the head kidney was examined under viral and bacterial challenge via real-time RT-PCR. Experimental challenge of rock bream with Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, and RSIV resulted in significant increases in RbNKEF mRNA in the head kidney. To obtain a recombinant NKEF, the RbNKEF ORF was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the purified soluble protein exhibited a single band corresponding to the predicted molecular mass. When kidney leucocytes were treated with a high concentration of rRbNKEF (10 μg/mL), they exhibited significantly enhanced cell proliferation and viability under oxidative stress. PMID:24371552

  12. From Pichia anomala killer toxin through killer antibodies to killer peptides for a comprehensive anti-infective strategy.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, Luciano; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    "Antibiobodies", antibodies (Abs) with antibiotic activity, internal image of a Pichia anomala killer toxin (PaKT) characterized by microbicidal activity against microorganisms expressing β-glucans cell-wall receptors (PaKTRs), were produced by idiotypic vaccination with a PaKT-neutralizing monoclonal Ab (PaKT-like Abs) or induced by a protein-conjugated β-glucan. Human natural PaKT-like Abs (PaKTAbs) were found in the vaginal fluid of women infected with KT-sensitive microorganisms. Monoclonal and recombinant PaKT-like Abs, and PaKTAbs proved to be protective against experimental candidiasis, cryptococcosis and aspergillosis. A killer decapeptide (KP), synthesized from the sequence of a recombinant PaKT-like Ab or produced in transgenic plants, showed a microbicidal activity in vitro, neutralized by β-glucans, a therapeutic effect in vivo, against experimental mucosal and systemic mycoses, and a prophylactic role in planta, against phytopathogenic microorganisms, respectively. KP showed fungicidal properties against all the defective mutants of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae library, inclusive of strains recognized to be resistant to conventional antifungal drugs. KP inhibited in vitro, ex vivo and/or in vivo HIV-1 and Influenza A virus replication, owing to down-regulation of CCR5 co-receptors, physical block of the gp120-receptor interaction and reduction in the synthesis of glycoproteins, HA and M1 in particular. KP modulated the expression of costimulatory and MHC molecules on murine dendritic cells, improving their capacity to induce lymphocyte proliferation. KP, proven to be devoid of cytotoxicity on human cells, showed self-assembly-releasing hydrogel-like properties, catalyzed by β 1,3 glucan. PaKT's biotechnological derivatives may represent the prototypes of novel antifungal vaccines and anti-infective drugs characterized by different mechanisms of action. PMID:20714805

  13. Phototoxic effects of lysosome-associated genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Boulina, Maria E.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Bogdanova, Ekaterina A.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2014-07-01

    KillerRed is a unique phototoxic red fluorescent protein that can be used to induce local oxidative stress by green-orange light illumination. Here we studied phototoxicity of KillerRed targeted to cytoplasmic surface of lysosomes via fusion with Rab7, a small GTPase that is known to be attached to membranes of late endosomes and lysosomes. It was found that lysosome-associated KillerRed ensures efficient light-induced cell death similar to previously reported mitochondria- and plasma membrane-localized KillerRed. Inhibitory analysis demonstrated that lysosomal cathepsins play an important role in the manifestation of KillerRed-Rab7 phototoxicity. Time-lapse monitoring of cell morphology, membrane integrity, and nuclei shape allowed us to conclude that KillerRed-Rab7-mediated cell death occurs via necrosis at high light intensity or via apoptosis at lower light intensity. Potentially, KillerRed-Rab7 can be used as an optogenetic tool to direct target cell populations to either apoptosis or necrosis.

  14. Estrogen Therapy Delays Autoimmune Diabetes and Promotes the Protective Efficiency of Natural Killer T-Cell Activation in Female Nonobese Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Gourdy, Pierre; Bourgeois, Elvire A; Levescot, Anaïs; Pham, Linh; Riant, Elodie; Ahui, Marie-Louise; Damotte, Diane; Gombert, Jean-Marc; Bayard, Francis; Ohlsson, Claes; Arnal, Jean-François; Herbelin, André

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies focused on restoring immune tolerance remain the main avenue to prevent type 1 diabetes (T1D). Because estrogens potentiate FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, two regulatory lymphocyte populations that are functionally deficient in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, we investigated whether estradiol (E2) therapy influences the course of T1D in this model. To this end, female NOD mice were sc implanted with E2- or placebo-delivering pellets to explore the course of spontaneous and cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes. Treg-depleted and iNKT-cell-deficient (Jα18(-/-)) NOD mice were used to assess the respective involvement of these lymphocyte populations in E2 effects. Early E2 administration (from 4 wk of age) was found to preserve NOD mice from both spontaneous and cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes, and a complete protection was also observed throughout treatment when E2 treatment was initiated after the onset of insulitis (from 12 wk of age). This delayed E2 treatment remained fully effective in Treg-depleted mice but failed to entirely protect Jα18(-/-) mice. Accordingly, E2 administration was shown to restore the cytokine production of iNKT cells in response to in vivo challenge with the cognate ligand α-galactosylceramide. Finally, transient E2 administration potentiated the previously described protective action of α-galactosylceramide treatment in NOD females. This study provides original evidence that E2 therapy strongly protects NOD mice from T1D and reveals the estrogen/iNKT cell axis as a new effective target to counteract diabetes onset at the stage of insulitis. Estrogen-based therapy should thus be considered for T1D prevention. PMID:26485613

  15. Development and maturation of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Theresa L; Sun, Joseph C

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are critical for host protection against pathogens and cancer due to their ability to rapidly release inflammatory cytokines and kill infected or transformed cells. In the 40 years since their initial discovery, much has been learned about how this important cellular lineage develops and functions. We now know that NK cells are the founding members of an expanded family of lymphocyte known as innate lymphoid cells (ILC). Furthermore, we have recently discovered that NK cells can possess features of adaptive immunity such as antigen specificity and long-lived memory responses. Here we will review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving development of NK cells from the common lymphoid progenitor (CLP) to mature NK cells, and from activated effectors to long-lived memory NK cells. PMID:26845614

  16. KillerRed and miniSOG as genetically encoded photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirmanova, Marina V.; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Turchin, Ilya V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Ignatova, Nadezhda I.; Klementieva, Natalia V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-06-01

    Despite of the success of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in cancer treatment, the problems of low selective accumulation of a photosensitizer in a tumor and skin phototoxicity have not resolved yet. The idea of encoding of a photosensitizer in genome of cancer cells is attractive, particularly because it can provide highly selective light induced cell killing. This work is aimed at the development of new approach to PDT of cancer, namely to using genetically encoded photosensitizers. A phototoxicity of red fluorescent GFP-like protein KillerRed and FMN-binding protein miniSOG was investigated on HeLa tumor xenografts in nude mice. The tumors were generated by subcutaneous injection of HeLa cells stably expressing the phototoxic proteins. The tumors were irradiated with 594 nm or 473 nm laser at 150 mW/cm2 for 20 or 30 min, repeatedly. Fluorescence intensity of the tumors was measured in vivo before and after each treatment procedure. Detailed pathomorphological analysis was performed 24 h after the therapy. On the epi-fluorescence images in vivo photobleaching of both proteins was observed indicating photodynamic reaction. Substantial pathomorphological abnormalities were found in the treated KillerRed-expressing tumor tissue, such as vacuolization of cytoplasm, cellular and nuclear membrane destruction, activation of apoptosis. In contrast, miniSOG-expressing tumors displayed no reaction to PDT, presumably due to the lack of FMN cofactor needed for fluorescence recovery of the flavoprotein. The results are of interest for photodynamic therapy as a proof of possibility to induce photodamages in cancer cells in vivo using genetically encoded photosensitizers.

  17. Turning Cancer Cells into Cancer Killers.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have changed leukemia cells into natural killer cells by adding a specific antibody to bone marrow cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. The induced natural killer cells killed leukemia cells in culture. The antibody does not trigger the same conversion in bone marrow from healthy patients. PMID:26621762

  18. Cellular immune response in Echinococcus multilocularis infection in humans. II. Natural killer cell activity and cell subpopulations in the blood and in the periparasitic granuloma of patients with alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vuitton, D A; Bresson-Hadni, S; Laroche, L; Kaiserlian, D; Guerret-Stocker, S; Bresson, J L; Gillet, M

    1989-01-01

    In animal models, the development of Echinococcus multilocularis larvae has been shown to correlate with the immune status of the host, and particularly with cellular immunity. In humans, a defect in immune regulation may explain the persistence of cellular infiltration and fibrogenesis. We assessed natural killer (NK) activity in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with alveolar echinococcosis, and compared in 12 patients who underwent a surgical procedure the cell populations in the PBMC with those present in the periparasitic granuloma. The results indicated that (i) the NK cell activity of the PBMC was significantly altered at the lower NK cell: target cell ratios; (ii) the percentage of CD8+ cells was significantly decreased in the PBMC with an increased CD4:CD8 cell ratio; (iii) inversely, the CD8+ cells constituted the main population of T cells in the liver of most patients; and (iv) the periparasitic granuloma was mainly composed of macrophages, T cells and myofibroblasts in close association with the developing fibrosis. A relatively high number of CD4+ cells in the periparasitic granuloma of two patients with 'abortive' parasitic lesions suggested that, as it is observed in experimental E. multilocularis infection, differential evolution of the phenotypic pattern of the periparasitic granuloma could be related to resistance or sensitivity to infection by E. multilocularis in humans. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2805425

  19. Natural Killer Cell Sensing of Infected Cells Compensates for MyD88 Deficiency but Not IFN-I Activity in Resistance to Mouse Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Cocita, Clément; Guiton, Rachel; Bessou, Gilles; Chasson, Lionel; Boyron, Marilyn; Crozat, Karine; Dalod, Marc

    2015-05-01

    In mice, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and natural killer (NK) cells both contribute to resistance to systemic infections with herpes viruses including mouse Cytomegalovirus (MCMV). pDCs are the major source of type I IFN (IFN-I) during MCMV infection. This response requires pDC-intrinsic MyD88-dependent signaling by Toll-Like Receptors 7 and 9. Provided that they express appropriate recognition receptors such as Ly49H, NK cells can directly sense and kill MCMV-infected cells. The loss of any one of these responses increases susceptibility to infection. However, the relative importance of these antiviral immune responses and how they are related remain unclear. In humans, while IFN-I responses are essential, MyD88 is dispensable for antiviral immunity. Hence, a higher redundancy has been proposed in the mechanisms promoting protective immune responses against systemic infections by herpes viruses during natural infections in humans. It has been assumed, but not proven, that mice fail to mount protective MyD88-independent IFN-I responses. In humans, the mechanism that compensates MyD88 deficiency has not been elucidated. To address these issues, we compared resistance to MCMV infection and immune responses between mouse strains deficient for MyD88, the IFN-I receptor and/or Ly49H. We show that selective depletion of pDC or genetic deficiencies for MyD88 or TLR9 drastically decreased production of IFN-I, but not the protective antiviral responses. Moreover, MyD88, but not IFN-I receptor, deficiency could largely be compensated by Ly49H-mediated antiviral NK cell responses. Thus, contrary to the current dogma but consistent with the situation in humans, we conclude that, in mice, in our experimental settings, MyD88 is redundant for IFN-I responses and overall defense against a systemic herpes virus infection. Moreover, we identified direct NK cell sensing of infected cells as one mechanism able to compensate for MyD88 deficiency in mice. Similar mechanisms likely

  20. Target Strength of Southern Resident Killer Whales (Orcinus orca): Measurement and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Moore, Brian

    2012-04-04

    A major criterion for tidal power licensing in Washington’s Puget Sound is the management of the risk of injury to killer whales due to collision with moving turbine blades. An active monitoring system is being proposed for killer whale detection, tracking, and alerting that links to and triggers temporary turbine shutdown when there is risk of collision. Target strength (TS) modeling of the killer whale is critical to the design and application of any active monitoring system. A 1996 study performed a high-resolution measurement of acoustic reflectivity as a function of frequency of a female bottlenose dolphin (2.2 m length) at broadside aspect and TS as a function of incident angle at 67 kHz frequency. Assuming that killer whales share similar morphology structure with the bottlenose dolphin, we extrapolated the TS of an adult killer whale 7.5 m in length at 67 kHz frequency with -8 dB at broadside aspect and -28 dB at tail side. The backscattering data from three Southern Resident killer whales were analyzed to obtain the TS measurement. These data were collected at Lime Kiln State Park using a split-beam system deployed from a boat. The TS of the killer whale at higher frequency (200 kHz) was estimated based on a three-layer model for plane wave reflection from the lung of the whale. The TS data of killer whales were in good agreement with our model. In this paper, we also discuss and explain possible causes for measurement estimation error.

  1. K2 killer toxin-induced physiological changes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Orentaite, Irma; Poranen, Minna M; Oksanen, Hanna M; Daugelavicius, Rimantas; Bamford, Dennis H

    2016-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells produce killer toxins, such as K1, K2 and K28, that can modulate the growth of other yeasts giving advantage for the killer strains. Here we focused on the physiological changes induced by K2 toxin on a non-toxin-producing yeast strain as well as K1, K2 and K28 killer strains. Potentiometric measurements were adjusted to observe that K2 toxin immediately acts on the sensitive cells leading to membrane permeability. This correlated with reduced respiration activity, lowered intracellular ATP content and decrease in cell viability. However, we did not detect any significant ATP leakage from the cells treated by killer toxin K2. Strains producing heterologous toxins K1 and K28 were less sensitive to K2 than the non-toxin producing one suggesting partial cross-protection between the different killer systems. This phenomenon may be connected to the observed differences in respiratory activities of the killer strains and the non-toxin-producing strain at low pH. This might also have practical consequences in wine industry; both as beneficial ones in controlling contaminating yeasts and non-beneficial ones causing sluggish fermentation. PMID:26818855

  2. Crude extract of Polygonum cuspidatum stimulates immune responses in normal mice by increasing the percentage of Mac-3-positive cells and enhancing macrophage phagocytic activity and natural killer cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chueh, Fu-Shin; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Weng, Shu-Wen; Huang, Yi-Ping; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Polygonum cuspidatum is a natural plant that is used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine. The crude extract of Polygonum cuspidatum (CEPC) has numerous biological effects; however, there is a lack of studies on the effects of CEPC on immune responses in normal mice. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vivo effects of CEPC on immune responses in normal mice. CEPC (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 mg/kg) was orally administered to BALB/c mice for three weeks, following which blood, liver, and spleen samples were collected. CEPC did not significantly affect the total body weight, or tissue weights of the liver or spleen, as compared with the control mice. CEPC increased the percentages of CD3 (T-cell marker), 11b (monocytes) and Mac-3 (macrophages) positive-cells, and reduced the percentage of CD19-positive cells (B-cell marker), as compared with the control mice. CEPC (100 mg/kg) stimulated macrophage phagocytosis of blood samples but did not affect macrophage phagocytosis in the peritoneum. Activity of the splenic natural killer cells was increased in response to CEPC (50 mg/kg) treatment. Furthermore, CEPC inhibited T- and B-cell proliferation when the cells were stimulated with concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide, respectively. PMID:25338846

  3. Persistence in the shadow of killers.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Killing is perhaps the most definite form of communication possible. Microbes such as yeasts and gut bacteria have been shown to exhibit killer phenotypes. The killer strains are able to kill other microbes occupying the same ecological niche, and do so with impunity. It would therefore be expected that, wherever a killer phenotype has arisen, all members of the population would soon be killers or dead. Surprisingly, (1) one can find both killer and sensitive strains in coexistence, both in the wild and in in vitro experiments, and (2) the absolute fitness cost of the killer phenotype often seems to be very small. We present an explicit model of such coexistence in a fragmented or discrete environment. A killer strain may kill all sensitive cells in one patch (one piece of rotting fruit, one cave or one human gut, for example), allowing sensitives to exist only in the absence of killer strains on the same patch. In our model, populations spread easily between patches, but in a stochastic manner: one can imagine spores borne by the wind over a field of untended apple trees, or enteric disease transmission in a region in which travel is effectively unrestricted. What we show is that coexistence is not only possible, but that it is possible even if the absolute fitness advantage of the sensitive strain over the killer strain is arbitrarily small. We do this by performing a specifically targeted mathematical analysis on our model, rather than via simulations. Our model does not assume large population densities, and may thus be useful in the context of understanding the ecology of extreme environments. PMID:25071753

  4. Persistence in the shadow of killers

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Killing is perhaps the most definite form of communication possible. Microbes such as yeasts and gut bacteria have been shown to exhibit killer phenotypes. The killer strains are able to kill other microbes occupying the same ecological niche, and do so with impunity. It would therefore be expected that, wherever a killer phenotype has arisen, all members of the population would soon be killers or dead. Surprisingly, (1) one can find both killer and sensitive strains in coexistence, both in the wild and in in vitro experiments, and (2) the absolute fitness cost of the killer phenotype often seems to be very small. We present an explicit model of such coexistence in a fragmented or discrete environment. A killer strain may kill all sensitive cells in one patch (one piece of rotting fruit, one cave or one human gut, for example), allowing sensitives to exist only in the absence of killer strains on the same patch. In our model, populations spread easily between patches, but in a stochastic manner: one can imagine spores borne by the wind over a field of untended apple trees, or enteric disease transmission in a region in which travel is effectively unrestricted. What we show is that coexistence is not only possible, but that it is possible even if the absolute fitness advantage of the sensitive strain over the killer strain is arbitrarily small. We do this by performing a specifically targeted mathematical analysis on our model, rather than via simulations. Our model does not assume large population densities, and may thus be useful in the context of understanding the ecology of extreme environments. PMID:25071753

  5. Susceptibility of RDM4 lymphoma cells to LAK-mediated lysis is decreased in tumor bearers fed fish oil high fat regimen.

    PubMed

    el Ayachi, N; Begin, M; Mercier, D; Ells, G; Oth, D

    1990-03-01

    RDM4 lymphoma cells were grown intraperitoneally in genetically compatible AKR mice fed either regular mouse chow, or diet supplemented with either saturated fat (hydrogenated beef tallow = HBT) or unsaturated fat (fish oil = FO). It was observed that the lymphoma cells number was significantly greater in FO-fed hosts and lower in HBT-fed hosts, than in the mice fed regular chow. The tumor bearers diet did not dramatically influence the rate of DNA synthesis of RDM4 cells, as measured by [3H]thymidine uptake in culture, a few hours after harvesting from the peritoneal cavity. It was repeatedly found that FO feeding of the tumor bearers elicited an increased resistance of RDM4 cells to lysis by LAK effectors, as appraised in vitro by 51Cr release test and in vivo by the "Winn assay". Different FO percentage of the diet (16%, 8%, 4%) resulted in comparable reduction of susceptibility of RDM4 cells to lysis by LAK effectors. Lipid analysis showed that RDM4 cells grown in mice fed FO diet or HBT diet differed markedly in their fatty acid composition and that their resistance to lysis by LAK cells correlated with the quantity of oxidizable fatty acids especially of the n-6 type. PMID:2317783

  6. The evolution of natural killer cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are immune cells that play a crucial role against viral infections and tumors. To be tolerant against healthy tissue and simultaneously attack infected cells, the activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a sophisticated array of germline-encoded activating and inhibiting receptors. The best characterized mechanism of NK cell activation is "missing self" detection, i.e., the recognition of virally infected or transformed cells that reduce their MHC expression to evade cytotoxic T cells. To monitor the expression of MHC-I on target cells, NK cells have monomorphic inhibitory receptors which interact with conserved MHC molecules. However, there are other NK cell receptors (NKRs) encoded by gene families showing a remarkable genetic diversity. Thus, NKR haplotypes contain several genes encoding for receptors with activating and inhibiting signaling, and that vary in gene content and allelic polymorphism. But if missing-self detection can be achieved by a monomorphic NKR system why have these polygenic and polymorphic receptors evolved? Here, we review the expansion of NKR receptor families in different mammal species, and we discuss several hypotheses that possibly underlie the diversification of the NK cell receptor complex, including the evolution of viral decoys, peptide sensitivity, and selective MHC-downregulation. PMID:26392015

  7. Killer whales and whaling: the scavenging hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Hal; Reeves, Randall

    2005-01-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) frequently scavenged from the carcasses produced by whalers. This practice became especially prominent with large-scale mechanical whaling in the twentieth century, which provided temporally and spatially clustered floating carcasses associated with loud acoustic signals. The carcasses were often of species of large whale preferred by killer whales but that normally sink beyond their diving range. In the middle years of the twentieth century floating whaled carcasses were much more abundant than those resulting from natural mortality of whales, and we propose that scavenging killer whales multiplied through diet shifts and reproduction. During the 1970s the numbers of available carcasses fell dramatically with the cessation of most whaling (in contrast to a reasonably stable abundance of living whales), and the scavenging killer whales needed an alternative source of nutrition. Diet shifts may have triggered declines in other prey species, potentially affecting ecosystems, as well as increasing direct predation on living whales. PMID:17148221

  8. Natural Killer Cells for Therapy of Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Suck, Garnet; Linn, Yeh Ching; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Clinical application of natural killer (NK) cells against leukemia is an area of intense investigation. In human leukocyte antigen-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT), alloreactive NK cells exert powerful anti-leukemic activity in preventing relapse in the absence of graft-versus-host disease, particularly in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Adoptive transfer of donor NK cells post-HSCT or in non-transplant scenarios may be superior to the currently widely used unmanipulated donor lymphocyte infusion. This concept could be further improved through transfusion of activated NK cells. Significant progress has been made in good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant large-scale production of stimulated effectors. However, inherent limitations remain. These include differing yields and compositions of the end-product due to donor variability and inefficient means for cryopreservation. Moreover, the impact of the various novel activation strategies on NK cell biology and in vivo behavior are barely understood. In contrast, reproduction of the third-party NK-92 drug from a cryostored GMP-compliant master cell bank is straightforward and efficient. Safety for the application of this highly cytotoxic cell line was demonstrated in first clinical trials. This novel 'off-the-shelf' product could become a treatment option for a broad patient population. For specific tumor targeting chimeric-antigen-receptor-engineered NK-92 cells have been designed. PMID:27226791

  9. Natural Killer Cells for Therapy of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Suck, Garnet; Linn, Yeh Ching; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Summary Clinical application of natural killer (NK) cells against leukemia is an area of intense investigation. In human leukocyte antigen-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT), alloreactive NK cells exert powerful anti-leukemic activity in preventing relapse in the absence of graft-versus-host disease, particularly in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Adoptive transfer of donor NK cells post-HSCT or in non-transplant scenarios may be superior to the currently widely used unmanipulated donor lymphocyte infusion. This concept could be further improved through transfusion of activated NK cells. Significant progress has been made in good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant large-scale production of stimulated effectors. However, inherent limitations remain. These include differing yields and compositions of the end-product due to donor variability and inefficient means for cryopreservation. Moreover, the impact of the various novel activation strategies on NK cell biology and in vivo behavior are barely understood. In contrast, reproduction of the third-party NK-92 drug from a cryostored GMP-compliant master cell bank is straightforward and efficient. Safety for the application of this highly cytotoxic cell line was demonstrated in first clinical trials. This novel ‘off-the-shelf’ product could become a treatment option for a broad patient population. For specific tumor targeting chimeric-antigen-receptor-engineered NK-92 cells have been designed. PMID:27226791

  10. Cationic amphipathic D-enantiomeric antimicrobial peptides with in vitro and ex vivo activity against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yun; Lam, Jason T; Siu, Gilman K H; Yam, Wing Cheong; Mason, A James; Lam, Jenny K W

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of bacterial death worldwide. Due to the emergence of multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB), and the persistence of latent infections, a safe and effective TB therapy is highly sought after. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have therapeutic potential against infectious diseases and have the ability to target microbial pathogens within eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we investigated the activity of a family of six AMPs containing all-D amino acids (D-LAK peptides) against MDR and XDR clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) both in vitro and, using THP-1 cells as a macrophage model, cultured ex vivo. All the D-LAK peptides successfully inhibited the growth of Mtb in vitro and were similarly effective against MDR and XDR strains. D-LAK peptides effectively broke down the heavy clumping of mycobacteria in broth culture, consistent with a 'detergent-like effect' that could reduce the hydrophobic interactions between the highly lipidic cell walls of the mycobacteria, preventing bacteria cell aggregation. Furthermore, though not able to eradicate the intracellular mycobacteria, D-LAK peptides substantially inhibited the intracellular growth of drug-resistant Mtb clinical isolates at concentrations that were well tolerated by THP-1 cells. Finally, combining D-LAK peptide with isoniazid could enhance the anti-TB efficacy. D-LAK peptide, particularly D-LAK120-A, was effective as an adjunct agent at non-toxic concentration to potentiate the efficacy of isoniazid against drug-resistant Mtb in vitro, possibly by facilitating the access of isoniazid into the mycobacteria by increasing the surface permeability of the pathogen. PMID:25154927

  11. Redistribution, Hyperproliferation, Activation of Natural Killer Cells and CD8 T Cells, and Cytokine Production During First-in-Human Clinical Trial of Recombinant Human Interleukin-15 in Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Kevin C.; Lugli, Enrico; Welles, Hugh C.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Fojo, Antonio Tito; Morris, John C.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Dubois, Sigrid P.; Perera, Liyanage P.; Stewart, Donn M.; Goldman, Carolyn K.; Bryant, Bonita R.; Decker, Jean M.; Chen, Jing; Worthy, Tat'Yana A.; Figg, William D.; Peer, Cody J.; Sneller, Michael C.; Lane, H. Clifford; Yovandich, Jason L.; Creekmore, Stephen P.; Roederer, Mario; Waldmann, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Interleukin-15 (IL-15) has significant potential in cancer immunotherapy as an activator of antitumor CD8 T and natural killer (NK) cells. The primary objectives of this trial were to determine safety, adverse event profile, dose-limiting toxicity, and maximum-tolerated dose of recombinant human IL-15 (rhIL-15) administered as a daily intravenous bolus infusion for 12 consecutive days in patients with metastatic malignancy. Patients and Methods We performed a first in-human trial of Escherichia coli–produced rhIL-15. Bolus infusions of 3.0, 1.0, and 0.3 μg/kg per day of IL-15 were administered for 12 consecutive days to patients with metastatic malignant melanoma or metastatic renal cell cancer. Results Flow cytometry of peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed dramatic efflux of NK and memory CD8 T cells from the circulating blood within minutes of IL-15 administration, followed by influx and hyperproliferation yielding 10-fold expansions of NK cells that ultimately returned to baseline. Up to 50-fold increases of serum levels of multiple inflammatory cytokines were observed. Dose-limiting toxicities observed in patients receiving 3.0 and 1.0 μg/kg per day were grade 3 hypotension, thrombocytopenia, and elevations of ALT and AST, resulting in 0.3 μg/kg per day being determined the maximum-tolerated dose. Indications of activity included clearance of lung lesions in two patients. Conclusion IL-15 could be safely administered to patients with metastatic malignancy. IL-15 administration markedly altered homeostasis of lymphocyte subsets in blood, with NK cells and γδ cells most dramatically affected, followed by CD8 memory T cells. To reduce toxicity and increase efficacy, alternative dosing strategies have been initiated, including continuous intravenous infusions and subcutaneous IL-15 administration. PMID:25403209

  12. FLT3 ligand administration after hematopoietic cell transplantation increases circulating dendritic cell precursors that can be activated by CpG oligodeoxynucleotides to enhance T-cell and natural killer cell function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chan, Anissa S H; Dawson, Amanda J; Liang, Xueqing; Blazar, Bruce R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key effectors in innate immunity and play critical roles in triggering adaptive immune responses. FLT3 ligand (FLT3-L) is essential for DC development from hematopoietic progenitors. In a phase I clinical trial, we demonstrated that immunotherapy with subcutaneous injection of FLT3-L is safe and well tolerated in cancer patients recovering from autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). FLT3-L administration significantly increased the frequency and absolute number of blood DC precursors without affecting other mature cell lineages during the 6-week course of FLT3-L therapy. After 14 days of FLT3-L administration, the number of blood CD11c + DCs, plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs), and CD14 + monocytes increased by 5.3-, 2.9-, 3.8-fold, respectively, and was maintained at increased levels throughout FLT3-L therapy. FLT3-L-increased blood DCs in HCT patients were immature and had modest enhancing effects on in vitro T-cell proliferation to antigens and natural killer (NK) cell function. The addition of type B CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from HCT patients receiving FLT3-L therapy induced rapid maturation of both CD11c + DCs and PDCs and enhanced T-cell proliferative responses. In addition, CpG ODN induced potent activation of NK cells from FLT3-L-treated patients with increased surface CD69 expression and augmented cytotoxicity. CpG ODN-induced activation of NK cells was primarily via an indirect mechanism through PDCs. These findings suggest that FLT3-L mobilization of DC precursors followed by a specific DC stimulus such as CpG ODN may provide a novel strategy to manipulate antitumor immunity in patients after HCT. PMID:15625541

  13. Balance between activating NKG2D, DNAM-1, NKp44 and NKp46 and inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptors determine natural killer degranulation towards rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Natasja; Pascal, Veronique; Fasth, Andreas E R; Sundström, Yvonne; Galsgaard, Elisabeth D; Ahern, David; Andersen, Martin; Baslund, Bo; Bartels, Else M; Bliddal, Henning; Feldmann, Marc; Malmström, Vivianne; Berg, Louise; Spee, Pieter; Söderström, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia leading to progressive joint destruction. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are central components of the aggressive, tumour-like synovial structure termed pannus, which invades the joint space and cartilage. A distinct natural killer (NK) cell subset expressing the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor is present in RA synovial fluid. Little is known about possible cellular interactions between RA-FLS and NK cells. We used cultured RA-FLS and the human NK cell line Nishi, of which the latter expresses an NK receptor repertoire similar to that of NK cells in RA synovial fluid, as an in vitro model system of RA-FLS/NK cell cross-talk. We show that RA-FLS express numerous ligands for both activating and inhibitory NK cell receptors, and stimulate degranulation of Nishi cells. We found that NKG2D, DNAM-1, NKp46 and NKp44 are the key activating receptors involved in Nishi cell degranulation towards RA-FLS. Moreover, blockade of the interaction between CD94/NKG2A and its ligand HLA-E expressed on RA-FLS further enhanced Nishi cell degranulation in co-culture with RA-FLS. Using cultured RA-FLS and the human NK cell line Nishi as an in vitro model system of RA-FLS/NK cell cross-talk, our results suggest that cell-mediated cytotoxicity of RA-FLS may be one mechanism by which NK cells influence local joint inflammation in RA. PMID:24673109

  14. Balance between activating NKG2D, DNAM-1, NKp44 and NKp46 and inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptors determine natural killer degranulation towards rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Natasja; Pascal, Veronique; Fasth, Andreas E R; Sundström, Yvonne; Galsgaard, Elisabeth D; Ahern, David; Andersen, Martin; Baslund, Bo; Bartels, Else M; Bliddal, Henning; Feldmann, Marc; Malmström, Vivianne; Berg, Louise; Spee, Pieter; Söderström, Kalle

    2014-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia leading to progressive joint destruction. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are central components of the aggressive, tumour-like synovial structure termed pannus, which invades the joint space and cartilage. A distinct natural killer (NK) cell subset expressing the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor is present in RA synovial fluid. Little is known about possible cellular interactions between RA-FLS and NK cells. We used cultured RA-FLS and the human NK cell line Nishi, of which the latter expresses an NK receptor repertoire similar to that of NK cells in RA synovial fluid, as an in vitro model system of RA-FLS/NK cell cross-talk. We show that RA-FLS express numerous ligands for both activating and inhibitory NK cell receptors, and stimulate degranulation of Nishi cells. We found that NKG2D, DNAM-1, NKp46 and NKp44 are the key activating receptors involved in Nishi cell degranulation towards RA-FLS. Moreover, blockade of the interaction between CD94/NKG2A and its ligand HLA-E expressed on RA-FLS further enhanced Nishi cell degranulation in co-culture with RA-FLS. Using cultured RA-FLS and the human NK cell line Nishi as an in vitro model system of RA-FLS/NK cell cross-talk, our results suggest that cell-mediated cytotoxicity of RA-FLS may be one mechanism by which NK cells influence local joint inflammation in RA. PMID:24673109

  15. Toxicity of a plant based mosquito repellent/killer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prakash Raj; Mohanty, Manoj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The mission to make humans less attractive to mosquitoes has fuelled decades of scientific research on mosquito behaviour and control. The search for the perfect topical insect repellent/killer continues. This analysis was conducted to review and explore the scientific information on toxicity produced by the ingredients/contents of a herbal product. In this process of systemic review the following methodology was applied. By doing a MEDLINE search with key words of selected plants, plant based insect repellents/killers pertinent articles published in journals and authentic books were reviewed. The World Wide Web and the Extension Toxicity Network database (IPCS-ITOX) were also searched for toxicology data and other pertinent information. Repellents do not all share a single mode of action and surprisingly little is known about how repellents act on their target insects. Moreover, different mosquito species may react differently to the same repellent. After analysis of available data and information on the ingredient, of the product in relation to medicinal uses, acute and chronic toxicity of the selected medicinal plants, it can be concluded that the ingredients included in the herbal product can be used as active agents against mosquitoes. If the product which contains the powder of the above said plants is applied with care and safety, it is suitable fo use as a mosquito repellent/killer. PMID:23554562

  16. Toxicity of a plant based mosquito repellent/killer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhoopendra; Singh, Prakash Raj; Mohanty, Manoj Kumar

    2012-12-01

    The mission to make humans less attractive to mosquitoes has fuelled decades of scientific research on mosquito behaviour and control. The search for the perfect topical insect repellent/killer continues. This analysis was conducted to review and explore the scientific information on toxicity produced by the ingredients/contents of a herbal product. In this process of systemic review the following methodology was applied. By doing a MEDLINE search with key words of selected plants, plant based insect repellents/killers pertinent articles published in journals and authentic books were reviewed. The World Wide Web and the Extension Toxicity Network database (IPCS-ITOX) were also searched for toxicology data and other pertinent information. Repellents do not all share a single mode of action and surprisingly little is known about how repellents act on their target insects. Moreover, different mosquito species may react differently to the same repellent. After analysis of available data and information on the ingredient, of the product in relation to medicinal uses, acute and chronic toxicity of the selected medicinal plants, it can be concluded that the ingredients included in the herbal product can be used as active agents against mosquitoes. If the product which contains the powder of the above said plants is applied with care and safety, it is suitable fo use as a mosquito repellent/killer. PMID:23554562

  17. Present and Future of Allogeneic Natural Killer Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Okjae; Jung, Mi Young; Hwang, Yu Kyeong; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the antitumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions. PMID:26089823

  18. MANGANESE CHLORIDE ENHANCES MURINE CELL-MEDIATED CYTOTOXICITY: EFFECTS ON NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity of mice given a single injection of manganese chloride (MnCl2) was significantly enhanced as measured in a 4-hr in vitro 51Cr release assay. Enhanced activity persisted for several days after injection. This cytotoxic activity was associated with...

  19. Natural Killer Cells: Key Players in Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Thiruchelvam, Uma; Wingfield, Mary; O'Farrelly, Cliona

    2015-10-01

    Endometriosis affects more than 10% of women, causing significant pain and morbidity. It is also a significant cause of infertility. The aetiology of the disease remains an enigma, and the mechanisms responsible for the associated infertility are unclear. A role for immune cells in endometriosis has been postulated, with attention directed towards natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages. NK cells kill tumours and infected cells but also have roles in tissue remodelling in several organs including the uterus and are key to successful pregnancy. Here, we explore evidence (from peer-reviewed published articles) of phenotypic and functional abnormalities in NK cell subpopulations of women with endometriosis. It is clear that peripheral blood NK cells and peritoneal NK cells have reduced cytotoxic function in women with endometriosis. Uterine NK cells have a vital role in infertility, but very little research has been carried out in this area. We propose that abnormal u NK cell activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility and that future research should focus on this complex area. PMID:26104509

  20. REPLICATIVE POTENTIAL OF HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Fujisaki, Hiroyuki; Kakuda, Harumi; Imai, Chihaya; Mullighan, Charles G.; Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    The replicative potential of human CD56+ CD3− natural killer (NK) cells is unknown. We found that by exposing NK cells to the leukemic cell line K562 genetically modified to express 4-1BB ligand and interleukin 15 (K562-mb15-41BBL), they expanded for up to 30 population doublings, achieving numbers that ranged from 1.6 × 105 to 1.2 × 1011 percent (median, 5.9 × 106 percent; n = 7) of those originally seeded. However, NK cells eventually became unresponsive to stimulation and died. Their demise could be suppressed by enforcing the expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. TERT-overexpressing NK cells continued to proliferate in response to K562-mb15-41BBL stimulation for more than 1 year of culture, while maintaining a normal karyotype and genotype. Long-lived NK cells had high cytotoxicity against myeloid and T-lineage leukemic cells. They remained susceptible to genetic manipulation, becoming highly cytotoxic to B-lineage leukemic cells after expression of anti-CD19 signaling receptors. Thus, human NK cells have a replicative potential similar to that of T lymphocytes and their lifespan can be significantly prolonged by an increase in TERT activity. We suggest that the methods described here should have many applications in studies of NK cell biology and NK cell-based therapies. PMID:19344420

  1. The bispecific immunoligand ULBP2-aCEA redirects natural killer cells to tumor cells and reveals potent anti-tumor activity against colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Achim; Jachimowicz, Ron D; Borchmann, Sven; Madlener, Marie; Keßler, Jörg; Reiners, Katrin S; Sauer, Maike; Hansen, Hinrich P; Ullrich, Roland T; Chatterjee, Sampurna; Borchmann, Peter; Yazaki, Paul; Koslowsky, Thomas C; Engert, Andreas; Heukamp, Lukas C; Hallek, Michael; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge

    2014-06-15

    NKG2D, an activating receptor expressed on NK cells and T cells, is critically involved in tumor immunosurveillance. In this study, we explored the potential therapeutic utility of the NKG2D ligand ULBP2 for the treatment of colon carcinoma. To this end we designed a fusion protein consisting of human ULBP2 and an antibody-derived single chain targeting the tumor carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The bispecific recombinant fusion protein re-directed NK cells towards malignant cells by binding to both, tumor cells and NK cells, and triggered NK cell-mediated target cell killing in vitro. Moreover, tumor growth was significantly delayed in a syngeneic colon carcinoma mouse model in response to immunoligand treatment. The anti-tumor activity could be attributed to the stimulation of immune cells with an elevated expression of the activation marker CD69 on NK, T and NKT cells and the infiltration of CD45+ immune cells into the solid tumor. In summary, it was demonstrated that immunoligands provide specific tumor targeting by NK cells and exert anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. This technology represents a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for solid tumors with the potential to be further developed for clinical applications. PMID:24242212

  2. Cancer on Course to Become Top Killer of Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160601.html Cancer on Course to Become Top Killer of Americans Report shows it will probably eclipse ... in on heart disease as America's number one killer, a new government study shows. Heart disease has ...

  3. Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) Peptide Activated Natural Killer (NK) Cells for the Treatment of Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) after Radiochemotherapy (RCTx) – From Preclinical Studies to a Clinical Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Hanno M.; Ahrens, Norbert; Blankenstein, Christiane; Duell, Thomas; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Günther, Christine; Gunther, Sophie; Habl, Gregor; Hautmann, Hubert; Hautmann, Matthias; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Molls, Michael; Offner, Robert; Rödel, Claus; Rödel, Franz; Schütz, Martin; Combs, Stephanie E.; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is frequently overexpressed in tumor cells. An unusual cell surface localization could be demonstrated on a large variety of solid tumors including lung, colorectal, breast, squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, prostate and pancreatic carcinomas, glioblastomas, sarcomas and hematological malignancies, but not on corresponding normal tissues. A membrane (m)Hsp70-positive phenotype can be determined either directly on single cell suspensions of tumor biopsies by flow cytometry using cmHsp70.1 monoclonal antibody or indirectly in the serum of patients using a novel lipHsp70 ELISA. A mHsp70-positive tumor phenotype has been associated with highly aggressive tumors, causing invasion and metastases and resistance to cell death. However, natural killer (NK), but not T cells were found to kill mHsp70-positive tumor cells after activation with a naturally occurring Hsp70 peptide (TKD) plus low dose IL-2 (TKD/IL-2). Safety and tolerability of ex vivo TKD/IL-2 stimulated, autologous NK cells has been demonstrated in patients with metastasized colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a phase I clinical trial. Based on promising clinical results of the previous study, a phase II randomized clinical study was initiated in 2014. The primary objective of this multicenter proof-of-concept trial is to examine whether an adjuvant treatment of NSCLC patients after platinum-based radiochemotherapy (RCTx) with TKD/IL-2 activated, autologous NK cells is clinically effective. As a mHsp70-positive tumor phenotype is associated with poor clinical outcome only mHsp70-positive tumor patients will be recruited into the trial. The primary endpoint of this study will be the comparison of the progression-free survival of patients treated with ex vivo activated NK cells compared to patients who were treated with RCTx alone. As secondary endpoints overall survival, toxicity, quality-of-life, and biological responses will be determined in both

  4. Killer systems of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The killer systems of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are an unusual class of cytoplasmic symbionts of primitive eukaryotes. The genetic material of these symbionts is double-stranded RNA. They are characterized by the linearity of the genome, its fragmentation into a major and a minor fraction, which replicate separately, and their ability to control the synthesis of secretory mycocin proteins possessing a toxic action on closely related strains. The secretion of mycocins at the same time ensures acquiring of resistance to them. Strains containing killer symbionts are toxigenic and resistant to the action of their own toxin, but strains that are free of killer double-stranded RNAs are sensitive to the action of mycocins. The killer systems of S. cerevisiae have retained features relating them to viruses and are apparently the result of evolution of infectious viruses. The occurrences of such systems among monocellular eukaryotic organisms is an example of complication of the genome by means of its assembly from virus-like components. We discuss the unusual features of replication and the expression of killer systems and their utilization in the construction of vector molecules.

  5. Natural Killer cell activation distinguishes M. tuberculosis-mediated Immune reconstitution syndrome (IRIS) from chronic HIV and HIV-MTB co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Conradie, F.; Foulkes, A.S.; Ive, P.; Yin, X.; Roussos, K.; Glencross, D.K.; Lawrie, D.; Stevens, W.; Montaner, L.J.; Sanne; Azzoni, L.

    2011-01-01

    Background With increased access to antiretroviral treatment (ART), Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-infected populations remains a clinical challenge. We studied a cross-sectional cohort of HIV-infected subjects in Johannesburg (South Africa) to help define the immune correlates that best distinguish IRIS from ongoing MTB cases. Methods We studied HIV+ subjects developing MTB-related unmasking IRIS (u-TB-IRIS) after ART initiation; control groups were HIV subjects and HIV-TB co-infected subjects with comparable ART treatment. Testing was conducted with whole blood-based 4-color flow cytometry and plasma-based Luminex cytokine assessment. Results NK cell activation, C-reactive protein and IL-8 serum concentration were significantly higher in u-TB-IRIS subjects as compared to both control groups. In addition, all MTB co-infected subjects, independent of clinical presentation, had higher neutrophils and T cell activation, together with lower lymphocytes, CD4+ T cell and myeloid DC counts. Using conditional inference tree analysis we show that elevated NK cell activation in combination with lymphocyte count characterizes the immunological profile of u-TB-IRIS. Conclusions Our results support a role for innate immune effectors in the immunopathogenesis of unmasking MTB-related IRIS, and identify new immune parameters defining this pathology. PMID:21826013

  6. Decreased non-MHC-restricted (CD56+) killer cell cytotoxicity after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Kaur, I.; Grimm, E. A.; Smid, C.; Feeback, D. L.; Pierson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Cytotoxic activity of non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted (CD56+) (NMHC) killer cells and cell surface marker expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined before and after spaceflight. Ten astronauts (9 men, 1 woman) from two space shuttle missions (9- and 10-day duration) participated in the study. Blood samples were collected 10 days before launch, within 3 h after landing, and 3 days after landing. All peripheral blood mononuclear cell preparations were cryopreserved and analyzed simultaneously in a 4-h cytotoxicity (51)Cr release assay using K562 target cells. NMHC killer cell lytic activity was normalized per 1,000 CD56+ cells. When all 10 subjects were considered as one study group, NMHC killer cell numbers did not change significantly during the three sampling periods, but at landing lytic activity had decreased by approximately 40% (P < 0.05) from preflight values. Nine of ten astronauts had decreased lytic activity immediately after flight. NMHC killer cell cytotoxicity of only three astronauts returned toward preflight values by 3 days after landing. Consistent with decreased NMHC killer cell cytotoxicity, urinary cortisol significantly increased after landing compared with preflight levels. Plasma cortisol and ACTH levels at landing were not significantly different from preflight values. No correlation of changes in NMHC killer cell function or hormone levels with factors such as age, gender, mission, or spaceflight experience was found. After landing, expression of the major lymphocyte surface markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD14, CD16, CD56), as determined by flow cytometric analysis, did not show any consistent changes from measurements made before flight.

  7. Selective induction of CTL ‘helper’ rather than killer activity by natural epitope variants promotes DC-mediated HIV-1 dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Mailliard, Robbie B.; Smith, Kellie N.; Fecek, Ronald J.; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Marques, Ernesto T.; Watkins, Simon C.; Mullins, James I.; Rinaldo, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of HIV-1 to rapidly accumulate mutations provides the virus with an effective means of escaping CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Here we describe how subtle alterations in CTL epitopes expressed by naturally occurring HIV-1 variants can result in an incomplete escape from CTL recognition, providing the virus with a selective advantage. Rather than paralyzing the CTL response, these epitope modifications selectively induce the CTL to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines in the absence of target killing. Importantly, instead of dampening the immune response through CTL elimination of variant antigen-expressing immature dendritic cells (iDC), a positive CTL-to-DC immune feedback loop dominates whereby the iDC differentiate into mature pro-inflammatory DC. Moreover, these CTL-programmed DC exhibit a superior capacity to mediate HIV-1 trans-infection of T cells. This discordant induction of CTL helper activity in the absence of killing likely contributes to the chronic immune activation associated with HIV-1 infection, and can be utilized by HIV-1 to promote viral dissemination and persistence. Our findings highlight the need to address the detrimental potential of eliciting dysfunctional cross-reactive memory CTL responses when designing and implementing anti-HIV-1 immunotherapies. PMID:23913962

  8. Cetuximab-activated natural killer (NK) and dendritic cells (DC) collaborate to trigger tumor antigen-specific T cell immunity in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Raghvendra M.; Lee, Steve C.; Filho, Pedro A. Andrade; Lord, Christopher A.; Jie, Hyun-bae; Davidson, H. Carter; López-Albaitero, Andrés; Gibson, Sandra P.; Gooding, William E.; Ferrone, Soldano; Ferris, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Tumor antigen (TA)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) block oncogenic signaling and induce Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated cytotoxicity. However, the role of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and FcγR in initiating innate and adaptive immune responses in mAb-treated human cancer patients is still emerging. Experimental Design FcγRIIIa codon 158 polymorphism was correlated with survival in 107 cetuximab-treated head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Flow cytometry was performed to quantify EGFR-specific T cells in cetuximab-treated HNC patients. The effect of cetuximab on NK cell, dendritic cell (DC), and T cell activation was measured using IFN-γ release assays and flow cytometry. Results FcγR IIIa polymorphism did not predict clinical outcome in cetuximab-treated HNC patients, however elevated circulating EGFR -specific CD8+ 853-861 T cells were found in cetuximab-treated HNC patients (p<0.005). Cetuximab promoted EGFR-specific cellular immunity through the interaction of EGFR+ tumor cells and FcγRIIIa on NK cells, but not on the polymorphism per se. Cetuximab-activated NK cells induced IFN-γ dependent expression of DC maturation markers, antigen presentation machinery (APM) components such as TAP-1/2, and Th1 chemokines through NKG2D/MICA binding. Cetuximab initiated adaptive immune responses via NK-cell induced DC maturation, which enhanced cross-presentation to CTL specific for EGFR as well as another TA, MAGE-3. Conclusion Cetuximab-activated NK cells promote DC maturation and CD8+ T cell priming, leading to TA spreading and Th1 cytokine release through ‘NK-DC cross-talk.’ FcγRIIIa polymorphism did not predict clinical response to cetuximab, but was necessary for NK-DC interaction and mAb induced cross-presentation. EGFR-specific T cells in cetuximab treated HNC patients may contribute to clinical response. PMID:23444227

  9. Polyclonal proliferation of activated suppressor/cytotoxic T cells with transient depression of natural killer cell function in acute infectious mononucleosis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, M L; Loughran, T P; Kidd, P G; Starkebaum, G A

    1989-01-01

    In acute infectious mononucleosis large numbers of atypical lymphocytes proliferate in response to B cells infected with Epstein-Barr virus, generally resulting in a self-limited illness. Although both T-cells and NK cells are known to be involved, the precise origin of the large granular lymphocytes in this disorder is incompletely understood. Using two-colour immunofluorescent flow cytometry, we sequentially examined the phenotype of selected T cell and NK cell subsets from nine patients with infectious mononucleosis. In parallel, we determined whether these lymphocytes utilized a restricted repertoire of the T cell receptor gene and also measured their NK activity. Our results show that in acute infectious mononucleosis there was a greater than three-fold increase in T lymphocytes with the phenotype CD2+, CD3+, CD8+ and DR+. A modest increase in Leu7(HNK1)+ and CD4+ T cells was also seen. In addition, there was a three-fold increase in cells coexpressing CD3- and CD16+, the phenotype reported to represent most NK cells. In spite of this latter finding, however, a marked decrease in NK function was found at the time of diagnosis, gradually returning to normal by day 28. Finally, Southern blot analysis of DNA from patient lymphocytes showed polyclonal rearrangements of the T cell receptor beta chain gene. These studies indicate that the proliferation of activated suppressor/cytotoxic T lymphocytes in acute infectious mononucleosis is polyclonal and is associated with transient depression of NK function. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2527653

  10. Loss-of-function mutations in a glutathione S-transferase suppress the prune-Killer of prune lethal interaction.

    PubMed

    Provost, Elayne; Hersperger, Grafton; Timmons, Lisa; Ho, Wen Qi; Hersperger, Evelyn; Alcazar, Rosa; Shearn, Allen

    2006-01-01

    The prune gene of Drosophila melanogaster is predicted to encode a phosphodiesterase. Null alleles of prune are viable but cause an eye-color phenotype. The abnormal wing discs gene encodes a nucleoside diphosphate kinase. Killer of prune is a missense mutation in the abnormal wing discs gene. Although it has no phenotype by itself even when homozygous, Killer of prune when heterozygous causes lethality in the absence of prune gene function. A screen for suppressors of transgenic Killer of prune led to the recovery of three mutations, all of which are in the same gene. As heterozygotes these mutations are dominant suppressors of the prune-Killer of prune lethal interaction; as homozygotes these mutations cause early larval lethality and the absence of imaginal discs. These alleles are loss-of-function mutations in CG10065, a gene that is predicted to encode a protein with several zinc finger domains and glutathione S-transferase activity. PMID:16143620

  11. Isolation and identification of normal killer cells from Syrian hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Matveeva, V.A.; Klyuchareva, T.E.

    1986-09-01

    This paper gives data on isolation of normal killer cells from the blood and various tissues of Syrian hamsters in a Percoll density gradient and their identification on the basis of morphologic criteria and cytotoxic activity (CTA). CTA of the isolated cells was studied in the cytotoxic test with target cells of a human MOLT-4 thymoma cell labeled with /sup 51/Cr. Isolation of large granular lymphocytes from blood, spleen, and bone marrow of Syrian hamsters in Percoll density gradient is shown in the results of five experiments used for cells of each type.

  12. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) produce ultrasonic whistles.

    PubMed

    Samarra, Filipa I P; Deecke, Volker B; Vinding, Katja; Rasmussen, Marianne H; Swift, René J; Miller, Patrick J O

    2010-11-01

    This study reports that killer whales, the largest dolphin, produce whistles with the highest fundamental frequencies ever reported in a delphinid. Using wide-band acoustic sampling from both animal-attached (Dtag) and remotely deployed hydrophone arrays, ultrasonic whistles were detected in three Northeast Atlantic populations but not in two Northeast Pacific populations. These results are inconsistent with analyses suggesting a correlation of maximum frequency of whistles with body size in delphinids, indicate substantial intraspecific variation in whistle production in killer whales, and highlight the importance of appropriate acoustic sampling techniques when conducting comparative analyses of sound repertoires. PMID:21110527

  13. Circulating natural killer cells in retired asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed

    Froom, P; Lahat, N; Kristal-Boneh, E; Cohen, C; Lerman, Y; Ribak, J

    2000-01-01

    The effect of past exposure to asbestos on natural killer (NK) cell number and activity is uncertain. We measured NK cell number and activity in 1052 retired asbestos workers without symptomatic lung disease, lung cancer, or mesothelioma and with a long latency period from exposure; results were compared with those for 100 healthy age-matched controls. The exposed workers showed a decreased NK cell activity and increased NK cell number, yielding a 10.8 higher odds ratio for low NK activity per cell compared with controls (95% confidence interval 6.4 to 18.4), which was due to both a decrease in NK cell activity and an increase in NK cell number. Asbestos exposure of 10 years or more increased the risk of low NK activity per cell. We conclude that exposure to asbestos is associated with diminished effectiveness of NK cells and a concomitant increase in the number of NK circulating cells. PMID:10652684

  14. Natural killer T cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lan; Van Kaer, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of T lymphocytes that share surface markers and functional characteristics with both conventional T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Most NKT cells express a semiinvariant T cell receptor that reacts with glycolipid antigens presented by the major histocompatibility complex class I-related protein CD1d on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. NKT cells become activated during a variety of infections and inflammatory conditions, rapidly producing large amounts of immunomodulatory cytokines. NKT cells can influence the activation state and functional properties of multiple other cell types in the immune system and, thus, modulate immune responses against infectious agents, autoantigens, tumors, tissue grafts and allergens. One attractive aspect of NKT cells is that their immunomodulatory activities can be readily harnessed with cognate glycolipid antigens, such as the marine sponge-derived glycosphingolipid alpha-galactosylceramide. These properties of NKT cells are being exploited for therapeutic intervention to prevent or treat cancer, infections, and autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:21196373

  15. Chasing Killer Statements From The Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Marianne

    1975-01-01

    This teacher discusses techniques she uses to rid the classroom of "killer statements", which are negative statements that express some kind of anger or distress and are unthinking outgrowths of the desire to get back at the world when feeling needy or deprived.

  16. The KP4 killer protein gene family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Killer protein 4 (KP4) is a well studied toxin secreted by the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis that kills sensitive Ustilago strains as well as inhibits Fusarium and plant root growth. This small, cysteine rich protein is encoded by a virus that depends on host survival for replication. KP4 functi...

  17. The School: A Killer of Giftedness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Walt, J. L.

    Criticisms of the school as a killer of giftedness in children are cited. After defining giftedness and talent, the problem of educating the gifted child is raised, and opinions of "new left" educational theorists are presented. Accusations against the school, based on its failure to meet the individual needs and the mental or cognitive…

  18. Young Killers: The Challenge of Juvenile Homicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heide, Kathleen M.

    This book assembles and synthesizes some of the latest available information, research findings, and informed opinions regarding the parameters of homicide by youths and concerning the nature of young killers themselves. It provides a framework for understanding youths who kill, for moving forward with treatment, and for reducing violence in…

  19. Are natural killer cells superior CAR drivers?

    PubMed Central

    Klingemann, Hans

    2014-01-01

    T lymphocytes engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are being celebrated as a major breakthrough of anticancer immunotherapy. Natural killer cells have not received similar attention as CAR effectors, although the use of these relatively short-lived cytotoxic cells is associated with several advantages. PMID:25340009

  20. TdKT, a new killer toxin produced by Torulaspora delbrueckii effective against wine spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Villalba, María Leticia; Susana Sáez, Julieta; Del Monaco, Silvana; Lopes, Christian Ariel; Sangorrín, Marcela Paula

    2016-01-18

    Microbiological spoilage is a major concern throughout the wine industry, and control tools are limited. This paper addresses the identification and partial characterization of a new killer toxin from Torulaspora delbrueckii with potential biocontrol activity of Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Pichia guilliermondii, Pichia manshurica and Pichia membranifaciens wine spoilage. A panel of 18 different wine strains of T. delbrueckii killer yeasts was analysed, and the strain T. delbrueckii NPCC 1033 (TdKT producer) showed a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of all different spoilage yeasts evaluated. The TdKT toxin was then subjected to a partial biochemical characterization. Its estimated molecular weight was N30 kDa and it showed glucanase and chitinase enzymatic activities. The killer activity was stable between pH 4.2 and 4.8 and inactivated at temperature above 40 °C. Pustulan and chitin — but not other cell wall polysaccharides — prevented sensitive yeast cells from being killed by TdKT, suggesting that those may be the first toxin targets in the cell wall. TdKT provoked an increase in necrosis cell death after 3 h treatment and apoptotic cell death after 24 h showing time dependence in its mechanisms of action. Killer toxin extracts were active at oenological conditions, confirming their potential use as a biocontrol tool in winemaking. PMID:26513248

  1. Molecular characterization of a novel gammaretrovirus in killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Lamere, Sarah A; St Leger, Judy A; Schrenzel, Mark D; Anthony, Simon J; Rideout, Bruce A; Salomon, Daniel R

    2009-12-01

    There are currently no published data documenting the presence of retroviruses in cetaceans, though the occurrences of cancers and immunodeficiency states suggest the potential. We examined tissues from adult killer whales and detected a novel gammaretrovirus by degenerate PCR. Reverse transcription-PCR also demonstrated tissue and serum expression of retroviral mRNA. The full-length sequence of the provirus was obtained by PCR, and a TaqMan-based copy number assay did not demonstrate evidence of productive infection. PCR on blood samples from 11 healthy captive killer whales and tissues from 3 free-ranging animals detected the proviral DNA in all tissues examined from all animals. A survey of multiple cetacean species by PCR for gag, pol, and env sequences showed homologs of this virus in the DNA of eight species of delphinids, pygmy and dwarf sperm whales, and harbor porpoises, but not in beluga or fin whales. Analysis of the bottlenose dolphin genome revealed two full-length proviral sequences with 97.4% and 96.9% nucleotide identity to the killer whale gammaretrovirus. The results of single-cell PCR on killer whale sperm and Southern blotting are also consistent with the conclusion that the provirus is endogenous. We suggest that this gammaretrovirus entered the delphinoid ancestor's genome before the divergence of modern dolphins or that an exogenous variant existed following divergence that was ultimately endogenized. However, the transcriptional activity demonstrated in tissues and the nearly intact viral genome suggest a more recent integration into the killer whale genome, favoring the latter hypothesis. The proposed name for this retrovirus is killer whale endogenous retrovirus. PMID:19812152

  2. Activation of cytokine genes during primary and anamnestic immune response to inactivated c. albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, E; Scaringi, L; Cornacchione, P; Fettucciari, K; Sabatini, R; Mezzasoma, L; Benedetti, C; Cianetti, S; Rossi, R; Marconi, P

    1996-01-01

    proliferative response of CA-5d-induced PEC to CA. NK activity also increased progressively with the number of CA injections and after the fifth stimulation lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activity was also induced. The anamnestic response to CA was characterized by a very quick induction of high levels of IL-2, II N-gamma and IL-1 beta mRNAs. IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNAs remained high up to 24 hr while IL-1 beta mRNA decreased strongly. A weak, transient expression of IL-10 mRNA was induced at 2 hr whereas the IL-12 p40 subunit, IL-4 and IL-5 mRNAs were not detectable. The presence of CA-specific memory lymphocytes was confirmed by the in vitro specific proliferative response of PEC to CA. CA booster caused also a very rapid and high level of NK/LAK activation. In conclusion, these results indicate that CA is able to progressively trigger differential on of the Th1 subset which develops in the absence of IL-12, and that Th memory cells retain the same selected Th1 cytokine profile developed in the primary immune response. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8911152

  3. Invariant natural killer T cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: killer choice for natural suppression.

    PubMed

    Guan, P; Bassiri, H; Patel, N P; Nichols, K E; Das, R

    2016-05-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKTs) are innate-like lipid-reactive T lymphocytes that express an invariant T-cell receptor (TCR). Following engagement of the iTCR, iNKTs rapidly secrete copious amounts of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and promote the functions of several immune cells including NK, T, B and dendritic cells. Accordingly, iNKTs bridge the innate and adaptive immune responses and modulate susceptibility to autoimmunity, infection, allergy and cancer. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is one of the most effective treatments for patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the beneficial graft versus leukemia (GvL) effect mediated by the conventional T cells contained within the allograft is often hampered by the concurrent occurrence of graft versus host disease (GvHD). Thus, developing strategies that can dissociate GvHD from GvL remain clinically challenging. Several preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that iNKTs significantly attenuate GvHD without abrogating the GvL effect. Besides preserving the GvL activity of the donor graft, iNKTs themselves exert antitumor immune responses via direct and indirect mechanisms. Herein, we review the various mechanisms by which iNKTs provide antitumor immunity and discuss their roles in GvHD suppression. We also highlight the opportunities and obstacles in manipulating iNKTs for use in the cellular therapy of hematologic malignancies. PMID:26878658

  4. Use of natural killer cells as immunotherapy for leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Grzywacz, Bartosz; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Verneris, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells potentially play a significant role in eradicating residual disease following allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation, and have been explored as tools for adoptive immunotherapy for chemotherapy-refractory patients. NK cell cytotoxicity is modulated by multiple activating and inhibitory receptors that maintain a balance between self-tolerance and providing surveillance against pathogens and malignant transformation. The functional characteristics of NK cells are dictated by the strength of inhibitory receptor signalling. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-specific inhibitory receptor acquisition occurs sequentially during NK cell development, and is determined by the nature of immunological reconstitution after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation. Polymorphisms of inhibitory receptors [killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs)] and their ligands (MHC) contribute to interindividual variability. As a result, the functional NK cell repertoire of individual donors has variable potential for graft-vs-leukaemia reactions. Models predicting NK cell alloreactivity, including KIR ligand mismatch and missing KIR ligand strategies, are discussed as algorithms for optimal NK cell donor selection. Future modifications to improve NK cell adoptive immunotherapy by means of increasing target recognition and reducing inhibitory signalling are being explored. PMID:18790450

  5. Disseminated mycosis in a killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Abdo, Walied; Kawachi, Takeshi; Sakai, Hiroki; Fukushi, Hideto; Kano, Rui; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Shirouzu, Hiroshi; Kakizoe, Yuko; Tuji, Hajime; Yanai, Tokuma

    2012-01-01

    Hematological findings in a female killer whale (Orcinus orca) undergoing rehabilitation after sudden severe anorexia revealed continuing increases in serum lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase activities as well as fibrinogen concentration. Serologic evidence of herpesvirus infection and skin vesicles were detected 2 weeks into the treatment regimen of antibiotics and corticosteroids. The whale showed signs of improvement after treatment with anti-herpesvirus drugs, but sudden severe anorexia reappeared, along with marked elevation of fibrinogen concentration that continued until the death. Postmortem examination revealed multiple light tan foci of necrosis in the skeletal and cardiac muscles, and lung consolidation. Microscopic findings indicated disseminated fungal granulomas in the skeletal and cardiac muscles, as well as myocarditis, mycotic embolic thromboarteritis of cardiac blood vessels, and bronchopneumonia with numerous typical Aspergillus-like fungi. Mucor-like structures in granulomas in the heart and skeletal muscle and Aspergillus-like fungi in the lungs were identified using periodic acid-Schiff, Gomori methenamine silver stain, and immunohistochemistry. The present case involves dual infection with Mucor and Aspergillus species in a killer whale with concurrent herpesvirus. PMID:22362957

  6. Endocytosis and Intracellular Trafficking of Human Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Masilamani, Madhan; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the defense against viral infections and tumor development. NK cell function is primarily regulated by the sum of signals from a broad array of activation and inhibitory receptors. Key to generating the input level of either activating or inhibitory signals is the maintenance of receptor expression levels on the cell surface. Although the mechanisms of endocytosis and trafficking for some cell surface receptors, such as transferrin receptor, and certain immune receptors, are very well known, that is not the situation for receptors expressed by NK cells. Recent studies have uncovered that endocytosis and trafficking routes characteristic for specific activation and inhibitory receptors can regulate the functional responses of NK cells. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of receptor endocytosis and trafficking, and integrate this with our current understanding of NK cell receptor trafficking. PMID:19719476

  7. Travel from a supercomputer to killer micros

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, N.E.

    1991-03-01

    I describe my effort to convert a Fortran application that runs on a parallel supercomputer (Cray Y/MP) to run on a set of BBN TC2000 killer micros. I used both shared memory parallel processing options available at MPCI for the BBN TC2000, the Parallel Fortran Preprocessor (PFP) and the Uniform System extended Fortran compiler (US). I describe how I used the BBN Xtra programming tools for analysis and debugging during this conversion process. My ultimate goal for this hands on experiment was to gain insight into the type of tools that might be helpful for porting existing programs from a supercomputer environment to a killer micro environment. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Representation of the serial killer on the Italian Internet.

    PubMed

    Villano, P; Bastianoni, P; Melotti, G

    2001-10-01

    The representation of serial killers was examined from the analysis of 317 Web pages in the Italian language to study how the psychological profiles of serial killers are described on the Italian Internet. The correspondence analysis of the content of these Web pages shows that in Italy the serial killer is associated with words such as "monster" and "horror," which suggest and imply psychological perversion and aberrant acts. These traits are peculiar for the Italian scenario. PMID:11783573

  9. Natural killer cell regulation - beyond the receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urlaub, Doris; Fasbender, Frank; Claus, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that are important for early and effective immune responses against infections and cancer. In the last 40 years, many receptors, their corresponding ligands and signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions have been identified. However, we now know that additional processes, such as NK cell education, differentiation and also the formation of NK cell memory, have a great impact on the reactivity of these cells. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about these modulatory processes. PMID:25374665

  10. Fighting back against male-killers.

    PubMed

    Jaenike, John

    2007-04-01

    Male-killing endosymbionts create a genetic black hole into which host nuclear genes vanish. In a recent paper, Hornett et al. transferred male-killing Wolbachia between different strains of the butterfly Hypolimnas bolina through hybridization and backcrossing. Their results provide unambiguous evidence of genetic variation for resistance to male-killers. A possible consequence of such variation is that male-killing might appear and disappear quickly on an evolutionary timescale. PMID:17276538

  11. Is killer whale dialect evolution random?

    PubMed

    Filatova, Olga A; Burdin, Alexandr M; Hoyt, Erich

    2013-10-01

    The killer whale is among the few species in which cultural change accumulates over many generations, leading to cumulative cultural evolution. Killer whales have group-specific vocal repertoires which are thought to be learned rather than being genetically coded. It is supposed that divergence between vocal repertoires of sister groups increases gradually over time due to random learning mistakes and innovations. In this case, the similarity of calls across groups must be correlated with pod relatedness and, consequently, with each other. In this study we tested this prediction by comparing the patterns of call similarity between matrilines of resident killer whales from Eastern Kamchatka. We calculated the similarity of seven components from three call types across 14 matrilines. In contrast to the theoretical predictions, matrilines formed different clusters on the dendrograms made by different calls and even by different components of the same call. We suggest three possible explanations for this phenomenon. First, the lack of agreement between similarity patterns of different components may be the result of constraints in the call structure. Second, it is possible that call components change in time with different speed and/or in different directions. Third, horizontal cultural transmission of call features may occur between matrilines. PMID:23796775

  12. Quantitation of natural killer cell precursors in man.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghian, Ahmad; Haque, K M Gausul; Truman, Carol; Newman, John; Bradley, Benjamin A

    2002-02-01

    A technique was developed to measure the frequency of natural killer cell precursors (NKpf) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples. Functional maturity of NK cells was reflected in their ability to lyse target cells from the K562 cell line. During the development of the technique, venous blood was taken from one healthy adult and assayed at different times to avoid individual variation. The technique was based on the principle of limiting dilution analysis. The NKpf assay was set up with a range of cell dilutions from 40,000 to 625 per 100 microl/well in 96-well culture plates. At the end of the culture period, the K562 cell line labelled with europium (Eu-K562) was added and the Eu-release was measured in culture supernatants using time-resolved fluorometry. The NKpf value differed between individuals and was influenced by the length of time in culture, being maximal at day 5. Maturation of NKp required the continuous presence of recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), or rIL-15, both being equally effective. In the absence of cytokines, the functional NK cells declined rapidly beyond 24 h in culture. Irradiated allogeneic cells appeared to substitute in part for cytokines, but the numbers of allo-activated NKpf were lower than those observed when allo-activated NKpf were cultured with rIL-2. This suggested selective activation by the allogeneic stimulus of subsets of NKp or rIL-2-rescue of NKp subsets destined for apoptotic cell death. Alternatively, the increased frequency could have been attributable to activation of precursors of natural killer-T cells (NK-Tp). This assay is suitable for estimating the total number of precursors of functional NK cells in the blood of patients. PMID:11792377

  13. Metabolic imaging of the tumor treated by KillerRed fluorescent protein-based photodynamic therapy in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Shuang; Qin, Lingsong; Wang, Anle; Liu, Zheng; Yang, Fei; Jin, Honglin; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-02-01

    KillerRed is a unique red fluorescent protein exhibiting excellent phototoxic properties. It has the ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), for killing tumor cells in vitro upon laser irradiation and has the potential to act as a photosensitizer in the application of tumor therapy. Here, we investigated the effects of KillerRed-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) on tumor growth in vivo and examined the subsequent tumor metabolic states including the changes of pyridine nucleotide (PN) and flavoprotein (Fp), two important metabolic coenzymes of tumor cells. Results showed that the tumor was scabbed in response to 561 nm laser irradiation at 80 mV for 3 min, and the tumor growth had been significantly inhibited by KillerRed-based PDT treatment compared to control groups. More importantly, a home-made cryo-imaging redox scanner was used to measure intrinsic fluorescence and exogenous KillerRed fluorescence signals in tumors. The flavoprotein was remarkable elevated and the PN was seldom increased with concomitant photobleaching of KillerRed fluorescence after irradiation, suggesting that flavoprotein and PN were oxidized in the course of KillerRed-based PDT.

  14. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Torelli, Giovanni F.; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S.; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL+ blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL+ blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL+, are worth pursuing further. PMID:24658822

  15. Identification of Anti-tumor Cells Carrying Natural Killer (NK) Cell Antigens in Patients With Hematological Cancers.

    PubMed

    Krzywinska, Ewelina; Allende-Vega, Nerea; Cornillon, Amelie; Vo, Dang-Nghiem; Cayrefourcq, Laure; Panabieres, Catherine; Vilches, Carlos; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Hicheri, Yosr; Rossi, Jean-François; Cartron, Guillaume; Villalba, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, a cytotoxic lymphocyte lineage, are able to kill tumor cells in vitro and in mouse models. However, whether these cells display an anti-tumor activity in cancer patients has not been demonstrated. Here we have addressed this issue in patients with several hematological cancers. We found a population of highly activated CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells that have recently degranulated, evidence of killing activity, and it is absent in healthy donors. A high percentage of these cells expressed natural killer cell p46-related protein (NKp46), natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) and killer inhibitory receptors (KIRs) and a low percentage expressed NKG2A and CD94. They are also characterized by a high metabolic activity and active proliferation. Notably, we found that activated NK cells from hematological cancer patients have non-NK tumor cell antigens on their surface, evidence of trogocytosis during tumor cell killing. Finally, we found that these activated NK cells are distinguished by their CD45RA(+)RO(+) phenotype, as opposed to non-activated cells in patients or in healthy donors displaying a CD45RA(+)RO(-) phenotype similar to naïve T cells. In summary, we show that CD45RA(+)RO(+) cells, which resemble a unique NK population, have recognized tumor cells and degranulate in patients with hematological neoplasias. PMID:26629531

  16. Cytotoxic and natural killer cell stimulatory constituents of Phyllanthus songboiensis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yulin; Yuan, Chunhua; Deng, Youcai; Kanagasabai, Ragu; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Tu, Vuong Tan; Chai, Hee-Byung; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Fuchs, James R.; Yalowich, Jack C.; Yu, Jianhua; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    A dichapetalin-type triterpenoid and a dibenzylbutyrolactone-type lignan, together with five known lignans, a known aromatic diterpenoid, and a known acylated phytosterol, were isolated from the aerial parts of Phyllanthus songboiensis, collected in Vietnam. Their structures were determined by interpretation of the spectroscopic data, and the inhibitory activity toward the HT-29 human colon cancer cells of all isolates was evaluated by a cytotoxicity assay. The known arylnaphthalene lignan, (+)-acutissimalignan A, was highly cytotoxic toward HT-29 cells, with an IC50 value of 19 nM, but this compound was inactive as a DNA topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα) poison. The known phytosterol, (−)-β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-(6-O-palmitoyl)glucopyranoside, was found to stimulate natural killer (NK) cells at a concentration of 10 μM in the presence of interleukin 12 (IL-12). PMID:25596805

  17. Killer B lymphocytes: the evidence and the potential

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Immune regulation plays a critical role in controlling potentially dangerous inflammation and maintaining health. The Fas ligand/Fas receptor axis has been studied extensively as a mechanism of killing T cells and other cells during infections, autoimmunity, and cancer. FasL expression has been primarily attributed to activated T cells and NK cells. Evidence has emerged that B lymphocytes can express FasL and other death-inducing ligands, and can mediate cell death under many circumstances. Among B cell subsets, the expression of both Fas ligand and IL-10 is highest on the CD5+ B cell population, suggesting that CD5+ B cells may have a specialized regulatory function. The relevance of killer B cells to normal immune regulation, disease pathogenesis, and inflammation is discussed. PMID:19262989

  18. Determination of natural killer cell function by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, K L; Ashton, F A; Schmitz, J L; Folds, J D

    1996-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) are a subset of peripheral blood lymphocytes that mediate non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxicity of foreign target cells. The "gold standard" assay for NK cell activity has been the chromium release assay. This method is not easily performed in the clinical laboratory because of difficulties with disposal of radioactive and hazardous materials, short reagent half-lives, expense, and difficulties with assay standardization. We describe a flow cytometric assay for the clinical measurement of NK cell activity. This study compared the chromium release assay and the flow cytometric assay by using clinically relevant specimens. There were no significant differences between the two assays in the measurement of lytic activity for 17 peripheral blood specimens or in reproducibility in repeated samplings of healthy individuals. We also established a normal range of values for NK activity in healthy adults and identified a small cluster of individuals who have exceptionally high or low levels of NK activity. The flow cytometric assay was validated by testing specimens from subjects expected to have abnormally low levels of NK activity (pregnant women) and specimens from healthy individuals in whom the activity of NK cells was enhanced by exposure to interleukin-2 or alpha interferon. Treatment with these agents was associated with a significant increase in NK activity. These results confirm and extend those of others, showing that the flow cytometric assay is a viable alternative to the chromium release assay for measuring NK cell activity. PMID:8705672

  19. The virally encoded killer proteins from Ustilago maydis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several strains of Ustilago maydis, a causal agent of corn smut disease, exhibit a 'killer' phenotype that is due to persistent infection by double-stranded RNA Totiviruses. These viruses produce potent killer proteins that are secreted by the host. This is a rare example of virus/host symbiosis in ...

  20. Natural Killer Cell Reduction and Uteroplacental Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Golic, Michaela; Haase, Nadine; Herse, Florian; Wehner, Anika; Vercruysse, Lisbeth; Pijnenborg, Robert; Balogh, Andras; Saether, Per Christian; Dissen, Erik; Luft, Friedrich C; Przybyl, Lukasz; Park, Joon-Keun; Alnaes-Katjavivi, Patji; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Verlohren, Stefan; Henrich, Wolfgang; Muller, Dominik N; Dechend, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    Uterine natural killer cells are important for uteroplacental development and pregnancy maintenance. Their role in pregnancy disorders, such as preeclampsia, is unknown. We reduced the number of natural killer cells by administering rabbit anti-asialo GM1 antiserum in an established rat preeclamptic model (female human angiotensinogen×male human renin) and evaluated the effects at the end of pregnancy (day 21), compared with preeclamptic control rats receiving normal rabbit serum. In 100% of the antiserum-treated, preeclamptic rats (7/7), we observed highly degenerated vessel cross sections in the mesometrial triangle at the end of pregnancy. This maternal uterine vasculopathy was characterized by a total absence of nucleated/living cells in the vessel wall and perivascularly and prominent presence of fibrosis. Furthermore, there were no endovascular trophoblast cells within the vessel lumen. In the control, normal rabbit serum-treated, preeclamptic rats, only 20% (1/5) of the animals displayed such vasculopathy. We confirmed the results in healthy pregnant wild-type rats: after anti-asialo GM1 treatment, 67% of maternal rats displayed vasculopathy at the end of pregnancy compared with 0% in rabbit serum-treated control rats. This vasculopathy was associated with a significantly lower fetal weight in wild-type rats and deterioration of fetal brain/liver weight ratio in preeclamptic rats. Anti-asialo GM1 application had no influence on maternal hypertension and albuminuria during pregnancy. Our results show a new role of natural killer cells during hypertensive pregnancy in maintaining vascular integrity. In normotensive pregnancy, this integrity seems important for fetal growth. PMID:27550919

  1. Effects of OK-432 on murine bone marrow and the production of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.B.; Rosse, C.

    1985-01-01

    The streptococcal preparation, OK-432, which augments anti-tumor responses in humans and mice, has been shown to be a potent immunomodulator. Among its effects is a pronounced augmentation of natural killer (NK) activity. The hypothesis that OK-432 alters the rates of production and maturation of NK cells in the bone marrow was tested. Studies to determine the kinetic parameters of NK cell production in normal C57BL/6J mice using tritiated thymidine, /sup 3/H-TdR, as a DNA marker are described. We are now extending those studies to determine the effect of OK-432 on the bone marrow and on the production of NK cells in the marrow. Initial observations are reported which indicate that OK-432 has profound effects on the cellularity and mitotic activity of the bone marrow, and in particular, on cells with the characteristics of natural killer cells within the marrow. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Analyzing Antigen Recognition by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeissig, Sebastian; Olszak, Torsten; Melum, Espen; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of T lymphocytes that recognize a wide variety of lipid antigens presented by CD1 molecules. NKT cells exhibit rapid activation after recognition of cognate antigens, secrete abundant amounts of T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines within hours of activation and shape the immune response through subsequent activation of dendritic, NK, T and B cells. NKT cells therefore play central roles in antimicrobial and anticancer immunity and in modulation of various autoimmune disorders. Consequently, recent research has focused on the discovery of microbial and self-antigens involved in NKT cell activation. In this chapter, we discuss different strategies for studying antigen recognition by NKT cells including CD1d tetramer-based approaches and in vitro assays characterizing NKT cell activation in response to lipid antigen presentation. While toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists and cytokines such as IL-12 are critical for NKT cell activation in vivo, particularly in the context of microbial infection, methods for detection of TLR- and cytokine-dependent NKT cell activation will not be discussed in this section. PMID:23329514

  3. Active suppression of host-vs-graft reaction in pregnant mice. VII. Spontaneous abortion of allogeneic CBA/J x DBA/2 fetuses in the uterus of CBA/J mice correlates with deficient non-T suppressor cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Chaput, A.; Tutton, D.

    1986-03-01

    The mammalian fetus has been viewed as an unusually successful type of allograft and unexplained spontaneous abortion as a possible example of maternal rejection. Previous studies have shown the presence of small lymphocytic suppressor cells in the murine decidua which block the generation and reactivation of anti-paternal cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and lymphokine-activated killer cells (LAK) by elaborating a factor that inhibits the response to interleukin 2 (IL 2). A deficiency of these suppressor cells was associated with implants of xenogeneic Mus caroli embryos in the Mus musculus uterus which are infiltrated by maternal lymphoid cells and aborted. A deficiency of such suppressor cells in the lymph nodes draining the uterus of CBA/J females in the process of aborting their semi-allogeneic CBA x DBA/2 F/sub 1/ progeny has also been shown. CBA/J females possess significantly lower levels of decidua-associated non-T suppressor cells on day 8.5 to 10.5 of allopregnancy than do mothers that will produce large litters of live babies. The F/sub 1/ embryos are infiltrated by maternal lymphocytes prior to abortion, and the infiltration and abortion rate appears to be augmented by pre-immunization with paternal DBA/2 spleen cells. The CBA/J x DBA/2J mating combination provides a model of spontaneous abortion in which immunologic factors play an important role and demonstrates that the association between deficiency of decidua-associated suppressor cells and xenopregnancy failure also holds true for the failure of allopregnancies resulting from natural within-species mating.

  4. Physical properties and antifungal activity of bioactive films containing Wickerhamomyces anomalus killer yeast and their application for preservation of oranges and control of postharvest green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Aloui, Hajer; Licciardello, Fabio; Khwaldia, Khaoula; Hamdi, Moktar; Restuccia, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    This study assessed the ability of two bio-based films, obtained from sodium alginate (NaAlg) and locust bean gum (LBG), to protect the viability of Wickerhamomyces anomalus cells and control the growth of Penicillium digitatum. The effect of microbial cell incorporation on physical properties of the developed films was evaluated in terms of barrier, mechanical and optical properties. Furthermore, the application of these two matrices as bioactive coatings was investigated in order to evaluate their efficacy in preserving the postharvest quality of 'Valencia' oranges and inhibiting the growth of P. digitatum on artificially inoculated fruits. Results showed that NaAlg and LBG films were able to maintain more than 85% of the initial W. anomalus yeast population and that the developed films incorporating the killer yeast completely inhibited the growth of P. digitatum in synthetic medium. Likewise, NaAlg and LBG coatings enriched with W. anomalus yeast were effective at reducing weight loss and maintaining firmness of 'Valencia' oranges during storage, and reduced green mold in inoculated fruits by more than 73% after 13 days. PMID:25666444

  5. Multiplicity and plasticity of natural killer cell signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Sabrina; Mingueneau, Michael; Fuseri, Nicolas; Malissen, Bernard; Raulet, David H.; Malissen, Marie; Vivier, Eric; Tomasello, Elena

    2006-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express an array of activating receptors that associate with DAP12 (KARAP), CD3ζ, and/or FcRγ ITAM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif)–bearing signaling subunits. In T and mast cells, ITAM-dependent signals are integrated by critical scaffolding elements such as LAT (linker for activation of T cells) and NTAL (non–T-cell activation linker). Using mice that are deficient for ITAM-bearing molecules, LAT or NTAL, we show that NK cell cytotoxicity and interferon-γ secretion are initiated by ITAM-dependent and -independent as well as LAT/NTAL-dependent and -independent pathways. The role of these various signaling circuits depends on the target cell as well as on the activation status of the NK cell. The multiplicity and the plasticity of the pathways that initiate NK cell effector functions contrast with the situation in T cells and B cells and provide an explanation for the resiliency of NK cell effector functions to various pharmacologic inhibitors and genetic mutations in signaling molecules. PMID:16291591

  6. Activation of human T-helper/inducer cell, T-cytotoxic/suppressor cell, B-cell, and natural killer (NK)-cells and induction of NK cell activity against K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells with modified citrus pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Modified citrus pectin (MCP) is known for its anti-cancer effects and its ability to be absorbed and circulated in the human body. In this report we tested the ability of MCP to induce the activation of human blood lymphocyte subsets including T-helper/inducer cell, Tcytotoxic/suppres...

  7. Leukemia-induced phenotypic and functional defects in natural killer cells predict failure to achieve remission in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stringaris, Kate; Sekine, Takuya; Khoder, Ahmad; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Razzaghi, Bonnie; Sargeant, Ruhena; Pavlu, Jiri; Brisley, Gill; de Lavallade, Hugues; Sarvaria, Anushruthi; Marin, David; Mielke, Stephan; Apperley, Jane F; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Barrett, A John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-05-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia will relapse, and older patients often fail to achieve remission with induction chemotherapy. We explored the possibility that leukemic suppression of innate immunity might contribute to treatment failure. Natural killer cell phenotype and function was measured in 32 consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients at presentation, including 12 achieving complete remission. Compared to 15 healthy age-matched controls, natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients were abnormal at presentation, with downregulation of the activating receptor NKp46 (P=0.007) and upregulation of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A (P=0.04). Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients had impaired effector function against autologous blasts and K562 targets, with significantly reduced CD107a degranulation, TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Failure to achieve remission was associated with NKG2A overexpression and reduced TNF-α production. These phenotypic and functional abnormalities were partially restored in the 12 patients achieving remission. In vitro co-incubation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts with natural killer cells from healthy donors induced significant impairment in natural killer cell TNF-α and IFN-γ production (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively) against K562 targets and a trend to reduced CD107a degranulation (P=0.07). Under transwell conditions, the inhibitory effect of AML blasts on NK cytotoxicity and effector function was still present, and this inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by IL-10. These results suggest that acute myeloid leukemia blasts induce long-lasting changes in natural killer cells, impairing their effector function and reducing the competence of the innate immune system, favoring leukemia survival. PMID:24488563

  8. Leukemia-induced phenotypic and functional defects in natural killer cells predict failure to achieve remission in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stringaris, Kate; Sekine, Takuya; Khoder, Ahmad; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Razzaghi, Bonnie; Sargeant, Ruhena; Pavlu, Jiri; Brisley, Gill; de Lavallade, Hugues; Sarvaria, Anushruthi; Marin, David; Mielke, Stephan; Apperley, Jane F.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Barrett, A. John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-01-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia will relapse, and older patients often fail to achieve remission with induction chemotherapy. We explored the possibility that leukemic suppression of innate immunity might contribute to treatment failure. Natural killer cell phenotype and function was measured in 32 consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients at presentation, including 12 achieving complete remission. Compared to 15 healthy age-matched controls, natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients were abnormal at presentation, with downregulation of the activating receptor NKp46 (P=0.007) and upregulation of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A (P=0.04). Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients had impaired effector function against autologous blasts and K562 targets, with significantly reduced CD107a degranulation, TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Failure to achieve remission was associated with NKG2A overexpression and reduced TNF-α production. These phenotypic and functional abnormalities were partially restored in the 12 patients achieving remission. In vitro co-incubation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts with natural killer cells from healthy donors induced significant impairment in natural killer cell TNF-α and IFN-γ production (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively) against K562 targets and a trend to reduced CD107a degranulation (P=0.07). Under transwell conditions, the inhibitory effect of AML blasts on NK cytotoxicity and effector function was still present, and this inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by IL-10. These results suggest that acute myeloid leukemia blasts induce long-lasting changes in natural killer cells, impairing their effector function and reducing the competence of the innate immune system, favoring leukemia survival. PMID:24488563

  9. Unnatural killer cells to prevent bloodborne metastasis: inspiration from biology and engineering.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael J; King, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Metastasis contributes to over 90% of cancer-related deaths. Many types of cancer metastasize via the bloodstream, where circulating tumor cells (CTCs) originating from the primary tumor can undergo selectin-mediated adhesion with the blood vessel wall and subsequently transmigrate to anatomically distant organs. In an effort to neutralize CTCs with the potential to form metastases, a new therapeutic approach has been developed in which circulating leukocytes are functionalized to target and kill cancer cells in the bloodstream. This approach mimics the cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells and the chemical engineering concept of a fluidized bed reactor, which increases the surface area for surface-catalyzed reactions. The resulting 'unnatural killer cells', proven effective in vitro with human blood and also in the living mouse, holds promise in neutralizing CTCs to interrupt the metastasis process. PMID:24791860

  10. Effect of a killer toxin of Pichia anomala to Pneumocystis. Perspectives in the control of pneumocystosis.

    PubMed

    Séguy, N; Polonelli, L; Dei-Cas, E; Cailliez, J C

    1998-09-01

    Despite the development of drugs in the prophylaxis of pneumocystosis, Pneumocystis carinii remains a major opportunistic microorganism in immunosuppressed individuals, especially in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Since side effects were frequently observed after administration of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or pentamidine, the drugs which are mainly used in treating human P. carinii pneumonia (PCP), new therapeutic strategies should be developed. Over the last years, the inhibitory effect of a Pichia anomala killer toxin (PaKT), a molecule with a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity, was characterized on P. carinii. The susceptibility of mouse and rat-derived Pneumocystis to PaKT has been demonstrated by in vitro attachment tests and in vivo infectivity assays. Nevertheless, PaKT is strongly antigenic, toxic and could not be used directly as a therapeutic agent. Then, a new strategy using killer toxin-like anti-idiotypic antibodies (KT-antiIds) mimicking the fungal toxin activity has been developed. Different KT-antiIds were obtained by idiotypic immunization with a monoclonal antibody (mabKT4). This mabKT4 neutralized the killer properties of the PaKT. KT-antiIds were produced by immunization against the variable domain (idiotype) of mAbKT4 (internal image of the killer toxin receptor), or they were obtained directly from vaginal fluid of patients affected by recurrent vaginal candidiosis. In this last case, such natural KT-antiIds were immunopurified by affinity-chromatography with mAbKT4 and their anti-P. carinii activity was then evaluated. Our results showed that both the in vitro attachment of rat-derived parasites and their infectivity to nude rats were inhibited by the KT-antiIds. With regard to KT-antiIds obtained by immunization, the antimicrobial activity of a monoclonal KT-antiIds (mAbK10) has been evaluated by using a PCP experimental nude rat model treated by mAbK10 administered by aerosol. The pneumocystosis extension was

  11. Radiology: "killer app" for next generation networks?

    PubMed

    McNeill, Kevin M

    2004-03-01

    The core principles of digital radiology were well developed by the end of the 1980 s. During the following decade tremendous improvements in computer technology enabled realization of those principles at an affordable cost. In this decade work can focus on highly distributed radiology in the context of the integrated health care enterprise. Over the same period computer networking has evolved from a relatively obscure field used by a small number of researchers across low-speed serial links to a pervasive technology that affects nearly all facets of society. Development directions in network technology will ultimately provide end-to-end data paths with speeds that match or exceed the speeds of data paths within the local network and even within workstations. This article describes key developments in Next Generation Networks, potential obstacles, and scenarios in which digital radiology can become a "killer app" that helps to drive deployment of new network infrastructure. PMID:15255516

  12. Positive selection on the killer whale mitogenome.

    PubMed

    Foote, Andrew D; Morin, Phillip A; Durban, John W; Pitman, Robert L; Wade, Paul; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, M Thomas P; da Fonseca, Rute R

    2011-02-23

    Mitochondria produce up to 95 per cent of the eukaryotic cell's energy. The coding genes of the mitochondrial DNA may therefore evolve under selection owing to metabolic requirements. The killer whale, Orcinus orca, is polymorphic, has a global distribution and occupies a range of ecological niches. It is therefore a suitable organism for testing this hypothesis. We compared a global dataset of the complete mitochondrial genomes of 139 individuals for amino acid changes that were associated with radical physico-chemical property changes and were influenced by positive selection. Two such selected non-synonymous amino acid changes were found; one in each of two ecotypes that inhabit the Antarctic pack ice. Both substitutions were associated with changes in local polarity, increased steric constraints and α-helical tendencies that could influence overall metabolic performance, suggesting a functional change. PMID:20810427

  13. Fewer Drugs in Pipeline to Treat World's No. 1 Killer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160676.html Fewer Drugs in Pipeline to Treat World's No. 1 Killer While number of cancer drugs ... 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease remains the world's leading cause of death, but development of drugs ...

  14. Towards PDT with Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed: A Comparison of Continuous and Pulsed Laser Regimens in an Animal Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Shirmanova, Marina; Yuzhakova, Diana; Snopova, Ludmila; Perelman, Gregory; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina; Lukyanov, Konstantin; Turchin, Ilya; Subochev, Pavel; Lukyanov, Sergey; Kamensky, Vladislav; Zagaynova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The strong phototoxicity of the red fluorescent protein KillerRed allows it to be considered as a potential genetically encoded photosensitizer for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. The advantages of KillerRed over chemical photosensitizers are its expression in tumor cells transduced with the appropriate gene and direct killing of cells through precise damage to any desired cell compartment. The ability of KillerRed to affect cell division and to induce cell death has already been demonstrated in cancer cell lines in vitro and HeLa tumor xenografts in vivo. However, the further development of this approach for PDT requires optimization of the method of treatment. In this study we tested the continuous wave (593 nm) and pulsed laser (584 nm, 10 Hz, 18 ns) modes to achieve an antitumor effect. The research was implemented on CT26 subcutaneous mouse tumors expressing KillerRed in fusion with histone H2B. The results showed that the pulsed mode provided a higher rate of photobleaching of KillerRed without any temperature increase on the tumor surface. PDT with the continuous wave laser was ineffective against CT26 tumors in mice, whereas the pulsed laser induced pronounced histopathological changes and inhibition of tumor growth. Therefore, we selected an effective regimen for PDT when using the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed and pulsed laser irradiation. PMID:26657001

  15. Towards PDT with Genetically Encoded Photosensitizer KillerRed: A Comparison of Continuous and Pulsed Laser Regimens in an Animal Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Shirmanova, Marina; Yuzhakova, Diana; Snopova, Ludmila; Perelman, Gregory; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina; Lukyanov, Konstantin; Turchin, Ilya; Subochev, Pavel; Lukyanov, Sergey; Kamensky, Vladislav; Zagaynova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The strong phototoxicity of the red fluorescent protein KillerRed allows it to be considered as a potential genetically encoded photosensitizer for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. The advantages of KillerRed over chemical photosensitizers are its expression in tumor cells transduced with the appropriate gene and direct killing of cells through precise damage to any desired cell compartment. The ability of KillerRed to affect cell division and to induce cell death has already been demonstrated in cancer cell lines in vitro and HeLa tumor xenografts in vivo. However, the further development of this approach for PDT requires optimization of the method of treatment. In this study we tested the continuous wave (593 nm) and pulsed laser (584 nm, 10 Hz, 18 ns) modes to achieve an antitumor effect. The research was implemented on CT26 subcutaneous mouse tumors expressing KillerRed in fusion with histone H2B. The results showed that the pulsed mode provided a higher rate of photobleaching of KillerRed without any temperature increase on the tumor surface. PDT with the continuous wave laser was ineffective against CT26 tumors in mice, whereas the pulsed laser induced pronounced histopathological changes and inhibition of tumor growth. Therefore, we selected an effective regimen for PDT when using the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed and pulsed laser irradiation. PMID:26657001

  16. Invariant natural killer T cells: bridging innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Wu, Lan

    2013-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system interact with pathogens via conserved pattern-recognition receptors, whereas cells of the adaptive immune system recognize pathogens through diverse, antigen-specific receptors that are generated by somatic DNA rearrangement. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. Although iNKT cells express T cell receptors that are generated by somatic DNA rearrangement, these receptors are semi-invariant and interact with a limited set of lipid and glycolipid antigens, thus resembling the pattern-recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Functionally, iNKT cells most closely resemble cells of the innate immune system, as they rapidly elicit their effector functions following activation, and fail to develop immunological memory. iNKT cells can become activated in response to a variety of stimuli and participate in the regulation of various immune responses. Activated iNKT cells produce several cytokines with the capacity to jump-start and modulate an adaptive immune response. A variety of glycolipid antigens that can differentially elicit distinct effector functions in iNKT cells have been identified. These reagents have been employed to test the hypothesis that iNKT cells can be harnessed for therapeutic purposes in human diseases. Here, we review the innate-like properties and functions of iNKT cells and discuss their interactions with other cell types of the immune system. PMID:20734065

  17. Reprogramming microbes to be pathogen-seeking killers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Young; Tan, Mui Hua; Koh, Elvin; Ho, Chun Loong; Poh, Chueh Loo; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2014-04-18

    Recent examples of new genetic circuits that enable cells to acquire biosynthetic capabilities, such as specific pathogen killing, present an attractive therapeutic application of synthetic biology. Herein, we demonstrate a novel genetic circuit that reprograms Escherichia coli to specifically recognize, migrate toward, and eradicate both dispersed and biofilm-encased pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells. The reprogrammed E. coli degraded the mature biofilm matrix and killed the latent cells encapsulated within by expressing and secreting the antimicrobial peptide microcin S and the nuclease DNaseI upon the detection of quorum sensing molecules naturally secreted by P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the reprogrammed E. coli exhibited directed motility toward the pathogen through regulated expression of CheZ in response to the quorum sensing molecules. By integrating the pathogen-directed motility with the dual antimicrobial activity in E. coli, we achieved signifincantly improved killing activity against planktonic and mature biofilm cells due to target localization, thus creating an active pathogen seeking killer E. coli. PMID:24020906

  18. Understanding of molecular mechanisms in natural killer cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells and the immune system are closely related and thus influence each other. Although immune cells can suppress cancer cell growth, cancer cells can evade immune cell attack via immune escape mechanisms. Natural killer (NK) cells kill cancer cells by secreting perforins and granzymes. Upon contact with cancer cells, NK cells form immune synapses to deliver the lethal hit. Mature NK cells are differentiated from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. They move to lymph nodes, where they are activated through interactions with dendritic cells. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a key molecule that activates mature NK cells. The adoptive transfer of NK cells to treat incurable cancer is an attractive approach. A certain number of activated NK cells are required for adoptive NK cell therapy. To prepare these NK cells, mature NK cells can be amplified to obtain sufficient numbers of NK cells. Alternatively, NK cells can be differentiated and amplified from hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, the selection of donors is important to achieve maximal efficacy. In this review, we discuss the overall procedures and strategies of NK cell therapy against cancer. PMID:25676064

  19. Characterization of novel killer toxins secreted by wine-related non-Saccharomyces yeasts and their action on Brettanomyces spp.

    PubMed

    Mehlomakulu, Ngwekazi N; Setati, Mathabatha E; Divol, Benoit

    2014-10-01

    Wine spoilage associated with Brettanomyces bruxellensis is a major concern for winemakers. An effective and reliable method to control the proliferation of this yeast is therefore of utmost importance. To achieve this purpose, sulphur dioxide (SO2) is commonly employed but the efficiency of this chemical compound is subject to wine composition and it can elicit allergic reactions in some consumers. Biological alternatives are therefore actively sought. The current study focused on identifying and characterizing killer toxins which are antimicrobial compounds that show potential in inhibiting B. bruxellensis in wine. Two killer toxins, CpKT1 and CpKT2, from the wine isolated yeast Candida pyralidae were identified and partially characterized. The two proteins had a molecular mass above 50kDa and exhibited killer activity against several B. bruxellensis strains especially in grape juice. They were active and stable at pH3.5-4.5, and temperatures between 15 and 25°C which are compatible with winemaking conditions. Furthermore, the activity of these killer toxins was not affected by the ethanol and sugar concentrations typically found in grape juice and wine. In addition, these killer toxins inhibited neither the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nor the lactic acid bacteria strains tested. These preliminary results indicated that the application of these toxins will have no effect on the main microbial agents that drive alcoholic and malolactic fermentations and further highlight the potential of using these toxins as agents to control the development of B. bruxellensis in grape juice or wine. PMID:25087208

  20. Killer whale ecotypes: is there a global model?

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, P J N; Tosh, Cheryl A; Terauds, Aleks

    2013-02-01

    Killer whales, Orcinus orca, are top predators occupying key ecological roles in a variety of ecosystems and are one of the most widely distributed mammals on the planet. In consequence, there has been significant interest in understanding their basic biology and ecology. Long-term studies of Northern Hemisphere killer whales, particularly in the eastern North Pacific (ENP), have identified three ecologically distinct communities or ecotypes in that region. The success of these prominent ENP studies has led to similar efforts at clarifying the role of killer whale ecology in other regions, including Antarctica. In the Southern Hemisphere, killer whales present a range of behavioural, social and morphological characteristics to biologists, who often interpret this as evidence to categorize individuals or groups, and draw general ecological conclusions about these super-predators. Morphologically distinct forms (Type A, B, C, and D) occur in the Southern Ocean and studies of these different forms are often presented in conjunction with evidence for specialised ecology and behaviours. Here we review current knowledge of killer whale ecology and ecotyping globally and present a synthesis of existing knowledge. In particular, we highlight the complexity of killer whale ecology in the Southern Hemisphere and examine this in the context of comparatively well-studied Northern Hemisphere populations. We suggest that assigning erroneous or prefatory ecotypic status in the Southern Hemisphere could be detrimental to subsequent killer whale studies, because unsubstantiated characteristics may be assumed as a result of such classification. On this basis, we also recommend that ecotypic status classification for Southern Ocean killer whale morphotypes be reserved until more evidence-based ecological and taxonomic data are obtained. PMID:22882545

  1. In vivo proof of concept of adoptive immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma using allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells.

    PubMed

    Leboeuf, Céline; Mailly, Laurent; Wu, Tao; Bour, Gaetan; Durand, Sarah; Brignon, Nicolas; Ferrand, Christophe; Borg, Christophe; Tiberghien, Pierre; Thimme, Robert; Pessaux, Patrick; Marescaux, Jacques; Baumert, Thomas F; Robinet, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Cell therapy based on alloreactivity has completed clinical proof of concept against hematological malignancies. However, the efficacy of alloreactivity as a therapeutic approach to treat solid tumors is unknown. Using cell culture and animal models, we aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells as a cell-based therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), for which treatment options are limited. Allogeneic killer cells from healthy donors were isolated, expanded, and phenotypically characterized. Antitumor cytotoxic activity and safety were studied using a panel of human or murine HCC cell lines engrafted in immunodeficient or immunocompetent mouse models. Human allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells (aSGMKCs) exhibit a high, rapid, interleukin-2-dependent, and non-major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted in vitro cytotoxicity toward human hepatoma cells, mainly mediated by natural killer (NK) and NK-like T cells. In vivo evaluation of this cell therapy product demonstrates a marked, rapid, and sustained regression of HCC. Preferential liver homing of effector cells contributed to its marked efficacy. Calcineurin inhibitors allowed preventing rejection of allogeneic lymphocytes by the host immune system without impairing their antitumor activity. Our results demonstrate proof of concept for aSGMKCs as immunotherapy for HCC and open perspectives for the clinical development of this approach. PMID:24445938

  2. Changes in dive behavior during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales, and sperm whales.

    PubMed

    Sivle, L D; Kvadsheim, P H; Fahlman, A; Lam, F P A; Tyack, P L; Miller, P J O

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of four killer whales (Orcinus orca), seven long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), and four sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) was studied during controlled exposures to naval sonar [low frequency active sonar (LFAS): 1-2 kHz and mid frequency active sonar (MFAS): 6-7 kHz] during three field seasons (2006-2009). Diving behavior was monitored before, during and after sonar exposure using an archival tag placed on the animal with suction cups. The tag recorded the animal's vertical movement, and additional data on horizontal movement and vocalizations were used to determine behavioral modes. Killer whales that were conducting deep dives at sonar onset changed abruptly to shallow diving (ShD) during LFAS, while killer whales conducting deep dives at the onset of MFAS did not alter dive mode. When in ShD mode at sonar onset, killer whales did not change their diving behavior. Pilot and sperm whales performed normal deep dives (NDD) during MFAS exposure. During LFAS exposures, long-finned pilot whales mostly performed fewer deep dives and some sperm whales performed shallower and shorter dives. Acoustic recording data presented previously indicates that deep diving (DD) is associated with feeding. Therefore, the observed changes in dive behavior of the three species could potentially reduce the foraging efficiency of the affected animals. PMID:23087648

  3. Pilot Whales Attracted to Killer Whale Sounds: Acoustically-Mediated Interspecific Interactions in Cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Curé, Charlotte; Antunes, Ricardo; Samarra, Filipa; Alves, Ana Catarina; Visser, Fleur; Kvadsheim, Petter H.; Miller, Patrick J. O.

    2012-01-01

    In cetaceans’ communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans’ behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways. PMID:23300613

  4. Unusual selection on the KIR3DL1/S1 natural killer cell receptor in Africans.

    PubMed

    Norman, Paul J; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Korbel, Daniel; Gleimer, Michael; Rowley, Don; Bruno, Dan; Carrington, Christine V F; Chandanayingyong, Dasdayanee; Chang, Yih-Hsin; Crespí, Catalina; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Fraser, Patricia A; Hameed, Kamran; Kamkamidze, Giorgi; Koram, Kwadwo A; Layrisse, Zulay; Matamoros, Nuria; Milà, Joan; Park, Myoung Hee; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M; Ramdath, D Dan; Shiau, Ming-Yuh; Stephens, Henry A F; Struik, Siske; Verity, David H; Vaughan, Robert W; Tyan, Dolly; Davis, Ronald W; Riley, Eleanor M; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Interactions of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands diversify natural killer cell responses to infection. By analyzing sequence variation in diverse human populations, we show that the KIR3DL1/S1 locus encodes two lineages of polymorphic inhibitory KIR3DL1 allotypes that recognize Bw4 epitopes of protein">HLA-A and HLA-B and one lineage of conserved activating KIR3DS1 allotypes, also implicated in Bw4 recognition. Balancing selection has maintained these three lineages for over 3 million years. Variation was selected at D1 and D2 domain residues that contact HLA class I and at two sites on D0, the domain that enhances the binding of KIR3D to HLA class I. HLA-B variants that gained Bw4 through interallelic microconversion are also products of selection. A worldwide comparison uncovers unusual KIR3DL1/S1 evolution in modern sub-Saharan Africans. Balancing selection is weak and confined to D0, KIR3DS1 is rare and KIR3DL1 allotypes with similar binding sites predominate. Natural killer cells express the dominant KIR3DL1 at a high frequency and with high surface density, providing strong responses to cells perturbed in Bw4 expression. PMID:17694054

  5. Effects of noise levels and call types on the source levels of killer whale calls.

    PubMed

    Holt, Marla M; Noren, Dawn P; Emmons, Candice K

    2011-11-01

    Accurate parameter estimates relevant to the vocal behavior of marine mammals are needed to assess potential effects of anthropogenic sound exposure including how masking noise reduces the active space of sounds used for communication. Information about how these animals modify their vocal behavior in response to noise exposure is also needed for such assessment. Prior studies have reported variations in the source levels of killer whale sounds, and a more recent study reported that killer whales compensate for vessel masking noise by increasing their call amplitude. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the source levels of a variety of call types in southern resident killer whales while also considering background noise level as a likely factor related to call source level variability. The source levels of 763 discrete calls along with corresponding background noise were measured over three summer field seasons in the waters surrounding the San Juan Islands, WA. Both noise level and call type were significant factors on call source levels (1-40 kHz band, range of 135.0-175.7 dB(rms) re 1 [micro sign]Pa at 1 m). These factors should be considered in models that predict how anthropogenic masking noise reduces vocal communication space in marine mammals. PMID:22087938

  6. Pilot whales attracted to killer whale sounds: acoustically-mediated interspecific interactions in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Curé, Charlotte; Antunes, Ricardo; Samarra, Filipa; Alves, Ana Catarina; Visser, Fleur; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Miller, Patrick J O

    2012-01-01

    In cetaceans' communities, interactions between individuals of different species are often observed in the wild. Yet, due to methodological and technical challenges very little is known about the mediation of these interactions and their effect on cetaceans' behavior. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are a highly vocal species and can be both food competitors and potential predators of many other cetaceans. Thus, the interception of their vocalizations by unintended cetacean receivers may be particularly important in mediating interspecific interactions. To address this hypothesis, we conducted playbacks of killer whale vocalizations recorded during herring-feeding activity to free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). Using a multi-sensor tag, we were able to track the whales and to monitor changes of their movements and social behavior in response to the playbacks. We demonstrated that the playback of killer whale sounds to pilot whales induced a clear increase in group size and a strong attraction of the animals towards the sound source. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways. PMID:23300613

  7. Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy: From Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Domogala, Anna; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    The potential of natural killer (NK) cells to target numerous malignancies in vitro has been well documented; however, only limited success has been seen in the clinic. Although NK cells prove non-toxic and safe regardless of the cell numbers injected, there is often little persistence and expansion observed in a patient, which is vital for mounting an effective cellular response. NK cells can be isolated directly from peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood, or bone marrow, expanded in vitro using cytokines or differentiated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells. Drugs that support NK cell function such as lenalidomide and bortezomib have also been studied in the clinic, however, the optimum combination, which can vary among different malignancies, is yet to be identified. NK cell proliferation, persistence, and function can further be improved by various activation techniques such as priming and cytokine addition though whether stimulation pre- or post-injection is more favorable is another obstacle to be tackled. Here, we review the various methods of obtaining and activating NK cells for use in the clinic while considering the ideal product and drug complement for the most successful cellular therapy. PMID:26089820

  8. Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Domogala, Anna; Madrigal, J. Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    The potential of natural killer (NK) cells to target numerous malignancies in vitro has been well documented; however, only limited success has been seen in the clinic. Although NK cells prove non-toxic and safe regardless of the cell numbers injected, there is often little persistence and expansion observed in a patient, which is vital for mounting an effective cellular response. NK cells can be isolated directly from peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood, or bone marrow, expanded in vitro using cytokines or differentiated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells. Drugs that support NK cell function such as lenalidomide and bortezomib have also been studied in the clinic, however, the optimum combination, which can vary among different malignancies, is yet to be identified. NK cell proliferation, persistence, and function can further be improved by various activation techniques such as priming and cytokine addition though whether stimulation pre- or post-injection is more favorable is another obstacle to be tackled. Here, we review the various methods of obtaining and activating NK cells for use in the clinic while considering the ideal product and drug complement for the most successful cellular therapy. PMID:26089820

  9. Antitumor Responses of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Jennie B.; Benavides, Adriana D.; Das, Rupali; Bassiri, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes that were first described in the late 1980s. Since their initial description, numerous studies have collectively shed light on their development and effector function. These studies have highlighted the unique requirements for the activation of these lymphocytes and the functional responses that distinguish these cells from other effector lymphocyte populations such as conventional T cells and NK cells. This body of literature suggests that NKT cells play diverse nonredundant roles in a number of disease processes, including the initiation and propagation of airway hyperreactivity, protection against a variety of pathogens, development of autoimmunity, and mediation of allograft responses. In this review, however, we focus on the role of a specific lineage of NKT cells in antitumor immunity. Specifically, we describe the development of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells and the factors that are critical for their acquisition of effector function. Next, we delineate the mechanisms by which iNKT cells influence and modulate the activity of other immune cells to directly or indirectly affect tumor growth. Finally, we review the successes and failures of clinical trials employing iNKT cell-based immunotherapies and explore the future prospects for the use of such strategies. PMID:26543874

  10. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer. PMID:27013447

  11. Stimulation of Natural Killer T Cells by Glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian L.; Teyton, Luc; Bendelac, Albert; Savage, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of T cells that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1d protein. The initial discovery of immunostimulatory glycolipids from a marine sponge and the T cells that respond to the compounds has led to extensive research by chemists and immunologists to understand how glycolipids are recognized, possible responses by NKT cells, and the structural features of glycolipids necessary for stimulatory activity. The presence of this cell type in humans and most mammals suggests that it plays critical roles in antigen recognition and the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Both endogenous and exogenous natural antigens for NKT cells have been identified, and it is likely that glycolipid antigens remain to be discovered. Multiple series of structurally varied glycolipids have been synthesized and tested for stimulatory activity. The structural features of glycolipids necessary for NKT cell stimulation are moderately well understood, and designed compounds have proven to be much more potent antigens than their natural counterparts. Nevertheless, control over NKT cell responses by designed glycolipids has not been optimized, and further research will be required to fully reveal the therapeutic potential of this cell type. PMID:24352021

  12. Regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by natural killer (NK) cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Yamamura, T; Kondo, T; Fujiwara, M; Tabira, T

    1997-11-17

    In this report, we establish a regulatory role of natural killer (NK) cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a prototype T helper cell type 1 (Th1)-mediated disease. Active sensitization of C57BL/6 (B6) mice with the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide induces a mild form of monophasic EAE. When mice were deprived of NK cells by antibody treatment before immunization, they developed a more serious form of EAE associated with relapse. Aggravation of EAE by NK cell deletion was also seen in beta 2-microglobulin-/- (beta 2m-/-) mice, indicating that NK cells can play a regulatory role in a manner independent of CD8+ T cells or NK1.1+ T cells (NK-T cells). The disease enhancement was associated with augmentation of T cell proliferation and production of Th1 cytokines in response to MOG35-55. EAE passively induced by the MOG35-55-specific T cell line was also enhanced by NK cell deletion in B6, beta 2m-/-, and recombination activation gene 2 (RAG-2)-/- mice, indicating that the regulation by NK cells can be independent of T, B, or NK-T cells. We further showed that NK cells inhibit T cell proliferation triggered by antigen or cytokine stimulation. Taken together, we conclude that NK cells are an important regulator for EAE in both induction and effector phases. PMID:9362528

  13. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3.

    PubMed

    Cacalano, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, key members of a distinct hematopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells, are not only critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation, and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell-cell contact, and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of "immune surveillance." Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anticancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates to poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells, which determine the outcome of cancer immunity, are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of NK cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:27148255

  14. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Cacalano, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, key members of a distinct hematopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells, are not only critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation, and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell–cell contact, and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of “immune surveillance.” Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anticancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates to poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells, which determine the outcome of cancer immunity, are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of NK cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:27148255

  15. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genotype and Haplotype Investigation of Natural Killer Cells from an Australian Population of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huth, T. K.; Brenu, E. W.; Staines, D. R.; Marshall-Gradisnik, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes encode for activating and inhibitory surface receptors, which are correlated with the regulation of Natural Killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. Reduced NK cell cytotoxic activity has been consistently reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients, and KIR haplotypes and allelic polymorphism remain to be investigated. The aim of this article was to conduct a pilot study to examine KIR genotypes, haplotypes, and allelic polymorphism in CFS/ME patients and nonfatigued controls (NFCs). Comparison of KIR and allelic polymorphism frequencies revealed no significant differences between 20 CFS/ME patients and 20 NFCs. A lower frequency of the telomeric A/B motif (P < 0.05) was observed in CFS/ME patients compared with NFCs. This pilot study is the first to report the differences in the frequency of KIR on the telomeric A/B motif in CFS/ME patients. Further studies with a larger CFS/ME cohort are required to validate these results. PMID:27346947

  16. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genotype and Haplotype Investigation of Natural Killer Cells from an Australian Population of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Huth, T K; Brenu, E W; Staines, D R; Marshall-Gradisnik, S M

    2016-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes encode for activating and inhibitory surface receptors, which are correlated with the regulation of Natural Killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. Reduced NK cell cytotoxic activity has been consistently reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) patients, and KIR haplotypes and allelic polymorphism remain to be investigated. The aim of this article was to conduct a pilot study to examine KIR genotypes, haplotypes, and allelic polymorphism in CFS/ME patients and nonfatigued controls (NFCs). Comparison of KIR and allelic polymorphism frequencies revealed no significant differences between 20 CFS/ME patients and 20 NFCs. A lower frequency of the telomeric A/B motif (P < 0.05) was observed in CFS/ME patients compared with NFCs. This pilot study is the first to report the differences in the frequency of KIR on the telomeric A/B motif in CFS/ME patients. Further studies with a larger CFS/ME cohort are required to validate these results. PMID:27346947

  17. Natural Killer Cell Diversity in Viral Infection: Why and How Much?

    PubMed Central

    Blish, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a diverse group of innate lymphocytes that are specialized to rapidly respond to cancerous or virus-infected cells. NK cell function is controlled by the integration of signals from activating and inhibitory receptors expressed at the cell surface. Variegated expression patterns of these activating and inhibitory receptors at the single cell level leads to a highly diverse NK cell repertoire. Here I review the factors that influence NK cell repertoire diversity and its functional consequences for our ability to fight viruses.

  18. Natural Killer Cells and Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fasbender, Frank; Widera, Agata; Hengstler, Jan G.; Watzl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    In the 40 years since the discovery of natural killer (NK) cells, it has been well established that these innate lymphocytes are important for early and effective immune responses against transformed cells and infections with different pathogens. In addition to these classical functions of NK cells, we now know that they are part of a larger family of innate lymphoid cells and that they can even mediate memory-like responses. Additionally, tissue-resident NK cells with distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics have been identified. Here, we focus on the phenotype of different NK cell subpopulations that can be found in the liver and summarize the current knowledge about the functional role of these cells with a special emphasis on liver fibrosis. NK cell cytotoxicity can contribute to liver damage in different forms of liver disease. However, NK cells can limit liver fibrosis by killing hepatic stellate cell-derived myofibroblasts, which play a key role in this pathogenic process. Therefore, liver NK cells need to be tightly regulated in order to balance these beneficial and pathological effects. PMID:26858722

  19. Natural Killer Cells in Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rehermann, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are traditionally regarded as first-line effectors of the innate immune response, but they also have a distinct role in chronic infection. Here, we review the role of NK cells against hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), two agents that cause acute and chronic hepatitis in humans. Interest in NK cells was initially sparked by genetic studies that demonstrated an association between NK cell–related genes and the outcome of HCV infection. Viral hepatitis also provides a model to study the NK cell response to both endogenous and exogenous type I interferon (IFN). Levels of IFN-stimulated genes increase in both acute and chronic HCV infection and pegylated IFNα has been the mainstay of HCV and HBV treatment for decades. In chronic viral hepatitis, NK cells display decreased production of antiviral cytokines. This phenotype is found in both HCV and HBV infection but is induced by different mechanisms. Potent antivirals now provide the opportunity to study the reversibility of the suppressed cytokine production of NK cells in comparison with the antigen-induced defect in IFNγ and tumor necrosis factor-α production of virus-specific T cells. This has implications for immune reconstitution in other conditions of chronic inflammation and immune exhaustion, such as human immunodeficiency virus infection and cancer. PMID:26682281

  20. Natural Killer Cells Modulation in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Baier, Céline; Fino, Aurore; Sanchez, Carole; Farnault, Laure; Rihet, Pascal; Kahn-Perlès, Brigitte; Costello, Régis T.

    2013-01-01

    Hematological malignancies (HM) treatment improved over the last years resulting in increased achievement of complete or partial remission, but unfortunately high relapse rates are still observed, due to remaining minimal residual disease. Therefore, sustainment of long-term remission is crucial, using either drug maintenance treatment or by boosting or prolonging an immune response. Immune system has a key role in tumor surveillance. Nonetheless, tumor-cells evade the specific T-lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance using many mechanisms but especially by the down-regulation of the expression of HLA class I antigens. In theory, these tumor-cells lacking normal expression of HLA class I molecules should be destroyed by natural killer (NK) cells, according to the missing-self hypothesis. NK cells, at the frontier of innate and adaptive immune system, have a central role in tumor-cells surveillance as demonstrated in the setting of allogenic stem cell transplantation. Nevertheless, tumors develop various mechanisms to escape from NK innate immune pressure. Abnormal NK cytolytic functions have been described in many HM. We present here various mechanisms involved in the escape of HM from NK-cell surveillance, i.e., NK-cells quantitative and qualitative abnormalities. PMID:24391641

  1. Clinical production and therapeutic applications of alloreactive natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    McKenna, David H; Kadidlo, Diane M; Cooley, Sarah; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances have improved our understanding of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated alloreactivity after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) or with adoptive transfer. NK cells contribute to a graft-versus-leukemia effect and may play a role in preventing graft-versus-host disease or controlling infectious diseases after allogeneic HCT. New discoveries in NK cell biology, including characterization of NK cell receptors and their interactions with self-HLA molecules and a better understanding of the mechanism of NK cell education have led to the development of novel strategies to exploit NK cell alloreactivity against tumors. While early studies using autologous NK cells lacked efficacy, the use of adoptively transferred NK cells to treat hematopoietic malignancies has been expanding. The production of allogeneic donor NK cells requires efficient removal of T- and B cells from clinical-scale leukapheresis collections. The goal of this chapter is to review NK cell biology, NK cell receptors, the use of NK cells as therapy and then to discuss the clinical decisions resulting in our current good manufacturing practices processing and activation of human NK cells for therapeutic use. PMID:22665252

  2. Insights into the paracrine effects of uterine natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    GONG, XIN; LIU, YANXIA; CHEN, ZHENZHEN; XU, CAI; LU, QIUDAN; JIN, ZHE

    2014-01-01

    Uterine natural killer (uNK) cells are recruited into the uterus during establishment of the implantation and placentation of the embryo, and are hypothesized to regulate uterine spiral artery remodeling and angiogenesis during the initial stages of pregnancy. Failures in uNK cell activation are linked to diseases associated with pregnancy. However, the manner in which these cells interact with the endometrium remain unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the paracrine effects of uNK cells on the gene expression profile of an endometrial epithelial and stromal cell co-culture system in vitro, using a microarray analysis. Results from reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments showed that soluble factors from uNK cells significantly alter endometrial gene expression. In conclusion, this study suggests that paracrine effects of uNK cells guide uNK cell proliferation, trophoblast migration, endometrial decidualization and angiogenesis, and maintain non-cytotoxicity of uNK cells. PMID:25310696

  3. Molecular Programming of Immunological Memory in Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Aimee M; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of the adaptive immune system. Although natural killer (NK) cells have traditionally been classified as a component of the innate immune system, they have recently been shown in mice and humans to exhibit certain features of immunological memory, including an ability to undergo a clonal-like expansion during virus infection, generate long-lived progeny (i.e. memory cells), and mediate recall responses against previously encountered pathogens--all characteristics previously ascribed only to adaptive immune responses by B and T cells in mammals. To date, the molecular events that govern the generation of NK cell memory are not completely understood. Using a mouse model of cytomegalovirus infection, we demonstrate that individual pro-inflammatory IL-12, IL-18, and type I-IFN signaling pathways are indispensible and play non-redundant roles in the generation of virus-specific NK cell memory. Furthermore, we discovered that antigen-specific proliferation and protection by NK cells is mediated by the transcription factor Zbtb32, which is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and promotes a cell cycle program in activated NK cells. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling NK cell responses will provide novel strategies for tailoring vaccines to target infectious disease. PMID:26324348

  4. rRNA fragmentation induced by a yeast killer toxin.

    PubMed

    Kast, Alene; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2014-02-01

    Virus like dsDNA elements (VLE) in yeast were previously shown to encode the killer toxins PaT and zymocin, which target distinct tRNA species via specific anticodon nuclease (ACNase) activities. Here, we characterize a third member of the VLE-encoded toxins, PiT from Pichia inositovora, and identify PiOrf4 as the cytotoxic subunit by conditional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to the tRNA targeting toxins, however, neither a change of the wobble uridine modification status by introduction of elp3 or trm9 mutations nor tRNA overexpression rescued from PiOrf4 toxicity. Consistent with a distinct RNA target, expression of PiOrf4 causes specific fragmentation of the 25S and 18S rRNA. A stable cleavage product comprising the first ∼ 130 nucleotides of the 18S rRNA was purified and characterized by linker ligation and subsequent reverse transcription; 3'-termini were mapped to nucleotide 131 and 132 of the 18S rRNA sequence, a region showing some similarity to the anticodon loop of tRNA(Glu)(UUC), the zymocin target. PiOrf4 residues Glu9 and His214, corresponding to catalytic sites Glu9 and His209 in the ACNase subunit of zymocin are essential for in vivo toxicity and rRNA fragmentation, raising the possibility of functionally conserved RNase modules in both proteins. PMID:24308908

  5. Natural killer cells in non-hematopoietic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Desbois, Mélanie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Locher, Clara; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system and were initially described functionallywise by their spontaneous cytotoxic potential against transformed or virus-infected cells. A delicate balance between activating and inhibiting receptors regulates NK cell tolerance. A better understanding of tissue resident NK cells, of NK cell maturation stages and migration patterns has evolved allowing a thoughtful evaluation of their modus operandi. While evidence has been brought up for their relevance as gate keepers in some hematopoietic malignancies, the role of NK cells against progression and dissemination of solid tumors remains questionable. Hence, many studies pointed out the functional defects of the rare NK cell infiltrates found in tumor beds and the lack of efficacy of adoptively transferred NK cells in patients. However, several preclinical evidences suggest their anti-metastatic role in a variety of mouse tumor models. In the present review, we discuss NK cell functions according to their maturation stage and environmental milieu, the receptor/ligand interactions dictating tumor cell recognition and recapitulate translational studies aimed at deciphering their prognostic or predictive role against human solid malignancies. PMID:23269924

  6. Natural killer cells in non-hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Mélanie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Locher, Clara; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system and were initially described functionallywise by their spontaneous cytotoxic potential against transformed or virus-infected cells. A delicate balance between activating and inhibiting receptors regulates NK cell tolerance. A better understanding of tissue resident NK cells, of NK cell maturation stages and migration patterns has evolved allowing a thoughtful evaluation of their modus operandi. While evidence has been brought up for their relevance as gate keepers in some hematopoietic malignancies, the role of NK cells against progression and dissemination of solid tumors remains questionable. Hence, many studies pointed out the functional defects of the rare NK cell infiltrates found in tumor beds and the lack of efficacy of adoptively transferred NK cells in patients. However, several preclinical evidences suggest their anti-metastatic role in a variety of mouse tumor models. In the present review, we discuss NK cell functions according to their maturation stage and environmental milieu, the receptor/ligand interactions dictating tumor cell recognition and recapitulate translational studies aimed at deciphering their prognostic or predictive role against human solid malignancies. PMID:23269924

  7. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  8. Visualizing compound transgenic zebrafish in development: a tale of green fluorescent protein and KillerRed.

    PubMed

    Korzh, Vladimir; Teh, Cathleen; Kondrychyn, Igor; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Lukyanov, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    Optically translucent embryos of model vertebrates expressing transgenic fluorescent proteins provide a possibility to unravel developmental events, particularly when combined with live imaging. An introduction of transposon-mediated transgenesis resulted in generation of a number of transgenics expressing cytosolic green fluorescent protein in a tissue-specific manner. The recent generation of photodynamic and differentially tagged fluorescent proteins opened a possibility not only to mix-and-match living markers of different color, but also to employ them as powerful experimental tools for studies of cell physiology. Using this approach, transgenic lines expressing membrane-tagged KillerRed (memKR), a genetically encoded photosensitizer, with little or no inducible phototoxicity under confocal imaging were generated. Phototoxicity is only induced by intense green or white light generated by the mercury lamp in a widefield mode. Here, we discuss new ideas born from experimentation using the zebrafish Tol2 transposon-mediated enhancer trap transgenic lines expressing memKR. Because of accumulation on the cell membrane, memKR reveals fine details of cellular morphology. In combination with cytosolic green fluorescent protein, the multicolor in vivo imaging of memKR transgenics reveals complex developmental processes and provides a possibility to manipulate them by regulated generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:21348774

  9. Human natural killer cells: origin, receptors, function, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Moretta, Lorenzo; Montaldo, Elisa; Vacca, Paola; Del Zotto, Genny; Moretta, Francesca; Merli, Pietro; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effectors playing a relevant role in innate immunity, primarily in tumor surveillance and in defenses against viruses. Human NK cells recognize HLA class I molecules through surface receptors (KIR and NKG2A) that inhibit NK cell function and kill target cells that have lost (or underexpress) HLA class I molecules as it occurs in tumors or virus-infected cells. NK cell activation is mediated by an array of activating receptors and co-receptors that recognize ligands expressed primarily on tumors or virus-infected cells. In vivo anti-tumor NK cell activity may be suppressed by tumor or tumor-associated cells. Alloreactive NK cells (i.e. those that are not inhibited by the HLA class I alleles of the patient) derived from HSC of haploidentical donors play a major role in the cure of high-risk leukemia, by killing leukemia blasts and patient's DC, thus preventing tumor relapses and graft-versus-host disease. The expression of the HLA-C2-specific activating KIR2DS1 may also contribute to NK alloreactivity in patients expressing C2 alleles. A clear correlation has been proven between the size of the alloreactive NK cell population and the clinical outcome. Recently, haplo-HSCT has been further improved with the direct infusion, together with HSC, of donor-derived, mature alloreactive NK cells and TCRγδ(+) T cells - both contributing to a prompt anti-leukemia effect together with an efficient defense against pathogens during the 6- to 8-week interval required for the generation of alloreactive NK cells from HSC. PMID:25323661

  10. A false killer whale adjusts its hearing when it echolocates.

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Paul E; Supin, Alexander Y

    2008-06-01

    The use of auditory evoked potential (AEP) measurements has added considerably to knowledge of the hearing mechanisms of marine mammals. We have recently measured the hearing of a stranded infant Risso's dolphin, the audiograms of white-beaked dolphins temporarily caught and released, and the hearing of anaesthetized polar bears. Most small toothed whales echolocate and hear very high frequency sounds underwater. While much has previously been learned about the echolocation performance and characteristics of the outgoing signals of echolocating dolphins and small whales, the hearing processes occurring while these animals actively echolocate have not previously been examined. Working with a well-trained echolocating false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) wearing latex surface suction cup electrodes, we have measured echolocation hearing AEPs in response to outgoing echolocation clicks, returning echoes, and comparable simulated whale clicks and echoes in a variety of situations. We have found that: (1) the whale may hear her loud outgoing clicks and much quieter returning echoes at comparable levels, (2) the whale has protective mechanisms that dampen the intensity of her outgoing signals - she hears her outgoing signals at a level about 40 dB lower than similar signals presented directly in front of her, (3) when echo return levels are lowered either by making the targets smaller or by placing the targets farther away - without changing the levels of her outgoing signals - the hearing of these echoes remains at almost the same level, (4) if targets are made much smaller and harder to echolocate, the animal will modify what she hears of her outgoing signal - as if to heighten overall hearing sensitivity to keep the echo level hearable, (5) the animal has an active 'automatic gain control' mechanism in her hearing based on both forward masking that balances outgoing pulse intensity and time between pulse and echo, and active hearing control. Overall, hearing

  11. MHC class I target recognition, immunophenotypes and proteomic profiles of natural killer cells within the spleens of day-14 chick embryos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicken natural killer (NK) cells are not well defined, so little is known about the molecular interactions controlling their activity. At day 14 of embryonic development, chick spleens are a rich source of T-cellfree CD8aa+, CD3_ cells with natural killing activity. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay...

  12. 50 CFR 229.37 - False Killer Whale Take Reduction Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false False Killer Whale Take Reduction Plan... § 229.37 False Killer Whale Take Reduction Plan. (a) Purpose and scope. The purpose of this section is to implement the False Killer Whale Take Reduction Plan to reduce mortality and serious injury of...

  13. Emerging role of Natural killer cells in oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rauf; Rommelaere, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute a subtype of lymphocytes that initiate innate immune responses against tumors and virus-infected cells. The ability of NK cells to kill target cells or to produce cytokines depends on the balance between signals from activating and inhibitory cell-surface receptors. Therapies with NK cells involve activation of endogenous NK cells and/or exogenous transfer by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation/adoptive cell therapy. To exploit the diverse functional abilities of NK cells for cancer immunotherapy, it is important to understand NK cell biology and the underlying regulatory mechanisms. The state of immune suppression prevalent in malignancies creates the need for innovative therapies. Oncolytic viruses are novel anticancer agents showing selective tropism for tumor cells and lacking pathogenicity in humans, but the use of oncolytic virotherapy (OVT) presents multiple challenges. An increasing body of evidence suggests that the host immune response may critically influence the outcome of OVT. Classically, the immune system is thought to limit the efficacy of therapy through virus clearance mediated by innate immune effectors or through adaptive antiviral immune responses eliminating infected cells. Effective strategies do need to be designed in OVT to circumvent the early antiviral activity of NK cells and to augment late NK-cell-mediated antitumor responses. The intrinsic immunostimulating capacity of oncolytic viruses and the possibility of engineering them to express heterologous immunostimulatory molecules (eg, cytokines) support the use of these agents to enhance antitumor immune responses besides inducing direct oncolytic effects. OVT has indeed shown promising therapeutic outcomes in various clinical trials. Here, we review the biology of NK cells, strategies involving NK cells for achieving cancer therapy, and, more particularly, the emerging role of NK cells in OVT.

  14. Biotyping of Malassezia pachydermatis strains using the killer system.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, S D; Paula, C R

    1998-06-01

    The killer phenomenon has been used as epidemiological marker for Candida albicans, where hundreds of biotypes can be obtained. The objective of this study is to observe the behaviour of 30 strains of Malassezia pachydermatis isolated from dogs with otitis (15) or dermatitis (15) against 9 killer yeasts, which, when grouped in triplets produced a 3 digit code (biotype). The growth inhibition of the 30 strains of M. pachydermatis due to the effect of the killer yeasts used permitted the determination of the following biotypes: 888 (33.3%), 212 (26.7%), 111 (16.7%), 312 (6.7%), 512 (6.7%), 242 (3.3%), 311 (3.3%) and 411 (3.3%). Biotypes 888, 212 and 111 occurred most frequently in both ear canal and skin samples. PMID:17655416

  15. Adaptive prolonged postreproductive life span in killer whales.

    PubMed

    Foster, Emma A; Franks, Daniel W; Mazzi, Sonia; Darden, Safi K; Balcomb, Ken C; Ford, John K B; Croft, Darren P

    2012-09-14

    Prolonged life after reproduction is difficult to explain evolutionarily unless it arises as a physiological side effect of increased longevity or it benefits related individuals (i.e., increases inclusive fitness). There is little evidence that postreproductive life spans are adaptive in nonhuman animals. By using multigenerational records for two killer whale (Orcinus orca) populations in which females can live for decades after their final parturition, we show that postreproductive mothers increase the survival of offspring, particularly their older male offspring. This finding may explain why female killer whales have evolved the longest postreproductive life span of all nonhuman animals. PMID:22984064

  16. M by Fritz Lang (Germany, 1931) Phenomenology of Evil: a serial killer and his social group.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Cesare

    2015-10-01

    In 1931 an unknown murderer of little girls (Peter Lorre) is terrorizing the city of Berlin. We see him entice a new victim, the little Elsie Beckmann, who is coming home from school: whistling a tune by Grieg, he buys her a balloon from a blind beggar. When her corpse is discovered, the police undertake a major mobilization aimed at seeking the serial killer in the criminal underworld; meanwhile, the ever more terrified population starts to see the dangerous murderer in everyone. Since the roundups and incursions into the seediest parts of town disturb the gangsters' activities, the leaders of organized crime, headed by Schränker (Gustav Gründgens), take it upon themselves also to hunt down the solitary child-killer, engaging the community of beggars. Every corner of the city is catalogued and sifted by the dual activity of the police and the gangsters. The 'monster', a former psychiatric patient, mild and harmless in manner, is finally tracked down via two parallel routes: the clue of a cigarette packet enables Inspector Lohmann (Otto Wernicke) to track down the serial killer's address, while the blind beggar recognizes the whistled tune. The murderer is identified by a 'slap' from a young criminal which leaves an M marked in chalk on a shoulder of the man's overcoat. Thus he is caught and undergoes a kind of trial at the hands of the gangsters who tie him up in order to lynch him, but they are interrupted by the arrival of the forces of law and order. PMID:26463110

  17. Ultrasonic whistles of killer whales (Orcinus orca) recorded in the North Pacific (L).

    PubMed

    Filatova, Olga A; Ford, John K B; Matkin, Craig O; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G; Burdin, Alexander M; Hoyt, Erich

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasonic whistles were previously found in North Atlantic killer whales and were suggested to occur in eastern North Pacific killer whales based on the data from autonomous recorders. In this study ultrasonic whistles were found in the recordings from two encounters with the eastern North Pacific offshore ecotype killer whales and one encounter with the western North Pacific killer whales of unknown ecotype. All ultrasonic whistles were highly stereotyped and all but two had downsweep contours. These results demonstrate that specific sound categories can be shared by killer whales from different ocean basins. PMID:23231094

  18. Expression of Meiotic Drive Elements Spore Killer-2 and Spore Killer-3 in Asci of Neurospora Tetrasperma

    PubMed Central

    Raju, N. B.; Perkins, D. D.

    1991-01-01

    It was shown previously that when a chromosomal Spore killer factor is heterozygous in Neurospora species with eight-spored asci, the four sensitive ascospores in each ascus die and the four survivors are all killers. Sk-2(K) and Sk-3(K) are nonrecombining haplotypes that segregate with the centromere of linkage group III. No killing occurs when either one of these killers is homozygous, but each is sensitive to killing by the other in crosses of Sk-2(K) X Sk-3(K). In the present study, Sk-2(K) and Sk-3(K) were transferred by recurrent backcrosses from the eight-spored species Neurospora crassa into Neurospora tetrasperma, a pseudohomothallic species which normally makes asci with four large spores, each heterokaryotic for mating type and for any other centromere-linked genes that are heterozygous in the cross. The action of Sk-2(K) and Sk-3(K) in N. tetrasperma is that predicted from their behavior in eight-spored species. A sensitive nucleus is protected from killing if it is enclosed in the same ascospore with a killer nucleus. Crosses of Sk-2(K) X Sk-2(S), Sk-3(K) X Sk-3(S), and Sk-2(K) X Sk-3(K) all produce four-spored asci that are wild type in appearance, with the ascospores heterokaryotic and viable. The Eight-spore gene E, which shows variable penetrance, was used to obtain N. tetrasperma asci in which two to eight spores are small and homokaryotic. When killer and sensitive alleles are segregating in the presence of E, only those ascospores that contain a killer allele survive. Half of the small ascospores are killed. In crosses of Sk-2(K) X Sk-3(K) (with E heterozygous), effectively all small ascospores are killed. The ability of N. tetrasperma to carry killer elements in cryptic condition suggests a possible role for Spore killers in the origin of pseudohomothallism, with adoption of the four-spored mode restoring ascospore viability of crosses in which killing would otherwise occur. PMID:1834522

  19. Impaired cytotoxicity associated with defective natural killer cell differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Maryam; Manser, Angela R.; Fröbel, Julia; Kündgen, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Schönberg, Kathrin; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Uhrberg, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are well known to mediate anti-leukemic responses in myeloid leukemia but their role in myelodysplastic syndromes is not well understood. Here, in a cohort of newly diagnosed patients (n=75), widespread structural and functional natural killer cell defects were identified. One subgroup of patients (13%) had a selective deficiency of peripheral natural killer cells (count <10/mm3 blood) with normal frequencies of T and natural killer-like T cells. Natural killer cell-deficient patients were predominantly found in high-risk subgroups and deficiency of these cells was significantly associated with poor prognosis. In the second subgroup, comprising the majority of patients (76%), natural killer cells were present but exhibited poor cytotoxicity. The defect was strongly associated with reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B. Notably, natural killer cell function and arming of cytotoxic granules could be fully reconstituted by in vitro stimulation. Further phenotypic analysis of these patients revealed an immature natural killer cell compartment that was biased towards CD56bright cells. The residual CD56dim cells exhibited a significant increase of the unlicensed NKG2A−KIR− subset and a striking reduction in complexity of the repertoire of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the widespread defects in natural killer cell function occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are mostly due to either unsuccessful or inefficient generation of mature, functionally competent natural killer cells, which might contribute to disease progression through impaired immune surveillance. PMID:25682594

  20. Impaired cytotoxicity associated with defective natural killer cell differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Maryam; Manser, Angela R; Fröbel, Julia; Kündgen, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Schönberg, Kathrin; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Uhrberg, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Natural killer cells are well known to mediate anti-leukemic responses in myeloid leukemia but their role in myelodysplastic syndromes is not well understood. Here, in a cohort of newly diagnosed patients (n=75), widespread structural and functional natural killer cell defects were identified. One subgroup of patients (13%) had a selective deficiency of peripheral natural killer cells (count <10/mm(3) blood) with normal frequencies of T and natural killer-like T cells. Natural killer cell-deficient patients were predominantly found in high-risk subgroups and deficiency of these cells was significantly associated with poor prognosis. In the second subgroup, comprising the majority of patients (76%), natural killer cells were present but exhibited poor cytotoxicity. The defect was strongly associated with reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B. Notably, natural killer cell function and arming of cytotoxic granules could be fully reconstituted by in vitro stimulation. Further phenotypic analysis of these patients revealed an immature natural killer cell compartment that was biased towards CD56(bright) cells. The residual CD56(dim) cells exhibited a significant increase of the unlicensed NKG2A(-)KIR(-) subset and a striking reduction in complexity of the repertoire of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the widespread defects in natural killer cell function occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are mostly due to either unsuccessful or inefficient generation of mature, functionally competent natural killer cells, which might contribute to disease progression through impaired immune surveillance. PMID:25682594

  1. Coordinated regulation of natural killer receptor expression in the maturing human immune system

    PubMed Central

    Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Horowitz, Amir; Parham, Peter; Blish, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are responsible for recognizing and killing transformed, stressed, and infected cells. They recognize a set of non-antigen-specific features termed “altered self” through combinatorial signals from activating and inhibitory receptors. These natural killer cell receptors (NKR) are also expressed on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, and monocytes, though a comprehensive inventory of NKR expression patterns across leukocyte lineages has never been performed. Using mass cytometry, we found that NKR expression patterns distinguish cell lineages in human peripheral blood. In individuals with high levels of CD57, indicative of a mature immune repertoire, NKR are more likely to be expressed on non-NK cells, especially CD8+ T cells. Mature NK and CD8+ T cell populations show increased diversity of NKR surface expression patterns, but with distinct determinants: mature NK cells acquire primarily inhibitory receptors, while CD8+ T cells attain a specific subset of both activating and inhibitory receptors, potentially imbuing them with a distinct functional role. Concurrently, monocytes show decreased expression of the generalized inhibitory receptor LILRB1, consistent with an increased activation threshold. Therefore, NKR expression is coordinately regulated as the immune system matures, resulting in the transfer of “altered self” recognition potential among leukocyte lineages. This likely reduces antigen specificity in the mature human immune system, and implies that vaccines and therapeutics that engage both its innate and adaptive branches may be more effective in the settings of aging and chronic infection. PMID:25288567

  2. Killing defect of natural killer cells with the absence of natural killer cytotoxic factors in a child with Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Komiyama, A.; Kawai, H.; Yamada, S.; Kato, M.; Yanagisawa, M.; Miyagawa, Y.; Akabane, T.

    1987-06-01

    A killing defect of natural killer (NK) cells in the absence of NK cytotoxic factors (NKCF) was first demonstrated in a child with Hodgkin's disease. The patient lacked detectable NK cell activity in every phase of the disease as measured by a four-hour /sup 51/Cr-release assay using K562 cells as a target. The percent lysis at a 40:1 effector:target ratio by the patient's lymphocytes was persistently below 0.3% as compared with the normal lymphocyte value of 46.2% +/- 5.8% (mean +/- SD). NK cell activity was not detectable at effector:target ratios of 10:1 to 80:1 and by prolongation of the incubation time, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by lymphocyte stimulation with polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid, interferon (IFN)-alpha, or interleukin 2 (IL 2). The numbers of Leu-7+ cells and Leu-11+ cells were normal as counted by flow cytometry. A single cell-in-agarose assay demonstrated normal numbers of target binding cells (TBCs), and they showed the morphology of large granular lymphocytes. However, there were no TBCs with dead targets. These results indicated that the patient's lymphocytes contained normal numbers of NK cells that were capable of recognizing and binding to a target but were incapable of killing the bound target cell. The patient's lymphocytes were then studied for their release of NKCF upon interaction with K562 cells. The patient's cells did not release NKCF, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by stimulation of the cells with IFN or IL 2. It is suggested that the deficient release of NKCF may have been related to the killing defect of the NK cells in this patient.

  3. Lewy Bodies: A Spectator or Salient Killer?

    PubMed

    Sian-Hulsmann, Jeswinder; Monoranu, Camelia; Strobel, S; Riederer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Lewy bodies (LBs) are characteristic hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, their role in the pathology of PD is not established yet. Are they primary events in the neurodegenerative process or only secondary phenomena? Are they signs of protecting neurons from toxicity or are they toxic per se? How are they are formed? Are LBs targets for therapeutic strategies? Addressing these questions may be of pivotal importance to unravel the basic mechanisms of neurodegeneration in PD. On the basis of current evidence, we intend to elucidate the possible role of LBs as triggers and/or markers of disease progression in PD. We present evidence for the morphogenesis of brain stem and cortical LBs, the role in neuronal cell death mechanisms, which seem to be correlated with the adhesion of LBs to and finally disruption of their inner neuronal membrane. Taken as such, LBs would be salient killers of nerve cells. However, they may also play a neuroprotective role in the early phases of neuronal pathology (LBs as a spectator), yet harmful to neuronal stability in later stages of LB development. Generation of LB pathology in the periphery (early subclinical Braak stage) might be due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to (chronic) bacteria-induced and/or otherwise intestinal inflammation, both leading to alpha-synuclein structural changes, oligomerization, seeding and propagation in a prion-like mechanism. If so, LB generation is a secondary process following ROS/inflammation pathology. Therapeutic implication based on LB pathology include drug development to inhibit protein misfolding, templating and transmission or vaccination against LBs, neuron regeneration strategies, anti-inflammatory and anti-biotic drugs as well as nutritional specialities to prevent intestine intoxications. In conclusion, evidence suggests LBs to be secondary hallmarks of PD pathology, induced by ROS/inflammation or other pathological triggers able to modify protein (alpha-synuclein) steric

  4. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  5. Life history evolution: what does a menopausal killer whale do?

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Hal

    2015-03-16

    Menopause evolved in humans and whales, presumably because older females can help their kin. But how do they help? New research shows that post-menopausal female killer whales lead foraging groups. This leadership is most significant when food is scarce. PMID:25784039

  6. West Nile virus infection in killer whale, Texas, USA, 2007.

    PubMed

    St Leger, Judy; Wu, Guang; Anderson, Mark; Dalton, Les; Nilson, Erika; Wang, David

    2011-08-01

    In 2007, nonsuppurative encephalitis was identified in a killer whale at a Texas, USA, marine park. Panviral DNA microarray of brain tissue suggested West Nile virus (WNV); WNV was confirmed by reverse transcription PCR and sequencing. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated WNV antigen within neurons. WNV should be considered in cases of encephalitis in cetaceans. PMID:21801643

  7. Whistle sequences in wild killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Ford, John K B; Thomsen, Frank

    2008-09-01

    Combining different stereotyped vocal signals into specific sequences increases the range of information that can be transferred between individuals. The temporal emission pattern and the behavioral context of vocal sequences have been described in detail for a variety of birds and mammals. Yet, in cetaceans, the study of vocal sequences is just in its infancy. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of sequences of stereotyped whistles in killer whales off Vancouver Island, British Columbia. A total of 1140 whistle transitions in 192 whistle sequences recorded from resident killer whales were analyzed using common spectrographic analysis techniques. In addition to the stereotyped whistles described by Riesch et al., [(2006). "Stability and group specificity of stereotyped whistles in resident killer whales, Orcinus orca, off British Columbia," Anim. Behav. 71, 79-91.] We found a new and rare stereotyped whistle (W7) as well as two whistle elements, which are closely linked to whistle sequences: (1) stammers and (2) bridge elements. Furthermore, the frequency of occurrence of 12 different stereotyped whistle types within the sequences was not randomly distributed and the transition patterns between whistles were also nonrandom. Finally, whistle sequences were closely tied to close-range behavioral interactions (in particular among males). Hence, we conclude that whistle sequences in wild killer whales are complex signal series and propose that they are most likely emitted by single individuals. PMID:19045672

  8. Skin TLR7 triggering promotes accumulation of respiratory dendritic cells and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Hackstein, Holger; Hagel, Nicole; Knoche, Angela; Kranz, Sabine; Lohmeyer, Jürgen; von Wulffen, Werner; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D; Bein, Gregor; Baal, Nelli

    2012-01-01

    The TLR7 agonist imiquimod has been used successfully as adjuvant for skin treatment of virus-associated warts and basal cell carcinoma. The effects of skin TLR7 triggering on respiratory leukocyte populations are unknown. In a placebo-controlled experimental animal study we have used multicolour flow cytometry to systematically analyze the modulation of respiratory leukocyte subsets after skin administration of imiquimod. Compared to placebo, skin administration of imiquimod significantly increased respiratory dendritic cells (DC) and natural killer cells, whereas total respiratory leukocyte, alveolar macrophages, classical CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T killer cell numbers were not or only moderately affected. DC subpopulation analyses revealed that elevation of respiratory DC was caused by an increase of respiratory monocytic DC and CD11b(hi) DC subsets. Lymphocyte subpopulation analyses indicated a marked elevation of respiratory natural killer cells and a significant reduction of B lymphocytes. Analysis of cytokine responses of respiratory leukocytes after stimulation with Klebsiella pneumonia indicated reduced IFN-γ and TNF-α expression and increased IL-10 and IL-12p70 production after 7 day low dose skin TLR7 triggering. Additionally, respiratory NK cytotoxic activity was increased after 7d skin TLR7 triggering. In contrast, lung histology and bronchoalveolar cell counts were not affected suggesting that skin TLR7 stimulation modulated respiratory leukocyte composition without inducing overt pulmonary inflammation. These data suggest the possibility to modulate respiratory leukocyte composition and respiratory cytokine responses against pathogens like Klebsiella pneumonia through skin administration of a clinically approved TLR7 ligand. Skin administration of synthetic TLR7 ligands may represent a novel, noninvasive means to modulate respiratory immunity. PMID:22927956

  9. Skin TLR7 Triggering Promotes Accumulation of Respiratory Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hackstein, Holger; Hagel, Nicole; Knoche, Angela; Kranz, Sabine; Lohmeyer, Jürgen; von Wulffen, Werner; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D.; Bein, Gregor; Baal, Nelli

    2012-01-01

    The TLR7 agonist imiquimod has been used successfully as adjuvant for skin treatment of virus-associated warts and basal cell carcinoma. The effects of skin TLR7 triggering on respiratory leukocyte populations are unknown. In a placebo-controlled experimental animal study we have used multicolour flow cytometry to systematically analyze the modulation of respiratory leukocyte subsets after skin administration of imiquimod. Compared to placebo, skin administration of imiquimod significantly increased respiratory dendritic cells (DC) and natural killer cells, whereas total respiratory leukocyte, alveolar macrophages, classical CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T killer cell numbers were not or only moderately affected. DC subpopulation analyses revealed that elevation of respiratory DC was caused by an increase of respiratory monocytic DC and CD11bhi DC subsets. Lymphocyte subpopulation analyses indicated a marked elevation of respiratory natural killer cells and a significant reduction of B lymphocytes. Analysis of cytokine responses of respiratory leukocytes after stimulation with Klebsiella pneumonia indicated reduced IFN-γ and TNF-α expression and increased IL-10 and IL-12p70 production after 7 day low dose skin TLR7 triggering. Additionally, respiratory NK cytotoxic activity was increased after 7d skin TLR7 triggering. In contrast, lung histology and bronchoalveolar cell counts were not affected suggesting that skin TLR7 stimulation modulated respiratory leukocyte composition without inducing overt pulmonary inflammation. These data suggest the possibility to modulate respiratory leukocyte composition and respiratory cytokine responses against pathogens like Klebsiella pneumonia through skin administration of a clinically approved TLR7 ligand. Skin administration of synthetic TLR7 ligands may represent a novel, noninvasive means to modulate respiratory immunity. PMID:22927956

  10. Natural Killer-like B Cells Prime Innate Lymphocytes against Microbial Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Xia, Pengyan; Chen, Yi; Huang, Guanling; Xiong, Zhen; Liu, Jing; Li, Chong; Ye, Buqing; Du, Ying; Fan, Zusen

    2016-07-19

    Natural killer (NK) cells and non-cytotoxic interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing group I innate lymphoid cells (ILC1s) produce large amounts of IFN-γ and cause activation of innate and adaptive immunity. However, how NKs and ILC1s are primed during infection remains elusive. Here we have shown that a lymphocyte subpopulation natural killer-like B (NKB) cells existed in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). NKBs had unique features that differed from T and B cells, and produced interleukin-18 (IL-18) and IL-12 at an early phase of infection. NKB cells played a critical role in eradication of microbial infection via secretion of IL-18 and IL-12. Moreover, IL-18 deficiency abrogated the antibacterial effect of NKBs. Upon bacterial challenge, NKB precursors (NKBPs) rapidly differentiated to NKBs that activated NKs and ILC1s against microbial infection. Our findings suggest that NKBs might be exploited to develop effective therapies for treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:27421702

  11. Invariant Natural Killer T cells in children with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jyonouchi, Soma; Smith, Cara Lea; Saretta, Francesca; Abraham, Valsamma; Ruymann, Kathryn R; Modayur-Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna; Wang, Mei-Lun; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Cianferoni, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an atopic disease characterized by eosinophilic inflammation in which dietary antigens (in particular, milk) play a major role. EoE is most likely a mixed IgE and non-IgE food-mediated reaction in which over-expression of Th2 cytokines, particularly IL-13, play a major role; however, the cells responsible for IL-13 over-expression remain elusive. Th2-cytokines are secreted following the ligation of invariant natural killer T cell receptors to sphingolipids (SL). Sphingolipids (SL) are presented via the CD1d molecule on the INKT cell surface. Cow’s milk-derived SL has been shown to activate iNKTs from children with IgE-mediated food allergies to milk (FA-MA) to produce Th2 cytokines. The role of iNKTs and milk-SL in EoE pathogenesis is currently unknown. Objective To investigate the role of iNKTs and milk-SL in EoE. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 10 children with active EoE (EoE-A), 10 children with controlled EoE (EoE-C), and 16 healthy controls (Non-EoE) were measured ex-vivo and then incubated with α-galactosylceramide (αGal) and milk-SL. INKTs from peripheral blood (PB) and esophageal biopsies were studied. Results EoE-A-children had significantly fewer peripheral blood iNKTs with a greater Th2-response to αGal and milk-SM compared to iNKTs of EoE-C and Non-EoE children. Additionally, EoE-A children had increased iNKT levels in esophageal biopsies compared to EoE-C children. Conclusion Milk-SLs are able to activate peripheral blood iNKTs in EoE-A children to produce Th2 cytokines. Additionally, iNKT levels are higher at the site of active esophageal eosinophilic inflammation. Clinical Relevance This study suggests that sphingolipids (SL) contained in milk may drive the development of EoE by promoting an iNKT cell-mediated Th2-type cytokine response that facilitates eosinophil-mediated allergic inflammation. PMID:24118614

  12. Immunomodulation by vitamin B12: augmentation of CD8+ T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cell activity in vitamin B12-deficient patients by methyl-B12 treatment.

    PubMed

    Tamura, J; Kubota, K; Murakami, H; Sawamura, M; Matsushima, T; Tamura, T; Saitoh, T; Kurabayshi, H; Naruse, T

    1999-04-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin B12 (vit.B12) plays an important role in immune system regulation, but the details are still obscure. In order to examine the action of vit.B12 on cells of the human immune system, lymphocyte subpopulations and NK cell activity were evaluated in 11 patients with vit.B12 deficiency anaemia and in 13 control subjects. Decreases in the number of lymphocytes and CD8+ cells and in the proportion of CD4+ cells, an abnormally high CD4/CD8 ratio, and suppressed NK cell activity were noted in patients compared with control subjects. In all 11 patients and eight control subjects, these immune parameters were evaluated before and after methyl-B12 injection. The lymphocyte counts and number of CD8+ cells increased both in patients and in control subjects. The high CD4/CD8 ratio and suppressed NK cell activity were improved by methyl-B12 treatment. Augmentation of CD3-CD16+ cells occurred in patients after methyl-B12 treatment. In contrast, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity, lectin-stimulated lymphocyte blast formation, and serum levels of immunoglobulins were not changed by methyl-B12 treatment. These results indicate that vit.B12 might play an important role in cellular immunity, especially relativing to CD8+ cells and the NK cell system, which suggests effects on cytotoxic cells. We conclude that vit.B12 acts as an immunomodulator for cellular immunity. PMID:10209501

  13. Simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell cytotoxicity against each of three different target cell lines.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, K

    1994-02-10

    A time-resolved fluorometric assay for the simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell activity against three different lanthanide diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (LaDTPA) labelled target cell lines is described. The target cell line K-562 was labelled with SmDTPA, the cell line Molt with TbDTPA and the cell line Raji with EuDTPA. After co-incubation of the three target cell lines with effector cells the fluorescence of the lanthanides released from the lysed target cells was measured in an enhancer solution in which they formed highly fluorescent complexes. It was possible to differentiate the specific release from the three target cell lines because the emission lines of the europium, samarium and terbium complexes formed in the enhancer solution are well separated from each other. The autofluorescence from culture media supplemented with serum was avoided by the use of time-resolved fluorometry. The results show that applying fluorometry based on the combination of spectral and temporal resolution to natural killer cell assays, makes possible the simultaneous determination of lysis in up to three target cell lines in complex culture medium. PMID:8308301

  14. The phenotypic and functional characteristics of umbilical cord blood and peripheral blood natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2009-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation can be curative for patients with high-risk acute leukaemia. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an increasingly used source of allogeneic stem cells for patients who are in need of a transplant, but do not have a sibling donor. This review highlights the similarities and differences between the natural killer (NK) cells obtained from adult peripheral blood (PB) and UCB. These two cell sources show similar percentages of NK cells, including the major CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) subpopulations. UCB also contains an additional CD56-CD16+ subset, not typically found in PB. In addition, there are a number of progenitor cell populations in UCB that can give rise to NK cells. Some studies showed that UCB NK cells express a relatively higher percentage of inhibitory receptors (CD94/NKG2A and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors) and less adhesion molecules. Resting UCB NK cells also show significantly less cytotoxicity compared to PB NK cells. However, following cytokine stimulation, the cytotoxicity of UCB NK cells can be rapidly increased to levels that are comparable to PB NK cells. Activation and expansion protocols for UCB NK cells are briefly reviewed. Lastly, we outline the early use of UCB NK cells in clinical trials. PMID:19796267

  15. ERAP1 regulates natural killer cell function by controlling the engagement of inhibitory receptors.

    PubMed

    Cifaldi, Loredana; Romania, Paolo; Falco, Michela; Lorenzi, Silvia; Meazza, Raffaella; Petrini, Stefania; Andreani, Marco; Pende, Daniela; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2015-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1 regulates innate and adaptive immune responses by trimming peptides for presentation by MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules. Herein, we demonstrate that genetic or pharmacological inhibition of ERAP1 on human tumor cell lines perturbs their ability to engage several classes of inhibitory receptors by their specific ligands, including killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) by classical MHC-I-peptide (pMHC-I) complexes and the lectin-like receptor CD94-NKG2A by nonclassical pMHC-I complexes, in each case leading to natural killer (NK) cell killing. The protective effect of pMHC-I complexes could be restored in ERAP1-deficient settings by the addition of known high-affinity peptides, suggesting that ERAP1 was needed to positively modify the affinity of natural ligands. Notably, ERAP1 inhibition enhanced the ability of NK cells to kill freshly established human lymphoblastoid cell lines from autologous or allogeneic sources, thereby promoting NK cytotoxic activity against target cells that would not be expected because of KIR-KIR ligand matching. Overall, our results identify ERAP1 as a modifier to leverage immune functions that may improve the efficacy of NK cell-based approaches for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25592150

  16. Effect of cytokine-induced killer cells on immune function in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    PAN, YANYAN; WU, YUANYUAN; JI, JUN; CAI, HONGJIAO; WANG, HESHUANG; JIANG, YIFAN; SANG, LIMIN; YANG, JIN; GAO, YANYAN; LIU, YING; YIN, LIANGWEI; ZHANG, LI

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells have been used as adoptive immunotherapy in cancer. The present study evaluated the effect of CIK cells on immune function in patients with lung cancer. Patients were divided into three groups, according to the treatment received prior to CIK cell treatment: CIK group (no prior treatment), Che-Sur group (prior chemotherapy and surgery) and Che-Rad group (prior chemotherapy and radiotherapy). Following treatment, the average percentage of cluster of differentiation (CD)3+CD4+, CD3+, natural killer (NK) and NKT cells in peripheral blood was significantly higher than that prior to CIK treatment in the Che-Sur and CIK groups, and the levels of interferon-γ in serum were significantly higher than those prior to CIK treatment in the Che-Sur and CIK groups. On the contrary, the levels of interleukin-10 had decreased in these groups following CIK treatment. Subsequently, patients were divided into three groups according to the percentage of CD3+CD56+ CIK cells that were administered to the patients. The number of NK and NKT cells increased with increasing number of CD3+CD56+ cells. The patients in the CIK and Che-Sur groups were the most benefited ones following CIK treatment, contrarily to those in the Che-Rad group, since the increase in the number of CD3+CD56+ CIK cells in the aforementioned patients enhanced the number of NK cells, which exhibit antitumor activity. PMID:27073559

  17. Support for the beam focusing hypothesis in the false killer whale.

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Laura N; Buck, John R; Smith, Adam B; Supin, Alexander Ya; Gaudette, Jason E; Nachtigall, Paul E

    2015-08-01

    The odontocete sound production system is complex and composed of tissues, air sacs and a fatty melon. Previous studies suggested that the emitted sonar beam might be actively focused, narrowing depending on target distance. In this study, we further tested this beam focusing hypothesis in a false killer whale. Using three linear arrays of hydrophones, we recorded the same emitted click at 2, 4 and 7 m distance and calculated the beamwidth, intensity, center frequency and bandwidth as recorded on each array at every distance. If the whale did not focus her beam, acoustics predicts the intensity would decay with range as a function of spherical spreading and the angular beamwidth would remain constant. On the contrary, our results show that as the distance from the whale to the array increases, the beamwidth is narrower and the received click intensity is higher than that predicted by a spherical spreading function. Each of these measurements is consistent with the animal focusing her beam on a target at a given range. These results support the hypothesis that the false killer whale is 'focusing' its sonar beam, producing a narrower and more intense signal than that predicted by spherical spreading. PMID:26056247

  18. Potential role of natural killer cells in controlling tumorigenesis by human T-cell leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, G; Stewart, S A; Baird, S M; Lee, F; Feuer, R; Chen, I S

    1995-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a malignancy of T lymphocytes that is characterized by a long latency period after virus exposure. Intraperitoneal inoculation of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with HTLV-transformed cell lines and ATL tumor cells was employed to investigate the tumorigenic potential of HTLV type I (HTLV-I)-infected cells. In contrast to inoculation of ATL (RV-ATL) cells into SCID mice, which resulted in the formation of lymphomas, inoculation of HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-transformed cell lines (SLB-I and JLB-II cells, respectively) did not result in tumor formation. Immunosuppression of SCID mice, either by whole-body irradiation or by treatment with an antiserum, anti-asialo GM1 (alpha-AGM1), which transiently abrogates natural killer cell activity in vivo, was necessary to establish the growth of tumors derived from HTLV-transformed cell lines. PCR and flow cytometric studies reveal that HTLV-I-transformed cells are eliminated from the peritoneal cavities of inoculated mice by 3 days postinoculation; in contrast, RV-ATL cells persist and are detected until the mice succumb to lymphoma development. The differing behaviors of HTLV-infected cell lines and ATL tumor cells in SCID mice suggest that ATL cells have a higher tumorigenic potential in vivo than do HTLV-infected cell lines because of their ability to evade natural killer cell-mediated cytolysis. PMID:7815516

  19. Orchestration of Invariant Natural Killer T cell development by E and Id proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sumedha; Zhuang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are αβ T cells that express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) along with Natural Killer (NK) cell markers, and have an innate cell-like ability to produce a myriad of cytokines very quickly upon antigen exposure and subsequent activation. These cells are diverted from conventional single positive (SP) T cell fate at the double positive (DP) stage where TCR-mediated recognition of a lipid antigen presented on a CD1d molecule promotes their selection into the NKT lineage. Although many key regulatory molecules have been shown to play important roles in the development of NKT cells, the mechanism of lineage specification and acquisition of effector functions in these cells still remain to be fully addressed. In this review we specifically discuss the role of a family of class I Helix Loop Helix proteins known as E proteins, and of their antagonists Id proteins in NKT cell development. Recent works have shown that these proteins play key roles in iNKT development, from the invariant TCR rearrangement to terminal differentiation and maturation. Elucidating these roles provides an opportunity to uncover the transcriptional network that separates NKT cells from the concurrently developed conventional αβ T cells. PMID:25746046

  20. Thermal biology of Pacific cicada killers, Sphecius convallis Patton, in the Upper Sonoran Desert.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Joseph R; Holliday, Charles W; Hastings, Jon M; Phillips, Christy M

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the Pacific cicada killer, Sphecius convallis Patton, was undertaken to examine the behavioral and physiological mechanisms by which they are able to complete their life cycle in the thermal extremes of the Upper Sonoran Desert. S. convallis were endothermic, exhibiting elevated and relatively constant thorax temperatures during many activities. Males basked in trees at dawn to warm up, then used a variety of behaviors and perching strategies to maintain thorax temperature during territorial behavior. The thorax temperature of females was highest during provisioning and orientation flights, somewhat lower while investigating burrows, and lowest while digging burrows. The optimal thorax temperature for flight was about 40°C, which was approximated most closely by males resting in the shade during the afternoon. In mating clusters, the mated male was the hottest, the female was coolest and the other males were intermediate. Wasps lost about 5% of body mass during heating treatments, and may use evaporative water loss for cooling. Pacific cicada killers use a complex suite of behavioral and physiological adaptations to regulate body temperature during their nesting season. PMID:27033045

  1. Ovarian cycle approach by rectal temperature and fecal progesterone in a female killer whale, Orcinus orca.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Satoshi; Kakizoe, Yuka; Kanda, Koji; Sengoku, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Yohei; Adachi, Itsuki; Watanabe, Yoko; Doi, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to validate the measurements of body temperature and fecal progesterone concentrations as minimally invasive techniques for assessing ovarian cycle in a single sexually mature female killer whale. Rectal temperature data, fecal and blood samples were collected in the dorsal position using routine husbandry training on a voluntary basis. The correlations between rectal temperature and plasma progesterone concentration and between fecal and plasma progesterone concentrations were investigated. Fecal progesterone metabolites were identified by a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and enzyme immunoassay. Plasma progesterone concentrations (range: 0.2-18.6 ng/ml) and rectal temperature (range: 35.3-35.9°C) changed cyclically, and cycle lengths were an average (±SD) of 44.9±4.0 days (nine cycles) and 44.6±5.9 days (nine cycles), respectively. Rectal temperature positively correlated with the plasma progesterone concentrations (r=0.641, P<0.01). There was a visual trend for fecal progesterone profiles to be similar to circulating plasma progesterone profiles. Fecal immunoreactive progestagen analysis resulted in a marked immunoreactive peak of progesterone. The data from the single killer whale indicate that the measurement of rectal temperature is suitable for minimally invasive assessment of the estrous cycle and monitoring the fecal progesterone concentration is useful to assess ovarian luteal activity. PMID:20648568

  2. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in killer whales (Orcinus orca) from the Crozet Archipelago, southern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Noël, Marie; Barrett-Lennard, Lance; Guinet, Christophe; Dangerfield, Neil; Ross, Peter S

    2009-10-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and dibenzofurans (PCDFs), are ubiquitous environmental contaminants of which significant concentrations are reported in upper trophic level animals. In 1998, we collected blubber biopsy samples (n=11) from killer whales (Orcinus orca) inhabiting the coastal waters around Possession Island, Crozet Archipelago, southern Indian Ocean, for contaminant analyses. Despite inhabiting an isolated region far removed from industrial activities, these killer whales can presently be considered among the most PCB-contaminated cetaceans in the southern hemisphere, with concentrations ranging from 4.4 to 20.5mg/kg lipid weight (lw). PCDD levels ranged from below the detection limit (5 ng/kg) to 77.1 ng/kg lw and PCDF levels from below the detection limit (7 ng/kg) to 36.1 ng/kg lw. Over 70% of our study animals had PCB concentrations which exceeded a 1.3mg/kg PCB threshold established for endocrine disruption and immunotoxicity in free-ranging harbour seals, suggesting that organic contaminants cannot be ruled out as an additional threat to this declining population. PMID:19625078

  3. Mobilization of natural killer cells inhibits development of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Leavenworth, Jianmei W; Wang, Xiaoyang; Wenander, Carola Schellack; Spee, Pieter; Cantor, Harvey

    2011-08-30

    Although natural killer (NK) cells have been implicated in regulating immune responses, their ability to modulate disease development in autoimmune arthritis has not been analyzed. Here we investigate the contribution of NK cells to regulating collagen-induced arthritis, a well-characterized preclinical model of human rheumatoid arthritis. We find that the disease is induced by the combined action of two CD4(+) T helper (T(H)) subsets: follicular T(H) cells and T(H)17 cells. Both CD4(+) T(H) subsets are highly susceptible to lysis by NK cells after activation. Administration of antibody that activates NK cells through blockade of its inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor allows enhanced elimination of pathogenic follicular T(H) and T(H)17 cells and arrest of disease progression. These results suggest that antibody-dependent enhancement of NK activity may yield effective, previously undescribed therapeutic approaches to this autoimmune disorder. PMID:21873193

  4. Identification of natural killer cell receptor genes in the genome of the marsupial Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    van der Kraan, Lauren E; Wong, Emily S W; Lo, Nathan; Ujvari, Beata; Belov, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Within the mammalian immune system, natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the first line of defence against infectious agents and tumours. Their activity is regulated, in part, by cell surface NK cell receptors. NK receptors can be divided into two unrelated, but functionally analogous superfamilies based on the structure of their extracellular ligand-binding domains. Receptors belonging to the C-type lectin superfamily are predominantly encoded in the natural killer complex (NKC), while receptors belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily are predominantly encoded in the leukocyte receptor complex (LRC). Natural killer cell receptors are emerging as a rapidly evolving gene family which can display significant intra- and interspecific variation. To date, most studies have focused on eutherian mammals, with significantly less known about the evolution of these receptors in marsupials. Here, we describe the identification of 43 immunoglobulin domain-containing LRC genes in the genome of the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the largest remaining marsupial carnivore and only the second marsupial species to be studied. We also identify orthologs of NKC genes KLRK1, CD69, CLEC4E, CLEC1B, CLEC1A and an ortholog of an opossum NKC receptor. Characterisation of these regions in a second, distantly related marsupial provides new insights into the dynamic evolutionary histories of these receptors in mammals. Understanding the functional role of these genes is also important for the development of therapeutic agents against Devil Facial Tumour Disease, a contagious cancer that threatens the Tasmanian devil with extinction. PMID:23007952

  5. Acute, lethal, natural killer cell-resistant myeloproliferative disease induced by polyomavirus in severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Szomolanyi-Tsuda, E.; Dundon, P. L.; Joris, I.; Shultz, L. D.; Woda, B. A.; Welsh, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    Infection of severe combined immunodeficient mice, which lack T and B lymphocytes, with polyomavirus (PyV) induced an acute hematological disorder leading to the death of the mice by 2 weeks postinfection. The disease was characterized by a dramatic decrease in megakaryocytes, multiple hemorrhages, anemia, thrombocytopenia, splenomegaly, a massive myeloproliferation and splenic erythroproliferation with a defect in maturation of the myeloid elements similar to that in acute leukemia. This pathology in severe combined immunodeficient mice is very different from that of the well-characterized tumor profiles induced by PyV in normal newborn or nude mice. Viral T and capsid (VP1) antigens and viral genome were detected in some cells in the spleen, but not in the majority of the proliferating myeloid cells. This suggests that the myeloproliferation is induced by some indirect mechanism, such as secretion of growth factors or cytokines by virus-infected cells, rather than by direct transformation by PyV. Neither the spread of PyV, its replication in different organs, nor the pathogenesis or the time of death were altered by depleting natural killer cells in vivo by anti-natural killer cell antibodies. Analysis of the spleen leukocyte population indicated that the cells expressed high levels of class I major histocompatibility complex antigens and were resistant to lysis by activated natural killer cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8311119

  6. Sounds produced by Norwegian killer whales, Orcinus orca, during capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Parijs, Sofie M.; Leyssen, Teo; Similä, Tiu

    2004-07-01

    To date very little is still known about the acoustic behavior of Norwegian killer whales, in particular that of individual whales. In this study a unique opportunity was presented to document the sounds produced by five captured killer whales in the Vestfjord area, northern Norway. Individuals produced 14 discrete and 7 compound calls. Two call types were used both by individuals 16178 and 23365 suggesting that they may belong to the same pod. Comparisons with calls documented in Strager (1993) showed that none of the call types used by the captured individuals were present. The lack of these calls in the available literature suggests that call variability within individuals is likely to be large. This short note adds to our knowledge of the vocal repertoire of this population and demonstrates the need for further studies to provide behavioural context to these sounds.

  7. Killer-sensitive coexistence in metapopulations of micro-organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Czárán, Tamás L; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    2003-01-01

    Many micro-organisms are known to produce efficient toxic substances against conspecifics and closely related species. The widespread coexistence of killer (toxin producer) and sensitive (non-producer) strains is a puzzle calling for a theoretical explanation. Based on stochastic cellular automaton simulations and the corresponding semi-analytical configuration-field approximation models, we suggest that metapopulation dynamics offers a plausible rationale for the maintenance of polymorphism in killer-sensitive systems. A slight trade-off between toxin production and population growth rate is sufficient to maintain the regional coexistence of toxic and sensitive strains, if toxic killing is a local phenomenon restricted to small habitat patches and local populations regularly go extinct and are renewed via recolonizations from neighbouring patches. Pattern formation on the regional scale does not play a decisive part in this mechanism, but the local manner of interactions is essential. PMID:12965028

  8. Phylogenomics of the killer whale indicates ecotype divergence in sympatry.

    PubMed

    Moura, A E; Kenny, J G; Chaudhuri, R R; Hughes, M A; Reisinger, R R; de Bruyn, P J N; Dahlheim, M E; Hall, N; Hoelzel, A R

    2015-01-01

    For many highly mobile species, the marine environment presents few obvious barriers to gene flow. Even so, there is considerable diversity within and among species, referred to by some as the 'marine speciation paradox'. The recent and diverse radiation of delphinid cetaceans (dolphins) represents a good example of this. Delphinids are capable of extensive dispersion and yet many show fine-scale genetic differentiation among populations. Proposed mechanisms include the division and isolation of populations based on habitat dependence and resource specializations, and habitat release or changing dispersal corridors during glacial cycles. Here we use a phylogenomic approach to investigate the origin of differentiated sympatric populations of killer whales (Orcinus orca). Killer whales show strong specialization on prey choice in populations of stable matrifocal social groups (ecotypes), associated with genetic and phenotypic differentiation. Our data suggest evolution in sympatry among populations of resource specialists. PMID:25052415

  9. Martyrdom redefined: self-destructive killers and vulnerable narcissism.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Leonardo

    2014-08-01

    Lankford shows that suicide terrorists have much in common with maladjusted persons who die by suicide. However, what differentiates suicidal killers from those who "only" commit suicide? A key element may be vulnerable narcissism. Narcissism has been simultaneously linked to interpersonal aggression, achievement, and depression. These traits may explain the paradoxical picture of a person who may appear "normal" in some aspects, and yet hate himself and others so intensely as to seek mutual destruction. PMID:25162842

  10. Can self-destructive killers be classified so easily?

    PubMed

    Egan, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    Lankford makes many useful points regarding the myths and shibboleths underlying our understanding of self-destructive killers and suicide bombers. He has collated an impressive data set on such offenders. However, his classification scheme is not built on sufficient evidence to support his proposed discrete categories of conventional, coerced, escapist, and indirect suicide terrorists. It would be straightforward to analyse the data, but it is unlikely that the resulting model would reflect that anticipated. PMID:25162843

  11. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  12. Offshore killer whale tracking using multiple hydrophone arrays.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Martin; Henderson, E Elizabeth; Wiggins, Sean M; Roch, Marie A; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    To study delphinid near surface movements and behavior, two L-shaped hydrophone arrays and one vertical hydrophone line array were deployed at shallow depths (<125 m) from the floating instrument platform R/P FLIP, moored northwest of San Clemente Island in the Southern California Bight. A three-dimensional propagation-model based passive acoustic tracking method was developed and used to track a group of five offshore killer whales (Orcinus orca) using their emitted clicks. In addition, killer whale pulsed calls and high-frequency modulated (HFM) signals were localized using other standard techniques. Based on these tracks sound source levels for the killer whales were estimated. The peak to peak source levels for echolocation clicks vary between 170-205 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m, for HFM calls between 185-193 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m, and for pulsed calls between 146-158 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m. PMID:24180762

  13. Experimental evidence for action imitation in killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Abramson, José Z; Hernández-Lloreda, Victoria; Call, Josep; Colmenares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Comparative experimental studies of imitative learning have focused mainly on primates and birds. However, cetaceans are promising candidates to display imitative learning as they have evolved in socioecological settings that have selected for large brains, complex sociality, and coordinated predatory tactics. Here we tested imitative learning in killer whales, Orcinus orca. We used a 'do-as-other-does' paradigm in which 3 subjects witnessed a conspecific demonstrator's performance that included 15 familiar and 4 novel behaviours. The three subjects (1) learned the copy command signal 'Do that' very quickly, that is, 20 trials on average; (2) copied 100 % of the demonstrator's familiar and novel actions; (3) achieved full matches in the first attempt for 8-13 familiar behaviours (out of 15) and for the 2 novel behaviours (out of 2) in one subject; and (4) took no longer than 8 trials to accurately copy any familiar behaviour, and no longer than 16 trials to copy any novel behaviour. This study provides experimental evidence for body imitation, including production imitation, in killer whales that is comparable to that observed in dolphins tested under similar conditions. These findings suggest that imitative learning may underpin some of the group-specific traditions reported in killer whales in the field. PMID:22875725

  14. Divergence of a stereotyped call in northern resident killer whales.

    PubMed

    Grebner, Dawn M; Parks, Susan E; Bradley, David L; Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L; Capone, Dean E; Ford, John K B

    2011-02-01

    Northern resident killer whale pods (Orcinus orca) have distinctive stereotyped pulsed call repertoires that can be used to distinguish groups acoustically. Repertoires are generally stable, with the same call types comprising the repertoire of a given pod over a period of years to decades. Previous studies have shown that some discrete pulsed calls can be subdivided into variants or subtypes. This study suggests that new stereotyped calls may result from the gradual modification of existing call types through subtypes. Vocalizations of individuals and small groups of killer whales were collected using a bottom-mounted hydrophone array in Johnstone Strait, British Columbia in 2006 and 2007. Discriminant analysis of slope variations of a predominant call type, N4, revealed the presence of four distinct call subtypes. Similar to previous studies, there was a divergence of the N4 call between members of different matrilines of the same pod. However, this study reveals that individual killer whales produced multiple subtypes of the N4 call, indicating that divergence in the N4 call is not the result of individual differences, but rather may indicate the gradual evolution of a new stereotyped call. PMID:21361462

  15. Destructive hostility: the Jeffrey Dahmer case. A psychiatric and forensic study of a serial killer.

    PubMed

    Jentzen, J; Palermo, G; Johnson, L T; Ho, K C; Stormo, K A; Teggatz, J

    1994-12-01

    We were involved as forensic experts in the case of the serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer. We discuss the scene and victim autopsy findings, with a brief consideration of the basic emotion of hostility. These findings support the thesis that at the basis of this serial killer's behavior were primary unconscious feelings of hate that he had channeled into a sadistic programmed destruction of 17 young men. The interview of the serial killer, the photographic scene documentation, and the autopsy findings stress the ambivalent homosexuality of the killer, his sexual sadism, his obsessive fetishism, and his possible cannibalism and necrophilia. PMID:7879770

  16. Involvement of cell wall beta-glucan in the action of HM-1 killer toxin.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, S; Ben Inoue, S; Mio, T; Yamada, T; Nakajima, T; Ichishima, E; Furuichi, Y; Yamada, H

    1994-07-01

    HM-1 killer toxin secreted from Hansenula mrakii inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells by interfering with beta-1,3-glucan synthesis. We found that HM-1 killer toxin killed intact cells but not protoplasts. In addition, cells lacking the functional KRE6 allele (kre6 delta) became resistant to higher concentration of HM-1 killer toxin. As reported by Roemer and Bussey [(1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 88 11295-11299], cells lacking functional KRE6 had a reduced level of the cell wall beta-1,6-glucan compared to that in cells harboring the normal KRE6. These results suggest that the cell wall beta-glucan is involved in the action of HM-1 killer toxin. Addition of HM-1 killer toxin with several kinds of oligosaccharides revealed that either beta-1,3- or beta-1,6-glucan blocked the cytocidal action of HM-1 killer toxin whereas alpha-1,4-glucan and chitin did not. Mannan also interfered with HM-1 killer toxin action, but this inhibitory effect was much weaker than that observed with beta-1,3- or beta-1,6-glucans. Thus, it appears that the cell wall beta-glucan interacts with HM-1 killer toxin, and that this toxin-beta-glucan commitment is required for the action of HM-1 killer toxin. PMID:8026578

  17. Natural Killer Cells-An Epigenetic Perspective of Development and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Alexander; Bloch, Wilhelm; Zimmer, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Based on their ability to recognize and eliminate various endo- and exogenous pathogens as well as pathological alterations, Natural Killer (NK) cells represent an important part of the cellular innate immune system. Although the knowledge about their function is growing, little is known about their development and regulation on the molecular level. Research of the past decade suggests that modifications of the chromatin, which do not affect the base sequence of the DNA, also known as epigenetic alterations, are strongly involved in these processes. Here, the impact of epigenetic modifications on the development as well as the expression of important activating and inhibiting NK-cell receptors and their effector function is reviewed. Furthermore, external stimuli such as physical activity and their influence on the epigenetic level are discussed. PMID:26938533

  18. Natural Killer Cells—An Epigenetic Perspective of Development and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Alexander; Bloch, Wilhelm; Zimmer, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Based on their ability to recognize and eliminate various endo- and exogenous pathogens as well as pathological alterations, Natural Killer (NK) cells represent an important part of the cellular innate immune system. Although the knowledge about their function is growing, little is known about their development and regulation on the molecular level. Research of the past decade suggests that modifications of the chromatin, which do not affect the base sequence of the DNA, also known as epigenetic alterations, are strongly involved in these processes. Here, the impact of epigenetic modifications on the development as well as the expression of important activating and inhibiting NK-cell receptors and their effector function is reviewed. Furthermore, external stimuli such as physical activity and their influence on the epigenetic level are discussed. PMID:26938533

  19. Isolation of a Wickerhamomyces anomalus yeast strain from the sandfly Phlebotomus perniciosus, displaying the killer phenotype.

    PubMed

    Martin, E; Bongiorno, G; Giovati, L; Montagna, M; Crotti, E; Damiani, C; Gradoni, L; Polonelli, L; Ricci, I; Favia, G; Epis, S

    2016-03-01

    The yeast Wickerhamomyces anomalus has been studied for its wide biotechnological potential, mainly for applications in the food industry. Different strains of W. anomalus have been isolated from diverse habitats and recently from insects, including mosquitoes of medical importance. This paper reports the isolation and phylogenetic characterization of W. anomalus from laboratory-reared adults and larvae of Phlebotomus perniciosus (Diptera: Psychodidae), a main phlebotomine vector of human and canine leishmaniasis. Of 65 yeast strains isolated from P. perniciosus, 15 strains were identified as W. anomalus; one of these was tested for the killer phenotype and demonstrated inhibitory activity against four yeast sensitive strains, as reported for mosquito-isolated strains. The association between P. perniciosus and W. anomalus deserves further investigation in order to explore the possibility that this yeast may exert inhibitory/killing activity against Leishmania spp. PMID:26542209

  20. Tolerogen-induced interferon-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDCs) protect against EAE

    PubMed Central

    Huarte, Eduardo; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Riccardi, Carol; Skyberg, Jerod A.; Golden, Sarah; Rollins, MaryClare F.; Ramstead, Andrew; Jackiw, Larissa O.; Maddaloni, Massimo; Pascual, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to link the innate and adaptive immune systems. Likewise, a new innate cell subset, interferon-producing killer DCs (IKDCs), shares phenotypic and functional characteristics with both DCs and NK cells. Here, we show IKDCs play an essential role in the resolution of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) upon treatment with the tolerizing agent, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), genetically fused to reovirus protein σ1 (termed MOG-pσ1). Activated IKDCs were recruited subsequent MOG-pσ1 treatment of EAE, and disease resolution was abated upon NK1.1 cell depletion. These IKDCs were able to kill activated CD4+ T cells and mature dendritic DCs, thus, contributing to EAE remission. In addition, IKDCs were responsible for MOG-pσ1-mediated MOG-specific regulatory T cell recruitment to the CNS. The IKDCs induced by MOG-pσ1 expressed elevated levels of HVEM for interactions with cognate ligand-positive cells: LIGHT+ NK and Teff cells and BTLA+ B cells. Further characterization revealed these activated IKDCs being MHC class IIhigh, and upon their adoptive transfer (CD11c+NK1.1+MHC class IIhigh), IKDCs, but not CD11c+NK1.1+MHC class IIintermediate/low (unactivated) cells, conferred protection against EAE. These activated IKDCs showed enhanced CD107a, PD-L1, and granzyme B expression and could present OVA, unlike unactivated IKDCs. Thus, these results demonstrate the interventional potency induced HVEM+ IKDCs to resolve autoimmune disease. PMID:22018711

  1. Effects of footshock stress and morphine on natural killer lymphocytes in rats: studies of tolerance and cross-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shavit, Y; Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Zane, C J; Gale, R P; Liebeskind, J C

    1986-05-01

    Exposure to a form of footshock stress known to cause opioid-mediated analgesia suppresses the cytotoxic activity of natural killer (NK) cells in rats. This suppression is blocked by the opioid antagonist, naltrexone and is mimicked by morphine administration, suggesting mediation by opioid receptors. Supporting this hypothesis, we now report that the morphine-induced suppression of NK activity shows tolerance after 14 daily injections. The NK-suppressive effect of stress, however, shows neither tolerance with repetition nor cross-tolerance in morphine-tolerant rats. PMID:3011211

  2. Natural killer cells and regulatory T cells in early pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra

    2014-01-01

    Survival of the allogeneic embryo in the uterus depends on the maintenance of immune tolerance at the maternal-fetal interface. The pregnant uterus is replete with activated maternal immune cells. How this immune tolerance is acquired and maintained has been a topic of intense investigation. The key immune cells that predominantly populate the pregnant uterus are natural killer (NK) cells. In normal pregnancy, these cells are not killers, but rather provide a microenvironment that is pregnancy compatible and supports healthy placentation. In placental mammals, an array of highly orchestrated immune elements to support successful pregnancy outcome has been incorporated. This includes active cooperation between maternal immune cells, particularly NK cells, and trophoblast cells. This intricate process is required for placentation, immune regulation and to remodel the blood supply to the fetus. During the past decade, various types of maternal immune cells have been thought to be involved in cross-talk with trophoblasts and in programming immune tolerance. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have attracted a great deal of attention in promoting implantation and immune tolerance beyond implantation. However, what has not been fully addressed is how this immune-trophoblast axis breaks down during adverse pregnancy outcomes, particularly early pregnancy loss, and in response to unscheduled inflammation. Intense research efforts have begun to shed light on the roles of NK cells and Tregs in early pregnancy loss, although much remains to be unraveled in order to fully characterize the mechanisms underlying their detrimental activity. An increased understanding of host-environment interactions that lead to the cytotoxic phenotype of these otherwise pregnancy compatible maternal immune cells is important for prediction, prevention and treatment of pregnancy maladies, particularly recurrent pregnancy loss. In this review, we discuss relevant information from experimental and human

  3. Natural killer cells and regulatory T cells in early pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    SHARMA, SURENDRA

    2015-01-01

    Survival of the allogeneic embryo in the uterus depends on the maintenance of immune tolerance at the maternal-fetal interface. The pregnant uterus is replete with activated maternal immune cells. How this immune tolerance is acquired and maintained has been a topic of intense investigation. The key immune cells that predominantly populate the pregnant uterus are natural killer (NK) cells. In normal pregnancy, these cells are not killers, but rather provide a microenvironment that is pregnancy compatible and supports healthy placentation. In placental mammals, an array of highly orchestrated immune elements to support successful pregnancy outcome has been incorporated. This includes active cooperation between maternal immune cells, particularly NK cells, and trophoblast cells. This intricate process is required for placentation, immune regulation and to remodel the blood supply to the fetus. During the past decade, various types of maternal immune cells have been thought to be involved in cross-talk with trophoblasts and in programming immune tolerance. RegulatoryT cells (Tregs) have attracted a great deal of attention in promoting implantation and immune tolerance beyond implantation. However, what has not been fully addressed is how this immune-trophoblast axis breaks down during adverse pregnancy outcomes, particularly early pregnancy loss, and in response to unscheduled inflammation. Intense research efforts have begun to shed light on the roles of NK cells and Tregs in early pregnancy loss, although much remains to be unraveled in order to fully characterize the mechanisms underlying their detrimental activity. An increased understanding of host-environment interactions that lead to the cytotoxic phenotype of these otherwise pregnancy compatible maternal immune cells is important for prediction, prevention and treatment of pregnancy maladies, particularly recurrent pregnancy loss. In this review, we discuss relevant information from experimental and human

  4. The nature of the natural killer (NK) cell of human intestinal mucosa and mesenteric lymph node.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P R; Jewell, D P

    1985-01-01

    The relationship of the mononuclear cell (MNC) from human intestinal mucosa and mesenteric lymph node mediating anti-K-562 activity with that of peripheral blood has been assessed. Depletion of macrophages did not alter the measured cytotoxicity confirming that the effector cells were lymphocytes. Complement lysis of Leu 7 and Leu 11b coated cells reduced intestinal natural killer (NK) activity by a similar degree to that of peripheral blood but mesenteric lymph node NK activity was affected to a lesser extent. The response in NK activity of mucosal and nodal MNC to short incubation with lymphoblastoid interferon was similar to that for peripheral blood MNC. Twenty-four hours incubation of MNC with low concentrations of purified interleukin-2 (IL-2) consistently augmented intestinal and nodal NK activity but failed to augment that of peripheral blood MNC. No differences between the inhibitory effects of cAMP and prostaglandin E2 on NK activity from the three sites were seen. In addition, inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase activity with indomethacin had no effect on NK activity of intestinal and peripheral blood MNC while the lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, suppressed intestinal and peripheral blood NK activity similarly. In conclusion, anti-K-562 activity by intestinal MNC is mediated by NK cells with similar phenotypic and functional properties to those of peripheral blood. However, the increased sensitivity of mucosal NK cells to IL-2 suggests that higher proportions of NK cell precursors may be present in intestinal MNC populations. PMID:2412737

  5. From the eye of the albatrosses: a bird-borne camera shows an association between albatrosses and a killer whale in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Takahashi, Akinori; Iwata, Takashi; Trathan, Philip N

    2009-01-01

    Albatrosses fly many hundreds of kilometers across the open ocean to find and feed upon their prey. Despite the growing number of studies concerning their foraging behaviour, relatively little is known about how albatrosses actually locate their prey. Here, we present our results from the first deployments of a combined animal-borne camera and depth data logger on free-ranging black-browed albatrosses (Thalassarche melanophrys). The still images recorded from these cameras showed that some albatrosses actively followed a killer whale (Orcinus orca), possibly to feed on food scraps left by this diving predator. The camera images together with the depth profiles showed that the birds dived only occasionally, but that they actively dived when other birds or the killer whale were present. This association with diving predators or other birds may partially explain how albatrosses find their prey more efficiently in the apparently 'featureless' ocean, with a minimal requirement for energetically costly diving or landing activities. PMID:19809497

  6. Therapeutic manipulation of natural killer (NK) T cells in autoimmunity: are we close to reality?

    PubMed Central

    Simoni, Y; Diana, J; Ghazarian, L; Beaudoin, L; Lehuen, A

    2013-01-01

    T cells reactive to lipids and restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like molecules represent more than 15% of all lymphocytes in human blood. This heterogeneous population of innate cells includes the invariant natural killer T cells (iNK T), type II NK T cells, CD1a,b,c-restricted T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. These populations are implicated in cancer, infection and autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the role of these cells in autoimmunity. We summarize data obtained in humans and preclinical models of autoimmune diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and atherosclerosis. We also discuss the promise of NK T cell manipulations: restoration of function, specific activation, depletion and the relevance of these treatments to human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23199318

  7. Current perspectives on natural killer cell education and tolerance: emerging roles for inhibitory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, L Michael

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are regulated through the coordinated functions of activating and inhibitory receptors. These receptors can act during the initial engagement of an NK cell with a target cell, or in subsequent NK cell engagements to maintain tolerance. Notably, each individual possesses a sizable minority-population of NK cells that are devoid of inhibitory receptors that recognize the surrounding MHC class I (ie, self-MHC). Since these NK cells cannot perform conventional inhibition, they are rendered less responsive through the process of NK cell education (also known as licensing) in order to reduce the likelihood of auto-reactivity. This review will delineate current views on NK cell education, clarify various misconceptions about NK cell education, and, lastly, discuss the relevance of NK cell education in anti-cancer therapies.

  8. Invariant natural killer T cells and their ligands: focus on multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Joan; Podbielska, Maria; Hogan, Edward L

    2015-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are an innate population of T cells identified by the expression of an invariant T-cell receptor and reactivity to lipid-based antigens complexed with CD1d. They account for a small percentage of lymphocytes, but are extremely potent and play central roles in immunity to infection, in some cancers, and in autoimmunity. The list of relevant stimulatory lipids and glycolipid antigens now includes a range of endogenous self-antigens including the myelin-derived acetylated galactosylceramides. Recent progress in studies to identify the nature of lipid recognition for iNKT cells in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis is likely to foster the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at harnessing iNKT cell activity. PMID:25976210

  9. Cytokine-induced killer cell therapy-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: rare but noteworthy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yong; Gao, Quanli; Lin, Jizhen; Zhang, Qinxian; Xu, Benling; Song, Yongping

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by a diminished platelet count, an autoimmune condition with antibodies against platelets and an increased tendency to bleed. The association between ITP and solid tumors is uncommon. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell therapy is a well tolerated and promising cancer treatment with minimal toxicity. For the first time, CIK cell therapy was reported to be followed by ITP. The mechanism through which CIK induces ITP remains unclear. Imbalanced ratio of Th cells, decreased numbers or impaired function of Treg cells and excessive secretion of cytokines inducing abnormal activation of B cells may be among the possible reasons. Therefore, a better understanding of this rare condition will require further investigation of these cases. PMID:27485074

  10. Natural Killer Cell Recognition of Melanoma: New Clues for a More Effective Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona, Raquel; Duran, Esther; Solana, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells participate in the early immune response against melanoma and also contribute to the development of an adequate adaptive immune response by their crosstalk with dendritic cells and cytokine secretion. Melanoma resistance to conventional therapies together with its high immunogenicity justifies the development of novel therapies aimed to stimulate effective immune responses against melanoma. However, melanoma cells frequently escape to CD8 T cell recognition by the down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. In this scenario, NK cells emerge as potential candidates for melanoma immunotherapy due to their capacity to recognize and destroy melanoma cells expressing low levels of MHC class I molecules. In addition, the possibility to combine immune checkpoint blockade with other NK cell potentiating strategies (e.g., cytokine induction of activating receptors) has opened new perspectives in the potential use of adoptive NK cell-based immunotherapy in melanoma. PMID:26779186

  11. 50 CFR 226.206 - Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Critical habitat for the Southern Resident... CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.206 Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca). Critical habitat is designated for the Southern Resident killer whale as described in this section. The...

  12. 50 CFR 226.206 - Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Critical habitat for the Southern Resident... CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.206 Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca). Critical habitat is designated for the Southern Resident killer whale as described in this section. The...

  13. 50 CFR 226.206 - Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Critical habitat for the Southern... DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.206 Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca). Critical habitat is designated for the Southern Resident killer whale as described in this section....

  14. 50 CFR 226.206 - Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Critical habitat for the Southern... DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.206 Critical habitat for the Southern Resident killer whale (Orcinus orca). Critical habitat is designated for the Southern Resident killer whale as described in this section....

  15. One-Year Prediction of Pain Killer Use among At-Risk Older Teens and Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Steve; Rohrbach, Louise A.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Barnett, Elizabeth; Lisha, Nadra; Sun, Ping

    2012-01-01

    The leading substance of misuse among teens after tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana is the use of pain killers. Very few longitudinal studies on prediction of pain killer use have been conducted among teens. This study examined the 1-year prediction of self-reported last 30-day pain killer use controlling for baseline 30-day painkiller use among…

  16. The transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to proapoptotic concentrations of Pichia membranifaciens killer toxin.

    PubMed

    Santos, A; Marquina, D

    2011-10-01

    PMKT (Pichia membranifaciens killer toxin) reportedly has antimicrobial activity against yeasts and filamentous fungi. In previous research we posited that high PMKT concentrations pose a serious challenge for cell survival by disrupting plasma membrane electrochemical gradients, inducing a transcriptional response similar to that of certain stimuli such as hyperosmotic shock. This response was related to the HOG-pathway with Hog1p phosphorylation and a transitional increase in intracellular glycerol accumulation. Such a response was consistent with the notion that the effect induced by high PMKT concentrations lies in an alteration to the ionic homeostasis of the sensitive cell. By contrast, the evidence presented here shows that low PMKT doses lead to a cell death process in Saccharomyces cerevisiae accompanied by cytological and biochemical indicators of apoptotic programmed cell death, namely, the production of reactive oxygen species, DNA strand breaks, metacaspase activation and cytochrome c release. Furthermore, dying cells progressed from an apoptotic state to a secondary necrotic state, and the rate at which this change occurred was proportional to the intensity of the stimulus. We have explored the global gene expression response of S. cerevisiae during that stimulus. The results obtained from DNA microarrays indicate that genes related with an oxidative stress response were induced in response to proapoptotic concentrations of PMKT, showing that the coordinated transcriptional response is not coincident with that obtained when ionophoric concentrations of PMKT are used. By contrast, cwp2Δ mutants showed no signs of apoptosis, indicating that the initial steps of the killer mechanism coincide when proapoptotic (low) or ionophoric (high) PMKT concentrations are used. Additionally, low dosages of PMKT promoted Hog1p phosphorylation and glycerol accumulation. PMID:21801845

  17. Immune checkpoint inhibitors enhance cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against human myeloid leukaemic blasts.

    PubMed

    Poh, Su Li; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2016-05-01

    We studied whether blockade of inhibitory receptors on cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells by immune checkpoint inhibitors could increase its anti-tumour potency against haematological malignancies. CIK cultures were generated from seven normal donors and nine patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or multiple myeloma (MM). The inhibitory receptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator, CD200 receptor, lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3) and T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-containing-3 (TIM-3) were present at variable percentages in most CIK cultures, while cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR2DL1/2/3) were expressed at low level in most cultures. Without blockade, myeloid leukaemia cells were susceptible to autologous and allogeneic CIK-mediated cytotoxicity. Blockade of KIR, LAG-3, PD-1 and TIM-3 but not CTLA-4 resulted in remarkable increase in killing against these targets, even in those with poor baseline cytotoxicity. ALL and MM targets were resistant to CIK-mediated cytotoxicity, and blockade of receptors did not increase cytotoxicity to a meaningful extent. Combination of inhibitors against two receptors did not further increase cytotoxicity. Interestingly, potentiation of CIK killing by blocking antibodies was not predicted by expression of receptors on CIK and their respective ligands on the targets. Compared to un-activated T and NK cells, blockade potentiated the cytotoxicity of CIK cells to a greater degree and at a lower E:T ratio, but without significant increase in cytotoxicity against normal white cell. Our findings provide the basis for clinical trial combining autologous CIK cells with checkpoint inhibitors for patients with AML. PMID:26961084

  18. Natural killer cells in highly exposed hepatitis C-seronegative injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Mina, M M; Cameron, B; Luciani, F; Vollmer-Conna, U; Lloyd, A R

    2016-06-01

    Injecting drug use remains the major risk factor for hepatitis C (HCV) transmission. A minority of long-term injecting drug users remain seronegative and aviraemic, despite prolonged exposure to HCV - termed highly exposed seronegative subjects. Natural killer (NK) cells have been implicated in this apparent protection. A longitudinal nested, three group case-control series of subjects was selected from a prospective cohort of seronegative injecting drug users who became incident cases (n = 11), remained seronegative (n = 11) or reported transient high-risk behaviour and remained uninfected (n = 11). The groups were matched by age, sex and initial risk behaviour characteristics. Stored peripheral blood mononuclear cells were assayed in multicolour flow cytometry to enumerate natural killer cell subpopulations and to assess functional activity using Toll-like receptor ligands before measurement of activation, cytokine production and natural cytotoxicity receptor expression. Principal components were derived to describe the detailed phenotypic characteristics of the major NK subpopulations (based on CD56 and CD16 co-expression), before logistic regression analysis to identify associations with exposed, seronegative individuals. The CD56(dim) CD16(+) (P = 0.05, OR 6.92) and CD56(dim) CD16(-) (P = 0.05, OR 6.07) principal components differed between exposed, seronegative individuals and pre-infection samples of the other two groups. These included CD56(dim) CD16(+) and CD56(dim) CD16(-) subsets with CD56(dim) CD16(+) IFN-γ and TNF-α on unstimulated cells, and CD56(dim) CD16(-) CD69(+) , CD107a(+) , IFN-γ and TNF-α following TLR stimulation. The cytotoxic CD56(dim) NK subset thus distinguished highly exposed, seronegative subjects, suggesting NK cytotoxicity may contribute to protection from HCV acquisition. Further investigation of the determinants of this association and prospective assessment of protection against HCV infection are warranted. PMID:26833632

  19. KLRG+ invariant natural killer T cells are long-lived effectors.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kanako; Sato, Yusuke; Shinga, Jun; Watanabe, Takashi; Endo, Takaho; Asakura, Miki; Yamasaki, Satoru; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Kinjo, Yuki; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Watarai, Hiroshi; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Tsuji, Moriya; Taniguchi, Masaru; Ohara, Osamu; Fujii, Shin-ichiro

    2014-08-26

    Immunological memory has been regarded as a unique feature of the adaptive immune response mediated in an antigen-specific manner by T and B lymphocytes. However, natural killer (NK) cells and γδT cells, which traditionally are classified as innate immune cells, have been shown in recent studies to have hallmark features of memory cells. Invariant NKT cell (iNKT cell)-mediated antitumor effects indicate that iNKT cells are activated in vivo by vaccination with iNKT cell ligand-loaded CD1d(+) cells, but not by vaccination with unbound NKT cell ligand. In such models, it previously was thought that the numbers of IFN-γ-producing cells in the spleen returned to the basal level around 1 wk after the vaccination. In the current study, we demonstrate the surprising presence of effector memory-like iNKT cells in the lung. We found long-term antitumor activity in the lungs of mice was enhanced after vaccination with iNKT cell ligand-loaded dendritic cells. Further analyses showed that the KLRG1(+) (Killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G, member 1-positive) iNKT cells coexpressing CD49d and granzyme A persisted for several months and displayed a potent secondary response to cognate antigen. Finally, analyses of CDR3β by RNA deep sequencing demonstrated that some particular KLRG1(+) iNKT-cell clones accumulated, suggesting the selection of certain T-cell receptor repertoires by an antigen. The current findings identifying effector memory-like KLRG1(+) iNKT cells in the lung could result in a paradigm shift regarding the basis of newly developed extrathymic iNKT cells and could contribute to the future development of antitumor immunotherapy by uniquely energizing iNKT cells. PMID:25118276

  20. Exploitation of natural killer cells for the treatment of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Handgretinger, Rupert; Lang, Peter; André, Maya C

    2016-06-30

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in surveillance and elimination of malignant cells. Their spontaneous cytotoxicity was first demonstrated in vitro against leukemia cell lines, and NK cells might play a crucial role in the therapy of leukemia. NK cell activity is controlled by an array of germ line-encoded activating and inhibitory receptors, as well as modulating coreceptors. This biologic feature can be exploited in allogeneic cell therapy, and the recognition of "missing-self" on target cells is crucial for promoting NK cell-mediated graft-versus-leukemia effects. In this regard, NK cells that express an inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (iKIR) for which the respective major histocompatibility complex class I ligand is absent on leukemic target cells can exert alloreactivity in vitro and in vivo. Several models regarding potential donor-patient constellations have been described that have demonstrated the clinical benefit of such alloreactivity of the donor-derived NK cell system in patients with adult acute myeloid leukemia and pediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, adoptive transfer of mature allogeneic NK cells in the nontransplant or transplant setting has been shown to be safe and feasible, whereas its effectivity needs further evaluation. NK cell therapy can be further improved by optimal donor selection based on phenotypic and genotypic properties, by adoptive transfer of NK cells with ex vivo or in vivo cytokine stimulation, by the use of antibodies to induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity or to block iKIRs, or by transduction of chimeric antigen receptors. PMID:27207791

  1. Exploring the Role of Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors and Their HLA Class I Ligands in Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Littera, Roberto; Chessa, Luchino; Onali, Simona; Figorilli, Francesco; Lai, Sara; Secci, Luca; La Nasa, Giorgio; Caocci, Giovanni; Arras, Marcella; Melis, Maurizio; Cappellini, Sara; Balestrieri, Cinzia; Serra, Giancarlo; Conti, Maria; Zolfino, Teresa; Casale, Michele; Casu, Stefania; Pasetto, Maria Cristina; Barca, Lucia; Salustro, Claudia; Matta, Laura; Scioscia, Rosetta; Zamboni, Fausto; Faa, Gavino; Orrù, Sandro; Carcassi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Background Natural killer cells are involved in the complex mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases but few studies have investigated their role in autoimmune hepatitis. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors are key regulators of natural killer cell-mediated immune responses. Methods and Findings KIR gene frequencies, KIR haplotypes, KIR ligands and combinations of KIRs and their HLA Class I ligands were investigated in 114 patients diagnosed with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis and compared with a group of 221 healthy controls. HLA Class I and Class II antigen frequencies were compared to those of 551 healthy unrelated families representative of the Sardinian population. In our cohort, type 1 autoimmune hepatitis was strongly associated with the HLA-B18, Cw5, DR3 haplotype. The KIR2DS1 activating KIR gene and the high affinity HLA-C2 ligands were significantly higher in patients compared to controls. Patients also had a reduced frequency of HLA-Bw4 ligands for KIR3DL1 and HLA-C1 ligands for KIR2DL3. Age at onset was significantly associated with the KIR2DS1 activating gene but not with HLA-C1 or HLA-C2 ligand groups. Conclusions The activating KIR gene KIR2DS1 resulted to have an important predictive potential for early onset of type 1 autoimmune hepatitis. Additionally, the low frequency of the KIR-ligand combinations KIR3DL1/HLA-Bw4 and KIR2DL3/HLA-C1 coupled to the high frequency of the HLA-C2 high affinity ligands for KIR2DS1 could contribute to unwanted NK cell autoreactivity in AIH-1. PMID:26744892

  2. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor gene association with cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Niepiekło-Miniewska, Wanda; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr; Havrylyuk, Anna; Kamieniczna, Marzena; Nakonechnyy, Andrij; Chopyak, Valentyna; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition where a testis persists in the abdominal cavity. Thus, due to elevated temperature we may expect induction of aberrant immune reactions depending on genetic constitution of individual. This may be reflected by development of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) in cryptorchid males. Also, natural killer (NK) cells which belong to innate immunity may control adaptive immunity. Therefore, the gene system encoding polymorphic NK cell immunoglobulin receptors (KIRs) has been studied. 109 prepubertal boys with cryptorchidism and 136 ethnically matched young male donors were selected to study NK cell KIRs. DNA was isolated using automatic Maxwell(®) system from the peripheral venous blood drawn onto anticoagulant. Olerup SSP KIR Genotyping kit including Taq polymerase was used for detection of KIR genes. Human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) groups, C1 and C2 were established using a Olerup SSP KIR HLA Ligand kit. KIR2DL2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain long 2) and KIR2DS2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain short 2) genes were less frequent in patients than in control individuals (corrected p values: 0.0110 and 0.0383, respectively). However, no significant differences were observed between ASA-positive and ASA-negative patients, or between bilateral or unilateral cryptorchidism. No association between KIR ligands C1 and C2, alone or together with KIR2DL2, was found. However, the results suggest that KIR2DL2+/KIR2DS2+ genotype may be, to some extent, protective against cryptorchidism. PMID:26679162

  3. A killer micro attack on 3D neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1990-11-01

    We describe the deterministic solution of the neutron transport equation and the computation of the effective criticality of three-dimensional assemblies using the BBN TC2000 killer micros. We observe that the performance of our research code PTRAN running on 48 processors of the TC2000 is competitive with the partially vectorizable version running on a single Cray Y/MP processor. This performance scales well with the number of processors on real problems, including those that are not load balanced a priori. To obtain this performance, we explicitly specify and exploit data locality and data dependence using domain decomposition and dynamic job scheduling. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Organ-specific features of natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; La Cava, Antonio; Van Kaer, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can be swiftly mobilized by danger signals and are among the earliest arrivals at target organs of disease. However, the role of NK cells in mounting inflammatory responses is often complex and sometimes paradoxical. Here, we examine the divergent phenotypic and functional features of NK cells, as deduced largely from experimental mouse models of pathophysiological responses in the liver, mucosal tissues, uterus, pancreas, joints and brain. Moreover, we discuss how organ-specific factors, the local microenvironment and unique cellular interactions may influence the organ-specific properties of NK cells. PMID:21941294

  5. A Detrimental Role for Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in the Pathogenesis of Experimental Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Renneson, Joelle; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Maillet, Isabelle; Marques, Rafael E.; Ivanov, Stoyan; Fontaine, Josette; Paget, Christophe; Quesniaux, Valérie; Faveeuw, Christelle; Ryffel, Bernhard; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Trottein, François

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the mosquito-borne flaviviruses, is a serious public health problem in many tropical countries. We assessed the in vivo physiologic contribution of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, a population of nonconventional lipid-reactive αβ T lymphocytes, to the host response during experimental DENV infection. We used a mouse-adapted DENV serotype 2 strain that causes a disease that resembles severe dengue in humans. On DENV challenge, splenic and hepatic iNKT cells became activated insofar as CD69 and Fas ligand up-regulation and interferon-γ production. C57BL/6 mice deficient in iNKT cells (Jα18−/−) were more resistant to lethal infection than were wild-type animals, and the phenotype was reversed by adoptive transfer of iNKT cells to Jα18−/− animals. The absence of iNKT cells in Jα18−/− mice was associated with decreased systemic and local inflammatory responses, less liver injury, diminished vascular leak syndrome, and reduced activation of natural killer cells and neutrophils. iNKT cell functions were not necessary for control of primary DENV infection, after either natural endogenous activation or exogenous activation with the canonical iNKT cell agonist α-galactosylceramide. Together, these data reveal a novel and critical role for iNKT cells in the pathogenesis of severe experimental dengue disease. PMID:21843496

  6. Local Production of Interferon Gamma by Invariant Natural Killer T cells Modulates Acute Lyme Carditis

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Chris M.; Bates, Tonya C.; Izadi, Hooman; Radolf, Justin D.; Huber, Sally A.; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Anguita, Juan

    2009-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is the only known human pathogen that directly activates invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. The number and activation kinetics of iNKT cells vary greatly among different strains of mice. We now report the role of the iNKT cell response in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease using C57Bl/6 mice, a strain with optimal iNKT cell activation that is resistant to the development of spirochetal-induced inflammation. During experimental infection of B6 mice with B. burgdorferi, iNKT cells localize to the inflamed heart where they are activated by CD1d-expressing macrophages. Activation of iNKT cells in vivo results in the production of IFNγ, which we demonstrate ameliorates the severity of murine Lyme carditis by at least two mechanisms. First, IFNγ enhances the recognition of B. burgdorferi by macrophages, leading to increased phagocytosis of the spirochete. Secondly, IFNγ activation of macrophages increases the surface expression of CD1d, thereby facilitating further iNKT activation. Collectively, our data demonstrate that in the resistant background, B6, iNKT cells modulate the severity of murine Lyme carditis through the action of IFNγ, which appears to self-renew through a positive feedback loop during infection. PMID:19265151

  7. Diagnostic and Biological Significance of KIR Expression Profile Determined by RNA-Seq in Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Küçük, Can; Hu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Qiang; Jiang, Bei; Cornish, Adam; Gaulard, Philippe; McKeithan, Timothy; Chan, Wing C

    2016-06-01

    Natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) is a rare, aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is generally incurable at more advanced stages with systemic involvement. Clonal diagnostic markers (eg, unique T- or B-cell receptor rearrangements) are not available for NKTCLs. Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptors (KIRs) are a family of type I transmembrane glycoproteins involved in the inhibition or activation of NK cells. A restricted expression profile of KIRs has been proposed as clonal markers of NK-cell proliferations. Here we evaluated the transcription profile of all KIR family genes and C-type lectin receptor genes using RNA sequencing on NKTCL cases (n = 17) and NK-cell lines (n = 3). The expression of all KIRs tended to be markedly reduced or absent in NKTCL, except for the KIR family member killer Ig-like receptor 2DL4 (KIR2DL4; alias CD158D), which was selectively overexpressed in the majority (59%) of cases. No specific expression pattern was observed for C-type lectin receptors. KIR2DL4 is an unusual member of the KIR family that recognizes human leukocyte antigen G and mediates NK-cell activation through inducing proliferation and survival pathways such as AKT and NF-κB. Stable knockdown of KIR2DL4 in two malignant NK-cell lines with high KIR2DL4 expression significantly reduced cell growth. Selective overexpression of KIR2DL4 and down-regulation of inhibitory KIRs may contribute to NKTCL pathogenesis. PMID:27060228

  8. Methylcobalamin: A Potential Vitamin of Pain Killer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Han, Wenjuan; Hu, Sanjue; Xu, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Methylcobalamin (MeCbl), the activated form of vitamin B12, has been used to treat some nutritional diseases and other diseases in clinic, such as Alzheimer's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. As an auxiliary agent, it exerts neuronal protection by promoting regeneration of injured nerves and antagonizing glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Recently several lines of evidence demonstrated that MeCbl may have potential analgesic effects in experimental and clinical studies. For example, MeCbl alleviated pain behaviors in diabetic neuropathy, low back pain and neuralgia. MeCbl improved nerve conduction, promoted the regeneration of injured nerves, and inhibited ectopic spontaneous discharges of injured primary sensory neurons. This review aims to summarize the analgesic effect and mechanisms of MeCbl at the present. PMID:24455309

  9. The Relationship between Vessel Traffic and Noise Levels Received by Killer Whales (Orcinus orca)

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Juliana; Holt, Marla M.; Giles, Deborah A.; Hanson, M. Bradley; Emmons, Candice K.; Hogan, Jeffrey T.; Branch, Trevor A.; VanBlaricom, Glenn R.

    2015-01-01

    Whale watching has become increasingly popular as an ecotourism activity around the globe and is beneficial for environmental education and local economies. Southern Resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) comprise an endangered population that is frequently observed by a large whale watching fleet in the inland waters of Washington state and British Columbia. One of the factors identified as a risk to recovery for the population is the effect of vessels and associated noise. An examination of the effects of vessels and associated noise on whale behavior utilized novel equipment to address limitations of previous studies. Digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs) measured the noise levels the tagged whales received while laser positioning systems allowed collection of geo-referenced data for tagged whales and all vessels within 1000 m of the tagged whale. The objective of the current study was to compare vessel data and DTAG recordings to relate vessel traffic to the ambient noise received by tagged whales. Two analyses were conducted, one including all recording intervals, and one that excluded intervals when only the research vessel was present. For all data, significant predictors of noise levels were length (inverse relationship), number of propellers, and vessel speed, but only 15% of the variation in noise was explained by this model. When research-vessel-only intervals were excluded, vessel speed was the only significant predictor of noise levels, and explained 42% of the variation. Simple linear regressions (ignoring covariates) found that average vessel speed and number of propellers were the only significant correlates with noise levels. We conclude that vessel speed is the most important predictor of noise levels received by whales in this study. Thus, measures that reduce vessel speed in the vicinity of killer whales would reduce noise exposure in this population. PMID:26629916

  10. The relationship between vessel traffic and noise levels received by killer whales (Orcinus orca)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houghton, Juliana; Holt, Marla M.; Giles, Deborah A.; Hanson, M. Bradley; Emmons, Candice K.; Hogan, Jeffrey T.; Branch, Trevor A.; Vanblaricom, Glenn R.

    2015-01-01

    Whale watching has become increasingly popular as an ecotourism activity around the globe and is beneficial for environmental education and local economies. Southern Resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) comprise an endangered population that is frequently observed by a large whale watching fleet in the inland waters of Washington state and British Columbia. One of the factors identified as a risk to recovery for the population is the effect of vessels and associated noise. An examination of the effects of vessels and associated noise on whale behavior utilized novel equipment to address limitations of previous studies. Digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs) measured the noise levels the tagged whales received while laser positioning systems allowed collection of geo-referenced data for tagged whales and all vessels within 1000 m of the tagged whale. The objective of the current study was to compare vessel data and DTAG recordings to relate vessel traffic to the ambient noise received by tagged whales. Two analyses were conducted, one including all recording intervals, and one that excluded intervals when only the research vessel was present. For all data, significant predictors of noise levels were length (inverse relationship), number of propellers, and vessel speed, but only 15% of the variation in noise was explained by this model. When research-vessel-only intervals were excluded, vessel speed was the only significant predictor of noise levels, and explained 42% of the variation. Simple linear regressions (ignoring covariates) found that average vessel speed and number of propellers were the only significant correlates with noise levels. We conclude that vessel speed is the most important predictor of noise levels received by whales in this study. Thus, measures that reduce vessel speed in the vicinity of killer whales would reduce noise exposure in this population.

  11. The Relationship between Vessel Traffic and Noise Levels Received by Killer Whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Houghton, Juliana; Holt, Marla M; Giles, Deborah A; Hanson, M Bradley; Emmons, Candice K; Hogan, Jeffrey T; Branch, Trevor A; VanBlaricom, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Whale watching has become increasingly popular as an ecotourism activity around the globe and is beneficial for environmental education and local economies. Southern Resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) comprise an endangered population that is frequently observed by a large whale watching fleet in the inland waters of Washington state and British Columbia. One of the factors identified as a risk to recovery for the population is the effect of vessels and associated noise. An examination of the effects of vessels and associated noise on whale behavior utilized novel equipment to address limitations of previous studies. Digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs) measured the noise levels the tagged whales received while laser positioning systems allowed collection of geo-referenced data for tagged whales and all vessels within 1000 m of the tagged whale. The objective of the current study was to compare vessel data and DTAG recordings to relate vessel traffic to the ambient noise received by tagged whales. Two analyses were conducted, one including all recording intervals, and one that excluded intervals when only the research vessel was present. For all data, significant predictors of noise levels were length (inverse relationship), number of propellers, and vessel speed, but only 15% of the variation in noise was explained by this model. When research-vessel-only intervals were excluded, vessel speed was the only significant predictor of noise levels, and explained 42% of the variation. Simple linear regressions (ignoring covariates) found that average vessel speed and number of propellers were the only significant correlates with noise levels. We conclude that vessel speed is the most important predictor of noise levels received by whales in this study. Thus, measures that reduce vessel speed in the vicinity of killer whales would reduce noise exposure in this population. PMID:26629916

  12. ALLOGENEIC NATURAL KILLER CELLS FOR REFRACTORY LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J.; McKenna, David H.; Curtsinger, Julie; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Lindgren, Bruce R.; Cooley, Sarah; Weisdorf, Daniel; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    We reported that IL-2 activated autologous NK cells can induce, but not maintain durable remissions in lymphoma patients. We hypothesized that allogeneic NK cells may overcome class I MHC-mediated inhibition of NK cell killing. In a pilot study we evaluated infusion of haploidentical donor NK cells for anti-tumor efficacy. Six patients with advanced B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) received rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and fludarabine as immunosupression to permit homeostatic NK cell expansion, followed by CD3-depleted NK cell enriched cell products followed by subcutaneous IL-2 administration (10×106 units every other day × 6 doses). At 2 months, four patients showed an objective clinical response. We observed early donor cell persistence in 2 patients (blood and in tumor-bearing node), but this was not detectable beyond 7 days. All patients demonstrated substantial increases in host regulatory T cells (Treg) after NK cell and IL-2 therapy (180±80 cells/μl vs baseline: 58±24 cells/μl, p=0.04) which may have limited donor cell expansion in vivo. These findings suggest safety and feasibility of allogeneic NK cell therapy in patients with lymphoma; however host Treg and inadequate immunodepletion may contribute to a hostile milieu for NK cell survival and expansion. Cell therapy trials should incorporate novel strategies to limit Treg expansion. PMID:20680271

  13. Cord Blood as a Source of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohtesh S.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) offers several unique advantages as a graft source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of relapse and graft vs. host disease after cord blood transplantation (CBT) is lower than what is typically observed after other graft sources with a similar degree of human leukocyte antigen mismatch. Natural killer (NK) cells have a well-defined role in both innate and adaptive immunity and as the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and CBT, and they play a significant role in protection against early relapse. In this article, we highlight the uses of CB NK cells in transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. First, we will describe differences in the phenotype and functional characteristics of NK cells in CB as compared with peripheral blood. Then, we will review some of the obstacles we face in using resting CB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy, and discuss methods to overcome them. We will review the current literature on killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors ligand mismatch and outcomes after CBT. Finally, we will touch on current strategies for the use of CB NK cells in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26779484

  14. Cord Blood as a Source of Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) offers several unique advantages as a graft source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of relapse and graft vs. host disease after cord blood transplantation (CBT) is lower than what is typically observed after other graft sources with a similar degree of human leukocyte antigen mismatch. Natural killer (NK) cells have a well-defined role in both innate and adaptive immunity and as the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and CBT, and they play a significant role in protection against early relapse. In this article, we highlight the uses of CB NK cells in transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. First, we will describe differences in the phenotype and functional characteristics of NK cells in CB as compared with peripheral blood. Then, we will review some of the obstacles we face in using resting CB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy, and discuss methods to overcome them. We will review the current literature on killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors ligand mismatch and outcomes after CBT. Finally, we will touch on current strategies for the use of CB NK cells in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26779484

  15. Energy Security: From Deal Killers to Game Changers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Charlie

    2010-03-01

    Five energy security ``deal killers" are identified: 1) Global warming and CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion; 2) Intermittent energy sources (wind, solar) and the presence and stability of the grid; 3) Penetration of plant defenses to produce transportation fuels from biomass; 4) Mimicking nature: artificial photosynthesis for solar energy to fuels; and 5) Spent fuel from nuclear power reactors. Transformational basic research is required to successfully change the ground rules, to transform these ``deal killers" into ``game changers." T hey are: 1) Offsetting carbon capture and storage costs through enhanced oil recovery and methane generation from high temperature geothermal saline aquifers; 2) Electrical energy storage, through batteries and super-capacitors; 3) Genetic modification of plant cell walls, and catalytic methods for transforming plant sugars into fuels; 4) Separation of solar-induced electrons from holes, and catalysis to produce fuels; and 5) Closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Basic research can revolutionize our approach to carbon-free energy by enhancing nature to achieve energy security.

  16. Echolocation signals of foraging killer whales (Orcinus orca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Whitlow W. L.; Ford, John K. B.; Allman, Kelly A.

    2002-05-01

    Fish eating resident killer whales that frequent the coastal waters of Vancouver Island, Canada have a strong preference for chinook salmon. The whales in Johnston Strait often forage along the steep cliffs that extend into the water, echolocating their prey. Echolocation signals were measured with a four hydrophone symmetrical star array and the signals were simultaneous digitized at a sample rate of 500 kHz using a lunch-box PC. A portable VCR recorded the images from an underwater camera located close to the array center. Only signals emanated from close to the beam axis (1185 total) were chosen for a detailed analysis. Killer whales project very broad band echolocation signals (Q 1.3 to 1.5) that tend to have a bimodal frequency structure. Ninety seven percent of the signals had center frequencies between 45 and 80 kHz with a band-width between 35 and 50 kHz. The peak-to-peak source level of the echolocation signal decreased as a function of the one way transmission loss to the array. Source levels varied between 200 and 225 dB re 1 μPa. Using a model of target strength for chinook salmons, the echo levels from the echolocation signals are estimated for different ranges between whale and salmon.

  17. Stable isotopes of captive cetaceans (killer whales and bottlenose dolphins).

    PubMed

    Caut, Stéphane; Laran, Sophie; Garcia-Hartmann, Emmanuel; Das, Krishna

    2011-02-15

    There is currently a great deal of interest in using stable isotope methods to investigate diet, trophic level and migration in wild cetaceans. In order to correctly interpret the results stemming from these methods, it is crucial to understand how diet isotopic values are reflected in consumer tissues. In this study, we investigated patterns of isotopic discrimination between diet and blood constituents of two species of cetaceans (killer whale, Orcinus orca, and bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus) fed controlled diets over 308 and 312 days, respectively. Diet discrimination factors (Δ; mean ± s.d.) for plasma were estimated to Δ(13)C=2.3±0.6‰ and Δ(15)N=1.8±0.3‰, respectively, for both species and to Δ(13)C=2.7±0.3‰ and Δ(15)N=0.5±0.1‰ for red blood cells. Delipidation did not have a significant effect on carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of blood constituents, confirming that cetacean blood does not serve as a reservoir of lipids. In contrast, carbon isotopic values were higher in delipidated samples of blubber, liver and muscle from killer whales. The potential for conflict between fisheries and cetaceans has heightened the need for trophic information about these taxa. These results provide the first published stable isotope incorporation data for cetaceans, which are essential if conclusions are to be drawn on issues concerning trophic structures, carbon sources and diet reconstruction. PMID:21270301

  18. [The changes of the function of lymphocytes natural killers in schizophrenics].

    PubMed

    Vasil'eva, E F; Kushner, S G; Abramova, L I; Kaleda, V G; Tsutsul'kovskaia, M Iu

    2002-01-01

    Cytotoxic activity and lymphocyte natural killers (NK) number as well as gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN) production were studied in patients with paranoid (22 patients) and progressive attack-like (39 patients) schizophrenia (47 male and 14 female patients aged 16-62 years). Compared to controls, a decrease of NK activity and a trend towards gamma-IFN production decrease were found. In the patients, NK lymphocytes number was not changed. Cytotoxic activity was reduced only in the male patients, a frequency of cases with lower activity level being the highest in those with more severe form of paranoid schizophrenia. A significant difference of both indices was detected between men and women. In the men, the longer was the disease duration, the higher was cytotoxic activity and lymphocyte number increase. It was shown in vitro that monocytes are not involved in mechanisms changing the level of lymphocyte cytotoxicity in the patients and immune modulator enkad stimulats cytotoxic activity in the male patients. PMID:12233256

  19. The lytic potential of human liver NK cells is restricted by their limited expression of inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Burt, Bryan M; Plitas, George; Zhao, Zeguo; Bamboat, Zubin M; Nguyen, Hoang M; Dupont, Bo; DeMatteo, Ronald P

    2009-08-01

    The human liver is enriched in NK cells which are potent effectors of the innate immune system. We have determined that liver NK cells freshly isolated from surgical specimens from patients with hepatic malignancy have less cytolytic activity than autologous blood NK cells. This difference was due to a higher proportion of CD16(-) NK cells in the liver and reduced cytotoxicity by CD16(+) liver NK cells compared with their blood counterparts. CD16(+) liver NK cells had similar expression of activating NK receptors and had similar intracellular granzyme B and perforin content compared with CD16(+) blood NK cells. CD16(+) liver NK cells contained a reduced fraction of cells with inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors specific for self-MHC class I (self-killer Ig-related receptor (KIR)) and an increased fraction of self-KIR(neg)NKG2A(pos) and self-KIR(neg)NKG2A(neg) cells. Using single-cell analysis of intracellular IFN-gamma production and cytotoxicity assays, we determined that CD16(+) liver NK cells expressing self-KIR were more responsive to target cells than those cells that did not express self-KIR molecules. CD16(+) liver NK cells gained cytolytic function when stimulated with IL-2 or cultured with LPS or poly(I:C)-activated autologous liver Kupffer cells. Thus, the human liver contains NK cell subsets which have reduced effector function, but under appropriate inflammatory conditions become potent killers. PMID:19587011

  20. Low-frequency signals produced by Northeast Atlantic killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Samarra, Filipa I P; Deecke, Volker B; Miller, Patrick J O

    2016-03-01

    Killer whale acoustic behavior has been extensively investigated; however, most studies have focused on pulsed calls and whistles. This study reports the production of low-frequency signals by killer whales at frequencies below 300 Hz. Recordings were made in Iceland and Norway when killer whales were observed feeding on herring and no other marine mammal species were nearby. Low-frequency sounds were identified in Iceland and ranged in duration between 0.14 and 2.77 s and in frequency between 50 and 270 Hz, well below the previously reported lower limit for killer whale tonal sounds of 500 Hz. Low-frequency sounds appeared to be produced close in time to tail slaps, which are indicative of feeding attempts, suggesting that these sounds may be related to a feeding context. However, their precise function is unknown, and they could be the by-product of a non-vocal behavior rather than a vocal signal deliberately produced by the whales. Although killer whales in Norway exhibit similar feeding behavior, this sound has not been detected in recordings from Norway to date. This study suggests that, like other delphinids, killer whales produce low-frequency sounds, but further studies will be required to understand whether similar sounds exist in other killer whale populations. PMID:27036251

  1. Effects of new Torulaspora delbrueckii killer yeasts on the must fermentation kinetics and aroma compounds of white table wine

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Rocío; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, María L.; Hernández, Luis M.; Ramírez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Torulaspora delbrueckii is becoming widely recommended for improving some specific characteristics of wines. However, its impact on wine quality is still far from satisfactory at the winery level, mostly because it is easily replaced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae-like yeasts during must fermentation. New T. delbrueckii killer strains were here isolated and selected for winemaking. They killed S. cerevisiae yeasts and were able to dominate and complete the fermentation of sterile grape must. Sequential yeast inoculation of non-sterile white must with T. delbrueckii followed by S. cerevisiae did not ensure T. delbrueckii dominance or wine quality improvement. Only a single initial must inoculation at high cell concentrations allowed the T. delbrueckii killer strains to dominate and complete the must fermentation to reach above 11% ethanol, but not the non-killer strains. None of the wines underwent malolactic fermentation as long as the must had low turbidity and pH. Although no statistically significant differences were found in the wine quality score, the S. cerevisiae-dominated wines were preferred over the T. delbrueckii-dominated ones because the former had high-intensity fresh fruit aromas while the latter had lower intensity, but nevertheless nice and unusual dried fruit/pastry aromas. Except for ethyl propanoate and 3-ethoxy-1-propanol, which were more abundant in the T. delbrueckii–dominated wines, most of the compounds with fresh fruit odor descriptors, including those with the greatest odor activity values (isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl octanoate), were more abundant in the S. cerevisiae–dominated wines. The low relative concentrations of these fruity compounds made it possible to detect in the T. delbrueckii–dominated wines the low-relative-concentration compounds with dried fruit and pastry odors. An example was γ-ethoxy-butyrolactone which was significantly more abundant in these wines than in those dominated by S. cerevisiae. PMID

  2. [Nasal type natural killer/T cell lymphoma: case series and literature review].

    PubMed

    Düzlü, Mehmet; Ant, Ayça; Tutar, Hakan; Karamert, Recep; Şahin, Melih; Sayar, Erolcan; Cesur, Nesibe

    2016-01-01

    Nasal type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma is a rare type of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma which originates from nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Exact diagnosis of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, which is a rapidly progressive clinical condition, may be established by immunohistochemical analysis on biopsy material after clinical suspicion. In this article, we report four cases of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma who were followed-up in our clinic and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the disease in light of the literature data. PMID:27405082

  3. Speaking up: Killer whales (Orcinus orca) increase their call amplitude in response to vessel noise.

    PubMed

    Holt, Marla M; Noren, Dawn P; Veirs, Val; Emmons, Candice K; Veirs, Scott

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of anthropogenic sound exposure on the vocal behavior of free-ranging killer whales. Endangered Southern Resident killer whales inhabit areas including the urban coastal waters of Puget Sound near Seattle, WA, where anthropogenic sounds are ubiquitous, particularly those from motorized vessels. A calibrated recording system was used to measure killer whale call source levels and background noise levels (1-40 kHz). Results show that whales increased their call amplitude by 1 dB for every 1 dB increase in background noise levels. Furthermore, nearby vessel counts were positively correlated with these observed background noise levels. PMID:19173379

  4. Paternal HLA-C and Maternal Killer-Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Genotypes in the Development of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Gamliel, Moriya; Anderson, Karen L.; Ebstein, Richard P.; Yirmiya, Nurit; Mankuta, David

    2016-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin