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Sample records for activated kupffer cells

  1. Kupffer cell activation after no-flow ischemia versus hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; Farhood, Anwar

    2002-07-15

    Kupffer cell-derived oxidant stress is critical for reperfusion injury after no-flow ischemia. However, the importance of Kupffer cells as source of reactive oxygen formation is unclear in a hemorrhagic shock model. Therefore, we evaluated Kupffer cell activation after 60 or 120 min of hemorrhage and 90 min of resuscitation (HS/RS) in pentobarbital-anesthetized male Fischer rats. Plasma glutathione disulfide (GSSG) as indicator for a vascular oxidant stress showed no significant changes after HS/RS. Plasma ALT activities were only moderately increased (100-200 U/L). Kupffer cells isolated from postischemic livers did not generate more superoxide than cells from sham controls. In contrast, the 10-fold increase of plasma GSSG and the 9-fold higher spontaneous superoxide formation of Kupffer cells after 60 min of hepatic no-flow ischemia followed by 90 min of reperfusion demonstrated the activation of Kupffer cells in this experimental model. Plasma ALT activities (1930 +/- 240 U/L) indicated severe liver injury. These results demonstrate a fundamental difference in the degree of Kupffer cell activation between the two models of warm hepatic ischemia. Our findings suggest that different therapeutic strategies are necessary to ameliorate the initial injury after low flow ischemia (hemorrhage) compared to cold (transplantation) or warm (Pringle maneuver) no-flow ischemia. PMID:12106817

  2. PEGylated IL-10 Activates Kupffer Cells to Control Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ivan H.; Van Hoof, Dennis; Abramova, Marina; Bilardello, Melissa; Mar, Elliot; Jorgensen, Brett; McCauley, Scott; Bal, Harminder; Oft, Martin; Van Vlasselaer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a multifunctional cytokine that exerts potent context specific immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive effects. We have investigated the mechanism by which PEGylated rIL-10 regulates plasma cholesterol in mice and humans. In agreement with previous work on rIL-10, we report that PEGylated rIL-10 harnesses the myeloid immune system to control total plasma cholesterol levels. We have discovered that PEG-rMuIL-10’s dramatic lowering of plasma cholesterol is dependent on phagocytotic cells. In particular, PEG-rHuIL-10 enhances cholesterol uptake by Kupffer cells. In addition, removal of phagocytotic cells dramatically increases plasma cholesterol levels, suggesting for the first time that immunological cells are implicitly involved in regulating total cholesterol levels. These data suggest that treatment with PEG-rIL-10 potentiates endogenous cholesterol regulating cell populations not currently targeted by standard of care therapeutics. Furthermore, we show that IL-10’s increase of Kupffer cell cholesterol phagocytosis is concomitant with decreases in liver cholesterol and triglycerides. This leads to the reversal of early periportal liver fibrosis and facilitates the restoration of liver health. These data recommend PEG-rIL-10 for evaluation in the treatment of fatty liver disease and preventing its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In direct confirmation of our in vivo findings in the treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice with PEG-rMuIL-10, we report that treatment of hypercholesterolemic cancer patients with PEG-rHuIL-10 lowers total plasma cholesterol by up to 50%. Taken together these data suggest that PEG-rIL-10’s cholesterol regulating biology is consistent between mice and humans. PMID:27299860

  3. Colloidal carbon stimulation of Kupffer cells triggers Nrf2 activation in the isolated perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Bárbara; Vargas, Romina; Castillo, Iván; Videla, Luis A

    2012-06-01

    Activation of transcription factor Nrf2 was investigated in the isolated perfused rat liver infused with 0.5 mg of colloidal carbon (CC)/ml for 5-15 min to stimulated Kupffer cell function. Infusion of CC enhanced liver O(2) consumption over basal levels, with a time-dependent increase in CC-induced O(2) uptake, at constant rates of CC phagocytosis by Kupffer cells, as assessed histologically, and adequate viability conditions of the livers, as shown by the marginal (0.34 %) total sinusoidal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) efflux over intrahepatic LDH activity. Under these conditions, cytosolic protein levels of Nrf2 (Western blot) and inhibitor of Nrf2 Keap1 progressively declined by CC infusion, those of nuclear Nrf2 increased, leading to enhancement in the nuclear/cytosolic Nrf2 ratios. It is concluded that the respiratory burst of CC-stimulated Kupffer cells triggers Nrf2 activation in the perfused liver, a response that may afford cellular protection under pro-oxidant conditions underlying Kupffer cell stimulation. PMID:22461194

  4. Cross-Activating Invariant NKT Cells and Kupffer Cells Suppress Cholestatic Liver Injury in a Mouse Model of Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Duwaerts, Caroline C.; Sun, Eric P.; Cheng, Chao-Wen; van Rooijen, Nico; Gregory, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL) in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry), mRNA expression (qtPCR), nitric oxide (NO.) production (Griess reaction), and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs) were determined. To address the potential role of NO. in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO., and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury. PMID:24260285

  5. Cross-activating invariant NKT cells and kupffer cells suppress cholestatic liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Duwaerts, Caroline C; Sun, Eric P; Cheng, Chao-Wen; van Rooijen, Nico; Gregory, Stephen H

    2013-01-01

    Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL) in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry), mRNA expression (qtPCR), nitric oxide (NO (.) ) production (Griess reaction), and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs) were determined. To address the potential role of NO (.) in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO (.) , and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury. PMID:24260285

  6. Pathogenesis of Kupffer Cells in Cholestatic Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keisaku; Hall, Chad; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2016-09-01

    Kupffer cells are the resident macrophages in the liver. They are located in hepatic sinusoid, which allows them to remove foreign materials, pathogens, and apoptotic cells efficiently. Activated Kupffer cells secrete various mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, to initiate immune responses, inflammation, or recruitment of other liver cells. Bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery in rodents is often studied as an animal model of cholestatic liver disease, characterized by obstruction of bile flow. BDL mice show altered functional activities of Kupffer cells compared with sham-operated mice, including elevated cytokine secretion and impaired bacterial clearance. Various mediators produced by other liver cells can regulate Kupffer cell activation, which suggest that Kupffer cells orchestrate with other liver cells to relay inflammatory signals and to maintain liver homeostasis during BDL-induced liver injury. Blocking or depletion of Kupffer cells, an approach for the treatment of liver diseases, has shown controversial implications. Procedures in Kupffer cell research have limitations and may produce various results in Kupffer cell research. It is important, however, to reveal underlying mechanisms of activation and functions of Kupffer cells, followed by hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. This review summarizes present Kupffer cell studies in cholestatic liver injury. PMID:27452297

  7. Toll Like Receptor 4 Dependent Kupffer Cell Activation and Liver Injury in a Novel Mouse Model of Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    El Kasmi, Karim C.; Anderson, Aimee L.; Devereaux, Michael W.; Fillon, Sophie A.; Harris, J. Kirk; Lovell, Mark A.; Finegold, Milton J.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with intestinal failure who are parenteral nutrition (PN)-dependent may develop cholestatic liver injury and cirrhosis (PN-associated liver injury: PNALI). The pathogenesis of PNALI remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that intestinal injury with increased intestinal permeability combined with administration of PN promotes LPS-TLR4 signaling dependent Kupffer cell activation as an early event in the pathogenesis of PNALI. We developed a mouse model in which intestinal injury and increased permeability were induced by oral treatment for 4 days with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) followed by continuous infusion of soy lipid-based PN solution through a central venous catheter for 7 (PN/DSS7d) and 28 (PN/DSS28d) days. Liver injury and cholestasis were evaluated by serum AST, ALT, bile acids, total bilirubin, and by histology. Purified Kupffer cells were probed for transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PN/DSS7d mice showed elevated portal vein LPS levels, evidence of hepatocyte injury and cholestasis, and increased Kupffer cell expression of IL6, TNFα, and TGFβ. Serological markers of liver injury remained elevated in PN/DSS28d mice associated with focal inflammation, hepatocyte apoptosis, peliosis, and Kupffer cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. PN infusion without DSS pre-treatment or DSS pre-treatment alone did not result in liver injury or Kupffer cell activation. Suppression of the intestinal microbiota with broad spectrum antibiotics or ablation of TLR4 signaling in TLR4 mutant mice resulted in significantly reduced Kupffer cell activation and markedly attenuated liver injury in PN/DSS7d mice. Conclusion These data suggest that intestinal-derived LPS activates Kupffer cells through TLR4 signaling in early stages of PNALI. PMID:22120983

  8. Activation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes in Kupffer cells in hepatic ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Yeon; Kim, Seok-Joo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasome activation by danger signals in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is responsible for the sterile inflammatory response. Signals triggering formation and activation of the inflammasome involve the generation of oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to examine the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation and the involvement of reactive oxygen species in hepatic I/R. I/R induced the formation of nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat containing family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) and absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasomes and the subsequent serum release of interleukin 1β. Pannexin-1 inhibitor and anti-cathepsin B antibody attenuated I/R-induced inflammasome activation and hepatic injury. The expression of the thioredoxin-interacting protein gene and the interaction between NLRP3 and the thioredoxin-interacting protein increased after I/R. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine significantly attenuated protein conversion of interleukin 1β after hepatic I/R. Moreover, pannexin-1 protein expression and cathepsin B release were strongly attenuated by N-acetylcysteine. The depletion of Kupffer cells with gadolinium chloride markedly decreased NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome expression and activation of their signaling pathways, and also reduced the level of caspase-1 protein in F4/80-positive cells. Our findings suggest that reactive-oxygen-species-mediated activation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes leads to I/R-induced inflammatory responses in which Kupffer cells play a crucial role. PMID:25327779

  9. The activation of Epimedium polysaccharide-propolis flavone liposome on Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yunpeng; Ren, Meimei; Hou, Weifeng; Guo, Chao; Tong, Dewen; Ma, Lin; Zhang, Weimin; He, Mengmeng; Song, Xiaoping

    2015-11-20

    Epimedium polysaccharide-propolis flavone liposome (EPL), a potent immunological pharmaceutical preparation, was investigated for the immunomodulatory activity on Kupffer cells (KCs) in vitro. The results showed that EPL could significantly induce the secretion of chemokines (RANTES and MCP-1), promote the production of nitric oxide and induced nitric oxide synthase, improve the pinocytic and phagocytic activity of KCs, promote the mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-1β, and enhance the expression of costimulatory molecules (CD11b and CD68) in KCs compared with Epimedium polysaccharide-propolis flavone (EP) at 30-7.5μg/mL. In addition, the abilities of KCs on stimulating lymphocytes proliferation and antigen presenting were significantly enhanced after stimulated with EPL compared with EP. These results suggested that EPL could activate KCs and possessed the stronger immunomodulatory effect, which provided the theoretical basis for further studying the mechanism of EPL on improving the immune response. PMID:26344320

  10. Histones activate the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Kupffer Cells during Sterile Inflammatory Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai; Chen, Hui-Wei; Evankovich, John; Yan, Wei; Rosborough, Brian R.; Nace, Gary W.; Ding, Qing; Loughran, Patricia; Beer-Stolz, Donna; Billiar, Timothy R.; Esmon, Charles T.; Tsung, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Cellular processes that drive sterile inflammatory injury after hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are not completely understood. Activation of the inflammasome plays a key role in response to invading intracellular pathogens, but mounting evidence suggests it also plays a role in inflammation driven by endogenous danger-associate molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules released after ischemic injury. The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is one such process, and the mechanism by which its activation results in damage and inflammatory responses following liver I/R is unknown. Here we report that both NLRP3 and its downstream target Caspase-1 are activated I/R and are essential for hepatic I/R injury as both NLRP3 and Caspase-1 KO mice are protected from injury. Furthermore, inflammasome-mediated injury is dependent on Caspase-1 expression in liver non-parenchymal cells. While upstream signals that activate the inflammasome during ischemic injury are not well characterized, we show that endogenous extracellular histones activate the NLRP3 inflammasome during liver I/R through Toll-like Receptor-9 (TLR9). This occurs through TLR9-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species. This mechanism is operant in resident liver Kupffer cells, which drive innate immune responses after I/R injury by recruiting additional cell types, including neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. These novel findings illustrate a new mechanism by which extracellular histones and activation of NLRP3 inflammasome contribute to liver damage and activation of innate immunity during sterile inflammation. PMID:23904166

  11. Kupffer cells and activation of endothelial TLR4 coordinate neutrophil adhesion within liver sinusoids during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Braedon; Jenne, Craig N; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Kubes, Paul

    2013-12-01

    A key pathological feature of the systemic inflammatory response of sepsis/endotoxemia is the accumulation of neutrophils within the microvasculature of organs such as the liver, where they cause tissue damage and vascular dysfunction. There is emerging evidence that the vascular endothelium is critical to the orchestration of inflammatory responses to blood-borne microbes and microbial products in sepsis/endotoxemia. In this study, we aimed to understand the role of endothelium, and specifically endothelial TLR4 activation, in the regulation of neutrophil recruitment to the liver during endotoxemia. Intravital microscopy of bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that TLR4 expression by non-bone marrow-derived cells was required for neutrophil recruitment to the liver during endotoxemia. Furthermore, LPS-induced neutrophil adhesion in liver sinusoids was equivalent between wild-type mice and transgenic mice that express TLR4 only on endothelium (tlr4(-/-)Tie2(tlr4)), revealing that activation of endothelial TLR4 alone was sufficient to initiate neutrophil adhesion. Neutrophil arrest within sinusoids of endotoxemic mice requires adhesive interactions between neutrophil CD44 and endothelial hyaluronan. Intravital immunofluorescence imaging demonstrated that stimulation of endothelial TLR4 alone was sufficient to induce the deposition of serum-derived hyaluronan-associated protein (SHAP) within sinusoids, which was required for CD44/hyaluronan-dependent neutrophil adhesion. In addition to endothelial TLR4 activation, Kupffer cells contribute to neutrophil recruitment via a distinct CD44/HA/SHAP-independent mechanism. This study sheds new light on the control of innate immune activation within the liver vasculature during endotoxemia, revealing a key role for endothelial cells as sentinels in the detection of intravascular infections and coordination of neutrophil recruitment to the liver. PMID:24113769

  12. Central Insulin Action Activates Kupffer Cells by Suppressing Hepatic Vagal Activation via the Nicotinic Alpha 7 Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kumi; Tanida, Mamoru; Nagata, Naoto; Inaba, Yuka; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Kido, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Toshinai, Koji; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kasuga, Masato; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    Central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling, which suppresses the gene expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. The vagus nerve plays an important role in this centrally mediated hepatic response; however, the precise mechanism underlying this brain-liver interaction is unclear. Here, we present our findings that the vagus nerve suppresses hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling via α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAchR) on Kupffer cells, and that central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling by suppressing vagal activity. Indeed, central insulin-mediated hepatic IL-6/STAT3 activation and gluconeogenic gene suppression were impeded in mice with hepatic vagotomy, pharmacological cholinergic blockade, or α7-nAchR deficiency. In high-fat diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant mice, control of the vagus nerve by central insulin action was disturbed, inducing a persistent increase of inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that dysregulation of the α7-nAchR-mediated control of Kupffer cells by central insulin action may affect the pathogenesis of chronic hepatic inflammation in obesity. PMID:26947072

  13. TREM2 governs Kupffer cell activation and explains belr1 genetic resistance to malaria liver stage infection

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Lígia Antunes; Rodrigues-Duarte, Lurdes; Rodo, Joana; Vieira de Moraes, Luciana; Marques, Isabel; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium liver stage infection is a target of interest for the treatment of and vaccination against malaria. Here we used forward genetics to search for mechanisms underlying natural host resistance to infection and identified triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) and MHC class II molecules as determinants of Plasmodium berghei liver stage infection in mice. Locus belr1 confers resistance to malaria liver stage infection. The use of newly derived subcongenic mouse lines allowed to map belr1 to a 4-Mb interval on mouse chromosome 17 that contains the Trem2 gene. We show that Trem2 expression in the nonparenchymal liver cells closely correlates with resistance to liver stage infection, implicating TREM2 as a mediator of the belr1 genetic effect. Trem2-deficient mice are more susceptible to liver stage infection than their WT counterparts. We found that Kupffer cells are the principle cells expressing TREM2 in the liver, and that Trem2−/− Kupffer cells display altered functional activation on exposure to P. berghei sporozoites. TREM2 expression in Kupffer cells contributes to the limitation of parasite expansion in isolated hepatocytes in vitro, potentially explaining the increased susceptibility of Trem2−/− mice to liver stage infection. The MHC locus was also found to control liver parasite burden, possibly owing to the expression of MHC class II molecules in hepatocytes. Our findings implicate unexpected Kupffer–hepatocyte cross-talk in the control Plasmodium liver stage infection and demonstrate that TREM2 is involved in host responses against the malaria parasite. PMID:24218563

  14. Vanillin suppresses Kupffer cell-related colloidal carbon-induced respiratory burst activity in isolated perfused rat liver: anti-inflammatory implications.

    PubMed

    Galgani, José E; Núñez, Bárbara; Videla, Luis A

    2012-12-01

    The inhibition of NADPH oxidase has become a potential therapeutic target for oxidative stress-related diseases. We investigated whether vanillin modifies hepatic O(2) consumption associated with Kupffer cell functioning. The influence of vanillin on Kupffer cell functioning was studied in isolated perfused rat liver by colloidal carbon (CC) infusion (0.5 mg ml(-1)), concomitantly with sinusoidal efflux of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as an organ viability parameter. CC infusion increased the rate of O(2) consumption of the liver above basal values, an effect that represents the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells. However, CC-dependent respiratory burst activity was suppressed by previous infusion of 2 mM vanillin. Vanillin did not affect the liver CC uptake rate and liver sinusoidal efflux of LDH efflux. These findings, elicited by vanillin, were reproduced by the well-established NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. In conclusion, vanillin suppresses the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells as assessed in intact liver, which may be associated with the inhibition of macrophage NADPH oxidase activity. Such a finding may have relevance in conditions underlying Kupffer cell-dependent up-regulation of the expression and release of pro-inflammatory mediators by redox-dependent mechanisms. PMID:23007174

  15. Kupffer Cell Activation by Ambient Air Particulate Matter Exposure May Exacerbate Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui-Hui; Fiel, M. Isabel; Sun, Qinghua; Guo, Jinsheng; Gordon, Ronald E.; Chen, Lung-Chi; Friedman, Scott L.; Odin, Joseph A.; Allina, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Due to increased obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most prevalent liver disease in the United States. NAFLD is considered a component of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of disorders that also includes diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, arteriosclerosis, and hypertension. Exposure to ambient air particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters < 2.5 µm (PM2.5) is a risk factor for arteriosclerosis as well as lung disease, but its effect on NAFLD is unknown. PM2.5 induces pulmonary dysfunction via toll-like receptor activation on alveolar macrophages. Toll-like receptor activation of Kupffer cells, resident hepatic macrophages, and subsequent pro-inflammatory cytokine production have been shown to play a key role in NAFLD progression. We hypothesized that PM2.5 exposure is a significant risk factor for progression of NAFLD. Thus, following exposure of male C57BL/6 mice fed high fat chow to concentrated air particulate matter (CAPs) or filtered air for 6 wk, progression of NAFLD was evaluated by standardized histological assessment of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. In mice fed high fat chow, the hepatic inflammatory grade (3.00 ± 0.00 vs. 1.50 ± 0.71, p < 0.001) and fibrosis stage (1.00 ± 0.00 vs. 0.60 ± 0.52, p = 0.023) were both significantly higher in mice exposed to CAPs versus filtered air, respectively. Increased numbers of Kupffer cells contained PM in CAPs-exposed mice (2.00 ± 0.94 vs. 0.20 ± 0.42, respectively, p < 0.001). PM exposure increased IL-6 secretion up to seven fold in a dose-dependent manner by isolated wild-type but not TLR4−/− Kupffer cells (p < 0.050). Conclusion: Ambient PM2.5 exposure may be a significant risk factor for NAFLD progression. PMID:19908945

  16. Activation of Kupffer Cells Is Associated with a Specific Dysbiosis Induced by Fructose or High Fat Diet in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferrere, Gladys; Leroux, Anne; Wrzosek, Laura; Puchois, Virginie; Gaudin, Françoise; Ciocan, Dragos; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Naveau, Sylvie; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Cassard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The increase consumption of fructose in diet is associated with liver inflammation. As a specific fructan substrate, fructose may modify the gut microbiota which is involved in obesity-induced liver disease. Here, we aimed to assess whether fructose-induced liver damage was associated with a specific dysbiosis, especially in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). To this end, four groups of mice were fed with normal and HFD added or not with fructose. Body weight and glucose sensitivity, liver inflammation, dysbiosis and the phenotype of Kupffer cells were determined after 16 weeks of diet. Food intake was increased in the two groups of mice fed with the HFD. Mice fed with HFD and fructose showed a higher infiltration of lymphocytes into the liver and a lower inflammatory profile of Kupffer cells than mice fed with the HFD without fructose. The dysbiosis associated with diets showed that fructose specifically prevented the decrease of Mouse intestinal bacteria in HFD fed mice and increased Erysipelotrichi in mice fed with fructose, independently of the amount of fat. In conclusion, fructose, used as a sweetener, induced a dysbiosis which is different in presence of fat in the diet. Consequently, the activation of Kupffer cells involved in mice model of HFD-induced liver inflammation was not observed in an HFD/fructose combined diet. These data highlight that the complexity of diet composition could highly impact the development of liver lesions during obesity. Specific dysbiosis associated with the diet could explain that the progressions of liver damage are different. PMID:26731543

  17. Non-Canonical Wnt Predominates in Activated Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells, Influencing HSC Survival and Paracrine Stimulation of Kupffer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Laura; Mann, Jelena; Mann, Derek A.

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt system is highly complex and is comprised of canonical and non-canonical pathways leading to the activation of gene expression. Our aim was to examine changes in the expression of Wnt ligands and regulators during hepatic stellate cell (HSC) transdifferentiation and assess the relative contributions of the canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathways in fibrogenic activated HSC. The expression profile of Wnt ligands and regulators in HSC was not supportive for a major role for β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signalling, this verified by inability to induce Topflash reporter activity in HSC even when expressing a constitutive active β-catenin. We detected expression of Wnt5a in activated HSC which can signal via non-canonical mechanisms and showed evidence for non-canonical signalling in these cells involving phosphorylation of Dvl2 and pJNK. Stimulation of HSC or Kupffer cells with Wnt5a regulated HSC apoptosis and expression of TGF-β1 and MCP1 respectively. We were unable to confirm a role for β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt in HSC and instead propose autocrine and paracrine functions for Wnts expressed by activated HSC via non-canonical pathways. The data warrant detailed investigation of Wnt5a in liver fibrosis. PMID:26566235

  18. Biphasic control of polymorphonuclear cell migration by Kupffer cells. Effect of exposure to metabolic products of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Fainsilber, Z.; Feinman, L.; Shaw, S.; Lieber, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of the Kupffer cells in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction seen in alcoholic hepatitis, rat liver Kupffer cells were cultured and exposed to products of ethanol metabolism. The resultant supernatants were tested to study their ability to stimulate or inhibit polymorphonuclear cell chemotaxis. Kupffer cells produced increased chemokinetic activity for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes; when incubated with soluble products of microsomal peroxidation, the Kupffer cells engendered more chemokinetic activity than that produced by untreated Kupffer cells. When Kupffer cells were incubated with acetaldehyde, the chemokinetic activity that appeared in the supernatant did not differ from control. Chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear cells was not observed when the Kupffer cell supernatants were tested by checkerboard analysis.

  19. Kupffer cell structure in the juvenile Nile crocodile, Crocodylus niloticus.

    PubMed

    van Wilpe, Erna; Groenewald, Hermanus Bernardus

    2014-01-01

    The morphology of Kupffer cells was examined in the liver of the juvenile Nile crocodile using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Pleomorphic Kupffer cells were located in the sinusoids, in the space of Disse, in the hepatic parenchyma and often connected adjacent sinusoids. The cell surfaces were irregular due to the presence of filopodia and lamelliapodia with phagocytosis of white blood cells, red blood cells and thrombocytes being evident. The cells were in close contact with endothelial cells and pit cells in the sinusoidal lumen and with stellate cells in the space of Disse. The cytoplasm contained large phagosomes comprising a combination of ceroid pigment, melanosomes and siderosomes. The nuclei were often indented and eccentrically placed due to the presence of the phagosomes. Conspicuous clusters of membrane-bound tubular organelles with a filamentous or crystalline interior were observed in the cytoplasm. The clusters were sometimes separated into smaller groups around phagosomes. A clear zone existed between the limiting membrane and the interior of these tubular organelles with the electron-dense interior profiles being, respectively, circular, angular or divided. The tubular organelles have not previously been described in Kupffer cells and possibly represent lysosomes with specialized functions. Mitochondria, microtubules, Golgi profiles, granular and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and a few cytoplasmic lipid droplets were also present. The presence of the tubular organelles and the occurrence of the Kupffer cells in different locations in the liver of the juvenile Nile crocodile are indicative of particularly active and mobile cells. PMID:24142864

  20. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Suraweera, Duminda B; Weeratunga, Ashley N; Hu, Robert W; Pandol, Stephen J; Hu, Richard

    2015-11-15

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called toll-like receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26600966

  1. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda B; Weeratunga, Ashley N; Hu, Robert W; Pandol, Stephen J; Hu, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called toll-like receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26600966

  2. Kupffer cells suppress perfluorononanoic acid-induced hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α expression by releasing cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xuemei; Zou, Shanshan; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Cui, Ruina; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Jiayue; Dai, Jiayin

    2012-10-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) have been demonstrated to play a role in the regulation of intra-hepatic lipid metabolism through the synthesis and secretion of biologically active products. The involvement of KCs in the disturbance of lipid metabolism that induced by perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), a known agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), was investigated in this study. Rats were exposed to PFNA or PFNA combined with gadolinium chloride, an inhibitor of KCs, for 14 days. PFNA exposure dose-dependently increased absolute and relative liver weights, induced triglyceride accumulation, up-regulated the expression of both SERBP-1c and PPARα, and stimulated the release of TNFα and IL-1β. Inactivation of KCs markedly lowered TNFα and IL-1β level, enhanced PFNA-induced expression of PPARα and its target genes, and reduced liver triglyceride levels. In vitro, PFNA-induced expression of PPARα in primary cultured hepatocytes was suppressed by recombinant rat TNFα and IL-1β. However, inhibition of the NF-κB pathway prevented this. Transient transfection and promoter analysis further revealed that these two cytokines and NF-κB were coordinately involved in the suppression of PPARα promoter activity. Our data demonstrate that TNFα and IL-1β released from KCs following PFNA exposure can suppress the expression of PPARα via NF-κB pathway, which partially contribute to the evident accumulation of triglycerides in rat liver. PMID:22648072

  3. P2X7 receptor-NADPH oxidase axis mediates protein radical formation and Kupffer cell activation in carbon tetrachloride-mediated steatohepatitis in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Saurabh; Rana, Ritu; Corbett, Jean; Kadiiska, Maria B; Goldstein, Joyce; Mason, Ronald P

    2012-05-01

    While some studies show that carbon tetrachloride-mediated metabolic oxidative stress exacerbates steatohepatitic-like lesions in obese mice, the redox mechanisms that trigger the innate immune system and accentuate the inflammatory cascade remain unclear. Here we have explored the role of the purinergic receptor P2X7-NADPH oxidase axis as a primary event in recognizing the heightened release of extracellular ATP from CCl(4)-treated hepatocytes and generating redox-mediated Kupffer cell activation in obese mice. We found that an underlying condition of obesity led to the formation of protein radicals and posttranslational nitration, primarily in Kupffer cells, at 24h post-CCl(4) administration. The free radical-mediated oxidation of cellular macromolecules, which was NADPH oxidase and P2X7 receptor-dependent, correlated well with the release of TNF-α and MCP-2 from Kupffer cells. The Kupffer cells in CCl(4)-treated mice exhibited increased expression of MHC Class II proteins and showed an activated phenotype. Increased expression of MHC Class II was inhibited by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin , P2X7 receptor antagonist A438709 hydrochloride, and genetic deletions of the NADPH oxidase p47 phox subunit or the P2X7 receptor. The P2X7 receptor acted upstream of NADPH oxidase activation by up-regulating the expression of the p47 phox subunit and p47 phox binding to the membrane subunit, gp91 phox. We conclude that the P2X7 receptor is a primary mediator of oxidative stress-induced exacerbation of inflammatory liver injury in obese mice via NADPH oxidase-dependent mechanisms. PMID:22343416

  4. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  5. Repopulation of murine Kupffer cells after intravenous administration of liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene diphosphonate.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T.; Naito, M.; Moriyama, H.; Umezu, H.; Matsuo, H.; Kiwada, H.; Arakawa, M.

    1996-01-01

    Kupffer cells were selectively eliminated in mice by the intravenous administration of liposome-entrapped dichloromethylene diphosphonate. At 5 days, small peroxidase-negative and acid-phosphatase-weakly-positive macrophages appeared, increased in number, and differentiated into peroxidase- and acid-phosphatase-positive Kupffer cells. Repopulating small macrophages actively proliferated, and the number of Kupffer cells returned to the normal level by day 14. The numbers of macrophage precursors in the liver as detected by the monoclonal antibodies ER-MP20 and ER-MP58 increased after liposome-entrapped dichloromethylene diphosphonate injection. ER-MP58-positive cells proliferated and differentiated into ER-MP20-positive cells and eventually into BM8-positive Kupffer cells in the liver. Bone-marrow-derived ER-MP58-positive cells were also detectable in the liver and differentiated into ER-MP20-positive cells, but they did not become BM8-positive macrophages. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA expression was enhanced in the liver 1 day after injection. The administration of macrophage colony-stimulating factor did not shorten the period of Kupffer cell depletion but increased the number and the proliferative capacity of repopulating Kupffer cells. These findings implied that repopulating Kupffer cells are derived from a macrophage precursor pool in the liver rather than from bone-marrow-derived monocytes. Local production of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the liver plays a crucial role in the differentiation, maturation, and proliferation of Kupffer cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 11 Figure 13 Figure 12 Figure 18 PMID:8863675

  6. Effective delivery of chemotherapeutic nanoparticles by depleting host Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Yusuke; Oda, Tatsuya; Yamada, Keiichi; Hashimoto, Shinji; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Ryoko; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2012-11-15

    Although chemotherapeutic nanoparticles would confer various advantages, the majority of administrated nanoparticles are known to be spoiled by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). Intending to more effectively deliver therapeutic nanoparticles to target regions in vivo, host RES, especially Kupffer cells in the liver, have been depleted ahead of drug administration. To demonstrate this hypothesis, clodronate liposomes were preinjected into BALB/c nude mice for depletion of Kupffer cells 2 days before, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) at the doses of 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg was administered. As a result, doxorubicin accumulation in the liver was decreased from 36 to 26% injected dose/organ by the Kupffer cells depletion, and consequently, the plasma concentration of doxorubicin was significantly enhanced threefold (from 11 to 33 μg/mL) on day 1 at 1.25 mg/kg-dose group. Doxorubicin accumulation in the tumor was increased from 0.78 to 3.0 μg/g-tissue on day 3, and tumor growth inhibition by Doxil was significantly boosted (tumor volumes from 751 to 482 mm(3) on day 24) by the Kupffer cells depletion. In conclusion, Kupffer cells depletion by clodronate liposomes enhanced the plasma concentration and antitumor effects of Doxil, and would be widely applicable for various clinical cancer chemotherapies using nanoparticles. PMID:22362271

  7. Kupffer cells-dependent inflammation in the injured liver increases recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chen; Lai, Fobao; Zhu, Pengxi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Jinghua; Yang, Yang; Gao, Lu; Ye, Fei; Zhao, Qiudong; Li, Rong; Han, Zhipeng; Wei, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) repair tissue injury and may be used to treat immune associated diseases. In carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury murine model, we administered MSCs. When MSCs were transmitted to young and old mice with liver injury, more MSCs were recruited in old mice. In old mice, inflammation, characterized by TNF-α and IL-6, was increased due to hyper-activation and hyper-function of Kupffer cells. Blocking Kupffer cells decreased MSCs migration in old mice. In vitro, Kupffer cells isolated from old mice secreted more inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Thus, hyper-activation of Kupffer cells in old mice increased recruitment of MSCs after their therapeutic administration. PMID:26716516

  8. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI

    PubMed Central

    Kegel, Victoria; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Burkhardt, Britta; Liu, Jia L.; Zeilinger, Katrin; Nüssler, Andreas K.; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC) sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2 ± 0.9 × 106 cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay) and cell activity (XTT assay). The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production. PMID:26491234

  9. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Victoria; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Burkhardt, Britta; Liu, Jia L; Zeilinger, Katrin; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC) sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2 ± 0.9 × 10(6) cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay) and cell activity (XTT assay). The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production. PMID:26491234

  10. Effect of allyl alcohol on hepatic transporter expression: Zonal patterns of expression and role of Kupffer cell function

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Sarah N.; Tatis-Rios, Cristina; Augustine, Lisa M.; Goedken, Michael J.; van Rooijen, Nico; Cherrington, Nathan J.; Manautou, José E.

    2015-01-01

    During APAP toxicity, activation of Kupffer cells is critical for protection from hepatotoxicity and up-regulation of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (Mrp4) in centrilobular hepatocytes. The present study was performed to determine the expression profile of uptake and efflux transporters in mouse liver following treatment with allyl alcohol (AlOH), a periportal hepatotoxicant. This study also investigated the role of Kupffer cells in AlOH hepatotoxicity, and whether changes in transport protein expression by AlOH are dependent on the presence of Kupffer cells. C57BL/6J mice received 0.1 ml clodronate liposomes to deplete Kupffer cells or empty liposomes 48 h prior to dosing with 60 mg/kg AlOH, i.p. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by plasma ALT and histopathology. Hepatic transporter mRNA and protein expression were determined by branched DNA signal amplification assay and Western blotting, respectively. Depletion of Kupffer cells by liposomal clodronate treatment resulted in heightened susceptibility to AlOH toxicity. Exposure to AlOH increased mRNA levels of several Mrp genes, while decreasing organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps) mRNA expression. Protein analysis mirrored many of these mRNA changes. The presence of Kupffer cells was not required for the observed changes in uptake and efflux transporters induced by AlOH. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed enhanced Mrp4 staining exclusively in centrilobular hepatocytes of AlOH treated mice. These findings demonstrate that Kupffer cells are protective from AlOH toxicity and that induction of Mrp4 occurs in liver regions away from areas of AlOH damage independent of Kupffer cell function. These results suggest that Kupffer cell mediators do not play a role in mediating centrilobular Mrp4 induction in response to periportal damage by AlOH. PMID:19371622

  11. Effect of allyl alcohol on hepatic transporter expression: Zonal patterns of expression and role of Kupffer cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, Sarah N.; Tatis-Rios, Cristina; Augustine, Lisa M.; Goedken, Michael J.; Rooijen, Nico van; Cherrington, Nathan J.; Manautou, Jose E.

    2009-04-01

    During APAP toxicity, activation of Kupffer cells is critical for protection from hepatotoxicity and up-regulation of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (Mrp4) in centrilobular hepatocytes. The present study was performed to determine the expression profile of uptake and efflux transporters in mouse liver following treatment with allyl alcohol (AlOH), a periportal hepatotoxicant. This study also investigated the role of Kupffer cells in AlOH hepatotoxicity, and whether changes in transport protein expression by AlOH are dependent on the presence of Kupffer cells. C57BL/6J mice received 0.1 ml clodronate liposomes to deplete Kupffer cells or empty liposomes 48 h prior to dosing with 60 mg/kg AlOH, i.p. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by plasma ALT and histopathology. Hepatic transporter mRNA and protein expression were determined by branched DNA signal amplification assay and Western blotting, respectively. Depletion of Kupffer cells by liposomal clodronate treatment resulted in heightened susceptibility to AlOH toxicity. Exposure to AlOH increased mRNA levels of several Mrp genes, while decreasing organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps) mRNA expression. Protein analysis mirrored many of these mRNA changes. The presence of Kupffer cells was not required for the observed changes in uptake and efflux transporters induced by AlOH. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed enhanced Mrp4 staining exclusively in centrilobular hepatocytes of AlOH treated mice. These findings demonstrate that Kupffer cells are protective from AlOH toxicity and that induction of Mrp4 occurs in liver regions away from areas of AlOH damage independent of Kupffer cell function. These results suggest that Kupffer cell mediators do not play a role in mediating centrilobular Mrp4 induction in response to periportal damage by AlOH.

  12. Kinetics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in SIV-infected macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Gill, Amy F.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Since the liver drains antigens from the intestinal tract, and since the intestinal tract is a major site of viral replication, we examined the dynamics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) throughout SIV infection. Absolute numbers of Kupffer cells increased in the livers in acute infection, and in animals with AIDS. Significantly higher percentages of proliferating (BrdU+) Kupffer cells were detected in acute infection and in AIDS with similar trends in blood monocytes. Significantly higher percentages of apoptotic (AC3+) Kupffer cells were also found in acute and AIDS stages. However, productively infected cells were not detected in liver of 41/42 animals examined, despite abundant infected cells in gut and lymph nodes of all animals. Increased rates of Kupffer cell proliferation resulting in an increase in Kupffer cells without productive infection indicate SIV infection affects Kupffer cells, but the liver does not appear to be a major site of productive viral replication. PMID:24074569

  13. Subanesthetic Isoflurane Reduces Zymosan-Induced Inflammation in Murine Kupffer Cells by Inhibiting ROS-Activated p38 MAPK/NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Lei; Li, Nan-lin; Li, Jun-tang; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ya-li; Wang, Ling; Yi, Jun; Wang, Ling; Bian, Jie-fang; Chen, Jiang-hao; Yuan, Shi-fang; Wang, Ting; Lv, Yong-gang; Liu, Ning-ning; Zhu, Xiao-shan; Ling, Rui; Yun, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Volatile anesthetic isoflurane (ISO) has immunomodulatory effects. The fungal component zymosan (ZY) induces inflammation through toll-like receptor 2 or dectin-1 signaling. We investigated the molecular actions of subanesthetic (0.7%) ISO against ZY-induced inflammatory activation in murine Kupffer cells (KCs), which are known as the resident macrophages within the liver. We observed that ISO reduced ZY-induced cyclooxygenase 2 upregulation and prostaglandin E2 release, as determined by western blot and radioimmunoassay, respectively. ISO also reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, IL-6, high-mobility group box-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. ISO blocked the ZY-induced nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor- (NF)-κB p65. Moreover, ISO attenuated ZY-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation partly by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS); the interregulation that ROS activated p38 MAPK followed by NF-κB activation was crucial for the ZY-induced inflammatory responses in KCs. An in vivo study by peritoneal injection of ZY into BALB/C mice confirmed the anti-inflammatory properties of 0.7% ISO against ZY in KCs. These results suggest that ISO ameliorates ZY-induced inflammatory responses in murine KCs by inhibiting the interconnected ROS/p38 MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:25147596

  14. Chronic Ethanol Feeding Modulates Inflammatory Mediators, Activation of Nuclear Factor-κB, and Responsiveness to Endotoxin in Murine Kupffer Cells and Circulating Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, Elsie; Jobin, Christian; Schleucher, Elke; Marzi, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse is known to increase susceptibility to infections after injury, in part, by modification of macrophage function. Several intracellular signalling mechanisms are involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses, including the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we investigated the systemic and hepatic effect of chronic ethanol feeding on in vivo activation of NF-κB in NF-κBEGFP reporter gene mice. Specifically, the study focused on Kupffer cell proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and activation of NF-κB after chronic ethanol feeding followed by in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that chronic ethanol upregulated NF-κB activation and increased hepatic and systemic proinflammatory cytokine levels. Similarly, LPS-stimulated IL-1β release from whole blood was significantly enhanced in ethanol-fed mice. However, LPS significantly increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding can improve the responsiveness of macrophage LPS-stimulated IL-6 and TNF-α production and indicate that this effect may result from ethanol-induced alterations in intracellular signalling through NF-κB. Furthermore, LPS and TNF-α stimulated the gene expression of different inflammatory mediators, in part, in a NF-κB-dependent manner. PMID:24623963

  15. Chronic ethanol feeding modulates inflammatory mediators, activation of nuclear factor-κB, and responsiveness to endotoxin in murine Kupffer cells and circulating leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Maraslioglu, Miriam; Oppermann, Elsie; Blattner, Carolin; Weber, Roxane; Henrich, Dirk; Jobin, Christian; Schleucher, Elke; Marzi, Ingo; Lehnert, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse is known to increase susceptibility to infections after injury, in part, by modification of macrophage function. Several intracellular signalling mechanisms are involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses, including the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we investigated the systemic and hepatic effect of chronic ethanol feeding on in vivo activation of NF-κB in NF-κB(EGFP) reporter gene mice. Specifically, the study focused on Kupffer cell proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and activation of NF-κB after chronic ethanol feeding followed by in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that chronic ethanol upregulated NF-κB activation and increased hepatic and systemic proinflammatory cytokine levels. Similarly, LPS-stimulated IL-1 β release from whole blood was significantly enhanced in ethanol-fed mice. However, LPS significantly increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding can improve the responsiveness of macrophage LPS-stimulated IL-6 and TNF-α production and indicate that this effect may result from ethanol-induced alterations in intracellular signalling through NF-κB. Furthermore, LPS and TNF-α stimulated the gene expression of different inflammatory mediators, in part, in a NF-κB-dependent manner. PMID:24623963

  16. Contribution of programmed cell death receptor (PD)-1 to Kupffer cell dysfunction in murine polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Huang, Xin; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Chen, Yaping; Hutchins, Noelle A; Ayala, Alfred

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that coinhibitory receptors appear to be important in contributing sepsis-induced immunosuppression. Our laboratory reported that mice deficient in programmed cell death receptor (PD)-1 have increased bacterial clearance and improved survival in experimental sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). In response to infection, the liver clears the blood of bacteria and produces cytokines. Kupffer cells, the resident macrophages in the liver, are strategically situated to perform the above functions. However, it is not known if PD-1 expression on Kupffer cells is altered by septic stimuli, let alone if PD-1 ligation contributes to the altered microbial handling seen. Here we report that PD-1 is significantly upregulated on Kupffer cells during sepsis. PD-1-deficient septic mouse Kupffer cells displayed markedly enhanced phagocytosis and restoration of the expression of major histocompatibility complex II and CD86, but reduced CD80 expression compared with septic wild-type (WT) mouse Kupffer cells. In response to ex vivo LPS stimulation, the cytokine productive capacity of Kupffer cells derived from PD-1-/- CLP mice exhibited a marked, albeit partial, restoration of the release of IL-6, IL-12, IL-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and IL-10 compared with septic WT mouse Kupffer cells. In addition, PD-1 gene deficiency decreased LPS-induced apoptosis of septic Kupffer cells, as indicated by decreased levels of cleaved caspase-3 and reduced terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling-positive cells. Exploring the signal pathways involved, we found that, after ex vivo LPS stimulation, septic PD-1-/- mouse Kupffer cells exhibited an increased Akt phosphorylation and a reduced p38 phosphorylation compared with septic WT mouse Kupffer cells. Together, these results indicate that PD-1 appears to play an important role in regulating the development of Kupffer cell dysfunction seen in sepsis. PMID:27288425

  17. Bimodal role of Kupffer cells during colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shu Wen; Ager, Eleanor I; Christophi, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are resident liver macrophages that play a crucial role in liver homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Evidence suggests KCs have both stimulatory and inhibitory functions during tumor development but the extent of these functions remains to be defined. Using KC depletion studies in an orthotopic murine model of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases we demonstrated the bimodal role of KCs in determining tumor growth. KC depletion with gadolinium chloride before tumor induction was associated with an increased tumor burden during the exponential growth phase. In contrast, KC depletion at the late stage of tumor growth (day 18) decreased liver tumor load compared with non-depleted animals. This suggests KCs exhibit an early inhibitory and a later stimulatory effect. These two opposing functions were associated with changes in iNOS and VEGF expression as well as T-cell infiltration. KC depletion at day 18 increased numbers of CD3 (+) T cells and iNOS-expressing infiltrating cells in the tumor, but decreased the number of VEGF-expressing infiltrating cells. These alterations may be responsible for the observed reduction in tumor burden following depletion of pro-tumor KCs at the late stage of metastatic growth. Taken together, our results indicate that the bimodal role of KC activity in liver tumors may provide the key to timing immunomodulatory intervention for the treatment of CRC liver metastases. PMID:23792646

  18. Kinetics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in SIV-infected macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Gill, Amy F.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-11-15

    Since the liver drains antigens from the intestinal tract, and since the intestinal tract is a major site of viral replication, we examined the dynamics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) throughout SIV infection. Absolute numbers of Kupffer cells increased in the livers in acute infection, and in animals with AIDS. Significantly higher percentages of proliferating (BrdU+) Kupffer cells were detected in acute infection and in AIDS with similar trends in blood monocytes. Significantly higher percentages of apoptotic (AC3+) Kupffer cells were also found in acute and AIDS stages. However, productively infected cells were not detected in liver of 41/42 animals examined, despite abundant infected cells in gut and lymph nodes of all animals. Increased rates of Kupffer cell proliferation resulting in an increase in Kupffer cells without productive infection indicate SIV infection affects Kupffer cells, but the liver does not appear to be a major site of productive viral replication. - Highlights: • Kupffer cells increase in the liver of SIV-infected macaques. • Increased proliferation and apoptosis of Kupffer cells occurs in SIV infection. • Productively infected cells are rarely detected in the liver. • The liver is not a major site for SIV replication.

  19. The Role of IL-1 Family Members and Kupffer Cells in Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Quanhui; Hu, Jianjun; Yu, Xiaolan; Guan, Wen; Lu, Huili; Yu, Yan; Yu, Yongsheng; Zang, Guoqiang; Tang, Zhenghao

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) family and Kupffer cells are linked with liver regeneration, but their precise roles remain unclear. IL-1 family members are pleiotropic factors with a range of biological roles in liver diseases, inducing hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as liver regeneration. Kupffer cells are the main source of IL-1 and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), the key members of IL-1 family. This systemic review highlights a close association of IL-1 family members and Kupffer cells with liver regeneration, although their specific roles are inconclusive. Moreover, IL-1 members are proposed to induce effects on liver regeneration through Kupffer cells. PMID:27092311

  20. C5a anaphylatoxin as a product of complement activation up-regulates the complement inhibitory factor H in rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Schlaf, Gerald; Nitzki, Frauke; Heine, Ines; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Schieferdecker, Henrike L; Götze, Otto

    2004-11-01

    The 155-kDa complement regulator factor H (FH) is the predominant soluble regulatory protein of the complement system. It acts as a cofactor for the factor I-mediated conversion of the component C3b to iC3b, competes with factor B for a binding site on C3b and C3(H2O) and promotes the dissociation of the C3bBb complex. The primary site of synthesis is the liver, i.e. FH-specific mRNA and protein were identified in both hepatocytes (HC) and Kupffer cells (KC). Previous studies in rat primary HC and KC had shown that the proinflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma influences the balance between activation and inhibition of the complement system through up-regulation of the inhibitory FH. In this study we show that C5a, as a product of complement activation, stimulates the expression of FH-specific mRNA and protein in KC and thus induces a negative feedback. Quantitative-competitive RT-PCR showed an approximate threefold C5a-induced up-regulation of FH. ELISA analyses revealed a corresponding increase in FH protein in the supernatants of KC. The up-regulation of FH was completely inhibited by the C5a-blocking monoclonal antibody 6-9F. Furthermore, an involvement of LPS and IFN-gamma was excluded, which strongly indicates a direct effect of C5a on the expression of FH in KC. PMID:15376195

  1. Kupffer cell proliferation and glucan-induced granuloma formation in mice depleted of blood monocytes by strontium-89

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.; Naito, M.; Takahashi, K. )

    1990-03-01

    In mice with prolonged severe monocytopenia induced by selective irradiation of the bone marrow with the bone-seeking isotope 89Sr, the proliferative capacity of Kupffer cells was studied by immunohistochemistry with an anti-mouse macrophage monoclonal antibody, F4/80, ultrastructural peroxidase (PO) cytochemistry, and tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) autoradiography. The number and 3HTdR uptake of Kupffer cells were significantly increased in the splenectomized mice after severe monocytopenia had continued for more than 4 wk, and almost all the Kupffer cells showed a localization pattern of PO activity similar to that of resident macrophages in the liver of normal mice. In the glucan-induced granuloma formation in similar monocytopenic mice, Kupffer cells proliferated, conglomerated, and transformed into epithelioid cells, which fused together to become multinuclear giant cells. These results suggest that Kupffer cells are a self-renewing population by their own cell division and can participate actively in granulomatous inflammations in severely monocytopenic and intact mice.

  2. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Kupffer cell phagosomal motility, bacterial clearance, and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christa Y; Molina, Ramon M; Louzada, Andressa; Murdaugh, Kimberly M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Brain, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc oxide engineered nanoparticles (ZnO ENPs) have potential as nanomedicines due to their inherent properties. Studies have described their pulmonary impact, but less is known about the consequences of ZnO ENP interactions with the liver. This study was designed to describe the effects of ZnO ENPs on the liver and Kupffer cells after intravenous (IV) administration. Materials and methods First, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine the tissue distribution of neutron-activated 65ZnO ENPs post-IV injection in Wistar Han rats. Then, a noninvasive in vivo method to assess Kupffer cell phagosomal motility was employed using ferromagnetic iron particles and magnetometry. We also examined whether prior IV injection of ZnO ENPs altered Kupffer cell bactericidal activity on circulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Serum and liver tissues were collected to assess liver-injury biomarkers and histological changes, respectively. Results We found that the liver was the major site of initial uptake of 65ZnO ENPs. There was a time-dependent decrease in tissue levels of 65Zn in all organs examined, refecting particle dissolution. In vivo magnetometry showed a time-dependent and transient reduction in Kupffer cell phagosomal motility. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa 24 hours post-ZnO ENP injection showed an initial (30 minutes) delay in vascular bacterial clearance. However, by 4 hours, IV-injected bacteria were cleared from the blood, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys. Seven days post-ZnO ENP injection, creatine phosphokinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in serum were significantly increased. Histological evidence of hepatocyte damage and marginated neutrophils were observed in the liver. Conclusion Administration of ZnO ENPs transiently inhibited Kupffer cell phagosomal motility and later induced hepatocyte injury, but did not alter bacterial clearance from the blood or killing in the liver, spleen, lungs, or kidneys. Our data show that

  3. Gadolinium chloride, a Kupffer cell inhibitor, attenuates hepatic injury in a rat model of chronic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Zandieh, Ali; Payabvash, Seyedmehedi; Pasalar, Parvin; Morteza, Afsaneh; Zandieh, Basira; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to elucidate the effect of Kupffer cells inhibition on hepatic injury induced by chronic cholestasis. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham operation and were treated with either saline solution or gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3), a specific Kupffer cell inhibitor, 20 mg/kg i.p. daily). Serum and liver samples were collected after 28 days. Direct and total bilirubin concentrations and serum enzyme activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) increased following BDL (p < 0.01). On the contrary to bilirubin concentrations and AST activity, GdCl(3) partially prevented the elevation in ALP, ALT and GGT enzyme activities (p < 0.05). GdCl(3) alleviated lipid peroxidation (reflected by malondialdehyde [MDA] concentration) and increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (i.e. catalase and glutathione peroxidase) in liver samples after BDL (p < 0.05). Fibrosis, ductular proliferation and portal inflammation were also scored in liver samples. Among morphological changes appeared following BDL (i.e. marked fibrosis, portal inflammation and ductular proliferation); only ductular proliferation was not alleviated by GdCl(3). Therefore, Kupffer cells inhibition has beneficial effects against the development of hepatic injury induced by chronic cholestasis. PMID:21339256

  4. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  5. Arachidonic acid stimulates TNFα production in Kupffer cells via a reactive oxygen species-pERK1/2-Egr1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cubero, Francisco Javier; Nieto, Natalia

    2012-07-15

    Kupffer cells are a key source of mediators of alcohol-induced liver damage such as reactive oxygen species, chemokines, growth factors, and eicosanoids. Since diets rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids are a requirement for the development of alcoholic liver disease, we hypothesized that polyunsaturated fatty acids could synergize with ethanol to promote Kupffer cell activation and TNFα production, hence, contributing to liver injury. Primary Kupffer cells from control and from ethanol-fed rats incubated with arachidonic acid showed similar proliferation rates than nontreated cells; however, arachidonic acid induced phenotypic changes, lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxides, and superoxide radical generation. Similar effects occurred in human Kupffer cells. These events were greater in Kupffer cells from ethanol-fed rats, and antioxidants and inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism prevented them. Arachidonic acid treatment increased NADPH oxidase activity. Inhibitors of NADPH oxidase and of arachidonic acid metabolism partially prevented the increase in oxidant stress. Upon arachidonic acid stimulation, there was a rapid and sustained increase in TNFα, which was greater in Kupffer cells from ethanol-fed rats than in Kupffer cells from control rats. Arachidonic acid induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of early growth response-1 (Egr1), and ethanol synergized with arachidonic acid to promote this effect. PD98059, a mitogen extracellular kinase 1/2 inhibitor, and curcumin, an Egr1 inhibitor, blocked the arachidonic acid-mediated upregulation of TNFα in Kupffer cells. This study unveils the mechanism whereby arachidonic acid and ethanol increase TNFα production in Kupffer cells, thus contributing to alcoholic liver disease. PMID:22538404

  6. Kupffer cell-mediated exacerbation of methimazole-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Akai, Sho; Uematsu, Yasuaki; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Oda, Shingo; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Methimazole (MTZ), an anti-thyroid drug, is known to cause liver injury in humans. It has been demonstrated that MTZ-induced liver injury in Balb/c mice is accompanied by T helper (Th) 2 cytokine-mediated immune responses; however, there is little evidence for immune responses associated with MTZ-induced liver injury in rats. To investigate species differences in MTZ-induced liver injury, we administered MTZ with a glutathione biosynthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO), to F344 rats and subsequently observed an increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which are associated with hepatic lesions. The hepatic mRNA expression of innate immune-related genes significantly increased in BSO- and MTZ-treated rats, but the change in Th2-related genes was not much greater than the change observed in the previous mouse study. Moreover, an increase in Kupffer cells and an induction of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) proteins were accompanied by an increase in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression, indicating that Kupffer cell activation occurs through HMGB1-TLR4 signaling. To elucidate the mechanism of liver injury in rats, gadolinium chloride, which inactivates the function of Kupffer cells, was administered before BSO and MTZ administration. The gadolinium chloride treatment significantly suppressed the increased ALT, which was accompanied by decreased hepatic mRNA expression related to innate immune responses and ERK/JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Kupffer cell-mediated immune responses are crucial factors for the exacerbation of MTZ-induced liver injury in rats, indicating apparent species differences in the immune-mediated exacerbation of liver injury between mice and rats. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26177832

  7. [Isolation and purification of primary Kupffer cells from mouse liver].

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Luo, Qingbo; Lu, Xiuxian; Zheng, Daofeng; He, Diao; Wu, Zhongjun

    2016-08-01

    Objective To isolate and purify Kupffer cells (KCs) from BALB/c mice by an efficient method of low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherence. Methods The mouse liver tissue was perfused in situ and digested with 0.5 g/L collagenase type IV in vitro by water bath. Then, through the low-speed centrifugation, KCs were separated from the mixed hepatocytes, and purified by rapid adherent characteristics. Finally, the production and activity of KCs obtained by this modified method were compared with those isolated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. We used F4/80 antibody immunofluorescence technique to observe morphological features of KCs, flow cytometry (FCM) to detect the expression of F4/80 antibody and the ink uptake test to observe the phagocytic activity. Moreover, using FCM, we evaluated the expressions of molecules associated with antigen presentation, including major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD40, CD86 and CD68 on the surface of KCs subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) modeling. And, ELISA was conducted to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production of the cultured KCs following H/R. Results The yield of KCs was (5.83±0.54)×10(6) per mouse liver and the survival rate of KCs was up to 92% by low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherent method. Compared with Percoll density gradient centrifugation [the yield of KCs was (2.19±0.43)×10(6) per liver], this new method significantly improved the yield of KCs. F4/80 immunofluorescence showed typical morphologic features of KCs such as spindle or polygon shapes and FCM identified nearly 90% F4/80 positive cells. The phagocytic assay showed that lots of ink particles were phagocytosed into the isolated cells. KC H/R models expressed more MHC II, CD40 and CD86 and produced more TNF-α participating in inflammation. Conclusion The efficient method to isolate and purify KCs from BALB /c mice has been successfully established. PMID:27412929

  8. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors protect against alcoholic liver disease by regulating Kupffer cell polarization in mice.

    PubMed

    Louvet, Alexandre; Teixeira-Clerc, Fatima; Chobert, Marie-Noële; Deveaux, Vanessa; Pavoine, Catherine; Zimmer, Andreas; Pecker, Françoise; Mallat, Ariane; Lotersztajn, Sophie

    2011-10-01

    Activation of Kupffer cells plays a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Because cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2) display potent anti-inflammatory properties, we investigated their role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease, focusing on the impact of CB2 on Kupffer cell polarization and the consequences on liver steatosis. Wild-type (WT) mice fed an alcohol diet showed an induction of hepatic classical (M1) and alternative (M2) markers. Cotreatment of alcohol-fed mice with the CB2 agonist, JWH-133, decreased hepatic M1 gene expression without affecting the M2 profile. In keeping with this, genetic ablation of CB2 enhanced hepatic induction of M1 gene signature and blunted the induction of M2 markers. CB2 also modulated alcohol-induced fatty liver, as shown by the reduction of hepatocyte steatosis in JWH-133-treated mice and its enhancement in CB2-/- animals. Studies in isolated Kupffer cells and cultured macrophages further demonstrated that CB2 inhibits M1 polarization and favors the transition to an M2 phenotype. In addition, conditioned-medium experiments showed that preventing M1 polarization in CB2-activated macrophages protects from lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mediated the anti-inflammatory effects of CB2 receptors. Indeed, alcohol-fed mice treated with JWH-133 showed increased hepatic expression of macrophage HO-1, as compared to vehicle-treated counterparts. In keeping with this, JWH-133 induced HO-1 expression in cultured macrophages, and the HO-1 inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin, blunted the inhibitory effect of JWH-133 on lipopolysaccharide-induced nuclear factor-kappa B activation and M1 polarization. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that CB2 receptors display beneficial effects on alcohol-induced inflammation by regulating M1/M2 balance in Kupffer cells, thereby reducing hepatocyte steatosis via paracrine interactions between Kupffer cells and hepatocytes. These data identify CB2

  9. Hepatic Tumor Metastases Cause Enhanced PEGylated Liposome Uptake by Kupffer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, Masami; Fujiwara, Yukako; Ando, Hidenori; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Kupffer cells in livers bearing tumor metastases were found to have promoted tumor invasion and exacerbated the metastasis. This implies that the function of Kupffer cells might differ between animals bearing hepatic metastases and those that are healthy. Kupffer cells are considered responsible for the accumulation of liposomes in the liver. In this study, we hypothesized that the alteration in the function of Kupffer cells by hepatic metastasis would also affect the biodistribution of liposomes following intravenous administration. The hepatic accumulation and the blood concentration of PEGylated liposomes were compared between healthy mice and tumor-bearing mice. We noted that hepatic accumulation and elimination from the blood were significantly accelerated in tumor-bearing mice, indicating that our hypothesis was correct. In the tumor-bearing mice, the proportion of Kupffer cells taking up liposomes was significantly increased. Intravenous injection of oxaliplatin (l-OHP) containing PEGylated liposomes decreased the fraction of Kupffer cells, but this administration caused no injury to the hepatocytes. These results suggest that PEGylated liposomes containing l-OHP may have the potential to treat metastatic hepatic cancer-not only via the direct killing of the cancer cells but also via a reduction in tumor-supportive Kupffer cells. PMID:26830481

  10. Establishment of c-myc-immortalized Kupffer cell line from a C57BL/6 mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Chisato; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated in several mammalian species, a novel procedure to obtain liver-macrophages (Kupffer cells) in sufficient numbers and purity using a mixed primary culture of hepatocytes. In this study, we applied this method to the C57BL/6 mouse liver and established an immortalized Kupffer cell line from this mouse strain. The hepatocytes from the C57BL/6 adult mouse liver were isolated by a two-step collagenase perfusion method and cultured in T25 culture flasks. Similar to our previous studies, the mouse hepatocytes progressively changed their morphology into a fibroblastic appearance after a few days of culture. After 7-10 days of culture, Kupffer-like cells, which were contaminants in the hepatocyte fraction at the start of the culture, actively proliferated on the mixed fibroblastic cell sheet. At this stage, a retroviral vector containing the human c-myc oncogene and neomycin resistance gene was introduced into the mixed culture. Gentle shaking of the culture flask, followed by the transfer and brief incubation of the culture supernatant, resulted in a quick and selective adhesion of Kupffer cells to a plastic dish surface. After selection with G418 and cloning by limiting dilutions, a clonal cell line (KUP5) was established. KUP5 cells displayed typical macrophage morphology and were stably passaged at 4-5 days intervals for more than 5 months, with a population doubling time of 19 h. KUP5 cells are immunocytochemically positive for mouse macrophage markers, such as Mac-1, F4/80. KUP5 cells exhibited substantial phagocytosis of polystyrene microbeads and the release of inflammatory cytokines upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Taken together, KUP5 cells provide a useful means to study the function of Kupffer cells in vitro. PMID:25379377

  11. Oxidative products from alcohol metabolism differentially modulate pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Qian; Zhang, Wenliang; Sun, Xinguo; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2016-09-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a vital role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic steatohepatitis. The present study was to determine the role of alcohol-induced oxidative stress in modulating cytokine production. A rat model of alcohol consumption was used to determine alcohol-induced hepatic cytokine expression. Chronic alcohol exposure caused lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the livers of Wistar rats. The role of oxidative stress in regulating cell type-specific cytokine production was further dissected in vitro. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependently upregulated TNF-α, MIP-1α, MCP-1, and CINC-1 in Kupffer cells-SV40, whereas TNF-α dose-dependently induced CINC-1, IP-10, and MIP-2 expression in H4IIEC3 hepatoma cells. An additive effect on cytokine production was observed in both Kupffer cells-SV40 and hepatocytes when combined hydrogen peroxide with LPS or TNF-α, respectively, which was associated with NF-κB activation and histone H3 hyper-acetylation. Unexpectedly, an inhibitory effect of 4-hydroxynonenal on cytokine production was revealed in LPS-treated Kupffer cells-SV40. Mechanistic study showed that 4-hydroxynonenal significantly enhanced mRNA degradation of TNF-α, MCP-1, and MIP-1α, and decreased the protein levels of MCP-1 in LPS-stimulated Kupffer cells-SV40 through reducing the phosphorylation of mRNA binding proteins. This study suggests that Kupffer cells and hepatocytes express distinct pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in response to alcohol intoxication, and oxidative products (4-hydroxynonenal) differentially modulate pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production via NF-κB signaling, histone acetylation, and mRNA stability. PMID:27314544

  12. Rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cell-mediated mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aflatoxin B sub 1

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, P.; Schlemper, B.; Molitor, E.; Platt, K.L.; Seidel, A.; Oesch, F. )

    1990-08-01

    The ability of isolated rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cells to activate benzo(a)pyrene (BP), trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo(a)pyrene (DDBP), trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrochrysene (DDCH), and aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) to mutagenic metabolites was assessed by means of a cell-mediated bacterial mutagenicity assay and compared with the ability of parenchymal cells to activate these compounds. Endothelial and Kupffer cells from untreated rats were able to activate AFB{sub 1} and DDBP; DDBP was activated even in the absence of an NADPH-generating system. Pretreating the animals with Aroclor 1254 strongly enhanced the mutagenicity of the dihydrodiol, whereas the mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} showed a slight increase. BP and DDCH were only activated by endothelial and Kupffer cells isolated from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Parenchymal cells form untreated animals activated all four carcinogens tested; Aroclor 1254 enhanced the parenchymal cell-mediated mutagenicity of BP and DDCH but did not affect that of DDBP and clearly reduced that of AFB{sub 1}. The reduced mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} correlates with the decrease in the amount of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone formed when testosterone was incubated with parenchymal cell microsomes from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats (compared with microsomes from untreated animals): the formation of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone is specifically catalyzed by cytochrome P-450h, a hemoprotein thought to be involved in the activation of AFB{sub 1}. These results show that not only rat liver parenchymal cells, but also endothelial and Kupffer cells, activated several carcinogens to mutagenic metabolites.

  13. Gliotoxin causes apoptosis and necrosis of rat Kupffer cells in vitro and in vivo in the absence of oxidative stress: Exacerbation by caspase and serine protease inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Anselmi, Kristin; Stolz, Donna B.; Nalesnik, Michael; Watkins, Simon C.; Kamath, Ravindra; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims A potential application of gliotoxin therapy for liver fibrosis was suggested by its apoptotic effect on fibrogenic activated stellate cells. We investigated if gliotoxin exerts similar effects on hepatic macrophages Kupffer cells. Methods Effects of gliotoxin on Kupffer cells isolated from the normal liver and in vivo following its administration to CCl4–induced cirrhotic rats were studied. Results Gliotoxin caused apoptosis of cultured Kupffer cells, the effect being apparent at 0.3 μM concentration within 1 hour; longer incubation caused necrosis. This effect was associated with mitochondroial cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation and ATP depletion. Interestingly, inhibition of caspase-3 and serine proteases accelerated and augmented gliotoxin-induced cell death via necrosis. Gliotoxin stimulated nuclear translocation of NFκB, and phosphorylation of p38, ERK1/2 and JNK MAP kinases, but these signaling molecules were not involved in gliotoxin-induced death of Kupffer cells. In vivo administration of gliotoxin to cirrhotic rats caused apoptosis of Kupffer cells, stellate cells and hepatocytes. In control rats, the effect was minimal on the nonparenchymal cells and not apparent on hepatocytes. Conclusions In the fibrotic liver, gliotoxin nonspecifically causes death of hepatic cell types. Modification of gliotoxin molecule may be necessary for selective targeting and elimination of activated stellate cells. PMID:17466404

  14. Endocytosis of heat-denatured albumin by cultured rat Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwer, A.; Knook, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Purified Kupffer cells were obtained by centrifugal elutriation of sinusoidal cells isolated by pronase treatment of the rat liver. The endocytosis of radioactively labeled heat-aggregated colloidal albumin (CA /sup 125/I) was investigated in maintenance cultures of the purified Kupffer cells. The endocytic capacity of the cells was studied during 4 days of culture. Maximum uptake was observed after 24 hr of culture, with a gradual decline during the following days. When the uptake was measured after incubation with increasing concentrations of CA /sup 125/I, a saturation effect was observed. This finding and the observed high rate of uptake are strong indications that receptor sites on the cell membrane are involved in the mechanism of endocytosis. The uptake of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was inhibited by the metabolic inhibitors fluoride and antimycin A, indicating that endocytosis of CA /sup 125/I is dependent on energy derived from both glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. The mechanism of internalization may also require the action of microfilaments as well as intact microtubules, since both cytochalasin B and colchicine inhibited the uptake of CA /sup 125/I. The intracellular degradation of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was strongly inhibited by chloroquine but not by colchicine. The degradation of ingested CA /sup 125/I occurred within the Kupffer cell lysosomes.

  15. Interactions between macrophage/Kupffer cells and hepatocytes in surgical sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    West, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the role of Kupffer cell/macrophage interactions with hepatocytes in modulating liver function during infections using direct in vitro cocultivation of rat macrophages or Kupffer cells with rat hepatocytes. Protein synthesis was assayed as a sensitive indicator of integrated hepatocellular function by measuring {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into hepatocyte protein. Septic stimuli such as lipoploysaccharide and killed bacteria were added to cocultures of hepatocytes and macrophages or Kupffer cells and the responses compared to hepatocytes alone. Information about the types of proteins synthesized by hepatocytes under various culture conditions was determined using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. These experiments showed that septic stimuli alter the amount and type of protein synthesized by hepatocytes and had no direct effect on hepatocytes in the absence of macrophages or Kupffer cells. The mediator(s) appears to be a heat labile, soluble monokine(s) which is distinct from interleukin-1 or tumor necrosis factor. The important role of Kupffer cells/macrophages in mediating alterations in hepatocellular function in sepsis may ultimately improve patient care.

  16. LXRα represses LPS-induced inflammatory responses by competing with IRF3 for GRIP1 in Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chun-Mu; He, Kun; Li, Pei-Zhi; Liu, Zuo-Jin; Zhu, Xi-Wen; Ou, Zhi-Bing; Ruan, Xiong-Zhong; Gong, Jian-Ping; Liu, Chang-An

    2016-06-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) in the nucleus play important roles in lipid metabolism and inflammation. The mechanism of LXR regulation of the LPS-induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inflammatory signaling pathway remains to be elucidated. C57/BL6 mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, T0901317 (a LXRs agonist), LPS and T0901317+LPS. Additionally, Kupffer cells isolated from male C57/BL6 mice were divided into the same four groups. A decreased amount of inflammatory cells infiltrated the portal areas and the hepatic sinusoids in the livers of mice in the T0901317+LPS group than in those of mice in the LPS group. In the T0901317+LPS group, the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were lower, while the serum level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) was higher. In vitro, Kupffer cells pretreated with T0901317 for 24h presented reduced TNF-α, interferon-beta (IFN-β) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) levels, while the IL-10 level increased; however, the mRNA and protein expression levels of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) were not significantly reduced. The co-IP data illustrated that LXRα bound to GRIP1 specifically in the T0901317+LPS group, while less IRF3 was bound to GRIP1 in the T0901317+LPS group than in the LPS group. Furthermore, the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB was decreased by pretreating Kupffer cells with T0901317 for 24h. These results suggest that activated LXRα competes with IRF3 for GRIP1 binding, thus repressing IRF3 and NF-κB transcriptional activity and inhibiting the inflammatory response initiated by LPS in Kupffer cells. PMID:27085678

  17. Graptopetalum Paraguayense Ameliorates Chemical-Induced Rat Hepatic Fibrosis In Vivo and Inactivates Stellate Cells and Kupffer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Su, Li-Jen; Chang, Chia-Chuan; Yang, Chih-Hsueh; Hsieh, Shur-Jong; Wu, Yi-Chin; Lai, Jin-Mei; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Huang, Chi-Ying F.; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Background Graptopetalum paraguayense (GP) is a folk herbal medicine with hepatoprotective effects that is used in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effects of GP on experimental hepatic fibrosis in both dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)- and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury rats. Methods Hepatic fibrosis-induced rats were fed with the methanolic extract of GP (MGP) by oral administration every day. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical assays, and Western blot analysis were performed. The effects of MGP on the expression of fibrotic markers and cytokines in the primary cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and Kupffer cells, respectively, were evaluated. Results Oral administration of MGP significantly alleviated DMN- or CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis. High levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin, prothrombin activity and mortality rates also decreased in rats treated with MGP. There were significantly decreased hydroxyproline levels in therapeutic rats compared with those of the liver-damaged rats. Collagen I and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression were all reduced by incubation with MGP in primary cultured rat HSCs. Furthermore, MGP induced apoptotic cell death in activated HSCs. MGP also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rat Kupffer cell activation by decreasing nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production, and increasing interleukin-10 expression. Conclusions The results show that the administration of MGP attenuated toxin-induced hepatic damage and fibrosis in vivo and inhibited HSC and Kupffer cell activation in vitro, suggesting that MGP might be a promising complementary or alternative therapeutic agent for liver inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:23335984

  18. Critical Role of Kupffer Cell CD89 Expression in Experimental IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Bingyu; Huang, Mengwen; Xie, Kun; Li, Dong; Li, You; Gu, Hua; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Although IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, its etiology remains only partly understood. It is clear that the pathogenesis of IgAN involves the formation of macromolecular IgA1 complexes and increased levels of serum IgA1 and IgA1-immune complexes(IC), due to defective IgA1 clearance. Previous studies suggest that the blood and tissue myeloid cell-expressed IgA Fc receptor (FcαR/CD89) mediates IgA-IC clearance and its dysfunction, via decreased activity or excessive levels of soluble FcαR/sCD89 induces IgAN. Such a mechanism requires robust stimulation of IgAN levels via forced expression of CD89. In the absence of unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism to date, we attempted to test the extent of CD89-evoked IgAN by generating a transgenic mouse strain expressing human CD89 under the control of murine CD14 promotor. No deposition of IgA-CD89 complexes or glomerulonephritis was detected, however. Further studies showed that elimination of murine IgA was mediated by Kupffer cells. In patients, however, CD89/IgA complexes were detected, and injection of patient IgA induced IgAN-like features in CD89 Tg mice. In transgenic mice, IgAN pathogenesis involves impaired clearance of abnormal IgA via CD89, primarily by the Kupffer cells. Conditional IgAN progression in CD89 transgenic mice thus reveals important aspects of IgAN pathogenesis. PMID:27437939

  19. Mammary-carcinoma cells in mouse liver: infiltration of liver tissue and interaction with Kupffer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, E.; Dingemans, K. P.; Van de Pavert, I. V.; Van den Bergh-Weerman, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Interactions between TA3 mammary-carcinoma cells and liver cells were studied with the electron microscope in mouse livers that had been perfused with a defined medium containing the tumour cells. Infiltration of liver tissue by the TA3 cells proceeded in the following steps. First, numerous small protrusions were extended through endothelial cells and into hepatocytes. Next, some cells had larger processes deeply indenting hepatocytes. Finally a few tumour cells became located outside the blood vessels. Two variant cell lines, TA3/Ha and TA3/St, differing in cell coat and surface charge, did not differ in the extent of infiltration. TA3/Ha cells were often encircled by thin processes of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells). Encircled cells were initially intact, but later some of them degenerated. These observations suggest that TA3/Ha cells were phagocytized by the Kupffer cells. Encirclement appeared to be inhibited after only 30 min, when many cells were still partly surrounded. Encirclement of TA3/St was much less frequent. After injection of tumour cells intra-portally in vivo, similar results were obtained, which demonstrated the validity of the perfused liver model. TA3/Ha cells formed much fewer tumour nodules in the liver than TA3/St cells. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:687522

  20. The role of Kupffer cells in glucan-induced granuloma formation in the liver of mice depleted of blood monocytes by administration of strontium-89

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, M.; Takahashi, K. )

    1991-05-01

    In order to elucidate the role of Kupffer cells in granuloma formation in the liver of mice under a condition of severe monocytopenia induced by administration of strontium-89, granulomas were produced by particulate glucan injection and examined histopathologically, immunohistochemically, by ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography, and in culture experiments. Hepatic granulomas were smaller, less numerous, and more irregularly shaped in the monocytopenic mice than in the control mice. The granulomas were composed of multinuclear giant cells, epithelioid cells, Kupffer cells, and T lymphocytes, but not monocytes or granulocytes. Kupffer cells were heavily labeled with ({sup 3}H)thymidine in the monocytopenic mice, particularly just before the stage of granuloma formation, and then clustered in the liver sinusoids. At 8 days, they formed granulomas, transformed into epithelioid cells, and transformed further into multinuclear giant cells. Although the culture of liver cell suspensions prepared from the livers of monocytopenic mice sustained diffuse proliferation of macrophages on a monolayer of mouse stromal cell line (ST2), no monocyte/macrophage colonies were formed. From these results, it is reasonable to conclude that Kupffer cells alone are activated in a condition without a supply of monocytes from peripheral blood; proliferate and cluster in the hepatic sinusoids; transform into peroxidase-negative macrophages, epithelioid cells, and multinuclear giant cells; and participate in granuloma formation in loco together with T lymphocytes.

  1. Kupffer Cells Protect Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells from Fas-Dependent Apoptosis in Sepsis by Down-Regulating gp130

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Noelle A.; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Borgerding, Joshua N.; Ayala, Carol A.; Ayala, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction is a key feature of multiple organ injury, the primary cause of fatality seen in critically ill patients. Although the development of EC dysfunction in the heart and lung is well studied in sepsis, it remains unclear in the liver. Herein, we report that liver sinusoidal ECs (LSECs; defined as CD146+CD45−) exhibit increased intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (CD54) and Fas in response to sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). By using magnetically enriched LSEC (CD146+) populations, we show evidence of marked apoptosis, with a twofold decline in viable LSECs in CLP animals compared with sham controls. These changes and increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels were all mitigated in septic Fas−/− and Fas ligand−/− animals. Although we previously reported increased numbers of Fas ligand expressing CD8+ T lymphocytes in the septic liver, CD8+ T-cell deficiency did not reverse the onset of LSEC apoptosis/damage. However, Kupffer cell depletion with clodronate liposomes resulted in greater apoptosis and Fas expression after CLP and a decrease in glycoprotein 130 expression on LSECs, suggesting that STAT3 activation may protect these cells from injury. Our results document a critical role for death receptor–mediated LSEC injury and show the first evidence that Kupffer cells are essential to the viability of LSECs, which appears to be mediated through glycoprotein 130 expression in sepsis. PMID:23306157

  2. Effects of glycine on phagocytosis and secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Wen; Yun, Ke-Ming; Han, De-Wu; Xu, Rui-Ling; Zhao, Yuan-Chang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects and mechanisms of action of glycine on phagocytosis and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro. METHODS: Kupffer cells were isolated from normal rats by collagenase digestion and Percoll density gradient differential centrifugation. After culture for 24 h, Kupffer cells were incubated in fresh Dulbecco's Modification of Eagle’s Medium containing glycine (G1: 1 mmol/L, G2: 10 mmol/L, G3: 100 mmol/L and G4: 300 mmol/L) for 3 h, then used to measure phagocytosis by a bead test, TNF-α secretion after lipopolysaccharide stimulation by radioactive immunoassay, and microfilament and microtubule expression by staining with phalloidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) or a monoclonal anti-α tubulin-FITC antibody, respectively, and evaluated under a ultraviolet fluorescence microscope. RESULTS: Glycine decreased the phagocytosis of Kupffer cells at both 30 min and 60 min (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). The numbers of beads phagocytosed by Kupffer cells in 30 min were 16.9 ± 4.0 (control), 9.6 ± 4.1 (G1), 12.1 ± 5.7 (G2), 8.1 ± 3.2 (G3) and 7.5 ± 2.0 (G4), and were 22.5 ± 7.9 (control), 20.1 ± 5.8 (G1), 19.3 ± 4.8 (G2), 13.5 ± 4.7 (G3) and 9.2 ± 3.1 (G4) after 60 min. TNF-α secretion by Kupffer cells in G1 (0.19 ± 0.03), G2 (0.16 ± 0.04), G3 (0.14 ± 0.03) and G4 (0.13 ± 0.05) was significantly less than that in controls (0.26 ± 0.03, P < 0.01), and the decrease in secretion was dose-dependent (P < 0.05). Microfilaments of Kupffer cells in G2, G3 and G4 groups were arranged in a disorderly manner. The fluorescence densities of microtubules in G1 (53.4 ± 10.5), G2 (54.1 ± 14.6), G3 (64.9 ± 12.1) and G4 (52.1 ± 14.2) were all lower than those in the controls (102.2 ± 23.7, P < 0.01), but the decrease in microtubule fluorescence density was not dose-dependant. CONCLUSION: Glycine can decrease the phagocytosis and secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro, which may be related to the changes in the expression of

  3. Radioprotective effect of kupffer cell depletion on hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Xing; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Hu, Wei-Xu

    2015-05-01

    Radiation-induced liver injury remains a clinical problem and data suggest that sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs) are an important target. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before exposure would protect SECs from radiation-induced injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously injected 24 h before irradiation with Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) (10 mg/kg body weight). Three groups of animals were treated: 1. control group (saline and sham irradiation); 2. GdCl3 + 30 Gy radiation group and 3. 30 Gy radiation only group. Specimens were collected at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after completion of each treatment. Liver tissue was assessed for inflammatory cytokine expression and radiation-induced SEC injury based on serum hyaluronic acid (HA) level, apoptosis and ultrastructural and histological analyses. The results showed that radiation exposure caused apoptosis of SECs, but not hepatocytes. Inflammatory cytokine expression, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression, was significantly attenuated in the GdCl3 + 30 Gy radiation group, compared with the 30 Gy radiation-only group (P < 0.05). The GdCl3 + radiation-treated rats exhibited significantly lower levels of HA and SEC apoptosis than the radiation-treated only rats at early time points, and radiation-induced liver injury was also attenuated. In conclusion, we hypothesize that selective Kupffer cell inhibition by gadolinium chloride was shown to reduce apoptosis in SECs caused by irradiation of the live and protected the liver against radiation-induced injury. PMID:25897555

  4. Characterization of the Inflammasome in Human Kupffer Cells in Response to Synthetic Agonists and Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zannetti, Claudia; Roblot, Guillaume; Charrier, Emily; Ainouze, Michelle; Tout, Issam; Briat, François; Isorce, Nathalie; Faure-Dupuy, Suzanne; Michelet, Maud; Marotel, Marie; Kati, Semra; Schulz, Thomas F; Rivoire, Michel; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Luangsay, Souphalone; Alatiff, Omran; Henry, Thomas; Walzer, Thierry; Durantel, David; Hasan, Uzma

    2016-07-01

    The liver is the largest gland in the human body and functions as an innate immune organ. Liver macrophages called Kupffer cells (KC) constitute the largest group of macrophages in the human body. Innate immune responses involving KC represent the first line of defense against pathogens in the liver. Human monocyte-derived macrophages have been used to characterize inflammasome responses that lead to the release of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, but it has not yet been determined whether human KC contain functional inflammasomes. We show, to our knowledge for the first time, that KC express genes and proteins that make up several different inflammasome complexes. Moreover, activation of KC in response to the absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasome led to the production of IL-1β and IL-18, which activated IL-8 transcription and hepatic NK cell activity, respectively. Other inflammasome responses were also activated in response to selected bacteria and viruses. However, hepatitis B virus inhibited the AIM2 inflammasome by reducing the mRNA stability of IFN regulatory factor 7, which regulated AIM2 transcription. These data demonstrate the production of IL-1β and IL-18 in KC, suggesting that KC contain functional inflammasomes that could be important players in the innate immune response following certain infections of the liver. We think our findings could potentially aid therapeutic approaches against chronic liver diseases that activate the inflammasome. PMID:27226092

  5. Thyroid hormone-induced cytosol-to-nuclear translocation of rat liver Nrf2 is dependent on Kupffer cell functioning.

    PubMed

    Videla, Luis A; Cornejo, Pamela; Romanque, Pamela; Santibáñez, Catherine; Castillo, Iván; Vargas, Romina

    2012-01-01

    L-3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T(3)) administration upregulates nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in rat liver, which is redox-sensitive transcription factor mediating cytoprotection. In this work, we studied the role of Kupffer cell respiratory burst activity, a process related to reactive oxygen species generation and liver homeostasis, in Nrf2 activation using the macrophage inactivator gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3); 10 mg/kg i.v. 72 h before T(3) [0.1 mg/kg i.p.]) or NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (1.5 mmol/L added to the drinking water for 7 days before T(3)), and determinations were performed 2 h after T(3). T(3) increased nuclear/cytosolic Nrf2 content ratio and levels of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase, and thioredoxin (Western blot) over control values, proteins whose gene transcription is induced by Nrf2. These changes were suppressed by GdCl(3) treatment prior to T(3), an agent-eliciting Kupffer-cell depletion, inhibition of colloidal carbon phagocytosis, and the associated respiratory burst activity, with enhancement in nuclear inhibitor of Nrf2 kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/Nrf2 content ratios suggesting Nrf2 degradation. Under these conditions, T(3)-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) response was eliminated by previous GdCl(3) administration. Similar to GdCl(3), apocynin given before T(3) significantly reduced liver Nrf2 activation and HO-1 expression, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor eliciting abolishment of colloidal carbon-induced respiratory burst activity without altering carbon phagocytosis. It is concluded that Kupffer cell functioning is essential for upregulation of liver Nrf2-signaling pathway by T(3). This contention is supported by suppression of the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells and the associated reactive oxygen species production by GdCl(3) or apocynin given prior to T(3), thus hindering Nrf2 activation. PMID:22649286

  6. Diminished organelle motion in murine Kupffer cells during the erythrocytic stage of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bellows, Charles F.; Molina, Ramon M.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitized erythrocytes are ingested by murine hepatic macrophages during malaria infection. We non-invasively monitored how this altered the motion of intracellular phagosomes in Kupffer cells using magnetometry. Submicrometric γFe2O3 particles were injected prior to malaria infection. They were cleared from the blood, primarily by Kupffer cells, and retained within their phagosomes. The mice were periodically magnetized. After removing this external magnet, the aligned iron particles created a remnant magnetic field (RMF) which then decayed (relaxation), reflecting the motion of particle-containing phagosomes. After baseline measurements of relaxation, the mice were injected intravenously with Plasmodium chabaudi-parasitized or normal murine red blood cells (RBCs). During the next 15 days, relaxation measurements, parasitaemia and haematocrit values were monitored. At 6 days post injection with 3 × 107 parasitized RBCs, relaxation rates had decreased. At this time, all mice had parasitaemias greater than 58 per cent and haematocrits less than 20 per cent. At day 7, while the parasitaemias were declining, the rate of relaxation continued to decrease. Throughout the experiment, relaxation remained constant in animals injected with normal RBCs. Electron microscopy revealed Kupffer cells filled with damaged and parasitized erythrocytes, and haemoglobin degradation pigment. We conclude that ingestion and metabolism of parasitized erythrocytes by liver macrophages during malaria infection decreases their organelle motion with likely consequences of compromised host defences. PMID:21068031

  7. A standardized aqueous extract of Anoectochilus formosanus ameliorated thioacetamide-induced liver fibrosis in mice: the role of Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Bin; Chuang, Hin-Ru; Yang, Li-Chan; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Anoectochilus formosanus is used in traditional folk medicine as an hepatoprotective agent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a standardized aqueous extract of A. formosanus (SAEAF) on thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver fibrosis. An in vitro study showed that the inhibitive effect of kinsenoside, a major component of SAEAF, on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion from Kupffer cells might be derived at least partly from downregulation of LPS-receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Hepatic fibrosis was produced by TAA (200 mg/kg, i.p.) 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Mice in the three TAA groups were treated daily with distilled water and SAEAF (1.0, 0.2 g/kg) via gastrogavage throughout the experimental period. The mice that received the SAEAF treatment had significantly reduced plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, relative liver weights, and hepatic hydroxyproline contents. A histological examination also confirmed that SAEAF reduced the degree of fibrosis caused by TAA treatment. RT-PCR analysis showed that SAEAF treatment reduced mRNA expression of collagen (alpha1)(I), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, CD14, TLR4, and TNF receptor 1. An immunohistochemical examination also indicated that SAEAF reduced the number of CD68-positive cells (macrophages). In conclusion, oral administration of SAEAF significantly reduced TAA-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice, probably through inhibition of hepatic Kupffer cell activation. PMID:20378990

  8. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  9. SiO2 nanoparticle-induced impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism in hepatocytes directly and through a Kupffer cell-mediated pathway in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yang; Chen, Qingqing; Ding, Tingting; Sun, Jiao

    2014-01-01

    The liver has been shown to be a primary target organ for SiO2 nanoparticles in vivo, and may be highly susceptible to damage by these nanoparticles. However, until now, research focusing on the potential toxic effects of SiO2 nanoparticles on mitochondria-associated energy metabolism in hepatocytes has been lacking. In this work, SiO2 nanoparticles 20 nm in diameter were evaluated for their ability to induce dysfunction of mitochondrial energy metabolism. First, a buffalo rat liver (BRL) cell line was directly exposed to SiO2 nanoparticles, which induced cytotoxicity and mitochondrial damage accompanied by decreases in mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, enzymatic expression in the Krebs cycle, and activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, III and IV. Second, the role of rat-derived Kupffer cells was evaluated. The supernatants from Kupffer cells treated with SiO2 nanoparticles were transferred to stimulate BRL cells. We observed that SiO2 nanoparticles had the ability to activate Kupffer cells, leading to release of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species from these cells and subsequently to inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity in BRL cells. PMID:24959077

  10. Purinergic signaling via P2X7 receptor mediates IL-1β production in Kupffer cells exposed to silica nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shuji; Negishi, Yusuke; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Takenouchi, Takato; Kitani, Hiroshi; Takeda, Ken

    2014-07-01

    There is extensive evidence that nanoparticles (NPs) cause adverse effects in multiple organs, including liver, though the mechanisms involved remain to be fully established. Kupffer cells are macrophages resident in the liver, and play important roles in liver inflammation induced by various toxic agents, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Interleukin-1 (IL-1) family members IL-1α,β are released from LPS-primed macrophages exposed to NPs, including silica NPs (SNPs), via activation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 inflammasomes. Here, we investigated the mechanism of production of IL-1β via activation of inflammasomes in mouse Kupffer cell line KUP5, focusing on the role of purinergic signaling via P2X7 receptor. IL-1β production by LPS-primed KUP5 cells exposed to SNPs was increased dose-dependently, and was greatest in response to SNPs with a diameter of 30 nm (SNP30), as compared with 70-nm and 300-nm SNPs (SNP70 and SNP300). ATP release was also highest in cells exposed to SNP30. Treatment of LPS-primed KUP5 cells with ATP also induced a high level of IL-1β production, similar to that induced by SNP30. IL-1β production was significantly inhibited by apyrase (an ecto-nucleotidase) and A438079 (a P2X7 antagonist/ATP-release inhibitor). Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was confirmed in cells exposed to SNP30. In conclusion, ATP released from P2X7 receptor in response to stimulation of KUP5 cells with SNP30 induces ROS production via cell-membrane NADPH oxidase. The ROS causes activation of inflammasomes, leading to caspase-1-dependent processing of IL-1β. PMID:24685903

  11. Liver innate immune cells and insulin resistance: the multiple facets of Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Jager, J; Aparicio-Vergara, M; Aouadi, M

    2016-08-01

    Obesity, which affects 600 million adults worldwide, is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and insulin resistance. Current therapies for these metabolic disorders include weight management by lifestyle intervention or bariatric surgery and pharmacological treatment with the aim of regulating blood glucose. Probably because of their short-term effectiveness, these therapies have not been able to stop the rapidly rising prevalence of T2D over the past decades, highlighting an urgent need to develop new therapeutic strategies. The role of immune cells, such as macrophages, in insulin resistance has been extensively studied. Major advances have been made to elucidate the role of adipose tissue macrophages in these pathogeneses. Recently, anti-inflammatory drugs have been suggested as an alternative treatment for T2D, and clinical trials of these agents are currently ongoing. In addition, results of previous clinical trials using antibodies against inflammatory cytokines, which showed modest effects, are now being rigorously re-evaluated. However, it is still unclear how liver macrophages [termed Kupffer cells (KCs)], which constitute the major source of macrophages in the body, contribute to the development of insulin resistance. In this review, we will discuss the present understanding of the role of liver immune cells in the development of insulin resistance. We will particularly focus on KCs, which could represent an attractive target for the treatment of metabolic diseases. PMID:26864622

  12. Suppression of Kupffer cell function prevents cadmium induced hepatocellular necrosis in the male Sprague-Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Sauer, J M; Waalkes, M P; Hooser, S B; Kuester, R K; McQueen, C A; Sipes, I G

    1997-08-15

    Exposure of humans to toxic metals and metalloids is a major environmental problem. Many metals, such as cadmium, can be hepatotoxic. However, the mechanisms by which metals cause acute hepatic injury are in many cases unknown. Previous reports suggest a major role for inflammation in acute cadmium induced hepatotoxicity. In initial experiments we found that a non-hepatotoxic dose of cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 2.0 mg/kg, i.v.) markedly increased the clearance rate of colloidal carbon from the blood, which is indicative of enhanced phagocytic activity by Kupffer cells (resident hepatic macrophages). Thus. the objective these studies was to determine the involvement of Kupffer cells in cadmium induced liver injury by inhibiting their function with gadolinium chloride (GdCl3). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered GdCl3 (10 mg/kg, i.v.) followed 24 h later by a single dose of CdCl2 (3.0 and 4.0 mg/kg, i.v.). Twenty four hours after CdCl2 administration animals were killed and the degree of liver toxicity was assessed using plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), as well as light microscopy. Cadmium chloride administration produced multifocal hepatocellular necrosis and increased plasma ALT activity. Pretreatment with GdCl3 significantly reduced both the morphological changes and hepatic ALT release caused by CdCl2. However, the protection was specific to the liver, and did not alter CdCl2 induced testicular injury, as determined by histopathological damage. In many cases, the inducible cadmium-binding protein, metallothionein (MT) is often an essential aspect of the acquisition of cadmium tolerance in the liver. Although cadmium caused a dramatic induction of hepatic MT (32-fold), GdCl3 caused only a minor increase (2-fold). Combined CdCl2 and GdCl3 treatment did not induce levels to an extent greater than CdCl2 alone. As expected, GdCl3 also caused a slight increase in the amount of cadmium associated with the liver. In cultured hepatocytes isolated from GdCl3

  13. Cytochrome P4502E1 inhibitor, chlormethiazole, decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in rat Kupffer cells with ethanol treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the role of Cytochrome P4502E1 in sensitizing Kupffer cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation after ethanol induction. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a liquid ethanol diet, control diet or ethanol diet supplemented with CYP2E1 inhibitor, chlormethiazole (CMZ), for 4'week...

  14. Bone marrow-derived monocytes give rise to self-renewing and fully differentiated Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Charlotte L.; Zheng, Fang; De Baetselier, Patrick; Martens, Liesbet; Saeys, Yvan; De Prijck, Sofie; Lippens, Saskia; Abels, Chloé; Schoonooghe, Steve; Raes, Geert; Devoogdt, Nick; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Beschin, Alain; Guilliams, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages are thought to be exclusively derived from embryonic progenitors. However, whether circulating monocytes can also give rise to such macrophages has not been formally investigated. Here we use a new model of diphtheria toxin-mediated depletion of liver-resident Kupffer cells to generate niche availability and show that circulating monocytes engraft in the liver, gradually adopt the transcriptional profile of their depleted counterparts and become long-lived self-renewing cells. Underlining the physiological relevance of our findings, circulating monocytes also contribute to the expanding pool of macrophages in the liver shortly after birth, when macrophage niches become available during normal organ growth. Thus, like embryonic precursors, monocytes can and do give rise to self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages if the niche is available to them. PMID:26813785

  15. Targeting Kupffer cells in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: Why and how?

    PubMed Central

    Lanthier, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development are under investigation in an era of increased prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Previous findings have pointed to the role of adipose tissue, adipose tissue macrophages and their secretory products in the development of a chronic inflammatory status inducing insulin resistance and a higher risk of liver steatosis called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The activation of resident macrophages [Kupffer cells (KC)] and the recruitment of blood derived monocytes/macrophages into the diseased liver have now been identified as key elements for disease initiation and progression. Those cells could be activated through gut flora modifications and an altered gut barrier function but also through the internalization of toxic lipid compounds in adjacent hepatocytes or in KC themselves. Due to the role of activated KC in insulin resistance, fibrosis development and inflammation amplification, they became a target in clinical trials. A shift towards an anti-inflammatory KC phenotype through peroxisome proliferator activator-receptorδ agonists, an inhibition of macrophage recruitment through anti-C-C chemokine receptor 2 action and a specific blocking of internalization of toxic lipoxidation or glycation compounds into KC by galectin-3 receptor inhibitors are now under investigation in human NASH. PMID:26380042

  16. Iron- and inflammation-induced hepcidin gene expression in mice is not mediated by Kupffer cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lou, Dan-Qing; Lesbordes, Jeanne-Claire; Nicolas, Gaël; Viatte, Lydie; Bennoun, Myriam; Van Rooijen, Nico; Kahn, Axel; Renia, Laurent; Vaulont, Sophie

    2005-05-01

    Hepcidin, a recently discovered iron regulatory peptide, is believed to inhibit the release of iron from absorptive enterocytes and macrophages. Liver hepcidin synthesis is induced in vivo by iron stores and inflammation. The molecular basis of the regulation of hepcidin gene expression by these effectors in hepatocytes is currently unknown, although there is strong evidence that indirect mechanisms are involved. The aims of this study were to gain insight into these mechanisms and to determine to what extent other liver cell types are responsible for transducing the signal by which hepcidin expression is regulated in mouse hepatocytes. For this, we depleted Kupffer cells by injection of liposome-encapsulated clodronate and then studied iron- and inflammation-induced hepcidin gene expression. In addition, we directly evaluated the role of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) by using IL-6-deficient mice. Our results show that iron is able to induce hepcidin gene expression independently of Kupffer cells in the liver and circulating IL-6. In contrast, we show that hepcidin gene induction by inflammation is also independent of Kupffer cells, but involves, at least partly, IL-6. In conclusion, these results show that two independent regulatory pathways control hepcidin gene expression and suggest that hepatocytes play a key role in the regulation of hepcidin gene expression by sensing iron and inflammatory signals. PMID:15793843

  17. Mainstream cigarette smoke accelerates the progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by modulating Kupffer cell-mediated hepatocellular apoptosis in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Surim; Kim, Jong Won; Yun, Hyejin; Choi, Seong-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hyub; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lim, Chae Woong; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Bumseok

    2016-08-10

    Cigarette smoking in adolescents is considered to be a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of mainstream cigarette smoke (MSCS) on the progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in adolescents. Three-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed either a methionine and choline-deficient plus high fat (MCDHF) diet for 6 weeks. Each group was exposed to MSCS (300, 600 ug/L) or fresh air for 2h per day during the first 3 weeks of MCDHF diet feeding. MSCS increased MCDHF diet-induced NASH by increasing serum ALT/AST levels, steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Furthermore, MSCS was associated with the degree of oxidative stress and hepatocellular apoptosis in NASH mice, but not prominent in controls. In vitro, cigarette smoke extract (CSE) activated Kupffer cells (KCs) to release inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress, which induced hepatocellular apoptosis. In conclusion, MSCS exposure accelerates the progression and severity of NASH by modulating KC-mediated hepatocellular apoptosis. Our results support the regulation of CS in adolescents with steatohepatitis. PMID:27180087

  18. Amphiphilic core–shell nanoparticles containing dense polyethyleneimine shells for efficient delivery of microRNA to Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuojin; Niu, Dechao; Zhang, Junyong; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yao, Yuan; Li, Pei; Gong, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery approach to transfer exogenous genes into macrophages is still a great challenge. Current gene delivery methods often result in low cellular uptake efficiency in vivo in some types of cells, especially for the Kupffer cells (KCs). In this article, we demonstrate that amphiphilic core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of well-defined hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cores and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) shells (denoted as PEI@PMMA NPs) are efficient nanocarriers to deliver microRNA (miRNA)-loaded plasmid to the KCs. Average hydrodynamic diameter of PEI@ PMMA NPs was 279 nm with a narrow size distribution. The NPs also possessed positive surface charges up to +30 mV in water, thus enabling effective condensation of negatively charged plasmid DNA. Gel electrophoresis assay showed that the resultant PEI@PMMA NPs were able to completely condense miRNA plasmid at a weight ratio of 25:1 (N/P ratio equal to 45:1). The Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry results showed that the PEI@PMMA/miRNA NPs displayed low cytotoxicity and cell apoptosis activity against the KCs. The maximum cell transfection efficiency reached 34.7% after 48 hours, which is much higher than that obtained by using the commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000 (1.7%). Bio-transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the PEI@PMMA NPs were mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of the KCs. Furthermore, when compared to the control groups, the protein expression of target nuclear factor κB P65 was considerably inhibited (P<0.05) both in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate that the PEI@PMMA NPs with a unique amphiphilic core–shell nanostructure are promising nanocarriers for delivering miRNA plasmid to KCs. PMID:27366061

  19. The renin angiotensin system regulates Kupffer cells in colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shu Wen; Ager, Eleanor I; Neo, Jaclyn; Christophi, Christopher

    2013-08-01

    Blockade of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) can inhibit tumor growth and this may be mediated via undefined immunomodulatory actions. This study investigated the effects of RAS blockade on liver macrophages (Kupffer cells; KCs) in an orthotopic murine model of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Here we showed that pharmacological targeting of the RAS [ANG II (31.25 µg/kg/h i.p.), ANG-(1-7) (24 µg/kg/h i.p.) or the ACE inhibitor; captopril (750 mg/kg/d i.p.)] altered endogenous KC numbers in the tumor-bearing liver throughout metastatic growth. Captopril, and to a lesser extent ANG-(1-7), increased KC numbers in the liver but not tumor. KCs were found to express the key RAS components: ACE and AT1R. Treatment with captopril and ANG II increased the number of AT1R-expressing KCs, although total KC numbers were not affected by ANG II. Captopril (0.1 µM) also increased macrophage invasion in vitro. Additionally, captopril was administered with KC depletion before tumor induction (day 0) or at established metastatic growth (day 18) using gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3; 20 mg/kg). Livers were collected at day 21 and quantitative stereology used as a measure of tumor burden. Captopril reduced growth of CRC liver metastases. However, when captopril was combined with early KC depletion (day 0) tumor growth was significantly increased compared with captopril alone. In contrast, late KC depletion (day 18) failed to influence the anti-tumor effects of captopril. The result of these studies suggests that manipulation of the RAS can alter KC numbers and may subsequently influence progression of CRC liver metastases. PMID:23792575

  20. Kupffer cells modulate hepatic fatty acid oxidation during infection with PR8 influenza.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, Tatyana N; Singh, Larry N; Chatterji-Len, Milani; Zerfas, Patricia M; Cusmano-Ozog, Kristina; McGuire, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    In response to infection, patients with inborn errors of metabolism may develop a functional deterioration termed metabolic decompensation. The biochemical hallmarks of this disruption of metabolic homeostasis are disease specific and may include acidosis, hyperammonemia or hypoglycemia. In a model system previously published by our group, we noted that during influenza infection, mice displayed a depression in hepatic mitochondrial enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that this normal adaptation may extend to other metabolic pathways, and as such, may impact various inborn errors of metabolism. Since the liver is a critical organ in inborn errors of metabolism, we carried out untargeted metabolomic profiling of livers using mass spectrometry in C57Bl/6 mice infected with influenza to characterize metabolic adaptation. Pathway analysis of metabolomic data revealed reductions in CoA synthesis, and long chain fatty acyl CoA and carnitine species. These metabolic adaptations coincided with a depression in hepatic long chain β-oxidation mRNA and protein. To our surprise, the metabolic changes observed occurred in conjunction with a hepatic innate immune response, as demonstrated by transcriptional profiling and flow cytometry. By employing an immunomodulation strategy to deplete Kupffer cells, we were able to improve the expression of multiple genes involved in β-oxidation. Based on these findings, we are the first to suggest that the role of the liver as an immunologic organ is central in the pathophysiology of hepatic metabolic decompensation in inborn errors of metabolism due to respiratory viral infection. PMID:26319418

  1. SR-A and SREC-I Are Kupffer and Endothelial Cell Receptors for Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Pasquale; Vetrini, Francesco; Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Grove, Nathan C; Bertin, Terry; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors can mediate long-term, high-level transgene expression from transduced hepatocytes with no chronic toxicity. However, a toxic acute response with potentially lethal consequences has hindered their clinical applications. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and Kupffer cells are major barriers to efficient hepatocyte transduction. Understanding the mechanisms of adenoviral vector uptake by non-parenchymal cells may allow the development of strategies aimed at overcoming these important barriers and to achieve preferential hepatocyte gene transfer with reduced toxicity. Scavenger receptors on Kupffer cells bind adenoviral particles and remove them from the circulation, thus preventing hepatocyte transduction. In the present study, we show that HDAd particles interact in vitro and in vivo with scavenger receptor-A (SR-A) and with scavenger receptor expressed on endothelial cells-I (SREC-I) and we exploited this knowledge to increase the efficiency of hepatocyte transduction by HDAd vectors in vivo through blocking of SR-A and SREC-I with specific fragments antigen-binding (Fabs). PMID:23358188

  2. Kupffer Cells Undergo Fundamental Changes during the Development of Experimental NASH and Are Critical in Initiating Liver Damage and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Reid, D T; Reyes, J L; McDonald, B A; Vo, T; Reimer, R A; Eksteen, B

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become the leading liver disease in North America and is associated with the progressive inflammatory liver disease non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Considerable effort has been made to understand the role of resident and recruited macrophage populations in NASH however numerous questions remain. Our goal was to characterize the dynamic changes in liver macrophages during the initiation of NASH in a murine model. Using the methionine-choline deficient diet we found that liver-resident macrophages, Kupffer cells were lost early in disease onset followed by a robust infiltration of Ly-6C+ monocyte-derived macrophages that retained a dynamic phenotype. Genetic profiling revealed distinct patterns of inflammatory gene expression between macrophage subsets. Only early depletion of liver macrophages using liposomal clodronate prevented the development of NASH in mice suggesting that Kupffer cells are critical for the orchestration of inflammation during experimental NASH. Increased understanding of these dynamics may allow us to target potentially harmful populations whilst promoting anti-inflammatory or restorative populations to ultimately guide the development of effective treatment strategies. PMID:27454866

  3. Kupffer Cells Undergo Fundamental Changes during the Development of Experimental NASH and Are Critical in Initiating Liver Damage and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reid, D. T.; Reyes, J. L.; McDonald, B. A.; Vo, T.; Reimer, R. A.; Eksteen, B.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become the leading liver disease in North America and is associated with the progressive inflammatory liver disease non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Considerable effort has been made to understand the role of resident and recruited macrophage populations in NASH however numerous questions remain. Our goal was to characterize the dynamic changes in liver macrophages during the initiation of NASH in a murine model. Using the methionine-choline deficient diet we found that liver-resident macrophages, Kupffer cells were lost early in disease onset followed by a robust infiltration of Ly-6C+ monocyte-derived macrophages that retained a dynamic phenotype. Genetic profiling revealed distinct patterns of inflammatory gene expression between macrophage subsets. Only early depletion of liver macrophages using liposomal clodronate prevented the development of NASH in mice suggesting that Kupffer cells are critical for the orchestration of inflammation during experimental NASH. Increased understanding of these dynamics may allow us to target potentially harmful populations whilst promoting anti-inflammatory or restorative populations to ultimately guide the development of effective treatment strategies. PMID:27454866

  4. TNFα-Mediated Liver Destruction by Kupffer Cells and Ly6Chi Monocytes during Entamoeba histolytica Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Thomas; Ittrich, Harald; Jacobs, Thomas; Heeren, Joerg; Tacke, Frank; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore

    2013-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is a focal destruction of liver tissue due to infection by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica). Host tissue damage is attributed mainly to parasite pathogenicity factors, but massive early accumulation of mononuclear cells, including neutrophils, inflammatory monocytes and macrophages, at the site of infection raises the question of whether these cells also contribute to tissue damage. Using highly selective depletion strategies and cell-specific knockout mice, the relative contribution of innate immune cell populations to liver destruction during amebic infection was investigated. Neutrophils were not required for amebic infection nor did they appear to be substantially involved in tissue damage. In contrast, Kupffer cells and inflammatory monocytes contributed substantially to liver destruction during ALA, and tissue damage was mediated primarily by TNFα. These data indicate that besides direct antiparasitic drugs, modulating innate immune responses may potentially be beneficial in limiting ALA pathogenesis. PMID:23300453

  5. Kupffer Cell Transplantation in Mice for Elucidating Monocyte/Macrophage Biology and for Potential in Cell or Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Simone; Bhargava, Kuldeep K; Ranaldo, Gabriella; Zanolini, Diego; Palestro, Christopher J; Santambrogio, Laura; Prat, Maria; Follenzi, Antonia; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2016-03-01

    Kupffer cells (KC) play major roles in immunity and tissue injury or repair. Because recapitulation of KC biology and function within liver will allow superior insights into their functional repertoire, we studied the efficacy of the cell transplantation approach for this purpose. Mouse KC were isolated from donor livers, characterized, and transplanted into syngeneic recipients. To promote cell engraftment through impairments in native KC, recipients were preconditioned with gadolinium chloride. The targeting, fate, and functionality of transplanted cells were evaluated. The findings indicated that transplanted KC engrafted and survived in recipient livers throughout the study period of 3 months. Transplanted KC expressed macrophage functions, including phagocytosis and cytokine expression, with or without genetic modifications using lentiviral vectors. This permitted studies of whether transplanted KC could affect outcomes in the context of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity or hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. Transplanted KC exerted beneficial effects in these injury settings. The benefits resulted from cytoprotective factors including vascular endothelial growth factor. In conclusion, transplanted adult KC were successfully targeted and engrafted in the liver with retention of innate immune and tissue repair functions over the long term. This will provide excellent opportunities to address critical aspects in the biogenesis, fate, and function of KC within their native liver microenvironment and to develop the cell and gene therapy potential of KC transplantation. PMID:26773351

  6. Curative Effects of Thiacremonone against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Hepatic Failure via Inhibition of Proinflammatory Cytokines Production and Infiltration of Cytotoxic Immune Cells and Kupffer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Ri; Ban, Jung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Lee, Yong Moon; Yoon, Yeo Pyo; Eum, So Young; Jeong, Heon Sang; Yoon, Do-young; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2013-01-01

    High doses of acetaminophen (APAP; N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) cause severe hepatotoxicity after metabolic activation by cytochrome P450 2E1. This study was undertaken to examine the preventive effects of thiacremonone, a compound extracted from garlic, on APAP-induced acute hepatic failure in male C57BL/6J. Mice received with 500 mg/kg APAP after a 7-day pretreatment with thiacremonone (10–50 mg/kg). Thiacremonone inhibited the APAP-induced serum ALT and AST levels in a dose-dependent manner, and markedly reduced the restricted area of necrosis and inflammation by administration of APAP. Thiacremonone also inhibited the APAP-induced depletion of intracellular GSH, induction of nitric oxide, and lipid peroxidation as well as expression of P450 2E1. After APAP injection, the numbers of Kupffer cells, natural killer cells, and cytotoxic T cells were elevated, but the elevated cell numbers in the liver were reduced in thiacremonone pretreated mice. The expression levels of I-309, M-CSF, MIG, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IL-7, and IL-17 were increased by APAP treatment, which were inhibited in thiacremonone pretreated mice. These data indicate that thiacremonone could be a useful agent for the treatment of drug-induced hepatic failure and that the reduction of cytotoxic immune cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine production may be critical for the prevention of APAP-induced acute liver toxicity. PMID:23935693

  7. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids decrease mortality and Kupffer cell prostaglandin E2 production in a rat model of chronic sepsis.

    PubMed

    Barton, R G; Wells, C L; Carlson, A; Singh, R; Sullivan, J J; Cerra, F B

    1991-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that substitution of omega-3 fat for dietary omega-6 fat would reduce mortality and decrease Kupffer cell prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in a rat model of chronic sepsis. Rats were fed via gastrostomy for 12 days with isonitrogenous, isocaloric diets containing 15% of calories as either safflower oil (omega-6) or a 10:1 mixture of menhaden oil (omega-3) and safflower oil. After five days of feeding, animals received an intra-abdominal abscess of defined bacterial content. Survivors were killed on post-laparotomy day 6 in conjunction with liver perfusion and protease liver digestion for Kupffer cell isolation. Kupffer cell PGE2 production was measured by radioimmunoassay after 18 hours of cell culture and again after stimulation with 0 LPS, 10 ng/ml LPS, and 10 micrograms/LPS. Mortality was decreased in menhaden oil-fed animals compared with safflower oil-fed animals (16% vs. 35%). Kupffer cell PGE2 production was decreased in menhaden oil-fed animals at 18 hours (354 +/- 54 vs. 570 +/- 95 pg/0.1 ml; p = 0.09) and after stimulation with 10 micrograms/ml LPS (140 +/- 41 vs. 288 +/- 45 pg/0.1 ml; p = 0.03) compared with safflower oil-fed animals. PMID:2056540

  8. Kupffer Cells Support Hepatitis B Virus-Mediated CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion via Hepatitis B Core Antigen-TLR2 Interactions in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Sun, Rui; Xu, Long; Yin, Wenwei; Chen, Yongyan; Zheng, Xiaodong; Lian, Zhexiong; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistence is a fundamental process in chronic HBV infection and a key factor in all related liver diseases; however, the mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. We studied the role of TLR2 in HBV persistence using a well-established HBV-carrier mouse model generated by hydrodynamically injecting a phospho-adeno-associated virus/HBV1.2 plasmid into mice. We found that a genetic deficiency in TLR2 improves HBV elimination, whereas activating TLR2 led to more stable HBV persistence, suggesting that TLR2 activation is critical in HBV persistence. Furthermore, we noted that TLR2 activation could inhibit CD8(+) T cell function, causing the exhaustion phenotype in HBV-carrier mice, because TLR2 deficiency might rescue CD8(+) T cell function in a cellular adoptive experiment. TLR2 expression on Kupffer cells (KCs) was upregulated in HBV-carrier mice, which accounts for HBV persistence, because the difference in anti-HBV immunity between HBV-carrier wild-type and Tlr2(-/-) mice did not exist after KC depletion. In addition, similar to TLR2 deficiency, after KC depletion, CD8(+) T cells were more efficiently activated in HBV-carrier mice, leading to rapid HBV elimination. KCs produced more IL-10 upon TLR2 activation in response to direct hepatitis B core Ag stimulation, and the elevated IL-10 inhibited CD8(+) T cell function in HBV-carrier mice, because IL-10 deficiency or anti-IL-10R treatment resulted in CD8(+) T cells with stronger antiviral function. In conclusion, KCs support liver tolerance by inducing anti-HBV CD8(+) T cell exhaustion via IL-10 production after TLR2 activation by hepatitis B core Ag stimulation. PMID:26304988

  9. Failure to demonstrate a major role for Kupffer cells and radiosensitive leukocytes in immunoglobulin-mediated elimination of Trypanosoma musculi

    SciTech Connect

    Kongshavn, P.A.; Shaw, K.; Ghadirian, E.; Ulczak, O. )

    1990-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that elimination of parasitemia in Trypanosoma musculi infection is brought about by immunoglobulin G2a antibodies, C3, and an effector cell. Experiments were designed to identify the putative effector cell by using several approaches. Infected C5-deficient or C5-sufficient mice treated with silica particles or given 900 rads of radiation 3 days earlier effectively eliminated trypanosomes following administration of immune plasma (IP). Silica-treated, noninfected mice given T. musculi preincubated with IP also cleared the parasites. Radiolabeling studies revealed that uptake of the cleared trypanosomes by the liver in normal mice was relatively low and fell only slightly (19%) in silica-treated mice. In contrast, uptake of radiolabeled sheep erythrocytes by the liver was normally much higher and fell drastically (7%) in silica-treated mice. Mice were then immunocompromised by 900 rads of radiation, silica particles, and anti-platelet serum combined before IP-sensitized trypanosomes were given. Leukocyte and platelet counts were both reduced by 95% and sheep erythrocyte uptake by the liver fell from 77 to 5%; however, greater than 99% of the injected trypanosomes were cleared in these mice and uptake of radiolabeled trypanosomes by the liver was similar to that of normal mice. Lastly, in anesthetized mice in which Kupffer cells were excluded surgically from the circulation, greater than 99% of the IP-sensitized trypanosomes disappeared rapidly from the blood. Only 7% of the radiolabel was found in the liver versus 60% in sham-operated mice. The results are interpreted as showing that hepatic Kupffer cells play a minor role in the immune elimination of T. musculi. Likewise, radiosensitive leukocytes and platelets are unlikely to be sole candidates for the putative effector cell that mediates a cure of murine trypanosomiasis.

  10. Altered Endothelin-1 Signaling in Production of Thromboxane A2 in Kupffer Cells from Bile Duct Ligated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew M; Zhang, Jian X

    2009-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs), the liver resident macrophages accounting for 80–90% of the total population of fixed tissue macrophages in the body, not only play a key role in host defense via removing particulate materials from the portal circulation, but may also contribute to the pathogenesis of various liver diseases. We have previously demonstrated that KCs play an important role in controlling portal hypertension and hepatocellular injury via releasing thromboxane A2 (TXA2) in early fibrosis induced by one-week bile duct ligation (BDL). Production of TXA2 is controlled by cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) that is activated by the interaction of entothelin-1 (ET-1) with its G-protein coupled ET receptor B (ETBR). However, the signaling pathways that contribute to the ET-1-induced activation of cPLA2 and production of TXA2 in KCs in the normal healthy or injured livers are not yet clear, which are investigated in the present study using isolated KCs from one-week BDL or sham rats. The pharmacological inhibition of cPLA2 or chelation of intracellular calcium abrogated the ET-1 induction of TXA2 from KCs. Compared to those from sham rats, KCs from BDL animals displayed a significantly enhanced responsiveness of p38 MAPK to ET-1, increased ETBR and Gαi subunit but decreased Gαq and Gα11 expression. Inhibition of ERK1/2 or Gq signaling abrogated significantly the ET-1 induction of TXA2 in sham KCs but only slightly in BDL KCs. In contrast, inhibition of p38 MAPK and Gi signaling markedly attenuated the ET-1 induction of TXA2 in BDL KCs but had no effect in sham KCs. Lastly, inhibition of PLC or PKC abrogated ET-1 induction of TXA2 in KCs from both sham and BDL groups. The hepatic stress (such as BDL) induces significant modifications in the receptor and intermediates of ET-1 signaling in KC and subsequently alters ET-1 signaling mechanisms, particularly a shift from Gq induced signaling to Gi induced signaling, in the activation of cPLA2 and production of TXA2 in

  11. Kupffer cell inactivation by carbon monoxide bound to red blood cells preserves hepatic cytochrome P450 via anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects exerted through the HMGB1/TLR-4 pathway during resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Shigeru; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Maeda, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishima, Yu; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2015-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions for controlling hemorrhaging induce systemic ischemia reperfusion, resulting in a decrease in hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels. Carbon monoxide (CO), when bound to red blood cells (CO-RBC) has the potential to protect the hepatic CYP protein to produce a resuscitative effect in a hemorrhagic shock rat model. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which CO-RBC resuscitation from a massive hemorrhage protects against a decrease in hepatic CYP. In the early phase (∼1h) after a hemorrhage and RBC resuscitation, hepatic CYP protein levels were significantly decreased with increasing hepatic free heme levels, but were maintained by a pre-treatment of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a Kupffer cell inhibitor, and Trolox, an anti-oxidant agent, as well as CO-RBC resuscitation. Under these conditions, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from activated Kupffer cells was increased, but this increase was suppressed by CO-RBC resuscitation. At a late phase (6∼24h), CYP mRNA levels decreased after hemorrhage and RBC resuscitation, but not in the case of CO-RBC resuscitation. The increases in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels were decreased by CO-RBC resuscitation via the suppression of the toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) and the expression of the high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1). Hepatic CYP protection after a hemorrhage and CO-RBC resuscitation can be attributed to the inactivation of Kupffer cells, resulting in the suppression of ROS production in the early phase and the suppression of inflammatory cytokine production via the TLR-4/HMGB-1signal pathway in the late phase. PMID:26232728

  12. Nucleation of platelets with bloodborne pathogens on Kupffer cell precedes other innate immunity and contributes to bacterial clearance

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Connie H. Y.; Jenne, Craig N.; Petri, Björn; Chrobok, Navina L.; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Using intravital imaging of the liver, we unveil a collaborative role for platelets with Kupffer cells (KCs) in eradicating bloodborne bacterial infections. Under basal conditions, platelets via glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) formed transient “touch-and-go” interactions with von Willebrand factor (vWF) constitutively expressed on KCs. Bacteria, such as Bacillus cereus and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), were rapidly caught by KCs and triggered platelets to switch from “touch-and-go” to sustained GPIIb-mediated adhesion on the KC surface to encase the bacterium. Infected GpIbα−/− mice demonstrated increased endothelial and KC damage, leading to increased fluid leakage, significant polycythemia and rapid mortality. This study identifies a novel surveillance mechanism of intravascular macrophage by platelets that rapidly converts to a critical host response against bloodborne bacteria. PMID:23770641

  13. Stereological assessment of sexual dimorphism in the rat liver reveals differences in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells but not hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ricardo; Lopes, Célia; Malhão, Fernanda; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Fonseca, Sónia; Lima, Margarida; Gebhardt, Rolf; Rocha, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    There is long-standing evidence that male and female rat livers differ in enzyme activity. More recently, differences in gene expression profiling have also been found to exist; however, it is still unclear whether there is morphological expression of male/female differences in the normal liver. Such differences could help to explain features seen at the pathological level, such as the greater regenerative potential generally attributed to the female liver. In this paper, hepatocytes (HEP), Kupffer cells (KC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC) of male and female rats were examined to investigate hypothesised differences in number, volume and spatial co-localisation of these cell types. Immunohistochemistry and design-based stereology were used to estimate total numbers, numbers per gram and mean cell volumes. The position of HSC within lobules (periportal vs. centrilobular) and their spatial proximity to KC was also assessed. In addition, flow cytometry was used to investigate the liver ploidy. In the case of HEP and KC, differences in the measured cell parameters were observed between male and female specimens; however, no such differences were detected for HSC. Female samples contained a higher number of HEP per gram, with more binucleate cells. The HEP nuclei were smaller in females, which was coincident with more abundant diploid particles in these animals. The female liver also had a greater number of KC per gram, with a lower percentage of KC in the vicinity of HSC compared with males. In this study, we document hitherto unknown morphological sexual dimorphism in the rat liver, namely in HEP and KC. These differences may account for the higher regenerative potential of the female liver and lend weight to the argument for considering the rat liver as a sexually dimorphic organ. PMID:26892301

  14. Effect of CD16a, the surface receptor of Kupffer cells, on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIU-YUN; WU, LUN; LI, SHENG-WEI; ZHOU, WEN-BO; WANG, MENG-YUAN; ZUO, GUO-QING; LIU, CHANG-AN; DING, XIONG

    2016-01-01

    FcγRIIIa (CD16) is a low-affinity Fc receptor of IgG. As the idio-binding receptor of IgG Fc, it plays an important role in the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of natural killer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of Kupffer cells (KCs) and the expression of their surface receptor FcγRIIIa in hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, we also aimed to observe the functional mechanism of FcγRIIIa. Immunohistochemical analysis was employed to study KCs and FcγRIIIa. In order to explore the role of FcγRIIIa in the growth of cancer cells, KCs and H22 tumor cells were co-cultured in different serum. The mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and FcγRIIIa were analyzed by RT-qPCR; the TNF-α and FcγRIIIa protein expression levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis, respectively. Our results showed that the number of Kuppfer cells in cancerous tissues (21.6±7.8) was lower than those in para-cancerous (68.8±9.1) tissues and adjacent normal hepatic tissues (62.0±1.9) (P<0.01); this decreased with the reduction in the differentiation degree of cancer (P<0.05). FcγRIIIa-positive cells were similar in morphology to KCs, and their distributive tendency was coincident (P<0.05). The increase in CD16a mRNA levels in the group treated with immune serum was 3.9-, 4.9- and 3.9-fold greater than that in the ordinary serum group at different time points, and CD16a protein expression also markedly increased (P<0.05). However, these effects were inhibited by the addition of anti-IgG Fc serum (P<0.05). The results of the present study suggested that FcγRIIIa resided in KCs, and it contributed to the inhibition of the growth of liver tumor cells. PMID:27082928

  15. Time course investigation of PPAR{alpha}- and Kupffer cell-dependent effects of WY-14,643 in mouse liver using microarray gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Courtney G.; Kosyk, Oksana; Bradford, Blair U.; Ross, Pamela K.; Burns, Amanda M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Qu Pingping; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2007-12-15

    Administration of peroxisome proliferators to rodents causes proliferation of peroxisomes, induction of {beta}-oxidation enzymes, hepatocellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia, with chronic exposure ultimately leading to hepatocellular carcinomas. Many responses associated with peroxisome proliferators are nuclear receptor-mediated events involving peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}). A role for nuclear receptor-independent events has also been shown, with evidence of Kupffer cell-mediated free radical production, presumably through NAPDH oxidase, induction of redox-sensitive transcription factors involved in cytokine production and cytokine-mediated cell replication following acute treatment with peroxisome proliferators in rodents. Recent studies have demonstrated, by using p47{sup phox}-null mice which are deficient in NADPH oxidase, that this enzyme is not related to the phenotypic events caused by prolonged administration of peroxisome proliferators. In an effort to determine the timing of the transition from Kupffer cell-to PPAR{alpha}-dependent modulation of peroxisome proliferator effects, gene expression was assessed in liver from Ppar{alpha}-null, p47{sup phox}-null and corresponding wild-type mice following treatment with 4-chloro-6-(2,3-xylidino)-pyrimidynylthioacetic acid (WY-14,643) for 8 h, 24 h, 72 h, 1 week or 4 weeks. WY-14,643-induced gene expression in p47{sup phox}-null mouse liver differed substantially from wild-type mice at acute doses and striking differences in baseline expression of immune related genes were evident. Pathway mapping of genes that respond to WY-14,643 in a time- and dose-dependent manner demonstrates suppression of immune response, cell death and signal transduction and promotion of lipid metabolism, cell cycle and DNA repair. Furthermore, these pathways were largely dependent on PPAR{alpha}, not NADPH oxidase demonstrating a temporal shift in response to peroxisome proliferators. Overall, this

  16. Re-evaluation of thin layer chromatography as an alternative method for the quantification of prostaglandins from rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Pestel, Sabine; Jungermann, Kurt; Schieferdecker, Henrike L

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to conventionally used immunoassays, thin layer chromatography (TLC)--by prelabeling of cells with radioactive arachidonic acid (AA)--allows to differentiate between cellularly built and added prostanoids and thus to investigate feedback effects of prostanoids on their own release. PGD2, TXB2 and PGE2 released from zymosan-stimulated Kupffer cells were separated with distinct RF-values, corresponding to those of the pure substances. Quantification of PGD2 and PGE2 gave comparable results with TLC and immunoassays, but measurement in the presence of added prostanoids was only possible with TLC. Moreover TLC was superior to immunoassays in having a longer linear range while being comparably sensitive. Cellularly built TXB2 in its radioactively labeled form was not detectable by TLC. Inhibition of TXB2 release by externally added AA or technical artifacts were excluded, suggesting that the cellular AA-pools used for prostaglandin and thromboxane synthesis differ in their accessibility for added AA. Thus, TLC is a simple, sensitive and precise method for the quantification of cellularly built prostaglandins but not of thromboxane even in the presence of added prostanoids. PMID:15789620

  17. Erythrophagocytosis by Liver Macrophages (Kupffer Cells) Promotes Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Fibrosis in a Rabbit Model of Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Otogawa, Kohji; Kinoshita, Kohji; Fujii, Hideki; Sakabe, Masahide; Shiga, Ryoko; Nakatani, Kazuki; Ikeda, Kazuo; Nakajima, Yuji; Ikura, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Makiko; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Hato, Fumihiko; Kawada, Norifumi

    2007-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a progressive fibrotic disease, the pathogenesis of which has not been fully elucidated. Here, we report a molecular aspect of this disease elucidated using rabbits fed a cholesterol-rich high-fat diet and exhibiting insulin resistance. The liver in this model showed steatohepatitis with fibrosis and high mRNA expression for some cytokines, heme oxygenase-1, transforming growth factor-β1, and collagen α1(I). Erythrocytes isolated from the model showed marked fragility and the externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the membrane and were frequently engulfed by Kupffer cells/macrophages in the hepatic sinusoids. Expression of milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor (EGF)-factor 8, a PS-binding protein, was augmented in the liver. In culture, RAW 264.7 cells engulfed erythrocytes oxidized by tert-butyl hydroperoxide, a process that was inhibited by anti-milk fat globule-EGF-factor 8 antibody. In addition, PS-positive erythrocytes appeared entrapped in the model liver in ex vivo perfusion experiments. Finally, in specimens from NASH patients, the aggregation of erythrocytes in inflammatory hepatic sinusoids was notable. These results indicate that the engulfment of PS-externalized, apoptotic signal-positive, erythrocytes by hepatic macrophages may lead to the deposition of iron derived from hemoglobin in the liver and be involved in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis. PMID:17322381

  18. Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Survive in Kupffer Cells and Exhibit High Virulence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Takuto; Miyazaki, Motoyasu; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Takata, Tohru; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki; Jimi, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is part of the normal body flora, heavy usage of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). MRSA can form biofilms and cause indwelling foreign body infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. Using an in vitro assay, we screened 173 clinical blood isolates of MRSA and selected 20 high-biofilm formers (H-BF) and low-biofilm formers (L-BF). These were intravenously administered to mice and the general condition of mice, the distribution of bacteria, and biofilm in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were investigated. MRSA count was the highest in the liver, especially within Kupffer cells, which were positive for acid polysaccharides that are associated with intracellular biofilm. After 24 h, the general condition of the mice worsened significantly in the H-BF group. In the liver, bacterial deposition and aggregation and the biofilm-forming spot number were all significantly greater for H-BF group than for L-BF. CFU analysis revealed that bacteria in the H-BF group survived for long periods in the liver. These results indicate that the biofilm-forming ability of MRSA is a crucial factor for intracellular persistence, which could lead to chronic infections. PMID:27376326

  19. Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Survive in Kupffer Cells and Exhibit High Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Takuto; Miyazaki, Motoyasu; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Takata, Tohru; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki; Jimi, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is part of the normal body flora, heavy usage of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). MRSA can form biofilms and cause indwelling foreign body infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. Using an in vitro assay, we screened 173 clinical blood isolates of MRSA and selected 20 high-biofilm formers (H-BF) and low-biofilm formers (L-BF). These were intravenously administered to mice and the general condition of mice, the distribution of bacteria, and biofilm in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were investigated. MRSA count was the highest in the liver, especially within Kupffer cells, which were positive for acid polysaccharides that are associated with intracellular biofilm. After 24 h, the general condition of the mice worsened significantly in the H-BF group. In the liver, bacterial deposition and aggregation and the biofilm-forming spot number were all significantly greater for H-BF group than for L-BF. CFU analysis revealed that bacteria in the H-BF group survived for long periods in the liver. These results indicate that the biofilm-forming ability of MRSA is a crucial factor for intracellular persistence, which could lead to chronic infections. PMID:27376326

  20. Kupffer cell depletion attenuates leptin-mediated methoxamine-stimulated portal perfusion pressure and thromboxane A2 release in a rodent model of NASH-cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Ying; Huang, Yi-Tsau; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lee, Shou-Dong; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2012-12-01

    plays an important role in hyper-responsiveness to MTX in NASH-cirrhotic rat livers with portal hypertension. The leptin-enhanced MTX-stimulated increase in PPP is mediated by increased oxidative stress and Kupffer-cell-activated AA-derived TXA(2) release in NASH-cirrhotic rats. PMID:22734967

  1. Effects of the in vitro administered ethanol and lipopolysaccharide toxin on membrane properties, intracellular free calcium and phagocytic function of isolated rat kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Victorov, A.; Smith, T.; Abril, E.; Hamlin, E.; Earnest, D. )

    1991-03-11

    Low concentrations of ethanol slightly stimulated phagocytosis of cultured Kupffer cells (KC), producing practically no effect on membrane microviscosity and cytosolic free (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}. On the contrary, high concentrations of ethanol significantly suppressed phagocytic function, increased fluidity of membrane lipids and caused a sustained rise in (Ca{sup 2}){sub i}; above the resting level of 41-85 nM. Treatment of KC with colchicine and cytochalasin B dramatically destructurized the plasma membrane lipids. Short term preincubation of KC with high doses of alcohol stimulated the disordering effects of both drugs, suggesting direct interaction of ethanol with microtubule and microfilament structures. The authors hypothesize that ethanol impairs phagocytosis of KC by concerted actions on membrane lipid fluidity, cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} and functioning of cytoskeleton. On the other hand, incubation of KC with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced no changes in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}; or plasma membrane fluidity but reduced by several fold the fluidizing effect of subsequently added ethanol. They suggested that low doses of LPS, by activating second messengers other than Ca{sup 2+}, alter the functioning of the cytoskeleton and cause reorganization of the plasma membrane thus making KC membranes more resistent to the fluidizing action of ethanol and partially restoring the phagocytic function.

  2. Large-pore mesoporous silica nanospheres as vehicles for delivering TRAF3-shRNA plasmids to Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyong; Guo, Shipeng; Zhang, Wenfeng; Niu, Dechao; Gong, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The currently available techniques for transferring exogenous genes into macrophages, especially the targeted import of exogenous genes into Kupffer cells (KCs) in vivo, are inefficient and achieve only low targeting. Novel Large-Pore Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres (LPMSNs) may be a promising gene transfection agent for KCs because of their superior biodegradation and hypotoxic characteristics, as well as their ability to retain the biological function of KCs and the high loading-rate of exogenous plasmid. LPMSNs were able to completely adsorb shRNA-TRAF3 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-3) plasmid at a mass ratio as low as 30:1, and exhibited a low cytotoxicity for KCs. LPMSNs were detected in KC cytoplasm in vitro, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that they were present only in KCs in liver tissue in vivo. The max KC transfection efficiency with LPMSNs was 34.8± 0.07%, as evaluated using flow cytometry, and the protein and mRNA levels of TRAF3 were significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) by shRNA-TRAF3 plasmid transfection after 24 h in vitro and 48 h in vivo. In conclusion, KC targeted transfection was achieved successfully by LPMSNs carrying shRNA-TRAF3 plasmids in vitro and vivo. The protein and mRNA levels of TRAF3 were suppressed significantly. These results suggest that LPMSNs are a promising vehicle for delivering exogenous genes into KCs in vitro and vivo. PMID:26631959

  3. Kupffer-cell-expressed transmembrane TNF-α is a major contributor to lipopolysaccharide and D-galactosamine-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Zhou, Wenjing; Li, Chenxi; Zhang, Meng; Jiang, Yaping; Jiang, Rui; Ba, Hongping; Li, Cheng; Wang, Jing; Yin, Bingjiao; Gong, Feili; Li, Zhuoya

    2016-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α exists in two bioactive forms, a 26-kDa transmembrane form (tmTNF-α) and a 17-kDa soluble form (sTNF-α). sTNF-α has been recognized as a key regulator of hepatitis; however, serum sTNF-α disappears in mice during the development of severe liver injury, and high levels of serum sTNF-α do not necessarily result in liver damage. Interestingly, in a mouse model of acute hepatitis, we have found that tmTNF-α expression on Kupffer cells (KCs) significantly increases when mice develop severe liver injury caused by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-gal), and the level of tmTNF-α expression is positively related to the activity of serum transaminases. Therefore, we hypothesized that KC-expressed tmTNF-α constitutes a pathomechanism in hepatitis and have explored the role of tmTNF-α in this disease model. Here, we have compared the impact of KCs(tmTNFlow) and KCs(tmTNFhigh) on acute hepatitis in vivo and ex vivo and have further demonstrated that KCs(tmTNFhigh), rather than KCs(tmTNFlow), not only exhibit an imbalance in secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, favoring inflammatory response and exacerbating liver injury, but also induce hepatocellular apoptosis via tmTNF-α and the expression of another pro-apoptotic factor, Fas ligand. Our data suggest that KC(tmTNFhigh) is a major contributor to liver injury in LPS/D-gal-induced hepatitis. PMID:26267221

  4. Kupffer cells potentiate liver sinusoidal endothelial cell injury in sepsis by ligating programmed cell death ligand-1

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Noelle A.; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yvonne; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Ayala, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    PD-1 and PD-L1 have been reported to provide peripheral tolerance by inhibiting TCR-mediated activation. We have reported that PD-L1−/− animals are protected from sepsis-induced mortality and immune suppression. Whereas studies indicate that LSECs normally express PD-L1, which is also thought to maintain local immune liver tolerance by ligating the receptor PD-1 on T lymphocytes, the role of PD-L1 in the septic liver remains unknown. Thus, we hypothesized initially that PD-L1 expression on LSECs protects them from sepsis-induced injury. We noted that the increased vascular permeability and pSTAT3 protein expression in whole liver from septic animals were attenuated in the absence of PD-L1. Isolated LSECs taken from septic animals, which exhibited increased cell death, declining cell numbers, reduced cellular proliferation, and VEGFR2 expression (an angiogenesis marker), also showed improved cell numbers, proliferation, and percent VEGFR2+ levels in the absence of PD-L1. We also observed that sepsis induced an increase of liver F4/80+PD-1+-expressing KCs and increased PD-L1 expression on LSECs. Interestingly, PD-L1 expression levels on LSECs decreased when PD-1+-expressing KCs were depleted with clodronate liposomes. Contrary to our original hypothesis, we document here that increased interactions between PD-1+ KCs and PD-L1+ LSECs appear to lead to the decline of normal endothelial function—essential to sustain vascular integrity and prevent ALF. Importantly, we uncover an underappreciated pathological aspect of PD-1:PD-L1 ligation during inflammation that is independent of its normal, immune-suppressive activity. PMID:23766529

  5. Mercury-Selenium Relationships in Liver of Guiana Dolphin: The Possible Role of Kupffer Cells in the Detoxification Process by Tiemannite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lailson-Brito, José; Dorneles, Paulo Renato; Andrade, Leonardo; Azevedo, Alexandre de Freitas; Fragoso, Ana Bernadete; Vidal, Lara Gama; Costa, Marianna Badini; Bisi, Tatiana Lemos; Almeida, Ronaldo; Carvalho, Dario Pires; Bastos, Wanderley Rodrigues; Malm, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Top marine predators present high mercury concentrations in their tissues as consequence of biomagnification of the most toxic form of this metal, methylmercury (MeHg). The present study concerns mercury accumulation by Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis), highlighting the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Liver samples from 19 dolphins incidentally captured within Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil) from 1994 to 2006 were analyzed for total mercury (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), total organic mercury (TOrgHg) and selenium (Se). X-ray microanalyses were also performed. The specimens, including from fetuses to 30-year-old dolphins, comprising 8 females and 11 males, presented high THg (0.53–132 µg/g wet wt.) and Se concentrations (0.17–74.8 µg/g wet wt.). Correlations between THg, MeHg, TOrgHg and Se were verified with age (p<0.05), as well as a high and positive correlation was observed between molar concentrations of Hg and Se (p<0.05). Negative correlations were observed between THg and the percentage of MeHg contribution to THg (p<0.05), which represents a consequence of the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Accumulation of Se-Hg amorphous crystals in Kupffer Cells was demonstrated through ultra-structural analysis, which shows that Guiana dolphin is capable of carrying out the demethylation process via mercury selenide formation. PMID:22860072

  6. Mercury-selenium relationships in liver of Guiana dolphin: the possible role of Kupffer cells in the detoxification process by tiemannite formation.

    PubMed

    Lailson-Brito, José; Cruz, Renato; Dorneles, Paulo Renato; Andrade, Leonardo; Azevedo, Alexandre de Freitas; Fragoso, Ana Bernadete; Vidal, Lara Gama; Costa, Marianna Badini; Bisi, Tatiana Lemos; Almeida, Ronaldo; Carvalho, Dario Pires; Bastos, Wanderley Rodrigues; Malm, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Top marine predators present high mercury concentrations in their tissues as consequence of biomagnification of the most toxic form of this metal, methylmercury (MeHg). The present study concerns mercury accumulation by Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis), highlighting the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Liver samples from 19 dolphins incidentally captured within Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil) from 1994 to 2006 were analyzed for total mercury (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), total organic mercury (TOrgHg) and selenium (Se). X-ray microanalyses were also performed. The specimens, including from fetuses to 30-year-old dolphins, comprising 8 females and 11 males, presented high THg (0.53-132 µg/g wet wt.) and Se concentrations (0.17-74.8 µg/g wet wt.). Correlations between THg, MeHg, TOrgHg and Se were verified with age (p<0.05), as well as a high and positive correlation was observed between molar concentrations of Hg and Se (p<0.05). Negative correlations were observed between THg and the percentage of MeHg contribution to THg (p<0.05), which represents a consequence of the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Accumulation of Se-Hg amorphous crystals in Kupffer Cells was demonstrated through ultra-structural analysis, which shows that Guiana dolphin is capable of carrying out the demethylation process via mercury selenide formation. PMID:22860072

  7. Exploring Kupffer's Vescicle Through Self Propelled Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundy, Kassidy; Dasgupta, Agnik; Amack, Jeff; Manning, M. Lisa

    Early development is an important stage in the formation of functional, relatively healthy organisms. In zebrafish embryos, a transient organ in the tailbud called Kupffer's Vescicle (KV) is responsible for the initial left-right (L-R) asymmetry that results in asymmetric organ and tissue placement in the adult zebrafish. Originating as a collection of symmetrically organized monociliated cells, the KV experiences a shift in cell shapes over time that leaves more cells on the anterior or top side of the KV. This arrangement helps to generate a stronger counter-clockwise fluid flow across the anterior side of the organ, which is required for L-R asymmetry. In seeking to understand the source of the shape changes occurring within the KV, we simulate a Self Propelled Particle (SPP) model that includes parameters for cell polarization and speed. We model the KV as a large particle moving in a straight line with constant velocity to mimic the physical forces of the notochord acting on this organ, and we model the surrounding tailbud cells as smaller, slower active particles with an orientation that changes over time due to rotational noise. Our goal is to calculate the forces exerted on the KV by the surrounding tissue, to see if they are sufficient to explain the shape changes we observe in the KV that lead to L-R asymmetry.

  8. Autoregulation by eicosanoids of human Kupffer cell secretory products. A study of interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta, and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Roland, C R; Goss, J A; Mangino, M J; Hafenrichter, D; Flye, M W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Methods employed previously to analyze the secretory behavior of rodent Kupffer cells (KC) were used to examine the human KC's secretory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: As the resident hepatic macrophage, the KC resides at the interface between the portal and systemic circulations. Consequently, this cell may play an integral role in the immune response to antigens and bacteria in the sinusoid. Study of cytokine production by the KC has relied predominantly on the rat as the source of these cells. Whether human KCs respond similarly to rat KCs after LPS stimulation has been a matter of speculation. METHODS: Kupffer cells obtained from seven human livers were tested under conditions identical to those used to study rat KCs. Kupffer cells rested for 12 hours after isolation were stimulated with LPS (2.5 micrograms/mL). Arginine concentration in the culture medium varied from 0.01 to 1.2 mM. To examine the role of eicosanoids, parallel culture wells received indomethacin (10 microM). Culture supernatants were assayed for interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and nitric oxide. RESULTS: Similar to the rat KC, LPS-stimulated human KCs released IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, and PGE2. However, unlike rat KCs, nitric oxide could not be detected, regardless of whether the human KCs were exposed to LPS, interferon-gamma (INF-gamma), or LPS + IFN-gamma. Similar to rat KCs, indomethacin prevented PGE2 release while significantly upregulating TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6, but not TGF-beta, consistent with an autoregulatory control of eicosanoids over proinflammatory cytokines. As has been shown in the rat, physiologic levels of L-arginine (0.01 mM) significantly enhanced LPS-induced PGE2 secretion relative to the response in medium containing standard L-arginine concentration (1.2 mM); however, unlike the rat KC, the human

  9. [THE EXCESS OF PALMITIC FATTY ACID IN FOOD AS MAIN CAUSE OF LIPOIDOSIS OF INSULIN-DEPENDENT CELLS: SKELETAL MYOCYTES, CARDIO-MYOCYTES, PERIPORTAL HEPATOCYTES, KUPFFER MACROPHAGES AND B-CELLS OF PANCREAS].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2016-02-01

    In phylogenesis, becoming of biologicalfunctions and biological reactions proceeds with the purpose ofpermanent increasing of "kinetic perfection ". The main role belongs to factors ofphysical, chemical and biological kinetics, their evaluation using systemic approach technique under permanent effect of natural selection. The late-in-phylogenesis insulin, proceeded with, in development of biological function of locomotion, specialization of insulin-dependent cells: skeletal myocytes, syncytium of cardiomyocytes, subcutaneous adipocytes, periportal hepatocytes, Kupffer's macrophages and β-cells of islets of pancreas. The insulin initiated formation of new, late in phylogenesis, large pool of fatty cells-subcutaneous adipocytes that increased kinetic parameters of biological function of locomotion. In realization of biological function of locomotion only adipocytes absorb exogenous mono unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in the form of triglycerides in composition of oleic and palmitic lipoproteins of very low density using apoE/B-100 endocytosis. The rest of insulin-dependent cells absorb fatty acids in the form of unesterified fatty acids from associates with albumin and under effect of CD36 of translocase offatty acids. The insulin in all insulin-depended cells inhibits biological reaction of lipolysis enhancing contributing into development of lipoidosis. The insulin expresses transfer offatty acids in the form of unsaturated fatty acids from adipocytes into matrix of mitochondria. The insulin supplies insulin-dependent cells with substrates for acquiring energy subject to that in pool of unsaturated fatty acids in adipocytes prevails hydrophobic palmitic unsaturated fatiy acid that slowly passes into matrix through external membrane ofmitochondria; oxidases of mitochondria so slowly implement its β-oxidation that content of exogenous palmitic unsaturatedfatty acid can't be higher than phylogenetic, physiological level - 15% of all amount offatty acids

  10. Rhomboid domain-containing protein 3 is a negative regulator of TLR3-triggered natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Liu, Shuxun; Xia, Meng; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Chunmei; Bao, Yan; Jiang, Minghong; Wu, Yue; Xu, Tian; Cao, Xuetao

    2013-05-01

    Rhomboid domain-containing protein 3 (Rhbdd3), which belongs to a family of proteins with rhomboid domain, is widely expressed in immune cells; however, the roles of the Rhbdd members, including Rhbdd3, in immunity remain unknown. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical for host immune defense and also can mediate inflammatory diseases such as hepatitis. Although much is known about how NK cells are activated, the detailed mechanisms for negative regulation of NK cell activation remain to be fully understood. Using Rhbdd3-deficient mice, we reveal that Rhbdd3, selectively up-regulated in NK cells upon Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) stimulation, negatively regulates TLR3-mediated NK cell activation in a feedback manner. Rhbdd3 inhibits TLR3-triggered IFN-γ and granzyme B expression of NK cells in cell-cell contact dependence of accessory cells such as dendritic cells and Kupffer cells. Rhbdd3 interacts with DNAX activation protein of 12 kDa and promotes its degradation, inhibiting MAPK activation in TLR3-triggered NK cells. Furthermore, Rhbdd3 plays a critical role in attenuating TLR3-triggered acute inflammation by controlling NK cell activation and accumulation in liver and disrupting NK cell-Kupffer cell interaction. Therefore, Rhbdd3 is a feedback inhibitor of TLR3-triggered NK cell activation. Our study outlines a mechanism for the negative regulation of NK cell activation and also provides clues for the function of the rhomboid proteins in immunity. PMID:23610400

  11. Three-dimensional flow in Kupffer's Vesicle.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Johnson, T D; Baker, D I; Smith, D J; Lopes, S S

    2016-09-01

    Whilst many vertebrates appear externally left-right symmetric, the arrangement of internal organs is asymmetric. In zebrafish, the breaking of left-right symmetry is organised by Kupffer's Vesicle (KV): an approximately spherical, fluid-filled structure that begins to form in the embryo 10 hours post fertilisation. A crucial component of zebrafish symmetry breaking is the establishment of a cilia-driven fluid flow within KV. However, it is still unclear (a) how dorsal, ventral and equatorial cilia contribute to the global vortical flow, and (b) if this flow breaks left-right symmetry through mechanical transduction or morphogen transport. Fully answering these questions requires knowledge of the three-dimensional flow patterns within KV, which have not been quantified in previous work. In this study, we calculate and analyse the three-dimensional flow in KV. We consider flow from both individual and groups of cilia, and (a) find anticlockwise flow can arise purely from excess of cilia on the dorsal roof over the ventral floor, showing how this vortical flow is stabilised by dorsal tilt of equatorial cilia, and (b) show that anterior clustering of dorsal cilia leads to around 40 % faster flow in the anterior over the posterior corner. We argue that these flow features are supportive of symmetry breaking through mechano-sensory cilia, and suggest a novel experiment to test this hypothesis. From our new understanding of the flow, we propose a further experiment to reverse the flow within KV to potentially induce situs inversus. PMID:26825450

  12. Organized chaos in Kupffer's vesicle: how a heterogeneous structure achieves consistent left-right patterning.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Montenegro-Johnson, T D; Lopes, S S

    2014-01-01

    Successful establishment of left-right asymmetry is crucial to healthy vertebrate development. In many species this process is initiated in a ciliated, enclosed cavity, for example Kupffer's vesicle (KV) in zebrafish. The microarchitecture of KV is more complex than that present in the left-right organizer of many other species. While swirling flow in KV is recognized as essential for left-right patterning, its generation, nature and conversion to asymmetric gene expression are only beginning to be fully understood. We recently [Sampaio, P et al. Dev Cell 29:716-728] combined imaging, genetics and fluid dynamics simulation to characterize normal and perturbed ciliary activity, and their correlation to asymmetric charon expression and embryonic organ fate. Randomness in cilia number and length have major implications for robust flow generation; even a modest change in mean cilia length has a major effect on flow speed to due to nonlinear scaling arising from fluid mechanics. Wildtype, and mutant embryos with normal liver laterality, exhibit stronger flow on the left prior to asymmetric inhibition of charon. Our discovery of immotile cilia, taken with data on morphant embryos with very few cilia, further support the role of mechanosensing in initiating and/or enhancing flow conversion into gene expression. PMID:25454897

  13. Organized chaos in Kupffer's vesicle: How a heterogeneous structure achieves consistent left-right patterning

    PubMed Central

    Smith, DJ; Montenegro-Johnson, TD; Lopes, SS

    2014-01-01

    Successful establishment of left-right asymmetry is crucial to healthy vertebrate development. In many species this process is initiated in a ciliated, enclosed cavity, for example Kupffer's vesicle (KV) in zebrafish. The microarchitecture of KV is more complex than that present in the left-right organizer of many other species. While swirling flow in KV is recognized as essential for left-right patterning, its generation, nature and conversion to asymmetric gene expression are only beginning to be fully understood. We recently [Sampaio, P et al. Dev Cell 29:716–728] combined imaging, genetics and fluid dynamics simulation to characterize normal and perturbed ciliary activity, and their correlation to asymmetric charon expression and embryonic organ fate. Randomness in cilia number and length have major implications for robust flow generation; even a modest change in mean cilia length has a major effect on flow speed to due to nonlinear scaling arising from fluid mechanics. Wildtype, and mutant embryos with normal liver laterality, exhibit stronger flow on the left prior to asymmetric inhibition of charon. Our discovery of immotile cilia, taken with data on morphant embryos with very few cilia, further support the role of mechanosensing in initiating and/or enhancing flow conversion into gene expression. PMID:25454897

  14. Solar cell activation system

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, L.

    1983-07-05

    A system for activating solar cells involves the use of phosphorescent paint, the light from which is amplified by a thin magnifying lens and used to activate solar cells. In a typical system, a member painted with phosphorescent paint is mounted adjacent a thin magnifying lens which focuses the light on a predetermined array of sensitive cells such as selenium, cadmium or silicon, mounted on a plastic board. A one-sided mirror is mounted adjacent the cells to reflect the light back onto said cells for purposes of further intensification. The cells may be coupled to rechargeable batteries or used to directly power a small radio or watch.

  15. Opposite cross-talk by oleate and palmitate on insulin signaling in hepatocytes through macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Guijas, Carlos; Balsinde, Jesús; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-05-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation in adipose tissue during obesity is associated with an impairment of the insulin signaling cascade. In this study, we have evaluated the impact of palmitate or oleate overload of macrophage/Kupffer cells in triggering stress-mediated signaling pathways, in lipoapoptosis, and in the cross-talk with insulin signaling in hepatocytes. RAW 264.7 macrophages or Kupffer cells were stimulated with oleate or palmitate, and levels of M1/M2 polarization markers and the lipidomic profile of eicosanoids were analyzed. Whereas proinflammatory cytokines and total eicosanoids were elevated in macrophages/Kupffer cells stimulated with palmitate, enhanced arginase 1 and lower leukotriene B4 (LTB4) levels were detected in macrophages stimulated with oleate. When hepatocytes were pretreated with conditioned medium (CM) from RAW 264.7 or Kupffer cells loaded with palmitate (CM-P), phosphorylation of stress kinases and endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling was increased, insulin signaling was impaired, and lipoapoptosis was detected. Conversely, enhanced insulin receptor-mediated signaling and reduced levels of the phosphatases protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were found in hepatocytes treated with CM from macrophages stimulated with oleate (CM-O). Supplementation of CM-O with LTB4 suppressed insulin sensitization and increased PTP1B and PTEN. Furthermore, LTB4 decreased insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in hepatocytes, activated the NFκB pathway, and up-regulated PTP1B and PTEN, these effects being mediated by LTB4 receptor BTL1. In conclusion, oleate and palmitate elicit an opposite cross-talk between macrophages/Kupffer cells and hepatocytes. Whereas CM-P interferes at the early steps of insulin signaling, CM-O increases insulin sensitization, possibly by reducing LTB4. PMID:25792746

  16. The zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle as a model system for the molecular mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to stimulation of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Roxo-Rosa, Mónica; Jacinto, Raquel; Sampaio, Pedro; Lopes, Susana Santos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst inflation and continuous enlargement are associated with marked transepithelial ion and fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Indeed, the inhibition or degradation of CFTR prevents the fluid accumulation within cysts. The in vivo mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to CFTR stimulation are an outstanding challenge in ADPKD research and may bring important biomarkers for the disease. However, hampering their study, the available ADPKD in vitro cellular models lack the three-dimensional architecture of renal cysts and the ADPKD mouse models offer limited access for live-imaging experiments in embryonic kidneys. Here, we tested the zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle (KV) as an alternative model-organ. KV is a fluid-filled vesicular organ, lined by epithelial cells that express both CFTR and Polycystin-2 endogenously, being each of them easily knocked-down. Our data on the intracellular distribution of Polycystin-2 support its involvement in the KV fluid-flow induced Ca2+-signalling. Mirroring kidney cysts, the KV lumen inflation is dependent on CFTR activity and, as we clearly show, the knockdown of Polycystin-2 results in larger KV lumens through overstimulation of CFTR. In conclusion, we propose the zebrafish KV as a model organ to study the renal cyst inflation. Favouring its use, KV volume can be easily determined by in vivo imaging offering a live readout for screening compounds and genes that may prevent cyst enlargement through CFTR inhibition. PMID:26432887

  17. The zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle as a model system for the molecular mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to stimulation of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Roxo-Rosa, Mónica; Jacinto, Raquel; Sampaio, Pedro; Lopes, Susana Santos

    2015-01-01

    In autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst inflation and continuous enlargement are associated with marked transepithelial ion and fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Indeed, the inhibition or degradation of CFTR prevents the fluid accumulation within cysts. The in vivo mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to CFTR stimulation are an outstanding challenge in ADPKD research and may bring important biomarkers for the disease. However, hampering their study, the available ADPKD in vitro cellular models lack the three-dimensional architecture of renal cysts and the ADPKD mouse models offer limited access for live-imaging experiments in embryonic kidneys. Here, we tested the zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle (KV) as an alternative model-organ. KV is a fluid-filled vesicular organ, lined by epithelial cells that express both CFTR and Polycystin-2 endogenously, being each of them easily knocked-down. Our data on the intracellular distribution of Polycystin-2 support its involvement in the KV fluid-flow induced Ca(2+)-signalling. Mirroring kidney cysts, the KV lumen inflation is dependent on CFTR activity and, as we clearly show, the knockdown of Polycystin-2 results in larger KV lumens through overstimulation of CFTR. In conclusion, we propose the zebrafish KV as a model organ to study the renal cyst inflation. Favouring its use, KV volume can be easily determined by in vivo imaging offering a live readout for screening compounds and genes that may prevent cyst enlargement through CFTR inhibition. PMID:26432887

  18. Human Amnion-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation Ameliorates Liver Fibrosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Kimitoshi; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Hosono, Hidetaka; Fukai, Moto; Kameya, Ayano; Higashi, Ryosuke; Yamada, Takahiro; Onishi, Reizo; Yamahara, Kenichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a valuable cell source in regenerative medicine. Recently, several studies have shown that MSCs can be easily isolated from human amnion. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of transplantation of human amnion-derived MSCs (hAMSCs) in rats with liver fibrosis. Methods Liver fibrosis was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of 2 mL/kg of 50% carbon tetrachloride twice a week for 6 weeks. At 3 weeks, hAMSCs (1 × 106 cells) were transplanted intravenously. Rats were sacrificed at 7 weeks, and histological analyses and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed. In vitro experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of hAMSCs on the activation of Kupffer cells. Results Transplantation of hAMSCs significantly reduced the fibrotic area, deposition of type-I collagen, the number of α-smooth muscle actin–positive hepatic stellate cells, and CD68-positive Kupffer cells in the livers. messenger RNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 was significantly decreased and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and hepatocyte growth factor was significantly increased in the liver of hAMSC-treated rats. Transplantation of hAMSCs at 3 weeks plus 5 weeks did not have an additive effect. In vitro experiments demonstrated that Kupffer cell activation induced by lipopolysaccharide was significantly decreased by culturing with conditioned medium obtained from hAMSCs. Conclusions Transplantation of hAMSCs provided significant improvement in a rat model of liver fibrosis, possibly through the inhibition of Kupffer cell and hepatic stellate cell activation. hAMSCs may be a potential new treatment for liver fibrosis.

  19. Histological and immunohistochemical effects of Curcuma longa on activation of rat hepatic stellate cells after cadmium induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    El-Mansy, A A; Mazroa, S A; Hamed, W S; Yaseen, A H; El-Mohandes, E A

    2016-03-01

    The liver is a target for toxic chemicals such as cadmium (Cd). When the liver is damaged, hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are activated and transformed into myofibroblast-like cells, which are responsible for liver fibrosis. Curcuma longa has been reported to exert a hepato-protective effect under various pathological conditions. We investigated the effects of C. longa administration on HSC activation in response to Cd induced hepatotoxicity. Forty adult male albino rats were divided into: group 1 (control), group 2 (Cd treated), group 3 (C. longa treated) and group 4 (Cd and C. longa treated). After 6 weeks, liver specimens were prepared for light and electron microscopy examination of histological changes and immunohistochemical localization of alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) as a specific marker for activated HSC. Activated HSC with a positive αSMA immune reaction were not detected in groups 1 and 3. Large numbers of activated HSC with αSMA immune reactions were observed in group 2 in addition to Cd induced hepatotoxic changes including excess collagen deposition in thickened portal triads, interlobular septa with hepatic lobulation, inflammatory cell infiltration, a significant increase in Kupffer cells and degenerated hepatocytes. In group 4, we observed a significant decrease in HSC that expressed αSMA with amelioration of the hepatotoxic changes. C. longa administration decreased HSC activation and ameliorated hepatotoxic changes caused by Cd in adult rats. PMID:26796199

  20. All-In-One: Advanced preparation of Human Parenchymal and Non-Parenchymal Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Melanie; Driftmann, Sabrina; Kleinehr, Kathrin; Kaiser, Gernot M.; Mathé, Zotlan; Treckmann, Juergen-Walter; Paul, Andreas; Skibbe, Kathrin; Timm, Joerg; Canbay, Ali; Gerken, Guido; Schlaak, Joerg F.; Broering, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver cells are key players in innate immunity. Thus, studying primary isolated liver cells is necessary for determining their role in liver physiology and pathophysiology. In particular, the quantity and quality of isolated cells are crucial to their function. Our aim was to isolate a large quantity of high-quality human parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells from a single liver specimen. Methods Hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and stellate cells were isolated from liver tissues by collagenase perfusion in combination with low-speed centrifugation, density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic-activated cell sorting. The purity and functionality of cultured cell populations were controlled by determining their morphology, discriminative cell marker expression, and functional activity. Results Cell preparation yielded the following cell counts per gram of liver tissue: 2.0±0.4×107 hepatocytes, 1.8±0.5×106 Kupffer cells, 4.3±1.9×105 liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and 3.2±0.5×105 stellate cells. Hepatocytes were identified by albumin (95.5±1.7%) and exhibited time-dependent activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes. Kupffer cells expressed CD68 (94.5±1.2%) and exhibited phagocytic activity, as determined with 1μm latex beads. Endothelial cells were CD146+ (97.8±1.1%) and exhibited efficient uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Hepatic stellate cells were identified by the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (97.1±1.5%). These cells further exhibited retinol (vitamin A)-mediated autofluorescence. Conclusions Our isolation procedure for primary parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells resulted in cell populations of high purity and quality, with retained physiological functionality in vitro. Thus, this system may provide a valuable tool for determining liver function and disease. PMID:26407160

  1. Exposure of Plasmodium sporozoites to the intracellular concentration of potassium enhances infectivity and reduces cell passage activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kota Arun; Garcia, Celia R S; Chandran, Vandana R; Van Rooijen, N; Zhou, Yingyao; Winzeler, Elizabeth; Nussenzweig, Victor

    2007-11-01

    Malaria sporozoites migrate through several cells prior to a productive invasion that involves the formation of a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) where sporozoites undergo transformation into Exo-erythorcytic forms (EEFs). The precise mechanism leading to sporozoite activation for invasion is unknown, but prior traversal of host cells is required. During cell migration sporozoites are exposed to large shifts in K(+) concentration. We report here that incubation of sporozoites to the intracellular K(+) concentration enhances 8-10 times the infectivity of Plasmodium berghei and 4-5 times the infectivity of Plasmodium yoelli sporozoites for a hepatocyte cell line, while simultaneously decreasing cell passage activity. The K(+) enhancing effect was time and concentration dependent, and was significantly decreased by K(+) channel inhibitors. Potassium-treated P. berghei sporozoites also showed enhanced numbers of EEFs in non-permissive cell lines. Treated sporozoites had reduced infectivity for mice, but infectivity was enhanced upon Kupffer cell depletion. Transcriptional analysis of K(+) treated and control sporozoites revealed a high degree of correlation in their levels of gene expression, indicating that the observed phenotypic changes are not due to radical changes in gene transcription. Only seven genes were upregulated by more than two-fold in K(+) treated sporozoites. The highest level was noted in PP2C, a phosphatase known to dephosphorylate the AKT potassium channel in plants. PMID:17714805

  2. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  3. [Biologically Active Peptides Isolated from Dill Anethum graveolens L].

    PubMed

    Kulikova, O G; Maltsev, D I; Ilyina, A P; Burdina, A V; Yamskova, V P; Yamskov, I A

    2015-01-01

    Peptide mixtures with molecular weights of 1000-2000 Da and in vivo membrano-trophic activity against mouse hepatocyte culture at very low concentrations were isolated from dill Anethum graveolens L. leaves. It has been found that plant peptides in aqueous solution formed larger nanosized particles of approximately 90 nm with a secondary structure mainly composed of β-structures and random coil structures. We demonstrated that peptides isolated from A. graveolens in vitro at an ultra-low dosage affected the size of the area of pigmented cells of amphibian liver, which are analogous to Kupffer cells of the mammalian liver, using roller organotypic newt liver culture models. PMID:26204780

  4. Dvr1 transfers left-right asymmetric signals from Kupffer's vesicle to lateral plate mesoderm in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Annita G; Wang, Xinghao; Yost, H Joseph

    2013-10-01

    An early step in establishing left-right (LR) symmetry in zebrafish is the generation of asymmetric fluid flow by Kupffer's vesicle (KV). As a result of fluid flow, a signal is generated and propagated from the KV to the left lateral plate mesoderm, activating a transcriptional response of Nodal expression in the left lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). The mechanisms and molecules that aid in this transfer of information from the KV to the left LPM are still not clear. Here we provide several lines of evidence demonstrating a role for a member of the TGFβ family member, Dvr1, a zebrafish Vg1 ortholog. Dvr1 is expressed bilaterally between the KV and the LPM. Knockdown of Dvr1 by morpholino causes dramatically reduced or absent expression of southpaw (spaw, a Nodal homolog), in LPM, and corresponding loss of downstream Lefty (lft1 and lft) expression, and aberrant brain and heart LR patterning. Dvr1 morphant embryos have normal KV morphology and function, normal expression of southpaw (spaw) and charon (cha) in the peri-KV region and normal expression of a variety of LPM markers in LPM. Additionally, Dvr1 knockdown does not alter the capability of LPM to respond to signals that initiate and propagate spaw expression. Co-injection experiments in Xenopus and zebrafish indicate that Dvr1 and Spaw can enhance each other's ability to activate the Nodal response pathway and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal differential relationships among activators and inhibitors in this pathway. These results indicate that Dvr1 is responsible for enabling the transfer of a left-right signal from KV to the LPM. PMID:23791819

  5. Multitarget magnetic activated cell sorter

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Kim, Unyoung; Soh, H. Tom

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic selection allows high-throughput sorting of target cells based on surface markers, and it is extensively used in biotechnology for a wide range of applications from in vitro diagnostics to cell-based therapies. However, existing methods can only perform separation based on a single parameter (i.e., the presence or absence of magnetization), and therefore, the simultaneous sorting of multiple targets at high levels of purity, recovery, and throughput remains a challenge. In this work, we present an alternative system, the multitarget magnetic activated cell sorter (MT-MACS), which makes use of microfluidics technology to achieve simultaneous spatially-addressable sorting of multiple target cell types in a continuous-flow manner. We used the MT-MACS device to purify 2 types of target cells, which had been labeled via target-specific affinity reagents with 2 different magnetic tags with distinct saturation magnetization and size. The device was engineered so that the combined effects of the hydrodynamic force produced from the laminar flow and the magnetophoretic force produced from patterned ferromagnetic structures within the microchannel result in the selective purification of the differentially labeled target cells into multiple independent outlets. We demonstrate here the capability to simultaneously sort multiple magnetic tags with >90% purity and >5,000-fold enrichment and multiple bacterial cell types with >90% purity and >500-fold enrichment at a throughput of 109 cells per hour. PMID:19015523

  6. [The becoming of biological function of endoecology in phylogenesis. The support of "purity" of inter-cellular medium in paracrin cenosises of cells, organs and organism (a lecture)].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2014-10-01

    The decentralized system of resident macrophages phylogenetically is earlier and complement-depending one in every paracrin regulated cenosis of cells, intima of elastic type arteries. This system primarily utilizes protein macromolecules implementing biological reaction of transcytosis. The anatomically and functionally more perfect system of insulin-depended Kupffer macrophages in liver is centralized at the level of organism and is also intended to collect and utilize minor and protein biological "garbage". The various peptides, humoral active mediators, fragments of plasmatic membranes, integral proteins of micro RNA in hydrophilic medium of blood plasma are forming under their physical chemical interaction micro-particles, micro-vesicles and exosomes. All of them, under effect of IgG, absorb phylogenetically late Kupffer macrophages. The consequent system of implementation of biologic function of endoecology includes biologic reaction of exocytosis at autocrin level; complement-depended macrophages in paracrin cenosises of cells; resident macrophages in intima of elastic type arteries with reaction of transcytosis; centralized Kupffer macrophages in liver in sinusoidal capillaries and Disse spaces without reaction of transcytosis. The difference of function of systems makes it possible to make a conception of the role of biologic function of endoecology in pathological processes. Therefore, an opportunity appears to evaluate diagnostic value of methods based on detection of amount and quality composition of micro particles of blood plasma. This can be useful in differential diagnostic of metabolic pandemics. PMID:25884078

  7. Cooperation of liver cells in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kmieć, Z

    2001-01-01

    The liver lobule is formed by parenchymal cells, i.e., hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. In contrast to hepatocytes that occupy almost 80% of the total liver volume and perform the majority of numerous liver functions, nonparenchymal liver cells, which contribute only 6.5% to the liver volume, but 40% to the total number of liver cells, are localized in the sinusoidal compartment of the tissue. The walls of hepatic sinusoid are lined by three different cell types: sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC), Kupffer cells (KC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC, formerly known as fat-storing cells, Ito cells, lipocytes, perisinusoidal cells, or vitamin A-rich cells). Additionally, intrahepatic lymphocytes (IHL), including pit cells, i.e., liver-specific natural killer cells, are often present in the sinusoidal lumen. It has been increasingly recognized that both under normal and pathological conditions, many hepatocyte functions are regulated by substances released from neighboring nonparenchymal cells. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells constitute the lining or wall of the hepatic sinusoid. They perform important filtration function due to the presence of small fenestrations that allow free diffusion of many substances, but not of particles of the size of chylomicrons, between the blood and the hepatocyte surface. SEC show huge endocytic capacity for many ligands including glycoproteins, components of the extracellular matrix (ECM; such as hyaluronate, collagen fragments, fibronectin, or chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan), immune complexes, transferrin and ceruloplasmin. SEC may function as antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the context of both MHC-I and MHC-II restriction with the resulting development of antigen-specific T-cell tolerance. They are also active in the secretion of cytokines, eicosanoids (i.e., prostanoids and leukotrienes), endothelin-1, nitric oxide, and some ECM components. Kupffer cells are intrasinusoidally located tissue macrophages with a pronounced

  8. Tracking and treating activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, N.H.; Nadithe, V.; Elsayed, M.; Merkel, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation, T cells of various subsets are the most important mediators in cell-mediated immune responses. Activated T cells play an important role in immune system related diseases such as chronic inflammatory diseases, viral infections, autoimmune disease, transplant rejection, Crohn disease, diabetes, and many more. Therefore, efforts have been made to both visualize and treat activated T cells specifically. This review summarizes imaging approaches and selective therapeutics for activated T cells and gives an outlook on how tracking and treating can be combined into theragnositc agents for activated T cells. PMID:24660025

  9. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  10. Mechanisms of Cell Propulsion by Active Stresses.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, A E

    2011-07-01

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that 1) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, 2) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, 3) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell, and 4) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed. PMID:21804763

  11. Mechanisms of Cell Propulsion by Active Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, A. E.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cytoskeletal flows and cell-substrate interactions interact to generate cell motion are explored using a simplified model of the cytoskeleton as a viscous gel containing active stresses. This model yields explicit general results relating cell speed and traction forces to the distributions of active stress and cell-substrate friction. It is found that 1) the cell velocity is given by a function that quantifies the asymmetry of the active-stress distribution, 2) gradients in cell-substrate friction can induce motion even when the active stresses are symmetrically distributed, 3) the traction-force dipole is enhanced by protrusive stresses near the cell edges or contractile stresses near the center of the cell, and 4) the cell velocity depends biphasically on the cell-substrate adhesion strength if active stress is enhanced by adhesion. Specific experimental tests of the calculated dependences are proposed. PMID:21804763

  12. Structure and function of sinusoidal lining cells in the liver.

    PubMed

    Wisse, E; Braet, F; Luo, D; De Zanger, R; Jans, D; Crabbé, E; Vermoesen, A

    1996-01-01

    The hepatic sinusoid harbors 4 different cells: endothelial cells (100, 101), Kupffer cells (96, 102, 103), fat-storing cells (34, 51, 93), and pit cells (14, 107, 108). Each cell type has its own specific morphology and functions, and no transitional stages exist between the cells. These cells have the potential to proliferate locally, either in normal or in special conditions, that is, experiments or disease. Sinusoidal cells from a functional unit together with the parenchymal cells. Isolation protocols exist for all sinusoidal cells. Endothelial cells filter the fluids, exchanged between the sinusoid and the space of Disse through fenestrae (100), which measure 175 nm in diameter and are grouped in sieve plates. Fenestrae occupy 6-8% of the surface (106). No intact basal lamina is present under these cells (100). Various factors change the number and diameter of fenestrae [pressure, alcohol, serotonin, and nicotin; for a review, see Fraser et al (32)]. These changes mainly affect the passage of lipoproteins, which contain cholesterol and vitamin A among other components. Fat-storing cells are pericytes, located in the space of Disse, with long, contractile processes, which probably influence liver (sinusoidal) blood flow. Fat-storing cells possess characteristic fat droplets, which contain a large part of the body's depot of vitamin A (91, 93). These cells play a major role in the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) (34, 39-41). Strongly reduced levels of vitamin A occur in alcoholic livers developing fibrosis (56). Vitamin A deficiency transforms fat-storing cells into myofibroblast-like cells with enhanced ECM production (38). Kupffer cells accumulate in periportal areas. They specifically endocytose endotoxin (70), which activates these macrophages. Lipopolysaccharide, together with interferon gamma, belongs to the most potent activators of Kupffer cells (28). As a result of activation, these cells secrete oxygen radicals, tumor necrosis factor

  13. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  14. Heterogeneous activity of immature and mature cells of the murine monocyte-macrophage lineage derived from different anatomical districts against yeast-phase Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Decker, T; Lohmann-Matthes, M L; Baccarini, M

    1986-01-01

    Mature mononuclear phagocytes have been receiving much attention as effectors of spontaneous candidacidal activity, although with controversial results due to differences in the effector populations and the methods used in different laboratories. We here systematically compare the fungistatic activity of immature and mature cells of the murine macrophage series. The results show that nonadherent, nonphagocytic precursor cells (isolated either [90% purity] from bone marrow liquid cultures or from the organs of mice in which inflammatory conditions had been elicited in vivo) exerted a strong extracellular candidastatic activity. In contrast, mature macrophages, either obtained from different anatomical areas (spleen, liver, lung, peritoneal cavity) or matured in vitro from the precursor populations, displayed striking heterogeneity in their ability to inhibit the growth of Candida albicans, depending on the anatomical site they were derived from. Lymphokine activation did not alter the fungistatic pattern of the untreated cells. The different macrophage populations behaved very differently also in the production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in response to phagocytosis of C. albicans. The amounts of ROI generated, however, showed no correlation with candidastatic ability. Low levels of candidastatic activity exerted by resident peritoneal macrophages (good ROI producers) were inhibited by catalase, whereas high levels of growth inhibition by Kupffer cells (poor ROI producers) after 8 h of assay were hardly influenced by the enzyme. Our data suggest the existence of two different effector mechanisms in macrophage-mediated C. albicans growth inhibition, a rather inefficient ROI-dependent one, and a second, very efficient oxygen-independent mechanism. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:3533781

  15. Kuppfer Cells Trigger Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Development in Diet-induced Mouse Model through Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production*

    PubMed Central

    Tosello-Trampont, Annie-Carole; Landes, Susan G.; Nguyen, Virginia; Novobrantseva, Tatiana I.; Hahn, Young S.

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), characterized by lipid deposits within hepatocytes (steatosis), is associated with hepatic injury and inflammation and leads to the development of fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocarcinoma. However, the pathogenic mechanism of NASH is not well understood. To determine the role of distinct innate myeloid subsets in the development of NASH, we examined the contribution of liver resident macrophages (i.e. Kupffer cells) and blood-derived monocytes in triggering liver inflammation and hepatic damage. Employing a murine model of NASH, we discovered a previously unappreciated role for TNFα and Kupffer cells in the initiation and progression of NASH. Sequential depletion of Kupffer cells reduced the incidence of liver injury, steatosis, and proinflammatory monocyte infiltration. Furthermore, our data show a differential contribution of Kupffer cells and blood monocytes during the development of NASH; Kupffer cells increased their production of TNFα, followed by infiltration of CD11bintLy6Chi monocytes, 2 and 10 days, respectively, after starting the methionine/choline-deficient (MCD) diet. Importantly, targeted knockdown of TNFα expression in myeloid cells decreased the incidence of NASH development by decreasing steatosis, liver damage, monocyte infiltration, and the production of inflammatory chemokines. Our findings suggest that the increase of TNFα-producing Kupffer cells in the liver is crucial for the early phase of NASH development by promoting blood monocyte infiltration through the production of IP-10 and MCP-1. PMID:23066023

  16. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chii J.; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J.; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  17. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-04-21

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  18. Natural killer cell activity during measles.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, D E; Ward, B J; Jauregui, E; Johnson, R T; Vaisberg, A

    1990-01-01

    Natural killer cells are postulated to play an important role in host anti-viral defences. We measured natural killer cell activity in 30 individuals with acute measles (73 +/- 21 lytic units (LU)/10(7) cells) and 16 individuals with other infectious diseases (149 +/- 95 LU) and found it reduced compared with values for adults (375 +/- 70 LU; P less than 0.001) or children (300 +/- 73 LU, P less than 0.01) without infection. Reduced natural killer cell activity was found in measles patients with (84 +/- 30 LU) and without (55 +/- 18 LU) complications and was present for at least 3 weeks after the onset of the rash. Activity was increased by in vitro exposure of cells to interleukin-2. Depressed natural killer cell activity parallels in time the suppression of other parameters of cell-mediated immunity that occurs during measles. PMID:1696863

  19. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  20. Transcriptional activation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 gene in vivo and its role in the pathophysiology of neutrophil-induced liver injury in murine endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Essani, N A; Bajt, M L; Farhood, A; Vonderfecht, S L; Jaeschke, H

    1997-06-15

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) can cause hepatic parenchymal cell injury during endotoxin (ET) shock. Because adhesion molecules are critical for inflammatory cell damage, the role of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was studied in the pathophysiology of ET shock. ET-sensitive mice (C3Heb/FeJ) were treated with 700 mg/kg galactosamine in combination with 100 microg/kg Salmonella abortus equi ET, 15 microg/kg TNF-alpha, or 13 to 23 microg/kg IL-1. VCAM-1 mRNA formation was strongly activated in animals treated with ET, TNF-alpha, or IL-1. In contrast, only TNF-alpha and IL-1, not ET, induced VCAM-1 gene transcription in livers of ET-resistant mice (C3H/HeJ). Immunohistochemistry and isolation of liver cells during endotoxemia indicated that VCAM-1 mRNA and protein were only formed in endothelial cells and Kupffer cells, not in hepatocytes. Galactosamine/ET induced neutrophil accumulation in sinusoids (515 +/- 30 neutrophils/50 high power fields) followed by transmigration at 7 h. At that time, severe liver injury was observed (necrosis, 53 +/- 5%). An anti-VCAM-1 Ab (3 mg/kg) attenuated the area of necrosis by 60%. The Ab reduced neutrophil transmigration by 84%, but had no effect on the total number of cells in the liver vasculature. Flow cytometric analysis identified the presence of very late Ag-4 on mouse peripheral neutrophils. Our data demonstrated cytokine-dependent VCAM-1 gene transcription and protein expression in the liver during endotoxemia. Neutrophils were able to use very late Ag-4/VCAM-1 interactions to transmigrate into liver parenchyma in vivo. Preventing transmigration by blocking VCAM-1 protected hepatocytes against neutrophil-induced injury. PMID:9190948

  1. Stem cell tracking with optically active nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Cui, Yan; Chan, Jerry KY; Xu, Chenjie

    2013-01-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies hold promise and potential to address many unmet clinical needs. Cell tracking with modern imaging modalities offers insight into the underlying biological process of the stem-cell-based therapies, with the goal to reveal cell survival, migration, homing, engraftment, differentiation, and functions. Adaptability, sensitivity, resolution, and non-invasiveness have contributed to the longstanding use of optical imaging for stem cell tracking and analysis. To identify transplanted stem cells from the host tissue, optically active probes are usually used to label stem cells before the administration. In comparison to the traditional fluorescent probes like fluorescent proteins and dyes, nanoparticle-based probes are advantageous in terms of the photo-stabilities and minimal changes to the cell phenotype. The main focus here is to overview the recent development of optically active nanoparticles for stem cells tracking. The related optical imaging modalities include fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging, Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging. PMID:23638335

  2. Causes of upregulation of glycolysis in lymphocytes upon stimulation. A comparison with other cell types.

    PubMed

    Stark, Heiko; Fichtner, Maximilian; König, Rainer; Lorkowski, Stefan; Schuster, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    In this review, we revisit the metabolic shift from respiration to glycolysis in lymphocytes upon activation, which is known as the Warburg effect in tumour cells. We compare the situation in lymphocytes with those in several other cell types, such as muscle cells, Kupffer cells, microglia cells, astrocytes, stem cells, tumour cells and various unicellular organisms (e.g. yeasts). We critically discuss and compare several explanations put forward in the literature for the observation that proliferating cells adopt this apparently less efficient pathway: hypoxia, poisoning of competitors by end products, higher ATP production rate, higher precursor supply, regulatory effects, and avoiding harmful effects (e.g. by reactive oxygen species). We conclude that in the case of lymphocytes, increased ATP production rate and precursor supply are the main advantages of upregulating glycolysis. PMID:26382968

  3. Mitochondrial ROS fire up T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael P; Siegel, Richard M

    2013-02-21

    Metabolic reprogramming has emerged as an important feature of immune cell activation. Two new studies, including Sena et al. (2013) in this issue of Immunity, identify mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) arising from metabolic reprogramming as signaling molecules in T cell activation. PMID:23438817

  4. LIM-domain protein cysteine- and glycine-rich protein 2 (CRP2) is a novel marker of hepatic stellate cells and binding partner of the protein inhibitor of activated STAT1.

    PubMed Central

    Weiskirchen, R; Moser, M; Weiskirchen, S; Erdel, M; Dahmen, S; Buettner, R; Gressner, A M

    2001-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells is considered to be the main step in the development of liver fibrosis, which is characterized by the transition of quiescent vitamin-A-rich cells to proliferative, fibrogenic and contractile myofibroblasts. The identification of regulatory genes during early cell activation and transdifferentiation is essential to extend our knowledge of hepatic fibrogenesis. In liver, the gene CSRP2 is exclusively expressed by stellate cells, whereas no transcripts are detectable in hepatocytes, sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells. The early activation of stellate cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor is accompanied by an enhanced expression of CSRP2. During later stages of transdifferentiation, the expression of CSRP2 in these cells is suppressed in vitro and in vivo. The CSRP2-encoded cysteine- and glycine-rich double-LIM-domain protein (CRP)2 is proposed to function as a molecular adapter, arranging two or more as yet unidentified protein constituents into a macromolecular complex. To identify these proteins and assign a cellular function to CRP2, a human cDNA library was screened with full-length CRP2 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen. The protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 ('PIAS1') was shown to associate selectively with the C-terminal LIM domain of CRP2. Physical interaction of both proteins in the cellular environment was confirmed by co-localization experiments with confocal laser scanning microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis. These results establish CRP2 as a potential new factor in the JAK/STAT-signalling pathway and suggest that the suppression of CSRP2 might be a prerequisite for the myofibroblastic transition of hepatic stellate cells. PMID:11672422

  5. Fructose-induced steatosis in mice: role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Kanuri, Giridhar; Spruss, Astrid; Wagnerberger, Sabine; Bischoff, Stephan C; Bergheim, Ina

    2011-06-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is an acute-phase protein known to be involved in alcoholic liver disease and hepatic fibrosis. In the present study, the hypothesis that PAI-1 is causally involved in the onset of fructose-induced hepatic steatosis was tested in a mouse model. Wild-type C57BL/6J and PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice were fed with 30% fructose solution or water for 8 weeks. Markers of hepatic steatosis, expression of PAI-1, apolipoprotein B (ApoB), cluster of differentiation 1d (CD1d), markers of natural killer T (NKT) cells, protein levels of phospho-c-Met and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined. Activity of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) was measured in liver tissue. In comparison with water controls, chronic intake of 30% fructose solution caused a significant increase in hepatic triglycerides, PAI-1 expression and plasma alanine aminotransferase levels in wild-type mice. This effect of fructose feeding was markedly attenuated in PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice. Despite no differences in portal endotoxin levels and hepatic TNF-α protein levels between fructose-fed groups, the protective effect of the loss of PAI-1 against the onset of fructose-induced steatosis was associated with a significant increase in phospho-c-Met, phospho Akt, expression of ApoB and activity of MTTP in livers of PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice in comparison with fructose-fed wild types. Moreover, in PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice, expressions of CD1d and markers of CD1d-reactive NKT cells were markedly higher than in wild-type mice; however, expression of markers of activation of CD1d-reactive NKT cells (eg, interleukin-15 and interferon-γ) were only found to be increased in livers of fructose-fed PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice. Taken together, these data suggest that PAI-1 has a causal role in mediating the early phase of fructose-induced liver damage in mice through signaling cascades downstream of Kupffer cells and TNF-α. PMID:21423135

  6. Regulation of alternative macrophage activation in the liver following acetaminophen intoxication by stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Carol R.; Hankey, Pamela; Mishin, Vladimir; Francis, Mary; Yu, Shan; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-07-15

    Stem cell-derived tyrosine kinase (STK) is a transmembrane receptor reported to play a role in macrophage switching from a classically activated/proinflammatory phenotype to an alternatively activated/wound repair phenotype. In the present studies, STK{sup −/−} mice were used to assess the role of STK in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity as evidence suggests that the pathogenic process involves both of these macrophage subpopulations. In wild type mice, centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminase levels were observed within 6 h of acetaminophen administration (300 mg/kg, i.p.). Loss of STK resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity of mice to the hepatotoxic effects of acetaminophen and increased mortality, effects independent of its metabolism. This was associated with reduced levels of hepatic glutathione, rapid upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and prolonged induction of heme oxygenase-1, suggesting excessive oxidative stress in STK{sup −/−} mice. F4/80, a marker of mature macrophages, was highly expressed on subpopulations of Kupffer cells in livers of wild type, but not STK{sup −/−} mice. Whereas F4/80{sup +} macrophages rapidly declined in the livers of wild type mice following acetaminophen intoxication, they increased in STK{sup −/−} mice. In wild type mice hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12, products of classically activated macrophages, increased after acetaminophen administration. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor, CCR2, as well as IL-10, mediators involved in recruiting and activating anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages, also increased in wild type mice after acetaminophen. Loss of STK blunted the effects of acetaminophen on expression of TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, MCP-1 and CCR2, while expression of IL-10 increased. Hepatic expression of CX3CL1, and its receptor, CX3CR1 also increased in STK{sup −/−} mice

  7. Activity-driven fluctuations in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, É.; Guo, M.; Gov, N. S.; Visco, P.; Weitz, D. A.; van Wijland, F.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a model for the dynamics of a probe embedded in a living cell, where both thermal fluctuations and nonequilibrium activity coexist. The model is based on a confining harmonic potential describing the elastic cytoskeletal matrix, which undergoes random active hops as a result of the nonequilibrium rearrangements within the cell. We describe the probe's statistics and we bring forth quantities affected by the nonequilibrium activity. We find an excellent agreement between the predictions of our model and experimental results for tracers inside living cells. Finally, we exploit our model to arrive at quantitative predictions for the parameters characterizing nonequilibrium activity, such as the typical time scale of the activity and the amplitude of the active fluctuations.

  8. Kinetic discrimination in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, J D; Beeson, C; Lyons, D S; Davis, M M; McConnell, H M

    1996-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model. PMID:8643643

  9. Lipolytic activity in adipocyte cell fractions.

    PubMed

    Oschry, Y; Shapiro, B

    1980-05-28

    Adipocytes release only negligible amounts of free fatty acids unless stimulated, but reveal considerable lipolytic activity when homogenized. Epinephrine treatment of the cells caused only a 20-40% increase in the activity of infranatants of homogenates while raising the activity associated with the fat layer up to 10-fold. Full activity (i.e. that of intact-activated cells) could be revealed by epinephrine treatment of the homogenate as well as by sonication of the fat layer in buffer. The combination of both treatments did not yield higher activities. The fat cake contains the bulk of the potential activities which are only realized when dispersed in the aqueous phase by sonication, or upon hormone activation of the whole homogenate. Increase in activity could also be obtained by removal of most of the lipid from the fat layer by extraction with petroleum ether. Re-introduction of extracted lipid inhibited lipolysis. The active enzyme could be separated by flotation at 1.12 specific gravity. The data suggest that the lack of activity in the intact non-stimulated cell may be due to the lack of availability of the aqueous phase to the enzyme. PMID:7378439

  10. Lymphatic endothelial cells actively regulate prostate cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tariq; Wildes, Flonne; Kakkad, Samata; Artemov, Dmitri; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-07-01

    Lymphatic vessels serve as the primary route for metastatic spread to lymph nodes. However, it is not clear how interactions between cancer cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), especially within hypoxic microenvironments, affect the invasion of cancer cells. Here, using an MR compatible cell perfusion assay, we investigated the role of LEC-prostate cancer (PCa) cell interaction in the invasion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by two human PCa cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145, under normoxia and hypoxia, and determined the metabolic changes that occurred under these conditions. We observed a significant increase in the invasion of ECM by invasive PC-3 cells, but not poorly invasive DU-145 cells when human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-dlys) were present. Enhanced degradation of ECM by PC-3 cells in the presence of HMVEC-dlys identified interactions between HMVEC-dlys and PCa cells influencing cancer cell invasion. The enhanced ECM degradation was partly attributed to increased MMP-9 enzymatic activity in PC-3 cells when HMVEC-dlys were in close proximity. Significantly higher uPAR and MMP-9 expression levels observed in PC-3 cells compared to DU-145 cells may be one mechanism for increased invasion and degradation of matrigel by these cells irrespective of the presence of HMVEC-dlys. Hypoxia significantly decreased invasion by PC-3 cells, but this decrease was significantly attenuated when HMVEC-dlys were present. Significantly higher phosphocholine was observed in invasive PC-3 cells, while higher glycerophosphocholine was observed in DU-145 cells. These metabolites were not altered in the presence of HMVEC-dlys. Significantly increased lipid levels and lipid droplets were observed in PC-3 and DU-145 cells under hypoxia reflecting an adaptive survival response to oxidative stress. These results suggest that in vivo, invasive cells in or near lymphatic endothelial cells are likely to be more invasive and degrade the ECM

  11. Activation of intraislet lymphoid cells causes destruction of islet cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, P. E.; Finke, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    In vitro culture of rat islets at 24 degrees C for 7 days in tissue culture medium CMRL 1066 almost completely eliminated lymphoid cells from the islets. Immunostaining of the islets with monoclonal antibody OX4 for demonstration of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-expressing cells revealed a decrease from 13.1 +/- 0.6 positive cells per islet on day 0 to 0.7 +/- 0.1 cells per islet on day 7. A comparable decrease was found using OX1 for demonstration of all leukocytes. In contrast, culture of rat islets at 24 degrees C for 7 days with tissue culture Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 medium was not as effective in eliminating lymphoid cells as in medium CMRL 1066 (3.0 +/- 0.2 class II MHC positive cells per islet at 7 days). Effective elimination of intraislet lymphoid cells apparently is due to the combined effect of low temperature culture and the tissue culture medium CMRL-1066. The second goal of the study was to determine whether the destructive effect of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) on rat islets in culture was due to intraislet lymphoid cells. In vitro culture of rat islets with IFN-gamma (1000 units/ml) at 37 degrees C caused almost complete destruction of the islets at 7 days. If intraislet lymphoid cells were eliminated from the islets by in vitro culture at 24 degrees C followed by exposure to IFN-gamma (1000 units/ml) for 7 days at 37 degrees C, then IFN-gamma did not cause destruction of the islets and transplants of the treated islets produced normoglycemia in diabetic recipient mice. These findings indicate that intraislet lymphoid cells are responsible for destruction of islet cells when these cells (presumably macrophages) are activated by IFN-gamma. Intraislet lymphoid cells may play a significant role in destroying islet cells in autoimmune diabetes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1902627

  12. Protrusive Activity Guides Changes in Cell-Cell Tension during Epithelial Cell Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Maruthamuthu, Venkat; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing how epithelial cells regulate cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesions is essential to understand key events in morphogenesis as well as pathological events such as metastasis. During epithelial cell scattering, epithelial cell islands rupture their cell-cell contacts and migrate away as single cells on the extracellular matrix (ECM) within hours of growth factor stimulation, even as adhesion molecules such as E-cadherin are present at the cell-cell contact. How the stability of cell-cell contacts is modulated to effect such morphological transitions is still unclear. Here, we report that in the absence of ECM, E-cadherin adhesions continue to sustain substantial cell-generated forces upon hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulation, consistent with undiminished adhesion strength. In the presence of focal adhesions, constraints that preclude the spreading and movement of cells at free island edges also prevent HGF-mediated contact rupture. To explore the role of cell motion and cell-cell contact rupture, we examine the biophysical changes that occur during the scattering of cell pairs. We show that the direction of cell movement with respect to the cell-cell contact is correlated with changes in the average intercellular force as well as the initial direction of cell-cell contact rupture. Our results suggest an important role for protrusive activity resulting in cell displacement and force redistribution in guiding cell-cell contact rupture during scattering. PMID:25099795

  13. Activation of radiosensitizers by hypoxic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Olive, P. L.; Durand, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Hypoxic cells can metabolize nitroheterocyclic compounds to produce toxic intermediates capable of affecting the survival of neighbouring oxygenated cells. Mutagenesis experiments with E. coli WP-2 343 (deficient in nitroreductase) indicated that reduction of nitroheterocyclics outside bacteria causes killing and mutations within bacteria, presumably due to the transfer of the "active" specie (s). Using animal tissue slices to reduce nitrofurans, cultured L-929 cells incubated under aerobic conditions were far more sensitive to the toxic and DNA damaging effects of these drugs. Transfer of the active species also occurs in a tissue-like environment in multicell spheroids where the presence of a hypoxic central core served to convert the nitroheterocyclics to intermediates which also damaged the neighbouring oxygenated cells. PMID:354676

  14. Polyclonal B cell activation in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, P; Olivieri, I; Benedettini, G; Marelli, P; Ciompi, M L; Pasero, G; Campa, M

    1990-01-01

    The peripheral blood lymphocyte response of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) to several polyclonal B cell activators was investigated. No differences were found in the reactivity to pokeweed mitogen and protein A between patients and controls; in contrast, the peripheral blood lymphocyte response to Staphylococcus aureus strain Cowan I (SAC) was significantly higher in patients with AS than in controls. This responsiveness was not influenced either by the presence of the HLA-B27 antigen or by environmental factors or associated diseases, and it was higher in patients with active AS than in those with inactive disease. The percentage of circulating B cells was normal. The responses to T cell mitogens and the percentages of T cell subpopulations were similar in patients and in controls. The peripheral blood lymphocyte hyperactivity of patients with AS to SAC was associated with an increased in vitro production of immunoglobulins. PMID:2383063

  15. (+)-Catechin attenuates activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bragança de Moraes, Cristina Machado; Bitencourt, Shanna; de Mesquita, Fernanda Cristina; Mello, Denizar; de Oliveira, Leticia Paranhos; da Silva, Gabriela Viegas; Lorini, Vinicius; Caberlon, Eduardo; de Souza Basso, Bruno; Schmid, Julia; Ferreira, Gabriela Acevedo; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues

    2014-04-01

    (+)-Catechin is a type of catechin present in large amounts in açaí fruits and cocoa seeds. Besides its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, little is known about its effects in the liver, especially during hepatic fibrosis. We report here the effects of (+)-catechin on hepatic stellate cells. (+)-Catechin induced quiescent phenotype in GRX cells, along with an increase in lipid droplets. Proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA expression was upregulated, whereas type I collagen mRNA expression was downregulated. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were not influenced by (+)-catechin, whereas the levels of interleukin 10 were significantly increased. The data provide evidence that (+)-catechin can reduce hepatic stellate cell activation. PMID:24353036

  16. Entangled active matter: From cells to ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, D. L.; Phonekeo, S.; Altshuler, E.; Brochard-Wyart, F.

    2016-07-01

    Both cells and ants belong to the broad field of active matter, a novel class of non-equilibrium materials composed of many interacting units that individually consume energy and collectively generate motion or mechanical stresses. However cells and ants differ from fish and birds in that they can support static loads. This is because cells and ants can be entangled, so that individual units are bound by transient links. Entanglement gives cells and ants a set of remarkable properties usually not found together, such as the ability to flow like a fluid, spring back like an elastic solid, and self-heal. In this review, we present the biology, mechanics and dynamics of both entangled cells and ants. We apply concepts from soft matter physics and wetting to characterize these systems as well as to point out their differences, which arise from their differences in size. We hope that our viewpoints will spur further investigations into cells and ants as active materials, and inspire the fabrication of synthetic active matter.

  17. Imaging CREB Activation in Living Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Michael W.; Aramuni, Gayane; Mank, Marco; Mackinnon, Jonathan A. G.; Griesbeck, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The Ca2+- and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and the related ATF-1 and CREM are stimulus-inducible transcription factors that link certain forms of cellular activity to changes in gene expression. They are attributed to complex integrative activation characteristics, but current biochemical technology does not allow dynamic imaging of CREB activation in single cells. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer between mutants of green fluorescent protein we here develop a signal-optimized genetically encoded indicator that enables imaging activation of CREB due to phosphorylation of the critical serine 133. The indicator of CREB activation due to phosphorylation (ICAP) was used to investigate the role of the scaffold and anchoring protein AKAP79/150 in regulating signal pathways converging on CREB. We show that disruption of AKAP79/150-mediated protein kinase A anchoring or knock-down of AKAP150 dramatically reduces the ability of protein kinase A to activate CREB. In contrast, AKAP79/150 regulation of CREB via L-type channels may only have minor importance. ICAP allows dynamic and reversible imaging in living cells and may become useful in studying molecular components and cell-type specificity of activity-dependent gene expression. PMID:20484048

  18. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wesch, Neil L; Burlock, Laura J; Gooding, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed. PMID:27500377

  19. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  20. Activated mast cells promote differentiation of B cells into effector cells

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni; Lundberg, Marcus; Pejler, Gunnar; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Based on the known accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in B cell-dependent inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, we hypothesized that MCs directly modulate B cells. We show here that degranulated, and to a lesser extent naïve or IgE-sensitized, MCs activate both naïve and B cell receptor-activated B cells. This was shown by increased proliferation, blast formation, and expression of CD19, MHC class II and CD86 in the B cells. Further, MCs stimulated the secretion of IgM and IgG in IgM+ B cells, indicating that MCs can induce class-switch recombination in B cells. We also show that coculture of MCs with B cells promotes surface expression of L-selectin, a homing receptor, on the B cells. The effects of MCs on B cells were partly dependent on cell-cell contact and both follicular and marginal zone B cells could be activated by MCs. Our findings suggest that degranulated MCs support optimal activation of B cells, a finding that is in line with in vivo studies showing that MCs frequently degranulate in the context of B-cell driven pathologies such as arthritis. Together, our findings show that MCs have the capacity to differentiate B cells to effector cells. PMID:26847186

  1. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  2. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  3. Mechanically activated artificial cell by using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Lap Man; Liu, Allen P.

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms sense mechanical forces. Engineering mechanosensitive artificial cell through bottom-up in vitro reconstitution offers a way to understand how mixtures of macromolecules assemble and organize into a complex system that responds to forces. We use stable double emulsion droplets (aqueous/oil/aqueous) to prototype mechanosensitive artificial cells. In order to demonstrate mechanosensation in artificial cells, we develop a novel microfluidic device that is capable of trapping double emulsions into designated chambers, followed by compression and aspiration in a parallel manner. The microfluidic device is fabricated using multilayer soft lithography technology, and consists of a control layer and a deformable flow channel. Deflections of the PDMS membrane above the main microfluidic flow channels and trapping chamber array are independently regulated pneumatically by two sets of integrated microfluidic valves. We successfully compress and aspirate the double emulsions, which result in transient increase and permanent decrease in oil thickness, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the influx of calcium ions as a response of our mechanically activated artificial cell through thinning of oil. The development of a microfluidic device to mechanically activate artificial cells creates new opportunities in force-activated synthetic biology. PMID:27610921

  4. Photochemical approaches to T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Huse, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Despite decades of intensive research, T-cell activation has remained mysterious because of both the dizzying diversity of antigen recognition and the speed and comprehensiveness of the T-cell-receptor signalling network. Further progress will require new approaches and reagents that provide added levels of control. Photochemistry allows specific biochemical processes to be controlled with light and is well suited to mechanistic studies in complex cellular environments. In recent years, several laboratories have adopted approaches based on photoreactive peptide-major histocompatibility complex reagents in order to study T-cell activation and function with high precision. Here, I review these efforts and outline future directions for this exciting area of research. PMID:20406301

  5. Immunological functions of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Knolle, Percy A; Wohlleber, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) line the liver sinusoids and separate passenger leukocytes in the sinusoidal lumen from hepatocytes. LSECs further act as a platform for adhesion of various liver-resident immune cell populations such as Kupffer cells, innate lymphoid cells or liver dendritic cells. In addition to having an extraordinary scavenger function, LSECs possess potent immune functions, serving as sentinel cells to detect microbial infection through pattern recognition receptor activation and as antigen (cross)-presenting cells. LSECs cross-prime naive CD8 T cells, causing their rapid differentiation into memory T cells that relocate to secondary lymphoid tissues and provide protection when they re-encounter the antigen during microbial infection. Cross-presentation of viral antigens by LSECs derived from infected hepatocytes triggers local activation of effector CD8 T cells and thereby assures hepatic immune surveillance. The immune function of LSECs complements conventional immune-activating mechanisms to accommodate optimal immune surveillance against infectious microorganisms while preserving the integrity of the liver as a metabolic organ. PMID:27041636

  6. Epigenetic Changes during Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Götze, Silke; Schumacher, Eva C.; Kordes, Claus; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which can participate in liver regeneration and fibrogenesis, have recently been identified as liver-resident mesenchymal stem cells. During their activation HSC adopt a myofibroblast-like phenotype accompanied by profound changes in the gene expression profile. DNA methylation changes at single genes have been reported during HSC activation and may participate in the regulation of this process, but comprehensive DNA methylation analyses are still missing. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of DNA methylation during in vitro activation of HSC. Methods and Results The analysis of DNA methylation changes by antibody-based assays revealed a strong decrease in the global DNA methylation level during culture-induced activation of HSC. To identify genes which may be regulated by DNA methylation, we performed a genome-wide Methyl-MiniSeq EpiQuest sequencing comparing quiescent and early culture-activated HSC. Approximately 400 differentially methylated regions with a methylation change of at least 20% were identified, showing either hypo- or hypermethylation during activation. Further analysis of selected genes for DNA methylation and expression were performed revealing a good correlation between DNA methylation changes and gene expression. Furthermore, global DNA demethylation during HSC activation was investigated by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay and L-mimosine treatment showing that demethylation was independent of DNA synthesis and thereby excluding a passive DNA demethylation mechanism. Conclusions In summary, in vitro activation of HSC initiated strong DNA methylation changes, which were associated with gene regulation. These results indicate that epigenetic mechanisms are important for the control of early HSC activation. Furthermore, the data show that global DNA demethylation during activation is based on an active DNA demethylation mechanism. PMID:26065684

  7. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Karina A.; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  8. Decidual Cell Polyploidization Necessitates Mitochondrial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xinghong; Gao, Fei; Rusie, Allison; Hemingway, Jennifer; Ostmann, Alicia B.; Sroga, Julie M.; Jegga, Anil G.; Das, Sanjoy K.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular polyploidy has been widely reported in nature, yet its developmental mechanism and function remain poorly understood. In the present study, to better define the aspects of decidual cell polyploidy, we isolated pure polyploid and non-polyploid decidual cell populations from the in vivo decidual bed. Three independent RNA pools prepared for each population were then subjected to the Affymetrix gene chip analysis for the whole mouse genome transcripts. Our data revealed up-regulation of 1015 genes and down-regulation of 1207 genes in the polyploid populations, as compared to the non-polyploid group. Comparative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization results indeed confirmed differential expressional regulation of several genes between the two populations. Based on functional enrichment analyses, up-regulated polyploidy genes appeared to implicate several functions, which primarily include cell/nuclear division, ATP binding, metabolic process, and mitochondrial activity, whereas that of down-regulated genes primarily included apoptosis and immune processes. Further analyses of genes that are related to mitochondria and bi-nucleation showed differential and regional expression within the decidual bed, consistent with the pattern of polyploidy. Consistently, studies revealed a marked induction of mitochondrial mass and ATP production in polyploid cells. The inhibition of mitochondrial activity by various pharmacological inhibitors, as well as by gene-specific targeting using siRNA-mediated technology showed a dramatic attenuation of polyploidy and bi-nucleation development during in vitro stromal cell decidualization, suggesting mitochondria play a major role in positive regulation of decidual cell polyploidization. Collectively, analyses of unique polyploidy markers and molecular signaling networks may be useful to further characterize functional aspects of decidual cell polyploidy at the site of implantation. PMID:22046353

  9. Fluorescence activated cell sorting of plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution, cell type-specific analysis of gene expression greatly enhances understanding of developmental regulation and responses to environmental stimuli in any multicellular organism. In situ hybridization and reporter gene visualization can to a limited extent be used to this end but for high resolution quantitative RT-PCR or high-throughput transcriptome-wide analysis the isolation of RNA from particular cell types is requisite. Cellular dissociation of tissue expressing a fluorescent protein marker in a specific cell type and subsequent Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) makes it possible to collect sufficient amounts of material for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis/amplification and microarray analysis. An extensive set of cell type-specific fluorescent reporter lines is available to the plant research community. In this case, two marker lines of the Arabidopsis thaliana root are used: P(SCR;)::GFP (endodermis and quiescent center) and P(WOX5;)::GFP (quiescent center). Large numbers (thousands) of seedlings are grown hydroponically or on agar plates and harvested to obtain enough root material for further analysis. Cellular dissociation of plant material is achieved by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. This procedure makes use of high osmolarity-induced plasmolysis and commercially available cellulases, pectinases and hemicellulases to release protoplasts into solution. FACS of GFP-positive cells makes use of the visualization of the green versus the red emission spectra of protoplasts excited by a 488 nm laser. GFP-positive protoplasts can be distinguished by their increased ratio of green to red emission. Protoplasts are typically sorted directly into RNA extraction buffer and stored for further processing at a later time. This technique is revealed to be straightforward and practicable. Furthermore, it is shown that it can be used without difficulty to isolate sufficient numbers of cells for transcriptome analysis, even for very scarce

  10. Chronic variable stress activates hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Courties, Gabriel; Dutta, Partha; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Zaltsman, Alex; von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Bode, Christoph; Fricchione, Gregory L.; Denninger, John; Lin, Charles P.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Libby, Peter; Swirski, Filip K.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to psychosocial stress is a risk factor for many diseases, including atherosclerosis1,2. While incompletely understood, interaction between the psyche and the immune system provides one potential mechanism linking stress and disease inception and progression. Known crosstalk between the brain and immune system includes the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which centrally drives glucocorticoid production in the adrenal cortex, and the sympathetic–adrenal–medullary axis, which controls stress–induced catecholamine release in support of the fight–or–flight reflex3,4. It remains unknown however if chronic stress changes hematopoietic stem cell activity. Here we show that stress increases proliferation of these most primitive progenitors, giving rise to higher levels of disease–promoting inflammatory leukocytes. We found that chronic stress induced monocytosis and neutrophilia in humans. While investigating the source of leukocytosis in mice, we discovered that stress activates upstream hematopoietic stem cells. Sympathetic nerve fibers release surplus noradrenaline, which uses the β3 adrenergic receptor to signal bone marrow niche cells to decrease CXCL12 levels. Consequently, elevated hematopoietic stem cell proliferation increases output of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. When atherosclerosis–prone ApoE−/− mice encounter chronic stress, accelerated hematopoiesis promotes plaque features associated with vulnerable lesions that cause myocardial infarction and stroke in humans. PMID:24952646

  11. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  12. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  13. Cell Micromanipulation with an Active Handheld Micromanipulator

    PubMed Central

    Tabarés, Jaime Cuevas; MacLachlan, Robert A.; Ettensohn, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the use of an active handheld micromanipulator, known as Micron, for micromanipulation of cells. The device enables users to manipulate objects on the order of tens of microns in size, with the natural ease of use of a fully handheld tool. Micron senses its own position using a purpose-built microscale optical tracker, estimates the erroneous or undesired component of hand motion, and actively corrects it by deflecting its own tool tip using piezoelectric actuators. Benchtop experiments in tip positioning show that active compensation can reduce positioning error by up to 51% compared to unaided performance. Preliminary experiments in bisection of sea urchin embryos exhibit an increased success rate when performed with the help of Micron. PMID:21096452

  14. Active stochastic stress fluctuations in the cell cytoskeleton stir the cell and activate primary cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christoph F.; Fakhri, Nikta; Battle, Christopher; Ott, Carolyn M.; Wessel, Alok D.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mackintosh, Frederick C.

    2015-03-01

    Cells are active systems with molecular force generation that drives complex dynamics at the supramolecular scale. Much of cellular dynamics is driven by myosin motors interacting with the actin cytoskeleton. We discovered active random ``stirring'' driven by cytoplasmic myosin as an intermediate mode of transport, different from both thermal diffusion and directed motor activity. We found a further manifestation of cytoskeletal dynamics in the active motion patterns of primary cilia generated by epithelial cells. These cilia were thought to be immotile due to the absence of dynein motors, but it turns out that their anchoring deeper inside the cell in combination with the strongly fluctuating cortex results in clearly measurable non-equilibrium fluctuations.

  15. [The micro-particles of blood plasma, micro-vesicles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies and Kupffer macrophage in liver: late in phylogenesis system of realization of biological function of endoecology].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2014-07-01

    Probably, at early stages of phylogenesis and on the stage of first contacts of single cells in environment the mode of intercommunication was developed via formation of micro-vesicles. It is quite possible that this so complicated way was used during billions of years to develop the very early cenosises of functionally different cells. Later on, diffusion of humoral mediators within the framework of group of cells but without vesicles resulted in formation of very early regulated cenosises of various cells. In billions years, these paracrin regulated cenosises became structural and functional units of every organ. It is difficult to imagine that mode of early in phylogenesis humoral intercommunication of cells could preserve its significance in present conditions. At the same time, according to methodological approach of biological continuity in becoming of biological functions and biological reactions, micro-vesicles continue to function but with somehow different purposes. It is surmised that microparticles of blood plasma consist a heterogeneous population of micro-vesicles initially formed by cells, exosomes and apoptotic bodies. This population is a foundation of spontaneous, physical chemical formation of complexes in blood plasma on principles of absorption, hydrophobicity and ionic interaction of structural cells'components insoluble in water medium. It is assumed that presently formation of micro-particles in blood is functionally a kind of realization of phylogenetically late variant of biological function of endoecology, in inter-cellular medium, in local pool of intravascular blood plasma. This variant includes: a) microparticles, micro-vesicles, exosomes and apoptotic bodies as elements of biological reaction of support of "purity" of inter-cellular medium; b) in many respects highly specialized variant of phagocytosis of micro-particles by Kupffer macrophages in liver In the aggregate, this is a phylogenetically late medium of realization of

  16. Probing cell activity in random access modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacconi, L.; Crocini, C.; Lotti, J.; Coppini, R.; Ferrantini, C.; Tesi, C.; Yan, P.; Loew, L. M.; Cerbai, E.; Poggesi, C.; Pavone, F. S.

    2013-06-01

    We combined the advantage of an ultrafast random access microscope with novel labelling technologies to study the intra- and inter-cellular action potential propagation in neurons and cardiac myocytes with sub-millisecond time resolution. The random accesses microscopy was used in combination with a new fluorinated voltage sensitive dye with improved photostability to record membrane potential from multiple Purkinje cells with near simultaneous sampling. The RAMP system rapidly scanned between lines drawn in the membranes of neurons to perform multiplex measurements of the TPF signal. This recording was achieved by rapidly positioning the laser excitation with the AOD to sample a patch of membrane from each cell in <100 μs for recording from five cells, multiplexing permits a temporal resolution of 400 μs sufficient to capture every spike. The system is capable to record spontaneous activity over 800 ms from five neighbouring cells simultaneously, showing that spiking is not temporally correlated. The system was also used to investigate the electrical properties of tubular system (TATS) in isolated rat ventricular myocytes.

  17. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom (HV) represent the most common form of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis are predominantly males and do not have skin lesions in the majority of cases, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase (≤11.4 ng/ml) in these patients does not exclude a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis have to undergo lifelong venom immunotherapy, in order to prevent further potentially fatal severe reactions. PMID:26714690

  18. Sertoli Cells Maintain Leydig Cell Number and Peritubular Myoid Cell Activity in the Adult Mouse Testis

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana; Milne, Laura; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Jeffrey, Nathan; Guillou, Florian; Freeman, Tom C.; Mitchell, Rod T.; Smith, Lee B.

    2014-01-01

    The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR) specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health. PMID:25144714

  19. Mitochondrial uncouplers inhibit hepatic stellate cell activation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction participates in the progression of several pathologies. Although there is increasing evidence for a mitochondrial role in liver disease, little is known about its contribution to hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. In this study we investigated the role of mitochondrial activity through mild uncoupling during in vitro activation of HSCs. Methods Cultured primary human and mouse HSCs were treated with the chemical uncouplers FCCP and Valinomycin. ATP levels were measured by luciferase assay and production of reactive oxygen species was determined using the fluorescent probe DCFH-DA. Possible cytotoxicity by uncoupler treatment was evaluated by caspase 3/7 activity and cytoplasmic protease leakage. Activation of HSCs and their response to the pro-fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β was evaluated by gene expression of activation markers and signal mediators using RT-qPCR. Proliferation was measured by incorporation of EdU and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and western blot. Results FCCP and Valinomycin treatment mildly decreased ATP and reactive oxygen species levels. Both uncouplers increased the expression of mitochondrial genes such as Tfam and COXIV while inducing morphological features of quiescent mouse HSCs and abrogating TGF-β signal transduction. Mild uncoupling reduced HSC proliferation and expression of pro-fibrogenic markers of mouse and human HSCs. Conclusions Mild mitochondrial uncoupling inhibits culture-induced HSC activation and their response to pro-fibrogenic cytokines like TGF-β. These results therefore suggest mitochondrial uncoupling of HSCs as a strategy to reduce progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:22686625

  20. Activity of nintedanib in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Steinemann, Gustav; Jacobsen, Christine; Gerwing, Mirjam; Hauschild, Jessica; von Amsberg, Gunhild; Höpfner, Michael; Nitzsche, Bianca; Honecker, Friedemann

    2016-02-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are the most frequent malignancy in male patients between 15 and 45 years of age. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy shows excellent cure rates, but patients with cisplatin-resistant GCTs have a poor prognosis. Nintedanib (BIBF 1120, Vargatef) inhibits the receptor classes vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet derived growth factor receptor, and fibroblast growth factor receptor, and has shown activity against many tumors, as well as in idiopathic lung fibrosis and bleomycin-induced lung injury. Here, we investigated the antineoplastic and antiangiogenic properties of nintedanib in cisplatin-resistant and cisplatin-sensitive GCT cells, both alone and in combination with classical cytotoxic agents such as cisplatin, etoposide, and bleomycin. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of nintedanib was 4.5 ± 0.43 μmol/l, 3.1 ± 0.45 μmol/l, and 3.6 ± 0.33 μmol/l in cisplatin-sensitive NTERA2, 2102Ep, and NCCIT cells, whereas the IC50 doses of the cisplatin-resistant counterparts were 6.6 ± 0.37 μmol/l (NTERA2-R), 4.5 ± 0.83 μmol/l (2102Ep-R), and 6.1 ± 0.41 μmol/l (NCCIT-R), respectively. Single treatment with nintedanib induced apoptosis and resulted in a sustained reduction in the capacity of colony formation in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant GCT cells. Cell cycle analysis showed that nintedanib induced a strong G0/G1-phase arrest in all investigated cell lines. Combination treatment with cisplatin did not result in additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effects. The in-vivo activity was studied using the chorioallantoic membrane assay and indicated the antiangiogenic potency of nintedanib with markedly reduced microvessel density. Topical treatment of inoculated tumor plaques resulted in a significant reduction of the tumor size. This indicates that nintedanib might be a promising substance in the treatment of GCT. PMID:26479145

  1. T helper cell activation and human retroviral pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, K F; Heeney, J L

    1996-01-01

    T helper (Th) cells are of central importance in regulating many critical immune effector mechanisms. The profile of cytokines produced by Th cells correlates with the type of effector cells induced during the immune response to foreign antigen. Th1 cells induce the cell-mediated immune response, while Th2 cells drive antibody production. Th cells are the preferential targets of human retroviruses. Infections with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) result in the expansion of Th cells by the action of HTLV (adult T-cell leukemia) or the progressive loss of T cells by the action of HIV (AIDS). Both retrovirus infections impart a high-level activation state in the host immune cells as well as systemically. However, diverging responses to this activation state have contrasting effects on the Th-cell population. In HIV infection, Th-cell loss has been attributed to several mechanisms, including a selective elimination of cells by apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis in HIV infection is complex, with many different pathways able to induce cell death. In contrast, infection of Th cells with HTLV-1 affords the cell a protective advantage against apoptosis. This advantage may allow the cell to escape immune surveillance, providing the opportunity for the development of Th-cell cancer. In this review, we will discuss the impact of Th-cell activation and general immune activation on human retrovirus expression with a focus upon Th-cell function and the progression to disease. PMID:8987361

  2. Kinase Activity Studied in Living Cells Using an Immunoassay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavec, Aljos?a

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates the use of an immunoassay for studying kinase enzyme activity in living cells. The advantage over the classical method, in which students have to isolate the enzyme from cell material and measure its activity in vitro, is that enzyme activity is modulated and measured in living cells, providing a more…

  3. Random mitotic activities across human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Q.; Duggan, R.; Dasa, S.; Li, F.; Chen, L.

    2010-08-01

    A systemic and quantitative study was performed to examine whether different levels of mitotic activities, assessed by the percentage of S-phase cells at any given time point, existed at different physical regions of human embryonic stem (hES) cell colonies at 2, 4, 6 days after cell passaging. Mitotically active cells were identified by the positive incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) within their newly synthesized DNA. Our data indicated that mitotically active cells were often distributed as clusters randomly across the colonies within the examined growth period, presumably resulting from local deposition of newly divided cells. This latter notion was further demonstrated by the confined growth of enhanced green florescence protein (EGFP) expressing cells amongst non-GFP expressing cells. Furthermore, the overall percentage of mitotically active cells remained constantly at about 50% throughout the 6-day culture period, indicating mitotic activities of hES cell cultures were time-independent under current growth conditions.

  4. Mast cell activation syndrome masquerading as agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2012-01-01

    Acquired agranulocytosis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. The few known causes/associations usually are readily identifiable (e.g., drug reaction, Felty syndrome, megaloblastosis, large granular lymphocytic leukemia, etc.). We report a novel association with mast cell disease. A 61-year-old morbidly obese man developed rheumatoid arthritis unresponsive to several medications. Agranulocytosis developed shortly after sulfasalazine was started but did not improve when the drug was soon stopped. Other symptoms across many systems developed including hives and presyncope. Marrow aspiration and biopsy showed only neutropenia. Serum tryptase was mildly elevated; urinary prostaglandin D2 was markedly elevated. Other causes were not found. Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) was diagnosed. Oral antihistamines, montelukast, and cromolyn were unhelpful; aspirin was initially felt contraindicated. Imatinib immediately increased neutrophils from 0% to 25% but did not help symptoms; subsequent addition of aspirin increased neutrophils further and abated symptoms. Different presentations of different MCAS patients reflect elaboration of different mediators likely consequent to different Kit mutations. Mast cells (MCs) help regulate adipocytes, and adipocytes can inhibit granulopoiesis; thus, a Kit-mutated MC clone may have directly and/or indirectly driven agranulocytosis. MCAS should be considered in otherwise idiopathic agranulocytosis presenting with comorbidities best explained by MC mediator release. PMID:22338992

  5. A novel isolation method for macrophage-like cells from mixed primary cultures of adult rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Hiroshi; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2010-08-31

    We report a simple and efficient method to obtain macrophage-like cells from the mixed primary cultures of adult rat liver cells. A parenchymal hepatocyte enriched fraction was prepared from adult rat livers and seeded into culture flasks. After 7 to 10 days of culture, when most hepatocytes were degenerated or transformed into fibroblastic cells, macrophage-like cells vigorously proliferated on the cell sheet. By shaking the flasks, macrophage-like cells were readily detached. Subsequent transfer and incubation in plastic dishes resulted in quick and selective adhesion of macrophage-like cells, while other contaminating cells remained suspended in the medium. After rinsing with saline, attached macrophage-like cells were harvested with 95 to 99% purity, as evaluated by flow cytometry or immunocytochemistry. These cells showed typical macrophage morphology and were strongly positive for markers of rat macrophages, such as ED-1, ED-3, and OX-41, but negative for cytokeratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin. They possessed functional properties of typical macrophages, including active phagocytosis of latex beads, proliferative response to recombinant GM-CSF, secretion of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines upon stimulation with LPS, and formation of multinucleated giant cells. As more than 10(6) cells can be recovered repeatedly from a T75 culture flask at two to three day intervals for more than two weeks, our procedure might implicate a novel alternative to obtain Kupffer cells in sufficient number and purity without complex equipment and skills. PMID:20600081

  6. The lytic potential of human liver NK cells is restricted by their limited expression of inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Burt, Bryan M; Plitas, George; Zhao, Zeguo; Bamboat, Zubin M; Nguyen, Hoang M; Dupont, Bo; DeMatteo, Ronald P

    2009-08-01

    The human liver is enriched in NK cells which are potent effectors of the innate immune system. We have determined that liver NK cells freshly isolated from surgical specimens from patients with hepatic malignancy have less cytolytic activity than autologous blood NK cells. This difference was due to a higher proportion of CD16(-) NK cells in the liver and reduced cytotoxicity by CD16(+) liver NK cells compared with their blood counterparts. CD16(+) liver NK cells had similar expression of activating NK receptors and had similar intracellular granzyme B and perforin content compared with CD16(+) blood NK cells. CD16(+) liver NK cells contained a reduced fraction of cells with inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors specific for self-MHC class I (self-killer Ig-related receptor (KIR)) and an increased fraction of self-KIR(neg)NKG2A(pos) and self-KIR(neg)NKG2A(neg) cells. Using single-cell analysis of intracellular IFN-gamma production and cytotoxicity assays, we determined that CD16(+) liver NK cells expressing self-KIR were more responsive to target cells than those cells that did not express self-KIR molecules. CD16(+) liver NK cells gained cytolytic function when stimulated with IL-2 or cultured with LPS or poly(I:C)-activated autologous liver Kupffer cells. Thus, the human liver contains NK cell subsets which have reduced effector function, but under appropriate inflammatory conditions become potent killers. PMID:19587011

  7. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections.

    PubMed

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Moore, Michael D; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Dustin, Lynn B; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B; Screaton, Gavin R; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation-driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation-is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology. PMID:27337592

  8. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a disease of activated monoclonal B cells

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Rajendra N.; Calissano, Carlo; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    B-cell type chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has long been considered a disease of resting lymphocytes. However cell surface and intracellular phenotypes suggest that most CLL cells are activated cells, although only a small subset progresses beyond the G1 stage of the cell cycle. In addition, traditional teaching says that CLL cells divide rarely, and therefore the buildup of leukemic cells is due to an inherent defect in cell death. However, in vivo labeling of CLL cells indicates a much more active rate of cell birth than originally estimated, suggesting that CLL is a dynamic disease. Here we review the observations that have led to these altered views of the activation state and proliferative capacities of CLL cells and also provide our interpretation of these observations in light of their potential impact on patients. PMID:20620969

  9. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  10. Elasticity of adherent active cells on a compliant substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Mertz, Aaron F.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2012-02-01

    We present a continuum mechanical model of rigidity sensing by livings cells adhering to a compliant substrate. The cell or cell colony is modeled as an elastic active gel, adapting recently developed continuum theories of active viscoelastic fluids. The coupling to the substrate enters as a boundary condition that relates the cell's deformation field to local stress gradients. In the presence of activity, the substrate induces spatially inhomogeneous contractile stresses and deformations, with a power law dependence of the total traction forces on cell or colony size. This is in agreement with recent experiments on keratinocyte colonies adhered to fibronectin coated surfaces. In the presence of acto-myosin activity, the substrate also enhances the cell polarization, breaking the cell's front-rear symmetry. Maximal polarization is observed when the substrate stiffness matches that of the cell, in agreement with experiments on stem cells.

  11. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C.; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Barnes, Eleanor; Ball, Jonathan; Burgess, Gary; Cooke, Graham; Dillon, John; Gore, Charles; Foster, Graham; Guha, Neil; Halford, Rachel; Herath, Cham; Holmes, Chris; Howe, Anita; Hudson, Emma; Irving, William; Khakoo, Salim; Koletzki, Diana; Martin, Natasha; Mbisa, Tamyo; McKeating, Jane; McLauchlan, John; Miners, Alec; Murray, Andrea; Shaw, Peter; Simmonds, Peter; Spencer, Chris; Targett-Adams, Paul; Thomson, Emma; Vickerman, Peter; Zitzmann, Nicole; Moore, Michael D.; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Dustin, Lynn B.; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M.; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B.; Screaton, Gavin R.; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation—driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation—is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology. PMID:27337592

  12. Functionally Active Gap Junctions between Connexin 43-Positive Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Gabashvili, A N; Baklaushev, V P; Grinenko, N F; Levinskii, A B; Mel'nikov, P A; Cherepanov, S A; Chekhonin, V P

    2015-05-01

    The formation of functional gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and cells of low-grade rat glioma C6 cells was studied in in vitro experiments. Immunocytochemical analysis with antibodies to connexin 43 extracellular loop 2 showed that mesenchymal stem cells as well as C6 glioma cells express the main astroglial gap junction protein connexin 43. Analysis of migration activity showed that mesenchymal stem cells actively migrate towards C6 glioma cells. During co-culturing, mesenchymal stem cells and glioma C6 form functionally active gap junctions mediating the transport of cytoplasmic dye from glioma cells to mesenchymal stem cells in the opposite direction. Fluorometry showed that the intensity of transport of low-molecular substances through heterologous gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and glioma cells is similar to that through homologous gap junctions between glioma cells. This phenomenon can be used for the development of new methods of cell therapy of high-grade gliomas. PMID:26033611

  13. Langerhans Cells Serve as Immunoregulatory Cells by Activating NKT Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Atsushi; Khaskhely, Noor M.; Ma, Ying; Sreevidya, Coimbatore S.; Taguchi, Kumiko; Nishigori, Chikako; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    UV exposure alters the morphology and function of epidermal Langerhans cells, which plays a role in UV-induced immune suppression. It is generally believed that UV exposure triggers the migration of immature Langerhans cells (LC) from the skin to the draining lymph nodes, where they induce tolerance. However, because most of the previous studies employed in vitro UV-irradiated LC, the data generated may not adequately reflect what is happening in vivo. In this study we isolated migrating Langerhans cells from the lymph nodes of UV-irradiated mice and studied their function. We found prolonged LC survival in the lymph nodes of UV-irradiated mice. LC were necessary for UV-induced immune suppression because no immune suppression was observed in Langerhans cells-deficient mice. Transferring LC from UV-irradiated mice into normal recipient animals transferred immune suppression and induced tolerance. We found that LC co-localized with lymph node Natural Killer T (NKT) cells. No immune suppression was observed when LC were transferred from UV-irradiated mice into NKT cell-deficient mice. NKT cells isolated from the lymph nodes of UV-irradiated mice secreted significantly more IL-4 than NKT cells isolated from non-irradiated controls. Injecting the wild type mice with anti-IL-4 blocked the induction of immune suppression. Our findings indicate that UV exposure activates the migration of mature LC to the skin draining lymph nodes where they induce immune regulation in vivo by activating NKT cells. PMID:20844203

  14. Single cell multiplexed assay for proteolytic activity using droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-15

    Cellular enzymes interact in a post-translationally regulated fashion to govern individual cell behaviors, yet current platform technologies are limited in their ability to measure multiple enzyme activities simultaneously in single cells. Here, we developed multi-color Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based enzymatic substrates and use them in a microfluidics platform to simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities from water-in-oil droplets that contain single cells. By integrating the microfluidic platform with a computational analytical method, Proteolytic Activity Matrix Analysis (PrAMA), we are able to infer six different protease activity signals from individual cells in a high throughput manner (~100 cells/experimental run). We characterized protease activity profiles at single cell resolution for several cancer cell lines including breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, lung cancer cell line PC-9, and leukemia cell line K-562 using both live-cell and in-situ cell lysis assay formats, with special focus on metalloproteinases important in metastasis. The ability to measure multiple proteases secreted from or expressed in individual cells allows us to characterize cell heterogeneity and has potential applications including systems biology, pharmacology, cancer diagnosis and stem cell biology. PMID:26995287

  15. Activated Muscle Satellite Cells Chase Ghosts.

    PubMed

    Mourikis, Philippos; Relaix, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    The in vivo behaviors of skeletal muscle stem cells, i.e., satellite cells, during homeostasis and after injury are poorly understood. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Webster et al. (2016) now perform a tour de force intravital microscopic analysis of this population, showing that "ghost fiber" remnants act as scaffolds to guide satellite cell divisions after injury. PMID:26849298

  16. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  17. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kist, M.; Koester, H.; Bredt, W.

    1985-06-01

    Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic /sup 75/selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by /sup 51/Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances.

  18. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response. PMID:27127520

  19. Active unjamming of confluent cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. Motivated by these observations, we have studied a model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers. In this model, referred to as self-propelled Voronoi (SPV), cells are described as polygons in a Voronoi tessellation with directed noisy cell motility and interactions governed by a shape energy that incorporates the effects of cell volume incompressibility, contractility and cell-cell adhesion. Using this model, we have demonstrated a new density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell-shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. We have also used the SPV model to test a new method developed by our group to determine cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces, hence providing the spatio-temporal distribution of stresses in motile dense tissues. This work was done with Dapeng Bi, Lisa Manning and Xingbo Yang. MCM was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184 and by the Simons Foundation.

  20. Glycolipid presentation to natural killer T cells differs in an organ-dependent fashion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieg, John; Yang, Guangli; Franck, Richard W.; van Rooijen, Nico; Tsuji, Moriya

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) are able to present glycolipids to natural killer (NK) T cells in vivo. However, the essential role of DCs, as well as the role of other cells in glycolipid presentation, is unknown. Here, we show that DCs are the crucial antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for splenic NK T cells, whereas Kupffer cells are the key APCs for hepatic NK T cells. Both cell types stimulate cytokine production by NK T cells within 2 h of glycolipid administration, but only DCs are involved in the systemic, downstream responses to glycolipid administration. More specifically, CD8+ DCs produce IL-12 in response to glycolipid presentation, which stimulates secondary IFN- production by NK cells in different organs. Different APCs participate in glycolipid presentation to NK T cells in vivo but differ in their involvement in the overall glycolipid response. dendritic cell | Kupffer cell

  1. Radiation exposure induces inflammasome pathway activation in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Stoecklein, Veit M; Osuka, Akinori; Ishikawa, Shizu; Lederer, Madeline R; Wanke-Jellinek, Lorenz; Lederer, James A

    2015-02-01

    Radiation exposure induces cell and tissue damage, causing local and systemic inflammatory responses. Because the inflammasome pathway is triggered by cell death and danger-associated molecular patterns, we hypothesized that the inflammasome may signal acute and chronic immune responses to radiation. Using a mouse radiation model, we show that radiation induces a dose-dependent increase in inflammasome activation in macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, T cells, and B cells as judged by cleaved caspase-1 detection in cells. Time course analysis showed the appearance of cleaved caspase-1 in cells by day 1 and sustained expression until day 7 after radiation. Also, cells showing inflammasome activation coexpressed the cell surface apoptosis marker annexin V. The role of caspase-1 as a trigger for hematopoietic cell losses after radiation was studied in caspase-1(-/-) mice. We found less radiation-induced cell apoptosis and immune cell loss in caspase-1(-/-) mice than in control mice. Next, we tested whether uric acid might mediate inflammasome activation in cells by treating mice with allopurinol and discovered that allopurinol treatment completely blocked caspase-1 activation in cells. Finally, we demonstrate that radiation-induced caspase-1 activation occurs by a Nod-like receptor family protein 3-independent mechanism because radiation-exposed Nlrp3(-/-) mice showed caspase-1 activation profiles that were indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice. In summary, our data demonstrate that inflammasome activation occurs in many immune cell types following radiation exposure and that allopurinol prevented radiation-induced inflammasome activation. These results suggest that targeting the inflammasome may help control radiation-induced inflammation. PMID:25539818

  2. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  3. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    PubMed

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  4. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M.; Nguyen, Nguyen H. P.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-01-01

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  5. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, John K; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states. PMID:26967308

  6. Remote Control of T Cell Activation Using Magnetic Janus Particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwahun; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-20

    We report a strategy for using magnetic Janus microparticles to control the stimulation of T cell signaling with single-cell precision. To achieve this, we designed Janus particles that are magnetically responsive on one hemisphere and stimulatory to T cells on the other side. By manipulating the rotation and locomotion of Janus particles under an external magnetic field, we could control the orientation of the particle-cell recognition and thereby the initiation of T cell activation. This study demonstrates a step towards employing anisotropic material properties of Janus particles to control single-cell activities without the need of complex magnetic manipulation devices. PMID:27144475

  7. Activation of B cells by antigens on follicular dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; El Sayed, Rania M.; Sukumar, Selvakumar; Szakal, Andras K.; Tew, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A need for antigen-processing and presentation to B cells is not widely appreciated. However, cross-linking of multiple B cell receptors (BCRs) by T-independent antigens delivers a potent signal that induces antibody responses. Such BCR cross-linking also occurs in germinal centers where follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) present multimerized antigens as periodically arranged antigen-antibody complexes (ICs). Unlike T cells that recognize antigens as peptide-MHC complexes, optimal B cell-responses are induced by multimerized FDC-ICs that simultaneously engage multiple BCRs. FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC-periodicity and FDC-BAFF, -IL-6 and -C4bBP are co-stimulators. Remarkably, specific antibody responses can be induced by FDC-ICs in the absence of T cells, opening up the exciting possibility that people with T cell insufficiencies may be immunized with T-dependent vaccines via FDC-ICs. PMID:20418164

  8. Cell trapping in activated micropores for functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Talasaz, AmirAli H; Powell, Ashley A; Stahl, Patrik; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Mindrinos, Michael; Davis, Ronald W

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel device which provides the opportunity to perform high-throughput biochemical assays on different individual cells. In particular, the proposed device is suited to screen the rare cells in biological samples for early stage cancer diagnosis and explore their biochemical functionality. In the process, single cells are precisely positioned and captured in activated micropores. To show the performance of the proposed device, cultured yeast cells and human epithelial circulating tumor cells are successfully captured. PMID:17945673

  9. IL-2 induces STAT4 activation in primary NK cells and NK cell lines, but not in T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, K S; Ritz, J; Frank, D A

    1999-01-01

    IL-2 exerts potent but distinct functional effects on two critical cell populations of the immune system, T cells and NK cells. Whereas IL-2 leads to proliferation in both cell types, it enhances cytotoxicity primarily in NK cells. In both T cells and NK cells, IL-2 induces the activation of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5. Given this similarity in intracellular signaling, the mechanism underlying the distinct response to IL-2 in T cells and NK cells is not clear. In this study, we show that in primary NK cells and NK cell lines, in addition to the activation of STAT1 and STAT5, IL-2 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT4, a STAT previously reported to be activated only in response to IL-12 and IFN-alpha. This activation of STAT4 in response to IL-2 is not due to the autocrine production of IL-12 or IFN-alpha. STAT4 activated in response to IL-2 is able to bind to a STAT-binding DNA sequence, suggesting that in NK cells IL-2 is capable of activating target genes through phosphorylation of STAT4. IL-2 induces the activation of Jak2 uniquely in NK cells, which may underlie the ability of IL-2 to activate STAT4 only in these cells. Although the activation of STAT4 in response to IL-2 occurs in primary resting and activated NK cells, it does not occur in primary resting T cells or mitogen-activated T cells. The unique activation of the STAT4-signaling pathway in NK cells may underlie the distinct functional effect of IL-2 on this cell population. PMID:9886399

  10. Senescence of activated stellate cells limits liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Krizhanovsky, Valery; Yon, Monica; Dickins, Ross A.; Hearn, Stephen; Simon, Janelle; Miething, Cornelius; Yee, Herman; Zender, Lars; Lowe, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cellular senescence acts as a potent mechanism of tumor suppression; however, its functional contribution to non-cancer pathologies has not been examined. Here we show that senescent cells accumulate in murine livers treated to produce fibrosis, a precursor pathology to cirrhosis. The senescent cells are derived primarily from activated hepatic stellate cells, which initially proliferate in response to liver damage and produce the extracellular matrix deposited in the fibrotic scar. In mice lacking key senescence regulators, stellate cells continue to proliferate, leading to excessive liver fibrosis. Furthermore, senescent activated stellate cells exhibit gene expression profile consistent with cell cycle exit, reduced secretion of extracellular matrix components, enhanced secretion of extracellular matrix degrading enzymes, and enhanced immune surveillance. Accordingly natural killer cells preferentially kill senescent activated stellate cells in vitro and in vivo, thereby facilitating the resolution of fibrosis. Therefore, the senescence program limits the fibrogenic response to acute tissue damage. PMID:18724938

  11. Mast cells and their activation in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Harvinder; Arthur, Greer; Bradding, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Mast cells and their activation contribute to lung health via innate and adaptive immune responses to respiratory pathogens. They are also involved in the normal response to tissue injury. However, mast cells are involved in disease processes characterized by inflammation and remodeling of tissue structure. In these diseases mast cells are often inappropriately and chronically activated. There is evidence for activation of mast cells contributing to the pathophysiology of asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, and pulmonary hypertension. They may also play a role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and lung cancer. The diverse mechanisms through which mast cells sense and interact with the external and internal microenvironment account for their role in these diseases. Newly discovered mechanisms of redistribution and interaction between mast cells, airway structural cells, and other inflammatory cells may offer novel therapeutic targets in these disease processes. PMID:26845625

  12. Cisplatin-induced Casepase-3 activation in different tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hua; Li, Xiao; Su, Ting; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in normal organism development which is one of the main types of programmed cell death to help tissues maintain homeostasis. Defective apoptosis can result in cell accumulation and therefore effects on tumor pathogenesis, progression and therapy resistance. A family of proteins, known as caspases, is typically activated in the early stages of apoptosis. Therefore, studying the kinetics of activation of caspases induced by antitumor drugs can contribute to antitumor drug discovery and explanation of the molecular mechanisms. This paper detected the Caspase-3 activity induced by cisplatin in human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-M), human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and human epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hela) with stably expressing ECFP-DEVDDsRed (CD3) probe, a fluorescent probe consisting of Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), red fluorescent protein (DsRed) and a linker with a recognition site of Caspase-3, by using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging system. Under the same concentration of cisplatin, ACC-M cells responded the most rapidly, and then HepG2 cells and Hela cells, respectively, in the early 30 hours. Later, HepG2 cells represented acceleration in the Caspase-3 activation speed and reached full activation the earliest comparing to other two cell types. The results demonstrated that ACC-M cell is more sensitive than the other two cell types under the treatment of cisplatin.

  13. Immobilization of Pichia pastoris cells containing alcohol oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleknia, S; Ahmadi, H; Norouzian, D

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The attempts were made to describe the development of a whole cell immobilization of P. pastoris by entrapping the cells in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell Pichia pastoris was evaluated in comparison with yeast biomass production. Materials and Methods Methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris was obtained from Collection of Standard Microorganisms, Department of Bacterial Vaccines, Pasteur Institute of Iran (CSMPI). Stock culture was maintained on YPD agar plates. Alcohol oxidase was strongly induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were harvested by centrifugation then permeabilized. Finally the cells were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel beads. The activity of alcohol oxidase was determined by method of Tane et al. Results At the end of the logarithmic phase of cell culture, the alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell P. Pastoris reached the highest level. In comparison, the alcohol oxidase activity was measured in an immobilized P. pastoris when entrapped in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of cells was induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were permeabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and immobilized. CTAB was also found to increase the gel permeability. Alcohol oxidase activity of immobilized cells was then quantitated by ABTS/POD spectrophotometric method at OD 420. There was a 14% increase in alcohol oxidase activity in immobilized cells as compared with free cells. By addition of 2-butanol as a substrate, the relative activity of alcohol oxidase was significantly higher as compared with other substrates added to the reaction media. Conclusion Immobilization of cells could eliminate lengthy and expensive procedures of enzyme separation and purification, protect and stabilize enzyme activity, and perform easy separation of the enzyme from the reaction media. PMID:22530090

  14. Antiviral Regulation in Porcine Monocytic Cells at Different Activation States

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytic cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells, exist in different activation states that are critical to the regulation of antimicrobial immunity. Many pandemic viruses are monocytotropic, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), which directly infects subsets of monocytic cells and interferes with antiviral responses. To study antiviral responses in PRRSV-infected monocytic cells, we characterized inflammatory cytokine responses and genome-wide profiled signature genes to investigate response pathways in uninfected and PRRSV-infected monocytic cells at different activation states. Our findings showed suppressed interferon (IFN) production in macrophages in non-antiviral states and an arrest of lipid metabolic pathways in macrophages at antiviral states. Importantly, porcine monocytic cells at different activation states were susceptible to PRRSV and responded differently to viral infection. Based on Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, two approaches were used to potentiate antiviral activity: (i) pharmaceutical modulation of cellular lipid metabolism and (ii) in situ PRRSV replication-competent expression of interferon alpha (IFN-α). Both approaches significantly suppressed exogenous viral infection in monocytic cells. In particular, the engineered IFN-expressing PRRSV strain eliminated exogenous virus infection and sustained cell viability at 4 days postinfection in macrophages. These findings suggest an intricate interaction of viral infection with the activation status of porcine monocytic cells. An understanding and integration of antiviral infection with activation status of monocytic cells may provide a means of potentiating antiviral immunity. IMPORTANCE Activation statuses of monocytic cells, including monocytes, macrophages (Mϕs), and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. Unfortunately, the activation status of porcine monocytic cells or how cell activation status

  15. Balance of inflammatory pathways and interplay of immune cells in the liver during homeostasis and injury

    PubMed Central

    Baeck, Christer; Tacke, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Multiple potentially harmful stimuli challenge the liver, the chief metabolic and detoxifying organ of the human body. Due to its central anatomical location, continuous blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract through the hepatic sinusoids allows the metabolically active hepatocytes, the non-parenchymal cells and the various immune cell populations residing and patrolling in the liver to interact with antigens and microbiological components coming from the intestine. Cytokines are key mediators within the complex interplay of intrahepatic immune cells and hepatocytes, because they can activate effector functions of immune cells as well as hepatocytic intracellular signaling pathways controlling cellular homeostasis. Kupffer cells and liver-infiltrating monocyte-derived macrophages are primary sources of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The liver is also enriched in natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cells, which fulfill functions in pathogen defense, T cell recruitment and modulation of fibrogenic responses. TNF can activate specific intracellular pathways in hepatocytes that influence cell fate in different manners, e.g. pro-apoptotic signals via the caspase cascade, but also survival pathways, namely the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway. NF-kappaB regulates important functions in liver physiology and pathology. The exact dissection of the contribution of recruited and resident immune cells, their soluble cytokine and chemokine mediators and the intracellular hepatocytic response in liver homeostasis and injury could potentially identify novel targets for the treatment of acute and chronic liver disease, liver fibrosis or cirrhosis. PMID:26417243

  16. AUGMENTATION OF MURINE NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY BY MANGANESE CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural Killer (NK) cell activity of spleen cells from male CBA/J mice was augmented by a single parenteral injection of MnCl2 administered 1 day prior to testing by in vitro and in vivo isotope release assays. Increased cytotoxic activity was observed in vitro against both NK-se...

  17. Gene expression profiles of hepatic cell-type specific marker genes in progression of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahara, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Wagatsuma, Hiroki; Yokoya, Fumihiko; Zhang, Qing-Wei; Yamaguchi, Mutsuyo; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kawada, Norifumi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the gene expression profile data for the whole liver during development of dimethylni-trosamine (DMN)-induced hepatic fibrosis. METHODS: Marker genes were identified for different types of hepatic cells, including hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), Kupffer cells (including other inflammatory cells), and hepatocytes, using independent temporal DNA microarray data obtained from isolated hepatic cells. RESULTS: The cell-type analysis of gene expression gave several key results and led to formation of three hypotheses: (1) changes in the expression of HSC-specific marker genes during fibrosis were similar to gene expression data in in vitro cultured HSCs, suggesting a major role of the self-activating characteristics of HSCs in formation of fibrosis; (2) expression of mast cell-specific marker genes reached a peak during liver fibrosis, suggesting a possible role of mast cells in formation of fibrosis; and (3) abnormal expression of hepatocyte-specific marker genes was found across several metabolic pathways during fibrosis, including sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and drug metabolism, suggesting a mechanistic relationship between these abnormalities and symptoms of liver fibrosis. CONCLUSION: Analysis of marker genes for specific hepatic cell types can identify the key aspects of fibrogenesis. Sequential activation of inflammatory cells and the self-supporting properties of HSCs play an important role in development of fibrosis. PMID:17072980

  18. Pacemaker activity resulting from the coupling with nonexcitable cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemet, Vincent

    2006-07-01

    Fibroblasts are nonexcitable cells that are sometimes coupled with excitable cells (cardiomyocytes). Due to a higher resting potential, these cells may act as a current source or sink and therefore disturb the electrical activity of the surrounding excitable cells. The possible occurrence of spontaneous pacemaker activity resulting from these electrotonic interactions was investigated in a theoretical model of two coupled cells as well as in a multicellular fiber model based on the Courtemanche kinetics. The results indicate that repeated spontaneous activations can be observed after an alteration in the activation and recovery properties of the sodium current (changes in excitability properties), provided that the difference in the resting potential as well as the coupling between the excitable and nonexcitable cells is sufficiently high. This may constitute a mechanism of focal sources triggering arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation.

  19. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  20. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  1. Signal transduction pathways in mast cell granule-mediated endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Luqi; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa; Smirnova, Irina; Stechschulte, Daniel J; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that incubation of human endothelial cells with mast cell granules results in potentiation of lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8. AIMS: The objective of the present study was to identify candidate molecules and signal transduction pathways involved in the synergy between mast cell granules and lipopolysaccharide on endothelial cell activation. METHODS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with rat mast cell granules in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and IL-6 production was quantified. The status of c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation, nuclear factor-kappaB translocation and intracellular calcium levels were determined to identify the mechanism of synergy between mast cell granules and lipopolysaccaride. RESULTS: Mast cell granules induced low levels of interleukin-6 production by endothelial cells, and this effect was markedly enhanced by lipopolysaccharide. The results revealed that both serine proteases and histamine present in mast cell granules were involved in this activation process. Mast cell granules increased intracellular calcium, and activated c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. The combination of lipopolysaccharide and mast cell granules prolonged c-Jun amino-terminal kinase activity beyond the duration of induction by either stimulant alone and was entirely due to active proteases. However, both proteases and histamine contributed to calcium mobilization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. The nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB proteins was of greater magnitude in endothelial cells treated with the combination of mast cell granules and lipopolysaccharide. CONCLUSIONS:Mast cell granule serine proteases and histamine can amplify lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial cell activation, which involves calcium mobilization, mitogen-activated

  2. Imaging the coordination of multiple signaling activities in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Christopher M.; Elliott, Hunter; Danuser, Gaudenz; Hahn, Klaus M.

    2013-01-01

    Preface Cellular signal transduction occurs in complex and redundant interaction networks that are best examined at the level of single cells by simultaneously monitoring the activation dynamics of multiple components. Recent advances in biosensor technology have made it possible to visualize and quantify the activation of multiple network nodes in the same living cell. The precision and scope of this approach has been greatly extended by novel computational approaches to determine the relationships between different networks, studied in separate cells. PMID:22016058

  3. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  4. Calcium alloy as active material in secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Michael F.; Preto, Sandra K.; Martin, Allan E.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium alloys such as calcium-aluminum and calcium-silicon, are employed as active material within a rechargeable negative electrode of an electrochemical cell. Such cells can use a molten salt electrolyte including calcium ions and a positive electrode having sulfur, sulfides, or oxides as active material. The calcium alloy is selected to prevent formation of molten calcium alloys resulting from reaction with the selected molten electrolytic salt at the cell operating temperatures.

  5. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  6. Microwave-induced thermogenetic activation of single cells

    SciTech Connect

    Safronov, N. A.; Fedotov, I. V.; Ermakova, Yu. G.; Matlashov, M. E.; Belousov, V. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-04-20

    Exposure to a microwave field is shown to enable thermogenetic activation of individual cells in a culture of cell expressing thermosensitive ion channels. Integration of a microwave transmission line with an optical fiber and a diamond quantum thermometer has been shown to allow thermogenetic single-cell activation to be combined with accurate local online temperature measurements based on an optical detection of electron spin resonance in nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond.

  7. Activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor downregulates inflammasome activity and liver inflammation via a β-arrestin-2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Ahmad; Hoque, Rafaz; Ouyang, Xinshou; Farooq, Ahsan; Ghani, Ayaz; Ahsan, Kaimul; Guerra, Mateus; Mehal, Wajahat Zafar

    2014-10-01

    Activation of the cytosolic inflammasome machinery is responsible for acute and chronic liver inflammation, but little is known about its regulation. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor families are heterotetrameric ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by a range of metabolites, including aspartate, glutamate, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the brain NMDA receptors are present on neuronal and nonneuronal cells and regulate a diverse range of functions. We tested the role of the NMDA receptor and aspartate in inflammasome regulation in vitro and in models of acute hepatitis and pancreatitis. We demonstrate that the NMDA receptor is present on Kupffer cells, and their activation on primary mouse and human cells limits inflammasome activation by downregulating NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 and procaspase-1. The NMDA receptor pathway is active in vivo, limits injury in acute hepatitis, and can be therapeutically further activated by aspartate providing protection in acute inflammatory liver injury. Downregulation of inflammasome activation by NMDA occurs via a β-arrestin-2 NF-kβ and JNK pathway and not via Ca(2+) mobilization. We have identified the NMDA receptor as a regulator of inflammasome activity in vitro and in vivo. This has identified a new area of immune regulation associated by metabolites that may be relevant in a diverse range of conditions, including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and total parenteral nutrition-induced immune suppression. PMID:25104498

  8. Effects of dexamethasone on palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bulleit, R.F.; Zimmerman, E.F.

    1984-09-15

    Corticosteroids will induce cleft palate in mice. One suggested mechanism for this effect is through inhibition of phospholipase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the effects of dexamethasone, a synthetic corticosteroid, on phospholipase activity in cultures of palate mesenchymal cells. Palate mesenchymal cells were prelabeled with (3H)arachidonic acid. The cells were subsequently treated with various concentrations of dexamethasone. Concurrently, cultures of M-MSV-transformed 3T3 cells were prepared identically. After treatment, phospholipase activity was stimulated by the addition of serum or epidermal growth factor (EGF), and radioactivity released into the medium was taken as a measure of phospholipase activity. Dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) or 1 X 10(-4) M) could inhibit serum-stimulated phospholipase activity in transformed 3T3 cells after 1 to 24 hr of treatment. However, no inhibition of activity was measured in palate mesenchymal cells following this period of treatment. Not until 120 hr of treatment with dexamethasone (1 X 10(-4) M) was any significant inhibition of serum-stimulated phospholipase activity observed in palate mesenchymal cells. When EGF was used to stimulate phospholipase activity, dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) M) caused an increase in phospholipase activity in palate mesenchymal cells. These observations suggested that phospholipase in transformed 3T3 cells was sensitive to inhibition by dexamethasone. However, palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase is only minimally sensitive to dexamethasone, and in certain instances can be enhanced. These results cannot support the hypothesis that corticosteroids mediate their teratogenic effect via inhibition of phospholipase activity.

  9. Mitogen-activated Tasmanian devil blood mononuclear cells kill devil facial tumour disease cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Tovar, Cesar; Cooray, Anne A; Kreiss, Alexandre; Darby, Jocelyn; Murphy, James M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Bettiol, Silvana S; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer that has brought the host species, the Tasmanian devil, to the brink of extinction. The cancer cells avoid allogeneic immune recognition by downregulating cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I expression. This should prevent CD8(+) T cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxicity. The reason why NK cells, normally reactive to MHC-negative cells, are not activated to kill DFTD cells has not been determined. The immune response of wild devils to DFTD, if it occurs, is uncharacterised. To investigate this, we tested 12 wild devils with DFTD, and found suggestive evidence of low levels of antibodies against DFTD cells in one devil. Eight of these devils were also analysed for cytotoxicity, however, none showed evidence for cytotoxicity against cultured DFTD cells. To establish whether mimicking activation of antitumour responses could induce cytotoxic activity against DFTD, Tasmanian devil peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated with either the mitogen Concanavalin A, the Toll-like receptor agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or recombinant Tasmanian devil IL-2. All induced the PBMC cells to kill cultured DFTD cells, suggesting that activation does not occur after encounter with DFTD cells in vivo, but can be induced. The identification of agents that activate cytotoxicity against DFTD target cells is critical for developing strategies to protect against DFTD. Such agents could function as adjuvants to induce functional immune responses capable of targeting DFTD cells and tumours in vivo. PMID:27089941

  10. Selective activation of functional suppressor cells by human seminal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, S S

    1986-01-01

    The ability of seminal fluid (SF) to induce suppressor cell activity from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMN) was examined. PBMN were incubated with SF for 48 h, washed to remove SF components, treated with mitomycin C (mit C) and co-cultured with Raji cells, a lymphoblastoid cell line. Raji cell proliferation was inhibited by SF-treated PBMN proportionally to SF concentration. SF (50-200 micrograms), mit C-treated Raji cells or mit C-treated PBMN pre-incubated with phytohaemagglutinin were without effect on Raji cell growth. Suppressor T lymphocytes generated by incubation of PBMN with concanavalin A inhibited Raji cells to the same extent as did SF-treated PBMN. All activity was lost following heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min; freezing and thawing reduced the ability of SF to induce suppression by 50%. Dialysis of SF or treatment with antibody to prostaglandin E2 led to a 50% reduction in suppression. PMID:2943541

  11. Platelet activating factor: regulation by mast cells and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Denburg, J A; Williams, D B; Kinlough-Rathbone, R L; Cazenave, J P; Bienenstock, J

    1984-02-01

    We have investigated some aspects of the regulation of production of rat platelet activating factor (PAF)2 in vitro. Suspensions of unseparated (PLC1), mast cell-depleted (PLC2), or mast cell (MC)-enriched rat peritoneal lavage cells (PLC) were analyzed for PAF content by extraction at alkaline pH. PAF activity extracted from PLC1 varied inversely with viable cell concentration: at 1 X 10(6) cells/ml, 32 +/- 9.3 PAF units, decreasing to 11.2 +/- 9.5 units at 10 X 10(6) cells/ml, and no activity at higher concentrations. Incubation of PLC1 in Tyrode's buffer or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), but not salicylate, resulted in a time-dependent loss of PAF activity. Mean PAF activity of PLC2 was similar to that in PLC1, while no PAF activity was extractable from MC. Co-incubation with MC extracts inhibited PAF activity of PLC1 extracts in a dose-dependent fashion. Ultracentrifugation of PAF-containing samples led to a loss of all PAF activity in PLC1 extracts, suggesting the association of PAF activity with subcellular components. PAF appears to be derived from a non-MC population of rat PLC, is not extractable from rat PLC in the presence of ASA and is inhibited by MC extracts. These studies suggest that ASA regulates PAF availability unrelated to its effect on cyclooxygenase and that MC membrane products directly inhibit PAF activity from rat PLC. PMID:6711391

  12. Effect of substrate mechanical properties on T cell activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2013-03-01

    T cell activation is a key process in cell-mediated immunity, and engagement of T cell receptors by peptides on antigen presenting cells leads to activation of signaling cascades as well as cytoskeletal reorganization and large scale membrane deformations. While significant advances have been made in understanding the biochemical signaling pathways, the effects imposed by the physical environment and the role of mechanical forces on cell activation are not well understood. In this study, we have used anti-CD3 coated elastic polyacrylamide gels as stimulatory substrates to enable the spreading of Jurkat T cells and the measurement of cellular traction forces. We have investigated the effect of substrate stiffness on the dynamics of T cell spreading and cellular force generation. We found that T cells display more active and sustained edge dynamics on softer gels and that they exert increased traction stresses with increasing gel stiffness. A dynamic actin cytoskeleton was required to maintain the forces generated during activation, as inferred from small molecule inhibition experiments. Our results indicate an important role for physical properties of the antigen presenting cell as well as cytoskeleton-driven forces in signaling activation.

  13. BMP2 Transfer to Neighboring Cells and Activation of Signaling.

    PubMed

    Alborzinia, Hamed; Shaikhkarami, Marjan; Hortschansky, Peter; Wölfl, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Morphogen gradients and concentration are critical features during early embryonic development and cellular differentiation. Previously we reported the preparation of biologically active, fluorescently labeled BMP2 and quantitatively analyzed their binding to the cell surface and followed BMP2 endocytosis over time on the level of single endosomes. Here we show that this internalized BMP2 can be transferred to neighboring cells and, moreover, also activates downstream BMP signaling in adjacent cells, indicated by Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and activation of the downstream target gene id1. Using a 3D matrix to modulate cell-cell contacts in culture we could show that direct cell-cell contact significantly increased BMP2 transfer. Using inhibitors of vesicular transport, transfer was strongly inhibited. Interestingly, cotreatment with the physiological BMP inhibitor Noggin increased BMP2 uptake and transfer, albeit activation of Smad signaling in neighboring cells was completely suppressed. Our findings present a novel and interesting mechanism by which morphogens such as BMP2 can be transferred between cells and how this is modulated by BMP antagonists such as Noggin, and how this influences activation of Smad signaling by BMP2 in neighboring cells. PMID:27306974

  14. Functional Implications of Plasma Membrane Condensation for T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Carmel M.; Engelhardt, Karin; Williamson, David; Grewal, Thomas; Jessup, Wendy; Harder, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    The T lymphocyte plasma membrane condenses at the site of activation but the functional significance of this receptor-mediated membrane reorganization is not yet known. Here we demonstrate that membrane condensation at the T cell activation sites can be inhibited by incorporation of the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC), which is known to prevent the formation of raft-like liquid-ordered domains in model membranes. We enriched T cells with 7KC, or cholesterol as control, to assess the importance of membrane condensation for T cell activation. Upon 7KC treatment, T cell antigen receptor (TCR) triggered calcium fluxes and early tyrosine phosphorylation events appear unaltered. However, signaling complexes form less efficiently on the cell surface, fewer phosphorylated signaling proteins are retained in the plasma membrane and actin restructuring at activation sites is impaired in 7KC-enriched cells resulting in compromised downstream activation responses. Our data emphasizes lipids as an important medium for the organization at T cell activation sites and strongly indicates that membrane condensation is an important element of the T cell activation process. PMID:18509459

  15. Activation-induced necroptosis contributes to B-cell lymphopenia in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H; Liu, F; Dong, G; Ren, D; Xu, Y; Dou, J; Wang, T; Sun, L; Hou, Y

    2014-01-01

    B-cell abnormality including excessive activation and lymphopenia is a central feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although activation threshold, auto-reaction and death of B cells can be affected by intrinsical and/or external signaling, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that co-activation of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and B-cell receptor (BCR) pathways is a core event for the survival/dead states of B cells in SLE. We found that the mortalities of CD19+CD27- and CD19+IgM+ B-cell subsets were increased in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of SLE patients. The gene microarray analysis of CD19+ B cells from active SLE patients showed that the differentially expressed genes were closely correlated to TLR7, BCR, apoptosis, necroptosis and immune pathways. We also found that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR could trigger normal B cells to take on SLE-like B-cell characters including the elevated viability, activation and proliferation in the first 3 days and necroptosis in the later days. Moreover, the necroptotic B cells exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction and hypoxia, along with the elevated expression of necroptosis-related genes, consistent with that in both SLE B-cell microarray and real-time PCR verification. Expectedly, pretreatment with the receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) inhibitor Necrostatin-1, and not the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD, suppressed B-cell death. Importantly, B cells from additional SLE patients also significantly displayed high expression levels of necroptosis-related genes compared with those from healthy donors. These data indicate that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR pathways can promote B cells to hyperactivation and ultimately necroptosis. Our finding provides a new explanation on B-cell lymphopenia in active SLE patients. These data suggest that extrinsic factors may increase the intrinsical abnormality of B cells in SLE patients. PMID:25210799

  16. Mast cells and dendritic cells form synapses that facilitate antigen transfer for T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Cannon, Judy L.; te Riet, Joost; Holmes, Anna; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki; Cambi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) produce soluble mediators such as histamine and prostaglandins that are known to influence dendritic cell (DC) function by stimulating maturation and antigen processing. Whether direct cell–cell interactions are important in modulating MC/DC function is unclear. In this paper, we show that direct contact between MCs and DCs occurs and plays an important role in modulating the immune response. Activation of MCs through FcεRI cross-linking triggers the formation of stable cell–cell interactions with immature DCs that are reminiscent of the immunological synapse. Direct cellular contact differentially regulates the secreted cytokine profile, indicating that MC modulation of DC populations is influenced by the nature of their interaction. Synapse formation requires integrin engagement and facilitates the transfer of internalized MC-specific antigen from MCs to DCs. The transferred material is ultimately processed and presented by DCs and can activate T cells. The physiological outcomes of the MC–DC synapse suggest a new role for intercellular crosstalk in defining the immune response. PMID:26304724

  17. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell demonstration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Veyo, S.E.

    1995-08-01

    The development of a viable fuel cell driven electrical power generation system involves not only the development of cell and stack technology, but also the development of the overall system concept, the strategy for control, and the ancillary subsystems. The design requirements used to guide system development must reflect a customer focus in order to evolve a commercial product. In order to obtain useful customer feedback, Westinghouse has practiced the deployment with customers of fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems. These field units have served to demonstrate to customers first hand the beneficial attributes of the SOFC, to expose deficiencies through experience in order to guide continued development, and to garner real world feedback and data concerning not only cell and stack parameters, but also transportation, installation, permitting and licensing, start-up and shutdown, system alarming, fault detection, fault response, and operator interaction.

  18. Interleukin-7 and Toll-Like Receptor 7 Induce Synergistic B Cell and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bikker, Angela; Kruize, Aike A.; van der Wurff-Jacobs, Kim M. G.; Peters, Rogier P.; Kleinjan, Marije; Redegeld, Frank; de Jager, Wilco; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.; van Roon, Joël A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the potential synergy of IL-7-driven T cell-dependent and TLR7-mediated B cell activation and to assess the additive effects of monocyte/macrophages in this respect. Methods Isolated CD19 B cells and CD4 T cells from healthy donors were co-cultured with TLR7 agonist (TLR7A, Gardiquimod), IL-7, or their combination with or without CD14 monocytes/macrophages (T/B/mono; 1 : 1 : 0,1). Proliferation was measured using 3H-thymidine incorporation and Ki67 expression. Activation marker (CD19, HLA-DR, CD25) expression was measured by FACS analysis. Immunoglobulins were measured by ELISA and release of cytokines was measured by Luminex assay. Results TLR7-induced B cell activation was not associated with T cell activation. IL-7-induced T cell activation alone and together with TLR7A synergistically increased numbers of both proliferating (Ki67+) B cells and T cells, which was further increased in the presence of monocytes/macrophages. This was associated by up regulation of activation markers on B cells and T cells. Additive or synergistic induction of production of immunoglobulins by TLR7 and IL-7 was associated by synergistic induction of T cell cytokines (IFNγ, IL-17A, IL-22), which was only evident in the presence of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions IL-7-induced CD4 T cell activation and TLR7-induced B cell activation synergistically induce T helper cell cytokine and B cell immunoglobulin production, which is critically dependent on monocytes/macrophages. Our results indicate that previously described increased expression of IL-7 and TLR7 together with increased numbers of macrophages at sites of inflammation in autoimmune diseases like RA and pSS significantly contributes to enhanced lymphocyte activation. PMID:24740301

  19. Cutting edge: cell surface linker for activation of T cells is recruited to microclusters and is active in signaling.

    PubMed

    Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Barr, Valarie A; Kortum, Robert L; Park, Anna K; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2013-04-15

    A controversy has recently emerged regarding the location of the cellular pool of the adapter linker for activation of T cells (LAT) that participates in propagation of signals downstream of the TCR. In one model phosphorylation and direct recruitment of cell surface LAT to activation-induced microclusters is critical for T cell activation, whereas in the other model vesicular, but not surface, LAT participates in these processes. By using a chimeric version of LAT that can be tracked via an extracellular domain, we provide evidence that LAT located at the cell surface can be recruited efficiently to activation-induced microclusters within seconds of TCR engagement. Importantly, we also demonstrate that this pool of LAT at the plasma membrane is rapidly phosphorylated. Our results provide support for the model in which the cell utilizes LAT from the cell surface for rapid responses to TCR stimulation. PMID:23487428

  20. T Cell Activation Thresholds are Affected by Gravitational

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Charley; Gonzalez, M.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    1999-01-01

    T cells stimulated in space flight by various mitogenic signals show a dramatic reduction in proliferation and expression of early activation markers. Similar results are also obtained in a ground based model of microgravity, clinorotation, which provides a vector-averaged reduction of the apparent gravity on cells without significant shear force. Here we demonstrate that T cell inhibition is due to an increase in the required threshold for activation. Dose response curves indicate that cells activated during clinorotation require higher stimulation to achieve the same level of activation, as measured by CD69 expression. Interleukin 2 receptor expression, and DNA synthesis. The amount of stimulation necessary for 50% activation is 5 fold in the clinostat relative to static. Correlation of TCR internalization with activation also exhibit a dramatic right shift in clinorotation, demonstrating unequivocally that signal transduction mechanism independent of TCR triggering account for the increased activation threshold. Previous results from space flight experiments are consistent with the dose response curves obtained for clinorotation. Activation thresholds are important aspects of T cell memory, autoimmunity and tolerance Clinorotation is a useful, noninvasive tool for the study of cellular and biochemical event regulating T cell activation threshold and the effects of gravitation forces on these systems.

  1. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Line Suppression of Phagolysosome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, AW; Dixit, S; Yu, J

    2015-01-01

    The eye is an immune privileged tissue with multiple mechanisms of immunosuppression to protect the light gathering tissues from the damage of inflammation. One of theses mechanisms involves retinal pigment epithelial cell suppression of phagosome activation in macrophages. The objective of this work is to determine if the human RPE cell line ARPE-19 is capable of suppressing the activation of the phagolysosome in macrophages in a manner similar to primary RPE. The conditioned media of RPE eyecups, sub-confluent, just confluent cultures, or established confluent cultures of human ARPE-19 cells were generated. These condition media were used to treat macrophages phagocytizing pHrodo bioparticles. After 24 hours incubation the macrophages were imaged by fluorescent microscopy, and fluorescence was measured. The fluorescent intensity is proportional to the amount of bioparticles phagocytized and are in an activated phagolysosome. The conditioned media of in situ mouse RPE eyecups significantly suppressed the activation of phagolysosome. The conditioned media from cultures of human ARPE-19 cells, grown to sub-confluence (50%) or grown to confluence had no effect on phagolysosome activation. In contrast, the conditioned media from established confluent cultures significantly suppressed phagolysosome activation. The neuropeptides alpha-MSH and NPY were depleted from the conditioned media of established confluent ARPE-19 cell cultures. This depleted conditioned media had diminished suppression of phagolysosome activation while promoting macrophage cell death. In addition, the condition media from cultures of ARPE-19 monolayers wounded with a bisecting scrape was diminished in suppressing phagolysosome activation. This technical report suggests that like primary RPE monolayers, established confluent cultures of ARPE-19 cells produce soluble factors that suppress the activation of macrophages, and can be used to study the molecular mechanisms of retinal immunobiology. In

  2. Scavenger properties of cultivated pig liver endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Elvevold, Kjetil H; Nedredal, Geir I; Revhaug, Arthur; Smedsrød, Bård

    2004-01-01

    Background The liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and Kupffer cells constitute the most powerful scavenger system in the body. Various waste macromolecules, continuously released from tissues in large quantities as a consequence of normal catabolic processes are cleared by the LSEC. In spite of the fact that pig livers are used in a wide range of experimental settings, the scavenger properties of pig LSEC has not been investigated until now. Therefore, we studied the endocytosis and intracellular transport of ligands for the five categories of endocytic receptors in LSEC. Results Endocytosis of five 125I-labelled molecules: collagen α-chains, FITC-biotin-hyaluronan, mannan, formaldehyde-treated serum albumin (FSA), and aggregated gamma globulin (AGG) was substantial in cultured LSEC. The endocytosis was mediated via the collagen-, hyaluronan-, mannose-, scavenger-, or IgG Fc-receptors, respectively, as judged by the ability of unlabelled ligands to compete with labelled ligands for uptake. Intracellular transport was studied employing a morphological pulse-chase technique. Ninety minutes following administration of red TRITC-FSA via the jugular vein of pigs to tag LSEC lysosomes, cultures of the cells were established, and pulsed with green FITC-labelled collagen, -mannan, and -FSA. By 10 min, the FITC-ligands was located in small vesicles scattered throughout the cytoplasm, with no co-localization with the red lysosomes. By 2 h, the FITC-ligands co-localized with red lysosomes. When LSEC were pulsed with FITC-AGG and TRITC-FSA together, co-localization of the two ligands was observed following a 10 min chase. By 2 h, only partial co-localization was observed; TRITC-FSA was transported to lysosomes, whereas FITC-AGG only slowly left the endosomes. Enzyme assays showed that LSEC and Kupffer cells contained equal specific activities of hexosaminidase, aryl sulphates, acid phosphatase and acid lipase, whereas the specific activities of α-mannosidase, and

  3. Activation of human inflammatory cells by secreted phospholipases A2.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Massimo; Granata, Francescopaolo; Frattini, Annunziata; Marone, Gianni

    2006-11-01

    Secreted phospholipases A(2) (sPLA(2)s) are enzymes detected in serum and biological fluids of patients with various inflammatory, autoimmune and allergic disorders. Different isoforms of sPLA(2)s are expressed and released by human inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils, eosinophils, T cells, monocytes, macrophages and mast cells. sPLA(2)s generate arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids thus contributing to the production of bioactive lipid mediators in inflammatory cells. However, sPLA(2)s also activate human inflammatory cells by mechanisms unrelated to their enzymatic activity. Several human and non-human sPLA(2)s induce degranulation of mast cells, neutrophils and eosinophils and activate exocytosis in macrophages. In addition some, but not all, sPLA(2) isoforms promote cytokine and chemokine production from macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes and endothelial cells. These effects are primarily mediated by binding of sPLA(2)s to specific membrane targets (heparan sulfate proteoglycans, M-type, N-type or mannose receptors) expressed on effector cells. Thus, sPLA(2)s may play an important role in the initiation and amplification of inflammatory reactions by at least two mechanisms: production of lipid mediators and direct activation of inflammatory cells. Selective inhibitors of sPLA(2)-enzymatic activity and specific antagonists of sPLA(2) receptors are current being tested for pharmacological treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:16952481

  4. Active elastic dimers: cells moving on rigid tracks.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J H; Das, Moumita; Schwarz, J M

    2014-09-01

    Experiments suggest that the migration of some cells in the three-dimensional extracellular matrix bears strong resemblance to one-dimensional cell migration. Motivated by this observation, we construct and study a minimal one-dimensional model cell made of two beads and an active spring moving along a rigid track. The active spring models the stress fibers with their myosin-driven contractility and α-actinin-driven extendability, while the friction coefficients of the two beads describe the catch and slip-bond behaviors of the integrins in focal adhesions. In the absence of active noise, net motion arises from an interplay between active contractility (and passive extendability) of the stress fibers and an asymmetry between the front and back of the cell due to catch-bond behavior of integrins at the front of the cell and slip-bond behavior of integrins at the back. We obtain reasonable cell speeds with independently estimated parameters. We also study the effects of hysteresis in the active spring, due to catch-bond behavior and the dynamics of cross linking, and the addition of active noise on the motion of the cell. Our model highlights the role of α-actinin in three-dimensional cell motility and does not require Arp2/3 actin filament nucleation for net motion. PMID:25314473

  5. Active elastic dimers: Cells moving on rigid tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, J. H.; Das, Moumita; Schwarz, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    Experiments suggest that the migration of some cells in the three-dimensional extracellular matrix bears strong resemblance to one-dimensional cell migration. Motivated by this observation, we construct and study a minimal one-dimensional model cell made of two beads and an active spring moving along a rigid track. The active spring models the stress fibers with their myosin-driven contractility and α-actinin-driven extendability, while the friction coefficients of the two beads describe the catch and slip-bond behaviors of the integrins in focal adhesions. In the absence of active noise, net motion arises from an interplay between active contractility (and passive extendability) of the stress fibers and an asymmetry between the front and back of the cell due to catch-bond behavior of integrins at the front of the cell and slip-bond behavior of integrins at the back. We obtain reasonable cell speeds with independently estimated parameters. We also study the effects of hysteresis in the active spring, due to catch-bond behavior and the dynamics of cross linking, and the addition of active noise on the motion of the cell. Our model highlights the role of α-actinin in three-dimensional cell motility and does not require Arp2/3 actin filament nucleation for net motion.

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Syndromes Affecting Human Natural Killer Cell Cytolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hyoungjun; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor-dependent fusion, promotes the release of the lytic granule contents into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process. PMID:24478771

  7. EFFECT OF NICKEL AND MANGANESE ON NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of NiCl2 causes a suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity, while a single injection of MnCl2 enhances NK activity. When injected together Mn preempts the suppressive effect of Ni on NK activity.

  8. Microchamber Device for Detection of Transporter Activity of Adherent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsugane, Mamiko; Uejima, Etsuko; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to detect the transporter activity of intact adherent cells using a microchamber device. When adherent cells are seeded onto the poly-di-methyl siloxane substrate having microchambers with openings smaller than the size of a cell, the cells form a confluent layer that covers the microchambers, creating minute, confined spaces. As substances exported across the cell membrane accumulate, transporter activity can be detected by observing the fluorescence intensity increase in the microchamber. We tested the microchamber device with HeLa cells over-expressing MDR1, an ATP-binding cassette transporter, and succeeded in detecting the transport of fluorescence-conjugated paclitaxel, the anti-cancer drug, at the single-cell level. PMID:25853126

  9. Modeling Active Mechanosensing in Cell-Matrix Interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Ji, Baohua; Gao, Huajian

    2015-01-01

    Cells actively sense the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix, such as its rigidity, morphology, and deformation. The cell-matrix interaction influences a range of cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation, among others. This article aims to review some of the recent progress that has been made in modeling mechanosensing in cell-matrix interactions at different length scales. The issues discussed include specific interactions between proteins, the structure and mechanosensitivity of focal adhesions, the cluster effects of the specific binding, the structure and behavior of stress fibers, cells' sensing of substrate stiffness, and cell reorientation on cyclically stretched substrates. The review concludes by looking toward future opportunities in the field and at the challenges to understanding active cell-matrix interactions. PMID:26098510

  10. Peptide mini-scaffold facilitates JNK3 activation in cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xuanzhi; Stoy, Henriette; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Perry, Nicole A.; Chen, Qiuyan; Perez, Alejandro; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Slagis, Jack V.; Iverson, Tina M.; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.; Dalby, Kevin N.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2016-01-01

    Three-kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades are present in virtually all eukaryotic cells. MAPK cascades are organized by scaffold proteins, which assemble cognate kinases into productive signaling complexes. Arrestin-3 facilitates JNK activation in cells, and a short 25-residue arrestin-3 peptide was identified as the critical JNK3-binding element. Here we demonstrate that this peptide also binds MKK4, MKK7, and ASK1, which are upstream JNK3-activating kinases. This peptide is sufficient to enhance JNK3 activity in cells. A homologous arrestin-2 peptide, which differs only in four positions, binds MKK4, but not MKK7 or JNK3, and is ineffective in cells at enhancing activation of JNK3. The arrestin-3 peptide is the smallest MAPK scaffold known. This peptide or its mimics can regulate MAPKs, affecting cellular decisions to live or die. PMID:26868142

  11. Twin Knudsen Cell Configuration for Activity Measurements by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1996-01-01

    A twin Knudsen cell apparatus for alloy activity measurements by mass spectrometry is described. Two Knudsen cells - one containing an alloy and one containing a pure component - are mounted on a single flange and translated into the sampling region via a motorized x-y table. Mixing of the molecular beams from the cells is minimized by a novel system of shutters. Activity measurements were taken on two well-characterized alloys to verify the operation of the system. Silver activity measurements are reported for Ag-Cu alloys and aluminum activity measurements are reported for Fe-Al alloys. The temperature dependence of activity for a 0.474 mol fraction Al-Fe alloy gives a partial molar heat of aluminum. Measurements taken with the twin cell show good agreement with literature values for these alloys.

  12. Cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer cells on U251 glioma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Wu, Tingting; Wan, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to observe the cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells on U251 glioma cells and to investigate their mechanism of action to establish an effective treatment strategy for neuroglioma. Cell survival curves, colony formation assays and karyotype analysis were performed to investigate the characteristics of U251 glioma cells. The present study demonstrated that natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D)‑major histocompatibility complex class I‑related chain A/B (MICA/B) interactions contributed to the cytotoxic effect of NK cells on K562 and U251 cells. In antibody‑blocking assays to inhibit NKG2D ligands, the cytotoxic activity was not completely attenuated, which suggested that other signaling pathways contribute to the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on tumor cells in addition to the NKG2D‑mediated activity. The present study identified that the expression levels of NKG2D ligands on the surface of target cells influenced the strength of the NK cell immune response. Furthermore, allogeneic NK cells were observed to kill glioma cells in vitro, and this anticancer activity is associated with the rate of NKG2D expression on the surface of glioma cells. PMID:27175912

  13. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  14. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity promotes survival of human muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Elise; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Notarnicola, Cécile; Rouger, Karl; Serratrice, Nicolas; Bonnieu, Anne; Gay, Stéphanie; Bacou, Francis; Duret, Cédric; Carnac, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a family of enzymes that efficiently detoxify aldehydic products generated by reactive oxygen species and might therefore participate in cell survival. Because ALDH activity has been used to identify normal and malignant cells with stem cell properties, we asked whether human myogenic precursor cells (myoblasts) could be identified and isolated based on their levels of ALDH activity. Human muscle explant-derived cells were incubated with ALDEFLUOR, a fluorescent substrate for ALDH, and we determined by flow cytometry the level of enzyme activity. We found that ALDH activity positively correlated with the myoblast-CD56+ fraction in those cells, but, we also observed heterogeneity of ALDH activity levels within CD56-purified myoblasts. Using lentiviral mediated expression of shRNA we demonstrated that ALDH activity was associated with expression of Aldh1a1 protein. Surprisingly, ALDH activity and Aldh1a1 expression levels were very low in mouse, rat, rabbit and non-human primate myoblasts. Using different approaches, from pharmacological inhibition of ALDH activity by diethylaminobenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of class I ALDH, to cell fractionation by flow cytometry using the ALDEFLUOR assay, we characterized human myoblasts expressing low or high levels of ALDH. We correlated high ALDH activity ex vivo to resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxic effect and in vivo to improved cell viability when human myoblasts were transplanted into host muscle of immune deficient scid mice. Therefore detection of ALDH activity, as a purification strategy, could allow non-toxic and efficient isolation of a fraction of human myoblasts resistant to cytotoxic damage. PMID:19840193

  15. Enzyme Activities in Polarized Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bass, L.; McIlroy, D. K.

    1968-01-01

    The theoretical pH dependence of enzyme activities in membranes of low dielectric constant is estimated. It is shown that in biological membranes some types of enzymes may attain a limiting pH sensitivity such that an increment of only 0.2 pH unit (sufficient to induce action potentials in squid axons) causes a relative activity change of over 25%. The transients of enzyme activity generated by membrane depolarization and by pH increments in the bathing solution are discussed in relation to the transients of nervous excitation. PMID:5641405

  16. Activated microglia cause reversible apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells, inducing their cell death by phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hornik, Tamara C.; Vilalta, Anna; Brown, Guy C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some apoptotic processes, such as phosphatidylserine exposure, are potentially reversible and do not necessarily lead to cell death. However, phosphatidylserine exposure can induce phagocytosis of a cell, resulting in cell death by phagocytosis: phagoptosis. Phagoptosis of neurons by microglia might contribute to neuropathology, whereas phagoptosis of tumour cells by macrophages might limit cancer. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which BV-2 microglia killed co-cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells that were either undifferentiated or differentiated into neuronal cells. We found that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharide rapidly phagocytosed PC12 cells. Activated microglia caused reversible phosphatidylserine exposure on and reversible caspase activation in PC12 cells, and caspase inhibition prevented phosphatidylserine exposur and decreased subsequent phagocytosis. Nitric oxide was necessary and sufficient to induce the reversible phosphatidylserine exposure and phagocytosis. The PC12 cells were not dead at the time they were phagocytised, and inhibition of their phagocytosis left viable cells. Cell loss was inhibited by blocking phagocytosis mediated by phosphatidylserine, MFG-E8, vitronectin receptors or P2Y6 receptors. Thus, activated microglia can induce reversible apoptosis of target cells, which is insufficient to cause apoptotic cell death, but sufficient to induce their phagocytosis and therefore cell death by phagoptosis. PMID:26567213

  17. Monocytic Cells Become Less Compressible but More Deformable upon Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ravetto, Agnese; Wyss, Hans M.; Anderson, Patrick D.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Monocytes play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. During the process of inflammation, circulating monocytes become activated in the blood stream. The consequent interactions of the activated monocytes with the blood flow and endothelial cells result in reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins, in particular of the microfilament structure, and concomitant changes in cell shape and mechanical behavior. Here we investigate the full elastic behavior of activated monocytes in relation to their cytoskeletal structure to obtain a better understanding of cell behavior during the progression of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Methods and Results The recently developed Capillary Micromechanics technique, based on exposing a cell to a pressure difference in a tapered glass microcapillary, was used to measure the deformation of activated and non-activated monocytic cells. Monitoring the elastic response of individual cells up to large deformations allowed us to obtain both the compressive and the shear modulus of a cell from a single experiment. Activation by inflammatory chemokines affected the cytoskeletal organization and increased the elastic compressive modulus of monocytes with 73–340%, while their resistance to shape deformation decreased, as indicated by a 25–88% drop in the cell’s shear modulus. This decrease in deformability is particularly pronounced at high strains, such as those that occur during diapedesis through the vascular wall. Conclusion Overall, monocytic cells become less compressible but more deformable upon activation. This change in mechanical response under different modes of deformation could be important in understanding the interplay between the mechanics and function of these cells. In addition, our data are of direct relevance for computational modeling and analysis of the distinct monocytic behavior in the circulation and the extravascular space. Lastly, an understanding of the changes of monocyte

  18. Ionizing Radiation Impairs T Cell Activation by Affecting Metabolic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng-Hong; Wang, Yi-wen; Chen, Renxiang; Zhou, Bin; Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has a variety of acute and long-lasting adverse effects on the immune system. Whereas measureable effects of radiation on immune cell cytotoxicity and population change have been well studied in human and animal models, little is known about the functional alterations of the surviving immune cells after ionizing radiation. The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of radiation on T cell function by studying the alterations of T cell receptor activation and metabolic changes in activated T cells isolated from previously irradiated animals. Using a global metabolomics profiling approach, for the first time we demonstrate that ionizing radiation impairs metabolic reprogramming of T cell activation, which leads to substantial decreases in the efficiency of key metabolic processes required for activation, such as glucose uptake, glycolysis, and energy metabolism. In-depth understanding of how radiation impacts T cell function highlighting modulation of metabolism during activation is not only a novel approach to investigate the pivotal processes in the shift of T cell homeostasis after radiation, it also may lead to new targets for therapeutic manipulation in the combination of radiotherapy and immune therapy. Given that appreciable effects were observed with as low as 10 cGy, our results also have implications for low dose environmental exposures. PMID:26078715

  19. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gloria; Martini, K. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE’s orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  20. Real-time transposable element activity in individual live cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Neil H; Lee, Gloria; Sherer, Nicholas A; Martini, K Michael; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Kuhlman, Thomas E

    2016-06-28

    The excision and reintegration of transposable elements (TEs) restructure their host genomes, generating cellular diversity involved in evolution, development, and the etiology of human diseases. Our current knowledge of TE behavior primarily results from bulk techniques that generate time and cell ensemble averages, but cannot capture cell-to-cell variation or local environmental and temporal variability. We have developed an experimental system based on the bacterial TE IS608 that uses fluorescent reporters to directly observe single TE excision events in individual cells in real time. We find that TE activity depends upon the TE's orientation in the genome and the amount of transposase protein in the cell. We also find that TE activity is highly variable throughout the lifetime of the cell. Upon entering stationary phase, TE activity increases in cells hereditarily predisposed to TE activity. These direct observations demonstrate that real-time live-cell imaging of evolution at the molecular and individual event level is a powerful tool for the exploration of genome plasticity in stressed cells. PMID:27298350

  1. Utilizing Chimeric Antigen Receptors to Direct Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hermanson, David L.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells represent an attractive lymphocyte population for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to lyse tumor targets without prior sensitization and without need for human leukocyte antigens-matching. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are able to enhance lymphocyte targeting and activation toward diverse malignancies. CARs consist of an external recognition domain (typically a small chain variable fragment) directed at a specific tumor antigen that is linked with one or more intracellular signaling domains that mediate lymphocyte activation. Most CAR studies have focused on their expression in T cells. However, use of CARs in NK cells is starting to gain traction because they provide a method to redirect these cells more specifically to target refractory cancers. CAR-mediated anti-tumor activity has been demonstrated using NK cell lines, as well as NK cells isolated from peripheral blood, and NK cells produced from human pluripotent stem cells. This review will outline the CAR constructs that have been reported in NK cells with a focus on comparing the use of different signaling domains in combination with other co-activating domains. PMID:25972867

  2. Activated Murine B Lymphocytes and Dendritic Cells Produce a Novel CC Chemokine which Acts Selectively on Activated T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaniel, Christoph; Pardali, Evangelia; Sallusto, Federica; Speletas, Mattheos; Ruedl, Christiane; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Seidl, Thomas; Andersson, Jan; Melchers, Fritz; Rolink, Antonius G.; Sideras, Paschalis

    1998-01-01

    Genes were isolated using the suppression subtractive hybridization method by stimulation of pro/pre B cells with anti-CD40 and interleukin (IL)-4 to mature Sμ-Sε–switched cells. One of the strongly upregulated genes encodes a novel murine CC chemokine we have named ABCD-1. The ABCD-1 gene has three exons separated by 1.2- and 2.7-kb introns. It gives rise to a 2.2-kb transcript containing an open reading frame of 276 nucleotides. Two polyadenylation sites are used, giving rise to cDNAs with either 1550 or 1850 bp of 3′ untranslated regions. The open reading frame encodes a 24 amino acid–long leader peptide and a 68 amino acid–long mature protein with a predicted molecular mass of 7.8 kD. ABCD-1 mRNA is found in highest quantities in activated splenic B lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Little chemokine mRNA is present in lung, in unstimulated splenic cells, in thymocytes, and in lymph node cells. No ABCD-1 mRNA is detected in bone marrow, liver, kidney, or brain, in peritoneal exudate cells as well as in the majority of all unstimulated B lineage cells tested. It is also undetectable in Concanavalin A–activated/IL-2–restimulated splenic T cells, and in bone marrow–derived IL-2–induced natural killer cells and IL-3–activated macrophages. Recombinant ABCD-1 revealed a concentration-dependent and specific migration of activated splenic T lymphoblasts in chemotaxis assays. FACS® analyses of migrated cells showed no preferential difference in migration of CD4+ versus CD8+ T cell blasts. Murine as well as human T cells responded to ABCD-1. Freshly isolated cells from bone marrow, thymus, spleen, and lymph node, IL-2–activated NK cells, and LPS-stimulated splenic cells, all did not show any chemotactic response. Thus, ABCD-1 is the first chemokine produced in large amounts by activated B cells and acting selectively on activated T lymphocytes. Therefore, ABCD-1 is expected to play an important role in the collaboration of dendritic cells and B

  3. Rapidly rendering cells phagocytic through a cell surface display technique and concurrent Rac activation.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Hiroki; Komatsu, Toru; Arita, Makoto; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Nagano, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takanari

    2014-07-15

    Cell surfaces represent a platform through which extracellular signals that determine diverse cellular processes, including migration, division, adhesion, and phagocytosis, are transduced. Techniques to rapidly reconfigure the surface properties of living cells should thus offer the ability to harness these cellular functions. Although the molecular mechanism of phagocytosis is well characterized, the minimal molecular players that are sufficient to activate this elaborate process remain elusive. We developed and implemented a technique to present a molecule of interest at the cell surface in an inducible manner on a time scale of minutes. We simultaneously induced the cell surface display of the C2 domain of milk fat globule epidermal growth factor factor 8 (MFG-E8) and activated the intracellular small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, which stimulates actin polymerization at the cell periphery. The C2 domain binds to phosphatidylserine, a lipid exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells. By integrating the stimulation of these two processes, we converted HeLa cells into a phagocytic cell line that bound to and engulfed apoptotic human Jurkat cells. Inducing either the cell surface display of the C2 domain or activating Rac alone was not sufficient to stimulate phagocytosis, which suggests that attachment to the target cell and actin reorganization together constitute the minimal molecular events that are needed to induce phagocytosis. This cell surface display technique might be useful as part of a targeted, cell-based therapy in which unwanted cells with characteristic surface molecules could be rapidly consumed by engineered cells. PMID:25028719

  4. Rapidly rendering cells phagocytic through a cell-surface display technique and concurrent Rac activation

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Hiroki; Arita, Makoto; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Cell surfaces represent a platform through which extracellular signals that determine diverse cellular processes, including migration, division, adhesion, and phagocytosis, are transduced. Techniques to rapidly reconfigure the surface properties of living cells should thus offer the ability to harness these cellular functions. Although the molecular mechanism of phagocytosis is well-characterized, the minimal molecular players that are sufficient to activate this elaborate process remain elusive. We developed and implemented a technique to present a molecule of interest at the cell surface in an inducible manner on a timescale of minutes. We simultaneously induced the cell-surface display of the C2 domain of milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) and activated the intracellular small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, which stimulates actin polymerization at the cell periphery. The C2 domain binds to phosphatidylserine, a lipid exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells. By integrating the stimulation of these two processes, we converted HeLa cells into a phagocytic cell line that bound to and engulfed apoptotic human Jurkat cells. Inducing either the cell-surface display of the C2 domain or activating Rac alone was not sufficient to stimulate phagocytosis, which suggests that attachment to the target cell and actin reorganization together constitute the minimal molecular events that are needed to induce phagocytosis. This cell-surface display technique might be useful as part of a targeted, cell-based therapy in which unwanted cells with characteristic surface molecules could be rapidly consumed by engineered cells. PMID:25028719

  5. Activation of B cells by non-canonical helper signals

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Cols, Montserrat; Puga, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Cognate interaction between T and B lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system is essential for the production of high-affinity antibodies against microbes, and for the establishment of long-term immunological memory. Growing evidence shows that—in addition to presenting antigens to T and B cells—macrophages, dendritic cells and other cells of the innate immune system provide activating signals to B cells, as well as survival signals to antibody-secreting plasma cells. Here, we discuss how these innate immune cells contribute to the induction of highly diversified and temporally sustained antibody responses, both systemically and at mucosal sites of antigen entry. PMID:22868664

  6. Laser activated nanothermolysis of leukemia cells monitored by photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Shnip, Alexander; Zheltov, George; Potapnev, Michail; Savitsky, Valeriy; Klimovich, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    We are developing new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies for leukemia based on selective targeting of leukemia cells with gold nanoparticles and thermomechanical destruction of the tumor cells with laser-induced microbubbles. Clusters of spherical gold nanoparticles that have strong optical absorption of laser pulses at 532 nm served as nucleation sites of vapor microbubbles. The nanoparticles were targeted selectively to leukemia cells using leukemia-specific surface receptors and a set of two monoclonal antibodies. Application of a primary myeloid-specific antibody to tumor cells followed by targeting the cells with 30-nm nanoparticles conjugated with a secondary antibody (IgG) resulted in formation of nanoparticulate clusters due to aggregation of IgGs. Formation of clusters resulted in substantial decrease of the damage threshold for target cells. The results encourage development of Laser Activated Nanothermolysis as a Cell Elimination Therapy (LANCET) for leukemia. The proposed technology can be applied separately or in combination with chemotherapy for killing leukemia cells without damage to other blood cells. Potential applications include initial reduction of concentration of leukemia cells in blood prior to chemotherapy and treatment of residual tumor cells after the chemotherapy. Laser-induced bubbles in individual cells and cell damage were monitored by analyzing profile of photothermal response signals over the entire cell after irradiation with a single 10-ns long laser pulse. Photothermal microscopy was utilized for imaging formation of microbubbles around nanoparticulate clusters.

  7. Acetaminophen Induces Human Neuroblastoma Cell Death through NFKB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Santos, Pablo; Ceña, Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the aggressive behavior of this tumor. Therefore, it would be relevant to activate endogenous cellular death mechanisms as a way to improve neuroblastoma therapy. We used the neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as a model to study the mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (AAP)-mediated toxicity by measuring CYP2E1 enzymatic activity, NFkB p65 subunit activation and translocation to the nucleus, Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase activation. AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. AAP metabolism is partially responsible for this activation, because blockade of the cytochrome CYP2E1 significantly reduced but did not totally prevent, AAP-induced SH-SY5Y cell death. AAP also induced NFkB p65 activation by phosphorylation and its translocation to the nucleus, where NFkB p65 increased IL-1β production. This increase contributed to neuroblastoma cell death through a mechanism involving Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase3 activation. Blockade of NFkB translocation to the nucleus by the peptide SN50 prevented AAP-mediated cell death and IL-1β production. Moreover, overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL did not decrease AAP-mediated IL-1β production, but prevented both AAP and IL-1β-mediated cell death. We also confirmed the AAP toxic actions on SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma and U87MG glioblastoma cell lines. The results presented here suggest that AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in neuroblastoma cells through a mechanism involving NFkB and IL-1β. PMID:23166834

  8. Protein Translation Activity: A New Measure of Host Immune Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Seedhom, Mina O; Hickman, Heather D; Wei, Jiajie; David, Alexandre; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2016-08-15

    We describe the in vivo ribopuromycylation (RPM) method, which uses a puromycin-specific Ab to fluorescently label ribosome-bound puromycylated nascent chains, enabling measurement of translational activity via immunohistochemistry or flow cytometry. Tissue staining provides a unique view of virus-induced activation of adaptive, innate, and stromal immune cells. RPM flow precisely quantitates virus-induced activation of lymphocytes and innate immune cells, and it provides a unique measure of immune cell deactivation and quiescence. Using RPM we find that high endothelial cells in draining lymph nodes rapidly increase translation in the first day of vaccinia virus infection. We also find a population of constitutively activated splenic T cells in naive mice and further that most bone marrow T cells activate 3 d after vaccinia virus infection. Bone marrow T cell activation is nonspecific, IL-12-dependent, and induces innate memory T cell phenotypic markers. Thus, RPM measures translational activity to uniquely identify cell populations that participate in the immune response to pathogens, other foreign substances, and autoantigens. PMID:27385780

  9. Cytolytic activity against tumor cells by macrophage cell lines and augmentation by macrophage stimulants.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, T; Holden, H T

    1980-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that macrophage cell lines retained the ability to phagocytize, to secrete lysosomal enzymes, and to function as effector cells in antibody-dependent cellular cytoxicity. In this paper, the cytolytic activity of murine macrophage cell lines against tumor target cells was assessed using an 18-h 51Cr release assay. Of the macrophage cell lines tested, RAW 264, PU5-1.8 and IC-21 had intermediate to high levels of spontaneous cytolytic activity, P388D, and J774 had low to intermediate levels, while /WEHI-3 showed little or no cytolytic activity against RBL-5, MBL-2 and TU-5 target cells. Tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines could be augmented by the addition of macrophage stimulants, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide and poly I:C, indicating that the activation of macrophages by these stimulants does not require the participation of other cell types. Treatment with interferon also augmented the tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines. Although the mechanism by which these cell lines exert their spontaneous or boosted cytotoxic activity is not clear, it does not appear to be due to depletion of nutrients since cell lines with high metabolic and proliferative activities, such as WEHI-3 and RBL-5, showed little or no cytotoxicity and supernatants from the macrophage cell lines did not exert any cytotoxic effects in their essay. Thus, it appears that the different macrophage cell lines represent different levels of activation and/or differentiation and may be useful for studying the development of these processes as well as providing a useful tool for analyzing the mechanisms of macrophage-mediated cytolysis. PMID:6165690

  10. γδ T Cells Support Pancreatic Oncogenesis by Restraining αβ T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Daley, Donnele; Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Seifert, Lena; Akkad, Neha; Mohan, Navyatha; Werba, Gregor; Barilla, Rocky; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu Raj Kumar; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel; Narayanan, Rajkishen; Jang, Jung-Eun; Newman, Elliot; Pillarisetty, Venu Gopal; Dustin, Michael Loran; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation is paramount in pancreatic oncogenesis. We identified a uniquely activated γδT cell population, which constituted ∼40% of tumor-infiltrating T cells in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Recruitment and activation of γδT cells was contingent on diverse chemokine signals. Deletion, depletion, or blockade of γδT cell recruitment was protective against PDA and resulted in increased infiltration, activation, and Th1 polarization of αβT cells. Although αβT cells were dispensable to outcome in PDA, they became indispensable mediators of tumor protection upon γδT cell ablation. PDA-infiltrating γδT cells expressed high levels of exhaustion ligands and thereby negated adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of PD-L1 in γδT cells enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration and immunogenicity and induced tumor protection suggesting that γδT cells are critical sources of immune-suppressive checkpoint ligands in PDA. We describe γδT cells as central regulators of effector T cell activation in cancer via novel cross-talk. PMID:27569912

  11. Smooth muscle cell calcium activation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is controlled by the Ca2+ and Rho kinase signalling pathways. While the SMC Rho kinase system seems to be reasonably constant, there is enormous variation with regard to the mechanisms responsible for generating Ca2+ signals. One way of dealing with this diversity is to consider how this system has been adapted to control different SMC functions. Phasic SMCs (vas deferens, uterus and bladder) rely on membrane depolarization to drive Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. This depolarization can be induced by neurotransmitters or through the operation of a membrane oscillator. Many tonic SMCs (vascular, airway and corpus cavernosum) are driven by a cytosolic Ca2+ oscillator that generates periodic pulses of Ca2+. A similar oscillator is present in pacemaker cells such as the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and atypical SMCs that control other tonic SMCs (gastrointestinal, urethra, ureter). The changes in membrane potential induced by these cytosolic oscillators does not drive contraction directly but it functions to couple together individual oscillators to provide the synchronization that is a characteristic feature of many tonic SMCs. PMID:18787034

  12. Activation of normal murine B cells by Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D A; Marshall-Clarke, S; Dixon, J B

    1989-01-01

    Echinococcus granulosus protoscolex (PSC) infection of BALB/c mice led, after 4 days, to raised numbers of cells forming plaques with trinitrophenyl-treated sheep red cells and bromelain-treated mouse red cells. The findings were similar in athymic and euthymic CBA mice. Activation of B cells was accompanied by secretion of immunoglobulin, as indicated by the reverse plaque technique. In addition, co-culture of PSC with the 7OZ/3 pre-B-cell led to the induction of differentiation, resulting in the expression of surface immunoglobulin (Ig). It is concluded that E. granulosus is a polyclonal activator of B cells inducing both transformation and differentiation, and that the effect is thymus-independent. PMID:2661414

  13. Characterization of tissue plasminogen activator binding proteins isolated from endothelial cells and other cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, D.P.; Wood, L.L.; Moos, M. )

    1990-07-15

    Human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) was shown to bind specifically to human osteosarcoma cells (HOS), and human epidermoid carcinoma cells (A-431 cells). Crosslinking studies with DTSSP demonstrated high molecular weight complexes (130,000) between {sup 125}I-t-PA and cell membrane protein on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), HOS, and A-431 cells. A 48-65,000 molecular weight complex was demonstrated after crosslinking t-PA peptide (res. 7-20) to cells. Ligand blotting of cell lysates which had been passed over a t-PA affinity column revealed binding of t-PA to 54,000 and 95,000 molecular weight proteins. Several t-PA binding proteins were identified in immunopurified cell lysates, including tubulin beta chain, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and single chain urokinase.

  14. Activation of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes by fusions of human dendritic cells and breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianlin; Avigan, David; Chen, Dongshu; Wu, Zekui; Koido, Shigeo; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kufe, Donald

    2000-01-01

    We have reported that fusions of murine dendritic cells (DCs) and murine carcinoma cells reverse unresponsiveness to tumor-associated antigens and induce the rejection of established metastases. In the present study, fusions were generated with primary human breast carcinoma cells and autologous DCs. Fusion cells coexpressed tumor-associated antigens and DC-derived costimulatory molecules. The fusion cells also retained the functional potency of DCs and stimulated autologous T cell proliferation. Significantly, the results show that autologous T cells are primed by the fusion cells to induce MHC class I-dependent lysis of autologous breast tumor cells. These findings demonstrate that fusions of human breast cancer cells and DCs activate T cell responses against autologous tumors. PMID:10688917

  15. Autophagy is activated for cell survival after endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Maiko; Hino, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Atsushi; Morikawa, Keisuke; Kondo, Shinichi; Kanemoto, Soshi; Murakami, Tomohiko; Taniguchi, Manabu; Tanii, Ichiro; Yoshinaga, Kazuya; Shiosaka, Sadao; Hammarback, James A; Urano, Fumihiko; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2006-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells deal with accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by the unfolded protein response, involving the induction of molecular chaperones, translational attenuation, and ER-associated degradation, to prevent cell death. Here, we found that the autophagy system is activated as a novel signaling pathway in response to ER stress. Treatment of SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells with ER stressors markedly induced the formation of autophagosomes, which were recognized at the ultrastructural level. The formation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LC3-labeled structures (GFP-LC3 "dots"), representing autophagosomes, was extensively induced in cells exposed to ER stress with conversion from LC3-I to LC3-II. In IRE1-deficient cells or cells treated with c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, the autophagy induced by ER stress was inhibited, indicating that the IRE1-JNK pathway is required for autophagy activation after ER stress. In contrast, PERK-deficient cells and ATF6 knockdown cells showed that autophagy was induced after ER stress in a manner similar to the wild-type cells. Disturbance of autophagy rendered cells vulnerable to ER stress, suggesting that autophagy plays important roles in cell survival after ER stress. PMID:17030611

  16. Autophagy Is Activated for Cell Survival after Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress▿

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Maiko; Hino, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Atsushi; Morikawa, Keisuke; Kondo, Shinichi; Kanemoto, Soshi; Murakami, Tomohiko; Taniguchi, Manabu; Tanii, Ichiro; Yoshinaga, Kazuya; Shiosaka, Sadao; Hammarback, James A.; Urano, Fumihiko; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells deal with accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by the unfolded protein response, involving the induction of molecular chaperones, translational attenuation, and ER-associated degradation, to prevent cell death. Here, we found that the autophagy system is activated as a novel signaling pathway in response to ER stress. Treatment of SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells with ER stressors markedly induced the formation of autophagosomes, which were recognized at the ultrastructural level. The formation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LC3-labeled structures (GFP-LC3 “dots”), representing autophagosomes, was extensively induced in cells exposed to ER stress with conversion from LC3-I to LC3-II. In IRE1-deficient cells or cells treated with c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, the autophagy induced by ER stress was inhibited, indicating that the IRE1-JNK pathway is required for autophagy activation after ER stress. In contrast, PERK-deficient cells and ATF6 knockdown cells showed that autophagy was induced after ER stress in a manner similar to the wild-type cells. Disturbance of autophagy rendered cells vulnerable to ER stress, suggesting that autophagy plays important roles in cell survival after ER stress. PMID:17030611

  17. [CELLS FORM AND THEIR SENSITIVITY TO LYTIC ACTIVITY OF NATURAL KILLER CELLS UNDER THE ANTIOXIDANT ACTION].

    PubMed

    Kirpichnikova, K M; Petrov, Yu P; Filatova, N A; Gamaley, I A

    2015-01-01

    The present paper is an attempt to estimate the influence of cell surface morphology changes to functional activity under the effect of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), and alpha-lipoic asid (ALA). Two experimental parameters were used to characterize transformed fibroblasts 3T3-SV40 status. The functional one was the cell sensitivity to lysis by natural killer (NK) mouse splenocytes, and morphology index (cell form index) was a cell area. We showed that addition of NAC or ALA to the cell medium caused fast decrease of cell area and changes of cell form. On the other hand, their sensitivity to lysis NK cells gradually and significantly decreased. Then we compared NAC or ALA effect with the effects of other substances, which were non-antioxidants but caused cell responses which concurred with of antioxidants, at least partly. They were: latrunculin B, desorganizing actin filaments (as both antioxidants), OTZ reducing ROS level in the cell (as NAC), BSO (inhibitor of glutathione synthesis), increasing ROS level in the cell (as ALA), antibodies to gelatinases, MMP-2 and MMP-9 inactivating their activities (as both antioxidants). The results obtained showed a correlation between changes of morphology index and functional activity, sensitivity to lysis by NK cells. We suppose that geometry of cell surface might be a functional indicator of cell reaction to the antioxidant. PMID:26591569

  18. A Model Approach to the Electrochemical Cell: An Inquiry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Deanna M.; Pentecost, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to address some student misconceptions in electrochemistry, this guided-inquiry laboratory was devised to give students an opportunity to use a manipulative that simulates the particulate-level activity within an electrochemical cell, in addition to using an actual electrochemical cell. Students are led through a review of expected…

  19. SIRT1 activating compounds reduce oxidative stress and prevent cell death in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Reas S.; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Callinan, Catherine; Zuo, Ling; Sachdeva, Mira M.; Shindler, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, prevents retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss in optic neuritis, an inflammatory demyelinating optic nerve disease. While SIRT1 deacetylates numerous protein targets, downstream mechanisms of SIRT1 activation mediating this neuroprotective effect are unknown. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress in muscle and other cells, and oxidative stress occurs in neuronal degeneration. We examined whether SIRT1 activators reduce oxidative stress and promote mitochondrial function in neuronal cells. Oxidative stress, marked by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, was induced in RGC-5 cells by serum deprivation, or addition of doxorubicin or hydrogen peroxide, and resulted in significant cell loss. SIRT1 activators resveratrol (RSV) and SRTAW04 reduced ROS levels and promoted cell survival in RGC-5 cells as well as primary RGC cultures. Effects were blocked by SIRT1 siRNA. SIRT1 activators also increased expression of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), a mitochondrial enzyme, and promoted deacetylation of PGC-1α, a co-enzyme involved in mitochondrial function. Results show SIRT1 activators prevent cell loss by reducing oxidative stress and promoting mitochondrial function in a neuronal cell line. Results suggest SIRT1 activators can mediate neuroprotective effects during optic neuritis by these mechanisms, and they have the potential to preserve neurons in other neurodegenerative diseases that involve oxidative stress. PMID:23293585

  20. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Chia-Ying; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs) conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs). Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs), which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+)) and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-), which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+) is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell biomarker, our

  1. Buoyancy-Activated Cell Sorting Using Targeted Biotinylated Albumin Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Chia-Ying; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including florescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs) conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs). Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4°C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs), which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44+) and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44–), which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44+ is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell biomarker, our targeted

  2. Cellular localization of BARF1 oncoprotein and its cell stimulating activity in human epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Sakka, Emna; Zur Hausen, Axel; Houali, Karim; Liu, Haying; Fiorini, Sylvie; Ooka, Tadamasa

    2013-06-01

    BARF1 gene encoded by Epstein-Barr virus is capable of immortalizing the primary monkey epithelial cells and of inducing malignant transformation in human EBV-negative B cell lines as well as rodent fibroblast. This oncoprotein is a secreted protein capable of acting as a powerful mitogen. We have studied the effect of BARF1 protein in transfected or BARF1 protein treated human HaCaT epithelial cells. In BARF1-transfected cells, cell growth was activated and its protein was found both in culture medium and cellular compartment (membrane, cytoplasm and nuclei). When purified BARF1 protein was exogenously added in the cell culture medium of HaCaT cells in absence of fetal calf serum led to its entrance into cells and its intracellular localization in cytoplasm, nuclear periphery and nuclei at 14h treatment, determined by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy. Cell fractionation confirmed its nuclear localization. Nuclear localization was observed in both systems. More interestingly, purified BARF1 protein p29 exogenously added in the cell culture medium activated cell passage of G1 to S phase. S phase activation by its autocrine activity and its tumorigenic activity would be associated with the development of EBV-associated carcinomas. PMID:23458996

  3. The intersection of cell death and inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Vince, James E; Silke, John

    2016-06-01

    Inflammasomes sense cellular danger to activate the cysteine-aspartic protease caspase-1, which processes precursor interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 into their mature bioactive fragments. In addition, activated caspase-1 or the related inflammatory caspase, caspase-11, can cleave gasdermin D to induce a lytic cell death, termed pyroptosis. The intertwining of IL-1β activation and cell death is further highlighted by research showing that the extrinsic apoptotic caspase, caspase-8, may, like caspase-1, directly process IL-1β, activate the NLRP3 inflammasome itself, or bind to inflammasome complexes to induce apoptotic cell death. Similarly, RIPK3- and MLKL-dependent necroptotic signaling can activate the NLRP3 inflammasome to drive IL-1β inflammatory responses in vivo. Here, we review the mechanisms by which cell death signaling activates inflammasomes to initiate IL-1β-driven inflammation, and highlight the clinical relevance of these findings to heritable autoinflammatory diseases. We also discuss whether the act of cell death can be separated from IL-1β secretion and evaluate studies suggesting that several cell death regulatory proteins can directly interact with, and modulate the function of, inflammasome and IL-1β containing protein complexes. PMID:27066895

  4. GSK621 Targets Glioma Cells via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Shi-Kun; Pan, Yi-Xin; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang; Pan, Si-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the anti-glioma cell activity by a novel AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator GSK621. We showed that GSK621 was cytotoxic to human glioma cells (U87MG and U251MG lines), possibly via provoking caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Its cytotoxicity was alleviated by caspase inhibitors. GSK621 activated AMPK to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downregulate Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) in glioma cells. AMPK inhibition, through shRNA knockdown of AMPKα or introduction of a dominant negative (T172A) AMPKα, almost reversed GSK621-induced AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition and Tspan8 degradation. Consequently, GSK621’s cytotoxicity in glioma cells was also significantly attenuated by AMPKα knockdown or mutation. Further studies showed that GSK621, at a relatively low concentration, significantly potentiated temozolomide (TMZ)’s sensitivity and lethality against glioma cells. We summarized that GSK621 inhibits human glioma cells possibly via activating AMPK signaling. This novel AMPK activator could be a novel and promising anti-glioma cell agent. PMID:27532105

  5. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression. PMID:26700461

  6. Aberrant activation of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Tsung-Chieh; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Hsieh, Yi-Yueh; Chen, Tse-Chin; Yeh, Chien-Yu; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lin, Deng-Yn; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 (NFAT2), the major NFAT protein in peripheral T cells, in sustained T cell activation and intractable inflammation in human ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: We used two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis, immunohistochemistry, double immunohistochemical staining, and confocal microscopy to inspect the expression of NFAT2 in 107, 15, 48 and 5 cases of UC, Crohn’s disease (CD), non-specific colitis, and 5 healthy individuals, respectively. RESULTS: Up-regulation with profound nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 of lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) of colonic mucosa was found specifically in the affected colonic mucosa from patients with UC, as compared to CD or NC (P < 0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 primarily occurred in CD8+T, but was less prominent in CD4+ T cells or CD20+B cells. It was strongly associated with the disease activity, including endoscopic stage (τ = 0.2145, P = 0.0281) and histologic grade (τ = 0.4167, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: We disclose for the first time the nucleo-translocation/activatin of NFAT2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis. Activation of NFAT2 was specific for ulcerative colitis and highly associated with disease activity. Since activation of NFAT2 is implicated in an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop of sustained T-cell activation and NFAT proteins play key roles in the calcium/calcineurin signaling pathways, our results not only provide new insights into the mechanism for sustained intractable inflammation, but also suggest the calcium-calcineurin/NFAT pathway as a new therapeutic target for ulcerative colitis. PMID:18350607

  7. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of Live Versus Dead Bacterial Cells and Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardini, James N.; LaDuc, Myron T.; Diamond, Rochelle; Verceles, Josh

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a coupled fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescent staining technology for purifying (removing cells from sampling matrices), separating (based on size, density, morphology, and live versus dead), and concentrating cells (spores, prokaryotic, eukaryotic) from an environmental sample.

  8. Activated Rac1 requires gp130 for Stat3 activation, cell proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Arulanandam, Rozanne; Geletu, Mulu; Feracci, Helene; Raptis, Leda

    2010-03-10

    Rac1 (Rac) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases which controls cell migration by regulating the organization of actin filaments. Previous results suggested that mutationally activated forms of the Rho GTPases can activate the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (Stat3), but the exact mechanism is a matter of controversy. We recently demonstrated that Stat3 activity of cultured cells increases dramatically following E-cadherin engagement. To better understand this pathway, we now compared Stat3 activity levels in mouse HC11 cells before and after expression of the mutationally activated Rac1 (Rac{sup V12}), at different cell densities. The results revealed for the first time a dramatic increase in protein levels and activity of both the endogenous Rac and Rac{sup V12} with cell density, which was due to inhibition of proteasomal degradation. In addition, Rac{sup V12}-expressing cells had higher Stat3, tyrosine-705 phosphorylation and activity levels at all densities, indicating that Rac{sup V12} is able to activate Stat3. Further examination of the mechanism of Stat3 activation showed that Rac{sup V12} expression caused a surge in mRNA of Interleukin-6 (IL6) family cytokines, known potent Stat3 activators. Knockdown of gp130, the common subunit of this family reduced Stat3 activity, indicating that these cytokines may be responsible for the Stat3 activation by Rac{sup V12}. The upregulation of IL6 family cytokines was required for cell migration and proliferation induced by Rac{sup V12}, as shown by gp130 knockdown experiments, thus demonstrating that the gp130/Stat3 axis represents an essential effector of activated Rac for the regulation of key cellular functions.

  9. Spontaneous Activity of Cochlear Hair Cells Triggered by Fluid Secretion Mechanism in Adjacent Support Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Chin; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Cheung, Rocky; Zhang-Hooks, YingXin; Agarwal, Amit; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Rock, Jason; Bergles, Dwight E

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity of neurons in developing sensory systems promotes their maturation and proper connectivity. In the auditory system, spontaneous activity of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) is initiated by the release of ATP from glia-like inner supporting cells (ISCs), facilitating maturation of central pathways before hearing onset. Here, we find that ATP stimulates purinergic autoreceptors in ISCs, triggering Cl(-) efflux and osmotic cell shrinkage by opening TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels. Release of Cl(-) from ISCs also forces K(+) efflux, causing transient depolarization of IHCs near ATP release sites. Genetic deletion of TMEM16A markedly reduces the spontaneous activity of IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons in the developing cochlea and prevents ATP-dependent shrinkage of supporting cells. These results indicate that supporting cells in the developing cochlea have adapted a pathway used for fluid secretion in other organs to induce periodic excitation of hair cells. PMID:26627734

  10. Enhancement of endothelial cell migration by constitutively active LPA{sub 1}-expressing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kitayoshi, Misaho; Kato, Kohei; Tanabe, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Kyohei; Fukui, Rie; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} stimulates cell migration of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF expressions are increased by mutated LPA{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} is involved in angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} promotes cancer cell progression. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors belong to G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors (LPA receptors; LPA{sub 1} to LPA{sub 6}). They indicate a variety of cellular response by the interaction with LPA, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Recently, we have reported that constitutive active mutated LPA{sub 1} induced the strong biological effects of rat neuroblastoma B103 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of mutated LPA{sub 1} on the interaction between B103 cells and endothelial F-2 cells. Each LPA receptor expressing B103 cells were maintained in serum-free DMEM and cell motility assay was performed with a Cell Culture Insert. When F-2 cells were cultured with conditioned medium from Lpar1 and Lpar3-expressing cells, the cell motility of F-2 cells was significantly higher than control cells. Interestingly, the motile activity of F-2 cells was strongly induced by mutated LPA{sub 1} than other cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A and Vegf-C. Pretreatment of LPA signaling inhibitors inhibited F-2 cell motility stimulated by mutated LPA{sub 1}. These results suggest that activation of LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} may play an important role in the promotion of angiogenesis in rat neuroblastoma cells.

  11. Dengue Virus Infection of Mast Cells Triggers Endothelial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael G.; Hermann, Laura L.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Marshall, Jean S.; Rowter, Derek; Al-Afif, Ayham; Anderson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Vascular perturbation is a hallmark of severe forms of dengue disease. We show here that antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection of primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs) and the human mast cell-like line HMC-1 results in the release of factor(s) which activate human endothelial cells, as evidenced by increased expression of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Endothelial cell activation was prevented by pretreatment of mast cell-derived supernatants with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-specific blocking antibody, thus identifying TNF as the endothelial cell-activating factor. Our findings suggest that mast cells may represent an important source of TNF, promoting vascular endothelial perturbation following antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection. PMID:21068256

  12. Mast cell degranulation activates a pain pathway underlying migraine headache

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Dan; Burstein, Rami; Kainz, Vanessa; Jakubowski, Moshe; Strassman, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Intracranial headaches such as that of migraine are generally accepted to be mediated by prolonged activation of meningeal nociceptors but the mechanisms responsible for such nociceptor activation are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that meningeal nociceptors can be activated locally through a neuroimmune interaction with resident mast cells, granulated immune cells that densely populate the dura mater. Using in vivo electrophysiological single unit recording of meningeal nociceptors in the rat we observed that degranulation of dural mast cells using intraperitoneal administration of the basic secretagogue agent compound 48/80 (2 mg/kg) induced a prolonged state of excitation in meningeal nociceptors. Such activation was accompanied by increased expression of the phosphorylated form of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), an anatomical marker for nociceptor activation. Mast cell - induced nociceptor interaction was also associated with downstream activation of the spinal trigeminal nucleus as indicated by an increase in c-fos expression. Our findings provide evidence linking dural mast cell degranulation to prolonged activation of the trigeminal pain pathway believed to underlie intracranial headaches such as that of migraine. PMID:17459586

  13. Ghrelin Inhibits Oligodendrocyte Cell Death by Attenuating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, we reported the antiapoptotic effect of ghrelin in spinal cord injury-induced apoptotic cell death of oligodendrocytes. However, how ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocytes apoptosis, is still unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether ghrelin inhibits microglia activation and thereby inhibits oligodendrocyte apoptosis. Methods Using total cell extracts prepared from BV-2 cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without ghrelin, the levels of p-p38 phosphor-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38MAPK), phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), p-c-Jun, and pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) were examined by Western blot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated by using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. To examine the effect of ghrelin on oligodendrocyte cell death, oligodendrocytes were cocultured in transwell chambers of 24-well plates with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. After 48 hours incubation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2'-deoxyuridine, 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling staining were assessed. Results Ghrelin treatment significantly decreased levels of p-p38MAPK, p-JNK, p-c-Jun, and proNGF in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. ROS production increased in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells was also significantly inhibited by ghrelin treatment. In addition, ghrelin significantly inhibited oligodendrocyte cell death when cocultured with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Conclusion Ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by decreasing proNGF and ROS production as well as p38MAPK and JNK activation in activated microglia as an anti-inflammatory hormone. PMID:25309797

  14. Antiproliferative activities of Garcinia bracteata extract and its active ingredient, isobractatin, against human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Li, Wei; Wang, Yan-Yan; Zhong, Qing-Qing; Wang, Shu-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Ren, Dong-Mei; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2014-03-01

    In our cell based screening of antitumor ingredients from plants, the EtOH extract of Garcinia bracteata displayed antiproliferative effect against human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and human prostate cancer PC3 cells. Phytochemical investigation of this active extract produced nine ingredients, and their structures were established by analysis of MS and NMR spectra. Antiproliferative evaluation of isolated ingredients on A549, MCF-7 and PC3 cells indicated that a xanthone named isobractatin (1) exhibited potent antiproliferative activity against the above three human cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 2.90 to 4.15 μM. Treatment of PC3 cells with 1 led to an enhancement of the cell apoptosis, and arrested cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase cycle-related proteins analysis showed that the expressions of cyclins D1 and E were reduced by 1, whereas the protein level of cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor P21 was induced. Additionally, 1 enhanced PC3 cell apoptosis by activations of Bax, caspases 3 and 9, and by inhibition of Bcl-2. Our combined data illustrated that isobractatin (1) was the antiproliferative ingredient of G. bracteata against three human cancer cell lines, which exerted its antiproliferatrive effect via cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. PMID:23812779

  15. Studies of T-cell activation in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Chapter summary The strong association between specific alleles encoded within the MHC class II region and the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has provided the best evidence to date that CD4+ T cells play a role in the pathogenesis of this chronic inflammatory disease. However, the unusual phenotype of synovial T cells, including their profound proliferative hyporesponsiveness to TCR ligation, has challenged the notion that T-cell effector responses are driven by cognate cartilage antigens in inflamed synovial joints. The hierarchy of T-cell dysfunction from peripheral blood to inflamed joint suggests that these defects are acquired through prolonged exposure to proinflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Indeed, there are now compelling data to suggest that chronic cytokine activation may contribute substantially to the phenotype and effector function of synovial T cells. Studies reveal that chronic exposure of T cells to TNF uncouples TCR signal transduction pathways by impairing the assembly and stability of the TCR/CD3 complex at the cell surface. Despite this membrane-proximal effect, TNF selectively uncouples downstream signalling pathways, as is shown by the dramatic suppression of calcium signalling responses, while Ras/ERK activation is spared. On the basis of these data, it is proposed that T-cell survival and effector responses are driven by antigen-independent, cytokine-dependent mechanisms, and that therapeutic strategies that seek to restore T-cell homeostasis rather than further depress T-cell function should be explored in the future. PMID:12110140

  16. Minimal model for spontaneous cell polarization and edge activity in oscillating, rotating and migrating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, Franck; Ambühl, Mark E.; Gabella, Chiara; Bornert, Alicia; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2016-04-01

    How cells break symmetry and organize activity at their edges to move directionally is a fundamental question in cell biology. Physical models of cell motility commonly incorporate gradients of regulatory proteins and/or feedback from the motion itself to describe the polarization of this edge activity. These approaches, however, fail to explain cell behaviour before the onset of polarization. We use polarizing and moving fish epidermal cells as a model system to bridge the gap between cell behaviours before and after polarization. Our analysis suggests a novel and simple principle of self-organizing cell activity, in which local cell-edge dynamics depends on the distance from the cell centre, but not on the orientation with respect to the front-back axis. We validate this principle with a stochastic model that faithfully reproduces a range of cell-migration behaviours. Our findings indicate that spontaneous polarization, persistent motion and cell shape are emergent properties of the local cell-edge dynamics controlled by the distance from the cell centre.

  17. Volume Changes During Active Shape Fluctuations in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Taloni, Alessandro; Kardash, Elena; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid-mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together, our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  18. Volume Changes During Active Shape Fluctuations in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taloni, Alessandro; Kardash, Elena; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid-mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together, our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  19. Activation of Human T-Helper/Inducer Cell, T-Cytotoxic Cell, B-Cell, and Natural Killer (NK)-Cells and induction of Natural Killer Cell Activity against K562 Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells with Modified Citrus Pectin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modified citrus pectin (MCP) is known for its anti-cancer effects and its ability to be absorbed and circulated in the human body. In this report we tested the ability of MCP to induce the activation of human blood lymphocyte subsets like T, B and NK-cells. Methods MCP treated human blood samples were incubated with specific antibody combinations and analyzed in a flow cytometer using a 3-color protocol. To test functionality of the activated NK-cells, isolated normal lymphocytes were treated with increasing concentrations of MCP. Log-phase PKH26-labeled K562 leukemic cells were added to the lymphocytes and incubated for 4 h. The mixture was stained with FITC-labeled active form of caspase 3 antibody and analyzed by a 2-color flow cytometry protocol. The percentage of K562 cells positive for PKH26 and FITC were calculated as the dead cells induced by NK-cells. Monosaccharide analysis of the MCP was performed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulse amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). Results MCP activated T-cytotoxic cells and B-cell in a dose-dependent manner, and induced significant dose-dependent activation of NK-cells. MCP-activated NK-cells demonstrated functionality in inducing cancer cell death. MCP consisted of oligogalacturonic acids with some containing 4,5-unsaturated non-reducing ends. Conclusions MCP has immunostimulatory properties in human blood samples, including the activation of functional NK cells against K562 leukemic cells in culture. Unsaturated oligogalacturonic acids appear to be the immunostimulatory carbohydrates in MCP. PMID:21816083

  20. Enzymatic Activity Assays for Base Excision Repair Enzymes in Cell Extracts from Vertebrate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Melike; Horton, Julie K.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported enzymatic activity assays for the base excision repair (BER) enzymes DNA polymerase β (pol β), aprataxin (APTX), and flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) in cell extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Çağlayan and Wilson, 2014). Here, we describe a method to prepare cell extracts from vertebrate cells to investigate these enzymatic activities for the processing of the 5′-adenylated-sugar phosphate-containing BER intermediate. This new protocol complements our previous publication. The cell lines used are wild-type and APTX-deficient human lymphoblast cells from an Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia Type 1 (AOA1) disease patient, wild-type and APTX-null DT40 chicken B cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. This protocol is a quick and efficient way to make vertebrate cell extracts without using commercial kits. PMID:27390764

  1. Decrease in T Cell Activation and Calcium Flux during Clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence; Holtzclaw, J. David

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of altered gravitational environments on T cell activation. We isolated human, naive T cells (CD3+CD14-CD19-CD16-CD56-CD25-CD69-CD45RA-) following IRB approved protocols. These purified T cells were then incubated with 6 mm polystyrene beads coated with OKT3 (Ortho Biotech, Raritan, NJ) and antiCD28 (Becton Dickinson (BD), San Jose, CA) at 37 C for 24 hours. Antibodies were at a 1:1 ratio and the bead-to-cell ratio was 2:1. Four incubation conditions existed: 1) static or "1g"; 2) centrifugation at 10 relative centrifugal force (RCF) or "10g"; 3) clinorotation at 25 RPM (functional weightlessness or "0g"); and 4) clinorotation at 80 RPM ("1g" plus net shear force approx.30 dynes/sq cm). Following incubation, T cells were stained for CD25 expression (BD) and intracellular calcium (ratio of Fluo4 to Fura Red, Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and analyzed by flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL, Miami, FL). Results: Static or "1g" T cells had the highest level of CD25 expression and intracellular calcium. T cells centrifuged at 10 RCF ("10g") had lower CD25 expression and calcium levels compared to the static control. However, cells centrifuged at 10 RCF had higher CD25 expression and calcium levels than those exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation ("0g"). T cells exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation had lower CD25 expression, but the approximately the same calcium levels than T cells exposed to 80 RPM clinorotation. These data suggest that stress-activated calcium channel exist in T cells and may play a role during T cell activation.

  2. Activation of protease-activated receptor 2 reduces glioblastoma cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of glioma is unclear. The disturbance of the apoptosis process plays a critical role in glioma growth. Factors regulating the apoptosis process are to be further understood. This study aims to investigate the role of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR2) in regulation the apoptosis process in glioma cells. Results The results showed that U87 cells and human glioma tissue expressed PAR2. Exposure to tryptase, or the PAR2 active peptide, increased STAT3 phosphorylation in the radiated U87 cells, reduced U87 cell apoptosis, suppressed the expression of p53 in U87 cells. Conclusions Activation of PAR2 can reduce the radiated U87 cell apoptosis via modulating the expression of p53. The results implicate that PAR2 may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of glioma. PMID:24670244

  3. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration. PMID:19996631

  4. Cell proliferation in vitro modulates fibroblast collagenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblad, W.J.; Flood, L.

    1986-05-01

    Collagenase enzyme activity is regulated by numerous control mechanisms which prevent excessive release and activation of this protease. A primary mechanism for regulating enzyme extracellular activity may be linked to cell division, therefore they have examined the release of collagenase by fibroblasts in vitro in response to cellular proliferation. Studies were performed using fibroblasts derived from adult rat dermis maintained in DMEM containing 10% newborn calf serum, 25 mM tricine buffer, and antibiotics. Cells between subculture 10 and 19 were used with enzyme activity determined with a /sup 14/C-labelled soluble Type I collagen substrate with and without trypsin activation. Fibroblasts, trypsinized and plated at low density secreted 8.5 fold more enzyme than those cells at confluence (975 vs. 115 dpm/..mu..g DNA). This diminution occurred gradually as the cells went from logrithmic growth towards confluence. Confluent fibroblast monolayers were scraped in a grid arrangement, stimulating the remaining cells to divide, without exposure to trypsin. Within 24-48 hr postscraping enzyme levels had increased 260-400%, accompanied by enhanced incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 3/H-uridine into cell macromolecules. The burst of enzyme release began to subside 12 hr later. These results support a close relationship between fibroblast proliferation and collagenase secretion.

  5. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes. PMID:25785438

  6. Calcium Activation Profile In Electrically Stimulated Intact Rat Heart Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Hugo; Nuydens, Rony; Ver Donck, Luc; Nuyens, Roger; De Brabander, Marc; Borgers, Marcel

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in fluorescent probe technology and image processing equipment have made available the measurement of calcium in living systems on a real-time basis. We present the use of the calcium indicator Fura-2 in intact normally stimulated rat heart cells for the spatial and dynamic measurement of the calcium excitation profile. After electric stimulation (1 Hz), the activation proceeds from the center of the myocyte toward the periphery. Within two frame times (80 ms), the whole cell is activated. The activation is slightly faster in the center of the cell than in the periphery. The mean recovery time is 200-400 ms. There is no difference along the cell's long axis. The effect of a beta-agonist and of a calcium antagonist is described.

  7. Activity-based probes for detection of active MALT1 paracaspase in immune cells and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Vosyka, Oliver; Nagel, Daniel; Bognar, Miriam; Lenze, Dido; Lammens, Katja; Schlauderer, Florian; Hlahla, Daniela; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Lenz, Georg; Hummel, Michael; Verhelst, Steven H L; Krappmann, Daniel

    2015-01-22

    MALT1 paracaspase is activated upon antigen receptor stimulation to promote lymphocyte activation. In addition, deregulated MALT1 protease activity drives survival of distinct lymphomas such as the activated B cell type of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). Here, we designed fluorophore or biotin-coupled activity based-probes (ABP) that covalently modify the active center of MALT1. MALT1-ABPs are exclusively labeling an active modified full length form of MALT1 upon T cell stimulation. Further, despite the CARMA1 requirement for initial MALT1 activation, the MALT1-ABPs show that protease activity is not confined to the high-molecular CARMA1-BCL10-MALT1 (CBM) complex. Using biotin-coupled ABPs, we developed a robust assay for sensitive and selective detection of active MALT1 in cell lines, primary lymphocytes, and DLBCL tumor biopsies. Taken together, MALT1-ABPs represent powerful chemical tools to measure cellular MALT1 activation, determine efficacy of small molecule inhibitors, and classify lymphomas based on MALT1 activity status. PMID:25556945

  8. Capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bitencourt, Shanna; Mesquita, Fernanda; Basso, Bruno; Schmid, Júlia; Ferreira, Gabriela; Rizzo, Lucas; Bauer, Moises; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis; Mannaerts, Inge; van Grunsven, Leo Adrianus; Oliveira, Jarbas

    2014-03-01

    Capsaicin, the active component of chili pepper, has been reported to have antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects on a variety of cell lines. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the effects of capsaicin during HSC activation and maintenance. Activated and freshly isolated HSCs were treated with capsaicin. Proliferation was measured by incorporation of EdU. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated using flow cytometry. The migratory response to chemotactic stimuli was evaluated by a modified Boyden chamber assay. Activation markers and inflammatory cytokines were determined by qPCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry. Our results show that capsaicin reduces HSC proliferation, migration, and expression of profibrogenic markers of activated and primary mouse HSCs. In conclusion, the present study shows that capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of HSC in vitro. PMID:23955514

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide Is an Endogenous Potentiator of T Cell Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas W.; Wang, Evelyn A.; Gould, Serge; Stein, Erica V.; Kaur, Sukhbir; Lim, Langston; Amarnath, Shoba; Fowler, Daniel H.; Roberts, David D.

    2012-01-01

    H2S is an endogenous signaling molecule that may act via protein sulfhydrylation to regulate various physiological functions. H2S is also a byproduct of dietary sulfate metabolism by gut bacteria. Inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis are associated with an increase in the colonization of the intestine by sulfate reducing bacteria along with an increase in H2S production. Consistent with its increased production, H2S is implicated as a mediator of ulcerative colitis both in its genesis or maintenance. As T cells are well established mediators of inflammatory bowel disease, we investigated the effect of H2S exposure on T cell activation. Using primary mouse T lymphocytes (CD3+), OT-II CD4+ T cells, and the human Jurkat T cell line, we show that physiological levels of H2S potentiate TCR-induced activation. Nanomolar levels of H2S (50–500 nm) enhance T cell activation assessed by CD69 expression, interleukin-2 expression, and CD25 levels. Exposure of T cells to H2S dose-dependently enhances TCR-stimulated proliferation with a maximum at 300 nm (30% increase, p < 0.01). Furthermore, activation increases the capacity of T cells to make H2S via increased expression of cystathionine γ-lyase and cystathionine β-synthase. Disrupting this response by silencing these H2S producing enzymes impairs T cell activation, and proliferation and can be rescued by the addition of 300 nm H2S. Thus, H2S represents a novel autocrine immunomodulatory molecule in T cells. PMID:22167178

  10. Cell wounding activates phospholipase D in primary mouse keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Senthil N.; Xie, Ding; Howard, Amber C.; Zhong, Quincy; Zhong, Xiaofeng; McNeil, Paul L.; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma membrane disruptions occur in mechanically active tissues such as the epidermis and can lead to cell death if the damage remains unrepaired. Repair occurs through fusion of vesicle patches to the damaged membrane region. The enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in membrane traffickiing; therefore, the role of PLD in membrane repair was investigated. Generation of membrane disruptions by lifting epidermal keratinocytes from the substratum induced PLD activation, whereas removal of cells from the substratum via trypsinization had no effect. Pretreatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, previously shown to increase PLD1 expression and activity, had no effect on, and a PLD2-selective (but not a PLD1-selective) inhibitor decreased, cell lifting-induced PLD activation, suggesting PLD2 as the isoform activated. PLD2 interacts functionally with the glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) to produce phosphatidylglycerol (PG); however, wounding resulted in decreased PG production, suggesting a potential PG deficiency in wounded cells. Cell lifting-induced PLD activation was transient, consistent with a possible role in membrane repair, and PLD inhibitors inhibited membrane resealing upon laser injury. In an in vivo full-thickness mouse skin wound model, PG accelerated wound healing. These results suggest that PLD and the PLD2/AQP3 signaling module may be involved in membrane repair and wound healing. PMID:23288946

  11. Cell wounding activates phospholipase D in primary mouse keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Arun, Senthil N; Xie, Ding; Howard, Amber C; Zhong, Quincy; Zhong, Xiaofeng; McNeil, Paul L; Bollag, Wendy B

    2013-03-01

    Plasma membrane disruptions occur in mechanically active tissues such as the epidermis and can lead to cell death if the damage remains unrepaired. Repair occurs through fusion of vesicle patches to the damaged membrane region. The enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in membrane traffickiing; therefore, the role of PLD in membrane repair was investigated. Generation of membrane disruptions by lifting epidermal keratinocytes from the substratum induced PLD activation, whereas removal of cells from the substratum via trypsinization had no effect. Pretreatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃, previously shown to increase PLD1 expression and activity, had no effect on, and a PLD2-selective (but not a PLD1-selective) inhibitor decreased, cell lifting-induced PLD activation, suggesting PLD2 as the isoform activated. PLD2 interacts functionally with the glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) to produce phosphatidylglycerol (PG); however, wounding resulted in decreased PG production, suggesting a potential PG deficiency in wounded cells. Cell lifting-induced PLD activation was transient, consistent with a possible role in membrane repair, and PLD inhibitors inhibited membrane resealing upon laser injury. In an in vivo full-thickness mouse skin wound model, PG accelerated wound healing. These results suggest that PLD and the PLD2/AQP3 signaling module may be involved in membrane repair and wound healing. PMID:23288946

  12. Role of Toll-Like Receptors in Immune Activation and Tolerance in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Kanai, Takanori

    2014-01-01

    Liver has a unique vascular system receiving the majority of the blood supply from the gastrointestinal tract through the portal vein and faces continuous exposure to foreign pathogens and commensal bacterial products. These gut-derived antigens stimulate liver cells and result in a distinctive immune response via a family of pattern recognition receptors, the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs are expressed on Kupffer cells, dendritic cells, hepatic stellate cells, endothelial cells, and hepatocytes in the liver. The crosstalk between gut-derived antigens and TLRs on immune cells trigger a distinctive set of mechanisms to induce immunity, contributing to various acute and chronic liver diseases including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Accumulating evidence has shown that TLRs stimulation by foreign antigens induces the production of immunoactivating and immunoregulatory cytokines. Furthermore, the immunoregulatory arm of TLR stimulation can also control excessive tissue damage. With this knowledge at hand, it is important to clarify the dual role of disease-specific TLRs as activators and regulators, especially in the liver. We will review the current understanding of TLR signaling and subsequent immune activation and tolerance by the innate immune system in the liver. PMID:24904576

  13. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Wurth, Mark A.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur; Moncman, Carole L.; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2006-07-05

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1{sup V12} or Cdc42{sup V12} could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra or SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA{sup L63} decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia.

  14. Activated NKT cells imprint NK-cell differentiation, functionality and education.

    PubMed

    Riese, Peggy; Trittel, Stephanie; May, Tobias; Cicin-Sain, Luka; Chambers, Benedict J; Guzmán, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    NK cells represent a vital component of the innate immune system. The recent discoveries demonstrating that the functionality of NK cells depends on their differentiation and education status underscore their potential as targets for immune intervention. However, to exploit their full potential, a detailed understanding of the cellular interactions involved in these processes is required. In this regard, the cross-talk between NKT cells and NK cells needs to be better understood. Our results provide strong evidence for NKT cell-induced effects on key biological features of NK cells. NKT-cell activation results in the generation of highly active CD27(high) NK cells with improved functionality. In this context, degranulation activity and IFNγ production were mainly detected in the educated subset. In a mCMV infection model, we also demonstrated that NKT-cell stimulation induced the generation of highly functional educated and uneducated NK cells, crucial players in viral control. Thus, our findings reveal new fundamental aspects of the NKT-NK cell axis that provide important hints for the manipulation of NK cells in clinical settings. PMID:25808315

  15. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase regulates mast cell ion channel activity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Rebecca S; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Sobiesiak, Malgorzata; Lang, Camelia; Felder, Edward; Dietl, Paul; Huber, Stephan M; Lang, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Stimulation of the mast cell IgE-receptor (FcepsilonRI) by antigen leads to stimulation of Ca(2+) entry with subsequent mast cell degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. Ca(2+) further activates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, which in turn provide the electrical driving force for Ca(2+) entry. Since phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3-kinase has previously been shown to be required for mast cell activation and degranulation, we explored, whether mast cell Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels may be sensitive to PI3-kinase activity. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments and Fura-2 fluorescence measurements for determination of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration were performed in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells either treated or untreated with the PI3-kinase inhibitors LY-294002 (10 muM) and wortmannin (100 nM). Antigen-stimulated Ca(2+) entry but not Ca(2+) release from the intracellular stores was dramatically reduced upon PI3-kinase inhibition. Ca(2+) entry was further inhibited by TRPV blocker ruthenium red (10 muM). Ca(2+) entry following readdition after Ca(+)-store depletion with thapsigargin was again decreased by LY-294002, pointing to inhibition of store-operated channels (SOCs). Moreover, inhibition of PI3-kinase abrogated IgE-stimulated, but not ionomycin-induced stimulation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These observations disclose PI3-kinase-dependent regulation of Ca(2+) entry and Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-channels, which in turn participate in triggering mast cell degranulation. PMID:18769043

  16. Passive versus active local microrheology in mammalian cells and amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, C.; Gazeau, F.; Marion, S.; Bacri, J.-C.; Wilhelm, C.

    2004-12-01

    We compare in this paper the rotational magnetic microrheology detailed by Marion et al [18] and Wilhelm et al [19] to the passive tracking microrheology. The rotational microrheology has been designed to explore, using magnetic rotating probes, the local intracellular microenvironment of living cells in terms of viscoelasticity. Passive microrheology techniques is based on the analysis of spontaneous diffusive motions of Brownian probes. The dependence of mean square displacement (MSD) with the time then directly reflects the type of movement (sub-, hyper- or diffusive motions). Using the same intracellular probes, we performed two types of measurements (active and passive). Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, one should obtain the same information from the both techniques in a thermally equilibrium system. Interestingly, our measurements differ, and the discordances directly inform on active biological processes, which add to thermally activated fluctuations in our out-of equilibrium systems. In both cell models used, mammalian Hela cells and amoebae Entamoeba Histolytica, a hyper-diffusive regime at a short time is observed, which highlights the presence of an active non-thermal driving force, acting on the probe. However, the nature of this active force in mammalian cells and amoebae is different, according to their different phenotypes. In mammalian cells active processes are governed by the transport, via molecular motors, on the microtubule network. In amoebae, which are highly motile cells free of microtubule network, the active processes are dominated by strong fluxes of cytoplasm driven by extension of pseudopodia, in random directions, leading to an amplitude of motion one order of magnitude higher than for mammalian cells. Figs 7, Refs 32.

  17. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  18. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  19. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  20. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1in L929 fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Stephen M.; Kerk, Samuel A.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuipers, David P.; Praamsma, Riemer C.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  1. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Gunnink, Stephen M; Kerk, Samuel A; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Alabi, Ola D; Kuipers, David P; Praamsma, Riemer C; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2014-04-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  2. Fibroblast activation protein predicts prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López, José I; Errarte, Peio; Erramuzpe, Asier; Guarch, Rosa; Cortés, Jesús M; Angulo, Javier C; Pulido, Rafael; Irazusta, Jon; Llarena, Roberto; Larrinaga, Gorka

    2016-08-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is a complex disease with only partial response to therapy and scarce reliable clinical parameters indicative of progression and survival. Fibroblast activation protein expression has been correlated with prognosis in several malignancies but never in renal cancer. We aim to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of fibroblast activation protein in 208 clear cell renal cell carcinomas and to evaluate its impact on the prognosis and survival. A positive cytoplasmic immunostaining of this protein in the stromal fibroblasts associated to cancer cells is associated with large tumor diameter (≥4cm), high-grade (G3/4) tumors, and high-stage (≥pT3) tumors. Fibroblast activation protein-positive cases had significantly shorter survivals after 5 (P=.00015), 10 (P=.0000042), and 15 (P=.000043) years of follow-up, with a hazard ratio of 0.31. Multivariate analysis showed that fibroblast activation protein (P=.00117) was stronger than grade and stage in predicting clinical aggressiveness in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This study confirms the usefulness of fibroblast activation protein detection in the stromal fibroblast associated to cancer in clear cell renal cell carcinoma and adds a new immunohistochemical marker to predict clinical behavior in these patients. PMID:27063470

  3. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, R.; Vitale, M.; Mazzotti, G.; Manzoli, L.; Papa, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly the lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.

  4. Active Biochemical Regulation of Cell Volume and a Simple Model of Cell Tension Response.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jiaxiang; Sun, Sean X

    2015-10-20

    Active contractile forces exerted by eukaryotic cells play significant roles during embryonic development, tissue formation, and cell motility. At the molecular level, small GTPases in signaling pathways can regulate active cell contraction. Here, starting with mechanical force balance at the cell cortex, and the recent discovery that tension-sensitive membrane channels can catalyze the conversion of the inactive form of Rho to the active form, we show mathematically that this active regulation of cellular contractility together with osmotic regulation can robustly control the cell size and membrane tension against external mechanical or osmotic shocks. We find that the magnitude of active contraction depends on the rate of mechanical pulling, but the cell tension can recover. The model also predicts that the cell exerts stronger contractile forces against a stiffer external environment, and therefore exhibits features of mechanosensation. These results suggest that a simple system for maintaining homeostatic values of cell volume and membrane tension could explain cell tension response and mechanosensation in different environments. PMID:26488645

  5. Plasma-activated medium induced apoptosis on tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kano, Hiroyuki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2013-09-01

    The non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) has attracted attention in cancer therapy. In this study, the fresh medium was treated with our developed NEAPP, ultra-high electron density (approximately 2 × 1016 cm-3). The medium called the plasma-activated medium (PAM) killed not normal cells but tumor cells through induction of apoptosis. Cell proliferation assays showed that the tumor cells were selectively killed by the PAM. Those cells induced apoptosis using an apoptotic molecular marker, cleaved Caspase3/7. The molecular mechanisms of PAM-mediated apoptosis in the tumor cells were also found that the PAM downregulated the expression of AKT kinase, a marker molecule in a survival signal transduction pathway. These results suggest that PAM may be a promising tool for tumor therapy by downregulating the survival signals in cancers.

  6. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Heizmann, Beate; Sellars, MacLean; Macias-Garcia, Alejandra; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2016-02-12

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation. PMID:26775846

  7. RACK1 inhibits colonic cell growth by regulating Src activity at cell cycle checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Mamidipudi, V; Dhillon, N K; Parman, T; Miller, L D; Lee, K C; Cartwright, C A

    2007-05-01

    Previously, we showed that Src tyrosine kinases are activated early in the development of human colon cancer and are suppressed as intestinal cells differentiate. We identified RACK1 as an endogenous substrate, binding partner and inhibitor of Src. Here we show (by overexpressing RACK1, depleting Src or RACK1 and utilizing cell-permeable peptides that perturb RACK1's interaction with Src) that RACK1 regulates growth of colon cells by suppressing Src activity at G(1) and mitotic checkpoints, and consequently delaying cell cycle progression. Activated Src rescues RACK1-inhibited growth of HT-29 cells. Conversely, inhibiting Src abolishes growth promoted by RACK1 depletion in normal cells. Two potential mechanisms whereby RACK1 regulates mitotic exit are identified: suppression of Src-mediated Sam68 phosphorylation and maintenance of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 1-cyclin B complex in an active state. Our results reveal novel mechanisms of cell cycle control in G(1) and mitosis of colon cells. The significance of this work lies in the discovery of a mechanism by which the growth of colon cancer cells can be slowed, by RACK1 suppression of an oncogenic kinase at critical cell cycle checkpoints. Small molecules that mimic RACK1 function may provide a powerful new approach to the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:17072338

  8. Evaluating cell-surface expression and measuring activation of mammalian odorant receptors in heterologous cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Hanyi; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental question in olfaction is which odorant receptors (ORs) are activated by a given odorant. A major roadblock to investigate odorant-OR relationship in mammals has been an inability to express ORs in heterologous cells suitable for screening active ligands for ORs. The discovery of the receptor-transporting protein (RTP) family has facilitated the effective cell-surface expression of ORs in heterologous cells. The establishment of a robust heterologous expression system for mammalian ORs facilitates the high-throughput “deorphanization” of these receptors by matching them to their cognate ligands. This protocol details the method used for evaluating the cell-surface expression and measuring the functional activation of ORs of transiently-expressed mammalian odorant receptors in HEK293T cells. The stages of odorant receptor cell-surface expression include cell culture preparation, transfer of cells, transfection, and immunocytochemistry/flow cytometry, odorant stimulation, and luciferase assay. This protocol can be completed in a period of 3 days from transfer of cells to cell-surface expression detection and/or measurement of functional activation. PMID:18772867

  9. Hypoxia promotes drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells via activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changfu; Zhang, Qiao; Yu, Tao; Sun, Shudong; Wang, Wenjun; Liu, Guangyao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Drug resistance has been recognized to be a major obstacle to the chemotherapy for osteosarcoma. And the potential importance of hypoxia as a target to reverse drug resistance in osteosarcoma has been indicated, though the mechanism underlining such role is not clarified. The present study aims to investigate the role of hypoxia in the drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells via activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. Experimental design We investigated the promotion of the resistance to doxorubicin of osteosarcoma MG-63 and U2-os cells in vitro, and then determined the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)α and HIF-1β, the activation and regulatory role of AMPK in the osteosarcoma U2-os cells which were treated with doxorubicin under hypoxia. Results It was demonstrated that hypoxia significantly reduced the sensitivity of MG-63 and U2-os cells to doxorubicin, indicating an inhibited viability reduction and a reduced apoptosis promotion. And such reduced sensitivity was not associated with HIF-1α, though it was promoted by hypoxia in U2-os cells. Interestingly, the AMPK signaling was significantly promoted by hypoxia in the doxorubicin-treated U2-os cells, with a marked upregulation of phosphorylated AMPK (Thr 172) and phosphorylated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) (Ser 79), which were sensitive to the AMPK activator, AICAR and the AMPK inhibitor, Compound C. Moreover, the promoted AMPK activity by AICAR or the downregulated AMPK activity by Compound C significantly reduced or promoted the sensitivity of U2-os cells to doxorubicin. Conclusion The present study confirmed the AMPK signaling activation in the doxorubicin-treated osteosarcoma cells, in response to hypoxia, and the chemical upregulation or downregulation of AMPK signaling reduced or increased the chemo-sensitivity of osteosarcoma U2-os cells in vitro. Our study implies that AMPK inhibition might be a effective strategy to sensitize osteocarcoma cells to chemotherapy. PMID

  10. Isolation of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells by Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Cheung, Tom H.; Charville, Gregory W.; Rando, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    The prospective isolation of purified stem cell populations has dramatically altered the field of stem cell biology and has been a major focus of research across tissues in different organisms. Muscle stem cells are now among the most intensely studied stem cell populations in mammalian systems and the prospective isolation of these cells has allowed cellular and molecular characterizations not dreamed of a decade ago. In this protocol, we describe how to isolate muscle stem cells from limb muscles of adult mice by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We provide a detailed description of the physical and enzymatic dissociation of mononucleated cells from limb muscles, a procedure that is essential to maximize cell yield. We then describe a FACS-based method for obtaining exquisitely pure populations of either quiescent or activated muscle stem cells (VCAM+/CD31−/CD45−/Sca1−). The protocol also allows for the isolation of endothelial cells, hematopoietic cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from muscle tissue. PMID:26401916

  11. Selective GPER activation decreases proliferation and activates apoptosis in tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Chimento, A; Casaburi, I; Bartucci, M; Patrizii, M; Dattilo, R; Avena, P; Andò, S; Pezzi, V; Sirianni, R

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogens binding to estrogen receptor (ER) α increase proliferation of Leydig tumor cells. Estrogens can also bind to G protein-coupled ER (GPER) and activation of this receptor can either increase or decrease cell proliferation of several tumor types. The aim of this study was to investigate GPER expression in R2C rat tumor Leydig cells, evaluate effects of its activation on Leydig tumor cell proliferation and define the molecular mechanisms triggered in response to its activation. R2C cells express GPER and its activation, using the specific ligand G-1, is associated with decreased cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis. Apoptosis after G-1 treatment was asserted by appearance of DNA condensation and fragmentation, decrease in Bcl-2 and increase in Bax expression, cytochrome c release, caspase and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation. These effects were dependent on GPER activation because after silencing of the gene, using a specific small interfering RNA, cyt c release, PARP-1 activation and decrease in cell proliferation were abrogated. These events required a rapid, however, sustained extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 activation. G-1 was able to decrease the growth of R2C xenograft tumors in CD1 nude mice while increasing the number of apoptotic cells. In addition, in vivo administration of G-1 to male CD1 mice did not cause any alteration in testicular morphology, while cisplatin, the cytotoxic drug currently used for the therapy of Leydig tumors, severely damaged testicular structure, an event associated with infertility in cisplatin-treated patients. These observations indicate that GPER targeting for the therapy of Leydig cell tumor may represent a good alternative to cisplatin to preserve fertility in Leydig tumor patients. PMID:23907461

  12. Selective GPER activation decreases proliferation and activates apoptosis in tumor Leydig cells

    PubMed Central

    Chimento, A; Casaburi, I; Bartucci, M; Patrizii, M; Dattilo, R; Avena, P; Andò, S; Pezzi, V; Sirianni, R

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogens binding to estrogen receptor (ER) α increase proliferation of Leydig tumor cells. Estrogens can also bind to G protein-coupled ER (GPER) and activation of this receptor can either increase or decrease cell proliferation of several tumor types. The aim of this study was to investigate GPER expression in R2C rat tumor Leydig cells, evaluate effects of its activation on Leydig tumor cell proliferation and define the molecular mechanisms triggered in response to its activation. R2C cells express GPER and its activation, using the specific ligand G-1, is associated with decreased cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis. Apoptosis after G-1 treatment was asserted by appearance of DNA condensation and fragmentation, decrease in Bcl-2 and increase in Bax expression, cytochrome c release, caspase and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation. These effects were dependent on GPER activation because after silencing of the gene, using a specific small interfering RNA, cyt c release, PARP-1 activation and decrease in cell proliferation were abrogated. These events required a rapid, however, sustained extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 activation. G-1 was able to decrease the growth of R2C xenograft tumors in CD1 nude mice while increasing the number of apoptotic cells. In addition, in vivo administration of G-1 to male CD1 mice did not cause any alteration in testicular morphology, while cisplatin, the cytotoxic drug currently used for the therapy of Leydig tumors, severely damaged testicular structure, an event associated with infertility in cisplatin-treated patients. These observations indicate that GPER targeting for the therapy of Leydig cell tumor may represent a good alternative to cisplatin to preserve fertility in Leydig tumor patients. PMID:23907461

  13. Contribution of myosin II activity to cell spreading dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nisenholz, Noam; Paknikar, Aishwarya; Köster, Sarah; Zemel, Assaf

    2016-01-14

    Myosin II activity and actin polymerization at the leading edge of the cell are known to be essential sources of cellular stress. However, a quantitative account of their separate contributions is still lacking; so is the influence of the coupling between the two phenomena on cell spreading dynamics. We present a simple analytic elastic theory of cell spreading dynamics that quantitatively demonstrates how actin polymerization and myosin activity cooperate in the generation of cellular stress during spreading. Consistent with experiments, myosin activity is assumed to polarize in response to the stresses generated during spreading. The characteristic response time and the overall spreading time are predicted to determine different evolution profiles of cell spreading dynamics. These include, a (regular) monotonic increase of cell projected area with time, a non-monotonic (overshooting) profile with a maximum, and damped oscillatory modes. In addition, two populations of myosin II motors are distinguished based on their location in the lamella; those located above the major adhesion zone at the cell periphery are shown to facilitate spreading whereas those in deeper regions of the lamella are shown to oppose spreading. We demonstrate that the attenuation of myosin activity in the two regions may result in reciprocal effects on spreading. These findings provide important new insight into the function of myosin II motors in the course of spreading. PMID:26481613

  14. Synthesis and cancer cell growth inhibitory activity of icaritin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Wu, Ping; Shi, Jing-Fang; Jiang, Zi-Hua; Wei, Xiao-Yi

    2015-07-15

    A series of icaritin derivatives bearing carboxylic acid or carboxylic ester groups are synthesized, and their in vitro cytotoxic activity against three cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-435s, and A549, are evaluated by MTT assay. Several derivatives including 2h, 2j, 5b and 5d show higher cytotoxic activity than the parent compound icaritin against these cancer cell lines. Compounds 5b and 5d are even more cytotoxic to MCF-7 cells than the clinic drug tamoxifen. Moreover, compound 5b is found to be non-toxic to normal cells (Vero) and both 5b and 5d exhibit good selectivity towards estrogen receptor positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells over estrogen receptor negative MDA-MB-435s breast cancer cells. The structure activity relationship analysis has revealed that mono-substitution at either C-3 or C-7 hydroxyl group of icaritin could improve the cytotoxicity of icaritin, and the C-3 hydroxyl group may be a preferable site for chemical modification. In addition, the length, the flexibility and the additional branching substituent group of the substitution chain(s) at both C-3 and C-7 hydroxyl groups can all affect the anti-cancer activity of these derivatives. PMID:26079090

  15. Dopamine Modulates the Activity of Sensory Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Cecilia; Trapani, Josef G.; Pacentine, Itallia; Maeda, Reo; Sheets, Lavinia; Mo, Weike

    2015-01-01

    The senses of hearing and balance are subject to modulation by efferent signaling, including the release of dopamine (DA). How DA influences the activity of the auditory and vestibular systems and its site of action are not well understood. Here we show that dopaminergic efferent fibers innervate the acousticolateralis epithelium of the zebrafish during development but do not directly form synapses with hair cells. However, a member of the D1-like receptor family, D1b, tightly localizes to ribbon synapses in inner ear and lateral-line hair cells. To assess modulation of hair-cell activity, we reversibly activated or inhibited D1-like receptors (D1Rs) in lateral-line hair cells. In extracellular recordings from hair cells, we observed that D1R agonist SKF-38393 increased microphonic potentials, whereas D1R antagonist SCH-23390 decreased microphonic potentials. Using ratiometric calcium imaging, we found that increased D1R activity resulted in larger calcium transients in hair cells. The increase of intracellular calcium requires Cav1.3a channels, as a Cav1 calcium channel antagonist, isradipine, blocked the increase in calcium transients elicited by the agonist SKF-38393. Collectively, our results suggest that DA is released in a paracrine fashion and acts at ribbon synapses, likely enhancing the activity of presynaptic Cav1.3a channels and thereby increasing neurotransmission. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neurotransmitter dopamine acts in a paracrine fashion (diffusion over a short distance) in several tissues and bodily organs, influencing and regulating their activity. The cellular target and mechanism of the action of dopamine in mechanosensory organs, such as the inner ear and lateral-line organ, is not clearly understood. Here we demonstrate that dopamine receptors are present in sensory hair cells at synaptic sites that are required for signaling to the brain. When nearby neurons release dopamine, activation of the dopamine receptors increases the activity of

  16. Strategies to reduce dendritic cell activation through functional biomaterial design

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Patrick S.; He, Jing; Haskins, Kathryn; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a key role in determining adaptive immunity, and there is growing interest in characterizing and manipulating the interactions between dendritic cells and biomaterial surfaces. Contact with several common biomaterials can induce the maturation of immature dendritic cells, but substrates that reduce dendritic cell maturation are of particular interest within the field of cell-based therapeutics where the goal is to reduce the immune response to cell-laden material carriers. In this study, we use a materials-based strategy to functionalize poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with immobilized immunosuppressive factors (TGF-β1 and IL-10) to reduce the maturation of immature dendritic cells. TGF-β1 and IL-10 are commonly employed as soluble factors to program dendritic cells in vitro, and we demonstrate that these proteins retain bioactivity towards dendritic cells when immobilized on hydrogel surfaces. Following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or cytokines, a dendritic cell line interacting with the surfaces of immunosuppressive hydrogels expressed reduced markers of maturation, including IL-12 and MHCII. The bioactivity of these immunomodulatory hydrogels was further confirmed with primary bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs) isolated from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, as quantified by a decrease in activation markers and a significantly reduced capacity to activate T cells. Furthermore, by introducing a second signal to promote BMDC-material interactions combined with the presentation of tolerizing signals, the mulitfunctional PEG hydrogels were found to further increase signaling towards BMDCs, as evidenced by greater reductions in maturation markers. PMID:22361099

  17. CD83 Modulates B Cell Activation and Germinal Center Responses.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, Lena; Seitz, Christine; Urbat, Anne; Hutzler, Stefan; Ostalecki, Christian; Gläsner, Joachim; Hiergeist, Andreas; Gessner, André; Winkler, Thomas H; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Nitschke, Lars

    2016-05-01

    CD83 is a maturation marker for dendritic cells. In the B cell lineage, CD83 is expressed especially on activated B cells and on light zone B cells during the germinal center (GC) reaction. The function of CD83 during GC responses is unclear. CD83(-/-) mice have a strong reduction of CD4(+) T cells, which makes it difficult to analyze a functional role of CD83 on B cells during GC responses. Therefore, in the present study we generated a B cell-specific CD83 conditional knockout (CD83 B-cKO) model. CD83 B-cKO B cells show defective upregulation of MHC class II and CD86 expression and impaired proliferation after different stimuli. Analyses of GC responses after immunization with various Ags revealed a characteristic shift in dark zone and light zone B cell numbers, with an increase of B cells in the dark zone of CD83 B-cKO mice. This effect was not accompanied by alterations in the level of IgG immune responses or by major differences in affinity maturation. However, an enhanced IgE response was observed in CD83 B-cKO mice. Additionally, we observed a strong competitive disadvantage of CD83-cKO B cells in GC responses in mixed bone marrow chimeras. Furthermore, infection of mice with Borrelia burgdorferi revealed a defect in bacterial clearance of CD83 B-cKO mice with a shift toward a Th2 response, indicated by a strong increase in IgE titers. Taken together, our results show that CD83 is important for B cell activation and modulates GC composition and IgE Ab responses in vivo. PMID:26983787

  18. Myeloid cell distribution and activity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moliné-Velázquez, Verónica; Vila-Del Sol, Virginia; de Castro, Fernando; Clemente, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease in which an exacerbated immune response provokes oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination, the hallmarks of this neurological disease. The destruction of myelin due to the uncontrolled activity of the invading immune cells leads to the formation of MS plaques. Among the different leukocytes that participate in the immune response associated with MS, the role of myeloid cells has been analyzed extensively (i.e. macrophages, dendritic cells -DCs- and neutrophils). Hence, in this review we will summarize what is known about the distribution, expression and markers available to study myeloid cells, and their histopathology, not only in a standard animal model of MS (autoimmune experimental encephalomyelitis -EAE) but also in MS tissue. In this review, we will not only refer to mature myeloid cells but also to the undifferentiated and almost unexplored myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The active role of MDSCs in the prompt resolution of an immune episode is gaining importance, yet is still the subject of some debate. Finally, the similarities and differences between MS and EAE are discussed, particularly in terms of myeloid cell phenotype, activity and the markers used. PMID:26592711

  19. LPS induces pulp progenitor cell recruitment via complement activation.

    PubMed

    Chmilewsky, F; Jeanneau, C; Laurent, P; About, I

    2015-01-01

    Complement system, a major component of the natural immunity, has been recently identified as an important mediator of the dentin-pulp regeneration process through STRO-1 pulp cell recruitment by the C5a active fragment. Moreover, it has been shown recently that under stimulation with lipoteichoic acid, a complex component of the Gram-positive bacteria cell wall, human pulp fibroblasts are able to synthesize all proteins required for complement activation. However, Gram-negative bacteria, which are also involved in tooth decay, are known as powerful activators of complement system and inflammation. Here, we investigated the role of Gram-negative bacteria-induced complement activation on the pulp progenitor cell recruitment using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of all Gram-negative bacteria. Our results show that incubating pulp fibroblasts with LPS induced membrane attack complex formation and C5a release in serum-free fibroblast cultures. The produced C5a binds to the pulp progenitor cells' membrane and induces their migration toward the LPS stimulation chamber, as revealed by the dynamic transwell migration assays. The inhibition of this migration by the C5aR-specific antagonist W54011 indicates that the pulp progenitor migration is mediated by the interaction between C5a and C5aR. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a direct interaction between the recruitment of progenitor pulp cells and the activation of complement system generated by pulp fibroblast stimulation with LPS. PMID:25359783

  20. Peptide fibrils with altered stability, activity, and cell selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Peptides have some unique and superior features compared to proteins. However, the use of peptides as therapeutics is hampered by their low stability and cell selectivity. In this study, a new lytic peptide (CL-1, FLGALFRALSRLL) was constructed. Under the physiological condition, peptide CL-1 self-assembled into dynamically stable aggregates with fibrils-like structures. Aggregated CL-1 demonstrated dramatically altered activity and stability in comparison with single molecule CL-1 and other lytic peptides: when incubated with co-cultured bacteria and tissue cells, CL-1 aggregates killed bacteria selectively but spared co-cultured human cells; CL-1 aggregates kept intact in human serum for more than five hours. Peptide-cell interaction studies performed on lipid monolayers and live human tissue cells revealed that in comparison with monomeric CL-1, aggregated CL-1 had decreased cell affinity and membrane insertion capability on tissue cells. A dynamic process involving aggregate dissociation and rearrangement seemed to be an essential step for membrane bound CL-1 aggregates to realize its cytotoxicity to tissue cells. Our study suggests that peptide aggregation could be as important as the charge and secondary structure of a peptide in affecting peptide-cell interactions. Controlling peptide self-assembly represents a new way to increase the stability and cell selectivity of bioactive peptides for wide biomedical applications. PMID:23713839

  1. Antitumor activity of dobutamine on human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    YIN, JUN; DONG, QIRONG; ZHENG, MINQIAN; XU, XIAOZU; ZOU, GUOYOU; MA, GUOLIN; LI, KEFENG

    2016-01-01

    Dobutamine has been widely used for the treatment of heart failure and cardiogenic shock since the 1970s. Osteosarcoma is the most commonly observed malignant bone tumor in children. Currently, there are no effective drugs for the treatment of osteosarcoma. In the present study, the potential anticancer activity of dobutamine on human osteosarcoma cells was examined. Human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells were treated with dobutamine at various concentrations and for various incubation times. The inhibition of cell growth by dobutamine was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry was utilized to evaluate the effect of dobutamine on cell apoptosis and the cell cycle. Furthermore, the expression levels of caspase-3 and caspase-9 were assessed by western blot analysis. The influence of dobutamine on cancer cell migration and invasion was additionally evaluated using wound-healing assay and the Boyden Chamber migration method. Dobutamine significantly inhibited the growth of MG-63 cells at a concentration of 10 µM or higher when incubated for 12 h or longer (P=0.023). Dobutamine augmented cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. Western blot analysis revealed that dobutamine induces expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9. In addition, the invasiveness and migration of MG-63 cells was inhibited by dobutamine in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of the present study may lead to novel applications for dobutamine in the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:27284371

  2. B cell mitogenic activity of sea squirt antigen.

    PubMed

    Segawa, K; Ono, K; Oka, S; Jyo, T; Kuroiwa, A; Yamashita, U

    1994-07-01

    The activity of sea squirt antigen, one of the allergy-inducing substances for humans, on murine and human lymphocytes was studied in vitro. Sea squirt antigen stimulated normal mouse spleen cells to proliferate, as detected by [3H]-TdR incorporation, in a dose-dependent manner. The responder cells are B cells because the response was reduced by the treatment of spleen cells with anti-immunoglobulin antibody and complement and passing through a nylon wool column, but not with anti-Thy-1 antibody and complement. Spleen cells of C3H/HeJ mice, which are lipopolysaccharide low responders, were also stimulated as well as spleen cells of C3H/HeN mice, suggesting that this response is not due to lipopolysaccharide in the antigen fraction. Sea squirt antigen stimulated not only proliferative response of B cells, but also polyclonal immunoglobulin production. Furthermore, sea squirt antigen also stimulated human lymphocytes to proliferate and to produce immunoglobulin. All these results suggest that sea squirt antigen has mitogenic activity on B cells, and this ability is concerned with the induction of allergic reaction. PMID:8032238

  3. Virulent Treponema pallidum activates human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Riley, B S; Oppenheimer-Marks, N; Hansen, E J; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1992-03-01

    Perivascular lymphocytic infiltration, fibrin deposition, and endothelial cell abnormalities consistent with cellular activation are prominent histopathologic features of syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum. Because activated endothelial cells play important roles in lymphocyte homing and hemostasis, the ability of virulent T. pallidum to activate cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was investigated. T. pallidum induced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and procoagulant activity on the surface of HUVEC. Electron microscopy of T. pallidum-stimulated HUVEC revealed extensive networks of fibrin strands not observed in cultures without treponemes. ICAM-1 expression in HUVEC also was promoted by a 47-kDa integral membrane lipoprotein purified from T. pallidum, implicating a role for spirochete membrane lipoproteins in endothelial cell activation. The combined findings are consistent with the pathology of syphilis and provide the first evidence that a pathogenic spirochetal bacterium such as T. pallidum or its constituent integral membrane lipoprotein(s) can activate directly host vascular endothelium. PMID:1347056

  4. Tim-1-Mediated T Cell Activation Requires Recruitment and Activation of PI 3-Kinase

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Anjali J.; Oak, Jean S.; Jordanhazy, Ryan; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Fruman, David A.; Kane, Lawrence P.

    2009-01-01

    Ligation of the transmembrane protein Tim-1 can co-stimulate T cell activation. Agonistic antibodies to Tim-1 are also capable of inducing T cell activation without additional stimuli. However, little is known about the biochemical mechanisms underlying T cell stimulation or co-stimulation through Tim-1. We show that a tyrosine in Tim-1 becomes phosphorylated in an lck-dependent manner, whereupon it can directly recruit p85 adaptor subunits of PI 3-kinase. This results in PI3K activation, which is required for Tim-1 function. We also provide genetic evidence that p85 expression is required for optimal Tim-1 function. Thus, we describe a pathway from Tim-1 tyrosine phosphorylation to the PI3K signaling pathway, which appears to be a major effector of Tim-1-mediated T cell activation. PMID:18453570

  5. Unirradiated cells rescue cells exposed to ionizing radiation: Activation of NF-κB pathway in irradiated cells.

    PubMed

    Lam, R K K; Han, Wei; Yu, K N

    2015-12-01

    We studied the involvement of NF-κB pathway activation in the rescue effect in HeLa and NIH/3T3 cells irradiated by α particles. Firstly, upon irradiation by 5 cGy of α particles, for both cell lines, the numbers of 53BP1 foci/cell at 12 h post-irradiation were significantly smaller when only 2.5% of the cell population was irradiated as compared to 100% irradiation, which demonstrated the rescue effect. Secondly, we studied the effect of NF-κB on the rescue effect through the use of the NF-κB activation inhibitor BAY-11-7082. Novel experimental setup and procedures were designed to prepare the medium (CM) which had conditioned the bystander cells previously partnered with irradiated cells, to ensure physical separation between rescue and bystander signals. BAY-11-7082 itself did not inflict DNA damages in the cells or have effects on activation of the NF-κB response pathway in the irradiated cells through direct irradiation. The rescue effect was induced in both cell lines by the CM, which was abrogated if BAY-11-7082 was added to the CM. Thirdly, we studied the effect of NF-κB on the rescue effect through staining for phosphorylated NF-κB (p-NF-κB) expression using the anti-NF-κB p65 (phospho S536) antibody. When the fraction of irradiated cells dropped from 100% to 2.5%, the p-NF-κB expression in the cell nuclei of irradiated NIH/3T3 cells increased significantly, while that in the cell nuclei of irradiated HeLa cells also increased although not significantly. Moreover, the p-NF-κB expression in the cell nuclei of irradiated HeLa cells and NIH/3T3 cells treated with CM also increased significantly. PMID:26524645

  6. ERK activation of p21 activated kinase-1 (Pak1) is critical for medulloblastoma cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liangping; Santi, Mariarita; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Cornelison, Robert; MacDonald, Tobey J

    2010-10-01

    We previously identified that overexpression of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) is associated with metastatic medulloblastoma (MB) and showed that PDGF treatment increases ERK activity and promotes MB cell migration. In this study, we investigated whether ERK regulates Rac1/Pak1 signaling and is critically linked to MB cell migration. Herein we demonstrate that PDGF-BB treatment of MB cells induces concomitant activation of PDGFRβ, MEK1/ERK, Rac1 and Pak1, but suppresses Rho activity, which together significantly promotes cell migration. Conversely, cells transfected with either PDGFRβ or Pak1 siRNA or treated with an inhibitor of Rac1 (NSC23766) or N-myristoyltransferase-1 (Tris-dipalladium) are unable to activate Rac1 or Pak1 in response to PDGF, and consequently, are unable to undergo PDGF-mediated cell migration. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that either chemical inhibition of MEK/ERK (U0126) or stable downregulation of PDGFRβ by shRNA similarly results in the loss of PDGF-induced ERK phosphorylation and abolishes Rac1/Pak1 activation and cell migration in response to PDGF. However, specific depletion of Pak1 by siRNA has no effect on PDGF-induced ERK phosphorylation, indicating that in MB cells ERK signaling is Pak1-independent, but PDGF-induced migration is dependent on ERK-mediated activation of Pak1. Finally, using tissue microarrays, we detect phosphorylated Pak1 in 53% of medulloblastomas and show that immunopositivity is associated with unfavorable outcome. We conclude that Rac1/Pak1 signaling is critical to MB cell migration and is functionally dependent on PDGFRβ/ERK activity. PMID:20526801

  7. ERK activation of p21 activated kinase-1 (Pak1) is critical for medulloblastoma cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liangping; Santi, Mariarita; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Cornelison, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We previously identified that overexpression of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) is associated with metastatic medulloblastoma (MB) and showed that PDGF treatment increases ERK activity and promotes MB cell migration. In this study, we investigated whether ERK regulates Rac1/Pak1 signaling and is critically linked to MB cell migration. Herein we demonstrate that PDGF-BB treatment of MB cells induces concomitant activation of PDGFRβ, MEK1/ERK, Rac1 and Pak1, but suppresses Rho activity, which together significantly promotes cell migration. Conversely, cells transfected with either PDGFRβ or Pak1 siRNA or treated with an inhibitor of Rac1 (NSC23766) or N-myristoyltransferase-1 (Tris-dipalladium) are unable to activate Rac1 or Pak1 in response to PDGF, and consequently, are unable to undergo PDGF-mediated cell migration. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that either chemical inhibition of MEK/ ERK (U0126) or stable downregulation of PDGFRβ by shRNA similarly results in the loss of PDGF-induced ERK phosphorylation and abolishes Rac1/Pak1 activation and cell migration in response to PDGF. However, specific depletion of Pak1 by siRNA has no effect on PDGF-induced ERK phosphorylation, indicating that in MB cells ERK signaling is Pak1-independent, but PDGF-induced migration is dependent on ERK-mediated activation of Pak1. Finally, using tissue microarrays, we detect phosphorylated Pak1 in 53% of medulloblastomas and show that immunopositivity is associated with unfavorable outcome. We conclude that Rac1/Pak1 signaling is critical to MB cell migration and is functionally dependent on PDGFRβ/ERK activity. PMID:20526801

  8. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  10. [An electrochemical method for measuring metabolic activity and counting cells].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, B a; Khlupova, M e; Shleev, S V; Kaprel'iants, A S; Iaropolov, A I

    2006-01-01

    An express electrochemical method for determining the metabolic activity of live cells based on the possibility of an electron exchange between an electrode and elements of the biological electron transfer chain in the presence of a mediator is proposed. This method is useful for studying any live cells (animal, plant, and microbial), including anaerobic, dormant, and spore cells. The sample preparation and measurement itself does not take more than 30 min. The detection limit in a volume of 15 ml amounts to 10-5 cells/ml. The applicability of the assessment method of the metabolic activity level during the transition of the bacteria Mycobacterium smegmatis into an uncultivable dormant state was demonstrated. This method is of special value for medicine and environmental control, detecting latent forms of pathogens. An optimal combination of the methods for the express analysis of latent pathogens is proposed. PMID:17066962

  11. Cytoplasmic myosin exposed apoptotic cells appear with caspase-3 activation and enhance CLL cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Lu; Magli, Amanda R.; Catera, Rosa; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Griffin, Daniel O.; Rothstein, Thomas L.; Barrientos, Jacqueline; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Chu, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    The degree of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) binding to myosin exposed apoptotic cells (MEACs) correlates with worse patient outcomes, suggesting a link to disease activity. Therefore, we studied MEAC formation and the effects of MEAC binding on CLL cells. In cell line studies, both intrinsic (spontaneous or camptothecin-induced) and extrinsic (FasL- or anti-Fas-induced) apoptosis created a high percent of MEACs over time in a process associated with caspase-3 activation, leading to cytoplasmic myosin cleavage and trafficking to cell membranes. The involvement of common apoptosis pathways suggests that most cells can produce MEACs and indeed CLL cells themselves form MEACs. Consistent with the idea that MEAC formation may be a signal to remove dying cells, we found that natural IgM antibodies bind to MEACs. Functionally, co-culture of MEACs with CLL cells, regardless of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region gene mutation status, improved leukemic cell viability. Based on inhibitor studies, this improved viability involved BCR signaling molecules. These results support the hypothesis that stimulation of CLL cells with antigen, such as those on MEACs, promotes CLL cell viability, which in turn could lead to progression to worse disease. PMID:26220042

  12. CCL5 activation of CCR5 regulates cell metabolism to enhance proliferation of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Darrin; Rahbar, Ramtin; Fish, Eleanor N.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that CCL5 enhances proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in an mTOR-dependent manner and we provided evidence that, for T cells, CCL5 activation of CCR5 results in increased glycolysis and enhanced ATP production. Increases in metabolic activity of cancer cells, specifically increased glycolytic activity and increased expression of glucose transporters, are associated with tumour progression. In this report, we provide evidence that CCL5 enhances the proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7) and mouse mammary tumour cells (MMTV-PyMT), mediated by CCR5 activation. Concomitant with enhanced proliferation we show that CCL5 increases cell surface expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1, and increases glucose uptake and ATP production by these cells. Blocking CCL5-inducible glucose uptake abrogates the enhanced proliferation induced by CCL5. We provide evidence that increased glucose uptake is associated with enhanced glycolysis, as measured by extracellular acidification. Moreover, CCL5 enhances the invasive capacity of these breast cancer cells. Using metabolomics, we demonstrate that the metabolic signature of CCL5-treated primary mouse mammary tumour cells reflects increased anabolic metabolism. The implications are that CCL5–CCR5 interactions in the tumour microenvironment regulate metabolic events, specifically glycolysis, to promote tumour proliferation and invasion. PMID:27335323

  13. CCL5 activation of CCR5 regulates cell metabolism to enhance proliferation of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Darrin; Rahbar, Ramtin; Fish, Eleanor N

    2016-06-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that CCL5 enhances proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in an mTOR-dependent manner and we provided evidence that, for T cells, CCL5 activation of CCR5 results in increased glycolysis and enhanced ATP production. Increases in metabolic activity of cancer cells, specifically increased glycolytic activity and increased expression of glucose transporters, are associated with tumour progression. In this report, we provide evidence that CCL5 enhances the proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7) and mouse mammary tumour cells (MMTV-PyMT), mediated by CCR5 activation. Concomitant with enhanced proliferation we show that CCL5 increases cell surface expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1, and increases glucose uptake and ATP production by these cells. Blocking CCL5-inducible glucose uptake abrogates the enhanced proliferation induced by CCL5. We provide evidence that increased glucose uptake is associated with enhanced glycolysis, as measured by extracellular acidification. Moreover, CCL5 enhances the invasive capacity of these breast cancer cells. Using metabolomics, we demonstrate that the metabolic signature of CCL5-treated primary mouse mammary tumour cells reflects increased anabolic metabolism. The implications are that CCL5-CCR5 interactions in the tumour microenvironment regulate metabolic events, specifically glycolysis, to promote tumour proliferation and invasion. PMID:27335323

  14. Early kinetic window of target T cell susceptibility to CD25+ regulatory T cell activity.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Dorothy K; Hughson, Angela; Sukiennicki, Teresa L; Fowell, Deborah J

    2005-12-01

    Peripheral tolerance is maintained in part by thymically derived CD25+CD4+ T cells (regulatory T cells (Tregs)). Their mechanism of action has not been well characterized. Therefore, to get a better understanding of Treg action, we investigated the kinetics of murine Treg activity in vitro. Tregs were suppressive within a surprisingly narrow kinetic window: necessary and sufficient only in the first 6-10 h of culture. Visualization of this time frame, using a sensitive single-cell assay for IL-2, revealed the early elaboration of target cell IL-2 producers in the first 6 h despite the presence of CD25+CD4+ Tregs. However, after 6 h, a rapid rise in the number of IL-2 producers in the absence of Tregs was dramatically abrogated by the presence of Tregs. Importantly, the timing of suppression was dictated by the kinetics of target T cell activation suggesting that early target T cell signals may alter susceptibility to suppression. Modulating target T cell activation signals with provision of CD28, IL-2, or high Ag dose all abrogated suppression of proliferation late in culture. However, only CD28 signals enabled target T cells to resist the early Treg-induced down-regulation of IL-2. Therefore the quality of early target T cell activation signals, in particular engagement of CD28, represents an important control point in the balance between vulnerability and resistance to Treg suppression. PMID:16301632

  15. Mucosal Regulatory T Cells and T Helper 17 Cells in HIV-Associated Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Talla, Aarthi; McDonald, David; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Levine, Alan D.; Weinberg, Aaron; Sekaly, Rafick P.

    2016-01-01

    Residual mucosal inflammation along with chronic systemic immune activation is an important feature in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and has been linked to a wide range of co-morbidities, including malignancy, opportunistic infections, immunopathology, and cardiovascular complications. Although combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can reduce plasma viral loads to undetectable levels, reservoirs of virus persist, and increased mortality is associated with immune dysbiosis in mucosal lymphoid tissues. Immune-based therapies are pursued with the goal of improving CD4+ T-cell restoration, as well as reducing chronic immune activation in cART-treated patients. However, the majority of research on immune activation has been derived from analysis of circulating T cells. How immune cell alterations in mucosal tissues contribute to HIV immune dysregulation and the associated risk of non-infectious chronic complications is less studied. Given the significant differences between mucosal T cells and circulating T cells, and the immediate interactions of mucosal T cells with the microbiome, more attention should be devoted to mucosal immune cells and their contribution to systemic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we will focus on mucosal immune cells with a specific emphasis on CD4+ T lymphocytes, such as T helper 17 cells and CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play crucial roles in maintaining mucosal barrier integrity and preventing inflammation, respectively. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory milieu in cART-treated patients with immune activation significantly contributes to enhanced loss of Th17 cells and increased frequency of dysregulated Tregs in the mucosa, which in turn may exacerbate immune dysfunction in HIV-infected patients. We also present initial evidence to support this hypothesis. A better comprehension of how pro-inflammatory milieu impacts these two types of cells in the mucosa will shed light

  16. Doxorubicin resistant cancer cells activate myeloid-derived suppressor cells by releasing PGE2.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yuan; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Qu, Zhen; Zhou, Hu; Guan, Qing; Yang, Na; Leng, Xiao-Hua; Bu, Lang; Wu, Ke; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapies often induce drug-resistance in cancer cells and simultaneously stimulate proliferation and activation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) to inhibit anti-tumor T cells, thus result in poor prognosis of patients with breast cancers. To date, the mechanism underlying the expansion of MDSCs in response to chemotherapies is poorly understood. In the present study, we used in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal studies to demonstrate that doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells secret significantly more prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than their parental doxorubicin-sensitive cells. The secreted PGE2 can stimulate expansion and polymerization of MDSCs by directly target to its receptors, EP2/EP4, on the surface of MDSCs, which consequently triggers production of miR-10a through activating PKA signaling. More importantly, activated MDSCs can inhibit CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells as evidenced by reduced proliferation and IFN-γ release. In order to determine the molecular pathway that involves miR-10a mediated activation of MDSCs, biochemical and pharmacological studies were carried out. We found that miR-10a can activate AMPK signaling to promote expansion and activation of MDSCs. Thus, these results reveal, for the first time, a novel role of PGE2/miR-10a/AMPK signaling axis in chemotherapy-induced immune resistance, which might be targeted for treatment of chemotherapy resistant tumors. PMID:27032536

  17. Doxorubicin resistant cancer cells activate myeloid-derived suppressor cells by releasing PGE2

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yuan; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Qu, Zhen; Zhou, Hu; Guan, Qing; Yang, Na; Leng, Xiao-Hua; Bu, Lang; Wu, Ke; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapies often induce drug-resistance in cancer cells and simultaneously stimulate proliferation and activation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) to inhibit anti-tumor T cells, thus result in poor prognosis of patients with breast cancers. To date, the mechanism underlying the expansion of MDSCs in response to chemotherapies is poorly understood. In the present study, we used in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal studies to demonstrate that doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells secret significantly more prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than their parental doxorubicin-sensitive cells. The secreted PGE2 can stimulate expansion and polymerization of MDSCs by directly target to its receptors, EP2/EP4, on the surface of MDSCs, which consequently triggers production of miR-10a through activating PKA signaling. More importantly, activated MDSCs can inhibit CD4+CD25− T cells as evidenced by reduced proliferation and IFN-γ release. In order to determine the molecular pathway that involves miR-10a mediated activation of MDSCs, biochemical and pharmacological studies were carried out. We found that miR-10a can activate AMPK signaling to promote expansion and activation of MDSCs. Thus, these results reveal, for the first time, a novel role of PGE2/miR-10a/AMPK signaling axis in chemotherapy-induced immune resistance, which might be targeted for treatment of chemotherapy resistant tumors. PMID:27032536

  18. Dectin-1-activated dendritic cells trigger potent antitumour immunity through the induction of Th9 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yinghua; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Jintong; Wang, Ying; Gao, Sujun; Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Tan, Guangyun; Zhao, Wenjie; Yi, Huanfa; Xu, Honglin; Ma, Xingzhe; Lu, Yong; Yi, Qing; Wang, Siqing

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 signalling in dendritic cells (DCs) has an important role in triggering protective antifungal Th17 responses. However, whether dectin-1 directs DCs to prime antitumour Th9 cells remains unclear. Here, we show that DCs activated by dectin-1 agonists potently promote naive CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into Th9 cells. Abrogation of dectin-1 in DCs completely abolishes their Th9-polarizing capability in response to dectin-1 agonist curdlan. Notably, dectin-1 stimulation of DCs upregulates TNFSF15 and OX40L, which are essential for dectin-1-activated DC-induced Th9 cell priming. Mechanistically, dectin-1 activates Syk, Raf1 and NF-κB signalling pathways, resulting in increased p50 and RelB nuclear translocation and TNFSF15 and OX40L expression. Furthermore, immunization of tumour-bearing mice with dectin-1-activated DCs induces potent antitumour response that depends on Th9 cells and IL-9 induced by dectin-1-activated DCs in vivo. Our results identify dectin-1-activated DCs as a powerful inducer of Th9 cells and antitumour immunity and may have important clinical implications. PMID:27492902

  19. Dectin-1-activated dendritic cells trigger potent antitumour immunity through the induction of Th9 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yinghua; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Jintong; Wang, Ying; Gao, Sujun; Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Tan, Guangyun; Zhao, Wenjie; Yi, Huanfa; Xu, Honglin; Ma, Xingzhe; Lu, Yong; Yi, Qing; Wang, Siqing

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 signalling in dendritic cells (DCs) has an important role in triggering protective antifungal Th17 responses. However, whether dectin-1 directs DCs to prime antitumour Th9 cells remains unclear. Here, we show that DCs activated by dectin-1 agonists potently promote naive CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Th9 cells. Abrogation of dectin-1 in DCs completely abolishes their Th9-polarizing capability in response to dectin-1 agonist curdlan. Notably, dectin-1 stimulation of DCs upregulates TNFSF15 and OX40L, which are essential for dectin-1-activated DC-induced Th9 cell priming. Mechanistically, dectin-1 activates Syk, Raf1 and NF-κB signalling pathways, resulting in increased p50 and RelB nuclear translocation and TNFSF15 and OX40L expression. Furthermore, immunization of tumour-bearing mice with dectin-1-activated DCs induces potent antitumour response that depends on Th9 cells and IL-9 induced by dectin-1-activated DCs in vivo. Our results identify dectin-1-activated DCs as a powerful inducer of Th9 cells and antitumour immunity and may have important clinical implications. PMID:27492902

  20. NKG2D is a Key Receptor for Recognition of Bladder Cancer Cells by IL-2-Activated NK Cells and BCG Promotes NK Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuesta, Eva María; López-Cobo, Sheila; Álvarez-Maestro, Mario; Esteso, Gloria; Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; Rey, Mercedes; Cassady-Cain, Robin L.; Linares, Ana; Valés-Gómez, Alejandro; Reyburn, Hugh Thomson; Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is used to treat superficial bladder cancer, either papillary tumors (after transurethral resection) or high-grade flat carcinomas (carcinoma in situ), reducing recurrence in about 70% of patients. Initially, BCG was proposed to work through an inflammatory response, mediated by phagocytic uptake of mycobacterial antigens and cytokine release. More recently, other immune effectors such as monocytes, natural killer (NK), and NKT cells have been suggested to play a role in this immune response. Here, we provide a comprehensive study of multiple bladder cancer cell lines as putative targets for immune cells and evaluated their recognition by NK cells in the presence and absence of BCG. We describe that different bladder cancer cells can express multiple activating and inhibitory ligands for NK cells. Recognition of bladder cancer cells depended mainly on NKG2D, with a contribution from NKp46. Surprisingly, exposure to BCG did not affect the immune phenotype of bladder cells nor increased NK cell recognition of purified IL-2-activated cell lines. However, NK cells were activated efficiently when BCG was included in mixed lymphocyte cultures, suggesting that NK activation after mycobacteria treatment requires the collaboration of various immune cells. We also analyzed the percentage of NK cells in peripheral blood of a cohort of bladder cancer patients treated with BCG. The total numbers of NK cells did not vary during treatment, indicating that a more detailed study of NK cell activation in the tumor site will be required to evaluate the response in each patient. PMID:26106390

  1. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  2. Structured variability in Purkinje cell activity during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbrei, Britton A.; Lubenov, Evgueniy V.; Siapas, Athanassios G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cerebellum is a prominent vertebrate brain structure that is critically involved in sensorimotor function. During locomotion, cerebellar Purkinje cells are rhythmically active, shaping descending signals and coordinating commands from higher brain areas with the step cycle. However, the variation in this activity across steps has not been studied, and its statistical structure, afferent mechanisms, and relationship to behavior remain unknown. Here, using multi-electrode recordings in freely moving rats, we show that behavioral variables systematically influence the shape of the step-locked firing rate. This effect depends strongly on the phase of the step cycle and reveals a functional clustering of Purkinje cells. Furthermore, we find a pronounced disassociation between patterns of variability driven by the parallel and climbing fibers. These results suggest that Purkinje cell activity not only represents step phase within each cycle, but is also shaped by behavior across steps, facilitating control of movement under dynamic conditions. PMID:26291165

  3. Femtosecond laser fabricated microfluorescence-activated cell sorter for single cell recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragheri, F.; Paiè, P.; Nava, G.; Yang, T.; Minzioni, P.; Martinez Vazquez, R.; Bellini, N.; Ramponi, R.; Cristiani, I.; Osellame, R.

    2014-03-01

    Manipulation, sorting and recovering of specific live cells from samples containing less than a few thousand cells is becoming a major hurdle in rare cell exploration such as stem cell research or cell based diagnostics. Moreover the possibility of recovering single specific cells for culturing and further analysis would be of great impact in many biological fields ranging from regenerative medicine to cancer therapy. In recent years considerable effort has been devoted to the development of integrated and low-cost optofluidic devices able to handle single cells, which usually rely on microfluidic circuits that guarantee a controlled flow of the cells. Among the different microfabrication technologies, femtosecond laser micromachining (FLM) is ideally suited for this purpose as it provides the integration of both microfluidic and optical functions on the same glass chip leading to monolithic, robust and portable devices. Here a new optofluidic device is presented, which is capable of sorting and recovering of single cells, through optical forces, on the basis of their fluorescence and. Both fluorescence detection and single cell sorting functions are integrated in the microfluidic chip by FLM. The device, which is specifically designed to operate with a limited amount of cells but with a very high selectivity, is fabricated by a two-step process that includes femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching. The capability of the device to act as a micro fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been tested on polystyrene beads and on tumor cells and the results on the single live cell recovery are reported.

  4. Effect Of Simulated Microgravity On Activated T Cell Gene Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Maureen A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of T lymphocytes under the shear stress environment of clinorotation have demonstrated an inhibition of activation in response to TCR mediated signaling. These results mimic those observed during space flight. This work investigates the molecular signaling events of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation. Purified human T lymphocytes and the T cell clone Jurkat exhibit an uncoupling of signaling as mediated through the TCR. Activation of the transcription factor AP-1 is inhibited while activation of NFAT occurs. NFAT dephosphorylation and activation is dependent on sustained Ca(++) influx. Alternatively, AP-1, which consists of two transcription factors, jun and fos, is activated by PKC and Ras mediated pathways. TCR signaling is known to be dependent on cytoskeletal rearrangements, in particular, raft aggregation is critical. Raft aggregation, as mediated through GM, crosslinking, overcomes the inhibition of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation, indicating that the block is occurring upstream of raft aggregation. Clinorotation is shown to have an effect similar to a weak TCR signal.

  5. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  6. Stochasticity and spatial heterogeneity in T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, Nigel J; van der Merwe, P Anton

    2007-04-01

    Stochastic and spatial aspects are becoming increasingly recognized as an important factor in T-cell activation. Activation occurs in an intrinsically noisy environment, requiring only a handful of agonist peptide-major histocompatibility complex molecules, thus making consideration of signal to noise of prime importance in understanding sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, it is widely established that surface-bound ligands are more effective at activation than soluble forms, while surface patternation has highlighted the role of spatial relocation in activation. Here we consider the results of a number of models of T-cell activation, from a realistic model of kinetic segregation-induced T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering through to simple queuing theory models. These studies highlight the constraints on cell activation by a surface receptor that recruits kinases. Our analysis shows that TCR triggering based on trapping of bound TCRs in regions of close proximity that exclude large ectodomain-containing molecules, such as the phosphatases CD45 and CD148, can effectively reproduce known signaling characteristics and is a viable 'signal transduction' mechanism distinct from oligomerization and conformation-based mechanisms. A queuing theory analysis shows the interrelation between sensitivity and specificity, emphasizing that these are properties of individual cell functions and need not be, nor are likely to be, uniform across different functions. In fact, threshold-based mechanisms of detection are shown to be poor at ligand discrimination because, although they can be highly specific, that specificity is limited to a small range of peptide densities. Time integration mechanisms however are able to control noise effectively, while kinetic proofreading mechanisms endow them with good specificity properties. Thus, threshold mechanisms are likely to be important for rapidly detecting minimal signaling requirements, thus achieving efficient scanning of antigen

  7. Immune activation by combination human lymphokine-activated killer and dendritic cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    West, E J; Scott, K J; Jennings, V A; Melcher, A A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Optimal cellular immunotherapy for cancer should ideally harness both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. Lymphokine-activated killer cells (LAKs) can trigger early innate killing of tumour targets, whereas long-term adaptive-specific tumour control requires priming of CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) following acquisition of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). As DCs stimulate both innate and adaptive effectors, combination cell therapy using LAKs and DCs has the potential to maximise anti-tumour immune priming. Methods: Reciprocal activation between human clinical grade LAKs and DCs on co-culture, and its immune consequences, was monitored by cell phenotype, cytokine release and priming of both innate and adaptive cytotoxicity against melanoma targets. Results: Co-culture of DCs and LAKs led to phenotypic activation of natural killer (NK) cells within the LAK population, which was associated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines and enhanced innate cytotoxicity against tumour cell targets. The LAKs reciprocally matured DCs, and the combination of LAKs and DCs, on addition of melanoma cells, supported priming of specific anti-tumour CTLs better than DCs alone. Conclusion: Clinical-grade LAKs/DCs represents a practical, effective combination cell immunotherapy for stimulation of both innate and adaptive anti-tumour immunity in cancer patients. PMID:21847125

  8. Endothelial juxtaposition of distinct adult stem cells activates angiogenesis signaling molecules in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Elham; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Siavashi, Vahid; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis needs a comprehensive understanding of endothelial cell (EC) function and biological factors and cells that interplay with ECs. Stem cells are considered the key components of pro- and anti-angiogenic milieu in a wide variety of physiopathological states, and interactions of EC-stem cells have been the subject of controversy in recent years. In this study, the potential effects of three tissue-specific adult stem cells, namely rat marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs) and rat muscle-derived satellite cells (rSCs), on the endothelial activation of key angiogenic signaling molecules, including VEGF, Ang-2, VEGFR-2, Tie-2, and Tie2-pho, were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMECs) were cocultured with the stem cells or incubated with the stem cell-derived conditioned media on Matrigel. Following HUVEC-stem cell coculture, CD31-positive ECs were flow sorted and subjected to western blotting to analyze potential changes in the expression of the pro-angiogenic signaling molecules. Elongation and co-alignment of the stem cells were seen along the EC tubes in the EC-stem cell cocultures on Matrigel, with cell-to-cell dye communication in the EC-rBMSC cocultures. Moreover, rBMSCs and rADSCs significantly improved endothelial tubulogenesis in both juxtacrine and paracrine manners. These two latter stem cells dynamically up-regulated VEGF, Ang-2, VREGR-2, and Tie-2 but down-regulated Tie2-pho and the Tie2-pho/Tie-2 ratio in HUVECs. Induction of pro-angiogenic signaling in ECs by marrow- and adipose-derived MSCs further indicates the significance of stem cell milieu in angiogenesis dynamics. PMID:26068799

  9. Schistosoma mansoni larvicidal activity of murine bronchoalveolar lavage cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, F A; White-Ziegler, C A; Ball, J E; Niemann, G M

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated the ability of cells obtained from both normal and immune mice by bronchoalveolar lavage (BACs) to kill Schistosoma mansoni larvae in vitro. In cultures with mechanically derived schistosomules, high levels of larvicidal activity were displayed by BACs from both normal and irradiated cercaria-immunized C57BL/6 mice. Based on effector-to-target-cell ratios, BAC-mediated killing was two- to threefold more efficient than killing mediated by macrophage-rich cell populations obtained from the peritoneal cavity. BACs from normal A/J mice were essentially as larvicidal as normal C57BL/6 cells. However, BACs from a strain of mouse (P/J) with a known macrophage defect possessed negligible larvicidal activity. Macrophages made up 85 to 95% of BACs from all three strains tested. In contrast to cells of the IC-21 macrophage cell line, B6 BACs did not show enhanced killing activity when preincubated with lymphokine-containing supernatants. Lung schistosomules harvested 10 days after cercarial penetration were refractory to BAC-mediated killing. PMID:2254018

  10. Schistosoma mansoni larvicidal activity of murine bronchoalveolar lavage cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, F A; White-Ziegler, C A; Ball, J E; Niemann, G M

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the ability of cells obtained from both normal and immune mice by bronchoalveolar lavage (BACs) to kill Schistosoma mansoni larvae in vitro. In cultures with mechanically derived schistosomules, high levels of larvicidal activity were displayed by BACs from both normal and irradiated cercaria-immunized C57BL/6 mice. Based on effector-to-target-cell ratios, BAC-mediated killing was two- to threefold more efficient than killing mediated by macrophage-rich cell populations obtained from the peritoneal cavity. BACs from normal A/J mice were essentially as larvicidal as normal C57BL/6 cells. However, BACs from a strain of mouse (P/J) with a known macrophage defect possessed negligible larvicidal activity. Macrophages made up 85 to 95% of BACs from all three strains tested. In contrast to cells of the IC-21 macrophage cell line, B6 BACs did not show enhanced killing activity when preincubated with lymphokine-containing supernatants. Lung schistosomules harvested 10 days after cercarial penetration were refractory to BAC-mediated killing. PMID:2254018

  11. Biphasic activity of chloroquine in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Deokbae; Lee, Youngki

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic degradation process that is involved in tumor development and normal development. Autophagy is induced in cancer cells in response to chemotherapeutic agents, and inhibition of autophagy results in enhanced cancer cell death or survival. Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial devrepug, is a lysosomotropic agent and is currently used as a potential anticancer agent as well as an autophagy inhibitor. Here, we evaluate the characteristics of these dual activities of CQ using human colorectal cancer cell line HCT15. The results show that CQ inhibited cell viability in dose-and time-dependent manner in the range between 20 to 80 uM, while CQ did not show any antiproliferative activity at 5 and 10 uM. Cotreatment of CQ with antitumor agent NVP-BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR, rescued the cell viability at low concentrations meaning that CQ acted as an autophagy inhibitor, but CQ induced the lethal effect at high concentrations. Acridine orange staining revealed that CQ at high doses induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). High doses of CQ produced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cotreatment of antioxidants, such as NAC and trolox, with high doses of CQ rescued the cell viability. These results suggest that CQ may exert its dual activities, as autophagy inhibitor or LMP inducer, in concentration-dependent manner. PMID:25949192

  12. Directed Ig class switch recombination in activated murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, E; Krawinkel, U; Radbruch, A

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination occurs at frequencies of up to 10%/cell/generation in activated murine B-lymphocytes. We analysed cH gene rearrangements and switch recombinations from active and inactive IgH loci of B-cells activated in various ways and immortalized by cell fusion. Although about half of the IgM+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes, the deletion of c mu is a rare event. Half of the IgG3+ and IgG1+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes on the inactive IgH locus and the other half of the IgG+ cells have deleted c mu from both IgH loci by switch recombination. This recombination is directed to the same switch regions on both IgH loci in 60-80% of all cases. Interleukin 4 may play a critical role in programming murine B-lymphocytes for specific switch recombination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3038529

  13. Antihelminthic niclosamide modulates dendritic cells activation and function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Shan; Li, Yi-Rong; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chen, Ying-Che; Chu, Chiang-Liang; Pan, I-Hong; Wu, Yu-Shan; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) link the sensing of the environment by the innate immune system to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. Accordingly, DCs are considered to be a major target in the development of immunomodulating compounds. In this study, the effect of niclosamide, a Food and Drug Administration-approved antihelminthic drug, on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine bone marrow-derived DCs was examined. Our experimental results show that niclosamide reduced the pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression of LPS-activated DCs. In addition, niclosamide also affected the expression of MHC and costimulatory molecules and influenced the ability of the cells to take up antigens. Therefore, in mixed cell cultures composed of syngeneic OVA-specific T cells and DCs, niclosamide-treated DCs showed a decreased ability to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Furthermore, intravenous injection of niclosamide also attenuated contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice during sensitization with 2,4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene. Blocking the LPS-induced activation of MAPK-ERK, JNK and NF-κB may contribute to the inhibitory effect of niclosamide on DC activation. Collectively, our findings suggest that niclosamide can manipulate the function of DCs. These results provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of niclosamide and suggest that it may be useful for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders or DC-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:24561310

  14. Cathepsin B Activity Initiates Apoptosis via Digestive Protease Activation in Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Experimental Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sendler, Matthias; Maertin, Sandrina; John, Daniel; Persike, Maria; Weiss, F Ulrich; Krüger, Burkhard; Wartmann, Thomas; Wagh, Preshit; Halangk, Walter; Schaschke, Norbert; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatitis is associated with premature activation of digestive proteases in the pancreas. The lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin B (CTSB) is a known activator of trypsinogen, and its deletion reduces disease severity in experimental pancreatitis. Here we studied the activation mechanism and subcellular compartment in which CTSB regulates protease activation and cellular injury. Cholecystokinin (CCK) increased the activity of CTSB, cathepsin L, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and caspase 3 in vivo and in vitro and induced redistribution of CTSB to a secretory vesicle-enriched fraction. Neither CTSB protein nor activity redistributed to the cytosol, where the CTSB inhibitors cystatin-B/C were abundantly present. Deletion of CTSB reduced and deletion of cathepsin L increased intracellular trypsin activation. CTSB deletion also abolished CCK-induced caspase 3 activation, apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein degradation, but these depended on trypsinogen activation via CTSB. Raising the vesicular pH, but not trypsin inhibition, reduced CTSB activity. Trypsin inhibition did not affect apoptosis in hepatocytes. Deletion of CTSB affected apoptotic but not necrotic acinar cell death. In summary, CTSB in pancreatitis undergoes activation in a secretory, vesicular, and acidic compartment where it activates trypsinogen. Its deletion or inhibition regulates acinar cell apoptosis but not necrosis in two models of pancreatitis. Caspase 3-mediated apoptosis depends on intravesicular trypsinogen activation induced by CTSB, not CTSB activity directly, and this mechanism is pancreas-specific. PMID:27226576

  15. Activation of cells using femtosecond laser beam (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Study of communication in cellular systems requires precise activation of targeted cell(s) in the network. In contrast to chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical stimulation, optical stimulation is non-invasive and is better suited for stimulation of targeted cells. As compared to visible lasers, the near infrared (NIR) microsecond/nanosecond pulsed laser beams are being used as preferred stimulation tool as they provide higher penetration depth in tissues. Femotosecond (FS) laser beams in NIR are also being used for direct and indirect (i.e. via two-photon optogenetics) stimulation of cells. Here, we present a comparative evaluation of efficacy of NIR FS laser beam for direct (no optogenetic sensitization) and 2ph optogenetic stimulation of cells. Further, for the first time, we demonstrate the use of blue (~450 nm, obtained by second harmonic generation) FS laser beam for stimulation of cells with and without Channelrhodopisn-2 (ChR2) expression. Comparative analysis of photocurrent generated by blue FS laser beam and continuous wave blue light for optogenetics stimulation of ChR2 transfected HEK cells will be presented. The use of ultrafast laser micro-beam for focal, non-contact, and repeated stimulation of single cells in a cellular circuitry allowed us to study the communication between different cell types.

  16. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  17. ASBESTOS-INDUCED ACTIVATION OF CELL SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using respiratory epithelial cells transfected with either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase, the authors tested the hypothesis that the activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signal pathway after asbestos exposure involves an oxidative stress. Western blot...

  18. Benfotiamine upregulates antioxidative system in activated BV-2 microglia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Stevanovic, Ivana; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic microglial activation and resulting sustained neuroinflammatory reaction are generally associated with neurodegeneration. Activated microglia acquires proinflammatory cellular profile that generates oxidative burst. Their persistent activation exacerbates inflammation, which damages healthy neurons via cytotoxic mediators, such as superoxide radical anion and nitric oxide. In our recent study, we have shown that benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate) possesses anti-inflammatory effects. Here, the effects of benfotiamine on the pro-oxidative component of activity of LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells were investigated. The activation of microglia was accompanied by upregulation of intracellular antioxidative defense, which was further promoted in the presence of benfotiamine. Namely, activated microglia exposed to non-cytotoxic doses of benfotiamine showed increased levels and activities of hydrogen peroxide- and superoxide-removing enzymes—catalase and glutathione system, and superoxide dismutase. In addition, benfotiamine showed the capacity to directly scavenge superoxide radical anion. As a consequence, benfotiamine suppressed the activation of microglia and provoked a decrease in NO and ·O−2 production and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, benfotiamine might silence pro-oxidative activity of microglia to alleviate/prevent oxidative damage of neighboring CNS cells. PMID:26388737

  19. Sphingosine Kinase Activity Is Not Required for Tumor Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew L.; Carlson, Timothy; Coxon, Angela; Fajardo, Flordeliza; Frank, Brendon; Gustin, Darin; Kamb, Alexander; Kassner, Paul D.; Li, Shyun; Li, Yihong; Morgenstern, Kurt; Plant, Matthew; Quon, Kim; Ruefli-Brasse, Astrid; Schmidt, Joanna; Swearingen, Elissa; Walker, Nigel; Wang, Zhulun; Watson, J. E. Vivienne; Wickramasinghe, Dineli; Wong, Mariwil; Xu, Guifen; Wesche, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine kinases (SPHKs) are enzymes that phosphorylate the lipid sphingosine, leading to the formation of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). In addition to the well established role of extracellular S1P as a mitogen and potent chemoattractant, SPHK activity has been postulated to be an important intracellular regulator of apoptosis. According to the proposed rheostat theory, SPHK activity shifts the intracellular balance from the pro-apoptotic sphingolipids ceramide and sphingosine to the mitogenic S1P, thereby determining the susceptibility of a cell to apoptotic stress. Despite numerous publications with supporting evidence, a clear experimental confirmation of the impact of this mechanism on tumor cell viability in vitro and in vivo has been hampered by the lack of suitable tool reagents. Utilizing a structure based design approach, we developed potent and specific SPHK1/2 inhibitors. These compounds completely inhibited intracellular S1P production in human cells and attenuated vascular permeability in mice, but did not lead to reduced tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo. In addition, siRNA experiments targeting either SPHK1 or SPHK2 in a large panel of cell lines failed to demonstrate any statistically significant effects on cell viability. These results show that the SPHK rheostat does not play a major role in tumor cell viability, and that SPHKs might not be attractive targets for pharmacological intervention in the area of oncology. PMID:23861887

  20. Functional Anatomy of T Cell Activation and Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fooksman, David R.; Vardhana, Santosh; Vasiliver-Shamis, Gaia; Liese, Jan; Blair, David; Waite, Janelle; Sacristán, Catarina; Victora, Gabriel; Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Dustin, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    T cell activation and function require a structured engagement of antigen-presenting cells. These cell contacts are characterized by two distinct dynamics in vivo: transient contacts resulting from promigratory junctions called immunological kinapses or prolonged contacts from stable junctions called immunological synapses. Kinapses operate in the steady state to allow referencing to self-peptide-MHC (pMHC) and searching for pathogen-derived pMHC. Synapses are induced by T cell receptor (TCR) interactions with agonist pMHC under specific conditions and correlate with robust immune responses that generate effector and memory T cells. High-resolution imaging has revealed that the synapse is highly coordinated, integrating cell adhesion, TCR recognition of pMHC complexes, and an array of activating and inhibitory ligands to promote or prevent T cell signaling. In this review, we examine the molecular components, geometry, and timing underlying kinapses and synapses. We integrate recent molecular and physiological data to provide a synthesis and suggest ways forward. PMID:19968559

  1. Long noncoding RNAs in B-cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Brazão, Tiago F.; Johnson, Jethro S.; Müller, Jennifer; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important regulators of cell differentiation and development, but little is known about their roles in B lymphocytes. Using RNA-seq and de novo transcript assembly, we identified 4516 lncRNAs expressed in 11 stages of B-cell development and activation. Most of these lncRNAs have not been previously detected, even in the closely related T-cell lineage. Comparison with lncRNAs previously described in human B cells identified 185 mouse lncRNAs that have human orthologs. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we classified 20% of the lncRNAs as either enhancer-associated (eRNA) or promoter-associated RNAs. We identified 126 eRNAs whose expression closely correlated with the nearest coding gene, thereby indicating the likely location of numerous enhancers active in the B-cell lineage. Furthermore, using this catalog of newly discovered lncRNAs, we show that PAX5, a transcription factor required to specify the B-cell lineage, bound to and regulated the expression of 109 lncRNAs in pro-B and mature B cells and 184 lncRNAs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27381906

  2. Many ways to die: passive and active cell death styles.

    PubMed

    Fietta, Pieranna

    2006-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, cells may undergo passive, pathological death in response to various environmental injuries, or actively decide to self-destroy in order to ensure proper physiological morphogenesis, preserve tissue homeostasis and eliminate abnormal cells. While the passive cell demise occurs in an accidental, violent and chaotic way, corresponding to "necrosis", the active auto-elimination, defined "programmed cell death" (PCD), is executed in planned modalities. Different PCD pathways have been described, such as apoptosis, autophagic death, para-apoptosis and programmed necrosis. However, death patterns may overlap or integrate, providing a variety of cellular responses to various circumstances or stimuli. The consequences for the whole organism of necrosis and PCD are quite different. In the case of classical necrosis, cytosolic constituents chaotically spill into extracellular space through damaged plasma membrane and provoke an inflammatory response, while in most PCDs the cellular components are safely isolated by membranes, and then consumed by adjacent parenchymal cells and/or resident phagocytes without inflammation. Thus, whereas the necrotic cell removal induces and amplifies pathological processes, the elimination of PCD debris may remain virtually unnoticed by the body. Otherwise, alterations of PCD controls may be involved in human diseases, such as developmental abnormalities, or neurodegenerative, autoimmune and neoplastic affections, whose treatment implies the complete understanding of cell suicide processes. In this review, the cellular death patterns are focused and their significance discussed. PMID:16791791

  3. Long noncoding RNAs in B-cell development and activation.

    PubMed

    Brazão, Tiago F; Johnson, Jethro S; Müller, Jennifer; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2016-08-18

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important regulators of cell differentiation and development, but little is known about their roles in B lymphocytes. Using RNA-seq and de novo transcript assembly, we identified 4516 lncRNAs expressed in 11 stages of B-cell development and activation. Most of these lncRNAs have not been previously detected, even in the closely related T-cell lineage. Comparison with lncRNAs previously described in human B cells identified 185 mouse lncRNAs that have human orthologs. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we classified 20% of the lncRNAs as either enhancer-associated (eRNA) or promoter-associated RNAs. We identified 126 eRNAs whose expression closely correlated with the nearest coding gene, thereby indicating the likely location of numerous enhancers active in the B-cell lineage. Furthermore, using this catalog of newly discovered lncRNAs, we show that PAX5, a transcription factor required to specify the B-cell lineage, bound to and regulated the expression of 109 lncRNAs in pro-B and mature B cells and 184 lncRNAs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27381906

  4. Novel yeast cell dehydrogenase activity assay in situ.

    PubMed

    Berłowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Klimek, Leszek; Orzeszyna, Bartosz; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a suitable method of succinate dehydrogenase activity assay in situ for different industrial yeast strains. For this purpose different compounds: EDTA, Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, digitonin, nystatin and beta-mercaptoethanol were used. The permeabilization process was controlled microscopically by primuline staining. Enzyme assay was conducted in whole yeast cells with Na-succinate as substrate, phenazine methosulfate (PMS) as electron carrier and in the presence one of two different tetrazolium salts: tetrazolium blue chloride (BT) or cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) reduced during the assay. In comparabile studies of yeast vitality the amount of intracellular ATP was determined according to luciferin/luciferase method. During the succinate dehydrogenase assay in intact yeast cells without permeabilization, BT formazans were partially visualized in the cells, but CTC formazans appeared to be totally extracellular or associated with the plasma membrane. Under these conditions there was no linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell density. From all chemical compounds tested, only digitonin was effective in membrane permeabilization without negative influence on cell morphology. Furthermore, with digitonin-treated cells a linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell number was noticed. Significant decreasing of succinate dehydrogenase activity and ATP content were observed during aging of the tested yeast strains. PMID:17419290

  5. Islet cell thymidine kinase activity as indicator of islet cell proliferation in rat pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Swenne, I. )

    1990-01-01

    The activity of thymidine kinase in homogenates of isolated rat islets of Langerhans was measured and correlated with the DNA replicatory activity of the islet cells. Adult and fetal rat islets were cultured in medium with 2.7 or 16.7 mM glucose or 16.7 mM glucose and 1 microgram/ml human growth hormone. In both types of islets, 16.7 mM glucose doubled (3H)thymidine incorporation compared with 2.7 mM glucose, and the addition of growth hormone caused a further increase in DNA replication. TK activity in the islets showed similar changes in response to glucose and growth hormone. The correlation between (3H)thymidine incorporation and TK activity was thus highly significant. Cell-cycle analysis of cultured fetal rat islets showed that TK activity was preferentially expressed during the S phase of the cell cycle. TK activity of freshly isolated islets declined with the age of the animal. In pancreatic sections, the islet cell autoradiographic labeling index after (3H)thymidine administration in vivo likewise declined with age and was correlated with the TK activity in freshly isolated islets. It is suggested that measurements of islet TK activity can be used as index of islet cell proliferation; this method has the distinct advantage of avoiding the cumbersome procedure of preparing and scoring autoradiograms.

  6. Single-cell transcriptome analyses reveal signals to activate dormant neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuping; Coskun, Volkan; Liang, Aibing; Yu, Juehua; Cheng, Liming; Ge, Weihong; Shi, Zhanping; Zhang, Kunshan; Li, Chun; Cui, Yaru; Lin, Haijun; Luo, Dandan; Wang, Junbang; Lin, Connie; Dai, Zachary; Zhu, Hongwen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hailiang; deVellis, Jean; Horvath, Steve; Sun, Yi Eve; Li, Siguang

    2015-05-21

    The scarcity of tissue-specific stem cells and the complexity of their surrounding environment have made molecular characterization of these cells particularly challenging. Through single-cell transcriptome and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA), we uncovered molecular properties of CD133(+)/GFAP(-) ependymal (E) cells in the adult mouse forebrain neurogenic zone. Surprisingly, prominent hub genes of the gene network unique to ependymal CD133(+)/GFAP(-) quiescent cells were enriched for immune-responsive genes, as well as genes encoding receptors for angiogenic factors. Administration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) activated CD133(+) ependymal neural stem cells (NSCs), lining not only the lateral but also the fourth ventricles and, together with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), elicited subsequent neural lineage differentiation and migration. This study revealed the existence of dormant ependymal NSCs throughout the ventricular surface of the CNS, as well as signals abundant after injury for their activation. PMID:26000486

  7. Berberine-induced anticancer activities in FaDu head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yo-Seob; Yim, Min-Ji; Kim, Bok-Hee; Kang, Kyung-Rok; Lee, Sook-Young; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Su-Gwan; Yu, Sang-Joun; Lee, Gyeong-Je; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated berberine‑induced apoptosis and the signaling pathways underlying its activity in FaDu head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells. Berberine did not affect the viability of primary human normal oral keratinocytes. In contrast, the cytotoxicity of berberine was significantly increased in FaDu cells stimulated with berberine for 24 h. Furthermore, berberine increased nuclear condensation and apoptosis rates in FaDu cells than those in untreated control cells. Berberine also induced the upregulation of apoptotic ligands, such as FasL and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, and triggered the activation of caspase-8, -7 and -3, and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, characteristic of death receptor-dependent extrinsic apoptosis. Moreover, berberine activated the mitochondria‑dependent apoptotic signaling pathway by upregulating pro-apoptotic factors, such as Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, and the active form of caspase-9, and downregulating anti-apoptotic factors, such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. In addition, berberine increased the expression of the tumor suppressor p53 in FaDu cells. The pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk suppressed the activation of caspase-3 and prevented cytotoxicity in FaDu cells treated with berberine. Interestingly, berberine suppressed cell migration through downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Moreover, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and p38, components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway that are associated with the expression of MMP and VEGF, was suppressed in FaDu cells treated with berberine for 24 h. Therefore, these data suggested that berberine exerted anticancer effects in FaDu cells through induction of apoptosis and suppression of migration. Berberine may have potential applications as a chemotherapeutic agent for the management of head and neck squamous carcinoma. PMID:26503508

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells inhibit complement activation by secreting factor H.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhidan; Li, Qing; Bu, Hong; Lin, Feng

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent and broad immunosuppressive capabilities, and have shown promise in clinical trials treating many inflammatory diseases. Previous studies have found that MSCs inhibit dendritic cell, T-cell, and B-cell activities in the adaptive immunity; however, whether MSCs inhibit complement in the innate immunity, and if so, by which mechanism, have not been established. In this report, we found that MSCs constitutively secrete factor H, which potently inhibits complement activation. Depletion of factor H in the MSC-conditioned serum-free media abolishes their complement inhibitory activities. In addition, production of factor H by MSCs is augmented by inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in dose- and time-dependent manners, while IL-6 does not have a significant effect. Furthermore, the factor H production from MSCs is significantly suppressed by the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis inhibitor indomethacin and the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitor 1-methyl-d-tryptophan (1-MT), both of which inhibitors are known to efficiently dampen MSCs immunosuppressive activity. These results indicate that MSCs inhibit complement activation by producing factor H, which could be another mechanism underlying MSCs broad immunosuppressive capabilities. PMID:20163251

  9. Tomato waste: Carotenoids content, antioxidant and cell growth activities.

    PubMed

    Stajčić, Sladjana; Ćetković, Gordana; Čanadanović-Brunet, Jasna; Djilas, Sonja; Mandić, Anamarija; Četojević-Simin, Dragana

    2015-04-01

    The carotenoid content, antioxidant and cell growth activities of tomato waste extracts, obtained from five different tomato genotypes, was investigated. High performance liquid chromatography was used to identify and quantify the main carotenoids present in tomato waste extracts. The antioxidant activity of tomato waste extracts was tested using spectrophotometric methods, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity and reducing power assay. The highest DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.057 mg/ml) was obtained for Bačka extract. The Knjaz extract showed the best reducing power (IC50 = 2.12 mg/ml). Cell growth effects were determined in HeLa, MCF7 and MRC-5 cell lines by sulforhodamine B test. Anti-proliferative effects were observed in all cell lines at higher concentrations (⩾ 0.125 mg/ml). The carotenoid contents exhibited a strong correlation with antioxidant and anti-proliferation activity. The results obtained indicated that tomato waste should be regarded as potential nutraceutic resource and may be used as a functional food ingredient. PMID:25442547

  10. Master switches of T-cell activation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Beier, K C; Kallinich, T; Hamelmann, E

    2007-04-01

    T-cells play a central role in allergic airway diseases such as bronchial asthma. The imbalance between allergen-specific pro-inflammatory and pro-allergic T-cell responses on one hand and regulatory or suppressive T-cell responses on the other may best explain the development of unwanted immune responses against environmental allergens, which lead to immunoglobulin E production and airway inflammation. A key role in the fine tuning of any T-cell response is provided by the engagement of so-called co-stimulatory molecules that are required for the full activation of T-cells and the recognition of antigens via the antigen-specific T-cell receptor. Many of these co-stimulatory molecules have been identified only recently, leading to a fundamental change in the overall understanding of T-cell regulation. Due to their pivotal impact on T-cell differentiation and control, co-stimulatory molecules are promising targets for therapeutic intervention in T-cell-regulated or -mediated immune disorders, including allergic diseases and asthma. In the present article, an attempt is made to summarise the current knowledge on the basic concept of co-stimulation, the presently known co-stimulatory molecules and their various functions on T-cell activation or suppression. The mini-series will be completed by two more articles describing the recent experimental studies and preliminary clinical findings regarding the role of co-stimulatory molecules in allergic disorders and bronchial asthma, and a discussion regarding the feasibility of co-stimulatory molecules as potential targets for the treatment of allergic airway disease. Although it is too early for any clinical implication or utilisation at this moment, the authors are convinced that a better understanding of co-stimulation in the context of allergic asthma will finally provide novel and promising approaches for treatment and prevention. PMID:17400879

  11. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Activation and Subsequent Th1 Cell Polarization by Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Tae; Na, Hyeongjin; Ryu, Heeju; Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play an essential role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing cellular stress including pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns and by shaping the types of antigen-specific T cell immunity. Although lidocaine is widely used in clinical settings that trigger cellular stress, it remains unclear whether such treatment impacts the activation of innate immune cells and subsequent differentiation of T cells. Here we showed that lidocaine inhibited the production of IL-6, TNFα and IL-12 from dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor ligands including lipopolysaccharide, poly(I:C) and R837 in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the differentiation of Th1 cells was significantly suppressed by the addition of lidocaine while the same treatment had little effect on the differentiation of Th17, Th2 and regulatory T cells in vitro. Moreover, lidocaine suppressed the ovalbumin-specific Th1 cell responses in vivo induced by the adoptive transfer of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. These results demonstrate that lidocaine inhibits the activation of dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor signals and subsequently suppresses the differentiation of Th1 cell responses. PMID:26445366

  12. PARP activation promotes nuclear AID accumulation in lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Katrin; Schmidt, Angelika; Davari, Kathrin; Müller, Peter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hemmerich, Peter; Pfeil, Ines; Jungnickel, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin diversification in germinal center B cells by targeted introduction of DNA damage. As aberrant nuclear AID action contributes to the generation of B cell lymphoma, the protein's activity is tightly regulated, e.g. by nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear degradation. In the present study, we asked whether DNA damage may affect regulation of the AID protein. We show that exogenous DNA damage that mainly activates base excision repair leads to prevention of proteasomal degradation of AID and hence its nuclear accumulation. Inhibitor as well as knockout studies indicate that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by DNA damaging agents promotes both phenomena. These findings suggest that PARP inhibitors influence DNA damage dependent AID regulation, with interesting implications for the regulation of AID function and chemotherapy of lymphoma. PMID:26921193

  13. Effects of physical activity on endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs)

    PubMed Central

    De Biase, Chiara; De Rosa, Roberta; Luciano, Rossella; De Luca, Stefania; Capuano, Ernesto; Trimarco, Bruno; Galasso, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity has a therapeutic role in cardiovascular disease (CVD), through its beneficial effects on endothelial function and cardiovascular system. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are bone marrow (BM) derived cells that represent a novel therapeutic target in CVD patients, because of their ability to home to sites of ischemic injury and repair the damaged vessels. Several studies show that physical activity results in a significant increase in circulating EPCs, and, in particular, there are some evidence of the beneficial exercise-induced effects on EPCs activity in CVD settings, including coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), and peripheral artery disease (PAD). The aim of this paper is to review the current evidence about the beneficial effects of physical exercise on endothelial function and EPCs levels and activity in both healthy subjects and patients with CVD. PMID:24550833

  14. Human Dendritic Cells Activated by TSLP and CD40L Induce Proallergic Cytotoxic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gilliet, Michel; Soumelis, Vassili; Watanabe, Norihiko; Hanabuchi, Shino; Antonenko, Svetlana; de Waal-Malefyt, Rene; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2003-01-01

    Human thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a novel epithelial cell–derived cytokine, which induces dendritic cell (DC)-mediated CD4+ T cell responses with a proallergic phenotype. Although the participation of CD8+ T cells in allergic inflammation is well documented, their functional properties as well as the pathways leading to their generation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that TSLP-activated CD11c+ DCs potently activate and expand naive CD8+ T cells, and induce their differentiation into interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13–producing effectors exhibiting poor cytolytic activity. Additional CD40L triggering of TSLP-activated DCs induced CD8+ T cells with potent cytolytic activity, producing large amounts of interferon (IFN)-γ, while retaining their capacity to produce IL-5 and IL-13. These data further support the role of TSLP as initial trigger of allergic T cell responses and suggest that CD40L-expressing cells may act in combination with TSLP to amplify and sustain pro-allergic responses and cause tissue damage by promoting the generation of IFN-γ–producing cytotoxic effectors. PMID:12707303

  15. Characterization of a serine protease-mediated cell death program activated in human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, A.R.; Holohan, C.; Torriglia, A.; Lee, B.F.; Stenson-Cox, C. . E-mail: catherine.stenson@nuigalway.ie

    2006-01-01

    Tightly controlled proteolysis is a defining feature of apoptosis and caspases are critical in this regard. Significant roles for non-caspase proteases in cell death have been highlighted. Staurosporine causes a rapid induction of apoptosis in virtually all mammalian cell types. Numerous studies demonstrate that staurosporine can activate cell death under caspase-inhibiting circumstances. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteolytic mechanisms responsible for cell death under these conditions. To that end, we show that inhibitors of serine proteases can delay cell death in one such system. Furthermore, through profiling of proteolytic activation, we demonstrate, for the first time, that staurosporine activates a chymotrypsin-like serine protease-dependent cell death in HL-60 cells independently, but in parallel with the caspase controlled systems. Features of the serine protease-mediated system include cell shrinkage and apoptotic morphology, regulation of caspase-3, altered nuclear morphology, generation of an endonuclease and DNA degradation. We also demonstrate a staurosporine-induced activation of a putative 16 kDa chymotrypsin-like protein during apoptosis.

  16. Necroptosis of Dendritic Cells Promotes Activation of γδ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Collins, Cheryl C; Bashant, Kathleen; Erikson, Cuixia; Thwe, Phyu Myat; Fortner, Karen A; Wang, Hong; Morita, Craig T; Budd, Ralph C

    2016-01-01

    γδ T cells function at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity and have well-demonstrated roles in response to infection, autoimmunity and tumors. A common characteristic of these seemingly disparate conditions may be cellular stress or death. However, the conditions under which ligands for γδ T cells are induced or exposed remain largely undefined. We observed that induction of necroptosis of murine or human dendritic cells (DC) by inhibition of caspase activity paradoxically augments their ability to activate γδ T cells. Furthermore, upregulation of the stabilizer of caspase-8 activity, c-FLIP, by IL-4, not only greatly reduced the susceptibility of DC to necroptosis, but also considerably decreased their ability to activate γδ T cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that the induction of necroptosis in DC upregulates or exposes the expression of γδ T cell ligands, and they support the view that γδ T cells function in the immune surveillance of cell stress. PMID:27431410

  17. DOCK2 regulates cell proliferation through Rac and ERK activation in B cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Kimura, Taichi; Kato, Yasutaka; Tanino, Mishie; Nishio, Mitsufumi; Obara, Masato; Endo, Tomoyuki; Koike, Takao; Tanaka, Shinya

    2010-04-23

    DOCK2; a member of the CDM protein family, regulates cell motility and cytokine production through the activation of Rac in mammalian hematopoietic cells and plays a pivotal role in the modulation of the immune system. Here we demonstrated the alternative function of DOCK2 in hematopoietic tumor cells, especially in terms of its association with the tumor progression. Immunostaining for DOCK2 in 20 cases of human B cell lymphoma tissue specimens including diffuse large B cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma revealed the prominent expression of DOCK2 in all of the lymphoma cells. DOCK2-knockdown (KD) of the B cell lymphoma cell lines, Ramos and Raji, using the lentiviral shRNA system presented decreased cell proliferation compared to the control cells. Furthermore, the tumor formation of DOCK2-KD Ramos cell in nude mice was significantly abrogated. Western blotting analysis and pull-down assay using GST-PAK-RBD kimeric protein suggested the presence of DOCK2-Rac-ERK pathway regulating the cell proliferation of these lymphoma cells. This is the first report to clarify the prominent role of DOCK2 in hematopoietic malignancy.

  18. Ragweed subpollen particles of respirable size activate human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pazmandi, Kitti; Kumar, Brahma V; Szabo, Krisztina; Boldogh, Istvan; Szoor, Arpad; Vereb, Gyorgy; Veres, Agota; Lanyi, Arpad; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(P)H oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3(+) pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs) in the airways and SPPs' NAD(P)H oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins. PMID:23251688

  19. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported

  20. Ligand Mobility Modulates Immunological Synapse Formation and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Jung; Hsieh, Wan-Ting; Waldman, Abraham; Clarke, Fiona; Huseby, Eric S.; Burkhardt, Janis K.; Baumgart, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) engagement induces clustering and recruitment to the plasma membrane of many signaling molecules, including the protein tyrosine kinase zeta-chain associated protein of 70 kDa (ZAP70) and the adaptor SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP76). This molecular rearrangement results in formation of the immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic protein array that modulates T cell activation. The current study investigates the effects of apparent long-range ligand mobility on T cell signaling activity and IS formation. We formed stimulatory lipid bilayers on glass surfaces from binary lipid mixtures with varied composition, and characterized these surfaces with respect to diffusion coefficient and fluid connectivity. Stimulatory ligands coupled to these surfaces with similar density and orientation showed differences in their ability to activate T cells. On less mobile membranes, central supramolecular activation cluster (cSMAC) formation was delayed and the overall accumulation of CD3ζ at the IS was reduced. Analysis of signaling microcluster (MC) dynamics showed that ZAP70 MCs exhibited faster track velocity and longer trajectories as a function of increased ligand mobility, whereas movement of SLP76 MCs was relatively insensitive to this parameter. Actin retrograde flow was observed on all surfaces, but cell spreading and subsequent cytoskeletal contraction were more pronounced on mobile membranes. Finally, increased tyrosine phosphorylation and persistent elevation of intracellular Ca2+ were observed in cells stimulated on fluid membranes. These results point to ligand mobility as an important parameter in modulating T cell responses. PMID:22384241

  1. XIAP reverses various functional activities of FRNK in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Sunyoung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Chi, Sung-Gil; Park, Heonyong

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRNK domain is recruited into focal adhesion (FA), controlling endothelial cell adhesion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP binds the FRNK domain of FAK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP inhibits recruitment of FRNK into Fas and FRNK-promoted cell adhesion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP plays a key role in vascular functions of FRNK or FRNK domain-mediated vascular functions of FAK. -- Abstract: In endothelial cells, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, and shear-stimulated activation of MAPK. We recently found that FAK is recruited into focal adhesion (FA) sites through interactions with XIAP (X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) and activated by Src kinase in response to shear stress. In this study, we examined which domain(s) of FAK is(are) important for various vascular functions such as FA recruiting, XIAP-binding and shear stress-stimulated ERK activation. Through a series of experiments, we determined that the FRNK domain is recruited into FA sites and promotes endothelial cell adhesion. Interestingly, XIAP knockdown was shown to reduce FA recruitment of FRNK and the cell adhesive effect of FRNK. In addition, we found that XIAP interacts with FRNK, suggesting cross-talk between XIAP and FRNK. We also demonstrated that FRNK inhibits endothelial cell migration and shear-stimulated ERK activation. These inhibitory effects of FRNK were reversed by XIAP knockdown. Taken together, we can conclude that XIAP plays a key role in vascular functions of FRNK or FRNK domain-mediated vascular functions of FAK.

  2. New thiazolidinediones affect endothelial cell activation and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Martina; Tripodi, Gustavo L; Ferrer, Renila; Boscá, Lisardo; Pitta, Marina G R; Pitta, Ivan R; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P

    2016-07-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists used in treating type 2 diabetes that may exhibit beneficial pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells. In this study, we characterized the effects of three new TZDs [GQ-32 (3-biphenyl-4-ylmethyl-5-(4-nitro-benzylidene)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione), GQ-169 (5-(4-chloro-benzylidene)-3-(2,6-dichloro-benzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione), and LYSO-7 (5-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-ylmethylene)-3-(4-chlorobenzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione)] on endothelial cells. The effects of the new TZDs were evaluated on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell migration, tube formation and the gene expression of adhesion molecules and angiogenic mediators in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). PPARγ activation by new TZDs was addressed with a reporter gene assay. The three new TZDs activated PPARγ and suppressed the tumor necrosis factor α-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. GQ-169 and LYSO-7 also inhibited the glucose-induced ROS production. Although NO production assessed with 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein-FM probe indicated that all tested TZDs enhanced intracellular levels of NO, only LYSO-7 treatment significantly increased the release of NO from HUVEC measured by chemiluminescence analysis of culture media. Additionally, GQ-32 and GQ-169 induced endothelial cell migration and tube formation by the up-regulation of angiogenic molecules expression, such as vascular endothelial growth factor A and interleukin 8. GQ-169 also increased the mRNA levels of basic fibroblast growth factor, and GQ-32 enhanced transforming growth factor-β expression. Together, the results of this study reveal that these new TZDs act as partial agonists of PPARγ and modulate endothelial cell activation and endothelial dysfunction besides to stimulate migration and tube formation. PMID:27108791

  3. Intracellular localization of mevalonate-activating enzymes in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, L. J.; Shah, S. P. J.; Goodwin, T. W.

    1966-01-01

    Mevalonate-activating enzymes are shown to be present in the chloroplasts of French-bean leaves. The chloroplast membrane is impermeable to mevalonic acid. Mevalonate-activating enzymes also appear to be found outside the chloroplast. These results support the view that terpenoid biosynthesis in the plant cell is controlled by a combination of enzyme segregation and specific membrane permeability. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:5947149

  4. Aminobisphosphonates Synergize with Human Cytomegalovirus To Activate the Antiviral Activity of Vγ9Vδ2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Daguzan, Charline; Moulin, Morgane; Kulyk-Barbier, Hanna; Davrinche, Christian; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Champagne, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are activated through their TCR by neighboring cells producing phosphoantigens. Zoledronate (ZOL) treatment induces intracellular accumulation of the phosphoantigens isopentenyl pyrophosphate and ApppI. Few attempts have been made to use immunomanipulation of Vγ9Vδ2 lymphocytes in chronic viral infections. Although Vγ9Vδ2 T cells seem to ignore human CMV (HCMV)-infected cells, we examined whether they can sense HCMV when a TCR stimulus is provided with ZOL. Fibroblasts treated with ZOL activate Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to produce IFN-γ but not TNF. Following the same treatment, HCMV-infected fibroblasts stimulate TNF secretion and an increased production of IFN-γ, indicating that Vγ9Vδ2 cells can sense HCMV infection. Increased lymphokine production was observed with most clinical isolates and laboratory HCMV strains, HCMV-permissive astrocytoma, or dendritic cells, as well as "naive" and activated Vγ9Vδ2 cells. Quantification of intracellular isopentenyl pyrophosphate/ApppI following ZOL treatment showed that HCMV infection boosts their accumulation. This was explained by an increased capture of ZOL and by upregulation of HMG-CoA synthase and reductase transcription. Using an experimental setting where infected fibroblasts were cocultured with γδ cells in submicromolar concentrations of ZOL, we show that Vγ9Vδ2 cells suppressed substantially the release of infectious particles while preserving uninfected cells. Vγ9Vδ2 cytotoxicity was decreased by HCMV infection of targets whereas anti-IFN-γ and anti-TNF Abs significantly blocked the antiviral effect. Our experiments indicate that cytokines produced by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells have an antiviral potential in HCMV infection. This should lead to in vivo studies to explore the possible antiviral effect of immunostimulation with ZOL in this context. PMID:26819204

  5. Oxytocin-Stimulated NFAT Transcriptional Activation in Human Myometrial Cells

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Craig A.; López Bernal, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) is a peptide hormone that binds the OXT receptor on myometrial cells, initiating an intracellular signaling cascade, resulting in accumulation of intracellular calcium and smooth muscle contraction. In other systems, an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ stimulates nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), which is transcriptionally active in arterial and ileal smooth muscle. Here we have investigated the role of NFAT in the mechanism of action of OXT. Human myometrial cells expressed all five NFAT isoforms (NFATC1–C4 and -5). Myometrial cells were transduced with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a NFATC1-EFP reporter, and a semi-automated imaging system was used to monitor effects of OXT on reporter localization in live cells. OXT induced a concentration-dependent nuclear translocation of NFATC1-EFP in a reversible manner, which was inhibited by OXT antagonists and calcineurin inhibitors. Pulsatile stimulation with OXT caused intermittent, pulse-frequency-dependent, nuclear translocation of NFATC1-EFP, which was more efficient than sustained stimulation. OXT induced nuclear translocation of endogenous NFAT that was transcriptionally active, because OXT stimulated activity of a NFAT-response element-luciferase reporter and induced calcineurin-NFAT dependent expression of RGS2, RCAN1, and PTGS2 (COX2) mRNA. Furthermore, OXT-dependent transcription was dependent on protein neosynthesis; cycloheximide abolished RGS2 transcription but augmented RCAN1 and COX2 transcriptional readouts. This study identifies a novel signaling mechanism within the myometrium, whereby calcineurin-NFAT signaling mediates OXT-induced transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we show NFATC1-EFP is responsive to pulses of OXT, a mechanism by which myometrial cells could decode OXT pulse frequency. PMID:22902539

  6. Flt3 permits survival during infection by rendering dendritic cells competent to activate NK cells.

    PubMed

    Eidenschenk, Céline; Crozat, Karine; Krebs, Philippe; Arens, Ramon; Popkin, Daniel; Arnold, Carrie N; Blasius, Amanda L; Benedict, Chris A; Moresco, Eva Marie Y; Xia, Yu; Beutler, Bruce

    2010-05-25

    A previously unappreciated signal necessary for dendritic cell (DC)-mediated activation of natural killer (NK) cells during viral infection was revealed by a recessive N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation called warmflash (wmfl). Wmfl homozygotes displayed increased susceptibility to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. In response to MCMV infection in vivo, delayed NK cell activation was observed, but no intrinsic defects in NK cell activation or function were identified. Rather, coculture experiments demonstrated that NK cells are suboptimally activated by wmfl DCs, which showed impaired cytokine production in response to MCMV or synthetic TLR7 and TLR9 ligands. The wmfl mutation was identified in the gene encoding the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3). Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) is transiently induced in the serum upon infection or TLR activation. However, antibody blockade reveals no acute requirement for Flt3L, suggesting that the Flt3L --> Flt3 axis programs the development of DCs, making them competent to support NK effector function. In the absence of Flt3 signaling, NK cell activation is delayed and survival during MCMV infection is markedly compromised. PMID:20457904

  7. Flt3 permits survival during infection by rendering dendritic cells competent to activate NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Eidenschenk, Céline; Crozat, Karine; Krebs, Philippe; Arens, Ramon; Popkin, Daniel; Arnold, Carrie N.; Blasius, Amanda L.; Benedict, Chris A.; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Xia, Yu; Beutler, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    A previously unappreciated signal necessary for dendritic cell (DC)-mediated activation of natural killer (NK) cells during viral infection was revealed by a recessive N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation called warmflash (wmfl). Wmfl homozygotes displayed increased susceptibility to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. In response to MCMV infection in vivo, delayed NK cell activation was observed, but no intrinsic defects in NK cell activation or function were identified. Rather, coculture experiments demonstrated that NK cells are suboptimally activated by wmfl DCs, which showed impaired cytokine production in response to MCMV or synthetic TLR7 and TLR9 ligands. The wmfl mutation was identified in the gene encoding the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3). Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) is transiently induced in the serum upon infection or TLR activation. However, antibody blockade reveals no acute requirement for Flt3L, suggesting that the Flt3L → Flt3 axis programs the development of DCs, making them competent to support NK effector function. In the absence of Flt3 signaling, NK cell activation is delayed and survival during MCMV infection is markedly compromised. PMID:20457904

  8. Identification of a novel gene expressed in activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, C.A.; Schall, R.P.; He, H.; Cairns, J.S. )

    1992-01-15

    The authors have isolated a cDNA clone from a human activated NK cell-derived cDNA library that identifies a transcript [NK4] that is selectively expressed in lymphocytes. The expression of this transcript is increased after activation of T cells by mitogens or activation of NK cells by IL-2 (lymphokine-activated killer cells). The transcript levels demonstrated by Northern blot analysis increase by 12 h after activation, remain high for at least 48 h, and require protein synthesis for expression. Southern blot analysis of B lymphoblastoid lines derived from 18 unrelated individuals reveal variable banding patterns suggestive of polymorphism within the NK4 gene. No homology was found between the sequence of the coding region of this transcript and any sequences in the GenBank data base. Sequence homology to the U1 small nuclear RNA was found within the 3[prime] untranslated region immediately upstream of the site of polyadenylation, suggesting a possible role for U1 in the polyadenylation process. Sequence analysis indicates the transcript would encode a protein having a mass of 27 kDa. The presence of a signal sequence and lack of a transmembrane region suggests that the protein is secreted. In addition, the protein contains an RGD sequence that may be involved in cellular adhesion. This transcript appears to encode a novel product common to the activation pathways of both NK cells and T cells. 50 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Initial activation of EpCAM cleavage via cell-to-cell contact

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Epithelial cell adhesion molecule EpCAM is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is frequently over-expressed in simple epithelia, progenitors, embryonic and tissue stem cells, carcinoma and cancer-initiating cells. Besides functioning as a homophilic adhesion protein, EpCAM is an oncogenic receptor that requires regulated intramembrane proteolysis for activation of its signal transduction capacity. Upon cleavage, the extracellular domain EpEX is released as a soluble ligand while the intracellular domain EpICD translocates into the cytoplasm and eventually into the nucleus in combination with four-and-a-half LIM domains protein 2 (FHL2) and β-catenin, and drives cell proliferation. Methods EpCAM cleavage, induction of the target genes, and transmission of proliferation signals were investigated under varying density conditions using confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunoblotting, cell counting, and conditional cell systems. Results EpCAM cleavage, induction of the target genes, and transmission of proliferation signals were dependent on adequate cell-to-cell contact. If cell-to-cell contact was prohibited EpCAM did not provide growth advantages. If cells were allowed to undergo contact to each other, EpCAM transmitted proliferation signals based on signal transduction-related cleavage processes. Accordingly, the pre-cleaved version EpICD was not dependent on cell-to-cell contact in order to induce c-myc and cell proliferation, but necessitated nuclear translocation. For the case of contact-inhibited cells, although cleavage of EpCAM occurred, nuclear translocation of EpICD was reduced, as were EpCAM effects. Conclusion Activation of EpCAM's cleavage and oncogenic capacity is dependent on cellular interaction (juxtacrine) to provide for initial signals of regulated intramembrane proteolysis, which then support signalling via soluble EpEX (paracrine). PMID:19925656

  10. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain. PMID:7852311

  11. Blockade of Mast Cell Activation Reduces Cutaneous Scar Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ranzer, Matthew J.; Wilgus, Traci A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  12. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  13. Photodynamic activation as a molecular switch to promote osteoblast cell differentiation via AP-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tu, Yupeng; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), cells are impregnated with a photosensitizing agent that is activated by light irradiation, thereby photochemically generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amounts of ROS produced depends on the PDT dose and the nature of the photosensitizer. Although high levels of ROS are cytotoxic, at physiological levels they play a key role as second messengers in cellular signaling pathways, pluripotency, and differentiation of stem cells. To investigate further the use of photochemically triggered manipulation of such pathways, we exposed mouse osteoblast precursor cells and rat primary mesenchymal stromal cells to low-dose PDT. Our results demonstrate that low-dose PDT can promote osteoblast differentiation via the activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1). Although PDT has been used primarily as an anti-cancer therapy, the use of light as a photochemical "molecular switch" to promote differentiation should expand the utility of this method in basic research and clinical applications. PMID:26279470

  14. Photodynamic activation as a molecular switch to promote osteoblast cell differentiation via AP-1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tu, Yupeng; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), cells are impregnated with a photosensitizing agent that is activated by light irradiation, thereby photochemically generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amounts of ROS produced depends on the PDT dose and the nature of the photosensitizer. Although high levels of ROS are cytotoxic, at physiological levels they play a key role as second messengers in cellular signaling pathways, pluripotency, and differentiation of stem cells. To investigate further the use of photochemically triggered manipulation of such pathways, we exposed mouse osteoblast precursor cells and rat primary mesenchymal stromal cells to low-dose PDT. Our results demonstrate that low-dose PDT can promote osteoblast differentiation via the activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1). Although PDT has been used primarily as an anti-cancer therapy, the use of light as a photochemical “molecular switch” to promote differentiation should expand the utility of this method in basic research and clinical applications. PMID:26279470

  15. Immunomodulation of phloretin by impairing dendritic cell activation and function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Chen; Chu, Ching-Liang; Ng, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Chen, Der-Yuan; Pan, I-Hong; Huang, Kao-Jean

    2014-05-01

    Dietary compounds in fruits and vegetables have been shown to exert many biological activities. In addition to antioxidant effects, a number of flavonoids are able to modulate inflammatory responses. Here, we demonstrated that phloretin (PT), a natural dihydrochalcone found in many fruits, suppressed the activation and function of mouse dendritic cells (DCs). Phloretin disturbed the multiple intracellular signaling pathways in DCs induced by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), including ROS, MAPKs (ERK, JNK, p38 MAPK), and NF-κB, and thereby reducing the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Phloretin also effectively suppressed the activation of DCs treated with different dosages of LPS or various TLR agonists. The LPS-induced DC maturation was attenuated by phloretin because the expression levels of the MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules were down-regulated, which then inhibited the LPS-stimulating DCs and the subsequent naïve T cell activation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. Moreover, in vivo administration of phloretin suppressed the phenotypic maturation of the LPS-challenged splenic DCs and decreased the IFN-γ production from the activated CD4 T cells. Thus, we suggest that phloretin may potentially be an immunomodulator by impairing the activation and function of DCs and phloretin-contained fruits may be helpful in the improvement of inflammation and autoimmune diseases. PMID:24651121

  16. Eph/ephrin signaling maintains the boundary of dorsal forerunner cell cluster during morphogenesis of the zebrafish embryonic left-right organizer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng; Jiang, Zheng; Liu, Xingfeng; Meng, Anming

    2016-07-15

    The Kupffer's vesicle (KV) is the so-called left-right organizer in teleost fishes. KV is formed from dorsal forerunner cells (DFCs) and generates asymmetrical signals for breaking symmetry of embryos. It is unclear how DFCs or KV cells are prevented from intermingling with adjacent cells. In this study, we show that the Eph receptor gene ephb4b is highly expressed in DFCs whereas ephrin ligand genes, including efnb2b, are expressed in cells next to the DFC cluster during zebrafish gastrulation. ephb4b knockdown or mutation and efnb2b knockdown cause dispersal of DFCs, a smaller KV and randomization of laterality organs. DFCs often dynamically form lamellipodium-like, bleb-like and filopodium-like membrane protrusions at the interface, which attempt to invade but are bounced back by adjacent non-DFC cells during gastrulation. Upon inhibition of Eph/ephrin signaling, however, the repulsion between DFCs and non-DFC cells is weakened or lost, allowing DFCs to migrate away. Ephb4b/Efnb2b signaling by activating RhoA activity mediates contact and repulsion between DFCs and neighboring cells during gastrulation, preventing intermingling of different cell populations. Therefore, our data uncover an important role of Eph/ephrin signaling in maintaining DFC cluster boundary and KV boundary for normal left-right asymmetrical development. PMID:27287807

  17. Eph/ephrin signaling maintains the boundary of dorsal forerunner cell cluster during morphogenesis of the zebrafish embryonic left-right organizer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfeng; Jiang, Zheng; Liu, Xingfeng

    2016-01-01

    The Kupffer's vesicle (KV) is the so-called left-right organizer in teleost fishes. KV is formed from dorsal forerunner cells (DFCs) and generates asymmetrical signals for breaking symmetry of embryos. It is unclear how DFCs or KV cells are prevented from intermingling with adjacent cells. In this study, we show that the Eph receptor gene ephb4b is highly expressed in DFCs whereas ephrin ligand genes, including efnb2b, are expressed in cells next to the DFC cluster during zebrafish gastrulation. ephb4b knockdown or mutation and efnb2b knockdown cause dispersal of DFCs, a smaller KV and randomization of laterality organs. DFCs often dynamically form lamellipodium-like, bleb-like and filopodium-like membrane protrusions at the interface, which attempt to invade but are bounced back by adjacent non-DFC cells during gastrulation. Upon inhibition of Eph/ephrin signaling, however, the repulsion between DFCs and non-DFC cells is weakened or lost, allowing DFCs to migrate away. Ephb4b/Efnb2b signaling by activating RhoA activity mediates contact and repulsion between DFCs and neighboring cells during gastrulation, preventing intermingling of different cell populations. Therefore, our data uncover an important role of Eph/ephrin signaling in maintaining DFC cluster boundary and KV boundary for normal left-right asymmetrical development. PMID:27287807

  18. CNR-TAE`s activity on fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Staiti, P.; Freni, S.; Passalacqua, E.; Antonucci, V.

    1997-07-01

    The recognition of the advantages and efficiencies implicit in an economy based upon the electrochemical conversion of fuels has led to intensive efforts toward the development of the fuel cells technology. On phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC), the CNR-TAE owns a full capability in PAFC technology and has built and tested 1 kW power plant in an ENEA supported program. On molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC), the CNR-TAE has matured a sound experience on the modeling of energy balances of MCFC with external or internal reforming, screening design and testing of reforming catalysts, on mechanisms of components aging, catalysts formulation and innovative methods to control catalyst poisoning by means of porous ceramic membranes. In solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) research, a comparison between steam internal and external reforming, exhaust gas recycling reforming and use of partial oxidation has been performed. Basic researches on the mechanism of conduction in solids and search for novel electrolytes are on course. In the field of fuel cells operating at low temperatures, the activity is addressed to the development of low Pt loading electrodes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) and development of ternary catalysts supported on carbon black for electrochemical oxidation of methanol in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). Further research is on the fuel cell utilizing a new type of electrolyte; in this field, an heteropolyacid lab-scale monocell has been realized and successful tested.

  19. A Micro Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter for Astrobiology Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Donald W.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    A micro-scale Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter (microFACS) for astrobiology applications is under development. This device is designed to have a footprint of 7 cm x 7 cm x 4 cm and allow live-dead counts and sorting of cells that have fluorescent characteristics from staining. The FACS system takes advantage of microfluidics to create a cell sorter that can fit in the palm of the hand. A micron-scale channel allows cells to pass by a blue diode which causes emission of marker-expressed cells which are detected by a filtered photodetector. A small microcontroller then counts cells and operates high speed valves to select which chamber the cell is collected in (a collection chamber or a waste chamber). Cells with the expressed characteristic will be collected in the collection chamber. This system has been built and is currently being tested. We are also designing a system with integrated MEMS-based pumps and valves for a small and compact unit to fly on small satellite-based biology experiments.

  20. Chemically programmed bispecific antibodies that recruit and activate T cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huiting; Thomas, Joshua D; Burke, Terrence R; Rader, Christoph

    2012-08-17

    Bispecific antibodies (biAbs) that mediate cytotoxicity by recruiting and activating endogenous immune cells are an emerging class of next-generation antibody therapeutics. Of particular interest are biAbs of relatively small size (∼50 kDa) that can redirect cytotoxic T cells through simultaneous binding of tumor cells. Here we describe a conceptually unique class of biAbs in which the tumor cell specificity of a humanized antibody fragment that recognizes CD3 on T cells is chemically programmed through a C-terminal selenocysteine (Sec) residue. We demonstrate that through chemically programmed specificity for integrin α(4)β(1) or folate receptor 1 (FOLR1), and common specificity for CD3, these hybrid molecules exert potent and specific in vitro and ex vivo cytotoxicity toward tumor cell lines and primary tumor cells in the presence of primary T cells. Importantly, the generic nature of chemical programming allows one to apply our approach to virtually any specificity, promising a broad utility of chemically programmed biAbs in cancer therapy. PMID:22761439

  1. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T C; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F T; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-05-26

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light-inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation-dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell-depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML. PMID:26941401

  2. Activated spinal cord ependymal stem cells rescue neurological function.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Francisco Javier; García-Roselló, Mireia; Laínez, Sergio; Erceg, Slaven; Calvo, Maria Teresa; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Lloret, Maria; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Sánchez-Puelles, Jose María; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2009-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major cause of paralysis. Currently, there are no effective therapies to reverse this disabling condition. The presence of ependymal stem/progenitor cells (epSPCs) in the adult spinal cord suggests that endogenous stem cell-associated mechanisms might be exploited to repair spinal cord lesions. epSPC cells that proliferate after SCI are recruited by the injured zone, and can be modulated by innate and adaptive immune responses. Here we demonstrate that when epSPCs are cultured from rats with a SCI (ependymal stem/progenitor cells injury [epSPCi]), these cells proliferate 10 times faster in vitro than epSPC derived from control animals and display enhanced self renewal. Genetic profile analysis revealed an important influence of inflammation on signaling pathways in epSPCi after injury, including the upregulation of Jak/Stat and mitogen activated protein kinase pathways. Although neurospheres derived from either epSPCs or epSPCi differentiated efficiently to oligodendrocites and functional spinal motoneurons, a better yield of differentiated cells was consistently obtained from epSPCi cultures. Acute transplantation of undifferentiated epSPCi or the resulting oligodendrocyte precursor cells into a rat model of severe spinal cord contusion produced a significant recovery of motor activity 1 week after injury. These transplanted cells migrated long distances from the rostral and caudal regions of the transplant to the neurofilament-labeled axons in and around the lesion zone. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of endogenous epSPCs represents a viable cell-based strategy for restoring neuronal dysfunction in patients with spinal cord damage. PMID:19259940

  3. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications. Stem Cells 2016;34:948-959. PMID:26727165

  4. Telomerase activity in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dobija-Kubica, Katarzyna; Bruliński, Krzysztof; Rogoziński, Paweł; Wiczkowski, Andrzej; Gawrychowska, Agata; Gawrychowski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High telomerase activity has been detected in the majority of malignant neoplasms including lung cancer. The purpose of the study was to attempt to use telomerase activity as a prognostic factor in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods Telomerase activity was analyzed in 47 tissue specimens taken from patients with NSCLC. The control group consisted of 30 specimens of non-cancerous lung parenchyma. Telomerase activity was measured by means of the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). Results Telomerase activity in the neoplastic tissue was significantly higher than in the lung parenchyma that was free from neoplastic infiltration. There was no significant association between telomerase activity and age, gender, tobacco smoking, histological type of the tumor, or staging (pTNM). No association was found between the level of telomerase activity in NSCLC specimens and the two-year survival rate of patients (p = 0.326). A higher level of telomerase activity in poorly differentiated tumors (G3) as compared to moderately differentiated tumors (G2) was detected (p = 0.008). A positive association was identified between telomerase activity in pulmonary parenchyma free from tumor infiltration and the presence of leukocyte infiltration (p = 0.0001). Conclusions No association was found between the level of telomerase activity in NSCLC specimens and the two-year survival rate of patients. The study has revealed a positive association between telomerase activity and the grade of differentiation (G) in NSCLC. PMID:27212973

  5. FGF2 activates TRPC and Ca2+ signaling leading to satellite cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yewei; Schneider, Martin F.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite cells, as stem cells of adult skeletal muscle, are tightly associated with the differentiated muscle fibers and remain quiescent in the absence of muscle damage. In response to an injury, the quiescent satellite cell is activated by soluble factors, including FGFs released from injured myofibers. Using immunostaining, we here first show that TRPC1 channels are highly expressed in satellite cells attached to muscle fibers. Since CD34, a traditional stem cell marker, was recently found to be expressed in skeletal muscle satellite cells we labeled living satellite cells in their physiological niche associated with host FDB fibers using anti-CD34-FITC antibody. We then monitored intra-cellular calcium in anti-CD34-FITC labeled satellite cells attached to muscle fibers using the calcium sensitive dye X rhod-1 which has little fluorescence cross talk with FITC. FGF2 increased intracellular calcium in satellite cells, which was antagonized by the TRPC channel blocker SKF 96365. Immunostaining showed that NFATc3 is highly expressed in satellite cells, but not in host FDB fibers. Elevation of intracellular calcium by FGF2 is accompanied by nuclear translocation of NFATc3 and NFATc2 and by an increase in the number of MyoD positive cells per muscle fiber, both of which were attenuated by TRPC blocker SKF 96365. Our results suggest a novel pathway of satellite cell activation where FGF2 enhances calcium influx through a TRPC channel, and the increased cytosolic calcium leads to both NFATc3 and NFATc2 nuclear translocation and enhanced number of MyoD positive satellite cells per muscle fiber. PMID:24575047

  6. Cell-to-cell distances between tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells have the potential to distinguish functionally active from suppressed inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Nagl, S; Haas, M; Lahmer, G; Büttner-Herold, M; Grabenbauer, G G; Fietkau, R; Distel, L V

    2016-05-01

    Beyond their mere presence, the distribution pattern of inflammatory cells is of special interest. Our hypothesis was that random distribution may be a clear indicator of being non-functional as a consequence of lack of interaction. Here, we have assessed the implication of cell-to-cell distances among inflammatory cells in anal squamous cell carcinoma and a possible association with survival data. Thirty-eight patients suffering from anal carcinoma were studied using tissue microarrays, double staining immunohistochemistry, whole slide scanning and image analysis software. Therapy consisted of concurrent radiochemotherapy. Numbers of stromal and intraepithelial tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells (TIC) and the distances between cells were quantified. Double-staining of FoxP3(+) cells with either CD8(+), CD1a(+) or CD20(+) cells was performed. Measured cell-to-cell distances were compared to computer simulated cell-to-cell distances leading to the assumption of non-randomly distributed and therefore functional immune cells. Intraepithelial CD1a(+) and CD20(+) cells were randomly distributed and therefore regarded as non-functional. In contrary, stromal CD20(+) cells had a non-random distribution pattern. A non-random distance between CD20(+) and FoxP3(+) cells was associated with a clearly unfavorable outcome. Measured distances between FoxP3(+) cells were distinctly shorter than expected and indicate a functional active state of the regulatory T cells (Treg). Analysis of cell-to-cell distances between TIC has the potential to distinguish between suppressed non-functional and functionally active inflammatory cells. We conclude that in this tumor model most of the CD1a(+) cells are non-functional as are the intraepithelial CD20(+) cells, while stromal CD20(+) cells and FoxP3(+) cells are functional cells. PMID:27467940

  7. 5-ASA Affects Cell Cycle Progression in Colorectal Cells by Reversibly Activating a Replication Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    LUCIANI, M. GLORIA; CAMPREGHER, CHRISTOPH; FORTUNE, JOHN M.; KUNKEL, THOMAS A.; GASCHE, CHRISTOPH

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease are at risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiologic, animal, and laboratory studies suggest that 5-amino-salicylic acid (5-ASA) protects from the development of CRC by altering cell cycle progression and by inducing apoptosis. Our previous results indicate that 5-ASA improves replication fidelity in colorectal cells, an effect that is active in reducing mutations. In this study, we hypothesized that 5-ASA restrains cell cycle progression by activating checkpoint pathways in colorectal cell lines, which would prevent tumor development and improve genomic stability. Methods CRC cells with different genetic backgrounds such as HT29, HCT116, HCT116p53−/−, HCT116+chr3, and LoVo were treated with 5-ASA for 2–96 hours. Cell cycle progression, phosphorylation, and DNA binding of cell cycle checkpoint proteins were analyzed. Results We found that 5-ASA at concentrations between 10 and 40 mmol/L affects cell cycle progression by inducing cells to accumulate in the S phase. This effect was independent of the hMLH1, hMSH2, and p53 status because it was observed to a similar extent in all cell lines under investigation. Moreover, wash-out experiments demonstrated reversibility within 48 hours. Although p53 did not have a causative role, p53 Ser15 was strongly phosphorylated. Proteins involved in the ATM-and-Rad3-related kinase (ATR)-dependent S-phase checkpoint response (Chk1 and Rad17) were also phosphorylated but not ataxia telengectasia mutated kinase. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that 5-ASA causes cells to reversibly accumulate in S phase and activate an ATR-dependent checkpoint. The activation of replication checkpoint may slow down DNA replication and improve DNA replication fidelity, which increases the maintenance of genomic stability and counteracts carcinogenesis. PMID:17241873

  8. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Germanium Active Layer for Top Cell of a Multi Junction Cell Structure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaehyun; Iftiquar, S M; Kim, Minbum; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Kim, Jiwoong; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium (a-SiGe:H) alloy is generally used in the bottom cell because of its low band gap. The a-SiGe:H has a higher photo conductivity in comparison to the a-Si:H; thus, it is expected that the a-SiGe:H can show better short circuit current density than that of the a-Si:H based solar cell. Therefore, we optimized a-SiGe:H active layer that can be a suitable choice for the front cell of a multi junction.solar cell. Furthermore, we carried out a comparative study of the solar cells that have a-SiGe:H and a-Si:H as respective active layers. The a-SiGe:H based solar cells show higher short circuit current density, while the a-Si:H based cells show higheropen circuit voltage. The current-voltage characteristics of these cells are as follows: (a) V(oc) = 770 mV, J(sc) = 15.0 mA/cm2, FF = 64.5%, and η = 7.47% for a-SiGe:H based cell; and (b) V(oc) = 826 mV, J(sc) = 13.63 mA/cm2, FF = 72.0%, and η = 8.1% for a-Si:H based cell. PMID:27483837

  9. Human endogenous retrovirus envelope proteins target dendritic cells to suppress T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Jonas; Kämmerer, Ulrike; Müller, Nora; Avota, Elita; Schneider-Schau