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Sample records for activated leukocyte adhesion

  1. Mechanisms of endothelial cell-dependent leukocyte adhesion stimulated by platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Ding, Z; Li, S; Wu, Z

    1992-04-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) stimulates leukocyte-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion through its effects either on leukocytes or on ECs. ECs may be injured, synthesize, or express new adhesive proteins to increase leukocyte adhesion. Intermediary mediators produced by activated ECs are also likely involved in promoting leukocyte adhesion. Our experiments demonstrated that PAF induced no obvious damage to bovine pulmonary artery ECs evaluated by lactic dehydrogenase release rate, angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, and cellular malondialdehyde content. Treatment of EC monolayers with 10(-9) M PAF increased polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) adhesion. Increasing PAF concentration did not induce more PMN adherence. PAF elicited both a rapid and prolonged increment of PMN adherence to EC monolayers. The rapid adherence was greatly attenuated by pretreatment of ECs with PAF receptor antagonist SRI 63-441 but was not affected by pretreatment of PMNs with SRI 63-441, suggesting that PAF increases PMN adherence rapidly through its effects on specific receptors on ECs. Increased PMN adherence lasted if PAF treatment of ECs was sustained for 3 or 6 h. Pretreatment of ECs with actinomycin D, a protein synthesis inhibitor, significantly decreased PAF-induced sustained PMN adherence, but the inhibition is incomplete, suggesting that other mechanisms than protein synthesis also participated in the prolonged PMN adherence. We concluded from the results that PAF may induce both rapid and prolonged PMN adhesion to ECs. The effects are receptor mediated. The prolonged PMN adhesion is partly the result of protein synthesis. PMID:1592489

  2. Interleukin-1 activation of vascular endothelium. Effects on procoagulant activity and leukocyte adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, M. P.; Pober, J. S.; Wheeler, M. E.; Cotran, R. S.; Gimbrone, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1), an inflammatory/immune mediator, acts directly and selectively on cultured human vascular endothelial cells to alter two important functional properties. First, IL-1 induces endothelial cell biosynthesis and surface expression of a tissue factor-like procoagulant activity. Second, IL-1 dramatically increases the adhesiveness of the endothelial cell surface for human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (6-42-fold increase) and monocytes (2-5-fold increase), as well as the related leukocyte cell lines HL-60 and U937. These IL-1 effects are concentration-dependent (maximum, 5-10 U/ml), time-dependent (peak 4-6 hours), and reversible. Cycloheximide and actinomycin D block these IL-1 actions on endothelium, which suggests the requirement for de novo protein synthesis. Human-monocyte-derived IL-1, cell-line--derived IL-1, and recombinant IL-1 exhibited comparable biologic activities in our assays, whereas two other mediators, IL-2 and immune interferon, were without effect. IL-1 stimulated procoagulant activity and leukocyte adhesion in human endothelial cells cultured from both umbilical veins and adult saphenous veins but not in other cultured cell types, including SV-40-transformed human endothelial cells and human dermal fibroblasts. Similar actions of IL-1 on vascular endothelium in vivo may contribute to the development of intravascular coagulation and enhanced leukocyte--vessel wall adhesion at sites of inflammation. Images Figure 2 PMID:3878084

  3. Towards a computational model of leukocyte adhesion cascade: Leukocyte rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khismatullin, Damir

    2005-11-01

    Recruitment of leukocytes into sites of acute and chronic inflammation is a vital component of the innate immune response in humans and plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and atherosclerosis. Leukocytes extravasate into the inflamed tissue through a multi-step process called "leukocyte adhesion cascade", which involves initial contact of a leukocyte with activated endothelium (tethering), leukocyte rolling, firm adhesion, and transendothelial migration. Recently we developed a fully three-dimensional CFD model of receptor-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The model treats the leukocyte as a viscoelastic cell with the nucleus located in the intracellular space and cylindrical microvilli distributed over the cell membrane. Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion is assumed to be mediated by adhesion molecules expressed on the tips of cell microvilli and on endothelium. We show that the model can predict both shape changes and velocities of rolling leukocytes under physiological flow conditions. Results of this study also indicate that viscosity of the cytoplasm is a critical parameter of leukocyte adhesion, affecting the cell's ability to roll on endothelium. This work is supported by NIH Grant HL- 57446 and NCSA Grant BCS040006 and utilized the NCSA IBM p690.

  4. Dynamic Regulation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule–mediated Homotypic Cell Adhesion through the Actin CytoskeletonV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nelissen, Judith M. D. T.; Peters, Inge M.; de Grooth, Bart G.; van Kooyk, Yvette; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Restricted expression of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) by hematopoietic cells suggests an important role in the immune system and hematopoiesis. To get insight into the mechanisms that control ALCAM-mediated adhesion we have investigated homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton regulates ALCAM-mediated cell adhesion because inhibition of actin polymerization by cytochalasin D (CytD) strongly induces homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. This induction of cell adhesion is likely due to clustering of ALCAM at the cell surface, which is observed after CytD treatment. Single-particle tracking demonstrated that the lateral mobility of ALCAM in the cell membrane is increased 30-fold after CytD treatment. In contrast, both surface distribution and adhesion of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored ALCAM mutant are insensitive to CytD, despite the increase in lateral mobility of GPI-ALCAM upon CytD treatment. This demonstrates that clustering of ALCAM is essential for cell adhesion, whereas enhanced diffusion of ALCAM alone is not sufficient for cluster formation. In addition, upon ligand binding, both free diffusion and the freely dragged distance of wild-type ALCAM, but not of GPI-ALCAM, are reduced over time, suggesting strengthening of the cytoskeleton linkage. From these findings we conclude that activation of ALCAM-mediated adhesion is dynamically regulated through actin cytoskeleton-dependent clustering. PMID:10848629

  5. Syntenin-1 and Ezrin Proteins Link Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule to the Actin Cytoskeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Tudor, Cicerone; te Riet, Joost; Eich, Christina; Harkes, Rolf; Smisdom, Nick; Bouhuijzen Wenger, Jessica; Ameloot, Marcel; Holt, Matthew; Kanger, Johannes S.; Figdor, Carl G.; Cambi, Alessandra; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is a type I transmembrane protein member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules. Involved in important pathophysiological processes such as the immune response, cancer metastasis, and neuronal development, ALCAM undergoes both homotypic interactions with other ALCAM molecules and heterotypic interactions with the surface receptor CD6 expressed at the T cell surface. Despite biochemical and biophysical evidence of a dynamic association between ALCAM and the actin cytoskeleton, no detailed information is available about how this association occurs at the molecular level. Here, we exploit a combination of complementary microscopy techniques, including FRET detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and single-cell force spectroscopy, and we demonstrate the existence of a preformed ligand-independent supramolecular complex where ALCAM stably interacts with actin by binding to syntenin-1 and ezrin. Interaction with the ligand CD6 further enhances these multiple interactions. Altogether, our results propose a novel biophysical framework to understand the stabilizing role of the ALCAM supramolecular complex engaged to CD6 during dendritic cell-T cell interactions and provide novel information on the molecular players involved in the formation and signaling of the immunological synapse at the dendritic cell side. PMID:24662291

  6. Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM or CD166) Modulates Bone Phenotype and Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, R. Adam; Chitteti, Brahmananda R.; Egan, Patrick H.; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Himes, Evan R.; Meijome, Tomas; Srour, Edward F.; Fuchs, Robyn K.; Kacena, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM/CD166), is expressed on osteoblasts (OB) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) residing in the hematopoietic niche, and may have important regulatory roles in bone formation. Because HSC numbers are reduced 77% in CD166−/− mice, we hypothesized that changes in bone phenotype and consequently the endosteal niche may partially be responsible for this alteration. Therefore, we investigated bone phenotype and OB function in CD166−/− mice. Although osteoclastic measures were not affected by loss of CD166, CD166−/− mice exhibited a modest increase in trabecular bone fraction (42%), and increases in osteoid deposition (72%), OB number (60%), and bone formation rate (152%). Cortical bone geometry was altered in CD166−/− mice resulting in up to 81% and 49% increases in stiffness and ultimate force, respectively. CD166−/− OB displayed elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization, and increased mRNA expression of Fra 1, ALP, and osteocalcin. Overall, CD166−/− mice displayed modestly elevated trabecular bone volume fraction with increased OB numbers and deposition of osteoid, and increased OB differentiation in vitro, possibly suggesting more mature OB are secreting more osteoid. This may explain the decline in HSC number in vivo because immature OB are mainly responsible for hematopoiesis enhancing activity. PMID:25730656

  7. Computational modeling of leukocyte adhesion cascade (LAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Kausik

    2005-11-01

    In response to an inflammation in the body, leukocytes (white blood cell) interact with the endothelium (interior wall of blood vessel) through a series of steps--capture, rolling, adhesion and transmigration--critical for proper functioning of the immune system. We are numerically simulating this process using a Front-tracking finite-difference method. The viscoelastcity of the cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus are incorporated and allowed to change with time in response to the cell surface molecular chemistry. The molecular level forces due to specific ligand-receptor interactions are accounted for by stochastic spring-peeling model. Even though leukocyte rolling has been investigated through various models, the transitioning through subsequent steps, specifically firm adhesion and transmigration through endothelial layer, has not been modeled. The change of viscoelastic properties due to the leukocyte activation is observed to play a critical role in mediating the transition from rolling to transmigration. We will provide details of our approach and discuss preliminary results.

  8. Matrix fibronectin disruption and altered endothelial cell adhesion induced by activated leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P.; Richards, P.; Saba, T.; DelVecchio, P.

    1986-03-01

    Sequestration of activated leukocytes (PMN) within the lung may contribute to pulmonary vascular injury following trauma, sepsis, or intravascular coagulation. Monolayers of cultured rat endothelial cells were utilized to evaluate the effect of activated PMNs on endothelial cell attachment and the extracellular fibronectin matrix over a 4 hr incubation interval. Rat endothelial cells were identified by immunofluorescent staining of Factor VIII R:Ag. Endothelial cells were labeled with /sup 51/Cr in order to establish a cell injury assay in which the release of pelletable (cell associated) or non-pelletable activity was measured in the media. PMN activation was verified by chemiluminescence activity. Following phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) the leukocytes aggregated, chemiluminesced, and caused detachment of /sup 51/Cr endothelial cells. Endothelial detachment increased as a function of time with a plateau by 3 hrs. Immunofluorescent analysis of extracellular fibronectin in endothelial cell cultures revealed disruption of the fibrillar matrix fibronectin in association with endothelial cell disadhesion. Matrix fibronectin disruption was not seen with PMNs or PMA alone. Thus, disruption of the fibronectin matrix by released proteases may contribute to endothelial cell detachment.

  9. [Investigation on bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Zhu; Cui, Yu-Dong; Zhu, Zhan-Bo; Cao, Hong-Wei; Piao, Fan-Ze

    2006-10-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is autosomal recessive disease. The pathogeny of BLAD is genic mutation of CD18-integrins on the leukocyte. In order to know the carrier and occurrence of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) among cows age from one to six years old in China, 1,000 cows were investigated by means of amplifying a CD18 gene fragment via reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by restriction digestion with Taq I. Results showed that 19 cows were BLAD carriers, indicating that the BLAD carrier rate was 1.9 percent. In addition, one cow was found to have BLAD. PMID:17035180

  10. Genetics Home Reference: leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion deficiency type 1 leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 is a disorder that causes the immune system ...

  11. A role for leukocyte-endothelial adhesion mechanisms in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fabene, Paolo F.; Mora, Graciela Navarro; Martinello, Marianna; Rossi, Barbara; Merigo, Flavia; Ottoboni, Linda; Bach, Simona; Angiari, Stefano; Benati, Donatella; Chakir, Asmaa; Zanetti, Lara; Schio, Federica; Osculati, Antonio; Marzola, Pasquina; Nicolato, Elena; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Xia, Lijun; Lowe, John B.; McEver, Rodger P.; Osculati, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Butcher, Eugene C.; Constantin, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, a chronic neurological disorder that affects approximately 1 percent of the world population, are not well understood1–3. Using a mouse model of epilepsy, we show that seizures induce elevated expression of vascular cell adhesion molecules and enhanced leukocyte rolling and arrest in brain vessels mediated by the leukocyte mucin P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and leukocyte integrins α4β1 and αLβ2. Inhibition of leukocyte-vascular interactions either with blocking antibodies, or in mice genetically deficient in functional PSGL-1, dramatically reduced seizures. Treatment with blocking antibodies following acute seizures prevented the development of epilepsy. Neutrophil depletion also inhibited acute seizure induction and chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage, which is known to enhance neuronal excitability, was induced by acute seizure activity but was prevented by blockade of leukocyte-vascular adhesion, suggesting a pathogenetic link between leukocyte-vascular interactions, BBB damage and seizure generation. Consistent with potential leukocyte involvement in the human, leukocytes were more abundant in brains of epileptics than of controls. Our results suggest leukocyte-endothelial interaction as a potential target for the prevention and treatment of epilepsy. PMID:19029985

  12. An Engineered Cysteine-Modified Diabody For Imaging Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM)-Positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Katelyn E.; Liu, Bin; Marks, James D.; Tomlinson, James S.; Wu, Hong; Wu, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To generate and evaluate a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer targeting activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166). Procedures A human anti-ALCAM single chain variable fragment was reformatted to produce a covalent dimer, termed a cys-diabody (CysDb). Purified CysDb was characterized by gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography, and immunoreactivity was assessed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence. Targeting and imaging of ALCAM-positive tumors using 64Cu-DOTA-CysDb were evaluated in mice bearing human pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts (HPAF-II or BxPC-3). Results CysDb binds specifically to ALCAM-positive cells in vitro with an apparent affinity in the range of 1–3 nM. MicroPET images at 4 h showed specific targeting of positive tumors in vivo, a finding confirmed by biodistribution analysis, with positive-to-negative tumor ratios of 1.9±0.6 and 2.4±0.6, and positive tumor-to-blood ratios of 2.5±0.9 and 2.9±0.6 (HPAF-II and BxPC-3, respectively). Conclusions Successful imaging with 64Cu-DOTA-CysDb in animal models suggests further investigation of ALCAM as an imaging biomarker is warranted. PMID:21630083

  13. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD): a review.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Hajime

    2004-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) in Holstein cattle is an autosomal recessive congenital disease characterized by recurrent bacterial infections, delayed wound healing and stunted growth, and is also associated with persistent marked neutrophilia. The molecular basis of BLAD is a single point mutation (adenine to guanine) at position 383 of the CD18 gene, which caused an aspartic acid to glycine substitution at amino acid 128 (D128G) in the adhesion molecule CD18. Neutrophils from BLAD cattle have impaired expression of the beta2 integrin (CD11a,b,c/CD18) of the leukocyte adhesion molecule. Abnormalities in a wide spectrum of adherence dependent functions of leukocytes have been fully characterized. Cattle affected with BLAD have severe ulcers on oral mucous membranes, severe periodontitis, loss of teeth, chronic pneumonia and recurrent or chronic diarrhea. Affected cattle die at an early age due to the infectious complications. Holstein bulls, including carrier sires that had a mutant BLAD gene in heterozygote were controlled from dairy cattle for a decade. The control of BLAD in Holstein cattle by publishing the genotypes and avoiding the mating between BLAD carriers was found to be successful. This paper provides an overview of the genetic disease BLAD with reference to the disease in Holstein cattle. PMID:15644595

  14. Curcumin modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion in murine sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Vachharajani, Vidula; Wang, Si-Wei; Mishra, Nilamadhab; El-Gazzar, Mohammad; Yoza, Barbara; McCall, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective Circulating cell-endothelial cell interaction in sepsis is a rate-determining factor in organ dysfunction, and interventions targeting this process have a potential therapeutic value. In this project, we examined whether curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric and an anti-inflammatory agent, could disrupt interactions between circulating blood cells and endothelium and improve survival in a murine model of sepsis. Methods Mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis vs. sham surgery. We studied leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation using intravital fluorescent video microscopy technique, blood brain barrier dysfunction using Evans Blue leakage method, P-selectin expression using dual radiolabeling technique and survival in mice subjected to Sham, CLP and CLP with curcumin pre-treatment (CLP+Curcumin). Results Curcumin significantly attenuated leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation, Evans Blue leakage in the brain tissue and improved survival in mice with CLP. P-selectin expression in mice with CLP+Curcumin was significantly attenuated compared to CLP in various microcirculatory beds including brain. Reduction in platelet adhesion was predominantly via modulation of endothelium by curcumin. Conclusion Curcumin pre-treatment modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion and blood brain barrier dysfunction in mice with CLP via P-selectin expression and improves survival in mice with CLP. PMID:20690979

  15. Cloning of the human activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule promoter and identification of its tissue-independent transcriptional activation by Sp1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fang; Mbunkui, Flaubert; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F

    2012-12-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) belongs to the immunoglobulin cell adhesion molecule super family. ALCAM is implicated in tumor progression, inflammation, and the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells. Hitherto, the identity of regulatory DNA elements and cognate transcription factors responsible for ALCAM gene expression remained unknown. In this report, the human ALCAM promoter was cloned and its transcriptional mechanisms elucidated. The promoter is TATA-less and contains multiple GC-boxes. A proximal 650-bp promoter fragment conferred tissue-independent activation, whereas two contiguous regions upstream of this region negatively influenced promoter activity in a tissue-specific manner. The positive regulatory promoter region was mapped to a core 50 base pair sequence containing a conical Sp1 element. Mutation analysis revealed that this element alone or in tandem with elements immediately upstream was required for maximal promoter activity. Chromatin analysis revealed that Sp1 binds exclusively to the canonical binding sequence in vivo, but not to DNA sequence immediately upstream. Finally, we showed that over-expression of Sp1 significantly increased the basal promoter activity. Thus, Sp1 activated the ALCAM promoter in most cells. These findings have important ramifications for unraveling the roles of ALCAM in inflammation and tumorigenesis. PMID:22941204

  16. Modulation of leukocyte adhesion in rat mesenteric venules by aspirin and salicylate.

    PubMed

    Asako, H; Kubes, P; Wallace, J; Wolf, R E; Granger, D N

    1992-07-01

    Erythrocyte velocity, vessel diameter, leukocyte rolling velocity, and number of adherent and emigrated leukocytes were measured in postcapillary venules both before and during superfusion of rat mesentery with either aspirin or sodium salicylate. In some experiments, animals were treated with either a leukotriene (LT)-synthesis inhibitor (L-663,536), an LTD4 antagonist (MK-571), an LTB4 antagonist (SC-41930), misoprostol, or prostaglandin (PG) I2, then the aspirin protocol was repeated. Superfusion of aspirin but not sodium salicylate resulted in increased leukocyte adherence and a reduced leukocyte rolling velocity but did not affect leukocyte emigration. Aspirin-induced leukocyte adhesion was effectively prevented by the LT-synthesis inhibitor and LTB4 antagonist but not by the LTD4 antagonist. Misoprostol and PGI2 also prevented the aspirin-induced adhesion responses. Superfusion of the mesentery with either platelet-activating factor (PAF) or LTB4 enhanced leukocyte adherence and emigration while reducing leukocyte rolling velocity. Sodium salicylate prevented all of the adhesion responses elicited by LTB4. Although salicylate did not affect the PAF-induced leukocyte adherence and rolling responses, it completely prevented the increased leukocyte emigration. These results indicate that aspirin promotes, whereas sodium salicylate inhibits, leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions at therapeutically relevant concentrations. PMID:1319367

  17. Hyaluronan-Mediated Leukocyte Adhesion and Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis Are Attenuated in the Absence of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Sudip K.; de la Motte, Carol A.; Kessler, Sean P.; Hascall, Vincent C.; Hill, David R.; Strong, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic inflammatory condition of the intestinal mucosa whose etiology is unclear but is likely to be multifactorial. We have shown previously that an increased amount of hyaluronan (HA) is present both in the inflamed mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease patients and in isolated human cells after polyI:C treatment. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1 protein plays an important role in many signaling pathways that are associated with inflammation. We therefore investigated the role of STAT1 in adhesive interactions that occur between leukocytes and polyI:C-induced mucosal smooth muscle cells (M-SMCs). Activation of STAT1 was observed after the polyI:C treatment of M-SMCs. Specific phosphorylation of tyrosine and serine residues of STAT1 was observed in polyI:C-treated, but not untreated, M-SMC cultures. To evaluate further the role of STAT1, a corresponding STAT-1-null mouse was used. PolyI:C-induced, HA-mediated leukocyte adhesion to colon SMCs from STAT1-null mice was significantly decreased compared with that from wild-type control mice. In vivo, using the dextran sulfate sodium-induced model of colon inflammation, both tissue damage and HA deposition were attenuated in STAT1-null mice compared with that in wild-type control mice. Additionally, the inter-α-trypsin inhibitor (IαI), a proteoglycan essential for facilitating leukocyte binding to the HA matrix, was reduced in STAT1-null mice. Together, these results demonstrate that STAT1 plays an important role in HA-mediated inflammatory processes. PMID:18818378

  18. Involvement of platelet cyclic GMP but not cyclic AMP suppression in leukocyte-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by platelet-activating factor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hirafuji, M.; Nezu, A.; Shinoda, H.; Minami, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence or the presence of PAF (10 nM) markedly increased platelet cyclic AMP levels, which were significantly decreased by indomethacin (3 microM). Co-incubation of endothelial cells and platelets with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) did not change the platelet cyclic AMP levels. 2. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence of PAF increased platelet cyclic GMP levels, which were increased 3.5 fold by PAF. These cyclic GMP levels were significantly decreased by NG-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM), and completely by methylene blue (10 microM). When endothelial cells and platelets were co-incubated with PMNs, the cyclic GMP level in the cell mixture was 42.5 and 65.3% lower than that in endothelial cells and platelets without and with PAF stimulation, respectively. 3. PAF induced platelet adhesion to endothelial cells only when PMNs were present. Methylene blue dose-dependently potentiated the PMN-dependent platelet adhesion induced by PAF, although it had no effect in the absence of PMNs. 4. Sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo cyclic GMP but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP significantly, although partially, inhibited the platelet adhesion. Inhibition of cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase by zaprinast slightly inhibited the PMN-induced platelet adhesion and potentiated the inhibitory effect of 8-bromo cyclic GMP, while these drugs markedly inhibited the adhesion of platelet aggregates induced by PMN sonicates. 5. These results suggest that the impairment by activated PMNs of EDRF-induced platelet cyclic GMP formation is involved in part in the mechanism of PMN-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by PAF in vitro. The precise mechanism still remains to be clarified. PMID:8789382

  19. [Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency: clinical picture and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lienau, A; Stöber, M; Kehrli, M E; Tammen, I; Schwenger, B; Kuczka, A; Pohlenz, J

    1994-10-01

    The pathological clinical and laboratory findings obtained in 50 calves and young cattle affected with Bovine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency are compared with those found in 114 calves and young cattle showing marked neutrophil leukocytosis of other origin (age: < 2 years; leukocyte count: > 30,000 per microl; percentage of lymphocytes: < 55%). PMID:7851303

  20. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency: in vitro assessment of neutrophil function and leukocyte integrin expression.

    PubMed Central

    Olchowy, T W; Bochsler, P N; Neilsen, N R; Welborn, M G; Slauson, D O

    1994-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was identified in a two-month-old Holstein heifer calf using DNA-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the affected calf and other clinical parameters. Neutrophil integrin expression (CD18, CD11a, CD11c), aggregation, and transendothelial migration were studied in vitro. Neutrophils were isolated from the affected calf and from normal, healthy, age-matched control Holstein calves. Neutrophils isolated from the affected BLAD calf had decreased expression of leukocyte integrins on their cell surface, decreased ability to aggregate in response to chemotactic stimuli, and decreased ability to migrate across bovine endothelial cell monolayers in vitro. Transendothelial migration of neutrophils from normal calves was reduced to levels comparable to the BLAD neutrophils by treatment with an anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb 60.3). Peripheral-blood lymphocytes from the BLAD calf also expressed negligible levels of leukocyte integrins, similar to their neutrophil counterparts. Our experimental findings in vitro correlate well with the clinical observations of decreased leukocyte trafficking and diminished host defense in leukocyte adhesion-deficient animals. The syndrome of BLAD may be a suitable model for one of the human leukocyte adhesion deficiency disorders. Images Fig. 4. PMID:7911733

  1. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency: in vitro assessment of neutrophil function and leukocyte integrin expression.

    PubMed

    Olchowy, T W; Bochsler, P N; Neilsen, N R; Welborn, M G; Slauson, D O

    1994-04-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was identified in a two-month-old Holstein heifer calf using DNA-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the affected calf and other clinical parameters. Neutrophil integrin expression (CD18, CD11a, CD11c), aggregation, and transendothelial migration were studied in vitro. Neutrophils were isolated from the affected calf and from normal, healthy, age-matched control Holstein calves. Neutrophils isolated from the affected BLAD calf had decreased expression of leukocyte integrins on their cell surface, decreased ability to aggregate in response to chemotactic stimuli, and decreased ability to migrate across bovine endothelial cell monolayers in vitro. Transendothelial migration of neutrophils from normal calves was reduced to levels comparable to the BLAD neutrophils by treatment with an anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb 60.3). Peripheral-blood lymphocytes from the BLAD calf also expressed negligible levels of leukocyte integrins, similar to their neutrophil counterparts. Our experimental findings in vitro correlate well with the clinical observations of decreased leukocyte trafficking and diminished host defense in leukocyte adhesion-deficient animals. The syndrome of BLAD may be a suitable model for one of the human leukocyte adhesion deficiency disorders. PMID:7911733

  2. Multiparticle adhesive dynamics: Hydrodynamic recruitment of rolling leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael R.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2001-01-01

    The slow rolling motion of leukocytes along the walls of blood vessels mediated by specific receptor-ligand adhesion is important in inflammation and occurs in postcapillary venules over a wide range of wall shear stresses and vessel diameters. The ability of hydrodynamic collisions between cells to induce capture of free-stream leukocytes to a selectin-bearing surface under shear flow was studied experimentally by using a cell-free assay. It was found that carbohydrate-coated spherical beads, representing model leukocytes, tend to attach to the adhesive wall 4–5 cell diameters up- or downstream of a slowly rolling or stationary adhesive bead. A key feature of such “hydrodynamic recruitment” is that only glancing, indirect collisions occurring close to the plane will result in downstream attachment. A direct numerical simulation of cell capture and rolling that includes multiparticle hydrodynamic interactions is shown to reproduce the observed behavior accurately. The theory predicts that hydrodynamic recruitment will occur in the absence of buoyancy effects and over a range of shear rates, suggesting that the mechanism may be important in vivo. This theory is supported by measurements of leukocyte capture in vivo using the hamster cheek pouch model. PMID:11752440

  3. Vitamin C Prevents Cigarette Smoke-Induced Leukocyte Aggregation and Adhesion to Endothelium in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Frei, Balz; Arfors, Karl-E.

    1994-08-01

    A common feature of cigarette-smoke (CS)-associated diseases such as atherosclerosis and pulmonary emphysema is the activation, aggregation, and adhesion of leukocytes to micro- and macrovascular endothelium. A previous study, using a skinfold chamber model for intravital fluorescence microscopy in awake hamsters, has shown that exposure of hamsters to the smoke generated by one research cigarette elicits the adhesion of fluorescently labeled leukocytes to the endothelium of arterioles and small venules. By the combined use of intravital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we now demonstrate in the same animal model that (i) CS-induced leukocyte adhesion is not confined to the microcirculation, but that leukocytes also adhere singly and in clusters to the aortic endothelium; (ii) CS induces the formation in the bloodstream of aggregates between leukocytes and platelets; and (iii) CS-induced leukocyte adhesion to micro- and macrovascular endothelium and leukocyte-platelet aggregate formation are almost entirely prevented by dietary or intravenous pretreatment with the water-soluble antioxidant vitamin C (venules, 21.4 ± 11.0 vs. 149.6 ± 38.7 leukocytes per mm^2, P < 0.01; arterioles, 8.5 ± 4.2 vs. 54.3 ± 21.6 leukocytes per mm^2, P < 0.01; aortas, 0.8 ± 0.4 vs. 12.4 ± 5.6 leukocytes per mm^2, P < 0.01; means ± SD of n = 7 animals, 15 min after CS exposure). No inhibitory effect was observed by pretreatment of the animals with the lipid-soluble antioxidants vitamin E or probucol. The protective effects of vitamin C on CS-induced leukocyte adhesion and aggregation were seen at vitamin C plasma levels (55.6 ± 22.2 μM, n = 7) that can easily be reached in humans by dietary means or supplementation, suggesting that vitamin C effectively contributes to protection from CS-associated cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases in humans.

  4. [Case presentation: bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Meylan, M; Abegg, R; Sager, H; Jungi, T W; Martig, J

    1997-01-01

    Bovine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (BLAD) Syndrome is a lethal congenital immunodeficiency caused by the strong reduction in the expression of leukocyte integrins (beta 2 integrins) on the surface of leukocytes. Therefore, neutrophils from BLAD animals lack the capacity to adhere to the endothelium, a necessary step in their emigration into foci of infection. Due to the virtual absence of neutrophil-mediated host defense, animals suffer from recurrent infection of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts and finally succumb to infections. A 14 days old Holstein-Friesian calf showing omphalophlebitis and leukocytosis, was referred to our clinic. It was found to suffer from several febrile episodes of infection. The tentative diagnosis BLAD could be confirmed for the first time in Switzerland by flow cytometry, pedigree analysis and by restriction fragment length polymorphism. PMID:9411734

  5. Cell adhesion molecules mediate radiation-induced leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D; Kuchibhotla, J; Wyble, C

    1996-11-15

    The predominant early histological changes in irradiated tissues are edema and leukocyte infiltration. Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are required for the extravasation of leukocytes from the circulation. To study the role of CAMs in the pathogenesis of radiation-mediated inflammation, we quantified the expression of P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 glycoproteins on the surface of irradiated human endothelial cells. We found that E-selectin and ICAM-1 expression increased after irradiation, whereas there was no increased expression of other cytokine-inducible adhesion molecules (P-selectin or vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). We found a dose- and time-dependent increase in radiation-induced expression of both E-selectin and ICAM-1. Furthermore, the threshold dose for E-selectin expression was 1 Gy, whereas the threshold dose for ICAM-1 synthesis was 5 Gy of X-rays. Northern blot analysis of RNA from irradiated endothelial cells demonstrated that ICAM-1 is expressed at 3-6 h following irradiation. No de novo protein synthesis was required for increased ICAM-1 mRNA expression. The 1.1-kb segment of the 5' untranslated region of the ICAM-1 gene was sufficient for X-ray induction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene expression. We measured whether ICAM-1 mediates adhesion of leukocyte to the irradiated endothelium and found that leukocyte adhesion occurred concurrently with ICAM-1 induction. Radiation-mediated leukocyte adhesion was prevented by anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibodies. These data indicate that ICAM-1 participates in the inflammatory response to ionizing radiation. Moreover, radiation induction of these CAMs occurs in the absence of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 production. PMID:8912850

  6. Altered expression of adhesion molecules on peripheral blood leukocytes in feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Olyslaegers, Dominique A J; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; Vermeulen, Ben L; Dewerchin, Hannah L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-10-25

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, coronavirus-induced systemic disease in domestic and wild felids. The pathology associated with FIP (multifocal granulomatous vasculitis) is considered to be elicited by exaggerated activation and subsequent extravasation of leukocytes. As changes in the expression of adhesion molecules on circulating leukocytes precede their margination and emigration, we reasoned that the expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules may be altered in FIP. In present study, the expression of principal adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte transmigration (CD15s, CD11a, CD11b, CD18, CD49d, and CD54) on peripheral blood leukocytes from cats with naturally occurring FIP (n=15) and controls (n=12) was quantified by flow cytometry using a formaldehyde-based rapid leukocyte preparation technique. T- and B-lymphocytes from FIP patients exhibit higher expression of both subunits (CD11a and CD18) composing the β2 integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1. In addition, the expression of the α4 subunit (CD49d) of the β1 integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 was elevated on B-lymphocytes from FIP patients. The expression of CD11b and CD18, that combine to form the β2 integrin macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1), was elevated on monocytes, whereas the density of CD49d was reduced on this population in FIP. Granulocytes of FIP cats displayed an increased expression of the α chain of Mac-1 (CD11b). These observations suggest that leukocytes from FIP patients show signs of systemic activation causing them to extravasate into surrounding tissues and ultimately contribute to pyogranuloma formation seen in FIP. PMID:23910523

  7. Phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins by protein kinase C correlates with leukocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Valmu, L; Autero, M; Siljander, P; Patarroyo, M; Gahmberg, C G

    1991-11-01

    Adhesion of activated leukocytes to cells is of critical functional importance. The adhesion is known to be mediated mainly by the CD11/CD18 integrins, also known as leukocytic cell adhesion molecules, or Leu-CAM. We have now studied the phosphorylation of Leu-CAM by protein kinase C and the correlation of phosphorylation with the generation of the adhesive phenotype among human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes during cell activation. We here show that a good correlation exists between the phosphorylation of the beta subunit of Leu-CAM (CD18), and the extent of cell-to-cell adhesion. The phosphorylated CD18 subunit was associated with both CD11a and CD11b. Purified protein kinase C was able to phosphorylate the beta subunit of isolated Leu-CAM in vitro. The phosphorylation occurred mainly on serine residues. PMID:1682156

  8. Carbohydrate ligands for endothelial - Leukocyte adhesion molecule 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tiemeyer, M.; Swiedler, S.J.; Ishihara, Masayuki; Moreland, M.; Schweingruber, H.; Hirtzer, P.; Brandley, B.K. )

    1991-02-15

    The acute inflammatory response requires that circulating leukocytes bind to and penetrate the vascular wall to access the site of injury. Several receptors have been implicated in this interaction, including a family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins. The authors report here the identification of an endogenous carbohydrate ligand for one of these receptors, endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1). Radiolabeled COS cells transfected with a plasmid containing the cDNA for ELAM-1 were used as probes to screen glycolipids extracted from human leukocytes. COS cells transfected with this plasmid adhered to a subset of sialylated glycolipids resolved on TLC plates or adsorbed on polyvinyl chloride microtiter wells. Adhesion to these glycolipids required calcium but was not inhibited by heparin, chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, or yeast phosphomannan. Monosaccharide composition, linkage analysis, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of the glycolipids indicate that the ligands for ELAM-1 are terminally sialylated lactosylceramides with a variable number of N-acetyllactosamine repeats and at least one fucosylated N-acetylglucosamine residue.

  9. Coagulant Activity of Leukocytes. TISSUE FACTOR ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Niemetz, J.

    1972-01-01

    Peritoneal leukocytes harvested from rabbits which have received two spaced doses of endotoxin have significantly greater (10-fold) coagulant activity than leukocytes from control rabbits. The coagulant activity accelerates the clotting of normal plasma and activates factor X in the presence of factor VII and calcium and is therefore regarded as tissue factor. A total of 40-80 mg tissue factor activity was obtained from the peritoneal cavity of single endotoxin-treated rabbits. In leukocyte subcellular fractions, separated by centrifugation, the specific tissue factor activity sedimented mainly at 14,500 g and above. The procoagulant activity was destroyed after heating for 10 min at 65°C but was preserved at lower temperatures. Polymyxin B, when given with the first dose of endotoxin, reduced both the number of peritoneal leukocytes and their tissue factor activity by two-thirds. When given immediately before the second dose of endotoxin, polymyxin B had no inhibitory effect. PMID:4333021

  10. Allograft rejection in cattle with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Müller, K E; Rutten, V P; Becker, C K; Hoek, A; Bernadina, W E; Wentink, G H; Figdor, C G

    1995-09-01

    In the present investigation cell-mediated immunity in animals with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was studied by means of skin transplantation experiments. Autograft and allograft behaviour in animals with BLAD was compared with the behaviour of simultaneously transplanted autografts and allografts in healthy controls. Allograft survival time was prolonged in three BLAD cattle (28, 30, and 72 days) compared to six healthy controls (12-14 days). When transplantations were repeated on one animal with BLAD using skin grafts from the same donor, accelerated rejection was observed (allograft survival time decreased from 72 days at primary to 35 days at secondary and to 21 days at tertiary transplantation), suggesting the development of immunological memory. Graft-infiltrating lymphocytes that were obtained from allograft biopsies during the period of rejection, were shown to be from recipient origin (beta 2-integrin negative). Our findings demonstrate that, although prolonged allograft survival is observed in cattle with BLAD, skin allografts are ultimately rejected. PMID:8533316

  11. Functional Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Regulate ICAM-1 Expression and Promote Leukocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Caprio, Massimiliano; Newfell, Brenna G.; la Sala, Andrea; Baur, Wendy; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe; Mendelsohn, Michael E.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2008-01-01

    In clinical trials, aldosterone antagonists decrease cardiovascular mortality and ischemia by unknown mechanisms. The steroid hormone aldosterone acts by binding to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. In humans, aldosterone causes MR-dependent endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and in animal models, aldosterone increases vascular macrophage infiltration and atherosclerosis. MR antagonists inhibit these effects without changing blood pressure, suggesting a direct role for vascular MR in EC function and atherosclerosis. Whether human vascular EC express functional MR is not known. Here we show that human coronary artery and aortic EC express MR mRNA and protein and that EC MR mediates aldosterone-dependent gene transcription. Human EC also express the enzyme 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2(11βHSD2) and inhibition of 11βHSD2 in aortic EC enhances gene transactivation by cortisol, supporting that EC 11βHSD2 is functional. Furthermore, aldosterone stimulates transcription of the proatherogenic leukocyte-EC adhesion molecule Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1(ICAM1) gene and protein expression on human coronary artery EC, an effect inhibited by the MR antagonist spironolactone and by MR knock-down with siRNA. Cell adhesion assays demonstrate that aldosterone promotes leukocyte-EC adhesion, an effect that is inhibited by spironolactone and ICAM1 blocking antibody, supporting that aldosterone induction of EC ICAM1 surface expression via MR mediates leukocyte-EC adhesion. These data show that aldosterone activates endogenous EC MR and proatherogenic gene expression in clinically important human EC. These studies describe a novel mechanism by which aldosterone may influence ischemic cardiovascular events and support a new explanation for the decrease in ischemic events in patients treated with aldosterone antagonists. PMID:18467630

  12. The Molecular Basis of Leukocyte Adhesion Involving Phosphatidic Acid and Phospholipase D*

    PubMed Central

    Speranza, Francis; Mahankali, Madhu; Henkels, Karen M.; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Defining how leukocytes adhere to solid surfaces, such as capillary beds, and the subsequent migration through the extracellular matrix, is a central biological issue. We show here that phospholipase D (PLD) and its enzymatic reaction product, phosphatidic acid (PA), regulate cell adhesion of immune cells (macrophages and neutrophils) to collagen and have defined the underlying molecular mechanism in a spatio-temporal manner that coincides with PLD activity timing. A rapid (t½ = 4 min) and transient activation of the PLD1 isoform occurs upon adhesion, and a slower (t½ = 7.5 min) but prolonged (>30 min) activation occurs for PLD2. Importantly, PA directly binds to actin-related protein 3 (Arp3) at EC50 = 22 nm, whereas control phosphatidylcholine did not bind. PA-activated Arp3 hastens actin nucleation with a kinetics of t½ = 3 min at 300 nm (compared with controls of no PA, t½ = 5 min). Thus, PLD and PA are intrinsic components of cell adhesion, which reinforce each other in a positive feedback loop and react from cues from their respective solid substrates. In nascent adhesion, PLD1 is key, whereas a sustained adhesion in mature or established focal points is dependent upon PLD2, PA, and Arp3. A prolonged adhesion could effectively counteract the reversible intrinsic nature of this cellular process and constitute a key player in chronic inflammation. PMID:25187519

  13. Activation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes reduces their adhesion to P-selectin and causes redistribution of ligands for P-selectin on their surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Lorant, D E; McEver, R P; McIntyre, T M; Moore, K L; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A

    1995-01-01

    In acute inflammatory responses, selectins mediate initial rolling of neutrophils (PMNs) along the endothelial surface. This is followed by tight adhesion that requires activation-dependent up-regulation of CD11/CD18 integrins on PMNs. For emigration to occur, the initial bonds that are established at the endothelial surface must be disengaged. We show that activation of PMNs results in their detachment from P-selectin, a glycoprotein expressed at the surface of inflamed endothelium that mediates initial tethering of PMNs. Loosening of the bond occurs when PMNs are activated by platelet-activating factor, which is coexpressed with P-selectin, or by other signaling molecules. The time course of reduced adhesion to P-selectin, when compared to up-regulation of CD11/CD18 integrins, suggests that "bond trading" may occur as activated PMNs transmigrate in vivo. Activation of PMNs did not alter binding of fluid-phase P-selectin, indicating that the ligand(s) for P-selectin is not shed or internalized. Using microspheres coated with P-selectin, we found that ligands for P-selectin were randomly distributed over the surfaces of rounded, unactivated PMNs. An antibody against P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) completely inhibited binding of P-selectin-coated beads suggesting that P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 is the critical binding site in this assay. In contrast to the dispersed pattern on unactivated PMNs, the ligands for P-selectin were localized on the uropods of activated, polarized cells. Pretreating PMNs with cytochalasin D before activation prevented the change in cell shape, the redistribution of binding sites for P-selectin-coated beads, and the decrease in cellular adhesiveness for P-selectin. These experiments indicate that the distribution of ligands for P-selectin is influenced by cellular activation and by cytoskeletal interactions, and that redistribution of these ligands may influence adhesive interactions. Activation of PMNs may cause loosening

  14. Leukocyte Activation in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Minervino, Daniele; Gumiero, Daniela; Nicolazzi, Maria Anna; Carnicelli, Annamaria; Fuorlo, Mariella; Guidone, Caterina; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Fattorossi, Andrea; Mingrone, Geltrude; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The rising prevalence of obesity is a major global health problem. In severe obesity, bariatric surgery (BS) allows to obtain a significant weight loss and comorbidities improvement, among them one of the factors is the thrombotic risk. In this observational study, we measured indices of leukocyte activation in severely obese patients as markers of increased thrombotic risk in relation with serum markers of inflammation before and after BS. Frequency of polymorphonuclear neutrophil-platelet (PLT) and monocyte (MONO)-PLT aggregates as well as of tissue factor (TF) expressing MONOs was measured in the peripheral blood of 58 consecutive obese patients and 30 healthy controls. In 31 of the 58 obese patients, data obtained at the enrollment were compared with those obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months after BS. Compared with healthy controls, obese patients showed a higher frequency of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL)-PLT aggregates (7.47 ± 2.45 [6.82–8.11]% vs 5.85 ± 1.89 [5.14–6.55]%, P = 0.001), MONO-PLT aggregates (12.31 ± 7.33 [10.38–14.24]% vs 8.14 ± 2.22 [7.31–8.97]%, P < 0.001), and TF expressing MONOs (4.01 ± 2.11 [3.45–4.56]% vs 2.64 ± 1.65 [2.02–3.25]%, P = 0.002). PMNL-PLT and MONO-PLT aggregate frequency was positively correlated with TF expressing MONOs (R2 = 0.260, P = 0.049 and R2 = 0.318, P = 0.015, respectively). BS was performed in 31 patients and induced a significant reduction of the body mass index, and waist and hip circumferences. These effects were associated with a significant decrease of PMNL-PLT aggregates at 12 months (7.58 ± 2.27 [6.75–8.42]% vs 4.47 ± 1.11 [3.93–5.01]%, P < 0.001), and a reduction of TF expressing MONOs at 6 (3.82 ± 2.04 [3.07–4.57]% vs 1.60 ± 1.69 [0.30–2.90]%, P = 0.008) and 12 months (3.82 ± 2.04 [3.07–4.57]% vs 1.71 ± 0.54 [1.45–1.97]%, P = 0.001) after BS. These data suggest that leukocyte

  15. Role of bacteria in leukocyte adhesion deficiency-associated periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hajishengallis, George; Moutsopoulos, Niki M

    2016-05-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency Type I (LAD-I)-associated periodontitis is an aggressive form of inflammatory bone loss that has been historically attributed to lack of neutrophil surveillance of the periodontal infection. However, this form of periodontitis has proven unresponsive to antibiotics and/or mechanical removal of the tooth-associated biofilm. Recent studies in LAD-I patients and relevant animal models have shown that the fundamental cause of LAD-I periodontitis involves dysregulation of a granulopoietic cytokine cascade. This cascade includes interleukin IL-23 (IL-23) and IL-17 that drive inflammatory bone loss in LAD-I patients and animal models and, moreover, foster a nutritionally favorable environment for bacterial growth and development of a compositionally unique microbiome. Although the lack of neutrophil surveillance in the periodontal pockets might be expected to lead to uncontrolled bacterial invasion of the underlying connective tissue, microbiological analyses of gingival biopsies from LAD-I patients did not reveal tissue-invasive infection. However, bacterial lipopolysaccharide was shown to translocate into the lesions of LAD-I periodontitis. It is concluded that the bacteria serve as initial triggers for local immunopathology through translocation of bacterial products into the underlying tissues where they unleash the dysregulated IL-23-IL-17 axis. Subsequently, the IL-23/IL-17 inflammatory response sustains and shapes a unique local microbiome which, in turn, can further exacerbate inflammation and bone loss in the susceptible host. PMID:26375893

  16. Chromosome and sperm size of Holsteins with and without bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Steinholt, H C; Chandler, J E; Baron, R A; Adkinson, R W

    1994-05-01

    The objective was to evaluate bull differences in chromosomal and spermatozoal areas related to the occurrence of the bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome. Lymphocyte chromosomes from 30 Holstein bulls and 2 Holstein heifers were measured using image analysis and computer-enhanced video-microscopy. Spermatozoal head areas from 29 of the 30 bulls were measured. Autosomal rank was based on decreasing area. Average total autosomal areas were not the same across bulls. One group of bulls had significantly smaller average chromosomal areas than the others; this group carried bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome. Area measures of spermatozoal heads showed that bulls with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome had significantly larger head areas than normal bulls. Lymphocyte chromosomes from 3 cattle that were homozygous for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome were significantly smaller than chromosomes from syndrome heterozygotes. Carrier identification was improved by the use of autosomal and sperm area measurements in addition to pedigree evaluation. PMID:8046065

  17. Leukocyte chemoattractant activity of diacylglycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.M.; Hoffman, R.D.; Nishijima, J.; Shin, H.S.

    1986-03-05

    Phosphatidylinositol breakdown with the generation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DG) and inositol phosphates occurs in response to receptor mediated stimulation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). In the authors attempt to demonstrate the direct role of 1,2-DG in cell migration, they have found 1,2 dioctanoyl glycerol (1,2-C8DG) to be a chemoattractant for 6C3HED, a mouse thymic lymphoma, and human peripheral blood PMN's. The chemoattractant activity for both cell types was observed at concentrations from 0.5 to 10mM in an under agarose assay. The maximum effect of 1,2-C8DG on 6C3HED cells was similar to that of 1mM lysophosphatidylcholine and the maximum effect of 1,2-C8DG on PMN's was similar to that of 10/sup -7/M f-met-leu-phe. Other 1,2-DG's with acyl chains ranging from 6 to 18 carbons in length and 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol were also chemoattractants for 6C3HED, although their activities were less than 1,2-C8DG. In addition, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), another activator of protein kinase C, was a chemoattractant for 6C3HED and human PMN's. PMA was more potent than 1,2-C8DG for both 6C3HED and PMN's with chemoattractant activity in the range of 30nM to 1..mu..M. These studies support the direct role of 1,2-DG in the transduction of chemotactic stimuli in leukocytes and further suggest that the formation of diacylglycerol represents a common step in the migratory responses of lymphoid and myeloid cells.

  18. L1 adhesion molecule on mouse leukocytes: regulation and involvement in endothelial cell binding.

    PubMed

    Hubbe, M; Kowitz, A; Schirrmacher, V; Schachner, M; Altevogt, P

    1993-11-01

    L1 is a cell surface glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily which was initially shown to mediate adhesion between neural cells. Recently we have reported that L1 is expressed by bone marrow cells and the majority of mature lymphocytes (Kowitz et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 1992. 22: 1199-1205). To analyze the function of L1 on leukocytes we studied its regulation following cell activation. In vitro activation of B lymphocytes with lipopolysaccharide or T lymphocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/Ca2+ ionophore, concanavalin A or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody as well as in vivo activation of V beta 8+ T cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) revealed a down-regulation of L1 within 48 h. A rapid loss of L1 expression was seen when mouse neutrophils were activated with PMA alone. This rapid loss paralleled the shedding of L-selectin. We also studied a possible role of L1 in the binding of leukocytes to endothelial cells. ESb-MP lymphoma cells with a high expression of L1 (L1hi) could bind to bend3 endothelioma cells without prior activation with inflammatory cytokines. The interaction was inhibited by anti-L1 antibodies. In contrast, ESb-MP cells with low L1 expression (L1lo) were only marginally bound. Latex beads coated with affinity-isolated L1 antigen were also able to bind to the endothelioma cells in a specific fashion. The binding of ESb-MP lymphoma cells required Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions and was sensitive to cold temperature. Since the endothelioma cells did not express L1 the binding mechanism studied here is distinct from the established L1-L1 homotypic interaction. It is possible that the novel L1-mediated adhesion pathway involves an unidentified ligand and could play a role in leukocyte migration. PMID:8223869

  19. Radiation-induced normal tissue injury: role of adhesion molecules in leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Quarmby, S; Kumar, P; Kumar, S

    1999-07-30

    The late onset of necrosis and fibrosis in normal tissues can be a serious consequence of radiotherapy in cancer patients. Because radiation-induced vascular injury precedes the tissue damage, vascular injury is regarded as crucial in the pathogenesis of tissue damage. An understanding of the processes responsible is essential to develop strategies for the amelioration of radiation-induced normal tissue damage. Leukocyte infiltration is commonly observed at sites of irradiation and is likely to lead to the acceleration and/or induction of parenchymal atrophy, fibrosis and necrosis in normal tissues following radiotherapy. The molecular mechanisms mediating leukocyte infiltration of tissues during inflammation have been studied extensively. It is now well established that cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) expressed on leukocytes and endothelial cells control the trafficking of leukocytes from the blood vessel lumen in these conditions. CAMs including E (endothelial), P (platelet) and L (leukocyte)-selectins, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), beta1 and beta2 integrins and CD31 are involved in the cascade of events resulting in rolling, arrest and transmigration of leukocytes through the inflamed endothelium. Whether a similar sequence of molecular events induces leukocyte sequestration in irradiated normal tissues is not known. This review is focussed on the role of CAMs in radiation-induced leukocyte infiltration of normal tissues and the therapeutic implications of these findings. PMID:10399956

  20. Analysis of mononuclear cell functions in Holstein cattle with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Nochi, H; Sanada, Y; Tamoto, K; Noda, H; Kociba, G J

    1994-08-01

    Lymphocyte functions in cattle affected with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD, termed BLAD in cattle) were evaluated by lymphocyte markers, blastogenic response, and immunoglobulin concentrations; mononuclear phagocyte functions were assessed by chemotactic and luminol-dependent chemiluminescent (CL) responses to determine the effects of impaired expression of leukocyte CD18 on mononuclear cell functions. Deficient CD18 expression on lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes from cattle with BLAD was clearly detected by use of flow cytometric analysis. There were no significant differences in the population of peanut agglutinin (PNA)-positive and surface immunoglobulin-bearing blood lymphocytes from clinically normal cattle and cattle with BLAD, as determined by flow cytometric analysis. Lymphocytes from cattle with BLAD had strong mitogen-induced blastogenic responses, which were greater than those from controls. Adherence of mononuclear phagocytes from cattle with BLAD was markedly impaired, and their chemotactic responses had diminished values, compared with those of controls. Luminol-dependent CL of mononuclear phagocytes from affected cattle, stimulated by opsonized zymosan, had significantly (P < 0.01) decreased values, compared with those of controls. Concentrations of IgG were markedly increased in serum from cattle with BLAD, compared with those in controls. These results indicated that impaired expression of leukocyte CD18 has marked effects on adhering activity of mononuclear phagocytes, and significantly inhibits CL response of mononuclear phagocytes mediated by inactivated-complement 3b-dependent functions. High selective immunoglobulin concentrations indicated that lymphocytes of B-cell lineage may have normal function. PMID:7978649

  1. Multi-scale Simulation of Receptor-Ligand-Mediated Adhesion of Two (PMN) Leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vijay; Konstantopoulos, Kostas; Eggleton, Charles

    2008-11-01

    Leukocytes are recruited from the bloodstream to the site of inflammation through interactions between cell surface receptors and complementary ligands expressed on the surface of the endothelium. PMNs rolling on activated endothelium can mediate secondary capture of PMNs flowing in the free stream through homotypic interactions. This interaction is mediated by L-selectin binding to PSGL-1 between the free-stream and adherent PMNs. Both L-selectin and PSGL-1 molecules are concentrated on the tips of PMN microvilli. It has been demonstrated that steady application of a threshold level of shear rate is necessary to support PMN homotypic aggregation in bulk suspension. A reduction of shear rate below a threshold value diminishes the probability of cell adhesion. Cell aggregation is a complex phenomenon involving the interplay of bond kinetics and hydrodynamics. We simulate PSGL-1--L-selectin-mediated homotypic leukocyte adhesion-dissociation under an externally applied force field using the Immersed Boundary Method. We investigate the influence of membrane elasticity and kinetic parameters on contact area, bond dynamics, average number of bonds formed and their respective life time. A Hookean spring model is used to characterize receptor-ligand bonds and their stochastic nature is simulated using the Monte Carlo technique.

  2. Insulin Resistance in PCOS Patients Enhances Oxidative Stress and Leukocyte Adhesion: Role of Myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Victor M.; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Bañuls, Celia; Diaz-Morales, Noelia; Martinez de Marañon, Arantxa; Rios-Navarro, Cesar; Alvarez, Angeles; Gomez, Marcelino; Rocha, Milagros; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases and oxidative stress are related to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and insulin resistance (IR). We have evaluated the relationship between myeloperoxidase (MPO) and leukocyte activation in PCOS patients according to homeostatic model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR), and have explored a possible correlation between these factors and endocrine and inflammatory parameters. This was a prospective controlled study conducted in an academic medical center. The study population consisted of 101 PCOS subjects and 105 control subjects. We divided PCOS subjects into PCOS non-IR (HOMA-IR<2.5) and PCOS IR (HOMA-IR>2.5). Metabolic and anthropometric parameters, total and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, MPO levels, interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells and leukocytes, adhesion molecules (E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) were evaluated. Oxidative stress was observed in PCOS patients, in whom there was an increase in total and mitochondrial ROS production and MPO levels. Enhanced rolling flux and adhesion, and a decrease in polymorphonuclear cell rolling velocity were also detected in PCOS subjects. Increases in IL-6 and TNF-α and adhesion molecules (E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) were also observed, particularly in the PCOS IR group, providing evidence that inflammation and oxidative stress are related in PCOS patients. HOMA-IR was positively correlated with hsCRP (p<0.001, r = 0.304), ROS production (p<0.01, r = 0.593), leukocyte rolling flux (p<0.05, r = 0.446), E-selectin (p<0.01, r = 0.436) and IL-6 (p<0.001, r = 0.443). The results show an increase in the rate of ROS and MPO levels in PCOS patients in general, and particularly in those with IR. Inflammation in PCOS induces leukocyte-endothelium interactions and a simultaneous increase in IL-6, TNF-α, E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. These conditions are aggravated by the presence of IR. PMID:27007571

  3. Intramammary infections in primiparous Holsteins: heritabilities and comparisons of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency carriers and noncarriers.

    PubMed

    Wanner, J M; Rogers, G W; Kehrli, M E; Cooper, J B

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency on intramammary infection (IMI) in Holstein cows at first calving. Quarter milk samples were collected between 3 d prepartum and 4 d postpartum from 756 Holstein cows in first lactation. These samples were frozen and subsequently cultured using National Mastitis Council recommendations. Sixty-eight carriers of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency were identified (9.0% of cows) from an additional milk sampling collected in early lactation. Binary variables (infected or uninfected) for each quarter were defined as dependent variables to evaluate IMI incidence from all bacterial species and major species groups: coliforms, coagulase-negative staphylococci, and streptococci other than Streptococcus agalactiae. The model included herd-season of calving, days in milk when samples were collected, age at calving, quarter, cow (random effect), and bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency. Sire was included as a random effect (instead of cow), and bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency was dropped from the model to estimate heritabilities. Heritabilities for IMI incidence from the various groups of organisms ranged from 0.02 to 0.66 (0.21 from all bacterial species). No differences were observed between carriers of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency and homozygous normal noncarriers for IMI from coliform, coagulase-negative staphylococci, streptococci other than Streptococcus agalactiae, or all bacterial species combined. PMID:9891275

  4. Clinical mastitis in primiparous Holsteins: comparisons of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency carriers and noncarriers.

    PubMed

    Wanner, J M; Rogers, G W; Kehrli, M E; Cooper, J B

    1999-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency on clinical mastitis incidence, severity, and duration in Holstein cows. Genomic DNA from milk of 847 Holstein cows in six Pennsylvania herds was used to determine bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency genotypes (82 or 9.7% carriers). Data on clinical mastitis incidence, severity, duration, and pathogen involved were collected during first lactation for the project cows. One hundred ninety-four cows had one or more clinical mastitis episodes; milk samples from each quarter with clinical mastitis were collected at discovery of the episode and were cultured following National Mastitis Council recommendations. The overall incidence of clinical mastitis was significantly affected by sire and herd-year-season of calving. In addition, incidence of clinical mastitis tended to increase with age at first calving. Severity and duration of clinical mastitis were impacted by the pathogen involved. Incidence of clinical mastitis from all pathogens, from coagulase-negative staphylococci, and from coliform bacteria was not significantly related to bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency status. Carriers tended to have lower rates of mastitis from streptococci other than Streptococcus agalactiae when compared with noncarriers, but this result should be interpreted with caution because of the low frequency of mastitis from the streptococci. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency status was unrelated to severity or duration of clinical episodes. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency carriers are probably similar to noncarriers in resistance to clinical mastitis. PMID:10575620

  5. Increased expression of NTPDases 2 and 3 in mesenteric endothelial cells during schistosomiasis favors leukocyte adhesion through P2Y1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Suellen Darc Santos; Oliveira, Nathália F; Meyer-Fernandes, José R; Savio, Luiz Eduardo Baggio; Ornelas, Flavia G I; Ferreira, Zulma S; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Silva, Claudia Lucia Martins

    2016-07-01

    Schistosomiasis is caused by an intravascular parasite and linked to phenotypic changes in endothelial cells that favor inflammation. Endothelial cells express P2Y1 receptors (P2Y1R), and their activation by ADP favors leukocyte adhesion to the endothelial monolayer. We aimed to evaluate the influence of schistosomiasis upon endothelial purinergic signaling-mediated leukocyte adhesion. Mesenteric endothelial cells and mononuclear cells from control and Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice were used in co-culture. P2Y1R levels were similar in both groups. Basal leukocyte adhesion was higher in the infected than in the control group; leukocyte adhesion increased after treatment with the P2Y1R agonist 2-MeSATP in both groups, though it only marginally increased in the infected group. Pre-incubation with the selective P2Y1R antagonist MRS2179 (0.3μM) prevented the agonist effect. However, in the infected group it also reduced the basal leukocyte adhesion, suggesting endothelial cell pre-activation. The endothelial expressions of NTPDases 2 and 3 were significantly increased in the infected group, increasing extracellular ATP hydrolysis and ADP formation by endothelial cells. Therefore, mesenteric endothelial cells are primed by schistosomiasis to a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by an increased expression of NTPDases 2 and 3, favoring ADP accumulation and mononuclear cell adhesion, possibly contributing to mesenteric inflammation and schistosomiasis morbidity. PMID:26924460

  6. Radiographic and immunohistochemical analysis of leukocyte adhesion deficiency in Holstein heifers.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Taniyama, H; Izumisawa, Y; Kotani, T; Noda, H; Kociba, G J

    1995-10-01

    Radiographic and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in two Holstein heifers with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD). Severe bone resorption, osteolysis and severe progressive periodontitis in submandibula due to dysfunction of leukocytes in heifers affected with BLAD were demonstrated by radiographic examination. Immunohistochemical analysis of lymph nodes using anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody demonstrated that CD18-positive cells were not found on those from a heifer affected with BLAD, whereas CD18-positive cells were clearly present in lymph nodes from a clinically normal heifer. These characteristic findings support the importance of adherence-dependent leukocyte functions in host defense. PMID:8548695

  7. Leukocyte emigration in normal calves and calves with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Masuyama, A; Masue, M; Yuki, M; Higuchi, H; Ohtsuka, H; Kurosawa, T; Sato, H; Noda, H

    1997-12-01

    The emigration of leukocytes from calves with beta 2 integrin deficiency (BLAD) into bronchoalveolar spaces and scraped tissues was compared to that of normal calves. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils were found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from BLAD-affected calves showing chronic pneumonia. The neutrophils were complement receptor type 3 (CR3)-negative when characterized by flow cytometric analysis using anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody. Chemiluminescent response mediated by CR3 in neutrophils isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from BLAD-calves showed similar findings obtained from CR3-deficient neutrophils. Neutrophils from normal calves migrated into scraped tissue which was prepared in an upper gluteal surface area, whereas few leukocytes from calves with BLAD migrated to the scraped tissue, evaluated by skin window (Rebuck) method. These findings confirmed the extravasation of CR3-deficient leukocytes into bronchoalveolar lumen in BLAD calves, and demonstrated in vivo characteristics of extravasating property of normal and CR3-deficient neutrophils into scraped tissues. PMID:9450245

  8. Receptor cleavage and P-selectin-dependent reduction of leukocyte adhesion in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Angela Y; Ha, Jessica N; Delano, Frank A; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2012-07-01

    The SHR, a genetic model for hypertension and the metabolic syndrome, has attenuated leukocyte adhesion to the postcapillary endothelium by an unknown mechanism. Based on recent evidence of elevated levels of MMPs in plasma and on microvascular endothelium of the SHR with cleavage of several receptor types, we hypothesize that the reduced leukocyte-endothelial interaction is a result of enhanced proteolytic cleavage of P-selectin on the postcapillary endothelium and PSGL-1 on leukocytes. The attenuated rolling interactions of SHR leukocytes with the endothelium were restored by chronic treatment with a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor (CGS) for 24 weeks. The SHR MMP levels, in plasma and mesentery, as well as the systolic blood pressure, decreased significantly with treatment. In the SHR mesentery, labeling of P-selectin in the postcapillary venules by immunohistochemistry demonstrated, on average, a 31% lower extracellular P-selectin density compared with the normotensive WKY. A significantly lower extracellular PSGL-1 density on the membranes of SHR neutrophils compared with the WKY also supported our hypothesis. In vivo stimulation of the mesenteric postcapillary venules with histamine demonstrated that the SHR had an attenuated response, as measured by leukocyte rolling velocity on the endothelium. The reduced P-selectin and PSGL-1 density, on SHR postcapillary endothelium and on SHR leukocytes, respectively, was restored significantly by chronic MMP inhibition. The impaired ability of SHR leukocytes to reduce rolling velocity upon inflammatory stimulation led to fewer firmly adhered leukocytes to the endothelium as a contributor to immune suppression. PMID:22566571

  9. Human dermal mast cells contain and release tumor necrosis factor alpha, which induces endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, L J; Trinchieri, G; Waldorf, H A; Whitaker, D; Murphy, G F

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates endothelial leukocyte interactions by inducing expression of adhesion molecules. In this report, we demonstrate that human dermal mast cells contain sizeable stores of immunoreactive and biologically active TNF-alpha within granules, which can be released rapidly into the extracellular space upon degranulation. Among normal human dermal cells, mast cells are the predominant cell type that expresses both TNF-alpha protein and TNF-alpha mRNA. Moreover, induction of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 expression is a direct consequence of release of mast cell-derived TNF-alpha. These findings establish a role for human mast cells as "gatekeepers" of the dermal microvasculature and indicate that mast cell products other than vasoactive amines influence endothelium in a proinflammatory fashion. Images PMID:1709737

  10. Serum biochemical changes and chemiluminescent responses of whole blood in Holstein cattle with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Tanaka, S; Oba, M; Minami, S; Noda, H

    1994-08-01

    Serum biochemical profile and whole blood chemiluminescent (CL) responses in 8 Holstein cattle affected with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) were evaluated. Concentrations of sodium, chloride and calcium in serum from cattle affected with LAD were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased as compared with controls. The characteristic changes in serum proteins were hypoalbuminemia and hyperglobulinemia, and the concentrations of albumin and gammaglobulin in serum from normal cattle and cattle affected with LAD were significantly (p < 0.01) different. Significantly (p < 0.01) diminished CL indices and prolonged peak time of CL responses in whole blood were detected in cattle affected with LAD. These findings indicate that the CL response associated with iC3b receptor mediated phagocytic activity is impaired in cattle affected with LAD. The whole blood CL assay appeared to be practical and useful for routine evaluation of blood samples from cattle affected with LAD. PMID:7999886

  11. Endothelial cells proactively form microvilli-like membrane projections upon intercellular adhesion molecule 1 engagement of leukocyte LFA-1.

    PubMed

    Carman, Christopher V; Jun, Chang-Duk; Salas, Azucena; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-12-01

    Specific leukocyte/endothelial interactions are critical for immunity and inflammation, yet the molecular details of this interaction interface remain poorly understood. Thus, we investigated, with confocal microscopy, the distribution dynamics of the central adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and LFA-1 in this context. Monolayers of activated HUVECs stained with fluorescent anti-ICAM-1 Fabs or Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells expressing ICAM-1-green fluorescent protein were allowed to bind LFA-1-bearing monocytes, neutrophils, or K562 LFA-1 transfectants. ICAM-1 was rapidly relocalized to newly formed microvilli-like membrane projections in response to binding LFA-1 on leukocytes. These ICAM-1-enriched projections encircled the leukocytes extending up their sides and clustered LFA-1 underneath into linear tracks. Projections formed independently of VCAM-1/very late Ag 4 interactions, shear, and proactive contributions from the LFA-1-bearing cells. In the ICAM-1-bearing endothelial cells, projections were enriched in actin but not microtubules, required intracellular calcium, and intact microfilament and microtubule cytoskeletons and were independent of Rho/Rho kinase signaling. Disruption of these projections with cytochalasin D, colchicine, or BAPTA-AM had no affect on firm adhesion. These data show that in response to LFA-1 engagement the endothelium proactively forms an ICAM-1-enriched cup-like structure that surrounds adherent leukocytes but is not important for firm adhesion. This finding leaves open a possible role in leukocyte transendothelial migration, which would be consistent with the geometry and kinetics of formation of the cup-like structure. PMID:14634129

  12. The CO donor CORM-2 inhibits LPS-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion in human rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Pei-Ling; Chuang, Yu-Chen; Chen, Yu-Wen; Lin, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Infection with Gram-negative bacteria has been recognized as an initiator of rheumatoid arthritis, which is characterized by chronic inflammation and infiltration of immune cells. Carbon monoxide (CO) exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. Here we have investigated the detailed mechanisms of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression induced by LPS and if CO inhibited LPS-induced leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts by suppressing VCAM-1 expression. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) were incubated with LPS and/or the CO-releasing compound CORM-2. Effects of LPS on VCAM-1 levels were determined by analysing mRNA expression, promoter activity, protein expression, and immunohistochemical staining. The molecular mechanisms were investigated by determining the expression, activation, and binding activity of transcriptional factors using target signal antagonists. KEY RESULTS CORM-2 significantly inhibited inflammatory responses in LPS-treated RASFs by down-regulating the expression of adhesion molecule VCAM-1 and leukocyte infiltration. The down-regulation of LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression involved inhibition of the expression of phosphorylated-NF-κB p65 and AP-1 (p-c-Jun, c-Jun and c-Fos mRNA levels). These results were confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to detect NF-κB and AP-1 DNA binding activity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS LPS-mediated formation of the TLR4/MyD88/TRAF6/c-Src complex regulated NF-κB and MAPKs/AP-1 activation leading to VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion. CORM-2, which liberates CO to elicit direct biological activities, attenuated LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression by interfering with NF-κB and AP-1 activation, and significantly reduced LPS-induced immune cell infiltration of the synovium. PMID:24628691

  13. Endothelial adhesion receptors are recruited to adherent leukocytes by inclusion in preformed tetraspanin nanoplatforms

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Olga; Zamai, Moreno; Yáñez-Mó, María; Tejera, Emilio; López-Romero, Pedro; Monk, Peter N.; Gratton, Enrico; Caiolfa, Valeria R.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, receptors for leukocyte integrins, are recruited to cell–cell contact sites on the apical membrane of activated endothelial cells. In this study, we show that this recruitment is independent of ligand engagement, actin cytoskeleton anchorage, and heterodimer formation. Instead, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 are recruited by inclusion within specialized preformed tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, which act as endothelial adhesive platforms (EAPs). Using advanced analytical fluorescence techniques, we have characterized the diffusion properties at the single-molecule level, nanoscale organization, and specific intradomain molecular interactions of EAPs in living primary endothelial cells. This study provides compelling evidence for the existence of EAPs as physical entities at the plasma membrane, distinct from lipid rafts. Scanning electron microscopy of immunogold-labeled samples treated with a specific tetraspanin-blocking peptide identify nanoclustering of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 within EAPs as a novel mechanism for supramolecular organization that regulates the leukocyte integrin–binding capacity of both endothelial receptors during extravasation. PMID:18955551

  14. HOXA9 Methylation by PRMT5 Is Essential for Endothelial Cell Expression of Leukocyte Adhesion Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Smarajit; Harris, Daniel P.; Adams, Gregory N.; Lause, Gregory E.; McHugh, Anne; Tillmaand, Emily G.; Money, Angela; Willard, Belinda; Fox, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    The induction of proinflammatory proteins in stimulated endothelial cells (EC) requires activation of multiple transcription programs. The homeobox transcription factor HOXA9 has an important regulatory role in cytokine induction of the EC-leukocyte adhesion molecules (ELAM) E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). However, the mechanism underlying stimulus-dependent activation of HOXA9 is completely unknown. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanism of HOXA9 activation by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and show an unexpected requirement for arginine methylation by protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). PRMT5 was identified as a TNF-α-dependent binding partner of HOXA9 by mass spectrometry. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of PRMT5 abrogated stimulus-dependent HOXA9 methylation with concomitant loss in E-selectin or VCAM-1 induction. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that PRMT5 is recruited to the E-selectin promoter following transient HOXA9 binding to its cognate recognition sequence. PRMT5 induces symmetric dimethylation of Arg140 on HOXA9, an event essential for E-selectin induction. In summary, PRMT5 is a critical coactivator component in a newly defined, HOXA9-containing transcription complex. Moreover, stimulus-dependent methylation of HOXA9 is essential for ELAM expression during the EC inflammatory response. PMID:22269951

  15. [Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD)--a hereditary disease in cattle].

    PubMed

    Heckert, H P; Wittstatt, U; Hofmann, W

    1997-07-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is an autosomal recessive and lethal disease of Holstein-Friesian cattle. It is characterized by leukocytosis with more than 30,000 cells/microliter blood and decreased resistance to infectious diseases. Details of the history and pathological findings in three patients, the situation in the herd and breeding aspects are described. PMID:9312893

  16. Imaging leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium at high intraluminal pressure.

    PubMed

    Michell, Danielle L; Andrews, Karen L; Woollard, Kevin J; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, hypertension is reported to be in approximately a quarter of the population and is the leading biomedical risk factor for mortality worldwide. In the vasculature hypertension is associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased inflammation leading to atherosclerosis and various disease states such as chronic kidney disease(2), stroke(3) and heart failure(4). An initial step in vascular inflammation leading to atherogenesis is the adhesion cascade which involves the rolling, tethering, adherence and subsequent transmigration of leukocytes through the endothelium. Recruitment and accumulation of leukocytes to the endothelium is mediated by an upregulation of adhesion molecules such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin as well as increases in cytokine and chemokine release and an upregulation of reactive oxygen species(5). In vitro methods such as static adhesion assays help to determine mechanisms involved in cell-to-cell adhesion as well as the analysis of cell adhesion molecules. Methods employed in previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that acute increases in pressure on the endothelium can lead to monocyte adhesion, an upregulation of adhesion molecules and inflammatory markers(6) however, similar to many in vitro assays, these findings have not been performed in real time under physiological flow conditions, nor with whole blood. Therefore, in vivo assays are increasingly utilised in animal models to demonstrate vascular inflammation and plaque development. Intravital microscopy is now widely used to assess leukocyte adhesion, rolling, migration and transmigration(7-9). When combining the effects of pressure on leukocyte to endothelial adhesion the in vivo studies are less extensive. One such study examines the real time effects of flow and shear on arterial growth and remodelling but inflammatory markers were only assessed via immunohistochemistry(10). Here we present

  17. Comparative rheology of the adhesion of platelets and leukocytes from flowing blood: why are platelets so small?

    PubMed

    Watts, Tim; Barigou, Mostafa; Nash, Gerard B

    2013-06-01

    We investigated rheological adaptation of leukocytes and platelets for their adhesive functions in inflammation and hemostasis, respectively. Adhesion and margination of leukocytes or platelets were quantified for blood perfused through capillaries coated with P-selectin or collagen, when flow rate, suspending phase viscosity, red cell aggregation, or rigidity was modified. Independent variation of shear rate and shear stress indicated that the ability of platelets to attach at higher levels than leukocytes was largely attributable to their smaller size, reducing their velocity before attachment, and, especially, drag after attachment. Increasing red cell aggregation increased the number of marginated and adhering leukocytes but inhibited platelet adhesion without effect on the number marginated. Increasing red cell rigidity tended to inhibit leukocyte adhesion but promote platelet adhesion. The effects on platelets may be explained by changes in the depth of the near-wall, red cell-depleted layer; broadening (or narrowing) this layer to greater (or less) than the platelet diameter would decrease (or increase) the normal force applied by red blood cells and make attachment less (or more) efficient. Thus different adhesive capabilities of leukocytes and platelets may arise from their differences in size, both directly because of influence on cell velocity and force experienced at the wall and indirectly through effects of size on margination in the bloodstream and interaction with the cell-free layer. In addition, red cell aggregation (of hitherto uncertain physiological significance) may be useful in promoting leukocyte adhesion in inflamed venules but inhibiting unwanted platelet deposition in veins. PMID:23585130

  18. The genetic immunodeficiency disease, leukocyte adhesion deficiency, in humans, dogs, cattle, and mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu-Chen; Bauer, Thomas R; Ackermann, Mark R; Smith, C Wayne; Kehrli, Marcus E; Starost, Matthew F; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2004-08-01

    This review highlights the genotype-phenotype relationship of the genetic immunodeficiency disease leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) in humans, dogs, cattle, and mice, and provides assessment of the opportunities that each animal species provides in the understanding of leukocyte biology and in developing new therapeutic approaches to LAD in humans. This comparison is important since animal models of genetic diseases in humans provide the opportunity to test new therapeutic approaches in an appropriate, disease-specific model. The success of this approach is dependent on the relationship of the phenotype in the animal to the phenotype of the disease in humans. PMID:15357315

  19. Event Tracking Model of Adhesion Identifies Load-bearing Bonds in Rolling Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    POSPIESZALSKA, MARIA K.; ZARBOCK, ALEXANDER; PICKARD, JOHN E.; LEY, KLAUS

    2009-01-01

    Objectives P-selectin binding to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL)-1 mediates leukocyte rolling under conditions of inflammation and injury. The objectives were to develop an efficient, high temporal resolution model for direct simulation of leukocyte rolling, and then to conduct a study of load-bearing bonds using the model. Methods A stochastic π-calculus-driven Event Tracking Model of Adhesion was developed and compared with experimental data. Multiple simulations for each case were conducted to obtain high confidence numerical characteristics of leukocyte rolling. Results Leukocyte rolling and the underlying P-selectin—PSGL-1 bonds were studied under low wall shear rate (25-50 s-1) conditions from measured parameters of leukocyte rolling and bond properties. For the first time, the location, number, lifetime, history, and kinetics of load-bearing bonds and their influence on cell rolling are identified. Instantaneous cell displacements, translational and rotational velocities, and cell-endothelium distances are derived. The model explains the commonly observed “stop-start” type rolling behavior and reveals that a few load-bearing bonds are sufficient to support rolling while a large number of bonds dissociate before becoming load-bearing. Conclusions The presented model provides a method for precise and direct simulation of leukocyte rolling, and sets a foundation upon which further refinements can be introduced. PMID:19023690

  20. Th1-Induced CD106 Expression Mediates Leukocytes Adhesion on Synovial Fibroblasts from Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Cristina; Capone, Manuela; Rossi, Maria Caterina; Chillà, Anastasia; Santarlasci, Veronica; Mazzoni, Alessio; Cimaz, Rolando; Liotta, Francesco; Maggi, Enrico; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Del Rosso, Mario; Annunziato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that subsets of human T helper cells can orchestrate leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts (SFbs), thus regulating the retention of leukocytes in the joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Several cell types, such as monocytes/macrophages, granulocytes, T and B lymphocytes, SFbs and osteoclasts participate in joint tissue damage JIA. Among T cells, an enrichment of classic and non-classic Th1 subsets, has been found in JIA synovial fluid (SF), compared to peripheral blood (PB). Moreover, it has been shown that IL-12 in the SF of inflamed joints mediates the shift of Th17 lymphocytes towards the non-classic Th1 subset. Culture supernatants of Th17, classic and non-classic Th1 clones, have been tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation, and to induce expression of adhesion molecules on SFbs, obtained from healthy donors. Culture supernatants of both classic and non-classic Th1, but not of Th17, clones, were able to induce CD106 (VCAM-1) up-regulation on SFbs. This effect, mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, was crucial for the adhesion of circulating leukocytes on SFbs. Finally, we found that SFbs derived from SF of JIA patients expressed higher levels of CD106 than those from healthy donors, resembling the phenotype of SFbs activated in vitro with Th1-clones supernatants. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that classic and non-classic Th1 cells induce CD106 expression on SFbs through TNF-α, an effect that could play a role in leukocytes retention in inflamed joints. PMID:27123929

  1. Adhesion and migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes across human brain microvessel endothelial cells are differentially regulated by endothelial cell adhesion molecules and modulate monolayer permeability.

    PubMed

    Wong, Donald; Prameya, Rukmini; Dorovini-Zis, Katerina

    2007-03-01

    The mechanisms by which polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) cross the human blood-brain barrier have not been fully elucidated. Using a well characterized in vitro model of the human BBB, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules on the adhesion and transendothelial migration of PMN across primary cultures of human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC). A small number of PMN (0.06%) adhered to unstimulated HBMEC, and the basal adhesion was not affected by anti-adhesion molecule antibodies. Treatment of HBMEC with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha resulted in increased PMN adhesion that was significantly inhibited by blocking antibodies to E-selectin and ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1 or PECAM-1. A very small number of adherent PMN migrated across unstimulated HBMEC monolayers. Migration increased 2 to 20 fold following stimulation of HBMEC with TNF-alpha. Monoclonal antibody blocking studies showed that PMN used ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1, E-selectin or PECAM-1 to move across activated monolayers. Anti-adhesion molecule antibodies did not diminish the basal PMN migration. Ultrastructurally, PMN often aggregated on top and between adjacent endothelial cells and adhered by first extending pseudopodia along the apical endothelial surface. They then flattened and inserted themselves between endothelial cells in order to migrate across the monolayers. At the end of the migration period, the cultures resumed their continuity with no evidence of disruption. Transendothelial migration of PMN decreased the transendothelial electrical resistance and increased the permeability to horseradish peroxidase, which penetrated alongside the migrating leukocytes. A blocking antibody to ICAM-1 that greatly decreased migration, had no effect on the permeability changes. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms that regulate the entry of PMN into the brain and the increased permeability of the BBB in CNS inflammation. PMID:17291598

  2. Inflammation induced by Bothrops asper venom: release of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids, and role of adhesion molecules in leukocyte infiltration.

    PubMed

    Zamuner, Stella Regina; Zuliani, Juliana Pavan; Fernandes, Cristina Maria; Gutiérrez, José Maria; de Fátima Pereira Teixeira, Catarina

    2005-12-01

    Bothrops asper venom (BaV) causes systemic and local effects characterized by an acute inflammatory reaction with accumulation of leukocytes and release of endogenous mediators. In this study, the effects of BaV on the release of the cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-alpha and the eicosanoids LTB4 and TXA2 in the peritoneal cavity of mice were analyzed. We also investigated the participation of beta2 integrin chain, l-selectin, LFA-1, ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 adhesion molecules in the BaV-induced leukocyte accumulation. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-alpha, as well as eicosanoids LTB4 and TXA2 were significantly increased after BaV injection (250 microg/kg), whereas no increment in IL-1 was observed. Anti-mouse l-selectin, LFA-1, ICAM-1, PECAM-1 and beta2 integrin chain monoclonal antibodies resulted in a reduction of neutrophil accumulation induced by BaV injection compared with isotype-matched control injected animals. These data suggest that BaV is able to induce the activation of leukocytes and endothelium to express adhesion molecules involved in the recruitment of neutrophils into the inflammed site. Furthermore, these results showed that BaV induces the release of cytokines and eicosanoids in the local of the venom injection; these inflammatory mediators may be important for the initiation and amplification of the inflammatory reaction characteristic from Bothrops sp envenomation. PMID:16198389

  3. Expression of beta 2 integrins on blood leukocytes of cows with or without bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cox, E; Mast, J; MacHugh, N; Schwenger, B; Goddeeris, B M

    1997-09-19

    Peripheral blood leukocytes of 11 normal cows, 7 cows heterozygous and 2 heifers homozygous for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) were analysed by flow cytometry for the intensity of their beta 2 integrin expression (LFA-1(CD11a/CD18), CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18)). BLAD-homozygotes revealed no or a very weak expression of the beta 2 integrins and had a 10-fold and 4- to 5-fold increase in absolute number of neutrophils and monocytes, respectively, whereas the absolute number of lymphocytes remained normal. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the beta 2 integrins (CD18) in heterozygous animals was 56 to 90% of this in the normal cows (MFI between 14 and 512). The difference in the expression level was most pronounced for LFA-1 on the small cluster of lymphocytes with the highest MFI for LFA-1. Repeated analysis and phorbol myristate acetate stimulation revealed that the LFA-1 expression on this high-expressing cell population of the peripheral blood allowed a ready identification of BLAD-heterozygotes by flow cytometry. PMID:9436269

  4. Adhesive dynamics simulations of the shear threshold effect for leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Kelly E; Lee, Dooyoung; King, Michael R; Hammer, Daniel A

    2007-02-01

    Many experiments have measured the effect of force on the dissociation of single selectin bonds, but it is not yet clear how the force dependence of molecular dissociation can influence the rolling of cells expressing selectin molecules. Recent experiments using constant-force atomic force microscopy or high-resolution microscopic observations of pause-time distributions of cells in a flow chamber show that for some bonds, the dissociation rate is high at low force and initially decreases with force, indicating a catch bond. As the force continues to increase, the dissociation rate increases again, like a slip bond. It has been proposed that this catch-slip bond leads to the shear threshold effect, in which a certain level of shear rate is required to achieve rolling. We have incorporated a catch-slip dissociation rate into adhesive dynamics simulations of cell rolling. Using a relatively simple model for the shear-controlled association rate for selectin bonds, we were able to recreate characteristics of the shear threshold effect seen most prominently for rolling through L-selectin. The rolling velocity as a function of shear rate showed a minimum near 100 s-1. Furthermore, cells were observed to roll at a shear rate near the threshold, but detach and move more quickly when the shear rate was dropped below the threshold. Finally, using adhesive dynamics, we were able to determine ranges of parameters necessary to see the shear threshold effect in the rolling velocity. In summary, we found through simulation that the catch-slip behavior of selectin bonds can be responsible for the shear threshold effect. PMID:17085490

  5. Adhesive Dynamics Simulations of the Shear Threshold Effect for Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Kelly E.; Lee, Dooyoung; King, Michael R.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    Many experiments have measured the effect of force on the dissociation of single selectin bonds, but it is not yet clear how the force dependence of molecular dissociation can influence the rolling of cells expressing selectin molecules. Recent experiments using constant-force atomic force microscopy or high-resolution microscopic observations of pause-time distributions of cells in a flow chamber show that for some bonds, the dissociation rate is high at low force and initially decreases with force, indicating a catch bond. As the force continues to increase, the dissociation rate increases again, like a slip bond. It has been proposed that this catch-slip bond leads to the shear threshold effect, in which a certain level of shear rate is required to achieve rolling. We have incorporated a catch-slip dissociation rate into adhesive dynamics simulations of cell rolling. Using a relatively simple model for the shear-controlled association rate for selectin bonds, we were able to recreate characteristics of the shear threshold effect seen most prominently for rolling through L-selectin. The rolling velocity as a function of shear rate showed a minimum near 100 s−1. Furthermore, cells were observed to roll at a shear rate near the threshold, but detach and move more quickly when the shear rate was dropped below the threshold. Finally, using adhesive dynamics, we were able to determine ranges of parameters necessary to see the shear threshold effect in the rolling velocity. In summary, we found through simulation that the catch-slip behavior of selectin bonds can be responsible for the shear threshold effect. PMID:17085490

  6. Adhesion of leukocytes under oscillating stagnation point conditions: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Walker, P G; Alshorman, A A; Westwood, S; David, T

    2002-01-01

    Leukocyte recruitment from blood to the endothelium plays an important role in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Cells show a primary and secondary adhesive process with primary bonds responsible for capture and rolling and secondary bonds for arrest. Our objective was to investigate the role played by this process on the adhesion of leukocytes in complex flow. Cells were modelled as rigid spheres with spring like adhesion molecules which formed bonds with endothelial receptors. Models of bond kinetics and Newton's laws of motion were solved numerically to determine cell motion. Fluid force was obtained from the local shear rate obtained from a CFD simulation of the flow over a backward facing step.In stagnation point flow the shear rate near the stagnation point has a large gradient such that adherent cells in this region roll to a high shear region preventing permanent adhesion. This is enhanced if a small time dependent perturbation is imposed upon the stagnation point. For lower shear rates the cell rolling velocity may be such that secondary bonds have time to form. These bonds resist the lower fluid forces and consequently there is a relatively large permanent adhesion region. PMID:12122269

  7. Expression and cell distribution of the intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule, endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule, and endothelial cell adhesion molecule (CD31) in reactive human lymph nodes and in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ruco, L. P.; Pomponi, D.; Pigott, R.; Gearing, A. J.; Baiocchini, A.; Baroni, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    The immunocytochemical expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1), endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule (ELAM-1), endothelial cell adhesion molecule (EndoCAM CD31), and HLA-DR antigens was investigated in sections of 24 reactive lymph nodes and in 15 cases of Hodgkin's disease. ICAM-1 was detected in sinus macrophages, follicular dendritic reticulum cells (FDRCs), interdigitating reticulum cells (IDRCs), epithelioid macrophages, Hodgkin's cells (HCs), and vascular endothelium. ICAM-1 expression was often associated with that of HLA-DR antigens. VCAM-1 was detected in FDRCs, in fibroblast reticulum cells (FRCs), in macrophages, and in rare blood vessels. EndoCAM (CD31) was constitutively expressed in all types of endothelial cells, sinus macrophages, and in epithelioid granulomas. ELAM-1 was selectively expressed by activated endothelial cells of high endothelium venules (HEVs). When expression of the inducible adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 was comparatively evaluated in HEVs, it was found that ICAM-1 + HEVs were present in all reactive and HD nodes, whereas ELAM-1 and/or VCAM-1 were expressed only in those pathologic conditions characterized by high levels of interleukin-1/tumor necrosis factor (IL-1/TNF) production, such as granulomatosis and Hodgkin's disease. In Hodgkin's disease, the expression of ELAM-1/VCAM-1 was more pronounced in cases of nodular sclerosis and was associated with a significantly higher content of perivascular neutrophils. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1605306

  8. Functional role of gap junctions in cytokine-induced leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in vivo.

    PubMed

    Véliz, Loreto P; González, Francisco G; Duling, Brian R; Sáez, Juan C; Boric, Mauricio P

    2008-09-01

    To assess the hypothesis that gap junctions (GJs) participate on leukocyte-endothelium interactions in the inflammatory response, we compared leukocyte adhesion and transmigration elicited by cytokine stimulation in the presence or absence of GJ blockers in the hamster cheek pouch and also in the cremaster muscle of wild-type (WT) and endothelium-specific connexin 43 (Cx43) null mice (Cx43e(-/-)). In the cheek pouch, topical tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; 150 ng/ml, 15 min) caused a sustained increment in the number of leukocytes adhered to venular endothelium (LAV) and located at perivenular regions (LPV). Superfusion with the GJ blockers 18-alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA; 75 microM) or 18-beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (50 microM) abolished the TNF-alpha-induced increase in LAV and LPV; carbenoxolone (75 microM) or oleamide (100 microM) reduced LAV by 50 and 75%, respectively, and LPV to a lesser extent. None of these GJ blockers modified venular diameter, blood flow, or leukocyte rolling. In contrast, glycyrrhizin (75 microM), a non-GJ blocker analog of AGA, was devoid of effect. Interestingly, when AGA was removed 90 min after TNF-alpha stimulation, LAV started to rise at a similar rate as in control. Conversely, application of AGA 90 min after TNF-alpha reduced the number of previously adhered cells. In WT mice, intrascrotal injection of TNF-alpha (0.5 microg/0.3 ml) increased LAV (fourfold) and LPV (threefold) compared with saline-injected controls. In contrast to the observations in WT animals, TNF-alpha stimulation did not increase LAV or LPV in Cx43e(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate an important role for GJ communication in leukocyte adhesion and transmigration during acute inflammation in vivo and further suggest that endothelial Cx43 is key in these processes. PMID:18599597

  9. Characterization of functions of neutrophils from bone marrow of cattle with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Nochi, H; Tamoto, K; Yamashita, K; Noda, H; Kociba, G J

    1995-02-01

    Marked differences in bone marrow cellularity were observed between cattle affected with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) and control cattle. The number of nucleated cells in bone marrow was 2.9 to 8.8 times higher in cattle affected with LAD, compared with controls. The myeloid-to-erythroid ratio of bone marrow from 3 cattle affected with LAD ranged from 2.4 to 12. Deficient CD18 expression on neutrophils isolated from bone marrow of cattle with LAD was clearly detected by flow cytometric analysis. Neutrophils from bone marrow of cattle affected with LAD appeared round and not flat, after adherence to plastic wells under agarose, whereas neutrophils from bone marrow of clinically normal cattle were firmly spread on the surface of plastic wells. In the chemotaxis under-agarose assay, many pseudopodia were detected on bone marrow neutrophils from clinically normal cattle, but were not detected on bone marrow neutrophils from cattle with LAD. Activities of chemotactic movements and phagocytosis of neutrophils isolated from bone marrow of cattle affected with LAD were documented to be severely impaired. PMID:7717579

  10. Relationship of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency with genetic merit for performance traits.

    PubMed

    Powell, R L; Norman, H D; Cowan, C M

    1996-05-01

    Examination of the existence of pleiotropy or linkage of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency with other traits and of the impact of removal of the recessive, undesirable allele on genetic progress for those traits has been limited. Frequency of carriers among 6400 Holstein bulls tested was 8.2%; however, reporting was incomplete, and, therefore, the estimate of carrier frequency was biased downward. For AI-sampled bulls, carrier frequency reached a high of 23% for bulls sampled during 1989 but declined to 0% since then because of DNA testing and culling. Association of the allele with yield, productive life, and somatic cell score was examined with a model in which the daughter yield deviation minus the mean of parent evaluations was explained by carrier status. A significant negative relationship was found with protein yield when effect of sires was ignored; all associations were unfavorable. Linkage was examined by applying the model for each of four sire families; only protein yield for one sire was significantly and negatively related to the recessive allele. Carrier bulls currently are labeled, and some continue to be used actively in AI because of superiority for other traits. Consequential pleiotropy of the allele or linkage of the locus with the traits studied is unlikely. Genetic progress for these performance traits will not be impeded by failure to sample carrier bulls. PMID:8792288

  11. Adhesion of leukocytes to dermal endothelial cells is induced after single-dose, but reduced after repeated doses of UVA.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, M; Pirthauer, M; Plewig, G

    1997-12-01

    Approximately 20-50% of ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation delivered to the skin surface may reach the human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) that play a pivotal role in cellular inflammatory tissue; however, the pathophysiologic role of HDMEC in UVA-induced skin changes is largely unknown. Based on previous in vivo and in vitro studies revealing UVA-induced expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, we studied isolated HDMEC under various conditions in order to further delineate the impact of UVA on these cells. The expression of cell adhesion molecules was determined by flow cytometry and the resulting changes of stable adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells were quantitated for granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes using a newly developed multicellular adhesion assay. Additionally, antibody blocking experiments were performed to delineate the role of individual cell adhesion molecules in UVA-induced leukocyte adherence. High-dose polychromatic UVA (25 J per cm2, maximal emission at 375 nm) induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin with different kinetics but correlating the adhesion of leukocyte subsets. This effect subsided, however, in the course of 3-6 daily applied UVA doses. Moreover, pro-inflammatory cytokine challenge by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1-alpha resulted in significantly weaker induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin in repeatedly UVA-exposed HDMEC. Differential quantitation of peripheral blood derived granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes revealed reduced adhesion particularly of lymphocytes followed by monocytes and granulocytes compared with leukocyte adhesion to nonirradiated but cytokine-stimulated HDMEC. It is concluded that UVA substantially influences endothelial cell adhesion molecules expression and thus directly interferes with leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Divergent UVA-induced effects in this respect can be attributed to the mode of UV exposure

  12. Leukocytic oxygen activation and microbicidal oxidative toxins.

    PubMed

    Hurst, J K; Barrette, W C

    1989-01-01

    Following a brief introduction of cellular response to stimulation comprising leukocyte activation, three major areas are discussed: (1) the neutrophil oxidase; (2) myeloperoxidase (MPO)-dependent oxidative microbicidal reactions; and (3) MPO-independent oxidative reactions. Topics included in section (A) are current views on the activation mechanism, redox composition, structural and topographic organization of the oxidase, and its respiratory products. In section (B), emphasis is placed on recent research on cidal mechanisms of HOCl, including the oxidative biochemistry of active chlorine compounds, identification of sites of lesions in bacteria, and attendant metabolic consequences. In section (C), we review the (bio)chemistry of H2O2 and .OH microbicidal reactions, with particular attention being given to addressing the controversial issue of probe methods to identify .OH radical and critical assessment of the recent proposal that MPO-independent killing arises from site-specific metal-catalyzed Fenton-type chemistry. PMID:2548810

  13. Role of leukotrienes in leukocyte adhesion following systemic administration of oxidatively modified human low density lipoprotein in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, H A; Hübner, C; Finckh, B; Angermüller, S; Nolte, D; Beisiegel, U; Kohlschütter, A; Messmer, K

    1991-01-01

    In vitro studies indicate that oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) promotes leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium, a constant feature of early atherogenesis. Using intravital fluorescence microscopy in the dorsal skinfold chamber model in awake Syrian golden hamsters, we studied whether (a) oxLDL elicits leukocyte/endothelium interaction in vivo, and whether (b) leukotrienes play a mediator role in this event. Leukocyte/endothelium interaction was assessed in the time course after intravenous injection of native human LDL (4 mg/kg body wt) and of oxLDL (7.5 microM Cu++, 6 h, 37 degrees C) into control hamsters and into hamsters, pretreated with the selective leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor MK-886 (20 mumol/kg, i.v.). While no effect was seen after injection of native LDL, oxLDL elicited an immediate induction of leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium of arterioles and postcapillary venules. Total and differential leukocyte counts suggest that all leukocyte subsets were likewise affected by oxLDL with no specific preference for monocytes. Stimulation of leukocyte adhesion was entirely prevented in inhibitor-treated animals, suggesting the important mediator role of leukotrienes in oxLDL-induced leukocyte/endothelium interaction. Images PMID:2056134

  14. Detection of aggregated leukocytes in the circulating pool during stress-demargination is not necessarily a result of decreased leukocyte adhesiveness.

    PubMed

    Arber, N; Berliner, S; Rotenberg, Z; Friedman, J; Belagodatni, E; Ostfeld, I; Aronson, M; Pinkhas, J

    1991-01-01

    Leukocyte endothelial interactions are essential for a normal immune response. It is known that this response is influenced by stress and that the latter induces demargination. We examined the question of whether stress demargination results from a decreased state of leukocyte adhesiveness. Included were various volunteers and patients under different degrees of stress. 66 young athletes before beginning their daily exercises, 67 middle-aged healthy volunteers, 25 patients before ergometry for evaluation of chest pain, 75 patients who were referred to the emergency room with chest pain without ischemia/infarction, 78 patients with ischemia/infarction, 65 patients with minor trauma, 25 with a fracture and 12 with polytrauma. The leukocyte adhesiveness/aggregation (LAA) values were measured with a direct slide test. The respective LAA values were 7.4 +/- 4.7, 6.3 +/- 4.4, 5.8 +/- 3.6, 5.2 +/- 3.5, 10.8 +/- 8.5, 9.1 +/- 5.8, 12.2 +/- 6.6 and 19 +/- 12.6% of aggregated leukocytes. We conclude that an increase in aggregated white blood cells can be detected in the circulating pool during major stress. It is therefore suggested that stress demargination is not necessarily a result of diminished leukocyte adhesiveness. PMID:1950357

  15. Increased microvascular density and enhanced leukocyte rolling and adhesion in the skin of VEGF transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Detmar, M; Brown, L F; Schön, M P; Elicker, B M; Velasco, P; Richard, L; Fukumura, D; Monsky, W; Claffey, K P; Jain, R K

    1998-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in the pathologic angiogenesis observed in psoriasis and other chronic inflammatory skin diseases that are characterized by enhanced expression of VEGF by epidermal keratinocytes and of VEGF receptors by tortuous microvessels in the upper dermis. To investigate the functional importance of chronic VEGF overexpression in vivo, we used a keratin 14 promoter expression cassette containing the gene for murine VEGF164 to selectively target VEGF expression to basal epidermal keratinocytes in transgenic mice. These mice demonstrated an increased density of tortuous cutaneous blood capillaries with elevated expression levels of the high affinity VEGF receptors, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, most prominently during the neonatal period. In contrast, no abnormalities of lymphatic vessels were detected. In addition, the number of mast cells in the upper dermis was significantly increased in transgenic skin. Intravital fluorescence microscopy revealed highly increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion in postcapillary skin venules that were both inhibited after injection of blocking antibodies against E- and P-selectin. Combined blocking antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 were without effect, whereas an anti-vascular cell adhesion molecule-1/VLA-4 antibody combination almost completely normalized the enhanced leukocyte adhesion in transgenic mice. This study reveals VEGF as a growth factor specific for blood vessels, but not lymphatic vessels, and demonstrates that chronic orthotopic overexpression of VEGF in the epidermis is sufficient to induce cardinal features of chronic skin inflammation, providing a molecular link between angiogenesis, mast cell accumulation, and leukocyte recruitment to sites of inflammation. PMID:9665379

  16. Determining β2-Integrin and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Binding Kinetics in Tumor Cell Adhesion to Leukocytes and Endothelial Cells by a Gas-driven Micropipette Assay*

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Changliang; Tong, Chunfang; Wang, Manliu; Gao, Yuxin; Zhang, Yan; Lü, Shouqin; Liang, Shile; Dong, Cheng; Long, Mian

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and tumor cells have been reported to facilitate the adhesion and subsequent extravasation of tumor cells through the endothelium under blood flow, both of which are mediated by binding β2-integrin to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). Here the adhesions between human WM9 metastatic melanoma cells, PMNs, and human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs) were quantified by a gas-driven micropipette aspiration technique (GDMAT). Our data indicated that the cellular binding affinity of PMN-WM9 pair was 3.9-fold higher than that of the PMN-HPMEC pair. However, the effective binding affinities per molecular pair were comparable between the two cell pairs no matter whether WM9 cells or HPMECs were quiescent or cytokine-activated, indicating that the stronger adhesion between PMN-WM9 pair is mainly attributed to the high expression of ICAM-1 on WM9 cells. These results proposed an alternative mechanism, where WM9 melanoma cells adhere first with PMNs near vessel-wall regions and then bind to endothelial cells via PMNs under blood flow. In contrast, the adhesions between human MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast carcinoma cells and PMNs showed a comparable cellular binding affinity to PMN-HPMEC pair because the ICAM-1 expressions on MDA-MB-231 cells and HPMECs are similar. Furthermore, differences were observed in the intrinsic forward and reverse rates of the β2-integrin-ICAM-1 bond between PMN-TC and PMN-EC pairs. This GDMAT assay enables us to quantify the binding kinetics of cell adhesion molecules physiologically expressed on nucleated cells. The findings also further the understanding of leukocyte-facilitated tumor cell adhesion from the viewpoint of molecular binding kinetics. PMID:21840991

  17. Loss of Reelin protects against atherosclerosis by reducing leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and lesion macrophage accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yinyuan; Huang, Linzhang; Xian, Xunde; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Wasser, Catherine R; Frotscher, Michael; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W; Herz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The multimodular glycoprotein Reelin controls neuronal migration and synaptic transmission by binding to apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (Apoer2) and very low density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr) on neurons. In the periphery, Reelin is produced by the liver, circulates in blood, and promotes thrombosis and hemostasis. To investigate if Reelin influences atherogenesis, we studied atherosclerosis-prone low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice in which we inducibly deleted Reelin either ubiquitously or only in the liver, thus preventing the production of circulating Reelin. In both types of Reelin-deficient mice, atherosclerosis progression was markedly attenuated, and macrophage content and endothelial cell staining for vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were reduced at the sites of atherosclerotic lesions. Intravital microscopy revealed decreased leukocyte-endothelial adhesion in the Reelin-deficient mice. In cultured human endothelial cells, Reelin enhanced monocyte adhesion and increased ICAM1, VCAM1, and E-selectin expression by suppressing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and increasing nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity in an Apoer2-dependent manner. These findings suggest that circulating Reelin promotes atherosclerosis by increasing vascular inflammation, and that reducing or inhibiting circulating Reelin may present a novel approach for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26980442

  18. Optimization of the PCR test for the mutation causing bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mirck, M H; Von Bannisseht-Wijsmuller, T; Timmermans-Besselink, W J; Van Luijk, J H; Buntjer, J B; Lenstra, J A

    1995-07-01

    The recent emergence of the bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) demonstrated the risks of narrowing the genetic basis of a population. About 6% of the Holstein-Friesian cattle now descends from one bull who was a heterozygous BLAD carrier. Crossing his descendants resulted in the birth of homozygous BLAD calves with a life expectancy of < 1 year. The BLAD syndrome is caused by a point mutation in the gene coding for CD18, a subunit of the beta 2 integrins on the surface of leukocytes. By using a PCR-RFLP test, large numbers of cattle are now being screened in several countries to eradicate the mutant allele. We describe an optimization of the PCR primer set that has led to an improvement of the test. PMID:7580848

  19. Endomucin prevents leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and has a critical role under resting and inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Zahr, Alisar; Alcaide, Pilar; Yang, Jinling; Jones, Alexander; Gregory, Meredith; dela Paz, Nathaniel G; Patel-Hett, Sunita; Nevers, Tania; Koirala, Adarsha; Luscinskas, Francis W; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Ksander, Bruce; D'Amore, Patricia A; Argüeso, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Endomucin is a membrane-bound glycoprotein expressed luminally by endothelial cells that line postcapillary venules, a primary site of leukocyte recruitment during inflammation. Here we show that endomucin abrogation on quiescent endothelial cells enables neutrophils to adhere firmly, via LFA-1-mediated binding to ICAM-1 constitutively expressed by endothelial cells. Moreover, TNF-α stimulation downregulates cell surface expression of endomucin concurrent with increased expression of adhesion molecules. Adenovirus-mediated expression of endomucin under inflammatory conditions prevents neutrophil adhesion in vitro and reduces the infiltration of CD45(+) and NIMP-R14(+) cells in vivo. These results indicate that endomucin prevents leukocyte contact with adhesion molecules in non-inflamed tissues and that downregulation of endomucin is critical to facilitate adhesion of leukocytes into inflamed tissues. PMID:26831939

  20. Selectin catch-slip kinetics encode shear threshold adhesive behavior of rolling leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Beste, Michael T; Hammer, Daniel A

    2008-12-30

    The selectin family of leukocyte adhesion receptors is principally recognized for mediating transient rolling interactions during the inflammatory response. Recent studies using ultrasensitive force probes to characterize the force-lifetime relationship between P- and L-selectin and their endogenous ligands have underscored the ability of increasing levels of force to initially extend the lifetime of these complexes before disrupting bond integrity. This so-called "catch-slip" transition has provided an appealing explanation for shear threshold phenomena in which increasing levels of shear stress stabilize leukocyte rolling under flow. We recently incorporated catch-slip kinetics into a mechanical model for cell adhesion and corroborated this hypothesis for neutrophils adhering via L-selectin. Here, using adhesive dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that biomembrane force probe measurements of various P- and L-selectin catch bonds faithfully predict differences in cell adhesion patterns that have been described extensively in vitro. Using phenomenological parameters to characterize the dominant features of molecular force spectra, we construct a generalized phase map that reveals that robust shear-threshold behavior is possible only when an applied force very efficiently stabilizes the bound receptor complex. This criteria explains why only a subset of selectin catch bonds exhibit a shear threshold and leads to a quantitative relationship that may be used to predict the magnitude of the shear threshold for families of catch-slip bonds directly from their force spectra. Collectively, our results extend the conceptual framework of adhesive dynamics as a means to translate complex single-molecule biophysics to macroscopic cell behavior. PMID:19095798

  1. [A diagnostic analysis of a genetic mutation associated with a deficiency of leukocyte adhesion in cattle].

    PubMed

    Kostetskiĭ, I E; Kirilenko, S M; Glazko, V I; Sozinov, A A

    1996-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion (BLAD) is a recessive autosomal disease in Holstein-Friesian cattle caused by point mutation in CD18 gene encoding neutrophil-surface glycoprotein. To determine BLAD carriers, the convenient primers were chosen to amplify the mutant region of gene with the following restriction analysis. A screening program for BLAD has been initiated. Among 190 animals from different Ukrainian farms 6 were heterozygous according to the tested trait, i.e., BLAD deficient. No homozygous BLAD carriers were detected. PMID:9281202

  2. Complement component C3b and immunoglobulin Fc receptors on neutrophils from calves with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Worku, M; Paape, M J; Di Carlo, A; Kehrli, M E; Marquardt, W W

    1995-04-01

    Receptors for opsonins, such as complement component C3b (CR1) and immunoglobulins, Fc receptors, interact with adhesion glycoproteins in mediating immune functions. Defects in expression of the adhesion glycoproteins CD11/CD18 results in severely hampered in vitro and in vivo adherence-related functions of leukocytes. Little is known regarding the effect of leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) on ligand binding and receptor expression. We investigated the binding and expression of CR1 and Fc receptors by bovine neutrophils isolated from dairy calves suffering from LAD, compared with clinically normal (hereafter referred to as normal) age-matched calves. Neutrophils were also assayed for endogenously bound IgG and IgM and for exogenous binding of C3b, IgG1, IgG2, IgM, and aggregated IgG (aIgG), using flow cytometry. Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) production in response to IgG2 opsonized zymosan was studied, and specific inhibition of CL was used to determine the specificity of IgG2 binding. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol myristate acetate was used to determine the effect of cellular activation on expression of CR1. A greater percentage of neutrophils from normal calves bound C3b than did neutrophils from LAD-affected calves. Receptor expression was similar. Activation with phorbol myristate acetate resulted in increased expression of CR1 on neutrophils from normal and LAD-affected calves, but expression was almost twofold greater on neutrophils from normal calves. There was no difference between LAD-affected and normal calves in percentage of neutrophils that bound endogenous IgG and IgM. A greater percentage of neutrophils from normal calves bound exogenous IgM than did neutrophils from LAD-affected calves.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7785817

  3. P2RX7 sensitizes Mac-1/ICAM-1-dependent leukocyte-endothelial adhesion and promotes neurovascular injury during septic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Hong, Ling-Juan; Huang, Ji-Yun; Jiang, Quan; Tao, Rong-Rong; Tan, Chao; Lu, Nan-Nan; Wang, Cheng-Kun; Ahmed, Muhammad M; Lu, Ying-Mei; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Shi, Wei-Xing; Lai, En-Yin; Wilcox, Christopher S; Han, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Septic encephalopathy (SE) is a critical factor determining sepsis mortality. Vascular inflammation is known to be involved in SE, but the molecular events that lead to the development of encephalopathy remain unclear. Using time-lapse in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy, we provide the first direct evidence that cecal ligation and puncture in septic mice induces microglial trafficking to sites adjacent to leukocyte adhesion on inflamed cerebral microvessels. Our data further demonstrate that septic injury increased the chemokine CXCL1 level in brain endothelial cells by activating endothelial P2RX7 and eventually enhanced the binding of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)-expressing leukocytes to endothelial ICAM-1. In turn, leukocyte adhesion upregulated endothelial CX3CL1, thereby triggering microglia trafficking to the injured site. The sepsis-induced increase in endothelial CX3CL1 was abolished in CD18 hypomorphic mutant mice. Inhibition of the P2RX7 pathway not only decreased endothelial ICAM-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion but also prevented microglia overactivation, reduced brain injury, and consequently doubled the early survival of septic mice. These results demonstrate the role of the P2RX7 pathway in linking neurovascular inflammation to brain damage in vivo and provide a rationale for targeting endothelial P2RX7 for neurovascular protection during SE. PMID:25998681

  4. P2RX7 sensitizes Mac-1/ICAM-1-dependent leukocyte-endothelial adhesion and promotes neurovascular injury during septic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Hong, Ling-Juan; Huang, Ji-Yun; Jiang, Quan; Tao, Rong-Rong; Tan, Chao; Lu, Nan-Nan; Wang, Cheng-Kun; Ahmed, Muhammad M; Lu, Ying-Mei; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Shi, Wei-Xing; Lai, En-Yin; Wilcox, Christopher S; Han, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Septic encephalopathy (SE) is a critical factor determining sepsis mortality. Vascular inflammation is known to be involved in SE, but the molecular events that lead to the development of encephalopathy remain unclear. Using time-lapse in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy, we provide the first direct evidence that cecal ligation and puncture in septic mice induces microglial trafficking to sites adjacent to leukocyte adhesion on inflamed cerebral microvessels. Our data further demonstrate that septic injury increased the chemokine CXCL1 level in brain endothelial cells by activating endothelial P2RX7 and eventually enhanced the binding of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)-expressing leukocytes to endothelial ICAM-1. In turn, leukocyte adhesion upregulated endothelial CX3CL1, thereby triggering microglia trafficking to the injured site. The sepsis-induced increase in endothelial CX3CL1 was abolished in CD18 hypomorphic mutant mice. Inhibition of the P2RX7 pathway not only decreased endothelial ICAM-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion but also prevented microglia overactivation, reduced brain injury, and consequently doubled the early survival of septic mice. These results demonstrate the role of the P2RX7 pathway in linking neurovascular inflammation to brain damage in vivo and provide a rationale for targeting endothelial P2RX7 for neurovascular protection during SE. PMID:25998681

  5. Renal cell carcinoma alters endothelial receptor expression responsible for leukocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Juengel, Eva; Krueger, Geraldine; Rutz, Jochen; Nelson, Karen; Werner, Isabella; Relja, Borna; Seliger, Barbara; Fisslthaler, Beate; Fleming, Ingrid; Tsaur, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) escapes immune recognition. To elaborate the escape strategy the influence of RCC cells on endothelial receptor expression and endothelial leukocyte adhesion was evaluated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were co-cultured with the RCC cell line, Caki-1, with and without tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), endothelial (E)-selectin, standard and variants (V) of CD44 were then analysed in HUVEC, using flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. To determine which components are responsible for HUVEC-Caki-1 interaction causing receptor alteration, Caki-1 membrane fragments versus cell culture supernatant were applied to HUVECS. Adhesion of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to endothelium was evaluated by co-culture adhesion assays. Relevance of endothelial receptor expression for adhesion to endothelium was determined by receptor blockage. Co-culture of RCC and HUVECs resulted in a significant increase in endothelial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, CD44 V3 and V7 expression. Previous stimulation of HUVECs with TNF-alpha and co-cultivation with Caki-1 resulted in further elevation of endothelial CD44 V3 and V7 expression, whereas ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression were significantly diminished. Since Caki-1 membrane fragments also caused these alterations, but cell culture supernatant did not, cell-cell contact may be responsible for this process. Blocking ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin or CD44 with respective antibodies led to a significant decrease in PBL and PMN adhesion to endothelium. Thus, exposing HUVEC to Caki-1 results in significant alteration of endothelial receptor expression and subsequent endothelial attachment of PBL and PMN. PMID:26943029

  6. Leukocyte arrest: Biomechanics and molecular mechanisms of β2 integrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhichao; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Integrins are a group of heterodimeric transmembrane receptors that play essential roles in cell–cell and cell–matrix interaction. Integrins are important in many physiological processes and diseases. Integrins acquire affinity to their ligand by undergoing molecular conformational changes called activation. Here we review the molecular biomechanics during conformational changes of integrins, integrin functions in leukocyte biorheology (adhesive functions during rolling and arrest) and molecules involved in integrin activation. PMID:26684674

  7. Reduction in cellular and vascular rejection by blocking leukocyte adhesion molecule receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Sadahiro, M.; McDonald, T. O.; Allen, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    Whether antibody blockage of leukocyte receptors for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 would prevent cardiac graft rejection was studied in a rabbit heterotopic transplant model. Monoclonal antibody 60.3, anti-CD18 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1 receptor, Group 1, n = 10) and monoclonal antibody HP1/2, anti-VLA-alpha 4 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 receptor, Group 2, n = 10) were administered to transplanted unimmunosuppressed animals. At 7 days, donor heart histology was compared to transplanted untreated controls (Group 3, n = 11). Peripheral white blood cell counts on postoperative day 2 were significantly higher in both treatment groups than controls. Significant increases in circulating neutrophils occurred in Group 1 (P < or = 0.05); lymphocytes predominated in Group 2 (P < or = 0.05). A significant reduction in cellular rejection was seen in Group 1 (P < or = 0.05) but not Group 2 hearts. Group 1 hearts demonstrated localization of lymphocytes to perivenular collections, whereas Group 2 hearts evidenced diffuse interstitial infiltration. Both treatment groups demonstrated a reduction in transplant arteritis compared to controls. Results suggest that monoclonal antibody 60.3 (anti-CD18) may hold promise as a therapeutic agent for both cellular and vascular rejection. Monoclonal antibody HP1/2 (anti-VLA-alpha 4) may reduce vascular rejection disproportionate to cellular rejection. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8096120

  8. Influence of hypothermia and subsequent rewarming upon leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of Junctional-Adhesion-Molecules A and B

    PubMed Central

    Bogert, Nicolai V.; Werner, Isabella; Kornberger, Angela; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Keller, Till; Stock, Ulrich A.; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Patients with risks of ischemic injury, e.g. during circulatory arrest in cardiac surgery, or after resuscitation are subjected to therapeutic hypothermia. For aortic surgery, the body is traditionally cooled down to 18 °C and then rewarmed to body temperature. The role of hypothermia and the subsequent rewarming process on leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of junctional-adhesion-molecules is not clarified yet. Thus, we investigated in an in-vitro model the influence of temperature modulation during activation and transendothelial migration of leukocytes through human endothelial cells. Additionally, we investigated the expression of JAMs in the rewarming phase. Exposure to low temperatures alone during transmigration scarcely affects leukocyte extravasation, whereas hypothermia during treatment and transendothelial migration improves leukocyte-endothelial interactions. Rewarming causes a significant up-regulation of transmigration with falling temperatures. JAM-A is significantly modulated during rewarming. Our data suggest that transendothelial migration of leukocytes is not only modulated by cell-activation itself. Activation temperatures and the rewarming process are essential. Continued hypothermia significantly inhibits transendothelial migration, whereas the rewarming process enhances transmigration strongly. The expression of JAMs, especially JAM-A, is strongly modulated during the rewarming process. Endothelial protection prior to warm reperfusion and mild hypothermic conditions reducing the difference between hypothermia and rewarming temperatures should be considered. PMID:26912257

  9. Endothelial Japanese encephalitis virus infection enhances migration and adhesion of leukocytes to brain microvascular endothelia via MEK-dependent expression of ICAM1 and the CINC and RANTES chemokines.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Yi; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Chang, Chen-Jung; Liao, Su-Lan; Su, Hong-Lin; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2012-10-01

    Currently, the underlying mechanisms and the specific cell types associated with Japanese encephalitis-associated leukocyte trafficking are not understood. Brain microvascular endothelial cells represent a functional barrier and could play key roles in leukocyte central nervous system trafficking. We found that cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells were susceptible to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection with limited amplification. This type of JEV infection had negligible effects on cell viability and barrier integrity. Instead, JEV-infected endothelial cells attracted more leukocytes adhesion onto surfaces and the supernatants promoted chemotaxis of leukocytes. Infection with JEV was found to elicit the elevated production of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, and regulated-upon-activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted, contributing to the aforementioned leukocyte adhesion and chemotaxis. We further demonstrated that extracellular signal-regulated kinase was a key upstream regulator which stimulated extensive endothelial gene induction by up-regulating cytosolic phospholipase A₂, NF-κB, and cAMP response element-binding protein via signals involving phosphorylation. These data suggest that JEV infection could activate brain microvascular endothelial cells and modify their characteristics without compromising the barrier integrity, making them favorable for the recruitment and adhesion of circulating leukocytes, thereby together with other unidentified barrier-disrupting mechanisms contributing to Japanese encephalitis and associated neuroinflammation. PMID:22845610

  10. Influence of Magnetite Nanoparticles on Human Leukocyte Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Džarová, Anežka; Dubničková, Martina; Závišová, Vlasta; Koneracká, Martina; Kopčanský, Peter; Gojzewski, Hubert; Timko, Milan

    2010-12-01

    Chemically synthesized magnetite particles coated by sodium oleate and PEG (MNP), and magnetosomes (MS) influence the process of phagocytosis and the metabolic activity (lysozyme and peroxidase activity) in leukocytes. Lysozyme activity is oxygen-independent liquidation mechanisms of engulfed microorganism, peroxidase activity is an oxygen-dependent mechanism. Both tested types of nanoparticles lysed leukocyte cells during incubation. MNP at concentrations of 10 and 20 μg/mL lysed almost all leukocytes and their cell viability was in the 14±0.05% range. On the other hand MS begin to influence leukocytes activity at the concentration of 1 μg/ml and this influence grows with increasing concentration up to 20 μg/ml. MS are more suitable for biological applications than MNP which are more aggressive material than MS. MS should not be used above 10 μg/mL.

  11. Enhanced expression of Fc receptors on neutrophils from calves with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Higuchi, H; Nochi, H; Tamoto, K; Noda, H; Kociba, G J

    1995-01-01

    The expression of Fc receptors for immunoglobulin G(IgG) and concanavalin A (con A)-binding receptors, luminol-dependent chemiluminescent (LDCL) responses, and the effect of anti-bovine IgG on LDCL responses were evaluated in neutrophils from Holstein calves with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD). Neutrophils from affected calves showed a 2.1- to 2.5-fold increase in Fc receptor expression compared with those of control calves by flow cytometric analysis. Con A-binding activities of neutrophils from affected calves were similar to those of control calves. Neutrophils from a calf with BLAD, when stimulated with zymosan opsonized with bovine serum (OPZ), heat-aggregated bovine IgG (Agg-bovine IgG), sheep red blood cells (SRBC) sensitized with anti-SRBC antibody (SRBC-anti-SRBC Ab), or con A had LDCL responses of 36 (P < 0.05), 77, 126 and 119% of peak LDCL values of controls, respectively. The NBT-reducing value of neutrophils from a calf with BLAD when stimulated with Agg-bovine IgG after pretreatment with anti-bovine IgG was 116.5% of the values of neutrophils from control calves, but the difference was not significant. The LDCL responses of neutrophils from a control calf and a calf with BLAD stimulated with OPZ were inhibited markedly by pre-incubation with anti-bovine IgG antiserum at concentrations ranging from 1.25 to 20 or 40 micrograms/ml. Although an increase in Fc receptor expression on neutrophils from calves with BLAD was observed, the LDCL responses stimulated with SRBC-anti-SRBC Ab and NBT-reducing activity stimulated with Agg-bovine IgG after pretreatment with anti-bovine IgG did not correlate significantly with the increased Fc receptor expression. These results support that neutrophil functions mediated by the Fc receptors are associated synergistically with the presence of the complement receptor type 3 (CR3)(CD11b/CD18). PMID:8577284

  12. Systemic kappaAL amyloidosis associated with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, H; Yamamoto, S; Sako, T; Hirayama, K; Higuchi, H; Nagahata, H

    2000-01-01

    Histopathologic and immunohistochemical examinations were conducted on a 5-year-old Holstein-Friesian cow with systemic kappaAL amyloidosis associated with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency. Amyloid deposits were present in the perivascular and intercellular spaces of the visceral organs, such as the liver, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal glands, and upper alimentary tract. Amyloid was stained positively with Congo red with or without 5% potassium permanganate pretreatment and had green birefringence observed under polarized light. Immunohistochemically, amyloid reacted strongly against anti-bovine IgG (H+L) and anti-bovine kappa-light chain and reacted weakly against bovine X-light chain antibodies but was negative for anti-human amyloid AA antibody. This is the first description of AL amyloidosis immunohistochemically related to immunoglobulin kappa-light chains of precursor protein in cattle. PMID:10643989

  13. Detection of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency by nonisotopic ligase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Batt, C A; Wagner, P; Wiedmann, M; Luo, J; Gilbert, R

    1994-04-01

    A nonisotopic ligase chain reaction (LCR) assay was developed to detect the mutation (D128G; Shuster et al. (1992) PNAS 89, 9225-9) for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD). Two sets of diagonally opposed discriminating LCR primers that differentiate the normal and BLAD allele were designed so that the 3' end of each primer overlapped the D128G mutation. These discriminating primers were synthesized with a 5' biotin and could be captured using streptavidin-coated microtitre wells. A common set of primers that abut these discriminating primers were also synthesized and 3'-tailed with digoxigenin-ddUTP. Captured LCR products were then detected using antidigoxigenin antibodies coupled to alkaline phosphatase. The assay readout was a chemiluminescent signal generated by the hydrolysis of Lumi-Phos 530 and the entire assay including DNA isolation can be completed within 8 h. PMID:7912052

  14. A missense mutation in the beta-2 integrin gene (ITGB2) causes canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kijas, J M; Bauer, T R; Gäfvert, S; Marklund, S; Trowald-Wigh, G; Johannisson, A; Hedhammar, A; Binns, M; Juneja, R K; Hickstein, D D; Andersson, L

    1999-10-01

    Canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) is a fatal immunodeficiency disease found in Irish setters. The clinical manifestations of CLAD are very similar to LAD in humans and BLAD in cattle, which are both caused by mutations in ITGB2 encoding the leukocyte integrin beta-2 subunit (CD18). Sequence analysis of the ITGB2 coding sequence from a CLAD dog and a healthy control revealed a single missense mutation, Cys36Ser. This cysteine residue is conserved among all beta integrins, and the mutation most likely disrupts a disulfide bond. The mutation showed a complete association with CLAD in Irish setters and was not found in a sample of dogs from other breeds. The causative nature of this mutation was confirmed by transduction experiments using retroviral vectors and human LAD EBV B-cells. The normal canine CD18 formed heterodimers with the human CD11 subunit, whereas gene transfer of the mutant CD18 resulted in very low levels of CD11/CD18 expression. The identification of the causative mutation for CLAD now makes it possible to identify carrier animals with a simple diagnostic DNA test, and it forms the basis for using CLAD as a large animal model for the development and evaluation of clinical treatments for human LAD. PMID:10512685

  15. Detection and screening of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency in Pakistan using molecular methods.

    PubMed

    Nasreen, Fozia; Altaf Malik, Naveed; Naeem Riaz, Muhammad; Anver Qureshi, Javed

    2009-05-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is an autosomal recessive disease. Affected animals die because of extreme susceptibility to infections caused by the lack of a membrane glycoprotein called the leukocyte integrin beta-2 subunit of CD18. The present study was planned to standardize a technique for the diagnosis of BLAD and to get an estimation of BLAD allele in the Pakistani cattle population. The study was performed on 700 animals including Holstein-Friesian (HF) (n=280), Friesian-Sahiwal (FS) (n=120) Sahiwal (n=100) cows and HF calves (n=59) from Government as well as private farms. Similarly 141 bulls of Sahiwal (n=100), HF (n=18) and FS (n=23) from the Semen Production Unit Qadirabad and Kherimorat were also sampled. The identification of normal, carrier and affected animals were made by the PCR-RFLP method. No animal was found homozygous for BLAD while 10 animals including HF calve (n=1), FS bull (n=1), HF (n=6) and FS (n=2) cows were BLAD carrier. The Hardy-Weinberg frequency of the mutant allele in HF and FS population in Pakistan was calculated to 0.01. Thus there is a need of regular screening of the bulls used for artificial insemination to avoid the risk of spreading BLAD in the cattle population of Pakistan. PMID:19490168

  16. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency: a brief overview of a modern disease and its implications.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, A S

    1996-01-01

    Bovine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (BLAD) is a genetic disease of cattle affecting the hematopoietic system. In the last decade BLAD has become a disease of economic importance in the dairy industry. As such, this overview describes the chronological developments and thinking that led to the elucidation of BLAD as a distinct disease entity from previous models in canine and human populations. All species affected exhibit symptoms of chronic and recurrent infections. Necrotic and/or gangrenous infections of soft tissues are prevalent, as well as secondary infections with bacteria or fungi. Low birthweight and unthriftiness are key symptoms of neonates in all species affected by LAD. Dermatomycoses and impaired pus formation are also common findings. The physiological basis for BLAD is a deficiency in leukocyte (particularly neutrophil) chemotactic and phagocytic properties. The inhibition of diapedesis in the inflammatory response prevents normal immune reactions to invading pathogens. Chronic infections are a consequence of the faulty immune mechanisms. The biochemical etiology of BLAD involves cell surface glycoprotein molecules known as integrins. These are responsible for cell-cell interactions necessary for neutrophils to adhere to vascular endothelium in a normal individual. Experiments using monoclonal antibodies to block LFA-1, Mac-1, and p150,95 (three integrins vital for cell-cell interactions) mimic BLAD symptomatology and have led to the discovery of the reciprocal Intercellular Adhesion Molecule (ICAM). Through pedigree analysis and biochemical detection with restrictive endonucleases BLAD has been isolated genetically to a single gene locus. The economic significance and prophylaxis are briefly discussed. In addition, the beneficial aspects of the study of BLAD are addressed. There are advantages of producing a BLAD-like state in preventing transplant rejection, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and other scenarios arising from the deleterious effects of

  17. Annexin A8 controls leukocyte recruitment to activated endothelial cells via cell surface delivery of CD63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poeter, Michaela; Brandherm, Ines; Rossaint, Jan; Rosso, Gonzalo; Shahin, Victor; Skryabin, Boris V.; Zarbock, Alexander; Gerke, Volker; Rescher, Ursula

    2014-04-01

    To enable leukocyte adhesion to activated endothelium, the leukocyte receptor P-selectin is released from Weibel-Palade bodies (WPB) to the endothelial cell surface where it is stabilized by CD63. Here we report that loss of annexin A8 (anxA8) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) strongly decreases cell surface presentation of CD63 and P-selectin, with a concomitant reduction in leukocyte rolling and adhesion. We confirm the compromised leukocyte adhesiveness in inflammatory-activated endothelial venules of anxA8-deficient mice. We find that WPB of anxA8-deficient HUVEC contain less CD63, and that this is caused by improper transport of CD63 from late multivesicular endosomes to WPB, with CD63 being retained in intraluminal vesicles. Consequently, reduced CD63 cell surface levels are seen following WPB exocytosis, resulting in enhanced P-selectin re-internalization. Our data support a model in which anxA8 affects leukocyte recruitment to activated endothelial cells by supplying WPB with sufficient amounts of the P-selectin regulator CD63.

  18. Adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to endothelium enhances the efficiency of detoxification of oxygen-free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, R. L.; Robinson, J. M.; Karnovsky, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes can produce active oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide under various conditions. Because these substances can be toxic to cells, it is possible that the interaction between the circulating leukocytes and the blood vessel wall, either in normal circulation or during the acute inflammatory response, could damage the endothelial lining. Using an in vitro system of cultured endothelial cells and isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes, we have measured the levels of detectable superoxide when neutrophils are attached to either endothelial monolayers or to plastic. Our results show that the levels of superoxide, on a per-cell basis, are lower when the neutrophils are attached to endothelium than when attached to plastic, even if the neutrophils are stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate. This is also reflected in data showing that no injury occurs to the endothelial cells, as measured by 51Cr release, under these same conditions. When endothelial cells are pretreated with an inhibitor of superoxide dismutase, diethyldithiocarbamate, the levels of superoxide detected are the same for neutrophils stimulated on plastic and those on the endothelial monolayer, suggesting that endothelial superoxide dismutase may remove a portion of the neutrophil-generated superoxide from the detection system. Further evidence for the role of endothelium in destroying superoxide is suggested by results that show that the level of detectable superoxide released from neutrophils attached to formalin-fixed endothelial monolayers is the same as that for neutrophils attached to plastic. It is important to note that with the inhibitor of superoxide dismutase present, the endothelial monolayers do not display enhanced 51Cr release under the conditions employed. When both endothelial catalase and glutathione reductase are inhibited, we detect increased 51Cr release from endothelial cells in response to stimulated neutrophils. Our results show that

  19. Virulent Treponema pallidum promotes adhesion of leukocytes to human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, B S; Oppenheimer-Marks, N; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1994-01-01

    Perivasculitis and endothelial cell abnormalities are characteristic histopathologic features of syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. To extend earlier studies demonstrating that T. pallidum activates endothelial cells, we now show that virulent T. pallidum, but not heat-killed T. pallidum or nonpathogenic Treponema phagedenis, promotes increased adherence of lymphocytes and monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Lymphocytes and monocytes are the two cell types prominent in the histopathology of syphilis. Recognition that T. pallidum can stimulate endothelial cells to bind leukocytes provides important insights into the early mechanisms of syphilis immunopathogenesis. Images PMID:7927729

  20. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombosis in mice by antagonizing eNOS via β2GPI and apoER2.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sangeetha; Morrell, Craig N; Tarango, Cristina; Thomas, Gail D; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Girardi, Guillermina; Herz, Joachim; Urbanus, Rolf T; de Groot, Philip G; Thorpe, Philip E; Salmon, Jane E; Shaul, Philip W; Mineo, Chieko

    2011-01-01

    In antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) binding to β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI) induce endothelial cell-leukocyte adhesion and thrombus formation via unknown mechanisms. Here we show that in mice both of these processes are caused by the inhibition of eNOS. In studies of cultured human, bovine, and mouse endothelial cells, the promotion of monocyte adhesion by aPL entailed decreased bioavailable NO, and aPL fully antagonized eNOS activation by diverse agonists. Similarly, NO-dependent, acetylcholine-induced increases in carotid vascular conductance were impaired in aPL-treated mice. The inhibition of eNOS was caused by antibody recognition of domain I of β2GPI and β2GPI dimerization, and it was due to attenuated eNOS S1179 phosphorylation mediated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Furthermore, LDL receptor family member antagonism with receptor-associated protein (RAP) prevented aPL inhibition of eNOS in cell culture, and ApoER2-/- mice were protected from aPL inhibition of eNOS in vivo. Moreover, both aPL-induced increases in leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombus formation were absent in eNOS-/- and in ApoER2-/- mice. Thus, aPL-induced leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombosis are caused by eNOS antagonism, which is due to impaired S1179 phosphorylation mediated by β2GPI, apoER2, and PP2A. Our results suggest that novel therapies for APS can now be developed targeting these mechanisms. PMID:21123944

  1. Intracellular Penetration and Activity of Gemifloxacin in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    García, Isabel; Pascual, Alvaro; Ballesta, Sofía; Joyanes, Providencia; Perea, Evelio J.

    2000-01-01

    The intracellular penetration and activity of gemifloxacin in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were evaluated. Gemifloxacin reached intracellular concentrations eight times higher than extracellular concentrations. The uptake was rapid, reversible, and nonsaturable and was affected by environmental temperature, cell viability, and membrane stimuli. At therapeutic extracellular concentrations, gemifloxacin showed intracellular activity against Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:11036051

  2. Differential MSC activation leads to distinct mononuclear leukocyte binding mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Daniel J.; Dicarlo, Bryan; Hetz, Robert A.; Smith, Philippa; Cox, Charles S.; Olson, Scott D.

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the field of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal cell (MSC) biology have demonstrated that MSCs can improve disease outcome when `activated' to exert immunomodulatory effects. However, the precise mechanisms modulating MSC-immune cells interactions remain largely elusive. In here, we activated MSC based on a recent polarization paradigm, in which MSCs can be polarized towards a pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotype depending on the Toll-like receptor stimulated, to dissect the mechanisms through which MSCs physically interact with and modulate leukocytes in this context. Our data show that MSCs activated through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 dependent binding of leukocytes. On the other hand, TLR3 stimulation strongly increases leukocytes affinity to MSC comparatively, through the formation of cable-like hyaluronic acid structures. In addition, TLR4 activation elicited secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators by MSCs, whereas TLR3-activated MSCs displayed a milder pro-inflammatory phenotype, similar to inactivated MSCs. However, the differently activated MSCs maintained their ability to suppress leukocyte activation at similar levels in our in vitro model, and this immunomodulatory property was shown here to be partially mediated by prostaglandin. These results reinforce the concept that alternate activation profiles control MSC responses and may impact the therapeutic use of MSCs.

  3. Treatment of canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency by foamy virus vectors expressing CD18 from a PGK promoter.

    PubMed

    Bauer, T R; Olson, E M; Huo, Y; Tuschong, L M; Allen, J M; Li, Y; Burkholder, T H; Russell, D W

    2011-06-01

    Proto-oncogene activation caused by retroviral vector integration can cause malignancies in gene therapy trials. This has led investigators to search for less genotoxic vectors with minimal enhancer activity and a decreased risk of influencing neighboring chromosomal gene expression after integration. We previously showed that foamy virus (FV) vectors expressing the canine CD18 gene from an internal murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter could cure canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD). Here, we have repeated these studies using a FV vector expressing canine CD18 from a phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) gene promoter. In vitro analysis showed that this vector did not contain an enhancer that activated neighboring genes, and it expressed CD18 efficiently in canine neutrophils and CD34+ cells. However, dogs that received hematopoietic stem cells transduced with the PGK-CD18 vector continued to suffer from LAD, and sometimes died prematurely of the disease. These studies show that the PGK promoter cannot effectively replace the MSCV promoter in CD18-expressing FV vectors, and they suggest that vectors containing a strong promoter-enhancer may be necessary for the treatment of human LAD. PMID:21228879

  4. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency--clinical course and laboratory findings in eight affected animals.

    PubMed

    Müller, K E; Bernadina, W E; Kalsbeek, H C; Hoek, A; Rutten, V P; Wentink, G H

    1994-03-01

    The clinical course of Bovine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (BLAD) in eight Holstein Friesian cattle is described. Affected animals were presented with a history of poor thriving and recurrent bacterial infections. Five of these animals had to be killed because of severe respiratory disease shortly after admittance. Three affected animals survived calfhood only as a result of frequent antibacterial treatments. At one year of age, failure to thrive and stunted growth were still evident, but infections requiring antibiotic treatments occurred only sporadically. Clinical manifestations of BLAD were found in the digestive system (gingivitis, periodontitis, alveolar periostitis, diarrhoea), the respiratory system and the skin (impaired wound healing, chronic dermatitis). A leukocytosis based on a mature neutrophilia, which persisted during infection-free periods, was observed in all animals. Granulocytes were substantially deficient of beta 2-integrin expression on their membranes. Anaemia, which was noted in four animals, may be related to the Anaemia of Inflammatory Disease Complex (AID). The serum total protein content increased with time and was associated with elevated gamma-globulin levels. We suggest that, at a certain age, animals affected with BLAD are able to cope with environmental agents due to compensatory mechanisms of the immune system. PMID:8009815

  5. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency--clinical course and laboratory findings in eight affected animals.

    PubMed

    Müller, K E; Bernadina, W E; Kalsbeek, H C; Hoek, A; Rutten, V P; Wentink, G H

    1994-07-01

    The clinical course of Bovine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (BLAD) in eight Holstein Friesian cattle is described. Affected animals were presented with a history of poor thriving and recurrent bacterial infections. Five of these animals had to be killed because of severe respiratory disease shortly after admittance. Three affected animals survived calfhood only as a result of frequent antibacterial treatments. At one year of age, failure to thrive and stunted growth were still evident, but infections requiring antibiotic treatments occurred only sporadically. Clinical manifestations of BLAD were found in the digestive system (gingivitis, periodontitis, alveolar periostitis, diarrhoea), the respiratory system and the skin (impaired wound healing, chronic dermatitis). A leukocytosis based on a mature neutrophilia, which persisted during infection-free periods, was observed in all animals. Granulocytes were substantially deficient of beta 2-integrin expression on their membranes. Anaemia, which was noted in four animals, may be related to the Anaemia of Inflammatory Disease Complex (AID). The serum total protein content increased with time and was associated with elevated gamma-globulin levels. We suggest that, at a certain age, animals affected with BLAD are able to cope with environmental agents due to compensatory mechanisms of the immune system. PMID:7985357

  6. Detection of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) in Turkish native and Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Akyüz, B; Ertuğrul, O

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to study whether the bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) allele is present in native cattle breeds and the Holstein breed in Turkey. Blood samples were obtained from 120 Holstein, 20 Brown Swiss, 20 Anatolian Black, 20 Turkish Grey, 20 South Anatolian Red and 20 East Anatolian Red cattle. The isolated DNA materials were multiplied in PCR using the primer developed by Kriegesmann et al. (1997). In order to determine the area of mutation in PCR products, the PCR products were digested with TaqI endonuclease enzyme. The resulting fragments were analysed on 2% agarose gel for the absence of a TaqI restriction site. It was found that two of the Holstein cattle (a bull and a cow) were heterozygote BLAD carriers. There was no homozygote BLAD animal. The BLAD allele was not found in the other breeds used in the study. The mutant BLAD allele frequency in the 120 Holstein cattle calculations was 0.0084. PMID:16841755

  7. Insights into leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 2 from a novel mutation in the GDP-fucose transporter gene.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Andrés; Ma, Songhui; Peired, Anna J; Weiss, Linnea A; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Frenette, Paul S

    2003-03-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 2 (LADII) is characterized by defective selectin ligand formation, recurrent infection, and mental retardation. This rare syndrome has only been described in 2 kindreds of Middle Eastern descent who have differentially responded to exogenous fucose treatment. The molecular defect was recently ascribed to single and distinct missense mutations in a putative Golgi guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-fucose transporter. Here, we describe a patient of Brazilian origin with features of LADII. Sequencing of the GDP-fucose transporter revealed a novel single nucleotide deletion producing a shift in the open-reading frame and severe truncation of the polypeptide. Overexpression of the mutant protein in the patient's fibroblasts did not rescue fucosylation, suggesting that the deletion ablated the activity of the transporter. Administration of oral L-fucose to the patient produced molecular and clinical responses, as measured by the appearance of selectin ligands, normalization of neutrophil counts, and prevention of infectious recurrence. The lower neutrophil counts paralleled improved neutrophil interactions with activated endothelium in cremasteric venules of nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. However, fucose supplementation induced autoimmune neutropenia and the appearance of H antigen on erythrocytes, albeit without evidence of intravascular hemolysis. The robust response to fucose despite a severely truncated transporter suggests alternative means to transport GDP-fucose into the Golgi complex. PMID:12406889

  8. Regulatory peptides modulate adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to bronchial epithelial cells through regulation of interleukins, ICAM-1 and NF-kappaB/IkappaB.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Song; Tan, Yu-Rong; Xiang, Yang; Luo, Zi-Qiang; Qin, Xiao-Qun

    2006-02-01

    A complex network of regulatory neuropeptides controls airway inflammation reaction, in which airway epithelial cells adhering to and activating leukocytes is a critical step. To study the effect of intrapulmonary regulatory peptides on adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) and its mechanism, several regulatory peptides including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), epidermal growth factor (EGF), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), were investigated. The results demonstrated that VIP and EGF showed inhibitory effects both on the secretion of IL-1, IL-8 and the adhesion of PMNs to BECs, whereas ET-1 and CGRP had the opposite effect. Anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) antibody could block the adhesion of PMNs to ozone-stressed BECs. Using immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), it was shown that VIP and EGF down-regulated the expression of ICAM-1 in BECs, while ET-1 and CGRP up-regulated ICAM-1 expression. NF-kappaB inhibitor MG132 blocked ICAM-1 expression induced by ET-1 and CGRP. Furthermore, in electric mobility shift assay (EMSA), VIP and EGF restrained the binding activity of NF-kappaB to the NF-kappaB binding site within the ICAM-1 promoter in ozone-stressed BECs, while CGRP and ET-1 promoted this binding activity. IkappaB degradation was consistent with NF-kappaB activation. These observations indicate that VIP and EGF inhibit inflammation, while ET-1 and CGRP enhance the inflammation reaction. PMID:16474903

  9. Constitutive and cytokine-induced expression of human leukocyte antigens and cell adhesion molecules by human myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, D.; Goebels, N.; Hohlfeld, R.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the immunobiology of muscle is relevant to muscular autoimmune diseases and to gene therapies based on myoblast transfer. We have investigated the constitutive and cytokine-induced intra- and extracellular expression of histocompatibility human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and cell adhesion molecules by multinucleated human myotubes using immunofluorescence microscopy. Myotubes constitutively expressed HLA class I but not HLA class II. Exposure to interferon-gamma, but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha, induced HLA-DR in the cytoplasm and on the surface membrane of approximately 40 to 95% of cultured myotubes. Surface expression was strongest in perinuclear membrane areas, and cytoplasmic expression was strongest at branching points and at the tips of myotubes. HLA-DP and HLA-DQ were not expressed in detectable amounts. Both interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (CD54) in the cytoplasm and on the surface of nearly all myotubes. The distribution of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and HLA-DR was similar but not identical in double-positive myotubes. The leukocyte function-associated (LFA) adhesion molecules LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18), LFA-2 (CD2), and LFA-3 (CD58) could not be detected in the cytoplasm or on the surface. Our results indicate that cytokine-induced myotubes can participate in immune interactions with T lymphocytes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8214008

  10. Analysis of serum cytokine profile in a holstein heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency which survived for long period.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Hajime; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kirisawa, Rikio; Iwai, Hiroshi

    2002-08-01

    Serum cytokine levels and their expression of mRNA on neutrophils from a bone marrow (BM) transplanted heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency were evaluated. The clinical condition of the affected heifer was relatively stable after BM-transplantation. Persistent hyper gamma-globulinemia and increased serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentrations were monitored longitudinally. The concentration of interleukin (IL)-1beta in serum from the affected heifer ranged from 15.8 to 321.7 ng/ml, and maximum concentration occurred at the time which coincided with peak IL-6. Serum levels of IL-6 ranged from 0.32 to 27.9 ng/m l, and they appeared to be associated with the increment of serum IgG in the affected heifer. mRNAs for IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8 and granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were increased in neutrophils from the affected heifer compared to controls. Persistent hyper gamma-globulinemia of the affected heifer appeared to be associated with enhanced mRNA expression for IL-6 and its serum levels. These findings suggest that humoral immunity of the affected heifer is activated and the production of neutrophils appears to be enhanced under the incapability of beta(2) integrin-mediated functions of phagocytic cells. PMID:12237512

  11. Subgingival Microbial Communities in Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency and Their Relationship with Local Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Moutsopoulos, Niki M.; Abusleme, Loreto; Greenwell-Wild, Teresa; Dutzan, Nicolas; Paster, Bruce J.; Munson, Peter J.; Fine, Daniel H.; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency I (LAD-I) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by single gene mutations in the CD18 subunit of β2 integrins which result in defective transmigration of neutrophils into the tissues. Affected patients suffer from recurrent life threatening infections and severe oral disease (periodontitis). Microbial communities in the local environment (subgingival plaque) are thought to be the triggers for inflammatory periodontitis, yet little is known regarding the microbial communities associated with LAD-I periodontitis. Here we present the first comprehensive characterization of the subgingival communities in LAD-I, using a 16S rRNA gene-based microarray, and investigate the relationship of this tooth adherent microbiome to the local immunopathology of periodontitis. We show that the LAD subgingival microbiome is distinct from that of health and Localized Aggressive Periodontitits. Select periodontitis-associated species in the LAD microbiome included Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Eubacterium brachy and Treponema species. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium not typically found in subgingival plaque is detected in LAD-I. We suggest that microbial products from LAD-associated communities may have a role in stimulating the local inflammatory response. We demonstrate that bacterial LPS translocates into the lesions of LAD-periodontitis potentially triggering immunopathology. We also show in in vitro assays with human macrophages and in vivo in animal models that microbial products from LAD-associated subgingival plaque trigger IL-23-related immune responses, which have been shown to dominate in patient lesions. In conclusion, our current study characterizes the subgingival microbial communities in LAD-periodontitis and supports their role as triggers of disease pathogenesis. PMID:25741691

  12. Exposure to mercury alters early activation events in fish leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    MacDougal, K C; Johnson, M D; Burnett, K G

    1996-01-01

    Although fish in natural populations may carry high body burdens of both organic and inorganic mercury, the effects of this divalent metal on such lower vertebrates is poorly understood. In this report, inorganic mercury in the form of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) is shown to produce both high-dose inhibition and low-dose activation of leukocytes in a marine teleost fish, Sciaenops ocellatus. Concentrations of inorganic mercury > or = 10 microM suppressed DNA synthesis and induced rapid influx of radiolabeled calcium, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins. Lower concentrations (0.1-1 microM) of HgCl2 that activated cell growth also induced a slow sustained rise in intracellular calcium in cells loaded with the calcium indicator dye fura-2, but did not produce detectable tyrosine phosphorylation of leukocyte proteins. These studies support the possibility that subtoxic doses of HgCl2 may inappropriately activate teleost leukocytes, potentially altering the processes that regulate the magnitude and specificity of the fish immune response to environmental pathogens. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8930553

  13. β2 integrins (CD11/18) are essential for the chemosensory adhesion and migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes on bacterial cellulose.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Dong; Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Hana; Park, Hye Rim; Son, Gun Woo; Park, Cheung-Seog; Park, Yong Seek

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has been studied widely for applications in biomedical materials such as prosthetic artificial blood vessels owing to its unique characteristics, which include nontoxicity and nonimmunogenicity as compared with synthetic biopolymers such as expanded polytetrafluorethylene (ePTFE). However, to date, studies on the relative effect of leukocytes on BC as a prosthetic vascular graft are insufficient. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) play a pivotal role in early-phase immune response to bacterial or periprosthetic infection. PMN recruitment at sites of infection or inflammation mediated by various integrins such as β2 integrin family (CD11/CD18 family). Therefore, we discuss our investigations into the mechanisms by which β2 integrins-mediated chemosensory adhesion and migration of PMN on the vascular graft surface, BC. Our results show that CD11b/CD18 components mainly mediate PMN adherence on BC. CD11b/CD18 displays weak coordination with the other two α subunits (CD11a and CD11c). Furthermore, it was found that the β subunit (CD18) plays a critical role in both the adhesion and migration of N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-stimulated PMN on BC. The activity of CD18 contrasts with that of the individual α subunits. Among these, only CD11b displayed inhibition of PMN migration on BC surfaces. PMID:25231265

  14. L-selectin-dependent leukocyte adhesion to microvascular but not to macrovascular endothelial cells of the human coronary system.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewicz, A; Gräfe, M; Terbeek, D; Bongrazio, M; Auch-Schwelk, W; Walzog, B; Graf, K; Fleck, E; Ley, K; Gaehtgens, P

    1997-05-01

    To characterize L-selectin-dependent cell adhesion to human vascular endothelium, human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMEC) and human coronary endothelial cells (HCEC) were isolated from explanted human hearts. The adhesion behavior of human (NALM-6) and mouse (300.19) pre-B cells transfected with cDNA encoding for human L-selectin was compared with that of the respective nontransfected cells in a flow chamber in vitro. More than 80% of the adhesion to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-stimulated HCMEC at shear stresses >2 dyne/cm2 was L-selectin dependent and could be equally well blocked by an anti-L-selectin antibody or a L-selectin-IgG-chimera. No L-selectin dependent adhesion to HCEC could be shown. The L-selectin dependent adhesion to HCMEC was insensitive to neuraminidase, but greatly inhibited by addition of NaClO3, which inhibits posttranslational sulfation and remained elevated for at least 24 hours of stimulation. E-selectin dependent adhesion of HL60 cells to HCMEC was blocked by neuraminidase, but not by NaClO3 and returned to control levels within 18 hours of HCMEC stimulation. It is concluded that microvascular, but not macrovascular endothelial cells express TNF-alpha-inducible sulfated ligand(s) for L-selectin, which differ from known L-selectin ligands, because sialylation is not required. The prolonged time course of L-selectin dependent adhesion suggests a role in sustained leukocyte recruitment into inflammatory sites in vivo. PMID:9129027

  15. The effects of cannabinoids and cannabispiro compounds on Escherichia coli adhesion to tissue culture cells and on leukocyte functions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Molnár, J; Petri, I; Berek, I; Shoyama, Y; Nishioka, I

    1987-01-01

    delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabidiolic acid, tetrahydrocannabidiolic acid, cannabispirol, acetylcannabispirol, cannabispirone, and cannabispirenone in a low concentration did not affect the adhesion of Escherichia coli on cultured HEp-2 cells. Cannabinoids at 10(-6) M increased the chemiluminescence of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, while the cannabispiro compounds failed to enhance the oxidative burst of leukocytes. In lymphocyte and granulocyte function tests (E- and EA-rosette formation, blast transformation of T-lymphocytes in the presence of phytohaemagglutinin and concanavalin-A, ADCC and phagocytosis) all compounds displayed immunosuppressive effect at 1.5 X 10(-5) M. Tetrahydrocannabidiolic acid exerted the weakest immunosuppression on human leukocyte functions. PMID:3329437

  16. Atraumatic Pulsatile Leukocyte Circulation for Long-Term In Vitro Dynamic Culture and Adhesion Assays.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Giulia; Stoiber, Martin; Pfeiffer, Dagmar; Schima, Heinrich

    2015-11-01

    Low flow rate pumping of cell suspensions finds current applications in bioreactors for short-term dynamic cell culture and adhesion assays. The aim of this study was to develop an atraumatic pump and hemodynamically adapted test circuit to allow operating periods of at least several hours. A computer-controlled mini-pump (MP) was constructed based on non-occlusive local compression of an elastic tube with commercial bi-leaflet valves directing the pulsatile flow into a compliant circuit. Cell damage and activation in the system were tested with whole blood in comparison with a set with a conventional peristaltic pump (PP). Activation of circulating THP-1 monocytes was tested by measuring the expression of CD54 (ICAM-1). Additionally, monocyte-endothelial interactions were monitored using a parallel-plate flow chamber with an artificial stenosis. The system required a priming volume of only 20 mL, delivering a peak pulsatile flow of up to 35 mL/min. After 8 h, blood hemolysis was significantly lower for MP with 11 ± 3 mg/dL compared with PP with 100 ± 16 mg/dL. CD142 (tissue factor) expression on blood monocytes was 50% lower for MP. With MP, THP-1 cells could be pumped for extended periods (17 h), with no enhanced expression of CD54 permitting the long-term co-culture of THP-1 with endothelial cells and the analysis of flow pattern effects on cell adhesion. A low-damage assay setup was developed, which allows the pulsatile flow of THP-1 cells and investigation of their interaction with other cells or surfaces for extended periods of time. PMID:25894522

  17. Adhesive curing through low-voltage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jianfeng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Jian Lin; Webster, Richard D.; Steele, Terry W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Instant curing adhesives typically fall within three categories, being activated by either light (photocuring), heat (thermocuring) or chemical means. These curing strategies limit applications to specific substrates and can only be activated under certain conditions. Here we present the development of an instant curing adhesive through low-voltage activation. The electrocuring adhesive is synthesized by grafting carbene precursors on polyamidoamine dendrimers and dissolving in aqueous solvents to form viscous gels. The electrocuring adhesives are activated at −2 V versus Ag/AgCl, allowing tunable crosslinking within the dendrimer matrix and on both electrode surfaces. As the applied voltage discontinued, crosslinking immediately terminated. Thus, crosslinking initiation and propagation are observed to be voltage and time dependent, enabling tuning of both material properties and adhesive strength. The electrocuring adhesive has immediate implications in manufacturing and development of implantable bioadhesives. PMID:26282730

  18. Alginate microsphere compositions dictate different mechanisms of complement activation with consequences for cytokine release and leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Ørning, Pontus; Hoem, Kine Samset; Coron, Abba Elizabeth; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Rokstad, Anne Mari

    2016-05-10

    The inflammatory potential of 12 types of alginate-based microspheres was assessed in a human whole blood model. The inflammatory potential could be categorized from low to high based on the four main alginate microsphere types; alginate microbeads, liquefied core poly-l-ornithine (PLO)-containing microcapsules, liquefied core poly-l-lysine (PLL)-containing microcapsules, and solid core PLL-containing microcapsules. No complement or inflammatory cytokine activation was detected for the Ca/Ba alginate microbeads. Liquefied core PLO- and PLL-containing microcapsules induced significant fluid phase complement activation (TCC), but with low complement surface deposition (anti-C3c), and a low proinflammatory cytokine secretion, with exception of an elevated MCP-1(CCL2) secretion. The solid core PLL-containing microcapsules generated lower TCC but a marked complement surface deposition and significant induction of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1)β, TNF, IL-6, the chemokines IL-8 (CXCL8), and MIP-1α (CCL3) and MCP-1(CCL2). Inhibition with compstatin (C3 inhibitor) completely abolished complement surface deposition, leukocyte adhesion and the proinflammatory cytokines. The C5 inhibitions partly lead to a reduction of the proinflammatory cytokines. The leukocyte adhesion was abolished by inhibitory antibodies against CD18 and partly reduced by CD11b, but not by CD11c. Anti-CD18 significantly reduced the (IL-1)β, TNF, IL-6 and MIP-1α and anti-CD11b significantly reduced the IL-6 and VEGF secretion. MCP-1 was strongly activated by anti-CD18 and anti-CD11b. In conclusion the initial proinflammatory cytokine responses are driven by the microspheres potential to trigger complement C3 (C3b/iC3b) deposition, leukocyte activation and binding through complement receptor CR3 (CD11b/CD18). MCP-1 is one exception dependent on the fluid phase complement activation mediated through CR3. PMID:26993426

  19. Leukocyte mimetic polysaccharide microparticles tracked in vivo on activated endothelium and in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Thomas; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Journé, Clément; Ho Tin Noe, Benoît; Arnaud, Denis; Louedec, Liliane; Derkaoui, Sidi Mohammed; Letourneur, Didier; Chauvierre, Cédric; Le Visage, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    We have developed injectable microparticles functionalized with fucoidan, in which sulfated groups mimic the anchor sites of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), one of the principal receptors supporting leukocyte adhesion. These targeted microparticles were combined with a fluorescent dye and a T2(∗) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, and then tracked in vivo with small animal imaging methods. Microparticles of 2.5μm were obtained by a water-in-oil emulsification combined with a cross-linking process of polysaccharide dextran, fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran, pullulan and fucoidan mixed with ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide. Fluorescent intravital microscopy observation revealed dynamic adsorption and a leukocyte-like behaviour of fucoidan-functionalized microparticles on a calcium ionophore induced an activated endothelial layer of a mouse mesentery vessel. We observed 20times more adherent microparticles on the activated endothelium area after the injection of functionalized microparticles compared to non-functionalized microparticles (197±11 vs. 10±2). This imaging tool was then applied to rats presenting an elastase perfusion model of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and 7.4T in vivo MRI was performed. Visual analysis of T2(∗)-weighted MR images showed a significant contrast enhancement on the inner wall of the aneurysm from 30min to 2h after the injection. Histological analysis of AAA cryosections revealed microparticles localized inside the aneurysm wall, in the same areas in which immunostaining shows P-selectin expression. The developed leukocyte mimetic imaging tool could therefore be relevant for molecular imaging of vascular diseases and for monitoring biologically active areas prone to rupture in AAA. PMID:24769117

  20. Cyclic stretching of mesangial cells up-regulates intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and leukocyte adherence: a possible new mechanism for glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riser, B L; Varani, J; Cortes, P; Yee, J; Dame, M; Sharba, A K

    2001-01-01

    Intraglomerular hypertension is a primary causal factor in the progressive glomerulosclerosis that characterizes diabetic nephropathy or severe renal ablation. However, inflammation of the glomerular mesangium also participates in at least the early phase of these diseases. In glomerulonephritis, where inflammation is thought to be the predominant causal factor, intraglomerular hypertension is also often present. Mesangial cells (MCs) are critical in orchestrating key functions of the glomerulus including extracellular matrix metabolism, cytokine production, and interaction with leukocytes. Because MCs are subject to increased stretching when intraglomerular hypertension is present, and in glomerulonephritis MC/leukocyte interactions seem to be mediated primarily via the up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), we examine the possibility that cyclic stretching is a stimulus for increased MC ICAM-1 activity. We demonstrate that the normal low levels of MC ICAM-1 mRNA and protein are dramatically up-regulated by even short intervals of cyclic stretch. This effect is dose- and time-dependent, and requires little amplitude and a brief period of elongation for significant induction. Stretch-induced MC ICAM-1 also leads to a marked elevation in phagocytic leukocyte adherence. This stimulated adherence is equal or greater than that induced by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha, whereas an additive effect occurs when both are applied in combination. Our results indicate that stretch-induced ICAM-1 may provide a direct link between hypertension and inflammation in the progression of injury and glomerulosclerosis in diabetes, renal ablation, and other forms of glomerulonephritis. PMID:11141473

  1. PCR screening for carriers of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) and uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS) in Argentine Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Poli, M A; Dewey, R; Semorile, L; Lozano, M E; Albariño, C G; Romanowski, V; Grau, O

    1996-05-01

    BLAD (Bovine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency) and DUMPS (Deficiency of Uridine Monophosphate Synthase) are monogenic autosomal, recessive inherited diseases of Holstein cattle. Single nucleotide changes (point mutations) responsible for the genetic disorders were detected by polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism assays (PCR-RFLP). Using oligonucleotide primers, DNA fragments of predicted sizes were amplified, and the products' specificity was assessed by nucleotide sequencing. Mutations were detected in DNA samples from bovine blood and semen by the presence or absence of restriction sites within the PCR amplification products (Taq I, Hae III for BLAD, Ava I for DUMPS). The test included 104 bulls and 950 cows of Argentinean Holstein breed. Defective alleles frequencies were as follows: 2.88% BLAD in bulls used in artificial insemination, 1.79% in cows; 0.96% DUMPS in bulls and 0.11% in cows. PMID:8693839

  2. Survival of transfused CD18-positive granulocytes and their chemiluminescent response in a heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Sakurai, N; Matsuki, S; Miura, T; Nioka, K; Kociba, G J

    1998-02-01

    Granulocyte transfusion (GT) was performed in an 8-month-old heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) to monitor the changes in transfused CD18-positive neutrophils and associated neutrophil chemiluminescent (CL) response in beta 2-integrin-deficient host. The CD18-positive neutrophils were detected in blood from the BLAD heifer during the first 3 hr after 2.6 x 10(9) cells were infused by GT, and disappeared by 5 hr after GT. The CL response of neutrophils was increased 1.7 to 2.8-fold in the BLAD heifer during the first 3 hr after GT, thereafter CL response decreased gradually from 2 to 5 hr after GT. PMID:9524955

  3. [A method for detecting bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency in Holstein calves using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Sheng-Li; Han, Guang-Wen; Xue, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Peng

    2007-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by A-->G mutation in the CD18 gene. The disease is characterized by greatly reduced expression of the heterodimeric beta2 integrin adhesion molecules on leukocytes, resulting in multiple defects in leukocyte function and significant deficits on performance traits in Holstein cattle. In this study, primers were designed to amplify the CD18 gene fragment and BLAD was detected by PCR-SSCP in a simple, highly accurate and high throughput manner. Results were confirmed by DNA sequencing. This study provides a more reliable and useful method for extensive screening of BLAD and also offers a theoretical basis for molecular diagnosis in Holstein calves. PMID:18065382

  4. Cytokine profile of a Holstein calf with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency during the acute-phase inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Hajime; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Takashi

    2002-12-01

    Changes in interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-8 in serum, and their mRNA expression on neutrophils from a 4.6-month old Holstein young calf with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) during the acute phase were evaluated. IL-1beta concentrations in the serum of the calf with BLAD at age 143-162 days ranged from 8.7 to 16.6 ng/ml, whereas the values were less than 2.7 ng/ml in control calves. Serum IL-6 (0.04 ng/ml) was only detected on the 1st day when the animal was diagnosed with the BLAD. IL-1beta and IL-8 mRNA expression on neutrophils from the affected calf appeared to be similar to those of controls. Serum cytokine levels and their mRNA expression on neutrophils from the calf with BLAD appeared to be little affected by the deficient expression of beta(2)-integrin on leukocytes, and are considered to be modulated by the inflammatory stimuli. PMID:12520109

  5. Effects of cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on the leukocyte function-associated antigen 1/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 pathway in gingival fibroblasts in adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, J; Saito, I; Ishikawa, I; Miyasaka, N

    1994-12-01

    We investigated the effects of inflammatory cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and E-selectin (endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1) in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cell surface ICAM-1 was upregulated on HGF under transcriptional control by exposure not only to interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and gamma interferon but also to sonic extracts prepared from Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia (nigrescens) and lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli. However, these stimuli induced only minimal expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and E-selectin on HGF. Binding assays using HGF and Molt 4, the human T-cell leukemia cell line, showed induced ICAM-1 to be functional, and the increased binding was blocked by a combination of monoclonal antibodies against ICAM-1 and leukocyte function-associated antigen 1. Furthermore, gingival tissues from adult periodontitis patients showed increased mRNA expression of ICAM-1 compared with that in tissues from normal healthy donors. In immunohistological analysis, we also observed in vivo that the expression of ICAM-1 on fibroblasts in adult periodontitis tissues was greater than that in normal gingiva. Thus, the overexpression of ICAM-1 on gingival fibroblasts induced by cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria is speculated to be deeply involved in the accumulation and retention of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1-bearing leukocytes in adult periodontitis lesions. PMID:7525481

  6. Alimentary and respiratory tract lesions in eight medically fragile Holstein cattle with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD).

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Kehrli, M E; Laufer, J A; Nusz, L T

    1996-05-01

    Lesions in the alimentary tract were studied in eight medically fragile Holstein cattle homozygous for the bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) allele as determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease analysis. These cattle received institutional medical care but died or were euthanatized because of chronic debilitation associated with diarrhea (6/8) and pneumonia (4/8). The six cattle with diarrhea had acute (n = 3) or chronic (n = 3) intestinal ulcers, but the other two remained relatively healthy for 3 years and did not develop intestinal tract ulcers. Ulcerated areas were present in the small intestine in six animals, and two of these also had ulcers in the large intestine. Ulcers were covered by thick exudates that, in chronic lesions, partially occluded the intestinal lumen. Intramural and serosal fibrosis also contributed to lumen constriction. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the intestine of four cattle. Bovine viral disease virus and Salmonella were not isolated from the five cattle that were tested. Respiratory tract lesions consisted of dense infiltrates of neutrophils in bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli. This study suggests that intestinal lesions are integral to the demise of BLAD cattle that receive intensive medical care and that neutrophils do infiltrate the lung and enter airway lumina, despite the adhesion deficiency. PMID:8740700

  7. The Effect of Gentamicin-Induced Readthrough on a Novel Premature Termination Codon of CD18 Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wolach, Baruch; Gavrieli, Ronit; Amariglio, Ninette; Rosenthal, Ester; Gazit, Ephraim; Eyal, Eran; Rechavi, Gideon; Somech, Raz

    2010-01-01

    Background Leukocyte adhesion deficiency 1 (LAD1) is an inherited disorder of neutrophil function. Nonsense mutations in the affected CD18 (ITB2) gene have rarely been described. In other genes containing such mutations, treatments with aminoglycoside types of antibiotics (e.g., gentamicin) were reported to partially correct the premature protein termination, by induction of readthrough mechanism. Methodology/Principal Findings Genetic analysis was performed on 2 LAD1 patients. Expression, functional and immunofluorescence assays of CD18 in the patients were used to determine the in-vivo and in-vitro effects of gentamicin-induced readthrough. A theoretical modeling of the corrected CD18 protein was developed to predict the protein function. Results We found a novel premature termination codon, C562T (R188X), in exon 6 of the CD18 gene that caused a severe LAD1 phenotype in two unrelated Palestinian children. In-vivo studies on these patients' cells after gentamicin treatment showed abnormal adhesion and chemotactic functions, while in-vitro studies showed mislocalization of the corrected protein to the cytoplasm and not to the cell surface. A theoretical modeling of the corrected CD18 protein suggested that the replacement of the wild type arginine by gentamicin induced tryptophan at the position of the nonsense mutation, although enabled the expression of the entire CD18 protein, this was not sufficient to stabilize the CD18/11 heterodimer at the cell surface. Conclusion A novel nonsense mutation in the CD18 gene causing a complete absence of CD18 protein and severe LAD1 clinical phenotype is reported. Both in vivo and in vitro treatments with gentamicin resulted in the expression of a corrected full-length dysfunctional or mislocalized CD18 protein. However, while the use of gentamicin increased the expression of CD18, it did not improve leukocyte adhesion and chemotaxis. Moreover, the integrity of the CD18/CD11 complex at the cell surface was impaired, due to

  8. Crossing the Vascular Wall: Common and Unique Mechanisms Exploited by Different Leukocyte Subsets during Extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Schnoor, Michael; Alcaide, Pilar; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation is one of the essential and first steps during the initiation of inflammation. Therefore, a better understanding of the key molecules that regulate this process may help to develop novel therapeutics for treatment of inflammation-based diseases such as atherosclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. The endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are known as the central mediators of leukocyte adhesion to and transmigration across the endothelium. Engagement of these molecules by their leukocyte integrin receptors initiates the activation of several signaling pathways within both leukocytes and endothelium. Several of such events have been described to occur during transendothelial migration of all leukocyte subsets, whereas other mechanisms are known only for a single leukocyte subset. Here, we summarize current knowledge on regulatory mechanisms of leukocyte extravasation from a leukocyte and endothelial point of view, respectively. Specifically, we will focus on highlighting common and unique mechanisms that specific leukocyte subsets exploit to succeed in crossing endothelial monolayers. PMID:26568666

  9. Myeloperoxidase-mediated activation of xenobiotics by human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, A H; Uetrecht, J P

    1993-10-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes contain a variety of enzymes that are capable of metabolising xenobiotics. The enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) appears to be the most important for drug metabolism. MPO is a peroxidase/oxidase and generates the powerful oxidant hypochlorous acid. MPO- or MPO-generated oxidants are capable of oxidizing a wide variety of compounds and a broad range of functional groups, especially those that contain nitrogen and sulfur. Leukocytes have a role in immune response; therefore, reactive intermediates generated by leukocyte metabolism of xenobiotics may have a role in idiosyncratic drug reactions, particularly those that are immune-mediated such as drug-induced lupus or agranulocytosis. PMID:8236277

  10. PI3K{gamma} activation by CXCL12 regulates tumor cell adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrubio, Maria; Mellado, Mario; Carrera, Ana C.

    2009-10-16

    Tumor dissemination is a complex process, in which certain steps resemble those in leukocyte homing. Specific chemokine/chemokine receptor pairs have important roles in both processes. CXCL12/CXCR4 is the most commonly expressed chemokine/chemokine receptor pair in human cancers, in which it regulates cell adhesion, extravasation, metastatic colonization, angiogenesis, and proliferation. All of these processes require activation of signaling pathways that include G proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), JAK kinases, Rho GTPases, and focal adhesion-associated proteins. We analyzed these pathways in a human melanoma cell line in response to CXCL12 stimulation, and found that PI3K{gamma} regulates tumor cell adhesion through mechanisms different from those involved in cell invasion. Our data indicate that, following CXCR4 activation after CXCL12 binding, the invasion and adhesion processes are regulated differently by distinct downstream events in these signaling cascades.

  11. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  12. Identification of novel allelic variants of integrin beta 2 (ITGB2) gene and screening for Bubaline leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome in Indian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Subodh; Deb, Sitangsu M; Mitra, Abhijit; Niranjan, Saket K; Naskar, Soumen; Sharma, Arjava

    2009-01-01

    A fragment of 570 bp corresponding to exon 5 and 6 of integrin beta 2 (ITGB2) gene was amplified for screening D128G mutation in one hundred and fifty two buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) which causes bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome (BLAD) in cattle, as well as to ascertain polymorphism. TaqI PCR-RFLP revealed no such mutation thus indicating the absence of bubaline leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BuLAD) allele in animals under study. However, the polymorphism studies using MspI restriction enzyme revealed two genotypic patterns viz. AA pattern (bands of 293, 141, 105, and 31 bp) and BB pattern (bands of 293, 105, 77, 64, and 31 bp). The sequences of A and B alleles were submitted to the GenBank (EU853307 and AY821799). PMID:19544212

  13. Endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 mediates antigen-induced acute airway inflammation and late-phase airway obstruction in monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Gundel, R H; Wegner, C D; Torcellini, C A; Clarke, C C; Haynes, N; Rothlein, R; Smith, C W; Letts, L G

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the role of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1) in the development of the acute airway inflammation (cell influx) and late-phase airway obstruction in a primate model of extrinsic asthma. In animals sensitive to antigen, a single inhalation exposure induced the rapid expression of ELAM-1 (6 h) exclusively on vascular endothelium that correlated with the influx of neutrophils into the lungs and the onset of late-phase airway obstruction. In contrast, basal levels of ICAM-1 was constitutively expressed on vascular endothelium and airway epithelium before antigen challenge. After the single antigen exposure, changes in ICAM-1 expression did not correlate with neutrophil influx or the change in airway caliber. This was confirmed by showing that pretreatment with a monoclonal antibody to ICAM-1 did not inhibit the acute influx of neutrophils associated with late-phase airway obstruction, whereas a monoclonal antibody to ELAM-1 blocked both the influx of neutrophils and the late-phase airway obstruction. This study demonstrates a functional role for ELAM-1 in the development of acute airway inflammation in vivo. We conclude that, in primates, the late-phase response is the result of an ELAM-1 dependent influx of neutrophils. Therefore, the regulation of ELAM-1 expression may provide a novel approach to controlling the acute inflammatory response, and thereby, affecting airway function associated with inflammatory disorders, including asthma. Images PMID:1717514

  14. Successful treatment of fusarium solani ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient affected by leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 with granulocytes transfusions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) manifests as a skin lesion affecting patients suffering extreme neutropenia and is commonly associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in immunocompromised patients. Leukocyte adhesion deficiency I (LAD I) which count among primary immunodeficiency syndromes of the innate immunity, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized in its severe phenotype by a complete defect in CD18 expression on neutrophils, delayed cord separation, chronic skin ulcers mainly due to recurrent bacterial and fungal infections, leucocytosis with high numbers of circulating neutrophils and an accumulation of abnormally low number of neutrophils at sites of infection. Case Presentation We report at our knowledge the first case of a child affected by LAD-1, who experienced during her disease course a multi-bacterial and fungal EG lesion caused by fusarium solani. Despite targeted antibiotics and anti-fungi therapy, the lesion extended for as long as 18 months and only massive granulocytes pockets transfusions in association with G-CSF had the capacity to cure this lesion. Conclusion We propose that granulocytes pockets transfusions will be beneficial to heal EG especially in severely immunocompromised patients. PMID:20929531

  15. Radiation-induced permeability and leukocyte adhesion in the rat blood-brain barrier: modulation with anti-ICAM-1 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong; Gaber, M Waleed; McColgan, Tamara; Naimark, Michael D; Kiani, Mohammad F; Merchant, Thomas E

    2003-04-18

    We assessed the acute effects of radiation on the rat blood-brain barrier. A cranial window model and intravital microscopy were used to measure changes in permeability and leukocyte adhesion in pial vessels after a localized, single dose of 20 Gy. Permeability was assessed using five sizes of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran molecules (4.4-, 10-, 38.2-, 70-, and 150-kDa) with measurements performed before and 2, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after irradiation for the 4.4 and 38.2-kDa molecules and before and 24 h after irradiation for the other three molecules. To demonstrate the nature of blood-brain barrier permeability, we concurrently studied the permeability of microvessels in the cremaster muscle. In both tissues, permeability to FITC-dextran was significantly greater 24 h after irradiation than before (P<0.05). The exception was that radiation did not affect the permeability of pial vessels to the 150-kDa molecule. The particle-size dependence of the permeability changes in the brain were indicative of altered integrity of endothelial tight junctions and occurred concomitantly with an increase in cell adhesion which was determined by fluorescent labeling of leukocytes with rhodamine 6G. An early inflammatory response to irradiation was apparent in the brain 2 h after irradiation. The numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased significantly and peaked at 24 h. Injection with the anti-ICAM-1 mAb significantly reduced leukocyte adhesion and permeability thereby linking the two processes. These findings provide a target to reduce radiation-related permeability and cell adhesion and potentially the side effects of radiation in the CNS. PMID:12676365

  16. Shear Dependent Adhesion of Leukocytes and Lectins to the Endothelium and Concurrent Changes in Thickness of the Glycocalyx of Post-capillary Venules in the Low Flow State

    PubMed Central

    Lipowsky, Herbert H.; Lescanic, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To elucidate shear dependent effects of deformation of the endothelial glycocalyx on adhesion of circulating ligands in post-capillary venules, and delineate effect of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). Methods Adhesion of leukocytes (WBCs) and lectin-coated fluorescently labeled microspheres (FLMs, 0.1 μm diameter), to endothelium (EC) of post-capillary venules in mesentery was examined during acute reductions in shear rates (γ̇, hemorrhagic hypotension). Adhesion was examined with or without superfusion with 0.5 μM doxycycline to inhibit MMPs. Thickness of the glycocalyx was measured by exclusion of fluorescent 70 kDa dextran from the EC surface. Results During superfusion with Ringers, rapid reductions in γ̇ resulted in a significant rise in WBC adhesion and a two-fold rise in microsphere adhesion. With addition of doxycycline WBC and FLM adhesion increased two-fold under high and low flow conditions. FLM adhesion was invariant with γ̇ throughout the network in the normal (high) flow state. With reductions in γ̇, thickness of the glycocalyx increased significantly, with or without doxycycline. Conclusions The concurrent increase in WBC and FLM adhesion with increased thickness of the glycocalyx during reductions in shear suggests that glycocalyx core proteins recoil from their deformed steady state configuration, which increases exposure of binding sites for circulating ligands. PMID:22963321

  17. Low incidence of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) carriers in Indian cattle and buffalo breeds.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajesh K; Singh, Krishna M; Soni, Kalpesh J; Chauhan, Jenabhai B; Sambasiva Rao, Krothapalli R S

    2007-01-01

    BLAD is an autosomal recessive genetic disease that affects Holstein-Friesian (HF) cattle worldwide. It is a disease characterized by a reduced expression of the adhesion molecules on neutrophils. The disease is caused by a mutation that replaces adenine at 383 with guanine, which causes an amino acid change from aspartic acid to glycine. Blood samples and a few semen samples were collected from 1250 phenotypically normal individuals, including HF (N=377), HF crossbred (N=334), Jersey (105), other breeds of cattle (N=160) and water buffalo Bubalus bubalis (N=274) belonging to various artificial insemination stations, bull mother farms (BMFs) and embryo transfer (ET) centres across the country. PCR-RFLP was performed to detect a point mutation in CD18, surface molecules of neutrophils. The results indicate that out of 1250 cattle and buffaloes tested for BLAD, 13 HF purebreds out of 377 and 10 HF crossbreds out of 334 appear to be BLAD carriers. In the HF and HF crossbred population, the percentage of BLAD carriers was estimated as 3.23%. The condition is alarming as the mutant gene has already entered the HF crossbred cattle population and therefore, the population of HF and its crossbreds needs regular screening to avoid the risk of spreading BLAD in the breeding cattle population of India. PMID:17495349

  18. Using CRISPR-Cas9 to quantify the contributions of O-glycans, N-glycans and Glycosphingolipids to human leukocyte-endothelium adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Stolfa, Gino; Mondal, Nandini; Zhu, Yuqi; Yu, Xinheng; Buffone, Alexander; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    There is often interest in dissecting the relative contributions of the N-glycans, O-glycans and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in regulating complex biological traits like cell signaling, adhesion, development and metastasis. To address this, we developed a CRISPR-Cas9 toolkit to selectively truncate each of these commonly expressed glycan-types. Here, O-glycan biosynthesis was truncated by knocking-out Core 1 β3Gal-T Specific Molecular Chaperone (COSMC), N-glycans by targeting the β1,2 GlcNAc-transferase (MGAT1) and GSLs by deleting UDP-glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG). These reagents were applied to reveal the glycoconjugates regulating human myeloid cell adhesion to selectins under physiological shear-flow observed during inflammation. These functional studies show that leukocyte rolling on P- and L-selectin is ablated in cells lacking O-glycans, with N-glycan truncation also increasing cell rolling velocity on L-selectin. All three glycan families contributed to E-selectin dependent cell adhesion with N-glycans contributing to all aspects of the leukocyte adhesion cascade, O-glycans only being important during initial recruitment, and GSLs stabilizing slow cell rolling and the transition to firm arrest. Overall, the genome editing tools developed here may be broadly applied in studies of cellular glycosylation. PMID:27458028

  19. Morphologic and cytokine profile characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection in calves with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nunes, J S; Lawhon, S D; Rossetti, C A; Khare, S; Figueiredo, J F; Gull, T; Burghardt, R C; Bäumler, A J; Tsolis, R M; Andrews-Polymenis, H L; Adams, L G

    2010-03-01

    The role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium-induced ruminant and human enteritis and diarrhea has yet to be characterized with in vivo models. To address this question, the in vivo bovine ligated ileal loop model of nontyphoidal salmonellosis was used in calves with the naturally occurring bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) mutation whose neutrophils are unable to extravasate and infiltrate the extravascular matrix. Data obtained from 4 BLAD Holstein calves homozygous for BLAD (CD18-), 1 to 5 weeks of age, were compared with 4 controls, age-matched Holstein calves negative for BLAD (CD18+). Morphologic studies revealed that infection of CD18- calves with S Typhimurium resulted in no significant tissue infiltration by neutrophils, less tissue damage, reduced luminal fluid accumulation, and increased bacterial invasion, when compared with CD18+ calves. Ultrastructurally, lesions in enterocytes induced by S Typhimurium infection in CD18- calves--including attachment and disruption of the brush border, apical membrane ruffling formation, and cellular degeneration--were similar to the ones reported in the literature for CD18- calves. Study of cytokine gene expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that early stages of acute infection (4-8 hours postinfection) were associated with increased interleukin 8 gene expression in the absence of tissue influx of neutrophils in CD18- calves, whereas later stages of infection (12 hours postinfection) were associated with increased expression of growth-related oncogene alpha in the presence of neutrophil influx in CD18+ calves. In contrast, the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha were poorly correlated with the presence or absence of tissue neutrophils. PMID:20118318

  20. Silencing α1,3-Fucosyltransferases in Human Leukocytes Reveals a Role for FUT9 Enzyme during E-selectin-mediated Cell Adhesion*

    PubMed Central

    Buffone, Alexander; Mondal, Nandini; Gupta, Rohitesh; McHugh, Kyle P.; Lau, Joseph T. Y.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion during inflammation is initiated by the binding of sialofucosylated carbohydrates expressed on leukocytes to endothelial E/P-selectin. Although the glycosyltransferases (glycoTs) constructing selectin-ligands have largely been identified using knock-out mice, important differences may exist between humans and mice. To address this, we developed a systematic lentivirus-based shRNA delivery workflow to create human leukocytic HL-60 cell lines that lack up to three glycoTs. Using this, the contributions of all three myeloid α1,3-fucosyltransferases (FUT4, FUT7, and FUT9) to selectin-ligand biosynthesis were evaluated. The cell adhesion properties of these modified cells to L-, E-, and P-selectin under hydrodynamic shear were compared with bone marrow-derived neutrophils from Fut4−/−Fut7−/− dual knock-out mice. Results demonstrate that predominantly FUT7, and to a lesser extent FUT4, forms the selectin-ligand at the N terminus of leukocyte P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) in humans and mice. Here, 85% reduction in leukocyte interaction was observed in human FUT4−7− dual knockdowns on P/L-selectin substrates. Unlike Fut4−/−Fut7−/− mouse neutrophils, however, human knockdowns lacking FUT4 and FUT7 only exhibited partial reduction in rolling interaction on E-selectin. In this case, the third α1,3-fucosyltransferase FUT9 played an important role because leukocyte adhesion was reduced by 50–60% in FUT9-HL-60, 70–80% in dual knockdown FUT7−9− cells, and ∼85% in FUT4−7−9− triple knockdowns. Gene silencing results are in agreement with gain-of-function experiments where all three fucosyltransferases conferred E-selectin-mediated rolling in HEK293T cells. This study advances new tools to study human glycoT function. It suggests a species-specific role for FUT9 during the biosynthesis of human E-selectin ligands. PMID:23192350

  1. Observing a fictitious stressful event: haematological changes, including circulating leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Mian, Rubina; Shelton-Rayner, Graham; Harkin, Brendan; Williams, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of watching a psychological stressful event on the activation of leukocytes in healthy human volunteers. Blood samples were obtained from 32 healthy male and female subjects aged between 20 and 26 years before, during and after either watching an 83-minute horror film that none of the subjects had previously seen (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, 1974) or by sitting quietly in a room (control group). Total differential cell counts, leukocyte activation as measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test, heart rate and blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken at defined time points. There were significant increases in peripheral circulating leukocytes, the number of activated circulating leukocytes, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and haematocrit (Hct) in response to the stressor. These were accompanied by significant increases in heart rate, systolic and diastolic BP (P<0.05 from baseline). This is the first reported study on the effects of observing a psychologically stressful, albeit fictitious event on circulating leukocyte numbers and the state of leukocyte activation as determined by the nitrotetrazolium test. PMID:12637206

  2. Rho-kinase activation in leukocytes plays a pivotal role in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Katsunori; Usui, Soichiro; Ootsuji, Hiroshi; Takashima, Shin-ichiro; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Murai, Hisayoshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Nomura, Ayano; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The Rho/Rho-kinase pathway plays an important role in many cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, heart failure, and myocardial infarction. Although previous studies have shown that Rho-kinase inhibitors reduce ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and cytokine production, the role of Rho-kinase in leukocytes during I/R injury is not well understood. Mice were subjected to 30-min ischemia and reperfusion. Rho-kinase activity was significantly greater in leukocytes subjected to myocardial I/R compared to the sham-operated mice. Administration of fasudil, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, significantly reduced the I/R-induced expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, C-C motif chemoattractant ligand 2 (CCL2), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, in leukocytes, compared with saline as the vehicle. Furthermore, fasudil decreased I/R-induced myocardial infarction/area at risk (IA) and I/R-induced leukocyte infiltration in the myocardium. Interestingly, IA in fasudil-administered mice with leukocyte depletion was similar to that in fasudil-administered mice. I/R also resulted in remarkable increases in the mRNA expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and CCL2 in the heart. Inhibition of Rho-kinase activation in leukocytes has an important role in fasudil-induced cardioprotective effects. Hence, inhibition of Rho-kinase may be an additional therapeutic intervention for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome. PMID:24638037

  3. Rho-Kinase Activation in Leukocytes Plays a Pivotal Role in Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Katsunori; Usui, Soichiro; Ootsuji, Hiroshi; Takashima, Shin-ichiro; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Murai, Hisayoshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Nomura, Ayano; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The Rho/Rho-kinase pathway plays an important role in many cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, heart failure, and myocardial infarction. Although previous studies have shown that Rho-kinase inhibitors reduce ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and cytokine production, the role of Rho-kinase in leukocytes during I/R injury is not well understood. Mice were subjected to 30-min ischemia and reperfusion. Rho-kinase activity was significantly greater in leukocytes subjected to myocardial I/R compared to the sham-operated mice. Administration of fasudil, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, significantly reduced the I/R-induced expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, C-C motif chemoattractant ligand 2 (CCL2), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, in leukocytes, compared with saline as the vehicle. Furthermore, fasudil decreased I/R-induced myocardial infarction/area at risk (IA) and I/R-induced leukocyte infiltration in the myocardium. Interestingly, IA in fasudil-administered mice with leukocyte depletion was similar to that in fasudil-administered mice. I/R also resulted in remarkable increases in the mRNA expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and CCL2 in the heart. Inhibition of Rho-kinase activation in leukocytes has an important role in fasudil-induced cardioprotective effects. Hence, inhibition of Rho-kinase may be an additional therapeutic intervention for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome. PMID:24638037

  4. Stress-induced enhancement of leukocyte trafficking into sites of surgery or immune activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Kavitha; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.

    2005-04-01

    Effective immunoprotection requires rapid recruitment of leukocytes into sites of surgery, wounding, infection, or vaccination. In contrast to immunosuppressive chronic stressors, short-term acute stressors have immunoenhancing effects. Here, we quantify leukocyte infiltration within a surgical sponge to elucidate the kinetics, magnitude, subpopulation, and chemoattractant specificity of an acute stress-induced increase in leukocyte trafficking to a site of immune activation. Mice acutely stressed before sponge implantation showed 200-300% higher neutrophil, macrophage, natural killer cell, and T cell infiltration than did nonstressed animals. We also quantified the effects of acute stress on lymphotactin- (LTN; a predominantly lymphocyte-specific chemokine), and TNF-- (a proinflammatory cytokine) stimulated leukocyte infiltration. An additional stress-induced increase in infiltration was observed for neutrophils, in response to TNF-, macrophages, in response to TNF- and LTN, and natural killer cells and T cells in response to LTN. These results show that acute stress initially increases trafficking of all major leukocyte subpopulations to a site of immune activation. Tissue damage-, antigen-, or pathogen-driven chemoattractants subsequently determine which subpopulations are recruited more vigorously. Such stress-induced increases in leukocyte trafficking may enhance immunoprotection during surgery, vaccination, or infection, but may also exacerbate immunopathology during inflammatory (cardiovascular disease or gingivitis) or autoimmune (psoriasis, arthritis, or multiple sclerosis) diseases. chemokine | psychophysiological stress | surgical sponge | wound healing | lymphotactin

  5. Oxidized omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil inhibit leukocyte-endothelial interactions through activation of PPAR alpha.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Ni, Heyu; Wagner, Denisa D; Plutzky, Jorge; Mayadas, Tanya N

    2002-08-15

    Omega-3 fatty acids, which are abundant in fish oil, improve the prognosis of several chronic inflammatory diseases although the mechanism for such effects remains unclear. These fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are highly polyunsaturated and readily undergo oxidation. We show that oxidized, but not native unoxidized, EPA significantly inhibited human neutrophil and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in vitro by inhibiting endothelial adhesion receptor expression. In transcriptional coactivation assays, oxidized EPA potently activated the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha), a member of the nuclear receptor family. In vivo, oxidized, but not native, EPA markedly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion to venular endothelium of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice. This occurred via a PPAR alpha-dependent mechanism because oxidized EPA had no such effect in LPS-treated PPAR alpha-deficient mice. Therefore, the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids may be explained by a PPAR alpha-mediated anti-inflammatory effect of oxidized EPA. PMID:12149216

  6. Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... type IV secretion systems (T4SS) 2’-O-methyl RNA methyltransferase MbtH Protein Rv2377c Vibrio cholerae ACP RpiB ... Data Sharing and Release Guidelines Metadata Implementation Guidelines World Reference Center for Emerging Viruses and Arboviruses (WRCEVA) ...

  7. Microfluidic Investigation Reveals Distinct Roles for Actin Cytoskeleton and Myosin II Activity in Capillary Leukocyte Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Sylvain; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Bongrand, Pierre; Théodoly, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Circulating leukocyte sequestration in pulmonary capillaries is arguably the initiating event of lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome. We present a microfluidic investigation of the roles of actin organization and myosin II activity during the different stages of leukocyte trafficking through narrow capillaries (entry, transit and shape relaxation) using specific drugs (latrunculin A, jasplakinolide, and blebbistatin). The deformation rate during entry reveals that cell stiffness depends strongly on F-actin organization and hardly on myosin II activity, supporting a microfilament role in leukocyte sequestration. In the transit stage, cell friction is influenced by stiffness, demonstrating that the actin network is not completely broken after a forced entry into a capillary. Conversely, membrane unfolding was independent of leukocyte stiffness. The surface area of sequestered leukocytes increased by up to 160% in the absence of myosin II activity, showing the major role of molecular motors in microvilli wrinkling and zipping. Finally, cell shape relaxation was largely independent of both actin organization and myosin II activity, whereas a deformed state was required for normal trafficking through capillary segments. PMID:19450501

  8. Comparison of enzyme activities in plasma and leukocytes in dairy and beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshiro; Inoue, Akira; Takeguchi, Akira; Mizutani, Hisashi; Shimoo, Megumi; Sako, Toshinori; Yoshimura, Itaru; Kimura, Nobuhiro

    2003-11-01

    Concentrations of plasma glucose, immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and free fatty acid (FFA) and activities of enzymes related to energy metabolism and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzyme pattern in plasma and leukocytes were investigated in lactating Holstein cows (dairy cattle) and fattening Japanese Black Wagyu x Holstein steers (beef cattle). IRI concentrations and LDH and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activities in the plasma of beef cattle were significantly higher than those in dairy cattle. The cytosolic ratio of MDH/LDH activity in the leukocytes of beef cattle was significantly higher than that of dairy cattle. These findings might be associated with the different energy metabolism between dairy and beef cattle. PMID:14665755

  9. Bronchial biopsy evidence for leukocyte infiltration and upregulation of leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion molecules 6 hours after local allergen challenge of sensitized asthmatic airways.

    PubMed Central

    Montefort, S; Gratziou, C; Goulding, D; Polosa, R; Haskard, D O; Howarth, P H; Holgate, S T; Carroll, M P

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the mucosal changes occurring in bronchial biopsies from six atopic asthmatics 5-6 h after local endobronchial allergen challenge and compared them with biopsies from saline-challenged segments from the same subjects at the same time point. All the subjects developed localized bronchoconstriction in the allergen-challenged segment and had a decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) (P < 0.01) and a decrease in their methacholine provocative concentration of agonist required to reduce FEV1 from baseline by 20% (P < 0.05) 24 h postchallenge. At 6 h we observed an increase in neutrophils (P = 0.03), eosinophils (P = 0.025), mast cells (P = 0.03), and CD3+ lymphocytes (P = 0.025), but not in CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocyte counts. We also detected an increase in endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (P < 0.05) and E-selectin (P < 0.005), but not vascular cell adhesion molecule type 1 expression with a correlative increase in submucosal and epithelial LFA+ leucocytes (P < 0.01). Thus, in sensitized asthmatics, local endobronchial allergen instillation leads to an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate of the airway mucosa that involves upregulation of specific adhesion molecules expressed on the microvasculature. Images PMID:7512980

  10. Implication of complex vertebral malformation and bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency DNA-based testing on disease frequency in the Holstein population.

    PubMed

    Schütz, E; Scharfenstein, M; Brenig, B

    2008-12-01

    Two inherited lethal disorders, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) and complex vertebral malformation (CVM), play a major role in breeding of Holstein cattle. Both inherited diseases are based on single nucleotide polymorphisms that have been known for 12 and 7 yr, respectively. A total of 25,753 cattle were genotyped for BLAD (18,200 tests) and CVM (14,493 tests) in our laboratory since the beginning of the genotyping programs for these diseases. Based on founder effects, the CVM mutation is thought to be linked to milk production. The BLAD was genotyped using RFLP until 2001; then a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay on a LightCycler was used, as for CVM genotyping. By using single nucleotide polymorphism-aided breeding, the allelic frequency of the BLAD and CVM mutations in the active sire population was reduced from 9.4% in 1997 to 0.3% in 2007 (BLAD) and from 8.3% in 2002 to 2.3% in 2007 (CVM), with calculated half-life of the mutant allele of 2.1 yr for BLAD and 3.6 yr for CVM. An observed increase of BLAD frequency in 1999 could be attributed to the massive use of a BLAD-positive sire tested falsely negative in another laboratory. These data show that marker-assisted selection is capable of substantially reducing the frequency of a mutation within a period of not more than 5 yr. The different selection strategies against the lethal recessive allele in CVM and BLAD are reflected in the different reduction rates of the specific allele frequencies. PMID:19038961

  11. Effect of Estragole on Leukocyte Behavior and Phagocytic Activity of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wiirzler, Luiz Alexandre Marques; Silva-Filho, Saulo Euclides; Kummer, Raquel; Pedroso, Raissa Bocchi; Spironello, Ricardo Alexandre; Silva, Expedito Leite; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Estragole, a chemical constituent of the essential oils of many aromatic plants, is used as flavoring in beverage and food industries. In vivo and in vitro experimental assays have shown that EST has sedative, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anesthetic activity. In this work, we evaluate the effect of EST on leukocyte behavior and phagocytic activity of macrophages. In the peritonitis model, EST (500 and 750 mg/kg) decreased the infiltration of peritoneal exudate leukocytes. In vitro chemotaxis assay showed that EST (3, 10, 30, and 60 μg/mL) inhibited neutrophil migration toward fMLP. In the in vivo microcirculation assay, EST at doses of 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg significantly reduced the number of rolling and adherent leukocytes and at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg decreased number of leukocyte migrated to perivascular tissue. The results showed that EST (3, 10, and 30 μg/mL) was able to stimulate the macrophages phagocytosis but only at concentration of 10 μg/mL promoted an increase in nitric oxide (NO) production. In conclusion, this study showed that EST had potential anti-inflammatory effects, likely by inhibiting leukocyte migration and by stimulating macrophages phagocytosis. PMID:25152763

  12. FRET Based Quantification and Screening Technology Platform for the Interactions of Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1) with InterCellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1)

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Núñez, David; Hu, Shih-Yang; Domingo, María Pilar; Pardo, Julian; Karmenyan, Artashes; Chiou, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between leukocyte function-associated antigen-1(LFA-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays a pivotal role in cellular adhesion including the extravasation and inflammatory response of leukocytes, and also in the formation of immunological synapse. However, irregular expressions of LFA-1 or ICAM-1 or both may lead to autoimmune diseases, metastasis cancer, etc. Thus, the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of these diseases. Here, we developed one simple ‘in solution’ steady state fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique to obtain the dissociation constant (Kd) of the interaction between LFA-1 and ICAM-1. Moreover, we developed the assay into a screening platform to identify peptides and small molecules that inhibit the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction. For the FRET pair, we used Alexa Fluor 488-LFA-1 conjugate as donor and Alexa Fluor 555-human recombinant ICAM-1 (D1-D2-Fc) as acceptor. From our quantitative FRET analysis, the Kd between LFA-1 and D1-D2-Fc was determined to be 17.93±1.34 nM. Both the Kd determination and screening assay were performed in a 96-well plate platform, providing the opportunity to develop it into a high-throughput assay. This is the first reported work which applies FRET based technique to determine Kd as well as classifying inhibitors of the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction. PMID:25032811

  13. KCNE gene expression is dependent on the proliferation and mode of activation of leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Laura; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Roig, Sara R.; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Manils, Joan; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels are tightly regulated during the immune system response. Leukocytes have a limited repertoire of Kv channels, whose physiological role is under intense investigation. A functional Kv channel is an oligomeric complex composed of pore-forming and ancillary subunits. The KCNE gene family is a novel group of modulatory Kv channel elements in leukocytes. Here, we characterized the gene expression of KCNEs (1–5) in leukocytes and investigated their regulation during leukocyte proliferation and mode of activation. Murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages, human Jurkat T-lymphocytes and human Raji B-cells were analyzed. KCNEs (1–5) are expressed in all leukocytes lineages. Most KCNE mRNAs show cell cycle-dependent regulation and are differentially regulated under specific insults. Our results further suggest a new and yet undefined physiological role for KCNE subunits in the immune system. Putative associations of these ancillary proteins with Kv channels would yield a wide variety of biophysically and pharmacologically distinct channels that fine-tune the immunological response. PMID:23327879

  14. Fast and Specific Assessment of the Halogenating Peroxidase Activity in Leukocyte-enriched Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Schwarz, Pauline; Bäcker, Ingo; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a protocol for the quick and standardized enrichment of leukocytes from small whole blood samples is described. This procedure is based on the hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes and can be applied to human samples as well as to blood of non-human origin. The small initial sample volume of about 50 to 100 µl makes this method applicable to recurrent blood sampling from small laboratory animals. Moreover, leukocyte enrichment is achieved within minutes and with low material efforts regarding chemicals and instrumentation, making this method applicable in multiple laboratory environments. Standardized purification of leukocytes is combined with a highly selective staining method to evaluate halogenating peroxidase activity of the heme peroxidases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), i.e., the formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acid (HOCl and HOBr). While MPO is strongly expressed in neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type in human blood as well as in monocytes, the related enzyme EPO is exclusively expressed in eosinophils. The halogenating activity of these enzymes is addressed by using the almost HOCl- and HOBr-specific dye aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and the primary peroxidase substrate hydrogen peroxide. Upon subsequent flow cytometry analysis all peroxidase-positive cells (neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils) are distinguishable and their halogenating peroxidase activity can be quantified. Since APF staining may be combined with the application of cell surface markers, this protocol can be extended to specifically address leukocyte sub-fractions. The method is applicable to detect HOCl and HOBr production both in human and in rodent leukocytes. Given the widely and diversely discussed immunological role of these enzymatic products in chronic inflammatory diseases, this protocol may contribute to a better understanding of the immunological relevance of leukocyte-derived heme peroxidases. PMID:27501318

  15. Hepatic sinusoidal endothelium avidly binds platelets in an integrin-dependent manner, leading to platelet and endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Lalor, Patricia F; Herbert, John; Bicknell, Roy; Adams, David H

    2013-03-01

    Platelets have recently been shown to drive liver injury in murine models of viral hepatitis and promote liver regeneration through the release of serotonin. Despite their emerging role in inflammatory liver disease, little is known about the mechanisms by which platelets bind to the hepatic vasculature. Therefore, we referenced public expression data to determine the profile of potential adhesive receptors expressed by hepatic endothelium. We then used a combination of tissue-binding and flow-based endothelial-binding adhesion assays to show that resting platelets bind to human hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells and that the magnitude of adhesion is greatly enhanced by thrombin-induced platelet activation. Adhesion was mediated by the integrins Gp1b, αIIbβIII, and αvβ3, as well as immobilized fibrinogen. Platelet binding to hepatic endothelial cells resulted in NF-κB activation and increased chemokine secretion. The functional relevance of platelet binding was confirmed by experiments that showed markedly increased binding of neutrophils and lymphocytes to hepatic endothelial cells under shear conditions replicating those found in the hepatic sinusoid, which was in part dependent on P-selectin expression. Thus the ability of platelets to activate endothelium and promote leukocyte adhesion may reflect an additional mechanism through which they promote liver injury. PMID:23257923

  16. Changes in activities of enzymes related to energy metabolism in peripheral leukocytes of fattening steers.

    PubMed

    Kimura, N; Yoshimura, I; Sako, T; Inoue, A; Tadami, K; Arai, T

    2005-01-01

    Glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) concentrations, some enzyme activities in plasma, and activities of enzymes related to energy metabolism in peripheral leukocytes were measured in fattening Japanese Black Wagyu x Holstein steers fed on different diets at 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 months of age. The plasma IRI concentrations at 20 and 24 months of age were significantly higher than those at 8 months of age. Activities of hexokinase (HK), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) in cytosolic fractions, and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), MDH and AST in mitochondrial fractions in peripheral leukocytes of steers at 24 months of age were significantly higher than those at 8 months. Increasing plasma insulin concentration was considered to induce acceleration of glucose utilization in leukocytes of fattening steers. The cytosolic ratio of MDH/lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in leukocytes increased significantly in the fattening process and was considered to be a useful indicator for evaluating changes in energy metabolism in steers. PMID:15727288

  17. Activation of GPR4 by Acidosis Increases Endothelial Cell Adhesion through the cAMP/Epac Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Nancy R.; Asch, Adam S.; Witte, Owen N.; Yang, Li V.

    2011-01-01

    Endothelium-leukocyte interaction is critical for inflammatory responses. Whereas the tissue microenvironments are often acidic at inflammatory sites, the mechanisms by which cells respond to acidosis are not well understood. Using molecular, cellular and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that activation of GPR4, a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, by isocapnic acidosis increases the adhesiveness of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that express GPR4 endogenously. Acidosis in combination with GPR4 overexpression further augments HUVEC adhesion with U937 monocytes. In contrast, overexpression of a G protein signaling-defective DRY motif mutant (R115A) of GPR4 does not elicit any increase of HUVEC adhesion, indicating the requirement of G protein signaling. Downregulation of GPR4 expression by RNA interference reduces the acidosis-induced HUVEC adhesion. To delineate downstream pathways, we show that inhibition of adenylate cyclase by inhibitors, 2′,5′-dideoxyadenosine (DDA) or SQ 22536, attenuates acidosis/GPR4-induced HUVEC adhesion. Consistently, treatment with a cAMP analog or a Gi signaling inhibitor increases HUVEC adhesiveness, suggesting a role of the Gs/cAMP signaling in this process. We further show that the cAMP downstream effector Epac is important for acidosis/GPR4-induced cell adhesion. Moreover, activation of GPR4 by acidosis increases the expression of vascular adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, which are functionally involved in acidosis/GPR4-mediated HUVEC adhesion. Similarly, hypercapnic acidosis can also activate GPR4 to stimulate HUVEC adhesion molecule expression and adhesiveness. These results suggest that acidosis/GPR4 signaling regulates endothelial cell adhesion mainly through the Gs/cAMP/Epac pathway and may play a role in the inflammatory response of vascular endothelial cells. PMID:22110680

  18. Focal MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity at the blood-brain barrier promotes chemokine-induced leukocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Wu, Chuan; Korpos, Eva; Zhang, Xueli; Agrawal, Smriti M; Wang, Ying; Faber, Cornelius; Schäfers, Michael; Körner, Heinrich; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Hallmann, Rupert; Sorokin, Lydia

    2015-02-24

    Although chemokines are sufficient for chemotaxis of various cells, increasing evidence exists for their fine-tuning by selective proteolytic processing. Using a model of immune cell chemotaxis into the CNS (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis [EAE]) that permits precise localization of immigrating leukocytes at the blood-brain barrier, we show that, whereas chemokines are required for leukocyte migration into the CNS, additional MMP-2/9 activities specifically at the border of the CNS parenchyma strongly enhance this transmigration process. Cytokines derived from infiltrating leukocytes regulate MMP-2/9 activity at the parenchymal border, which in turn promotes astrocyte secretion of chemokines and differentially modulates the activity of different chemokines at the CNS border, thereby promoting leukocyte migration out of the cuff. Hence, cytokines, chemokines, and cytokine-induced MMP-2/9 activity specifically at the inflammatory border collectively act to accelerate leukocyte chemotaxis across the parenchymal border. PMID:25704809

  19. Rapid in vitro biocompatibility assay of endovascular stents by flow cytometry using platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Tárnok, A; Mahnke, A; Müller, M; Zotz, R J

    1999-02-15

    Clinical studies suggest that stent design and surface texture are responsible for differences in biocompatibility of metallic endovascular stents. A simple in vitro experimental setup was established to test stent-induced degree of platelet and leukocyte activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation by flow cytometry. Heparin-coated tantalum stents and gold-coated and uncoated stainless steel stents were tested. Stents were implanted into silicone tubes and exposed to blood from healthy volunteers. Platelet and leukocyte activation and percentage of leukocyte-platelet aggregates were determined in a whole-blood assay by subsequent staining for activation-associated antigens (CD41a, CD42b, CD62p, and fibrinogen binding) and leukocyte antigens (CD14 and CD45) and flow cytometric analysis. Blood taken directly after venous puncture or exposed to the silicone tube alone was used as negative controls. Positive control was in vitro stimulation with thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP-6). Low degree of platelet activation and significant increase in monocyte- and neutrophil-platelet aggregation were observed in blood exposed to stents (P < 0.05). In addition, leukocyte activation was induced as measured by increased CD45 and CD14 expression. Heparin coated stents continuously induced less platelet activation and leukocyte-platelet aggregation than uncoated stainless steel stents of the same length and shorter stents of the same structure. Stent surface coating and texture plays a role in platelet and leukocyte activation and leukocyte-platelet aggregation. Using this simple in vitro assay and whole blood and flow cytometry, it seems possible to differentiate stents by their potency to activate platelets and/or leukocytes. This assay could be applied for improving the biocompatibility of coronary stents. PMID:10088974

  20. Phospholipid base exchange activity in the leukocyte membranes of patients with inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Y.; Sakane, T.; Ozaki, Y.; Kanoh, T.; Taniguchi, S.

    1987-01-01

    Phospholipid base exchange and cholinephosphotransferase (CPT) and ethanolaminephosphotransferase (EPT) activities were assessed in the membranes of neutrophils or lymphocytes from patients with various inflammatory disorders. Ethanolamine exchange activity was significantly enhanced in both neutrophils and lymphocytes from patients with active Behçet's disease, active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and severe bacterial infections and slightly enhanced in those from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA), compared with healthy controls. No abnormal findings were found in CPT, EPT, or serine or choline base exchange activities in the leukocytes from any of the diseased groups tested or in the ethanolamine exchange activity of patients with severe viral infections and inactive SLE, RA, and Behçet's disease. The authors have recently demonstrated the enhancement of transmethylation and phospholipase A2 activity in human leukocyte membranes at the height of inflammatory disease states, as well as the activation of leukocyte ethanolamine exchange by bioactive stimulants. These data postulate that phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis by the base exchange reaction may be the precursor of transmethylation and its subsequent activation of phospholipase A2, leading to the induction of arachidonic acid cascade. PMID:3034067

  1. Leukocyte Recruitment and Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Leukocytes are recruited into the cerebral microcirculation following an ischemic insult. The leukocyte–endothelial cell adhesion manifested within a few hours after ischemia (followed by reperfusion, I/R) largely reflects an infiltration of neutrophils, while other leukocyte populations appear to dominate the adhesive interactions with the vessel wall at 24 h of reperfusion. The influx of rolling and adherent leukocytes is accompanied by the recruitment of adherent platelets, which likely enhances the cytotoxic potential of the leukocytes to which they are attached. The recruitment of leukocytes and platelets in the postischemic brain is mediated by specific adhesion glycoproteins expressed by the activated blood cells and on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. This process is also modulated by different signaling pathways (e.g., CD40/CD40L, Notch) and cytokines (e.g., RANTES) that are activated/released following I/R. Some of the known risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including hypercholesterolemia and obesity appear to exacerbate the leukocyte and platelet recruitment elicited by brain I/R. Although lymphocyte–endothelial cell and –platelet interactions in the postischemic cerebral microcirculation have not been evaluated to date, recent evidence in experimental animals implicate both CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in the cerebral microvascular dysfunction, inflammation, and tissue injury associated with brain I/R. Evidence implicating regulatory T-cells as cerebroprotective modulators of the inflammatory and tissue injury responses to brain I/R support a continued focus on leukocytes as a target for therapeutic intervention in ischemic stroke. PMID:19579016

  2. Incidence of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, complex vertebral malformation, and deficiency of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase carriers in Brazilian Girolando cattle.

    PubMed

    Paiva, D S; Fonseca, I; Pinto, I S B; Ianella, P; Campos, T A; Caetano, A R; Paiva, S R; Silva, M V G B; Martins, M F

    2013-01-01

    Among the various hereditary diseases that have been widely studied in dairy cattle, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), deficiency of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase (DUMPS), and complex vertebral malformation (CVM) are noteworthy because of their high impact on overall herd productivity as a consequence of increased calf mortality. The aim of this study was to verify the frequency of carriers of BLAD, CVM, and DUMPS mutant alleles in cows and bulls from the National Girolando Progeny Test carried out in Brazil by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism and allele-specific PCR assays. A total of 777 animals were genotyped for BLAD, 783 for CVM, and 122 for DUMPS. The frequencies of carriers for BLAD and CVM were 0.77 and 1.53%, respectively, whereas no carriers of DUMPS were observed. PMID:24065661

  3. Gene therapy for canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency with lentiviral vectors using the murine stem cell virus and human phosphoglycerate kinase promoters.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Michael J; Zhao, Huifen; Tuschong, Laura M; Bauer, Thomas R; Burkholder, Tanya H; Persons, Derek A; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2011-06-01

    Children with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) and dogs with canine LAD (CLAD) develop life-threatening bacterial infections due to mutations in the leukocyte integrin CD18. Here, we compared the human phosphoglycerate kinase (hPGK) promoter to the murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter/enhancer in a self-inactivating HIV-1-derived lentiviral vector to treat animals with CLAD. Four CLAD dogs were infused with CD34(+) cells transduced with the hPGK vector, and two CLAD dogs received MSCV vector-transduced CD34(+) cells. Infusions were preceded by a nonmyeloablative dose of 200 cGy total body irradiation. Comparable numbers of transduced cells were infused in each group of animals. Only one of four CLAD animals treated with the hPGK-cCD18 vector had reversal of CLAD, whereas both MSCV-cCD18 vector-treated dogs had reversal of the phenotype. Correction of CLAD depends both upon the percentage of CD18(+) myeloid cells and the level of expression of CD18 on individual myeloid cells. In this regard, the hPGK promoter directed low levels of expression of CD18 on neutrophils compared to the MSCV promoter, likely contributing to the suboptimal clinical outcome with the hPGK vector. PMID:21275758

  4. Gene Therapy for Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency with Lentiviral Vectors Using the Murine Stem Cell Virus and Human Phosphoglycerate Kinase Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huifen; Tuschong, Laura M.; Bauer, Thomas R.; Burkholder, Tanya H.; Persons, Derek A.; Hickstein, Dennis D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Children with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) and dogs with canine LAD (CLAD) develop life-threatening bacterial infections due to mutations in the leukocyte integrin CD18. Here, we compared the human phosphoglycerate kinase (hPGK) promoter to the murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter/enhancer in a self-inactivating HIV-1–derived lentiviral vector to treat animals with CLAD. Four CLAD dogs were infused with CD34+ cells transduced with the hPGK vector, and two CLAD dogs received MSCV vector–transduced CD34+ cells. Infusions were preceded by a nonmyeloablative dose of 200 cGy total body irradiation. Comparable numbers of transduced cells were infused in each group of animals. Only one of four CLAD animals treated with the hPGK-cCD18 vector had reversal of CLAD, whereas both MSCV-cCD18 vector–treated dogs had reversal of the phenotype. Correction of CLAD depends both upon the percentage of CD18+ myeloid cells and the level of expression of CD18 on individual myeloid cells. In this regard, the hPGK promoter directed low levels of expression of CD18 on neutrophils compared to the MSCV promoter, likely contributing to the suboptimal clinical outcome with the hPGK vector. PMID:21275758

  5. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  6. Erythromycin exerts in vivo anti-inflammatory activity downregulating cell adhesion molecule expression

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, María-Jesús; Nabah, Yafa Naim Abu; Cerdá-Nicolás, Miguel; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Issekutz, Andrew C; Cortijo, Julio; Morcillo, Esteban J

    2004-01-01

    Macrolides have long been used as anti-bacterial agents; however, there is some evidence that may exert anti-inflammatory activity. Therefore, erythromycin was used to characterize the mechanisms involved in their in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. Erythromycin pretreatment (30 mg kg−1 day−1 for 1 week) reduced the lipopolysaccharide (LPS; intratracheal, 0.4 mg kg−1)-induced increase in neutrophil count and elastase activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue myeloperoxidase activity, but failed to decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and macrophage-inflammatory protein-2 augmented levels in BALF. Erythromycin pretreatment also prevented lung P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA upregulation in response to airway challenge with LPS. Mesentery superfusion with LPS (1 μg ml−1) induced a significant increase in leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions at 60 min. Erythromycin pretreatment abolished the increases in these parameters. LPS exposure of the mesentery for 4 h caused a significant increase in leukocyte rolling flux, adhesion and emigration, which were inhibited by erythromycin by 100, 93 and 95%, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LPS exposure of the mesentery for 4 h caused a significant enhancement in P-selectin, E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression that was downregulated by erythromycin pretreatment. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that erythromycin pretreatment inhibited LPS-induced CD11b augmented expression in rat neutrophils. In conclusion, erythromycin inhibits leukocyte recruitment in the lung and this effect appears mediated through downregulation of CAM expression. Therefore, macrolides may be useful in the control of neutrophilic pulmonary diseases. PMID:15665859

  7. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  8. Leukocyte activation by (1→3)-β-D glucans

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Ohno, Naohito; Yadomae, Toshiro

    1997-01-01

    We studied the activities of several kinds of β-glucans, including sonifilan, grifolan, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum glucan, laminarin and zymosan, on macrophages. Preculture of macrophages with inactive β-glucans rendered the cells unresponsive to subsequent stimulation with grifolan, suggesting a specific pathway in the β-glucan structure. The importance of protein C and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase was demonstrated in the activation with grifolan or zymosan. Immunoprecipitation of complement receptor (CR3), coprecipitated other proteins carrying phosphotyrosine residues in stimulation with grifolan. These data suggest that protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases are essential for signal transduction, and that CR3 might participate in the activation through interaction with other intracellular proteins. PMID:18472853

  9. Vitamin D3 mediated effects on postprandial leukocyte activation and arterial stiffness in men and women.

    PubMed

    Klop, B; van de Geijn, G-J M; Birnie, E; Njo, T L; Janssen, H W; Jansen, H G; Jukema, J W; Elte, J W F; Castro Cabezas, M

    2014-05-01

    Postprandial inflammation is considered to be pro-atherogenic. Vitamin D can reduce inflammation and arterial stiffness. We hypothesized that vitamin D3 improves postprandial arterial elasticity by the modulation of leukocyte activation. Healthy volunteers underwent two oral fat-loading tests (OFLTs). The augmentation index (AIx) and flow cytometric quantification of leukocyte activation markers were measured. After the first OFLT, 100 000 IU of vitamin D3 was administered and a second OFLT was carried out 7 days later. Six men and six women were included. A favorable reduction in AIx was found after vitamin D3 supplementation (P=0.042) in both genders. After vitamin D3, exclusively in women a reduction in the area under the postprandial curve for monocytes CD11b and CD35 by 10.5% (P=0.016) and 12.5% (P=0.04) and neutrophil CD11b by 17.0% (P=0.014) was observed. In conclusion, vitamin D3 probably increased postprandial arterial elasticity in men and women, but reduced postprandial leukocyte activation exclusively in women. PMID:24619107

  10. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  11. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  12. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27219347

  13. 5-Fluorouracil causes leukocytes attraction in the peritoneal cavity by activating autophagy and HMGB1 release in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cottone, Lucia; Capobianco, Annalisa; Gualteroni, Chiara; Perrotta, Cristiana; Bianchi, Marco E; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Manfredi, Angelo A

    2015-03-15

    Signals released by leukocytes contribute to tumor growth and influence the efficacy of antineoplastic treatments. The outcome of peritoneal carcinomatosis treatments is unsatisfactory, possibly because chemotherapy activates events that have in the long-term deleterious effects. In this study we offer evidence that 5-fluorouracile (5-FU), besides provoking apoptosis of MC38 colon carcinoma cells, induces a striking attraction of leukocytes both in an orthotopic model of colon carcinomatosis in vivo and in monocyte-migration assays in vitro. Leukocyte attraction depends on the presence of High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), an endogenous immune adjuvant and chemoattractant released by dying cells. Leukocyte recruitment is prevented in vivo and in vitro using blocking antibodies against HMGB1 and its competitive antagonist BoxA or by interfering with HMGB1 expression. Autophagy is required for leukocyte chemoattraction, since the latter abates upon pharmacological blockade of the autophagic flux while activation of autophagy per se, in the absence of death of colon carcinoma cells, is not sufficient to attract leukocytes. Our results identify autophagy induction and HMGB1 release in colon carcinoma cells as key events responsible for 5-FU elicited leukocyte attraction and define a novel rate-limiting target for combinatorial therapies. PMID:25098891

  14. Increased production of plasminogen activator inhibitor in vitro by pleural leukocytes from rats intratracheally instilled with crocidolite asbestos

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Yang Li; Brown, G.M.; Donaldson, K. ); Lamb, D. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors have previously reported that normal pleural leukocytes secrete a urokinase-type plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) in culture. In view of the pathogenic effects of asbestos on the pleura, in particular pleural fibrosis, they have extended these observation to crocidolite asbestos-exposed rats. Pleural leukocytes from rats exposed to crocidolite asbestos were found to secrete more PAI in culture than controls. The activity of PAI in pleural leukocyte-conditioned medium increased in a dose-dependent manner in relation to the quantity of asbestos injected into the lung. However, with increasing time post asbestos instillation, there was no significant change in the secretion of PAI by pleural leukocytes in culture compared with earlier time points of crocidolite-exposed rats. Plasminogen activator was not detectable in the conditioned medium at any time point. The data derived from this study may help to elucidate the pathogenesis of some pleural disorders caused by exposure to fibrous dusts in the lungs.

  15. The Fucosylation Inhibitor, 2-Fluorofucose, Inhibits Vaso-Occlusion, Leukocyte-Endothelium Interactions and NF-ĸB Activation in Transgenic Sickle Mice

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, John D.; Chen, Chunsheng; Nguyen, Julia; Abdulla, Fuad; Nguyen, Phong; Nguyen, Minh; Okeley, Nicole M.; Benjamin, Dennis R.; Senter, Peter D.; Vercellotti, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    2-Fluorofucose (2FF) blocks the fucosylation and the tethering of sialyl-Lewisx tetrasaccharide and structural variants on leukocytes and red blood cells to P- and E-selectins on activated endothelial cell surfaces. Because P- and E-selectin are required for vaso-occlusion in murine sickle cell disease (SCD), we investigated whether 2FF would inhibit vaso-occlusion in SCD mice. Microvascular stasis was measured in subcutaneous venules in NY1DD and HbSS-Townes SCD mice with dorsal skin-fold chambers after infusion of hemoglobin or exposure to hypoxia/reoxygenation. 2FF in drinking water or administered by gavage inhibited stasis in sickle mice in a dose-responsive manner. Significant inhibitory effects on stasis were seen 1 day post-treatment. 2FF treatment of SCD mice also significantly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion along the vessel walls of SCD mice and the static adhesion of neutrophils and sickle red blood cells isolated from 2FF-treated SCD mice to resting and activated endothelial cells. Total white blood cell counts increased in response to 2FF. NF-ĸB activation and VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression were inhibited in the livers of SCD mice consistent with an overall decrease in vascular inflammation and ischemia-reperfusion physiology. Pretreatment with 2FF completely eliminated heme-induced lethality in HbSS-Townes mice, consistent with the observed anti-inflammatory and anti-adhesive properties of 2FF in SCD mice. These data suggest that 2FF may be beneficial for preventing or treating vaso-occlusive crises in SCD patients. PMID:25706118

  16. The fucosylation inhibitor, 2-fluorofucose, inhibits vaso-occlusion, leukocyte-endothelium interactions and NF-ĸB activation in transgenic sickle mice.

    PubMed

    Belcher, John D; Chen, Chunsheng; Nguyen, Julia; Abdulla, Fuad; Nguyen, Phong; Nguyen, Minh; Okeley, Nicole M; Benjamin, Dennis R; Senter, Peter D; Vercellotti, Gregory M

    2015-01-01

    2-Fluorofucose (2FF) blocks the fucosylation and the tethering of sialyl-Lewisx tetrasaccharide and structural variants on leukocytes and red blood cells to P- and E-selectins on activated endothelial cell surfaces. Because P- and E-selectin are required for vaso-occlusion in murine sickle cell disease (SCD), we investigated whether 2FF would inhibit vaso-occlusion in SCD mice. Microvascular stasis was measured in subcutaneous venules in NY1DD and HbSS-Townes SCD mice with dorsal skin-fold chambers after infusion of hemoglobin or exposure to hypoxia/reoxygenation. 2FF in drinking water or administered by gavage inhibited stasis in sickle mice in a dose-responsive manner. Significant inhibitory effects on stasis were seen 1 day post-treatment. 2FF treatment of SCD mice also significantly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion along the vessel walls of SCD mice and the static adhesion of neutrophils and sickle red blood cells isolated from 2FF-treated SCD mice to resting and activated endothelial cells. Total white blood cell counts increased in response to 2FF. NF-ĸB activation and VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression were inhibited in the livers of SCD mice consistent with an overall decrease in vascular inflammation and ischemia-reperfusion physiology. Pretreatment with 2FF completely eliminated heme-induced lethality in HbSS-Townes mice, consistent with the observed anti-inflammatory and anti-adhesive properties of 2FF in SCD mice. These data suggest that 2FF may be beneficial for preventing or treating vaso-occlusive crises in SCD patients. PMID:25706118

  17. Vascular activation of adhesion molecule mRNA and cell surface expression by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, M; Douwes, K; Peter, R; Degitz, K

    1998-01-10

    During cutaneous inflammatory reactions the recruitment of circulating leukocytes into the tissue critically depends on the regulated expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Various proinflammatory stimuli upregulate endothelial CAMs, including cytokines and UV irradiation. We have investigated the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) on endothelial CAM expression. Organ cultures of normal human skin as well as cultured human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) were exposed to IR. Expression of three major endothelial CAMs was studied in skin organ cultures by immunohistochemistry and in cell culture by Northern blot analysis and flow cytometry. In skin organ cultures vascular immunoreactivity for ICAM-1, E-selectin, and VCAM-1 was strongly induced 24 h after exposure to 5 or 10 Gy of IR, while immunoreactivity for CD31/PECAM-1, a constitutively expressed endothelial cell adhesion molecule, remained unchanged. In cultured HDMEC IR upregulated ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin mRNAs and cell surface expression in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Cellular morphology and viability remained unaltered by IR up to 24 h postirradiation. This study characterizes microvascular activation of adhesion molecule expression in response to ionizing radiation in a clinically relevant IR dose range. The findings also underscore the ability of endothelial cells to integrate environmental electromagnetic stimuli. PMID:9457067

  18. Differentiation of MCF-7 tumor cells from leukocytes and fibroblast cells using epithelial cell adhesion molecule targeted multicore surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Isabel; Matthäus, Christian; Csaki, Andrea; Clement, Joachim H.; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    Identification of tumor and normal cells is a promising application of Raman spectroscopy. The throughput of Raman-assisted cell sorting is limited by low sensitivity. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a well-recognized candidate to increase the intensity of Raman signals of cells. First, different strategies are summarized to detect tumor cells using targeted SERS probes. Then, a protocol is described to prepare multicore-SERS-labels (MSLs) by aggregating gold nanoparticles, coating with a reporter molecule and a thin silver shell to further boost enhancement, encapsulating with a stable silica layer, and functionalizing by epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies. Raman, dark field and fluorescence microscopy proved the specific and nonspecific binding of functionalized and nonfunctionalized MSLs to MCF-7 tumor cells, leukocytes from blood, and nontransformed human foreskin fibroblasts. Raman imaging and dark field microscopy indicated no uptake of MSLs, yet binding to the cellular membrane. Viability tests were performed with living tumor cells to demonstrate the low toxicity of MSL-EpCAM. The SERS signatures were detected from cells with exposure times down to 25 ms at 785-nm laser excitation. The prospects of these MSLs in multiplex assays, for enumeration and sorting of circulating tumor cells in microfluidic chips, are discussed.

  19. Identification of a null allele in genetic tests for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency in Pakistani Bos indicus × Bos taurus cattle.

    PubMed

    Nasreen, Fozia; Malik, Naveed A; Qureshi, Javed A; Raadsma, Herman W; Tammen, Imke

    2012-12-01

    Two clinically healthy mature Pakistani Bos indicus × Bos taurus cattle were genotyped as homozygous affected for the lethal immunodeficiency disorder bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) using previously described PCR-RFLP based DNA tests which was confirmed by sequencing. Sequencing of Bos taurus and B. indicus × B. taurus genomic DNA surrounding the disease causing mutation (c.383A > G) in the ITGB2 gene identified numerous variations in exonic and intronic regions within and between species, including substantial variation in primer annealing sites for three PCR-RFLP tests for one of the B. indicus allelic variants. These variations in the primer annealing sites resulted in a null allele in the DNA tests causing the misdiagnosis of some heterozygous B. taurus × B. indicus cattle to be classified as homozygous affected. New primers were designed and a modified test was developed which simultaneously identified the disease mutation and the Pakistani B. indicus allelic variant associated with the null allele in the previous test. PMID:22374219

  20. Haploidentical In Utero Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Improves Phenotype and Can Induce Tolerance for Postnatal Same Donor Transplants in the Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Model

    PubMed Central

    Peranteau, William H.; Heaton, Todd E.; Gu, Yu-Chen; Volk, Susan W.; Bauer, Thomas R.; Alcorn, Keith; Tuschong, Laura M.; Johnson, Mark P.; Hickstein, Dennis D.; Flake, Alan W.

    2009-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCT) has been shown in the murine model to achieve low levels of allogeneic chimerism and associated donor specific tolerance permissive for minimal conditioning postnatal hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT). In this pilot study, we investigate IUHCT in the canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) model. Haploidentical IUHCT resulted in stable low level donor cell chimerism in all dogs that could be analyzed by sensitive detection methodology (4 of 10) through 18 months of follow up. In the two CLAD recipients, low level chimerism resulted in amelioration and complete reversal of the CLAD phenotype respectively. Six recipients of IUHCT (5 carriers and 1 CLAD) subsequently received postnatal HSCT from the same haploidentical prenatal donor following minimal conditioning with 10 mg/kg Busulfan. Chimerism in 2 of 5 CLAD carriers that received HSCT increased from <1% pre-HSCT to sustained levels of 35 – 45%. Control animals receiving postnatal haploidentical HSCT without IUHCT had no detectable donor chimerism. These results demonstrate that haploidentical IUHCT in the CLAD model; 1) can result in low level donor chimerism that in CLAD dogs can prevent the lethal phenotype; and 2) can result in donor specific tolerance that can facilitate postnatal minimal conditioning HSCT. PMID:19203720

  1. The Epithelial Cellular Adhesion Molecule (EP-Cam) Is a Ligand for the Leukocyte-Associated Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (Lair)

    PubMed Central

    Meyaard, Linde; van der Vuurst de Vries, Anne-Renée; de Ruiter, Talitha; Lanier, Lewis L.; Phillips, Joseph H.; Clevers, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Human leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor (LAIR)-1 is expressed on many cells of the immune system and is predicted to mediate inhibitory functions based on the presence of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) in its cytoplasmic domain. Although the role of LAIR-1 in the regulation of immune responses in vivo is unknown, LAIR-1 cross-linking by monoclonal antibody inhibits various immune cell functions in vitro. Here, we identify the coloncarcinoma-associated epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) as a ligand for LAIR-1 and LAIR-2, a related soluble LAIR-1 family member. Ep-CAM interacts with the LAIR molecules through its first epidermal growth factor domain; Ep-CAM–specific antibodies can abrogate the binding. Intraepithelial T lymphocytes express LAIR-1 and thus may interact with Ep-CAM present on human intestinal epithelium. We propose that LAIR-1–Ep-CAM interaction may contribute to mucosal tolerance and that LAIR-2 possibly modulates this function. PMID:11435477

  2. Ambroxol inhibits neutrophil respiratory burst activated by alpha chain integrin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peroni, D G; Moser, S; Gallo, G; Pigozzi, R; Tenero, L; Zanoni, L; Boner, A L; Piacentini, G L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-oxidant effect(s) of Ambroxol on neutrophils activated by ligand-binding of the drug with membrane-associated adhesion integrin CD11a and to estimate dose-response changes in oxygen free radical production. The amount of free radical production by anti-CD11a- and anti-CD4-coated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and challenged with increasing concentration of Ambroxol, was evaluated within a time frame of 90 minutes. A significant dose-dependent effect response of Ambroxol on O2‾ production by cells coated with anti-CD11a antibody was observed. This preliminary study opens a new perspective on the therapeutic role of Ambroxol as an antioxidant drug and for its potential use in controlling oxidative stress, particularly in leukocyte-dependent inflammation. PMID:24355223

  3. Estradiol protects female rats against sepsis induced by Enterococcus faecalis improving leukocyte bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Saia, Rafael Simone; Garcia, Fabíola Morales; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari

    2015-10-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive bacteria described as an important causative agent of sepsis. The contact between host leukocytes and bacteria activates the innate immunity, participating as the first defense mechanism against infection. Pro-inflammatory cytokines [including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin-1β] and nitric oxide (NO) are essential to recruitment of leukocytes into the infectious focus as well as their activation for phagocytosis. Beyond the bacteria species, gender has been considered another factor to predict outcome in septic patients. Studies suggest that females exhibit a protective advantage during sepsis models, being gonadal hormones possible modulators of functions of immune cells. Nevertheless, the role of estradiol during Gram-positive infection remains a literature gap. Our aims were to investigate whether estradiol protects rats against bacterial dissemination during E. faecalis-induced sepsis. We determined whether estradiol modulates the local and systemic inflammatory response, as well as the cell migration into the infectious focus and the bactericidal capacity of leukocytes. Our findings demonstrated that estradiol pre-treated rats showed a dose-dependent reduction in bacterial counts in peritoneal lavage fluid (PLF) and in liver. Moreover, TNF-α and nitrate levels were increased in plasma, while only TNF-α was increased in the PLF in estradiol-treated rats. The prevention of bacterial dissemination may be related to the enhanced neutrophil and macrophage migration into the peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, estradiol improved the phagocytic and bactericidal ability of these both inflammatory cells. Taken together, the present study clearly demonstrates an important protective role of estradiol against sepsis induced by E. faecalis in female rats. PMID:26143494

  4. Immunomodulatory effect of mushrooms on cytotoxic activity and cytokine production of intestinal lamina propria leukocytes does not necessarily depend on β-glucan contents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Sung; Oka, Kohsuke; Watanabe, Osamu; Hara, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Satoshi

    2011-06-15

    We evaluated the effects of seven mushroom extracts (Grifola frondosa, Pholiota nameko, Panellus serotinus, Hypsizygus marmoreus, Pleurotus cornucopiae, Armillaria mellea, and Flammulina velutipes) on cytotoxic activity and cytokine production of lamina propria leukocytes (LPLs) isolated from rat small (S) and large (L) intestinal mucosa. Boiling water extracts from seven species of mushrooms showed no direct cytotoxicity against the YAC-1 target cells. However, prominent increases of cytotoxicity were observed in S- and L-LPLs co-cultured with P. serotinus extract. Cytokine production (TNFα, IFNγ, IL-12 p70, and IL-4) of S- and L-LPLs was stimulated in response to P. cornucopiae extract. Mushroom extracts contributed to target cell adhesion and/or cytokine production in the effector cells. The promotion of cytotoxic activity in S- and L-LPLs was not necessarily related to β-glucan content of the mushroom. PMID:25213921

  5. Herpes Murine Model as a Biological Assay to Test Dialyzable Leukocyte Extracts Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemí; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Becerril-García, Miguel Angel; Limón-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Vázquez-Leyva, Said; Pavón, Lenin; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs) are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Transferon, we standardized and validated a murine model of cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Using this model, we evaluated the activity of 27 Transferon batches. All batches improved the survival of HSV-1-infected mice, wherein average survival rose from 20.9% in control mice to 59.6% in Transferon-treated mice. The activity of Transferon correlated with increased serum levels of IFN-γ and reduced IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations. Our results demonstrate that (i) this mouse model of cutaneous herpes can be used to examine the activity of DLEs, such as Transferon; (ii) the assay can be used as a routine test for batch release; (iii) Transferon is produced with high homogeneity between batches; (iv) Transferon does not have direct virucidal, cytoprotective, or antireplicative effects; and (v) the protective effect of Transferon in vivo correlates with changes in serum cytokines. PMID:25984538

  6. Endogenous Thrombospondin-1 Regulates Leukocyte Recruitment and Activation and Accelerates Death from Systemic Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Manso, Gema; Navarathna, Dhammika H. M. L. P.; Galli, Susana; Soto-Pantoja, David R.; Kuznetsova, Svetlana A.; Tsokos, Maria; Roberts, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Disseminated Candida albicans infection results in high morbidity and mortality despite treatment with existing antifungal drugs. Recent studies suggest that modulating the host immune response can improve survival, but specific host targets for accomplishing this goal remain to be identified. The extracellular matrix protein thrombospondin-1 is released at sites of tissue injury and modulates several immune functions, but its role in C. albicans pathogenesis has not been investigated. Here, we show that mice lacking thrombospondin-1 have an advantage in surviving disseminated candidiasis and more efficiently clear the initial colonization from kidneys despite exhibiting fewer infiltrating leukocytes. By examining local and systemic cytokine responses to C. albicans and other standard inflammatory stimuli, we identify a crucial function of phagocytes in this enhanced resistance. Subcutaneous air pouch and systemic candidiasis models demonstrated that endogenous thrombospondin-1 enhances the early innate immune response against C. albicans and promotes activation of inflammatory macrophages (inducible nitric oxide synthase+, IL-6high, TNF-αhigh, IL-10low), release of the chemokines MIP-2, JE, MIP-1α, and RANTES, and CXCR2-driven polymorphonuclear leukocytes recruitment. However, thrombospondin-1 inhibited the phagocytic capacity of inflammatory leukocytes in vivo and in vitro, resulting in increased fungal burden in the kidney and increased mortality in wild type mice. Thus, thrombospondin-1 enhances the pathogenesis of disseminated candidiasis by creating an imbalance in the host immune response that ultimately leads to reduced phagocytic function, impaired fungal clearance, and increased mortality. Conversely, inhibitors of thrombospondin-1 may be useful drugs to improve patient recovery from disseminated candidiasis. PMID:23144964

  7. Airway distension promotes leukocyte recruitment in rat tracheal circulation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lina H K; Wagner, Elizabeth M

    2003-11-01

    Mechanical distortion of blood vessels is known to activate endothelial cells. Whether airway distension likewise activates the vascular endothelium within the airway wall is unknown. Using intravital microscopy in the rat trachea, we investigated if airway distention with the application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) caused leukocyte recruitment to the airway. Tracheal postcapillary venules were visualized and leukocyte kinetics monitored in anesthetized, mechanically ventilated rats (80 breaths/minute, 6 ml/kg VT, 1 cm H(2)O PEEP). Leukocyte rolling velocity (Vwbc) and the number of adherent cells were not altered with normal ventilation over the course of 2 hours. Ventilation with sustained PEEP (8 cm H(2)O for 1 hour reduced Vwbc and increased adhesion, reaching a maximum at 1 hour of PEEP. Intermittent (2x and 5x) 8 cm H(2)O PEEP also induced a similar reduction in Vwbc, accompanied by an increase in adhesion. However, leukocyte recruitment after airway distension is localized to the airways because increased PEEP did not induce leukocyte recruitment in the mesenteric microcirculation or when PEEP was applied to the lung distal to the site of measurement. Pretreatment with endothelin receptor and selectin inhibitors blocked the effects of distension on leukocyte recruitment, suggesting their involvement in the proinflammatory response. PMID:12869357

  8. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  9. [The effect of antioxidants on the activity of acid hydrolases in blood leukocytes from patients with leukoplakia of mouth mucosa].

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Iu A; Mashkilleĭson, A L; Suleĭmanova, G G; Lagunov, A I

    1989-01-01

    Activity of acid hydrolases, alkaline phosphatase and leucine aminopeptidase was studied in leukocytes of patients with leukoplakia of mouth mucosa before and after the treatment involving antioxidant drugs. The enzymatic activity studied was increased in leukoplakia. Cryotherapy combined with antioxidants and the treatment with antioxidants only contributed to a decrease in these enzymes activity. PMID:2617939

  10. cDNA cloning and complete primary structure of the alpha subunit of a leukocyte adhesion glycoprotein, p150,95.

    PubMed Central

    Corbi, A L; Miller, L J; O'Connor, K; Larson, R S; Springer, T A

    1987-01-01

    The leukocyte adhesion receptors, p150,95, Mac-1 and LFA-1 are integral membrane glycoproteins which contain distinct alpha subunits of 180,000-150,000 Mr associated with identical beta subunits of 95,000 Mr in alpha beta complexes. p150,95 alpha subunit tryptic peptides were used to specify oligonucleotide probes and a cDNA clone of 4.7 kb containing the entire coding sequence was isolated from a size-selected myeloid cell cDNA library. The 4.7-kb cDNA clone encodes a signal sequence, an extracellular domain of 1081 amino acids containing 10 potential glycosylation sites, a transmembrane domain of 26 amino acids, and a C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of 29 residues. The extracellular domain contains three tandem homologous repeats of approximately 60 amino acids with putative divalent cation-binding sites, and four weaker repeats which lack such binding sites. The cDNA clone hybridizes with a mRNA of 4.7 kb which is induced during in vitro differentiation of myeloid cell lines. The p150,95 alpha subunit is homologous to the alpha subunits of receptors which recognize the RGD sequence in extracellular matrix components, as has previously been shown for the beta subunits, supporting the concept that receptors involved in both cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions belong to a single gene superfamily termed the integrins. Distinctive features of the p150,95 alpha subunit include an insertion of 126 residues N-terminal to the putative metal binding region and a deletion of the region in which the matrix receptors are proteolytically cleaved during processing. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3327687

  11. Screening for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase, complex vertebral malformation, bovine citrullinaemia, and factor XI deficiency in Holstein cows reared in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS), complex vertebral malformation (CVM), bovine citrullinaemia (BC) and factor XI deficiency (FXID) are autosomal recessive hereditary disorders, which have had significant economic impact on dairy cattle breeding worldwide. In this study, 350 Holstein cows reared in Turkey were screened for BLAD, DUMPS, CVM, BC and FXID genotypes to obtain an indication on the importance of these defects in Turkish Holsteins. Methods Genomic DNA was obtained from blood and the amplicons of BLAD, DUMPS, CVM, BC and FXID were obtained by using PCR. PCR products were digested with TaqI, AvaI and AvaII restriction enzymes for BLAD, DUMPS, and BC, respectively. These digested products and PCR product of FXID were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis stained with ethidium bromide. CVM genotypes were detected by DNA sequencing. Additionally, all genotypes were confirmed by DNA sequencing to determine whether there was a mutant allele or not. Results Fourteen BLAD, twelve CVM and four FXID carriers were found among the 350 Holstein cows examined, while carriers of DUMPS and BC were not detected. The mutant allele frequencies were calculated as 0.02, 0.017, and 0.006 for BLAD, CVM and FXID, respectively with corresponding carrier prevalence of 4.0% (BLAD), 3.4% (CVM) and 1.2% (FXID). Conclusion This study demonstrates that carriers of BLAD, CVM and FXID are present in the Turkish Holstein population, although at a low frequency. The actual number of clinical cases is unknown, but sporadic cases may appear. As artificial insemination is widely used in dairy cattle breeding, carriers of BLAD, CVM and FXID are likely present within the population of breeding sires. It is recommended to screen breeding sires for these defective genes in order to avoid an unwanted spread within the population. PMID:20929557

  12. Suppression of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell function by neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dallegri, F; Dapino, P; Patrone, F; Sacchetti, C

    1991-01-01

    Peripheral blood neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were found to inhibit the cytolytic efficiency of interleukin 2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes (LAK cells) in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory activity of PMN was not merely due to PMN acting as cold alternative targets, PMN ingestion of the label released by target cells or cell overcrowding in test wells. Heat-treated (50 degrees C, 30 min) lysates from PMN maintained their ability to inhibit LAK cell cytotoxicity, whereas PMN supernatants were completely ineffective. Oxidant scavengers (catalase, superoxide, dismutase) did not affect the PMN-mediated inhibition of LAK cell function. The results suggest that PMN contain heat-stable factor(s) able to suppress LAK cytotoxicity and potentially capable of limiting the therapeutic efficacy of IL-2 and/or LAK cells. PMID:1667940

  13. Detection of the halogenating activity of heme peroxidases in leukocytes by aminophenyl fluorescein.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, J; Remmler, J; Zschaler, J; Arnhold, J

    2015-06-01

    The formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acids by heme peroxidases is a key property of certain immune cells. These products are not only involved in defense against pathogenic microorganisms and in regulation of inflammatory processes, but contribute also to tissue damage in certain pathologies. After a short introduction about experimental approaches for the assessment of the halogenating activity in vitro and in cell suspensions, we are focusing on novel applications of fluorescent dye systems to detect the formation of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in leukocytes. Special attention is directed to properties and applications of the non-fluorescent dye aminophenyl fluorescein that is converted by HOCl, HOBr, and other strong oxidants to fluorescein. This dye allows the detection of the halogenating activity in samples containing free myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase as well as in intact granulocytes using fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. PMID:25536418

  14. HIV-1 gp120 induces cytokine expression, leukocyte adhesion, and transmigration across the blood-brain barrier: modulatory effects of STAT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Akhter, Sidra; Chaudhuri, Anathbandhu; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2009-03-01

    How neuroinflammatory activities affect signaling pathways leading to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury during HIV/AIDS are currently unknown. Our previous work demonstrated that HIV-1 exposure activates pro-inflammatory genes in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and showed that these genes are linked to the janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) pathway. Here, we report that HIV-1 gp120 protein activated STAT1 and induced interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion in HBMEC. IL-6, IL-8, and gp120 increased monocyte adhesion and migration across in vitro BBB models. The STAT1 inhibitor, fludarabine, prevented gp120-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Inhibitors of STAT1, mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) (PD98059), and phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) (LY294002), blocked gp120-induced STAT1 activation and significantly diminished IL-8-, IL-6-, and gp120-induced monocyte adhesion and migration across in vitro BBB models. These data support the notion that STAT1 plays an important role in gp120-induced inflammation and BBB dysfunction associated with viral infection. Results also suggest crosstalk between STAT1, MEK, and PI3K pathways in gp120-induced BBB dysfunction. Inhibition of STAT1 activation could provide a unique therapeutic strategy to decrease neuroinflammation and BBB dysfunction in HIV/AIDS. PMID:19103208

  15. Physical Activity, Physical Fitness and Leukocyte Telomere Length: the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    PubMed Central

    Soares-Miranda, Luisa; Imamura, Fumiaki; Siscovick, David; Jenny, Nancy Swords; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The influence of physical activity (PA) and physical fitness (PF) at older ages on changes in telomere length (TL), repetitive DNA sequences that may mark biologic aging, is not well-established. Few prior studies have been conducted in older adults, these were mainly cross-sectional, and few evaluated PF. Methods We investigated cross-sectional and prospective associations of PA and PF with leukocyte TL among 582 older adults (age 73±5 y at baseline) in the Cardiovascular Health Study, having serial TL measures and PA and PF assessed multiple times. Cross-sectional associations were assessed using multivariable repeated-measures regression, in which cumulatively averaged PA and PF measures were related to TL. Longitudinal analyses assessed cumulatively averaged PA and PF against later changes in TL; and changes in cumulatively averaged PA and PF against changes in TL. Results Cross-sectionally, greater walking distance and chair test performance, but not other PA and PF measures, were each associated with longer TL (p-trend=0.007, 0.04 respectively). In longitudinal analyses, no significant associations of baseline PA and PF with change in TL were observed. In contrast, changes in leisure-time activity and chair test performance were each inversely associated with changes in TL. Conclusions Cross-sectional analyses suggest that greater PA and PF are associated with longer TL. Prospective analyses show that changes in PA and PF are associated with differences in changes in TL. Even later in life, changes in certain PA and PF measures are associated with changes in TL, suggesting that leisure-time activity and fitness could reduce leukocyte telomere attrition among older adults. PMID:26083773

  16. The Activation Pattern of Blood Leukocytes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Is Correlated to Survival

    PubMed Central

    Millrud, Camilla Rydberg; Månsson Kvarnhammar, Anne; Uddman, Rolf; Björnsson, Sven; Riesbeck, Kristian; Cardell, Lars Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is known to cause substantial immunosuppression. The present study was designed to characterize blood leukocyte activation in HNSCC and to investigate if the individual activation pattern could be related to tumor progress and survival. The leukocyte activation profile of HNSCC patients and healthy controls was assessed with flow cytometry. HNSCC patients displayed increased numbers of monocytes, neutrophils and total leukocytes as well as an enhanced neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. In addition, patients had a higher percentage of CD69+, CD71+ and CD98+ T cell subsets and NK cells, and a reduced expression of L-selectin in CD14highCD16+ monocytes and neutrophils, when compared to controls. These changes could be correlated to both tumor burden and spread to lymph nodes. Among the cancer patients an increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, a low neutrophil and CD14high CD16+ monocyte activation state and an elevated CD4/CD8 ratio were related to poor survival. In contrast, a high percentage of CD98+ Th cells appeared to be associated with a better outcome. Taken together, the present data indicate that HNSCC causes activation of blood leukocytes and that the individual activation pattern can be linked to prognosis. PMID:23251433

  17. Platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte interaction in dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Amelia; Leisewitz, Andrew L; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Schoeman, Johan P

    2015-09-01

    Using flow cytometry, platelet-leukocyte aggregate (PLA) formation has previously been documented in dogs with a variety of systemic inflammatory disorders and immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia. Platelet activation and subsequent interaction between platelets and leukocytes are important for regulating innate immunity and systemic inflammation. The objective of this study was to investigate PLA formation in canine babesiosis and to determine whether it was associated with outcome. Blood was collected from 36 client-owned dogs diagnosed with Babesia rossi infection and 15 healthy controls using EDTA as anticoagulant. Activated platelets and PLA formation were detected by measuring surface expression of P-selectin (CD62P) on platelets, monocytes and neutrophils. Of the Babesia-infected dogs, 29 survived and seven died. The percentage of CD62P-positive monocytes was significantly higher (P = 0.036) in the Babesia-infected dogs (54%) than in healthy control dogs (35.3%). However, there were no significant differences between the Babesia-infected and control groups for CD62P-positive platelets (4.9% and 1.2%, respectively) and CD62P-positive neutrophils (28.3% and 17.9%, respectively). The percentage of CD62P-positive monocytes was significantly higher (P = 0.019) in the survivors (58.9%) than in healthy control dogs; however, there were no significant differences between the non-survivors (39.2%) and the controls or between survivors and non-survivors. There were no significant differences between groups for the percentage of CD62P-positive platelets (survivors 4.8%; non-survivors 5.3%; controls 1.2%) or CD62P-positive neutrophils (survivors 31.6%; non-survivors 5.6%; controls 17.9%). In conclusion, Babesia-infected dogs, specifically dogs that survived, had a significantly increased percentage of platelet-monocyte aggregates compared to healthy control dogs. PMID:26088270

  18. Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Leukocytes Enhance Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Production in a Mouse Air-Pouch-Type Inflammation Model.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Natsumi; Hatayama, Takahiro; Jiangxu, Dong; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Endo, Yasuo; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2016-08-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a key cytokine that exacerbates allergic and fibrotic reactions. Several microbes and virus components have been shown to induce TSLP production, mainly in epithelial cells. TLR4 activators, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induce TSLP production in vivo, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the contribution of LPS-activated leukocytes to the production of TSLP in a mouse air-pouch-type inflammation model. LPS induced the production of TSLP in this model but not in the mouse keratinocyte cell line PAM212. Transfer of the infiltrated leukocytes collected from an LPS-injected air pouch to the air pouch of another mouse enhanced TSLP production. Further, the LPS-activated leukocytes produced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β); a deficiency in these cytokines attenuated the LPS-induced production of TSLP. TSLP production was induced by TNF-α and enhanced by IL-1β and LPS in the PAM212 cells. These results demonstrated that TNF-α and IL-1β, which are partly produced by LPS-activated leukocytes, contribute to TSLP production via TLR4 activation in vivo. PMID:27271511

  19. The influence of tobacco smoking on adhesion molecule profiles

    PubMed Central

    Scott, DA; Palmer, RM

    2003-01-01

    Sequential interactions between several adhesion molecules and their ligands regulate lymphocyte circulation and leukocyte recruitment to inflammatory foci. Adhesion molecules are, therefore, central and critical components of the immune and inflammatory system. We review the evidence that tobacco smoking dysregulates specific components of the adhesion cascade, which may be a common factor in several smoking-induced diseases. Smoking causes inappropriate leukocyte activation, leukocyte-endothelial adhesion, and neutrophil entrapment in the microvasculature, which may help initiate local tissue destruction. Appropriate inflammatory reactions may thus be compromised. In addition to smoke-induced alterations to membrane bound endothelial and leukocyte adhesion molecule expression, which may help explain the above phenomena, smoking has a profound influence on circulating adhesion molecule profiles, most notably sICAM-1 and specific sCD44 variants. Elevated concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules may simply reflect ongoing inflammatory processes. However, increasing evidence suggests that specific soluble adhesion molecules are immunomodulatory, and that alterations to soluble adhesion molecule profiles may represent a significant risk factor for several diverse diseases. This evidence is discussed herein.

  20. The influence of tobacco smoking on adhesion molecule profiles

    PubMed Central

    Scott, DA; Palmer, RM

    2003-01-01

    Sequential interactions between several adhesion molecules and their ligands regulate lymphocyte circulation and leukocyte recruitment to inflammatory foci. Adhesion molecules are, therefore, central and critical components of the immune and inflammatory system. We review the evidence that tobacco smoking dysregulates specific components of the adhesion cascade, which may be a common factor in several smoking-induced diseases. Smoking causes inappropriate leukocyte activation, leukocyte-endothelial adhesion, and neutrophil entrapment in the microvasculature, which may help initiate local tissue destruction. Appropriate inflammatory reactions may thus be compromised. In addition to smoke-induced alterations to membrane bound endothelial and leukocyte adhesion molecule expression, which may help explain the above phenomena, smoking has a profound influence on circulating adhesion molecule profiles, most notably sICAM-1 and specific sCD44 variants. Elevated concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules may simply reflect ongoing inflammatory processes. However, increasing evidence suggests that specific soluble adhesion molecules are immunomodulatory, and that alterations to soluble adhesion molecule profiles may represent a significant risk factor for several diverse diseases. This evidence is discussed herein. PMID:19570245

  1. Effect of plastic catheters on the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    López-López, G; Pascual, A; Perea, E J

    1990-05-01

    The effect of five kinds of plastic catheters (polyvinyl chloride, Teflon, polyurethane, Vialon and siliconized latex) on the phagocytic and bactericidal function of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was evaluated. In the presence of the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters, superoxide radical production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes was significantly inhibited. The effect of the siliconized latex catheter was presumably mediated by products eluted from the catheter into the medium, since the incubation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in eluates obtained from the incubation of this catheter in buffer induced a similar inhibitory effect. This phenomenon was not observed with polyurethane or Vialon catheters. Neither the catheters evaluated nor their eluates affected the uptake of opsonized Staphylococcus aureus by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It is concluded that the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters used in this study could impair the respiratory burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. PMID:2164932

  2. SUMOylation of DRIL1 Directs Its Transcriptional Activity Towards Leukocyte Lineage-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    van Lohuizen, Maarten; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    DRIL1 is an ARID family transcription factor that can immortalize primary mouse fibroblasts, bypass RASV12-induced cellular senescence and collaborate with RASV12 or MYC in mediating oncogenic transformation. It also activates immunoglobulin heavy chain transcription and engages in heterodimer formation with E2F to stimulate E2F-dependent transcription. Little, however, is known about the regulation of DRIL1 activity. Recently, DRIL1 was found to interact with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9, but the functional relevance of this association has not been assessed. Here, we show that DRIL1 is sumoylated both in vitro and in vivo at lysine 398. Moreover, we provide evidence that PIASy functions as a specific SUMO E3-ligase for DRIL1 and promotes its sumoylation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, consistent with the subnuclear localization of PIASy in the Matrix-Associated Region (MAR), SUMO-modified DRIL1 species are found exclusively in the MAR fraction. This post-translational modification interferes neither with the subcellular localization nor the DNA-binding activity of the protein. In contrast, DRIL1 sumoylation impairs its interaction with E2F1 in vitro and modifies its transcriptional activity in vivo, driving transcription of subset of genes regulating leukocyte fate. Taken together, these results identify sumoylation as a novel post-translational modification of DRIL1 that represents an important mechanism for targeting and modulating DRIL1 transcriptional activity. PMID:19436740

  3. Broad Spectrum Activity of a Lectin-Like Bacterial Serine Protease Family on Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Lujan, Jorge Luis; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei; Smith, Rachel; Santiago, Araceli E.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system. PMID:25251283

  4. Broad spectrum activity of a lectin-like bacterial serine protease family on human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Lujan, Jorge Luis; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei; Smith, Rachel; Santiago, Araceli E; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system. PMID:25251283

  5. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications. Stem Cells 2016;34:948-959. PMID:26727165

  6. Specific acceptance of fetal bowel allograft in mice after combined treatment with anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Y; Yamataka, A; Yagita, H; Okumura, K; Fujiwara, T; Miyano, T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to see whether tolerance could be induced by simultaneous administration of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) after transplantation of fetal small bowel between fully incompatible mice strains. METHODS: Fetal small bowel from either BALB/c (H-2d) or C3H/He (H-2k) mice was transplanted into the space between the peritoneum and rectus abdominis of adult C3H/He recipient mice. Syngeneic (n = 6) and two allogeneic transplant groups were made. In one of the allogeneic groups (n = 8), no immunosuppressant was given. In the other allogeneic group (n = 13), both anti-LFA-1 and anti-ICAM-1 MoAbs (50 micrograms each/mouse/day) were given intraperitoneally after transplantation for the first 4 weeks. In the syngeneic and untreated allogeneic groups, all mice were killed 4 weeks after transplantation. In the treated allogeneic group, eight mice were killed 6 weeks after cessation of the MoAb treatment. At the time the mice were killed, the bowel graft as well as the recipient spleen were taken for histologic analysis and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assay, respectively. Each mouse in the remaining treated five mice was transplanted with BALB/c and C57BL/6 (as third-party) full-thickness skin simultaneously 8 weeks after cessation of the MoAb treatment. RESULTS: All grafts in the syngeneic group survived with normally developing villi, whereas all grafts in the untreated allogeneic group disappeared. In the treated allogeneic group, all allografts developed normal mucosa without any sign of rejection. Splenocytes from the recipient mice in the untreated allogeneic group showed increased CTL induction against donor-type alloantigen (p < 0.005), compared with that in the syngeneic group. Suppressed CTL induction against donor-type alloantigen was observed in the treated allografted recipient (p < 0.001), whereas CTL induction against third

  7. Endothelial CD99 signals through soluble adenylyl cyclase and PKA to regulate leukocyte transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Richard L.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.; Winger, Ryan C.; Wang, Jing; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    CD99 is a critical regulator of leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM). How CD99 signals during this process remains unknown. We show that during TEM, endothelial cell (EC) CD99 activates protein kinase A (PKA) via a signaling complex formed with the lysine-rich juxtamembrane cytoplasmic tail of CD99, the A-kinase anchoring protein ezrin, and soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). PKA then stimulates membrane trafficking from the lateral border recycling compartment to sites of TEM, facilitating the passage of leukocytes across the endothelium. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of EC sAC or PKA, like CD99 blockade, arrests neutrophils and monocytes partway through EC junctions, in vitro and in vivo, without affecting leukocyte adhesion or the expression of relevant cellular adhesion molecules. This is the first description of the CD99 signaling pathway in TEM as well as the first demonstration of a role for sAC in leukocyte TEM. PMID:26101266

  8. Cluster Analysis of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Canine Leukocytes Identifies Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Julie-Anne; Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system undergo activation and subsequent proliferation in the normal course of an immune response. Infrequently, the molecular and cellular events that underlie the mechanisms of proliferation are dysregulated and may lead to oncogenesis, leading to tumor formation. The most common forms of immunological cancers are lymphomas, which in dogs account for 8%–20% of all cancers, affecting up to 1.2% of the dog population. Key genes involved in negatively regulating proliferation of lymphocytes include a group classified as tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). These genes are also known to be associated with progression of lymphoma in humans, mice, and dogs and are potential candidates for pathological grading and diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze TSG profiles in stimulated leukocytes from dogs to identify genes that discriminate an activated phenotype. A total of 554 TSGs and three gene set collections were analyzed from microarray data. Cluster analysis of three subsets of genes discriminated between stimulated and unstimulated cells. These included 20 most upregulated and downregulated TSGs, TSG in hallmark gene sets significantly enriched in active cells, and a selection of candidate TSGs, p15 (CDKN2B), p18 (CDKN2C), p19 (CDKN1A), p21 (CDKN2A), p27 (CDKN1B), and p53 (TP53) in the third set. Analysis of two subsets suggested that these genes or a subset of these genes may be used as a specialized PCR set for additional analysis. PMID:27478369

  9. Tumorigenic conversion of a rat urothelial cell line by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes activated by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Tamatani, T; Turk, P; Weitzman, S; Oyasu, R

    1999-08-01

    Chronic inflammation is a significant risk factor for the development of urinary bladder cancer. We have shown that inflammation induced by killed Escherichia coli and also by its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) strikingly enhances N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-initiated rat bladder carcinogenesis. Aspirates from the bladder lumen contained a large quantity of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and several cytokines. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) released from activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are involved in inflammation-associated bladder carcinogenesis. Using an immortalized nontumorigenic rat urothelial cell line, MYP3, we examined the effect of LPS-activated PMN on malignant transformation. MYP3 cells pretreated with or without MNU were exposed daily to LPS-activated PMN for one week and were then tested for growth in soft agar. In contrast to no colony formation by the parental cells, a varying number of colonies developed from cells treated with LPS-activated PMN. Although combined treatment with MNU and PMN was most effective (P<0.01), cells treated with LPS-activated PMN alone also formed a small number of colonies. Addition of catalase, which decomposes H2O2, and/or an antioxidant, alpha-tocopherol, reduced the number of colonies induced by LPS-activated PMN (P<0.05). Cells derived from colonies were tumorigenic in athymic nude mice. However, tumorigenicity in mice was greater with cells treated with both MNU and PMN than with cells treated with PMN alone. Our results suggest that ROI released from LPS-activated PMN may be one of the mechanisms involved in the carcinogenesis associated with active urinary tract infection. PMID:10543254

  10. Blockade of C5a and C5b-9 generation inhibits leukocyte and platelet activation during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed Central

    Rinder, C S; Rinder, H M; Smith, B R; Fitch, J C; Smith, M J; Tracey, J B; Matis, L A; Squinto, S P; Rollins, S A

    1995-01-01

    Complement activation contributes to the systemic inflammatory response induced by cardiopulmonary bypass. At the cellular level, cardiopulmonary bypass activates leukocytes and platelets; however the contribution of early (3a) versus late (C5a, soluble C5b-9) complement components to this activation is unclear. We used a model of simulated extracorporeal circulation that activates complement (C3a, C5a, and C5b-9 formation), platelets (increased percentages of P-selectin-positive platelets and leukocyte-platelet conjugates), and neutrophils (upregulated CD11b expression). to specifically target complement activation in this model, we added a blocking mAb directed at the human C5 complement component and assessed its effect on complement and cellular activation. Compared with a control mAB, the anti-human C5 mAb profoundly inhibited C5a and soluble C5b-9 generation and serum complement hemolytic activity but had no effect on C3a generation. Additionally, the anti-human C5 mAb significantly inhibited neutrophil CD11b upregulation and abolished the increase in P-selectin-positive platelets and leukocyte-platelet conjugate formation compared to experiments performed with the control mAb. This suggests that the terminal components C5a and C5b-9, but not C3a, directly contribute to platelet and neutrophil activation during extracorporeal circulation. Furthermore, these data identify the C5 component as a site for therapeutic intervention in cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:7657827

  11. IL-6 blockade reverses the abnormal STAT activation of peripheral blood leukocytes from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, M A; Diaz-Torné, C; Hernández, M V; Reina, D; de la Fuente, D; Castellví, I; Moya, P; Ruiz, J M; Corominas, H; Zamora, C; Cantó, E; Sanmartí, R; Juarez, C; Vidal, S

    2015-06-01

    Considering the interplay of multiple STATs in response to cytokines, we investigated how IL-6 and its blocking affect STAT signaling in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Leukocytes obtained from RA patients before and after tocilizumab treatment and healthy donors (HDs) were cytokine-stimulated and STAT phosphorylation was analyzed by cytometry. RA patients had significantly fewer pSTAT1+, pSTAT3+, and pSTAT6+ monocytes and pSTAT5+ lymphocytes than HDs. After 24weeks of treatment, percentages of IFNγ-induced pSTAT1+ and IL-10-induced pSTAT3+ monocytes in RA patients increased, reaching levels comparable to HDs. pSTAT1+ and pSTAT3+ cells correlated inversely with RA disease activity index and levels of pSTAT+ cells at baseline were higher in patients with good EULAR response to tocilizumab. IFNγ-induced pSTAT1+ cells correlated inversely with memory T cells and anti-CCP levels. IL-10-induced pSTAT3+ cells correlated with Treg/Teff ratio. Our findings suggest that IL-6 blocking reduces the inflammatory mechanisms through the correction of STAT1 and STAT3 activation status. PMID:25847223

  12. Group A streptococcal peptidoglycan-polysaccharide inhibits phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Leong, P A; Cohen, M S

    1984-01-01

    Injection of sterile aqueous preparations of the peptidoglycan-polysaccharide of group A streptococci (PG-APS) produces chronic inflammation in several animal models. Chronic bacterial infection may be involved in some aspects of the pathogenesis of inflammation associated with the accumulation of PG-APS. Accordingly, the effect of PG-APS on human neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte [PMN]) bactericidal activity was studied with the supposition that this interaction may contribute to the inflammation observed. Concentrations of PG-APS greater than 10 micrograms/ml inhibited the ability of PMNs to kill Staphylococcus aureus. This inhibition was not due to a cytotoxic effect of PG-APS on PMNs, nor did PG-APS inhibit PMN metabolism required for the formation of microbicidal oxygen reduction products. PG-APS concentrations of 10 micrograms/ml or greater in the presence of 10% normal serum inhibited the attachment of bacteria to PMNs by 49% as compared with control cell populations. The concentrations of PG-APS required to inhibit uptake of Staphylococcus aureus were identical to those required for inhibition of PMN bactericidal activity. This inhibition did not occur in the presence of serum-free medium or medium with sera that had been heated to inactivate complement. These results show that PG-APS interacts with serum to inhibit PMN-mediated killing of S. aureus, most probably by interfering with bacterial uptake. PMID:6378796

  13. Heparin Interaction with the Primed Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte CD11b Induces Apoptosis and Prevents Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Mazor, Meital; Mazor, Rafi; Kristal, Batya; Kistler, Erik B.; Ziv, Inbal; Chezar, Judith; Sela, Shifra

    2015-01-01

    Heparin is known to have anti-inflammatory effects, yet the mechanisms are not completely understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that heparin has a direct effect on activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs), changing their activation state, and can explain its anti-inflammatory effect. To test our hypothesis, we designed both in vitro and ex vivo studies to elucidate the mechanism by which heparin modulates PMNL functions and therefore the inflammatory response. We specifically tested the hypothesis that priming of PMNLs renders them more susceptible to heparin. Amplified levels of CD11b and increased rate of superoxide release manifested PMNL priming. Increase in cell priming resulted in a dose-dependent increase in heparin binding to PMNLs followed by augmented apoptosis. Blocking antibodies to CD11b inhibited heparin binding and abolished the apoptotic response. Moreover, heparin caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in the rate of superoxide release from PMNLs, which was blunted by blocking antibodies to CD11b. Altogether, this study shows that the interaction of heparin with the PMNL CD11b results in cell apoptosis and explains heparin's anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26819958

  14. Kindlin-3–mediated integrin adhesion is dispensable for quiescent but essential for activated hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, Raphael; Moser, Markus; Sperandio, Markus; Rognoni, Emanuel; Orban, Martin; Liu, Wen-Hsin; Schulz, Ansgar S.; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.; Massberg, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate highly dividing hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), which produce all blood cell lineages. HSCs are usually quiescent, retained by integrins in specific niches, and become activated when the pools of HPCs decrease. We report that Kindlin-3–mediated integrin activation controls homing of HSCs to the bone marrow (BM) and the retention of activated HSCs and HPCs but not of quiescent HSCs in their BM niches. Consequently, Kindlin-3–deficient HSCs enter quiescence and remain in the BM when cotransplanted with wild-type hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), whereas they are hyperactivated and lost in the circulation when wild-type HSPCs are absent, leading to their exhaustion and reduced survival of recipients. The accumulation of HSPCs in the circulation of leukocyte adhesion deficiency type III patients, who lack Kindlin-3, underlines the conserved functions of Kindlin-3 in man and the importance of our findings for human disease. PMID:26282877

  15. Activation of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes by Candidate Biomaterials for an Implantable Glucose Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Andrey; Hellerud, Bernt Christian; Lambris, John D; Johannessen, Erik A; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Background Continuous monitoring of glucose by implantable microfabricated devices offers key advantages over current transcutaneous glucose sensors that limit usability due to their obtrusive nature and risk of infection. A successful sensory implant should be biocompatible and retain long-lasting function. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) play a key role in the inflammatory system by releasing enzymes, cytokines, and reactive oxygen species, typically as a response to complement activation. The aim of this study was to perform an in vitro analysis of PMN activation as a marker for biocompatibility of materials and to evaluate the role of complement in the activation of PMN. Methods Fifteen candidate materials of an implantable glucose sensor were incubated in lepirudin-anticoagulated whole blood. The cluster of differentiation molecule 11b (CD11b) expression on PMN was analyzed with flow cytometry and the myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentration in plasma was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Complement activation was prevented by the C3 inhibitor compstatin or the C5 inhibitor eculizumab. Results Three of the biomaterials (cellulose ester, polyamide reverse osmosis membrane, and polyamide thin film membrane), all belonging to the membrane group, induced a substantial and significant increase in CD11b expression and MPO release. The changes were virtually identical for these two markers. Inhibition of complement with compstatin or eculizumab reduced the CD11b expression and MPO release dose dependently and in most cases back to baseline. The other 12 materials did not induce significant PMN activation. Conclusion Three of the 15 candidate materials triggered PMN activation in a complement-dependent manner and should therefore be avoided for implementation in implantable microsensors. PMID:22226271

  16. Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression and Signaling During Disease: Regulation by Reactive Oxygen Species and Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Michelle E.; Abdala-Valencia, Hiam

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The endothelium is immunoregulatory in that inhibiting the function of vascular adhesion molecules blocks leukocyte recruitment and thus tissue inflammation. The function of endothelial cells during leukocyte recruitment is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants. In inflammatory sites and lymph nodes, the endothelium is stimulated to express adhesion molecules that mediate leukocyte binding. Upon leukocyte binding, these adhesion molecules activate endothelial cell signal transduction that then alters endothelial cell shape for the opening of passageways through which leukocytes can migrate. If the stimulation of this opening is blocked, inflammation is blocked. In this review, we focus on the endothelial cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Expression of VCAM-1 is induced on endothelial cells during inflammatory diseases by several mediators, including ROS. Then, VCAM-1 on the endothelium functions as both a scaffold for leukocyte migration and a trigger of endothelial signaling through NADPH oxidase-generated ROS. These ROS induce signals for the opening of intercellular passageways through which leukocytes migrate. In several inflammatory diseases, inflammation is blocked by inhibition of leukocyte binding to VCAM-1 or by inhibition of VCAM-1 signal transduction. VCAM-1 signal transduction and VCAM-1-dependent inflammation are blocked by antioxidants. Thus, VCAM-1 signaling is a target for intervention by pharmacological agents and by antioxidants during inflammatory diseases. This review discusses ROS and antioxidant functions during activation of VCAM-1 expression and VCAM-1 signaling in inflammatory diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1607–1638. PMID:21050132

  17. Altered polymorphonuclear leukocyte Fc gamma R expression contributes to decreased candicidal activity during intraabdominal sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, H.H.; D'Amico, R.; Monfils, P.; Burchard, K.W. )

    1991-03-01

    We investigated the effects of untreated intraabdominal sepsis on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) candicidal activity. Two groups of swine were studied. Group I (n=6) underwent sham laparotomy, group II (n=7) underwent cecal ligation and incision. Untreated intraabdominal sepsis resulted in a progressive decrease in PMN candicidal activity. Concomitant rosetting and phagocytosis assays demonstrated a decrease in both the attachment and phagocytosis of Candida albicans opsonized with both normal and septic swine serum by PMNs in group II. Iodine 125-labeled swine immunoglobulin G (IgG) and fluorescein isothioalanate (FITC)-labeled swine IgG were used to investigate Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions. Scatchard analyses demonstrated a progressive decline in both the binding affinity constant and number of IgG molecules bound per PMN. Stimulation of the oxidative burst markedly reduced 125I-labeled IgG binding in both group I and group II, with a greater decrement being seen in animals with intraabdominal sepsis. Further, in group II, PMN recycling of the Fc gamma receptor to the cell surface after generation of the oxidative burst was reduced by postoperative day 4. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to Fc gamma receptor II, but not Fc gamma receptor I/III markedly reduced intracellular candicidal activity. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a homogeneous pattern of FITC-IgG uptake by nearly all group I PMNs, whereas by postoperative day 8 a substantial number of PMNs from group II failed to internalize the FITC-IgG. These studies suggest that untreated intraabdominal sepsis reduces PMN candicidal activity and that this is due, in part, to altered PMN Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions.

  18. Human HLA-G+ extravillous trophoblasts: Immune-activating cells that interact with decidual leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Tilburgs, Tamara; Crespo, Ângela C; van der Zwan, Anita; Rybalov, Basya; Raj, Towfique; Stranger, Barbara; Gardner, Lucy; Moffett, Ashley; Strominger, Jack L

    2015-06-01

    Invading human leukocyte antigen-G+ (HLA-G+) extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) are rare cells that are believed to play a key role in the prevention of a maternal immune attack on foreign fetal tissues. Here highly purified HLA-G+ EVT and HLA-G- villous trophoblasts (VT) were isolated. Culture on fibronectin that EVT encounter on invading the uterus increased HLA-G, EGF-Receptor-2, and LIF-Receptor expression on EVT, presumably representing a further differentiation state. Microarray and functional gene set enrichment analysis revealed a striking immune-activating potential for EVT that was absent in VT. Cocultures of HLA-G+ EVT with sample matched decidual natural killer cells (dNK), macrophages, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were established. Interaction of EVT with CD4+ T cells resulted in increased numbers of CD4+CD25(HI)FOXP3+CD45RA+ resting regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased the expression level of the Treg-specific transcription factor FOXP3 in these cells. However, EVT did not enhance cytokine secretion in dNK, whereas stimulation of dNK with mitogens or classical natural killer targets confirmed the distinct cytokine secretion profiles of dNK and peripheral blood NK cells (pNK). EVT are specialized cells involved in maternal-fetal tolerance, the properties of which are not imitated by HLA-G-expressing surrogate cell lines. PMID:26015573

  19. Ionizing radiation increases adhesiveness of human aortic endothelial cells via a chemokine-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Saman; Gupta, Kiran B; Kucik, Dennis F

    2012-05-01

    Exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Since radiation also induces inflammation, a possible mechanism is a change in the adhesiveness of vascular endothelial cells, triggering pro-atherogenic accumulation of leukocytes. To investigate this mechanism at the cellular level, the effect of X rays on adhesiveness of cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) was determined. HAECs were grown as monolayers and exposed to 0 to 30 Gy X rays, followed by measurement of adhesiveness under physiological shear stress using a flow chamber adhesion assay. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, HAEC adhesiveness was increased, with a peak effect at 15 Gy. Radiation had no significant effect on surface expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Antibody blockade of the leukocyte integrin receptors for ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, however, abolished the radiation-induced adhesiveness. Since these leukocyte integrins can be activated by chemokines presented on the endothelial cell surface, the effect of pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of chemokine-mediated integrin activation, was tested. PTX specifically inhibited radiation-induced adhesiveness, with no significant effect on nonirradiated cells. Therefore, radiation induces increased adhesiveness of aortic endothelial cells through chemokine-dependent signaling from endothelial cells to leukocytes, even in the absence of increased expression of the adhesion molecules involved. PMID:22087741

  20. Molecular basis of leukocyte-endothelium interactions during the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Olga; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2009-05-01

    The process of leukocyte extravasation, a critical step in the inflammatory response, involves the migration of leukocytes from the bloodstream towards target tissues, where they exert their effector function. Leukocyte extravasation is orchestrated by the combined action of cellular adhesion receptors and chemotactic factors, and involves radical morphological changes in both leukocytes and endothelial cells. Thus, it constitutes an active process for both cell types and promotes the rapid and efficient influx of leukocytes to inflammatory foci without compromising the integrity of the endothelial barrier. This article provides a review of leukocyte extravasation from both molecular and mechanical points of view, with a particular emphasis on the most recent findings on the topic. It includes a description of newly revealed steps in the adhesion cascade, such as slow rolling motion, intraluminal crawling and alternative pathways for transcellular migration, and discusses the functional role of novel adhesion receptors, the spatiotemporal organization of receptors at the plasma membrane and the signaling pathways that control different phases of the extravasation process. PMID:19406069

  1. Interventional Transcatheter Closure Ameliorates the Leukocyte Rho Kinase Activities among Patients with Patent Ductus Arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Min-Ling; Liu, Ping-Yen; Wu, Jing-Ming; Liao, James K.; Wang, Jieh-Neng

    2015-01-01

    Background Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) causes increased pulmonary blood flow, which can lead to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) may play an important pathophysiological role in PAH. We hypothesized that the increased pulmonary artery (PA) flow from PDA could activate ROCK. Methods Patients who received a PDA transcatheter closure in our hospital were consecutively enrolled in this study. Basic demographics and clinical hemodynamic data of the study participants were recorded. Then, ROCK activity was measured before and after the PDA occlusion procedure. ROCK activity was defined as the phosphorylation ratio of myosin-binding subunit by Western blot measurement. We also sub-divided patients into the coil group and occluder group based on the occlusion device used in each patient’s procedure. Results From January 2009 to December 2011, 25 patients with a median age of 2.3 years, ranging from 10 months to 72 years were enrolled. The mean PDA size was 0.31 ± 0.14 cm, the mean Qp/Qs shunt was 1.54 ± 0.41, and the mean systolic pulmonary artery pressure was 26.9 ± 10.3 mmHg. There were 10 patients (one boy and nine girls) in the coil group and 15 patients (four boys and eleven girls) in the occluder group. Following the closure of the PDA, ROCK activity significantly decreased (1.78 ± 2.25 vs. 0.77 ± 0.69, p < 0.01). There was a strong correlation between the leukocyte ROCK activity with the systolic PA pressure (y = 5.4608x + 22.54, R2 = 0.5539, p < 0.05), but not the Qp/Qs value. Both subgroups showed significant changes of ROCK activity after the procedure. Interestingly, when comparing the coil group with the occluder group, the decrease in ROCK activity was more apparent in the occluder group. Conclusions The findings of this study indicated that ROCK activity is higher in patients with PDA and correlates with PA pressure. The decrease in ROCK activity following the device closure suggests

  2. The citrus flavonone naringenin reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory pain and leukocyte recruitment by inhibiting NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Zarpelon, Ana C; Mizokami, Sandra S; Borghi, Sergio M; Bordignon, Juliano; Silva, Rangel L; Cunha, Thiago M; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major structural component of Gram-negative bacteria cell wall and a highly pro-inflammatory toxin. Naringenin is found in Citrus fruits and exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties through inhibition of NF-κB activation but its effects in LPS-induced inflammatory pain and leukocyte recruitment were not investigated yet. We investigated the effects of naringenin in mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia and leukocyte recruitment induced by intraplantar injection of LPS in mice. We found that naringenin reduced hyperalgesia to mechanical and thermal stimuli, myeloperoxidase (MPO, a neutrophil and macrophage marker) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG, a macrophage marker) activities, oxidative stress and cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12) production in the paw skin. In the peritoneal cavity, naringenin reduced neutrophil and mononuclear cell recruitment, and abrogated MPO and NAG activity, cytokine and superoxide anion production, and lipid peroxidation. In vitro, pre-treatment with naringenin inhibited superoxide anion and cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12) production by LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Finally, we demonstrated that naringenin inhibited NF-κB activation in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, naringenin is a promising compound to treat LPS-induced inflammatory pain and leukocyte recruitment. PMID:27260463

  3. Leukocyte relaxation properties.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, K L; Dong, C; Schmid-Schönbein, G W; Chien, S; Skalak, R

    1988-01-01

    Study of the mechanical properties of leukocytes is useful to understand their passage through narrow capillaries and interaction with other cells. Leukocytes are known to be viscoelastic and their properties have been established by micropipette aspiration techniques. Here, the recovery of leukocytes to their normal spherical form is studied after prolonged deformation in a pipette which is large enough to permit complete entry of the leukocyte. The recovery history is characterized by the time history of the major diameter (d1) and minor diameter (d2). When the cell is removed from the pipette, it shows initially a small rapid recoil followed by a slower asymptotic recovery to the spherical shape. In the presence of cell activation and formation of pseudopods, the time history for recovery is prolonged compared with passive cell recovery. If a protopod pre-existed during the holding period, the recovery only begins when the protopod starts to retract. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3207829

  4. Nascent Integrin Adhesions Form on All Matrix Rigidities after Integrin Activation.

    PubMed

    Changede, Rishita; Xu, Xiaochun; Margadant, Felix; Sheetz, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Integrin adhesions assemble and mature in response to ligand binding and mechanical factors, but the molecular-level organization is not known. We report that ∼100-nm clusters of ∼50 β3-activated integrins form very early adhesions under a wide variety of conditions on RGD surfaces. These adhesions form similarly on fluid and rigid substrates, but most adhesions are transient on rigid substrates. Without talin or actin polymerization, few early adhesions form, but expression of either the talin head or rod domain in talin-depleted cells restores early adhesion formation. Mutation of the integrin binding site in the talin rod decreases cluster size. We suggest that the integrin clusters constitute universal early adhesions and that they are the modular units of cell matrix adhesions. They require the association of activated integrins with cytoplasmic proteins, in particular talin and actin, and cytoskeletal contraction on them causes adhesion maturation for cell motility and growth. PMID:26625956

  5. Increased activity of 5-lipoxygenase in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from asthmatic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Mita, H.; Yui, Y.; Taniguchi, N.; Yasueda, H.; Shida, T.

    1985-09-09

    The formation of 5-lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid, 5-HETE and 5,12-diHETE, was determined in 100,000 x g supernatant of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from 17 healthy subjects, 17 patients with extrinsic asthma and 15 patients with intrinsic asthma. After the supernatant was incubated with /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid in the presence of calcium and indomethacin, the lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid were separated by thin layer chromatography. The results were expressed as the percentage conversion of /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid into the product per 10/sup 7/ cells. The formation of 5,12-diHETE, but not of the 5-HETE, was significantly increased in the cells from the group of patients with extrinsic asthma (4.38 +/- 0.78%, mean +/- S.E.; p < 0.01) and intrinsic asthma (6.09 +/- 1.11%; p < 0.01), when compared to normal subjects (1.74 +/- 0.30%). Both extrinsic and intrinsic asthmatics had significantly enhanced 5-lipoxygenase activity, which was expressed as the sum of percentage conversion of /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid into 5-HETE and 5,12-diHETE. The percentage conversion in normal subjects was 4.19 +/- 0.39%, 6.24 +/- 0.84% for 17 patients with extrinsic asthma (p < 0.05), and 8.59 +/- 1.29% for 15 patients with intrinsic asthma (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference between these asthmatic groups. These results indicate that 5-lipoxygenase activity is increased in patients with bronchial asthma. 22 references, 3 figures.

  6. Cerebral nitric oxide represses choroid plexus NFκB-dependent gateway activity for leukocyte trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Baruch, Kuti; Kertser, Alexander; Porat, Ziv; Schwartz, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Chronic neuroinflammation is evident in brain aging and neurodegenerative disorders and is often associated with excessive nitric oxide (NO) production within the central nervous system (CNS). Under such conditions, increased NO levels are observed at the choroid plexus (CP), an epithelial layer that forms the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) and serves as a selective gateway for leukocyte entry to the CNS in homeostasis and following injury. Here, we hypothesized that elevated cerebral NO levels interfere with CP gateway activity. We found that induction of leukocyte trafficking determinants by the CP and sequential leukocyte entry to the CSF are dependent on the CP epithelial NFκB/p65 signaling pathway, which was inhibited upon exposure to NO. Examining the CP in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD-Tg) revealed impaired ability to mount an NFκB/p65-dependent response. Systemic administration of an NO scavenger in AD-Tg mice alleviated NFκB/p65 suppression at the CP and augmented its gateway activity. Together, our findings identify cerebral NO as a negative regulator of CP gateway activity for immune cell trafficking to the CNS. PMID:25940071

  7. Adhesive disbond detection using piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, William; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2015-04-01

    The aerospace industry continues to increase the use of adhesives for structural bonding due to the increased joint efficiency (reduced weight), even distribution of the load path and decreases in stress concentrations. However, the limited techniques for verifying the strength of adhesive bonds has reduced its use on primary structures and requires an intensive inspection schedule. This paper discusses a potential structural health monitoring (SHM) technique for the detection of disbonds through the in situ inspection of adhesive joints. This is achieved through the use of piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS), thin unobtrusive sensors which are permanently bonded to the aircraft structure. The detection method discussed in this study is electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS), a local vibration method. This method detects disbonds from the change in the mechanical impedance of the structure surrounding the disbond. This paper will discuss how predictive modeling can provide valuable insight into the inspection method, and provide better results than empirical methods alone. The inspection scheme was evaluated using the finite element method, and the results were verified experimentally using a large aluminum test article, and included both pristine and disbond coupons.

  8. Immunohistochemical analysis of adhesion molecules in airway biopsies.

    PubMed

    J Wilson, S; T Holgate, S

    2000-01-01

    Adhesion molecules are receptors found on the surface of leukocytes and endothelial cells, which bind to their ligands, either on other cells or on the extracellular matrix. The function of adhesion molecules is to allow leukocytes to interact with other hemopoetic cells or with foreign antigens (Ags) in the blood, to transiently adhere to the vascular endothelium, to migrate between endothelial cells and through the basement membrane into the surrounding tissue, and to adhere to the epithelium. There are three main groups of adhesion molecules: the integrins, immunoglobulin (Ig) supergene family, and the selectins: These are summarized in Table 1 (1-7). Table 1 Summary of Adhesion Molecules Group CD number Name Expressed on Ligand Integrins CD 49a VLA-1 T lymphocytes, fibroblasts, basement membrane Laminin, collagen B1 very late antigens CD 49b VLA-2 Activated T lymphocytes, platelets, fibroblasts, endothelium, epithelium Collagen, laminin CD 49c VLA-3 Epithelium, fibroblasts Laminin, collagen, fibronectin CD 49d VLA-4 Leukocytes, fibroblasts VCAM-1, fibronectin CD 49e VLA-5 Leukocytes, platelets, epithelium Fibronectin CD 49f VLA-6 T lymphocytes, platelets Laminin B2 leukocyte integrins CD 11a LFA-1 Leukocytes ICAM-1, ICAM-2, ICAM-3 CD 11b Mac-1 Macrophages, monocytes, granulocytes ICAM-1, fibrinogen, C3bi CD 11c p150.95 Macrophages, monocytes, granulocytes Fibrinogen, C3bi IG Supergene family CD 54 ICAM-1 Endothelium, leukocytes, epithelium LFA-1 Mac-1 CD 102 ICAM-2 Endothelium, leukocytes LFA-1 CD 106 VCAM-1 Endothelium, dendritic cells, tissue macrophages VLA-4 Selectins CD 62E E selectin Endothelium Sialyl Lewis x CD 62P P selectin Platelets, endothelium Sialyl Lewis x CD 62L L selectin Leukocytes Mannose-6-P, fructose-6-P. PMID:21312133

  9. Antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans strains and genotoxicity assessment in human leukocyte cells of Euphorbia tirucalli L

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Luís Flávio Souza; Fuentefria, Alexandre Meneghello; Klein, Fernanda da Silva; Machado, Michel Mansur

    2014-01-01

    In the last times, focus on plant research has increased all over the world. Euphorbia tirucalli L., a plant known popularly as Aveloz, and originally used in Africa, has been drawing attention for its use in the United States and Latin America, both for use as an ornamental plant and as a medicinal plant. E. tirucalli L. is a member of the family Euphorbiaceae and contains many diterpenoids and triterpenoids, in particular phorbol esters, apparently the main constituent of this plant, which are assumed to be responsible for their activities in vivo and in vitro. The in vitro antifungal activities of Euphorbia tirucalli (L.) against opportunistic yeasts were studied using microbroth dilution assay. The results showed that aqueous extract and latex preparation were effective against ten clinical strains of Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro (Latex and extract MIC range of 3.2 – > 411 μg/mL). Aiming the safe use in humans, the genotoxic effects of E. tirucalli were evaluated in human leukocytes cells. Our data show that both aqueous extract and latex preparation have no genotoxic effect in human leukocytes cells in vitro. Although the results cannot be extrapolated by itself for use in vivo, they suggest a good perspective for a therapeutic application in future. In conclusion, our results show that the aqueous extract and latex preparation from E. tirucalli L. are antifungal agents effectives against several strains of C. neoformans and do not provoke DNA damage in human leukocyte cells, considering the concentrations tested. PMID:25763040

  10. Trans-Serosal Leakage of Proinflammatory Mediators during Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Role of Phospholipase A2 in Activating Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Gut barrier failure and the resultant translocation of luminal bacteria and bacterial products into the systemic circulation have been proposed as pathogenic mechanisms of multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Our study aimed to demonstrate the direct release of gut-derived inflammatory mediators via the trans-serosal route in humans. Fifteen patients who underwent elective infrarenal open repair of AAA were randomized into two groups. In Group I patients (n = 10), the small intestine was exteriorized into a bowel bag. In Group II patients (n = 5), the small intestine was packed within the peritoneal cavity using large gauzes. We collected the bowel bag fluid in Group I and the ascites fluid, squeezed out from the gauzes at the end of surgery, in Group II. Leukocytes were collected from patients' blood samples. Incubation with the bowel bag fluid and ascites fluid caused a significant increase in both granulocyte pseudopod formation and CD11b expression compared to that with control fluid (p < 0.01). The addition of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor quinacrine abolished leukocyte activation by the bowel bag fluid. Based on these results, we consider that trasns-serosal leakage of gut-derived mediators occurred during the open repair of AAA; further, sPLA2 may be the most potent mediator in the activation of leukocytes among such gut-derived mediators in AAA surgery. PMID:23555400

  11. A small molecule, orally active, α4β1/α4β7 dual antagonist reduces leukocyte infiltration and airway hyper-responsiveness in an experimental model of allergic asthma in Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Cortijo, Julio; Sanz, María-Jesús; Iranzo, Arantxa; Montesinos, José Luis; Nabah, Yafa Naim Abu; Alfón, José; Gómez, Luis A; Merlos, Manuel; Morcillo, Esteban J

    2006-01-01

    α4β1 and α4β7 integrins are preferentially expressed on eosinophils and mononuclear leukocytes and play critical roles in their recruitment to inflammatory sites. We investigated the effects of TR14035, a small molecule, α4β1/α4β7 dual antagonist, in a rat model of allergic asthma. Actively sensitized rats were challenged with aerosol antigen or saline on day 21, and the responses evaluated 24 and 48-h later. TR14035 (3 mg kg−1, p.o.) was given 1-h before and 4-h after antigen or saline challenge. Airway hyper-responsiveness to intravenous 5-hydroxytryptamine was suppressed in TR14035-treated rats. Eosinophil, mononuclear cell and neutrophil counts, and eosinophil peroxidase and protein content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were decreased in TR14035-treated rats. Histological study showed a marked reduction of lung inflammatory lesions by TR14035. At 24-h postchallenge, antigen-induced lung interleukin (IL)-5 mRNA upregulation was suppressed in TR14035-treated rats. By contrast, IL-4 levels in BALF were not significantly affected by TR14035 treatment. IL-4 selectively upregulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), which is the main endothelial ligand of α4 integrins. Intravital microscopy within the rat mesenteric microcirculation showed that 24-h exposure to 1 μg per rat of IL-4 induced a significant increase in leukocyte rolling flux, adhesion and emigration. These responses were decreased by 48, 100 and 99%, respectively in animals treated with TR14035. In conclusion, TR14035, by acting on α4β1 and α4β7 integrins, is an orally active inhibitor of airway leukocyte recruitment and hyper-responsiveness in animal models with potential interest for the treatment of asthma. PMID:16432509

  12. Anandamide inhibits Theiler's virus induced VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells and reduces leukocyte transmigration in a model of blood brain barrier by activation of CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background VCAM-1 represents one of the most important adhesion molecule involved in the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that is an essential step in the pathogenesis of MS. Several evidences have suggested the potential therapeutic value of cannabinoids (CBs) in the treatment of MS and their experimental models. However, the effects of endocannabinoids on VCAM-1 regulation are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of anandamide (AEA) in the regulation of VCAM-1 expression induced by Theiler's virus (TMEV) infection of brain endothelial cells using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Methods i) in vitro: VCAM-1 was measured by ELISA in supernatants of brain endothelial cells infected with TMEV and subjected to AEA and/or cannabinoid receptors antagonist treatment. To evaluate the functional effect of VCAM-1 modulation we developed a blood brain barrier model based on a system of astrocytes and brain endothelial cells co-culture. ii) in vivo: CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-) infected with TMEV were treated with the AEA uptake inhibitor UCM-707 for three days. VCAM-1 expression and microglial reactivity were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results Anandamide-induced inhibition of VCAM-1 expression in brain endothelial cell cultures was mediated by activation of CB1 receptors. The study of leukocyte transmigration confirmed the functional relevance of VCAM-1 inhibition by AEA. In vivo approaches also showed that the inhibition of AEA uptake reduced the expression of brain VCAM-1 in response to TMEV infection. Although a decreased expression of VCAM-1 by UCM-707 was observed in both, wild type and CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-), the magnitude of VCAM-1 inhibition was significantly higher in the wild type mice. Interestingly, Cnr1-/- mice showed enhanced microglial reactivity and VCAM-1 expression following TMEV infection, indicating that the lack of CB1 receptor exacerbated

  13. The role of platelets in the recruitment of leukocytes during vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ed Rainger, G.; Chimen, Myriam; Harrison, Matthew J.; Yates, Clara M.; Harrison, Paul; Watson, Stephen P.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Nash, Gerard B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Besides their role in the formation of thrombus during haemostasis, it is becoming clear that platelets contribute to a number of other processes within the vasculature. Indeed, the integrated function of the thrombotic and inflammatory systems, which results in platelet-mediated recruitment of leukocytes, is now considered to be of great importance in the propagation, progression and pathogenesis of atherosclerotic disease of the arteries. There are three scenarios by which platelets can interact with leukocytes: (1) during haemostasis, when platelets adhere to and are activated on sub-endothelial matrix proteins exposed by vascular damage and then recruit leukocytes to a growing thrombus. (2) Platelets adhere to and are activated on stimulated endothelial cells and then bridge blood borne leukocytes to the vessel wall and. (3) Adhesion between platelets and leukocytes occurs in the blood leading to formation of heterotypic aggregates prior to contact with endothelial cells. In the following review we will not discuss leukocyte recruitment during haemostasis, as this represents a physiological response to tissue trauma that can progress, at least in its early stages, in the absence of inflammation. Rather we will deal with scenarios 2 and 3, as these pathways of platelet–leukocyte interactions are important during inflammation and in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Indeed, these interactions mean that leukocytes possess means of adhesion to the vessel wall under conditions that may not normally be permissive of leukocyte–endothelial cell adhesion, meaning that the disease process may be able to bypass the regulatory pathways which would ordinarily moderate the inflammatory response. PMID:26196409

  14. Effect of rubber flooring on leukocyte activation during the peripartuient period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of 2 dairy cow housing systems on innate immune status during the peri-parturient period. Leukocyte counts, phagocytic ability and neutrophil and monocyte differentiation were examined. Cows were assigned to free-stall housing with either rubber (RUB; n=13) or...

  15. Brain endothelial miR-146a negatively modulates T-cell adhesion through repressing multiple targets to inhibit NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dongsheng; Cerutti, Camilla; Lopez-Ramirez, Miguel A; Pryce, Gareth; King-Robson, Josh; Simpson, Julie E; van der Pol, Susanne Ma; Hirst, Mark C; de Vries, Helga E; Sharrack, Basil; Baker, David; Male, David K; Michael, Gregory J; Romero, Ignacio A

    2015-03-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced activation of nuclear factor, NF-κB has an important role in leukocyte adhesion to, and subsequent migration across, brain endothelial cells (BECs), which is crucial for the development of neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In contrast, microRNA-146a (miR-146a) has emerged as an anti-inflammatory molecule by inhibiting NF-κB activity in various cell types, but its effect in BECs during neuroinflammation remains to be evaluated. Here, we show that miR-146a was upregulated in microvessels of MS-active lesions and the spinal cord of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In vitro, TNFα and IFNγ treatment of human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) led to upregulation of miR-146a. Brain endothelial overexpression of miR-146a diminished, whereas knockdown of miR-146a augmented cytokine-stimulated adhesion of T cells to hCMEC/D3 cells, nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and expression of adhesion molecules in hCMEC/D3 cells. Furthermore, brain endothelial miR-146a modulates NF-κB activity upon cytokine activation through targeting two novel signaling transducers, RhoA and nuclear factor of activated T cells 5, as well as molecules previously identified, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1, and TNF receptor-associated factor 6. We propose brain endothelial miR-146a as an endogenous NF-κB inhibitor in BECs associated with decreased leukocyte adhesion during neuroinflammation. PMID:25515214

  16. Brain endothelial miR-146a negatively modulates T-cell adhesion through repressing multiple targets to inhibit NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongsheng; Cerutti, Camilla; Lopez-Ramirez, Miguel A; Pryce, Gareth; King-Robson, Josh; Simpson, Julie E; van der Pol, Susanne MA; Hirst, Mark C; de Vries, Helga E; Sharrack, Basil; Baker, David; Male, David K; Michael, Gregory J; Romero, Ignacio A

    2015-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced activation of nuclear factor, NF-κB has an important role in leukocyte adhesion to, and subsequent migration across, brain endothelial cells (BECs), which is crucial for the development of neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In contrast, microRNA-146a (miR-146a) has emerged as an anti-inflammatory molecule by inhibiting NF-κB activity in various cell types, but its effect in BECs during neuroinflammation remains to be evaluated. Here, we show that miR-146a was upregulated in microvessels of MS-active lesions and the spinal cord of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In vitro, TNFα and IFNγ treatment of human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) led to upregulation of miR-146a. Brain endothelial overexpression of miR-146a diminished, whereas knockdown of miR-146a augmented cytokine-stimulated adhesion of T cells to hCMEC/D3 cells, nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and expression of adhesion molecules in hCMEC/D3 cells. Furthermore, brain endothelial miR-146a modulates NF-κB activity upon cytokine activation through targeting two novel signaling transducers, RhoA and nuclear factor of activated T cells 5, as well as molecules previously identified, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1, and TNF receptor-associated factor 6. We propose brain endothelial miR-146a as an endogenous NF-κB inhibitor in BECs associated with decreased leukocyte adhesion during neuroinflammation. PMID:25515214

  17. Oxygenator Is the Main Responsible for Leukocyte Activation in Experimental Model of Extracorporeal Circulation: A Cautionary Tale

    PubMed Central

    Rungatscher, Alessio; Tessari, Maddalena; Stranieri, Chiara; Solani, Erika; Linardi, Daniele; Milani, Elisabetta; Montresor, Alessio; Merigo, Flavia; Salvetti, Beatrice; Menon, Tiziano

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess mechanisms underlying inflammatory activation during extracorporeal circulation (ECC), several small animal models of ECC have been proposed recently. The majority of them are based on home-made, nonstandardized, and hardly reproducible oxygenators. The present study has generated fundamental information on the role of oxygenator of ECC in activating inflammatory signaling pathways on leukocytes, leading to systemic inflammatory response, and organ dysfunction. The present results suggest that experimental animal models of ECC used in translational research on inflammatory response should be based on standardized, reproducible oxygenators with clinical characteristics. PMID:26063972

  18. Activation of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhances monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Kun . E-mail: leedk@memorialhealthsource.com; Nathan Grantham, R.; Trachte, Aaron L.; Mannion, John D.; Wilson, Colleen L.

    2006-08-18

    Monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium has been reported to be one of the early processes in the development of atherosclerosis. In an attempt to develop strategies to prevent or delay atherosclerosis progression, we analyzed effects of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway on monocyte adhesion to various human endothelial cells. Adhesion of fluorescein-labeled monocytes to various human endothelial cells was analyzed under a fluorescent microscope. Unlike sodium chloride, lithium chloride enhanced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3{beta} or proteosome enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Results of semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway did not change expression levels of mRNA for adhesion molecules. In conclusion, the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion without changing expression levels of adhesion molecules.

  19. Theileria induces oxidative stress and HIF1α activation that are essential for host leukocyte transformation.

    PubMed

    Medjkane, S; Perichon, M; Marsolier, J; Dairou, J; Weitzman, J B

    2014-04-01

    Complex links between infection and cancer suggest that we still can learn much about tumorigenesis by studying how infectious agents hijack the host cell machinery. We studied the effects of an intracellular parasite called Theileria that infects bovine leukocytes and turns them into invasive cancer-like cells. We investigated the host cells pathways that are deregulated in infected leukocytes and might link infection and lymphoproliferative disease. We show that intracellular Theileria parasites drive a Warburg-like phenotype in infected host leukocytes, characterized by increased expression of metabolic regulators, increased glucose uptake and elevated lactate production, which were lost when the parasite was eliminated. The cohabitation of the parasites within the host cells leads to disruption of the redox balance (as measured by reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio) and elevated ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels, associated with chronic stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1α). Inhibition of HIF1α (pharmacologically or genetically), or treatment with antioxidants, led to a marked reduction in expression of aerobic glycolytic genes and inhibited the transformed phenotype. These data show that stabilization of HIF1α, following increased ROS production, modulates host glucose metabolism and is critical for parasite-induced transformation. Our study expands knowledge about the molecular strategy used by the parasite Theileria to induce the transformed phenotypes of infected cells via reprogramming of glucose metabolism and redox signaling. PMID:23665677

  20. Location and activity of ulcerative and Crohn's colitis by /sup 111/In leukocyte scan. A prospective comparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, D.T.; Gray, G.M.; Gregory, P.B.; Anderson, M.; Goodwin, D.A.; McDougall, I.R.

    1983-02-01

    A prospective blinded study comparing the /sup 111/In leukocyte scan to barium enema, colonoscopy, or surgery or a combination of these, was carried out in 15 patients (10 with active ulcerative colitis and 5 with active Crohn's colitis). Correlation of disease location to colonic regions between indium scan and other diagnostic studies was excellent in 11 instances, good in 2, and poor in 3. In 2 of the 3 studies where major disagreement occurred, the comparative barium enema was performed greater than 2 mo after the indium scan. Disease activity, estimated by the intensity of radionuclide uptake, was compared to clinical disease activity assessed by the Crohn's Disease Activity Index for both forms of colitis. The relative degree of inflammation estimated by the indium scan correlated well with the independent clinical assessment (correlation coefficient . 0.81). The indium 111 leukocyte scan appears to be an accurate, noninvasive method for assessing the extent and the severity of the inflammation in patients with acute ulcerative or Crohn's colitis.

  1. Light-triggered in vivo activation of adhesive peptides regulates cell adhesion, inflammation and vascularization of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta I.; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; Del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2015-03-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have recently been realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell-adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials.

  2. Light-triggered in vivo activation of adhesive peptides regulates cell adhesion, inflammation and vascularization of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ted T; García, José R; Paez, Julieta I; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; Del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J

    2015-03-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have recently been realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell-adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials. PMID:25502097

  3. Light-triggered in vivo Activation of Adhesive Peptides Regulates Cell Adhesion, Inflammation and Vascularization of Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2014-01-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have been recently realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials. PMID:25502097

  4. Halloysite Nanotube Coatings Suppress Leukocyte Spreading.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew D; Marsh, Graham; Waugh, Richard E; Foster, David G; King, Michael R

    2015-12-22

    The nanoscale topography of adhesive surfaces is known to be an important factor governing cellular behavior. Previous work has shown that surface coatings composed of halloysite nanotubes enhance the adhesion, and therefore capture of, rare target cells such as circulating tumor cells. Here we demonstrate a unique feature of these coatings in their ability to reduce the adhesion of leukocytes and prevent leukocyte spreading. Surfaces were prepared with coatings of halloysite nanotubes and functionalized for leukocyte adhesion with E-selectin, and the dilution of nanotube concentration revealed a threshold concentration below which cell spreading became comparable to smooth surfaces. Evaluation of surface roughness characteristics determined that the average distance between discrete surface features correlated with adhesion metrics, with a separation distance of ∼2 μm identified as the critical threshold. Computational modeling of the interaction of leukocytes with halloysite nanotube-coated surfaces of varying concentrations demonstrates that the geometry of the cell surface and adhesive counter-surface produces a significantly diminished effective contact area compared to a leukocyte interacting with a smooth surface. PMID:26605493

  5. Leukocyte biophysics. An invited review.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Schönbein, G W

    1990-10-01

    The biophysical properties of leukocytes in the passive and active state are discussed. In the passive unstressed state, leukocytes are spherical with numerous membrane folds. Passive leukocytes exhibit viscoelastic properties, and the stress is carried largely by the cell cytoplasm and the nucleus. The membrane is highly deformable in shearing and bending, but resists area expansion. Membrane tension can usually be neglected but plays a role in cases of large deformation when the membrane becomes unfolded. The constant membrane area constraint is a determinant of phagocytic capacity, spreading of cells, and passage through narrow pores. In the active state, leukocytes undergo large internal cytoplasmic deformation, pseudopod projection, and granule redistribution. Several different measurements for assessment of biophysical properties and the internal cytoplasmic deformation in form of strain and strain rate tensors are presented. The current theoretical models for active cytoplasmic motion in leukocytes are discussed in terms of specific macromolecular reactions. PMID:1705479

  6. Membrane-associated CD93 regulates leukocyte migration and C1q-hemolytic activity during murine peritonitis1

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee-Wacker, Mallary C.; Briseño, Carlos; Galvan, Manuel; Moriel, Gabriela; Velázquez, Peter; Bohlson, Suzanne S.

    2011-01-01

    CD93 is emerging as a novel regulator of inflammation; however, its molecular function is unknown. CD93 exists as a membrane-associated glycoprotein on the surface of cells involved in the inflammatory cascade, including endothelial and myeloid cells. A soluble form (sCD93) is detectable in blood and is elevated with inflammation. Here we demonstrate heightened susceptibility to thioglycollate-induced peritonitis in CD93−/− mice. CD93−/− mice showed a 1.6 to 1.8-fold increase in leukocyte infiltration during thioglycollate-induced peritonitis between 3 and 24 hours that returned to wildtype levels by 96 hours. Impaired vascular integrity in CD93−/− mice during peritonitis was demonstrated using fluorescence multi-photon intravital microscopy; however, no differences in cytokine or chemokine levels were detected by Luminex Multiplex or ELISA analysis. C1q-hemolytic activity in CD93−/− mice was decreased by 22% at time zero and by 46% 3 hours post thioglycollate injection suggesting a defect in the classical complement pathway. Leukocyte recruitment and C1q-hemolytic activity was restored to wildtype levels when CD93 was expressed on either hematopoietic cells or non-hematopoietic cells in bone marrow chimeric mice. However, elevated levels of sCD93 in inflammatory fluid were observed only when CD93 was expressed on non-hematopoietic cells. Since cell-associated CD93 was sufficient to restore a normal inflammatory response, these data suggest that cell-associated CD93, and not sCD93, regulates leukocyte recruitment and complement activation during murine peritonitis. PMID:21849679

  7. Membrane-associated CD93 regulates leukocyte migration and C1q-hemolytic activity during murine peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Greenlee-Wacker, Mallary C; Briseño, Carlos; Galvan, Manuel; Moriel, Gabriela; Velázquez, Peter; Bohlson, Suzanne S

    2011-09-15

    CD93 is emerging as a novel regulator of inflammation; however, its molecular function is unknown. CD93 exists as a membrane-associated glycoprotein on the surface of cells involved in the inflammatory cascade, including endothelial and myeloid cells. A soluble form (sCD93) is detectable in blood and is elevated with inflammation. In this study, we demonstrate heightened susceptibility to thioglycollate-induced peritonitis in CD93(-/-) mice. CD93(-/-) mice showed a 1.6-1.8-fold increase in leukocyte infiltration during thioglycollate-induced peritonitis between 3 and 24 h that returned to wild type levels by 96 h. Impaired vascular integrity in CD93(-/-) mice during peritonitis was demonstrated using fluorescence multiphoton intravital microscopy; however, no differences in cytokine or chemokine levels were detected with Luminex Multiplex or ELISA analysis. C1q-hemolytic activity in CD93(-/-) mice was decreased by 22% at time zero and by 46% 3 h after thioglycollate injection, suggesting a defect in the classical complement pathway. Leukocyte recruitment and C1q-hemolytic activity was restored to wild type levels when CD93 was expressed on either hematopoietic cells or nonhematopoietic cells in bone marrow chimeric mice. However, elevated levels of sCD93 in inflammatory fluid were observed only when CD93 was expressed on nonhematopoietic cells. Because cell-associated CD93 was sufficient to restore a normal inflammatory response, these data suggest that cell-associated CD93, and not sCD93, regulates leukocyte recruitment and complement activation during murine peritonitis. PMID:21849679

  8. Recent insights into endothelial control of leukocyte extravasation.

    PubMed

    Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    In the process of leukocyte migration from the circulation across the vascular wall, the crosstalk with endothelial cells that line the blood vessels is essential. It is now firmly established that in endothelial cells important signaling events are initiated upon leukocyte adhesion that impinge on the regulation of cell-cell contact and control the efficiency of transendothelial migration. In addition, several external factors such as shear force and vascular stiffness were recently identified as important regulators of endothelial signaling and, consequently, leukocyte transmigration. Here, I review recent insights into endothelial signaling events that are linked to leukocyte migration across the vessel wall. In this field, protein phosphorylation and Rho-mediated cytoskeletal dynamics are still widely studied using increasingly sophisticated mouse models. In addition, activation of tyrosine phosphatases, changes in endothelial cell stiffness as well as different vascular beds have all been established as important factors in endothelial signaling and leukocyte transmigration. Finally, I address less-well-studied but interesting components in the endothelium that also control transendothelial migration, such as the ephrins and their Eph receptors, that provide novel insights in the complexity associated with this process. PMID:26794844

  9. Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) Is an Endogenous Activator of the MMP-9 Secreted by Placental Leukocytes: Implication in Human Labor

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Pliego, Arturo; Espejel-Nuñez, Aurora; Castillo-Castrejon, Marisol; Meraz-Cruz, Noemi; Beltran-Montoya, Jorge; Zaga-Clavellina, Veronica; Nava-Salazar, Sonia; Sanchez-Martinez, Maribel; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Estrada-Gutierrez, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    Background The activity of matrix degrading enzymes plays a leading role in the rupture of the fetal membranes under normal and pathological human labor, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) it is considered a biomarker of this event. To gain further insight into local MMP-9 origin and activation, in this study we analyzed the contribution of human placental leukocytes to MMP-9 secretion and explored the local mechanisms of the pro-enzyme activation. Methods Placental blood leukocytes were obtained from women at term gestation without labor and maintained in culture up to 72 h. MMP-9 activity in the culture supernatants was determined by zymography and using a specific substrate. The presence of a potential pro-MMP-9 activator in the culture supernatants was monitored using a recombinant biotin-labeled human pro-MMP-9. To characterize the endogenous pro-MMP-9 activator, MMP-1, -3, -7 and -9 were measured by multiplex assay in the supernatants, and an inhibition assay of MMP-9 activation was performed using an anti-human MMP-3 and a specific MMP-3 inhibitor. Finally, production of MMP-9 and MMP-3 in placental leukocytes obtained from term pregnancies with and without labor was assessed by immunofluorescence. Results Placental leukocytes spontaneously secreted pro-MMP-9 after 24 h of culture, increasing significantly at 48 h (P≤0.05), when the active form of MMP-9 was detected. Culture supernatants activated the recombinant pro-MMP-9 showing that placental leukocytes secrete the activator. A significant increase in MMP-3 secretion by placental leukocytes was observed since 48 h in culture (P≤0.05) and up to 72 h (P≤0.001), when concentration reached its maximum value. Specific activity of MMP-9 decreased significantly (P≤0.005) when an anti-MMP-3 antibody or a specific MMP-3 inhibitor were added to the culture media. Placental leukocytes from term labor produced more MMP-9 and MMP-3 compared to term non-labor cells. Conclusions In this work we confirm that

  10. Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) induces differential leukocyte accumulation in mice genetically selected for acute inflammatory reaction: the role of host genetic background on expression of adhesion molecules and release of endogenous mediators.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Adriana S; Ribeiro, Orlando G; Cabrera, Wafa H K; Vorraro, Francisca; De Franco, Marcelo; Ibañez, Olga M; Starobinas, Nancy

    2008-10-01

    The dynamics of the local inflammatory events induced by Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) inoculation in footpad of mice genetically selected for maximal (AIRmax) and minimal (AIRmin) acute inflammatory reactivity (AIR) was investigated. The BjV injection induced a marked inflammatory cell infiltrate with predominance of neutrophils, with increased blood cell numbers before its accumulation, suggesting a stimulatory action of BjV on mechanisms of cell mobilization from bone marrow. The process of cell migration is regulated by different cell-adhesion molecules (CAM). Our results showed that neutrophil cells from both lines had the same pattern of response concerning CAMs expression, presenting the involvement of l-selectin, Mac-1 and PECAM-1 adhesion molecules in BjV-induced neutrophil accumulation. The effect of BjV on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines related with cellular migration was also studied and IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha and MIP-2 levels could be detected after venom injection. The AIRmax mice were shown to be more responsive than AIRmin with respect to leukocyte influx, expression of MIP-2 and release of IL-1beta and IL-6. These results demonstrate the importance of host genetic background in the local response and the involvement of alleles accumulated in AIRmax mice in the inflammatory events induced by BjV. PMID:18723041

  11. Modulation of Toll-Like Receptor Activity by Leukocyte Ig-Like Receptors and Their Effects during Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pilsbury, Louise E.; Allen, Rachel L.; Vordermeier, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a potent trigger for inflammatory immune responses. Without tight regulation their activation could lead to pathology, so it is imperative to extend our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that govern TLR expression and function. One family of immunoregulatory proteins which can provide a balancing effect on TLR activity are the Leukocyte Ig-like receptors (LILRs), which act as innate immune receptors for self-proteins. Here we describe the LILR family, their inhibitory effect on TLR activity in cells of the monocytic lineage, their signalling pathway, and their antimicrobial effects during bacterial infection. Agents have already been identified which enhances or inhibits LILR activity raising the future possibility that modulation of LILR function could be used as a means to modulate TLR activity. PMID:20634939

  12. Factor Associated with Neutral Sphingomyelinase Activity Mediates Navigational Capacity of Leukocytes Responding to Wounds and Infection: Live Imaging Studies in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Boecke, Alexandra; Sieger, Dirk; Neacsu, Cristian Dan; Kashkar, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Factor associated with neutral sphingomyelinase activity (FAN) is an adaptor protein that specifically binds to the p55 receptor for TNF (TNF-RI). Our previous investigations demonstrated that FAN plays a role in TNF-induced actin reorganization by connecting the plasma membrane with actin cytoskeleton, suggesting that FAN may impact on cellular motility in response to TNF and in the context of immune inflammatory conditions. In this study, we used the translucent zebrafish larvae for in vivo analysis of leukocyte migration after morpholino knockdown of FAN. FAN-deficient zebrafish leukocytes were impaired in their migration toward tail fin wounds, leading to a reduced number of cells reaching the wound. Furthermore, FAN-deficient leukocytes show an impaired response to bacterial infections, suggesting that FAN is generally required for the directed chemotactic response of immune cells independent of the nature of the stimulus. Cell-tracking analysis up to 3 h after injury revealed that the reduced number of leukocytes is not due to a reduction in random motility or speed of movement. Leukocytes from FAN-deficient embryos protrude pseudopodia in all directions instead of having one clear leading edge. Our results suggest that FAN-deficient leukocytes exhibit an impaired navigational capacity, leading to a disrupted chemotactic response. PMID:22802420

  13. Static Adhesion Assay for the Study of Integrin Activation in T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Strazza, Marianne; Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Pedoeem, Ariel; Mor, Adam

    2014-01-01

    T lymphocyte adhesion is required for multiple T cell functions, including migration to sites of inflammation and formation of immunological synapses with antigen presenting cells. T cells accomplish regulated adhesion by controlling the adhesive properties of integrins, a class of cell adhesion molecules consisting of heterodimeric pairs of transmembrane proteins that interact with target molecules on partner cells or extracellular matrix. The most prominent T cell integrin is lymphocyte function associated antigen (LFA)-1, composed of subunits αL and β2, whose target is the intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. The ability of a T cell to control adhesion derives from the ability to regulate the affinity states of individual integrins. Inside-out signaling describes the process whereby signals inside a cell cause the external domains of integrins to assume an activated state. Much of our knowledge of these complex phenomena is based on mechanistic studies performed in simplified in vitro model systems. The T lymphocyte adhesion assay described here is an excellent tool that allows T cells to adhere to target molecules, under static conditions, and then utilizes a fluorescent plate reader to quantify adhesiveness. This assay has been useful in defining adhesion-stimulatory or inhibitory substances that act on lymphocytes, as well as characterizing the signaling events involved. Although described here for LFA-1 - ICAM-1 mediated adhesion; this assay can be readily adapted to allow for the study of other adhesive interactions (e.g. VLA-4 - fibronectin). PMID:24961998

  14. Actin polymerization stabilizes α4β1 integrin anchors that mediate monocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Henry; Hyduk, Sharon J.; Wong, Janice C.; Digby, Genevieve; Arora, Pamma D.; Cano, Adrianet Puig; Hartwig, John; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Leukocytes arrested on inflamed endothelium via integrins are subjected to force imparted by flowing blood. How leukocytes respond to this force and resist detachment is poorly understood. Live-cell imaging with Lifeact-transfected U937 cells revealed that force triggers actin polymerization at upstream α4β1 integrin adhesion sites and the adjacent cortical cytoskeleton. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that this culminates in the formation of structures that anchor monocyte adhesion. Inhibition of actin polymerization resulted in cell deformation, displacement, and detachment. Transfection of dominant-negative constructs and inhibition of function or expression revealed key signaling steps required for upstream actin polymerization and adhesion stabilization. These included activation of Rap1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ isoform, and Rac but not Cdc42. Thus, rapid signaling and structural adaptations enable leukocytes to stabilize adhesion and resist detachment forces. PMID:22472442

  15. RNAi targeting multiple cell adhesion molecules reduces immune cell recruitment and vascular inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sager, Hendrik B; Dutta, Partha; Dahlman, James E; Hulsmans, Maarten; Courties, Gabriel; Sun, Yuan; Heidt, Timo; Vinegoni, Claudio; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Khan, Omar F; Kauffman, Kevin J; Xing, Yiping; Shaw, Taylor E; Libby, Peter; Langer, Robert; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K; Anderson, Daniel G; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to a systemic surge of vascular inflammation in mice and humans, resulting in secondary ischemic complications and high mortality. We show that, in ApoE(-/-) mice with coronary ligation, increased sympathetic tone up-regulates not only hematopoietic leukocyte production but also plaque endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. To counteract the resulting arterial leukocyte recruitment, we developed nanoparticle-based RNA interference (RNAi) that effectively silences five key adhesion molecules. Simultaneously encapsulating small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting intercellular cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (Icam1 and Icam2), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (Vcam1), and E- and P-selectins (Sele and Selp) into polymeric endothelial-avid nanoparticles reduced post-MI neutrophil and monocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions and decreased matrix-degrading plaque protease activity. Five-gene combination RNAi also curtailed leukocyte recruitment to ischemic myocardium. Therefore, targeted multigene silencing may prevent complications after acute MI. PMID:27280687

  16. Fish Oil and Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis: Inhibitory Effect on Leukocyte Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Estevão-Silva, Camila Fernanda; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Silva-Comar, Francielli Maria de Souza; Kummer, Raquel; Tronco, Rafael Prizon; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2016-02-01

    Fish oil, a rich source of n-3 fatty acids, has been studied for its beneficial effects in many diseases. Recent studies have shown the robust anti-inflammatory activity of fish oil (FO), when administered orally to rats, in models of acute inflammation. Herein, we investigated if treatment with fish oil preparation (FOP) could interfere with the recruitment of leukocytes into the joint cavity of arthritic rats. We also evaluated the effect of treatment on rolling behavior and leukocyte adhesion in vivo and on leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro. Treatment with FOP (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg) initiated on the day of induction of arthritis (day 0) and maintained for 21 days reduced the total number of leukocytes recruited into the joint cavity, the number of rolling and adhered leukocytes in arthritic rats, and leukocyte migration in response to stimulation with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Together, our data provide evidence that FOP plays an important inhibitory role in the recruitment of leukocytes into the joint cavity of arthritic rats. PMID:26378008

  17. Superoxide production by phagocytic leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Karnovsky, M L

    1975-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytic leukocytes, as well as polymorphonuclear leukocytes, produce and release superoxide at rest, and this is stimulated by phagocytosis. Of the mouse monocytic cells studied, alveolar macrophages released the largest amounts of superoxide during phagocytosis, followed by normal peritoneal macrophages. Casein-elicited and "activated" macrophages released smaller quantities. In the guinea pig, polymorphonuclear leukocytes and casein-elicited macrophages were shown to release superoxide during phagocytosis whereas alveolar macrophages did not. Superoxide release accounted for only a small fraction of the respiratory burst of phagocytosis in all but the normal mouse peritoneal macrophage, the guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocyte, and probably the mouse alveolar macrophage. There are obviously considerable species differences in O2-release by various leukocytes that might reflect both the production and/or destruction (e.g. by dismutase) of that substance. PMID:804030

  18. Differential effects of anti-TNF-α and anti-IL-12/23 agents on human leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Navarro, Cesar; de Pablo, Carmen; Collado-Diaz, Víctor; Orden, Samuel; Blas-Garcia, Ana; Martínez-Cuesta, María Ángeles; Esplugues, Juan V; Alvarez, Angeles

    2015-10-15

    Enhanced leukocyte recruitment is an inflammatory process that occurs during early phases of the vascular dysfunction that characterises atherosclerosis. We evaluated the impact of anti-TNF-α (adalimumab, infliximab and etanercept) and anti-IL-12/23 (ustekinumab) on interactions between human leukocytes and endothelial cells in a flow chamber that reproduced in vivo conditions. Clinical concentrations of anti-TNF-α were evaluated on the leukocyte recruitment induced by a variety of endothelial (TNF-α, interleukin-1β, lymphotoxin-α and angiotensin-II) and leukocyte (PAF, IL-12 and IL-23) stimuli related to inflammation and atherosclerosis. Treatment with anti-TNF-α, even before or after establishing the inflammatory situation induced by TNF-α, diminished leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions induced by this stimuli. Our results also implicated adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin) in the actions of anti-TNF-α in terms of leukocyte adhesion to endothelium. However, anti-TNF-α drugs did not influence the actions of interleukin-1β, but prevented those of lymphotoxin-α and angiotensin-II. However, once established, inflammatory response elicited by the latter three stimuli could not be reversed. Pre-treatment with anti-TNF-α, also prevented leukocyte actions induced by IL-23 on PBMC rolling flux and rolling velocity and by IL-12 on PMN adhesion. Ustekinumab exhibited a more discreet profile, having no effect on leukocyte recruitment induced by any of the endothelial stimuli, while blocking the effects of IL-23 on leukocyte activation and those of IL-12 on PMN adhesion and PAF on PBMC rolling velocity. These findings endorse the idea that biological anti-inflammatory drugs, in particular anti-TNF-α, have the capacity to influence cardiovascular risk accompanying psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis by ameliorating vascular inflammation. PMID:26344475

  19. In Vivo Chemoprotective Activity of Bovine Dialyzable Leukocyte Extract in Mouse Bone Marrow Cells against Damage Induced by 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Coronado-Cerda, Erika Evangelina; Franco-Molina, Moisés Armides; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Prado-García, Heriberto; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Zapata-Benavides, Pablo; Rodríguez-Salazar, María del Carmen; Caballero-Hernandez, Diana; Tamez-Guerra, Reyes Silvestre; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy treatments induce a number of side effects, such as leukopenia neutropenia, peripheral erythropenia, and thrombocytopenia, affecting the quality of life for cancer patients. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is wieldy used as myeloablative model in mice. The bovine dialyzable leukocyte extract (bDLE) or IMMUNEPOTENT CRP® (ICRP) is an immunomodulatory compound that has antioxidants and anti-inflammatory effects. In order to investigate the chemoprotection effect of ICRP on bone marrow cells in 5-FU treated mice, total bone marrow (BM) cell count, bone marrow colony forming units-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), cell cycle, immunophenotypification, ROS/superoxide and Nrf2 by flow cytometry, and histological and hematological analyses were performed. Our results demonstrated that ICRP increased BM cell count and CFU-GM number, arrested BM cells in G0/G1 phase, increased the percentage of leukocyte, granulocytic, and erythroid populations, reduced ROS/superoxide formation and Nrf2 activation, and also improved hematological levels and weight gain in 5-FU treated mice. These results suggest that ICRP has a chemoprotective effect against 5-FU in BM cells that can be used in cancer patients. PMID:27191003

  20. Involvement of activated leukocytes in the regulation of plasma levels of acute phase proteins in microgravity simulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna; Turin-Kuzmin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Earth-based studies of microgravity effects showed the induction of the mechanisms of acute phase reaction (APR). APR comprises the transition of stress-sensitive protein kinases of macrophages and other responsive cells into the active state and the phosphorylation of transcription factors which in turn stimulate the production of acute-phase reaction cytokines. Leukocyte activation is accompanied by the acceleration of the formation of oxygen radicals which can serve a functional indice of leukocyte cell state. The series of events at acute phase response result in selective changes in the synthesis of a number of secretory blood proteins (acute phase proteins, APPs) in liver cells thus contributing the recovery of homeostasis state in the organism. Earlier experiment with head-down tilt showed the increase in plasma concentrations of two cytokine mediators of acute phase response, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) being the outcome of the activation of producer cells, foremost, leukocytes. In experiment with 4-day dry immersion chemiluminescent (ChL) reply of the whole blood samples to a test stimulus were studied along with the measurements of plasma levels of APPs, namely, alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT), alpha1-acid glycoprotein (alpha1-AGP), alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M), ceruloplasmin (Cer), haptoglobin (Hp), C3-complement component (C3), C-reactive protein (CRP). Eight individuals aged 21.2 ± 3.2 years were the test subjects in the investigation. Protein studies showed a noticeable increase in the mean plasma levels of all APPs measured in experiment thus producing the evidence of the activation of acute phase response mechanisms while individual patterns revealed variability during the immersion period. The overall trends were similar to these in the previous immersion series. The augment in the strength of signal in stimulated light emission tests was higher after 1- and 2-day of immersion exposure than before the

  1. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome in End-Stage Heart Failure Patients Following Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: Differences in Plasma Redox Status and Leukocyte Activation.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Nandan K; Sorensen, Erik N; Pham, Si M; Koenig, Steven C; Griffith, Bartley P; Slaughter, Mark S; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2016-05-01

    The role of oxidative stress and leukocyte activation has not been elucidated in developing systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in heart failure (HF) patients after continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) implantation. The objective of this study was to investigate the change of plasma redox status and leukocyte activation in CF-LVAD implanted HF patients with or without SIRS. We recruited 31 CF-LVAD implanted HF patients (16 SIRS and 15 non-SIRS) and 11 healthy volunteers as the control. Pre- and postimplant blood samples were collected from the HF patients. Plasma levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) in erythrocyte, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and polymorphonuclear elastase (PMN-elastase) were measured. The HF patients had a preexisting condition of oxidative stress than healthy controls as evident from the higher oxLDL and MDA levels as well as depleted SOD and TAC. Leukocyte activation in terms of higher plasma MPO and PMN-elastase was also prominent in HF patients than controls. Persistent oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant status were found to be more belligerent in HF patients with SIRS after the implantation of CF-LVAD when compared with non-SIRS patients. Similar to oxidative stress, the activation of blood leukocyte was significantly highlighted in SIRS patients after implantation compared with non-SIRS. We identified that the plasma redox status and leukocyte activation became more prominent in CF-LVAD implanted HF patients who developed SIRS. Our findings suggest that plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress and leukocyte activation may be associated with the development of SIRS after CF-LVAD implant surgery. PMID:26416627

  2. Roscovitine blocks leukocyte extravasation by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases 5 and 9

    PubMed Central

    Berberich, Nina; Uhl, Bernd; Joore, Jos; Schmerwitz, Ulrike K; Mayer, Bettina A; Reichel, Christoph A; Krombach, Fritz; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Fürst, Robert

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that induces tumour cell death, is under evaluation as an anti-cancer drug. By triggering leukocyte apoptosis, roscovitine can also enhance the resolution of inflammation. Beyond death-inducing properties, we tested whether roscovitine affects leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction, a vital step in the onset of inflammation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions were evaluated in venules of mouse cremaster muscle, using intravital microscopy. In primary human endothelial cells, we studied the influence of roscovitine on adhesion molecules and on the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. A cellular kinome array, in vitro CDK profiling and RNAi methods were used to identify targets of roscovitine. KEY RESULTS In vivo, roscovitine attenuated the tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced leukocyte adherence to and transmigration through, the endothelium. In vitro, roscovitine strongly inhibited TNF-α-evoked expression of endothelial adhesion molecules (E-selectin, intercellular cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule). Roscovitine blocked NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, but not the NF-κB activation cascade [inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase activity, IκB-α degradation, p65 translocation]. Using a cellular kinome array and an in vitro CDK panel, we found that roscovitine inhibited protein kinase A, ribosomal S6 kinase and CDKs 2, 5, 7 and 9. Experiments using kinase inhibitors and siRNA showed that the decreased endothelial activation was due solely to blockade of CDK5 and CDK9 by roscovitine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our study highlights a novel mode of action for roscovitine, preventing endothelial activation and leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction by inhibition of CDK5 and 9. This might expand its usage as a promising anti-inflammatory compound. PMID:21391976

  3. Imaging Active Surface Processes in Barnacle Adhesive Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Golden, Joel P; Burden, Daniel K; Fears, Kenan P; Barlow, Daniel E; So, Christopher R; Burns, Justin; Miltenberg, Benjamin; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittshof, Daniel; Spillmann, Christopher M; Wahl, Kathryn J; Tender, Leonard M

    2016-01-19

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) and voltammetry were used simultaneously to monitor Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite barnacles reattached and grown on gold-coated glass slides in artificial seawater. Upon reattachment, SPRI revealed rapid surface adsorption of material with a higher refractive index than seawater at the barnacle/gold interface. Over longer time periods, SPRI also revealed secretory activity around the perimeter of the barnacle along the seawater/gold interface extending many millimeters beyond the barnacle and varying in shape and region with time. Ex situ experiments using attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy confirmed that reattachment of barnacles was accompanied by adsorption of protein to surfaces on similar time scales as those in the SPRI experiments. Barnacles were grown through multiple molting cycles. While the initial reattachment region remained largely unchanged, SPRI revealed the formation of sets of paired concentric rings having alternately darker/lighter appearance (corresponding to lower and higher refractive indices, respectively) at the barnacle/gold interface beneath the region of new growth. Ex situ experiments coupling the SPRI imaging with optical and FTIR microscopy revealed that the paired rings coincide with molt cycles, with the brighter rings associated with regions enriched in amide moieties. The brighter rings were located just beyond orifices of cement ducts, consistent with delivery of amide-rich chemistry from the ducts. The darker rings were associated with newly expanded cuticle. In situ voltammetry using the SPRI gold substrate as the working electrode revealed presence of redox active compounds (oxidation potential approx 0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl) after barnacles were reattached on surfaces. Redox activity persisted during the reattachment period. The results reveal surface adsorption processes coupled to the complex secretory and chemical activity under barnacles as they construct

  4. Cysteinyl leukotriene overproduction in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease is driven by platelet-adherent leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Tanya M.; Kidder, Molly S.; Bhattacharyya, Neil; Xing, Wei; Shen, Shiliang; Milne, Ginger L.; Castells, Mariana C.; Chhay, Heng

    2012-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) overproduction is a hallmark of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), but its mechanism is poorly understood. Because adherent platelets can convert the leukocyte-derived precursor leukotriene (LT)A4 to LTC4, the parent cysLT, through the terminal enzyme LTC4 synthase, we investigated the contribution of platelet-dependent transcellular cysLT production in AERD. Nasal polyps from subjects with AERD contained many extravascular platelets that colocalized with leukocytes, and the percentages of circulating neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes with adherent platelets were markedly higher in the blood of subjects with AERD than in aspirin-tolerant controls. Platelet-adherent subsets of leukocytes had higher expression of several adhesion markers than did platelet nonadherent subsets. Adherent platelets contributed more than half of the total LTC4 synthase activity of peripheral blood granulocytes, and they accounted for the higher level of LTC4 generation by activated granulocytes from subjects with AERD compared with aspirin-tolerant controls. Urinary LTE4 levels, a measure of systemic cysLT production, correlated strongly with percentages of circulating platelet-adherent granulocytes. Because platelet adherence to leukocytes allows for both firm adhesion to endothelial cells and augmented transcellular conversion of leukotrienes, a disturbance in platelet-leukocyte interactions may be partly responsible for the respiratory tissue inflammation and the overproduction of cysLTs that characterize AERD. PMID:22262771

  5. High Basal Activity of the PTPN22 Gain-of-Function Variant Blunts Leukocyte Responsiveness Negatively Affecting IL-10 Production in ANCA Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yali; Yang, Jiajin; Colby, Kerry; Hogan, Susan L.; Hu, Yichun; Jennette, Caroline E.; Berg, Elisabeth A.; Zhang, Youkang; Jennette, J. Charles; Falk, Ronald J.; Preston, Gloria A.

    2012-01-01

    Consequences of expression of the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22) gain-of-function variant were evaluated in leukocytes from patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) disease. The frequency of the gain-of-function allele within the Caucasian patient cohort was 22% (OR 1.45), compared to general American Caucasian population (16.5%, p = 0.03). Examination of the basal phosphatase activity of PTPN22 gain-of-function protein indicated persistently elevated activity in un-stimulated peripheral leukocytes, while basal activity was undetectable in leukocytes from patients without the gain-of-function variant. To examine consequences of persistently high PTPN22 activity, the activation status of ERK and p38 MAPK were analyzed. While moderate levels of activated ERK were observed in controls, it was undetectable in leukocytes expressing PTPN22 gain-of-function protein and instead p38MAPK was up-regulated. IL-10 transcription, reliant on the ERK pathway, was negatively affected. Over the course of disease, patients expressing variant PTPN22 did not show a spike in IL-10 transcription as they entered remission in contrast to controls, implying that environmentally triggered signals were blunted. Sustained activity of PTPN22, due to the gain-of-function mutation, acts as a dominant negative regulator of ERK activity leading to blunted cellular responsiveness to environmental stimuli and expression of protective cytokines. PMID:22880107

  6. Leukocyte Trafficking to the Small Intestine and Colon.

    PubMed

    Habtezion, Aida; Nguyen, Linh P; Hadeiba, Husein; Butcher, Eugene C

    2016-02-01

    Leukocyte trafficking to the small and large intestines is tightly controlled to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis, mediate immune responses, and regulate inflammation. A wide array of chemoattractants, chemoattractant receptors, and adhesion molecules expressed by leukocytes, mucosal endothelium, epithelium, and stromal cells controls leukocyte recruitment and microenvironmental localization in intestine and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs). Naive lymphocytes traffic to the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes where they undergo antigen-induced activation and priming; these processes determine their memory/effector phenotypes and imprint them with the capacity to migrate via the lymph and blood to the intestines. Mechanisms of T-cell recruitment to GALT and of T cells and plasmablasts to the small intestine are well described. Recent advances include the discovery of an unexpected role for lectin CD22 as a B-cell homing receptor GALT, and identification of the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 15 (GPR15) as a T-cell chemoattractant/trafficking receptor for the colon. GPR15 decorates distinct subsets of T cells in mice and humans, a difference in species that could affect translation of the results of mouse colitis models to humans. Clinical studies with antibodies to integrin α4β7 and its vascular ligand mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 are proving the value of lymphocyte trafficking mechanisms as therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel diseases. In contrast to lymphocytes, cells of the innate immune system express adhesion and chemoattractant receptors that allow them to migrate directly to effector tissue sites during inflammation. We review the mechanisms for innate and adaptive leukocyte localization to the intestinal tract and GALT, and discuss their relevance to human intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. PMID:26551552

  7. Glycobiology of leukocyte trafficking in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rachael D; Cooper, Dianne

    2014-12-01

    To fulfill their potential, leukocytes must be able to exit the vasculature and reach the site of inflammation within the tissue. This process of leukocyte extravasation is a tightly regulated sequence of events that is governed by a host of cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, chemokines and lipid mediators. Of major importance to this process and the function of many of the proteins and lipids involved is the posttranslational modification of these moieties by glycosylation. The glycosylation process is coordinated by multiple enzymes that add and remove saccharides to/from glycan structures on proteins and lipids, resulting in a unique molecular signature that affords specificity to the molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment. This review will discuss how glycosylation impacts the function of these key molecules involved in the recruitment of leukocytes during inflammation and the function of specific lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins) that have a role in leukocyte trafficking. PMID:25258391

  8. Derivation of Cinnamon Blocks Leukocyte Attachment by Interacting with Sialosides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Guu, Shih-Yun; Tsai, Chan-Chuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Viswaraman, Mohan; Chen, Hsing-Bao; Chang, Chuan-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Molecules derived from cinnamon have demonstrated diverse pharmacological activities against infectious pathogens, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. This study aims to evaluate the effect of the cinnamon-derived molecule IND02 on the adhesion of leukocytes to host cells. The anti-inflammatory ability of IND02, a pentameric procyanidin type A polyphenol polymer isolated from cinnamon alcohol extract, was examined. Pretreatment with IND02 significantly reduced the attachment of THP-1 cells or neutrophils to TNF-α-activated HUVECs or E-selectin/ICAM-1, respectively. IND02 also reduced the binding of E-, L- and P-selectins with sialosides. Furthermore, IND02 could agglutinate human red blood cells (RBC), and the agglutination could be disrupted by sialylated glycoprotein. Our findings demonstrate that IND02, a cinnamon-derived compound, can interact with sialosides and block the binding of selectins and leukocytes with sialic acids. PMID:26076445

  9. Derivation of Cinnamon Blocks Leukocyte Attachment by Interacting with Sialosides

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Guu, Shih-Yun; Tsai, Chan-Chuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Viswaraman, Mohan; Chen, Hsing-Bao; Chang, Chuan-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Molecules derived from cinnamon have demonstrated diverse pharmacological activities against infectious pathogens, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. This study aims to evaluate the effect of the cinnamon-derived molecule IND02 on the adhesion of leukocytes to host cells. The anti-inflammatory ability of IND02, a pentameric procyanidin type A polyphenol polymer isolated from cinnamon alcohol extract, was examined. Pretreatment with IND02 significantly reduced the attachment of THP-1 cells or neutrophils to TNF-α-activated HUVECs or E-selectin/ICAM-1, respectively. IND02 also reduced the binding of E-, L- and P-selectins with sialosides. Furthermore, IND02 could agglutinate human red blood cells (RBC), and the agglutination could be disrupted by sialylated glycoprotein. Our findings demonstrate that IND02, a cinnamon-derived compound, can interact with sialosides and block the binding of selectins and leukocytes with sialic acids. PMID:26076445

  10. Inhibitory Effect of Serotonin Antagonist on Leukocyte-Endothelial Interactions In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Ariyama, Yuno; Deushi, Michiyo; Osaka, Mizuko; Nitta, Kosaku; Yoshida, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Although 5-HT2A serotonergic antagonists have been used to treat vascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus or obesity, their effects on leukocyte-endothelial interactions have not been fully investigated. In this study, we assessed the effects of sarpogrelate hydrochloride (SRPO), a 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist, on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in obesity both in vivo and in vitro. Methods and Findings In the in vivo experiment, C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat high-fructose diet (HFFD), comprising 20% fat and 30% fructose, with or without intraperitoneal injection of 5 mg/kg/day SRPO for 4 weeks. The body weight, visceral fat weight, and serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels in the mice increased significantly with the HFFD, but these effects were prevented by chronic injections of SRPO. Intravital microscopy of the femoral artery detected significant leukocyte-endothelial interactions after treatment with HFFD, but these leukocyte-endothelial interactions were reduced in the mice injected with SRPO. In the in vitro experiment, pre-incubation of activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) induced THP-1 cell adhesion under physiological flow conditions, but the adhesion was reduced by pretreatment of PRP with SRPO. A fluorescent immunobinding assay showed that PRP induced significant upregulation of E-selectin in HUVECs, but this upregulation was reduced by pretreatment of PRP with SRPO. In other in vitro conditions, pre-incubation of THP-1 cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased the adhesion of THP-1 cells to activated HUVECs under rotational conditions, but this adhesion was reduced by pretreatment with SRPO. Western blotting analysis showed that protein kinase C α activation in THP-1 cells was inhibited by SRPO. Conclusion Our findings indicated that SRPO inhibits vascular inflammation in obesity via inactivation of platelets and leukocytes, and improvement of

  11. Retinoids induce integrin-independent lymphocyte adhesion through RAR-α nuclear receptor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Jarrett T.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Jianming; Metts, Meagan E.; Nasser, Taj A.; McGoldrick, Liam J.; Bridges, Lance C.

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Transcription and translation are required for retinoid-induced lymphocyte adhesion. • RAR activation is sufficient to induced lymphocyte cell adhesion. • Vitamin D derivatives inhibit RAR-prompted lymphocyte adhesion. • Adhesion occurs through a novel binding site within ADAM disintegrin domains. • RARα is a key nuclear receptor for retinoid-dependent lymphocyte cell adhesion. - Abstract: Oxidative metabolites of vitamin A, in particular all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), have emerged as key factors in immunity by specifying the localization of immune cells to the gut. Although it is appreciated that isomers of retinoic acid activate the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) family of nuclear receptors to elicit cellular changes, the molecular details of retinoic acid action remain poorly defined in immune processes. Here we employ a battery of agonists and antagonists to delineate the specific nuclear receptors utilized by retinoids to evoke lymphocyte cell adhesion to ADAM (adisintegrin and metalloprotease) protein family members. We report that RAR agonism is sufficient to promote immune cell adhesion in both immortal and primary immune cells. Interestingly, adhesion occurs independent of integrin function, and mutant studies demonstrate that atRA-induced adhesion to ADAM members required a distinct binding interface(s) as compared to integrin recognition. Anti-inflammatory corticosteroids as well as 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, a vitamin D metabolite that prompts immune cell trafficking to the skin, potently inhibited the observed adhesion. Finally, our data establish that induced adhesion was specifically attributable to the RAR-α receptor isotype. The current study provides novel molecular resolution as to which nuclear receptors transduce retinoid exposure into immune cell adhesion.

  12. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase interacts with vinculin at focal adhesions during fatty acid-stimulated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    George, Margaret D.; Wine, Robert N.; Lackford, Brad; Kissling, Grace E.; Akiyama, Steven K.; Olden, Kenneth; Roberts, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Arachidonic acid stimulates cell adhesion by activating α2β1 integrins in a process that depends on protein kinases, including p38 mitogen activated protein kinase. Here, we describe the interaction of cytoskeletal components with key signaling molecules that contribute to spreading of, and morphological changes in, arachidonic acid-treated MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma cells. Arachidonic acid-treated cells showed increased attachment and spreading on collagen type IV as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Fatty acid-treated cells displayed short cortical actin filaments associated with an increased number of β1 integrin-containing pseudopodia whereas untreated cells displayed elongated stress fibers and fewer clusters of β1 integrins. Confocal microscopy of arachidonic acid-treated cells showed that vinculin and phospho-p38 both appeared enriched in pseudopodia and at the tips of actin filaments, and fluorescence ratio imaging indicated the increase was specific for the phospho-(active) form of p38. Immunoprecipitates of phospho-p38 from extracts of arachidonic acid-treated cells contained vinculin, and GST-vinculin fusion proteins carrying the central region of vinculin bound phospho-p38, whereas fusion proteins expressing the terminal portions of vinculin did not. These data suggest that phospho-p38 associates with particular domains on critical focal adhesion proteins that are involved in tumor cell adhesion and spreading and that this association can be regulated by factors in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24219282

  13. Dynamic component chemiluminescent sensor for assessing circulating polymorphonuclear leukocyte activity of peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, Daria; Rogachev, Boris; Vorobiov, Marina; Zlotnik, Moshe; Last, Mark; Lobel, Leslie; Marks, Robert S

    2008-07-01

    Recurrent bacterial peritonitis is a major complication in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, which is associated with polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) functional changes and can be assessed by a chemiluminescent (CL) reaction. We applied a new approach of a dynamic component chemiluminescence sensor for the assessment of functional states of PMNs in a luminol-amplified whole-blood system. This method is based on the evaluation of CL kinetic patterns of stimulated PMNs, while the parallel measurements of intracellular and extracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the same sample can be conducted. Blood was drawn from diabetic and nondiabetic patients during follow-up, and during peritonitis. Healthy medical personnel served as the control group. Chemiluminescence curves were recorded and presented as a sum of three biological components. CL kinetic parameters were calculated, and functional states of PMNs were assessed. Data mining algorithms were used to build decision tree models that can distinguish between different clinical groups. The induced classification models were used afterward for differentiating and classifying new blind cases and demonstrated good correlation with medical diagnosis (84.6% predictive accuracy). In conclusion, this novel method shows a high predictive diagnostic value and may assist in detection of PD-associated clinical states. PMID:18510343

  14. Lymphatic endothelial mCLCA1 is a ligand for leukocyte LFA-1 and Mac-1

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Momoko; Kirschbaum, Sara B.; Paulovich, Amanda; Pauli, Bendicht U.; Zhang, Heidi; Alexander, Jonathan S.; Farr, Andrew G.; Ruddell, Alanna

    2012-01-01

    The lymphatic circulation mediates drainage of fluid and cells from the periphery through lymph nodes, facilitating immune detection of lymph-borne foreign antigens. The 10.1.1 monoclonal antibody recognizes a lymphatic endothelial antigen, here purified by antibody affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry identified mCLCA1 as the 10.1.1 antigen, a 90 kD cell surface protein expressed in lymphatic endothelium and stromal cells of spleen and thymus. The 10.1.1 antibody affinity chromatography also purified LFA-1, an integrin that mediates leukocyte adhesion to endothelium. This mCLCA1-LFA-1 interaction has functional consequences, as lymphocyte adhesion to lymphatic endothelium was blocked by 10.1.1 antibody bound to endothelium, or by LFA-1 antibody bound to lymphocytes. Lymphocyte adhesion was increased by cytokine treatment of lymphatic endothelium, in association with increased expression of ICAM-1, an endothelial surface protein that is also a ligand for LFA-1. By contrast, mCLCA1 expression and the relative contribution of mCLCA1 to lymphocyte adhesion were unaffected by cytokine activation, demonstrating that mCLCA1 and ICAM-1 interactions with LFA-1 are differentially regulated. mCLCA1 also bound to the LFA-1-related Mac-1 integrin that is preferentially expressed on leukocytes. mCLCA1-mediated adhesion of Mac-1- or LFA-1-expressing leukocytes to lymphatic vessels and lymph node lymphatic sinuses provides a new target for investigation of lymphatic involvement in leukocyte adhesion and trafficking during the immune response. PMID:20937843

  15. Effect of active packaging incorporated with triclosan on bacteria adhesion.

    PubMed

    Camilloto, Geany P; Pires, Ana Clarissa S; Soares, Nilda de Fátima F; Araújo, Emiliane A; Andrade, Nélio J; Ferreira, Sukarno O

    2010-10-01

    Antimicrobial polyethylene and cellulose based films incorporated with triclosan were studied. The antimicrobial efficacy, the hydrophobicity, microscopic and the mechanical characteristics of the films, as well free energy of adhesion between bacteria and antimicrobial films were evaluated. It was observed that both polyethylene and cellulose based films incorporated with the antimicrobial were homogeneous. Furthermore, the addition of triclosan did not affect mechanical characteristics of the films (P > 0.05). However, triclosan incorporated into polyethylene films reduced its hydrophobicity while antimicrobial cellulose based films became more hydrophobic. The adhesion was thermodynamically favorable between tested bacteria and polyethylene films. On the other hand, the adhesion to triclosan cellulose based film was thermodynamically unfavorable to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and favorable to Listeria innocua and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Polyethylene and cellulose based films showed inhibitory effect against S. aureus and E. coli, being the inhibition halo higher for polyethylene films. This study improves the knowledge about antimicrobial films. PMID:21535496

  16. Bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory activities of glaucine: In vitro studies in human airway smooth muscle and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Pons, R; Berto, L; Martí-Cabrera, M; Martinez-Losa, M; Domenech, T; Beleta, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-08-01

    1. Selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors are of potential interest in the treatment of asthma. We examined the effects of the alkaloid S-(+)-glaucine, a PDE4 inhibitor, on human isolated bronchus and granulocyte function. 2. Glaucine selectively inhibited PDE4 from human bronchus and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in a non-competitive manner (Ki=3.4 microM). Glaucine displaced [3H]-rolipram from its high-affinity binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes (IC50 approximately 100 microM). 3. Glaucine inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced tone in human isolated bronchus (pD2 approximately 4.5). Glaucine (10 microM) did not potentiate the isoprenaline-induced relaxation but augmented cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. The glaucine-induced relaxation was resistant to H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Glaucine depressed the contractile responses to Ca2+ (pD'2 approximately 3.62) and reduced the sustained rise of [Ca2+]i produced by histamine in cultured human airway smooth muscle cells (-log IC50 approximately 4.3). 4. Glaucine augmented cyclic AMP levels in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes challenged with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) or isoprenaline, and inhibited FMLP-induced superoxide generation, elastase release, leukotriene B4 production, [Ca2+]i signal and platelet aggregation as well as opsonized zymosan-, phorbol myristate acetate-, and A23187-induced superoxide release. The inhibitory effect of glaucine on superoxide generation by FMLP was reduced by H-89. 5. In conclusion, Ca2+ channel antagonism by glaucine appears mainly responsible for the relaxant effect of glaucine in human isolated bronchus while PDE4 inhibition contributes to the inhibitory effects of glaucine in human granulocytes. The very low PDE4/binding site ratio found for glaucine makes this compound attractive for further structure-activity studies. PMID:10455321

  17. Bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory activities of glaucine: In vitro studies in human airway smooth muscle and polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Pons, R; Berto, L; Martí-Cabrera, M; Martinez-Losa, M; Domenech, T; Beleta, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-01-01

    Selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors are of potential interest in the treatment of asthma. We examined the effects of the alkaloid S-(+)-glaucine, a PDE4 inhibitor, on human isolated bronchus and granulocyte function.Glaucine selectively inhibited PDE4 from human bronchus and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in a non-competitive manner (Ki=3.4 μM). Glaucine displaced [3H]-rolipram from its high-affinity binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes (IC50∼100 μM).Glaucine inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced tone in human isolated bronchus (pD2∼4.5). Glaucine (10 μM) did not potentiate the isoprenaline-induced relaxation but augmented cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. The glaucine-induced relaxation was resistant to H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Glaucine depressed the contractile responses to Ca2+ (pD'2∼3.62) and reduced the sustained rise of [Ca2+]i produced by histamine in cultured human airway smooth muscle cells (−log IC50∼4.3).Glaucine augmented cyclic AMP levels in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes challenged with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) or isoprenaline, and inhibited FMLP-induced superoxide generation, elastase release, leukotriene B4 production, [Ca2+]i signal and platelet aggregation as well as opsonized zymosan-, phorbol myristate acetate-, and A23187-induced superoxide release. The inhibitory effect of glaucine on superoxide generation by FMLP was reduced by H-89.In conclusion, Ca2+ channel antagonism by glaucine appears mainly responsible for the relaxant effect of glaucine in human isolated bronchus while PDE4 inhibition contributes to the inhibitory effects of glaucine in human granulocytes. The very low PDE4/binding site ratio found for glaucine makes this compound attractive for further structure-activity studies. PMID:10455321

  18. ETC-1002 regulates immune response, leukocyte homing, and adipose tissue inflammation via LKB1-dependent activation of macrophage AMPK.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L; Lister, Richard J; Pawloski, Catherine; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Cramer, Clay T; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K; Hurley, Timothy R; Bradshaw, Cheryl D; Spahr, Mark A; Newton, Roger S

    2013-08-01

    ETC-1002 is an investigational drug currently in Phase 2 development for treatment of dyslipidemia and other cardiometabolic risk factors. In dyslipidemic subjects, ETC-1002 not only reduces plasma LDL cholesterol but also significantly attenuates levels of hsCRP, a clinical biomarker of inflammation. Anti-inflammatory properties of ETC-1002 were further investigated in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and in in vivo models of inflammation. In cells treated with ETC-1002, increased levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation coincided with reduced activity of MAP kinases and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. AMPK phosphorylation and inhibitory effects of ETC-1002 on soluble mediators of inflammation were significantly abrogated by siRNA-mediated silencing of macrophage liver kinase B1 (LKB1), indicating that ETC-1002 activates AMPK and exerts its anti-inflammatory effects via an LKB1-dependent mechanism. In vivo, ETC-1002 suppressed thioglycollate-induced homing of leukocytes into mouse peritoneal cavity. Similarly, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, ETC-1002 restored adipose AMPK activity, reduced JNK phosphorylation, and diminished expression of macrophage-specific marker 4F/80. These data were consistent with decreased epididymal fat-pad mass and interleukin (IL)-6 release by inflamed adipose tissue. Thus, ETC-1002 may provide further clinical benefits for patients with cardiometabolic risk factors by reducing systemic inflammation linked to insulin resistance and vascular complications of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23709692

  19. ETC-1002 regulates immune response, leukocyte homing, and adipose tissue inflammation via LKB1-dependent activation of macrophage AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Lister, Richard J.; Pawloski, Catherine; Hanselman, Jeffrey C.; Cramer, Clay T.; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K.; Hurley, Timothy R.; Bradshaw, Cheryl D.; Spahr, Mark A.; Newton, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    ETC-1002 is an investigational drug currently in Phase 2 development for treatment of dyslipidemia and other cardiometabolic risk factors. In dyslipidemic subjects, ETC-1002 not only reduces plasma LDL cholesterol but also significantly attenuates levels of hsCRP, a clinical biomarker of inflammation. Anti-inflammatory properties of ETC-1002 were further investigated in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and in in vivo models of inflammation. In cells treated with ETC-1002, increased levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation coincided with reduced activity of MAP kinases and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. AMPK phosphorylation and inhibitory effects of ETC-1002 on soluble mediators of inflammation were significantly abrogated by siRNA-mediated silencing of macrophage liver kinase B1 (LKB1), indicating that ETC-1002 activates AMPK and exerts its anti-inflammatory effects via an LKB1-dependent mechanism. In vivo, ETC-1002 suppressed thioglycollate-induced homing of leukocytes into mouse peritoneal cavity. Similarly, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, ETC-1002 restored adipose AMPK activity, reduced JNK phosphorylation, and diminished expression of macrophage-specific marker 4F/80. These data were consistent with decreased epididymal fat-pad mass and interleukin (IL)-6 release by inflamed adipose tissue. Thus, ETC-1002 may provide further clinical benefits for patients with cardiometabolic risk factors by reducing systemic inflammation linked to insulin resistance and vascular complications of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23709692

  20. Integrins mediate adhesion of medulloblastoma cells to tenascin and activate pathways associated with survival and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Fiorilli, Paul; Partridge, Darren; Staniszewska, Izabela; Wang, Jin Y; Grabacka, Maja; So, Kelvin; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Reiss, Krzysztof; Khalili, Kamel; Croul, Sidney E

    2008-11-01

    Medulloblastoma spreads by leptomeningeal dissemination rather than by infiltration that characterizes other CNS tumors, eg, gliomas. This study represents an initial attempt to identify both the molecules that mediate medulloblastoma adhesion to leptomeninges and the pathways that are key to survival and proliferation of tumor following adhesion. As a first step in molecule identification, we produced adhesion of D283 medulloblastoma cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of H4 glioma cells in vitro. Within this context, D283 cells preferentially expressed the alpha9 and beta1 integrin subunits; antibody and disintegrin blockade of alpha9 and beta1 binding eliminated the adhesion. The H4 ECM was enriched in tenascin, a binding partner for the alpha9beta1 integrin heterodimer. Purified tenascin-C supported D283 cell adhesion. The adhesion was blocked by antibodies to alpha9 and beta1 integrin. In vivo data were similar; immunohistochemistry of primary human medulloblastomas with leptomeningeal extension demonstrated increased expression of alpha9 and beta1 integrins as well as tenascin at the interface of brain and leptomeningeal tumor. These data suggest that tumor-cell expressions of alpha9 and beta1 integrins in combination with extracellular tenascin are necessary for medulloblastoma adhesion to the leptomeninges. As a first step in the identification of pathways that mediate survival and proliferation of tumor following adhesion, we demonstrated that adhesion to H4 ECM was associated with survival and proliferation of D283 cells as well as activation of the MAPK pathway in a growth factor deficient environment. Antibody blockade of alpha9 and beta1 integrin binding that eliminated adhesion also eliminated the in vitro survival benefit. These data suggest that adhesion of medulloblastoma to the meninges is necessary for the survival and proliferation of these tumor cells at the secondary site. PMID:18794852

  1. Combined blockade of ADP receptors and PI3-kinase p110β fully prevents platelet and leukocyte activation during hypothermic extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Stefanie; Kurz, Julia; Geisler, Tobias; Peter, Karlheinz; Wendel, Hans Peter; Straub, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and hypothermia are used to maintain stable circulatory parameters and improve the ischemia tolerance of patients in cardiac surgery. However, ECC and hypothermia induce activation mechanisms in platelets and leukocytes, which are mediated by the platelet agonist ADP and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) p110β. Under clinical conditions these processes are associated with life-threatening complications including thromboembolism and inflammation. This study analyzes effects of ADP receptor P(2)Y(12) and P(2)Y(1) blockade and PI3K p110β inhibition on platelets and granulocytes during hypothermic ECC. Human blood was treated with the P(2)Y(12) antagonist 2-MeSAMP, the P(2)Y(1) antagonist MRS2179, the PI3K p110β inhibitor TGX-221, combinations thereof, or PBS and propylene glycol (controls). Under static in vitro conditions a concentration-dependent effect regarding the inhibition of ADP-induced platelet activation was found using 2-MeSAMP or TGX-221. Further inhibition of ADP-mediated effects was achieved with MRS2179. Next, blood was circulated in an ex vivo ECC model at 28°C for 30 minutes and various platelet and granulocyte markers were investigated using flow cytometry, ELISA and platelet count analysis. GPIIb/IIIa activation induced by hypothermic ECC was inhibited using TGX-221 alone or in combination with P(2)Y blockers (p<0.05), while no effect of hypothermic ECC or antiplatelet agents on GPIIb/IIIa and GPIbα expression and von Willebrand factor binding was observed. Sole P(2)Y and PI3K blockade or a combination thereof inhibited P-selectin expression on platelets and platelet-derived microparticles during hypothermic ECC (p<0.05). P(2)Y blockade alone or combined with TGX-221 prevented ECC-induced platelet-granulocyte aggregate formation (p<0.05). Platelet adhesion to the ECC surface, platelet loss and Mac-1 expression on granulocytes were inhibited by combined P(2)Y and PI3K blockade (p<0.05). Combined blockade of P

  2. Effect of two phenanthrene alkaloids on angiotensin II-induced leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Estellés, Rossana; López-Martín, Javier; Milian, Lara; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Martínez-Losa, Magdalena; Cerdá-Nicolás, Miguel; Anam, Edet M; Ivorra, María Dolores; Issekutz, Andrew C; Cortijo, Julio; Morcillo, Esteban J; Blázquez, Maria Amparo; Sanz, Maria-Jesús

    2003-11-01

    1. The present study has evaluated the effect of two phenanthrene alkaloids, uvariopsine and stephenanthrine, on angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in vivo and the mechanisms involved in their activity. Intravital microscopy within the rat mesenteric microcirculation was used. 2. A 60 min superfusion with 1 nm Ang-II induced a significant increase in the leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions that were completely inhibited by 1 microm uvariopsine cosuperfusion. A lower dose of 0.1 microm significantly reduced Ang-II-induced leukocyte adhesion by 75%. 3. When Ang-II was cosuperfused with 1 and 0.1 microm stephenanthrine, Ang-II-induced leukocyte responses were significantly diminished. A lower dose of 0.01 microm only affected Ang-II-induced leukocyte adhesion. 4. Both alkaloids inhibited Ang-II-induced endothelial P-selectin upregulation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in endothelial cells stimulated with Ang-II, in fMLP-stimulated human neutrophils (PMNs) and in the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system. However, cyclic AMP levels in PMNs stimulated with fMLP were not affected. 5. Uvariopsine and stephenanthrine inhibited PAF-induced elevations in intracellular calcium levels in PMNs (IC50 values: 15.1 and 6.1 microm respectively) and blocked the binding of [3H]PAF to these leukocytes. They also reduced PAF-induced increases in intracellular levels of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. 6. In conclusion, stephenanthrine and uvariopsine are potent inhibitors of Ang-II-induced leukocyte accumulation in vivo. This effect appears to be mediated through ROS scavenging activity and blockade of PAF receptor. Thus, they have potential therapeutic interest for the control of leukocyte recruitment that occurs in cardiovascular disease states in which Ang-II is involved. PMID:14559857

  3. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 prevents intra-abdominal adhesions by decreasing activity of peritoneal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guangbing; Chen, Xin; Wang, Guanghui; Jia, Pengbo; Xu, Qinhong; Ping, Gaofeng; Wang, Kang; Li, Xuqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions are common complications after abdominal surgery. The exact molecular mechanisms that are responsible for these complications remain unclear, and there are no effective methods for preventing adhesion formation or reformation. The aim of the study reported here was to investigate the preventive effects and underlying potential molecular mechanisms of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors in a rodent model of postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and methods The expression of COX-2 in postoperative intra-abdominal adhe-sions and normal peritoneal tissue was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Assays were performed to elucidate the effect of COX-2 inhibition on hypoxia-induced fibroblast activity in vitro and on intra-abdominal adhesion formation in vivo. Results Hypoxia-induced COX-2 expression in peritoneal fibroblasts was increased in postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. Inhibition of COX-2 attenuated the activating effect of hypoxia on normal peritoneal fibroblasts in vitro. Data indicate that selective COX-2 inhibitor prevents in vivo intra-abdominal adhesion by inhibition of basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta expression, but not through an antiangiogenic mechanism. Furthermore, using selective COX-2 inhibitors to prevent intra-abdominal adhesions did not adversely affect the weight, bowel motility, or healing of intestinal anastomoses in a rat model. Conclusion These results show that hypoxia-induced COX-2 expression in peritoneal fibroblasts is involved in the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions. Inhibition of COX-2 prevents postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions through suppression of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26109851

  4. Lipid Raft Is Required for PSGL-1 Ligation Induced HL-60 Cell Adhesion on ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingshuang; Liu, Wenai; Luo, Jixian; Li, Chunfeng; Ba, Xueqing; Ampah, Khamal Kwesi; Wang, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong; Zeng, Xianlu

    2013-01-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and integrins are adhesion molecules that play critical roles in host defense and innate immunity. PSGL-1 mediates leukocyte rolling and primes leukocytes for integrin-mediated adhesion. However, the mechanism that PSGL-1 as a rolling receptor in regulating integrin activation has not been well characterized. Here, we investigate the function of lipid raft in regulating PSGL-1 induced β2 integrin-mediated HL-60 cells adhesion. PSGL-1 ligation with antibody enhances the β2 integrin activation and β2 integrin-dependent adhesion to ICAM-1. Importantly, with the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), we confirm the role of lipid raft in regulating the activation of β2 integrin. Furthermore, we find that the protein level of PSGL-1 decreased in raft fractions in MβCD treated cells. PSGL-1 ligation induces the recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a tyrosine kinase and Vav1 (the pivotal downstream effector of Syk signaling pathway involved in cytoskeleton regulation) to lipid raft. Inhibition of Syk activity with pharmacologic inhibitor strongly reduces HL-60 cells adhesion, implicating Syk is crucial for PSGL-1 mediated β2 integrin activation. Taken together, we report that ligation of PSGL-1 on HL-60 cells activates β2 integrin, for which lipid raft integrity and Syk activation are responsible. These findings have shed new light on the mechanisms that connect leukocyte initial rolling with subsequent adhesion. PMID:24312591

  5. Detection of Bidirectional Signaling During Integrin Activation and Neutrophil Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Stuart M.; Dixit, Neha; Simon, Scott I.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil arrest and migration on inflamed endothelium is dependent upon a conformational shift in CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1) from a low to high affinity and clustered state which determines the strength and lifetime of bond formation with intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). Cytoskeletal adaptor proteins kindlin-3 and talin-1 anchor clustered LFA-1 to the cytoskeleton and support the transition from neutrophil rolling to arrest. We employ microfluidic flow channels and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to evaluate the spatiotemporal regulation of LFA-1 affinity and bond formation that facilitate the transition from neutrophil rolling to arrest. Methodology is presented to correlate the relationship between integrin conformation, bond formation with ICAM-1, and cytoskeletal engagement and adhesion strengthening necessary to achieve a migratory phenotype. PMID:24504956

  6. Micro-adhesion rings surrounding TCR microclusters are essential for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Sakuma, Machie; Ike, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Kimura, Yayoi; Ohara, Osamu; Saito, Takashi

    2016-07-25

    The immunological synapse (IS) formed at the interface between T cells and antigen-presenting cells represents a hallmark of initiation of acquired immunity. T cell activation is initiated at T cell receptor (TCR) microclusters (MCs), in which TCRs and signaling molecules assemble at the interface before IS formation. We found that each TCR-MC was transiently bordered by a ring structure made of integrin and focal adhesion molecules in the early phase of activation, which is similar in structure to the IS in microscale. The micro-adhesion ring is composed of LFA-1, focal adhesion molecules paxillin and Pyk2, and myosin II (MyoII) and is supported by F-actin core and MyoII activity through LFA-1 outside-in signals. The formation of the micro-adhesion ring was transient but especially sustained upon weak TCR stimulation to recruit linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and SLP76. Perturbation of the micro-adhesion ring induced impairment of TCR-MC development and resulted in impaired cellular signaling and cell functions. Thus, the synapse-like structure composed of the core TCR-MC and surrounding micro-adhesion ring is a critical structure for initial T cell activation through integrin outside-in signals. PMID:27354546

  7. Does inhibition of proteolytic activity improve adhesive luting?

    PubMed

    Lührs, Anne-Katrin; De Munck, Jan; Geurtsen, Werner; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2013-04-01

    Endogenous enzymes may be involved in the biodegradation of adhesive restoration-tooth interfaces. Inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been suggested to retard the bond-degradation process. Limited data are available on whether composite cements may also benefit from MMP inhibitors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of two MMP inhibitors--chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) and galardin--on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of two self-adhesive composite cements to dentin. Ceramic specimens were cemented to bur-cut dentin surfaces using the self-adhesive composite cements RelyX Unicem 2 (3M ESPE) or Clearfil SA (Kuraray), or the etch-and-rinse composite cement Nexus 3 (Kerr) that served as the control. The surfaces were left untreated or were pretreated with MMP inhibitors (2% CHX or 0.2 mM galardin). The μTBS was determined 'immediately' and upon ageing (water storage for 6 months). Statistical analysis revealed a significant effect of the factors 'composite cement' and 'storage', as well as all interactions, but no effect of the MMP inhibitors. After 6 months of ageing, the μTBS decreased for all cements, except for the multistep etch-and-rinse luting composite when it was applied without MMP inhibitors. The MMP inhibitors could not prevent the decrease in μTBS upon ageing and therefore do not improve the luting durability of the composite cements tested. PMID:23489902

  8. Plasma myeloperoxidase level and polymorphonuclear leukocyte activation in horses suffering from large intestinal obstruction requiring surgery: preliminary results.

    PubMed Central

    Grulke, S; Benbarek, H; Caudron, I; Deby-Dupont, G; Mathy-Hartert, M; Farnir, F; Deby, C; Lamy, M; Serteyn, D

    1999-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a specific enzyme of neutrophil azurophilic granules with a strong oxidative activity. Thanks to a radioimmunoassay of equine myeloperoxidase, the authors have observed a significantly higher plasma level of MPO in horses operated for strangulation obstruction of the large intestine (n = 6) than in horses suffering from a non-strangulating displacement of the large intestine (n = 9). For the 2 groups, 3 phases were distinguished: reception (P1), intensive care (P2) and terminal phase (P3). The mean peak values of MPO for these phases were 121.6 ng/mL (P1), 168.6 ng/mL (P2), and 107.0 ng/mL (P3) for the non-strangulating group, and 242.6 ng/mL (P1); 426.0 ng/mL (P2), and 379.5 ng/mL (P3) for the strangulation group. The variations of the mean peak values of plasma MPO were significantly different between the 2 groups and between the different phases. A significant increase of the least square means of MPO was observed between P1 and P2. A significant decrease of the least square means of the number of circulating leukocytes was observed between P1 and P3. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation could play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute abdominal disease and endotoxic shock. PMID:10369573

  9. Interaction of Platelet Activating Factor, Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Xanthine Oxidase, and Leukocytes in the Generation of Hepatic Injury After Shock/Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Yasuhiko; Takano, Manabu; Patel, Mayur; Tien, Nevin; Takada, Tadahiro; Bulkley, Gregory B.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the putative relation of platelet activating factor (PAF), xanthine oxidase, reactive oxidants, and leukocytes in the pathogenesis of hepatic injury after shock/resuscitation (S/R) in vivo. Background Reactive oxygen metabolites generated by xanthine oxidase at reperfusion have been found to trigger postischemic injury in many organs, including the liver. However, the precise linear sequence of the mechanism of consequent hepatic injury after S/R remains to be characterized. Methods Unheparinized male rats were bled to a mean blood pressure of 45 ± 3 mmHg. After 2 hours of shock, they were resuscitated by reinfusion of shed blood (anticoagulated with citrate-phosphate-dextrose) and crystalloid and observed for the next 6 or 24 hours. Results S/R caused the oxidation of hepatic glutathione and generated centrolobular leukocyte accumulation at 6 hours, followed by predominantly centrolobular hepatocellular injury at 24 hours. Each of these components was attenuated by PAF inhibition with WEB 2170, xanthine oxidase inhibition with allopurinol, antioxidant treatment with N-acetylcysteine, or severe leukopenia induced by vinblastine. In each case, the degree of leukocyte accumulation at 6 hours correlated with the hepatocellular injury seen at 24 hours. However, xanthine oxidase inhibition with allopurinol failed to attenuate further the small level of residual hepatocellular injury seen in leukopenic rats. Conclusion These findings suggest that reactive oxidants generated by xanthine oxidase at reperfusion, stimulated by PAF, mediate hepatocellular injury by triggering leukocyte accumulation, primarily within the centrolobular sinusoids. PMID:10714632

  10. [Effect of cultivation conditions on the adhesive activity of rhodococci towards n-hexadecane].

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, E V; Kuiukina, M S; Ivshina, I B

    2012-01-01

    The effect of cultivation conditions (the composition, acidity, and salinity of the cultivation medium; temperature; and the hydrodynamic conditions of cultivation) on the adhesion of actinobacteria of the genus Rhodococcus to n-hexadecane has been investigated. A study performed showed that the adhesive activity of rhodococci depends on the composition of the cultivation medium and on the cultivation temperature. The possible mechanisms underlying the effect of growth conditions on the adhesion ofrhodococci to liquid hydrocarbons and involving changes in the cell lipid content or the zeta potential of cells are addressed. Rhodococcal strains displaying high adhesive activity (80-90%) at a low temperature (18 degrees C), high salinity (5.0% NaCl), and acidity (pH 6.0) of the cultivation medium have been selected as a result of the present work; these strains have a considerable potential for use in bioremediation of soil and water contaminated by hydrocarbons. PMID:23101387

  11. Shedding of APP limits its synaptogenic activity and cell adhesion properties

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Ronny; Schilling, Sandra; Soba, Peter; Rupp, Carsten; Hartmann, Tobias; Wagner, Katja; Merdes, Gunter; Eggert, Simone; Kins, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and has essential synapse promoting functions. Synaptogenic activity as well as cell adhesion properties of APP presumably depend on trans-cellular dimerization via its extracellular domain. Since neuronal APP is extensively processed by secretases, it raises the question if APP shedding affects its cell adhesion and synaptogenic properties. We show that inhibition of APP shedding using cleavage deficient forms of APP or a dominant negative α-secretase strongly enhanced its cell adhesion and synaptogenic activity suggesting that synapse promoting function of APP is tightly regulated by α-secretase mediated processing, similar to other trans-cellular synaptic adhesion molecules. PMID:25520622

  12. The multiple faces of leukocyte interstitial migration

    PubMed Central

    Lämmermann, Tim; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    Spatiotemporal control of leukocyte dynamics within tissues is critical for successful innate and adaptive immune responses. Homeostatic trafficking and coordinated infiltration into and within sites of inflammation and infection rely on signaling in response to extracellular cues that in turn controls a variety of intracellular protein networks regulating leukocyte motility, migration, chemotaxis, positioning, and cell–cell interaction. In contrast to mesenchymal cells, leukocytes migrate in an amoeboid fashion by rapid cycles of actin polymerization and actomyosin contraction, and their migration in tissues is generally referred to as low adhesive and nonproteolytic. The interplay of actin network expansion, contraction, and adhesion shapes the exact mode of amoeboid migration, and in this review, we explore how leukocyte subsets potentially harness the same basic biomechanical mechanisms in a cell-type-specific manner. Most of our detailed understanding of these processes derives from in vitro migration studies in three-dimensional gels and confined spaces that mimic geometrical aspects of physiological tissues. We summarize these in vitro results and then critically compare them to data from intravital imaging of leukocyte interstitial migration in mouse tissues. We outline the technical challenges of obtaining conclusive mechanistic results from intravital studies, discuss leukocyte migration strategies in vivo, and present examples of mode switching during physiological interstitial migration. These findings are also placed in the context of leukocyte migration defects in primary immunodeficiencies. This overview of both in vitro and in vivo studies highlights recent progress in understanding the molecular and biophysical mechanisms that shape robust leukocyte migration responses in physiologically complex and heterogeneous environments. PMID:24573488

  13. Purification of the active C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a receptor - G sub i complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, T.E.; Siciliano, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Cianciarulo, D.N.; Bonilla-Argudo, V.; Collier, K.; Springer, M.S. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors have isolated, in an active state, the C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The purification was achieved in a single step using a C5a affinity column in which the C5a molecule was coupled to the resin through its N terminus. The purified receptor, like the crude solubilized molecule, exhibited a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a K{sub d} of 30 pM. Further, the binding of C5a retained its sensitivity to guanine nucleotides, implying that the purified receptor contained a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of three polypeptides with molecular masses of 42, 40, and 36 kDa, which were determined to be the C5a-binding subunit and the {alpha} and {beta} subunits of G{sub i}, respectively. The 36- and 40-kDa polypeptides were identified by immunoblotting and by the ability of pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate the 40-kDa molecule. These results confirm their earlier hypothesis that the receptor exists as a complex with a G protein in the presence or absence of C5a. The tight coupling between the receptor and G protein should make possible the identification of the G protein(s) involved in the transduction pathways used by C5a to produce its many biological effects.

  14. A Novel Murine Anti-Lactoferrin Monoclonal Antibody Activates Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes through Membrane-Bound Lactoferrin and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Min; Xu, Yan-Rui; Yan, Ru; Sun, Shu-Liang; Dong, Hong-Liang; Wang, Jun; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Soluble lactoferrin (LTF) is a versatile molecule that not only regulates the iron homeostasis, but also harbors direct microbicidal and immunomodulating abilities in mammalian body fluids. In contrast, little is known about the function of membrane-bound LTF (mbLTF), although its expression on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (huPMNs) has been reported for decades. Given that LTF/anti-LTF antibodies represent a potential diagnostic/prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in patients with immune disorders, we wished, in the present study, to generate a novel human LTF- (huLTF-) specific mAb suitable for detailed analyses on the expression and function of mbLTF as well as for deciphering the underlying mechanisms. By using the traditional hybridoma cell fusion technology, we obtained a murine IgG1 (kappa) mAb, M-860, against huLTF. M-860 recognizes a conformational epitope of huLTF as it binds to natural, but not denatured, huLTF in ELISA. Moreover, M-860 detects mbLTF by FACS and captures endogenous huLTF in total cell lysates of huPMNs. Functionally, M-860 induces the activation of huPMNs partially through TLR4 but independently of phagocytosis. M-860 is thus a powerful tool to analyze the expression and function of human mbLTF, which will further our understanding of the roles of LTF in health and disease. PMID:26649297

  15. TRAIL-coated leukocytes that kill cancer cells in the circulation

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Wayne, Elizabeth; Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Schaffer, Chris B.; King, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis through the bloodstream contributes to poor prognosis in many types of cancer. Mounting evidence implicates selectin-based adhesive interactions between cancer cells and the blood vessel wall as facilitating this process, in a manner similar to leukocyte trafficking during inflammation. Here, we describe a unique approach to target and kill colon and prostate cancer cells in the blood that causes circulating leukocytes to present the cancer-specific TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) on their surface along with E-selectin adhesion receptor. This approach, demonstrated in vitro with human blood and also in mice, mimics the cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells and increases the surface area available for delivery of the receptor-mediated signal. The resulting “unnatural killer cells” hold promise as an effective means to neutralize circulating tumor cells that enter blood with the potential to form new metastases. PMID:24395803

  16. Leukocyte traffic control: a novel therapeutic strategy for inflammatory bowel disease--an update.

    PubMed

    Cesarini, Monica; Fiorino, Gionata

    2013-04-01

    Adhesion molecules play a key role in the pathogenetic mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), both in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). In the last decade, some progress has been made in understanding their key role in leukocyte trafficking control in terms of basic research, but evidence of clinical efficacy is lacking. In the last 2 years, new molecules directed against integrins and integrin receptors have been developed and investigated in clinical trials, showing that anti-α4β7 integrin agents can be effective and safe for the induction and maintenance of remission in active CD and UC. Preliminary data show that anti-MAdCAM, anti-β7 and anti-integrin receptor agents are not all effective in IBD. Such results open new perspectives on clinical management of IBD, and new directions in understanding the role of adhesion molecules and leukocyte recruitment both in CD and UC. PMID:23557266

  17. [Role of the lungs in the regulation of the generation of active oxygen forms by leukocytes under normal and pathological conditions].

    PubMed

    Kogan, A Kh; Losev, N I; Biriukov, Iu V; Sandrikov, V A; Tsypin, A B; Al'-Khadidi, M; Manuĭlov, B M; Syrkin, A L; Krotovskiĭ, G S; Pogromov, A P

    1991-01-01

    Studies conducted in the clinic (in patients with cardiac diseases) and experiments (performed on intact dogs) by means of the hemiluminescent method and the nitroblue tetrazolium test showed that the lungs, in distinction to other organs (heart and others), have a stimulating effect on the generation of active oxygen forms (AOF) by the leukocytes. In this way the lungs may probably play a double role in the organism: potentiate its defence (by intensifying the microbicidal activity of the phagocytes) and facilitate damage (by secretion of AOF by the phagocytes beyond them--into the tissues); the resultant effect depends on the balance of these two types of action. In carcinoma of the lung the stimulating effect of its involved lobe (part) on the leukocytes diminishes. PMID:2057236

  18. Antimicrobial activity of rabbit leukocyte defensins against Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Borenstein, L A; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I; Miller, J N

    1991-04-01

    Defensins, which are peptides with broad antimicrobial activity, are major constituents of rabbit neutrophils and certain macrophages. We tested six rabbit defensins, NP-1, NP-2, NP-3a, NP-3b, NP-4, and NP-5, for activity against Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Mixtures of T. pallidum and defensin in 10% normal rabbit serum (NRS) or heat-inactivated NRS (HI-NRS) were incubated anaerobically for various time periods ranging between 0 and 16 h and then examined by dark-field microscopy for treponemal motility or inoculated intradermally into rabbits to assess treponemal virulence. Immobilization of T. pallidum by NP-1 (400 micrograms/ml) occurred after 4 and 8 h of coincubation in mixtures containing NRS and HI-NRS, respectively. Similarly, neutralization of T. pallidum by NP-1 occurred more rapidly and was complete when incubations were performed in NRS as compared with that in HI-NRS. Endpoint titration confirmed the augmentation of NP-1 antitreponemal activity by heat-labile serum factors; NP-1 showed neutralizing activity at 4 micrograms/ml (about 1 microM) in NRS and at 40 micrograms/ml in HI-NRS. When NP-1 was tested in serum that was deficient in C6, the T. pallidum neutralizing activity of NP-1 was reduced to levels slightly greater than that observed in HI-NRS. NP-1 that had been reduced and alkylated was inactive against T. pallidum. When NP-2, NP-3a, NP-3b, NP-4, and NP-5 were tested at 400 micrograms/ml, all exerted potent treponemicidal activity, manifested by abrogation or delayed development of cutaneous lesions relative to that of controls. These data suggest that defensins may equip certain macrophages and neutrophils to participate in host defense against T. pallidum, that the direct activity of defensins against T. pallidum is enhanced by heat-labile serum factors (presumably complement), and that conformational factors influence the biological activity of the defensin molecule. PMID:2004816

  19. Therapeutic polymers for dental adhesives: Loading resins with bio-active components

    PubMed Central

    Imazato, Satoshi; Ma, Sai; Chen, Ji-hua; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Many recent adhesives on the market exhibit reasonable clinical performance. Future innovations in adhesive materials should therefore seek out novel properties rather than simply modifying existing technologies. It is proposed that adhesive materials that are “bio-active” could contribute to better prognosis of restorative treatments. Methods This review examines the recent approaches used to achieve therapeutic polymers for dental adhesives by incorporating bio-active components. A strategy to maintain adhesive restorations is the focus of this paper. Results Major trials on therapeutic dental adhesives have looked at adding antibacterial activities or remineralization effects. Applications of antibacterial resin monomers based on quaternary ammonium compounds have received much research attention, and the loading of nano-sized bioactive particles or multiple ion-releasing glass fillers have been perceived as advantageous since they are not expected to influence the mechanical properties of the carrier polymer. Significance The therapeutic polymer approaches described here have the potential to provide clinical benefits. However, not many technological applications in this category have been successfully commercialized. Clinical evidence as well as further advancement of these technologies can be a driving force to make these new types of materials clinically available. PMID:23899387

  20. PECAM-1 (CD 31) mediates transendothelial leukocyte migration in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Rijcken, Emile; Mennigen, Rudolf B; Schaefer, Sebastian D; Laukoetter, Mike G; Anthoni, Christoph; Spiegel, Hans-Ullrich; Bruewer, Matthias; Senninger, Norbert; Krieglstein, Christian F

    2007-08-01

    Transendothelial migration of circulating leukocytes into the colonic wall is a key step in the development of the inflammatory infiltrate in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 PECAM-1 (CD31) is expressed in the tight junction area of endothelial cells, where it is supposed to support the transmigration process. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PECAM-1 in experimental IBD and to show whether blockade of PECAM-1 has therapeutic effects. Chronic colitis was induced in female BALB/c mice by cyclic oral administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) 3% (wt/vol). Expression of PECAM-1 was visualized by immunohistochemistry. In the treatment group animals received 1 mg/kg anti-PECAM-1 (2H8) ip daily starting on day 26. On day 30 leukocyte adhesion and migration was measured during N(2)O-isoflurane anesthesia in the distal colon by intravital microscopy. Disease activity index (DAI), histology, and MPO levels were compared with healthy and diseased controls. PECAM-1 was expressed in colitic mice. Chronic DSS colitis was characterized by a marked increase in rolling, adherent, and transmigrated leukocytes compared with healthy controls. Immunoblockade of PECAM-1 reduced leukocyte transmigration significantly and also diminished leukocyte rolling and sticking in an indirect manner. It also resulted in a significantly diminished DAI and MPO levels, as well as an amelioration of the histological inflammation score. PECAM-1 plays an important role in transendothelial leukocyte migration in DSS colitis. PECAM-1 could be a novel target for antibody-based treatment in IBD. PMID:17510197

  1. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Derived from Crocodylus siamensis Leukocyte Extract, Revealing Anticancer Activity and Apoptotic Induction on Human Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Theansungnoen, Tinnakorn; Maijaroen, Surachai; Jangpromma, Nisachon; Yaraksa, Nualyai; Daduang, Sakda; Temsiripong, Theeranan; Daduang, Jureerut; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2016-06-01

    Known antimicrobial peptides KT2 and RT2 as well as the novel RP9 derived from the leukocyte extract of the freshwater crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) were used to evaluate the ability in killing human cervical cancer cells. RP9 in the extract was purified by a combination of anion exchange column and reversed-phase HPLC, and its sequence was analyzed by mass spectrometry. The novel peptide could inhibit Gram-negative Vibrio cholerae (clinical isolation) and Gram-positive Bacillus pumilus TISTR 905, and its MIC values were 61.2 µM. From scanning electron microscopy, the peptide was seen to affect bacterial surfaces directly. KT2 and RT2, which are designed antimicrobial peptides using the C. siamensis Leucrocin I template, as well as RP9 were chemically synthesized for investigation of anticancer activity. By Sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay, these antimicrobial peptides could inhibit both HeLa and CaSki cancer cell lines. The IC50 values of KT2 and RT2 for HeLa and CaSki cells showed 28.7-53.4 and 17.3-30.8 µM, while those of RP9 were 126.2 and 168.3 µM, respectively. Additionally, the best candidate peptides KT2 and RT2 were used to determine the apoptotic induction on cancer cells by human apoptosis array assay. As a result, KT2 and RT2 were observed to induce apoptotic cell death in HeLa cells. Therefore, these results indicate that KT2 and RT2 with antimicrobial activity have a highly potent ability to kill human cervical cancer cells. PMID:27129462

  2. The activity of milk leukocytes in response to a water-soluble fraction of Mycobacterium phlei in bovine subclinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, R; Ram, G C; Dash, P K; Goswami, T

    2004-01-01

    The effect of a water-soluble fraction (WSF) of a non-pathogenic strain of Mycobacterium phlei was studied in bovine subclinical mastitis (SCM) by measuring the myeloperoxidase and acid phosphatase enzyme levels in the milk leukocytes. Forty-five cows were divided into three equal groups. Group I, consisting of 15 healthy cows, served as the control, whereas groups II and III each contained 15 cows with subclinical mastitis on the basis of a positive reaction in the California mastitis test (CMT). The cows in group II received 100 microg of WSF in 5 ml sterile phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4 (PBS) once only, while those in group III received 5 ml sterile PBS daily for 7 days, both treatments being given by the intramammary route. Observations were made up to 30 days after treatment (AT). The CMT of the healthy milk was negative (0), whereas it ranged between 1 and 2 points in SCM. The somatic cell count (SCC) increased significantly (p < 0.05) on day 3, then fell steeply from day 7 up to day 30 AT in the cows in group II. A steady decrease in the total bacterial count (TBC) was observed in the group treated with WSF but the bacterial counts remained high in the groups treated with PBS. The mean acid phosphatase level was enhanced by 119% on day 3 AT in group II but only by 18.7% in the cows in group III. The mean myeloperoxidase level was enhanced by 100% in the cows in group II but only by 18% in those in group III on day 3 AT. This significant reduction in the bacterial load in infected cows caused by intramammary infusion of WSF may be due to activation of the microbicidal activity of the neutrophils, but this requires confirmation. PMID:14989362

  3. TRPC6 is the endothelial calcium channel that regulates leukocyte transendothelial migration during the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Weber, Evan W; Han, Fei; Tauseef, Mohammad; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Mehta, Dolly; Muller, William A

    2015-10-19

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) is a tightly regulated, multistep process that is critical to the inflammatory response. A transient increase in endothelial cytosolic free calcium ion concentration (↑[Ca(2+)]i) is required for TEM. However, the mechanism by which endothelial ↑[Ca(2+)]i regulates TEM and the channels mediating this ↑[Ca(2+)]i are unknown. Buffering ↑[Ca(2+)]i in endothelial cells does not affect leukocyte adhesion or locomotion but selectively blocks TEM, suggesting a role for ↑[Ca(2+)]i specifically for this step. Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a Ca(2+) channel expressed in endothelial cells, colocalizes with platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM) to surround leukocytes during TEM and clusters when endothelial PECAM is engaged. Expression of dominant-negative TRPC6 or shRNA knockdown in endothelial cells arrests neutrophils apically over the junction, similar to when PECAM is blocked. Selectively activating endothelial TRPC6 rescues TEM during an ongoing PECAM blockade, indicating that TRPC6 functions downstream of PECAM. Furthermore, endothelial TRPC6 is required for trafficking of lateral border recycling compartment membrane, which facilitates TEM. Finally, mice lacking TRPC6 in the nonmyeloid compartment (i.e., endothelium) exhibit a profound defect in neutrophil TEM with no effect on leukocyte trafficking. Our findings identify endothelial TRPC6 as the calcium channel mediating the ↑[Ca(2+)]i required for TEM at a step downstream of PECAM homophilic interactions. PMID:26392222

  4. TRPC6 is the endothelial calcium channel that regulates leukocyte transendothelial migration during the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Evan W.; Han, Fei; Tauseef, Mohammad; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Mehta, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) is a tightly regulated, multistep process that is critical to the inflammatory response. A transient increase in endothelial cytosolic free calcium ion concentration (↑[Ca2+]i) is required for TEM. However, the mechanism by which endothelial ↑[Ca2+]i regulates TEM and the channels mediating this ↑[Ca2+]i are unknown. Buffering ↑[Ca2+]i in endothelial cells does not affect leukocyte adhesion or locomotion but selectively blocks TEM, suggesting a role for ↑[Ca2+]i specifically for this step. Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a Ca2+ channel expressed in endothelial cells, colocalizes with platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM) to surround leukocytes during TEM and clusters when endothelial PECAM is engaged. Expression of dominant-negative TRPC6 or shRNA knockdown in endothelial cells arrests neutrophils apically over the junction, similar to when PECAM is blocked. Selectively activating endothelial TRPC6 rescues TEM during an ongoing PECAM blockade, indicating that TRPC6 functions downstream of PECAM. Furthermore, endothelial TRPC6 is required for trafficking of lateral border recycling compartment membrane, which facilitates TEM. Finally, mice lacking TRPC6 in the nonmyeloid compartment (i.e., endothelium) exhibit a profound defect in neutrophil TEM with no effect on leukocyte trafficking. Our findings identify endothelial TRPC6 as the calcium channel mediating the ↑[Ca2+]i required for TEM at a step downstream of PECAM homophilic interactions. PMID:26392222

  5. Halo sign on indium-111 leukocyte scan in gangrenous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, J.M.; Boykin, M.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Cawthon, M.A.; Landry, A.J.

    1986-02-01

    A 56-year-old man with a long history of Crohn's disease was evaluated by In-111 labeled leukocyte scanning. A halo of leukocyte activity was seen around the gallbladder fossa. A gangrenous gallbladder was removed at surgery.

  6. Trimeric Autotransporters Require Trimerization of the Passenger Domain for Stability and Adhesive Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Shane E.; Surana, Neeraj K.; Grass, Susan; St. Geme, Joseph W.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, structural studies have identified a number of bacterial, viral, and eukaryotic adhesive proteins that have a trimeric architecture. The prototype examples in bacteria are the Haemophilus influenzae Hia adhesin and the Yersinia enterocolitica YadA adhesin. Both Hia and YadA are members of the trimeric-autotransporter subfamily and are characterized by an internal passenger domain that harbors adhesive activity and a short C-terminal translocator domain that inserts into the outer membrane and facilitates delivery of the passenger domain to the bacterial surface. In this study, we examined the relationship between trimerization of the Hia and YadA passenger domains and the capacity for adhesive activity. We found that subunit-subunit interactions and stable trimerization are essential for native folding and stability and ultimately for full-level adhesive activity. These results raise the possibility that disruption of the trimeric architecture of trimeric autotransporters, and possibly other trimeric adhesins, may be an effective strategy to eliminate adhesive activity. PMID:16855229

  7. [AMP-activated protein kinase activation regulates adhesion of monocytes to vascular endothelial cells and the underlying mechanism].

    PubMed

    Bai, Hong-Bo; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-02-25

    The present study was aimed to explore the effect of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) on monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelial cells and underlying molecular mechanism. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-activated human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were treated with different concentrations of AMPK agonist 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribonucleotide (AICAR) or AMPK inhibitor compound C. And other HAECs were overexpressed with constitutive active or dominant negative AMPK protein and then treated with TNFα. The rates of monocytes adhering to endothelial cells were detected by fluorescent staining. Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA levels and protein secretions were detected by quantitative PCR and ELISA, respectively. Acetylation of NF-κB p65 at lysine 221 site was assessed by Western blot. NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity was analyzed by an ELISA-based method. By using small interfering RNA based strategy, p300 expression in HAECs was down-regulated and then cells were incubated with TNFα. NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions and adhesion rates were detected, respectively. The activity of p300 was also detected by ELISA. The results showed that AICAR treatment significantly reduced monocyte-endothelial adhesion rate, as well as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 mRNA levels and protein secretions, in TNFα-activated HAECs. Moreover, transfection of constitutive active AMPKα but not dominant negative AMPKα strongly diminished TNFα-induced upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 mRNA expressions and secretions, as well as monocyte-endothelial adhesion. Furthermore, AMPK activation decreased TNFα-mediated acetylation of NF-κB p65 at Lys221 site and reduced NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity. Silencing p300 by siRNA significantly abolished the effect of TNFα- induced adhesion molecules expression and monocyte-endothelial adhesion. Blocking AMPK activation by compound C almost

  8. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  9. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  10. Novel post-translational incorporation of tyrosine in PMA-activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, J.; Oliver, C.; Ohno, Y.; Gallin, J.I.

    1986-03-05

    During studies undertaken to determine whether stimulation of tubulin tyrosinolation occurs in PMA-activated PMN, a distinctly different and novel post-translational incorporation of tyrosine into multiple PMN proteins was observed. The reaction also occurred in organelle-depleted neutrophil cytoplasts and was highly exaggerated in organelle-enriched karyogranuloplasts. The incorporation was specific for tyrosine, did not require extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and was inhibited in the presence of a variety of reducing agents, intracellular scavengers of oxygen radicals and inhibitors of peroxidase-mediated reactions. The PMA-induced incorporation of tyrosine was completely absent in PMN from patients with chronic granulomatous disease, but occurred normally in PMN of a patient with myeloperoxidase deficiency. Moreover, the incorporation of tyrosine was blocked by N-acetyl-L-tyrosine but not by phenylalanine suggesting a requirement for the phenolic group. A two-fold increase in stable protein carbonyl derivatives was demonstrated suggesting an increased oxidative modification of the proteins. SDS urea PAGE and reversed phase HPLC did not reveal any detectable changes in the extent of protein cross-linking. The PMN tyrosine pool was approximately 900 ..mu..M and yet only 1 ..mu..M tyrosine was added in these experiments. The functional significance of this reaction is not yet clear.

  11. Phenotyping of leukocytes and granulocyte and monocyte phagocytic activity in the peripheral blood and uterus of cows with endometritis.

    PubMed

    Brodzki, P; Kostro, K; Brodzki, A; Lisiecka, U; Kurek, L; Marczuk, J

    2014-08-01

    This study was a comparative evaluation of selected immunological parameters in peripheral blood and uterine wash samples from cows with a normal postpartum period compared with cows with endometritis. We aimed to determine the usefulness of these parameters in monitoring the puerperium. In total, 40 cows were included in the study: 20 had endometritis (experimental group), and 20 did not have uterine inflammation (control group). Animals were chosen on the basis of cytological and bacteriological test results. The tests were conducted 5, 22, and 40 days postpartum. In both groups, flow cytometric analysis of the surface molecules CD4, CD8, CD21, CD25, and CD14 in the peripheral blood and uterine washings was performed. Granulocyte and monocyte phagocytic activity was determined using a commercial Phagotest kit that was adapted for flow cytometry. The percentage of phagocytic granulocytes and monocytes in both the peripheral blood and the uterine washings was significantly lower for cows in the experimental group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). A significant decrease (P < 0.01) in the percentage of CD4+, CD25+, CD14+, and CD4 + CD25(high) leukocyte subpopulations was also observed in the peripheral blood of cows with endometritis. A significant decrease (P < 0.01) in CD21+ lymphocytes and an increase in CD8+ lymphocytes was detected in uterine washings. The results of this work indicate that cell immunity dysfunction may be the main factor causing advanced inflammation of the uterus in endometritis. Knowledge of the immunological mechanisms observed in cows with endometritis might aid in choosing the correct immunomodulating agent-based adjuvant therapy. PMID:24857644

  12. Determination of the immunotoxic potential of heavy metals on the functional activity of bottlenose dolphin leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cámara Pellissó, S; Muñoz, M J; Carballo, M; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2008-02-15

    Heavy metals may affect the immune system of cetaceans. But no information exists on their effects on the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) immune system, although this species is a coastal top predator which can bioaccumulate high concentrations of them. This work studies the effects of Hg (1, 5 and 10mg/L), Al (2,5, 25 and 50mg/L), Cd (1, 10, 20 and 40mg/L), Pb (1, 10, 20 and 50mg/L) and Cr (1 and 10mg/L), on the function of phagocytes and lymphocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of bottlenose dolphins under in vitro conditions. Cell viability, apoptosis, lymphocyte proliferation and phagocytosis were evaluated. Viability and lymphoproliferation were measured with Alamar Blue assay, and apoptosis and phagocytosis were evaluated with flow cytometry. Apoptosis was detected as mechanism of cell death after cadmium and mercury exposure. A significant reduction in the lymphoproliferative response was registered by exposure to 1mg/L of mercury, 10mg/L of cadmium and 50mg/L of lead. Decreased phagocytosis was also observed at 5mg/L of mercury, 50mg/L of aluminium and 10mg/L of cadmium. Chromium did not present any effects on any immune assay at the concentrations tested. The concentrations of heavy metals that were found to affect the functional activity of bottlenose dolphin leukocytes are within the environmental ranges reported in the tissues of bottlenose dolphins. These results support the hypothesis that exposure to these contaminants, particularly mercury and cadmium could lead to a reduction in host resistance to disease in these animals. PMID:17997166

  13. Reactive oxygen species mediate angiotensin II-induced leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, A; Sanz, M J

    2001-08-01

    Chronically elevated angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced hypertension is partly mediated by superoxide production. In this study, we have investigated whether the leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions elicited by Ang-II involve reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Intravital microscopy within the rat mesenteric microvessels was used. Superfusion (60 min) with Ang-II (1 nM) induced significant increases in leukocyte rolling flux, adhesion, and emigration, which were inhibited by pretreatment with superoxide dismutase or catalase. Dihydrorhodamine-123 oxidation indicated that ROS are primarily produced by the vessel wall. Administration of dimethylthiourea, desferrioxamine, or N-acetylcysteine provoked significant reductions in Ang-II-induced leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions. In addition, a blockade of platelet-activating factor or leukotrienes also attenuated such responses significantly. The results presented indicate that in vivo Ang-II-induced leukocyte recruitment is dependent on the generation of intra- and extracellular ROS. Therefore, the use of anti-oxidants might constitute an alternative therapy for the control of the subendothelial leukocyte infiltration associated with hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:11493611

  14. Lipid binding promotes oligomerization and focal adhesion activity of vinculin

    PubMed Central

    Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Patil, Dipak N.; George, Eric M.; Brown, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and focal adhesion (FA) complexes are necessary for cell migration and morphogenesis, and for the development, growth, and survival of all metazoans. Vinculin is an essential regulator of both AJs and FAs, where it provides links to the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) affects the functions of many targets, including vinculin. Here we report the crystal structure of vinculin in complex with PIP2, which revealed that PIP2 binding alters vinculin structure to direct higher-order oligomerization and suggests that PIP2 and F-actin binding to vinculin are mutually permissive. Forced expression of PIP2-binding–deficient mutants of vinculin in vinculin-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts revealed that PIP2 binding is necessary for maintaining optimal FAs, for organization of actin stress fibers, and for cell migration and spreading. Finally, photobleaching experiments indicated that PIP2 binding is required for the control of vinculin dynamics and turnover in FAs. Thus, through oligomerization, PIP2 directs a transient vinculin sequestration at FAs that is necessary for proper FA function. PMID:25488920

  15. Elemental composition of leukocyte subfractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Admans, L. L.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to determine the elemental concentration of various subfractions of leukocytes in a normal subject. Little work has been published on the elemental composition of these subfractions. First, a reliable technique for separation of these subfractions had to be established so that it could be applied to the determination of elemental concentrations in leukocyte subfractions from patients undergoing heart bypass surgery. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) utilising short irradiation and counting was the technique employed. Various washing media were examined during the separation of the leukocyte subfractions, for contamination of these small samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclearcytes (PMN). Early results showed Mg and Se were present in these subfractions. Possibilities for further work are also discussed.

  16. Adhesion molecules and receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adhesion molecules are necessary for leukocyte trafficking and differentiation. They serve to initiate cell-cell interactions under conditions of shear, and they sustain the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions needed for cellular locomotion. They also can serve directly as signaling molecules act...

  17. Rapidly light-activated surgical protein glue inspired by mussel adhesion and insect structural crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun Young; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Yang, Yun Jung; Kim, Bum Jin; Choi, Bong-Hyuk; Jung, Gyu Yong; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-10-01

    Currently approved surgical tissue glues do not satisfy the requirements for ideal bioadhesives due to limited adhesion in wet conditions and severe cytotoxicity. Herein, we report a new light-activated, mussel protein-based bioadhesive (LAMBA) inspired by mussel adhesion and insect dityrosine crosslinking chemistry. LAMBA exhibited substantially stronger bulk wet tissue adhesion than commercially available fibrin glue and good biocompatibility in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Besides, the easily tunable, light-activated crosslinking enabled an effective on-demand wound closure and facilitated wound healing. Based on these outstanding properties, LAMBA holds great potential as an ideal surgical tissue glue for diverse medical applications, including sutureless wound closures of skin and internal organs. PMID:26197411

  18. Quantal concept of T-cell activation: adhesion domains as immunological synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackmann, Erich

    2011-06-01

    Adhesion micro-domains (ADs) formed during encounters of lymphocytes with antigen-presenting cells (APC) mediate the genetic expression of quanta of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2). The IL-2-induced activation of IL-2 receptors promotes the stepwise progression of the T-cells through the cell cycle, hence their name, immunological synapses. The ADs form short-lived reaction centres controlling the recruitment of activators of the biochemical pathway (the kinases Lck and ZAP) while preventing the access of inhibitors (phosphatase CD45) through steric repulsion forces. CD45 acts as the generator of adhesion domains and, through its role as a spacer protein, also as the promoter of the reaction. In a second phase of T-cell-APC encounters, long-lived global reaction spaces (called supramolecular activation complexes (SMAC)) form by talin-mediated binding of the T-cell integrin (LFA-1) to the counter-receptor ICAM-1, resulting in the formation of ring-like tight adhesion zones (peripheral SMAC). The ADs move to the centre of the intercellular adhesion zone forming the central SMAC, which serve in the recycling of the AD. We propose that cell stimulation is triggered by integrating the effect evoked by the short-lived adhesion domains. Similar global reaction platforms are formed by killer cells to destruct APC. We present a testable mechanical model showing that global reaction spaces (SMAC or dome-like contacts between cytotoxic cells and APC) form by self-organization through delayed activation of the integrin-binding affinity and stabilization of the adhesion zones by F-actin recruitment. The mechanical stability and the polarization of the adhering T-cells are mediated by microtubule-actin cross-talk.

  19. Ligand-induced adhesion to activated endothelium and to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in lymphocytes transfected with the N-formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Honda, S; Campbell, J J; Andrew, D P; Engelhardt, B; Butcher, B A; Warnock, R A; Ye, R D; Butcher, E C

    1994-04-15

    Binding of FMLP to the neutrophil N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) transmits signals through pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins triggering Ca2+ flux, superoxide production, granule exocytosis, and neutrophil aggregation and adhesion involving the beta 2 (CD18) integrins. Expression of the FPR in mouse fibroblasts or human kidney cells has been shown to confer an N-formyl peptide-inducible Ca2+ flux in transfectants. Here we demonstrate that the transfected receptor can also support ligand-induced alterations in cellular adhesion. We established stable transfectants of mouse L1-2 pre-B cells with cDNA for human FPR (L1-2 FPR cells). The transfectants bind N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein with 1.4 x 10(5) sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 3.3 nM. Stimulation with FMLP induces a transient Ca2+ flux. FMLP also triggers adhesion of L1-2 FPR cells to TNF-alpha- or LPS-activated bEnd3 cells (mouse brain-derived endothelial cells) and to purified mouse VCAM-1. Binding is inhibited by Abs to VCAM-1 and to the alpha-chain of its lymphocyte receptor (the alpha 4 beta 1 integrin, VLA-4). Stimulation with FMLP does not induce a change in cell surface expression of alpha 4. Induced adhesion to VCAM-1 is rapid, detectable at the earliest times measurable (30 to 60 s after FMLP addition), and is inhibited by pertussis toxin. We conclude that FPR can mediate integrin activation not only in neutrophils but also in lymphocytes, and can trigger rapid adhesion via lymphocyte alpha 4 beta 1. The adhesion of lymphocytes is critical to their migration and targeting; our results suggest the possibility of manipulating adhesive responses through expression of chemoattractant receptors in lymphoid cells engineered for cellular therapy, allowing targeted adhesion and potentially migration in response to locally administered ligands. PMID:7511663

  20. Dynamic transcription factor activity networks in response to independently altered mechanical and adhesive microenvironmental cues.

    PubMed

    Peñalver Bernabé, Beatriz; Shin, Seungjin; Rios, Peter D; Broadbelt, Linda J; Shea, Lonnie D; Seidlits, Stephanie K

    2016-08-01

    Multiple aspects of the local extracellular environment profoundly affect cell phenotype and function. Physical and chemical cues in the environment trigger intracellular signaling cascades that ultimately activate transcription factors (TFs) - powerful regulators of the cell phenotype. TRACER (TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRrays) was employed for large-scale, dynamic quantification of TF activity in human fibroblasts cultured on hydrogels with a controlled elastic modulus and integrin ligand density. We identified three groups of TFs: responders to alterations in ligand density alone, substrate stiffness or both. Dynamic networks of regulatory TFs were constructed computationally and revealed distinct TF activity levels, directionality (i.e., activation or inhibition), and dynamics for adhesive and mechanical cues. Moreover, TRACER networks predicted conserved hubs of TF activity across multiple cell types, which are significantly altered in clinical fibrotic tissues. Our approach captures the distinct and overlapping effects of adhesive and mechanical stimuli, identifying conserved signaling mechanisms in normal and disease states. PMID:27470442

  1. Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor-α with Adalimumab: Effects on Endothelial Activation and Monocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Raghav; Schuett, Jutta; Schuett, Harald; Koch, Ann-Kathrin; Luchtefeld, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Objective It is well known that atherosclerotic inflammatory vascular disease is critically driven by oxidized lipids and cytokines. In this regard, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is known as a crucial mediator of early pro-atherosclerotic events. Epidemiologic data suggest that blockade of TNF-α has beneficial effects on vascular outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, however, detailed mechanistic studies are still lacking. This study aims to elucidate effects of TNF-α blockade by adalimumab–which is approved for several inflammatory disorders–on endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion under pro-atherosclerotic conditions. Methods and Results Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) differentiated THP-1 macrophages were stimulated with oxidized low density lipoprotein and subsequent analysis of this conditioned media (oxLDL CM) revealed a strong release of TNF-α. The TNF-α rich supernatant led to activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as shown by enhanced expression of major adhesion molecules, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin which was suppressed by the TNF-α inhibitor adalimumab. Accordingly, adalimumab effectively prevented THP-1 monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under static as well as under flow conditions. Furthermore, adalimumab suppressed endothelial leakage as shown by Evan's blue diffusion across a confluent endothelial monolayer. Of note, after intraperitoneal injection we detected abundant deposition of fluorophore-labelled adalimumab in atherosclerotic plaques of hypercholesterolemic mice. Conclusion Our results show that adalimumab prevents major inflammatory effects of TNF-α on endothelial activation, endothelial monocyte adhesion, endothelial leakage and therefore extends the therapeutic options of adalimumab to limit vascular inflammation. PMID:27467817

  2. Real-time digital imaging of leukocyte-endothelial interaction in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) of the rat cremaster muscle.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Jan R; Goerendt, Kurt; Stark, G Bjoern; Eisenhardt, Steffen U

    2012-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) has been implicated in a large array of pathological conditions such as cerebral stroke, myocardial infarction, intestinal ischemia as well as following transplant and cardiovascular surgery. Reperfusion of previously ischemic tissue, while essential for the prevention of irreversible tissue injury, elicits excessive inflammation of the affected tissue. Adjacent to the production of reactive oxygen species, activation of the complement system and increased microvascular permeability, the activation of leukocytes is one of the principle actors in the pathological cascade of inflammatory tissue damage during reperfusion. Leukocyte activation is a multistep process consisting of rolling, firm adhesion and transmigration and is mediated by a complex interaction between adhesion molecules in response to chemoattractants such as complement factors, chemokines, or platelet-activating factor. While leukocyte rolling in postcapillary venules is predominantly mediated by the interaction of selectins with their counter ligands, firm adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium is selectin-controlled via binding to intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM) and vascular cellular adhesion molecules (VCAM). Gold standard for the in vivo observation of leukocyte-endothelial interaction is the technique of intravital microscopy, first described in 1968. Though various models of IRI (ischemia-reperfusion injury) have been described for various organs, only few are suitable for direct visualization of leukocyte recruitment in the microvascular bed on a high level of image quality. We here promote the digital intravital epifluorescence microscopy of the postcapillary venule in the cremasteric microcirculation of the rat as a convenient method to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze leukocyte recruitment for IRI-research in striated muscle tissue and provide a detailed manual for accomplishing the technique. We further illustrate common pitfalls and

  3. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gerritsen, M. E.; Carley, W. W.; Ranges, G. E.; Shen, C. P.; Phan, S. A.; Ligon, G. F.; Perry, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma induces the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell surface. Interfering with either leukocyte adhesion or adhesion protein upregulation is an important therapeutic target as evidenced by the potent anti-inflammatory actions of neutralizing antibodies to these ligands in various animal models and in patients. In the present study we report that cotreatment of human endothelial cells with certain hydroxyflavones and flavanols blocks cytokine-induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells. One of the most potent flavones, apigenin, exhibited a dose- and time-dependent, reversible effect on adhesion protein expression as well as inhibiting adhesion protein upregulation at the transcriptional level. Apigenin also inhibited IL-1 alpha-induced prostaglandin synthesis and TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production, suggesting that the hydroxyflavones may act as general inhibitors of cytokine-induced gene expression. Although apigenin did not inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B(p50(NFKB1)/p65(RelA)) we found this flavonoid did inhibit TNF-alpha induced beta-galactosidase activity in SW480 cells stably transfected with a beta-galactosidase reporter construct driven by four NF-kappa B elements, suggesting an action on NF-kappa B transcriptional activation. Adhesion of leukocytes to cytokine-treated endothelial cells was blocked in endothelial cells cotreated with apigenin. Finally, apigenin demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw edema and delayed type hypersensitivity in the mouse. We conclude that flavonoids offer important therapeutic potential for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory diseases involving an increase in leukocyte adhesion and trafficking. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 11 PMID:7543732

  4. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Induced with Leukocyte Procoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Kociba, Gary J.; Griesemer, Richard A.

    1972-01-01

    The procoagulant activity of rabbit peritoneal leukocytes significantly increased when the leukocytes were incubated in suspension cultures at 37 C for 24 hours. Intravenous infusions of Iysates of 232 × 106 rabbit leukocytes which had been incubated in cultures at 37 C for 24 hours produced disseminated intravascular coagulation and vasculitis involving the pulmonary arteries in normal rabbits. Intraaortic infusions of lysates of 230 × 106 similarly incubated leukocytes produced renal thrombosis and renal cortical necrosis in normal rabbits. These observations suggest that the procoagulant of granulocytic leukocytes could play a role in the generalized Shwartzman reaction and other syndromes of disseminated intravascular coagulation. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 1Fig 2 PMID:5086898

  5. Platelet adhesion and activation on polyethylene glycol modified polyurethane surfaces. Measurement of cytoplasmic calcium.

    PubMed

    Park, K D; Suzuki, K; Lee, W K; Lee, J E; Kim, Y H; Sakurai, Y; Okano, T

    1996-01-01

    Polyurethane (PU) surfaces were modified by coupling polyethylene glycol (PEG; molecular weight, 1,000) chains carrying different terminal groups (PU-PEG1K-OH, PU-PEG1K-NH2, PU-PEG1K-SO3) and longer PEG chains (MW, 3,350; PU-PEG3.4K-OH). The modified PU surfaces have the same PEG (1K) chain density. Surface induced platelet activation was evaluated by measuring cytoplasmic free calcium concentration in platelets contacting modified surfaces, and platelet adhesion onto modified surfaces was investigated in vitro. Cytoplasmic free calcium levels in platelets contacting PU-PEG-SO3 remained relatively constant, in contrast to the significant increase observed for PU-PEG-NH2, PU-PEG-OH, and control PU surfaces. The degree of platelet adhesion clearly demonstrates that all PEG graft surfaces prevented platelet adhesion. Among PEG1K surfaces, PU-PEG-SO3 shows the lowest platelet adhesion. In the case of relatively longer PEG grafted surfaces (PU-PEG3.4K-OH and PU-PEG3.4K-Hep), both surfaces were found to prevent the increase in both cytoplasmic free calcium and platelet adhesion. These results suggest that longer PEG chain grafting is more effective than shorter grafting in preventing platelet activation and adhesion because of the highly dynamic movement of hydrated PEG chains at the interface. In addition, in vitro platelet interaction is dependent upon terminal groups of PEG chains on PEG1K series surfaces. PMID:8945010

  6. Urokinase links plasminogen activation and cell adhesion by cleavage of the RGD motif in vitronectin.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzi, Valentina; Sarra Ferraris, Gian Maria; Madsen, Jeppe B; Lupia, Michela; Andreasen, Peter A; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2016-07-01

    Components of the plasminogen activation system including urokinase (uPA), its inhibitor (PAI-1) and its cell surface receptor (uPAR) have been implicated in a wide variety of biological processes related to tissue homoeostasis. Firstly, the binding of uPA to uPAR favours extracellular proteolysis by enhancing cell surface plasminogen activation. Secondly, it promotes cell adhesion and signalling through binding of the provisional matrix protein vitronectin. We now report that uPA and plasmin induces a potent negative feedback on cell adhesion through specific cleavage of the RGD motif in vitronectin. Cleavage of vitronectin by uPA displays a remarkable receptor dependence and requires concomitant binding of both uPA and vitronectin to uPAR Moreover, we show that PAI-1 counteracts the negative feedback and behaves as a proteolysis-triggered stabilizer of uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to vitronectin. These findings identify a novel and highly specific function for the plasminogen activation system in the regulation of cell adhesion to vitronectin. The cleavage of vitronectin by uPA and plasmin results in the release of N-terminal vitronectin fragments that can be detected in vivo, underscoring the potential physiological relevance of the process. PMID:27189837

  7. Kank2 activates talin, reduces force transduction across integrins and induces central adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqi; Tseng, Hui-Yuan; Tan, Steven; Senger, Fabrice; Kurzawa, Laetitia; Dedden, Dirk; Mizuno, Naoko; Wasik, Anita A; Thery, Manuel; Dunn, Alexander R; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    Integrin-based adhesions play critical roles in cell migration. Talin activates integrins and flexibly connects integrins to the actomyosin cytoskeleton, thereby serving as a 'molecular clutch' that transmits forces to the extracellular matrix to drive cell migration. Here we identify the evolutionarily conserved Kank protein family as novel components of focal adhesions (FAs). Kank proteins accumulate at the lateral border of FAs, which we term the FA belt, and in central sliding adhesions, where they directly bind the talin rod domain through the Kank amino-terminal (KN) motif and induce talin and integrin activation. In addition, Kank proteins diminish the talin-actomyosin linkage, which curbs force transmission across integrins, leading to reduced integrin-ligand bond strength, slippage between integrin and ligand, central adhesion formation and sliding, and reduced cell migration speed. Our data identify Kank proteins as talin activators that decrease the grip between the integrin-talin complex and actomyosin to regulate cell migration velocity. PMID:27548916

  8. Fluorescence imaging microscopy of leukocytes-endothelium interaction in rat mesenteric microcirculation after endotoxin injection: role of inhaled nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Neviere, Remi; Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Buys, Bruno; Dhelin, Guy; Lesage, Jean C.; Mathieu, D.; Guery, Benoit; Chopin, Claude

    1999-02-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to microvascular endothelium has been recognized as an important factor in the development of multiple organ dysfunction after a septic insult. We tested the hypothesis whether inhaled NO would reduce leukocyte rolling and / or leukocyte adhesion in the mesenteric venule preparation in endotoxemic rats. This study was performed with fluorescence imaging microscopy using a closed chamber for in vivo mesentery visualization. Leukocytes were selectively stained with acridine red. Compared to saline, endotoxemia was associated with increases in the flux of rolling leukocytes and in adherent and emigrated leukocytes. Inhaled nitric oxide treatment had no effects on leukocyte behavior in saline treated rats, whereas it reduced adherent and emigrated leukocytes in endotoxin-treated rats. In conclusion, we demonstrated that endotoxemia-induced leukocyte infiltration was related to an increase in the number of rolling leukocytes and subsequent adhesion and emigration in the mesenteric venule. Our results clearly showed that inhaled NO reduces leukocyte adhesion and transmigration in mesenteric venule of endotoxemic rats presumably by interfering with specific cell adhesion molecules.

  9. Extracellular MRP8/14 is a regulator of β2 integrin-dependent neutrophil slow rolling and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Pruenster, Monika; Kurz, Angela R. M.; Chung, Kyoung-Jin; Cao-Ehlker, Xiao; Bieber, Stephanie; Nussbaum, Claudia F.; Bierschenk, Susanne; Eggersmann, Tanja K.; Rohwedder, Ina; Heinig, Kristina; Immler, Roland; Moser, Markus; Koedel, Uwe; Gran, Sandra; McEver, Rodger P.; Vestweber, Dietmar; Verschoor, Admar; Leanderson, Tomas; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Roth, Johannes; Vogl, Thomas; Sperandio, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-related proteins (MRPs) 8 and 14 are cytosolic proteins secreted from myeloid cells as proinflammatory mediators. Currently, the functional role of circulating extracellular MRP8/14 is unclear. Our present study identifies extracellular MRP8/14 as an autocrine player in the leukocyte adhesion cascade. We show that E-selectin–PSGL-1 interaction during neutrophil rolling triggers Mrp8/14 secretion. Released MRP8/14 in turn activates a TLR4-mediated, Rap1-GTPase-dependent pathway of rapid β2 integrin activation in neutrophils. This extracellular activation loop reduces leukocyte rolling velocity and stimulates adhesion. Thus, we identify Mrp8/14 and TLR4 as important modulators of the leukocyte recruitment cascade during inflammation in vivo. PMID:25892652

  10. Extracellular MRP8/14 is a regulator of β2 integrin-dependent neutrophil slow rolling and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Pruenster, Monika; Kurz, Angela R M; Chung, Kyoung-Jin; Cao-Ehlker, Xiao; Bieber, Stephanie; Nussbaum, Claudia F; Bierschenk, Susanne; Eggersmann, Tanja K; Rohwedder, Ina; Heinig, Kristina; Immler, Roland; Moser, Markus; Koedel, Uwe; Gran, Sandra; McEver, Rodger P; Vestweber, Dietmar; Verschoor, Admar; Leanderson, Tomas; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Roth, Johannes; Vogl, Thomas; Sperandio, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-related proteins (MRPs) 8 and 14 are cytosolic proteins secreted from myeloid cells as proinflammatory mediators. Currently, the functional role of circulating extracellular MRP8/14 is unclear. Our present study identifies extracellular MRP8/14 as an autocrine player in the leukocyte adhesion cascade. We show that E-selectin-PSGL-1 interaction during neutrophil rolling triggers Mrp8/14 secretion. Released MRP8/14 in turn activates a TLR4-mediated, Rap1-GTPase-dependent pathway of rapid β2 integrin activation in neutrophils. This extracellular activation loop reduces leukocyte rolling velocity and stimulates adhesion. Thus, we identify Mrp8/14 and TLR4 as important modulators of the leukocyte recruitment cascade during inflammation in vivo. PMID:25892652

  11. Suboptimal Activation of Protease-activated Receptors Enhances α2β1 Integrin-mediated Platelet Adhesion to Collagen*

    PubMed Central

    Marjoram, Robin J.; Voss, Bryan; Pan, Yumei; Dickeson, S. Kent; Zutter, Mary M.; Hamm, Heidi E.; Santoro, Samuel A.

    2009-01-01

    Thrombin and fibrillar collagen are potent activators of platelets at sites of vascular injury. Both agonists cause platelet shape change, granule secretion, and aggregation to form the primary hemostatic plug. Human platelets express two thrombin receptors, protease-activated receptors 1 and 4 (PAR1 and PAR4) and two collagen receptors, the α2β1 integrin (α2β1) and the glycoprotein VI (GPVI)/FcRγ chain complex. Although these receptors and their signaling mechanisms have been intensely studied, it is not known whether and how these receptors cooperate in the hemostatic function of platelets. This study examined cooperation between the thrombin and collagen receptors in platelet adhesion by utilizing a collagen-related peptide (α2-CRP) containing the α2β1-specific binding motif, GFOGER, in conjunction with PAR-activating peptides. We demonstrate that platelet adhesion to α2-CRP is substantially enhanced by suboptimal PAR activation (agonist concentrations that do not stimulate platelet aggregation) using the PAR4 agonist peptide and thrombin. The enhanced adhesion induced by suboptimal PAR4 activation was α2β1-dependent and GPVI/FcRγ-independent as revealed in experiments with α2β1- or FcRγ-deficient mouse platelets. We further show that suboptimal activation of other platelet Gq-linked G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) produces enhanced platelet adhesion to α2-CRP. The enhanced α2β1-mediated platelet adhesion is controlled by phospholipase C (PLC), but is not dependent on granule secretion, activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, or on phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate a platelet priming mechanism initiated by suboptimal activation of PAR4 or other platelet Gq-linked GPCRs through a PLC-dependent signaling cascade that promotes enhanced α2β1 binding to collagens containing GFOGER sites. PMID:19815553

  12. Effect of etizolam (Depas) on production of superoxide anion by platelet-activating factor and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Aratani, H; Nishida, Y; Terasawa, M; Maruyama, Y

    1988-06-01

    Effect of etizolam on platelet activating factor (PAF) and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced superoxide anion (O2-) production in guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) was investigated. Etizolam showed the inhibitory effect on PAF-induced O2- production concentration dependently, with an IC50 value of 4.7 microM, but it had no inhibitory effect on FMLP-induced O2- production at 100 microM. These results suggest that etizolam has a selectively strong inhibitory effect on PAF-induced O2- production in guinea pig PMNL. PMID:2848961

  13. Screening of immunomodulatory and adhesive Lactobacillus with antagonistic activities against Salmonella from fermented vegetables.

    PubMed

    Feng, Junchang; Liu, Pilong; Yang, Xin; Zhao, Xin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to select strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) by their in vitro adhesive and immunomodulatory properties for potential use as probiotics. In this study, 16 randomly selected LAB strains from fermented vegetables (sauerkraut, bean and cabbage) were first screened for their tolerance to acid, bile salts, pepsin and pancreatin, bacterial inhibitory activities and abilities to adherence to Caco-2 cells. Then, 4 strains with the highest adhesion abilities were selected for further studies of their immunomodulatory properties and inhibitory effects against Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro. The results showed that these 16 LAB strains effectively survived in simulated gastrointestinal condition and inhibited growth of six tested pathogens. Lactobacillus rhamnosus P1, Lactobacillus plantarum P2, Lactobacillus rhamnosus P3 and Lactobacillus casei P4 had the highest abilities to adhere to Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, L. plantarum P2 strain showed higher abilities to induce expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-12 by splenic monocytes and strongly inhibited the adhesion and invasion of S. enteritidis ATCC13076 to Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that Lactobacillus strains P2 could be used as a probiotic candidate in food against Salmonella infection. PMID:26340935

  14. Leukocyte rheology in recent stroke.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; Matrai, A; Paulsen, F

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen patients with recent ischemic stroke were compared with an equal number of matched controls. Standardized suspensions of red cells as well as of red and white cells were filtered in a new filtration apparatus capable of discriminating between cell deformability and filter occlusion. Results show that red cell deformability, although slightly lower than in controls, is not significantly altered in stroke patients. Filter occlusion, however, was significantly higher in patients when red and white cell suspensions were filtered, but not when red cell suspensions were used, suggesting that white cell filterability is impaired after stroke, which could be due to decreased deformability and/or increased adhesiveness of leukocytes. Slowed white cell passage may also occur in the living microcirculation and may present an obstacle to nutritive flow in exchange vessels, possibly contributing to local ischemia and tissue necrosis after stroke. PMID:3810770

  15. Modulation of Leukocyte Behavior by an Inflamed Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Schor, Hagai; Vaday, Gayle G.

    2000-01-01

    Inflammation is a response of the immune system to foreign insult or physical damage. Various cellular and humoral components of the immune system are recruited from the vascular system and are translocated through endothelium, and into extracellular matrix (ECM) compartments of inflamed tissues. This translocation is orchestrated by various types of accessory signals, in the form of soluble or complexed molecules, which evoke remarkable transitions in leukocyte activities. Recruited inflammatory cells give rise to mechanisms of migration, including the secretion of enzymes and other pro-inflammatory mediators and the alteration of their adhesive contacts with the ECM. Hence, migrating cells secrete enzymes, chemokines, and cytokines which interact with the ECM, and thereby, provide the cells with intrinsic signals for coordinating their responses. Resultant products of enzymatic modifications to the ECM microenvironment, such as cytokine- and ECM-derived molecules, may be also part of a cell-signaling mechanism that provides leukocytes with information about the nature of their inflammatory activity; such a mechanism may give the immune system data that can be cognitively interpreted for consequential activities. This article reviews the findings that support this notion and describe the dynamic interactions between participants of the inflammatory processes. PMID:11097214

  16. Kupffer cells and activation of endothelial TLR4 coordinate neutrophil adhesion within liver sinusoids during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Braedon; Jenne, Craig N; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Kubes, Paul

    2013-12-01

    A key pathological feature of the systemic inflammatory response of sepsis/endotoxemia is the accumulation of neutrophils within the microvasculature of organs such as the liver, where they cause tissue damage and vascular dysfunction. There is emerging evidence that the vascular endothelium is critical to the orchestration of inflammatory responses to blood-borne microbes and microbial products in sepsis/endotoxemia. In this study, we aimed to understand the role of endothelium, and specifically endothelial TLR4 activation, in the regulation of neutrophil recruitment to the liver during endotoxemia. Intravital microscopy of bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that TLR4 expression by non-bone marrow-derived cells was required for neutrophil recruitment to the liver during endotoxemia. Furthermore, LPS-induced neutrophil adhesion in liver sinusoids was equivalent between wild-type mice and transgenic mice that express TLR4 only on endothelium (tlr4(-/-)Tie2(tlr4)), revealing that activation of endothelial TLR4 alone was sufficient to initiate neutrophil adhesion. Neutrophil arrest within sinusoids of endotoxemic mice requires adhesive interactions between neutrophil CD44 and endothelial hyaluronan. Intravital immunofluorescence imaging demonstrated that stimulation of endothelial TLR4 alone was sufficient to induce the deposition of serum-derived hyaluronan-associated protein (SHAP) within sinusoids, which was required for CD44/hyaluronan-dependent neutrophil adhesion. In addition to endothelial TLR4 activation, Kupffer cells contribute to neutrophil recruitment via a distinct CD44/HA/SHAP-independent mechanism. This study sheds new light on the control of innate immune activation within the liver vasculature during endotoxemia, revealing a key role for endothelial cells as sentinels in the detection of intravascular infections and coordination of neutrophil recruitment to the liver. PMID:24113769

  17. Systems-level studies of glycosyltransferase gene expression and enzyme activity that are associated with the selectin binding function of human leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, Dhananjay D.; Chandrasekaran, E. V.; Lau, Joseph T. Y.; Matta, Khushi L.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2008-01-01

    The application of systems biology methods in the emerging field of glycomics requires the collection and integration of glycosyltransferase data at the gene and enzyme level for the purpose of hypothesis generation. We systematically examined the relationship between gene expression, glycosyltransferase activity, glycan expression, and selectin-binding function in different systems, including human neutrophils, undifferentiated HL-60 (human promyelocytic cells), differentiated HL-60, and HL-60 synchronized in specific growth phases. Results demonstrate that 1) the sLeX (sialyl-Lewis-X) epitope is expressed in P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) from neutrophils at higher levels compared with HL-60. This variation may be due to differences in the relative activities of α1,3-fucosyltransferases and α2,3-sialyltransferases in these two cell types. 2) HL-60 cell differentiation along granulocyte lineage increased the activity of β1,4GalT and β1,3GlcNAcT by 1.6- to 3.2-fold. This may contribute to LacNAc chain extension as evidenced by the 1.7-fold increase in DSA-lectin (lectin recognizing LacNAc) binding to cells after differentiation. 3) The activity of enzymes contributing to sLeX formation in leukocytes likely varies as ST3[Galβ1,4GlcNAc] ≤ α1,3FT[sialyl-LacNAc] < β1,3GlcNAcT. 4) O-glycan specific glycosyltransferase activity does not undergo periodic variation with cell cycle phases. Overall, gene expression and enzyme activity data combined with knowledge of biochemistry can predict the resulting glycan structures and yield viable experimentally testable hypothesis.—Marathe, D. D., Chandrasekaran, E. V., Lau, J. T. Y., Matta, K. L., Neelamegham, S. Systems-level studies of glycosyltransferase gene expression and enzyme activity that are associated with the selectin binding function of human leukocytes. PMID:18716032

  18. Antibiotic-decorated titanium with enhanced antibacterial activity through adhesive polydopamine for dental/bone implant

    PubMed Central

    He, Shu; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Linxin; Xiong, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yifei; Deng, Yi; Wei, Shicheng

    2014-01-01

    Implant-associated infections, which are normally induced by microbial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, practical approaches to prevent implant-associated infections are in great demand. Inspired by adhesive proteins in mussels, here we have developed a novel antibiotic-decorated titanium (Ti) material with enhanced antibacterial activity. In this study, Ti substrate was coated by one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine followed by immobilization of the antibiotic cefotaxime sodium (CS) onto the polydopamine-coated Ti through catechol chemistry. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of CS grafted on the Ti surface. Our results demonstrated that the antibiotic-grafted Ti substrate showed good biocompatibility and well-behaved haemocompatibility. In addition, the antibiotic-grafted Ti could effectively prevent adhesion and proliferation of Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Streptococcus mutans (Gram-positive). Moreover, the inhibition of biofilm formation on the antibiotic-decorated Ti indicated that the grafted CS could maintain its long-term antibacterial activity. This modified Ti substrate with enhanced antibacterial activity holds great potential as implant material for applications in dental and bone graft substitutes. PMID:24647910

  19. Antibiotic-decorated titanium with enhanced antibacterial activity through adhesive polydopamine for dental/bone implant.

    PubMed

    He, Shu; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Linxin; Xiong, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yifei; Deng, Yi; Wei, Shicheng

    2014-06-01

    Implant-associated infections, which are normally induced by microbial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, practical approaches to prevent implant-associated infections are in great demand. Inspired by adhesive proteins in mussels, here we have developed a novel antibiotic-decorated titanium (Ti) material with enhanced antibacterial activity. In this study, Ti substrate was coated by one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine followed by immobilization of the antibiotic cefotaxime sodium (CS) onto the polydopamine-coated Ti through catechol chemistry. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of CS grafted on the Ti surface. Our results demonstrated that the antibiotic-grafted Ti substrate showed good biocompatibility and well-behaved haemocompatibility. In addition, the antibiotic-grafted Ti could effectively prevent adhesion and proliferation of Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Streptococcus mutans (Gram-positive). Moreover, the inhibition of biofilm formation on the antibiotic-decorated Ti indicated that the grafted CS could maintain its long-term antibacterial activity. This modified Ti substrate with enhanced antibacterial activity holds great potential as implant material for applications in dental and bone graft substitutes. PMID:24647910

  20. Oxidant-dependent metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by phorbol ester-stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: possible link between inflammation and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Trush, M.A.; Seed, J.L.; Kensler, T.W.

    1985-08-01

    Oxidants, such as those generated by metabolically activated phagocytes in inflammation, have been implicated in the metabolic activation of carcinogens, and in this study the authors demonstrate that the interaction of (+/-)-trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo(a)pyrene (BP 7,8-dihydrodiol) with phorbol ester-stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) results in the generation of both a chemiluminescent intermediate and one that covalently binds to DNA. Concordant with the formation of a carcinogen-DNA adduct, the admixture of BP 7,8-dihydrodiol and phorbol ester-stimulated PMNs elicited mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100. These results demonstrate that oxidants generated by metabolically stimulated PMNs can activate penultimate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to a genotoxic metabolite and further defines a role for inflammation in carcinogenesis.

  1. Leukocyte Diapedesis In Vivo Induces Transient Loss of Tight Junction Protein at the Blood–Retina Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Heping; Dawson, Rosemary; Crane, Isabel J.; Liversidge, Janet

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Although much is now understood about the molecular structure of tight junctions (TJs), little is known about the regulation of their function during neural inflammatory disease processes in vivo. The mechanisms by which leukocytes transmigrate the blood-retina barrier (BRB) without affecting endothelial permeability are controversial. Methods Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of ex vivo retinal wholemounts was used to study BRB integrity during leukocyte adhesion and migration during experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Western blot analysis was used to measure levels of TJ proteins in EAU retina and RPE and in normal retina or RPE cultured with cytokines or chemokines. Results No evidence for discontinuity or other weakness of the endothelial or epithelial barrier at tricellular corners was observed, and maximum disruption of TJ protein expression was focused in retinal venules correlating with sites of leukocyte extravasation. Areas of maximum TJ protein loss in vivo also correlated with redistribution or loss of ensheathing astrocyte processes on venules but not adjacent capillaries or arterioles. Exposure of normal choroidal and retinal explants ex vivo to cytokines and chemokines alone did not downregulate total occludin-1 or claudin-3 TJ protein expression. Conclusions The data presented herein support an active role for leukocytes in TJ disruption and blood-retina barrier (BRB) breakdown during retinal inflammation and further implicate venule microenvironment as a key factor in leukocyte recruitment to retinal tissue in vivo. PMID:15980240

  2. Adhesion molecules in cutaneous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barker, J N

    1995-01-01

    As in other organs, leukocyte adhesion molecules and their ligands play a major role in cutaneous inflammatory events both by directing leukocyte trafficking and by their effects on antigen presentation. Skin biopsies of inflamed skin from patients with diseases such as as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis reveal up-regulation of endothelial cell expression of P- and E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Studies of evolving lesions following UVB irradiation, Mantoux reaction or application of contact allergen, demonstrate that expression of these adhesion molecules parallels leukocyte infiltration into skin. When cutaneous inflammation is widespread (e.g. in erythroderma), soluble forms of these molecules are detectable in serum. In vitro studies predict that peptide mediators are important regulatory factors for endothelial adhesion molecules. Intradermal injection of the cytokines interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma into normal human skin leads to induction of endothelial adhesion molecules with concomitant infiltration of leukocytes. In addition, neuropeptides rapidly induce P-selectin translocation to the cell membrane and expression of E-selectin. Adhesion molecules also play a crucial role as accessory molecules in the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by Langerhans' cells. Expression of selectin ligands by Langerhans' cells is up-regulated by various inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that adhesion molecules may be important in Langerhans' cell migration. The skin, because of its accessibility, is an ideal organ in which to study expression of adhesion molecules and their relationship to inflammatory events. Inflammatory skin diseases are common and inhibition of lymphocyte accumulation in skin is likely to prove of great therapeutic benefit. PMID:7587640

  3. The in vitro effect of bovine lactoferrin on the activity of organ leukocytes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and wels catfish (Silurus glanis).

    PubMed

    Małaczewska, J; Wójcik, M; Wójcik, R; Siwicki, A K

    2010-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a glycoprotein found in milk, neutrophil granules, secretions and selected organs of mammals. Lactoferrin exhibits antibacterial, antiviral, fungicidal, immunoregulatory and other functions. Although fish are devoid of this protein and its cell receptors, LF effect on the immune mechanisms of fish has been demonstrated. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of bovine lactoferrin, applied in vitro, on the activity of head kidney and spleen leukocytes in three freshwater fish species: rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and wels catfish (Silurus glanis). The obtained results validate LF beneficial effect on the respiratory burst of phagocytes in rainbow trout and wels catfish despite the fact that the potential killing activity against Aeromonas hydrophila was not stimulated in any of the studied species. Bovine lactoferrin enhanced the proliferation of T-lymphocytes in rainbow trout and European eel, as well as of B-lymphocytes in rainbow trout. PMID:21077435

  4. Extract of corn silk (stigma of Zea mays) inhibits the tumour necrosis factor-alpha- and bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced cell adhesion and ICAM-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Habtemariam, S

    1998-05-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) or E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the expression of several adhesion molecules and enhances leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell surface. Interfering with this leukocyte adhesion or adhesion molecules upregulation is an important therapeutic target for the treatment of bacterial sepsis and various inflammatory diseases. In the course of screening marketed European anti-inflammatory herbal drugs for TNF antagonistic activity, a crude ethanolic extract of corn silk (stigma of Zea mays) exhibited significant activity. The extract at concentrations of 9-250 micrograms/ml effectively inhibited the TNF- and LPS-induced adhesiveness of EAhy 926 endothelial cells to monocytic U937 cells. Similar concentration ranges of corn silk extract did also block the TNF and LPS but not the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced ICAM-1 expression on EAhy 926 endothelial cell surface. The extract did not alter the production of TNF by LPS-activated macrophages and failed to inhibit the cytotoxic activity of TNF. It is concluded that corn silk possesses important therapeutic potential for TNF- and LPS-mediated leukocyte adhesion and trafficking. PMID:9619111

  5. Scintigraphic assessment of bowel involvement and disease activity in Crohn's disease using technetium 99m-hexamethyl propylene amine oxine as leukocyte label

    SciTech Connect

    Schoelmerich, J.S.; Schmidt, E.; Schuemichen, C.B.; Billmann, P.; Schmidt, H.; Gerok, W.

    1988-11-01

    Using a novel labeling technique with technetium 99m-hexamethyl propylene amine oxine, we studied 29 patients with known or suspected Crohn's disease. Technetium 99m-hexamethyl propylene amine oxine leukocyte scanning (99mTc scan) was prospectively compared with the results of independently performed radiologic, endoscopic, and histologic examinations, and with findings at surgery, to assess the clinical usefulness of this technique to localize inflammatory lesions. In addition, uptake of technetium 99m-hexamethyl propylene amine oxine in the bowel was graded by comparing it with the uptake in liver and bone marrow and correlating this with established parameters of disease activity. The viability of homologous labeled leukocytes was greater than 95%. Less than 5% of lymphocytes were found in the final preparation. It was found that 45% +/- 12% of the label was bound to granulocytes, and 98% of the unbound label was washed off before reinjection. The results of 99mTc scan revealed a good correlation with those of barium enema (r = 0.880, p less than 0.001), of endoscopy/surgery (r = 0.983, p less than 0.001), and of all combined reference methods (r = 0.981, p less than 0.001). Activity as determined by 99mTc scan was weakly correlated with the results of Crohn's disease activity index (r = 0.559, p less than 0.01), van Hees index (r = 0.606, p less than 0.01), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r = 0.456, p less than 0.05) in 24 patients with proven Crohn's disease. The correlation was improved when the 99mTc scan was compared with a combination of these activity parameters and C-reactive protein (r = 0.781, p less than 0.001). Extraintestinal manifestations (joints) and complications (cholecystitis) were also identified correctly by the 99mTc scan.

  6. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  7. Molecular mechanism of vinculin activation and nano-scale spatial organization in focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Case, Lindsay B.; Baird, Michelle A.; Shtengel, Gleb; Campbell, Sharon L.; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) link the extracellular matrix (ECM) to the actin cytoskeleton to mediate cell adhesion, migration, mechanosensing and signaling. FAs have conserved nanoscale protein organization, suggesting that the position of proteins within FAs regulates their activity and function. Vinculin binds different FA proteins to mediate distinct cellular functions, but how vinculin’s interactions are spatiotemporally organized within FA is unknown. Using interferometric photo-activation localization (iPALM) super-resolution microscopy to assay vinculin nanoscale localization and a FRET biosensor to assay vinculin conformation, we found that upward repositioning within the FA during FA maturation facilitates vinculin activation and mechanical reinforcement of FA. Inactive vinculin localizes to the lower integrin signaling layer in FA by binding to phospho-paxillin. Talin binding activates vinculin and targets active vinculin higher in FA where vinculin can engage retrograde actin flow. Thus, specific protein interactions are spatially segregated within FA at the nano-scale to regulate vinculin activation and function. PMID:26053221

  8. Lutheran/basal cell adhesion molecule accelerates progression of crescentic glomerulonephritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Filipe, Anne; Rahuel, Cécile; Bonnin, Philippe; Mesnard, Laurent; Guérin, Coralie; Wang, Yu; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Colin, Yves; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Migration of circulating leukocytes from the vasculature into the surrounding tissue is an important component of the inflammatory response. Among the cell surface molecules identified as contributing to leukocyte extravasation is VCAM-1, expressed on activated vascular endothelium, which participates in all stages of leukocyte–endothelial interaction by binding to leukocyte surface expressed integrin VLA-4. However, not all VLA-4-mediated events can be linked to VCAM-1. A novel interaction between VLA-4 and endothelial Lutheran (Lu) blood group antigens and basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) proteins has been recently shown, suggesting that Lu/BCAM may have a role in leukocyte recruitments in inflamed tissues. Here, we assessed the participation of Lu/BCAM in the immunopathogenesis of crescentic glomerulonephritis. High expression of Lu/BCAM in glomeruli of mice with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis suggests a potential role for the local expression of Lu/BCAM in nephritogenic recruitment of leukocytes. Genetic deficiency of Lu/BCAM attenuated glomerular accumulation of T cells and macrophages, crescent formation, and proteinuria, correlating with reduced fibrin and platelet deposition in glomeruli. Furthermore, we found a pro-adhesive interaction between human monocyte α4β1 integrin and Lu/BCAM proteins. Thus, Lu/BCAM may have a critical role in facilitating the accumulation of monocytes and macrophages, thereby exacerbating renal injury. PMID:24429403

  9. Transcriptional activation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 gene in vivo and its role in the pathophysiology of neutrophil-induced liver injury in murine endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Essani, N A; Bajt, M L; Farhood, A; Vonderfecht, S L; Jaeschke, H

    1997-06-15

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) can cause hepatic parenchymal cell injury during endotoxin (ET) shock. Because adhesion molecules are critical for inflammatory cell damage, the role of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was studied in the pathophysiology of ET shock. ET-sensitive mice (C3Heb/FeJ) were treated with 700 mg/kg galactosamine in combination with 100 microg/kg Salmonella abortus equi ET, 15 microg/kg TNF-alpha, or 13 to 23 microg/kg IL-1. VCAM-1 mRNA formation was strongly activated in animals treated with ET, TNF-alpha, or IL-1. In contrast, only TNF-alpha and IL-1, not ET, induced VCAM-1 gene transcription in livers of ET-resistant mice (C3H/HeJ). Immunohistochemistry and isolation of liver cells during endotoxemia indicated that VCAM-1 mRNA and protein were only formed in endothelial cells and Kupffer cells, not in hepatocytes. Galactosamine/ET induced neutrophil accumulation in sinusoids (515 +/- 30 neutrophils/50 high power fields) followed by transmigration at 7 h. At that time, severe liver injury was observed (necrosis, 53 +/- 5%). An anti-VCAM-1 Ab (3 mg/kg) attenuated the area of necrosis by 60%. The Ab reduced neutrophil transmigration by 84%, but had no effect on the total number of cells in the liver vasculature. Flow cytometric analysis identified the presence of very late Ag-4 on mouse peripheral neutrophils. Our data demonstrated cytokine-dependent VCAM-1 gene transcription and protein expression in the liver during endotoxemia. Neutrophils were able to use very late Ag-4/VCAM-1 interactions to transmigrate into liver parenchyma in vivo. Preventing transmigration by blocking VCAM-1 protected hepatocytes against neutrophil-induced injury. PMID:9190948

  10. In-vivo tissue repair using light-activated surgical adhesive in a porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Riley, Jill N.; Dickson, Tonya J.; Hou, Dong Ming; Rogers, Pamela; March, Keith L.

    2001-05-01

    An in vivo study was conducted to investigate the feasibility, mechanical function, and chronic biocompatibility of a new light-activated surgical adhesive for achieving rapid hemostasis of the puncture site following diagnostic catheterization and interventional cardiac procedures. Porcine carotid arteries (nequals6) and femoral arteries (nequals6) were exposed, and an incision was made in the arterial walls using a 16G needle. The surgical adhesive, composed of a poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold doped with the traditional protein solder mix of serum albumin and indocyanine green dye, was used to close the incisions in conjunction with an 805-nm diode laser. Blood flow was restored to the vessels immediately after the procedure and the incision sites were checked for patency. The strength and hemostatic abilities of the new surgical adhesive were evaluated in the context of arterial pressure, persistence of hemostatis and presence of any inflammatory reaction after 3 days. After this evaluation period, the surgical procedure was repeated on the carotid arteries (nequals6) and femoral arteries (nequals6) of three additional animals that had been heparinized prior to surgery to closer approximate the conditions seen in a typical vascular surgical setting.

  11. hTERT promotes cell adhesion and migration independent of telomerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiying; Liu, Qianqian; Ge, Yuanlong; Zhao, Qi; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    hTERT, a catalytic component of human telomerase, is undetectable in normal somatic cells but up-regulated in cancer and stem cells where telomere length is maintained by telomerase. Accumulated evidence indicates that hTERT may have noncanonical functions beyond telomerase by regulating the expression of particular genes. However, comprehensive identification of the genes regulated by hTERT is unavailable. In this report, we expressed WT hTERT and hTERTmut which displays dysfunctional catalytic activity, in human U2OS cancer cells and VA-13 immortalized fibroblast cells, both of which lack endogenous hTERT and hTR expression. Changes in gene expression induced by hTERT and hTERT-mut expression were determined by genome-wide RNA-seq and verified by qPCR. Our results showed that hTERT affects different genes in two cell lines, implying that the regulation of gene expression by hTERT is indirect and cell type dependent. Moreover, functional analysis identifies cell adhesion-related genes that have been changed by hTERT in both cell lines. Adhesion experiments revealed that hTERT expression significantly increases cell adhesion. Monolayer wound healing and transwell assays demonstrated increased cell migration upon hTERT expression. These results provide new evidence to support a noncanonical function for hTERT in promoting tumorigenesis. PMID:26971878

  12. hTERT promotes cell adhesion and migration independent of telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiying; Liu, Qianqian; Ge, Yuanlong; Zhao, Qi; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    hTERT, a catalytic component of human telomerase, is undetectable in normal somatic cells but up-regulated in cancer and stem cells where telomere length is maintained by telomerase. Accumulated evidence indicates that hTERT may have noncanonical functions beyond telomerase by regulating the expression of particular genes. However, comprehensive identification of the genes regulated by hTERT is unavailable. In this report, we expressed WT hTERT and hTERTmut which displays dysfunctional catalytic activity, in human U2OS cancer cells and VA-13 immortalized fibroblast cells, both of which lack endogenous hTERT and hTR expression. Changes in gene expression induced by hTERT and hTERT-mut expression were determined by genome-wide RNA-seq and verified by qPCR. Our results showed that hTERT affects different genes in two cell lines, implying that the regulation of gene expression by hTERT is indirect and cell type dependent. Moreover, functional analysis identifies cell adhesion-related genes that have been changed by hTERT in both cell lines. Adhesion experiments revealed that hTERT expression significantly increases cell adhesion. Monolayer wound healing and transwell assays demonstrated increased cell migration upon hTERT expression. These results provide new evidence to support a noncanonical function for hTERT in promoting tumorigenesis. PMID:26971878

  13. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  14. Widespread activation of immunity and pro-inflammatory programs in peripheral blood leukocytes of HIV-infected patients with impaired lung gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Crothers, Kristina; Petrache, Irina; Wongtrakool, Cherry; Lee, Patty J; Schnapp, Lynn M; Gharib, Sina A

    2016-04-01

    HIV infection is associated with impaired lung gas transfer as indicated by a low diffusing capacity (DLCO), but the mechanisms are not well understood. We hypothesized that HIV-associated gas exchange impairment is indicative of system-wide perturbations that could be reflected by alterations in peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) gene expression. Forty HIV-infected (HIV(+)) and uninfected (HIV(-)) men with preserved versus low DLCO were enrolled. All subjects were current smokers and those with acute illness, lung diseases other than COPD or asthma were excluded. Total RNA was extracted from PBLs and hybridized to whole-genome microarrays. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed between HIV(+) versus HIV(-) subjects with preserved DLCO and those with low DLCO to identify differentially activated pathways. Using pathway-based analyses, we found that in subjects with preserved DLCO, HIV infection is associated with activation of processes involved in immunity, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Applying a similar analysis to subjects with low DLCO, we identified a much broader repertoire of pro-inflammatory and immune-related pathways in HIV(+) patients relative to HIV(-) subjects, with up-regulation of multiple interleukin pathways, interferon signaling, and toll-like receptor signaling. We confirmed elevated circulating levels of IL-6 in HIV(+) patients with low DLCO relative to the other groups. Our findings reveal that PBLs of subjects with HIV infection and low DLCO are distinguished by widespread enrichment of immuno-inflammatory programs. Activation of these pathways may alter the biology of circulating leukocytes and play a role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated gas exchange impairment. PMID:27117807

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of the partially purified extract of radix Stephaniae tetrandrae: comparative studies of its active principles tetrandrine and fangchinoline on human polymorphonuclear leukocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y C; Chou, C J; Chiou, W F; Chen, C F

    2001-11-01

    We hypothesized that prevention of neutrophil from activation may underlie the myocardial protective effect of the specially processed extract of radix Stephaniae tetrandrae (SPRST). Inflammatory responses in isolated peripheral human neutrophils were studied in the presence or absence of SPRST. SPRST (1-10 microg/ml) concentration-dependently prevented N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)- or leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4))-induced neutrophil adhesion and transmigration. Comparable results were also observed in neutrophils pretreated with fangchinoline (Fan) or tetrandrine (Tet), two active components in SPRST. It has been reported that neutrophil adhesion/transmigration is mainly Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)-dependent and could be modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. SPRST, Tet, and Fan diminished fMLP- or LTB4-induced Mac-1 up-regulation and ROS production. SPRST, Fan, Tet, and verapamil impaired fMLP-induced rapid intracellular alkalization, an essential mechanism for neutrophil ROS production, and [Ca(2+)](i) increment, suggesting that a calcium dependent pathway might be involved. Direct G protein activation by AlF(4)(-) also triggered [Ca(2+)](i) increment and adhesion that could be abolished by pertussis toxin and were partially reversed by SPRST, Fan, and Tet. These results reveal that inhibition of neutrophil adhesion and transmigration may account for SPRST's myocardial protective effect. This effect of SPRST may be mediated by component(s) in addition to Tet and Fan because combination of 0.1 microg/ml of Tet and Fan did not mimic the effect of SPRST. We conclude that SPRST exerts anti-inflammatory effects by interfering with ROS production and Ca(2+) influx through G protein modulation to prevent Mac-1 up-regulation in neutrophil activation. PMID:11641437

  16. The effects of space flight on polymorphonuclear leukocyte response experiment MA-032

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    In a series of studies performed at intervals from 30 day before flight to 30 days after recovery, blood samples were obtained from the three astronauts of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project and from eight control subjects. To determine the effects of space flight on polymorphonuclear leukocytes, tests were performed on blood samples obtained as quickly as possible after splashdown and on the day following recovery. The astronauts' inhalation of propellant gases and the inception of corticosteroid therapy 1 day after recovery provided an additional opportunity to investigate the possible effects of these factors on leukocyte function. Data were obtained during each time period on the total leukocyte count, differential count, leukocyte adhesion, leukocyte migration and chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and histochemical staining for leukocyte acid and alkaline phosphatase. These observations present a variety of in vitro correlates to white blood cell function within the body. Taken together, they serve as a reasonable approximation of the effects of space flight on leukocyte function.

  17. Effect of viscous macromolecules on peritoneal plasminogen activator activity: a potential mechanism for their ability to reduce postoperative adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M; Yedgar, S; Hurwitz, A; Palti, Z; Finzi, Z; Milwidsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Activity of peritoneal plasminogen activator and its regulation by dextran and other macromolecules that clinically suppress postoperative adhesions was studied. Plasminogen activator activity was assayed by a two-stage globinolytic assay that monitors formation of plasmin, as well as by cleavage of a chromogenic peptide substrate (S-2444) in the presence of aprotinin (Trasylol). Plasminogen activator activity was located on the outer surface of human peritoneum. Incubation of peritoneal tissue with buffer in vitro (conditioning) prompted release of plasminogen activator into the conditioning medium. The released plasminogen activator formed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis at an apparent molecular weight of 174,000 and was markedly suppressed by antiserum raised against human melanoma tissue-type plasminogen activator. Nonspecific proteolytic activity did not accumulate in the medium during conditioning. The presence of dextran 80 during conditioning of peritoneum reversibly suppressed tissue-bound plasminogen activator activity and reduced plasminogen activator activity in the spent medium. A similar inhibition of peritoneal plasminogen activator was induced by dextran 500, methyl cellulose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Dextran, when added to the medium after conditioning, had no direct inhibitory effect on plasminogen activator activity. Dextran did not induce peritoneal production of inhibitor(s) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, or urokinase. On the basis of these findings, two possible mechanisms for the effect of viscous polymers in the reduction of adhesion formation are proposed. These mechanisms consider the importance of peritoneal tissue-type plasminogen activator for removal of fibrin clots and suggest that polymer coating either prevents the shedding of plasminogen activator into the abdominal cavity or reduces the access of fibrin clots to the serosal surfaces. PMID:2459968

  18. Integrin adhesion drives the emergent polarization of active cytoskeletal stresses to pattern cell delamination

    PubMed Central

    Meghana, C.; Ramdas, Nisha; Hameed, Feroz Meeran; Rao, Madan; Shivashankar, G. V.; Narasimha, Maithreyi

    2011-01-01

    Tissue patterning relies on cellular reorganization through the interplay between signaling pathways and mechanical stresses. Their integration and spatiotemporal coordination remain poorly understood. Here we investigate the mechanisms driving the dynamics of cell delamination, diversely deployed to extrude dead cells or specify distinct cell fates. We show that a local mechanical stimulus (subcellular laser perturbation) releases cellular prestress and triggers cell delamination in the amnioserosa during Drosophila dorsal closure, which, like spontaneous delamination, results in the rearrangement of nearest neighbors around the delaminating cell into a rosette. We demonstrate that a sequence of “emergent cytoskeletal polarities” in the nearest neighbors (directed myosin flows, lamellipodial growth, polarized actomyosin collars, microtubule asters), triggered by the mechanical stimulus and dependent on integrin adhesion, generate active stresses that drive delamination. We interpret these patterns in the language of active gels as asters formed by active force dipoles involving surface and body stresses generated by each cell and liken delamination to mechanical yielding that ensues when these stresses exceed a threshold. We suggest that differential contributions of adhesion, cytoskeletal, and external stresses must underlie differences in spatial pattern. PMID:21571643

  19. Chitosan hydrogels enriched with polyphenols: Antibacterial activity, cell adhesion and growth and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Lišková, Jana; Douglas, Timothy E L; Beranová, Jana; Skwarczyńska, Agata; Božič, Mojca; Samal, Sangram Keshari; Modrzejewska, Zofia; Gorgieva, Selestina; Kokol, Vanja; Bačáková, Lucie

    2015-09-20

    Injectable hydrogels for bone regeneration consisting of chitosan, sodium beta-glycerophosphate (Na-β-GP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were enriched with the polyphenols phloroglucinol (PG) and gallic acid (GA) and characterized physicochemically and biologically with respect to properties relevant for applications in bone regeneration, namely gelation kinetics, mineralizability, antioxidant properties, antibacterial activity, cytocompatibility and ability to support adhesion and growth of human osteoblast-like MG63 cells. Enrichment with PG and GA had no negative effect on gelation kinetics and mineralizability. PG and GA both enhanced antioxidant activity of unmineralized hydrogels. Mineralization reduced antioxidant activity of hydrogels containing GA. Hydrogels containing GA, PG and without polyphenols reduced colony forming ability of Escherichia coli after 1h, 3h and 6h incubation and slowed E. coli growth in liquid culture for 150min. Hydrogels containing GA were cytotoxic and supported cell growth more poorly than polyphenol-free hydrogels. PG had no negative effect on cell adhesion and growth. PMID:26050898

  20. The adhesion receptor CD44 promotes atherosclerosis by mediating inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cuff, Carolyn A.; Kothapalli, Devashish; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Chun, Sam; Zhang, Yuanming; Belkin, Richard; Yeh, Christine; Secreto, Anthony; Assoian, Richard K.; Rader, Daniel J.; Puré, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Atherosclerosis causes most acute coronary syndromes and strokes. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes recruitment of inflammatory cells to the vessel wall and activation of vascular cells. CD44 is an adhesion protein expressed on inflammatory and vascular cells. CD44 supports the adhesion of activated lymphocytes to endothelium and smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ligation of CD44 induces activation of both inflammatory and vascular cells. To assess the potential contribution of CD44 to atherosclerosis, we bred CD44-null mice to atherosclerosis-prone apoE-deficient mice. We found a 50–70% reduction in aortic lesions in CD44-null mice compared with CD44 heterozygote and wild-type littermates. We demonstrate that CD44 promotes the recruitment of macrophages to atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CD44 is required for phenotypic dedifferentiation of medial smooth muscle cells to the “synthetic” state as measured by expression of VCAM-1. Finally, we demonstrate that hyaluronan, the principal ligand for CD44, is upregulated in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE-deficient mice and that the low-molecular-weight proinflammatory forms of hyaluronan stimulate VCAM-1 expression and proliferation of cultured primary aortic smooth muscle cells, whereas high-molecular-weight forms of hyaluronan inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation. We conclude that CD44 plays a critical role in the progression of atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms. PMID:11581304

  1. Adhesive properties of the purified plasminogen activator Pla of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leandro Araujo

    2006-09-01

    The beta-barrel outer membrane protease Pla from Yersinia pestis is an important virulence factor in plague and enables initiation of the bubonic plague. Pla is a multifunctional protease whose expression also enhances bacterial adherence to extracellular matrix. It has remained uncertain whether the increase in cellular adhesiveness results from modification of the bacterial surface by Pla, or whether the Pla molecule is an adhesin. Pla was purified as a His6-fusion protein from Escherichia coli and reconstituted with lipopolysaccharide to an enzymatically active form. Purified His6-Pla was coated onto fluorescent micro-particles (FMPs) that expressed plasminogen activity. Pla-coated FMPs also bound to laminin and to reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel) immobilized on permanox slides, whereas only poor activity was seen with lipopolysaccharide-coated FMPs or bovine serum albumin-coated FMPs. The results show that the Pla molecule has intrinsic adhesive properties and that purified transmembrane proteins coated onto FMPs can be used for functional assays. PMID:16923070

  2. Kinetics of LFA-1 mediated adhesion of human neutrophils to ICAM-1-role of E-selectin signaling post-activation.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    LFA-1 and Mac-1 are the two integrins involved in the arrest and firm adhesion of neutrophils. LFA-1 plays a role in the early stage of cell arrest while Mac-1 stabilizes firm adhesion. Here, we further elucidated the kinetics of LFA-1 activation and its role in mediating neutrophil adhesion to ICAM...

  3. Cinnamaldehyde inhibits the tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in endothelial cells by suppressing NF-{kappa}B activation: Effects upon I{kappa}B and Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, B.-C.; Hsieh, C.-W.; Liu, Y.-C.; Tzeng, T.-T.; Sun, Y.-W.; Wung, B.-S.

    2008-06-01

    The production of adhesion molecules and subsequent attachment of leukocytes to endothelial cells (ECs) are critical early events in atherogenesis. These adhesion molecules thus play an important role in the development of this disease. Recent studies have highlighted the chemoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of cinnamaldehyde, a Cinnamomum cassia Presl-specific diterpene. In our current study, we have examined the effects of both cinnamaldehyde and extracts of C. cassia on cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interactions. We find that these compounds inhibit the adhesion of TNF{alpha}-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppress the expression of the cell adhesion molecules, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, at the transcriptional level. Moreover, in TNF{alpha}-treated ECs, the principal downstream signal of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, NF-{kappa}B, was also found to be abolished in a time-dependent manner. Interestingly, cinnamaldehyde exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by blocking the degradation of the inhibitory protein I{kappa}B-{alpha}, but only in short term pretreatments, whereas it does so via the induction of Nrf2-related genes, including heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), over long term pretreatments. Treating ECs with zinc protoporphyrin, a HO-1 inhibitor, partially blocks the anti-inflammatory effects of cinnamaldehyde. Elevated HO-1 protein levels were associated with the inhibition of TNF{alpha}-induced ICAM-1 expression. In addition to HO-1, we also found that cinnamaldehyde can upregulate Nrf2 in nuclear extracts, and can increase ARE-luciferase activity and upregulate thioredoxin reductase-1, another Nrf2-related gene. Moreover, cinnamaldehyde exposure rapidly reduces the cellular GSH levels in ECs over short term treatments but increases these levels after 9 h exposure. Hence, our present findings indicate that cinnamaldehyde suppresses TNF-induced singling pathways via two distinct mechanisms that are activated by different pretreatment periods.

  4. Glycosylation in a Mammalian Expression System Is Critical for the Production of Functionally Active Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-like Receptor A3 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Terry H. Y.; Mitchell, Ainslie; Liu Lau, Sydney; An, Hongyan; Rajeaskariah, Poornima; Wasinger, Valerie; Raftery, Mark; Bryant, Katherine; Tedla, Nicodemus

    2013-01-01

    The leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LILR) A3 is a member of the highly homologous activating and inhibitory receptors expressed on leukocytes. LILRA3 is a soluble receptor of unknown functions but is predicted to act as a broad antagonist to other membrane-bound LILRs. Functions of LILRA3 are unclear primarily because of the lack of high quality functional recombinant protein and insufficient knowledge regarding its ligand(s). Here, we expressed and characterized recombinant LILRA3 (rLILRA3) proteins produced in 293T cells, Escherichia coli, and Pichia pastoris. We found that the purified rLILRA3 produced in the mammalian system was the same size as a 70-kDa native macrophage LILRA3. This is 20 kDa larger than the calculated size, suggesting significant post-translational modifications. In contrast, rLILRA3 produced in E. coli was similar in size to the unprocessed protein, but yeast-produced protein was 2–4 times larger than the unprocessed protein. Treatment with peptide-N-glycosidase F reduced the size of the mammalian cell- and yeast-produced rLILRA3 to 50 kDa, suggesting that most modifications are due to glycosylation. Consistent with this, mass spectrometric analysis of the mammalian rLILRA3 revealed canonical N-glycosylation at the predicted Asn140, Asn281, Asn302, Asn341, and Asn431 sites. Functionally, only mammalian cell-expressed rLILRA3 bound onto the surface of monocytes with high affinity, and importantly, only this significantly abrogated LPS-induced TNFα production by monocytes. Binding to monocytes was partially blocked by β-lactose, indicating that optimally glycosylated LILRA3 might be critical for ligand binding and function. Overall, our data demonstrated for the first time that LILRA3 is a potential new anti-inflammatory protein, and optimal glycosylation is required for its functions. PMID:24085305

  5. Surface morphology of platelet adhesion influenced by activators, inhibitors and shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Melanie Groan

    Platelet activation involves multiple events, one of which is the generation and release of nitric oxide (NO), a platelet aggregation inhibitor. Platelets simultaneously send and receive various agents that promote a positive and negative feedback control system during hemostasis. Although the purpose of platelet-derived NO is not fully understood, NO is known to inhibit platelet recruitment. NO's relatively large diffusion coefficient allows it to diffuse more rapidly than platelet agonists. It may thus be able to inhibit recruitment of platelets near the periphery of a growing thrombus before agonists have substantially accumulated in those regions. Results from two studies in our laboratory differed in the extent to which platelet-derived NO decreased platelet adhesion. Frilot studied the effect of L-arginine (L-A) and NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA) on platelet adhesion to collagen under static conditions in a Petri dish. Eshaq examined the percent coverage on collagen-coated and fibrinogen-coated microchannels under shear conditions with different levels of L-A and Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP). Frilot's results showed no effect of either L-A or L-NMMA on surface coverage, thrombus size or serotonin release, while Eshaq's results showed a decrease in surface coverage with increased levels of L-A. A possible explanation for these contrasting results is that platelet-derived NO may be more important under flow conditions than under static conditions. For this project, the effects of L-A. ADP and L-NMMA on platelet adhesion were studied at varying shear stresses on protein-coated glass slides. The surface exposed to platelet-rich-plasma in combination with each chemical solution was observed under AFM, FE-SEM and fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons of images obtained with these techniques confirmed the presence of platelets on the protein coatings. AFM images of fibrinogen and collagen-coated slides presented characteristic

  6. Matrix stiffness exerts biphasic control over monocyte-endothelial adhesion via Rho-mediated ICAM-1 clustering.

    PubMed

    Scott, Harry A; Quach, Boi; Yang, Xiao; Ardekani, Soroush; Cabrera, Andrea P; Wilson, Randall; Messaoudi-Powers, Ilhem; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2016-08-01

    Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion is a critical early step in chronic vascular inflammation associated with diabetes, emphysema, and aging. Importantly, these conditions are also marked by abnormal subendothelial matrix crosslinking (stiffness). Yet, whether and how abnormal matrix stiffness contributes to leukocyte-endothelial adhesion remains poorly understood. Using a co-culture of human monocytic cells and human microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) grown on matrices of tunable stiffness, we demonstrate that matrix stiffness exerts biphasic control over monocyte-EC adhesion, with both matrix softening and stiffening eliciting a two-fold increase in this adhesive interaction. This preferential endothelial adhesivity on softer and stiffer matrices was consistent with a significant increase in α-actinin-4-associated endothelial ICAM-1 clustering, a key determinant of monocyte-EC adhesion. Further, the enhanced ICAM-1 clustering on soft and stiff matrices correlated strongly with an increase in Rho activity and ROCK2 expression. Importantly, inhibition of Rho/ROCK activity blocked the effects of abnormal matrix stiffness on ICAM-1 clustering and monocyte-EC adhesion. Thus, these findings implicate matrix stiffness-dependent ICAM-1 clustering as an important regulator of vascular inflammation and provide the rationale for closely examining mechanotransduction pathways as new molecular targets for anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:27444067

  7. Research of surface activating influence on formation of adhesion between gas-thermal coating and steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskaya, Z.; Klimenov, V.; Zaitsev, K.

    2015-09-01

    Estimation of influence of physical and thermal activating on adhesion between steel substrates and thermal coatings has been performed. The substrates with surfaces obtained by and ultrasonic surface plastic deformation were used. To evaluate physical activating, preheating of the substrates to 600°C was performed. To evaluate the effect of thermal activating, the substrate surfaces after interfacial detachment were examined. Bonded areas on the substrate surfaces were measured by means of optical profilometry. The experiments have shown that surface physical activating is the main factor in formation of the adhesive bond between the coating and the substrate processed with the proposed methods.

  8. Adhesion to hyphal matrix and antifungal activity of Pseudomonas strains isolated from Tuber borchii ascocarps.

    PubMed

    Sbrana, C; Bagnoli, G; Bedini, S; Filippi, C; Giovannetti, M; Nuti, M P

    2000-03-01

    Pseudomonas spp. isolates from Tuber borchii ascocarps, known to be able to produce phytoregulatory and biocontrol substances in pure culture, were used to perform studies on their possible physiological role in nature. Antimycotic activity was confirmed against fungal contaminants isolated from the ascocarps, suggesting that populations associated with Tuber borchii fruit bodies may play a role in the maintenance of ascocarp health. Fifty-five percent of strains tested were also able to release metabolites which affected T. borchii mycelial growth and morphogenesis in culture. On the contrary, growth of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae and the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor, putative competitors of Tuber for mycorrhizal infection sites on roots, was not influenced by the presence of any bacterial strain. The possibility that these bacteria, which show antifungal activity and fungal growth modulation activities, might be incorporated in the developing ascocarp by means of their preferential adhesion to Tuber mycelium is discussed. PMID:10749539

  9. Porcine E. coli: Virulence-Associated Genes, Resistance Genes and Adhesion and Probiotic Activity Tested by a New Screening Method

    PubMed Central

    Schierack, Peter; Rödiger, Stefan; Kuhl, Christoph; Hiemann, Rico; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Li, Ganwu; Weinreich, Jörg; Berger, Enrico; Nolan, Lisa K.; Nicholson, Bryon; Römer, Antje; Frömmel, Ulrike; Wieler, Lothar H.; Schröder, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We established an automated screening method to characterize adhesion of Escherichia coli to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and their probiotic activity against infection by enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). 104 intestinal E. coli isolates from domestic pigs were tested by PCR for the occurrence of virulence-associated genes, genes coding for resistances to antimicrobial agents and metals, and for phylogenetic origin by PCR. Adhesion rates and probiotic activity were examined for correlation with the presence of these genes. Finally, data were compared with those from 93 E. coli isolates from wild boars. Isolates from domestic pigs carried a broad variety of all tested genes and showed great diversity in gene patterns. Adhesions varied with a maximum of 18.3 or 24.2 mean bacteria adherence per epithelial cell after 2 or 6 hours respectively. Most isolates from domestic pigs and wild boars showed low adherence, with no correlation between adhesion/probiotic activity and E. coli genes or gene clusters. The gene sfa/foc, encoding for a subunit of F1C fimbriae did show a positive correlative association with adherence and probiotic activity; however E. coli isolates from wild boars with the sfa/foc gene showed less adhesion and probiotic activity than E. coli with the sfa/foc gene isolated from domestic pigs after 6 hour incubation. In conclusion, screening porcine E. coli for virulence associated genes genes, adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, and probiotic activity revealed a single important adhesion factor, several probiotic candidates, and showed important differences between E. coli of domestic pigs and wild boars. PMID:23658605

  10. Placental fractalkine mediates adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to villous trophoblast

    PubMed Central

    Siwetz, Monika; Sundl, Monika; Kolb, Dagmar; Hiden, Ursula; Herse, Florian; Huppertz, Berthold; Gauster, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine fractalkine (CX3CL1) recently attracted increasing attention in the field of placenta research due to its dual nature, acting both as membrane-bound and soluble form. While the membrane-bound form mediates flow resistant adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial and epithelial cells via its corresponding receptor CX3CR1, the soluble form arises from metalloprotease dependent shedding and bears chemoattractive activity for monocytes, natural killer cells and T-cells. In human placenta, fractalkine is expressed at the apical microvillous plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast, which may enable close physical contact with circulating maternal leukocytes. Based on these observations we tested the hypothesis that fractalkine mediates adhesion of monocytes to the villous trophoblast. Forskolin-induced differentiation and syncytialization of the trophoblast cell line BeWo was accompanied with a substantial upregulation in fractalkine expression and led to increased adhesion of the monocyte cell line THP-1, which preferentially bound to syncytia. Blocking as well as silencing of the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 proved involvement of the fractalkine/CX3CR1 system in adherence of THP-1 monocytes to villous trophoblast. Pre-incubation of THP-1 monocytes with human recombinant fractalkine as well as silencing of CX3CR1 expression in THP-1 monocytes significantly impaired their adherence to BeWo cells and primary term trophoblasts. The present study suggests fractalkine as another candidate amongst the panel of adhesion molecules enabling stable interaction between leukocytes and the syncytiotrophoblast. PMID:25566740

  11. Cysteine Protease Activity of Feline Tritrichomonas foetus Promotes Adhesion-Dependent Cytotoxicity to Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, M. K.; Stauffer, S. H.; Brand, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Trichomonads are obligate protozoan parasites most renowned as venereal pathogens of the reproductive tract of humans and cattle. Recently, a trichomonad highly similar to bovine venereal Tritrichomonas foetus but having a unique tropism for the intestinal tract was recognized as a significant cause of colitis in domestic cats. Despite a high prevalence, worldwide distribution, and lack of consistently effective drugs for treatment of the infection, the cellular mechanisms of T. foetus pathogenicity in the intestinal tract have not been examined. The aims of this study were to determine the pathogenic effect of feline T. foetus on porcine intestinal epithelial cells, the dependence of T. foetus pathogenicity on adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium, and the identity of mediators responsible for these effects. Using an in vitro coculture approach to model feline T. foetus infection of the intestinal epithelium, these studies demonstrate that T. foetus promotes a direct contact-dependent activation of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis signaling and progressive monolayer destruction. Moreover, these pathological effects were demonstrated to be largely dependent on T. foetus cell-associated cysteine protease activity. Finally, T. foetus cysteine proteases were identified as enabling cytopathic effects by promoting adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium. The present studies are the first to examine the cellular mechanisms of pathogenicity of T. foetus toward the intestinal epithelium and support further investigation of the cysteine proteases as virulence factors in vivo and as potential therapeutic targets for ameliorating the pathological effects of intestinal trichomonosis. PMID:24752513

  12. Cysteine protease activity of feline Tritrichomonas foetus promotes adhesion-dependent cytotoxicity to intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, M K; Stauffer, S H; Brand, M D; Gookin, J L

    2014-07-01

    Trichomonads are obligate protozoan parasites most renowned as venereal pathogens of the reproductive tract of humans and cattle. Recently, a trichomonad highly similar to bovine venereal Tritrichomonas foetus but having a unique tropism for the intestinal tract was recognized as a significant cause of colitis in domestic cats. Despite a high prevalence, worldwide distribution, and lack of consistently effective drugs for treatment of the infection, the cellular mechanisms of T. foetus pathogenicity in the intestinal tract have not been examined. The aims of this study were to determine the pathogenic effect of feline T. foetus on porcine intestinal epithelial cells, the dependence of T. foetus pathogenicity on adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium, and the identity of mediators responsible for these effects. Using an in vitro coculture approach to model feline T. foetus infection of the intestinal epithelium, these studies demonstrate that T. foetus promotes a direct contact-dependent activation of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis signaling and progressive monolayer destruction. Moreover, these pathological effects were demonstrated to be largely dependent on T. foetus cell-associated cysteine protease activity. Finally, T. foetus cysteine proteases were identified as enabling cytopathic effects by promoting adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium. The present studies are the first to examine the cellular mechanisms of pathogenicity of T. foetus toward the intestinal epithelium and support further investigation of the cysteine proteases as virulence factors in vivo and as potential therapeutic targets for ameliorating the pathological effects of intestinal trichomonosis. PMID:24752513

  13. Evaluation of disease activity in rheumatic patients by leucocyte adhesiveness/aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Berliner, S; Fried, M; Caspi, D; Weinberger, A; Yaron, M; Pinkhas, J; Aronson, M

    1988-01-01

    Previous work has shown that leucocyte adhesiveness/aggregation (LAA), as measured by the leukergy test, correlates well with disease severity in rheumatic patients. As LAA is probably a manifestation of the acute phase reaction various components of the acute phase reaction were measured in order to identify the best marker of disease activity. In addition to LAA, the following variables were measured in 79 patients with various rheumatic diseases and in 10 controls: white blood cell and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, C reactive protein, albumin, globulin, caeruloplasmin, alpha 1, alpha 2, beta, and gamma globulin, and haemoglobin concentrations. Patients were graded according to the state of their disease as mild, moderate, or severe. The extent of leucocyte adhesiveness/aggregation in peripheral blood proved to be the best laboratory variable for the grading of disease activity. Correct grading was obtained in 63% of the patients by means of the LAA, compared with 48% with C reactive protein, 41% with caeruloplasmin, 40% with haptoglobin, and 32% with haemoglobin. It is suggested that LAA of the peripheral blood during inflammation may be used as a reliable marker of disease severity. PMID:3260093

  14. Characterisation of a novel light activated adhesive scaffold: Potential for device attachment.

    PubMed

    Ark, Morris; Boughton, Philip; Lauto, Antonio; Tran, Giang T; Chen, Yongjuan; Cosman, Peter H; Dunstan, Colin R

    2016-09-01

    The most common methods for attaching a device to the internal tissues of the human body are via sutures, clips or staples. These attachment techniques require penetration and manipulation of the tissue. Tears and leaks can often be a complication post-attachment, and scarring usually occurs around the attachment sites. To resolve these issues, it is proposed to develop a soft tissue scaffold impregnated with Rose Bengal/Chitosan solution (RBC-scaffold, 0.01% w/v Rose Bengal, 1.7% w/v Medium Molecular Weight Chitosan). This scaffold will initially attach to the tissue via a light activation method. The light activates the dye in the scaffold which causes cross-links to form between the scaffold and tissue, thus adhering them together. This is done without mechanically manipulating the surrounding tissue, thus avoiding the issues associated with current techniques. Eventually, the scaffold will be resorbed and tissue will integrate for long-term attachment. A variety of tests were performed to characterise the RBC-scaffold. Porosity, interconnectivity, and mechanical strength were measured. Light activation was performed with a broad spectrum (380-780nm) 10W LED lamp exposed to various time lengths (2-15min, Fluence range 0.4-3J/cm(2) ). Adhesive strength of the light-activated bond was measured with lap-shear tests performed on porcine stomach tissue. Cell culture viability was also assessed to confirm tissue integration potential. These properties were compared to Variotis™, an aliphatic polyester soft tissue scaffold which has proven to be viable for soft tissue regeneration. The RBC-scaffolds were found to have high porosity (86.46±2.95%) and connectivity, showing rapid fluid movement. The elastic modulus of the RBC-scaffolds (3.55±1.28MPa) was found to be significantly higher than the controls (0.15±0.058MPa, p<0.01) and approached reported values for human gastrointestinal tissue (2.3MPa). The maximum adhesion strength achieved of the RBC-scaffolds was 8

  15. Indium-111 leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Uno, K.; Matsui, N.; Nohira, K.; Suguro, T.; Kitakata, Y.; Uchiyama, G.; Miyoshi, T.; Uematsu, S.; Inoue, S.; Arimizu, N.

    1986-03-01

    This study evaluates the usefulness of labeled leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In 33 patients, the incidence of pain and swelling in 66 wrist joints and 66 knee joints was compared with the accumulation of (/sup 111/In)leukocytes. No accumulation of (/sup 111/In)leukocytes was seen in any of the patients' wrists (0/12) or knee joints (0/14) when both pain and swelling were absent. In contrast, 93% (25/27) of wrist joints and 80% (24/30) of knee joints with both pain and swelling were positive by (/sup 111/In)leukocyte scintigraphy. There was little correlation between the stage of the disease, as determined by radiography, and (/sup 111/In)leukocyte accumulation. This study suggests that (/sup 111/In)leukocyte imaging may be a reliable procedure for monitoring the activity of rheumatoid arthritis, especially for confirming the lack of an ongoing inflammatory response.

  16. Oxidant-dependent metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by phorbol ester-stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: possible link between inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Trush, M A; Seed, J L; Kensler, T W

    1985-01-01

    Oxidants, such as those generated by metabolically activated phagocytes in inflammation, have been implicated in the metabolic activation of carcinogens, and in this study we demonstrate that the interaction of (+/-)-trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BP 7,8-dihydrodiol) with phorbol ester-stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) results in the generation of both a chemiluminescent intermediate and one that covalently binds to DNA. Cu(II)(3,5-diisopropylsalicylic acid)2 (CuDIPS), a biomimetic superoxide dismutase, and azide, a myeloperoxidase inhibitor, inhibited both of these reactions, indicating a dependency on oxygen-derived oxidants in these hydrocarbon-activation processes. Concordant with the formation of a carcinogen-DNA adduct, the admixture of BP 7,8-dihydrodiol and phorbol ester-stimulated PMNs elicited mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100. 7,8-Dihydro-BP and BP cis-7,8-dihydrodiol were also mutagenic, whereas derivatives lacking a double bond at the 9,10 position were not. These results demonstrate that oxidants generated by metabolically stimulated PMNs can activate penultimate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to a genotoxic metabolite and further defines a role for inflammation in carcinogenesis. PMID:2991910

  17. Leukocyte accumulation promoting fibrin deposition is mediated in vivo by P-selectin on adherent platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palabrica, Theresa; Lobb, Roy; Furie, Barbara C.; Aronovitz, Mark; Benjamin, Christopher; Hsu, Yen-Ming; Sajer, Susan A.; Furie, Bruce

    1992-10-01

    THE glycoprotein P-selectin is a cell adhesion molecule of stimulated platelets and endothelial cells, which mediates the interaction of these cells with neutrophils and monocytes1,2. It is a membrane component of cell storage granules3-6, and is a member of the selectin family which includes E-selectin and L-selectin7,8. P-selectin recognizes both lineage-specific carbohydrate ligands on monocytes and neutrophils, including the Lewis x antigen, sialic acid, and a protein component9-12. In inflammation and thrombosis, P-selectin may mediate the interaction of leukocytes with platelets bound in the region of tissue injury and with stimulated endothelium1,2. To evaluate the role of P-selectin in platelet-leukocyte adhesion in vivo, the accumulation of leukocytes within an experimental thrombus was explored in an arteriovenous shunt model in baboons13. A Dacron graft implanted within an arteriovenous shunt is thrombogenic, accumulating platelets and fibrin within its lumen. These bound platelets express P-selectin14. Here we show that antibody inhibition of leukocyte binding to P-selectin expressed on platelets immobilized on the graft blocks leukocyte accumulation and inhibits the deposition of fibrin within the thrombus. These results indicate that P-selectin is an important adhesion molecule on platelets, mediating platelet-leukocyte binding in vivo, that the presence of leukocytes in thrombi is mediated by P-selectin, and that these leukocytes promote fibrin deposition.

  18. Immune modulation of blood leukocytes in humans by lactic acid bacteria: criteria for strain selection.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, E J; Brassart, D; Servin, A L; Rochat, F; Donnet-Hughes, A

    1997-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria in food can transiently colonize the intestine and exert beneficial effects (probiotic). Survival during intestinal transit or adhesion to epithelium or both seem to be important for modifying the host's immune reactivity. Because Lactobacillus acidophilus strain La1 is adherent to enterocytes in vitro, we hypothesize that contact with immune cells may occur in vivo. However, Bifidobacterium bifidum strain Bb12, which shows high fecal colonization, is another potential immunomodulator. Twenty-eight volunteers were divided into two groups and given a fermented product containing one of the two strains. Lymphocyte subsets and leukocyte phagocytic activity were studied in blood. No modifications were detected in lymphocyte subsets. In contrast, phagocytosis of Escherichia coli ssp. was enhanced in both groups (P < 0.001 for both). Bacterial adhesion to enterocytes, fecal colonization, or both seem to be valuable selection criteria for immunomodulation. Antiinfective mechanisms of defense can be enhanced after ingestion of specific lactic acid bacteria strains. PMID:9250141

  19. Signaling networks regulating leukocyte podosome dynamics and function

    PubMed Central

    Dovas, Athanassios; Cox, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    Podosomes are ventral adhesion structures prominent in cells of the myeloid lineage. A common aspect of these cells is that they are highly motile and are required to traverse multiple tissue barriers in order to perform their functions. Recently podosomes have gathered attention from researchers as important cellular structures that can influence cell adhesion, motility and matrix remodeling. Adhesive and soluble ligands act via transmembrane receptors and propagate signals to the leukocyte cytoskeleton via small G proteins of the Rho family, tyrosine kinases and scaffold proteins and are able to induce podosome formation and rearrangements. Manipulation of the signals that regulate podosome formation and dynamics can therefore be a strategy to interfere with leukocyte functions in a multitude of pathological settings, such as infections, atherosclerosis and arthritis. Here, we review the major signaling molecules that act in the formation and regulation of podosomes. PMID:21342664

  20. Biomechanics of leukocyte rolling.

    PubMed

    Sundd, Prithu; Pospieszalska, Maria K; Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Ley, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Leukocyte rolling on endothelial cells and other P-selectin substrates is mediated by P-selectin binding to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 expressed on the tips of leukocyte microvilli. Leukocyte rolling is a result of rapid, yet balanced formation and dissociation of selectin-ligand bonds in the presence of hydrodynamic shear forces. The hydrodynamic forces acting on the bonds may either increase (catch bonds) or decrease (slip bonds) their lifetimes. The force-dependent 'catch-slip' bond kinetics are explained using the 'two pathway model' for bond dissociation. Both the 'sliding-rebinding' and the 'allosteric' mechanisms attribute 'catch-slip' bond behavior to the force-induced conformational changes in the lectin-EGF domain hinge of selectins. Below a threshold shear stress, selectins cannot mediate rolling. This 'shear-threshold' phenomenon is a consequence of shear-enhanced tethering and catch bond-enhanced rolling. Quantitative dynamic footprinting microscopy has revealed that leukocytes rolling at venular shear stresses (>0.6 Pa) undergo cellular deformation (large footprint) and form long tethers. The hydrodynamic shear force and torque acting on the rolling cell are thought to be synergistically balanced by the forces acting on tethers and stressed microvilli, however, their relative contribution remains to be determined. Thus, improvement beyond the current understanding requires in silico models that can predict both cellular and microvillus deformation and experiments that allow measurement of forces acting on individual microvilli and tethers. PMID:21515934

  1. Polyurethane blended with polylactides for improved cell adhesion and reduced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, S H; Tseng, H J; Fang, Z K

    1999-10-01

    Poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) or 50:50 poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was blended with a commercial polyurethane (PU), Pellethane 2103-80A, using a mutual solvent technique. After preparation by salt casting, the mechanical properties of the porous matrices were measured, and the surface element was characterized by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. The attachment and growth of fibroblasts as well as human umbilical vein endothelial cells on the substrates were investigated by the cell culture test. Platelet activation on different substrates was also studied. It was found that blending with these biodegradable polymers, especially PLGA. enhanced the cellular attachment and growth. This enhancement may be correlated with the higher oxygen/carbon (0/C) atomic ratio on the surface of the blends. Blending with either PLLA or PLGA was also found to decrease platelet adhesion and activation in vitro. These characteristics make PU/polylactide blends potential substrates for cardiovascular applications. PMID:10610681

  2. Laminin α2-Mediated Focal Adhesion Kinase Activation Triggers Alport Glomerular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Delimont, Duane; Dufek, Brianna M.; Meehan, Daniel T.; Zallocchi, Marisa; Gratton, Michael Anne; Phillips, Grady; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages. PMID:24915008

  3. EphB2 activity plays a pivotal role in pediatric medulloblastoma cell adhesion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, Arend H.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F.A.; Hulleman, Esther; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Yang, Hui; Scherpen, Frank J.G.; Kampen, Kim R.; Hoving, Eelco W.; Kamps, Willem A.; Diks, Sander H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; de Bont, Eveline S.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Eph/ephrin signaling has been implicated in various types of key cancer-enhancing processes, like migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis. In medulloblastoma, invading tumor cells characteristically lead to early recurrence and a decreased prognosis. Based on kinase-activity profiling data published recently, we hypothesized a key role for the Eph/ephrin signaling system in medulloblastoma invasion. In primary medulloblastoma samples, a significantly higher expression of EphB2 and the ligand ephrin-B1 was observed compared with normal cerebellum. Furthermore, medulloblastoma cell lines showed high expression of EphA2, EphB2, and EphB4. Stimulation of medulloblastoma cells with ephrin-B1 resulted in a marked decrease in in vitro cell adhesion and an increase in the invasion capacity of cells expressing high levels of EphB2. The cell lines that showed an ephrin-B1–induced phenotype possessed increased levels of phosphorylated EphB2 and, to a lesser extent, EphB4 after stimulation. Knockdown of EphB2 expression by short hairpin RNA completely abolished ephrin ligand–induced effects on adhesion and migration. Analysis of signal transduction identified p38, Erk, and mTOR as downstream signaling mediators potentially inducing the ephrin-B1 phenotype. In conclusion, the observed deregulation of Eph/ephrin expression in medulloblastoma enhances the invasive phenotype, suggesting a potential role in local tumor cell invasion and the formation of metastases. PMID:22723427

  4. Osteomyelitis: diagnosis with In-111-labeled leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Schauwecker, D.S.

    1989-04-01

    In a retrospective review, 485 patients with suspected osteomyelitis were studied. Of these, 453 patients were studied with both bone and indium-111 leukocyte scanning (173 sequentially and 280 simultaneously). The ability to determine that the infection was in bone rather than in adjacent soft tissue was greater with simultaneous bone scan and In-111 leukocyte studies than with sequential studies. The locations of suspected osteomyelitis were divided into central (containing active bone marrow), peripheral (hands and feet), and middle (between central and peripheral). Specificity remained high (about 90%) regardless of the location. Overall sensitivity was significantly lower in the central location than in the peripheral or middle location. Determination of whether the In-111 leukocyte activity was in bone or adjacent soft tissue was also more difficult when the infection was in the central location. For acute osteomyelitis, sensitivity was high regardless of the location. For chronic osteomyelitis, sensitivity was lower in the central location.

  5. Impact of simulated microgravity on the secretory and adhesive activity of cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudimov, Evgeny; Buravkova, Ludmila; Pogodina, Margarita; Andrianova, Irina

    The layer of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is a dynamic,disseminated organ that perform the function of an interface between the blood and vascular wall. The endothelial monolayer is able to quickly respond to changes in the microenvironment due to its synthesis of vasoactive substances, chemokines, adhesion molecules expression, etc. ECs are highly sensitive to gravitational changes and capable of short-term and long-term responses (Sangha et al., 2001; Buravkova et al., 2005; Infanger et al., 2006, 2007. However, the question remains how to reflect the impact of microgravity on endothelium under the inflammatory process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate secretory and adhesive activity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) during simulated microgravity and TNF-a activation. HUVECs were isolated according to Gimbrone et al. (1978) in modification A. Antonov (1981) and used for experiments at 2-4 passages. HUVECs were activated by low level of TNF-a (2 ng/ml). Microgravity was generated by Random Positioning Machine (RPM, Dutch Space, Leiden) placed into the thermostat at 37°C. After 24 hours of clinorotation we measured adhesion molecules expression on the cell surface (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, E-selectin, CD144, endoglin (CD105)) and cell viability using a flow cytometry. To evaluate the level of target gene expression was used the real time RT-PCR. IL-6 and IL-8 concentration was measured in the conditioned medium of HUVECs by using the ELISA test. We found that simulated microgravity within 24 hours caused a decrease of ICAM-1, CD144, and E-selectin expression, at the same time not affect the cell viability, endoglin and PECAM-1 expression on the surface HUVEC. Furthermore, there were no changes of the level of IL-6 and IL-8 gene expression and their products in the culture medium. TNF-activated HUVECs showed an increase in gene expression of interleukins and molecules involved in the adhesion process, which also was confirmed

  6. Age-dependent basal level and induction capacity of copper-zinc and manganese superoxide dismutase and other scavenging enzyme activities in leukocytes from young and elderly adults.

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Y.; Iizawa, O.; Ishimoto, K.; Akamatsu, H.; Kanoh, T.

    1993-01-01

    Several enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and D-glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are capable of scavenging reactive oxygen species in in vivo. We assessed both basal levels and the capacity of these enzyme activities to be induced in human leukocytes in response to a variety of agents. Basal activity of copper-zinc SOD, and manganese SOD showed little variation with age. In contrast, the basal activity of the three H2O2 scavenging enzymes, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and D-glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, was significantly higher in younger adults than in elderly individuals. Both manganese SOD and copper, zinc SOD activities were significantly induced by paraquat, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, adriamycin, and bleomycin in lymphocytes and neutrophils from asymptomatic non-aged adults, whereas neither activity was induced in aged individuals. In contrast, glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly induced in both groups of subjects, whereas catalase and D-glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were only slightly induced in either. Enzyme induction with paraquat, adriamycin, or bleomycin was inhibitable by neutralizing antibody to interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor, suggesting that the inductions observed with these three drugs are due to the distal mediators, interleukin-1 or tumor necrosis factor released from the cells. Finally, as observed in the regulation of genes in eukaryotes (Storz et al: Bacterial defenses against oxidative stress. Trends Genetics 1990, 6:363-368, ref. 1) O2- and H2O2 seem to differ in the rate of change with age in both basal levels and inducibility under oxygen stress. PMID:8317554

  7. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  12. Role of CXCL5 in leukocyte recruitment to the lungs during secondhand smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Batra, Sanjay; Cai, Shanshan; Mei, Junjie; Worthen, G Scott; Penn, Arthur L; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2012-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of mortality in the United States. The major cause of COPD is cigarette smoking. Extensive leukocyte influx into the lungs, mediated by chemokines, is a critical event leading to COPD. Although both resident and myeloid cells secrete chemokines in response to inflammatory stimuli, little is known about the role of epithelial-derived chemokines, such as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)5, in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke-induced inflammation. To explore the role of CXCL5, we generated CXCL5 gene-deficient mice and exposed them to secondhand smoke (SHS) for 5 hours/day for 5 days/week up to 3 weeks (subacute exposure). We observed a reduced recruitment of leukocytes to the lungs of CXCL5(-/-) mice compared with their wild-type (WT) counterparts, and noted that macrophages comprised the predominant leukocytes recruited to the lungs. Irradiation experiments performed on CXCL5(-/-) or WT mice transplanted with WT or CXCL5(-/-) bone marrow revealed that resident but not hematopoietic cell-driven CXCL5 is important for mediating SHS-induced lung inflammation. Interestingly, we observed a significant reduction of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CC chemokine ligand 2) concentrations in the lungs of CXCL5(-/-) mice. The instillation of recombinant MCP-1 in CXCL5(-/-) mice reversed macrophage recruitment. Our results also show the reduced activation of NF-κB/p65 in the lungs, as well as the attenuated activation of C-Jun N-terminal kinase, p42/44, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in the lungs of SHS-exposed CXCL5(-/-) mice. Our findings suggest an important role for CXCL5 in augmenting leukocyte recruitment in SHS-induced lung inflammation, and provide novel insights into CXCL5-driven pathogenesis. PMID:22362385

  13. Novel anticancer agent, SQAP, binds to focal adhesion kinase and modulates its activity

    PubMed Central

    Izaguirre-Carbonell, Jesus; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Murata, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Kusayanagi, Tomoe; Tsukuda, Senko; Hirakawa, Takeshi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Miura, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Sahara, Hiroeki; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sugawara, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    SQAP is a novel and promising anticancer agent that was obtained by structural modifications from a natural compound. SQAP inhibits angiogenesis in vivo resulting in increased hypoxia and reduced tumor volume. In this study, the mechanism by which SQAP modifies the tumor microenvironment was revealed through the application of a T7 phage display screening. This approach identified five SQAP-binding proteins including sterol carrier protein 2, multifunctional enzyme type 2, proteasomal ubiquitin receptor, UV excision repair protein and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). All the interactions were confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Since FAK plays an important role in cell turnover and angiogenesis, the influence of SQAP on FAK was the principal goal of this study. SQAP decreased FAK phosphorylation and cell migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and A549 cancer cells. These findings suggest that inhibition of FAK phosphorylation works as the mechanism for the anti-angiogenesis activity of SQAP. PMID:26456697

  14. CD99 is essential for leukocyte diapedesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Eric M; Deroche, Alana; Bae, Youngmee; Muller, William A

    2008-11-01

    Recruitment of leukocytes into inflamed tissue requires migration of leukocytes from the blood stream across the endothelial lining and the basement membrane of the local blood vessels. CD99 in humans is a 32-kDa highly O-glycosylated cell surface protein expressed on most leukocytes. The authors recently found CD99 to be expressed in leukocytes and at human endothelial cell contacts. Human CD99 is involved in homophilic interaction between the two cell types and participates in the transendothelial migration of monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in vitro. To test the role of CD99 in vivo, the authors cloned murine CD99 (muCD99), expressed it in vitro, and generated a blocking monoclonal antibody against it. We first showed that muCD99 is expressed on mouse leukocytes as well as enriched at the endothelial cell borders. Transfection of cells with muCD99 imparts on them the ability to aggregate in a CD99-dependent homophilic manner. Cells expressing muCD99 did not bind to cells expressing murine or human platelet endothelial call adhesion molecule (PECAM) or human CD99. In the thioglycollate peritonitis model of inflammation, anti-CD99 monoclonal antibody blocked the recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes by over 40% and 80%, respectively, at 18 h. Microscopy showed that this blocking occurred at the luminal surface of venules. The authors conclude that CD99 plays a major role in the emigration of leukocytes in vivo. PMID:18923973

  15. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Guillermina M; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka; Camacho-Artacho, Marta; Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Martín, M Teresa; Eck, Michael J; Kremer, Leonor; Gräter, Frauke; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Lietha, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the players involved are known; however, mechanistically, FAK activation is not understood. Here, using a multidisciplinary approach, including biochemical, biophysical, structural, computational, and cell biology approaches, we provide a detailed view of a multistep activation mechanism of FAK initiated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Interestingly, the mechanism differs from canonical NRTK activation and is tailored to the dual catalytic and scaffolding function of FAK. We find PI(4,5)P2 induces clustering of FAK on the lipid bilayer by binding a basic region in the regulatory 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology (FERM) domain. In these clusters, PI(4,5)P2 induces a partially open FAK conformation where the autophosphorylation site is exposed, facilitating efficient autophosphorylation and subsequent Src recruitment. However, PI(4,5)P2 does not release autoinhibitory interactions; rather, Src phosphorylation of the activation loop in FAK results in release of the FERM/kinase tether and full catalytic activation. We propose that PI(4,5)P2 and its generation in focal adhesions by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ are important in linking integrin signaling to FAK activation. PMID:25049397

  16. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, Guillermina M.; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka; Camacho-Artacho, Marta; Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Martín, M. Teresa; Eck, Michael J.; Kremer, Leonor; Gräter, Frauke; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Lietha, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the players involved are known; however, mechanistically, FAK activation is not understood. Here, using a multidisciplinary approach, including biochemical, biophysical, structural, computational, and cell biology approaches, we provide a detailed view of a multistep activation mechanism of FAK initiated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Interestingly, the mechanism differs from canonical NRTK activation and is tailored to the dual catalytic and scaffolding function of FAK. We find PI(4,5)P2 induces clustering of FAK on the lipid bilayer by binding a basic region in the regulatory 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology (FERM) domain. In these clusters, PI(4,5)P2 induces a partially open FAK conformation where the autophosphorylation site is exposed, facilitating efficient autophosphorylation and subsequent Src recruitment. However, PI(4,5)P2 does not release autoinhibitory interactions; rather, Src phosphorylation of the activation loop in FAK results in release of the FERM/kinase tether and full catalytic activation. We propose that PI(4,5)P2 and its generation in focal adhesions by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ are important in linking integrin signaling to FAK activation. PMID:25049397

  17. Effects of antioxidant supplementation on insulin sensitivity, endothelial adhesion molecules, and oxidative stress in normal-weight and overweight young adults.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Heather K; Bourguignon, Cheryl M; Weltman, Arthur L; Vincent, Kevin R; Barrett, Eugene; Innes, Karen E; Taylor, Ann G

    2009-02-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether short-term antioxidant (AOX) supplementation affects insulin sensitivity, endothelial adhesion molecule levels, and oxidative stress in overweight young adults. A randomized, double-blind, controlled study tested the effects of AOXs on measures of insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment [HOMA]) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index), endothelial adhesion molecules (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular adhesion molecule, and endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1), adiponectin, and oxidative stress (lipid hydroperoxides) in overweight and normal-weight individuals (N = 48, 18-30 years). Participants received either AOX (vitamin E, 800 IU; vitamin C, 500 mg; beta-carotene, 10 mg) or placebo for 8 weeks. The HOMA values were initially higher in the overweight subjects and were lowered with AOX by week 8 (15% reduction, P = .02). Adiponectin increased in both AOX groups. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 decreased in overweight AOX-treated groups by 6% and 13%, respectively (P < .05). Plasma lipid hydroperoxides were reduced by 0.31 and 0.70 nmol/mL in the normal-weight and overweight AOX-treated groups, respectively, by week 8 (P < .05). Antioxidant supplementation moderately lowers HOMA and endothelial adhesion molecule levels in overweight young adults. A potential mechanism to explain this finding is the reduction in oxidative stress by AOX. Long-term studies are needed to determine whether AOXs are effective in suppressing diabetes or vascular activation over time. PMID:19154960

  18. Active Metal Brazing and Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to C/C Composites for Heat Rejection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Cerny, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Robust assembly and integration technologies are critically needed for the manufacturing of heat rejection system (HRS) components for current and future space exploration missions. Active metal brazing and adhesive bonding technologies are being assessed for the bonding of titanium to high conductivity Carbon-Carbon composite sub components in various shapes and sizes. Currently a number of different silver and copper based active metal brazes and adhesive compositions are being evaluated. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Several mechanical tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of different brazing and adhesive approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these mechanical tests along with the fractographic analysis will be discussed. In addition, advantages, technical issues and concerns in using different bonding approaches will also be presented.

  19. Blood leukocyte and spleen lymphocyte immune response of spleen lymphocytes and whole blood leukocytes of hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.A.; Sothmann, M.; Wehrenberg, W.B. )

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of chronic physical activity on the immune response of spleen lymphocytes and whole blood leukocytes of hamsters. Animals were kept sedentary or allowed to exercise spontaneously on running wheels for eight weeks. Physically active animals averaged 12 kilometers per day. The immune response of spleen lymphocytes whole blood leukocytes was evaluated by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation in response to Concanavalin A or lipopolysaccharide. There was no treatment effect between physically active and sedentary hamster in response of spleen lymphocytes. The immune response of whole blood leukocytes to these mitogens was significantly greater in physically active vs. sedentary hamsters. These results demonstrate that chronic physical activity has the capacity to modulate immunoresponses.

  20. Tumor cell lysis by activated human neutrophils: analysis of neutrophil-delivered oxidative attack and role of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Dallegri, F; Ottonello, L; Ballestrero, A; Dapino, P; Ferrando, F; Patrone, F; Sacchetti, C

    1991-02-01

    The lysis of tumor cells, and other nucleated mammalian cells, by neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) triggered by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) represents a widely used model system to dissect the PMN cytolytic armamentarium, potentially responsible for the cell damage at tissue sites of PMN activation. Although oxidants are generally considered to be instrumental in the target lysis by PMNs, the mediators actually involved remain a matter of controversy. Moreover, other factors potentially crucial to the lysis have not been clearly identified. In order to reexamine the determinants of the cytolytic process, we studied the events underlying the PMA-triggered PMN-delivered attack against two different targets, selected on the basis of preliminary experiments (B lymphoblastoid Daudi cells and erythroleukemic K 562 cells). The results suggest that the lysis is promoted by hypochlorous acid (HOCl) or a compound with characteristics very similar to HOCl itself. No evidence was obtained for the intervention or contribution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl (OH.) radicals, and the major HOCl-derived chloramines. PMNs appeared to use 35% of the generated H2O2 to produce HOCl, while the remainder appears to be consumed by PMNs themselves and target cells as well. Moreover, PMNs and target cells coaggregated at an early step of the cytolytic reaction, through a process efficiently prevented by a monoclonal antibody (MoAb J-90) directed against leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). The inhibition of the PMN-target aggregation by the MoAb J-90 resulted in the impairment of the lysis, despite a normal generation of HOCl. Thus, the data demonstrate that the PMA-triggered lysis of tumor target cells by PMNs requires at least two events, occurring simultaneously: the LFA-1-mediated effector-target adherence and the PMN production of HOCl. The intervention of the LFA-1-mediated PMN-target adherence in the PMA-triggered lysis is likely to allow PMNs to

  1. The melanocortin system in leukocyte biology.

    PubMed

    Catania, Anna

    2007-02-01

    The melanocortin system is composed of the melanocortin peptides, adrenocorticotropic hormone and alpha-, beta-, and gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, the melanocortin receptors (MCRs), and the endogenous antagonists agouti- and agouti-related protein. Melanocortin peptides exert multiple effects upon the host, including anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Leukocytes are a source of melanocortins and a major target for these peptides. Because of reduced translocation of the nuclear factor NF-kappaB to the nucleus, MCR activation by their ligands causes a collective reduction of the most important molecules involved in the inflammatory process. This review examines how melanocortin peptides and their receptors participate in leukocyte biology. PMID:17041004

  2. Imaging of Leukocyte Trafficking in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pietronigro, Enrica; Zenaro, Elena; Constantin, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and is characterized by a progressive decline of cognitive functions. The neuropathological features of AD include amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles derived from the cytoskeletal hyperphosphorylated tau protein, amyloid angiopathy, the loss of synapses, and neuronal degeneration. In the last decade, inflammation has emerged as a key feature of AD, but most studies have focused on the role of microglia-driven neuroinflammation mechanisms. A dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD, and several studies have demonstrated that the vascular deposition of Aβ induces the expression of adhesion molecules and alters the expression of tight junction proteins, potentially facilitating the transmigration of circulating leukocytes. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) has become an indispensable tool to dissect the molecular mechanisms controlling leukocyte trafficking in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent TPLSM studies have shown that vascular deposition of Aβ in the CNS promotes intraluminal neutrophil adhesion and crawling on the brain endothelium and also that neutrophils extravasate in the parenchyma preferentially in areas with Aβ deposits. These studies have also highlighted a role for LFA-1 integrin in neutrophil accumulation in the CNS of AD-like disease models, revealing that LFA-1 inhibition reduces the corresponding cognitive deficit and AD neuropathology. In this article, we consider how current imaging techniques can help to unravel new inflammation mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AD and identify novel therapeutic strategies to treat the disease by interfering with leukocyte trafficking mechanisms. PMID:26913031

  3. Characterization of mouse peritoneal exudate and associated leukocyte adherence inhibitory activity after intraperitoneal injection of either Bordetella pertussis or Corynebacterium parvum vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, T W; Pross, S H; Benjamin, W R

    1978-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis and Corynebacterium parvum are commonly used immunopotentiating agents. To explore the inflammatory environment induced by these agents, the peritoneal exudate response in mice following intraperitoneal injection of B. pertussis (PV) and C. parvum (CV) vaccines was investigated. The PV-induced exudate isolated by lavage was characterized by an early neutrophil influx followed by enhanced accumulation of mononuclear cells and fluid protein. The CV exudate was principally mononuclear in nature and displayed fewer numbers of cells and less fluid protein. Both vaccines also enhanced the leukocyte adherence inhibitory activity (LAIA) of peritoneal fluid as measured in vitro. The development of exudate LAIA was T lymphocyte independent. A similar LAIA was demonstrated in nonimmune mouse plasma and serum. Exudate fluid and serum LAIA were heat stable and trypsin sensitive. These studies suggest that significant differences exist in the composition of the local tissue environment following PV and CV injection and that exudate LAIA is serum derived. Further studies in this direction should result in a better understanding of the ways in which inflammatory cells and fluid substances affect lymphocyte-macrophage interaction subsequent to adjuvant administration. PMID:215552

  4. Pathogenic Triad in Bacterial Meningitis: Pathogen Invasion, NF-κB Activation, and Leukocyte Transmigration that Occur at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shifu; Peng, Liang; Gai, Zhongtao; Zhang, Lehai; Jong, Ambrose; Cao, Hong; Huang, Sheng-He

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains the leading cause of disabilities worldwide. This life-threatening disease has a high mortality rate despite the availability of antibiotics and improved critical care. The interactions between bacterial surface components and host defense systems that initiate bacterial meningitis have been studied in molecular and cellular detail over the past several decades. Bacterial meningitis commonly exhibits triad hallmark features (THFs): pathogen penetration, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation in coordination with type 1 interferon (IFN) signaling and leukocyte transmigration that occur at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists mainly of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). This review outlines the progression of these early inter-correlated events contributing to the central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and injury during the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis. A better understanding of these issues is not only imperative to elucidating the pathogenic mechanism of bacterial meningitis, but may also provide the in-depth insight into the development of novel therapeutic interventions against this disease. PMID:26925035

  5. Development of Buccal Adhesive Tablet with Prolonged Antifungal activity: Optimization and ex vivo Deposition Studies

    PubMed Central

    Madgulkar, A.; Kadam, S.; Pokharkar, V.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to prepare buccal adhesive tablets of miconazole nitrate. The simplex centroid experimental design was used to arrive at optimum ratio of carbopol 934P, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M and polyvinylpyrollidone, which will provide desired drug release and mucoadhesion. Swelling index, mucoadhesive strength and in vitro drug release of the prepared tablet was determined. The drug release and bioadhesion was dependent on type and relative amounts of the polymers. The optimized combination was subjected to in vitro antifungal activity, transmucosal permeation, drug deposition in mucosa, residence time and bioadhesion studies. IR spectroscopy was used to investigate any interaction between drug and excipients. Dissolution of miconazole from tablets was sustained for 6 h. based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the prepared slow release buccoadhesive tablets of miconazole would markedly prolong the duration of antifungal activity. Comparison of in vitro antifungal activity of tablet with marketed gel showed that drug concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration were achieved immediately from both formulations but release from tablet was sustained up to 6 h, while the gel showed initially fast drug release, which did not sustain later. Drug permeation across buccal mucosa was minimum from the tablet as well as marketed gel; the deposition of drug in mucosa was higher in case of tablet. In vitro residence time and bioadhesive strength of tablet was higher than gel. Thus the buccoadhesive tablet of miconazole nitrate may offer better control of antifungal activity as compared to the gel formulation. PMID:20490296

  6. Development of Buccal Adhesive Tablet with Prolonged Antifungal activity: Optimization and ex vivo Deposition Studies.

    PubMed

    Madgulkar, A; Kadam, S; Pokharkar, V

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of the present work was to prepare buccal adhesive tablets of miconazole nitrate. The simplex centroid experimental design was used to arrive at optimum ratio of carbopol 934P, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M and polyvinylpyrollidone, which will provide desired drug release and mucoadhesion. Swelling index, mucoadhesive strength and in vitro drug release of the prepared tablet was determined. The drug release and bioadhesion was dependent on type and relative amounts of the polymers. The optimized combination was subjected to in vitro antifungal activity, transmucosal permeation, drug deposition in mucosa, residence time and bioadhesion studies. IR spectroscopy was used to investigate any interaction between drug and excipients. Dissolution of miconazole from tablets was sustained for 6 h. based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the prepared slow release buccoadhesive tablets of miconazole would markedly prolong the duration of antifungal activity. Comparison of in vitro antifungal activity of tablet with marketed gel showed that drug concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration were achieved immediately from both formulations but release from tablet was sustained up to 6 h, while the gel showed initially fast drug release, which did not sustain later. Drug permeation across buccal mucosa was minimum from the tablet as well as marketed gel; the deposition of drug in mucosa was higher in case of tablet. In vitro residence time and bioadhesive strength of tablet was higher than gel. Thus the buccoadhesive tablet of miconazole nitrate may offer better control of antifungal activity as compared to the gel formulation. PMID:20490296

  7. Cleavage of Type I Collagen by Fibroblast Activation Protein-α Enhances Class A Scavenger Receptor Mediated Macrophage Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Anna; Holthoff, Emily; Vadali, Shanthi; Kelly, Thomas; Post, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions such as fibrosis, inflammation, and tumor progression are associated with modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM). These modifications create ligands that differentially interact with cells to promote responses that drive pathological processes. Within the tumor stroma, fibroblasts are activated and increase the expression of type I collagen. In addition, activated fibroblasts specifically express fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP), a post-prolyl peptidase. Although FAP reportedly cleaves type I collagen and contributes to tumor progression, the specific pathophysiologic role of FAP is not clear. In this study, the possibility that FAP-mediated cleavage of type I collagen modulates macrophage interaction with collagen was examined using macrophage adhesion assays. Our results demonstrate that FAP selectively cleaves type I collagen resulting in increased macrophage adhesion. Increased macrophage adhesion to FAP-cleaved collagen was not affected by inhibiting integrin-mediated interactions, but was abolished in macrophages lacking the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A/CD204). Further, SR-A expressing macrophages localize with activated fibroblasts in breast tumors of MMTV-PyMT mice. Together, these results demonstrate that FAP-cleaved collagen is a substrate for SR-A-dependent macrophage adhesion, and suggest that by modifying the ECM, FAP plays a novel role in mediating communication between activated fibroblasts and macrophages. PMID:26934296

  8. CD44 sensitivity of platelet activation, membrane scrambling and adhesion under high arterial shear rates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guilai; Liu, Guoxing; Alzoubi, Kousi; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Walker, Britta; Münzer, Patrick; Luo, Dong; Umbach, Anja T; Elvira, Bernat; Chen, Hong; Voelkl, Jakob; Föller, Michael; Mak, Tak W; Borst, Oliver; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    CD44 is required for signalling of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an anti-apoptotic pro-inflammatory cytokine. MIF is expressed and released from blood platelets, key players in the orchestration of occlusive vascular disease. Nothing is known about a role of CD44 in the regulation of platelet function. The present study thus explored whether CD44 modifies degranulation (P-selectin exposure), integrin activation, caspase activity, phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface, platelet volume, Orai1 protein abundance and cytosolic Ca(2+)-activity ([Ca2+]i). Platelets from mice lacking CD44 (cd44(-/-)) were compared to platelets from corresponding wild-type mice (cd44(+/+)). In resting platelets, P-selectin abundance, α(IIb)β3 integrin activation, caspase-3 activity and phosphatidylserine exposure were negligible in both genotypes and Orai1 protein abundance, [Ca2+]i, and volume were similar in cd44(-/-) and cd44(+/+) platelets. Platelet degranulation and α(IIb)β3 integrin activation were significantly increased by thrombin (0.02 U/ml), collagen related peptide (CRP, 2 µg/ml and Ca(2+)-store depletion with thapsigargin (1 µM), effects more pronounced in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Thrombin (0.02 U/ml) increased platelet [Ca2+]i, caspase-3 activity, phosphatidylserine exposure and Orai1 surface abundance, effects again significantly stronger in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Thrombin further decreased forward scatter in cd44(-/-) and cd44(+/+) platelets, an effect which tended to be again more pronounced in cd44(-/-) than in cd44(+/+) platelets. Platelet adhesion and in vitro thrombus formation under high arterial shear rates (1,700 s(-1)) were significantly augmented in cd44(-/-) mice. In conclusion, genetic deficiency of CD44 augments activation, apoptosis and pro-thrombotic potential of platelets. PMID:26355696

  9. Prasugrel inhibits platelet-leukocyte interaction and reduces inflammatory markers in a model of endotoxic shock in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Totani, Licia; Dell'Elba, Giuseppe; Martelli, Nicola; Di Santo, Angelomaria; Piccoli, Antonio; Amore, Concetta; Evangelista, Virgilio

    2012-06-01

    Prasugrel, through its active metabolite, reduces atherothrombosis and its clinical manifestations by inhibiting platelet activation and aggregation. Platelets also contribute to inflammation through interaction with different classes of leukocytes. We investigated whether the inhibitory effect of prasugrel on platelets also counteract inflammatory responses. The effect of prasugrel active metabolite, R-138727, was investigated on platelet P-selectin expression, platelet adhesion to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and monocytes (MN) and Mac-1 expression in PMN and MN, in vitro, in human cells. The ex vivo effect of prasugrel administration on P-selectin, thromboxane (TXB)2 formation, platelet-PMN conjugates and Mac-1 expression in PMN triggered by PAR-4 agonist peptide was examined in whole blood from healthy mice as well as from mice in which an acute inflammatory reaction was induced by treatment with endotoxin. The effect of prasugrel on inflammatory markers in endotoxin-treated animals was also tested in vivo. R-138727 inhibited agonist-stimulated expression of platelet P-selectin, platelet-PMN and platelet-MN adhesion and platelet-dependent Mac-1 expression in leukocytes. Addition of aspirin did not modify the inhibitory effect elicited by R-138727. Treatment of mice with prasugrel resulted in a profound inhibition of platelet P-selectin expression, TXB2 production, platelet-PMN adhesion and Mac-1 expression in PMN induced by ex vivo stimulation with PAR-4 agonist peptide of whole blood from healthy or endotoxin-treated mice. Measurement of markers revealed that prasugrel reduced TXB2 and tumour necrosis factor-α synthesis and increased nitric oxide metabolites in endotoxin-treated mice in vivo. In conclusion, prasugrel reduces platelet interactions with PMN and MN. Through these effects prasugrel may curb platelet-mediated inflammatory responses. PMID:22436970

  10. Role of Leukocyte Elastase in Preventing Cellular Re-Colonization of the Mural Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Vincent; Touat, Ziad; Mtairag, El Mostafa; Vranckx, Roger; Louedec, Liliane; Houard, Xavier; Andreassian, Bernard; Sebbag, Uriel; Palombi, Tonino; Jacob, Marie-Paule; Meilhac, Olivier; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2004-01-01

    To explore possible mechanisms responsible for the absence of cell re-colonization of mural thrombi in aneurysms, we analyzed the release and storage of leukocyte proteases in the most luminal layer versus intermediate and abluminal layers of 10 mural thrombi of human abdominal aortic aneurysms. The luminal layer contained many polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), which released pro-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-8. Leukocyte elastase was also stored and released by the luminal layer (immunohistochemistry, activity on synthetic substrates, and casein zymography). Acid buffer allowed extraction of leukocyte elastase from the luminal layer, which was inhibited by elastase inhibitors. Casein zymography of luminal extracts and conditioned medium from formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-stimulated PMNs exhibited a similar lysis pattern, corresponding to elastase activity. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) seeding resulted in colonization of the intermediate thrombus layer ex vivo but not of the luminal layer. Extracts of the luminal layer induced loss of anchorage of both cultured human smooth muscle cells and stromal cells of bone marrow origin (anoikis). This anoikis was prevented by preincubation of the extracts with serine protease inhibitors. Moreover, adhesion of human SMCs and stromal bone marrow cells on fibrin gels was strongly inhibited when the gel was preincubated with pure elastase, medium of fMLP-stimulated PMNs, or extracts of luminal layers of mural thrombi. This loss of cell anchorage was prevented by the preincubation of the medium or extracts with α1-antitrypsin, but not when α1-antitrypsin was added after binding of elastase to the fibrin gel. In conclusion, elastase released by PMNs trapped within the mural thrombus impairs the spontaneous anchorage of mesenchymal cells to a fibrin matrix. This phenomenon could be one mechanism by which cellular healing of the mural thrombus in aneurysms is prevented. PMID:15161642

  11. Numerically bridging lamellipodial and filopodial activity during cell spreading reveals a potentially novel trigger of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Y; Vianay, B; Luginbuehl, R; Snedeker, J G

    2012-05-01

    We present a novel approach to modeling cell spreading, and use it to reveal a potentially central mechanism regulating focal adhesion maturation in various cell phenotypes. Actin bundles that span neighboring focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface were assumed to be loaded by intracellular forces in proportion to bundle length. We hypothesized that the length of an actin bundle (with the corresponding accumulated force at its adhesions) may thus regulate adhesion maturation to ensure cell mechanical stability and morphological integrity. We developed a model to test this hypothesis, implementing a "top-down" approach to simplify certain cellular processes while explicitly incorporating complexity of other key subcellular mechanisms. Filopodial and lamellipodial activities were treated as modular processes with functional spatiotemporal interactions coordinated by rules regarding focal adhesion turnover and actin bundle dynamics. This theoretical framework was able to robustly predict temporal evolution of cell area and cytoskeletal organization as reported from a wide range of cell spreading experiments using micropatterned substrates. We conclude that a geometric/temporal modeling framework can capture the key functional aspects of the rapid spreading phase and resultant cytoskeletal complexity. Hence the model is used to reveal mechanistic insight into basic cell behavior essential for spreading. It demonstrates that actin bundles spanning nascent focal adhesions such that they are aligned to the leading edge may accumulate centripetal endogenous forces along their length, and could thus trigger focal adhesion maturation in a force-length dependent fashion. We suggest that this mechanism could be a central "integrating" factor that effectively coordinates force-mediated adhesion maturation at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface. PMID:22453759

  12. Antimicrobial activity of a novel adhesive containing chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) against the resident microflora in human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Carty, Neal; Wibaux, Anne; Ward, Colleen; Paulson, Daryl S.; Johnson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of a new, transparent composite film dressing, whose adhesive contains chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), against the native microflora present on human skin. Methods CHG-containing adhesive film dressings and non-antimicrobial control film dressings were applied to the skin on the backs of healthy human volunteers without antiseptic preparation. Dressings were removed 1, 4 or 7 days after application. The bacterial populations underneath were measured by quantitative cultures (cylinder-scrub technique) and compared with one another as a function of time. Results The mean baseline microflora recovery was 3.24 log10 cfu/cm2. The mean log reductions from baseline measured from underneath the CHG-containing dressings were 0.87, 0.78 and 1.30 log10 cfu/cm2 on days 1, 4 and 7, respectively, compared with log reductions of 0.67, −0.87 and −1.29 log10 cfu/cm2 from underneath the control film dressings. There was no significant difference between the log reductions of the two treatments on day 1, but on days 4 and 7 the log reduction associated with the CHG adhesive was significantly higher than that associated with the control adhesive. Conclusions The adhesive containing CHG was associated with a sustained antimicrobial effect that was not present in the control. Incorporating the antimicrobial into the adhesive layer confers upon it bactericidal properties in marked contrast to the non-antimicrobial adhesive, which contributed to bacterial proliferation when the wear time was ≥4 days. PMID:24722839

  13. Inhibitory activity of cranberry extract on the bacterial adhesiveness in the urine of women: an ex-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Tempera, G; Corsello, S; Genovese, C; Caruso, F E; Nicolosi, D

    2010-01-01

    Strains of uropathogenic E. coli are responsible for approximately 90% of community-acquired, uncomplicated cystitis, and fimbriae represent the adhesive factors enabling E. coli to be anchored to uroepithelial cells in the first step of the infectious process. Recently, a few studies have shown that a correlation between the consumption of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) and prevention of UTI is related to the ability of proanthocyanidins to reduce the bacterial adhesion to uroepithelial cells. In this study we evaluate the inhibitory activity of urine of healthy women treated with tablets containing cranberry extract on the adhesiveness of E. coli to uroepithelial human cells. Two groups of 12 female volunteers each, aged between 18 and 65 years, were enrolled, one group with negative history and one group with positive history of recurrent cystitis. Subjects were treated with the active product or placebo in a random, cross-over, double-blinded sequence for one week in each of the two treatment sequences. Urine samples were collected at the beginning and the end of each study period. Tests of bacterial adhesiveness were performed with two strains of E. coli (ATCC 25922 and ATCC 35218) on HT1376 human bladder carcinoma cells. Significant reductions of bacterial adhesiveness were observed in women who received cranberry extract (-50.9%; p less than 0.0001), regardless of their medical history and the treatment period in the cross-over sequence. No changes were observed with placebo (-0.29%; n.s.). This ex-vivo study showed that the assumption of cranberry extract in suitable amounts can have an anti-adhesive activity on uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:20646356

  14. A comparative phenotypical analysis of rheumatoid nodules and rheumatoid synovium with special reference to adhesion molecules and activation markers

    PubMed Central

    Elewaut, D.; De Keyser, F.; De Wever, N.; Baeten, D.; Van Damme, N.; Verbruggen, G.; Cuvelier, C.; Veys, E.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—(1)To analyse the in situ expression of adhesion molecules in rheumatoid nodules. (2) To compare the endothelial expression of adhesion molecules in synovial tissue and subcutaneous nodules obtained from the same patients. (3) To compare the expression of adhesion molecules and activation markers on T cell lines from nodules and synovium.
METHODS—(1) Immunohistochemical analysis by APAAP technique of E selectin, CD44, ICAM-1, PECAM-1, and VCAM-1 was performed on 10 rheumatoid nodules from seven patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); nodules and synovium were simultaneously analysed from three patients. (2) T cell lines were generated from RA nodules (n=7) and synovium (n=7) by interleukin 2 expansion, and subsequently characterised by flow cytometry for surface expression of αEβ7, α4β7, CD44, L selectin, LFA-1a, PECAM-1, and CD30.
RESULTS—(1) In rheumatoid nodules, the palisading layer strongly stains for ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, but less pronounced for CD44. VCAM-1 staining was usually negative. ICAM-1 is upregulated in the vessels surrounding the central zone of fibrinoid necrosis. The immunohistological picture in different nodules derived from the same patient was similar. (2) The endothelial expression of adhesion molecules is comparable in RA nodules and synovium on an individual level, except for E selectin, which is overexpressed in nodule endothelium. (3) T cell lines from nodules and synovium display similar adhesion molecule profiles. However, the expression of CD30, a T cell activation marker linked with Th2 subsets, is higher in nodules compared with synovium.
CONCLUSION—These data support a recirculation hypothesis of T cells between articular and extra-articular manifestations in RA, although the activation state of the T cells in each of these localisations may differ.

 Keywords: T cells; adhesion molecules; rheumatoid nodules; rheumatoid synovium PMID:9797554

  15. Screening New Drugs for Immunotoxic Potential: II. Assessment of the Effects of Selective and Nonselective COX-2 Inhibitors on Complement Activation, Superoxide Anion Production and Leukocyte Chemotaxis and Migration Through Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Furst, Sylvia M; Khan, K Nasir; Komocsar, Wendy J; Fan, Lian; Mennear, John

    2005-04-01

    Results from earlier experiments in our laboratories revealed that both selective and nonselective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 possess little potential for decreasing in vitro phagocytosis by rat macrophages or canine neutrophils and no potential for decreasing in vivo phagocytosis by the intact murine immune system. We now report the results of studies to assess in vitro and ex vivo effects of the drugs on 1) canine complement activation, 2) generation of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide (oxidative burst) by canine neutrophils, and 3) leukocytic chemotaxis and transmigration through endothelial cell monolayers. In vitro concentrations of naproxen sodium, SC-236, SC-245, and SC-791 ranging from 0.1 to 10 muM were tested for their abilities to inhibit canine complement-mediated hemolysis of opsonized sheep erythrocytes and to block phorbol myristate acetate-induced oxidative burst in canine neutrophils. Both models responded to known inhibitory agents, leupeptin in the complement activation test and staurosporine in the superoxide anion assay. In contrast, tested nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs produced only trivial changes in complement activation and superoxide anion production. Experiments on plasma and neutrophils isolated from dogs administered an experimental selective COX-2 inhibitor during a 28-day toxicology study revealed no evidence of drug-associated changes in complement activation or formation of superoxide anion. SC-791 reduced chemotaxis of canine leukocytes toward zymosan-activated dog plasma, but not toward leukotriene B(4). None of the other drugs tested significantly affected leukocytic chemotaxis. Ibuprofen, SC-245 and SC-791 but not SC-236, reduced transmigration of canine leukocytes through endothelial cell monolayers. Based on the results of these experiments and our earlier studies we have concluded that, although high (suprapharmacologic) concentrations of the drugs may induce in vitro evidence of apparent immunomodulation of

  16. Alteration of rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte function after thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Gruber, D F; D'Alesandro, M M

    1989-01-01

    One portion of host defense to bacterial challenge(s) involves the activation and infiltration of endogenous polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Thermal injuries are frequently associated with immunologic abnormalities including alterations of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-associated nonspecific resistance. We examined isolated peripheral rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes for alterations in membrane potential, oxidative capability, and locomotor function after the experimental application of 20% full-thickness body surface area thermal injury. Thermal injury resulted in significant reductions of peripheral red blood cell concentration(s) and increases in leukocyte and platelet concentrations for 42 days after injury. In addition to the quantitative changes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes also demonstrated altered qualitative functions. Compared with phorbol myristate acetate-induced activation of normal cells, polymorphonuclear leukocyte membranes from thermal-injured animals were electrophysiologically less responsive for 3 weeks after injury. The ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to produce intracellular H2O2, a measure of oxidative function, was also significantly decreased for 7 days after injury. The paradox in this paradigm of thermal injury was the demonstration of peripheral polymorphonuclear leukocyte quantitative increases with concurrent significant qualitative impairment. Qualitative lesions included altered states of membrane depolarization and depressed oxidative capability that may individually, or collectively, reduce nonspecific immune capabilities of the host to levels that are inadequate to combat infection. PMID:2793916

  17. Agonist Leukadherin-1 Increases CD11b/CD18-Dependent Adhesion Via Membrane Tethers

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Emrah; Faridi, Mohd. Hafeez; Kumar, Vinay; Deep, Shashank; Moy, Vincent T.; Gupta, Vineet

    2013-01-01

    Integrin CD11b/CD18 is a key adhesion receptor that mediates leukocyte migration and immune functions. Leukadherin-1 (LA1) is a small molecule agonist that enhances CD11b/CD18-dependent cell adhesion to its ligand ICAM-1. Here, we used single-molecule force spectroscopy to investigate the biophysical mechanism by which LA1-activated CD11b/CD18 mediates leukocyte adhesion. Between the two distinct populations of CD11b/CD18:ICAM-1 complex that participate in cell adhesion, the cytoskeleton(CSK)-anchored elastic elements and the membrane tethers, we found that LA1 enhanced binding of CD11b/CD18 on K562 cells to ICAM-1 via the formation of long membrane tethers, whereas Mn2+ additionally increased ICAM-1 binding via CSK-anchored bonds. LA1 activated wild-type and LFA1−/− neutrophils also showed longer detachment distances and time from ICAM-1-coated atomic force microscopy tips, but significantly lower detachment force, as compared to the Mn2+-activated cells, confirming that LA1 primarily increased membrane-tether bonds to enhance CD11b/CD18:ICAM-1 binding, whereas Mn2+ induced additional CSK-anchored bond formation. The results suggest that the two types of agonists differentially activate integrins and couple them to the cellular machinery, providing what we feel are new insights into signal mechanotransduction by such agents. PMID:24314082

  18. Modulation of Cell-adhesive Activity of Fibronectin by the Alternatively Spliced EDA Segment

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Oh-e, Naoko; Maeda, Toshinaga; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    1997-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) has a complex pattern of alternative splicing at the mRNA level. One of the alternatively spliced segments, EDA, is prominently expressed during biological processes involving substantial cell migration and proliferation, such as embryonic development, malignant transformation, and wound healing. To examine the function of the EDA segment, we overexpressed recombinant FN isoforms with or without EDA in CHO cells and compared their cell-adhesive activities using purified proteins. EDA+ FN was significantly more potent than EDA− FN in promoting cell spreading and cell migration, irrespective of the presence or absence of a second alternatively spliced segment, EDB. The cell spreading activity of EDA+ FN was not affected by antibodies recognizing the EDA segment but was abolished by antibodies against integrin α5 and β1 subunits and by Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro peptide, indicating that the EDA segment enhanced the cell-adhesive activity of FN by potentiating the interaction of FN with integrin α5β1. In support of this conclusion, purified integrin α5β1 bound more avidly to EDA+ FN than to EDA− FN. Augmentation of integrin binding by the EDA segment was, however, observed only in the context of the intact FN molecule, since the difference in integrin-binding activity between EDA+ FN and EDA− FN was abolished after limited proteolysis with thermolysin. Consistent with this observation, binding of integrin α5β1 to a recombinant FN fragment, consisting of the central cell-binding domain and the adjacent heparin-binding domain Hep2, was not affected by insertion of the EDA segment. Since the insertion of an extra type III module such as EDA into an array of repeated type III modules is expected to rotate the polypeptide up to 180° at the position of the insertion, the conformation of the FN molecule may be globally altered upon insertion of the EDA segment, resulting in an increased exposure of the RGD motif in III10 module and/or local

  19. PROLACTIN-INDUCED TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION, ACTIVATION AND RECEPTOR ASSOCIATION OF FOCAL ADHESION KINASE (FAK) IN MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prolactin-Induced Tyrosine Phosphorylation, Activation and Receptor
    Association of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) in Mammary Epithelial Cells.
    Suzanne E. Fenton1 and Lewis G. Sheffield2. 1U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency, MD-72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and

  20. Micro-structuring of polycarbonate-urethane surfaces in order to reduce platelet activation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Johanna; Gester, Kathrin; Roggenkamp, Jan; Mager, Ilona; Maas, Judith; Jansen, Sebastian V; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    In the development of new hemocompatible biomaterials, surface modification appears to be a suitable method in order to reduce the thrombogenetic potential of such materials. In this study, polycarbonate-urethane (PCU) tubes with different surface microstructures to be used for aortic heart valve models were investigated with regard to the thrombogenicity. The surface structures were produced by using a centrifugal casting process for manufacturing PCU tubes with defined casting mold surfaces which are conferred to the PCU surface during the process. Tubes with different structures defined by altering groove widths were cut into films and investigated under dynamic flow conditions in contact with porcine blood. The analysis was carried out by laser scanning microscopy which allowed for counting various morphological types of platelets with regard to the grade of activation. The comparison between plain and shaped PCU samples showed that the surface topography led to a decline of the activation of the coagulation cascade and thus to the reduction of the fibrin synthesis. Comparing different types of structures revealed that smooth structures with a small groove width (d ~ 3 μm) showed less platelet activation as well as less adhesion in contrast to a distinct wave structure (d ~ 90 μm). These results prove surface modification of polymer biomaterials to be a suitable method for reducing thrombogenicity and hence give reason for further alterations and improvements. PMID:24484511

  1. Diminished adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils with CD47 functionalized blood contacting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Finley, Matthew J; Rauova, Lubica; Alferiev, Ivan S; Weisel, John W; Levy, Robert J; Stachelek, Stanley J

    2012-08-01

    CD47 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that, through signaling mechanisms mediated by signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα1), functions as a biological marker of 'self-recognition'. We showed previously that inflammatory cell attachment to polymeric surfaces is inhibited by the attachment of biotinylated recombinant CD47 (CD47B). We test herein the hypothesis that CD47 modified blood conduits can reduce platelet and neutrophil activation under clinically relevant conditions. We appended a poly-lysine tag to the C-terminus of recombinant CD47 (CD47L) allowing for covalent linkage to the polymer. SIRPα1 expression was confirmed in isolated platelets. We then compared biocompatibility between CD47B and CD47L functionalized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces and unmodified control PVC surfaces. Quantitative and Qualitative analysis of blood cell attachment to CD47B and CD47L surfaces, via scanning electron microscopy, showed strikingly fewer platelets attached to CD47 modified surfaces compared to control. Flow cytometry analysis showed that activation markers for neutrophils (CD62L) and platelets (CD62P) exposed to CD47 modified PVC were equivalent to freshly acquired control blood, while significantly elevated in the unmodified PVC tubing. In addition, ethylene oxide gas sterilization did not inhibit the efficacy of the CD47 modification. In conclusion, CD47 modified PVC inhibits both the adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils. PMID:22613135

  2. Anthocyanins and their gut metabolites reduce the adhesion of monocyte to TNFα-activated endothelial cells at physiologically relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Krga, Irena; Monfoulet, Laurent-Emmanuel; Konic-Ristic, Aleksandra; Mercier, Sylvie; Glibetic, Maria; Morand, Christine; Milenkovic, Dragan

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of evidence suggests a protective role of dietary anthocyanins against cardiovascular diseases. Anthocyanins' extensive metabolism indicates that their metabolites could be responsible for the protective effects associated with consumption of anthocyanin-rich foods. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of plasma anthocyanins and their metabolites on the adhesion of monocytes to TNFα-activated endothelial cells and on the expression of genes encoding cell adhesion molecules. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to circulating anthocyanins: cyanidin-3-arabinoside, cyanidin-3-galactoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, peonidin-3-glucoside, anthocyanin degradation product: 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, or to their gut metabolites: protocatechuic, vanillic, ferulic and hippuric acid, at physiologically-relevant concentrations (0.1-2 μM) and time of exposure. Both anthocyanins and gut metabolites decreased the adhesion of monocytes to HUVECs, with a magnitude ranging from 18.1% to 47%. The mixture of anthocyanins and that of gut metabolites also reduced monocyte adhesion. However, no significant effect on the expression of genes encoding E-selectin, ICAM1 and VCAM1 was observed, suggesting that other molecular targets are involved in the observed effect. In conclusion, this study showed the potency of anthocyanins and their gut metabolites to modulate the adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells, the initial step in atherosclerosis development, under physiologically-relevant conditions. PMID:26873533

  3. Association between Kinin B1 Receptor Expression and Leukocyte Trafficking across Mouse Mesenteric Postcapillary Venules

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Peter G.; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Perretti, Mauro

    2000-01-01

    Using intravital microscopy, we examined the role played by B1 receptors in leukocyte trafficking across mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo. B1 receptor blockade attenuated interleukin (IL)-1β–induced (5 ng intraperitoneally, 2 h) leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions and leukocyte emigration (∼50% reduction). The B1 receptor agonist des-Arg9bradykinin (DABK), although inactive in saline- or IL-8–treated mice, caused marked neutrophil rolling, adhesion, and emigration 24 h after challenge with IL-1β (when the cellular response to IL-1β had subsided). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot revealed a temporal association between the DABK-induced response and upregulation of mesenteric B1 receptor mRNA and de novo protein expression after IL-1β treatment. DABK-induced leukocyte trafficking was antagonized by the B1 receptor antagonist des-arg10HOE 140 but not by the B2 receptor antagonist HOE 140. Similarly, DABK effects were maintained in B2 receptor knockout mice. The DABK-induced responses involved the release of neuropeptides from C fibers, as capsaicin treatment inhibited the responses. Treatment with the neurokinin (NK)1 and NK3 receptor antagonists attenuated the responses, whereas NK2, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or platelet-activating factor receptor antagonists had no effect. Substance P caused leukocyte recruitment that, similar to DABK, was inhibited by NK1 and NK3 receptor blockade. Mast cell depletion using compound 48/80 reduced DABK-induced leukocyte trafficking, and DABK treatment was shown histologically to induce mast cell degranulation. DABK-induced trafficking was inhibited by histamine H1 receptor blockade. Our findings provide clear evidence that B1 receptors play an important role in the mediation of leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions in postcapillary venules, leading to leukocyte recruitment during an inflammatory response. This involves activation of C fibers and mast cells

  4. Degree of conversion of simplified contemporary adhesive systems as influenced by extended air-activated or passive solvent volatilization modes.

    PubMed

    Borges, Boniek C D; Souza-Junior, Eduardo Jose; Brandt, William C; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Montes, Marcos A J R; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of five methods of solvent volatilization on the degree of conversion (DC) of nine one-bottle adhesive systems using Fourier transform infrared/attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR) analysis. Nine adhesives were tested: Adper Single Bond 2 (SB), Adper Easy One (EO), One Up Bond F Plus (OUP), One Coat Bond SL (OC), XP Bond (XP), Ambar (AM), Natural Bond (NB), GO, and Stae. The adhesive systems were applied to a zinc-selenide pellet and 1) cured without solvent volatilization, 2) left undisturbed for 10 seconds before curing, 3) left undisturbed for 60 seconds before curing, 4) air-dried with an air stream for 10 seconds before curing, and 5) air-dried with an air stream for 60 seconds before curing. FTIR/ATR spectra were obtained, and the DC was calculated by comparing the aliphatic bonds/reference peaks before and after light activation for 10 seconds (FlashLite 1401). The DC means of each material were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey test (p<0.05). The DC of GO and Stae adhesive systems was not affected by the five evaporation conditions. Air-drying for 60 seconds before curing yielded the highest DC for SB, EO, and OC. Extended solvent volatilization time (60 seconds) either with or without air-drying before curing provided the highest DC for AM, NB, XP, and OUP. Thus, the monomer conversion of adhesive systems was material dependent. In general, the 60-second passive or active air-drying modes to volatilize solvents before curing enhanced the degree of conversion for the one-bottle simplified adhesive systems. PMID:22313268

  5. Effects of methoxypoly (Ethylene glycol) mediated immunocamouflage on leukocyte surface marker detection, cell conjugation, activation and alloproliferation.

    PubMed

    Kyluik-Price, Dana L; Scott, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Tissue rejection occurs subsequent to the recognition of foreign antigens via receptor-ligand contacts between APC (antigen presenting cells) and T cells, resulting in initialization of signaling cascades and T cell proliferation. Bioengineering of donor cells by the covalent attachment of methoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG) to membrane proteins (PEGylation) provides a novel means to attenuate these interactions consequent to mPEG-induced charge and steric camouflage. While previous studies demonstrated that polymer-mediated immunocamouflage decreased immune recognition both in vitro and in vivo, these studies monitored late events in immune recognition and activation such as T cell proliferation. Consequently little information has been provided concerning the early cellular events governing this response. Therefore, the effect of PEGylation was assessed by examining initial cell-cell interactions, changes to activation pathways, and apoptosis to understand the role that each may play in the decreased proliferative response observed in modified cells during the course of a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). The mPEG-modified T cells resulted in significant immunocamouflage of lymphocyte surface proteins and decreased interactions with APC. Furthermore, mPEG-MLR exhibited decreased NFκB pathway activation, while exhibiting no significant differences in degree of cell death compared to the control MLR. These results suggest that PEGylation may prevent the direct recognition of foreign alloantigens by decreasing the stability and duration of initial cell-cell interactions. PMID:26457834

  6. GABP and PU.1 compete for binding, yet cooperate to increase CD18 (beta 2 leukocyte integrin) transcription.

    PubMed

    Rosmarin, A G; Caprio, D G; Kirsch, D G; Handa, H; Simkevich, C P

    1995-10-01

    CD18 (beta 2 leukocyte integrin) is a leukocyte-specific adhesion molecule that plays a crucial role in immune and inflammatory responses. A 79-nucleotide fragment of the CD18 promoter is sufficient to direct myeloid transcription. The CD18 promoter is bound by the B lymphocyte- and myeloid-restricted ets factor, PU.1, and disruption of the PU.1-binding sites significantly reduces promoter activity. However, PU.1 alone cannot fully account for the leukocyte-specific and myeloid-inducible transcription of CD18. We identified a ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein complex of extremely low electrophoretic mobility that also binds to this region of the CD18 promoter. This binding complex is a heterotetramer composed of GABP alpha, and ets factor, and GABP beta, a subunit with homology to Drosophila Notch. GABP alpha competes with the lineage restricted factor, PU.1, for the same critical CD18 ets sites. The CD18 promoter is activated in myeloid cells by transfection with both GABP alpha and GABP beta together, but not by either factor alone. Transfection of non-hematopoietic cells with the two GABP subunits together with PU.1 is sufficient to activate CD18 transcription in otherwise non-permissive cells. Thus, GABP and PU.1 compete for the same binding sites but cooperate to activate CD18 transcription. PMID:7559529

  7. Adhesive Properties and Acid-Forming Activity of Lactobacilli and Streptococci Under Inhibitory Substances, Such as Nitrates.

    PubMed

    Hakobyan, L; Harutyunyan, K; Harutyunyan, N; Melik-Andreasyan, G; Trchounian, A

    2016-06-01

    One of the main requirements for probiotics is their ability to survive during passage through gastrointestinal tract and to maintain their activity at different adverse conditions. The aim of the study was to look for the strains of lactobacilli and streptococci with high adhesive properties even affected by inhibitory substances, such as nitrates (NO3 (-)). To study the adhesion properties hemagglutination reaction of bacterial cells with red blood cells of different animals and humans was used. The acid formation ability of bacteria was determined by the method of titration after 7 days of incubation in the sterile milk. These properties were investigated at different concentrations of NO3 (-). The high concentration (mostly ≥2.0 %) NO3 (-) inhibited the growth of both lactobacilli and streptococci, but compared with streptococcal cultures lactobacilli, especially Lactobacillus acidophilus Ep 317/402, have shown more stability and higher adhesive properties. In addition, the concentrations of NO3 (-) of 0.5-2.0 % decreased the acid-forming activity of the strains, but even under these conditions they coagulated milk and, in comparison to control, formed low acidity in milk. Thus, the L. acidophilus Ep 317/402 with high adhesive properties has demonstrated a higher activity of NO3 (-) transformation. PMID:26942420

  8. Soluble adhesion molecules correlate with surface expression in an in vitro model of endothelial activation.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Anders G; Dige, Anders; Krog, Jan; Tønnesen, Else; Wogensen, Lise

    2013-10-01

    Endothelial activation is a pivotal event in the development and progression of inflammation. Central to endothelial activation is the up-regulation of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) including E-selectin (CD62E), ICAM-1 (CD54), VCAM-1 (CD106) and PECAM-1 (CD31). These CAMs are also found in soluble forms (sCAMs). In this in vitro study of endothelial activation, we examined whether the levels of sCAMs correlate with the endothelial surface expression of CAMs in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Such a correlation would support the use of sCAMs as surrogate markers for endothelial activation in inflammatory conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured with various concentrations of TNF-α for 8 hr and at a fixed concentration of TNF-α for various durations. The levels of soluble and surface-bound E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and PECAM-1 were quantified by flow cytometry. TNF-α stimulation increased CAM and sCAM expression in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. There was a significant positive correlation between the levels of ICAM-1 and sICAM-1 and between the levels of VCAM and sVCAM-1 in both the dose-response and time-response experiments. A positive correlation between the levels of E-selectin and sE-selectin was observed in the time-response experiment. This study supports the use of sCAMs as potential biomarkers of endothelial activation. In particular, the use of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and sE-selectin seems promising. PMID:23724832

  9. NADPH oxidase and lipid raft-associated redox signaling are required for PCB153-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules in human brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eum, Sung Yong; Andras, Ibolya; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), can lead to chronic inflammation and the development of vascular diseases. Because cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the cerebrovascular endothelium regulate infiltration of inflammatory cells into the brain, we have explored the molecular mechanisms by which ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), such as PCB153, can upregulate CAMs in brain endothelial cells. Exposure to PCB153 increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as well as elevated adhesion of leukocytes to brain endothelial cells. These effects were impeded by inhibitors of EGFR, JAKs, or Src activity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase or disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depleting agents blocked PCB153-induced phosphorylation of JAK and Src kinases and upregulation of CAMs. In contrast, silencing of caveolin-1 by siRNA interference did not affect upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells stimulated by PCB153. Results of the present study indicate that lipid raft-dependent NADPH oxidase/JAK/EGFR signaling mechanisms regulate the expression of CAMs in brain endothelial cells and adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial monolayers. Due to its role in leukocyte infiltration, induction of CAMs may contribute to PCB-induced cerebrovascular disorders and neurotoxic effects in the CNS. PMID:19632255

  10. NADPH oxidase and lipid raft-associated redox signaling are required for PCB153-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules in human brain endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Andras, Ibolya; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), can lead to chronic inflammation and the development of vascular diseases. Because cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the cerebrovascular endothelium regulate infiltration of inflammatory cells into the brain, we have explored the molecular mechanisms by which ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), such as PCB153, can upregulate CAMs in brain endothelial cells. Exposure to PCB153 increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as well as elevated adhesion of leukocytes to brain endothelial cells. These effects were impeded by inhibitors of EGFR, JAKs, or Src activity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase or disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depleting agents blocked PCB153-induced phosphorylation of JAK and Src kinases and upregulation of CAMs. In contrast, silencing of caveolin-1 by siRNA interference did not affect upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells stimulated by PCB153. Results of the present study indicate that lipid raft-dependent NADPH oxidase/JAK/EGFR signaling mechanisms regulate the expression of CAMs in brain endothelial cells and adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial monolayers. Due to its role in leukocyte infiltration, induction of CAMs may contribute to PCB-induced cerebrovascular disorders and neurotoxic effects in the CNS.

  11. Reduction of Leukocyte Counts by Hydroxyurea Improves Cardiac Function in Rats with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guiyue; Yao, Yucai; Pan, Lingyun; Zhu, Wei; Yan, Suhua

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to decrease leukocytes counts by hydroxyurea (Hu) in an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) rat model and examine its effect on the inflammatory response of myocardial infarction and cardiac functions. Material/Methods AMI was successfully caused in 36 rats, and 12 control rats received sham operation. Rats in the AMI group were then randomly divided into Hu and vehicle group with 18 rats each. Rats in the Hu AMI group received Hu (200 mg/kg) intragastrically while vehicle AMI group received saline. Leukocytes counts, cardiac functions, myocardial tissue morphology, and levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM), P-selectin and platelet activating factor (PAF) were measured and compared among the three groups four weeks after AMI induction. Results Leukocytes, neutrophils, and leukomonocyte counts in vehicle AMI rats were significantly higher than that of the normal control group (p<0.05). However, Hu treatment decreased their counts significantly (p<0.05). sICAM, P-selectin, and PAF level in vehicle AMI group were significantly higher than those of the normal group, and their level was also decreased by Hu treatment (p<0.05). Echocardiography analysis showed that Hu treatment increased left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular fractional shortening (LVFS) compared to that of vehicle AMI group (p<0.05). Histopathological examination showed that Hu significantly reduced the swelling of the heart muscle fiber in necrotic foci and the number of inflammatory cells infiltrated into myocardial interstitium compared to vehicle AMI group. Conclusions Decrease leukocytes counts by Hu significantly reduced inflammatory reaction and improved cardiac functions in AMI rats. PMID:26675565

  12. Interaction of the two components of leukocidin from Staphylococcus aureus with human polymorphonuclear leukocyte membranes: sequential binding and subsequent activation.

    PubMed Central

    Colin, D A; Mazurier, I; Sire, S; Finck-Barbançon, V

    1994-01-01

    The sequential interaction between the two components S and F of leukocidin from Staphylococcus aureus and the membrane of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils has been investigated in the presence of 1 mM Ca2+. With 125I-labeled components, it has been shown that binding of the F component occurred only after binding of the S component. The kinetic constants of binding of both components were not statistically different (Kd, approximately 5 nM; Bm, approximately 35,000 molecules per cell), and both Hill coefficients were 1. The application of increasing concentrations of leukocidin provoked a dose-dependent secretion of the granule content, as determined by hexosaminidase and lysozyme activity measurements. Furthermore, the separate perfusion of S and F components on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils deposited on a filter induced secretion of the granules content only when the perfusion of the S component preceded that of the F component. We conclude, therefore, that (i) S-component binding is a prerequisite for F-component binding and for subsequent activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and (ii) there is a specific binding site for the S component in the plasma membrane. PMID:8039887

  13. Src and FAK mediate cell-matrix adhesion-dependent activation of Met during transformation of breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hui, Angela Y; Meens, Jalna A; Schick, Colleen; Organ, Shawna L; Qiao, Hui; Tremblay, Eric A; Schaeffer, Erik; Uniyal, Shashi; Chan, Bosco M C; Elliott, Bruce E

    2009-08-15

    Cell-matrix adhesion has been shown to promote activation of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor, Met, in a ligand-independent manner. This process has been linked to transformation and tumorigenesis in a variety of cancer types. In the present report, we describe a key role of integrin signaling via the Src/FAK axis in the activation of Met in breast epithelial and carcinoma cells. Expression of an activated Src mutant in non-neoplastic breast epithelial cells or in carcinoma cells was found to increase phosphorylation of Met at regulatory tyrosines in the auto-activation loop domain, correlating with increased cell spreading and filopodia extensions. Furthermore, phosphorylated Met is complexed with beta1 integrins and is co-localized with vinculin and FAK at focal adhesions in epithelial cells expressing activated Src. Conversely, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Src abrogates constitutive Met phosphorylation in carcinoma cells or epithelial cells expressing activated Src, and inhibits filopodia formation. Interestingly, Src-dependent phosphorylation of Met requires cell-matrix adhesion, as well as actin stress fiber assembly. Phosphorylation of FAK by Src is also required for Src-induced Met phosphorylation, emphasizing the importance of the Src/FAK signaling pathway. However, stimulation of Met phosphorylation by addition of exogenous HGF in epithelial cells is refractory to inhibition of Src family kinases, indicating that HGF-dependent and Src/integrin-dependent Met activation occur via distinct mechanisms. Together these findings demonstrate a novel mechanism by which the Src/FAK axis links signals from the integrin adhesion complex to promote Met activation in breast epithelial cells. PMID:19533669

  14. Separation of uncompromised whole blood mixtures for single source STR profiling using fluorescently-labeled human leukocyte antigen (HLA) probes and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Dean, Lee; Kwon, Ye Jin; Philpott, M Katherine; Stanciu, Cristina E; Seashols-Williams, Sarah J; Dawson Cruz, Tracey; Sturgill, Jamie; Ehrhardt, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of biological mixtures is a significant problem for forensic laboratories, particularly when the mixture contains only one cell type. Contributions from multiple individuals to biologic evidence can complicate DNA profile interpretation and often lead to a reduction in the probative value of DNA evidence or worse, its total loss. To address this, we have utilized an analytical technique that exploits the intrinsic immunological variation among individuals to physically separate cells from different sources in a mixture prior to DNA profiling. Specifically, we applied a fluorescently labeled antibody probe to selectively bind to one contributor in a mixture through allele-specific interactions with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins that are expressed on the surfaces of most nucleated cells. Once the contributor's cells were bound to the probe, they were isolated from the mixture using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)-a high throughput technique for separating cell populations based on their optical properties-and then subjected to STR analysis. We tested this approach on two-person and four-person whole blood mixtures where one contributor possessed an HLA allele (A*02) that was not shared by other contributors to the mixture. Results showed that hybridization of the mixture with a fluorescently-labeled antibody probe complimentary to the A*02 allele's protein product created a cell population with a distinct optical profile that could be easily differentiated from other cells in the mixture. After sorting the cells with FACS, genetic analysis showed that the STR profile of this cell population was consistent with that of the contributor who possessed the A*02 allele. Minor peaks from the A*02 negative contributor(s) were observed but could be easily distinguished from the profile generated from A*02 positive cells. Overall, this indicates that HLA antibody probes coupled to FACS may be an effective approach for generating STR profiles of

  15. The role of G-CSF and IL-6 in the granulopoiesis-stimulating activity of murine blood serum induced by perorally administered ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, IMUNOR.

    PubMed

    Vacek, Antonín; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Weiterová, Lenka; Streitová, Denisa; Svoboda, Jaroslav

    2007-05-01

    IMUNOR, a low-molecular weight (< 12 kD) ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, has been previously found to have significant stimulatory effects on murine hematopoiesis supressed by ionizing radiation or cytotoxic drugs. This communication shows data on the mechanisms of these effects. Using ELISA assay, significantly increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were observed. On the contrary, no detectable levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CFC) and interleukin-3 (IL-3) have been found in blood serum of IMUNOR-treated mice. Incubation of the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with antibodies against G-CSF caused abrogation of the ability of the sera to stimulate in vitro growth of colonies originating from granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC). In contrast, incubation of the serum with antibodies against IL-6 did not change its colony-stimulating activity. It may be inferred from these findings that G-CSF is probably the main cytokine responsible for the granulopoiesis-stimulating effects of IMUNOR. When the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with G-CSF inactivated by anti-G-CSF antibodies (but with elevated IL-6) was added to cultures of bone marrow cells together with a suboptimum concentration of IL-3, a significant increase in the numbers of GM-CFC colonies was found. Moreover, conjoint inactivation of G-CSF and IL-6 significantly decreased the numbers of GM-CFC colonies in comparison with those observed when only G-CSF was inactivated. This observation strongly suggests that though IMUNOR-induced IL-6 is not able to induce the growth of GM-CFC colonies alone, it is able to potentiate the hematopoiesis-stimulating effect of IL-3. These findings represent a new knowledge concerning the hematopoiesis-stimulating action of IMUNOR, a promising immunomodulatory agent. PMID:17386413

  16. Degradation of thyroid hormones by phagocytosing human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Klebanoff, S J; Green, W L

    1973-01-01

    untreated normal or MPO-deficient leukocytes and by normal leukocytes treated with azide or methimazole. These data suggest that both MPO-dependent and MPO-independent systems are involved in the degradation of T(4) and T(3) by phagocytosing leukocytes. The role of leukocytic degradation of T(4) and T(3) in thyroid hormone economy and in leukocytic microbicidal activity is considered. PMID:4629909

  17. Activation of matrix metalloproteinase-26 by HOXA10 promotes embryo adhesion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yue; Yan, Guijun; Zhang, Hui; Shan, Huizhi; Kong, Chengcai; Yan, Qiang; Xue, Bai; Diao, Zhenyu; Hu, Yali; Sun, Haixiang

    2014-03-14

    Successful embryonic implantation requires an effective maternal-embryonic molecular dialogue. However, the detailed mechanisms of epithelial-embryo adhesion remain poorly understood. Here, we report that matrix metalloproteinase-26 (MMP-26) is a novel downstream target gene of homeobox a 10 (HOXA10) in human endometrial cells. HOXA10 binds directly to a conserved TTAT unit (-442 to -439) located within the 5' regulatory region of the MMP-26 gene and regulates the expression and secretion of MMP-26 in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the adenovirus-mediated overexpression of MMP-26 in Ishikawa cells markedly increased BeWo spheroid adhesion. An antibody blocking assay further demonstrated that the promotion of BeWo spheroid adhesion by HOXA10 and MMP-26 was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment with a specific antibody against MMP-26. These results demonstrate that the HOXA10-mediated expression of MMP-26 promotes embryo adhesion during the process of embryonic implantation. PMID:24565841

  18. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion-site formation.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Grégory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin J; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P

    2007-02-01

    Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion, and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction, and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  19. Extravasation of leukocytes in comparison to tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Strell, Carina; Entschladen, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The multi-step process of the emigration of cells from the blood stream through the vascular endothelium into the tissue has been termed extravasation. The extravasation of leukocytes is fairly well characterized down to the molecular level, and has been reviewed in several aspects. Comparatively little is known about the extravasation of tumor cells, which is part of the hematogenic metastasis formation. Although the steps of the process are basically the same in leukocytes and tumor cells, i.e. rolling, adhesion, transmigration (diapedesis), the molecules that are involved are different. A further important difference is that leukocyte interaction with the endothelium changes the endothelial integrity only temporarily, whereas tumor cell interaction leads to an irreversible damage of the endothelial architecture. Moreover, tumor cells utilize leukocytes for their extravasation as linkers to the endothelium. Thus, metastasis formation is indirectly susceptible to localization signals that are literally specific for the immune system. We herein compare the extravasation of leukocytes and tumor cells with regard to the involved receptors and the localization signals that direct the cells to certain organs and sites of the body. PMID:19055814

  20. Localized adhesion of monocytes to human atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated in vitro: implications for atherogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, R. N.; Johnson-Tidey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Blood-derived macrophages in the arterial intima are a characteristic feature of active atherosclerotic plaques. Adherent monocytes on the luminal surface and increased adhesion molecules on the endothelium have suggested that specific molecular mechanisms are involved in monocyte/macrophage traffic into the arterial wall. Adhesion of human monocytes and related cell lines was therefore studied in vitro to histological sections of human plaques. At 37 degrees C, these cells bound selectively to the plaques. Binding to the endothelium occurred and was also present extensively in the diseased intima. Inhibition studies showed that the endothelial and general intimal binding had largely similar molecular properties. Strong inhibition was produced by antibodies to the monocyte-specific adhesion molecule CD14, to beta2 integrins, and to ICAM-1. Likewise, a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence was strongly inhibitory, suggesting that binding of leukocyte integrins to arterial extracellular matrix was synergistic with cell-cell interactions. A P-selectin antibody was exceptional in giving selective inhibition of endothelial adhesion, which correlates with the specific endothelial localization of this adhesion molecule. These results show that monocytes adhere to atherosclerotic plaques through the focal activation of multiple arterial wall adhesion molecules, confirming the adhesion hypothesis. A positive feedback theory for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can be suggested, based on the ability of macrophages in the wall to activate the endothelium, induce adhesion molecules, and facilitate additional monocyte entry. The adhesion assay provides a means for the identification of adhesion inhibitors with therapeutic potential. Images Figure 2 PMID:8686764

  1. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  2. Thyroid hormone regulates adhesion, migration and matrix metalloproteinase 9 activity via αvβ3 integrin in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Keren; Flint, Nir; Shalev, Shachar; Erez, Daniel; Baharal, Tal; Davis, Paul J; Hercbergs, Aleck; Ellis, Martin; Ashur-Fabian, Osnat

    2014-08-15

    Thyroid hormone (3,5,3'-triiodothyronine, T3; L-thyroxine, T4) enhances cancer cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis via a discrete receptor located near the RGD recognition site on αvβ3 integrin. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and its nanoparticulate formulation interfere with binding of T3/T4 to the integrin. This integrin is overexpressed in multiple myeloma (MM) and other cancers. MM cells interact with αvβ3 integrin to support growth and invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes active in tissue remodeling and cancer. The association between integrins and MMPs secretion and action is well established. In the current study, we examined the effects of thyroid hormone on myeloma cell adhesion, migration and MMP activity. We show that T3 and T4 increased myeloma adhesion to fibronectin and induced αvβ3 clustering. In addition, the hormones induced MMP-9 expression and activation via αvβ3 and MAPK induction. Bortezomib, a standard myeloma treatment, caused a decrease in activity/quantity of MMPs and thyroid hormone opposed this effect. RGD peptide and tetrac impaired the production of MMP-9 in cell lines and in primary BM cells from myeloma patients. In conclusion, thyroid hormone-dependent regulation via αvβ3 of myeloma cell adhesion and MMP-9 production may play a role in myeloma migration and progression. PMID:25071016

  3. Thyroid hormone regulates adhesion, migration and matrix metalloproteinase 9 activity via αvβ3 integrin in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Keren; Flint, Nir; Shalev, Shachar; Erez, Daniel; Baharal, Tal; Davis, Paul J.; Hercbergs, Aleck; Ellis, Martin; Ashur-Fabian, Osnat

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (3,5,3′-triiodothyronine, T3; L-thyroxine, T4) enhances cancer cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis via a discrete receptor located near the RGD recognition site on αvβ3 integrin. Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and its nanoparticulate formulation interfere with binding of T3/T4 to the integrin. This integrin is overexpressed in multiple myeloma (MM) and other cancers. MM cells interact with αvβ3 integrin to support growth and invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes active in tissue remodeling and cancer. The association between integrins and MMPs secretion and action is well established. In the current study, we examined the effects of thyroid hormone on myeloma cell adhesion, migration and MMP activity. We show that T3 and T4 increased myeloma adhesion to fibronectin and induced αvβ3 clustering. In addition, the hormones induced MMP-9 expression and activation via αvβ3 and MAPK induction. Bortezomib, a standard myeloma treatment, caused a decrease in activity/quantity of MMPs and thyroid hormone opposed this effect. RGD peptide and tetrac impaired the production of MMP-9 in cell lines and in primary BM cells from myeloma patients. In conclusion, thyroid hormone-dependent regulation via αvβ3 of myeloma cell adhesion and MMP-9 production may play a role in myeloma migration and progression. PMID:25071016

  4. Antirheumatic agents and leukocyte recruitment. New light on the mechanism of action of oxaceprol.

    PubMed

    Parnham, M J

    1999-07-15

    Most anti-inflammatory agents used in the treatment of joint diseases exert inhibitory effects on leukocyte infiltration. Methotrexate, a disease-modifying drug, and corticosteroids also inhibit leukocyte accumulation during inflammation. However, the mechanisms of action of these different compounds on leukocytes vary and in the case of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) the mechanism(s) may be indirect. No current drug for inflammatory or degenerative joint disease has been proposed to act specifically by an inhibitory action on neutrophilic leukocytes. Oxaceprol is an amino acid derivative that has been used for several years for the treatment of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, ameliorating pain and stiffness and showing good gastrointestinal safety, particularly in comparison with NSAIDs. Recent experimental studies have shown that oxaceprol does not inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins in vitro, but markedly inhibits neutrophil infiltration into the joints of rats with adjuvant arthritis. These results support earlier screening data showing inhibition by oxaceprol of leukocyte infiltration into sites of acute inflammation. In studies on surgical ischemia reperfusion in hamsters in vivo, oxaceprol was an effective inhibitor of leukocyte adhesion and extravasation. It is proposed that oxaceprol represents a therapeutic agent for degenerative and inflammatory joint diseases, which acts predominantly by inhibiting leukocyte adhesion and migration. PMID:10423160

  5. Combined bone scintigraphy and indium-111 leukocyte scans in neuropathic foot disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schauwecker, D.S.; Park, H.M.; Burt, R.W.; Mock, B.H.; Wellman, H.N.

    1988-10-01

    It is difficult to diagnose osteomyelitis in the presence of neurotrophic osteoarthropathy. We performed combined (99mTc)MDP bone scans and indium-111 (111In) leukocyte studies on 35 patients who had radiographic evidence of neuropathic foot disease and clinically suspected osteomyelitis. The (111In)leukocyte study determined if there was an infection and the bone scan provided the anatomic landmarks so that the infection could be localized to the bone or the adjacent soft tissue. Seventeen patients had osteomyelitis and all showed increased (111In)leukocyte activity localized to the bone, giving a sensitivity of 100%. Among the 18 patients without osteomyelitis, eight had no accumulation of (111In)leukocytes, seven had the (111In)leukocyte activity correctly localized to the soft tissue, two had (111In)leukocyte activity mistakenly attributed to the bone, and one had (111In)leukocyte accumulation in a proven neuroma which was mistakenly attributed to bone. These three false-positive results for osteomyelitis reduced the specificity to 83%. Considering only the 27 patients with a positive (111In)leukocyte study, the combined bone scan and (111In)leukocyte study correctly localized the infection to the soft tissues or bone in 89%. Uninfected neurotrophic osteoarthropathy does not accumulate (111In)leukocytes. We found the combined bone scan and (111In) leukocyte study useful for the detection and localization of infection to soft tissue or bone in patients with neuropathic foot disease.

  6. Cytokines induce urokinase-dependent adhesion of human myeloid cells. A regulatory role for plasminogen activator inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Waltz, D A; Sailor, L Z; Chapman, H A

    1993-01-01

    Differentiation of monocytic precursors often results in adhesive properties thought to be important in migration. In this study, the influence of cytokines, known to induce macrophage differentiation, on the adhesiveness of the monocytic cell line U937 was examined in vitro. Despite development of a macrophage morphology, < 5% of cytokine-stimulated U937 cells were adherent at 24 h. Addition of 1-10 nM urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) induced adherence in the presence of transforming growth factor type beta-1, 1,25-(OH)2 vitamin D3, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, or tumor necrosis factor alpha. uPA-dependent adhesiveness was reversible after 24 h of stimulation with cytokines and uPA as adherence was prevented by the subsequent addition of anti-uPA antibodies. Adherence induced by diisopropylfluorophosphate-inactivated uPA was severalfold greater than that seen with active uPA. This difference was largely due to cell-surface turnover of active uPA complexed with plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). These data indicate that cytokines prime monocyte progenitors for uPA receptor-mediated signals leading to adherence, continued uPA receptor occupancy is required for adherence, and PAI decreases adherence by promoting clearance of uPA/PAI complexes. Thus the interaction of uPA and PAI at the cell surface, known to affect extracellular matrix proteolysis and hence myeloid cell migration, also regulates adhesion. The coordinated regulation of these two uPA functions by PAI may enhance the migratory potential of monocytic cells. Images PMID:8386190

  7. Pannexin 1 channels regulate leukocyte emigration through the venous endothelium during acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Alexander W; Leskov, Igor L; Butcher, Joshua T; Johnstone, Scott R; Stokes, Tara A; Begandt, Daniela; DeLalio, Leon J; Best, Angela K; Penuela, Silvia; Leitinger, Norbert; Ravichandran, Kodi S; Stokes, Karen Y; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cell recruitment to local sites of tissue injury and/or infection is controlled by a plethora of signalling processes influencing cell-to-cell interactions between the vascular endothelial cells (ECs) in post-capillary venules and circulating leukocytes. Recently, ATP-sensitive P2Y purinergic receptors have emerged as downstream regulators of EC activation in vascular inflammation. However, the mechanism(s) regulating cellular ATP release in this response remains elusive. Here we report that the ATP-release channel Pannexin1 (Panx1) opens downstream of EC activation by TNF-α. This process involves activation of type-1 TNF receptors, recruitment of Src family kinases (SFK) and SFK-dependent phosphorylation of Panx1. Using an inducible, EC-specific Panx1 knockout mouse line, we report a previously unidentified role for Panx1 channels in promoting leukocyte adhesion and emigration through the venous wall during acute systemic inflammation, placing Panx1 channels at the centre of cytokine crosstalk with purinergic signalling in the endothelium. PMID:26242575

  8. Peel resistance characterization of localized polymer film bonding via thin film adhesive thermally activated by scanned CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowding, Colin; Dowding, Robert; Griffiths, Jonathan; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    Thermal laser polymer bonding is a non-contact process for the joining of polymer laminates using thermally activated adhesives. Conventional, contact based bonding techniques suffer from mechanical wear, geometric inflexibility and poor energy efficiency. The application of lasers offers the potential for highly localized delivery of energy and increased process flexibility whilst achieving controlled and repeatable bonding of polymer laminates in a contact free process. Unlike previously reported techniques, here it is reported that laser based non-contact bonding is both viable and highly desirable due to the increased levels of control it affords the user. In this work, laser polymer bonding of 75 μm thick linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) film backed with a thermally activated adhesive to a 640 μm thick polypropylene (PP) substrate was conducted using continuous wave 10.6 μm laser radiation and scanning galvanometric optics. The effect of laser power and scanning traverse speed on the peel resistance properties of the bonded polymer laminates is presented, with a threshold specific energy density for successful adhesive activation determined.

  9. Binding of Pasteurella haemolytica le