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Sample records for activated luciferase expression

  1. Computational analysis and functional expression of ancestral copepod luciferase.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Noda-Ogura, Akiko; Imanishi, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Gojobori, Takashi; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2013-10-10

    We recently reported the cDNA sequences of 11 copepod luciferases from the superfamily Augaptiloidea in the order Calanoida. They were classified into two groups, Metridinidae and Heterorhabdidae/Lucicutiidae families, by phylogenetic analyses. To elucidate the evolutionary processes, we have now further isolated 12 copepod luciferases from Augaptiloidea species (Metridia asymmetrica, Metridia curticauda, Pleuromamma scutullata, Pleuromamma xiphias, Lucicutia ovaliformis and Heterorhabdus tanneri). Codon-based synonymous/nonsynonymous tests of positive selection for 25 identified copepod luciferases suggested that positive Darwinian selection operated in the evolution of Heterorhabdidae luciferases, whereas two types of Metridinidae luciferases had diversified via neutral mechanism. By in silico analysis of the decoded amino acid sequences of 25 copepod luciferases, we inferred two protein sequences as ancestral copepod luciferases. They were expressed in HEK293 cells where they exhibited notable luciferase activity both in intracellular lysates and cultured media, indicating that the luciferase activity was established before evolutionary diversification of these copepod species.

  2. Establishment of a luciferase assay-based screening system: Fumitremorgin C selectively inhibits cellular proliferation of immortalized astrocytes expressing an active form of AKT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lei; Sasai, Ken Akagi, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Shinya

    2008-08-29

    The AKT pathway is frequently activated in glioblastoma, and as such, inhibitors of this pathway could prove very useful as anti-glioblastoma therapies. Here we established immortalized astrocytes expressing Renilla luciferase as well as those expressing both an active form of AKT and firefly luciferase. Since both luciferase activities represent the numbers of corresponding cell lines, novel inhibitors of the AKT pathway can be identified by treating co-cultures containing the two types of luciferase-expressing cells with individual compounds. Indeed, such a screening system succeeded in identifying fumitremorgin C as an efficient inhibitor of the AKT pathway, which was further confirmed by the ability of fumitremorgin C to selectively inhibit the growth of immortalized astrocytes expressing an active form of AKT. The present study proposes a broadly applicable approach for identifying therapeutic agents that target the pathways and/or molecules responsible for cancer development.

  3. Use Of Low Light Image Microscopy To Monitor Genetically Engineered Bacterial Luciferase Gene Expression In Living Cells And Gene Activation Throughout The Development Of A Transgenic Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langridge, W. H.; Escher, Alan P.; Baga, M.; O'Kane, Dennis J.; Wampler, John E.; Koncz, C.; Schell, John D.; Szalay, A. A.

    1989-12-01

    Procaryotic and eucaryotic expression vectors which contain a marker gene for selection of transformants linked to genes encoding bacterial luciferase for detection of promoter activated gene expression in vivo were used to transform the appropriate host organisms and drug resistant colonies, cells, or calli were obtained. Bacterial luciferase expression was measured by a luminescence assay for quantitative determination of promoter activation. The cellular localization of bacteria inside the host plant cell cytoplasm was achieved in a single infected plant cell based on the light emitting ability of the genetically engineered bacteria. In addition, the bacterial luciferase marker gene fusions were used to monitor cell type, tissue, and organ specific gene expression in transgenic plants in vivo. To monitor physiological changes during ontogeny of a transformed plant, low light video microscopy, aided by real time image processing techniques developed specifically to enhance extreme low light images, was successfully applied.

  4. Expression and stabilization of bacterial luciferase in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Stacey S.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Current mammalian bioreporters using either firefly luciferase (luc) or GFP constructs require lysis and/or exogenous excitation to evoke a measurable response. Consequently, these cells cannot serve as continuous, on-line monitoring devices for in vivo imaging. Bacterial luciferase, lux, produces a photonic reaction that is cyclic, resulting in autonomous signal generation without the requirement for exogenous substrates or external activation. Therefore, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporters are the only truly autonomous light-generating sensors in existence. Unfortunately, the bacterial lux system has not yet been efficiently expressed in mammalian cells. In this research, three approaches for optimal expression of the a and b subunits of the bacterial luciferase protein were compared and reporter signal stability was evaluated from stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Maximum light levels were obtained from cells expressing the luciferase subunits linked with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Cells harboring this construct produced bioluminescence equaling 2.6 X 106 photons/sec compared to 7.2 X 104 photons/sec obtained from cells expressing the luciferase from a dual promoter vector and 3.5 X 104 photons/sec from a Lux fusion protein. Furthermore, the bioluminescence levels remained stable for more than forty cell passages (5 months) in the absence of antibiotic selection. After this time, bioluminescence signals dropped at a rate of approximately 5% per cell passage. These data indicate that mammalian cell lines can be engineered to efficiently express the bacterial lux system, thus lending themselves to possible long-term continuous monitoring or imaging applications in vivo.

  5. Active-site properties of Phrixotrix railroad worm green and red bioluminescence-eliciting luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Arnoldi, F G C; Venkatesh, B; Neto, A J S; Ogawa, F G T; Oehlmeyer, A T L; Ohmiya, Y

    2006-10-01

    The luciferases of the railroad worm Phrixotrix (Coleoptera: Phengodidae) are the only beetle luciferases that naturally produce true red bioluminescence. Previously, we cloned the green- (PxGR) and red-emitting (PxRE) luciferases of railroad worms Phrixotrix viviani and P. hirtus[OLE1]. These luciferases were expressed and purified, and their active-site properties were determined. The red-emitting PxRE luciferase displays flash-like kinetics, whereas PxGR luciferase displays slow-type kinetics. The substrate affinities and catalytic efficiency of PxRE luciferase are also higher than those of PxGR luciferase. Fluorescence studies with 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid and 6-p-toluidino-2-naphthalene sulfonic acid showed that the PxRE luciferase luciferin-binding site is more polar than that of PxGR luciferase, and it is sensitive to guanidine. Mutagenesis and modelling studies suggest that several invariant residues in the putative luciferin-binding site of PxRE luciferase cannot interact with excited oxyluciferin. These results suggest that one portion of the luciferin-binding site of the red-emitting luciferase is tighter than that of PxGR luciferase, whereas the other portion could be more open and polar.

  6. [Effect of glucose on luciferase expression in Photobacterium leiognathi].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Takuya; Yoshikawa, Naoki; Ueno, Yukihiro; Mikami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Tatsuji

    2004-10-01

    Photobacterium leiognathi cultured in marine broth emits a luminescence that is temporarily enhanced and then extinguished by glucose. Glucose reduces the luciferase level and the expression of lux ABG mRNA in P. leiognathi. The amount of ATP in P. leiognathi is temporarily increased and then declines to the normal level. These results indicate that the extinguishing by glucose in P. leiognathi is induced by the interruption of the translation of luciferase.

  7. A transgenic rat with ubiquitous expression of firefly luciferase gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamata, Yoji; Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2006-02-01

    In vivo imaging strategies provide cellular and molecular events in real time that helps us to understand biological processes in living animals. The development of molecular tags such as green fluorescent proteins and luciferase from the firefly Photinus pyralis has lead to a revolution in the visualization of complex biochemical processes. We developed a novel inbred transgenic rat strain containing firefly luciferase based on the transgenic (Tg) technique in rats. This Tg rat expressed the luciferase gene ubiquitously under control of the ROSA26 promoter. Cellular immune responsiveness against the luciferase protein was evaluated using conventional skin grafting and resulted in the long-term acceptance of Tg rat skin on wild-type rats. Strikingly, organ transplant with heart and small bowel demonstrated organ viability and graft survival, suggesting that cells from luciferase-Tg are transplantable to track their fate. Taking advantage of the less immunogenic luciferase, we also tested the role of hepatocyte-infusion in a liver injury model, and bone marrow-derived cells in a skin defect model. Employed in conjunction with modern advances in optical imaging, this luciferase-Tg rat system provides an innovative animal tool and a new means of facilitating biomedical research such as in the case of regeneration medicine.

  8. Expression, purification and characterization of the secreted luciferase of the copepod Metridia longa from Sf9 insect cells.

    PubMed

    Stepanyuk, Galina A; Xu, Hao; Wu, Chia-Kuei; Markova, Svetlana V; Lee, John; Vysotski, Eugene S; Wang, Bi-Cheng

    2008-10-01

    Metridia luciferase is a secreted luciferase from a marine copepod and uses coelenterazine as a substrate to produce a blue bioluminescence (lambda(max)=480 nm). This luciferase has been successfully applied as a bioluminescent reporter in mammalian cells. The main advantage of secreted luciferase as a reporter is the capability of measuring intracellular events without destroying the cells or tissues and this property is well suited for development of high throughput screening technologies. However because Metridia luciferase is a Cys-rich protein, Escherichia coli expression systems produce an incorrectly folded protein, hindering its biochemical characterization and application for development of in vitro bioluminescent assays. Here we report the successful expression of Metridia luciferase with its signal peptide for secretion, in insect (Sf9) cells using the baculovirus expression system. Functionally active luciferase secreted by insect cells into the culture media has been efficiently purified with a yield of high purity protein of 2-3 mg/L. This Metridia luciferase expressed in the insect cell system is a monomeric protein showing 3.5-fold greater bioluminescence activity than luciferase expressed and purified from E. coli. The near coincidence of the experimental mass of Metridia luciferase purified from insect cells with that calculated from amino acid sequence, indicates that luciferase does not undergo post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation or glycosylation and also, the cleavage site of the signal peptide for secretion is at VQA-KS, as predicted from sequence analysis.

  9. Fe65 does not stabilize AICD during activation of transcription in a luciferase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Huysseune, Sandra; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noel . E-mail: octave@nchm.ucl.ac.be

    2007-09-21

    The APP intracellular domain (AICD) could be involved in signaling via interaction with the adaptor protein Fe65, and with the histone acetyl transferase Tip60. However, the real function of AICD and Fe65 in regulation of transcription remains controversial. In this study, the human APPGal4 fusion protein was expressed in CHO cells and the transcriptional activity of AICDGal4 was measured in a luciferase-based reporter assay. AICDGal4 was stabilized by expression of Fe65 and levels of AICDGal4 controlled luciferase activity. On the contrary, when human APP was expressed in CHO cells, coexpression of Fe65 increased luciferase activity without affecting the amount of AICD fragment. AICD produced from APP was protected from degradation by orthophenanthroline, but not by lactacystine, indicating that AICD is not a substrate of the chymotryptic activity of the proteasome. It is concluded that Fe65 can control luciferase activity without stabilizing the labile AICD fragment.

  10. In vivo bioimaging with tissue-specific transcription factor activated luciferase reporters

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Suzanne M. K.; Delhove, Juliette M. K. M.; Perocheau, Dany P.; Karda, Rajvinder; Rahim, Ahad A.; Howe, Steven J.; Ward, Natalie J.; Birrell, Mark A.; Belvisi, Maria G.; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Johnson, Mark R.; Waddington, Simon N.; McKay, Tristan R.

    2015-01-01

    The application of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter cassettes in vitro is widespread but potential for in vivo application has not yet been realized. Bioluminescence imaging enables non-invasive tracking of gene expression in transfected tissues of living rodents. However the mature immune response limits luciferase expression when delivered in adulthood. We present a novel approach of tissue-targeted delivery of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter lentiviruses to neonatal rodents as an alternative to the existing technology of generating germline transgenic light producing rodents. At this age, neonates acquire immune tolerance to the conditionally responsive luciferase reporter. This simple and transferrable procedure permits surrogate quantitation of transcription factor activity over the lifetime of the animal. We show principal efficacy by temporally quantifying NFκB activity in the brain, liver and lungs of somatotransgenic reporter mice subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. This response is ablated in Tlr4−/− mice or when co-administered with the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone. Furthermore, we show the malleability of this technology by quantifying NFκB-mediated luciferase expression in outbred rats. Finally, we use somatotransgenic bioimaging to longitudinally quantify LPS- and ActivinA-induced upregulation of liver specific glucocorticoid receptor and Smad2/3 reporter constructs in somatotransgenic mice, respectively. PMID:26138224

  11. Systemic activation of NF-κB driven luciferase activity in transgenic mice fed advanced glycation end products modified albumin.

    PubMed

    Nass, Norbert; Bayreuther, Kristina; Simm, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are stable end products of the Maillard reaction and accumulate with progressing ageing and degenerative diseases. Significant amounts of AGE-modified peptides are also consumed with processed food. AGEs bind to specific receptors, especially the receptor of AGEs (RAGE). Activation of RAGE then evokes intracellular signalling, finally resulting in the activation of the NF-κB transcription factor and therefore a proinflammatory state. We here analysed, whether NF-κB is activated in short term upon feeding an AGE-modified protein in-vivo. Transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of an NF-κB responsive promoter were intraperitoneally injected or fed with AGE-modified- or control albumin and luciferase expression was analysed by in-vivo imaging and by in-vitro by determination of luciferase enzyme activity in heart, lung, gut, spleen, liver and kidney. In all organs, an activation of the luciferase reporter gene was observed in response to AGE-BSA feeding, however with different intensity and timing. The gut exhibited highest luciferase activity and this activity peaked 6-8 h post AGE-feeding. In heart and kidney, luciferase activity increased for up to 12 h post feeding. All other organs tested, exhibited highest activity at 10 h after AGE-consumption. Altogether, these data demonstrate that feeding AGE-modified protein resulted in a transient and systemic activation of the NF-κB reporter.

  12. Inhibition of luciferase expression by synthetic hammerhead ribozymes and their cellular uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Bramlage, B; Alefelder, S; Marschall, P; Eckstein, F

    1999-01-01

    Two synthetic hammerhead ribozymes, one unmodified and the other with 2"-modifications and four phosphorothioate groups, targeting a single GUA site in the luciferase mRNA, were compared for their inhibition of gene expression in cell cultureand their cellular uptake was also analysed. A HeLa X1/5 cell line stably expressing luciferase, under an inducible promoter, was treated with these ribozymes by liposome-mediated transfection to determine their activity.Luciferase expression in cells was inhibited to approximately 50% with little difference between the unmodified and the 2"-modified ribozyme. A similar degree of inhibition was observed with two catalytically inactive ribozymes, indicating that inhibition was mainly due to an antisense effect. A ribozyme carrying a cholesterol moiety, applied to the cells without carrier, showed no inhibition. Northern blotting indicated a similar amount of cellular uptake of all ribozymes. The unmodified ribozyme was essentially evenly distributed between cytoplasm and nucleus, whereas a higher proportion of the phosphorothioate-containing ribozyme was observed in the nucleus. Fluorescence microscopy, including confocal microscopy using 5"-fluorescein-labelled ribozymes, showed that the unmodified and 2"-modified ribozymes were present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus to a similar extent, whereas the fluorescence of the phosphorothioate-containing ribozyme was much stronger in the nucleus. Both ribozymes inhibited luciferase expression to a comparable degree, suggesting that the ribozyme in the nucleus did not contribute significantly to the inhibition. Ribozymes with a cholesterol moiety were predominantly trapped in the cell membrane, explaining their inability to interfere with gene expression. PMID:10454613

  13. A destabilized bacterial luciferase for dynamic gene expression studies

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Michael S.; Wilgus, John R.; Chewning, Christopher S.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    Fusions of genetic regulatory elements with reporter genes have long been used as tools for monitoring gene expression and have become a major component in synthetic gene circuit implementation. A major limitation of many of these systems is the relatively long half-life of the reporter protein(s), which prevents monitoring both the initiation and the termination of transcription in real-time. Furthermore, when used as components in synthetic gene circuits, the long time constants associated with reporter protein decay may significantly degrade circuit performance. In this study, short half-life variants of LuxA and LuxB from Photorhabdus luminescens were constructed in Escherichia coli by inclusion of an 11-amino acid carboxy-terminal tag that is recognized by endogenous tail-specific proteases. Results indicated that the addition of the C-terminal tag affected the functional half-life of the holoenzyme when the tag was added to luxA or to both luxA and luxB, but modification of luxB alone did not have a significant effect. In addition, it was also found that alteration of the terminal three amino acid residues of the carboxy-terminal tag fused to LuxA generated variants with half-lives of intermediate length in a manner similar to that reported for GFP. This report is the first instance of the C-terminal tagging approach for the regulation of protein half-life to be applied to an enzyme or monomer of a multi-subunit enzyme complex and will extend the utility of the bacterial luciferase reporter genes for the monitoring of dynamic changes in gene expression. PMID:19003433

  14. [Expression of thermostable recombiant Luciola lateralis luciferase and development of heat-stable pyrosequencing system].

    PubMed

    Xu, Shu; Zou, Bingjie; Wang, Jianping; Wu, Haiping; Zhou, Guohua

    2012-06-01

    Pyrosequencing is a tool based on bioluminescence reaction for real-time analyzing DNA sequences. The sensitivity of pyrosequencing mainly depends on luciferase in reaction mixture. However, the instability of pyrosequencing reagents caused by fragile wild Photinus pyralis luciferase (PpL) in conventional pyrosequencing usually leads to unsatisfied results, which limits the application of pyrosequencing. In order to improve the stability of pyrosequencing reagents, the coding sequences of mutant thermostable Luciola lateralis luciferase (rt-LlL) was synthesized, and inserted into the plasmid of pET28a(+) to express the thermostable rt-LlL with a 6 x His-tag in the N terminal. The purified rt-LlL with the molecular mass of 60 kDa was obtained by Ni-affinity chromatography. The specific activity of rt-LlL was determined as 4.29 x 10(10) RLU/mg. Moreover, the thermostability of rt-LlL was investigated, and the results showed that rt-LlL had activity at 50 degrees C, and remained 90% of activity after incubated at 40 degrees C for 25 min. Finally, rt-LlL was used to substitute commercial Photinus pyralis luciferase in conventional pyrosequencing reagent to get thermostable pyrosequencing reagent. Comparing with conventional pyrosequencing reagent, the thermostable pyrosequencing reagent is more stable, and it's activity would not lose when incubated at 37 degrees C for 1 h. This study laid foundation of establishing reliable and stable pyrosequencing system which would be applied in Point-of-Care Testing.

  15. High-throughput Analysis of Mammalian Olfactory Receptors: Measurement of Receptor Activation via Luciferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Trimmer, Casey; Snyder, Lindsey L.; Mainland, Joel D.

    2014-01-01

    Odorants create unique and overlapping patterns of olfactory receptor activation, allowing a family of approximately 1,000 murine and 400 human receptors to recognize thousands of odorants. Odorant ligands have been published for fewer than 6% of human receptors1-11. This lack of data is due in part to difficulties functionally expressing these receptors in heterologous systems. Here, we describe a method for expressing the majority of the olfactory receptor family in Hana3A cells, followed by high-throughput assessment of olfactory receptor activation using a luciferase reporter assay. This assay can be used to (1) screen panels of odorants against panels of olfactory receptors; (2) confirm odorant/receptor interaction via dose response curves; and (3) compare receptor activation levels among receptor variants. In our sample data, 328 olfactory receptors were screened against 26 odorants. Odorant/receptor pairs with varying response scores were selected and tested in dose response. These data indicate that a screen is an effective method to enrich for odorant/receptor pairs that will pass a dose response experiment, i.e. receptors that have a bona fide response to an odorant. Therefore, this high-throughput luciferase assay is an effective method to characterize olfactory receptors—an essential step toward a model of odor coding in the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:24961834

  16. Improvement of thermostability and activity of firefly luciferase through [TMG][Ac] ionic liquid mediator.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mehdi; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Heydari, Akbar; Khavari-Nejad, Ramazan Ali; Akbari, Jafar

    2012-10-01

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes production of light from luciferin in the presence of Mg(2+)-ATP and oxygen. This enzyme has wide range of applications in biotechnology and development of biosensors. The low thermal stability of wild-type firefly luciferase is a limiting factor in most applications. Improvements in activity and stability of few enzymes in the presence of ionic liquids were shown in many reports. In this study, kinetic and thermal stability of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis in the presence of three tetramethylguanidine-based ionic liquids was investigated. The enzyme has shown improved activity in the presence of [1, 1, 3, 3-tetramethylguanidine][acetate], but in the presence of [TMG][trichloroacetate] and [TMG][triflouroacetate] activity, it decreased or unchanged significantly. Among these ionic liquids, only [TMG][Ac] has increased the thermal stability of luciferase. Incubation of [TMG][Ac] with firefly luciferase brought about with decrease of K(m) for ATP.

  17. Low-cost system for real-time monitoring of luciferase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gailey, P C; Miller, E J; Griffin, G D

    1997-03-01

    In some mammalian cells transfected with luciferase reporter genes, the luciferase/luciferin reaction in a cell monolayer produces a very small light flux. While the low light levels are often measurable with single-photon counting cameras, these devices are expensive and may require long averaging times to acquire an image. We describe an approach for real-time monitoring of light produced by luciferase gene expression in intact, cultured cells using readily available and relatively inexpensive components. The system uses a single-photon counting photomultiplier tube with built-in high voltage supply and photon counting circuitry to rapidly measure average light output from growing cells in a 35 mm culture dish. The fast, accurate and highly sensitive response of the system makes it useful for studying the dynamics of gene expression over time periods ranging from minutes to days.

  18. Adaptation of a Luciferase Gene Reporter and lac Expression System to Borrelia burgdorferi▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Jon S.; Revel, Andrew T.; Smith, Alexandra H.; Bachlani, Gulnaz N.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    The development of new genetic systems for studying the complex regulatory events that occur within Borrelia burgdorferi is an important goal of contemporary Lyme disease research. Although recent advancements have been made in the genetic manipulation of B. burgdorferi, there still remains a paucity of basic molecular systems for assessing differential gene expression in this pathogen. Herein, we describe the adaptation of two powerful genetic tools for use in B. burgdorferi. The first is a Photinus pyralis firefly luciferase gene reporter that was codon optimized to enhance translation in B. burgdorferi. Using this modified reporter, we demonstrated an increase in luciferase expression when B. burgdorferi transformed with a shuttle vector encoding the outer surface protein C (OspC) promoter fused to the luciferase reporter was cultivated in the presence of fresh rabbit blood. The second is a lac operator/repressor system that was optimized to achieve the tightest degree of regulation. Using the aforementioned luciferase reporter, we assessed the kinetics and maximal level of isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-dependent gene expression. This lac-inducible expression system also was used to express the gene carried on lp25 required for borrelial persistence in ticks (bptA). These advancements should be generally applicable for assessing further the regulation of other genes potentially involved in virulence expression by B. burgdorferi. PMID:17220265

  19. In-depth Characterization of Firefly Luciferase as a Reporter of Circadian Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Kevin A.; Putker, Marrit; Brancaccio, Marco; O’Neill, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Firefly luciferase (Fluc) is frequently used to report circadian gene expression rhythms in mammalian cells and tissues. During longitudinal assays it is generally assumed that enzymatic substrates are in saturating excess, such that total bioluminescence is directly proportional to Fluc protein level. To test this assumption, we compared the enzyme kinetics of purified luciferase with its activity in mammalian cells. We found that Fluc activity in solution has a lower Michaelis constant (Km) for luciferin, lower temperature dependence, and lower catalytic half-life than Fluc in cells. In consequence, extracellular luciferin concentration significantly affects the apparent circadian amplitude and phase of the widely used PER2::LUC reporter in cultured fibroblasts, but not in SCN, and we suggest that this arises from differences in plasma membrane luciferin transporter activity. We found that at very high concentrations (>1 mM), luciferin lengthens circadian period, in both fibroblasts and organotypic SCN slices. We conclude that the amplitude and phase of circadian gene expression inferred from bioluminescence recordings should be treated with some caution, and we suggest that optimal luciferin concentration should be determined empirically for each luciferase reporter and cell type. PMID:28112045

  20. Construction and evaluation of luciferase reporter phages for the detection of active and non-replicating tubercle bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Dusthackeer, Azger; Kumar, Vanaja; Subbian, Selvakumar; Sivaramakrishnan, Gomathi; Zhu, Guofang; Subramanyam, Balaji; Hassan, Sameer; Nagamaiah, Selvakumar; Chan, John; Rama, Narayanan Paranji

    2008-01-01

    The luciferase reporter phages (LRP) show great promise for diagnostic mycobacteriology. Though conventional constructs developed from lytic phages such as D29 and TM4 are highly specific, they lack sensitivity. We have isolated and characterized Che12, the first true temperate phage infecting M. tuberculosis. Since the tuberculosis (TB) cases among HIV infected population result from the reactivation of latent bacilli, it would be useful to develop LRP that can detect dormant bacteria. During dormancy, pathogenic mycobacteria switch their metabolism involving divergent genes than during normal, active growth phase. Since the promoters of these genes can potentially function during dormancy, they were exploited for the construction of novel mycobacterial luciferase reporter phages. The promoters of hsp60, isocitrate lyase (icl), and alpha-crystallin (acr) genes from M. tuberculosis were used for expressing firefly luciferase gene (FFlux) in both Che12 and TM4 phages and their efficiency was evaluated in detecting dormant bacteria from clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. These LRP constructs exhibited detectable luciferase activity in dormant as well as in actively growing M. tuberculosis. The TM4 ts mutant based constructs showed about one log increase in light output in three of the five tested clinical isolates and in M. tuberculosis H37Rv compared to conventional lytic reporter phage, phAE129. By refining the LRP assay format further, an ideal rapid assay can be designed not only to diagnose active and dormant TB but also to differentiate the species and to find their drug susceptibility pattern. PMID:18272245

  1. Expression of firefly luciferase in Candida albicans and its use in the selection of stable transformants.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Timothy C; Nawotka, Kevin A; Purchio, Anthony F; Akin, Ali R; Francis, Kevin P; Contag, Pamela R

    2006-02-01

    The infectious yeast Candida albicans is a model organism for understanding the mechanisms of fungal pathogenicity. We describe the functional expression of the firefly luciferase gene, a reporter commonly used to tag genes in many other cellular systems. Due to a non-standard codon usage by this yeast, the CUG codons were first mutated to UUG to allow functional expression. When integrated into the chromosome of C. albicans with a strong constitutive promoter, cells bioluminesce when provided with luciferin substrate in their media. When fused to the inducible promoter from the HWP1 gene, expression and bioluminescence was only detected in cultures conditioning hyphal growth. We further used the luciferase gene as a selection to isolate transformed cell lines from clinical isolates of C. albicans, using a high-density screening strategy that purifies transformed colonies by virtue of light emission. This strategy requires no drug or auxotrophic selectable marker, and we were thus able to generate stable transformants of clinical isolates that are identical to the parental strain in all aspects tested, other than their bioluminescence. The firefly luciferase gene can, therefore, be used as a sensitive reporter to analyze gene function both in laboratory and clinical isolates of this medically important yeast.

  2. Monitoring cell-autonomous circadian clock rhythms of gene expression using luciferase bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Khan, Sanjoy K; Kathale, Nimish D; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Andrew C

    2012-09-27

    In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology such as sleep-wake cycles and liver metabolism are regulated by endogenous circadian clocks (reviewed). The circadian time-keeping system is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizing and coordinating extra-SCN and peripheral clocks elsewhere. Individual cells are the functional units for generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, and these oscillators of different tissue types in the organism share a remarkably similar biochemical negative feedback mechanism. However, due to interactions at the neuronal network level in the SCN and through rhythmic, systemic cues at the organismal level, circadian rhythms at the organismal level are not necessarily cell-autonomous. Compared to traditional studies of locomotor activity in vivo and SCN explants ex vivo, cell-based in vitro assays allow for discovery of cell-autonomous circadian defects. Strategically, cell-based models are more experimentally tractable for phenotypic characterization and rapid discovery of basic clock mechanisms. Because circadian rhythms are dynamic, longitudinal measurements with high temporal resolution are needed to assess clock function. In recent years, real-time bioluminescence recording using firefly luciferase as a reporter has become a common technique for studying circadian rhythms in mammals, as it allows for examination of the persistence and dynamics of molecular rhythms. To monitor cell-autonomous circadian rhythms of gene expression, luciferase reporters can be introduced into cells via transient transfection or stable transduction. Here we describe a stable transduction protocol using lentivirus-mediated gene delivery. The lentiviral vector system is superior to traditional methods such as transient transfection and germline transmission because of its efficiency and versatility: it permits efficient delivery and stable integration into the host

  3. High level constitutive expression of luciferase reporter by lsd90 promoter in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Verma, Hemant Kumar; Shukla, Poonam; Alfatah, Md; Khare, Asheesh Kumar; Upadhyay, Udita; Ganesan, Kaliannan; Singh, Jagmohan

    2014-01-01

    Because of a large number of molecular similarities with higher eukaryotes, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been considered a potentially ideal host for expressing human proteins having therapeutic and pharmaceutical applications. However, efforts in this direction are hampered by lack of a strong promoter. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a strong, constitutive promoter from S. pombe. A new expression vector was constructed by cloning the putative promoter region of the lsd90 gene (earlier reported to be strongly induced by heat stress) into a previously reported high copy number vector pJH5, which contained an ARS element corresponding to the mat2P flanking region and a truncated URA3m selectable marker. The resulting vector was used to study and compare the level of expression of the luciferase reporter with that achieved with the known vectors containing regulatable promoter nmt1 and the strong constitutive promoter adh1 in S. pombe and the methanol-inducible AOX1 promoter in Pichia pastoris. Following growth in standard media the new vector containing the putative lsd90 promoter provided constitutive expression of luciferase, at a level, which was 19-, 39- and 10-fold higher than that achieved with nmt1, adh1 and AOX1 promoters, respectively. These results indicate a great potential of the new lsd90 promoter-based vector for commercial scale expression of therapeutic proteins in S. pombe.

  4. Effects of iodide on the fluorescence and activity of the hydroperoxyflavin intermediate of Vibrio harveyi luciferase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shouqin; Tu, Shiao-Chun

    2005-01-01

    The 4a-hydroperoxy-4a,5-dihydroFMN intermediate (II or HFOOH) of Vibrio harveyi luciferase is known to transform from a low quantum yield IIx to a high quantum yield (lambdamax 485 nm, uncorrected) IIy fluorescent species on exposure to excitation light. Similar results were observed with II prepared from the alphaH44A luciferase mutant, which is very weak in bioluminescence activity. Because of the rapid decay of the alphaH44A II, its true fluorescence was obscured by the more intense 520 nm fluorescence (uncorrected) from its decay product oxidized flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Potassium iodide (KI) at 0.2 M was effective in quenching the FMN fluorescence, leaving the 485 nm fluorescence of II from both the wild-type (WT) and alphaH44A luciferase readily detectable. For both II species, the luciferase-bound peroxyflavin was well shielded from KI quenching. KI also enhanced the decay rates of both the WT and alphaH44A II. For alphaH44A, the transformation of IIx to IIy can be induced by KI in the dark, and it is proposed to be a consequence of a luciferase conformational change. The WT II formed a bioluminescence-inactive complex with KI, resulting in two distinct decay time courses based on absorption changes and decreases of bioluminescence activity of II.

  5. Effect of antiangiogenic therapy on luciferase activity in a cytomegalovirus- or HSP70-promoter-transfected M21 tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundt, Walter; Schink, Christian; Steinbach, Silke; O'Connell-Rodwell, Caitlin E.; Kiessling, Andreas; Librizzi, Damiano; Burbelko, Mykhaylo; Guccione, Samira

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of targeted gene therapy on heat shock protein 70 expression (Hsp70) and protein production (HSP70) in a melanoma tumor model (M21; M21-L). M21 and M21-L cells transfected with a plasmid containing the Hsp70 (Hspa1b) or the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter and the luciferase reporter gene were injected into mice; the resulting tumors grew to a size of 650 mm3. Mice (five per group) were intravenously treated with an Arg-Gly-Asp peptide-nanoparticle/Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein complex [RGD-NP/RAF(-)] or with a nanoparticle control. Bioluminescence imaging (IVIS®, Xenogen, USA) was performed at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after the treatment cycle. Western blot analysis of HSP70 protein was performed to monitor protein expression. The size of the treated M21 tumors remained fairly constant (647.8+/-103.4 mm2 at the beginning versus 704.8+/-94.4 mm3 at the end of the experiment). The size of the M21-L tumors increased, similar to the untreated control tumors. Bioluminescent imaging demonstrated that when transcription was controlled by the CMV promoter, luciferase activity decreased to 17.9%+/-4.3% of baseline values in the treated M21 tumors. When transcription was controlled by the Hsp70 promoter, the highest luciferase activity (4.5+/-0.7-fold increase over base-line values) was seen 24 h after injection in the M21 tumors; however, no luciferase activity was seen in the M21-L tumors. In accordance with bioluminescent imaging, western blot analysis showed a peak in HSP70 production at 24 h after the injection of the RGD-NP/RAF(-) complex in the M21 tumors; however, no HSP70 protein induction was seen in the M21-L tumors. Thus, targeted antiangiogenic therapy can induce Hsp70 expression and HSP70 protein in melanoma tumors.

  6. Synthetic versions of firefly luciferase and Renilla luciferase reporter genes that resist transgene silencing in sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Down-regulation or silencing of transgene expression can be a major hurdle to both molecular studies and biotechnology applications in many plant species. Sugarcane is particularly effective at silencing introduced transgenes, including reporter genes such as the firefly luciferase gene. Synthesizing transgene coding sequences optimized for usage in the host plant is one method of enhancing transgene expression and stability. Using specified design rules we have synthesised new coding sequences for both the firefly luciferase and Renilla luciferase reporter genes. We have tested these optimized versions for enhanced levels of luciferase activity and for increased steady state luciferase mRNA levels in sugarcane. Results The synthetic firefly luciferase (luc*) and Renilla luciferase (Renluc*) coding sequences have elevated G + C contents in line with sugarcane codon usage, but maintain 75% identity to the native firefly or Renilla luciferase nucleotide sequences and 100% identity to the protein coding sequences. Under the control of the maize pUbi promoter, the synthetic luc* and Renluc* genes yielded 60x and 15x higher luciferase activity respectively, over the native firefly and Renilla luciferase genes in transient assays on sugarcane suspension cell cultures. Using a novel transient assay in sugarcane suspension cells combining co-bombardment and qRT-PCR, we showed that synthetic luc* and Renluc* genes generate increased transcript levels compared to the native firefly and Renilla luciferase genes. In stable transgenic lines, the luc* transgene generated significantly higher levels of expression than the native firefly luciferase transgene. The fold difference in expression was highest in the youngest tissues. Conclusions We developed synthetic versions of both the firefly and Renilla luciferase reporter genes that resist transgene silencing in sugarcane. These transgenes will be particularly useful for evaluating the expression patterns conferred

  7. Optical imaging of Renilla luciferase reporter gene expression in living mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhaumik, S.; Gambhir, S. S.

    2002-01-01

    Imaging reporter gene expression in living subjects is a rapidly evolving area of molecular imaging research. Studies have validated the use of reporter genes with positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), MRI, fluorescence with wild-type and mutants of green fluorescent protein, as well as bioluminescence using Firefly luciferase enzyme/protein (FL). In the current study, we validate for the first time the ability to image bioluminescence from Renilla luciferase enzyme/protein (RL) by injecting the substrate coelenterazine in living mice. A highly sensitive cooled charge-coupled device camera provides images within a few minutes of photon counting. Cells, transiently expressing the Rluc were imaged while located in the peritoneum, s.c. layer, as well as in the liver and lungs of living mice tail-vein injected with coelenterazine. Furthermore, d-luciferin (a substrate for FL) does not serve as a substrate for RL, and coelenterazine does not serve as a substrate for FL either in cell culture or in living mice. We also show that both Rluc and Fluc expression can be imaged in the same living mouse and that the kinetics of light production are distinct. The approaches validated will have direct applications to various studies where two molecular events need to be tracked, including cell trafficking of two cell populations, two gene therapy vectors, and indirect monitoring of two endogenous genes through the use of two reporter genes. PMID:11752410

  8. Safe and Sensitive Antiviral Screening Platform Based on Recombinant Human Coronavirus OC43 Expressing the Luciferase Reporter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liang; Yang, Yang; Ye, Fei; Liu, Gaoshan; Desforges, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause 15 to 30% of mild upper respiratory tract infections. However, no specific antiviral drugs are available to prevent or treat HCoV infections to date. Here, we developed four infectious recombinant HCoVs-OC43 (rHCoVs-OC43) which express the Renilla luciferase (Rluc) reporter gene. Among these four rHCoVs-OC43, rOC43-ns2DelRluc (generated by replacing ns2 with the Rluc gene) showed robust luciferase activity with only a slight impact on its growth characteristics. Additionally, this recombinant virus remained stable for at least 10 passages in BHK-21 cells. rOC43-ns2DelRluc was comparable to its parental wild-type virus (HCoV-OC43-WT) with respect to the quantity of the antiviral activity of chloroquine and ribavirin. We showed that chloroquine strongly inhibited HCoV-OC43 replication in vitro, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.33 μM. However, ribavirin showed inhibition of HCoV-OC43 replication only at high concentrations which may not be applicable to humans in clinical treatment, with an IC50 of 10 μM. Furthermore, using a luciferase-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening assay, we identified double-stranded-RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) and DEAD box RNA helicases (DDX3X) that exhibited antiviral activities, which were further verified by the use of HCoV-OC43-WT. Therefore, rOC43-ns2DelRluc represents a promising safe and sensitive platform for high-throughput antiviral screening and quantitative analysis of viral replication. PMID:27381385

  9. Replication Competent Molecular Clones of HIV-1 Expressing Renilla Luciferase Facilitate the Analysis of Antibody Inhibition in PBMC

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Tara G.; Ding, Haitao; Yuan, Xing; Wei, Qing; Smith, Kendra S.; Conway, Joan A.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Brown, Bruce; Polonis, Victoria; West, John T.; Montefiori, David C.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Effective vaccine development for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will require assays that ascertain the capacity of vaccine immunogens to elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAb) to diverse HIV-1 strains. To facilitate NAb assessment in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based assays, we developed an assay-adaptable platform based on a Renilla luciferase (LucR) expressing HIV-1 proviral backbone. LucR was inserted into pNL4-3 DNA, preserving all viral open reading frames. The proviral genome was engineered to facilitate expression of diverse HIV-1 env sequences, allowing analysis in an isogenic background. The resulting Env-IMC-LucR viruses are infectious, and LucR is stably expressed over multiple replications in PBMC. HIV-1 neutralization, targeting TZM-bl cells, was highly correlative comparing virus (LucR) and cell (firefly luciferase) readouts. In PBMC, NAb activity can be analyzed either within a single or multiple cycles of replication. These results represent advancement toward a standardizable PBMC-based neutralization assay for assessing HIV-1 vaccine immunogen efficacy. PMID:20863545

  10. Formation of active bacterial luciferase between interspecific subunits in vivo.

    PubMed

    Almashanu, S; Tuby, A; Hadar, R; Einy, R; Kuhn, J

    1995-01-01

    Interspecific complementation between luxAs and luxBs from Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium leiognathi and Xenorhabdus luminescens was examined in vivo. The individual genes from these species were cloned on different compatible plasmids or amplified by PCR and brought together to yield cis combinations without extraneous DNA. The beta subunits from V. harveyi and X. luminescens form active enzyme only with alpha subunits from one of these species. All other combinations yield active enzymes. The lack of activity of the V. harveyi and X. luminescens beta subunits with the alpha subunits from V. fischeri and P. leiognathi results from a lack of association. This was shown by in vivo competition in which these beta subunits were overproduced in comparison with the beta and alpha of V. fischeri. No reduction in light was found. Overall, the in vivo results parallel those found in vitro using isolated denatured subunits and renaturation by removal of the denaturant.

  11. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Masser, Anna E.; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon‐optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half‐lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano‐Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat‐shock promoter (PCYC1–HSE), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C‐terminus of a temperature‐sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26860732

  12. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Masser, Anna E; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan; Andréasson, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon-optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half-lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano-Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat-shock promoter (PCYC1-HSE ), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C-terminus of a temperature-sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Development of luciferase expressing Leishmania donovani axenic amastigotes as primary model for in vitro screening of antileishmanial compounds.

    PubMed

    Ravinder; Bhaskar; Gangwar, Sonali; Goyal, Neena

    2012-12-01

    The development of new therapeutic leads against leishmaniasis relies primarily on screening of a large number of compounds on multiplication of clinically irrelevant transgenic promastigotes. The advent of the successful in vitro culture of axenic amastigotes allows the development of transgenic axenic amastigotes as a primary screen which can test compounds in a high throughput mode like promastigotes, still representative of the clinically relevant mammalian amastigotes stage. The present study reports the development of luciferase-tagged axenic amastigotes of Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar, for in vitro drug screening. Luciferase expressing promastigotes were transformed to axenic amastigotes at a low pH and high temperature without the loss of luciferase expression. As compared to transgenic promastigotes, the luciferase expressing axenic amastigotes exhibited more sensitivity to antileishmanial drugs, particularly to pentavalent antimony (~2.8-fold) and also to the test compounds. Hence, the developed luciferase expressing axenic amastigotes make an ideal choice for high throughput drug screening for antileishmanial compounds.

  14. Latent luciferase activity in the fruit fly revealed by a synthetic luciferin

    PubMed Central

    Mofford, David M.; Reddy, Gadarla Randheer; Miller, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Beetle luciferases are thought to have evolved from fatty acyl-CoA synthetases present in all insects. Both classes of enzymes activate fatty acids with ATP to form acyl-adenylate intermediates, but only luciferases can activate and oxidize d-luciferin to emit light. Here we show that the Drosophila fatty acyl-CoA synthetase CG6178, which cannot use d-luciferin as a substrate, is able to catalyze light emission from the synthetic luciferin analog CycLuc2. Bioluminescence can be detected from the purified protein, live Drosophila Schneider 2 cells, and from mammalian cells transfected with CG6178. Thus, the nonluminescent fruit fly possesses an inherent capacity for bioluminescence that is only revealed upon treatment with a xenobiotic molecule. This result expands the scope of bioluminescence and demonstrates that the introduction of a new substrate can unmask latent enzymatic activity that differs significantly from an enzyme’s normal function without requiring mutation. PMID:24616520

  15. Autonomous Bioluminescent Expression of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) in a Mammalian Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan M.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Ripp, Steven; Baek, Seung J.; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE) whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH2) was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp) from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background. Conclusions/Significance The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies. PMID:20805991

  16. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  17. GENERATION OF TWO NOVEL CELL LINES THAT STABLY EXPRESS HAR AND FIREFLY LUCIFERASE GENES FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of Two Novel Cell Lines that Stably Express hAR and Firefly Luciferase Genes for Endocrine Screening
    K.L. Bobseine*1, W.R. Kelce2, P.C. Hartig*1, and L.E. Gray, Jr.1
    1USEPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC, 2Searle, Reproductive Toxicology Divi...

  18. [Comparison of the relative luciferase activity in secondary CEF by different heterogenous strong promoters, MDV gB promoter and the composed promoters].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ya-Feng; Ge, Fei-Fei; Xu, Xue-Qing; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2006-04-01

    To improve the protection efficiency of the recombinant Marek' s disease viruses (MDV) in chickens with or without maternal antibodies,the work of selecting the optimal promoters for the construction of recombinant MDV was carried out. Combined with the efficient genetic manipulation, the composed promoters was constructed by use of the MDV gB core promoter with the regulatory elements from the early immediately promoter and enhancer of hCMV, the promoter and enhancer of SV40 or the partial enhancer of hCMV. And these composed promoters were ligased to the luciferase to construct the eukaryotic expressing vectors and named PhCMV-gB, Psv-gB and Pen-gB, respectively. In vitro, these vectors and internal standard plasmid (pSV-beta-LacZ) were transiently co-transfected into secondary CEF by FuGene 6 Transfection Reagent. Furthermore, cells were harvested 48 hours after transfection. Then the luciferase activity was detected by a luciferase assay kit, at the same time, the beta-galactosidase enzyme activity was detected by a beta-galactosidase enzyme assay kit, and the luciferase activity was corrected by the beta-galactosidase enzyme activity to get the relative luciferase activity. The relative luciferase activity was used as the transcriptional activity. By comparison of the relative luciferase activity of every promoter, it was found that these composed promoters could more effectively drive the reporter gene expression than the full legth of gB promoter did. Among them, PhCMV-gB robustly drove the reporter gene expression. On the other hand, PSV-gB and Pen-gB appeared to have the same strength; But compared with the commercial strong promoters, the transcriptional activity of the composed promoter were less than as or the same as that of the strong promoters. Therefore, at a sense, it can be proposed that these composed promoters have not only the characteristic of MDV gB promoter, but also that of the commercial strong promoters. These provide the choices for

  19. Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Tadatsugu

    2007-05-21

    Interactions between luciferase and a nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface were explored by molecular-dynamics simulations. The structural changes in the active-site residues, the residues affecting the luciferin binding, and the residues affecting the bioluminescence color were smaller on the nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface than on both a hydrophobic Si surface and a hydrophilic Si surface. The nanofabrication and wet-treatment techniques are expected to prevent the decrease in activity of luciferase on the Si surface.

  20. Localization of the active site of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase, using two-quantum affinity modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benimetskaya, L. Z.; Gitelzon, I. I.; Kozionov, Andrew L.; Novozhilov, S. Y.; Petushkov, V. N.; Rodionova, N. S.; Stockman, Mark I.

    1991-11-01

    For the first time the method of two-quantum affinity modification has been employed to probe the structure of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase. Position of the flavin-binding site of this enzyme, which was previously unknown, has been established. The obtained data indicate that the flavin site is positioned on the (alpha) -subunit. The closest contact of the protein chain of the enzyme with the chromophoric group of the flavin takes place near 80 +/- 10 and 120 +/- 10 amino acid residues; the regions 50 +/- 10 and 215 +/- 10 are also close to the flavin. The established localization does not contradict suggestions on positions of the flavin and phosphate sites of the bacterial luciferase, which had earlier been made from the data on evolutionary stability of various luciferases. The present method can, in principle, be applied to a great number of enzymes, including all flavin-dependent enzymes. Enzymatic catalysis has high speed and specificity. Creation of a method of determination of the elements of the primary structure of a protein, making up the active site (in which substratum conversion occurs), could be a significant advance in clearing up mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis. It was proposed to localize active sites of the enzymes, whose substrata are chromophores, using this method of two-quantum affinity modification. An enzyme- substratum complex is irradiated with laser light of sufficiently long wavelength ((lambda) 300 nm) which is not directly absorbed by the enzyme. Two-quantum quasiresonant excitation of the substratum activates it to the state with energy 5-7 eV, which is then radiativelessly transferred to neighboring protein groups. This energy exceeds the energy of activation of peptide bond breakage. Therefore, the enzyme will be disrupted in the vicinity of its active site. In the present paper the above approach has been implemented for the first time. Information has been obtained about the position of the flavin-binding site of bacterial

  1. Replication of Subgenomic Hepatitis A Virus RNAs Expressing Firefly Luciferase Is Enhanced by Mutations Associated with Adaptation of Virus to Growth in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yi, MinKyung; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2002-01-01

    Replication of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in cultured cells is inefficient and difficult to study due to its protracted and generally noncytopathic cycle. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved, we constructed a subgenomic HAV replicon by replacing most of the P1 capsid-coding sequence from an infectious cDNA copy of the cell culture-adapted HM175/18f virus genome with sequence encoding firefly luciferase. Replication of this RNA in transfected Huh-7 cells (derived from a human hepatocellular carcinoma) led to increased expression of luciferase relative to that in cells transfected with similar RNA transcripts containing a lethal premature termination mutation in 3Dpol (RNA polymerase). However, replication could not be confirmed in either FrhK4 cells or BSC-1 cells, cells that are typically used for propagation of HAV. Replication was substantially slower than that observed with replicons derived from other picornaviruses, as the basal luciferase activity produced by translation of input RNA did not begin to increase until 24 to 48 h after transfection. Replication of the RNA was reversibly inhibited by guanidine. The inclusion of VP4 sequence downstream of the viral internal ribosomal entry site had no effect on the basal level of luciferase or subsequent increases in luciferase related to its amplification. Thus, in this system this sequence does not contribute to viral translation or replication, as suggested previously. Amplification of the replicon RNA was profoundly enhanced by the inclusion of P2 (but not 5′ noncoding sequence or P3) segment mutations associated with adaptation of wild-type virus to growth in cell culture. These results provide a simple reporter system for monitoring the translation and replication of HAV RNA and show that critical mutations that enhance the growth of virus in cultured cells do so by promoting replication of viral RNA in the absence of encapsidation, packaging, and cellular export of the viral genome. PMID

  2. Fimbrolide Natural Products Disrupt Bioluminescence of Vibrio By Targeting Autoinducer Biosynthesis and Luciferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weining; Lorenz, Nicola; Jung, Kirsten; Sieber, Stephan A

    2016-01-18

    Vibrio is a model organism for the study of quorum sensing (QS) signaling and is used to identify QS-interfering drugs. Naturally occurring fimbrolides are important tool compounds known to affect QS in various organisms; however, their cellular targets have so far remained elusive. Here we identify the irreversible fimbrolide targets in the proteome of living V. harveyi and V. campbellii via quantitative mass spectrometry utilizing customized probes. Among the major hits are two protein targets with essential roles in Vibrio QS and bioluminescence. LuxS, responsible for autoinducer 2 biosynthesis, and LuxE, a subunit of the luciferase complex, were both covalently modified at their active-site cysteines leading to inhibition of activity. The identification of LuxE unifies previous reports suggesting inhibition of bioluminescence downstream of the signaling cascade and thus contributes to a better mechanistic understanding of these QS tool compounds.

  3. Bioluminescent Reaction by Immobilized Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryuta; Takahama, Eriko; Iinuma, Masataka; Ikeda, Takeshi; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    We have investigated an effect of immobilization of luciferase molecules at the optical fiber end on a bioluminescent reaction. The time dependence of measured count rates of emitted photons has been analyzed by fitting with numerical solution of differential equations including the effect of the product-inhibitor and the deactivation of the luciferase. Through the analysis, we have successfully extracted kinetic constants such as, reaction rate, number of active luciferase molecules, etc. Ratio of active molecules to total luciferase molecules in immobilization was one order of magnitude lower than that in solution. The reaction rate of the bioluminescent process was also different from the one of free luciferase in solution.

  4. Coupling ex vivo electroporation of mouse retinas and luciferase reporter assays to assess rod-specific promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Boulling, Arnaud; Escher, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Ex vivo electroporation of mouse retinas is an established tool to modulate gene expression and to study cell type-specific gene expression. Here we coupled ex vivo electroporation to luciferase reporter assays to facilitate the study of rod-photoreceptor-specific gene promoters. The activity of the rod-specific proximal bovine rhodopsin promoter was significantly increased in C57BL/6J wild-type retinas at postnatal days 1 and 7 by 3.4-fold and 8.7-fold respectively. In C57BL/6J Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) retinas, where the rod photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor Nr2e3 is not expressed, a significant increase by 2.5-fold was only observed at postnatal day 7. Cone-specific S-opsin promoter activity was not modulated in C57BL/6J wild-type and Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) retinas. Taken together, we describe an easily implementable protocol to assess rod-specific promoter activity in a physiological context resembling that of the developing postnatal mouse retina.

  5. Structural evolution of luciferase activity in Zophobas mealworm AMP/CoA-ligase (protoluciferase) through site-directed mutagenesis of the luciferin binding site.

    PubMed

    Prado, R A; Barbosa, J A; Ohmiya, Y; Viviani, V R

    2011-07-01

    The structural origin and evolution of bioluminescent activity of beetle luciferases from AMP/CoA ligases remains a mystery. Previously we cloned the luciferase-like enzyme from Zophobas morio mealworm, a reasonable protoluciferase model that could shine light on this mystery. Kinetic characterization and studies with D- and L-luciferin and their adenylates showed that stereoselectivity constitutes a critical feature for the origin of luciferase activity in AMP/CoA ligases. Comparison of the primary structures and modeling studies of this protoluciferase and the three main families of beetle luciferases showed that the carboxylic acid substrate binding site of this enzyme is smaller and more hydrophobic than the luciferin binding site of beetle luciferases, showing several substitutions of otherwise conserved residues. Thus, here we performed a site-directed mutagenesis survey of the carboxylic binding site motifs of the protoluciferase by replacing their residues by the respective conserved ones found in beetle luciferases in order to identify the structural determinants of luciferase/oxygenase activity. Although most of the substitutions had negative impact on the luminescence activity of the protoluciferase, only the substitution I327T improved the luminescence activity, resulting in a broad and 15 nm blue-shifted luminescence spectrum. Such substitution indicates the importance of the loop motif 322YGMSEI327 (341YGLTETT347 in Photinus pyralis luciferase) for luciferase activity, and indicates a possible route for the evolution of bioluminescence function of beetle luciferases.

  6. Determination of relative assay response factors for toxic chlorinated and bromiated dioxins/furans using an enyme immunoassay (EIA) and a chemically-activated luciferase gene expression cell bioassay (CALUX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of dioxin-like activity requires knowledge of both the concentration and toxicity to evaluate the risk of adverse human health and environmental effects. The dioxin-like response of several polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PBDDs/Fs) and polybrominated/chlori...

  7. Discovery, adaptation and transcriptional activity of two tick promoters: Construction of a dual luciferase reporter system for optimization of RNA interference in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual luciferase reporter systems are valuable tools for functional genomic studies, but have not previously been developed for use in tick cell culture. We evaluated expression of available luciferase constructs in tick cell cultures derived from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, an important vec...

  8. Generation of a recombinant classical swine fever virus stably expressing the firefly luciferase gene for quantitative antiviral assay.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Li, Yongfeng; Chen, Jianing; Li, Chao; Huang, Junhua; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2014-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is a highly contagious swine disease leading to significant economic losses worldwide. Vaccines are widely used to control the disease, and no CSFV-specific antivirals are currently available. To facilitate anti-CSFV molecule discovery, we developed a reporter virus CSFV-N(pro)Fluc stably expressing the firefly luciferase (Fluc) gene in the N(pro) gene. The reporter virus enabled more sensitive and convenient detection of the N(pro) protein expression and the viral replication by luciferase reporter assay than by traditional methods. The CSFV N(pro) protein was detectable as early as 4.5h post-infection. As a proof-of-concept for its utility in rapid antiviral screening, this reporter virus was used to quantify anti-CSFV neutralizing antibodies of 50 swine sera and to assess 12 small interfering RNAs targeting different regions of the CSFV genome. The results were comparable to those obtained by traditional methods. Taken together, the reporter virus CSFV-N(pro)Fluc represents a useful tool for rapid and quantitative screening and evaluation of antivirals against CSFV.

  9. Evaluation of a bioluminescent mouse model expressing aromatase PII-promoter-controlled luciferase as a tool for the study of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Rivest, Patricia Devine, Patrick J. Sanderson, J. Thomas

    2010-11-15

    Dysfunction of the enzyme aromatase (CYP19) is associated with endocrine pathologies such as osteoporosis, impaired fertility and development of hormone-dependent cancers. Certain endocrine disrupting chemicals affect aromatase expression and activity in vitro, but little is known about their ability to do so in vivo. We evaluated a bioluminescent mouse model (LPTA (registered)) CD-1-Tg(Cyp19-luc)-Xen) expressing luciferase under control of the gonadal aromatase pII promoter as an in vivo screening tool for chemicals that may affect aromatase expression. We studied the effects of forskolin, pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and atrazine in this model (atrazine was previously shown to induced pII-promoter-driven aromatase expression in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells). About 2-4 out of every group of 10 male or female Cyp19-luc mice injected i.p. with 10 mg/kg forskolin had increased gonadal bioluminescence after 3-5 days compared to controls; the others appeared non-responsive. Similarly, about 4 per group of 9 individual females injected with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin had increased ovarian bioluminescence after 24 h. There was a statistically significant correlation between ovarian bioluminescence and plasma estradiol concentrations (n = 14; p = 0.022). Males exposed to a single dose of 100 mg/kg or males and females exposed to 5 daily injections of 30 mg/kg atrazine showed no change in gonadal bioluminescence over a 7 day period, but a significant interaction was found between atrazine (100 mg/kg) and time in female mice (p < 0.05; two-way ANOVA). Ex vivo luciferase activity in dissected organs was increased by forskolin in testis, epididymis and ovaries. Atrazine (30 mg/kg/day) increased (30%) luciferase activity significantly in epididymis only. In conclusion, certain individual Cyp19-luc mice are highly responsive to aromatase inducers, suggesting this model, with further optimization, may have potential as an in vivo screening tool for

  10. Assessment of shikonin for potential estrogenic activity by dual-luciferase reporter based bioluminescent measurements in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Ping-Ping

    2011-02-01

    Shikonin, an active component of Lithospermum erythrorhizon Sieb. et Zucc., shows multiple pharmacological properties. However, the estrogenic activity of shikonin is remaining unclear. We assessed the potential estrogenic activity of shikonin with dual-luciferase reporter assay and bioluminescent measurements, by using transient cotransfection with estrogen dependent plasmid pERE-TK-Luc and internal control plasmid pRL-TK in MCF-7 cells. Estrogenic activity of shikonin, even at high concentration did not alter significantly compared to negative control (p > 0.05) and were significantly lower than those with E2 (p < 0.01). Concluding, shikonin demonstrates no estrogenic activity in vitro.

  11. Identification of circadian-clock-regulated enhancers and genes of Drosophila melanogaster by transposon mobilization and luciferase reporting of cyclical gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Stempfl, Thomas; Vogel, Marion; Szabo, Gisela; Wülbeck, Corinna; Liu, Jian; Hall, Jeffrey C; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    A new way was developed to isolate rhythmically expressed genes in Drosophila by modifying the classic enhancer-trap method. We constructed a P element containing sequences that encode firefly luciferase as a reporter for oscillating gene expression in live flies. After generation of 1176 autosomal insertion lines, bioluminescence screening revealed rhythmic reporter-gene activity in 6% of these strains. Rhythmically fluctuating reporter levels were shown to be altered by clock mutations in genes that specify various circadian transcription factors or repressors. Intriguingly, rhythmic luminescence in certain lines was affected by only a subset of the pacemaker mutations. By isolating genes near 13 of the transposon insertions and determining their temporal mRNA expression pattern, we found that four of the loci adjacent to the trapped enhancers are rhythmically expressed. Therefore, this approach is suitable for identifying genetic loci regulated by the circadian clock. One transposon insert caused a mutation in the rhythmically expressed gene numb. This novel numb allele, as well as previously described ones, was shown to affect the fly's rhythm of locomotor activity. In addition to its known role in cell fate determination, this gene and the phosphotyrosine-binding protein it encodes are likely to function in the circadian system. PMID:11861563

  12. Assessing Activity and Inhibition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Papain-Like and 3C-Like Proteases Using Luciferase-Based Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kilianski, Andy; Mielech, Anna M.; Deng, Xufang

    2013-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is associated with an outbreak of more than 90 cases of severe pneumonia with high mortality (greater than 50%). To date, there are no antiviral drugs or specific therapies to treat MERS-CoV. To rapidly identify potential inhibitors of MERS-CoV replication, we expressed the papain-like protease (PLpro) and the 3-chymotrypsin-like protease (3CLpro) from MERS-CoV and developed luciferase-based biosensors to monitor protease activity in cells. We show that the expressed MERS-CoV PLpro recognizes and processes the canonical CoV-PLpro cleavage site RLKGG in the biosensor. However, existing CoV PLpro inhibitors were unable to block MERS-CoV PLpro activity, likely due to the divergence of the amino acid sequence in the drug binding site. To investigate MERS-CoV 3CLpro activity, we expressed the protease in context with flanking nonstructural protein 4 (nsp4) and the amino-terminal portion of nsp6 and detected processing of the luciferase-based biosensors containing the canonical 3CLpro cleavage site VRLQS. Importantly, we found that a small-molecule inhibitor that blocks replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV and murine CoV also inhibits the activity of MERS-CoV 3CLpro. Overall, the protease expression and biosensor assays developed here allow for rapid evaluation of viral protease activity and the identification of protease inhibitors. These biosensor assays can now be used to screen for MERS-CoV-specific or broad-spectrum coronavirus PLpro and 3CLpro inhibitors. PMID:23986593

  13. GENERATION OF TWO STABLE CELL LINES THAT EXPRESS HER-ALPHA OR HER-ALPHA AND -BETA AND FIREFLY LUCIFERASE GENES FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of Two Stable Cell Lines that Express hERa or
    hERa and b and Firefly Luciferase Genes for Endocrine Screening

    K.L. Bobseine*1, W.R. Kelce2, P.C. Hartig*1, and L.E. Gray, Jr.1

    1USEPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC, 2Searle, Reprod...

  14. Design of disulfide bridge as an alternative mechanism for color shift in firefly luciferase and development of secreted luciferase.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Mahboobeh; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2011-07-01

    The bioluminescence reaction, which uses luciferin, Mg(2+)-ATP and molecular oxygen to yield an electronically excited oxyluciferin, is carried out by luciferase and emits visible light. The bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases is determined by the luciferase structure and assay conditions. It is proposed that the stability of a protein can be increased by introduction of disulfide bridge that decreases the configurational entropy of unfolding. A disulfide bridge is introduced into Photinus pyralis firefly luciferase to make three separate mutant enzymes with a single bridge. Moreover, C(81)-A(105)C mutant luciferase was modified and successfully secreted to the extracellular medium. By introduction of disulfide bridges using site-directed mutagenesis in Photinus pyralis luciferase the color of emitted light was changed to red and the optimum temperature of activity was also increased (up to 10 °C more than wild type). Amongst mutants with a disulfide bridge, P(451)C-V(469)C and L(306)C-L(309)C mutants exhibit a single peak in the red region of the spectrum at pH 7.8. It is worthwhile to note that with the design of a secreted luciferase, the increased optimum temperature, thermostability and emission of red light might make mutant luciferase suitable reporters for the study of gene expression in high through-put screening.

  15. Firefly luciferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Leitão, João M M; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2010-10-05

    Firefly luciferase (Luc) is the most studied of the luciferase enzymes and the mechanism and kinetics of the reactions catalyzed by this enzyme have been relatively well characterized. Luc catalyzes the bioluminescent reaction involving firefly luciferin (D-LH(2)), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), magnesium ion and molecular oxygen with the formation of an electronically excited species (oxyluciferin), inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), carbon dioxide and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Luc also catalyzes other non-luminescent reactions, which can interfere with the light production mechanism. Following electronic relaxation, the excited oxyluciferin emits radiation in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum (550-570 nm). Among the various possible compounds, several classes of inhibitory substances interfere with the activity of this enzyme: here, we consider substrate-related compounds, intermediates or products of the Luc catalyzed reactions, in addition to anesthetics and, fatty acids. This review summarizes the main inhibitors of Luc and the corresponding inhibition kinetic parameters.

  16. Long-term luciferase expression monitored by bioluminescence imaging after adeno-associated virus-mediated fetal gene delivery in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Tarantal, Alice F; Lee, C Chang I

    2010-02-01

    The safety and efficiency of fetal adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery in rhesus monkeys and long-term monitoring of transgene expression by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were evaluated. Early second-trimester fetal monkeys were administered AAV2/5, AAV2/9, or AAV2/10 vector supernatant preparations expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter, using an intrathoracic (n = 6) or intramyocardial (n = 6) approach and established ultrasound-guided techniques. Postnatal BLI was performed monthly up to 6 months postnatal age (n = 12) and then every 3 months thereafter to monitor transgene expression up to 24 months postnatal age (27 months after gene transfer; n = 6). All AAV serotypes showed greater than 1.0 x 10(9) photons/sec at all time points evaluated with limited biodistribution to nontargeted anatomical sites. The highest levels of bioluminescence (photons per second) observed were noted with AAV2/9 and AAV2/10 when the three vector constructs were compared. To correlate in vivo findings at the tissue level, specimens were collected from selected animals and analyzed. Three-dimensional reconstruction showed that firefly luciferase expression was consistent with imaging and morphometric measures. These findings suggest that (1) high levels of AAV-mediated firefly luciferase expression can be found after fetal AAV gene transfer and without any evidence of adverse effects; (2) the intercostal muscles, myocardium, and muscular component of the diaphragm of developing fetuses are readily transduced with AAV2/5, AAV2/9, or AAV2/10; and (3) postnatal outcomes and long-term luciferase expression can be effectively monitored by BLI in young rhesus monkeys.

  17. A New Screen for Tuberculosis Drug Candidates Utilizing a Luciferase-Expressing Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guéren

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Masayuki; Doe, Matsumi; Tamaru, Aki; Kinoshita, Naoko; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Sawa, Ryuichi; Umekita, Maya; Enany, Shymaa; Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Niki, Mamiko; Tateishi, Yoshitaka; Hatano, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious infectious disease caused by a bacterial pathogen. Mortality from tuberculosis was estimated at 1.5 million deaths worldwide in 2013. Development of new TB drugs is needed to not only to shorten the medication period but also to treat multi-drug resistant and extensively drug-resistant TB. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) grows slowly and only multiplies once or twice per day. Therefore, conventional drug screening takes more than 3 weeks. Additionally, a biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) facility is required. Thus, we developed a new screening method to identify TB drug candidates by utilizing luciferase-expressing recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guéren (rBCG). Using this method, we identified several candidates in 4 days in a non-BSL-3 facility. We screened 10,080 individual crude extracts derived from Actinomyces and Streptomyces and identified 137 extracts which possessed suppressive activity to the luciferase of rBCG. Among them, 41 compounds inhibited the growth of both Mtb H37Rv and the extensively drug-resistant Mtb (XDR-Mtb) strains. We purified the active substance of the 1904–1 extract, which possessed strong activity toward rBCG, Mtb H37Rv, and XDR-Mtb but was harmless to the host eukaryotic cells. The MIC of this substance was 0.13 μg/ml, 0.5 μg/ml, and 2.0–7.5 μg/ml against rBCG, H37Rv, and 2 XDR-strains, respectively. Its efficacy was specific to acid-fast bacterium except for the Mycobacterium avium intracellular complex. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses revealed that the active substance of 1904–1 was cyclomarin A. To confirm the mode of action of the 1904-1-derived compound, resistant BCG clones were used. Whole genome DNA sequence analysis showed that these clones contained a mutation in the clpc gene which encodes caseinolytic protein, an essential component of an ATP-dependent proteinase, and the likely target of the active substance of 1904–1. Our method provides a

  18. Identification of mutant firefly luciferases that efficiently utilize aminoluciferins.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Katryn R; Mofford, David M; Reddy, Gadarla R; Miller, Stephen C

    2011-12-23

    Firefly luciferase-catalyzed light emission from D-luciferin is widely used as a reporter of gene expression and enzymatic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Despite the power of bioluminescence for imaging and drug discovery, light emission from firefly luciferase is fundamentally limited by the physical properties of the D-luciferin substrate. We and others have synthesized aminoluciferin analogs that exhibit light emission at longer wavelengths than D-luciferin and have increased affinity for luciferase. However, although these substrates can emit an intense initial burst of light that approaches that of D-luciferin, this is followed by much lower levels of sustained light output. Here we describe the creation of mutant luciferases that yield improved sustained light emission with aminoluciferins in both lysed and live mammalian cells, allowing the use of aminoluciferins for cell-based bioluminescence experiments.

  19. Development of Neh2-Luciferase Reporter and Its Application for High Throughput Screening and Real-Time Monitoring of Nrf2 Activators

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Natalya A.; Haskew-Layton, Renee E.; Basso, Manuela; Hushpulian, Dmitry M.; Payappilly, Jimmy B.; Speer, Rachel E.; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Rakhman, Ilay; Cole, Philip A.; Pinto, John T.; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Gazaryan, Irina G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcriptional regulator of antioxidant defense and detoxification. To directly monitor stabilization of Nrf2, we fused its Neh2 domain, responsible for the interaction with its nucleocytoplasmic regulator, Keap1, to firefly luciferase (Neh2-luciferase). We show that Neh2 domain is sufficient for recognition, ubiquitination, and proteasomal degradation of Neh2-luciferase fusion protein. The Neh2-luc reporter system allows direct monitoring of the adaptive response to redox stress and classification of drugs based on the time course of reporter activation. The reporter was used to screen the Spectrum library of 2000 biologically active compounds to identify activators of Nrf2. The most robust and yet nontoxic Nrf2 activators found—nordihydroguaiaretic acid, fisetin, and gedunin—induced astrocyte-dependent neuroprotection from oxidative stress via an Nrf2-dependent mechanism. PMID:21700211

  20. An enzymatic assay based on luciferase Ebola virus-like particles for evaluation of virolytic activity of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Peskova, Marie; Heger, Zbynek; Janda, Petr; Adam, Vojtech; Pekarik, Vladimir

    2017-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are currently considered as promising antiviral compounds. Current assays to evaluate the effectivity of peptides against enveloped viruses based on liposomes or hemolysis are encumbered by the artificial nature of liposomes or distinctive membrane composition of used erythrocytes. We propose a novel assay system based on enzymatic Ebola virus-like particles containing sensitive luciferase reporter. The assay was validated with several cationic and anionic peptides and compared with lentivirus inactivation and hemolytic assays. The assay is sensitive and easy to perform in standard biosafety level laboratory with potential for high-throughput screens. The use of virus-like particles in the assay provides a system as closely related to the native viruses as possible eliminating some issues associated with other more artificial set ups. We have identified CAM-W (KWKLWKKIEKWGQGIGAVLKWLTTWL) as a peptide with the greatest antiviral activity against infectious lentiviral vectors and filoviral virus-like particles.

  1. Food-associated estrogenic compounds induce estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase gene expression in transgenic male mice.

    PubMed

    Ter Veld, Marcel G R; Zawadzka, E; van den Berg, J H J; van der Saag, Paul T; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Murk, Albertinka J

    2008-07-30

    The present paper aims at clarifying to what extent seven food-associated compounds, shown before to be estrogenic in vitro, can induce estrogenic effects in male mice with an estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated luciferase (luc) reporter gene system. The luc induction was determined in different tissues 8h after dosing the ER-luc male mice intraperitoneally (IP) or 14h after oral dosing. Estradiol-propionate (EP) was used as a positive control at 0.3 and 1mg/kg bodyweight (bw), DMSO as solvent control. The food-associated estrogenic compounds tested at non-toxic doses were bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP) (both at 10 and 50mg/kgbw), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE; at 5 and 25mg/kgbw), quercetin (at 1.66 and 16.6mg/kgbw), di-isoheptyl phthalate (DIHP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) all at 30 and 100mg/kgbw. In general IP dosing resulted in higher luc inductions than oral dosing. EP induced luc activity in the liver in a statistically significant dose-related way with the highest induction of all compounds tested which was 20,000 times higher than the induction by the DMSO-control. NP, DDE, DEHA and DIHP did not induce luc activity in any of the tissues tested. BPA induced luc in the liver up to 420 times via both exposure routes. BPA, DEHP and quercetin induced luc activity in the liver after oral exposure. BPA (50mg/kgbw IP) also induced luc activity in the testis, kidneys and tibia. The current study reveals that biomarker-responses in ER-luc male mice occur after a single oral exposure to food-associated estrogenic model compounds at exposure levels 10 to 10(4) times higher than the established TDI's for some of these compounds. Given the facts that (i) the present study did not include chronic exposure and that (ii) simultaneous exposure to multiple estrogenic compounds may be a realistic exposure scenario, it remains to be seen whether this margin is sufficiently high.

  2. A novel luciferase based reporter system to monitor activation of the ErbB2/Her2/neu pathway non-invasively during radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Frank; Li, Wenrong; Li, Fang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop a split-luciferase based reporter system that allows for non-invasive monitoring of activation of the Her2/neu pathway in vivo in a quantitative and sensitive manner. Methods and Materials Fusion proteins of the ErbB2/Her2/neu receptor to the N-terminal fragment of luciferase as well as of its downstream binding partner Shc to the C-terminal fragment of luciferase have been engineered based on the rationale that upon activation and binding of the Her2 receptor molecule to Shc, luciferase function will be reconstituted. Thus the resulting bioluminescence signals can serve as a surrogate measure of receptor activation. Results We show that our reporter systems functions well in vitro in breast cancer cells and in vivo in xenograft tumors. In particular, the activities of Her2/neu in xenograft tumors could be monitored serially for an extended period of time after radiotherapy. Conclusions We believe that the novel ErbB2/Her2/neu reporter presented here is a powerful tool to study the biology of the Her2-neu pathway in vitro as well as in vivo. It should also facilitate the development and rapid evaluation of new Her2/neu targeted therapeutics. PMID:20934271

  3. Novel Luciferase-Based Reporter System to Monitor Activation of ErbB2/Her2/neu Pathway Noninvasively During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Frank; Li Wenrong; Li Fang; Li Chuanyuan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a split-luciferase-based reporter system that allows for noninvasive monitoring of activation of the Her2/neu pathway in vivo in a quantitative and sensitive manner. Methods and Materials: Fusion proteins of the ErbB2/Her2/neu receptor to the N-terminal fragment of luciferase and of its downstream binding partner Shc to the C-terminal fragment of luciferase have been engineered owing to the rationale that on activation and binding of the Her2 receptor molecule to Shc, luciferase function will be reconstituted. Thus, the resulting bioluminescence signals can serve as a surrogate measure of receptor activation. Results: We have shown that our reporter systems functions well in vitro in breast cancer cells and in vivo in xenograft tumors. In particular, the activities of Her2/neu in xenograft tumors could be monitored serially for an extended period after radiotherapy. Conclusions: We believe that the novel ErbB2/Her2/neu reporter we have presented is a powerful tool to study the biology of the Her2-neu pathway in vitro and in vivo. It should also facilitate the development and rapid evaluation of new Her2/neu-targeted therapeutic agents.

  4. Exploiting NanoLuc luciferase for smartphone-based bioluminescence cell biosensor for (anti)-inflammatory activity and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cevenini, Luca; Calabretta, Maria Maddalena; Lopreside, Antonia; Tarantino, Giuseppe; Tassoni, Annalisa; Ferri, Maura; Roda, Aldo; Michelini, Elisa

    2016-12-01

    The availability of smartphones with high-performance digital image sensors and processing power has completely reshaped the landscape of point-of-need analysis. Thanks to the high maturity level of reporter gene technology and the availability of several bioluminescent proteins with improved features, we were able to develop a bioluminescence smartphone-based biosensing platform exploiting the highly sensitive NanoLuc luciferase as reporter. A 3D-printed smartphone-integrated cell biosensor based on genetically engineered Hek293T cells was developed. Quantitative assessment of (anti)-inflammatory activity and toxicity of liquid samples was performed with a simple and rapid add-and-measure procedure. White grape pomace extracts, known to contain several bioactive compounds, were analyzed, confirming the suitability of the smartphone biosensing platform for analysis of untreated complex biological matrices. Such approach could meet the needs of small medium enterprises lacking fully equipped laboratories for first-level safety tests and rapid screening of new bioactive products. Graphical abstract Smartphone-based bioluminescence cell biosensor.

  5. Monitoring Protein–Protein Interactions Using Split Synthetic Renilla Luciferase Protein-Fragment-Assisted Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Paulmurugan, R.; Gambhir, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we developed an inducible synthetic renilla luciferase protein-fragment-assisted complementation-based bioluminescence assay to quantitatively measure real time protein–protein interactions in mammalian cells. We identified suitable sites to generate fragments of N and C portions of the protein that yield significant recovered activity through complementation. We validate complementation-based activation of split synthetic renilla luciferase protein driven by the interaction of two strongly interacting proteins, MyoD and Id, in five different cell lines utilizing transient transfection studies. The expression level of the system was also modulated by tumor necrosis factor α through NFκB-promoter/enhancer elements used to drive expression of the N portion of synthetic renilla luciferase reporter gene. This new system should help in studying protein–protein interactions and when used with other split reporters (e.g., split firefly luciferase) should help to monitor different components of an intracellular network. PMID:12705589

  6. Firefly Luciferase Enzyme Fragment Complementation for Imaging in Cells and Living Animals

    PubMed Central

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-01-01

    We identified different fragments of the firefly luciferase gene based on the crystal structure of firefly luciferase. These split reporter genes which encode for protein fragments, unlike the fragments currently used for studying protein–protein interactions, can self-complement and provide luciferase enzyme activity in different cell lines in culture and in living mice. The comparison of the fragment complementation associated recovery of firefly luciferase enzyme activity with intact firefly luciferase was estimated for different fragment combinations and ranged from 0.01 to 4% of the full firefly luciferase activity. Using a cooled optical charge-coupled device camera, the analysis of firefly luciferase fragment complementation in transiently transfected subcutaneous 293T cell implants in living mice showed significant detectable enzyme activity upon injecting D-luciferin, especially from the combinations of fragments identified (Nfluc and Cfluc are the N and C fragments of the firefly luciferase gene, respectively): Nfluc (1–475)/Cfluc (245–550), Nfluc (1–475)/Cfluc (265–550), and Nfluc (1–475)/Cfluc (300–550). The Cfluc (265–550) fragment, upon expression with the nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide of SV40, shows reduced enzyme activity when the cells are cotransfected with the Nfluc (1–475) fragment expressed without NLS. We also proved in this study that the complementing fragments could be efficiently used for screening macromolecule delivery vehicles by delivering TAT–Cfluc (265–550) to cells stably expressing Nfluc (1–475) and recovering signal. These complementing fragments should be useful for many reporter-based assays including intracellular localization of proteins, studying cellular macromolecule delivery vehicles, studying cell–cell fusions, and also developing intracellular phosphorylation sensors based on fragment complementation. PMID:15732910

  7. The fusion Vibrio campbellii luciferase as a eukaryotic gene reporter.

    PubMed

    Tinikul, Ruchanok; Thotsaporn, Kittisak; Thaveekarn, Wichit; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2012-12-31

    Bacterial luciferase from Vibrio campbellii is a thermostable enzyme with an in vitro thermal inactivation half-life of ~1020 min at 37°C. The enzyme also binds tightly to reduced FMN. In this study, a V. campbellii fusion luciferase construct in which the α and β subunits are linked with a decapeptide was made and characterized. In general, the overall enzymatic properties of the two enzymes are similar. Expression of the enzymes in Escherichia coli demonstrated that the V. campbellii fusion luciferase emits less light than the native luciferase, but still emits a much greater amount of light than native luciferase from Vibrio harveyi and Photobacterium leiognathi TH1. The intensity of light emitted by the V. campbellii fusion luciferase was more than 80-fold greater than that from the V. harveyi native luciferase when expressed at 37°C. Biochemical characterization has shown that the V. campbellii fusion luciferase also retains a high binding affinity for reduced flavin mononucleotide and high thermostability. The levels of bioluminescence emitted by the V. campbellii fusion luciferase expressed in HEK293T cells reached ~1×10(6) Relative Light Units/mg total protein. These findings suggest that the V. campbellii fusion luciferase is a promising candidate for further development as a luciferase-based reporter for eukaryotic systems.

  8. Transgenic mouse model expressing P53R172H, luciferase, EGFP, and KRASG12D in a single open reading frame for live imaging of tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hye-Lim; Calvisi, Diego F.; Moon, Hyuk; Baek, Sinhwa; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Cho, Kyung Joo; Chung, Sook In; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse cancer models allow tumors to be imaged in vivo via co-expression of a reporter gene with a tumor-initiating gene. However, differential transcriptional and translational regulation between the tumor-initiating gene and the reporter gene can result in inconsistency between the actual tumor size and the size indicated by the imaging assay. To overcome this limitation, we developed a transgenic mouse in which two oncogenes, encoding P53R172H and KRASG12D, are expressed together with two reporter genes, encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and firefly luciferase, in a single open reading frame following Cre-mediated DNA excision. Systemic administration of adenovirus encoding Cre to these mice induced specific transgene expression in the liver. Repeated bioluminescence imaging of the mice revealed a continuous increase in the bioluminescent signal over time. A strong correlation was found between the bioluminescent signal and actual tumor size. Interestingly, all liver tumors induced by P53R172H and KRASG12D in the model were hepatocellular adenomas. The mouse model was also used to trace cell proliferation in the epidermis via live fluorescence imaging. We anticipate that the transgenic mouse model will be useful for imaging tumor development in vivo and for investigating the oncogenic collaboration between P53R172H and KRASG12D. PMID:25623590

  9. Creation of High Efficient Firefly Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsu, Toru

    Firefly emits visible yellow-green light. The bioluminescence reaction is carried out by the enzyme luciferase. The bioluminescence of luciferase is widely used as an excellent tool for monitoring gene expression, the measurement of the amount of ATP and in vivo imaging. Recently a study of the cancer metastasis is carried out by in vivo luminescence imaging system, because luminescence imaging is less toxic and more useful for long-term assay than fluorescence imaging by GFP. However the luminescence is much dimmer than fluorescence. Then bioluminescence imaging in living organisms demands the high efficient luciferase which emits near infrared lights or enhances the emission intensity. Here I introduce an idea for creating the high efficient luciferase based on the crystal structure.

  10. Oestrogenic activity of a textile industrial wastewater treatment plant effluent evaluated by the E-screen test and MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay.

    PubMed

    Schilirò, Tiziana; Porfido, Arianna; Spina, Federica; Varese, Giovanna Cristina; Gilli, Giorgio

    2012-08-15

    This study quantified the biological oestrogenic activity in the effluent of a textile industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWWTP) in northwestern Italy. Samples of the IWWTP effluent were collected monthly, both before and after tertiary treatment (ozonation). After solid phase extraction, all samples were subjected to two in vitro tests of total estrogenic activity, the human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 BUS) proliferation assay, or E-screen test, and the luciferase-transfected human breast cancer cell line (MELN) gene-reporter assay, to measure the 17β-oestradiol equivalent quantity (EEQ). In the E-screen test, the mean EEQ values were 2.35±1.68 ng/L pre-ozonation and 0.72±0.58 ng/L post-ozonation; in the MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay, the mean EEQ values were 4.18±3.54 ng/L pre-ozonation and 2.53±2.48 ng/L post-ozonation. These results suggest that the post-ozonation IWWTP effluent had a lower oestrogenic activity (simple paired t-tests, p<0.05). The average reduction of estrogenic activity of IWWTP effluent after ozonation was 67±26% and 52±27% as measured by E-screen test and MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay, respectively. There was a positive and significant correlation between the two tests (Rho S=0.650, p=0.022). This study indicates that the environmental risk is low because oestrogenic substances are deposited into the river via IWWTP at concentrations lower than those at which chronic exposure has been reported to affect the endocrine system of living organisms.

  11. Structure, Mechanism, and Mutation of Bacterial Luciferase.

    PubMed

    Tinikul, Ruchanok; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2016-01-01

    : Bacterial luciferase is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase found in bioluminescent bacteria. The enzyme catalyzes a light-emitting reaction by using reduced flavin, long chain aldehyde, and oxygen as substrates and yields oxidized flavin, carboxylic acid, and water as products with concomitant emission of blue-green light around 485-490 nm. The enzyme is a heterodimer consisting of two homologous subunits, designated as the α- and β-subunits. The reactive reaction center is located in the α-subunit, whereas the β-subunit is required for maintaining the active conformation of the α-subunit. The enzyme reaction occurs through the generation of a reactive C4a-oxygenflavin adduct, presumably C4a-peroxyflavin, before the light-emitting species is generated from the decomposition of an adduct between the C4a-peroxyflavin and the aldehyde. Because the luciferase reaction generates light, the enzyme has the potential to be used as a bioreporter for a wide variety of applications. With the recent invention of the fusion enzyme that can be expressed in mammalian cells, future possibilities for the development of additional bioreporter applications are promising.

  12. In Vivo Determination of Mitochondrial Function Using Luciferase-Expressing Caenorhabditis elegans: Contribution of Oxidative Phosphorylation, Glycolysis, and Fatty Acid Oxidation to Toxicant-Induced Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Lagido, Cristina; Hirschey, Matthew D; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are a target of many drugs and environmental toxicants; however, how toxicant-induced mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the progression of human disease remains poorly understood. To address this issue, in vivo assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial function need to be developed. Here, using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, we describe how to rapidly assess the in vivo role of the electron transport chain, glycolysis, or fatty acid oxidation in energy metabolism following toxicant exposure, using a luciferase-expressing ATP reporter strain. Alterations in mitochondrial function subsequent to toxicant exposure are detected by depleting steady-state ATP levels with inhibitors of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, glycolysis, or fatty acid oxidation. Differential changes in ATP following short-term inhibitor exposure indicate toxicant-induced alterations at the site of inhibition. Because a microplate reader is the only major piece of equipment required, this is a highly accessible method for studying toxicant-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Fully Codon-Optimized luciferase Uncovers Novel Temperature Characteristics of the Neurospora Clock▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gooch, Van D.; Mehra, Arun; Larrondo, Luis F.; Fox, Julie; Touroutoutoudis, Melissa; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete reconstruction of the firefly luciferase gene, fully codon optimized for expression in Neurospora crassa. This reporter enhances light output by approximately 4 log orders over that with previously available versions, now producing light that is visible to the naked eye and sufficient for monitoring the activities of many poorly expressed genes. Time lapse photography of strains growing in race tubes, in which the frq or eas/ccg-2 promoter is used to drive luciferase, shows the highest levels of luciferase activity near the growth front and newly formed conidial bands. Further, we have established a sorbose medium colony assay that will facilitate luciferase-based screens. The signals from sorbose-grown colonies of strains in which the frq promoter drives luciferase exhibit the properties of circadian rhythms and can be tracked for many days to weeks. This reporter now makes it possible to follow the clock in real time, even in strains or under conditions in which the circadian rhythm in conidial banding is not expressed. This property has been used to discover short, ca. 15-h period rhythms at high temperatures, at which banding becomes difficult to observe in race tubes, and to generate a high-resolution temperature phase-response curve. PMID:17766461

  14. Relationship between stability and bioluminescence color of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Maghami, Parvaneh; Ranjbar, Bijan; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Moradi, Ali; Gill, Pooria

    2010-03-01

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes the oxidation of luciferin in the presence of ATP, Mg(2+) and molecular oxygen. The bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases is identified by the luciferase structure and assay conditions. Amongst different types of beetles, luciferase from Phrixotrix railroad worm (PhRE) with a unique additional residue (Arg353) naturally emits red bioluminescence color. By insertion of Arg356 in luciferase of Lampyris turkestanicus, corresponding to Arg353 in Phrixotrix hirtus, the color of the emitted light was changed to red. To understand the effect of this position on the bioluminescence color shift, four residues with similar sizes but different charges (Arg, Lys, Glu, and Gln) were inserted into Photinus pyralis luciferase. Comparison of mutants with native luciferase shows that mutation brought an increase in the content of secondary structure and globular compactness of (P. pylalis) luciferase. Comparative study of chemical denaturation of native and mutant luciferases by activity measurement, intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence, circular dichroism, and DSC techniques revealed that insertion of positively charged residues (Arg, Lys) in the flexible loop (352-358) plays a significant role on the stability of (P. pyralis) luciferase and changes the light color to red.

  15. Firefly Luciferase Mutants Allow Substrate-Selective Bioluminescence Imaging in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Adams, Spencer T; Mofford, David M; Reddy, G S Kiran Kumar; Miller, Stephen C

    2016-04-11

    Bioluminescence imaging is a powerful approach for visualizing specific events occurring inside live mice. Animals can be made to glow in response to the expression of a gene, the activity of an enzyme, or the growth of a tumor. But bioluminescence requires the interaction of a luciferase enzyme with a small-molecule luciferin, and its scope has been limited by the mere handful of natural combinations. Herein, we show that mutants of firefly luciferase can discriminate between natural and synthetic substrates in the brains of live mice. When using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to express luciferases in the brain, we found that mutant luciferases that are inactive or weakly active with d-luciferin can light up brightly when treated with the aminoluciferins CycLuc1 and CycLuc2 or their respective FAAH-sensitive luciferin amides. Further development of selective luciferases promises to expand the power of bioluminescence and allow multiple events to be imaged in the same live animal.

  16. Cellular Immune Response Against Firefly Luciferase After Sleeping Beauty–Mediated Gene Transfer In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M.; Vezys, Vaiva; Somia, Nikunj V.; Russell, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been shown to mediate new gene sequence integration resulting in long-term expression. Here the effectiveness of hyperactive SB100X transposase was tested, and we found that hydrodynamic co-delivery of a firefly luciferase transposon (pT2/CaL) along with SB100X transposase (pCMV-SB100X) resulted in remarkably sustained, high levels of luciferase expression. However, after 4 weeks there was a rapid, animal-by-animal loss of luciferase expression that was not observed in immunodeficient mice. We hypothesized that this sustained, high-level luciferase expression achieved using the SB100X transposase elicits an immune response in pT2/CaL co-administered mice, which was supported by the rapid loss of luciferase expression upon challenge of previously treated animals and in naive animals adoptively transferred with splenocytes from previously treated animals. Specificity of the immune response to luciferase was demonstrated by increased cytokine expression in splenocytes after exposure to luciferase peptide in parallel with MHC I–luciferase peptide tetramer binding. This anti-luciferase immune response observed following continuous, high-level luciferase expression in vivo clearly impacts its use as an in vivo reporter. As both an immunogen and an extremely sensitive reporter, luciferase is also a useful model system for the study of immune responses following in vivo gene transfer and expression. PMID:25093708

  17. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  18. Making temporal maps using bacterial luciferase: Bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Broza, Rachel; Verkin, Ekaterina

    2004-06-01

    A method for making temporal maps in bacteria, plasmids and bacteriophages is described. A cassette containing both the genes for bacterial luciferase and kanamycin resistance can be introduced at precise sites. The technique involves clonging followed by genetic recombination. The result is formation of structures that have the luciferase genes in place of the normal DNA and this allows the very precise measurement of transcription/translation of the substituted regions. Very low levels of transcription as well as the kinetics of induction can be easily ascertained. As a specific demonstration of this general method, the technique was used with bacteriophage λ, one of the best known organisms. By measuring light emission, the expression of luciferase was followed after induction for both early and late genes. The exact timing of initial expression of genes was also determined by sampling at very short intervals. The results show that the early genes express almost without delay implying that the function of the N antitermination system is not temporal regulation.

  19. Isolation and properties of the luciferase stored in the ovary of the scyphozoan medusa Periphylla periphylla.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, O; Flood, P R; Inouye, S; Bryan, B; Shimomura, A

    2001-12-01

    Bioluminescence of the medusa Periphylla is based on the oxidation of coelenterazine catalyzed by luciferase. Periphylla has two types of luciferase: the soluble form luciferase L, which causes the exumbrellar bioluminescence display of the medusa, and the insoluble aggregated form, which is stored as particulate material in the ovary, in an amount over 100 times that of luciferase L. The eggs are especially rich in the insoluble luciferase, which drastically decreases upon fertilization. The insoluble form could be solubilized by 2-mercaptoethanol, yielding a mixture of luciferase oligomers with molecular masses in multiples of approximately 20 kDa. Those having the molecular masses of 20 kDa, 40 kDa, and 80 kDa were isolated and designated, respectively, as luciferase A, luciferase B, and luciferase C. The luminescence activities of Periphylla luciferases A, B, and C were 1.2 approximately 4.1 x 10(16) photon/mg. s, significantly higher than any coelenterazine luciferase known, and the quantum yields of coelenterazine catalyzed by these luciferases (about 0.30 at 24 degrees C) are comparable to that catalyzed by Oplophorus luciferase (0.34 at 22 degrees C), which has been considered the most efficient coelenterazine luciferase until now. Luciferase L (32 kDa) could also be split by 2-mercaptoethanol into luciferase A and an accessory protein (approx. 12 kDa), as yet uncharacterized. Luciferases A, B, and C are highly resistant to inactivation: their luminescence activities are only slightly diminished at pH 1 and pH 11 and are enhanced in the presence of 1 approximately 2 M guanidine hydrochloride; but they are less stable to heating than luciferase L, which is practically unaffected by boiling.

  20. Chaperones rescue luciferase folding by separating its domains.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Zackary N; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2014-10-10

    Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made toward understanding how small single-domain proteins fold. However, very little is known about folding mechanisms of medium and large multidomain proteins that predominate the proteomes of all forms of life. Large proteins frequently fold cotranslationally and/or require chaperones. Firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase (Luciferase, 550 residues) has been a model of a cotranslationally folding protein whose extremely slow refolding (approximately days) is catalyzed by chaperones. However, the mechanism by which Luciferase misfolds and how chaperones assist Luciferase refolding remains unknown. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (atomic force microscopy (AFM)/single-molecule force spectroscopy) with steered molecular dynamic computer simulations to unravel the mechanism of chaperone-assisted Luciferase refolding. Our AFM and steered molecular dynamic results show that partially unfolded Luciferase, with the N-terminal domain remaining folded, can refold robustly without chaperones. Complete unfolding causes Luciferase to get trapped in very stable non-native configurations involving interactions between N- and C-terminal residues. However, chaperones allow the completely unfolded Luciferase to refold quickly in AFM experiments, strongly suggesting that chaperones are able to sequester non-natively contacting residues. More generally, we suggest that many chaperones, rather than actively promoting the folding, mimic the ribosomal exit tunnel and physically separate protein domains, allowing them to fold in a cotranslational-like sequential process.

  1. Chaperones Rescue Luciferase Folding by Separating Its Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Zackary N.; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made toward understanding how small single-domain proteins fold. However, very little is known about folding mechanisms of medium and large multidomain proteins that predominate the proteomes of all forms of life. Large proteins frequently fold cotranslationally and/or require chaperones. Firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase (Luciferase, 550 residues) has been a model of a cotranslationally folding protein whose extremely slow refolding (approximately days) is catalyzed by chaperones. However, the mechanism by which Luciferase misfolds and how chaperones assist Luciferase refolding remains unknown. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (atomic force microscopy (AFM)/single-molecule force spectroscopy) with steered molecular dynamic computer simulations to unravel the mechanism of chaperone-assisted Luciferase refolding. Our AFM and steered molecular dynamic results show that partially unfolded Luciferase, with the N-terminal domain remaining folded, can refold robustly without chaperones. Complete unfolding causes Luciferase to get trapped in very stable non-native configurations involving interactions between N- and C-terminal residues. However, chaperones allow the completely unfolded Luciferase to refold quickly in AFM experiments, strongly suggesting that chaperones are able to sequester non-natively contacting residues. More generally, we suggest that many chaperones, rather than actively promoting the folding, mimic the ribosomal exit tunnel and physically separate protein domains, allowing them to fold in a cotranslational-like sequential process. PMID:25160632

  2. A puzzling homology: a brittle star using a putative cnidarian-type luciferase for bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Delroisse, Jérôme; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Blaue, Stefanie; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Eeckhaut, Igor; Flammang, Patrick; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2017-04-01

    Bioluminescence relies on the oxidation of a luciferin substrate catalysed by a luciferase enzyme. Luciferins and luciferases are generic terms used to describe a large variety of substrates and enzymes. Whereas luciferins can be shared by phylogenetically distant organisms which feed on organisms producing them, luciferases have been thought to be lineage-specific enzymes. Numerous light emission systems would then have co-emerged independently along the tree of life resulting in a plethora of non-homologous luciferases. Here, we identify for the first time a candidate luciferase of a luminous echinoderm, the ophiuroid Amphiura filiformis Phylogenomic analyses identified the brittle star predicted luciferase as homologous to the luciferase of the sea pansy Renilla (Cnidaria), contradicting with the traditional viewpoint according to which luciferases would generally be of convergent origins. The similarity between the Renilla and Amphiura luciferases allowed us to detect the latter using anti-Renilla luciferase antibodies. Luciferase expression was specifically localized in the spines which were demonstrated to be the bioluminescent organs in vivo However, enzymes homologous to the Renilla luciferase but unable to trigger light emission were also identified in non-luminous echinoderms and metazoans. Our findings strongly indicate that those enzymes, belonging to the haloalkane dehalogenase family, might then have been convergently co-opted into luciferases in cnidarians and echinoderms. In these two benthic suspension-feeding species, similar ecological pressures would constitute strong selective forces for the functional shift of these enzymes and the emergence of bioluminescence.

  3. Engineering an Enhanced, Thermostable, Monomeric Bacterial Luciferase Gene As a Reporter in Plant Protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future. PMID:25271765

  4. Firefly luciferase gene contains a cryptic promoter

    PubMed Central

    Vopálenský, Václav; Mašek, Tomáš; Horváth, Ondřej; Vicenová, Blanka; Mokrejš, Martin; Pospíšek, Martin

    2008-01-01

    A firefly luciferase (FLuc) counts among the most popular reporters of present-day molecular and cellular biology. In this study, we report a cryptic promoter activity in the luc+ gene, which is the most frequently used version of the firefly luciferase. The FLuc coding region displays cryptic promoter activity both in mammalian and yeast cells. In human CCL13 and Huh7 cells, cryptic transcription from the luc+ gene is 10–16 times weaker in comparison to the strong immediate-early cytomegalovirus promoter. Additionally, we discuss a possible impact of the FLuc gene cryptic promoter on experimental results especially in some fields of the RNA-oriented research, for example, in analysis of translation initiation or analysis of miRNA/siRNA function. Specifically, we propose how this newly described cryptic promoter activity within the FLuc gene might contribute to the previous determination of the strength of the cryptic promoter found in the cDNA corresponding to the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site. Our findings should appeal to the researchers to be more careful when designing firefly luciferase-based assays as well as open the possibility of performing some experiments with the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site, which could not be considered until now. PMID:18697919

  5. Rational and random mutagenesis of firefly luciferase to identify an efficient emitter of red bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchini, Bruce R.; Southworth, Tara L.; Khattak, Neelum F.; Murtiashaw, Martha H.; Fleet, Sarah E.

    2004-06-01

    Firefly luciferase, which emits yellow-green (557 nm) light, and the corresponding cDNA have been used successfully as a bioluminescence reporter of gene expression. One particularly exciting application is in the area of in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Our interest is in developing improved reagents by identifying Photinus pyralis luciferase mutants that efficiently emit red bioluminescence. In this way, the proven advantages of the P. pyralis protein can be combined with the potential advantages of a red-shifted emitter. Using site-directed mutagenesis techniques, we have identified many mutants emitting red bioluminescence. Unfortunately, these enzymes generally have significantly decreased bioluminescence activity. Interestingly, we discovered a mutation, Ile351Ala, that produced a moderate 16 nm red-shift, while maintaining excellent bioluminescence activity. We then undertook a random mutagenesis approach to identify luciferase mutants that emit further red-shifted bioluminescence with minimal loss of activity. Libraries of mutants were created using an error-prone PCR method and the Ile351Ala luciferase mutant as the template DNA. The libraries were screened by in vivo bacterial assays and the promising mutants were purified to enable accurate determination of bioluminescence emission spectra and total bioluminescence activity. We will report the characterization results, including the identification of the randomly altered amino acids, of several mutants that catalyze bioluminescence with emission maxima of approximately 600 nm.

  6. Alternative luciferase for monitoring bacterial cells under adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Siouxsie; Ferguson, Kathryn; Stefanidou, Martha; Young, Douglas B; Robertson, Brian D

    2005-07-01

    The availability of cloned luciferase genes from fireflies (luc) and from bacteria (luxAB) has led to the widespread use of bioluminescence as a reporter to measure cell viability and gene expression. The most commonly occurring bioluminescence system in nature is the deep-sea imidazolopyrazine bioluminescence system. Coelenterazine is an imidazolopyrazine derivative which, when oxidized by an appropriate luciferase enzyme, produces carbon dioxide, coelenteramide, and light. The luciferase from the marine copepod Gaussia princeps (Gluc) has recently been cloned. We expressed the Gluc gene in Mycobacterium smegmatis using a shuttle vector and compared its performance with that of an existing luxAB reporter. In contrast to luxAB, the Gluc luciferase retained its luminescence output in the stationary phase of growth and exhibited enhanced stability during exposure to low pH, hydrogen peroxide, and high temperature. The work presented here demonstrated the utility of the copepod luciferase bioluminescent reporter as an alternative to bacterial luciferase, particularly for monitoring responses to environmental stress stimuli.

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids improve firefly luciferase properties.

    PubMed

    Noori, Ali Reza; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Ghiasi, Parisa; Akbari, Jafar; Heydari, Akbar

    2014-03-01

    Ionic liquids as neoteric solvents, microwave irradiation, and alternative energy source are becoming as a solvent for many enzymatic reactions. We recently showed that the incubation of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis with various ionic liquids increased the activity and stability of luciferase. Magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids have been obtained by covalent bonding of ionic liquids-silane on magnetic silica nanoparticles. In the present study, the effects of [γ-Fe2O3@SiO2][BMImCl] and [γ-Fe2O3@SiO2][BMImI] were investigated on the structural properties and function of luciferase using circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and bioluminescence assay. Enzyme activity and structural stability increased in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids. Furthermore, the effect of ingredients which were used was not considerable on K(m) value of luciferase for adenosine-5'-triphosphate and also K(m) value for luciferin.

  8. Visualization of Malaria Parasites in the Skin Using the Luciferase Transgenic Parasite, Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Ryuta; Arai, Meiji; Hirai, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    We produced a transgenic rodent malaria parasite (Plasmodium berghei) that contained the luciferase gene under a promoter region of elongation factor-1α. These transgenic (TG) parasites expressed luciferase in all stages of their life cycle, as previously reported. However, we were the first to succeed in observing sporozoites as a mass in mouse skin following their deposition by the probing of infective mosquitoes. Our transgenic parasites may have emitted stronger bioluminescence than previous TG parasites. The estimated number of injected sporozoites by mosquitoes was between 34 and 775 (median 80). Since luciferase activity diminished immediately after the death of the parasites, luciferase activity could be an indicator of the existence of live parasites. Our results indicated that sporozoites survived at the probed site for more than 42 hours. We also detected sporozoites in the liver within 15 min of the intravenous injection. Bioluminescence was not observed in the lung, kidney or spleen. We confirmed the observation that the liver was the first organ in which malaria parasites entered and increased in number.

  9. Thermostabilization of firefly luciferase by in vivo directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2011-11-01

    Firefly luciferase is widely used in a number of areas of biotechnology and molecular biology. However, rapid inactivation of wild-type (WT) luciferases at elevated temperatures often hampers their application. A simple non-lethal in vivo screening scheme was used to identify thermostable mutants of luciferase in Escherichia coli colonies. This scheme allowed carrying out each cycle of mutagenesis in a rapid and efficient manner. Four rounds of directed evolution were conducted on a part of the gene coding for amino acid residues 130-390 of Luciola mingrelica luciferase. The resultant mutant designated 4TS had a half-life of 10 h at 42°C, which is 65-fold higher compared with the WT luciferase. Moreover, the mutant 4TS showed a 1.9-fold increase in specific activity, 5.7-fold reduction of K(m) for ATP and a higher-temperature optimum compared with the WT enzyme. 4TS contains eight mutations, four of which are suggested to be mainly responsible for the enhancement of thermostability: R211L, A217V, E356K and S364C. Thus, directed evolution with non-lethal colony screening for in vivo bioluminescence activity proved to be an effective and efficient approach for increasing thermal stability of luciferase while retaining high catalytic activity.

  10. Firefly bioluminescence: a mechanistic approach of luciferase catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Marques, Simone M; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2009-01-01

    Luciferase is a general term for enzymes catalyzing visible light emission by living organisms (bioluminescence). The studies carried out with Photinus pyralis (firefly) luciferase allowed the discovery of the reaction leading to light production. It can be regarded as a two-step process: the first corresponds to the reaction of luciferase's substrate, luciferin (LH(2)), with ATP-Mg(2+) generating inorganic pyrophosphate and an intermediate luciferyl-adenylate (LH(2)-AMP); the second is the oxidation and decarboxylation of LH(2)-AMP to oxyluciferin, the light emitter, producing CO(2), AMP, and photons of yellow-green light (550- 570 nm). In a dark reaction LH(2)-AMP is oxidized to dehydroluciferyl-adenylate (L-AMP). Luciferase also shows acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity, which leads to the formation of dehydroluciferyl-coenzyme A (L-CoA), luciferyl-coenzyme A (LH(2)-CoA), and fatty acyl-CoAs. Moreover luciferase catalyzes the synthesis of dinucleoside polyphosphates from nucleosides with at least a 3'-phosphate chain plus an intact terminal pyrophosphate moiety. The LH(2) stereospecificity is a particular feature of the bioluminescent reaction where each isomer, D-LH(2) or L-LH(2), has a specific function. Practical applications of the luciferase system, either in its native form or with engineered proteins, encloses the analytical assay of metabolites like ATP and molecular biology studies with luc as a reporter gene, including the most recent and increasing field of bioimaging.

  11. Effect of solvents on the fluorescence spectra of bacterial luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukovataya, Irina E.; Tyulkova, Natalya A.; Kaykova, Elisaveta V.

    2006-08-01

    Bacteria luciferases catalyze the oxidation reaction of the long-chain aliphatic aldehyde and reduced flavinmononucleotide involving molecular oxygen to a respective fatty acid emitting light quanta in the visible spectrum. Fluorescence emission of luciferases from Photobacterium leiognathi dissolved in organic solvent-water mixtures was investigated. Methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide were used as organic solvents. As the methanol and acetone concentration is increased the emission maximum peak is decrease. In contrast, with dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide addition induced a increasing of the emission maximum intensity. The values of wavelength maximum (λ max) at the addition of this solvent can shows the spectra shifted to the red by about 12 nm. These increasing in the fluorescence intensity and in the λ max may be due to luciferase denaturation, resulting from the more intensive contact of chromospheres of luciferase with the solvent. At all used concentrations of methanol, acetone and formamide the shape of the fluorescence spectra was not changed. These studies demonstrate that the luciferase tryptophan fluorescence is sensitive to changes of physical-chemical property of enzyme environment. A comparison of activation/inactivation and fluorescence spectra of luciferase in methanol or acetone solutions shows that the extent of inactivation is larger than the extent of fluorescence changes at the same methanol or acetone concentration.

  12. In Vivo Imaging of Human MDR1 Transcription in the Brain and Spine of MDR1-Luciferase Reporter Mice.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuto; Cline, Cynthia; Lin, Yvonne S; Scheib, Rachel; Ganguly, Samit; Thirumaran, Ranjit K; Chaudhry, Amarjit; Kim, Richard B; Schuetz, Erin G

    2015-11-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) [the product of the MDR1 (ABCB1) gene] at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits central nervous system (CNS) entry of many prescribed drugs, contributing to the poor success rate of CNS drug candidates. Modulating Pgp expression could improve drug delivery into the brain; however, assays to predict regulation of human BBB Pgp are lacking. We developed a transgenic mouse model to monitor human MDR1 transcription in the brain and spinal cord in vivo. A reporter construct consisting of ∼10 kb of the human MDR1 promoter controlling the firefly luciferase gene was used to generate a transgenic mouse line (MDR1-luc). Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the MDR1-luciferase transgene on chromosome 3. Reporter gene expression was monitored with an in vivo imaging system following D-luciferin injection. Basal expression was detectable in the brain, and treatment with activators of the constitutive androstane, pregnane X, and glucocorticoid receptors induced brain and spinal MDR1-luc transcription. Since D-luciferin is a substrate of ABCG2, the feasibility of improving D-luciferin brain accumulation (and luciferase signal) was tested by coadministering the dual ABCB1/ABCG2 inhibitor elacridar. The brain and spine MDR1-luc signal intensity was increased by elacridar treatment, suggesting enhanced D-luciferin brain bioavailability. There was regional heterogeneity in MDR1 transcription (cortex > cerebellum) that coincided with higher mouse Pgp protein expression. We confirmed luciferase expression in brain vessel endothelial cells by ex vivo analysis of tissue luciferase protein expression. We conclude that the MDR1-luc mouse provides a unique in vivo system to visualize MDR1 CNS expression and regulation.

  13. In Vivo Imaging of Human MDR1 Transcription in the Brain and Spine of MDR1-Luciferase Reporter Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Kazuto; Cline, Cynthia; Lin, Yvonne S.; Scheib, Rachel; Ganguly, Samit; Thirumaran, Ranjit K.; Chaudhry, Amarjit; Kim, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) [the product of the MDR1 (ABCB1) gene] at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits central nervous system (CNS) entry of many prescribed drugs, contributing to the poor success rate of CNS drug candidates. Modulating Pgp expression could improve drug delivery into the brain; however, assays to predict regulation of human BBB Pgp are lacking. We developed a transgenic mouse model to monitor human MDR1 transcription in the brain and spinal cord in vivo. A reporter construct consisting of ∼10 kb of the human MDR1 promoter controlling the firefly luciferase gene was used to generate a transgenic mouse line (MDR1-luc). Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the MDR1-luciferase transgene on chromosome 3. Reporter gene expression was monitored with an in vivo imaging system following D-luciferin injection. Basal expression was detectable in the brain, and treatment with activators of the constitutive androstane, pregnane X, and glucocorticoid receptors induced brain and spinal MDR1-luc transcription. Since D-luciferin is a substrate of ABCG2, the feasibility of improving D-luciferin brain accumulation (and luciferase signal) was tested by coadministering the dual ABCB1/ABCG2 inhibitor elacridar. The brain and spine MDR1-luc signal intensity was increased by elacridar treatment, suggesting enhanced D-luciferin brain bioavailability. There was regional heterogeneity in MDR1 transcription (cortex > cerebellum) that coincided with higher mouse Pgp protein expression. We confirmed luciferase expression in brain vessel endothelial cells by ex vivo analysis of tissue luciferase protein expression. We conclude that the MDR1-luc mouse provides a unique in vivo system to visualize MDR1 CNS expression and regulation. PMID:26281846

  14. Dual-color bioluminescence imaging assay using green- and red-emitting beetle luciferases at subcellular resolution.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Mayu; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is widely used to monitor cellular events, including gene expression in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, recent advances in luciferase technology have made possible imaging at the single-cell level. To improve the bioluminescence imaging system, we have developed a dual-color imaging system in which the green-emitting luciferase from a Brazilian click beetle (Emerald Luc, ELuc) and the red-emitting luciferase from a railroad worm (Stable Luciferase Red, SLR) were used as reporters, which were localized to the peroxisome and the nucleus, respectively. We clearly captured simultaneously the subcellular localization of ELuc in the peroxisome and SLR in the nucleus of a single cell using a high-magnification objective lens with 3-min exposure time without binning using a combination of optical filters. Furthermore, to apply this system to quantitative time-lapse imaging, the activation of nuclear factor triggered by tumor necrosis factor α was measured using nuclear-targeted SLR and peroxisome-targeted ELuc as the test and internal control reporters, respectively. We successfully quantified the kinetics of activation of nuclear factor κB using nuclear-targeted SLR and the transcriptional change of the internal control promoter using peroxisome-targeted ELuc simultaneously in a single cell, and showed that the activation kinetics, including activation rate and amplitude, differed among cells. The results demonstrated that this imaging system can visualize the subcellular localization of reporters and track the expressions of two genes simultaneously at subcellular resolution.

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A CELL LINE THAT STABLY EXPRESSES AN ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE LUCIFERASE REPORTER FOR THE DETECTION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR AGONIST AND ANTAGONISTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Screening for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that act as estrogens or antiestrogens relies on the use of in vitro binding and gene expression assays coupled with short-term diagnostic in vivo assays. Although binding assays are useful to identify chemicals that are competi...

  16. Enhanced red-emitting railroad worm luciferase for bioassays and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueyan; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Niwa, Kazuki; Viviani, Vadim R; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    A luciferase from the railroad worm (Phrixothrix hirtus) is the only red-emitting bioluminescent enzyme in nature that is advantageous in multicolor luciferase assays and in bioluminescence imaging (BLI). However, it is not used widely in scientific or industrial applications because of its low activity and stability. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we produced red-emitting mutants with higher activity and better stability. Compared with the wild-type (WT), the luminescent activities from extracts of cultured mammalian cells expressing mutant luciferase were 9.8-fold in I212L/N351K, 8.4-fold in I212L, and 7.8-fold in I212L/S463R; and the cell-based activities were 3.6-fold in I212L/N351K and 3.4-fold in N351K. The remaining activities after incubation at 37 degrees C for 10 min were 50.0% for I212L/S463R, 31.8% for I212L, and 23.0% for I212L/N351K, but only 5.2% for WT. To demonstrate an application of I212L/N351K, cell-based BLI was performed, and the luminescence signal was 3.6-fold higher than in WT. These results indicate that the mutants might improve the practicability of this signaling in bioassays and BLI.

  17. Phytochemicals Mediate the Expression and Activity of OCTN2 as Activators of the PPARγ/RXRα Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Qu, Jian; Yang, Rui; Ge, Meng-Xue; Mei, Yin; Zhou, Bo-Ting; Qu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Many phytochemicals exert activities as agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). This study aims to investigate whether phytochemicals are agonists of the PPARγ/RXRα pathway and modulate the target gene OCTN2. In this study, a luciferase reporter gene system was used to screen novel OCTN2 activators from 39 phytochemicals. Kaempferol, curcumin, and puerarin were found to show the significant PPRE-mediated luciferase activities (>150%) at 20 μM and showed a dose-dependent manner. Phytochemicals also elevated the mRNA and protein expression of OCTN2 in a dose-dependent fashion in colorectal cancer SW480 cells. These induction effects were gradually inhibited by PPARγ antagonist GW9662 in the luciferase reporter gene system and in SW480 cells. Moreover, the results of cell viability assay imply that three phytochemicals probably induce OCTN2 expression leading to the enhanced uptake of its substrate, oxaliplatin, thereby making cells more sensitive to oxaliplatin. The molecular docking study showed the possible binding sites of phytochemicals in PPARγ protein, and all of the docked phytochemicals fitted the same active pocket in PPARγ as troglitazone. All three phytochemicals exhibited hydrogen bonds between their polar moieties and the amino acid residues. Thus, we identified three phytochemicals as PPARγ ligands, which potentiated the expression and activity of OCTN2. PMID:27445823

  18. Transgenic Mouse Model Harboring the Transcriptional Fusion Ccl20-Luciferase as a Novel Reporter of Pro-Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Crispo, Martina; Van Maele, Laurye; Tabareau, Julien; Cayet, Delphine; Errea, Agustina; Ferreira, Ana María; Rumbo, Martin; Sirard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc) encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo. PMID:24265691

  19. Transgenic mouse model harboring the transcriptional fusion ccl20-luciferase as a novel reporter of pro-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Crispo, Martina; Van Maele, Laurye; Tabareau, Julien; Cayet, Delphine; Errea, Agustina; Ferreira, Ana María; Rumbo, Martin; Sirard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc) encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo.

  20. Enhanced Beetle Luciferase for High-Resolution Bioluminescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Tomomi; Nishii, Shigeaki; Noguchi, Takako; Hoshino, Hideto; Niwa, Kazuki; Viviani, Vadim R.; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    We developed an enhanced green-emitting luciferase (ELuc) to be used as a bioluminescence imaging (BLI) probe. ELuc exhibits a light signal in mammalian cells that is over 10-fold stronger than that of the firefly luciferase (FLuc), which is the most widely used luciferase reporter gene. We showed that ELuc produces a strong light signal in primary cells and tissues and that it enables the visualization of gene expression with high temporal resolution at the single-cell level. Moreover, we successfully imaged the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of importin α by fusing ELuc at the intracellular level. These results demonstrate that the use of ELuc allows a BLI spatiotemporal resolution far greater than that provided by FLuc. PMID:20368807

  1. A NOVEL CELL LINE THAT STABLY EXPRESSES AN ANDROGEN RESPONSIVE LUCIFERASE REPORTER FOR THE DETECTION OF ANDROGEN RECEPTOR (AR) AGONISTS AND ANTAGONISTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of in vitro assays to screen chemicals for estrogen receptor (ER) and AR mediated actions is being evaluated by the USEPA for use in a Tier I screening battery to detect endocrine active chemicals. We have developed a stable cell line, MDA-MB-453-KB2, for screening of and...

  2. A NOVEL CELL LINE THAT STABLY EXPRESSES AN ANDROGEN RESPONSIVE LUCIFERASE REPORTER FOR THE DETECTION OF ANDROGEN RECEPTOR (AR) AGONIST AND ANTAGONISTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of in vitro assays to screen chemicals for estrogen receptor (ER) and AR mediated actions is being evaluated by the USEPA for use in a Tier I screening battery to detect endocrine active chemicals. We have developed a stable cell line, MDA-MB-453-KB2, for screening of and...

  3. Visualization and Quantification of Browning Using a Ucp1-2A-Luciferase Knock-in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liufeng; Nie, Baoming; Nie, Tao; Hui, Xiaoyan; Gao, Xuefei; Lin, Xiaoliang; Liu, Xin; Xu, Yong; Tang, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Ran; Li, Kuai; Li, Peng; Ding, Ke; Wang, Yu; Xu, Aimin; Fei, Jian; Han, Weiping; Liu, Pentao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Zhou, Zhiguang; Ding, Sheng; Wu, Donghai

    2017-02-01

    Both mammals and adult humans possess classic brown adipocytes and beige adipocytes, and the amount and activity of these adipocytes are considered key factors in combating obesity and its associated metabolic diseases. Uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) is the functional marker of both brown and beige adipocytes. To facilitate a reliable, easy, and sensitive measurement of Ucp1 expression both in vivo and in vitro, we generated a Ucp1-2A-luciferase knock-in mouse by deleting the stop codon for the mouse Ucp1 gene and replacing it with a 2A peptide. This peptide was followed by the luciferase coding sequence to recapitulate the expression of the Ucp1 gene at the transcriptional and translational levels. With this mouse, we discovered a cold-sensitive brown/beige adipose depot underneath the skin of the ears, which we named uBAT. Because of the sensitivity and high dynamic range of luciferase activity, the Ucp1-2A-luciferase mouse is useful for both in vitro quantitative determination and in vivo visualization of nonshivering thermogenesis. With the use of this model, we identified and characterized axitinib, an oral small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as an effective browning agent.

  4. Visualization of Oxidative Stress Induced by Experimental Periodontitis in Keap1-Dependent Oxidative Stress Detector-Luciferase Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kota; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Irie, Koichiro; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Uchida, Yoko; Fukuhara, Daiki; Morita, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a Keap1-dependent oxidative stress detector-luciferase (OKD-LUC) mouse model would be useful for the visualization of oxidative stress induced by experimental periodontitis. A ligature was placed around the mandibular first molars for seven days to induce periodontitis. Luciferase activity was measured with an intraperitoneal injection of d-luciferin on days 0, 1, and 7. The luciferase activity in the periodontitis group was significantly greater than that in the control group at seven days. The expressions of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and malondialdehyde in periodontal tissue were significantly higher in the periodontitis group than in the control group. Immunofluorescent analysis confirmed that the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) occurred more frequently in the periodontitis group than in the control group. This study found that under oxidative stress induced by experimental periodontitis, the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway was activated and could be visualized from the luciferase activity in the OKD-LUC model. Thus, the OKD-LUC mouse model may be useful for exploring the mechanism underlying the relationship between the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway and periodontitis by enabling the visualization of oxidative stress over time. PMID:27854327

  5. Crystal structure of native and a mutant of Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase implicate in bioluminescence color shift.

    PubMed

    Kheirabadi, Mitra; Sharafian, Zohreh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Heineman, Udo; Gohlke, Ulrich; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2013-12-01

    Firefly bioluminescence reaction in the presence of Mg(2+), ATP and molecular oxygen is carried out by luciferase. The luciferase structure alterations or modifications of assay conditions determine the bioluminescence color of firefly luciferase. Among different beetle luciferases, Phrixothrix hirtus railroad worm emits either yellow or red bioluminescence color. Sequence alignment analysis shows that the red-emitter luciferase from Phrixothrix hirtus has an additional arginine residue at 353 that is absent in other firefly luciferases. It was reported that insertion of Arg in an important flexible loop350-359 showed changes in bioluminescence color from green to red and the optimum temperature activity was also increased. To explain the color tuning mechanism of firefly luciferase, the structure of native and a mutant (E354R/356R/H431Y) of Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase is determined at 2.7Å and 2.2Å resolutions, respectively. The comparison of structure of both types of Lampyris turkestanicus luciferases reveals that the conformation of this flexible loop is significantly changed by addition of two Arg in this region. Moreover, its surface accessibility is affected considerably and some ionic bonds are made by addition of two positive charge residues. Furthermore, we noticed that the hydrogen bonding pattern of His431 with the flexible loop is changed by replacing this residue with Tyr at this position. Juxtaposition of a flexible loop (residues 351-359) in firefly luciferase and corresponding ionic and hydrogen bonds are essential for color emission.

  6. Identification, characterization and use of two tick promoters for construction of a dual luciferase reporter vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual luciferase reporter systems are valuable tools for functional genomic studies, but have not previously been developed for use in tick cell culture. We evaluated expression of available luciferase constructs in tick cell cultures derived from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, an important vec...

  7. Identification of a functional luciferase gene in the non-luminous diurnal firefly, Lucidina biplagiata.

    PubMed

    Oba, Y; Furuhashi, M; Inouye, S

    2010-12-01

    We isolated a luciferase gene (LbLuc) from the non-luminous diurnal firefly, Lucidina biplagiata, with high similarity to that from the nocturnal firefly, Photinus pyralis. The recombinant LbLuc showed luminescence activity comparable to that of the luciferases from P. pyralis and Luciola cruciata. To understand the non-luminosity of L. biplagiata, we determined the amount of luciferase in the adult specimen using the luciferin-luciferase reaction and found that the content of luciferase in L. biplagiata was estimated to be only 0.1% of that in L. cruciata. As previously reported, the content of luciferin in L. biplagiata was less than 0.1% of that in L. cruciata. Thus, the non-luminosity of L. biplagiata might be explained by low levels of both luciferase and luciferin.

  8. Phytol directly activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) and regulates gene expression involved in lipid metabolism in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kato, Sota; Egawa, Kahori; Ebisu, Shogo; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Fushiki, Tohru; Kawada, Teruo . E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-18

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is one of the indispensable transcription factors for regulating lipid metabolism in various tissues. In our screening for natural compounds that activate PPAR using luciferase assays, a branched-carbon-chain alcohol (a component of chlorophylls), phytol, has been identified as a PPAR{alpha}-specific activator. Phytol induced the increase in PPAR{alpha}-dependent luciferase activity and the degree of in vitro binding of a coactivator, SRC-1, to GST-PPAR{alpha}. Moreover, the addition of phytol upregulated the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes at both mRNA and protein levels in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes. These findings indicate that phytol is functional as a PPAR{alpha} ligand and that it stimulates the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes in intact cells. Because PPAR{alpha} activation enhances circulating lipid clearance, phytol may be important in managing abnormalities in lipid metabolism.

  9. Highly Potent Cell-Permeable and Impermeable NanoLuc Luciferase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Walker, Joel R; Hall, Mary P; Zimprich, Chad A; Robers, Matthew B; Duellman, Sarah J; Machleidt, Thomas; Rodriguez, Jacquelynn; Zhou, Wenhui

    2017-02-22

    Novel engineered NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase being smaller, brighter, and superior to traditional firefly (Fluc) or Renilla (Rluc) provides a great opportunity for the development of numerous biological, biomedical, clinical, and food and environmental safety applications. This new platform created an urgent need for Nluc inhibitors that could allow selective bioluminescent suppression and multiplexing compatibility with existing luminescence or fluorescence assays. Starting from thienopyrrole carboxylate 1, a hit from a 42 000 PubChem compound library with a low micromolar IC50 against Nluc, we derivatized four different structural fragments to discover a family of potent, single digit nanomolar, cell permeable inhibitors. Further elaboration revealed a channel that allowed access to the external Nluc surface, resulting in a series of highly potent cell impermeable Nluc inhibitors with negatively charged groups likely extending to the protein surface. The permeability was evaluated by comparing EC50 shifts calculated from both live and lysed cells expressing Nluc cytosolically. Luminescence imaging further confirmed that cell permeable compounds inhibit both intracellular and extracellular Nluc, whereas less permeable compounds differentially inhibit extracellular Nluc and Nluc on the cell surface. The compounds displayed little to no toxicity to cells and high luciferase specificity, showing no activity against firefly luciferase or even the closely related NanoBit system. Looking forward, the structural motifs used to gain access to the Nluc surface can also be appended with other functional groups, and therefore interesting opportunities for developing assays based on relief-of-inhibition can be envisioned.

  10. Complementation of subunits from different bacterial luciferases. Evidence for the role of the. beta. subunit in the bioluminescent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meighen, E.A.; Bartlet, I.

    1980-12-10

    Complementation of the nonidentical subunits (..cap alpha.. and ..beta..) of luciferases isolated from two different bioluminescent strains, Beneckea harveyi and Photobacterium phosphoreum, has resulted in the formation of a functional hybrid luciferase (..cap alpha../sub h/..beta../sub p/) containing the ..cap alpha.. subunit from B. harveyi luciferase (..cap alpha../sub h/) and the ..beta.. subunit from P. phosphoreum luciferase (..beta../sub p/). The complementation was unidirectional; activity could not be restored by complementing the ..cap alpha.. subunit of P. phosphoreum luciferase with the ..beta.. subunit of B. harveyi luciferase, showing that the subunits from these luciferases were not identical. Kinetic parameters of the hybrid luciferase reflecting the intermediate and later steps of the bioluminescent reaction as well as the overall activity and specificity were essentially identical to the same kinetic parameters for B. harveyi luciferase, the source of the ..cap alpha.. subunit, and quite distinct from those of P. phosphoreum luciferase. However, kinetic parameters that reflected the initial step in the reaction involving interaction of FMNH/sub 2/ and luciferase were altered in the hybrid luciferase compared to both the parental luciferases, the K/sub d/ for FMNH/sub 2/ actually being closer to that observed for the P. phosphoreum luciferase (the source of the ..beta.. subunit). These results provide direct evidence that modification or alteration of the ..beta.. subunit in a dimeric luciferase molecule can affect the kinetic properties and indicates that the ..beta.. subunit plays a functional role in the bioluminescent mechanism. It is proposed that both the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits are involved with the initial interaction with FMNH/sub 2/, whereas subsequent steps in the mechanism are dictated exclusively by the ..cap alpha.. subunit and are unaffected by alterations in the ..beta.. subunit.

  11. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Omokoko, Tana A.; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard 51Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the 51Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  12. Correlation between luminescence intensity and cytotoxicity in cell-based cytotoxicity assay using luciferase.

    PubMed

    Wakuri, S; Yamakage, K; Kazuki, Y; Kazuki, K; Oshimura, M; Aburatani, S; Yasunaga, M; Nakajima, Y

    2017-04-01

    The luciferase reporter assay has become one of the conventional methods for cytotoxicity evaluation. Typically, the decrease of luminescence expressed by a constitutive promoter is used as an index of cytotoxicity. However, to our knowledge, there have been no reports of the correlation between cytotoxicity and luminescence intensity. In this study, to accurately verify the correlation between them, beetle luciferase was stably expressed in human hepatoma HepG2 cells harboring the multi-integrase mouse artificial chromosome vector. We showed that the cytotoxicity assay using luciferase does not depend on the stability of luciferase protein and the kind of constitutive promoter. Next, HepG2 cells in which green-emitting beetle luciferase was expressed under the control of CAG promoter were exposed to 58 compounds. The luminescence intensity and cytotoxicity curves of cells exposed to 48 compounds showed similar tendencies, whereas those of cells exposed to 10 compounds did not do so, although the curves gradually approached each other with increasing exposure time. Finally, we demonstrated that luciferase expressed under the control of a constitutive promoter can be utilized both as an internal control reporter for normalizing a test reporter and for monitoring cytotoxicity when two kinds of luciferases are simultaneously used in the cytotoxicity assay.

  13. Luciferase protection against proteolytic degradation: a key for improving signal in nano-system biology.

    PubMed

    Ataei, Farangis; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Khajeh, Khosro

    2009-10-26

    Luciferase is most widely used bioluminescence protein in biotechnological processes, but the enzyme is susceptible to proteolytic degradation, thereby its intracellular half-life decreased. Osmolytes are known to enhance the stability of proteins and protect them in a native folded and functional state. The effects of osmolytes, including sucrose, glycine and DMSO on the stability of luciferase were investigated. To different extents, all osmolytes protected the luciferase towards proteolytic degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. The results showed that 1.5M sucrose, 1.5M glycine and 15% DMSO are the best. The ability of these osmolytes to protect luciferase against proteolysis decreased from sucrose, glycine, and finally DMSO. Enzymatic kinetic data showed that the luciferase activity is significantly kept in the presence of sucrose and glycine compared to DMSO, particularly at high temperatures. Bioluminescence intensity, circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic and ANS fluorescence experiments showed change in secondary and tertiary luciferase structure. These results suggest that osmolytes exert an important effect on stabilization of luciferase conformation; decreasing the unfolding rate, preventing adaptation and binding of luciferase at the active site of proteases, thereby the proteolytic digestion reduced and its active conformation was kept.

  14. Engineered Luciferase Reporter from a Deep Sea Shrimp Utilizing a Novel Imidazopyrazinone Substrate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bioluminescence methodologies have been extraordinarily useful due to their high sensitivity, broad dynamic range, and operational simplicity. These capabilities have been realized largely through incremental adaptations of native enzymes and substrates, originating from luminous organisms of diverse evolutionary lineages. We engineered both an enzyme and substrate in combination to create a novel bioluminescence system capable of more efficient light emission with superior biochemical and physical characteristics. Using a small luciferase subunit (19 kDa) from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, we have improved luminescence expression in mammalian cells ∼2.5 million-fold by merging optimization of protein structure with development of a novel imidazopyrazinone substrate (furimazine). The new luciferase, NanoLuc, produces glow-type luminescence (signal half-life >2 h) with a specific activity ∼150-fold greater than that of either firefly (Photinus pyralis) or Renilla luciferases similarly configured for glow-type assays. In mammalian cells, NanoLuc shows no evidence of post-translational modifications or subcellular partitioning. The enzyme exhibits high physical stability, retaining activity with incubation up to 55 °C or in culture medium for >15 h at 37 °C. As a genetic reporter, NanoLuc may be configured for high sensitivity or for response dynamics by appending a degradation sequence to reduce intracellular accumulation. Appending a signal sequence allows NanoLuc to be exported to the culture medium, where reporter expression can be measured without cell lysis. Fusion onto other proteins allows luminescent assays of their metabolism or localization within cells. Reporter quantitation is achievable even at very low expression levels to facilitate more reliable coupling with endogenous cellular processes. PMID:22894855

  15. Engineered luciferase reporter from a deep sea shrimp utilizing a novel imidazopyrazinone substrate.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mary P; Unch, James; Binkowski, Brock F; Valley, Michael P; Butler, Braeden L; Wood, Monika G; Otto, Paul; Zimmerman, Kristopher; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Machleidt, Thomas; Robers, Matthew B; Benink, Hélène A; Eggers, Christopher T; Slater, Michael R; Meisenheimer, Poncho L; Klaubert, Dieter H; Fan, Frank; Encell, Lance P; Wood, Keith V

    2012-11-16

    Bioluminescence methodologies have been extraordinarily useful due to their high sensitivity, broad dynamic range, and operational simplicity. These capabilities have been realized largely through incremental adaptations of native enzymes and substrates, originating from luminous organisms of diverse evolutionary lineages. We engineered both an enzyme and substrate in combination to create a novel bioluminescence system capable of more efficient light emission with superior biochemical and physical characteristics. Using a small luciferase subunit (19 kDa) from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, we have improved luminescence expression in mammalian cells ~2.5 million-fold by merging optimization of protein structure with development of a novel imidazopyrazinone substrate (furimazine). The new luciferase, NanoLuc, produces glow-type luminescence (signal half-life >2 h) with a specific activity ~150-fold greater than that of either firefly (Photinus pyralis) or Renilla luciferases similarly configured for glow-type assays. In mammalian cells, NanoLuc shows no evidence of post-translational modifications or subcellular partitioning. The enzyme exhibits high physical stability, retaining activity with incubation up to 55 °C or in culture medium for >15 h at 37 °C. As a genetic reporter, NanoLuc may be configured for high sensitivity or for response dynamics by appending a degradation sequence to reduce intracellular accumulation. Appending a signal sequence allows NanoLuc to be exported to the culture medium, where reporter expression can be measured without cell lysis. Fusion onto other proteins allows luminescent assays of their metabolism or localization within cells. Reporter quantitation is achievable even at very low expression levels to facilitate more reliable coupling with endogenous cellular processes.

  16. Mass culture of photobacteria to obtain luciferase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Rich, E., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Inoculating preheated trays containing nutrient agar with photobacteria provides a means for mass culture of aerobic microorganisms in order to obtain large quantities of luciferase. To determine optimum harvest time, growth can be monitored by automated light-detection instrumentation.

  17. Automatic polymerase chain reaction product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger protein fused to luciferase.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Wataru; Kezuka, Aki; Murakami, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Jinhee; Abe, Koichi; Motoki, Hiroaki; Matsuo, Takafumi; Shimura, Nobuaki; Noda, Mamoru; Igimi, Shizunobu; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2013-11-01

    An automatic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger (ZF) protein fused to luciferase was developed. ZF protein fused to luciferase specifically binds to target double stranded DNA sequence and has luciferase enzymatic activity. Therefore, PCR products that comprise ZF protein recognition sequence can be detected by measuring the luciferase activity of the fusion protein. We previously reported that PCR products from Legionella pneumophila and Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 genomic DNA were detected by Zif268, a natural ZF protein, fused to luciferase. In this study, Zif268-luciferase was applied to detect the presence of Salmonella and coliforms. Moreover, an artificial zinc finger protein (B2) fused to luciferase was constructed for a Norovirus detection system. In the luciferase activity detection assay, several bound/free separation process is required. Therefore, an analyzer that automatically performed the bound/free separation process was developed to detect PCR products using the ZF-luciferase fusion protein. By means of the automatic analyzer with ZF-luciferase fusion protein, target pathogenic genomes were specifically detected in the presence of other pathogenic genomes. Moreover, we succeeded in the detection of 10 copies of E. coli BL21 without extraction of genomic DNA by the automatic analyzer and E. coli was detected with a logarithmic dependency in the range of 1.0×10 to 1.0×10(6) copies.

  18. TGEV infection up-regulates FcRn expression via activation of NF-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinyue; Li, Fei; Qian, Shaoju; Bi, Dingren; He, Qigai; Jin, Hui; Luo, Rui; Li, Shaowen; Meng, Xianrong; Li, Zili

    2016-01-01

    It has been well characterized that the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) transports maternal IgG to a fetus or newborn and protects IgG from degradation. We previously reported that FcRn is expressed in a model of normal porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). Transmissible gastroenteritis is an acute enteric disease of swine that is caused by transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). How porcine FcRn (pFcRn) expression is regulated by pathogenic infection remains unknown. Our research shows that IPEC-J2 cells infected with TGEV had up-regulated pFcRn expression. In addition, the NF-κB signaling pathway was activated in IPEC-J2 cells by TGEV infection. Furthermore, treatment of TGEV-infected IPEC-J2 cells with the NF-κB-specific inhibitor BAY 11-7082 resulted in down-regulation of pFcRn expression. Transient transfection of pFcRn promoter luciferase report plasmids with overexpression of NF-κB p65 transcription factor enhanced the activation of the luciferase report plasmids. We identified four NF-κB transcription factor binding sites in the promoter region of this gene using luciferase reporter system, chromatin immunoprecipitation, electromobility shift assay, and supershift analysis. Together, the data provide the first evidence that TGEV infection up-regulates pFcRn expression via activation of NF-κB signaling. PMID:27555521

  19. Firefly luciferase as the reporter for transcriptional response to the environment in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Masashi; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Doi, Shosei; Motoki, Shogo; Niimi, Atsuko; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2013-12-15

    We demonstrate that firefly luciferase is a good reporter in Escherichia coli for transcription dynamics in response to the environment. E. coli strains, carrying a fusion of the promoter of the ycgZ gene and the coding region of the luciferase gene, showed transient bioluminescence on receiving blue light. This response was compromised in mutants lacking known regulators in manners consistent with each regulator's function. We also show that relA, a gene encoding a (p)ppGpp synthetase, affects ycgZ dynamics when nullified. Moreover, two unstable luciferase variants showed improved response dynamics and should be useful to study quick changes of gene expression.

  20. High-throughput, luciferase-based reverse genetics systems for identifying inhibitors of Marburg and Ebola viruses.

    PubMed

    Uebelhoer, Luke S; Albariño, César G; McMullan, Laura K; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Vincent, Joel P; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2014-06-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus (EBOV), members of the family Filoviridae, represent a significant challenge to global public health. Currently, no licensed therapies exist to treat filovirus infections, which cause up to 90% mortality in human cases. To facilitate development of antivirals against these viruses, we established two distinct screening platforms based on MARV and EBOV reverse genetics systems that express secreted Gaussia luciferase (gLuc). The first platform is a mini-genome replicon to screen viral replication inhibitors using gLuc quantification in a BSL-2 setting. The second platform is complementary to the first and expresses gLuc as a reporter gene product encoded in recombinant infectious MARV and EBOV, thereby allowing for rapid quantification of viral growth during treatment with antiviral compounds. We characterized these viruses by comparing luciferase activity to virus production, and validated luciferase activity as an authentic real-time measure of viral growth. As proof of concept, we adapt both mini-genome and infectious virus platforms to high-throughput formats, and demonstrate efficacy of several antiviral compounds. We anticipate that both approaches will prove highly useful in the development of anti-filovirus therapies, as well as in basic research on the filovirus life cycle.

  1. Firefly Luciferase and Rluc8 Exhibit Differential Sensitivity to Oxidative Stress in Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Czupryna, Julie; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, firefly Luciferase (fLuc) has been used in a wide range of biological assays, providing insight into gene regulation, protein-protein interactions, cell proliferation, and cell migration. However, it has also been well established that fLuc activity can be highly sensitive to its surrounding environment. In this study, we found that when various cancer cell lines (HeLa, MCF-7, and 293T) stably expressing fLuc were treated with staurosporine (STS), there was a rapid loss in bioluminescence. In contrast, a stable variant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc), RLuc8, exhibited significantly prolonged functionality under the same conditions. To identify the specific underlying mechanism(s) responsible for the disparate sensitivity of RLuc8 and fLuc to cellular stress, we conducted a series of inhibition studies that targeted known intracellular protein degradation/modification pathways associated with cell death. Interestingly, these studies suggested that reactive oxygen species, particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), was responsible for the diminution of fLuc activity. Consistent with these findings, the direct application of H2O2 to HeLa cells also led to a reduction in fLuc bioluminescence, while H2O2 scavengers stabilized fLuc activity. Comparatively, RLuc8 was far less sensitive to ROS. These observations suggest that fLuc activity can be substantially altered in studies where ROS levels become elevated and can potentially lead to ambiguous or misleading findings. PMID:21603648

  2. Engineering luciferase enzymes and substrates for novel assay capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Keith V.

    2004-06-01

    In the development of HTS as a central paradigm of drug discovery, fluorescent reporter molecules have generally been adopted as the favored signal transducer. Nevertheless, luminescence has maintained a prominent position among certain methodologies, most notably genetic reporters. Recently, there has been growing partiality for luminescent assays across a broader range of applications due to their sensitivity, extensive linearity, and robustness to library compounds and complex biological samples. This trend has been fostered by development several new assay designs for diverse targets such as kinases, cytochrome p450's, proteases, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. This review addresses recent progress made in the use of bioluminescent assays for drug discovery, highlighting new detection capabilities brought about by engineering luciferase enzymes and substrates. In reporter gene applications, modified luciferases have provided greatly improved expression efficiency in mammalian cells, improved responsiveness to changes of transcriptional rate, and increased the magnitude of the reporter response. Highly stabilized luciferase mutants have enabled new assays strategies for high-throughput screening based on detection of ATP and luciferin. Assays based on ATP support rapid analysis of cell metabolism and enzymatic processes coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Although luciferin is found natively only in luminous beetles, coupled assays have been designed using modified forms of luciferin requiring the action of second enzyme to yield luminescence. Due to the very low inherent background and protection of the photon-emitter afforded by the enzyme, bioluminescent assays often outperform the analogous fluorescent assays for analyses performed in multiwell plates.

  3. Detection of allergenic compounds using an IL-4/luciferase/CNS-1 transgenic mice model.

    PubMed

    Bae, Chang Joon; Lee, Jae Won; Bae, Hee Sook; Shim, Sun Bo; Jee, Seung Wan; Lee, Su Hae; Lee, Chang Kyu; Hong, Jin Tae; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2011-04-01

    The interleukin-4 (IL-4) signaling cascade has been identified as a potentially important pathway in the development of allergies. The principal objective of this study was to produce novel transgenic (Tg) mice harboring the luciferase gene under the control of the human IL-4 promoter and the enhancer of IL-4 (CNS-1), in an effort to evaluate three types of allergens including a respiratory sensitizer, vaccine additives, and crude extracts of natural allergens in vivo. A new lineage of Tg mice was generated by the microinjection of pIL-4/Luc/CNS-1 constructs into a fertilized mice egg. The luciferase activity was successfully regulated by the IL-4 promoter in splenocytes cultured from IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice. From the first five founder lines, one (#57) evidencing a profound response to ovalbumin was selected for use in evaluating the allergens. Additionally, the lungs, thymus, and lymph nodes of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice evidenced high luciferase activity in response to allergens such as phthalic anhydride (PA), trimellitic anhydride, ovalbumin, gelatin, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extracts, and Japanese cedar pollen, whereas key allergy-related indicators including ear thickness, Immunoglobulin E concentration, and the infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes in response to PA were unaltered in the Tg mice relative to the non-Tg mice. Furthermore, the expression levels of endogenous type 2 helper T cells cytokines and proinflammatory cytokines were similarly increased in these organs of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice in response to allergens. These results indicate that IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice may be used as an animal model for the evaluation and prediction of the human body response to a variety of allergens originating from the environment and from certain industrial products.

  4. Split luciferase-based biosensors for characterizing EED binders.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Feng, Lijian; Shi, Minlong; Zeng, Jue; Chen, Zijun; Zhong, Li; Huang, Li; Guo, Weihui; Huang, Ying; Qi, Wei; Lu, Chris; Li, En; Zhao, Kehao; Gu, Justin

    2017-04-01

    The EED (embryonic ectoderm development) subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) plays an important role in the feed forward regulation of the PRC2 enzymatic activity. We recently identified a new class of allosteric PRC2 inhibitors that bind to the H3K27me3 pocket of EED. Multiple assays were developed and used to identify and characterize this type of PRC2 inhibitors. One of them is a genetically encoded EED biosensor based on the EED[G255D] mutant and the split firefly luciferase. This EED biosensor can detect the compound binding in the transfected cells and in the in vitro biochemical assays. Compared to other commonly used cellular assays, the EED biosensor assay has the advantage of shorter compound incubation with cells. The in vitro EED biosensor is much more sensitive than other label-free biophysical assays (e.g. DSF, ITC). Based on the crystal structure, the DSF data as well as the biosensor assay data, it's most likely that compound-induced increase in the luciferase activity of the EED[G255D] biosensor results from the decreased non-productive interactions between the EED subdomain and other subdomains within the biosensor construct. This new insight of the mechanism might help to broaden the use of the split luciferase based biosensors.

  5. Genetic modification in organ transplantation and in vivo luciferase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Takashi; Inoue, Sei-ichiro; Sato, Yuki; Ajiki, Takashi; Ohsawa, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2005-04-01

    The genetic modification for organ transplantation is one of the most promising strategies to regulate allogeneic immune response. Organ-selective gene transfer has especially benefit to control local immune responses. Based on the catheter technique, we tested to deliver naked plasmid DNA to target graft organs of rats (liver and limbs) by a rapid injection (hydrodynamics-based transfection). Recent advances in transplantation have been achieved by visualization of cellular process and delivered gene expression during the inflammatory process by using non-invasive in vivo imaging. Herein, we examined the fate of genetically modified grafts using a firefly luciferase expression plasmid. For liver modification before transplantation, 6.25% of body weight PBS containing plasmid DNA was injected into the liver through the inferior vena cava using a catheter, and the liver was subsequently transplanted to the recipient rat. For limb modification, the femoral caudal epigastric vein was used. In the rat liver transplantation model, substantial luciferase expression was visualized and sustained for only a few days in the grafted liver. We also addressed stress responses by this hydrodynamics procedure using reporter plasmids containing cis-acting enhancer binding site such as NF-kappa B, cAMP, or heat shock response element. In contrast to hepatic transduction, this genetic limb targeting achieved long lasting luciferase expression in the muscle for 2 months or more. Thus, our results suggest that this catheter-based in vivo transfection technique provides an effective strategy for organ-selective gene modification in transplantation, and the bioluminescent imaging is broadening its potential for evaluation to various preclinical studies.

  6. Firefly luciferase genes from the subfamilies Psilocladinae and Ototretinae (Lampyridae, Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Oba, Yuichi; Yoshida, Mayumi; Shintani, Takeru; Furuhashi, Mana; Inouye, Satoshi

    2012-02-01

    Firefly luciferase genes have been isolated from approximately 20 species of Lampyrinae, Luciolinae, and Photurinae. These are mostly nocturnal luminescent species that use light signals for sexual communication. In this study, we isolated three cDNAs for firefly luciferase from Psilocladinae (Cyphonocerus ruficollis) and Ototretinae (Drilaster axillaris and Stenocladius azumai), which are diurnal non-luminescent or weakly luminescent species that may use pheromones for communication. The amino acid sequences deduced from the three cDNAs showed 81-89% identities to each other and 60-81% identities with known firefly luciferases. The three purified recombinant proteins showed luminescence and fatty acyl-CoA synthetic activities, as observed in other firefly luciferases. The emission maxima by the three firefly luciferases (λmax, 545-546nm) were shorter than those by known luciferases from the nocturnal fireflies (λmax, 550-568nm). These results suggest that the primary structures and enzymatic properties of luciferases are conserved in Lampyridae, but the luminescence colors were red-shifted in nocturnal species compared to diurnal species.

  7. Firefly luciferase inhibitor-conjugated peptide quenches bioluminescence: a versatile tool for real time monitoring cellular uptake of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, Pekka K; Rönkkö, Teemu; Hinkkanen, Ari E; Palvimo, Jorma J; Närvänen, Ale; Turhanen, Petri; Laatikainen, Reino; Weisell, Janne; Pulkkinen, Juha T

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, novel firefly luciferase-specific inhibitor compounds (FLICs) are evaluated as potential tools for cellular trafficking of transporter conjugates. As a proof-of-concept, we designed FLICs that were suitable for solid phase peptide synthesis and could be covalently conjugated to peptides via an amide bond. The spacer between inhibitor and peptide was optimized to gain efficient inhibition of recombinant firefly luciferase (FLuc) without compromising the activity of the model peptides. The hypothesis of using FLICs as tools for cellular trafficking studies was ensured with U87Fluc glioblastoma cells expressing firefly luciferase. Results show that cell penetrating peptide (penetratin) FLIC conjugate 9 inhibited FLuc penetrated cells efficiently (IC50 = 1.6 μM) and inhibited bioluminescence, without affecting the viability of the cells. Based on these results, peptide-FLIC conjugates can be used for the analysis of cellular uptake of biomolecules in a new way that can at the same time overcome some downsides seen with other methods. Thus, FLICs can be considered as versatile tools that broaden the plethora of methods that take advantage of the bioluminescence phenomena.

  8. Suitability of Macrolampis firefly and Pyrearinus click beetle luciferases for bacterial light off toxicity biosensor.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Gabriele V M; Lopes, P S; Viviani, V R

    2014-01-15

    Bioluminescence is widely used in biosensors. For water toxicity analysis, the naturally bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri have been used extensively. We investigated the suitability of two new beetle luciferases for Escherichia coli light off biosensors: Macrolampis firefly and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle luciferases. The bioluminescence detection assay using this system is very sensitive, being comparable or superior to V. fischeri. The luciferase of P. termitilluminans produces a strong and sustained bioluminescence that is useful for less sensitive and inexpensive assays that require integration of the emission, whereas Macrolampis luciferase displays a flash-like luminescence that is useful for fast and more sensitive assays. The effect of heavy metals and sanitizing agents was analyzed. Zinc, copper, 1-propanol, and iodide had inhibitory effects on bioluminescence and growth assays; however, in these cases the bioluminescence was not a very reliable indicator of cell growth and metabolic activity because these agents also inhibited the luciferase. On the other hand, mercury and silver strongly affected cell bioluminescence and growth but not the luciferase activity, indicating that bioluminescence was a reliable indicator of cell growth and metabolic activity in this case. Finally, bioluminescent E. coli immobilized in agarose matrix gave a more stable format for environmental assays.

  9. Visualizing and quantifying protein secretion using a Renilla luciferase-GFP fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Wang, Y; Szalay, A A; Escher, A

    2000-01-01

    We have shown previously that an engineered form of Renilla luciferase (SRUC) can be secreted as a functional enzyme by mammalian cells, and that fusing wild-type Renilla luciferase with the green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria (GFP) yields a chimeric protein retaining light-emission properties similar to that of unfused Renilla luciferase and GFP. In the work presented here, SRUC was fused with GFP to determine whether it could be used to both visualize and quantify protein secretion in mammalian cells. Simian COS-7 and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were transiently transfected with gene constructs encoding a secreted or an intracellular version of a Renilla luciferase-GFP fusion protein. Renilla luciferase activity was measured from COS-7 cell lysates and culture media, and GFP activity was detected in CHO cells using fluorescence microscopy. Data indicated that the SRUC-GFP fusion protein was secreted as a chimeric protein that had both Renilla luciferase and GFP activity. This fusion protein could be a useful marker for the study of protein secretion in mammalian cells.

  10. Monitoring the dynamics of clonal tumour evolution in vivo using secreted luciferases

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Joël P.; Fuchs, Jeannette; Hefter, Mirjam; Vischedyk, Jonas B.; Kleint, Maximilian; Vogiatzi, Fotini; Schäfer, Jonas A.; Nist, Andrea; Timofeev, Oleg; Wanzel, Michael; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Tumours are heterogeneous cell populations that undergo clonal evolution during tumour progression, metastasis and response to therapy. Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) generate stable loss-of-function phenotypes and are versatile experimental tools to explore the contribution of individual genetic alterations to clonal evolution. In these experiments tumour cells carrying shRNAs are commonly tracked with fluorescent reporters. While this works well for cell culture studies and leukaemia mouse models, fluorescent reporters are poorly suited for animals with solid tumours—the most common tumour types in cancer patients. Here we develop a toolkit that uses secreted luciferases to track the fate of two different shRNA-expressing tumour cell clones competitively, both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that secreted luciferase activities can be measured robustly in the blood stream of tumour-bearing mice to accurately quantify, in a minimally invasive manner, the dynamic evolution of two genetically distinct tumour subclones in preclinical mouse models of tumour development, metastasis and therapy. PMID:24889111

  11. Monitoring the dynamics of clonal tumour evolution in vivo using secreted luciferases.

    PubMed

    Charles, Joël P; Fuchs, Jeannette; Hefter, Mirjam; Vischedyk, Jonas B; Kleint, Maximilian; Vogiatzi, Fotini; Schäfer, Jonas A; Nist, Andrea; Timofeev, Oleg; Wanzel, Michael; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2014-06-03

    Tumours are heterogeneous cell populations that undergo clonal evolution during tumour progression, metastasis and response to therapy. Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) generate stable loss-of-function phenotypes and are versatile experimental tools to explore the contribution of individual genetic alterations to clonal evolution. In these experiments tumour cells carrying shRNAs are commonly tracked with fluorescent reporters. While this works well for cell culture studies and leukaemia mouse models, fluorescent reporters are poorly suited for animals with solid tumours--the most common tumour types in cancer patients. Here we develop a toolkit that uses secreted luciferases to track the fate of two different shRNA-expressing tumour cell clones competitively, both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that secreted luciferase activities can be measured robustly in the blood stream of tumour-bearing mice to accurately quantify, in a minimally invasive manner, the dynamic evolution of two genetically distinct tumour subclones in preclinical mouse models of tumour development, metastasis and therapy.

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulates expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Hanne; Haldosen, Lars-Arne . E-mail: Lars-Arne.Haldosen@mednut.ki.se

    2006-05-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A (STAT5A) has been shown to be important for terminal differentiation of mammary epithelial cells. In order to understand regulation of expression of STAT5A, the 5' end of the mouse Stat5a gene was isolated. Putative regulatory elements was searched for and several peroxisome proliferator response elements (PPREs) were found, one with high (12/13 nucleotides) and three with less (8-10/13) similarity to the reported consensus sequence. Mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cells were treated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) ligand, the thiazolidinedione (TZD) troglitazone, and an increase in STAT5A protein expression was seen. The 5' flank of Stat5a gene was cloned in a luciferase reporter vector. A concentration dependent activation of the STAT5A-luciferase reporter was detected, when transiently transfected HC11 cells were treated with TZD. The activation could be inhibited by treatment with a PPAR{gamma} antagonist. It has earlier been shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces MAPK phosphorylation of PPAR{gamma} resulting in a less transcriptionally active receptor. In HC11 cells, EGF inhibited TZD induced STAT5A-reporter activity suggesting that our previously reported EGF-mediated suppression of STAT5A expression is mediated in all or partly through inhibition of PPAR{gamma} activity. Furthermore, the MEK inhibitor PD98059 inhibited the EGF effect. All together, data presented suggest that PPAR{gamma} participates in regulation of STAT5A expression.

  13. Increase of segmental mobility through insertion of a flexible linker in split point of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Parisa; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure of Photinus pyralis luciferase shows a unique molecular architecture consisting of a large N-terminal domain and a small C-terminal domain which is separated by a wide cleft. Protein engineering methods attempts to design the peptide linkers that make a connection between different protein domains or subunits to allow for separating domains and improve kinetics and structural features of proteins. In regard to this; introduction of a flexible linker at split point of luciferase which has a strong self-association activity, may leads to conformational change and improve general flexibility of protein. In this study, two flexible linkers in the split point of luciferase are introduced in order to test the effect of linker on flexibility of luciferase activity. Glycine-rich linkers are introduced into P. pyralis firefly luciferase to make two separate mutant enzymes. Enzymatic properties of mutant and native forms were measured using luminescence assay. Results show that lengthening of luciferase domains through insertion of a flexible linker did not affect bioluminescence emission spectra. Also adding linkers do not have remarkable effect on thermostability. The Km values of mutants were increased compared to native form, indicating lower affinity of mutants toward substrates.

  14. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  15. Development of a stably transfected estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene assay in the human T47D breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Legler, J; van den Brink, C E; Brouwer, A; Murk, A J; van der Saag, P T; Vethaak, A D; van der Burg, B

    1999-03-01

    Development of an estrogen receptor-mediated, chemical-activated luciferase reporter gene-expression (ER-CALUX) assay was attempted by stable transfection of luciferase reporter genes in a number of cell lines. Stable transfection of the chimeric Gal4 estrogen receptor and luciferase gene constructs in MCF-7 breast cancer and Hepa.1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cell lines, as well as transfection of a newly constructed luciferase reporter gene pEREtata-Luc in the ECC-1 human endometrial cell line, resulted in constitutive, non-estradiol-inducible clones. Stable transfection of pEREtata-Luc in the T47D breast cancer cell line, however, resulted in an extremely sensitive, highly responsive cell line. Following a 24-h exposure to estradiol (E2), stably transfected T47D.Luc cells demonstrated a detection limit of 0.5 pM, an EC50 of 6 pM, and a maximum induction of 100-fold relative to solvent controls. No clear reduction in responsiveness has been found over extended culture periods (50 passages). Anti-estrogens ICI 182,780, TCDD, and tamoxifen inhibited the estradiol-mediated luciferase induction. Genistein, nonylphenol, and o,p'DDT were the most potent (pseudo-)estrogens tested in this system (EC50 100, 260, and 660 nM, respectively). Determination of interactive effects of the (pseudo-)estrogens nonylphenol, o,p'DDT, chlordane, endosulfan, dieldrin, and methoxychlor revealed that, in combination with 3 pM E2, (pseudo-)estrogens were additive. Slightly more than additive effects (less than 2-fold) were found for combinations of dieldrin and endosulfan tested in the range of 3 to 6 microM. At these concentrations, the combination of endosulfan and chlordane demonstrated additive interaction. The ER-CALUX assay with T47D cells can provide a sensitive, responsive, and rapid in vitro system to detect and measure substances with potential (anti-)estrogenic activity.

  16. A real time Metridia luciferase based non-invasive reporter assay of mammalian cell viability and cytotoxicity via the β-actin promoter and enhancer.

    PubMed

    Lupold, Shawn E; Johnson, Tamara; Chowdhury, Wasim H; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Secreted reporter molecules offer a means to evaluate biological processes in real time without the need to sacrifice samples at pre-determined endpoints. Here we have adapted the secreted bioluminescent reporter gene, Metridia luciferase, for use in a real-time viability assay for mammalian cells. The coding region of the marine copepod gene has been codon optimized for expression in human cells (hMLuc) and placed under the control of the human β-actin promoter and enhancer. Metridia luciferase activity of stably transfected cell models corresponded linearly with cell number over a 4-log dynamic range, detecting as few as 40 cells. When compared to standard endpoint viability assays, which measure the mitochondrial dehydrogenase reduction of tetrazolium salts, the hMLuc viability assay had a broader linear range of detection, was applicable to large tissue culture vessels, and allowed the same sample to be repeatedly measured over several days. Additional studies confirmed that MLuc activity was inhibited by serum, but demonstrated that assay activity remained linear and was measurable in the serum of mice bearing subcutaneous hMLuc-expressing tumors. In summary, these comparative studies demonstrate the value of humanized Metridia luciferase as an inexpensive and non-invasive method for analyzing viable cell number, growth, tumor volume, and therapeutic response in real time.

  17. Luciferase imaging for evaluation of oncolytic adenovirus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guse, K; Dias, J D; Bauerschmitz, G J; Hakkarainen, T; Aavik, E; Ranki, T; Pisto, T; Särkioja, M; Desmond, R A; Kanerva, A; Hemminki, A

    2007-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses kill cancer cells by tumor-selective replication. Clinical data have established the safety of the approach but also the need of improvements in potency. Efficacy of oncolysis is linked to effective infection of target cells and subsequent productive replication. Other variables include intratumoral barriers, access to target cells, uptake by non-target organs and immune response. Each of these aspects relates to the location and degree of virus replication. Unfortunately, detection of in vivo replication has been difficult, labor intensive and costly and therefore not much studied. We hypothesized that by coinfection of a luciferase expressing E1-deleted virus with an oncolytic virus, both viruses would replicate when present in the same cell. Photon emission due to conversion of D-Luciferin is sensitive and penetrates tissues well. Importantly, killing of animals is not required and each animal can be imaged repeatedly. Two different murine xenograft models were used and intratumoral coinjections of luciferase encoding virus were performed with eight different oncolytic adenoviruses. In both models, we found significant correlation between photon emission and infectious virus production. This suggests that the system can be used for non-invasive quantitation of the amplitude, persistence and dynamics of oncolytic virus replication in vivo, which could be helpful for the development of more effective and safe agents.

  18. Posttranslationally caused bioluminescence burst of the Escherichia coli luciferase reporter strain.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Yamato; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Ryo, Masashi; Motoki, Shogo; Kuwano, Takashi; Tezuka, Takafumi; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We continuously monitored bioluminescence from a wild-type reporter strain of Escherichia coli (lacp::luc+/WT), which carries the promoter of the lac operon (lacp) fused with the firefly luciferase gene (luc+). This strain showed a bioluminescence burst when shifted into the stationary growth phase. Bioluminescence profiles of other wild-type reporter strains (rpsPp::luc+ and argAp::luc+) and gene-deletion reporter strains (lacp::luc+/crp- and lacp::luc+/lacI-) indicate that transcriptional regulation is not responsible for generation of the burst. Consistently, changes in the luciferase protein levels did not recapitulate the profile of the burst. On the other hand, dissolved oxygen levels increased over the period across the burst, suggesting that the burst is, at least partially, caused by an increase in intracellular oxygen levels. We discuss limits of the firefly luciferase when used as a reporter for gene expression and its potential utility for monitoring metabolic changes in cells.

  19. Comparison of Cell-Labeling Methods with 124I-FIAU and 64Cu-PTSM for Cell Tracking Using Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Expressing HSV1-tk and Firefly Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Jun; Son, Jin-Ju; Chun, Kwon-Soo; Song, In-Ho; Park, Yong-Serk; Kim, Kwang-Il; Lee, Yong-Jin; Kang, Joo-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cell-tracking methods with molecular-imaging modality can monitor the biodistribution of cells. In this study, the direct-labeling method with 64Cu-pyruvaldehyde-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (64Cu-PTSM), indirect cell-labeling methods with herpes simplex virus type 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk)-mediated 124I-2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (124I-FIAU) were comparatively investigated in vitro and in vivo for tracking of human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells. K562-TL was established by retroviral transduction of the HSV1-tk and firefly luciferase gene in the K562 cell. K562-TL cells were labeled with 64Cu-PTSM or 124I-FIAU. Cell labeling efficiency, viability, and radiolabels retention were compared in vitro. The biodistribution of radiolabeled K562-TL cells with each radiolabel and small-animal positron emission tomography imaging were performed. Additionally, in vivo and ex vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and tissue reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis were used for confirming those results. K562-TL cells were efficiently labeled with both radiolabels. The radiolabel retention (%) of 124I-FIAU (95.2%±1.1%) was fourfold higher than 64Cu-PTSM (23.6%±0.7%) at 24 hours postlabeling. Viability of radiolabeled cells was statistically nonsignificant between 124I-FIAU and 64Cu-PTSM. The radioactivity of each radiolabeled cells was predominantly accumulated in the lungs and liver at 2 hours. Both the radioactivity of 64Cu-PTSM- and 124I-FIAU-labeled cells was highly accumulated in the liver at 24 hours. However, the radioactivity of 124I-FIAU-labeled cells was markedly decreased from the body at 24 hours. The K562-TL cells were dominantly localized in the lungs and liver, which also verified by BLI and RT-PCR analysis at 2 and 24 hours postinjection. The 64Cu-PTSM-labeled cell-tracking method is more efficient than 124I-FIAU-labeled cell tracking, because of markedly decrease of radioactivity and

  20. Multiplex detection of protein-protein interactions using a next generation luciferase reporter.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Lisette G G C; Mattioli, Michela; Ricci, Fernanda; Li, Yao-Cheng; Wade, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Cell-based assays of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) using split reporter proteins can be used to identify PPI agonists and antagonists. Generally, such assays measure one PPI at a time, and thus counterscreens for on-target activity must be run in parallel or at a subsequent stage; this increases both the cost and time during screening. Split luciferase systems offer advantages over those that use split fluorescent proteins (FPs). This is since split luciferase offers a greater signal:noise ratio and, unlike split FPs, the PPI can be reversed upon small molecule treatment. While multiplexed PPI assays using luciferase have been reported, they suffer from low signal:noise and require fairly complex spectral deconvolution during analysis. Furthermore, the luciferase enzymes used are large, which limits the range of PPIs that can be interrogated due to steric hindrance from the split luciferase fragments. Here, we report a multiplexed PPI assay based on split luciferases from Photinus pyralis (firefly luciferase, FLUC) and the deep-sea shrimp, Oplophorus gracilirostris (NanoLuc, NLUC). Specifically, we show that the binding of the p53 tumor suppressor to its two major negative regulators, MDM2 and MDM4, can be simultaneously measured within the same sample, without the requirement for complex filters or deconvolution. We provide chemical and genetic validation of this system using MDM2-targeted small molecules and mutagenesis, respectively. Combined with the superior signal:noise and smaller size of split NanoLuc, this multiplexed PPI assay format can be exploited to study the induction or disruption of pairwise interactions that are prominent in many cell signaling pathways.

  1. Illuminating insights into firefly luciferase and other bioluminescent reporters used in chemical biology

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Natasha; Inglese, James; Auld, Douglas S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Understanding luciferase enzymology and the structure of compounds that modulate luciferase activity can be used to improve the design of luminescence-based assays. This review provides an overview of these popular reporters with an emphasis on the commonly used firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis (FLuc). Large-scale chemical profile studies have identified a variety of scaffolds that inhibit FLuc. In some cell-based assays these inhibitors can act in a counter-intuitive way –leading to a gain in luminescent signal. Although formerly attributed to transcriptional activation, intracellular stabilization of FLuc is the primary mechanism underlying this observation. FLuc inhibition/stabilization can be complex, as illustrated by the compound PTC124, which is converted by FLuc in the presence of ATP to a high affinity multi-substrate-adduct inhibitor, PTC124-AMP. The potential influence these findings can have on drug discovery efforts is provided here. PMID:20609414

  2. A Photinus pyralis and Luciola italica chimeric firefly luciferase produces enhanced bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Southworth, Tara L; Fontaine, Danielle M; Davis, Audrey L; Behney, Curran E; Murtiashaw, Martha H

    2014-10-14

    We report the enhanced bioluminescence properties of a chimeric enzyme (PpyLit) that contains the N-domain of recombinant Photinus pyralis luciferase joined to the C-domain of recombinant Luciola italica luciferase. Compared to the P. pyralis enzyme, the novel PpyLit chimera exhibited 1.8-fold enhanced flash-height specific activity, 2.0-fold enhanced integration-based specific activity, 2.9-fold enhanced catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km), and a 1.4-fold greater bioluminescence quantum yield. The results of this study provide an underlying basis of this unusual example of a chimeric enzyme with enhanced catalytic properties that are not simply the sum of the contributions of the two luciferases.

  3. Gastrin stimulates expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nørsett, Kristin G; Steele, Islay; Duval, Cedric; Sammut, Stephen J; Murugesan, Senthil V M; Kenny, Susan; Rainbow, Lucille; Dimaline, Rod; Dockray, Graham J; Pritchard, D Mark; Varro, Andrea

    2011-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is associated with cancer progression, fibrosis and thrombosis. It is expressed in the stomach but the mechanisms controlling its expression there, and its biological role, are uncertain. We sought to define the role of gastrin in regulating PAI-1 expression and to determine the relevance for gastrin-stimulated cell migration and invasion. In gastric biopsies from subjects with elevated plasma gastrin, the abundances of PAI-1, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), and uPA receptor (uPAR) mRNAs measured by quantitative PCR were increased compared with subjects with plasma concentrations in the reference range. In patients with hypergastrinemia due to autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis, there was increased abundance of PAI-1, uPA, and uPAR mRNAs that was reduced by octreotide or antrectomy. Immunohistochemistry revealed localization of PAI-1 to parietal cells and enterochromaffin-like cells in micronodular neuroendocrine tumors in hypergastrinemic subjects. Transcriptional mechanisms were studied by using a PAI-1-luciferase promoter-reporter construct transfected into AGS-G(R) cells. There was time- and concentration-dependent increase of PAI-1-luciferase expression in response to gastrin that was reversed by inhibitors of the PKC and MAPK pathways. In Boyden chamber assays, recombinant PAI-1 inhibited gastrin-stimulated AGS-G(R) cell migration and invasion, and small interfering RNA treatment increased responses to gastrin. We conclude that elevated plasma gastrin concentrations are associated with increased expression of gastric PAI-1, which may act to restrain gastrin-stimulated cell migration and invasion.

  4. Bioluminescence is produced from a trapped firefly luciferase conformation predicted by the domain alternation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Rosenberg, Justin C; Fontaine, Danielle M; Southworth, Tara L; Behney, Curran E; Uzasci, Lerna

    2011-07-27

    According to the domain alternation mechanism and crystal structure evidence, the acyl-CoA synthetases, one of three subgroups of a superfamily of adenylating enzymes, catalyze adenylate- and thioester-forming half-reactions in two different conformations. The enzymes accomplish this by presenting two active sites through an ~140° rotation of the C-domain. The second half-reaction catalyzed by another subgroup, the beetle luciferases, is a mechanistically dissimilar oxidative process that produces bioluminescence. We have demonstrated that a firefly luciferase variant containing cysteine residues at positions 108 and 447 can be intramolecularly cross-linked by 1,2-bis(maleimido)ethane, trapping the enzyme in a C-domain-rotated conformation previously undocumented in the available luciferase crystal structures. The cross-linked luciferase cannot adenylate luciferin but is nearly fully capable of bioluminescence with synthetic luciferyl adenylate because it retains the ability to carry out the oxidative half-reaction. The cross-linked luciferase is apparently trapped in a conformation similar to those adopted by acyl-CoA synthetases as they convert acyl adenylates into the corresponding CoA thioesters.

  5. Leptin induces CYP1B1 expression in MCF-7 cells through ligand-independent activation of the ERα pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Khanal, Tilak; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Do, Minh Truong; Choi, Jae Ho; Won, Seong Su; Kang, Wonku; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2014-05-15

    Leptin, a hormone with multiple biological actions, is produced predominantly by adipose tissue. Among its functions, leptin can stimulate tumour cell growth. Oestrogen receptor α (ERα), which plays an essential role in breast cancer development, can be transcriptionally activated in a ligand-independent manner. In this study, we investigated the effect of leptin on CYP1B1 expression and its mechanism in breast cancer cells. Leptin induced CYP1B1 protein, messenger RNA expression and promoter activity in ERα-positive MCF-7 cells but not in ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. Additionally, leptin increased 4-hydroxyoestradiol in MCF-7 cells. Also, ERα knockdown by siRNA significantly blocked the induction of CYP1B1 expression by leptin, indicating that leptin induced CYP1B1 expression via an ERα-dependent mechanism. Transient transfection with CYP1B1 deletion promoter constructs revealed that the oestrogen response element (ERE) plays important role in the up-regulation of CYP1B1 by leptin. Furthermore, leptin stimulated phosphorylation of ERα at serine residues 118 and 167 and increased ERE-luciferase activity, indicating that leptin induced CYP1B1 expression by ERα activation. Finally, we found that leptin activated ERK and Akt signalling pathways, which are upstream kinases related to ERα phosphorylation induced by leptin. Taken together, our results indicate that leptin-induced CYP1B1 expression is mediated by ligand-independent activation of the ERα pathway as a result of the activation of ERK and Akt in MCF-7 cells. - Highlights: • Leptin increased 4-hydroxyoestradiol in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. • Leptin activated ERK and Akt kinases related to ERα phosphorylation. • Leptin induces phosphorylation of ERα at serine residues 118 and 167. • Leptin induces ERE-luciferase activity.

  6. Fabrication of Adenosine Triphosphate-Molecule Recognition Chip by Means of Bioluminous Enzyme Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanii, Takashi; Goto, Tomomi; Iida, Tomoyuki; Koh-Masahara, Meishoku; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2001-10-01

    We have succeeded in detecting the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration in a solution quantitatively using an ATP-molecule recognition chip. The ATP-molecule recognition chip is composed of a silicon photodiode on which bioluminous enzyme luciferase is immobilized. When the chip was immersed in an ATP-containing solution, the luciferase emitted light and the photoinduced current detected by the photodiode was in proportion to the ATP concentration. We found that the photoinduced current fits the Michaelis-Menten plot. These results indicate that the luciferase is successfully immobilized on the silicon chip without losing the bioluminous activity and that the proposed device enables us to detect the ATP concentration in a solution by measuring the photoinduced current.

  7. Marker gene tethering by nucleoporins affects gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah; Galinha, Carla; Desset, Sophie; Tolmie, Frances; Evans, David; Tatout, Christophe; Graumann, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In non-plant systems, chromatin association with the nuclear periphery affects gene expression, where interactions with nuclear envelope proteins can repress and interactions with nucleoporins can enhance transcription. In plants, both hetero- and euchromatin can localize at the nuclear periphery, but the effect of proximity to the nuclear periphery on gene expression remains largely unknown. This study explores the putative function of Seh1 and Nup50a nucleoporins on gene expression by using the Lac Operator / Lac Repressor (LacI-LacO) system adapted to Arabidopsis thaliana. We used LacO fused to the luciferase reporter gene (LacO:Luc) to investigate whether binding of the LacO:Luc transgene to nucleoporin:LacI protein fusions alters luciferase expression. Two separate nucleoporin-LacI-YFP fusions were introduced into single insert, homozygous LacO:Luc Arabidopsis plants. Homozygous plants carrying LacO:Luc and a single insert of either Seh1-LacI-YFP or Nup50a-LacI-YFP were tested for luciferase activity and compared to plants containing LacO:Luc only. Seh1-LacI-YFP increased, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP decreased luciferase activity. Seh1-LacI-YFP accumulated at the nuclear periphery as expected, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP was nucleoplasmic and was not selected for further study. Protein and RNA levels of luciferase were quantified by western blotting and RT-qPCR, respectively. Increased luciferase activity in LacO:Luc+Seh1-LacI-YFP plants was correlated with increased luciferase protein and RNA levels. This change of luciferase expression was abolished by disruption of LacI-LacO binding by treating with IPTG in young seedlings, rosette leaves and inflorescences. This study suggests that association with the nuclear periphery is involved in the regulation of gene expression in plants.

  8. Luciferase fragment complementation imaging in preclinical cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Madryn C.; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    The luciferase fragment complementation assay (LFCA) enables molecular events to be non-invasively imaged in live cells in vitro and in vivo in a comparatively cheap and safe manner. It is a development of previous enzyme complementation assays in which reporter genes are split into two, individually enzymatically inactive, fragments that are able to complement one another upon interaction. This complementation can be used to externally visualize cellular activities. In recent years, the number of studies which have used LFCAs to probe questions relevant to cancer have increased, and this review summarizes the most significant and interesting of these. In particular, it focuses on work conducted on the epidermal growth factor, nuclear and chemokine receptor families, and intracellular signaling pathways, including IP3, cAMP, Akt, cMyc, NRF2 and Rho GTPases. LFCAs which have been developed to image DNA methylation and detect RNA transcripts are also discussed. PMID:25594026

  9. RXRα and LXR activate two promoters in placenta- and tumor-specific expression of PLAC1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaohui; Moradin, Adi; Schlessinger, David; Nagaraja, Ramaiah

    2011-01-01

    PLAC1 expression, first characterized as restricted to developing placenta among normal tissues, is also found in a wide range of tumors and transformed cell lines. To understand the basis for its unusual expression profile, we have analyzed the gene structure and its mode of transcription. We find that the gene has a hitherto unique feature, with two promoters, P1 and P2, separated by 105 kb. P2 has been described before. Here we define P1 and show that it and P2 are activated by RXRα in conjunction with LXRα or LXRβ. In placenta, P2 is the preferred promoter, whereas various tumor cell lines tend to express predominantly either one or the other promoter. Furthermore, when each promoter is fused to a luciferase reporter gene and transfected into cancer cell lines, the promoter corresponding to the more active endogenous promoter is preferentially transcribed. Joint expression of activating nuclear receptors can partially account for the restricted expression of PLAC1 in placenta, and may be co-opted for preferential P1 or P2 PLAC1 expression in various tumor cells. PMID:21937108

  10. Comparison of human optimized bacterial luciferase, firefly luciferase, and green fluorescent protein for continuous imaging of cell culture and animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan M.; Hahn, Ruth E.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Baek, Seung J.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-04-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent reporter systems have enabled the rapid and continued growth of the optical imaging field over the last two decades. Of particular interest has been noninvasive signal detection from mammalian tissues under both cell culture and whole animal settings. Here we report on the advantages and limitations of imaging using a recently introduced bacterial luciferase (lux) reporter system engineered for increased bioluminescent expression in the mammalian cellular environment. Comparison with the bioluminescent firefly luciferase (Luc) system and green fluorescent protein system under cell culture conditions demonstrated a reduced average radiance, but maintained a more constant level of bioluminescent output without the need for substrate addition or exogenous excitation to elicit the production of signal. Comparison with the Luc system following subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection into nude mice hosts demonstrated the ability to obtain similar detection patterns with in vitro experiments at cell population sizes above 2.5 × 104 cells but at the cost of increasing overall image integration time.

  11. Novel application of luciferase assay for the in vitro functional assessment of KAL1 variants in three females with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD)

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Mark J.; Hu, Youli; Gregory, Louise C.; Gaston-Massuet, Carles; Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S.; Saldanha, José W.; Gualtieri, Angelica; Thankamony, Ajay; Hughes, Ieuan; Townshend, Sharron; Martinez-Barbera, Juan-Pedro; Bouloux, Pierre-Marc; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2015-01-01

    KAL1 is implicated in 5% of Kallmann syndrome cases, a disorder which genotypically overlaps with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD). To date, a reporter-based assay to assess the functional consequences of KAL1 mutations is lacking. We aimed to develop a luciferase assay for novel application to functional assessment of rare KAL1 mutations detected in a screen of 422 patients with SOD. Quantitative analysis was performed using L6-myoblasts stably expressing FGFR1, transfected with a luciferase-reporter vector containing elements of the FGF-responsive osteocalcin promoter. The two variants assayed [p.K185N, p.P291T], were detected in three females with SOD (presenting with optic nerve hypoplasia, midline and pituitary defects). Our novel assay revealed significant decreases in transcriptional activity [p.K185N: 21% (p < 0.01); p.P291T: 40% (p < 0.001)]. Our luciferase-reporter assay, developed for assessment of KAL1 mutations, determined that two variants in females with hypopituitarism/SOD are loss-of-function; demonstrating that this assay is suitable for quantitative assessment of mutations in this gene. PMID:26375424

  12. The influence of hypoxia on bioluminescence in luciferase-transfected gliosarcoma tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Eduardo H; Niedre, Mark J; Jarvi, Mark T; Mocanu, Joseph D; Moriyama, Yumi; Subarsky, Patrick; Li, Buhong; Lilge, Lothar D; Wilson, Brian C

    2008-06-01

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes the emission of light from luciferin in the presence of oxygen and adenosine triphosphate. This bioluminescence is commonly employed in imaging mode to monitor tumor growth and treatment responses in vivo. A potential concern is that, since solid tumors are often hypoxic, either constitutively and/or as a result of treatment, the oxygen available for the bioluminescence reaction could be reduced to limiting levels, leading to underestimation of the actual number of luciferase-labeled cells during in vivo experiments. We present studies of the oxygen dependence of bioluminescence in vitro in rat 9 L gliosarcoma cells tagged with the firefly luciferase gene (9L(luc)). We demonstrate that the bioluminescence signal decreases at pO(2) luciferase expression or oxygen itself.

  13. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios.

    PubMed Central

    Makemson, J C

    1986-01-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively. PMID:3944057

  14. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios

    SciTech Connect

    Makemson, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively.

  15. Conditionally replicating luciferase reporter phages: improved sensitivity for rapid detection and assessment of drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Carrière, C; Riska, P F; Zimhony, O; Kriakov, J; Bardarov, S; Burns, J; Chan, J; Jacobs, W R

    1997-01-01

    TM4 is a lytic mycobacteriophage which infects mycobacteria of clinical importance. A luciferase reporter phage, phAE40, has been constructed from TM4 and was previously shown to be useful for the rapid detection and drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, the lytic nature of the phage results in a loss of detectable light output and limits the sensitivity of detection. We describe several strategies aimed at improving the luciferase activity generated by TM4 luciferase phages, including (i) varying the position of the luciferase gene in the phage genome, (ii) isolating host-range mutants of the phage, and (iii) introducing temperature-sensitive mutations in the phage such that it will not replicate at the infecting temperature. Several new phages generated by these methods show increased intensity of luciferase production compared to the first-generation reporter phage phAE40, and one phage, phAE88, also demonstrates an enhanced duration of luciferase activity. This has allowed the detection of as few as 120 BCG cells and the determination of drug susceptibilities of M. tuberculosis in as little as 1 day. PMID:9399525

  16. Activation of FXR protects against renal fibrosis via suppressing Smad3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; He, Jialin; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Zhizhen; Xiong, Haojun; Gong, Rujun; Li, Song; Chen, Shan; He, Fengtian

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is the common pathway of most chronic kidney disease progression to end-stage renal failure. The nuclear receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor), a multiple functional transcription factor, plays an important role in protecting against fibrosis. The TGFβ-Smad signaling has a central role in kidney fibrosis. However, it remains unclear whether FXR plays direct anti-fibrotic effect in renal fibrosis via regulating TGFβ-Smad pathway. In this study, we found that the level of FXR was negatively correlated with that of Smad3 and fibronectin (a marker of fibrosis) in human fibrotic kidneys. Activation of FXR suppressed kidney fibrosis and downregulated Smad3 expression, which was markedly attenuated by FXR antagonist. Moreover, the FXR-mediated repression of fibrosis was significantly alleviated by ectopic expression of Smad3. Luciferase reporter assay revealed that FXR activation inhibited the transcriptional activity of Smad3 gene promoter. The in vivo experiments showed that FXR agonist protected against renal fibrosis and downregulated Smad3 expression in UUO mice. These results suggested that FXR may serve as an important negative regulator for manipulating Smad3 expression, and the FXR/Smad3 pathway may be a novel target for the treatment of renal fibrosis. PMID:27853248

  17. [Nucleotide sequence of genes for alpha- and beta-subunits of luciferase from Photobacterium leiognathi].

    PubMed

    Illarionov, B A; Protopopova, M V; Karginov, V A; Mertvetsov, N P; Gitel'zon, I I

    1988-03-01

    Nucleotide sequence of the Photobacterium leiognathi DNA containing genes of alpha and beta subunits of luciferase has been determined. We also deduced amino acid sequence and molecular mass of luciferase and localized luciferase genes in the sequenced DNA fragment.

  18. Delicate balance of electrostatic interactions and disulfide bridges in thermostability of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Somayeh; Moradi, Maryam; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2012-12-01

    The wild type Photinus pyralis luciferase does not have any disulfide bridge. Disulfide bridges are determinant in inherent stability of protein at moderate temperatures. Meanwhile, arginin is responsible for thermostability at higher temperatures. In this study, by concomitant introduction of disulfide bridge and a surface arginin in a mutant (A296C-A326C/I232R), the contribution of disulfide bridge introduction and surface hydrophilic residue on activity and global stability of P. pyralis luciferase is investigated. In addition to the mentioned mutant; I232R, A296C-A326C and wild type luciferases are characterized. Though addition of Arg caused stability against proteolysis but in combination with disulfide bridge resulted in decreased thermal stability compared to A296C-A326C mutant. In spite of long distance of two different mutations (A296C-A326C and I232R) from each other in the three-dimensional structure, combination of their effects on the stability of luciferase was not cumulative.

  19. Expression of Ceramide Synthase 6 Transcriptionally Activates Acid Ceramidase in a c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Tirodkar, Tejas S.; Lu, Ping; Bai, Aiping; Scheffel, Matthew J.; Gencer, Salih; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Bielawska, Alicja; Ogretmen, Besim; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A family of six ceramide synthases with distinct but overlapping substrate specificities is responsible for generation of ceramides with acyl chains ranging from ∼14–26 carbons. Ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) preferentially generates C14- and C16-ceramides, and we have previously shown that down-regulation of this enzyme decreases apoptotic susceptibility. In this study, we further evaluated how increased CerS6 expression impacts sphingolipid composition and metabolism. Overexpression of CerS6 in HT29 colon cancer cells resulted in increased apoptotic susceptibility and preferential generation of C16-ceramide, which occurred at the expense of very long chain, saturated ceramides. These changes were also reflected in sphingomyelin composition. HT-CerS6 cells had increased intracellular levels of sphingosine, which is generated by ceramidases upon hydrolysis of ceramide. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that only expression of acid ceramidase (ASAH1) was increased. The increase in acid ceramidase was confirmed by expression and activity analyses. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK (SP600125) or curcumin reduced transcriptional up-regulation of acid ceramidase. Using an acid ceramidase promoter driven luciferase reporter plasmid, we demonstrated that CerS1 has no effect on transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase and that CerS2 slightly but significantly decreased the luciferase signal. Similar to CerS6, overexpression of CerS3–5 resulted in an ∼2-fold increase in luciferase reporter gene activity. Exogenous ceramide failed to induce reporter activity, while a CerS inhibitor and a catalytically inactive mutant of CerS6 failed to reduce it. Taken together, these results suggest that increased expression of CerS6 can mediate transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase in a JNK-dependent manner that is independent of CerS6 activity. PMID:25839235

  20. Expression of Ceramide Synthase 6 Transcriptionally Activates Acid Ceramidase in a c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Tirodkar, Tejas S; Lu, Ping; Bai, Aiping; Scheffel, Matthew J; Gencer, Salih; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Bielawska, Alicja; Ogretmen, Besim; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2015-05-22

    A family of six ceramide synthases with distinct but overlapping substrate specificities is responsible for generation of ceramides with acyl chains ranging from ∼14-26 carbons. Ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6) preferentially generates C14- and C16-ceramides, and we have previously shown that down-regulation of this enzyme decreases apoptotic susceptibility. In this study, we further evaluated how increased CerS6 expression impacts sphingolipid composition and metabolism. Overexpression of CerS6 in HT29 colon cancer cells resulted in increased apoptotic susceptibility and preferential generation of C16-ceramide, which occurred at the expense of very long chain, saturated ceramides. These changes were also reflected in sphingomyelin composition. HT-CerS6 cells had increased intracellular levels of sphingosine, which is generated by ceramidases upon hydrolysis of ceramide. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that only expression of acid ceramidase (ASAH1) was increased. The increase in acid ceramidase was confirmed by expression and activity analyses. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK (SP600125) or curcumin reduced transcriptional up-regulation of acid ceramidase. Using an acid ceramidase promoter driven luciferase reporter plasmid, we demonstrated that CerS1 has no effect on transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase and that CerS2 slightly but significantly decreased the luciferase signal. Similar to CerS6, overexpression of CerS3-5 resulted in an ∼2-fold increase in luciferase reporter gene activity. Exogenous ceramide failed to induce reporter activity, while a CerS inhibitor and a catalytically inactive mutant of CerS6 failed to reduce it. Taken together, these results suggest that increased expression of CerS6 can mediate transcriptional activation of acid ceramidase in a JNK-dependent manner that is independent of CerS6 activity.

  1. Cyclical strain modulates metalloprotease and matrix gene expression in human tenocytes via activation of TGFβ.

    PubMed

    Jones, Eleanor R; Jones, Gavin C; Legerlotz, Kirsten; Riley, Graham P

    2013-12-01

    Tendinopathies are a range of diseases characterised by degeneration and chronic tendon pain and represent a significant cause of morbidity. Relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms; however onset is often associated with physical activity. A number of molecular changes have been documented in tendinopathy such as a decrease in overall collagen content, increased extracellular matrix turnover and protease activity. Metalloproteinases are involved in the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix and expression is regulated by mechanical strain. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of strain upon matrix turnover by measuring metalloproteinase and matrix gene expression and to elucidate the mechanism of action. Primary Human Achilles tenocytes were seeded in type I rat tail collagen gels in a Flexcell™ tissue train system and subjected to 5% cyclic uniaxial strain at 1Hz for 48h. TGFβ1 and TGFβRI inhibitor were added to selected cultures. RNA was measured using qRT-PCR and TGFβ protein levels were determined using a cell based luciferase assay. We observed that mechanical strain regulated the mRNA levels of multiple protease and matrix genes anabolically, and this regulation mirrored that seen with TGFβ stimulation alone. We have also demonstrated that the inhibition of the TGFβ signalling pathway abrogated the strain induced changes in mRNA and that TGFβ activation, rather than gene expression, was increased with mechanical strain. We concluded that TGFβ activation plays an important role in mechanotransduction. Targeting this pathway may have its place in the treatment of tendinopathy.

  2. The influence of the region between residues 220 and 344 and beyond in Phrixotrix railroad worm luciferases green and red bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Viviani, Vadim R; Joaquim da Silva Neto, Antonio; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2004-02-01

    To find the regions having a major influence on the bioluminescence spectra of railroad worm luciferases, we constructed new chimeric luciferases switching the fragments from residues 1-219 and from 220-545 between Phrixotrix viviani (PxvGR; lambda(max) = 548 nm) green light-emitting luciferase and Phrixothrix hirtus (PxhRE; lambda(max) = 623 nm) red light-emitting luciferases. The emission spectrum (lambda(max) = 571 nm) and K(M) for luciferin in the chimera PxRE220GR (1-219, PxhRE; 220-545, PxvGR) suggested that the region above residue 220 of PxvGR had a major effect on the active site. However, switching the sequence between the residues 220-344 from PxvGR luciferase into PxhRE (PxREGRRE) luciferase resulted in red light emission (lambda(max) = 603 nm), indicating that the region 220-344 by itself does not determine the emission spectrum. Furthermore, the sequence before residue 220 of the green-emitting luciferase is incompatible for light emission with the sequence above residue 220 of PxhRE. These results suggest that the fragments before and after residue 220, which correspond to distinct subdomains, may fold differently in the green- and red-emitting luciferases, affecting the active site conformation.

  3. A bioluminescence reporter mouse that monitors expression of constitutively active β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Peavey, Mary C.; Hai, Lan; Lonard, David M.; Lydon, John P.

    2017-01-01

    This short technical report describes the generation and characterization of a bioluminescence reporter mouse that is engineered to detect and longitudinally monitor the expression of doxycycline-induced constitutively active β-catenin. The new responder transgenic mouse contains the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgene, which consists of the tet-operator followed by a bicistronic sequence encoding a stabilized form of active β-catenin (ΔN89β-catenin), an internal ribosome entry site, and the firefly luciferase gene. To confirm that the transgene operates as designed, TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic mouse lines were crossed with an effector mouse that harbors the mouse mammary tumor virus-reverse tetracycline transactivator (MMTV-rtTA) transgene (termed MTB hereon), which primarily targets rtTA expression to the mammary epithelium. Following doxycycline administration, the resultant MTB/CatTMILA bigenic reporter exhibited precocious lobuloalveologenesis, ductal hyperplasia, and mammary adenocarcinomas, which were visualized and monitored by in vivo bioluminescence detection. Therefore, we predict that the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic responder mouse—when crossed with the appropriate effector transgenic—will have wide-applicability to non-invasively monitor the influence of constitutively active β-catenin expression on cell-fate specification, proliferation, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation in a broad spectrum of target tissues. PMID:28253313

  4. A novel luciferase knock-in reporter system for studying transcriptional regulation of the human Sox2 gene.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Weifeng; Li, Yan; Liu, Kuan; Zhao, Junli; Sun, Xiaohong; Shan, Linlin; Mao, Qinwen; Xia, Haibin

    2016-02-10

    Sox2 is an important transcriptional factor that has multiple functions in stem cell maintenance and tumorigenesis. To investigate the transcriptional regulation of the Sox2 gene, a luciferase knock-in reporter system was established in HEK293 cells by placing the luciferase gene in the genome under the control of the Sox2 gene promoter using a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated genome editing technique. PCR and Southern blot results confirmed the site-specific integration of a single copy of the exogenous luciferase gene into the genome. To prove the reliability and sensitivity of this novel luciferase knock-in system, a CRISPR/Cas transcription activation system for the Sox2 gene was constructed and applied to the knock-in system. The results indicated that luciferase activity was directly correlated with the activity of the Sox2 endogenous promoter. This novel system will be a useful tool to study the transcriptional regulation of Sox2, and has great potential in medical and industrial applications.

  5. Structural basis for the spectral difference in luciferase bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Toru; Ichiyama, Susumu; Hiratake, Jun; Saldanha, Adrian; Kobashi, Nobuyuki; Sakata, Kanzo; Kato, Hiroaki

    2006-03-16

    Fireflies communicate with each other by emitting yellow-green to yellow-orange brilliant light. The bioluminescence reaction, which uses luciferin, Mg-ATP and molecular oxygen to yield an electronically excited oxyluciferin species, is carried out by the enzyme luciferase. Visible light is emitted during relaxation of excited oxyluciferin to its ground state. The high quantum yield of the luciferin/luciferase reaction and the change in bioluminescence colour caused by subtle structural differences in luciferase have attracted much research interest. In fact, a single amino acid substitution in luciferase changes the emission colour from yellow-green to red. Although the crystal structure of luciferase from the North American firefly (Photinus pyralis) has been described, the detailed mechanism for the bioluminescence colour change is still unclear. Here we report the crystal structures of wild-type and red mutant (S286N) luciferases from the Japanese Genji-botaru (Luciola cruciata) in complex with a high-energy intermediate analogue, 5'-O-[N-(dehydroluciferyl)-sulfamoyl]adenosine (DLSA). Comparing these structures to those of the wild-type luciferase complexed with AMP plus oxyluciferin (products) reveals a significant conformational change in the wild-type enzyme but not in the red mutant. This conformational change involves movement of the hydrophobic side chain of Ile 288 towards the benzothiazole ring of DLSA. Our results indicate that the degree of molecular rigidity of the excited state of oxyluciferin, which is controlled by a transient movement of Ile 288, determines the colour of bioluminescence during the emission reaction.

  6. The effect of sex hormones on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and activity in mature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiromi; Sugai, Hana; Kurosaki, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Momoko; Funaki, Asami; Kimura, Yuki; Ueno, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ plays a major role in the regulation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Pioglitazone is a PPARγ agonist that is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, female patients have been reported to experience stronger efficacy and adverse effects than male patients. This study evaluated the effects of sex hormones on PPARγ expression and activity in adipocytes. Mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were used after being grown into matured adipocytes. The sex hormones 17β-estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), or 5α-androstan-17β-ol-3-one (dihydrotestosterone; DHT) were added to the matured adipocytes and the cells were then maintained for short (24-72 h) or long (1- or 2-weeks) periods. E2 significantly upregulated PPARγ protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner after extended exposure, whereas T and DHT did not have such an effect. When cells were co-treated with pioglitazone and E2, PPARγ protein expression significantly increased in an E2-dependent manner, whereas this expression seemed to be reduced by pioglitazone mono-treatment and co-treatment with DHT at higher concentrations. The secretion levels of adiponectin protein, a major indicator of PPARγ activity, were significantly decreased by DHT, but were not affected by E2. Finally a luciferase assay was performed using a PPAR response element-Luk reporter gene. Transcriptional activity was not changed by any of single sex hormone treatment, but was significantly downregulated by co-treatment with pioglitazone and DHT. Taken together, our results suggest that sex hormones may influence PPARγ expression and function, which may explain the observed sex-specific different effect of pioglitazone.

  7. Bavachalcone-induced manganese superoxide dismutase expression through the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yanqi; Ling, Shuang; Duan, Ju; Ma, Jing; Ni, Rongzhen; Xu, Jin-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress has been suggested as a major etiological factor in cardiovascular diseases. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is an essential antioxidant mitochondrial enzyme. Although polyphenols can induce MnSOD expression, their mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the effect of bavachalcone, a bioactive compound isolated from Psoralea corylifolia, on MnSOD protein expression and explored whether this effect is mediated through the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. Our data showed that bavachalcone enhanced the luciferase activity of the MnSOD promoter and increased MnSOD mRNA and protein expressions. Moreover, bavachalcone suppressed the mitochondrial superoxide production in endothelial cells. Conversely, bavachalcone stimulated liver kinase B1 and AMPKα phosphorylation. mRNA interference by using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) of AMPK inhibited bavachalcone-induced MnSOD expression. A-769662, an AMPK activator, also stimulated AMPK activity and increased MnSOD expression. Furthermore, AMPK knockdown by shRNA-AMPK reversed the inhibitory effects of bavachalcone on mitochondrial superoxide production in endothelial cells. These findings indicate that bavachalcone can protect the endothelial function by increasing AMPK activity and MnSOD expression and reducing mitochondrial oxidative stress. .

  8. The Androgen Receptor Regulates PPARγ Expression and Activity in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Olokpa, Emuejevoke; Bolden, Adrienne

    2016-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand‐activated transcription factor that regulates growth and differentiation within normal prostate and prostate cancers. However the factors that control PPARγ within the prostate cancers have not been characterized. The goal of this study was to examine whether the androgen receptor (AR) regulates PPARγ expression and function within human prostate cancer cells. qRT‐PCR and Western blot analyses revealed nanomolar concentrations of the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) decrease PPARγ mRNA and protein within the castration‐resistant, AR‐positive C4‐2 and VCaP human prostate cancer cell lines. The AR antagonists bicalutamide and enzalutamide blocked the ability of DHT to reduce PPARγ levels. In addition, siRNA mediated knockdown of AR increased PPARγ protein levels and ligand‐induced PPARγ transcriptional activity within the C4‐2 cell line. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitors that interfere with AR function increased the level of basal PPARγ and prevented the DHT‐mediated suppression of PPARγ. These data suggest that AR normally functions to suppress PPARγ expression within AR‐positive prostate cancer cells. To determine whether increases in AR protein would influence PPARγ expression and activity, we used lipofectamine‐based transfections to overexpress AR within the AR‐null PC‐3 cells. The addition of AR to PC‐3 cells did not significantly alter PPARγ protein levels. However, the ability of the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone to induce activation of a PPARγ‐driven luciferase reporter and induce expression of FABP4 was suppressed in AR‐positive PC‐3 cells. Together, these data indicate AR serves as a key modulator of PPARγ expression and function within prostate tumors. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2664–2672, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26945682

  9. Increased dietary sodium induces COX2 expression by activating NFκB in renal medullary interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    He, Wenjuan; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Min; Davis, Linda S; Blackwell, Timothy S; Yull, Fiona; Breyer, Matthew D; Hao, Chuan-Ming

    2014-02-01

    High salt diet induces renal medullary cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression. Selective blockade of renal medullary COX2 activity in rats causes salt-sensitive hypertension, suggesting a role for renal medullary COX2 in maintaining systemic sodium balance. The present study characterized the cellular location of COX2 induction in the kidney of mice following high salt diet and examined the role of NFκB in mediating this COX2 induction in response to increased dietary salt. High salt diet (8 % NaCl) for 3 days markedly increased renal medullary COX2 expression in C57Bl/6 J mice. Co-immunofluorescence using a COX2 antibody and antibodies against aquaporin-2, ClC-K, aquaporin-1, and CD31 showed that high salt diet-induced COX2 was selectively expressed in renal medullary interstitial cells. By using NFκB reporter transgenic mice, we observed a sevenfold increase of luciferase activity in the renal medulla of the NFκB-luciferase reporter mice following high salt diet, and a robust induction of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression mainly in renal medullary interstitial cells of the NFκB-EGFP reporter mice following high salt diet. Treating high salt diet-fed C57Bl/6 J mice with selective IκB kinase inhibitor IMD-0354 (8 mg/kg bw) substantially suppressed COX2 induction in renal medulla, and also significantly reduced urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). These data therefore suggest that renal medullary interstitial cell NFκB plays an important role in mediating renal medullary COX2 expression and promoting renal PGE2 synthesis in response to increased dietary sodium.

  10. Increased Dietary Sodium Induces COX2 Expression by activating NFκB in Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Davis, Linda S.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Yull, Fiona; Breyer, Matthew D.; Hao, Chuan-Ming

    2013-01-01

    High salt diet induces renal medullary COX2 expression. Selective blockade of renal medullary COX2 activity in rats causes salt sensitive hypertension, suggesting a role for renal medullary COX2 in maintaining systemic sodium balance. The present study characterized the cellular location of COX2 induction in the kidney of mice following high salt diet and examined the role of NFκB in mediating this COX2 induction in response to increased dietary salt. High salt diet (8% NaCl) for 3 days markedly increased renal medullary COX2 expression in C57Bl/6J mice. Co-immunofluorescence using a COX2 antibody and antibodies against AQP2, ClC-K, AQP1 and CD31 showed that high salt diet-induced COX2 was selectively expressed in renal medullary interstitial cells. By using NFκB reporter transgenic mice, we observed a 7 fold increase of luciferase activity in the renal medulla of the NFκB-luciferase reporter mice following high salt diet, and a robust induction of EGFP expression mainly in renal medullary interstitial cells of the NFκB-EGFP reporter mice following high salt diet. Treating high salt diet fed C57Bl/6J mice with selective IκB kinase inhibitor IMD-0354 (8mg/kg bw) substantially suppressed COX2 induction in renal medulla, and also significantly reduced urinary PGE2. These data therefore suggest that renal medullary interstitial cell NFκB plays an important role in mediating renal medullary COX2 expression and promoting renal PGE2 synthesis in response to increased dietary sodium. PMID:23900806

  11. An enhanced chimeric firefly luciferase-inspired enzyme for ATP detection and bioluminescence reporter and imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Southworth, Tara L; Fontaine, Danielle M; Kohrt, Dawn; Talukder, Munya; Michelini, Elisa; Cevenini, Luca; Roda, Aldo; Grossel, Martha J

    2015-09-01

    Firefly luciferases, which emit visible light in a highly specific ATP-dependent process, have been adapted for a variety of applications, including gene reporter assays, whole-cell biosensor measurements, and in vivo imaging. We previously reported the approximately 2-fold enhanced activity and 1.4-fold greater bioluminescence quantum yield properties of a chimeric enzyme that contains the N-domain of Photinus pyralis luciferase joined to the C-domain of Luciola italica luciferase. Subsequently, we identified 5 amino acid changes based on L. italica that are the main determinants of the improved bioluminescence properties. Further engineering to enhance thermal and pH stability produced a novel luciferase called PLG2. We present here a systematic comparison of the spectral and physical properties of the new protein with P. pyralis luciferase and demonstrate the potential of PLG2 for use in assays based on the detection of femtomole levels of ATP. In addition, we compared the performance of a mammalian codon-optimized version of the cDNA for PLG2 with the luc2 gene in HEK293T cells. Using an optimized low-cost assay system, PLG2 activity can be monitored in mammalian cell lysates and living cells with 4.4-fold and approximately 3.0-fold greater sensitivity, respectively. PLG2 could be an improved alternative to Promega's luc2 for reporter and imaging applications.

  12. Codon optimization of genes for efficient protein expression in mammalian cells by selection of only preferred human codons.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara-Miura, Yuiko; Sato, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Takahiro

    2015-05-01

    A simple design method for codon optimization of genes to express a heterologous protein in mammalian cells is described. Codon optimization was performed by choosing only codons preferentially used in humans and with over 60% GC content, and the method was named the "preferred human codon-optimized method." To test our simple rule for codon optimization, the preferred human codon-optimized genes for six proteins containing photoproteins (aequorin and clytin II) and luciferases (Gaussia luciferase, Renilla luciferase, and firefly luciferases from Photinus pyralis and Luciola cruciata) were chemically synthesized and transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells. All preferred human codon-optimized genes showed higher luminescence activity than the corresponding wild-type genes. Our simple design method could be used to improve protein expression in mammalian cells efficiently.

  13. Botulinum neurotoxin dose-dependently inhibits release of neurosecretory vesicle-vargeted luciferase from neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Pathe-Neuschäfer-Rube, Andrea; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Genz, Lara; Püchel, Gerhard P

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a bacterial toxin that inhibits neurotransmitter release from neurons and thereby causes a flaccid paralysis. It is used as drug to treat a number of serious ailments and, more frequently, for aesthetic medical interventions. Botulinum toxin for pharmacological applications is isolated from bacterial cultures. Due to partial denaturation of the protein, the specific activity of these preparations shows large variations.Because of its extreme potential toxicity, pharmacological preparations must be carefully tested for their activity. For the current gold standard, the mouse lethality assay, several hundred thousand mice are killed per year. Alternative methods have been developed that suffer from one or more of the following deficits: In vitro enzyme assays test only the activity of the catalytic subunit of the toxin. Enzymatic and cell based immunological assays are specific for just one of the different serotypes. The current study takes a completely different approach that overcomes these limitations: Neuronal cell lines were stably transfected with plasmids coding for luciferases of different species, which were N-terminally tagged with leader sequences that redirect the luciferase into neuro-secretory vesicles. From these vesicles, luciferases were released upon depolarization of the cells. The depolarization-dependent release was efficiently inhibited by of botulinum toxin in a concentration range (1 to 100 pM) that is used in pharmacological preparations. The new assay might thus be an alternative to the mouse lethality assay and the immunological assays already in use.

  14. A method to rapidly and accurately compare relative efficacies of non-invasive imaging reporter genes in a mouse model, and its application to luciferase reporters

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Jose S.; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Herschman, Harvey R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Our goal is to develop a simple, quantitative, robust method to compare the efficacy of imaging reporter genes in culture and in vivo. We describe an adenoviral vector-liver transduction procedure, and compare the luciferase reporter efficacies. Procedures Alternative reporter genes are expressed in a common adenoviral vector. Vector amounts used in vivo are based on cell culture titrations, ensuring the same transduction efficacy is used for each vector. After imaging, in vivo and in vitro values are normalized to hepatic vector transduction using quantitative real-time PCR. Results We assayed standard firefly luciferase (FLuc), enhanced firefly luciferase (EFLuc), luciferase 2 (Luc2), humanized Renilla luciferase (hRLuc), Renilla luciferase 8.6-535 (RLuc8.6), and a membrane-bound Gaussia luciferase variant (extGLuc) in cell culture and in vivo. We observed a greater that 100-fold increase in bioluminescent signal for both EFLuc and Luc2 when compared to FLuc, and a greater than 106-fold increase for RLuc8.6 when compared to hRLuc. ExtGLuc was not detectable in liver. Conclusions Our findings contrast, in some cases, with conclusions drawn in prior comparisons of these reporter genes, and demonstrate the need for a standardized method to evaluate alternative reporter genes in vivo. Our procedure can be adapted for reporter genes that utilize alternative imaging modalities (fluorescence, bioluminescence, MRI, SPECT, PET). PMID:21850545

  15. Phosphatase activities analyzed by in vivo expressions.

    PubMed

    Schweighofer, Alois; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Meskiene, Irute

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatases act to reverse phosphorylation-related modifications induced by protein kinases. Type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C) are monomeric Ser/Thr phosphatases that require a metal for their activity and are abundant in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In plants, such as Medicago and Arabidopsis PP2Cs control several essential processes, including ABA signaling, development, and wound-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. In vitro assays with recombinant proteins and yeast two-hybrid systems usually provide initial information about putative PP2C substrates; however, these observations have to be verified in vivo. Therefore, a method for transient expression in isolated Arabidopsis suspension cell protoplasts was developed to assay PP2C action in living cells. This system has proven to be very useful in producing active enzymes and their substrates and in performing enzymatic reactions in vivo. Transient gene expression in isolated cells enabled assembly of functional protein kinase cascades and the creation of phosphorylated targets for PP2Cs. The method is based on the co-transformation and transient co-expression of different PP2C proteins with MAPK. It shows that epitope-tagged PP2C and MAPK proteins exhibit high enzymatic activities and produce substantial protein amounts easily monitored by Western blot analysis. Additionally, PP2C phosphatase activities can be directly tested in protein extracts from protoplasts, suggesting a possibility for analysis of activities of new PP2C family members.

  16. Creation of artificial luciferases to expand their analytical potential.

    PubMed

    Frank, Ludmila A

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescent proteins have been intensively used as high sensitive reporters in all kinds of binding assays (immuno-, nucleic acid hybridization assays, etc.) and in bioimaging. But natural luciferases do not always meet the requirements set for them as the assay reporters: thermostabitity, definite bioluminescence spectral and kinetics characteristics, stability to chemical modifications, etc. Luciferases with different appropriate characteristics as well as various luciferin derivatives were obtained using mutagenesis and chemical synthesis. Thanks to rigorous efforts of many researchers bioluminescencebased analytical techniques offer a great potential for solving analytical tasks in the field of biotechnology, biomedicine, pharmacology, etc.

  17. Implication of an unfavorable residue (Thr346) in intrinsic flexibility of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Maryam; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Emamzadeh, Rahman

    2012-09-10

    In order to better understand the functional role of an unusual residue (Thr346) of firefly luciferase mutagenesis at this residue was performed. Firefly luciferase, catalyzes the bioluminescence reaction and is an excellent tool as a reporter in nano-system biology studies. Nonetheless, the enzyme rapidly loses its activity at temperatures above 30 °C and this leads to reduced sensitivity and precision in analytical applications. Residue Thr346 in a connecting loop (341-348) of firefly luciferase is located in a disallowed region of Ramachandran plot. In this study, we have substituted this residue (T346) with anomalous dihedral angles with Val, Gly and Pro to clarify the role of this residue in structure and function of the enzyme using site-directed mutagenesis. Substitution of this unfavorable residue (T346) with atypical dihedral angles (ψ, φ) with other residues brought about an increase of thermostability and decrease of specific activity. Structural and functional properties of the mutants were analyzed using different spectroscopic methods. It seems that this residue is a critically conserved residue to support the functional flexibility for a fast kinetic bioluminescence reaction at the expense of lower stability.

  18. Basal expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene is dependent on protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, R A; Matthews, R P; Idzerda, R L; McKnight, G S

    1995-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a Cl- channel that becomes activated after phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). We demonstrate that PKA also plays a crucial role in maintaining basal expression of the CFTR gene in the human colon carcinoma cell line T84. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of a dominant-negative regulatory subunit or treatment with the PKA-selective inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89) caused a complete suppression of CFTR gene expression without affecting other constitutively active genes. Basal expression of a 2.2-kb region of the CFTR promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene (CFTR-luc) exhibited the same dependence on PKA. The ability of cAMP to induce CFTR over basal levels is cell-type specific. In T84 cells, both the endogenous CFTR gene and CFTR-luc exhibited only a modest inducibility (approximately 2-fold), whereas in the human choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3, CFTR-luc could be induced at least 4-fold. A variant cAMP-response element is present at position -48 to -41 in the CFTR promoter, and mutation of this sequence blocks basal expression. We conclude that cAMP, acting through PKA, is an essential regulator of basal CFTR gene expression and may mediate an induction of CFTR in responsive cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7543684

  19. SALL4 promotes gastric cancer progression through activating CD44 expression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X; Zhang, X; Zhang, W; Liang, W; Zhang, P; Shi, H; Zhang, B; Shao, M; Yan, Y; Qian, H; Xu, W

    2016-11-07

    The stem cell factor SALL4 (Sal-like protein 4) plays important roles in the development and progression of cancer. SALL4 is critically involved in tumour growth, metastasis and therapy resistance. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the oncogenic roles of SALL4 have not been well characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that SALL4 knockdown by short hairpin RNA greatly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. We further confirmed the inhibitory effects of SALL4 knockdown on gastric cancer cells by using a tetracycline-inducible system. Mechanistically, SALL4 knockdown downregulated the expression of CD44. The results of luciferase assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation study showed that SALL4 bound to CD44 promoter region and transcriptionally activated CD44. The results of rescue study revealed that CD44 overexpression antagonized SALL4 knockdown-mediated inhibition of gastric cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and gastric cancer growth in vivo. Collectively, our findings indicate that SALL4 promotes gastric cancer progression through directly activating CD44 expression, which suggests a novel mechanism for the oncogenic roles of SALL4 in gastric cancer and represents a new target for gastric cancer therapy.

  20. SALL4 promotes gastric cancer progression through activating CD44 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, X; Zhang, X; Zhang, W; Liang, W; Zhang, P; Shi, H; Zhang, B; Shao, M; Yan, Y; Qian, H; Xu, W

    2016-01-01

    The stem cell factor SALL4 (Sal-like protein 4) plays important roles in the development and progression of cancer. SALL4 is critically involved in tumour growth, metastasis and therapy resistance. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the oncogenic roles of SALL4 have not been well characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that SALL4 knockdown by short hairpin RNA greatly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. We further confirmed the inhibitory effects of SALL4 knockdown on gastric cancer cells by using a tetracycline-inducible system. Mechanistically, SALL4 knockdown downregulated the expression of CD44. The results of luciferase assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation study showed that SALL4 bound to CD44 promoter region and transcriptionally activated CD44. The results of rescue study revealed that CD44 overexpression antagonized SALL4 knockdown-mediated inhibition of gastric cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and gastric cancer growth in vivo. Collectively, our findings indicate that SALL4 promotes gastric cancer progression through directly activating CD44 expression, which suggests a novel mechanism for the oncogenic roles of SALL4 in gastric cancer and represents a new target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27819668

  1. Myb expression is critical for myeloid leukemia development induced by Setbp1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nhu; Vishwakarma, Bandana A.; Oakley, Kevin; Han, Yufen; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej

    2016-01-01

    SETBP1 missense mutations have been frequently identified in multiple myeloid neoplasms; however, their oncogenic potential remains unclear. Here we show that expression of Setbp1 mutants carrying two such mutations in mouse bone marrow progenitors efficiently induced development of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) in irradiated recipient mice with significantly shorter latencies and greater penetrance than expression of wild-type Setbp1, suggesting that these mutations are highly oncogenic. The increased oncogenicity of Setbp1 missense mutants could be due in part to their capability to drive significantly higher target gene transcription. We further identify Myb as a critical mediator of Setbp1-induced self-renewal as its knockdown caused efficient differentiation of myeloid progenitors immortalized by wild-type Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutants. Interestingly, Myb is also a direct transcriptional target of Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutants as they directly bind to the Myb locus in immortalized cells and dramatically activate a critical enhancer/promoter region of Myb in luciferase reporter assays. Furthermore, Myb knockdown in Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutations-induced AML cells also efficiently induced their differentiation in culture and significantly prolonged the survival of their secondary recipient mice, suggesting that targeting MYB pathway could be a promising strategy for treating human myeloid neoplasms with SETBP1 activation. PMID:27863435

  2. Characteristics of endogenous flavin fluorescence of Photobacterium leiognathi luciferase and Vibrio fischeri NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Vetrova, E V; Kudryasheva, N S; Visser, A J W G; van Hoek, A

    2005-01-01

    The bioluminescent bacterial enzyme system NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase-luciferase has been used as a test system for ecological monitoring. One of the modes to quench bioluminescence is the interaction of xenobiotics with the enzymes, which inhibit their activity. The use of endogenous flavin fluorescence for investigation of the interactions of non-fluorescent compounds with the bacterial luciferase from Photobacterium leiognathi and NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase from Vibrio fischeri has been proposed. Fluorescence spectroscopy methods have been used to study characteristics of endogenous flavin fluorescence (fluorophore lifetime, the rotational correlation time). The fluorescence anisotropy behaviour of FMN has been analysed and compared to that of the enzyme-bound flavin. The fluorescence characteristics of endogenous flavin of luciferase and NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase have been shown to be applicable in studying enzymes' interactions with non-fluorescent compounds.

  3. Expression and Activity of Metalloproteinases in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bobińska, Kinga; Szemraj, Janusz; Czarny, Piotr; Gałecki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is one of the most common mental disorders and often co-exists with somatic diseases. The most probable cause of comorbidity is a generalized inflammatory process that occurs in both depression and somatic diseases. Matrix metalloproteinases MMPs play a role in modulating inflammation and their impact in many inflammatory diseases has been investigated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate gene expression for selected polymorphisms of MMP-2 (C-735T), MMP-7 (A-181G), and MMP-9 (T-1702A, C1562T), which have been confirmed to participate in development of depression, and TIMP-2 (G-418C, tissue inhibitor of MMP). Activity variability of pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9 was measured in a group of people with depression and a group of healthy individuals. Material/Methods The examined population comprised 142 individuals suffering from depression and 100 individuals who formed a control group (CG). Designations were carried out for MMP-2 (C-735T), MMP-7 (A-181G), MMP-9 (T-1702A, C1562T), and TIMP-2 (G-418C). Results For all examined and tested MMPs and for TIMP-2, gene expression at the mRNA level was higher in patients with depression than in the CG. Similar results were recorded for gene expression at the protein level, while expression on the protein level for TIMP-2 was higher in the CG. Change in activity of MMP-2 and pro-MMP-2 was statistically more significant in the group with depression. The opposite result was recorded for MMP-9 and pro-MMP-9, in which the change in activity was statistically more significant in the CG. Conclusions Changes in MMPs and TIMP expression may be a common element in, or perhaps even a marker for, recurrent depressive disorders and somatic diseases. PMID:27098106

  4. Development of red-shifted mutants derived from luciferase of Brazilian click beetle Pyrearinus termitilluminans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Yamada, Toshimichi; Nasu, Yusuke; Ito, Mashiho; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2015-10-01

    Luciferase, a bioluminescent protein, has been used as an analytical tool to visualize intracellular phenomena. Luciferase with red light emission is particularly useful for bioluminescence imaging because of its high transmittance in mammalian tissues. However, the luminescence intensity of existing luciferases with their emission over 600 nm is insufficient for imaging studies because of their weak intensities. We developed mutants of Emerald luciferase (Eluc) from Brazilian click beetle (Pyrearinus termitilluminans), which emits the strongest bioluminescence among beetle luciferases. We successively introduced four amino acid mutations into the luciferase based on a predicted structure of Eluc using homology modeling. Results showed that quadruple mutations R214K/H241K/S246H/H347A into the beetle luciferase emit luminescence with emission maximum at 626 nm, 88-nm red-shift from the wild-type luciferase. This mutant luciferase is anticipated for application in in vivo multicolor imaging in living samples.

  5. The role of proline substitutions within flexible regions on thermostability of luciferase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haoran; Zhao, Yang; Guo, Chao; Gan, Yiru; Huang, He

    2015-01-01

    Improving the stability of firefly luciferase has been a critical issue for its wider industrial applications. Studies about hyperthermophile proteins show that flexibility could be an effective indicator to find out weak spots to engineering thermostability of proteins. However, the relationship among flexibility, activity and stability in most of proteins is unclear. Proline is the most rigid residue and can be introduced to rigidify flexible regions to enhance thermostability of proteins. We firstly apply three different methods, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, B-FITTER and framework rigidity optimized dynamics algorithm (FRODA) to determine the flexible regions of Photinus pyralis luciferase: Fragment 197-207; Fragment 471-481 and Fragment 487-495. Then, introduction of proline is used to rigidify these flexible regions. Two mutants D476P and H489P within most flexible regions are finally designed. In the results, H489P mutant shows improved thermostability while maintaining its catalytic efficiency compared to that of wild type luciferase. Flexibility analysis confirms that the overall rigidity and local rigidity of H489P mutant are greatly strengthened. D476P mutant shows decreased thermosatbility and the reason for this is elucidated at the molecular level. S307P mutation is randomly chosen outside the flexible regions as a control. Thermostability analysis shows that S307P mutation has decreased kinetic stability and enhanced thermodynamic stability.

  6. Polyphenol Oxidase Activity Expression in Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Romero, Diana; Solano, Francisco; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing of the genome of Ralstonia solanacearum revealed several genes that putatively code for polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). To study the actual expression of these genes, we looked for and detected all kinds of PPO activities, including laccase, cresolase, and catechol oxidase activities, in cellular extracts of this microorganism. The conditions for the PPO assays were optimized for the phenolic substrate, pH, and sodium dodecyl sulfate concentration used. It was demonstrated that three different PPOs are expressed. The genes coding for the enzymes were unambiguously correlated with the enzymatic activities detected by generation of null mutations in the genes by using insertional mutagenesis with a suicide plasmid and estimating the changes in the levels of enzymatic activities compared to the levels in the wild-type strain. The protein encoded by the RSp1530 locus is a multicopper protein with laccase activity. Two other genes, RSc0337 and RSc1501, code for nonblue copper proteins exhibiting homology to tyrosinases. The product of RSc0337 has strong tyrosine hydroxylase activity, and it has been shown that this enzyme is involved in melanin synthesis by R. solanacearum. The product of the RSc1501 gene is an enzyme that shows a clear preference for oxidation of o-diphenols. Preliminary characterization of the mutants obtained indicated that PPOs expressed by R. solanacearum may participate in resistance to phenolic compounds since the mutants exhibited higher sensitivity to l-tyrosine than the wild-type strain. These results suggest a possible role in the pathogenic process to avoid plant resistance mechanisms involving the participation of phenolic compounds. PMID:16269713

  7. Comparison of human optimized bacterial luciferase, firefly luciferase, and green fluorescent protein for continuous imaging of cell culture and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan M.; Hahn, Ruth E.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Baek, Seung J.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent reporter systems have enabled the rapid and continued growth of the optical imaging field over the last two decades. Of particular interest has been noninvasive signal detection from mammalian tissues under both cell culture and whole animal settings. Here we report on the advantages and limitations of imaging using a recently introduced bacterial luciferase (lux) reporter system engineered for increased bioluminescent expression in the mammalian cellular environment. Comparison with the bioluminescent firefly luciferase (Luc) system and green fluorescent protein system under cell culture conditions demonstrated a reduced average radiance, but maintained a more constant level of bioluminescent output without the need for substrate addition or exogenous excitation to elicit the production of signal. Comparison with the Luc system following subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection into nude mice hosts demonstrated the ability to obtain similar detection patterns with in vitro experiments at cell population sizes above 2.5 × 104 cells but at the cost of increasing overall image integration time. PMID:21529093

  8. Mutagenesis of solvent-exposed amino acids in Photinus pyralis luciferase improves thermostability and pH-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Law, G H Erica; Gandelman, Olga A; Tisi, Laurence C; Lowe, Christopher R; Murray, James A H

    2006-07-15

    Firefly luciferase catalyses a two-step reaction, using ATP-Mg2+, firefly luciferin and molecular oxygen as substrates, leading to the efficient emission of yellow-green light. We report the identification of novel luciferase mutants which combine improved pH-tolerance and thermostability and that retain the specific activity of the wild-type enzyme. These were identified by the mutagenesis of solvent-exposed non-conserved hydrophobic amino acids to hydrophilic residues in Photinus pyralis firefly luciferase followed by in vivo activity screening. Mutants F14R, L35Q, V182K, I232K and F465R were found to be the preferred substitutions at the respective positions. The effects of these amino acid replacements are additive, since combination of the five substitutions produced an enzyme with greatly improved pH-tolerance and stability up to 45 degrees C. All mutants, including the mutant with all five substitutions, showed neither a decrease in specific activity relative to the recombinant wild-type enzyme, nor any substantial differences in kinetic constants. It is envisaged that the combined mutant will be superior to wild-type luciferase for many in vitro and in vivo applications.

  9. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient γ-ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Timothy O; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-06-01

    Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M(2) seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione depletion

  10. Thrombin-induced CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β activation and IL-8/CXCL8 expression via MEKK1, ERK, and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Nai, Po-Ling; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Yu, Chung-Chi; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Thrombin, a serine protease, is a well-known coagulation factor generated during vascular injury and plays an important role in lung inflammation. We previously showed that the c-Src- and Rac/PI3K/Akt-dependent NF-κB pathways are involved in thrombin-induced IL-8/CXCL8 expression in human lung epithelial cells (A549). In this study, we investigated the role of the MEK kinase (MEKK)1/ERK/p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK)1-dependent C/EBPβ signaling pathway in thrombin-induced IL-8/CXCL8 expression. Thrombin-induced IL-8/CXCL8 release and IL-8/CXCL8-luciferase activity were attenuated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) of C/EBPβ and by cells transfected with the C/EBPβ site mutation of the IL-8/CXCL8 construct. Moreover, thrombin-induced κB-luciferase activity was also inhibited by C/EBPβ siRNA. The thrombin-induced increases in IL-8/CXCL8 release and IL-8/CXCL8-luciferase were also inhibited by MEKK1 siRNA, PD98059 (an MEK inhibitor), U0126 (an ERK inhibitor), and RSK1 siRNA. Treatment of cells with thrombin caused an increase in C/EBPβ phosphorylation at Thr(235), C/EBPβ-luciferase activity, recruitment of C/EBPβ to the IL-8/CXCL8 promoter, and C/EBPβ-specific DNA complex formation. Furthermore, thrombin-mediated C/EBPβ phosphorylation and C/EBPβ-luciferase activity were inhibited by MEKK1 siRNA, PD98059, and RSK1 siRNA. Stimulation of cells with thrombin resulted in an increase in RSK1 phosphorylation at Thr(359)/Ser(363), and this effect was inhibited by MEKK1 siRNA and PD98059. The thrombin-induced increase in ERK activation was inhibited by MEKK1 siRNA. These results imply that thrombin activates the MEKK1/ERK/RSK1 signaling pathway, which in turn initiates C/EBPβ activation, recruitment of C/EBPβ to the IL-8/CXCL8 promoter, and C/EBPβ-specific DNA complex formation, and ultimately induces IL-8/CXCL8 expression and release in lung epithelial cells.

  11. NonO binds to the CpG island of oct4 promoter and functions as a transcriptional activator of oct4 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoojin; Lee, Ja-Myong; Hwang, Min-Young; Son, Gi-hoon; Geum, Dongho

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between oct4 gene expression patterns and CpG sites methylation profiles during ES cell differentiation into neurons, and identified relevant binding factor. The oct4 gene expression level gradually declined as ES cell differentiation progressed, and the CpG sites in the oct4 proximal enhancer (PE) and promoter regions were methylated in concert with ES cell differentiation. An electro-mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that putative proteins bind to CpG sites in the oct4 PE/promoter. We purified CpG binding proteins with DNAbinding purification method, and NonO was identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. EMSA with specific competitors revealed that NonO specifically binds to the conserved CCGGTGAC sequence in the oct4 promoter. Methylation at a specific cytosine residue (CC* GGTGAC) reduced the binding affinity of NonO for the recognition sequence. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that NonO binds to the unmethylated oct4 promoter. There were no changes in the NonO mRNA and protein levels between ES cells and differentiated cells. The transcriptional role of NonO in oct4 gene expression was evaluated by luciferase assays and knockdown experiments. The luciferase activity significantly increased threefold when the NonO expression vector was cotransfected with the NonO recognition sequence, indicating that NonO has a transcription activator effect on oct4 gene expression. In accordance with this effect, when NonO expression was inhibited by siRNA treatment, oct4 expression was also significantly reduced. In summary, we purified NonO, a novel protein that binds to the CpG island of oct4 promoter, and positively regulates oct4 gene expression in ES cells.

  12. Transcription Factor ZBED6 Mediates IGF2 Gene Expression by Regulating Promoter Activity and DNA Methylation in Myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Liang-Zhi; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Li, Ming-Xun; Sun, Yu-Jia; Li, Cong-Jun; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were upregulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels were negatively associated with the methylation status in beef cattle (P < 0.05). A luciferase assay for the IGF2 intron 3 and P3 promoter showed that the mutant-type 439 A-SNP-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the wild-type 439 G-SNP-pGL3 construct (P < 0.05). An over-expression assay revealed that ZBED6 regulate IGF2 expression and promote myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of ZBED6 led to IGF2 expression change in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that ZBED6 inhibits IGF2 activity and expression via a G to A transition disrupts the interaction. Thus, we propose that ZBED6 plays a critical role in myogenic differentiation.

  13. Mitotane induces CYP3A4 expression via activation of the steroid and xenobiotic receptor.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Akira; Igarashi-Migitaka, Junko; Koibuchi, Noriyuki; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2013-03-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare disease with an extremely poor prognosis. Mitotane alone or in combination with other cytotoxic drugs is a common therapeutic option for ACC. In addition to its adrenolytic function, mitotane has been known for decades to increase the metabolic clearance of glucocorticoids. It was recently shown that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib is also rapidly metabolized in patients treated with mitotane, indicating that mitotane engages in clinically relevant drug interactions. Although the precise mechanism of these interactions is not well understood, cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase 3A4 (CYP3A4) is a key enzyme to inactivate both glucocorticoids and sunitinib. The nuclear receptor steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR (NR1I2)) is one of the key transcriptional regulators of CYP3A4 gene expression in the liver and intestine. A variety of xenobiotics bind to SXR and stimulate transcription of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) located in the CYP3A4 gene promoter. In this study, we evaluated the effects of mitotane on SXR-mediated transcription in vitro by luciferase reporter analysis, SXR-steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1) interactions, quantitative real-time PCR analysis of CYP3A4 expression, SXR knockdown, and CYP3A4 enzyme activity assays using human hepatocyte-derived cells. We found that mitotane activated SXR-mediated transcription of the XREs. Mitotane recruited SRC1 to the ligand-binding domain of SXR. Mitotane increased CYP3A4 mRNA levels, which was attenuated by SXR knockdown. Finally, we showed that mitotane increased CYP3A4 enzyme activity. We conclude that mitotane can induce CYP3A4 gene expression and suggest that mitotane is used cautiously due to its drug-drug interactions.

  14. Effect of Regulatory Element DNA Methylation on Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rivier-Cordey, Anne-Sophie; Caetano, Carlos; Fish, Richard J.; Kruithof, Egbert K. O.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the tissue-type plasminogen activator gene (t-PA; gene name PLAT) is regulated, in part, by epigenetic mechanisms. We investigated the relationship between PLAT methylation and PLAT expression in five primary human cell types and six transformed cell lines. CpG methylation was analyzed in the proximal PLAT gene promoter and near the multihormone responsive enhancer (MHRE) -7.3 kilobase pairs upstream of the PLAT transcriptional start site (TSS, -7.3 kb). In Bowes melanoma cells, the PLAT promoter and the MHRE were fully unmethylated and t-PA secretion was extremely high. In other cell types the region from -647 to -366 was fully methylated, whereas an unmethylated stretch of DNA from -121 to +94 was required but not sufficient for detectable t-PA mRNA and t-PA secretion. DNA methylation near the MHRE was not correlated with t-PA secretion. Specific methylation of the PLAT promoter region -151 to +151, inserted into a firefly luciferase reporter gene, abolished reporter gene activity. The region -121 to + 94 contains two well-described regulatory elements, a PMA-responsive element (CRE) near -106 and a GC-rich region containing an Sp1 binding site near +59. Methylation of double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the CRE or the GC-rich region had little or no effect on transcription factor binding. Methylated CpGs may attract co-repressor complexes that contain histone deacetylases (HDAC). However, reporter gene activity of methylated plasmids was not restored by the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin. In conclusion, efficient PLAT gene expression requires a short stretch of unmethylated CpG sites in the proximal promoter. PMID:27973546

  15. Laboratory procedures manual for the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Knust, E. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Vance, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A manual on the procedures and instruments developed for the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) luciferase assay is presented. Data cover, laboratory maintenance, maintenance of bacterial cultures, bacteria measurement, reagents, luciferase procedures, and determination of microbal susceptibility to antibiotics.

  16. Optimization of the firefly luciferase reaction for analytical purposes.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Arne

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of assays has two purposes: (1) to increase the sensitivity of the assay so that low levels of the analyte can be determined; and (2) to prevent small changes of the reaction conditions from having a large impact on the outcome of the assay. The two purposes are usually equally important, as has been recognized in well-established branches of analytical chemistry, such as clinical chemistry. The firefly luciferase reaction can be used for many types of assays. The way to optimize these assays is not trivial, as there are many parameters to consider. Furthermore, as there are now several types of recombinant luciferases available, one has to decide which is the most suitable for each individual assay. The optimization is influenced by the conditions and requirements under which the assay is performed. Special attention is given to ways to calibrate assays. Examples on optimization are mainly taken from the author's own work during 40 years using assays based on the firefly luciferase reaction.

  17. Tracking of dendritic cell migration into lymph nodes using molecular imaging with sodium iodide symporter and enhanced firefly luciferase genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Won; Yoon, Seung Yun; Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Choi, Yoon Ju; Lee, Hong Je; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Lee, Jaetae

    2015-05-14

    We sought to evaluate the feasibility of molecular imaging using the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene as a reporter, in addition to the enhanced firefly luciferase (effluc) gene, for tracking dendritic cell (DCs) migration in living mice. A murine dendritic cell line (DC2.4) co-expressing hNIS and effluc genes (DC/NF) was established. For the DC-tracking study, mice received either parental DCs or DC/NF cells in the left or right footpad, respectively, and combined I-124 PET/CT and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were performed. In vivo PET/CT imaging with I-124 revealed higher activity of the radiotracer in the draining popliteal lymph nodes (DPLN) of the DC/NF injection site at day 1 than DC injection site (p < 0.05). The uptake value further increased at day 4 (p < 0.005). BLI also demonstrated migration of DC/NF cells to the DPLNs at day 1 post-injection, and signals at the DPLNs were much higher at day 4. These data support the feasibility of hNIS reporter gene imaging in the tracking of DC migration to lymphoid organs in living mice. DCs expressing the NIS reporter gene could be a useful tool to optimize various strategies of cell-based immunotherapy.

  18. Non-invasive activation of optogenetic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkner, Elisabeth; Berglund, Ken; Klein, Marguerita E.; Augustine, George J.; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2014-03-01

    The manipulation of genetically targeted neurons with light (optogenetics) continues to provide unprecedented avenues into studying the function of the mammalian brain. However, potential translation into the clinical arena faces a number of significant hurdles, foremost among them the need for insertion of optical fibers into the brain to deliver light to opsins expressed on neuronal membranes. In order to overcome these hardware-related problems, we have developed an alternative strategy for delivering light to opsins which does not involve fiber implants. Rather, the light is produced by a protein, luciferase, which oxidizes intravenously applied substrate, thereby emitting bioluminescence. In proof-ofprinciple studies employing a fusion protein of a light-generating luciferase to a light-sensing opsin (luminopsin), we showed that light emitted by Gaussia luciferase is indeed able to activate channelrhodopsin, allowing modulation of neuronal activity when expressed in cultured neurons. Here we assessed applicability of the concept in vivo in mice expressing luminopsins from viral vectors and from genetically engineered transgenes. The experiments demonstrate that intravenously applied substrate reaches neurons in the brain, causing the luciferase to produce bioluminescence which can be imaged in vivo, and that activation of channelrhodopsin by bioluminescence is sufficient to affect behavior. Further developments of such technology based on combining optogenetics with bioluminescence - i.e. combining lightsensing molecules with biologically produced light through luciferases - should bring optogenetics closer to clinical applications.

  19. Elevated SP-1 Transcription Factor Expression and Activity Drives Basal and Hypoxia-induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deacon, Karl; Onion, David; Kumari, Rajendra; Watson, Susan A.; Knox, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    VEGF plays a central role in angiogenesis in cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors have increased microvascular density, localized hypoxia, and high VEGF expression levels; however, there is a lack of understanding of how oncogenic and tumor microenvironment changes such as hypoxia lead to greater VEGF expression in lung and other cancers. We show that NSCLC cells secreted higher levels of VEGF than normal airway epithelial cells. Actinomycin D inhibited all NSCLC VEGF secretion, and VEGF minimal promoter-luciferase reporter constructs were constitutively active until the last 85 base pairs before the transcription start site containing three SP-1 transcription factor-binding sites; mutation of these VEGF promoter SP-1-binding sites eliminated VEGF promoter activity. Furthermore, dominant negative SP-1, mithramycin A, and SP-1 shRNA decreased VEGF promoter activity, whereas overexpression of SP-1 increased VEGF promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated SP-1, p300, and PCA/F histone acetyltransferase binding and histone H4 hyperacetylation at the VEGF promoter in NSCLC cells. Cultured NSCLC cells expressed higher levels of SP-1 protein than normal airway epithelial cells, and double-fluorescence immunohistochemistry showed a strong correlation between SP-1 and VEGF in human NSCLC tumors. In addition, hypoxia-driven VEGF expression in NSCLC cells was SP-1-dependent, with hypoxia increasing SP-1 activity and binding to the VEGF promoter. These studies are the first to demonstrate that overexpression of SP-1 plays a central role in hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion. PMID:22992725

  20. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by hydrogen peroxide transcriptionally inhibits NaV1.5 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Huo, Rong; Cai, Benzhi; Lu, Yan; Ye, Bo; Li, Xiang; Li, Faqian; Xu, Haodong

    2016-07-01

    Oxidants and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling have been shown to decrease cardiac Na(+) channel activity by suppressing NaV1.5 expression. Our aims are to determine if hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), one oxidant of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and promotes β-catenin nuclear activity, leading to suppression of NaV1.5 expression and if this suppression requires the interaction of β-catenin with its nuclear partner, TCF4 (also called TCF7L2) to decrease SCN5a promoter activity. The results demonstrated that H2O2 increased β-catenin, but not TCF4 nuclear localization determined by immunofluorescence without affecting total β-catenin protein level. Furthermore, H2O2 exerted a dose- and time-dependent suppressive effect on NaV1.5 expression. RT-PCR and/or Western blot analyses revealed that overexpressing active form of β-catenin or stabilizing β-catenin by GSK-3β inhibitors, LiCl and Bio, suppressed NaV1.5 expression in HL-1 cells. In contrast, destabilization of β-catenin by a constitutively active GSK-3β mutant (S9A) upregulated NaV1.5 expression. Whole-cell recording showed that LiCl significantly inhibited Na(+) channel activity in these cells. Using immunoprecipitation (IP), we showed that β-catenin interacted with TCF4 indicating that β-catenin as a co-transfactor, regulates NaV1.5 expression through TCF4. Analyses of the SCN5a promoter sequences among different species by using VISTA tools indicated that SCN5a promoter harbors TCF4 binding sites. Chromatin IP assays demonstrated that both β-catenin and TCF4 were recruited in the SCN5a promoter, and regulated its activity. Luciferase promoter assays exhibited that β-catenin inhibited the SCN5a promoter activity at a dose-dependent manner and this inhibition required TCF4. Small interfering (Si) RNA targeting β-catenin significantly increased SCN5a promoter activity, leading to enhanced NaV1.5 expression. As expected, β-catenin SiRNA prevents H2O2 suppressive effects

  1. Photodynamic therapy using luciferase nanoconjugate as a treatment for colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koritarov, Tamara

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) has proven itself in previous studies to be a successful therapeutic treatment for surface tumors, but its effectiveness is limited to only shallow depths that allow for the penetration of light. This study demonstrates that we have improved upon the conventional method of PDT and have overcome the previous depth limitation by creating the light at the location of the tumor in situ. We conjugated a bioluminescent protein, Luciferase, to a semiconductor nanoparticle, TiO2, and with a cell specific antibody, anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody C225. The nanoconjugate, TiDoL-C225, was then activated by ATP and Luciferin in a reaction that creates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induces apoptosis in the tumor cells. We created the optimal nanoconjugate synthesis protocol to make TiDoL and TiDoL-C225 for use in the PDT treatment. The TiDoL-C225 nanoconjugate is able to bind specifically to colon caner cells as the C225 antibody recognizes EGFR expressed at the surface of the cells, and further, when activated it will react only with the tumor cells. The optimal cell staining protocols were developed to visualize the treatment process and later analyze with the laser confocal microscope. The TiDoL nanoconjugate was found to only be operational and effective at killing tumor cells after being activated by Luciferin and ATP, which then enhances the control we have over the therapy. The TiDoL-C225 nanoconjugate increases the efficacy of binding to tumor cells and the speed of the reaction in the cells to begin apoptosis, even in lower concentrations when compared to the free TiDoL nanoconjugate. Finally, our PDT technique allowed us to monitor the tumor cells as they begin to undergo apoptosis in less than five minutes after the Luciferin was added to activate the reaction. The advantage of our method of PDT with the TiDoL-C225 nanoconjugate is that it can be used for early detection as well as developed into an effective treatment for cancers in all

  2. A high-throughput cell-based Gaussia luciferase reporter assay for identifying modulators of fibulin-3 secretion.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, John D; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2013-07-01

    An R345W mutation in fibulin-3 causes its inefficient secretion, increased intracellular steady-state levels, and the macular dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese (ML), a disease similar to age-related macular degeneration. It is unknown whether R345W causes ML through increased intracellular levels, by the secretion of a potentially aggregation-prone protein, or both. To identify small molecules that alter the secretion of fibulin-3, we developed ARPE19 retinal cell lines that inducibly express wild-type (WT) or R345W fibulin-3 fused to an enhanced Gaussia luciferase (eGLuc2). Screening of the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds demonstrated that these cell lines and the GLuc assay are suitable for high-throughput chemical screening. Two estrogen-related compounds enhanced fibulin-3 secretion, whereas a diverse series of small molecules reduced fibulin-3 secretion. A counterscreen identified compounds that did not substantially alter the secretion of unfused eGLuc2, demonstrating at least partial selectivity for fibulin-3. A secondary assay using untagged fibulin-3 confirmed that the top three inhibitory compounds reduced R345W fibulin-3 secretion. Interestingly, in untagged fibulin-3 studies, one compound, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, reduced R345W fibulin-3 secretion while minimally enhancing WT fibulin-3 secretion, the desired activity and selectivity we sought for ML. The identified compounds could serve as tools for probing the etiology of fibulin-3-related diseases.

  3. A High-Throughput Cell-Based Gaussia Luciferase Reporter Assay for Identifying Modulators of Fibulin-3 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Hulleman, John D.; Brown, Steven J.; Rosen, Hugh; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2015-01-01

    An R345W mutation in fibulin-3 causes its inefficient secretion, increased intracellular steady-state levels, and the macular dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese (ML), a disease similar to age-related macular degeneration. It is unknown whether R345W causes ML through increased intracellular levels, by the secretion of a potentially aggregation-prone protein, or both. To identify small molecules that alter the secretion of fibulin-3, we developed ARPE19 retinal cell lines that inducibly express wild-type (WT) or R345W fibulin-3 fused to an enhanced Gaussia luciferase (eGLuc2). Screening of the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds demonstrated that these cell lines and the GLuc assay are suitable for high-throughput chemical screening. Two estrogen-related compounds enhanced fibulin-3 secretion, whereas a diverse series of small molecules reduced fibulin-3 secretion. A counterscreen identified compounds that did not substantially alter the secretion of unfused eGLuc2, demonstrating at least partial selectivity for fibulin-3. A secondary assay using untagged fibulin-3 confirmed that the top three inhibitory compounds reduced R345W fibulin-3 secretion. Interestingly, in untagged fibulin-3 studies, one compound, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, reduced R345W fibulin-3 secretion while minimally enhancing WT fibulin-3 secretion, the desired activity and selectivity we sought for ML. The identified compounds could serve as tools for probing the etiology of fibulin-3–related diseases. PMID:23230284

  4. Increased expression of Gp96 by HBx-induced NF-κB activation feedback enhances hepatitis B virus production.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hongxia; Yan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaojun; Gao, Yanzhou; Xu, Yaxing; Wang, Fusheng; Meng, Songdong

    2013-01-01

    Elevated expression of heat shock protein gp96 in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients is positively correlated with the progress of HBV-induced diseases, but little is known regarding the molecular mechanism of virus-induced gp96 expression and its impact on HBV infection. In this study, up-regulation of gp96 by HBV replication was confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. Among HBV components, HBV x protein (HBx) was found to increase gp96 promoter activity and enhance gp96 expression by using a luciferase reporter system, and western blot analysis. Further, we found that HBx-mediated regulation of gp96 expression requires a NF-κB cis-regulatory element on the gp96 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation results demonstrated that HBx promotes the binding of NF-κB to the gp96 promoter. Significantly, both gain- and loss-of-function studies showed that gp96 enhances HBV production in HBV-transfected cells and a mouse model based on hydrodynamic transfection. Moreover, up-regulated gp96 expression was observed in HBV-infected patients, and gp96 levels were correlated with serum viral loads. Thus, our work demonstrates a positive feedback regulatory pathway involving gp96 and HBV, which may contribute to persistent HBV infection. Our data also indicate that modulation of gp96 function may represent a novel strategy for the intervention of HBV infection.

  5. A mouse model for studying the clearance of hepatitis B virus in vivo using a luciferase reporter.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sheng-qiang; Du, Juan; Yan, Hu; Zhou, Qian-qian; Zhou, Yong; Yuan, Zhen-nan; Yan, Shao-duo; Fu, Qiu-xia; Wang, Xiao-hui; Jia, Shuai-zheng; Peng, Jian-chun; Zhang, Yang-gen; Zhan, Lin-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection remains a global problem, despite the effectiveness of the Hepatitis B vaccine in preventing infection. The resolution of Hepatitis B virus infection has been believed to be attributable to virus-specific immunity. In vivo direct evaluation of anti-HBV immunity in the liver is currently not possible. We have developed a new assay system that detects HBV clearance in the liver after the hydrodynamic transfer of a reporter gene and over-length, linear HBV DNA into hepatocytes, followed by bioluminescence imaging of the reporter gene (Fluc). We employed bioluminescence detection of luciferase expression in HBV-infected hepatocytes to measure the Hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg)-specific immune responses directed against these infected hepatocytes. Only HBcAg-immunized, but not mock-treated, animals decreased the amounts of luciferase expression, HBsAg and viral DNA from the liver at day 28 after hydrodynamic infection with over-length HBV DNA, indicating that control of luciferase expression correlates with viral clearance from infected hepatocytes.

  6. Trigger factor assists the refolding of heterodimeric but not monomeric luciferases.

    PubMed

    Melkina, O E; Goryanin, I I; Manukhov, I V; Baranova, A V; Kolb, V A; Svetlov, M S; Zavilgelsky, G B

    2014-01-01

    The refolding of thermally inactivated protein by ATP-independent trigger factor (TF) and ATP-dependent DnaKJE chaperones was comparatively analyzed. Heterodimeric (αβ) bacterial luciferases of Aliivibrio fischeri, Photobacterium leiognathi, and Vibrio harveyi as well as monomeric luciferases of Vibrio harveyi and Luciola mingrelica (firefly) were used as substrates. In the presence of TF, thermally inactivated heterodimeric bacterial luciferases refold, while monomeric luciferases do not refold. These observations were made both in vivo (Escherichia coli ΔdnaKJ containing plasmids with tig gene) and in vitro (purified TF). Unlike TF, the DnaKJE chaperone system refolds both monomeric and heterodimeric luciferases with equal efficiency.

  7. Activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 signaling induces CD46 expression and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Ralf; Huang, Mei; Gritsko, Tanya; Karras, Jim; Enkemann, Steve; Mesa, Tania; Nam, Sangkil; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2007-08-01

    CD46 is one of the complement-regulatory proteins expressed on the surface of normal and tumor cells for protection against complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Cancer cells need to access the blood circulation for continued growth and metastasis, thus exposing themselves to destruction by complement system components. Previous studies have established that the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor is persistently activated in a wide variety of human cancer cells and primary tumor tissues compared with their normal counterparts. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified the CD46 gene as a target for activated STAT3 signaling in human breast and prostate cancer cells. The CD46 promoter contains two binding sites for activated STAT3 and mutations introduced into the major site abolished STAT3 binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirms binding of STAT3 to the CD46 promoter. CD46 promoter activity is induced by activation of STAT3 and blocked by a dominant-negative form of STAT3 in luciferase reporter assays. CD46 mRNA expression is induced by interleukin-6 and by transient transfection of normal human epithelial cells with a persistently active mutant construct of STAT3, STAT3C. Furthermore, we show that inhibition of STAT3-mediated CD46 cell surface expression sensitizes DU145 prostate cancer cells to cytotoxicity in an in vitro complement lysis assay using rabbit anti-DU145 antiserum and rabbit complement. These results show that activated STAT3 signaling induces the CD46 promoter and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity, suggesting a potential mechanism whereby oncogenic signaling contributes to tumor cell evasion of antibody-mediated immunity.

  8. A novel luciferase fusion protein for highly sensitive optical imaging: from single-cell analysis to in vivo whole-body bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, Laura; Blankevoort, Vicky; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Kaijzel, Eric L

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have different advantages and disadvantages depending on the application. Bioluminescence imaging is now the most sensitive optical technique for tracking cells, promoter activity studies, or for longitudinal in vivo preclinical studies. Far-red and near-infrared fluorescence imaging have the advantage of being suitable for both ex vivo and in vivo analysis and have translational potential, thanks to the availability of very sensitive imaging instrumentation. Here, we report the development and validation of a new luciferase fusion reporter generated by the fusion of the firefly luciferase Luc2 to the far-red fluorescent protein TurboFP635 by a 14-amino acid linker peptide. Expression of the fusion protein, named TurboLuc, was analyzed in human embryonic kidney cells, (HEK)-293 cells, via Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and in vivo optical imaging. The created fusion protein maintained the characteristics of the original bioluminescent and fluorescent protein and showed no toxicity when expressed in living cells. To assess the sensitivity of the reporter for in vivo imaging, transfected cells were subcutaneously injected in animals. Detection limits of cells were 5 × 10(3) and 5 × 10(4) cells for bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging, respectively. In addition, hydrodynamics-based in vivo gene delivery using a minicircle vector expressing TurboLuc allowed for the analysis of luminescent signals over time in deep tissue. Bioluminescence could be monitored for over 30 days in the liver of animals. In conclusion, TurboLuc combines the advantages of both bioluminescence and fluorescence and allows for highly sensitive optical imaging ranging from single-cell analysis to in vivo whole-body bioluminescence imaging.

  9. Rapid and scalable assembly of firefly luciferase substrates†

    PubMed Central

    McCutcheon, David C.; Porterfield, William B.; Prescher, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging with luciferase-luciferin pairs is a popular method for visualizing biological processes in vivo. Unfortunately, most luciferins are difficult to access and remain prohibitively expensive for some imaging applications. Here we report cost-effective and efficient syntheses of D-luciferin and 6′-aminoluciferin, two widely used bioluminescent substrates. Our approach employs inexpensive anilines and Appel's salt to generate the luciferin cores in a single pot. Additionally, the syntheses are scalable and can provide multi-gram quantities of both substrates. The streamlined production and improved accessibility of luciferin reagents will bolster in vivo imaging efforts. PMID:25525906

  10. Application of luciferase assay for ATP to antimicrobial drug susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The susceptibility of bacteria, particularly those derived from body fluids, to antimicrobial agents is determined in terms of an ATP index measured by culturing a bacterium in a growth medium. The amount of ATP is assayed in a sample of the cultured bacterium by measuring the amount of luminescent light emitted when the bacterial ATP is reacted with a luciferase-luciferin mixture. The sample of the cultured bacterium is subjected to an antibiotic agent. The amount of bacterial adenosine triphosphate is assayed after treatment with the antibiotic by measuring the luminescent light resulting from the reaction. The ATP index is determined from the values obtained from the assay procedures.

  11. Stable Tagging of Rhizobium meliloti with the Firefly Luciferase Gene for Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Cebolla, Angel; Ruiz-Berraquero, Francisco; Palomares, Antonio Jose

    1993-01-01

    A system for stable tagging of gram-negative bacteria with the firefly luciferase gene, luc, is described. A previously constructed fusion constitutively expressing luc from the λpR promoter was used. Stable integration into the bacterial genome was achieved by use of mini-Tn5 delivery vectors. The procedure developed was applied for tagging of representative gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Rhizobium meliloti, Pseudomonas putida, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The system permitted the detection of tagged R. meliloti in the presence of more than 105 CFU per plate without the use of any selective markers (such as antibiotic resistance genes). No significant differences in growth rates or soil survival were found between the marked strain and the wild-type strain. Studies of bioluminescent R. meliloti also revealed a good correlation between cell biomass and bioluminescence. The firefly luciferase tagging system is an easy, safe, and sensitive method for the detection and enumeration of bacteria in the environment. Images PMID:16349015

  12. Statins suppress glucose-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression by regulating RhoA and nuclear factor-κB activities in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiao-Qing; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Yao, Ning-Hua; Qian, Juan; Yang, Xiang-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible proinflammatory signaling pathways involved in statin inhibition of glucose-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs). Primary rat CMECs were grown in the presence of 5.7 or 23 mmol/L glucose. PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were measured by realtime polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. A pull-down assay was performed to determine RhoA activity. IκBα protein expression was measured by Western blotting, nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and its transcription activity was determined by a dual luciferase reporter gene assay. PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were both increased with high glucose concentrations, but they were significantly suppressed by simvastatin and atorvastatin treatment (P < 0.01) and the effects were reversed by mevalonate (100 μmol/L) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (10 μmol/L) but not farnesyl pyrophosphate (10 μmol/L). Such effects were similar to those of a RhoA inhibitor, C3 exoenzyme (5 μg/mL), inhibitors of RhoA kinase (ROCK), Y-27632 (10 μmol/L) and hydroxyfasudil (10 μmol/L) and an NF-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7082 (5 μmol/L). High glucose-induced RhoA and NF-κB activations in CMECs were both significantly inhibited by statins (P < 0.01). Simvastatin and atorvastatin equally suppress high glucose-induced PAI-1 expression. These effects of statins may occur partly by regulating the RhoA/ROCK-NF-κB pathway. The multifunctional roles of statins may be particularly beneficial for patients with metabolic syndrome.

  13. A novel firefly luciferase biosensor enhances the detection of apoptosis induced by ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Junwei; Zhang, Huan; Fang, Liurong; Xi, Yongqiang; Zhou, Yanrong; Luo, Rui; Wang, Dang Xiao, Shaobo; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • We developed a novel firefly luciferase based biosensor to detect apoptosis. • The novel biosensor 233-DnaE-DEVDG was reliable, sensitive and convenient. • 233-DnaE-DEVDG faithfully indicated ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced apoptosis. • EsxA, esxT and esxL in ESAT-6 family proteins induced apoptosis. • Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. - Abstract: The activation of caspase-3 is a key surrogate marker for detecting apoptosis. To quantitate caspase-3 activity, we constructed a biosensor comprising a recombinant firefly luciferase containing a caspase-3 cleavage site. When apoptosis was induced, caspase-3 cleavage of the biosensor activated firefly luciferase by a factor greater than 25. The assay conveniently detected apoptosis in real time, indicating that it will facilitate drug discovery. We screened ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and found that esxA, esxT and esxL induced apoptosis. Further, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the NF-κB-regulated genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that this assay is useful for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize proteins and drugs that regulate apoptosis.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) Infection Using Co-Culture with Jurkat LTR-Luciferase or Jurkat LTR-GFP Reporter Cells.

    PubMed

    Alais, Sandrine; Dutartre, Hélène; Mahieux, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    Unlike HIV-1, HTLV-1 viral transmission requires cell-to-cell contacts, while cell-free virions are poorly infectious and almost absent from body fluids. Though the virus uses three nonexclusive mechanisms to infect new target cells: (1) MTOC polarization followed by formation of a virological synapse and viral transfer into a synaptic cleft, (2) genesis of a viral biofilm and its transfer of embedded viruses, or (3) HTLV-1 transmission using conduits. The Tax transactivator and the p8 viral proteins are involved in virological synapse and nanotube formation respectively.HTLV-1 transcription from the viral promoter (i.e., LTR) requires the Tax protein that is absent from the viral particle and is expressed after productive infection. The present chapter focuses on a series of protocols used to quantify HTLV-1 de novo infection of target cells. These techniques do not discriminate between the different modes of transmission, but allow an accurate measure of productive infection. We used cell lines that are stably transfected with LTR-GFP or LTR-luciferase plasmids and quantified Green Fluorescent Protein expression or luciferase activity, since both of them reflect Tax expression.

  15. Constitutively active RAS signaling reduces 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D-mediated gene transcription in intestinal epithelial cells by reducing vitamin D receptor expression.

    PubMed

    DeSmet, Marsha L; Fleet, James C

    2017-01-16

    High vitamin D status is associated with reduced colon cancer risk but these studies ignore the diversity in the molecular etiology of colon cancer. RAS activating mutations are common in colon cancer and they activate pro-proliferative signaling pathways. We examined the impact of RAS activating mutations on 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D)-mediated gene expression in cultured colon and intestinal cell lines. Transient transfection of Caco-2 cells with a constitutively active mutant K-RAS (G12 V) significantly reduced 1,25(OH)2D-induced activity of both a human 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 24 hydroxyase (CYP24A1) promoter-luciferase and an artificial 3X vitamin D response element (VDRE) promoter-luciferase reporter gene. Young Adult Mouse Colon (YAMC) and Rat Intestinal Epithelial (RIE) cell lines with stable expression of mutant H-RAS had suppressed 1,25(OH)2D-mediated induction of CYP24A1 mRNA. The RAS effects were associated with lower Vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA and protein levels in YAMC and RIE cells and they could be partially reversed by VDR overexpression. RAS-mediated suppression of VDR levels was not due to either reduced VDR mRNA stability or increased VDR gene methylation. However, chromatin accessibility to the VDR gene at the proximal promoter (-300bp), an enhancer region at -6kb, and an enhancer region located in exon 3 was significantly reduced in RAS transformed YAMC cells (YAMC-RAS). These data show that constitutively active RAS signaling suppresses 1,25(OH)2D-mediated gene transcription in colon epithelial cells by reducing VDR gene transcription but the mechanism for this suppression is not yet known. These data suggest that cancers with RAS-activating mutations may be less responsive to vitamin D mediated treatment or chemoprevention.

  16. Hyperthermia in the febrile range induces HSP72 expression proportional to exposure temperature but not to HSF-1 DNA-binding activity in human lung epithelial A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Asiegbu, Benedict E; Singh, Ishwar S; Hasday, Jeffrey D

    2009-09-01

    Expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) is classically activated at temperatures above the physiologic range (>or=42 degrees C) via activation of the stress-activated transcription factor, heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1). Several studies suggest that less extreme hyperthermia, especially within the febrile range, as occurs during fever and exertional/environmental hyperthemia, can also activate HSF-1 and enhance HSP expression. We compared HSP72 protein and mRNA expression in human A549 lung epithelial cells continuously exposed to 38.5 degrees C, 39.5 degrees C, or 41 degrees C or exposed to a classic heat shock (42 degrees C for 2 h). We found that expression of HSP72 protein and mRNA increased linearly as incubation temperature was increased from 37 degrees C to 41 degrees C, but increased abruptly when the incubation temperature was raised to 42 degrees C. A similar response in luciferase activity was observed using A549 cells stably transfected with an HSF-1-responsive luciferase reporter plasmid. However, activation of intranuclear HSF-1 DNA-binding activity was comparable at 38.5 degrees C, 39.5 degrees C, and 41 degrees C and only modestly greater at 42 degrees C but the mobility of HSF1 protein on a denaturing gel was altered with increasing exposure temperature and was distinctly different at 42 degrees C. These findings indicate that the proportional changes in HSF-1-dependent HSP72 expression at febrile-range temperatures are dependent upon exposure time and temperature but not on the degree of HSF-1 DNA-binding activity. Instead, HSF-1-mediated HSP expression following hyperthermia and heat shock appears to be mediated, in addition to HSF-1 activation, by posttranslational modifications of HSF-1 protein.

  17. A novel tool for monitoring endogenous alpha-synuclein transcription by NanoLuciferase tag insertion at the 3′end using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technique

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sambuddha; Adams, Levi; Guhathakurta, Subhrangshu; Kim, Yoon-Seong

    2017-01-01

    α-synuclein (α-SYN) is a major pathologic contributor to Parkinson’s disease (PD). Multiplication of α-SYN encoding gene (SNCA) is correlated with early onset of the disease underlining the significance of its transcriptional regulation. Thus, monitoring endogenous transcription of SNCA is of utmost importance to understand PD pathology. We developed a stable cell line expressing α-SYN endogenously tagged with NanoLuc luciferase reporter using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. This allows efficient measurement of transcriptional activity of α-SYN in its native epigenetic landscape which is not achievable using exogenous transfection-based luciferase reporter assays. The NanoLuc activity faithfully monitored the transcriptional regulation of SNCA following treatment with different drugs known to regulate α-SYN expression; while exogenous promoter-reporter assays failed to reproduce the similar outcomes. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing endogenous monitoring of α-SYN transcription, thus making it an efficient drug screening tool that can be used for therapeutic intervention in PD. PMID:28374838

  18. Construction of a cytosolic firefly luciferase reporter cassette for use in PCR-mediated gene deletion and fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, W B; Rome, C M; Hjortsø, M A; Benton, M G

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring promoter response to environmental changes using reporter systems has provided invaluable information regarding cellular state. With the development of in vivo luciferase reporter systems, inexpensive, sensitive and accurate promoter assays have been developed without the variability reported between in vitro samplings. Current luciferase reporter systems, however, are largely inflexible to modifications to the promoter of interest. To overcome problems in flexibility and stability of these expression vectors, we report the creation of a novel vector system which introduces a cytosol-localized Photinus pyralis luciferase [LUC*(-SKL)] capable of one-step, in vivo measurements into a promoter-reporter system via PCR-based gene deletion and fusion. After introduction of the reporter under HUG1 promoter control, cytosolic localization was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The dose-response of this novel construct was then compared with that of a similar HUG1Δ::yEGFP1 promoter-reporter system and shown to give a similar response pattern.

  19. Isorhamnetin protects against oxidative stress by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Han, Jae Yun; Kim, Mi Gwang; Wi, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Isorhamentin is a 3'-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, the effects of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation and on the expressions of its downstream genes in hepatocytes have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isorhamnetin has the ability to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II antioxidant enzyme expression, and to determine the protective role of isorhamnetin on oxidative injury in hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, isorhamnetin increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and consistently, increased antioxidant response element (ARE) reporter gene activity and the protein levels of hemeoxygenase (HO-1) and of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which resulted in intracellular GSH level increases. The specific role of Nrf2 in isorhamnetin-induced Nrf2 target gene expression was verified using an ARE-deletion mutant plasmid and Nrf2-knockout MEF cells. Deletion of the ARE in the promoter region of the sestrin2 gene, which is recently identified as the Nrf2 target gene by us, abolished the ability of isorhamnetin to increase luciferase activity. In addition, Nrf2 deficiency completely blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to induce HO-1 and GCL. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment blocked t-BHP-induced ROS production and reversed GSH depletion by t-BHP and consequently, due to reduced ROS levels, decreased t-BHP-induced cell death. In addition isorhamnetin increased ERK1/2, PKCδ and AMPK phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that Nrf2 deficiency blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to protect cells from injury induced by t-BHP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that isorhamnetin is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against oxidative stress by Nrf2 activation and in inducing the expressions of its downstream genes.

  20. Development of microLIPS (Luciferase Immunoprecipitation Systems): a novel microfluidic assay for rapid serum antibody detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrangsu, Matt; Burbelo, Peter D.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Smith, Paul D.; Morgan, Nicole Y.

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of rapid, point-of-care antibody detection for the diagnosis of infectious and auto-immune diseases. In this paper, we present work on the development of a self-contained microfluidic format for the Luciferase Immunoprecipitation Systems (LIPS) assay. Whereas the majority of immunoassays for antigen-specific antibodies employ either bacteria- or yeast-expressed proteins and require the use of secondary antibodies, the LIPS technique uses a fusion protein comprised of a Renilla luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest produced via mammalian cell culture, ensuring the addition of mammalian post-translational modifications. Patient serum is mixed with the fusion protein and passed over immobilized Protein A/G; after washing, the only remaining luciferase-tagged antigens are those retained by specific antibodies. These can be quantitatively measured using chemiluminescence upon the introduction of coelenterazine. The assay has been successfully employed for a wide variety of diseases in a microwell format. We report on a recent demonstration of rapid HSV-2 diagnosis with the LIPS assay in a microfluidic format, using one microliter of serum and obtaining results in under ten minutes. We will also discuss recent progress on two fronts, both aimed at the deployment of this technology in the field: first, simplifying assay operation through the automation of flow control using power-free means; and second, efforts to increase signal levels, primarily through strategies to increase antibody binding capacity, in order to move towards portable battery powered electronics.

  1. Activation of PKR Causes Amyloid ß-Peptide Accumulation via De-Repression of BACE1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    ILL-Raga, Gerard; Palomer, Ernest; Wozniak, Matthew A.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Tajes, Marta; Guix, Francesc X.; Galán, José J.; Clarimón, Jordi; Antúnez, Carmen; Real, Luis M.; Boada, Mercé; Itzhaki, Ruth F.; Fandos, César; Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    BACE1 is a key enzyme involved in the production of amyloid ß-peptide (Aß) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Normally, its expression is constitutively inhibited due to the presence of the 5′untranslated region (5′UTR) in the BACE1 promoter. BACE1 expression is activated by phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)2-alpha, which reverses the inhibitory effect exerted by BACE1 5′UTR. There are four kinases associated with different types of stress that could phosphorylate eIF2-alpha. Here we focus on the double-stranded (ds) RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR). PKR is activated during viral infection, including that of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), a virus suggested to be implicated in the development of AD, acting when present in brains of carriers of the type 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene. HSV1 is a dsDNA virus but it has genes on both strands of the genome, and from these genes complementary RNA molecules are transcribed. These could activate BACE1 expression by the PKR pathway. Here we demonstrate in HSV1-infected neuroblastoma cells, and in peripheral nervous tissue from HSV1-infected mice, that HSV1 activates PKR. Cloning BACE1 5′UTR upstream of a luciferase (luc) gene confirmed its inhibitory effect, which can be prevented by salubrinal, an inhibitor of the eIF2-alpha phosphatase PP1c. Treatment with the dsRNA analog poly (I∶C) mimicked the stimulatory effect exerted by salubrinal over BACE1 translation in the 5′UTR-luc construct and increased Aß production in HEK-APPsw cells. Summarizing, our data suggest that PKR activated in brain by HSV1 could play an important role in the development of AD. PMID:21738672

  2. A Panel of Trypanosoma brucei Strains Tagged with Blue and Red-Shifted Luciferases for Bioluminescent Imaging in Murine Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Van Reet, Nick; Van de Vyver, Hélène; Pyana, Patient Pati; Van der Linden, Anne Marie; Büscher, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic engineering with luciferase reporter genes allows monitoring Trypanosoma brucei (T.b.) infections in mice by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Until recently, luminescent T.b. models were based on Renilla luciferase (RLuc) activity. Our study aimed at evaluating red-shifted luciferases for in vivo BLI in a set of diverse T.b. strains of all three subspecies, including some recently isolated from human patients. Methodology/Principal findings We transfected T.b. brucei, T.b. rhodesiense and T.b. gambiense strains with either RLuc, click beetle red (CBR) or Photinus pyralis RE9 (PpyRE9) luciferase and characterised their in vitro luciferase activity, growth profile and drug sensitivity, and their potential for in vivo BLI. Compared to RLuc, the red-shifted luciferases, CBR and PpyRE9, allow tracking of T.b. brucei AnTaR 1 trypanosomes with higher details on tissue distribution, and PpyRE9 allows detection of the parasites with a sensitivity of at least one order of magnitude higher than CBR luciferase. With CBR-tagged T.b. gambiense LiTaR1, T.b. rhodesiense RUMPHI and T.b. gambiense 348 BT in an acute, subacute and chronic infection model respectively, we observed differences in parasite tropism for murine tissues during in vivo BLI. Ex vivo BLI on the brain confirmed central nervous system infection by all luminescent strains of T.b. brucei AnTaR 1, T.b. rhodesiense RUMPHI and T.b. gambiense 348 BT. Conclusions/Significance We established a genetically and phenotypically diverse collection of bioluminescent T.b. brucei, T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense strains, including drug resistant strains. For in vivo BLI monitoring of murine infections, we recommend trypanosome strains transfected with red-shifted luciferase reporter genes, such as CBR and PpyRE9. Red-shifted luciferases can be detected with a higher sensitivity in vivo and at the same time they improve the spatial resolution of the parasites in the entire body due to the better

  3. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    SciTech Connect

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-04-07

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 {angstrom} cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the 'off-target' effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism.

  4. Nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NFKB (NF-kappaB) after exposure of human monocytes to pulsed ultra-wideband electromagnetic fields (1 kV/cm) fails to transactivate kappaB-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, M; Nayak, B K; Galindo, C; Mathur, S P; Roldan, F N; Meltz, M L

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether exposure of human monocytes to a pulsed ultra-wideband electromagnetic field (EMF) of 1 kV/cm average peak power triggers a signaling pathway responsible for the transcriptional regulation of NFKB (NF-kappaB)-dependent gene expression. Human Mono Mac 6 (MM6) cells were exposed intermittently to EMF pulses for a total of 90 min. The pulse width was 0.79+/-0.01 ns and the pulse repetition rate was 250 pps. The temperature of the medium was maintained at 37 degrees C in both sham- and EMF-exposed flasks. Total NFKB DNA-binding activity was measured in the nuclear extracts by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Cells exposed to the EMFs and incubated for 24 h postexposure showed a 3.5+/-0.2-fold increase in the NFKB DNA-binding activity. Since activation of NFKB was observed, the possibility of kappaB-dependent gene expression in response to exposure to the EMFs was investigated using NFKB signal-specific gene arrays. The results revealed no difference in the NFKB-dependent gene expression profiles at 8 or 24 h postexposure, indicating that activated NFKB does not lead to the differential expression of kappaB-dependent target genes. To determine whether the absence of the kappaB-dependent gene expression was due to compromised transcriptional regulation of NFKB, the functional activity of NFKB was examined in cells transiently transfected with Mercury Pathway constructs containing 4x NFKB binding sites associated either with the luciferase reporter system or a control vector. Pulsed EMF exposure did not induce NFKB-driven luciferase activity in these cells, indicating that the activation of NFKB at 24 h after the 1 kV/cm EMF exposure is functionally inactive. From these results, it is clear that the EMF-induced NFKB activation is only a transient response, with minimal or no downstream effect.

  5. Identification of Follistatin-Like 1 by Expression Cloning as an Activator of the Growth Differentiation Factor 15 Gene and a Prognostic Biomarker in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Widera, Christian; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Kempf, Tibor; Korf-Klingebiel, Mortimer; Fiedler, Beate; Sharma, Sarita; Katus, Hugo A.; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Shimano, Masayuki; Walsh, Kenneth; Wollert, Kai C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is a stress-responsive cytokine and biomarker that is produced after myocardial infarction and that is related to prognosis in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We hypothesized that secreted proteins that activate GDF15 production may represent new ACS biomarkers. METHODS We expressed clones from an infarcted mouse heart cDNA library in COS1 cells and assayed for activation of a luciferase reporter gene controlled by a 642-bp fragment of the mouse growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) gene promoter. We measured the circulating concentrations of follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) and GDF15 in 1369 patients with ACS. RESULTS One cDNA clone that activated the GDF15 promoter–luciferase reporter encoded the secreted protein FSTL1. Treatment with FSTL1 activated GDF15 production in cultured cardiomyocytes. Transgenic production of FSTL1 stimulated GDF15 production in the murine heart, whereas cardiomyocyte-selective deletion of FSTL1 decreased production of GDF15 in cardiomyocytes, indicating that FSTL1 is sufficient and required for GDF15 production. In ACS, FSTL1 emerged as the strongest independent correlate of GDF15 (partial R2 = 0.26). A total of 106 patients died of a cardiovascular cause during a median follow-up of 252 days. Patients with an FSTL1 concentration in the top quartile had a 3.7-fold higher risk of cardiovascular death compared with patients in the first 3 quartiles (P < 0.001). FSTL1 remained associated with cardiovascular death after adjustment for clinical, angiographic, and biochemical variables. CONCLUSIONS Our study is the first to use expression cloning for biomarker discovery upstream of a gene of interest and to identify FSTL1 as an independent prognostic biomarker in ACS. PMID:22675198

  6. β₂ adrenergic receptor activation suppresses bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced alkaline phosphatase expression in osteoblast-like MC3T3E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takayuki; Ezura, Yoichi; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Moriya, Shuichi; Shirakawa, Jumpei; Notomi, Takuya; Arayal, Smriti; Kawasaki, Makiri; Izu, Yayoi; Harada, Kiyoshi; Noda, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    β adrenergic stimulation suppresses bone formation in vivo while its actions in osteoblastic differentiation are still incompletely understood. We therefore examined the effects of β2 adrenergic stimulation on osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells focusing on BMP-induced alkaline phosphatase expression. Morphologically, isoproterenol treatment suppresses BMP-induced increase in the numbers of alkaline phosphatase-positive small foci in the cultures of MC3T3-E1 cells. Biochemically, isoproterenol treatment suppresses BMP-induced enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase in a dose-dependent manner. Isoproterenol suppression of alkaline phosphatase activity is observed even when the cells are treated with high concentrations of BMP. With respect to cell density, isoproterenol treatment tends to suppress BMP-induced increase in alkaline phosphatase expression more in osteoblasts cultured at higher cell density. In terms of treatment protocol, continuous isoproterenol treatment is compared to cyclic treatment. Continuous isoproterenol treatment is more suppressive against BMP-induced increase in alkaline phosphatase expression than cyclic regimen. At molecular level, isoproterenol treatment suppresses BMP-induced enhancement of alkaline phosphatase mRNA expression. Regarding the mode of isoproterenol action, isoproterenol suppresses BMP-induced BRE-luciferase activity. These data indicate that isoproterenol regulates BMP-induced alkaline phosphatase expression in osteoblast-like MC3T3E1 cells.

  7. p53 Degradation Activity, Expression, and Subcellular Localization of E6 Proteins from 29 Human Papillomavirus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mesplède, Thibault; Gagnon, David; Bergeron-Labrecque, Fanny; Azar, Ibrahim; Sénéchal, Hélène; Coutlée, François

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the etiological agents of cervical cancer and other human malignancies. HPVs are classified into high- and low-risk genotypes according to their association with cancer. Host cell transformation by high-risk HPVs relies in part on the ability of the viral E6 protein to induce the degradation of p53. We report the development of a cellular assay that accurately quantifies the p53 degradation activity of E6 in vivo, based on the fusion of p53 to Renilla luciferase (RLuc-p53). This assay was used to measure the p53 degradation activities of E6 proteins from 29 prevalent HPV types and variants of HPV type 16 (HPV16) and HPV33 by determining the amount of E6 expression vector required to reduce by half the levels of RLuc-p53 (50% effective concentration [EC50]). These studies revealed an unexpected variability in the p53 degradation activities of different E6 proteins, even among active types whose EC50s span more than 2 log units. Differences in activity were greater between types than between variants and did not correlate with differences in the intracellular localization of E6, with most being predominantly nuclear. Protein and mRNA expression of the 29 E6 proteins was also examined. For 16 high-risk types, spliced transcripts that encode shorter E6*I proteins of variable sizes and abundances were detected. Mutation of the splice donor site in five different E6 proteins increased their p53 degradation activity, suggesting that mRNA splicing can limit the activity of some high-risk E6 types. The quantification of p53 degradation in vivo represents a novel tool to systematically compare the oncogenic potentials of E6 proteins from different HPV types and variants. PMID:22013048

  8. Inhibin alpha gene expression in human trophoblasts is regulated by interactions between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Depoix, Christophe L; Debiève, Frédéric; Hubinont, Corinne

    2014-11-01

    Inhibin α (Inha) gene expression is regulated, in rat granulosa cells, via a cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-response element (CRE) found in a region of the promoter that is homologous to the human INHA promoter. We previously found that during in vitro cytotrophoblast differentiation, human INHA gene expression was regulated by TFAP2A via association with an AP-2 site located upstream of this CRE. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the human INHA gene was also regulated by cAMP in trophoblasts, and to investigate the possible crosstalk between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways in the regulation of INHA gene expression. Treatment with cAMP or forskolin increased INHA mRNA expression by 7- and 2-fold in primary cytotrophoblasts and choriocarcinoma-derived BeWo cells, respectively. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 reduced forskolin-induced luciferase activity by ∼40% in BeWo cells transfected with an INHA promoter-driven luciferase reporter vector. TFAP2 overexpression increased basal luciferase activity, whereas the dominant repressor KCREB abolished it. Surprisingly, mutation of the CRE also eliminated the TFAP2-induced transcription, although TFAP2 overexpression was still able to increase forskolin-induced luciferase activity when the AP-2 binding site, but not the CRE site, was mutated. Thus, INHA gene expression is upregulated by cAMP via CRE in human trophoblasts, and TFAP2 regulates this expression by interacting with CRE.

  9. Correspondence between resting state activity and brain gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guang-Zhong; Belgard, T. Grant; Mao, Deng; Chen, Leslie; Berto, Stefano; Preuss, Todd M.; Lu, Hanzhang; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Konopka, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The relationship between functional brain activity and gene expression has not been fully explored in the human brain. Here, we identify significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and functional activity by comparing fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations (fALFF) from two independent human fMRI resting state datasets to regional cortical gene expression from a newly generated RNA-seq dataset and two additional gene expression datasets to obtain robust and reproducible correlations. We find significantly more genes correlated with fALFF than expected by chance, and identify specific genes correlated with the imaging signals in multiple expression datasets in the default mode network. Together, these data support a population-level relationship between regional steady state brain gene expression and resting state brain activity. PMID:26590343

  10. SpyTag/SpyCatcher Cyclization Enhances the Thermostability of Firefly Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Si, Meng; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    SpyTag can spontaneously form a covalent isopeptide bond with its protein partner SpyCatcher. Firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis was cyclized in vivo by fusing SpyCatcher at the N terminus and SpyTag at the C terminus. Circular LUC was more thermostable and alkali-tolerant than the wild type, without compromising the specific activity. Structural analysis indicated that the cyclized LUC increased the thermodynamic stability of the structure and remained more properly folded at high temperatures when compared with the wild type. We also prepared an N-terminally and C-terminally shortened form of the SpyCatcher protein and cyclization using this truncated form led to even more thermostability than the original form. Our findings suggest that cyclization with SpyTag and SpyCatcher is a promising and effective strategy to enhance thermostability of enzymes. PMID:27658030

  11. Enhanced Gaussia luciferase blood assay for monitoring of in vivo biological processes.

    PubMed

    Bovenberg, M Sarah S; Degeling, M Hannah; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2012-01-17

    Secreted Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) has been shown to be a useful tool for ex vivo monitoring of in vivo biological processes. The Gluc level in the blood was used to detect tumor growth, metastasis and response to therapy, gene transfer, and circulating cells viability, as well as transcription factors activation, complementing in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The sensitivity of the Gluc blood assay is limited due to the absorption of blue light by pigmented molecules such as hemoglobin, resulting in quenching of the signal and therefore lower sensitivity. To overcome this problem, we designed an alternative microtiter well-based binding assay in which Gluc is captured first from blood using a specific antibody followed by the addition of coelenterazine and signal acquisition using a luminometer. This assay showed to be over 1 order of magnitude more sensitive in detecting Gluc in the blood as compared to the direct Gluc blood assay enhancing ex vivo monitoring of biological processes.

  12. Full color modulation of firefly luciferase through engineering with unified Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Cai, Duanjun; Marques, Miguel A L; Nogueira, Fernando

    2013-11-07

    The firefly luciferase has been a unique marking tool used in various bioimaging techniques. Extensive color modulation is strongly required to meet special marking demands; however, intentional and accurate wavelength tuning has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate that the color shift of the firefly chromophore (OxyLH2-1) by internal and external fields can be described as a unified Stark shift. Electrostatic microenvironmental effects on fluorescent spectroscopy are modeled in vacuo through effective electric fields by using time-dependent density functional theory. A complete visible fluorescence spectrum of firefly chromophore is depicted, which enables one to control the emission in a specific color. As an application, the widely observed pH-correlated color shift is proved to be associated with the local Stark field generated by the trace water-ions (vicinal hydronium and hydroxide ions) at active sites close to the OxyLH2-1.

  13. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of luciferase gene mRNA requires CRM1/Exportin1 and RanGTPase.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tominori; Hashimoto, Iwao; Nishikawa, Masao; Yamada, Hisao

    2009-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev (regulator of the expression of the virion) protein was shown to reduce the expression level of the co-transfected luciferase reporter gene (luc+) introduced to monitor transfection efficiency. We studied the mechanism of the inhibitory Rev effect. The effect, caused by nuclear retention of luc+ mRNA, was reversed if rev had a point mutation that makes its nuclear export signal (NES) unable to associate with cellular transport factors. The Rev NES receptor CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-specific inhibitor, leptomycin B, blocked luc+ mRNA export. This finding was also supported by the overexpression of delta CAN, another specific CRM1 inhibitor that caused inhibition of luciferase gene expression. Experiments involving tsBN2 cells, which have a temperature-sensitive RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation 1) allele, demonstrated that luc+ expression required generation of the GTP-bound form of RanGTPase (RanGTP) by RCC1. The constitutive transport element (CTE)-mediated nuclear export of luc+ mRNA was found to also depend upon RanGTP. Nuclear export of luc+ mRNA is thus suggested to involve CRM1 and RanGTP, which Rev employs to transport viral mRNA. The Rev effect is therefore considered to involve competition between two molecules for common transport factors.

  14. Interaction of Photobacterium leiognathi and Vibrio fischeri Y1 luciferases with fluorescent (antenna) proteins: bioluminescence effects of the aliphatic additive.

    PubMed

    Petushkov, V N; Ketelaars, M; Gibson, B G; Lee, J

    1996-09-17

    The kinetics of the bacterial bioluminescence reaction is altered in the presence of the fluorescent (antenna) proteins, lumazine protein (LumP) from Photobacterium or the yellow fluorescence proteins (YFP) having FMN or Rf bound, from Vibrio fischeri strain Y1. Depending on reaction conditions, the bioluminescence intensity and its decay rate may be either enhanced or strongly quenched in the presence of the fluorescent proteins. These effects can be simply explained on the basis of the same protein-protein complex model that accounts for the bioluminescence spectral shifts induced by these fluorescent proteins. In such a complex, where the fluorophore evidently is in proximity to the luciferase active site, it is expected that the on-off rate of certain aliphatic components of the reaction should be altered with a consequent shift in the equilibria among the luciferase intermediates, as recently elaborated in a kinetic scheme. These aliphatic components are the bioluminescence reaction substrate, tetradecanal or other long-chain aldehyde, its carboxylic acid product, or dodecanol used as a stabilizer of the luciferase peroxyflavin. No evidence can be found for the protein-protein interaction in the absence of the aliphatic component.

  15. Point mutations in firefly luciferase C-domain demonstrate its significance in green color of bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Modestova, Yulia; Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2014-09-01

    Firefly luciferase is a two-domain enzyme that catalyzes the bioluminescent reaction of firefly luciferin oxidation. Color of the emitted light depends on the structure of the enzyme, yet the exact color-tuning mechanism remains unknown by now, and the role of the C-domain in it is rarely discussed, because a very few color-shifting mutations in the C-domain were described. Recently we reported a strong red-shifting mutation E457K in the C-domain; the bioluminescence spectra of this enzyme were independent of temperature or pH. In the present study we investigated the role of the residue E457 in the enzyme using the Luciola mingrelica luciferase with a thermostabilized N-domain as a parent enzyme for site-directed mutagenesis. We obtained a set of mutants and studied their catalytic properties, thermal stability and bioluminescence spectra. Experimental spectra were represented as a sum of two components (bioluminescence spectra of putative "red" and "green" emitters); λmax of these components were constant for all the mutants, but the ratio of these emitters was defined by temperature and mutations in the C-domain. We suggest that each emitter is stabilized by a specific conformation of the active site; thus, enzymes with two forms of the active site coexist in the reactive media. The rigid structure of the C-domain is crucial for maintaining the conformation corresponding to the "green" emitter. We presume that the emitters are the keto- and enol forms of oxyluciferin.

  16. Diversity of zebrafish peripheral oscillators revealed by luciferase reporting.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Maki; Hernandez-Borsetti, Nancy; Cahill, Gregory M

    2006-09-26

    In various multicellular organisms, circadian clocks are present not only in the central nervous system, but also in peripheral organs and tissues. In mammals peripheral oscillators are not directly responsive to light, but are entrained by the central oscillator in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. These individual oscillators are diverse in their free-running periods and phases. In contrast, cultured peripheral tissues and cell lines from zebrafish are not only rhythmic, but can also be directly entrained by light. Because of the convenience of studying rhythms in cultured cells, however, little has been known about properties of individual oscillators in intact zebrafish. Here, we show the remarkable diversity and consistency of oscillator properties in various peripheral organs and tissues from the period3-luciferase (per3-luc) transgenic zebrafish. Tissue-dependent differences were found in free-running period, phase, response to light, and temperature compensation. Furthermore, cycling amplitudes were reduced at lower temperatures in some, but not all, of the organs tested. Finally, we found that per3-luc rhythms can free run in both constant dark and constant light with remarkably similar amplitudes, phases, and periods, despite the fact that the mRNA of per2 and per1 has been shown not to oscillate in constant light.

  17. Evaluation of viral and mammalian promoters for driving transgene expression in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Dosari, Mohammed; Zhang Guisheng; Knapp, Joseph E.; Liu Dexi . E-mail: dliu@pitt.edu

    2006-01-13

    Fifteen luciferase plasmid constructs driven by various promoters including cytomegalovirus (CMV), Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), human serum albumin (SA), {alpha}-1 antitrypsin (AAT), cytochrome P450 CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, mouse CYP2b10, human amyloid precursor protein (APP), chicken {beta} actin (ACT), nuclear factor {kappa} B (NF{kappa}B), and heat shock protein 70 (HS) promoters were hydrodynamically introduced into mouse hepatocytes, and the level and persistence of luciferase gene expression were examined. Eight hours post-gene transfer, the CMV and AAT promoters showed the highest activity, followed by the CYP2D6, HS, and RSV promoters which were slightly less active. The human serum albumin promoter exhibited the lowest activity among the promoters examined. The time course of gene expression showed a two-phase decline in luciferase activity with a rapid phase within First 5-7 days and a slower decline thereafter. Results from Southern and Northern blot analyses revealed a good correlation between the decline of luciferase activity and the decrease in mRNA level, suggesting promoter silencing as the possible mechanism for the observed transient luciferase gene expression. Inclusion of EBN1 and oriP sequences of Epstein-Barr virus into the plasmid extended the period of active transcription for about one week. These results provide important information concerning the role of promoters in regulating transgene expression and for the proper design of plasmids for gene expression and gene therapy.

  18. Influenza A virus encoding secreted Gaussia luciferase as useful tool to analyze viral replication and its inhibition by antiviral compounds and cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Nadine; Wrensch, Florian; Gärtner, Sabine; Palanisamy, Navaneethan; Goedecke, Ulrike; Jäger, Nils; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Winkler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Reporter genes inserted into viral genomes enable the easy and rapid quantification of virus replication, which is instrumental to efficient in vitro screening of antiviral compounds or in vivo analysis of viral spread and pathogenesis. Based on a published design, we have generated several replication competent influenza A viruses carrying either fluorescent proteins or Gaussia luciferase. Reporter activity could be readily quantified in infected cultures, but the virus encoding Gaussia luciferase was more stable than viruses bearing fluorescent proteins and was therefore analyzed in detail. Quantification of Gaussia luciferase activity in the supernatants of infected culture allowed the convenient and highly sensitive detection of viral spread, and enzymatic activity correlated with the number of infectious particles released from infected cells. Furthermore, the Gaussia luciferase encoding virus allowed the sensitive quantification of the antiviral activity of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) zanamivir and the host cell interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) proteins 1-3, which are known to inhibit influenza virus entry. Finally, the virus was used to demonstrate that influenza A virus infection is sensitive to a modulator of endosomal cholesterol, in keeping with the concept that IFITMs inhibit viral entry by altering cholesterol levels in the endosomal membrane. In sum, we report the characterization of a novel influenza A reporter virus, which allows fast and sensitive detection of viral spread and its inhibition, and we show that influenza A virus entry is sensitive to alterations of endosomal cholesterol levels.

  19. [Photoreactivation of UV-irradiated Escherichia coli K12 AB1886 uvrA6 with assistance of luminescence of Photobacterium leiognathi Luciferase].

    PubMed

    Melkina, O E; Kotova, V Yu; Konopleva, M N; Manukhov, I V; Pustovoit, K S; Zavilgelsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    The bioluminescence induced by luciferases of marine bacteria promotes repair of UV damaged DNA of Escherichia coli AB1886 uvrA6. It is shown that bacterial photolyase that implements photoreactivation activity is the major contributor to DNA repair. However, the intensity of bioluminescence increasing induced by UV-irradiation (SOS-induction) in bacterial cells is not enough for efficient photoreactivation.

  20. Pseuderanthemum palatiferum leaf extract inhibits the proinflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6 expression in LPS-activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sittisart, Patcharawan; Chitsomboon, Benjamart; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2016-11-01

    The anti-inflammatory potential and underlying mechanisms of an ethanol extract of Pseuderanthemum palatiferum (EEP) leaves was investigated using LPS-activated macrophages. Our results show EEP produced a concentration-dependent suppression of TNF-α and IL-6 secretion by LPS-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages. EEP also suppressed LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 protein and mRNA levels in mouse-derived myeloid cell line RAW264.7. To further elucidate the molecular mechanisms responsible for impaired TNF-α and IL-6 regulation by EEP, the activation of transcription factors, NF-κB, C/EBP, and AP-1, was monitored using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. EEP suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB DNA binding activity within both the TNF-α and IL-6 promoters in RAW264.7 cells with impairment being more pronounced in the IL-6 promoter. In addition, EEP exhibited a concentration-dependent suppression of C/EBP and AP-1 DNA binding activity within the IL-6 promoter. Concordantly, IL-6 luciferase promoter reporter activity was also suppressed by EEP in transiently transfected RAW264.7 cells, upon LPS activation. EEP analysis by GC-MS and HPLC DAD-MSD revealed the presence of β-sitosterol and various polyphenols, respectively, which are known to possess anti-inflammatory activity. Collectively, these results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of EEP are mediated, at least in part, by modulating TNF-α and IL-6 expression through impairment of NF-κB, C/EBP, and AP-1 activity.

  1. Patterns of activity expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Dubofsky, E A; Simpson, S D; Chabot, Christopher C; Watson, Winsor H

    2013-09-01

    Adult American horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, possess endogenous circadian and circatidal clocks controlling visual sensitivity and locomotion, respectively. The goal of this study was to determine the types of activity rhythms expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs (n = 24) when exposed to a 14:10 light/dark cycle (LD) for 10 days, followed by 10 days of constant darkness (DD). Horseshoe crab activity was recorded with a digital time-lapse video system that used an infrared-sensitive camera so animals could be monitored at night. In LD, 15 animals expressed daily patterns of activity, 6 displayed a circatidal pattern, and the remaining 3 were arrhythmic. Of the 15 animals with daily patterns of locomotion, 7 had a significant preference (P < 0.05) for diurnal activity and 3 for nocturnal activity; the remainder did not express a significant preference for day or night activity. In DD, 13 horseshoe crabs expressed circatidal rhythms and 8 maintained a pattern of about 24 h. Although these results suggest the presence of a circadian clock influencing circatidal patterns of locomotion, these apparent circadian rhythms may actually represent the expression of just one of the two bouts of activity driven by the putative circalunidian clocks that control their tidal rhythms. Overall, these results indicate that, like adults, juvenile horseshoe crabs express both daily and tidal patterns of activity and that at least one, and maybe both, of these patterns is driven by endogenous clocks.

  2. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberger, T; Flint, Y B; Blank, M; Etkin, S; Lavi, S

    1988-01-01

    We report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later. Images PMID:2835673

  3. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberger, T.; Flint, Y.B.; Blank, M.; Etkin, S.; Lavi, S.

    1988-03-01

    The authors report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later.

  4. RAS–Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signal Is Required for Enhanced PD-L1 Expression in Human Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sumimoto, Hidetoshi; Takano, Atsushi; Teramoto, Koji; Daigo, Yataro

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) is related to immune evasion by cancer, and it is a molecular target of immune checkpoint therapies. Although some altered signals in NSCLCs are responsible for ectopic PD-L1 expression, the precise mechanisms remain obscure. Because we found a higher frequency of EGFR/KRAS mutations in NSCLC cell lines with high PD-L1 expression (p < 0.001), we evaluated the relationships between downstream signals and PD-L1 expression, particularly in three KRAS-mutant adenocarcinoma cell lines. The MEK inhibitor U0126 (20 μM) significantly decreased the surface PD-L1 levels by 50–60% compared with dimethyl sulfoxide (p < 0.0001). Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulation (100 nM, 15 min) increased (p < 0.05) and two ERK2 siRNAs as well as KRAS siRNAs decreased (p < 0.05) PD-L1 expression. The transcriptional activity of the potential AP-1 site (+4785 to +5056 from the transcription start site) in the PD-L1 gene was demonstrated by luciferase assays, which was inhibited by U0126. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated the binding of cJUN to the AP-1 site. Two STAT3 siRNAs decreased PD-L1 expression by 10–32% in two of the three KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (p < 0.05), while the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (40 μM) did not change the expression level. Supervised cluster analysis and gene set enrichment analysis between the PD-L1-high and -low NSCLCs revealed a correlation between PD-L1 expression and genes/pathways related to cell motility/adhesion. These results indicate that MAPK signaling is the dominant downstream signal responsible for ectopic PD-L1 expression, in which STAT3 is also involved to some extent. Furthermore, MAPK signaling may control the expression of PD-L1 and several genes related to enhanced cell motility. Our findings suggest that MAPK, along with STAT3, is important for determining PD-L1 expression, which could be useful for

  5. A dual-color luciferase assay system reveals circadian resetting of cultured fibroblasts by co-cultured adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Ikeda, Masaaki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms of various organs and tissues are synchronized by pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal glands can synchronize circadian rhythms in other tissues. Many hormones show circadian rhythms in their plasma concentrations; however, whether organs outside the SCN can serve as master synchronizers to entrain circadian rhythms in target tissues is not well understood. To further delineate the function of the adrenal glands and the interactions of circadian rhythms in putative master synchronizing organs and their target tissues, here we report a simple co-culture system using a dual-color luciferase assay to monitor circadian rhythms separately in various explanted tissues and fibroblasts. In this system, circadian rhythms of organs and target cells were simultaneously tracked by the green-emitting beetle luciferase from Pyrearinus termitilluminans (ELuc) and the red-emitting beetle luciferase from Phrixothrix hirtus (SLR), respectively. We obtained tissues from the adrenal glands, thyroid glands, and lungs of transgenic mice that expressed ELuc under control of the promoter from a canonical clock gene, mBmal1. The tissues were co-cultured with Rat-1 fibroblasts as representative target cells expressing SLR under control of the mBmal1 promoter. Amplitudes of the circadian rhythms of Rat-1 fibroblasts were potentiated when the fibroblasts were co-cultured with adrenal gland tissue, but not when co-cultured with thyroid gland or lung tissue. The phases of Rat-1 fibroblasts were reset by application of adrenal gland tissue, whereas the phases of adrenal gland tissue were not influenced by Rat-1 fibroblasts. Furthermore, the effect of the adrenal gland tissue on the fibroblasts was blocked by application of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist. These results demonstrate that glucocorticoids are strong circadian synchronizers for fibroblasts and that this co

  6. Heparanase expression upregulates platelet adhesion activity and thrombogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Österholm, Cecilia; Zhang, Xiao; Hedin, Ulf; Vlodavsky, Israel; Li, Jin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endo-glucuronidase that specifically cleaves heparan sulfate (HS) and heparin polysaccharides. The enzyme is expressed at low levels in normal tissues, but is often upregulated under pathological conditions such as cancer and inflammation. Normal human platelets express exceptionally high levels of heparanase, but the functional consequences of this feature remain unknown. We investigated functional roles of heparanase by comparing the properties of platelets expressing high (Hpa-tg) or low (Ctr) levels of heparanase. Upon activation, Hpa-tg platelets exhibited a much stronger adhesion activity as compared to Ctr platelets, likely contributing to a higher thrombotic activity in a carotid thrombosis model. Furthermore, we found concomitant upregulated expression of both heparanase and CD62P (P-selectin) upon activation of mouse and human platelets. As platelets play important roles in tumor metastasis, these findings indicate contribution of the platelet heparanase to hyper-thrombotic conditions often seen in patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:27129145

  7. Proposed ionic bond between Arg300 and Glu270 and Glu271 are not involved in inactivation of a mutant firefly luciferase (LRR).

    PubMed

    Sobhani-Damavandifar, Zahra; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Sajedi, Reza H

    2016-05-01

    The weakness of firefly luciferase is its rapid inactivation. Many studies have been done to develop thermostable luciferases. One of these modifications was LRR mutant in which the Leu300 was substituted with Arg in the E(354)RR(356)Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase as template. LRR was more thermostable than the wild type but with only 0.02% activity. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was used to change the proposed ionic bond between the Arg and two neighboring residues (Glu270 and Glu271), to understand if the induced interactions were responsible for inactivation in LRR. Our results showed that substitution of Glu270 and 271 with Ala removed the interactions but the activity of enzyme did not return. The E270A mutant was more active than LRR but the E271A and E270A/E271A mutants were inactive. Fluorescence and CD measurements showed that these mutations were accompanied by conformational changes. Extrinsic fluorescence measurement and obtained quenching data by KI and acrylamide also confirmed that the mutants were less compact than the LRR enzyme. In conclusion, in LRR, the interactions between Arg300 and Glu270 and Glu271 were not responsible for the enzyme inactivation and it is proposed that the enzyme inactivation is due to conformational changes of LRR mutant of firefly luciferase.

  8. Isorhamnetin protects against oxidative stress by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Han, Jae Yun; Kim, Mi Gwang; Wi, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Isorhamentin is a 3′-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, the effects of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation and on the expressions of its downstream genes in hepatocytes have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isorhamnetin has the ability to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II antioxidant enzyme expression, and to determine the protective role of isorhamnetin on oxidative injury in hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, isorhamnetin increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and consistently, increased antioxidant response element (ARE) reporter gene activity and the protein levels of hemeoxygenase (HO-1) and of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which resulted in intracellular GSH level increases. The specific role of Nrf2 in isorhamnetin-induced Nrf2 target gene expression was verified using an ARE-deletion mutant plasmid and Nrf2-knockout MEF cells. Deletion of the ARE in the promoter region of the sestrin2 gene, which is recently identified as the Nrf2 target gene by us, abolished the ability of isorhamnetin to increase luciferase activity. In addition, Nrf2 deficiency completely blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to induce HO-1 and GCL. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment blocked t-BHP-induced ROS production and reversed GSH depletion by t-BHP and consequently, due to reduced ROS levels, decreased t-BHP-induced cell death. In addition isorhamnetin increased ERK1/2, PKCδ and AMPK phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that Nrf2 deficiency blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to protect cells from injury induced by t-BHP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that isorhamnetin is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against oxidative stress by Nrf2 activation and in inducing the expressions of its downstream genes. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation. • Isorhamnetin increased Nrf2

  9. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification.

  10. Differential modulation by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9)-THC) of CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression in activated mouse splenic CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Crawford, Robert B; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2012-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of cannabinoids has been widely demonstrated in experimental animal models and in humans. CD40-CD40-ligand (L) interactions are among the most crucial initiators of inflammation. This study investigated the effects of ∆(9)-THC on CD40L expression in mouse splenic T cells after activation with various stimuli. Time course studies demonstrated that peak surface expression of CD40L by CD4(+) T cells after anti-CD3/CD28 or phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io) occurred 8 h post activation. Peak CD40L mRNA levels were observed at 2 h post PMA/Io treatment and at 4 h post anti-CD3/CD28 treatment. Pretreatment with ∆(9)-THC significantly impaired the upregulation of CD40L induced by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level. By contrast, ∆(9)-THC did not affect PMA/Io-induced surface CD40L expression on CD4(+) T cells. Additionally, ∆(9)-THC also attenuated anti-CD3/CD28-induced CD40L expression on CD4(+) T cells derived from CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. We investigated whether the mechanism by which ∆(9)-THC suppressed CD40L expression involved putative cannabinoid activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Although activation of GR resulted in suppression of CD40L induction by anti-CD3/CD28, no interaction between ∆(9)-THC and GR was observed by a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) luciferase reporter assay in HEK293T cells. Collectively, these results suggest that ∆(9)-THC targets proximal T cell receptor-associated signaling in a cannabinoid receptor- and glucocorticoid receptor-independent manner. These findings identify suppression of CD40L expression as a novel part of the mechanism by which ∆(9)-THC exerts anti-inflammatory activity.

  11. Neuronal Activity Regulates Hippocampal miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Eacker, Stephen M.; Keuss, Matthew J.; Berezikov, Eugene; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA) represent a relatively recently discovered player in the regulation of translation in the nervous system. We have conducted an in depth analysis of how neuronal activity regulates miRNA expression in the hippocampus. Using deep sequencing we exhaustively identify all miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs, expressed in hippocampus of the adult mouse. We identified 119 miRNAs documented in miRBase but less than half of these miRNA were expressed at a level greater than 0.1% of total miRNA. Expression profiling following induction of neuronal activity by electroconvulsive shock demonstrates that most miRNA show a biphasic pattern of expression: rapid induction of specific mature miRNA expression followed by a decline in expression. These results have important implications into how miRNAs influence activity-dependent translational control. PMID:21984899

  12. Constitutive androstane receptor activation evokes the expression of glycolytic genes.

    PubMed

    Yarushkin, Andrei A; Kazantseva, Yuliya A; Prokopyeva, Elena A; Markova, Diana N; Pustylnyak, Yuliya A; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O

    2016-09-23

    It is well-known that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) increases the liver-to-body weight ratio. CAR-mediated liver growth is correlated with increased expression of the pleiotropic transcription factor cMyc, which stimulates cell cycle regulatory genes and drives proliferating cells into S phase. Because glycolysis supports cell proliferation and cMyc is essential for the activation of glycolytic genes, we hypothesized that CAR-mediated up-regulation of cMyc in mouse livers might play a role in inducing the expression of glycolytic genes. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of long-term CAR activation on glycolytic genes in a mouse model not subjected to metabolic stress. We demonstrated that long-term CAR activation by TCPOBOP increases expression of cMyc, which was correlated with reduced expression of gluconeogenic genes and up-regulation of glucose transporter, glycolytic and mitochondrial pyruvate metabolising genes. These changes in gene expression after TCPOBOP treatment were strongly correlated with changes in levels of glycolytic intermediates in mouse livers. Moreover, we demonstrated a significant positive regulatory effect of TCPOBOP-activated CAR on both mRNA and protein levels of Pkm2, a master regulator of glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Thus, our findings provide evidence to support the conclusion that CAR activation initiates a transcriptional program that facilitates the coordinated metabolic activities required for cell proliferation.

  13. Probing the emitter site of Renilla luciferase using small organic molecules; an attempt to understand the molecular architecture of the emitter site.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Farajollah; Emamzadeh, Rahman; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Rasa, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Renilla luciferase is a sensitive enzyme and has wide applications in biotechnology such as drug screening. Previous studies have tried to show the catalytic residues, nevertheless, the accurate architecture and molecular behavior of its emitter site remains uncharacterized. In this study, the activity of Renilla luciferase, in the presence of two small organic molecules including dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and isopropanol was considered and the structure was studied by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, the interaction of small organic molecules with the Renilla luciferase was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetics studies showed that at low concentration of DMSO (16.6-66mM) and isopropanol (19.3-76mM) the Km changed and a competitive inhibition pattern was observed. Moreover, spectroscopy studies reveled that the changes of activity of Renilla luciferase in the presence of low concentrations of small organic molecules was not associated with structural collapse or severe changes in the enzyme conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that DMSO and isopropanol, as probing molecules, were both able to bind to the emitter site and remained with the residues of the emitter site. Based on the probing data, the architecture of the emitter site in the "non-binding" model was proposed.

  14. Exposure to PM2.5 induces aberrant activation of NF-κB in human airway epithelial cells by downregulating miR-331 expression.

    PubMed

    Song, Lei; Li, Dan; Li, Xiaoping; Ma, Lianjun; Bai, Xiaoxue; Wen, Zhongmei; Zhang, Xiufang; Chen, Dong; Peng, Liping

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter≤2.5μm (PM2.5) induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, leading to airway epithelial injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of PM2.5 have not been clarified. Here, we show that exposure to PM2.5 induces sustained activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling in human airway epithelial Beas-2B (B2B) cells. In addition, PM2.5 exposure significantly decreased miR-331 expression in B2B cells, which was abrogated by inhibition of ROS or phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Induction of miR-331 overexpression attenuated the PM2.5 exposure-induced NF-kBp65 nuclear translocation, IL-6 and IL-8 expression in B2B cells. Furthermore, miR-331 targeted the inhibitor of NF-κB kinase beta (IKK-β) by down-regulating the IKK-β-regulated luciferase activity in HEK293 cells. Moreover, induction of miR-331 over-expression inhibited IKK-β expression while induction of IKK-β over-expression prevented the inhibition of miR-331 on the PM2.5 exposure-induced NF-kBp65 nuclear translocation, IL-6 and IL-8 expression in B2B cells. Therefore, PM2.5 exposure decreased miR-331 expression via the ROS/PI3K/Akt pathway, resulting in an increase in the IKK-β expression and sustained NF-κB activation in human airway epithelial cells. Our findings may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the toxicity of PM2.5 exposure and aid in design of new therapeutic strategies to prevent PM2.5-induced toxicity.

  15. Endothelin‑1 induces oncostatin M expression in osteoarthritis osteoblasts by trans‑activating the oncostatin M gene promoter via Ets‑1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ren; Wang, Wanchun; Huang, Guoliang; Mao, Xinzhan; Chen, You; Tang, Qi; Liao, Lele

    2016-04-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM) contributes to cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA) and was demonstrated to be expressed in OA osteoblasts. Endothelin‑1 (ET‑1) is implicated in the degradation of OA articular cartilage, and osteoblast proliferation and bone development. In the present study, the effects of ET‑1 on OSM expression in human OA osteoblasts were investigated, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. Primary human OA osteoblasts were treated with ET‑1 (1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 nM) for 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h with or without the selective ETA receptor (ETAR) antagonist, BQ123, ETB receptor antagonist, BQ788 or the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, BKM120. ET‑1 treatment induced OSM mRNA expression, and the intracellular and secreted protein levels of OA osteoblasts in a dose‑dependent manner. This effect was suppressed by BQ123 and BKM120, but not BQ788 administration. In combination with electrophoretic mobility shift assays, deletional and mutational analyses on the activity of a human OSM promoter/luciferase reporter demonstrated that ET‑1 induced OSM expression in OA osteoblasts by trans‑activating the OSM gene promoter through specific binding of Ets‑1 to an Ets‑1 binding site in the OSM promoter in an ETAR‑ and PI3K‑dependent manner. Furthermore, ET‑1 treatment increased the expression of Ets‑1 in a dose‑dependent manner, however the knockdown of Ets‑1 suppressed the ET1‑induced expression of OSM in OA osteoblasts. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that ET‑1 induces the expression of OSM in OA osteoblasts by trans‑activating the OSM gene promoter primarily through increasing the expression level of Ets‑1 in an ETAR‑ and PI3K‑dependent manner. The current study suggested novel insights into the mechanistic role of ET‑1 in the pathophysiology of OA.

  16. High glucose enhances microRNA-26a to activate mTORC1 for mesangial cell hypertrophy and matrix protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Nirmalya; Bera, Amit; Das, Falguni; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    High glucose milieu inhibits PTEN expression to activate Akt kinase and induces glomerular mesangial cell hypertrophy and matrix protein expression in diabetic nephropathy. Specific mechanism by which high glucose inhibits PTEN expression is not clear. We found that high glucose increased the expression of the microRNA-26a (miR-26a) in mesangial cells. Using a sensor plasmid with 3’UTR-driven luciferase, we showed PTEN as a target of miR-26a in response to high glucose. Overexpression of miR-26a reduced the PTEN protein levels resulting in increased Akt kinase activity similar to high glucose treatment. In contrast, anti-miR-26a reversed high glucose-induced suppression of PTEN with concomitant inhibition of Akt kinase activity. Akt-mediated phosphorylation of tuberin and PRAS40 regulates mTORC1, which is necessary for mesangial cell hypertrophy and matrix protein expression. Inhibition of high glucose-induced miR-26a blocked phosphorylation of tuberin and PRAS40, which lead to suppression of phosphorylation of S6 kinase and 4EBP-1, two substrates of mTORC1. Furthermore, we show that expression of miR-26a induced mesangial cell hypertrophy and increased fibronectin and collagen I (α2) expression similar to that observed with the cells incubated with high glucose. Anti-miR-26a inhibited these phenomena in response to high glucose. Together our results provide the first evidence for the involvement of miR-26a in high glucose-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy and matrix protein expression. These data indicate the potential therapeutic utility of anti-miR-26a for the complications of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:25797045

  17. Active AU Based Patch Weighting for Facial Expression Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Weicheng; Shen, Linlin; Yang, Meng; Lai, Zhihui

    2017-01-01

    Facial expression has many applications in human-computer interaction. Although feature extraction and selection have been well studied, the specificity of each expression variation is not fully explored in state-of-the-art works. In this work, the problem of multiclass expression recognition is converted into triplet-wise expression recognition. For each expression triplet, a new feature optimization model based on action unit (AU) weighting and patch weight optimization is proposed to represent the specificity of the expression triplet. The sparse representation-based approach is then proposed to detect the active AUs of the testing sample for better generalization. The algorithm achieved competitive accuracies of 89.67% and 94.09% for the Jaffe and Cohn–Kanade (CK+) databases, respectively. Better cross-database performance has also been observed. PMID:28146094

  18. Dynamic Imaging of Pancreatic Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Activation in Live Mice Using Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) Infusion and Bioluminescence*

    PubMed Central

    Orabi, Abrahim I.; Sah, Swati; Javed, Tanveer A.; Lemon, Kathryn L.; Good, Misty L.; Guo, Ping; Xiao, Xiangwei; Prasadan, Krishna; Gittes, George K.; Jin, Shunqian; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is an important signaling molecule that plays a critical role in the development of acute pancreatitis. Current methods for examining NF-κB activation involve infection of an adenoviral NF-κB-luciferase reporter into cell lines or electrophoretic mobility shift assay of lysate. The use of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) has proven to be an effective method of transfecting whole organs in live animals. We examined whether intrapancreatic duct infusion of AAV containing an NF-κB-luciferase reporter (AAV-NF-κB-luciferase) can reliably measure pancreatic NF-κB activation. We confirmed the infectivity of the AAV-NF-κB-luciferase reporter in HEK293 cells using a traditional luciferase readout. Mice were infused with AAV-NF-κB-luciferase 5 weeks before induction of pancreatitis (caerulein, 50 μg/kg). Unlike transgenic mice that globally express NF-κB-luciferase, AAV-infused mice showed a 15-fold increase in pancreas-specific NF-κB bioluminescence following 12 h of caerulein compared with baseline luminescence (p < 0.05). The specificity of the NF-κB-luciferase signal to the pancreas was confirmed by isolating the pancreas and adjacent organs and observing a predominant bioluminescent signal in the pancreas compared with liver, spleen, and stomach. A complementary mouse model of post-ERCP-pancreatitis also induced pancreatic NF-κB signals. Taken together these data provide the first demonstration that NF-κB activation can be examined in a live, dynamic fashion during pancreatic inflammation. We believe this technique offers a valuable tool to study real-time activation of NF-κB in vivo. PMID:25802340

  19. High-Throughput Luciferase-Based Assay for the Discovery of Therapeutics That Prevent Malaria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify the most attractive starting points for drugs that can be used to prevent malaria, a diverse chemical space comprising tens of thousands to millions of small molecules may need to be examined. Achieving this throughput necessitates the development of efficient ultra-high-throughput screening methods. Here, we report the development and evaluation of a luciferase-based phenotypic screen of malaria exoerythrocytic-stage parasites optimized for a 1536-well format. This assay uses the exoerythrocytic stage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, and a human hepatoma cell line. We use this assay to evaluate several biased and unbiased compound libraries, including two small sets of molecules (400 and 89 compounds, respectively) with known activity against malaria erythrocytic-stage parasites and a set of 9886 diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS)-derived compounds. Of the compounds screened, we obtain hit rates of 12–13 and 0.6% in preselected and naïve libraries, respectively, and identify 52 compounds with exoerythrocytic-stage activity less than 1 μM and having minimal host cell toxicity. Our data demonstrate the ability of this method to identify compounds known to have causal prophylactic activity in both human and animal models of malaria, as well as novel compounds, including some exclusively active against parasite exoerythrocytic stages. PMID:27275010

  20. A high throughput system for the evaluation of protein kinase C inhibitors based on Elk1 transcriptional activation in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sharif, T R; Sharif, M

    1999-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) designates a family of kinases that regulate many essential functions including cell growth and differentiation. The tight regulation of PKC activity is crucial for maintaining normal cellular proliferation and excessive activity leads to abnormal or uncontrolled cell growth. Recent reports indicate that malignant glioma cell lines express 100 to 1000-fold higher PKC activity when compared to non-neoplastic astrocytes. This high activity correlates well with the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro. We recently reported on the anti-proliferative properties of selective PKC inhibitors on the growth of U-373MG human astrocytoma cell line, and their ability to block mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway activated by substance P (SP) neuropeptide receptor signaling via a PKC-dependent mechanism. Therefore, inhibiting PKC activity by selective PKC inhibitors may present a promising approach for improving astroglial brain tumor therapy. For this purpose, we constructed a high throughput model cell system to evaluate the efficacy of PKC inhibitors. This system is based on the measurement of light production in U-373MG cells stably transfected with the luciferase reporter gene whose expression depends on the transcriptional activation of GAL4-Elk1 fusion protein by enzyme components of the MAP kinase pathway and the upstream activation of PKC (PKC activation-->MAP kinases-->GAL4-Elk1 phosphorylation-->luciferase expression-->luciferase activity). In brief, we have demonstrated that the PKC activator 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced luciferase activity in this cell system is mediated via the MAP kinase pathway and can be blocked in the presence of MEK1 selective inhibitors (PD 098059 or U0126). We also demonstrated that TPA-induced luciferase activity in U-373MG stable clones can be blocked by PKC inhibitors (CGP 41251, Go 6976, and GF 109203X) in a concentration dependent manner. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF

  1. Altered glutamyl-aminopeptidase activity and expression in renal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in the knowledge of renal neoplasms have demonstrated the implication of several proteases in their genesis, growth and dissemination. Glutamyl-aminopeptidase (GAP) (EC. 3.4.11.7) is a zinc metallopeptidase with angiotensinase activity highly expressed in kidney tissues and its expression and activity have been associated wtih tumour development. Methods In this prospective study, GAP spectrofluorometric activity and immunohistochemical expression were analysed in clear-cell (CCRCC), papillary (PRCC) and chromophobe (ChRCC) renal cell carcinomas, and in renal oncocytoma (RO). Data obtained in tumour tissue were compared with those from the surrounding uninvolved kidney tissue. In CCRCC, classic pathological parameters such as grade, stage and tumour size were stratified following GAP data and analyzed for 5-year survival. Results GAP activity in both the membrane-bound and soluble fractions was sharply decreased and its immunohistochemical expression showed mild staining in the four histological types of renal tumours. Soluble and membrane-bound GAP activities correlated with tumour grade and size in CCRCCs. Conclusions This study suggests a role for GAP in the neoplastic development of renal tumours and provides additional data for considering the activity and expression of this enzyme of interest in the diagnosis and prognosis of renal neoplasms. PMID:24885240

  2. HSD17B1 expression enhances estrogen signaling stimulated by the low active estrone, evidenced by an estrogen responsive element-driven reporter gene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Järvensivu, Päivi; Saloniemi-Heinonen, Taija; Awosanya, Michael; Koskimies, Pasi; Saarinen, Niina; Poutanen, Matti

    2015-06-05

    Hydroxysteroid (17beta) dehydrogenase 1 (HSD17B1) belongs to a family of short-chain-dehydrogenases. The enzyme utilizes NAD(P) and NAD(P)H as cofactors, and catalyzes the reversible reaction between estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) in vitro. Of these steroids, E1 presents with lower estrogenic activity, but is converted to highly active E2 by HSD17B1. HSD17B1 is expressed especially in tissues with a high E2-producing capacity such as human ovaries and placenta, but also in several peripheral estrogen target tissues in humans, and inhibiting the enzyme activity is, thus, considered a promising approach to treat estrogen-dependent diseases. By analyzing transgenic mice universally expressing human HSD17B1 and carrying estrogen-response element (ERE)-driven luciferase reporter gene (Bi-transgenic ERELuc-HSD17B1TG mice) we showed a markedly higher reporter gene activity in various peripheral tissues of these mice as compared with ERELuc mice, indicating enhanced estrogen response generated by human HSD17B1 expression. An increased response after E1 administration was also evident in the Bi-TG mice, indicated by the increased uterus growth response and by the higher ERELuc reporter gene activity in the uterus. Moreover, a HSD17B1 inhibitor significantly reduced E1-induced increase in the uterus weight and uterine epithelial proliferation in the Bi-TG mice. Also the E1-induced ERELuc activity in the inhibitor-treated uterus was reduced by the HSD17B1 inhibitor in immature mice ex vivo, as well as in the liver of adult mice. The data, thus, demonstrate the potential use of the Bi-TG mice as a preclinical in vivo model for screening the efficacy of HSD17B1 inhibitors. As compared with the existing models, the Bi-TG mice present with luciferase activity as an additional, easily quantitative endpoint for the estrogen action.

  3. Control of luciferase synthesis in a newly isolated strain of Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, R; Ulitzur, S

    1977-12-15

    In previous studies with luminous bacteria of all different species it has been reported that the synthesis of luciferase is autoinducible: during growth at low cell densities synthesis is effectively repressed while after induction, at higher cell densities, the rate of synthesis of enzyme is up to five times the growth rate. In this paper we report on newly isolated strains of Photobacterium leiognathi which show continued luciferase synthesis irrespective of the cell density. The specific synthesis rate may nevertheless differ from the rate of growth and depends on the luciferase content of the inoculated cells. A ratio of 1 was established for cells having a maximum luciferase content varying to a ratio of about 2 for cells that contained only 1% of the maximum.

  4. Excitation transfer in the in-vitro reaction of photobacterium luciferase bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, John W.

    1992-04-01

    Fluorescence dynamics methods are used to probe the mechanism by which the chemi- energized intermediates of the bacterial luciferase catalyzed oxidation of FMNH2 and tetradecanal are able to excite the ligand of lumazine protein to its first excited singlet state. A fluorescence dynamics study of the effect of lumazine protein on the reaction of several types of luciferase has recently been published (Biochemistry 30 6825, 1991). This present report examines the case of the Photobacterium leiognathi luciferase reaction in more detail. The fluorescence anisotropy of a mixture of this luciferase fluorescent transient mixed with lumazine protein decays rapidly with a correlation time of 5 ns, interpreted as due to energy transfer. There is no sign of a longer time corresponding to the rotation of the proteins themselves. No rise time of the lumazine (acceptor) fluorescence on exciting into the fluorescent transient (donor) absorption is measureable, so that no straightforward estimate of the energy transfer rate can be made.

  5. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  6. Expression, purification and characterization of inactive and active forms of ERK2 from insect expression system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kelly; Merritt, Hanne; Crawford, Kenneth; Pardee, Gwynn; Cheng, Jan Marie; Widger, Stephania; Hekmat-Nejad, Mohammad; Zaror, Isabel; Sim, Janet

    2015-06-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is a serine/threonine protein kinase involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility and programed cell-death. It is therefore considered an important target in the treatment of cancer. In an effort to support biochemical screening and small molecule drug discovery, we established a robust system to generate both inactive and active forms of ERK2 using insect expression system. We report here, for the first time, that inactive ERK2 can be expressed and purified with 100% homogeneity in the unphosphorylated form using insect system. This resulted in a significant 20-fold yield improvement compared to that previously reported using bacterial expression system. We also report a newly developed system to generate active ERK2 in insect cells through in vivo co-expression with a constitutively active MEK1 (S218D S222D). Isolated active ERK2 was confirmed to be doubly phosphorylated at the correct sites, T185 and Y187, in the activation loop of ERK2. Both ERK2 forms, inactive and active, were well characterized by biochemical activity assay for their kinase function. Inactive and active ERK2 were the two key reagents that enabled successful high through-put biochemical assay screen and structural drug discovery studies.

  7. Does pressure antagonize anesthesia? High-pressure stopped-flow study of firefly luciferase and anatomy of initial flash.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, I; Minami, H; Matsuki, H; Inoue, T

    1999-01-01

    The antagonizing effect of high pressure against anesthesia is well known. With purified firefly luciferase, however,. Biophys. J. 60:1309-1314) reported that high pressure did not affect the initial flash intensity. Firefly luciferase emits a burst of light when the substrates luciferin and ATP are added in the presence of O2. The light intensity decays rapidly and the weak light lasts for hours. The initial flash is a transient event and is not in a steady state. The steady state is represented by the slope of the linear part of the integral of the light output. The present study used a high-pressure stopped-flow system to compare the pressure effects on the initial flash intensity and the steady-state light intensity. The flash intensity did not change by the application of hydrostatic pressure in the presence or absence of chloroform or 1-octanol. In contrast, high pressure increased the steady-state light intensity. The application of 12 MPa pressure increased the steady-state light intensity of firefly luciferase inhibited by 5 mM chloroform or 0.7 mM 1-octanol by 19.7% and 18.8%, respectively. When analyzed by the rapid reaction kinetics of the transition state theory, the initial peak intensity represents the total amount of active enzyme and is unrelated to the reaction rate. Anesthetics inhibited the initial flash by unfolding the protein, thereby decreasing the concentration of the active enzyme. Pressure affected the steady-state light intensity by changing the reaction rates. PMID:9876160

  8. Effect of charge distribution in a flexible loop on the bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Alipour, Bagher Said

    2009-01-27

    Firefly luciferase is a monooxygenase that catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of firefly luciferin into a luciferyl-adenylate, which is oxidized to an electronically excited oxyluciferin in a multistep reaction and produces visible light with a remarkable quantum yield. The bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases is determined by the luciferase structure and assay conditions. Among different beetles, only luciferase from Phrixotrix railroad worm (Ph(RE)) emits red bioluminescence, naturally. The presence of Arg353 in Ph(RE) luciferase, which corresponds to the deleted residue in the other luciferases, is an important distinctive structural feature of it. Insertion of Arg356 into a green-emitter luciferase (Lampyris turkestanicus), corresponding to Arg353 in Phrixotrix hirtus, changed the emitted light from green to red. To further clarify the effect of this position on the light shift mechanism, four residues with similar sizes but different charges (Arg, Lys, Glu, and Gln) were inserted into Photinus pyralis luciferase, using site-specific insertion mutagenesis. Insertion of a residue with a positive side chain (Arg356 and Lys356) changed the light color to red, while insertion of a residue with a negative side chain (Glu356) had little effect on color. Insertion of a neutral residue (Gln356) at this position was performed without any change in bioluminescence spectra. Insertion of positively charged residues in this loop took place with a series of structural changes which were confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and homology modeling. Homology modeling reveals the appearance of a bulge in a flexible loop (T352-P359) upon mutation which shifts to the left side with a color change from green to red.

  9. Urine and Serum Analysis of Consumed Curcuminoids Using an IκB-Luciferase Surrogate Marker Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ponnurangam, Sivapriya; Mondalek, Fadee G.; Govind, Janita; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Houchen, Courtney W.; Anant, Shrikant; Pantazis, Panayotis; Ramanujam, Rama P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Curcumin metabolites are detectable in body fluids such as serum and urine. We have developed a novel assay that can detect metabolites in such body fluids by measuring their effect on the nuclear factor kappa B/inhibitor of kappa B (NF-κB/IκB) pathway. Patients and Methods Fifteen healthy individuals were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned to two groups: control group (five) and curcumin group (ten). The test group ingested 8 g of the curcuminoids (C3-Complex™) with 16 oz of bottled water. Blood and urine were collected at 0, 4, 8, and 24 h after ingestion. Degradation of the NF-κB/IκB complex was detected by the Genetic Expression and Measurement (GEM™) assay using HCT116 cells stably transfected with PGL3-IκB firefly luciferase. Results Using our novel GEM assay, the five controls who had not taken curcumin were identified. Conclusion The GEM assay is a very sensitive and accurate non-invasive assay that could be utilized to detect metabolites in body fluids. It could also serve as a tool to determine participants’ compliance during clinical research studies. PMID:21164045

  10. Plasmodium falciparum Transfected with Ultra Bright NanoLuc Luciferase Offers High Sensitivity Detection for the Screening of Growth and Cellular Trafficking Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Elsworth, Brendan; Charnaud, Sarah C.; Sanders, Paul R.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Gilson, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Drug discovery is a key part of malaria control and eradication strategies, and could benefit from sensitive and affordable assays to quantify parasite growth and to help identify the targets of potential anti-malarial compounds. Bioluminescence, achieved through expression of exogenous luciferases, is a powerful tool that has been applied in studies of several aspects of parasite biology and high throughput growth assays. We have expressed the new reporter NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase in Plasmodium falciparum and showed it is at least 100 times brighter than the commonly used firefly luciferase. Nluc brightness was explored as a means to achieve a growth assay with higher sensitivity and lower cost. In addition we attempted to develop other screening assays that may help interrogate libraries of inhibitory compounds for their mechanism of action. To this end parasites were engineered to express Nluc in the cytoplasm, the parasitophorous vacuole that surrounds the intraerythrocytic parasite or exported to the red blood cell cytosol. As proof-of-concept, these parasites were used to develop functional screening assays for quantifying the effects of Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of protein secretion, and Furosemide, an inhibitor of new permeation pathways used by parasites to acquire plasma nutrients. PMID:25392998

  11. Suppression of AKT expression by miR-153 produced anti-tumor activity in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Du, Weijie; Wang, Ying; Xu, Chaoqian; Wang, Jinghao; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Huimin; Ju, Jiaming; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Zhiguo; Lu, Yanjie; Cai, Benzhi; Pan, Zhenwei

    2015-03-15

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. microRNAs have been shown to be a novel class of regulators in lung cancer. Here, we explored the role of miR-153 in the pathogenesis of lung cancer and its therapeutic potential. miR-153 was significantly decreased in lung cancer tissues than the adjacent tissues. The protein and mRNA levels of protein kinase B (AKT), which were shown to promote tumor growth, were both increased in lung cancer tissues than adjacent tissues. Overexpression of miR-153 significantly inhibited AKT protein expression, which were abrogated by co-transfection of AMO-153, the specific inhibitor of miR-153. Luciferase assay showed that transfection of miR-153 markedly suppressed the fluorescent intensity of chimeric vectors carrying the 3'UTR of AKT1, while produced no effect on the mutant construct, indicating that AKT is regulated by miR-153. Overexpression of miR-153 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration, and promoted apoptosis of cultured lung cancer cells in vitro, and suppressed the growth of xenograft tumors in vivo. Interestingly, lung cancer cells with lower endogenous miR-153 expression are more sensitive to ectopic overexpressed miR-153. The IC50 of miR-153 on lung cancer cells is positive correlated with the endogenous miR-153 level, while negative correlated with AKT level. Knockdown of AKT expression suppressed lung cancer cell proliferation. In summary, miR-153 exerted anti-tumor activity in lung cancer by targeting on AKT. The sensitivity of lung cancer cells to miR-153 is determined by its endogenous miR-153 level.

  12. Bifunctional role of leucine 300 of firefly luciferase in structural rigidity.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Farzad; Ataei, Farangis; Mortazavi, Mojtaba; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2017-03-18

    Firefly luciferase is susceptible to thermal inactivation, thereby its intracellular half-life decreased. Previous reports indicated that L(300)R mutation (LRR mutant) in E(354)R/Arg(356) double mutant (ERR mutant) from Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase has increased its thermal stability and rigidity through induction of some ionic bonds with Asp 270 and 271. Disruption of the deduced ionic bonds in an ultra-rigid mutant of firefly luciferase did not reverse the flexibility of the protein. In this study, we investigated the effects of this residue to find the truth behind an extraordinary increase in thermal stability and rigidity of luciferase after replacement of leucine 300 by arginine based on previous reports. For this purpose, L(300)R, L(300)K and L(300)E mutations were performed to compare the effects of these mutations on the native firefly luciferase. In spite of increase of intrinsic fluorescence of the mutants a slight increase in thermostability and retention of kinetic properties was observed. Based on our results, we can conclude that L(300)R mutation in LRR mutant accompanying with alteration in a flexible loop (352-359) increased thermostability and rigidity of luciferase.

  13. Cloning and Expression of Yak Active Chymosin in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fan; Jiang, Wei Hua; Yang, Yuan Xiao; Li, Jiang; Jiang, Ming Feng

    2016-01-01

    Rennet, a complex of enzymes found in the stomachs of ruminants, is an important component for cheese production. In our study, we described that yak chymosin gene recombinant Pichia pastoris strain could serve as a novel source for rennet production. Yaks total RNA was extracted from the abomasum of an unweaned yak. The yak preprochymosin, prochymosin, and chymosin genes from total RNA were isolated using gene specific primers based on cattle chymosin gene sequence respectively and analyzed their expression pattern byreal time-polymerase chain reaction. The result showed that the chymosin gene expression level of the sucking yaks was 11.45 times higher than one of adult yaks and yak chymosin belongs to Bovidae family in phylogenetic analysis. To express each, the preprochymosin, prochymosin, and chymosin genes were ligated into the expression vector pPICZαA, respectively, and were expressed in Pichia pastoris X33. The results showed that all the recombinant clones of P. pastoris containing the preprochymosin, prochymosin or chymosin genes could produce the active form of recombinant chymosin into the culture supernatant. Heterologous expressed prochymosin (14.55 Soxhlet unit/mL) had the highest enzyme activity of the three expressed chymosin enzymes. Therefore, we suggest that the yak chymosin gene recombinant Pichia pastoris strain could provide an alternative source of rennet production. PMID:27004812

  14. Optimized chromatographic and bioluminescent methods for inorganic pyrophosphate based on its conversion to ATP by firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Marques, Simone M; Peralta, Filipe; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2009-02-15

    Two new methods for inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) quantification are described. They are based on the enzymatic conversion of PPi into ATP by firefly luciferase (Luc, E.C. 1.13.12.7) in the presence of dehydroluciferyl-adenylate (L-AMP) followed by the determination of ATP by one of two different procedures, either UV-monitored (260 nm) ion-pair-HPLC (IP-HPLC) (method A) or luciferase-dependent bioluminescence in the presence of its substrate, firefly luciferin (D-LH(2)) (method B). These methods were subjected to optimization using experimental design methodologies to obtain optimum values for the selected factors: method A-incubation time (t(inc)=15 min), inactivation time of the enzyme (t(inac)=2 min), pH of the reaction mixture (pH 7.50) and the concentrations of L-AMP ([L-AMP]=40 microM) and luciferase ([Luc]=0.1 microM); method B-concentrations of L-AMP ([L-AMP]=2 microM), luciferase ([Luc]=50 nM) and luciferin ([LH(2)]=30 microM). Method A has a linear response over the range of 0.1-20 microM of PPi, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.5 microM and a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 1.8 microM. Precision, expressed as relative standard deviation (R.S.D.), is 7.4% at 1 microM PPi and 5.9% at 8 microM PPi. Method B has a linear response over the range of 0.75-6.0 microM of PPi, with LOD and LOQ of 0.624 and 2.23 microM, respectively, and a R.S.D. of 5.1% at 2.5 microM PPi and 4.9% at 5 microM PPi. Under optimized conditions sensitive and robust methods can be obtained for the analysis of PPi impurities in commercial nucleotides and tripolyphosphate (P(3)).

  15. Expression of soluble and active interferon consensus in SUMO fusion expression system in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Peciak, Karolina; Tommasi, Rita; Choi, Ji-won; Brocchini, Steve; Laurine, Emmanuelle

    2014-07-01

    Protein production can be improved if methods for soluble protein expression are developed. Interferon consensus (IFN-con) is used to treat hepatitis C. IFN-con has superior activity compared to other clinically used interferon α subtypes. However IFN-con is a challenging protein to produce in a soluble form using an Escherichia coli expression system. Here we describe the expression of soluble and active recombinant IFN-con in E. coli. The IFN-con gene sequence was optimised for expression in E. coli, which was then cloned into the Champion™ pET SUMO expression vector downstream of the SUMO fusion protein and under strong T7lac promoter. The SUMO-IFN-con fusion protein was efficiently expressed using the SHuffle™ E. coli strain and existed in soluble form as 86-88% of the total IFN-con. After removal of the SUMO fusion partner, approximately 50mg of recombinant IFN-con of at least 98% purity (by RP-HPLC) was obtained from a 1L fermentation culture. Using an A549/EMCV antiviral assay, the specific activity of the recombinant IFN-con was determined to be 960×10(6) IU/mg as calculated to NIBSC standard for IFN-con (3×10(5)pfu/mL virus titre). Comparison of the antiviral activity of the produced IFN-con to IFN α-2a showed that IFN-con displays 2.8 times greater activity, which is in good agreement with what has been reported in the literature for pure protein. IFN-con expression in a soluble form from E. coli allowed us to use a simple, two-step purification process to yield highly pure and active IFN-con which is more efficient than obtaining IFN-con from inclusion bodies.

  16. Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor δ Regulates Mitofusin 2 Expression in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuquan; Yin, Ran; Liu, Jian; Wang, Peiyong; Wu, Sijie; Luo, Jinwen; Zhelyabovska, Olga; Yang, Qinglin

    2009-01-01

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) has been proposed as an important mitochondrial protein in maintaining mitochondrial network and bioenergetics. Mfn2 is highly expressed in the heart, but is downregulated in response to hypertrophic stimuli. However, little is known about how Mfn2’s expression is regulated in cardiomyocytes. Here, we have investigated how Mfn2 expression in the heart responds to fasting condition and determined if Mfn2 is one of those PPARδ-selective target genes that are involved in myocardial energy metabolism. Fasting for 48 hours in mice led to a robust increase of Mfn2 expression in the heart. On the other hand, cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARδ deficiency in mice led to substantially diminished cardiac expression of Mfn2 transcript and protein compared to that of controls. Fasting induced cardiac expression of Mfn2 was blunted in cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARδ deficient hearts. Moreover, PPARδ-selective ligand treatment in cultured cardiomyocytes induced elevated Mfn2 expression. A functional PPRE consensus sequence located at −837 to −817bp upstream of the mouse Mfn2 promoter was identified and confirmed by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays and Luciferase Promoter Reporter Assays. We conclude that Mfn2 is a PPARδ-selective target, which may play an important role in regulating myocardial energy homeostasis. PMID:19265701

  17. Sensitive Dual Color in vivo Bioluminescence Imaging Using a New Red Codon Optimized Firefly Luciferase and a Green Click Beetle Luciferase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    better separation in deeper tissues [27]. Recently, Hida and colleagues applied multicolor luciferases to study protein-protein interaction and proposed...fluorescence imaging with a multivariate curve resolution spectral unmixing technique. J Biomed Opt 14: 064011. 28. Hida N, Awais M, Takeuchi M, Ueno N

  18. A Luciferase Gene Driven by an Alphaherpesviral Promoter Also Responds to Immediate Early Antigens of the Betaherpesvirus HCMV, Allowing Comparative Analyses of Different Human Herpesviruses in One Reporter Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Villinger, Clarissa; Schubert, Axel; Walther, Paul; Sinzger, Christian; Lieber, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Widely used methods for quantification of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in cell culture such as immunoblotting or plaque reduction assays are generally restricted to low throughput and require time-consuming evaluation. Up to now, only few HCMV reporter cell lines have been generated to overcome these restrictions and they are afflicted with other limitations because permanently expandable cell lines are normally not fully permissive to HCMV. In this work, a previously existing epithelial cell line hosting a luciferase gene under control of a Varicella-zoster virus promoter was adopted to investigate HCMV infection. The cells were susceptible to different HCMV strains at infection efficiencies that corresponded to their respective degree of epithelial cell tropism. Expression of early and late viral antigens, formation of nuclear inclusions, release of infectious virus progeny, and focal growth indicated productive viral replication. However, viral release and spread occurred at lower levels than in primary cell lines which appears to be due to a malfunction of virion morphogenesis during the nuclear stage. Expression of the luciferase reporter gene was specifically induced in HCMV infected cultures as a function of the virus dose and dependent on viral immediate early gene expression. The level of reporter activity accurately reflected infection efficiencies as determined by viral antigen immunostaining, and hence could discriminate the cell tropism of the tested virus strains. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate that this cell line is applicable to evaluate drug resistance of clinical HCMV isolates and the neutralization capacity of human sera, and that it allows comparative and simultaneous analysis of HCMV and human herpes simplex virus type 1. In summary, the permanent epithelial reporter cell line allows robust, rapid and objective quantitation of HCMV infection and it will be particularly useful in higher throughput analyses as well as in

  19. Reduced miR-200b and miR-200c expression contributes to abnormal hepatic lipid accumulation by stimulating JUN expression and activating the transcription of srebp1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Libo; Lu, Yonggang; Dou, Lin; Huang, Xiuqing; Sun, Mingxiao; Pang, Cheng; Qu, Jing; Liu, Guanghui; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that miR-200s participated in IL-6-induced hepatic insulin resistance. However, the role of miR-200s in hepatic lipid accumulation has not been elucidated. Here we found that miR-200b and miR-200c were reduced in the steatotic livers of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. This down-regulation was accompanied by an increase in the expression of lipogenic proteins such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and fatty acid synthase (FAS). The suppression of miR-200b and miR-200c in Hep1-6 and NCTC1469 hepatocytes enhanced intracellular triglyceride levels, which were associated with increased SREBP-1 and FAS protein levels. In contrast, the over-expression of miR-200b and miR-200c suppressed lipid accumulation and reduced the expression of SREBP1 and FAS in Hep1-6 and NCTC1469 cells transfected with miR-200b or miR-200c mimics. Importantly, the up-regulation of miR-200b and miR-200c could reverse oleic acid/palmitic acid-induced lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. A luciferase reporter assay identified that miR-200b and miR-200c could directly bind the 3′UTR of jun. JUN activated the transcription of srebp1 to increase lipid accumulation. The data also demonstrated that increased miR-200b and miR-200c expression might be associated with sitagliptin-reduced hepatic lipid accumulation in mice fed a HFD. These findings suggest, for the first time, that reduced miR-200b and miR-200c expression contributes to abnormal hepatic lipid accumulation by stimulating JUN expression and activating the transcription of srebp1. PMID:27166182

  20. Transforming growth factor β signaling upregulates the expression of human GDP-fucose transporter by activating transcription factor Sp1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ma, Anna; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    GDP-fucose transporter plays a crucial role in fucosylation of glycoproteins by providing activated fucose donor, GDP-fucose, for fucosyltransferases in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Fucose-containing glycans are involved in many biological processes, which are essential for growth and development. Mutations in the GDP-fucose transporter gene cause leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome II, a disease characterized by slow growth, mental retardation and immunodeficiency. However, no information is available regarding its transcriptional regulation. Here, by using human cells, we show that TGF-β1 specifically induces the GDP-fucose transporter expression, but not other transporters tested such as CMP-sialic acid transporter, suggesting a diversity of regulatory pathways for the expression of these transporters. The regulatory elements that are responsive to the TGF-β1 stimulation are present in the region between bp -330 and -268 in the GDP-fucose transporter promoter. We found that this region contains two identical octamer GC-rich motifs (GGGGCGTG) that were demonstrated to be essential for the transporter expression. We also show that the transcription factor Sp1 specifically binds to the GC-rich motifs in vitro and Sp1 coupled with phospho-Smad2 is associated with the promoter region covering the Sp1-binding motifs in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, we further confirmed that Sp1 is essential for the GDP-fucose transporter expression stimulated by TGF-β1 using a luciferase reporter system. These results highlight the role of TGF-β signaling in regulation of the GDP-fucose transporter expression via activating Sp1. This is the first transcriptional study for any nucleotide sugar transporters that have been identified so far. Notably, TGF-β1 receptor itself is known to be modified by fucosylation. Given the essential role of GDP-fucose transporter in fucosylation, the finding that TGF-β1 stimulates the expression of

  1. GILT expression in B cells diminishes cathepsin S steady-state protein expression and activity

    PubMed Central

    Phipps-Yonas, Hannah; Semik, Vikki; Hastings, Karen Taraszka

    2013-01-01

    MHC class II-restricted Ag processing requires protein degradation in the endocytic pathway for the activation of CD4+ T cells. Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) facilitates Ag processing by reducing protein disulfide bonds in this compartment. Lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin S (CatS) contains disulfide bonds and mediates essential steps in MHC class II-restricted processing, including proteolysis of large polypeptides and cleavage of the invariant chain. We sought to determine whether GILT’s reductase activity regulates CatS expression and function. Confocal microscopy confirmed that GILT and CatS colocalized within lysosomes of B cells. GILT expression posttranscriptionally decreased the steady-state protein expression of CatS in primary B cells and B-cell lines. GILT did not substantially alter the expression of other lysosomal proteins, including H2-M, H2-O, or CatL. GILT’s reductase active site was necessary for diminished CatS protein levels, and GILT expression decreased the half-life of CatS, suggesting that GILT-mediated reduction of protein disulfide bonds enhances CatS degradation. GILT expression decreased the proteolysis of a CatS selective substrate. This study illustrates a physiologic mechanism that regulates CatS and has implications for fine tuning MHC class II-restricted Ag processing and for the development of CatS inhibitors, which are under investigation for the treatment of autoimmune disease. PMID:23012103

  2. Identifying a Kinase Network Regulating FGF14:Nav1.6 Complex Assembly Using Split-Luciferase Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Nenov, Miroslav N.; Shavkunov, Alexander; Panova, Neli; Zhan, Ming; Laezza, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Kinases play fundamental roles in the brain. Through complex signaling pathways, kinases regulate the strength of protein:protein interactions (PPI) influencing cell cycle, signal transduction, and electrical activity of neurons. Changes induced by kinases on neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and brain connectivity are linked to complex brain disorders, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these cellular events remain for the most part elusive. To further our understanding of brain disease, new methods for rapidly surveying kinase pathways in the cellular context are needed. The bioluminescence-based luciferase complementation assay (LCA) is a powerful, versatile toolkit for the exploration of PPI. LCA relies on the complementation of two firefly luciferase protein fragments that are functionally reconstituted into the full luciferase enzyme by two interacting binding partners. Here, we applied LCA in live cells to assay 12 kinase pathways as regulators of the PPI complex formed by the voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.6, a transmembrane ion channel that elicits the action potential in neurons and mediates synaptic transmission, and its multivalent accessory protein, the fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14). Through extensive dose-dependent validations of structurally-diverse kinase inhibitors and hierarchical clustering, we identified the PI3K/Akt pathway, the cell-cycle regulator Wee1 kinase, and protein kinase C (PKC) as prospective regulatory nodes of neuronal excitability through modulation of the FGF14:Nav1.6 complex. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis shows convergence of these pathways on glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and functional assays demonstrate that inhibition of GSK3 impairs excitability of hippocampal neurons. This combined approach provides a versatile toolkit for rapidly surveying PPI signaling, allowing the discovery of new modular pathways centered on GSK3 that might be the basis for functional alterations between the normal and

  3. Persistent synchronized oscillations in prolactin gene promoter activity in living pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    McFerran, D W; Stirland, J A; Norris, A J; Khan, R A; Takasuka, N; Seymour, Z C; Gill, M S; Robertson, W R; Loudon, A S; Davis, J R; White, M R

    2001-07-01

    PRL gene expression in the anterior pituitary gland responds rapidly to different hormonal signals. We have investigated the long-term timing of transcriptional activation from the PRL, GH, and cytomegalovirus promoters in response to different stimulus duration, using real-time imaging of luciferase expression in living stably transfected GH3 cells. Long-term stimulation of serum-starved cells with 50% serum induced a homogeneous rise in PRL promoter activity, with subsequent heterogeneous fluctuations in luciferase activity in individual cells. When cells were subjected to a 2-h pulse of 50% serum, followed by serum-free medium, there were long-term (approximately 50 h) synchronized, homogeneous oscillations in PRL promoter activity. This response was PRL-specific, because in GH3 cells expressing luciferase from the GH or cytomegalovirus promoters, a serum pulse elicited no oscillations in luciferase expression after an initial transient response to serum. The PRL promoter may therefore be a template for an unstable transcription complex subject to stochastic regulation, allowing an oscillatory transcriptional response to physiological signals. This suggests that precise timing and coordination of cell responses to different signal-duration may represent a novel mechanism for coordinating long-term dynamic changes in transcription in cell populations.

  4. TRAF family member-associated NF-kappa B activator (TANK) expression increases in injured sensory neurons and is transcriptionally regulated by Sox11

    PubMed Central

    Salerno, Kathleen M.; Jing, Xiaotang; Diges, Charlotte M.; Davis, Brian M.; Albers, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury evokes rapid and complex changes in gene transcription and cellular signaling pathways. Understanding how these changes are functionally related is essential for developing new approaches that accelerate and improve nerve regeneration. Towards this goal we found that nerve injury induces a rapid and significant up-regulation of the transcription factor Sox11 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Gain and loss of function studies have shown this increase is essential for normal axon regeneration. To determine how Sox11 impacts neuronal gene expression, DRG neurons were treated with Sox11 siRNA to identify potential transcriptional targets. One gene significantly reduced by Sox11 knockdown was TRAF (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor)-associated NF-κB activator (TANK). Here we show that TANK is expressed in DRG neurons, that TANK expression is increased in response to peripheral nerve injury and that Sox11 overexpression in vitro increases TANK expression. Injury and in vitro overexpression were also found to preferentially increase TANK transcript variant 3 and a larger TANK protein isoform. To determine if Sox11 regulates TANK transcription bioinformatic analysis was used to identify potential Sox binding motifs within 5 kbp of the TANK 5’ untranslated region (UTR) across several mammalian genomes. Two sites in the mouse TANK gene were examined. Luciferase expression assays coupled with site-directed mutagenesis showed each site contributes to enhanced TANK promoter activity. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed direct Sox11 binding in regions containing the two identified Sox motifs in the mouse TANK 5’-UTR. These studies are the first to show that TANK is expressed in DRG neurons, that TANK is increased by peripheral nerve injury and that the regulation of TANK expression is, at least in part, controlled by the injury-associated transcription factor Sox11. PMID:23201825

  5. Bioorthogonal Catalysis: A General Method To Evaluate Metal-Catalyzed Reactions in Real Time in Living Systems Using a Cellular Luciferase Reporter System

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of abiological catalysts that can function in biological systems is an emerging subject of importance with significant ramifications in synthetic chemistry and the life sciences. Herein we report a biocompatible ruthenium complex [Cp(MQA)Ru(C3H5)]+PF6–2 (Cp = cyclopentadienyl, MQA = 4-methoxyquinoline-2-carboxylate) and a general analytical method for evaluating its performance in real time based on a luciferase reporter system amenable to high throughput screening in cells and by extension to evaluation in luciferase transgenic animals. Precatalyst 2 activates alloc-protected aminoluciferin 4b, a bioluminescence pro-probe, and releases the active luminophore, aminoluciferin (4a), in the presence of luciferase-transfected cells. The formation and enzymatic turnover of 4a, an overall process selected because it emulates pro-drug activation and drug turnover by an intracellular target, is evaluated in real time by photon counting as 4a is converted by intracellular luciferase to oxyaminoluciferin and light. Interestingly, while the catalytic conversion (activation) of 4b to 4a in water produces multiple products, the presence of biological nucleophiles such as thiols prevents byproduct formation and provides almost exclusively luminophore 4a. Our studies show that precatalyst 2 activates 4b extracellularly, exhibits low toxicity at concentrations relevant to catalysis, and is comparably effective in two different cell lines. This proof of concept study shows that precatalyst 2 is a promising lead for bioorthogonal catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy, similarly activatable pro-drugs. More generally, this study provides an analytical method to measure abiological catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy with our earlier studies on pro-Taxol, similarly activatable pro-drugs in real time using a coupled biological catalyst that mediates a bioluminescent readout, providing tools for the study of imaging signal amplification and

  6. Expression of protooncogenes during lymphocyte activation by growth factors.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, E G; Budagyan, V M; Yarilin, A A; Mazurenko, N N

    1997-09-01

    Effects of growth factors of non-immune origin including somatotropin (ST) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on the expression of the proteins encoded by c-fos, c-myc, c-fun, and c-ets family protooncogenes were studied for the first time. The dynamics of the oncoprotein expression in activated CD(3+)-lymphocytes was investigated by immunoblotting. The accumulation of the Fos and Myc proteins was enhanced in T-lymphocytes treated with ST, PDGF, or phytohemagglutinin; the accumulation was maximum at 30-60 min and decreased in 2 h; the data indicate that the oncoproteins participate in the early lymphocyte activation by various growth factors. The Jun protein appears only in 3 h after the onset of lymphocyte activation; this suggests independent participation of Fos in the early stages of lymphocyte activation prior to the appearance of Jun, preceding the joint action of Fos and Jun within the AP-1 transcription complex. The products of the c-ets family are differentially activated by the studied growth factors. Resting lymphocytes actively accumulate the Ets-1 protein; ST and PDGF activation decreases Ets-1 expression in 2 h. The Ets-2 protein is not detected in resting cells and PDGF-activated lymphocytes, whereas lymphocyte activation by ST is associated with accumulation of Ets-2. The data suggest that the product of the c-ets-1 gene is more important in the regulation of resting cells and the product of the c-ets-2 gene is important during activation of lymphocytes by ST. The results indicate that activation of lymphocytes with growth factors of non-immune origin is mediated by several signal transduction pathways.

  7. Lotus hairy roots expressing inducible arginine decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, María A; Ruiz, Oscar A; Sánchez, Diego H

    2004-05-01

    Biotechnological uses of plant cell-tissue culture usually rely on constitutive transgene expression. However, such expression of transgenes may not always be desirable. In those cases, the use of an inducible promoter could be an alternative approach. To test this hypothesis, we developed two binary vectors harboring a stress-inducible promoter from Arabidopsis thaliana, driving the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene and the oat arginine decarboxylase. Transgenic hairy roots of Lotus corniculatus were obtained with osmotic- and cold-inducible beta-glucuronidase and arginine decarboxylase activities. The increase in the activity of the latter was accompanied by a significant rise in total free polyamines level. Through an organogenesis process, we obtained L. corniculatus transgenic plants avoiding deleterious phenotypes frequently associated with the constitutive over-expression of arginine decarboxylation and putrescine accumulation.

  8. Linking estrogen receptor β expression with inflammatory bowel disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Pierdominici, Marina; Maselli, Angela; Varano, Barbara; Barbati, Cristiana; Cesaro, Paola; Spada, Cristiano; Zullo, Angelo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Rosati, Marco; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Limiti, Maria Rosaria; Guidi, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) whose pathogenesis is only poorly understood. Estrogens have a complex role in inflammation and growing evidence suggests that these hormones may impact IBD pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction (p < 0.05) of estrogen receptor (ER)β expression in peripheral blood T lymphocytes from CD/UC patients with active disease (n = 27) as compared to those in remission (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 29). Accordingly, in a subgroup of CD/UC patients undergoing to anti-TNF-α therapy and responsive to treatment, ERβ expression was higher (p < 0.01) than that observed in not responsive patients and comparable to that of control subjects. Notably, ERβ expression was markedly decreased in colonic mucosa of CD/UC patients with active disease, reflecting the alterations observed in peripheral blood T cells. ERβ expression inversely correlated with interleukin (IL)-6 serum levels and exogenous exposure of both T lymphocytes and intestinal epithelial cells to this cytokine resulted in ERβ downregulation. These results demonstrate that the ER profile is altered in active IBD patients at both mucosal and systemic levels, at least in part due to IL-6 dysregulation, and highlight the potential exploitation of T cell-associated ERβ as a biomarker of endoscopic disease activity. PMID:26497217

  9. Fireflies in the coalmine: luciferase technologies in next-generation toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Steven O

    2011-09-01

    Whole-animal studies have been the mainstay of toxicity testing for decades. These approaches are too expensive and laborious to effectively characterize all of the chemicals currently in commercial use. In addition, there are social and ethical pressures to reduce, refine and replace animal testing in toxicology. The National Research Council (NRC) has outlined a new strategy to transition from animal-based tests to high throughput, cell-based assays and computational modeling approaches to characterize chemical toxicants. Critical to this vision, assays that measure toxicity pathways associated with adverse health effects must be developed. Bioluminescent assays are particularly well suited to the demands of next-generation toxicity testing because they measure a wide range of biological activities in a quantitative and high throughput manner. This review describes the limitations of traditional, animal-based toxicity testing and discusses the current and developing uses of bioluminescent technologies in next-generation testing based on three general assay formats: luciferase-limited assays, ATP-limited assays and luciferin-limited assays.

  10. Probing Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Rod-Luciferase Nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M; Doane, Tennyson L; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2016-02-23

    We describe the necessary design criteria to create highly efficient energy transfer conjugates containing luciferase enzymes derived from Photinus pyralis (Ppy) and semiconductor quantum rods (QRs) with rod-in-rod (r/r) microstructure. By fine-tuning the synthetic conditions, CdSe/CdS r/r-QRs were prepared with two different emission colors and three different aspect ratios (l/w) each. These were hybridized with blue, green, and red emitting Ppy, leading to a number of new BRET nanoconjugates. Measurements of the emission BRET ratio (BR) indicate that the resulting energy transfer is highly dependent on QR energy accepting properties, which include absorption, quantum yield, and optical anisotropy, as well as its morphological and topological properties, such as aspect ratio and defect concentration. The highest BR was found using r/r-QRs with lower l/w that were conjugated with red Ppy, which may be activating one of the anisotropic CdSe core energy levels. The role QR surface defects play on Ppy binding, and energy transfer was studied by growth of gold nanoparticles at the defects, which indicated that each QR set has different sites. The Ppy binding at those sites is suggested by the observed BRET red-shift as a function of Ppy-to-QR loading (L), where the lowest L results in highest efficiency and furthest shift.

  11. Aconine inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells by suppressing NF-κB and NFATc1 activation and DC-STAMP expression

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiang-zhou; He, Long-gang; Wang, Song; Wang, Keng; Zhang, Yue-yang; Tao, Lei; Li, Xiao-juan; Liu, Shu-wen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Aconiti Lateralis Radix Preparata is a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat chronic arthritis and is highly effective against rheumatoid arthritis. However, the effects of aconine, a derivative of aconitum alkaloids, on osteoclasts, which can absorb bone, remain unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of aconine on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro. Methods: The viability of mouse leukemic monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was measured using CCK-8 assays. Osteoclast differentiation was induced by incubation of RAW264.7 cells in the presence of RANKL, and assessed with TRAP staining assay. Bone resorption was examined with bone resorption pits assay. The expression of relevant genes and proteins was analyzed using RT-PCR and Western blots. The activation of NF-κB and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) was examined using stable NF-κB and NFATc1 luciferase reporter gene systems, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results: Aconine (0.125, 0.25 μmol/L) did not affect the viability of RAW264.7 cells, but dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorptive activity. Furthermore, aconine dose-dependently inhibited the RANKL-induced activation of NF-κB and NFATc1 in RAW264.7 cells, and subsequently reduced the expression of osteoclast-specific genes (c-Src, β3-Integrin, cathepsin K and MMP-9) and the expression of dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), which played an important role in cell-cell fusion. Conclusion: These findings suggest that aconine inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and NFATc1 and the expression of the cell-cell fusion molecule DC-STAMP. PMID:26592521

  12. Up-Regulation of CYP2C19 Expression by BuChang NaoXinTong via PXR Activation in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Huan; Qu, Qiang; Tan, Shen-Lan; Ruan, Jun-Shan; Qu, Jian; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) is an important drug-metabolizing enzyme (DME), which is responsible for the biotransformation of several kinds of drugs such as proton pump inhibitors, platelet aggregation inhibitors and antidepressants. Previous studies showed that Buchang NaoXinTong capsules (NXT) increased the CYP2C19 metabolic activity in vitro and enhanced the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel in vivo. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remained unclear. In the present study, we examined whether Pregnane X receptor (PXR) plays a role in NXT-mediated regulation of CYP2C19 expression. Methods We applied luciferase assays, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), Western blotting and cell-based analysis of metabolic activity experiments to investigate the NXT regulatory effects on the CYP2C19 promoter activity, the mRNA/ protein expression and the metabolic activity. Results Our results demonstrated that NXT significantly increased the CYP2C19 promoter activity when co-transfected with PXR in HepG2 cells. Mutations in PXR responsive element abolished the NXT inductive effects on the CYP2C19 promoter transcription. Additionally, NXT incubation (150 and 250μg/mL) also markedly up-regulated endogenous CYP2C19 mRNA and protein levels in PXR-transfected HepG2 cells. Correspondingly, NXT leaded to a significant enhancement of the CYP2C19 catalytic activity in PXR-transfected HepG2 cells. Conclusion In summary, this is the first study to suggest that NXT could induce CYP2C19 expression via PXR activation. PMID:27467078

  13. Prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons shape neuronal activity to drive fear expression.

    PubMed

    Courtin, Julien; Chaudun, Fabrice; Rozeske, Robert R; Karalis, Nikolaos; Gonzalez-Campo, Cecilia; Wurtz, Hélène; Abdi, Azzedine; Baufreton, Jerome; Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Herry, Cyril

    2014-01-02

    Synchronization of spiking activity in neuronal networks is a fundamental process that enables the precise transmission of information to drive behavioural responses. In cortical areas, synchronization of principal-neuron spiking activity is an effective mechanism for information coding that is regulated by GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic interneurons through the generation of neuronal oscillations. Although neuronal synchrony has been demonstrated to be crucial for sensory, motor and cognitive processing, it has not been investigated at the level of defined circuits involved in the control of emotional behaviour. Converging evidence indicates that fear behaviour is regulated by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). This control over fear behaviour relies on the activation of specific prefrontal projections to the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), a structure that encodes associative fear memories. However, it remains to be established how the precise temporal control of fear behaviour is achieved at the level of prefrontal circuits. Here we use single-unit recordings and optogenetic manipulations in behaving mice to show that fear expression is causally related to the phasic inhibition of prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons (PVINs). Inhibition of PVIN activity disinhibits prefrontal projection neurons and synchronizes their firing by resetting local theta oscillations, leading to fear expression. Our results identify two complementary neuronal mechanisms mediated by PVINs that precisely coordinate and enhance the neuronal activity of prefrontal projection neurons to drive fear expression.

  14. Erythropoietin-mediated expression of placenta growth factor is regulated via activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and post-transcriptionally by miR-214 in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Caryn S; Li, Chen; Mpollo, Marthe-Sandrine Eiymo Mwa; Pullarkat, Vinod; Malik, Punam; Tahara, Stanley M; Kalra, Vijay K

    2015-06-15

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) plays an important role in various pathological conditions and diseases such as inflammation, cancer, atherosclerosis and sickle cell disease (SCD). Abnormally high PlGF levels in SCD patients are associated with increased inflammation and pulmonary hypertension (PHT) and reactive airway disease; however, the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms regulating PlGF expression are not well defined. Herein, we show that treatment of human erythroid cells and colony forming units with erythropoietin (EPO) increased PlGF expression. Our studies showed EPO-mediated activation of HIF-1α led to subsequent binding of HIF-1α to hypoxia response elements (HREs) within the PlGF promoter, as demonstrated by luciferase transcription reporter assays and ChIP analysis of the endogenous gene. Additionally, we showed miR-214 post-transcriptionally regulated the expression of PlGF as demonstrated by luciferase reporter assays using wild-type (wt) and mutant PlGF-3'-UTR constructs. Furthermore, synthesis of miR-214, located in an intron of DNM3 (dynamin 3), was transcriptionally regulated by transcription factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). These results were corroborated in vivo wherein plasma from SCD patients and lung tissues from sickle mice showed an inverse correlation between PlGF and miR-214 levels. Finally, we observed that miR-214 expression could be induced by fenofibrate, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved PPARα agonist, thus revealing a potential therapeutic approach for reduction in PlGF levels by increasing miR-214 transcription. This strategy has potential clinical implications for several pathological conditions including SCD.

  15. Amphioxus allantoicase: molecular cloning, expression and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Shicui; Liu, Zhenhui; Li, Hongyan; Wang, Lei

    2005-06-01

    Allantoicase, one of the purine metabolism enzymes, is progressively truncated during the chordate evolution, yet it is unknown when its activity became phylogenetically extinct. In this study, a cDNA encoding allantoicase was isolated from the gut cDNA library of amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense. It is 2441 bp long, and contains an open reading frame encoding a protein of 392 amino acid residues. RT-PCR analysis showed that amphioxus allantoicase was strongly expressed in the hepatic caecum, and weakly expressed in other tissues including hind-gut, gill, muscle, notochord, testis and ovary. The parallel experiment was performed measuring the allantoicase activity in the same tissues revealed that its activity was high in the hepatic caecum, but low or undetectable in other tissues examined. These suggest that allantoicase remains in action in the primitive chordate amphioxus.

  16. Interspecific luciferase beta subunit hybrids between Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio fischeri and Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Almashanu, S; Gendler, I; Hadar, R; Kuhn, J

    1996-09-01

    Bacterial luciferase (EC 1.14.14.3) is a heterodimer composed of alpha- and beta-chains encoded by luxA and luxB, respectively. Although some interspecific combinations of these subunits lead to active enzyme, others do not. The beta subunits of Vibrio fischeri and Photobacterium leiognathi form active enzyme with the alpha subunits of V.fischeri, P.leiognathi and Vibrio harveyi, while the beta subunit from V.harveyi only complements the alpha subunit of V.harveyi. Inactivity is caused by a lack of dimerization of the beta subunit of V.harveyi with the alpha subunits of V.fischeri and P.leiognathi. These observations served as the basis for a search to discover which segment of the beta polypeptide confers the ability to dimerize with the alpha subunits of V.fischeri and P.leiognathi. Intragenic beta subunit hybrids were made between V.harveyi, V.fischeri and P.leiognathi. Unique restriction sites were introduced into the respective luxB genes to divide them into four roughly equal segments. In all, 78 hybrids were constructed by in vitro techniques. The N-terminal segment of the peptide contains the signals that differentiate between the beta subunits of V.fischeri and P. leiognathi and the beta subunit of V. harveyi, and allow the former to dimerize with their alpha subunits. The second segment has no major effect on enzyme activity but does exhibit some context effects. Important interactions were found between the third and fourth segments of the polypeptide with respect to enzymatic activity.

  17. LAG3 expression in active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bonnie L; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A; Kaushal, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus-induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4(+) T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response.

  18. The Effect of Surface Charge Saturation on Heat-induced Aggregation of Firefly Luciferase.

    PubMed

    Gharanlar, Jamileh; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Sajedi, Reza H; Yaghmaei, Parichehr

    2015-01-01

    We present here the effect of firefly luciferase surface charge saturation and the presence of some additives on its thermal-induced aggregation. Three mutants of firefly luciferase prepared by introduction of surface Arg residues named as 2R, 3R and 5R have two, three and five additional arginine residues substituted at their surface compared to native luciferase; respectively. Turbidimetric study of heat-induced aggregation indicates that all three mutants were reproducibly aggregated at higher rates relative to wild type in spite of their higher thermostability. Among them, 2R had most evaluated propensity to heat-induced aggregation. Therefore, the hydrophilization followed by appearing of more substituted arginine residues with positive charge on the firefly luciferase surface was not reduced its thermal aggregation. Nevertheless, at the same condition in the presence of charged amino acids, e.g. Arg, Lys and Glu, as well as a hydrophobic amino acid, e.g. Val, the heat-induced aggregation of wild type and mutants of firefly luciferases was markedly decelerated than those in the absence of additives. On the basis of obtained results it seems, relinquishment of variety in charge of amino acid side chains, they via local interactions with proteins cause to decrease rate and extent of their thermal aggregation.

  19. A self-inactivating retrovector incorporating the IL-2 promoter for activation-induced transgene expression in genetically engineered T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaalouk, Diana E; Lejeune, Laurence; Couture, Clément; Galipeau, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Background T-cell activation leads to signaling pathways that ultimately result in induction of gene transcription from the interleukin-2 (IL-2) promoter. We hypothesized that the IL-2 promoter or its synthetic derivatives can lead to T-cell specific, activation-induced transgene expression. Our objective was to develop a retroviral vector for stable and activation-induced transgene expression in T-lymphocytes. Results First, we compared the transcriptional potency of the full-length IL-2 promoter with that of a synthetic promoter composed of 3 repeats of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Cells (NFAT) element following activation of transfected Jurkat T-cells expressing the large SV40 T antigen (Jurkat TAg). Although the NFAT3 promoter resulted in a stronger induction of luciferase reporter expression post stimulation, the basal levels of the IL-2 promoter-driven reporter expression were much lower indicating that the IL-2 promoter can serve as a more stringent activation-dependent promoter in T-cells. Based on this data, we generated a self-inactivating retroviral vector with the full-length human IL-2 promoter, namely SINIL-2pr that incorporated the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused to herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase as a reporter/suicide "bifunctional" gene. Subsequently, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-G Protein pseudotyped retroparticles were generated for SINIL-2pr and used to transduce the Jurkat T-cell line and the ZAP-70-deficient P116 cell line. Flow cytometry analysis showed that EGFP expression was markedly enhanced post co-stimulation of the gene-modified cells with 1 μM ionomycin and 10 ng/ml phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). This activation-induced expression was abrogated when the cells were pretreated with 300 nM cyclosporin A. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the SINIL-2pr retrovector leads to activation-inducible transgene expression in Jurkat T-cell lines. We propose that this design can be potentially exploited in

  20. Expression and characterization of a Talaromyces marneffei active phospholipase B expressed in a Pichia pastoris expression system

    PubMed Central

    He, Yan; Li, Linghua; Hu, Fengyu; Chen, Wanshan; Lei, Huali; Chen, Xiejie; Cai, Weiping; Tang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase B is a virulence factor for several clinically important pathogenic fungi, including Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus, but its role in the thermally dimorphic fungus Talaromyces marneffei remains unclear. Here, we provide the first report of the expression of a novel phospholipase gene, designated TmPlb1, from T. marneffei in the eukaryotic expression system of Pichia pastoris GS115. Sensitive real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that the expression of TmPlb1 increased 1.85-fold in the yeast phase compared with the mycelial phase. TmPlb1 contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 732 bp that encodes a protein of 243 amino acids. The conserved serine, aspartate and histidine catalytic triad and the G-X-S-X-G domain of TmPLB1 provide the structural basis for its molecular activity. The ORF of TmPlb1 was successfully cloned into a pPIC9K vector containing an α-mating factor secretion signal that allowed the secretory expression of TmPLB1 in P. pastoris. The heterologous protein expression began 12 h after methanol induction and peaked at 96 h. Through analysis with SDS–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), western blotting and mass spectrometry, we confirmed that TmPLB1 was successfully expressed. Through Ni-affinity chromatography, TmPLB1 was highly purified, and its concentration reached 240.4 mg/L of culture medium. With specific substrates, the phospholipase A1 and phospholipase A2 activities of TmPLB1 were calculated to be 5.96 and 1.59 U/mg, respectively. The high purity and activity of the TmPLB1 obtained here lay a solid foundation for further investigation. PMID:27876784

  1. Titration-based screening for evaluation of natural product extracts: identification of an aspulvinone family of luciferase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, P.G.; Auld, D.S.; Schultz, P.J.; Lovell, S.; Battaile, K.P.; MacArthur, R.; Shen, M.; Tamayo-Castillo, G.; Inglese, J.; Sherman, D.H.

    2011-11-28

    The chemical diversity of nature has tremendous potential for the discovery of molecular probes and medicinal agents. However, sensitivity of HTS assays to interfering components of crude extracts derived from plants, and macro- and microorganisms has curtailed their use in lead discovery. Here, we describe a process for leveraging the concentration-response curves obtained from quantitative HTS to improve the initial selection of actives from a library of partially fractionated natural product extracts derived from marine actinomycetes and fungi. By using pharmacological activity, the first-pass CRC paradigm improves the probability that labor-intensive subsequent steps of reculturing, extraction, and bioassay-guided isolation of active component(s) target the most promising strains and growth conditions. We illustrate how this process identified a family of fungal metabolites as potent inhibitors of firefly luciferase, subsequently resolved in molecular detail by X-ray crystallography.

  2. Firefly Luciferase-Based Sequential Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Protease Assays.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyzes yellow-green (560 nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-Infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41 nM for caspase 3, 1.0 nM for thrombin, and 58 nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. This method successfully employs an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence to assay physiologically important protease activities and should be generally applicable to the measurement of any endoprotease lacking accessible cysteine residues.

  3. Prokaryotic expression of a constitutively expressed Tephrosia villosa defensin and its potent antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, S; Guruprasad, Lalitha; Kirti, P B

    2008-10-01

    Plant defensins are small, highly stable, cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides produced by the plants for inhibiting a broad-spectrum of microbial pathogens. Some of the well-characterized plant defensins exhibit potent antifungal activity on certain pathogenic fungal species only. We characterized a defensin, TvD1 from a weedy leguminous herb, Tephrosia villosa. The open reading frame of the cDNA was 228 bp, which codes for a peptide with 75 amino acids. Expression analyses indicated that this defensin is expressed constitutively in T. villosa with leaf, stem, root, and seed showing almost similar levels of high expression. The recombinant peptide (rTvD1), expressed in the Escherichia coli expression system, exhibited potent in vitro antifungal activity against several filamentous soil-borne fungal pathogens. The purified peptide also showed significant inhibition of root elongation in Arabidopsis seedlings, subsequently affecting the extension of growing root hairs indicating that it has the potential to disturb the plant growth and development.

  4. Oligomeric TTR V30M aggregates compromise cell viability, erythropoietin gene expression and promoter activity in the human hepatoma cell line Hep3B.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Luciana; Beirão, João Melo; Beirão, Idalina; Pinho e Costa, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, ATTRV30M (p. TTRV50M) amyloidosis, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by systemic extracellular amyloid deposition of a mutant transthyretin, TTR V30M. Anemia, with low erythropoietin (EPO) levels and spared kidney function, affects about 25% of symptomatic patients, suggesting a blockage of EPO-producing cells. Early non-fibrillar TTR aggregates are highly cytotoxic, inducing oxidative stress, the expression of apoptosis-related molecules and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, factors capable of inhibiting EPO production. Low EPO levels in these patients are not related to renal amyloid deposition or the presence of circulating TTR V30M. However, the role of early non-fibrillar TTR aggregates remains unexplored. We used the EPO producing Hep3B human hepatoma cell line to study the effect of TTR oligomeric aggregates on EPO expression. Hep3B cells were incubated with soluble and oligomeric TTR V30M, and cell proliferation as well as caspase 3/7 activation was evaluated. Relative quantification of EPO mRNA transcripts was performed by real-time PCR. Significant reductions in cell viability (13 ± 7.3%) and activation of caspases 3/7 were seen after 24 h in the presence of oligomeric TTR V30M. Also, EPO expression was significantly reduced (50 ± 2.8%), in normoxic conditions. A reporter assay was constructed with a PCR fragment of the EPO promoter linked to the luciferase gene to evaluate the role of transcription factors targeting the promoter. A significant reduction of EPO promoter activity (53 ± 6.5%) was observed in transfected cells exposed to TTR oligomers. Our results show that oligomeric TTR V30M reduces EPO expression, at least in part through inhibition of promoter activity.

  5. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 activation is important for anthrax edema toxin-induced dendritic cell maturation and anthrax toxin receptor 2 expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Larabee, Jason L; Maldonado-Arocho, Francisco J; Pacheco, Sergio; France, Bryan; DeGiusti, Kevin; Shakir, Salika M; Bradley, Kenneth A; Ballard, Jimmy D

    2011-08-01

    Anthrax edema toxin (ET) is one of two binary toxins produced by Bacillus anthracis that contributes to the virulence of this pathogen. ET is an adenylate cyclase that generates high levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP), causing alterations in multiple host cell signaling pathways. We previously demonstrated that ET increases cell surface expression of the anthrax toxin receptors (ANTXR) in monocyte-derived cells and promotes dendritic cell (DC) migration toward the lymph node-homing chemokine MIP-3β. In this work, we sought to determine if glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is important for ET-induced modulation of macrophage and DC function. We demonstrate that inhibition of GSK-3 dampens ET-induced maturation and migration processes of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Additional studies reveal that the ET-induced expression of ANTXR in macrophages was decreased when GSK-3 activity was disrupted with chemical inhibitors or with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting GSK-3. Further examination of the ET induction of ANTXR revealed that a dominant negative form of CREB could block the ET induction of ANTXR, suggesting that CREB or a related family member was involved in the upregulation of ANTXR. Because CREB and GSK-3 activity appeared to be important for ET-induced ANTXR expression, the impact of GSK-3 on ET-induced CREB activity was examined in RAW 264.7 cells possessing a CRE-luciferase reporter. As with ANTXR expression, the ET induction of the CRE reporter was decreased by reducing GSK-3 activity. These studies not only provide insight into host pathways targeted by ET but also shed light on interactions between GSK-3 and CREB pathways in host immune cells.

  6. The transcription factors MS188 and AMS form a complex to activate the expression of CYP703A2 for sporopollenin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shuang-Xi; Lu, Jie-Yang; Lou, Yue; Teng, Xiao-Dong; Gu, Jing-Nan; Zhang, Cheng; Shi, Qiang-Sheng; Yang, Zhong-Nan; Zhu, Jun

    2016-12-01

    The sexine layer of pollen grain is mainly composed of sporopollenins. The sporophytic secretory tapetum is required for the biosynthesis of sporopollenin. Although several enzymes involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis have been reported, the regulatory mechanism of these enzymes in tapetal layer remains elusive. ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS) and MALE STERILE 188/MYB103/MYB80 (MS188/MYB103/MYB80) are two tapetal cell-specific transcription factors required for pollen wall formation. AMS functions upstream of MS188. Here we report that AMS and MS188 target the CYP703A2 gene, which is involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis. We found that AMS and MS188 were localized in tapetum while CYP703A2 was localized in both tapetum and locule. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed that MS188 directly bound to the promoter of CYP703A2 and luciferase-inducible assay showed that MS188 activated the expression of CYP703A2. Yeast two-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) further demonstrated that MS188 complexed with AMS. The expression of CYP703A2 could be partially restored by the elevated levels of MS188 in the ams mutant. Therefore, our data reveal that MS188 coordinates with AMS to activate CYP703A2 in sporopollenin biosynthesis of plant tapetum.

  7. Diverse intracellular pathogens activate type III interferon expression from peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Odendall, Charlotte; Dixit, Evelyn; Stavru, Fabrizia; Bierne, Helene; Franz, Kate M; Durbin, Ann Fiegen; Boulant, Steeve; Gehrke, Lee; Cossart, Pascale; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    Type I interferon responses are considered the primary means by which viral infections are controlled in mammals. Despite this view, several pathogens activate antiviral responses in the absence of type I interferons. The mechanisms controlling type I interferon-independent responses are undefined. We found that RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) induce type III interferon expression in a variety of human cell types, and identified factors that differentially regulate expression of type I and type III interferons. We identified peroxisomes as a primary site of initiation of type III interferon expression, and revealed that the process of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation upregulates peroxisome biogenesis and promotes robust type III interferon responses in human cells. These findings highlight the importance of different intracellular organelles in specific innate immune responses.

  8. Activating frataxin expression by repeat-targeted nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an incurable genetic disorder caused by a mutant expansion of the trinucleotide GAA within an intronic FXN RNA. This expansion leads to reduced expression of frataxin (FXN) protein and evidence suggests that transcriptional repression is caused by an R-loop that forms between the expanded repeat RNA and complementary genomic DNA. Synthetic agents that increase levels of FXN protein might alleviate the disease. We demonstrate that introducing anti-GAA duplex RNAs or single-stranded locked nucleic acids into patient-derived cells increases FXN protein expression to levels similar to analogous wild-type cells. Our data are significant because synthetic nucleic acids that target GAA repeats can be lead compounds for restoring curative FXN levels. More broadly, our results demonstrate that interfering with R-loop formation can trigger gene activation and reveal a new strategy for upregulating gene expression. PMID:26842135

  9. Screening to Identify Commonly Used Chinese Herbs That Affect ERBB2 and ESR1 Gene Expression Using the Human Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Wu, Jing-Chong; Wen, Che-Sheng; Chen, Jiun-Liang; Chen, Wei-Shone; Shyr, Yi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Our aim the was to screen the commonly used Chinese herbs in order to detect changes in ERBB2 and ESR1 gene expression using MCF-7 cells. Methods. Using the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line, cell cytotoxicity and proliferation were evaluated by MTT and trypan blue exclusion assays, respectively. A luciferase reporter assay was established by transient transfecting MCF-7 cells with plasmids containing either the ERBB2 or the ESR1 promoter region linked to the luciferase gene. Chinese herbal extracts were used to treat the cells at 24 h after transfection, followed by measurement of their luciferase activity. The screening results were verified by Western blotting to measure HER2 and ERα protein expression. Results. At concentrations that induced little cytotoxicity, thirteen single herbal extracts and five compound recipes were found to increase either ERBB2 or ESR1 luciferase activity. By Western blotting, Si-Wu-Tang, Kuan-Shin-Yin, and Suan-Tsao-Ren-Tang were found to increase either HER2 or ERα protein expression. In addition, Ligusticum chuanxiong was shown to have a great effect on ERBB2 gene expression and synergistically with estrogen to stimulate MCF-7 cell growth. Conclusion. Our results provide important information that should affect clinical treatment strategies among breast cancer patients who are receiving hormonal or targeted therapies. PMID:24987437

  10. Interaction of aromatic compounds with Photobacterium leiognathi luciferase: fluorescence anisotropy study.

    PubMed

    Kudryasheva, N S; Nemtseva, E V; Visser, A J W G; Van Hoek, A

    2003-01-01

    The time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence techniques were employed to elucidate possible interactions of four aromatic compounds (anthracene, POPOP, MSB and 1,4-naphthalendiol) with bacterial luciferase. Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence anisotropy decays of these compounds were studied in ethanol, water-ethanol solutions and in the presence of bacterial luciferase. Shifts of fluorescent spectra and differences in rotational correlation times are interpreted in terms of weak (hydrophobic) interactions of the molecules with the enzyme. These interactions suggest the feasibility of intermolecular energy transfer by an exchange resonance mechanism with a collision-interaction radius as a way of excitation of these compounds in the reaction catalysed by bacterial luciferase.

  11. Problem areas in the use of the firefly luciferase assay for bacterial detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Knust, E. A.; Tuttle, S. A.; Curtis, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    By purifying the firefly luciferase extract and adding all necessary chemicals but ATP in excess, an assay for ATP was performed by measuring the amount of light produced when a sample containing soluble ATP is added to the luciferase reaction mixture. Instrumentation, applications, and basic characteristics of the luciferase assay are presented. Effect of the growth medium and length of time grown in this medium on ATP per viable E. coli values is shown in graphic form, along with an ATP concentration curve showing relative light units versus ATP injected. Reagent functions and concentration methods are explored. Efforts to develop a fast automatable system to detect the presence of bacteria in biological fluids, especially urine, resulted in the optimization of procedures for use with different types of samples.

  12. Light without substrate amendment: the bacterial luciferase gene cassette as a mammalian bioreporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan M.; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby E.; Jegier, Pat; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-06-01

    Bioluminescent production represents a facile method for bioreporter detection in mammalian tissues. The lack of endogenous bioluminescent reactions in these tissues allows for high signal to noise ratios even at low signal strength compared to fluorescent signal detection. While the luciferase enzymes commonly employed for bioluminescent detection are those from class Insecta (firefly and click beetle luciferases), these are handicapped in that they require concurrent administration of a luciferin compound to elicit a bioluminescent signal. The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette offers the advantages common to other bioluminescent proteins, but is simultaneously capable of synthesizing its own luciferin substrates using endogenously available cellular compounds. The longstanding shortcoming of the lux cassette has been its recalcitrance to function in the mammalian cellular environment. This paper will present an overview of the work completed to date to overcome this limitation and provide examples of mammalian lux-based bioreporter technologies that could provide the framework for advanced, biomedically relevant real-time sensor development.

  13. TGF-β1 Upregulates the Expression of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1 in Murine Lungs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Zhou, Yong; Dong, Liang; Chen, Rui-Qi; Sun, Guo-Ying; Liu, Tian; Ran, Wen-Zhuo; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-01-07

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) increases the expression of TGF-β family genes, which are known as profibrogenic cytokines in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we determined whether TGF-β1 regulated the expression of TREM-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. The expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1 was increased on day 7, 14, and 21 after single intratracheal injection of bleomycin (BLM). And there was positive correlation between the expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1. TGF-β1 increased expression of TREM-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and dose-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. The expression of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) was increased in lung tissues from mouse after BLM injection and in mouse macrophages after TGF-β1 treatment, respectively. TGF-β1 significantly increased the relative activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with plasmid contenting wild type-promoter of TREM-1. But TGF-β1 had no effect on the activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with a mutant-TREM1 plasmid carrying mutations in the AP-1 promoter binding site. In conclusion, we found the expression of TREM-1 was increased in lung tissues from mice with pulmonary fibrosis. TGF-β1 increased the expression of TREM-1 in mouse macrophages partly via the transcription factor AP-1.

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity modulates prolactin expression in the pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Tyler B.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary tumors account for 15% of intracranial neoplasms, however the extent to which environmental toxicants contribute to the proliferation and hormone expression of pituitary cells is unknown. Aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) interacting protein (AIP) loss of function mutations cause somatotroph and lactotroph adenomas in humans. AIP sequesters AhR and inhibits its transcriptional function. Because of the link between AIP and pituitary tumors, we hypothesize that exposure to dioxins, potent exogenous ligands for AhR that are persistent in the environment, may predispose to pituitary dysfunction through activation of AhR. In the present study, we examined the effect of AhR activation on proliferation and endogenous pituitary hormone expression in the GH3 rat somato-lactotrope tumor cell line and the effect of loss of AhR action in knockout mice. GH3 cells respond to nM doses of the reversible AhR agonist β-naphthoflavone with a robust induction of Cyp1a1. Although mRNA levels of the anti-proliferative signaling cytokine TGFbeta1 are suppressed upon β-naphthoflavone treatment, we did not observe an alteration in cell proliferation. AhR activation with β-naphthoflavone suppresses Ahr expression and impairs expression of prolactin (PRL), but not growth hormone (GH) mRNA in GH3 cells. In mice, loss of Ahr similarly leads to a reduction in Prl mRNA at P3, while Gh is unaffected. Additionally, there is a significant reduction pituitary hormones Lhb and Fshb in the absence of Ahr. Overall, these results demonstrate that AhR is important for pituitary hormone expression and suggests environmental dioxins can exert endocrine disrupting effects at the pituitary. PMID:22975028

  15. Quantitative High-throughput Luciferase Screening in Identifying CAR Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Caitlin; Zhao, Jinghua; Wang, Hongbing; Xia, Menghang

    2017-01-01

    Summary The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is responsible for the transcription of multiple drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. There are two possible methods of activation for CAR, direct ligand binding and a ligand-independent method, which makes this a unique nuclear receptor. Both of these mechanisms require translocation of CAR from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. Interestingly, CAR is constitutively active in immortalized cell lines due to the basal nuclear location of this receptor. This creates an important challenge in most in vitro assay models because immortalized cells cannot be used without inhibiting the basal activity. In this book chapter, we go into detail of how to perform quantitative high-throughput screens to identify hCAR1 modulators through the employment of a double stable cell line. Using this line, we are able to identify activators, as well as deactivators, of the challenging nuclear receptor, CAR. PMID:27518621

  16. Luminopsins integrate opto- and chemogenetics by using physical and biological light sources for opsin activation

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Ken; Clissold, Kara; Li, Haofang E.; Wen, Lei; Park, Sung Young; Gleixner, Jan; Klein, Marguerita E.; Lu, Dongye; Barter, Joseph W.; Rossi, Mark A.; Augustine, George J.; Yin, Henry H.; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Luminopsins are fusion proteins of luciferase and opsin that allow interrogation of neuronal circuits at different temporal and spatial resolutions by choosing either extrinsic physical or intrinsic biological light for its activation. Building on previous development of fusions of wild-type Gaussia luciferase with channelrhodopsin, here we expanded the utility of luminopsins by fusing bright Gaussia luciferase variants with either channelrhodopsin to excite neurons (luminescent opsin, LMO) or a proton pump to inhibit neurons (inhibitory LMO, iLMO). These improved LMOs could reliably activate or silence neurons in vitro and in vivo. Expression of the improved LMO in hippocampal circuits not only enabled mapping of synaptic activation of CA1 neurons with fine spatiotemporal resolution but also could drive rhythmic circuit excitation over a large spatiotemporal scale. Furthermore, virus-mediated expression of either LMO or iLMO in the substantia nigra in vivo produced not only the expected bidirectional control of single unit activity but also opposing effects on circling behavior in response to systemic injection of a luciferase substrate. Thus, although preserving the ability to be activated by external light sources, LMOs expand the use of optogenetics by making the same opsins accessible to noninvasive, chemogenetic control, thereby allowing the same probe to manipulate neuronal activity over a range of spatial and temporal scales. PMID:26733686

  17. Robust circadian rhythms in organoid cultures from PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean R; Pruszka, Jill; Vallance, Jefferson; Aihara, Eitaro; Matsuura, Toru; Montrose, Marshall H; Shroyer, Noah F; Hong, Christian I

    2014-09-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms is a risk factor for several human gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, ranging from diarrhea to ulcers to cancer. Four-dimensional tissue culture models that faithfully mimic the circadian clock of the GI epithelium would provide an invaluable tool to understand circadian regulation of GI health and disease. We hypothesized that rhythmicity of a key circadian component, PERIOD2 (PER2), would diminish along a continuum from ex vivo intestinal organoids (epithelial 'miniguts'), nontransformed mouse small intestinal epithelial (MSIE) cells and transformed human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Here, we show that bioluminescent jejunal explants from PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) mice displayed robust circadian rhythms for >72 hours post-excision. Circadian rhythms in primary or passaged PER2::LUC jejunal organoids were similarly robust; they also synchronized upon serum shock and persisted beyond 2 weeks in culture. Remarkably, unshocked organoids autonomously synchronized rhythms within 12 hours of recording. The onset of this autonomous synchronization was slowed by >2 hours in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486 (20 μM). Doubling standard concentrations of the organoid growth factors EGF, Noggin and R-spondin enhanced PER2 oscillations, whereas subtraction of these factors individually at 24 hours following serum shock produced no detectable effects on PER2 oscillations. Growth factor pulses induced modest phase delays in unshocked, but not serum-shocked, organoids. Circadian oscillations of PER2::LUC bioluminescence aligned with Per2 mRNA expression upon analysis using quantitative PCR. Concordant findings of robust circadian rhythms in bioluminescent jejunal explants and organoids provide further evidence for a peripheral clock that is intrinsic to the intestinal epithelium. The rhythmic and organotypic features of organoids should offer unprecedented advantages as a resource for elucidating the role

  18. The Evolution of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) as a Real-Time Bioreporter

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby; Rogers, Alexandra; Crossley, Robert; Price, Sarah; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted. PMID:22368493

  19. Baicalein inhibits TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation and expression of NF-κB-regulated target gene products.

    PubMed

    Li, Junbo; Ma, Juan; Wang, Ke Si; Mi, Chunliu; Wang, Zhe; Piao, Lian Xun; Xu, Guang Hua; Li, Xuezheng; Lee, Jung Joon; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-11-01

    The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors control many physiological processes including inflammation, immunity, apoptosis and angiogenesis. In our search for NF-κB inhibitors from natural resources, we identified baicalein from Scutellaria baicalensis as an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. As examined by the NF-κB luciferase reporter assay, we found that baicalein suppressed TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner. It also inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of p65 through inhibition of phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Furthermore, baicalein blocked the TNF-α-induced expression of NF-κB target genes involved in anti-apoptosis (cIAP-1, cIAP-2, FLIP and BCL-2), proliferation (COX-2, cyclin D1 and c-Myc), invasion (MMP‑9), angiogenesis (VEGF) and major inflammatory cytokines (IL-8 and MCP1). The flow cytometric analysis indicated that baicalein potentiated TNF-α-induced apoptosis and induced G1 phase arrest in HeLa cells. Moreover, baicalein significantly blocked activation of p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Our results imply that baicalein could be a lead compound for the modulation of inflammatory diseases as well as certain cancers in which inhibition of NF-κB activity may be desirable.

  20. Genomic structure of the luciferase gene and phylogenetic analysis in the Hotaria-group fireflies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Soo; Bae, Jin Sik; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Seong Ryul; Kim, Iksoo; Kim, Jong Gill; Kim, Keun Young; Kim, Sam Eun; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Lee, Sang Mong; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2003-02-01

    The luminescent fireflies have species specific flash patterns, being recognized as sexual communication. The luciferase gene is the sole enzyme responsible for bioluminescence. We describe here the complete nucleotide sequence and the exon-intron structure of the luciferase gene of the Hotaria-group fireflies, H. unmunsana, H. papariensis and H. tsushimana. The luciferase gene of the Hotaria-group firefly including the known H. parvula spans 1950 bp and consisted of six introns and seven exons coding for 548 amino acid residues, suggesting highly conserved structure among the Hotaria-group fireflies. Although only one luciferase gene was cloned from H. papariensis, each of the two sequences of the gene was found in H. unmunsana (U1 and Uc) and H. tsushimana (T1 and T2). The amino acid sequence divergence among H. unmunsana, H. papariensis, and H. tsushimana only ranged from zero to three amino acid residues, but H. parvula differed by 10-11 amino acid residues from the other Hotaria-group fireflies, suggesting a divergent relationship of this species. Phylogenetic analysis using the deduced amino acid sequences of the luciferase gene resulted in a monophyletic group in the Hotaria excluding H. parvula, suggesting a close relationship among H. unmunsana, H. papariensis and H. tsushimana. Additionally, we also analyzed the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene of the Hotaria-group fireflies. The deduced amino acid sequence of the COI gene of H. unmunsana was identical to that of H. papariensis and H. tsushimana, but different by three positions from H. parvula. In terms of nucleotide sequences of the COI gene, intraspecific sequence divergence was sometimes larger than interspecies level, and phylogenetic analysis placed the three species into monophyletic groups unresolved among them, but excluded H. parvula. In conclusion, our results suggest that H. unmunsana, H. papariensis and H. tsushimana are very closely related or might be an identical species, at

  1. Effect of 60 Hz magnetic fields on the activation of hsp70 promoter in cultured INER-37 and RMA E7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Rojas, J Antonio; Rodríguez de la Fuente, Abraham Octavio; Alcocer González, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Santoyo-Stephano, Martha A; Castañeda-Garza, Esperanza; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S

    2010-10-01

    It has been reported that 50-60 Hz magnetic fields (MF) with flux densities ranging from microtesla to millitesla are able to induce heat shock factor or heat shock proteins in various cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal MF at 8 and 80 μT on the expression of the luciferase gene contained in a plasmid labeled as electromagnetic field-plasmid (pEMF). This gene construct contains the specific sequences previously described for the induction of hsp70 expression by MF, as well as the reporter for the luciferase gene. The pEMF vector was transfected into INER-37 and RMA E7 cell lines that were later exposed to either MF or thermal shock (TS). Cells that received the MF or TS treatments and their controls were processed according to the luciferase assay system for evaluate luciferase activity. An increased luciferase gene expression was observed in INER-37 cells exposed to MF and TS compared with controls (p < 0.05), but MF exposure had no effect on the RMA E7 cell line.

  2. Activator protein 1 promotes the transcriptional activation of IRAK-M.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peipei; Bo, Lulong; Liu, Yongjian; Lu, Wenbin; Lin, Shengwei; Bian, Jinjun; Deng, Xiaoming

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M) is a well-known negative regulator for Toll-like receptor signaling, which can regulate immune homeostasis and tolerance in a number of pathological settings. However, the mechanism for IRAK-M regulation at transcriptional level remains largely unknown. In this study, a 1.4kb upstream sequence starting from the major IRAK-M transcriptional start site was cloned into luciferase reporter vector pGL3-basic to construct the full-length IRAK-M promoter. Luciferase reporter plasmids harboring the full-length and the deletion mutants of IRAK-M were transfected into 293T and A549 cells, and their relative luciferase activity was measured. The results demonstrated that activator protein 1(AP-1) cis-element plays a crucial role in IRAK-M constitutive gene transcription. Silencing of c-Fos and/or c-Jun expression suppressed the IRAK-M promoter activity as well as its mRNA and protein expressions. As a specific inhibitor for AP-1 activation, SP600125 also significantly suppressed the basal transcriptional activity of IRAK-M, the binding activity of c-Fos/c-Jun with IRAK-M promoter, and IRAK-M protein expression. Taken together, the result of this study highlights the importance of AP-1 in IRAK-M transcription, which offers more information on the role of IRAK-M in infectious and non-infectious diseases.

  3. Adaptation of muscle gene expression to changes in contractile activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Babij, P.; Thomason, D. B.; Wong, T. S.; Morrison, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the existing literature regarding the effects of different types of physical activities on the gene expression of adult skeletal muscles leads us to conclude that each type of exercise training program has, as a result, a different phenotype, which means that there are multiple mechanisms, each producing a unique phenotype. A portion of the facts which support this position is presented and interpreted here. [Abstract translated from the original French by NASA].

  4. Quantum/molecular mechanics study of firefly bioluminescence on luciferase oxidative conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2014-07-01

    This is the first report of a computational study of the color tuning mechanism of firefly bioluminescence, using the oxidative conformation of luciferase. The results of these calculations demonstrated that the electrostatic field generated by luciferase is fundamental both for the emission shift and efficiency. Further calculations indicated that a shift in emission is achieved by modulating the energy, at different degrees, of the emissive and ground states. These differences in energy modulation will then lead to changes in the energy gap between the states.

  5. Hyaluronic acid receptor for endocytosis (HARE)-mediated endocytosis of hyaluronan, heparin, dermatan sulfate, and acetylated low density lipoprotein (AcLDL), but not chondroitin sulfate types A, C, D, or E, activates NF-κB-regulated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Madhu S; Weigel, Paul H

    2014-01-17

    The hyaluronan (HA) receptor for endocytosis (HARE; Stab2) clears 14 systemic ligands, including HA and heparin. Here, we used NF-κB promoter-driven luciferase reporter assays to test HARE-mediated intracellular signaling during the uptake of eight ligands, whose binding sites in the HARE ectodomain were mapped by competition studies (Harris, E. N., and Weigel, P. H. (2008) Glycobiology 18, 638-648). Unique intermediate size Select-HA(TM), heparin, dermatan sulfate, and acetylated LDL stimulated dose-dependent HARE-mediated NF-κB activation of luciferase expression, with half-maximal values of 10-25 nM. In contrast, chondroitin sulfate types A, C, D, and E did not stimulate NF-κB activation. Moreover, degradation of endogenous IkB-α (an NF-κB inhibitor) was stimulated only by the signaling ligands. The stimulatory activities of pairwise combinations of the four signaling ligands were additive. The four nonstimulatory chondroitin sulfate types, which compete for HA binding, also effectively blocked HA-stimulated signaling. Clathrin siRNA decreased clathrin expression by ∼50% and completely eliminated NF-κB-mediated signaling by all four ligands, indicating that activation of signaling complexes occurs after endocytosis. These results indicate that HARE not only binds and clears extracellular matrix degradation products (e.g. released normally or during infection, injury, tumorigenesis, or other stress situations) but that a subset of ligands also serves as signaling indicator ligands. HARE may be part of a systemic tissue-stress sensor feedback system that responds to abnormal tissue turnover or damage as a danger signal; the signaling indicator ligands would reflect the homeostatic status, whether normal or pathological, of tissue cells and biomatrix components.

  6. Expression and activation of proteases in co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Roman; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna

    2011-01-01

    The present study concerned the expression and activation of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and the urokinase plasminogen activator/urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPA/uPAR) system in co-cultures of human colon carcinoma cell spheroids (HT29, LS180, SW948) with human normal colon epithelium (CCD 841 CoTr), myofibroblasts (CCD-18Co) and endothelial cells (HUVEC). Additionally, the influence of monensin on the production and function of the proteases was tested. Tumor cells expressed small amounts of MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA. Normal cells generally produced proportionally higher concentrations of these proteases (especially MMP-2, compared with significantly smaller yields of MMP-9 and significantly lower amounts of uPAR than tumors. In co-cultures of tumor spheroids with normal cell monolayers, the concentration of the proteases was equal to the sum of the enzymes produced in monocultures of both types of cells. The highest activity of uPA, measured as the reduction of the chromogenic substrate (S-2444), was detected in supernatants and lysates of endothelial cells. Interestingly, in normal cells, the higher expression of proteases, mainly uPA, measured as the level of protein concentration, was closely linked with their lower activity and inversely, in tumor cells, the low level of the expression of the enzymes correlated with their high enzymatic activity. In zymography analysis, mainly pro-MMPs were detected both in culture supernatants and cell lysates. The highest amounts of active forms of the MMPs were detected in tumor spheroids co-cultured with endothelial cells. Monensin inhibited MMPs and uPA secretion but significantly increased uPAR release, mainly from normal cells. In conclusion, during direct interactions of tumor cells with normal cells, MMPs and the uPA/uPAR system play an important role in the degradation of ECM and tumor development, but as we found, there is a reverse relationship between the concentration and the

  7. Expression of biologically active murine interleukin-18 in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Feizollahzadeh, Sadegh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak; Andalib, Alireza; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    The food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is increasingly used for heterologous protein expression in therapeutic and industrial applications. The ability of L. lactis to secrete biologically active cytokines may be used for the generation of therapeutic cytokines. Interleukin (IL)-18 enhances the immune response, especially on mucosal surfaces, emphasizing its therapeutic potential. However, it is produced as an inactive precursor and has to be enzymatically cleaved for maturation. We genetically manipulated L. lactis to secrete murine IL-18. The mature murine IL-18 gene was inserted downstream of a nisin promoter in pNZ8149 plasmid and the construct was used to transform L. lactis NZ3900. The transformants were selected on Elliker agar and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The expression and secretion of IL-18 protein was verified by SDS-PAGE, western blotting and ELISA. The biological activity of recombinant IL-18 was determined by its ability to induce interferon (IFN)-γ production in L. lactis co-cultured with murine splenic T cells. The amounts of IL-18 in bacterial lysates and supernatants were 3-4 μg mL(-1) and 0.6-0.7 ng mL(-1), respectively. The successfully generated L. lactis strain that expressed biologically active murine IL-18 can be used to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of IL-18 on mucosal surfaces.

  8. Human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase.

    PubMed

    Lillehoj, Erik P; Hyun, Sang Won; Feng, Chiguang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Anguo; Guang, Wei; Nguyen, Chinh; Sun, Wenji; Luzina, Irina G; Webb, Tonya J; Atamas, Sergei P; Passaniti, Antonino; Twaddell, William S; Puché, Adam C; Wang, Lai-Xi; Cross, Alan S; Goldblum, Simeon E

    2014-05-01

    Sialic acids on glycoconjugates play a pivotal role in many biological processes. In the airways, sialylated glycoproteins and glycolipids are strategically positioned on the plasma membranes of epithelia to regulate receptor-ligand, cell-cell, and host-pathogen interactions at the molecular level. We now demonstrate, for the first time, sialidase activity for ganglioside substrates in human airway epithelia. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, NEU3 has a substrate preference for gangliosides and is expressed at mRNA and protein levels at comparable abundance in epithelia derived from human trachea, bronchi, small airways, and alveoli. In small airway and alveolar epithelia, NEU3 protein was immunolocalized to the plasma membrane, cytosolic, and nuclear subcellular fractions. Small interfering RNA-induced silencing of NEU3 expression diminished sialidase activity for a ganglioside substrate by >70%. NEU3 immunostaining of intact human lung tissue could be localized to the superficial epithelia, including the ciliated brush border, as well as to nuclei. However, NEU3 was reduced in subepithelial tissues. These results indicate that human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase.

  9. Expression and Activity of a Novel Cathelicidin from Domestic Cats

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Brian C.; Chu, Hiutung; Johns, Jennifer L.; Gallo, Richard L.; Moore, Peter F.; Marks, Stanley L.; Bevins, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Cathelicidins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides found in many species including primates, mammals, marsupials, birds and even more primitive vertebrates, such as the hagfish. Some animals encode multiple cathelicidins in their genome, whereas others have only one. This report identifies and characterizes feline cathelicidin (feCath) as the sole cathelicidin in domestic cats (Felis catus). Expression of feCath is predominantly found in the bone marrow, with lower levels of expression in the gastrointestinal tract and skin. By immunocytochemistry, feCath localizes to the cytoplasm of neutrophils in feline peripheral blood. Structurally, the mature feCath sequence is most similar to a subgroup of cathelicidins that form linear α-helices. feCath possesses antimicrobial activity against E. coli D31, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (IR715), Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (clinical isolate) similar to that of the human ortholog, LL-37. In contrast, feCath lacks the DNA binding activity seen with LL-37. Given its similarity in sequence, structure, tissue expression, and antimicrobial activity, the cathelicidin encoded by cats, feCath, belongs to the subgroup of linear cathelicidins found not only in humans, but also non-human primates, dogs, mice, and rats. PMID:21533281

  10. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer using luciferase-immobilized quantum dots for self-illuminated photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Ching-Wen; Yu, Hsiu-Ping; Lin, Yan-Fu; Lai, Ping-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an innovative method for cancer treatment that involves the administration of a photosensitizing agent followed by exposure to visible light. An appreciable amount of a particular light source is a key to activate photosensitizers in PDT. However, the external excitation light source is a problem for clinical application because of the limitation of tissue-penetrating properties. Additionally, the wavelength of laser emission should match the absorption wavelength of each photosensitizer for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species and cell killing. In this study, Renilla luciferase-immobilized quantum dots-655 (QD-RLuc8) was used for bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-mediated PDT to resolve these problems. The bioluminescent QD-RLuc8 conjugate exhibits self-illumination at 655 nm after coelenterazine addition, which can activate the photosensitizer, Foscan(®)-loaded micelles for PDT. Our results show that BRET-mediated PDT by QD-RLuc8 plus coelenterazine (20 μg/mL) successfully generated reactive oxygen species (40.8%), killed ~ 50% A549 cells at 2 μg/mL equivalent Foscan(®)in vitro and significantly delayed tumor growth in vivo due to cell apoptosis under TUNEL analysis without obvious weight loss. Based on immunohistochemical observations, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-negative area of tumor sections after BRET-mediated PDT was obviously increased compared to the PDT-untreated groups without an external light source. We conclude that this nanotechnology-based PDT possesses several clinical benefits, such as overcoming light penetration issues and treating deeper lesions that are intractable by PDT alone.

  11. Titration-based screening for evaluation of natural product extracts: identification of an aspulvinone family of luciferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Patricia G.; Auld, Douglas S.; Schultz, Pamela J.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; MacArthur, Ryan; Shen, Min; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Inglese, James; Sherman, David H.

    2011-01-01

    The chemical diversity of nature has tremendous potential for discovery of new molecular probes and medicinal agents. However, sensitivity of HTS assays to interfering components of crude extracts derived from plants, macro- and microorganisms has curtailed their use in lead discovery efforts. Here we describe a process for leveraging the concentration-response curves (CRCs) obtained from quantitative HTS to improve the initial selection of “actives” from a library of partially fractionated natural product extracts derived from marine actinomycetes and fungi. By using pharmacological activity, the first-pass CRC paradigm aims to improve the probability that labor-intensive subsequent steps of re-culturing, extraction and bioassay-guided isolation of active component(s) target the most promising strains and growth conditions. We illustrate how this process identified a family of fungal metabolites as potent inhibitors of firefly luciferase, subsequently resolved in molecular detail by x-ray crystallography. PMID:22118678

  12. Bioluminescence of beetle luciferases with 6'-amino-D-luciferin analogues reveals excited keto-oxyluciferin as the emitter and phenolate/luciferin binding site interactions modulate bioluminescence colors.

    PubMed

    Viviani, Vadim R; Neves, Deimison Rodrigues; Amaral, Danilo Trabuco; Prado, Rogilene A; Matsuhashi, Takuto; Hirano, Takashi

    2014-08-19

    Beetle luciferases produce different bioluminescence colors from green to red using the same d-luciferin substrate. Despite many studies of the mechanisms and structural determinants of bioluminescence colors with firefly luciferases, the identity of the emitters and the specific active site interactions responsible for bioluminescence color modulation remain elusive. To address these questions, we analyzed the bioluminescence spectra with 6'-amino-D-luciferin (aminoluciferin) and its 5,5-dimethyl analogue using a set of recombinant beetle luciferases that naturally elicit different colors and different pH sensitivities (pH-sensitive, Amydetes vivianii λmax=538 nm, Macrolampis sp2 λmax=564 nm; pH-insensitive, Phrixotrix hirtus λmax=623 nm, Phrixotrix vivianii λmax=546 nm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans λmax=534 nm), a luciferase-like enzyme (Tenebrionidae, Zophobas morio λmax=613 nm), and mutants of C311 (S314). The green-yellow-emitting luciferases display red-shifted bioluminescence spectra with aminoluciferin in relation to those with D-luciferin, whereas the red-emitting luciferases displayed blue-shifted spectra. Bioluminescence spectra with 5,5-dimethylaminoluciferin, in which enolization is blocked, were almost identical to those of aminoluciferin. Fluorescence probing using 2-(4-toluidino)naphthalene-6-sulfonate and inference with aminoluciferin confirm that the luciferin binding site of the red-shifted luciferases is more polar than in the case of the green-yellow-emitting luciferases. Altogether, the results show that the keto form of excited oxyluciferin is the emitter in beetle bioluminescence and that bioluminescence colors are essentially modulated by interactions of the 6'-hydroxy group of oxyluciferin and basic moieties under the influence of the microenvironment polarity of the active site: a strong interaction between a base moiety and oxyluciferin phenol in a hydrophobic microenvironment promotes green-yellow emission, whereas a more polar

  13. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Ariadna; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kameneka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression. PMID:26963516

  14. Minicircle HBV cccDNA with a Gaussia luciferase reporter for investigating HBV cccDNA biology and developing cccDNA-targeting drugs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Murphy, Christopher M.; Reszka-Blanco, Natalia J.; Wu, Yaxu; Chi, Liqun; Hu, Jianming; Su, Lishan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection is generally not curable with current anti-viral drugs. Virus rebounds after stopping treatment from the stable HBV covalently-closed-circular DNA (cccDNA). The development of drugs that directly target cccDNA is hampered by the lack of robust HBV cccDNA models. We report here a novel HBV cccDNA technology that will meet the need. We engineered a minicircle HBV cccDNA with a Gaussia Luciferase reporter (mcHBV-GLuc cccDNA), which serves as a surrogate to measure cccDNA activity. The mcHBV-GLuc cccDNA was easily produced in bacteria, and it formed minichromosomes as HBV cccDNA episome DNA does when it was transfected into human hepatocytes. Compared to non-HBV minicircle plasmids, mcHBV-GLuc cccDNA showed persistent HBV-GLuc activity and HBx-dependent gene expression. Importantly, the mcHBV-GLuc cccDNA showed resistance to interferons (IFN) treatment, indicating its unique similarity to HBV cccDNA that is usually resistant to long-term IFN treatment in chronic HBV patients. Most importantly, GLuc illuminates cccDNA as a surrogate of cccDNA activity, providing a very sensitive and quick method to detect trace amount of cccDNA. The mcHBV-GLuc cccDNA model is independent of HBV infection, and will be valuable for investigating HBV cccDNA biology and for developing cccDNA-targeting drugs. PMID:27819342

  15. CRISPR-mediated Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Limsirichai, Prajit; Gaj, Thomas; Schaffer, David V

    2016-03-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of cells that harbor chromosomally integrated but transcriptionally inactive provirus. These cells can persist for years without producing viral progeny, rendering them refractory to immune surveillance and antiretroviral therapy and providing a permanent reservoir for the stochastic reactivation and reseeding of HIV-1. Strategies for purging this latent reservoir are thus needed to eradicate infection. Here, we show that engineered transcriptional activation systems based on CRISPR/Cas9 can be harnessed to activate viral gene expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further demonstrate that complementing Cas9 activators with latency-reversing compounds can enhance latent HIV-1 transcription and that epigenome modulation using CRISPR-based acetyltransferases can also promote viral gene activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CRISPR systems are potentially effective tools for inducing latent HIV-1 expression and that their use, in combination with antiretroviral therapy, could lead to improved therapies for HIV-1 infection.

  16. CRISPR-mediated Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Limsirichai, Prajit; Gaj, Thomas; Schaffer, David V

    2016-01-01

    Complete eradication of HIV-1 infection is impeded by the existence of cells that harbor chromosomally integrated but transcriptionally inactive provirus. These cells can persist for years without producing viral progeny, rendering them refractory to immune surveillance and antiretroviral therapy and providing a permanent reservoir for the stochastic reactivation and reseeding of HIV-1. Strategies for purging this latent reservoir are thus needed to eradicate infection. Here, we show that engineered transcriptional activation systems based on CRISPR/Cas9 can be harnessed to activate viral gene expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further demonstrate that complementing Cas9 activators with latency-reversing compounds can enhance latent HIV-1 transcription and that epigenome modulation using CRISPR-based acetyltransferases can also promote viral gene activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CRISPR systems are potentially effective tools for inducing latent HIV-1 expression and that their use, in combination with antiretroviral therapy, could lead to improved therapies for HIV-1 infection. PMID:26607397

  17. Allele-specific transcriptional activity of the variable number of tandem repeats in 5' region of the DRD4 gene is stimulus specific in human neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Paredes, U M; Quinn, J P; D'Souza, U M

    2013-03-01

    The dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene includes several variable number of tandem repeat loci that have been suggested to modulate DRD4 gene expression patterns. Previous studies showed differential basal activity of the two most common variants of a tandem repeat (120 bp per repeat unit) located in the 5' region adjacent to the DRD4 promoter in human cell lines. In this communication, we further characterized the ability of this polymorphic repeat to elicit tissue-, allele- and stimuli-specific transcriptional activity in vitro. The short and long variants of the DRD4 5' tandem repeat were cloned into a luciferase reporter gene construct containing the SV40 promoter. The luciferase constructs were cotransfected with expression vectors of two ubiquitously expressed human transcription factors (TFs), CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2), into human cell lines and primary cultures of neonate rat cortex and luciferase activity measured. Overexpression with these TFs resulted in differential cell- and allele-specific transcriptional activities of the luciferase constructs. The results of our experiments show that variants of this tandem repeat in the 5' promoter of the DRD4 gene will direct differential reporter gene transcriptional activity in a cell-type-specific manner dependent on the signal pathways activated.

  18. Bixin regulates mRNA expression involved in adipogenesis and enhances insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through PPAR{gamma} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Taimatsu, Aki; Egawa, Kahori; Katoh, Sota; Kusudo, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Ohyane, Chie; Lee, Joo-Young; Kim, Young-il; Uemura, Taku; Hirai, Shizuka; Kawada, Teruo

    2009-12-25

    Insulin resistance is partly due to suppression of insulin-induced glucose uptake into adipocytes. The uptake is dependent on adipocyte differentiation, which is controlled at mRNA transcription level. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, is involved in the differentiation. Many food-derived compounds serve as ligands to activate or inactivate PPAR. In this study, we demonstrated that bixin and norbixin (annatto extracts) activate PPAR{gamma} by luciferase reporter assay using GAL4-PPAR chimera proteins. To examine the effects of bixin on adipocytes, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with bixin or norbixin. The treatment induced mRNA expression of PPAR{gamma} target genes such as adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein (aP2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and adiponectin in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes and enhanced insulin-dependent glucose uptake. The observations indicate that bixin acts as an agonist of PPAR{gamma} and enhances insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, suggesting that bixin is a valuable food-derived compound as a PPAR ligand to regulate lipid metabolism and to ameliorate metabolic syndrome.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of PCFT by KLF4, HNF4α, CDX2 and C/EBPα: Implication in its site-specific expression in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Furumiya, Mai; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Ohta, Kinya; Hayashi, Yayoi; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► We examined transcription factors that may regulate PCFT expression in the intestine. ► PCFT promoter activity is basically induced by KLF4. ► KLF4-induced PCFT promoter activity is enhanced by HNF4α synergistically. ► CDX2 and C/EBPα suppress PCFT promoter activity induced by KLF4 and HNF4α. -- Abstract: Proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT), which is responsible for the intestinal uptake of folates and analogs, is expressed only in the proximal region in the small intestine. The present study was to examine its transcriptional regulation, which may be involved in such a unique expression profile and potentially in its alteration, using dual-luciferase reporter assays in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. The luciferase activity derived from the reporter construct containing the 5′-flanking sequence of −1695/+96 of the human PCFT gene was enhanced most extensively by the introduction of Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4). The KLF4-induced luciferase activity was further enhanced by hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) synergistically. To the contrary, caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) extensively suppressed the luciferase activity induced by KLF4 alone and also that induced by KLF4 and HNF4α. Western blot analysis using the rat small intestine indicated uniform expression of KLF4 along the intestinal tract, proximal-oriented expression of HNF4α, distal-oriented expression of CDX2 and C/EBPα. These results suggest that the activity of PCFT promoter is basically induced by KLF4 and the gradiented expression profile of PCFT may be at least in part accounted for by those of HNF4α, CDX2 and C/EBPα.

  20. EBNA2 and activated Notch induce expression of BATF.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Lisa M; Deppmann, Christopher D; Erickson, Kimberly D; Coffin, William F; Thornton, Tina M; Humphrey, Sean E; Martin, Jennifer M; Taparowsky, Elizabeth J

    2003-05-01

    The immortalization of human B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) requires the virus-encoded transactivator EBNA2 and the products of both viral and cellular genes which serve as EBNA2 targets. In this study, we identified BATF as a cellular gene that is up-regulated dramatically within 24 h following the infection of established and primary human B cells with EBV. The transactivation of BATF is mediated by EBNA2 in a B-cell-specific manner and is duplicated in non-EBV-infected B cells by the expression of mammalian Notch proteins. In contrast to other target genes activated by EBNA2, the BATF gene encodes a member of the AP-1 family of transcription factors that functions as a negative regulator of AP-1 activity and as an antagonist of cell growth. A potential role for BATF in promoting EBV latency is supported by studies in which BATF was shown to negatively impact the expression of a BZLF1 reporter gene and to reduce the frequency of lytic replication in latently infected cells. The identification of BATF as a cellular target of EBV provides important new information on how programs of viral and cellular gene expression may be coordinated to promote viral latency and control lytic-cycle entry.

  1. Osteoprotegerin expression and sensitivity in otosclerosis with different histological activity.

    PubMed

    Karosi, Tamás; Csomor, Péter; Szalmás, Anita; Kónya, József; Petkó, Mihály; Sziklai, István

    2011-03-01

    Otosclerosis is a complex bone dystrophy of the human otic capsule leading to conductive and sensorineural hearing loss. Since otosclerosis may, at least in part, be considered as an autoimmune-inflammatory disease, disturbed balance of TNF-alpha and osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression has been implicated in the pathological bone remodeling. It has been supposed that active otosclerosis is characterized by decreased or missing local OPG production with invariable OPG sensitivity of the otosclerotic foci. Ankylotic stapes footplates (n = 41) removed by stapedectomy were processed to histological examination, OPG-specific RT-PCR, tissue culturing and alkaline-phosphatase (AP) activity assessment, respectively. OPG concentration of serum specimens (n = 41) was measured by ELISA. Cortical bone fragments harvested from the external ear canal were used as negative controls of otosclerosis. Among 41 ankylotic stapes footplates, 22 active and 19 inactive otosclerosis cases were histologically diagnosed. OPG expression was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in active otosclerosis compared to inactive cases. Osteoclast cultures originated from active otosclerotic foci showed a considerable susceptibility against external OPG dosage, which resulted in a significant decrease of AP activity (p < 0.001). In contrast, OPG serum levels were in the normal range (5-100 ng/ml) indicating a non-systemic bone resorption. In conclusion, secondary decreased local OPG production might play an important role in the pathogenesis of otosclerotic bone remodeling disorder. As to previous and current results, decreased OPG sensitivity of lesion-forming cells should be excluded. These observations may indicate the potential role of recombinant OPG treatment in early stages of otosclerosis.

  2. A new humanized in vivo model of KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis monitored using a secreted luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Siham; Zhang, Yanyan; Hugonin, Caroline; Mangean, Mallorie Depond; He, Liang; Wedeh, Ghaith; Launay, Jean-Marie; Van Rijn, Sjoerd; Würdinger, Thomas; Louache, Fawzia; Arock, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis are rare neoplasms characterized by accumulation of mast cells in at least one internal organ. The majority of systemic mastocytosis patients carry KIT D816V mutation, which activates constitutively the KIT receptor. Patient with advanced forms of systemic mastocytosis, such as aggressive systemic mastocytosis or mast cell leukemia, are poorly treated to date. Unfortunately, the lack of in vivo models reflecting KIT D816V+ advanced disease hampers pathophysiological studies and preclinical development of new therapies for such patients. Here, we describe a new in vivo model of KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis developed by transplantation of the human ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc mast cell line in NOD-SCID IL-2R g−/− mice, using Gaussia princeps luciferase as a reporter. Intravenous injection of ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc cells led, in 4 weeks, to engraftment in all injected primary recipient mice. Engrafted cells were found at high levels in bone marrow, and at lower levels in spleen, liver and peripheral blood. Disease progression was easily monitored by repeated quantification of Gaussia princeps luciferase activity in peripheral blood. This quantification evidenced a linear relationship between the number of cells injected and the neoplastic mast cell burden in mice. Interestingly, the secondary transplantation of ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc cells increased their engraftment capability. To conclude, this new in vivo model mimics at the best the features of human KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis. In addition, it is a unique and convenient tool to study the kinetics of the disease and the potential in vivo activity of new drugs targeting neoplastic mast cells. PMID:27783996

  3. Protein sterilization method of firefly luciferase using reduced pressure and molecular sieves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Rich, E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The sterilization of the protein fruitfly luciferase under conditions that prevent denaturation is examined. Denaturation is prevented by heating the protein in contact with molecular seives and under a reduced pressure of the order of 0.00005 millimeters of mercury.

  4. Urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor expression in colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, S; Hayashi, Y; Wang, Y; Nakamura, T; Morita, Y; Kawasaki, K; Ohta, K; Aoyama, N; Kim, S; Itoh, H; Kuroda, Y; Doe, W

    1998-01-01

    Background—The urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. 
Aims—To study the involvement of uPAR in colorectal carcinogenesis. 
Methods—The cellular expression and localisation of uPAR were investigated in colorectal adenomas and invasive carcinomas by in situ hybridisation, immunohistochemistry, and northern and western blot analyses. 
Results—uPAR mRNA expression was found mainly in the cytoplasm of dysplastic epithelial cells of 30% of adenomas with mild (19%), moderate (21%), and severe (47%) dysplasia, and in that of carcinomatous cells of 85% of invasive carcinomas: Dukes' stages A (72%), B (93%), and C (91%). Some stromal cells in the adjacent neoplastic epithelium were faintly positive. Immunoreactivity for uPAR was detected in dysplastic epithelial cells of 14% of adenomas and in carcinomatous cells of 49% of invasive carcinomas. uPAR mRNA and protein concentrations were significantly higher in severe than in mild or moderate dysplasia (p<0.05); they were notably higher in Dukes' stage A than in severe dysplasia (p<0.05), and significantly higher in Dukes' stage B than in stage A (p<0.05), but those in stage B were not different from those in stage C or in metastatic colorectal carcinomas of the liver. 
Conclusions—Colorectal adenoma uPAR, expressed essentially in dysplastic epithelial cells, was upregulated with increasing severity of atypia, and increased notably during the critical transition from severe dysplasic adenoma to invasive carcinoma. These findings implicate uPAR expression in the invasive and metastatic processes of colorectal cancer. 

 Keywords: urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor; colorectal adenoma; colorectal cancer; adenoma-carcinoma sequence PMID:9824607

  5. Recombinant human endostatin inhibits TNF-alpha-induced receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression in fibroblast-like synoviocytes in mice with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiu-Fang; Zhang, Xiu-Hong; Yuan, Feng-Lai; Zhao, Ming-Dong; Li, Xia

    2016-12-01

    Bone loss is a critical pathology responsible for the functional disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is well known that receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) plays a crucial role in bone loss in RA. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recombinant human endostatin (rh-endostatin) mediates bone erosion in RA by regulation of RANKL expression in an experimental model of RA, consisting of mice with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA). Cultured AA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) obtained from these mice were induced by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) combined with or without rh-endostatin. The levels of RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA, soluble and membrane-bound proteins were assessed by real-time PCR, ELISA, and Western blotting. Western blotting and the luciferase reporter assay were used to study related signaling pathways. Rh-endostatin inhibited RANKL mRNA expression, soluble and membrane-bound protein expression in AA FLSs but not in CD4+ T cells. However, OPG expression and secretion was not affected by rh-endostatin in AA FLSs. Molecular analysis demonstrated that rh-endostatin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways. Moreover, rh-endostatin attenuated TNF-α-induced NF-κB signaling by suppressing the phosphorylation level of inhibitor kappaBα (IκBα) and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in FLSs from mice with AA. These results provide the first evidence that rh-endostatin inhibits TNF-α-induced RANKL expression in AA FLSs.

  6. F-18 Labeled Diabody-Luciferase Fusion Proteins for Optical-ImmunoPET

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Anna M

    2013-01-18

    The goal of the proposed work is to develop novel dual-labeled molecular imaging probes for multimodality imaging. Based on small, engineered antibodies called diabodies, these probes will be radioactively tagged with Fluorine-18 for PET imaging, and fused to luciferases for optical (bioluminescence) detection. Performance will be evaluated and validated using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Multimodality probes for optical-PET imaging will be based on diabodies that are dually labeled with 18F for PET detection and fused to luciferases for optical imaging. 1) Two sets of fusion proteins will be built, targeting the cell surface markers CEA or HER2. Coelenterazine-based luciferases and variant forms will be evaluated in combination with native substrate and analogs, in order to obtain two distinct probes recognizing different targets with different spectral signatures. 2) Diabody-luciferase fusion proteins will be labeled with 18F using amine reactive [18F]-SFB produced using a novel microwave-assisted, one-pot method. 3) Sitespecific, chemoselective radiolabeling methods will be devised, to reduce the chance that radiolabeling will inactivate either the target-binding properties or the bioluminescence properties of the diabody-luciferase fusion proteins. 4) Combined optical and PET imaging of these dual modality probes will be evaluated and validated in vitro and in vivo using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Each imaging modality has its strengths and weaknesses. Development and use of dual modality probes allows optical imaging to benefit from the localization and quantitation offered by the PET mode, and enhances the PET imaging by enabling simultaneous detection of more than one probe.

  7. Properties of recombinant fluorescent proteins from Photobacterium leiognathi and their interaction with luciferase intermediates.

    PubMed

    Petushkov, V N; Gibson, B G; Lee, J

    1995-03-14

    Ligand binding and luciferase interaction properties of the recombinant protein corresponding to the lumazine protein gene (EMBL X56534) of Photobacterium leiognathi have been determined by fluorescence dynamics, circular dichroism, gel filtration, and SDS-PAGE. Scatchard analysis of a fluorescence titration shows that the apoprotein possess one binding site, and at 30 degrees C the KdS (microM) are as follows: 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine, 0.26; riboflavin, 0.53; and much more weakly bound FMN, 30. All holoproteins are highly fluorescent and have absorption spectra distinct from each other and from the free ligands. The longest wavelength absorption maxima are, respectively (nm, 2 degrees C), 420, 463, and 458. Ligand binding produces no change in the far-UV circular dichroism; all have mean residual ellipticity at 210 nm of -6500 deg cm2 dmol-1, the same as the native protein. However, in the bioluminescence reaction only the lumazine holoprotein shows a bioluminescence effect. Fluorescence emission anisotropy decay was used to establish that none of these holoproteins complexed with native luciferase and that the lumazine protein alone formed a 1:1 complex with the luciferase hydroxyflavin fluorescent transient and the luciferase peroxyflavin intermediates, revealed by a dominant channel of anisotropy loss, with rotational correlation time of 2.5 ns, and attributed to excitation transfer from the luciferase flavin donor to the acceptor, the lumazine ligand. The complex stability was sufficient to allow its isolation by FPLC gel filtration and verification by SDS-PAGE. These methods also confirmed the absence of interaction of the holoflavoproteins.

  8. Firefly luciferase in chemical biology: A compendium of inhibitors, mechanistic evaluation of chemotypes, and suggested use as a reporter

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Natasha; Shen, Min; Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton; Lovell, Scott; Auld, Douglas S.; Inglese, James

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Firefly luciferase (FLuc) is frequently used as a reporter in high-throughput screening assays owing to the exceptional sensitivity, dynamic range, and rapid measurement that bioluminescence affords. However, interaction of small molecules with FLuc has, to some extent, confounded its use in chemical biology and drug discovery. To identify and characterize chemotypes interacting with FLuc, we determined potency values for 360,864 compounds, found in the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository, available in PubChem. FLuc inhibitory activity was observed for 12% of this library with discernible SAR. Characterization of 151 inhibitors demonstrated a variety of inhibition modes including FLuc-catalyzed formation of multisubstrate-adduct enzyme inhibitor complexes. As in some cell-based FLuc reporter assays compounds acting as FLuc inhibitors yield paradoxical luminescence increases, data on compounds acquired from FLuc-dependent assays requires careful analysis as described in this report. PMID:22921073

  9. Oxalomalate affects the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Irace, Carlo; Esposito, Giuseppe; Maffettone, Carmen; Rossi, Antonietta; Festa, Michela; Iuvone, Teresa; Santamaria, Rita; Sautebin, Lidia; Carnuccio, Rosa; Colonna, Alfredo

    2007-03-13

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is an homodimeric enzyme which produces large amounts of nitric oxide (NO) in response to inflammatory stimuli. Several factors affect the synthesis and catalytic activity of iNOS. Particularly, dimerization of NOS monomers is promoted by heme, whereas an intracellular depletion of heme and/or L-arginine considerably decreases NOS resistance to proteolysis. In this study, we found that oxalomalate (OMA, oxalomalic acid, alpha-hydroxy-beta-oxalosuccinic acid), an inhibitor of both aconitase and NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, inhibited nitrite production and iNOS protein expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated J774 macrophages, without affecting iNOS mRNA content. Furthermore, injection of OMA precursors to LPS-stimulated rats also decreased nitrite production and iNOS expression in isolated peritoneal macrophages. Interestingly, alpha-ketoglutarate or succinyl-CoA administration reversed OMA effect on NO production, thus correlating NO biosynthesis with the anabolic capacity of Krebs cycle. When protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide in LPS-activated J774 cells treated with OMA, iNOS protein levels, evaluated by Western blot analysis and (35)S-metabolic labelling, were decreased, suggesting that OMA reduces iNOS biosynthesis and induces an increase in the degradation rate of iNOS protein. Moreover, we showed that OMA inhibits the activity of the iNOS from lung of LPS-treated rats by enzymatic assay. Our results, demonstrating that OMA acts regulating synthesis, catalytic activity and degradation of iNOS, suggest that this compound might have a potential role in reducing the NO overproduction occurring in some pathological conditions.

  10. Gamma-band activity reflects attentional guidance by facial expression.

    PubMed

    Müsch, Kathrin; Siegel, Markus; Engel, Andreas K; Schneider, Till R

    2017-02-01

    Facial expressions attract attention due to their motivational significance. Previous work focused on attentional biases towards threat-related, fearful faces, although healthy participants tend to avoid mild threat. Growing evidence suggests that neuronal gamma (>30Hz) and alpha-band activity (8-12Hz) play an important role in attentional selection, but it is unknown if such oscillatory activity is involved in the guidance of attention through facial expressions. Thus, in this magnetoencephalography (MEG) study we investigated whether attention is shifted towards or away from fearful faces and characterized the underlying neuronal activity in these frequency ranges in forty-four healthy volunteers. We employed a covert spatial attention task using neutral and fearful faces as task-irrelevant distractors and emotionally neutral Gabor patches as targets. Participants had to indicate the tilt direction of the target. Analysis of the neuronal data was restricted to the responses to target Gabor patches. We performed statistical analysis at the sensor level and used subsequent source reconstruction to localize the observed effects. Spatially selective attention effects in the alpha and gamma band were revealed in parieto-occipital regions. We observed an attentional cost of processing the face distractors, as reflected in lower task performance on targets with short stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA <150ms) between faces and targets. On the neuronal level, attentional orienting to face distractors led to enhanced gamma band activity in bilateral occipital and parietal regions, when fearful faces were presented in the same hemifield as targets, but only in short SOA trials. Our findings provide evidence that both top-down and bottom-up attentional biases are reflected in parieto-occipital gamma-band activity.

  11. Apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides inhibit expression and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in human ovarian cancer cell lines and a mouse ovarian cancer model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Navab, Mohamad; Grijalva, Victor; Su, Feng; Fogelman, Alan M; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Farias-Eisner, Robin

    2012-08-01

    Our previous results demonstrated that the apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptides L-4F and L-5F inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor production and tumor angiogenesis. The present study was designed to test whether apoA-I mimetic peptides inhibit the expression and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which plays a critical role in the production of angiogenic factors and angiogenesis. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to examine the expression of HIF-1α in tumor tissues. Immunoblotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence, and luciferase activity assays were used to determine the expression and activity of HIF-1α in human ovarian cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemistry staining demonstrated that L-4F treatment dramatically decreased HIF-1α expression in mouse ovarian tumor tissues. L-4F inhibited the expression and activity of HIF-1α induced by low oxygen concentration, cobalt chloride (CoCl(2), a hypoxia-mimic compound), lysophosphatidic acid, and insulin in two human ovarian cancer cell lines, OV2008 and CAOV-3. L-4F had no effect on the insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt, but inhibited the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p70s6 kinase, leading to the inhibition of HIF-1α synthesis. Pretreatment with L-4F dramatically accelerated the proteasome-dependent protein degradation of HIF-1α in both insulin- and CoCl(2)-treated cells. The inhibitory effect of L-4F on HIF-1α expression is in part mediated by the reactive oxygen species-scavenging effect of L-4F. ApoA-I mimetic peptides inhibit the expression and activity of HIF-1α in both in vivo and in vitro models, suggesting the inhibition of HIF-1α may be a critical mechanism responsible for the suppression of tumor progression by apoA-I mimetic peptides.

  12. Cell surface expression of biologically active influenza C virus HEF glycoprotein expressed from cDNA.

    PubMed

    Pekosz, A; Lamb, R A

    1999-10-01

    The hemagglutinin, esterase, and fusion (HEF) glycoprotein of influenza C virus possesses receptor binding, receptor destroying, and membrane fusion activities. The HEF cDNAs from influenza C/Ann Arbor/1/50 (HEF-AA) and influenza C/Taylor/1223/47 (HEF-Tay) viruses were cloned and expressed, and transport of HEF to the cell surface was monitored by susceptibility to cleavage by exogenous trypsin, indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Previously it has been found in studies with the C/Johannesburg/1/66 strain of influenza C virus (HEF-JHB) that transport of HEF to the cell surface is severely inhibited, and it is thought that the short cytoplasmic tail, Arg-Thr-Lys, is involved in blocking HEF cell surface expression (F. Oeffner, H.-D. Klenk, and G. Herrler, J. Gen. Virol. 80:363-369, 1999). As the cytoplasmic tail amino acid sequences of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay are identical to that of HEF-JHB, the data indicate that cell surface expression of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay is not inhibited by this amino acid sequence. Furthermore, the abundant cell surface transport of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay indicates that their cell surface expression does not require coexpression of another viral protein. The HEF-AA and HEF-Tay HEF glycoproteins bound human erythrocytes, promoted membrane fusion in a low-pH and trypsin-dependent manner, and displayed esterase activity, indicating that the HEF glycoprotein alone mediates all three known functions at the cell surface.

  13. Altered Activity and Expression of Cytosolic Peptidases in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Itxaro; Blanco, Lorena; Sanz, Begoña; Errarte, Peio; Ariz, Usue; Beitia, Maider; Fernández, Ainhoa; Loizate, Alberto; Candenas, M Luz; Pinto, Francisco M; Gil, Javier; López, José I.; Larrinaga, Gorka

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The role of peptidases in carcinogenic processes and their potential usefulness as tumor markers in colorectal cancer (CRC) have been classically attributed to cell-surface enzymes. The objective of the present study was to analyze the activity and mRNA expression of three cytosolic peptidases in the CRC and to correlate the obtained results with classic histopathological parameters for tumor prognosis and survival. Methods: The activity and mRNA levels of puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (PSA), aminopeptidase B (APB) and pyroglutamyl-peptidase I (PGI) were measured by fluorimetric and quantitative RT-PCR methods in colorectal mucosa and tumor tissues and plasma samples from CRC patients (n=81). Results: 1) PSA and APB activity was higher in adenomas and carcinomas than in the uninvolved mucosa. 2) mRNA levels of PSA and PGI was lower in tumors. 3) PGI activity in CRC tissue correlated negatively with histological grade, tumor size and 5-year overall suvival of CRC patients. 4) Higher plasmatic APB activity was independently associated with better 5-year overall survival. Conclusions: Data suggest that cytosolic peptidases may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis and point to the determination of this enzymes as a valuable method in the determination of CRC prognosis. PMID:26078706

  14. Cardiac afferent activity modulates the expression of racial stereotypes

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Ruben T.; Garfinkel, Sarah N.; Critchley, Hugo D.; Tsakiris, Manos

    2017-01-01

    Negative racial stereotypes tend to associate Black people with threat. This often leads to the misidentification of harmless objects as weapons held by a Black individual. Yet, little is known about how bodily states impact the expression of racial stereotyping. By tapping into the phasic activation of arterial baroreceptors, known to be associated with changes in the neural processing of fearful stimuli, we show activation of race-threat stereotypes synchronized with the cardiovascular cycle. Across two established tasks, stimuli depicting Black or White individuals were presented to coincide with either the cardiac systole or diastole. Results show increased race-driven misidentification of weapons during systole, when baroreceptor afferent firing is maximal, relative to diastole. Importantly, a third study examining the positive Black-athletic stereotypical association fails to demonstrate similar modulations by cardiac cycle. We identify a body–brain interaction wherein interoceptive cues can modulate threat appraisal and racially biased behaviour in context-dependent ways. PMID:28094772

  15. Constitutive Activation of the Aromatic Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Yi; Puga, Alvaro

    1998-01-01

    The ligand-activated aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) dimerizes with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) to form a functional complex that transactivates expression of the cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 gene and other genes in the dioxin-inducible [Ah] gene battery. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the activity of the CYP1A1 enzyme negatively regulates this process. To study the relationship between CYP1A1 activity and Ah receptor activation we used CYP1A1-deficient mouse hepatoma c37 cells and CYP1A1- and AHR-deficient African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Using gel mobility shift and luciferase reporter gene expression assays, we found that c37 cells that had not been exposed to exogenous Ah receptor ligands already contained transcriptionally active AHR-ARNT complexes, a finding that we also observed in wild-type Hepa-1 cells treated with Ellipticine, a CYP1A1 inhibitor. In CV-1 cells, transient expression of AHR and ARNT leads to high levels of AHR–ARNT-dependent luciferase gene expression even in the absence of an agonist. Using a green fluorescent protein-tagged AHR, we showed that elevated reporter gene expression correlates with constitutive nuclear localization of the AHR. Transcriptional activation of the luciferase reporter gene observed in CV-1 cells is significantly decreased by (i) expression of a functional CYP1A1 enzyme, (ii) competition with chimeric or truncated AHR proteins containing the AHR ligand-binding domain, and (iii) treatment with the AHR antagonist α-naphthoflavone. These results suggest that a CYP1A1 substrate, which accumulates in cells lacking CYP1A1 enzymatic activity, is an AHR ligand responsible for endogenous activation of the Ah receptor. PMID:9418899

  16. Nuclear Factor-Y is an adipogenic factor that regulates leptin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Dallner, Olof Stefan; Birsoy, Kivanc; Fayzikhodjaeva, Gulya; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Leptin gene expression is highly correlated with cellular lipid content in adipocytes but the transcriptional mechanisms controlling leptin expression in vivo are poorly understood. In this report, we set out to identify cis- and trans-regulatory elements controlling leptin expression. Methods Leptin-BAC luciferase transgenic mice combining with other computational and molecular techniques were used to identify transcription regulatory elements including a CCAAT-binding protein Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y). The function of NF-Y in adipocyte was studied in vitro with 3T3-L1 cells and in vivo with adipocyte-specific knockout of NF-Y. Results Using Leptin-BAC luciferase mice, we showed that DNA sequences between −22 kb and +8.8 kb can confer quantitative expression of a leptin reporter. Computational analysis of sequences and gel shift assays identified a 32 bp sequence (chr6: 28993820–2899385) consisting a CCAAT binding site for Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) and this was confirmed by a ChIP assay in vivo. A deletion of this 32 bp sequence in the −22 kb to +8.8 kb leptin-luciferase BAC reporter completely abrogates luciferase reporter activity in vivo. RNAi mediated knockdown of NF-Y interfered with adipogenesis in vitro and adipocyte-specific knockout of NF-Y in mice reduced expression of leptin and other fat specific genes in vivo. Further analyses of the fat specific NF-Y knockout revealed that these animals develop a moderately severe lipodystrophy that is remediable with leptin therapy. Conclusions These studies advance our understanding of leptin gene expression and show that NF-Y controls the expression of leptin and other adipocyte genes and identifies a new form of lipodystrophy. PMID:25973387

  17. Brain Activity while Reading Sentences with Kanji Characters Expressing Emotions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuasa, Masahide; Saito, Keiichi; Mukawa, Naoki

    In this paper, we describe the brain activity associated with kanji characters expressing emotion, which are places at the end of a sentence. Japanese people use a special kanji character in brackets at the end of sentences in text messages such as those sent through e-mail and messenger tools. Such kanji characters plays a role to expresses the sender's emotion (such as fun, laughter, sadness, tears), like emoticons. It is a very simple and effective way to convey the senders' emotions and his/her thoughts to the receiver. In this research, we investigate the effects of emotional kanji characters by using an fMRI study. The experimental results show that both the right and left inferior frontal gyrus, which have been implicated on verbal and nonverbal information, were activated. We found that we detect a sentence with an emotional kanji character as the verbal and nonverval information, and a sentence with emotional kanji characters enrich communication between the sender and the reciever.

  18. Heterologous expression of an active chitin synthase from Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Lugo, Holjes; Sánchez-Arreguín, Alejandro; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2016-12-01

    Chitin synthases are highly important enzymes in nature, where they synthesize structural components in species belonging to different eukaryotic kingdoms, including kingdom Fungi. Unfortunately, their structure and the molecular mechanism of synthesis of their microfibrilar product remain largely unknown, probably because no fungal active chitin synthases have been isolated, possibly due to their extreme hydrophobicity. In this study we have turned to the heterologous expression of the transcript from a small chitin synthase of Rhizopus oryzae (RO3G_00942, Chs1) in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was active, but accumulated mostly in inclusion bodies. High concentrations of arginine or urea solubilized the enzyme, but their dilution led to its denaturation and precipitation. Nevertheless, use of urea permitted the purification of small amounts of the enzyme. The properties of Chs1 (Km, optimum temperature and pH, effect of GlcNAc) were abnormal, probably because it lacks the hydrophobic transmembrane regions characteristic of chitin synthases. The product of the enzyme showed that, contrasting with chitin made by membrane-bound Chs's and chitosomes, was only partially in the form of short microfibrils of low crystallinity. This approach may lead to future developments to obtain active chitin synthases that permit understanding their molecular mechanism of activity, and microfibril assembly.

  19. Demonstration of protein-fragment complementation assay using purified firefly luciferase fragments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human interactome is predicted to contain 150,000 to 300,000 protein-protein interactions, (PPIs). Protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA) is one of the most widely used methods to detect PPI, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). To date, successful applications of firefly luciferase (Fluc)-based PCA have been reported in vivo, in cultured cells and in cell-free lysate, owing to its high sensitivity, high signal-to-background (S/B) ratio, and reversible response. Here we show the assay also works with purified proteins with unexpectedly rapid kinetics. Results Split Fluc fragments both fused with a rapamycin-dependently interacting protein pair were made and expressed in E. coli system, and purified to homogeneity. When the proteins were used for PCA to detect rapamycin-dependent PPI, they enabled a rapid detection (~1 s) of PPI with high S/B ratio. When Fn7-8 domains (7 nm in length) that was shown to abrogate GFP mutant-based FRET was inserted between split Fluc and FKBP12 as a rigid linker, it still showed some response, suggesting less limitation in interacting partner’s size. Finally, the stability of the probe was investigated. Preincubation of the probes at 37 degreeC up to 1 h showed marked decrease of the luminescent signal to 1.5%, showing the limited stability of this system. Conclusion Fluc PCA using purified components will enable a rapid and handy detection of PPIs with high S/B ratio, avoiding the effects of concomitant components. Although the system might not be suitable for large-scale screening due to its limited stability, it can detect an interaction over larger distance than by FRET. This would be the first demonstration of Fluc PCA in vitro, which has a distinct advantage over other PPI assays. Our system enables detection of direct PPIs without risk of perturbation by PPI mediators in the complex cellular milieu. PMID:23536995

  20. Thiazolidinediones repress ob gene expression in rodents via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, P; Lefebvre, A M; Miller, S G; Guerre-Millo, M; Wong, K; Saladin, R; Hamann, L G; Staels, B; Briggs, M R; Auwerx, J

    1996-01-01

    The ob gene product, leptin, is a signaling factor regulating body weight and energy balance. ob gene expression in rodents is increased in obesity and is regulated by feeding patterns and hormones, such as insulin and glucocorticoids. In humans with gross obesity, ob mRNA levels are higher, but other modulators of human ob expression are unknown. In view of the importance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) in adipocyte differentiation, we analyzed whether ob gene expression is subject to regulation by factors activating PPARs. Treatment of rats with the PPARalpha activator fenofibrate did not change adipose tissue and body weight and had no significant effect on ob mRNA levels. However, administration of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653, a PPARgamma ligand, increased food intake and adipose tissue weight while reducing ob mRNA levels in rats in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653 on ob mRNA levels was also observed in vitro. Thiazolidinediones reduced the expression of the human ob promoter in primary adipocytes, however, in undifferentiated 3T3-L1 preadipocytes lacking endogenous PPARgamma, cotransfection of PPARgamma was required to observe the decrease. In conclusion, these data suggest that PPARgamma activators reduce ob mRNA levels through an effect of PPARgamma on the ob promoter. PMID:8770873

  1. P2Y2 receptor activation inhibits the expression of the sodium-chloride cotransporter NCC in distal convoluted tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Gailly, P; Szutkowska, M; Olinger, E; Debaix, H; Seghers, F; Janas, S; Vallon, V; Devuyst, O

    2014-11-01

    Luminal nucleotide stimulation is known to reduce Na(+) transport in the distal nephron. Previous studies suggest that this mechanism may involve the thiazide-sensitive Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC), which plays an essential role in NaCl reabsorption in the cells lining the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). Here we show that stimulation of mouse DCT (mDCT) cells with ATP or UTP promoted Ca(2+) transients and decreased the expression of NCC at both mRNA and protein levels. Specific siRNA-mediated silencing of P2Y2 receptors almost completely abolished ATP/UTP-induced Ca(2+) transients and significantly reduced ATP/UTP-induced decrease of NCC expression. To test whether local variations in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) may control NCC transcription, we overexpressed the Ca(2+)-binding protein parvalbumin selectively in the cytosol or in the nucleus of mDCT cells. The decrease in NCC mRNA upon nucleotide stimulation was abolished in cells overexpressing cytosolic PV but not in cells overexpressing either a nuclear-targeted PV or a mutated PV unable to bind Ca(2+). Using a firefly luciferase reporter gene strategy, we observed that the activity of NCC promoter region from -1 to -2,200 bp was not regulated by changes in [Ca(2+)]i. In contrast, high cytosolic calcium level induced instability of NCC mRNA. We conclude that in mDCT cells: (1) P2Y2 receptor is essential for the intracellular Ca(2+) signaling induced by ATP/UTP stimulation; (2) P2Y2-mediated increase of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration down-regulates the expression of NCC; (3) the decrease of NCC expression occurs, at least in part, via destabilization of its mRNA.

  2. Cooperative antiproliferative signaling by aspirin and indole-3-carbinol targets microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene expression and promoter activity in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Poindexter, Kevin M; Matthew, Susanne; Aronchik, Ida; Firestone, Gary L

    2016-04-01

    Antiproliferative signaling of combinations of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural indolecarbinol compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, was investigated in human melanoma cells. Melanoma cell lines with distinct mutational profiles were sensitive to different extents to the antiproliferative response of aspirin, with oncogenic BRAF-expressing G361 cells and wild-type BRAF-expressing SK-MEL-30 cells being the most responsive. I3C triggered a strong proliferative arrest of G361 melanoma cells and caused only a modest decrease in the proliferation of SK-MEL-30 cells. In both cell lines, combinations of aspirin and I3C cooperatively arrested cell proliferation and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, and nearly ablated protein and transcript levels of the melanocyte master regulator microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoform M (MITF-M). In melanoma cells transfected with a -333/+120-bp MITF-M promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid, treatment with aspirin and I3C cooperatively disrupted MITF-M promoter activity, which accounted for the loss of MITF-M gene products. Mutational analysis revealed that the aspirin required the LEF1 binding site, whereas I3C required the BRN2 binding site to mediate their combined and individual effects on MITF-M promoter activity. Consistent with LEF1 being a downstream effector of Wnt signaling, aspirin, but not I3C, downregulated protein levels of the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein-6 and β-catenin and upregulated the β-catenin destruction complex component Axin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that aspirin-regulated Wnt signaling and I3C-targeted signaling pathways converge at distinct DNA elements in the MITF-M promoter to cooperatively disrupt MITF-M expression and melanoma cell proliferation.

  3. Replication-Competent Influenza Virus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Luciferase Reporter Strains Engineered for Co-Infections Identify Antiviral Compounds in Combination Screens

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dan; Weisshaar, Marco; Lamb, Kristen; Chung, Hokyung K; Lin, Michael Z; Plemper, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Myxoviruses such as influenza A virus (IAV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are major human pathogens, mandating the development of novel therapeutics. To establish a high-throughput screening protocol for the simultaneous identification of pathogen- and host-targeted hit candidates against either or both pathogens, we have attempted coinfection of cells with IAV and RSV. However, viral replication kinetics were incompatible, RSV signal window was low, and an IAV-driven minireplicon reporter assay used in initial screens narrowed the host cell range and restricted to single-cycle infections. To overcome these limitations, we developed an RSV strain carrying firefly luciferase fused to an innovative universal small-molecule assisted shut-off domain, which boosted assay signal window, and a hyperactive fusion protein that synchronized IAV and RSV reporter expression kinetics and suppresses the identification of RSV entry inhibitors sensitive to a recently reported RSV pan-resistance mechanism. Combined with a replication-competent recombinant IAV strain harboring nano-luciferase, the assay performed well on a human respiratory cell line and supports multi-cycle infections. Miniaturized to 384-well format, the protocol was validated through screening of a set of the NIH Clinical Collection (NCC) in quadruplicate. These test screens demonstrated favorable assay parameters and reproducibility. Application to a LOPAC library of bioactive compounds in a proof-of-concept campaign detected licensed anti-myxovirus therapeutics, ribavirin and the neuraminidase inhibitor zanamivir, and identified two unexpected RSV-specific hit candidates, Fenretinide and the opioid receptor antagonist BNTX-7. Hits were evaluated in direct and orthogonal dose-response counterscreens using a standard recRSV reporter strain expressing renilla luciferase. PMID:26307636

  4. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P < 0.05). The expression of huPA protein in eggs increased from 7.82 IU/egg in the G0 generation to 17.02 IU/egg in the G1 generation. However, huPA-expressing embryos had reduced survival and hatchability at d 18 and 21 of incubation, respectively, and the blood clotting time was significantly higher in transgenic chickens than their nontransgenic counterparts (P < 0.05). Furthermore, adult transgenic rooster showed reduced (P < 0.05) fertility, as revealed by reduced volume of semen ejaculate, sperm concentration, and sperm viability. Taken together, our data suggest that huPA transgenic chickens could be successfully produced by the retroviral vector system. Transgenic chickens, expressing the huPA under the control of a ubiquitous promoter, may not only be used as a bioreactor for pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders.

  5. Polyphenols from Chilean Propolis and Pinocembrin Reduce MMP-9 Gene Expression and Activity in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Nicolás; Cuevas, Alejandro; Cavalcante, Marcela F.; Dörr, Felipe A.; Saavedra, Kathleen; Zambrano, Tomás; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols from diverse sources have shown anti-inflammatory activity. In the context of atherosclerosis, macrophages play important roles including matrix metalloproteinases synthesis involved in degradation of matrix extracellular components affecting the atherosclerotic plaque stability. We prepared a propolis extract and pinocembrin in ethanol solution. Propolis extract was chemically characterized using LC-MS. The effect of treatments on gene expression and proteolytic activity was measured in vitro using murine macrophages activated with LPS. Cellular toxicity associated with both treatments and the vehicle was determined using MTT and apoptosis/necrosis detection assays. MMP-9 gene expression and proteolytic activity were measured using qPCR and zymography, respectively. Thirty-two compounds were identified in the propolis extract, including pinocembrin among its major components. Treatment with either ethanolic extract of propolis or pinocembrin inhibits MMP-9 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, an inhibitory effect was observed in proteolytic activity. However, the effect showed by ethanolic extract of propolis was higher than the effect of pinocembrin, suggesting that MMP-9 inhibition results from a joint contribution between the components of the extract. These data suggest a potential role of polyphenols from Chilean propolis in the control of extracellular matrix degradation in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27119082

  6. Diosgenin does not express estrogenic activity: a uterotrophic assay.

    PubMed

    Medigović, Ivana; Ristić, Nataša; Živanović, Jasmina; Šošić-Jurjević, Branka; Filipović, Branko; Milošević, Verica; Nestorović, Nataša

    2014-04-01

    This study assessed the effects of diosgenin on estrogenic activity using a uterotrophic assay. Immature female rats received diosgenin orally at doses of 200, 100, or 20 mg/kg body mass; and 17α ethynylestradiol at doses of 1 or 0.3 μg/kg, daily, for 3 consecutive days from day 19 to day 21. Controls were distributed among 2 groups: an intact control group and a vehicle control group. Animals were sacrificed 24 h after the last application of diosgenin, estradiol, or vehicle (22nd day of life). Uterine wet weight, stereological and histomorphometrical changes, immunohistochemical expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR), and the expression of lactoferrin (LF) were examined. Diosgenin did not affect the uterine wet weight, epithelium height, volume densities of endometrium, endometrial epithelia, number of endometrial glands, or histological appearance of vaginal epithelia. ERα, PR, and LF immunostaining intensity were not altered in the animals that received diosgenin. High-potency reference ER agonist 17α-ethynylestradiol induced a significant increase in all of the measured parameters, and as expected, decreased ERα immunostaining intensity. Based on these data, it can be concluded that diosgenin, at doses of 20-200 mg/kg, did not act as an estrogen agonist in the immature rat uterotrophic assay.

  7. The intrinsic microglial clock system regulates interleukin-6 expression.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Ryota; Hotta, Shogo; Yamada, Daisuke; Kou, Miki; Nakamura, Saki; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Tei, Hajime; Numano, Rika; Hida, Akiko; Shimba, Shigeki; Mieda, Michihiro; Hinoi, Eiichi; Yoneda, Yukio; Takarada, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Similar to neurons, microglia have an intrinsic molecular clock. The master clock oscillator Bmal1 modulates interleukin-6 upregulation in microglial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide. Bmal1 can play a role in microglial inflammatory responses. We previously demonstrated that gliotransmitter ATP induces transient expression of the clock gene Period1 via P2X7 purinergic receptors in cultured microglia. In this study, we further investigated mechanisms underlying the regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production by clock molecules in microglial cells. Several clock gene transcripts exhibited oscillatory diurnal rhythmicity in microglial BV-2 cells. Real-time luciferase monitoring also showed diurnal oscillatory luciferase activity in cultured microglia from Per1::Luciferase transgenic mice. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) strongly induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in BV-2 cells, whereas an siRNA targeting Brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like protein 1 (Bmal1), a core positive component of the microglial molecular clock, selectively inhibited LPS-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression. In addition, LPS-induced IL-6 expression was attenuated in microglia from Bmal1-deficient mice. This phenotype was recapitulated by pharmacological disruption of oscillatory diurnal rhythmicity using the synthetic Rev-Erb agonist SR9011. Promoter analysis of the Il6 gene revealed that Bmal1 is required for LPS-induced IL-6 expression in microglia. Mice conditionally Bmal1 deficient in cells expressing CD11b, including microglia, exhibited less potent upregulation of Il6 expression following middle cerebral artery occlusion compared with that in control mice, with a significant attenuation of neuronal damage. These results suggest that the intrinsic microglial clock modulates the inflammatory response, including the positive regulation of IL-6 expression in a particular pathological situation in the brain, GLIA 2016. GLIA 2017;65:198-208.

  8. Robust heat-inducible gene expression by two endogenous hsp70-derived promoters in transgenic Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Carpenetti, Tiffany L. G.; Aryan, Azadeh; Myles, Kevin M.; Adelman, Zach N.

    2011-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is an important vector of the viruses that cause dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and yellow fever. Reverse genetic approaches to the study of gene function in this mosquito have been limited by the lack of a robust inducible promoter to allow precise temporal control over a protein-encoding or hairpin RNA transgene. Likewise, investigations into the molecular and biochemical basis of vector competence would benefit from the ability to activate an anti-pathogen molecule at specific times during infection. We have characterized the ability of genomic sequences derived from two Ae. aegypti hsp70 genes to drive heat-inducible expression of a reporter in both transient and germline transformation contexts. AaHsp70-luciferase transcripts accumulated specifically after heat shock, and displayed a pattern of rapid induction and decay similar to endogenous AaHsp70 genes. Luciferase expression in transgenic Ae. aegypti increased by ∼25-50 fold in whole adults by four hours after heat-shock, with significant activity (∼20 fold) remaining at 24 hr. Heat-induced expression was even more dramatic in midgut tissues, with one strain showing a ∼2500-fold increase in luciferase activity. The AaHsp70 promoters described could be valuable for gene function studies as well as for the precise timing of the expression of anti-pathogen molecules. PMID:22142225

  9. Polygonum cuspidatum and Its Active Components Inhibit Replication of the Influenza Virus through Toll-Like Receptor 9-Induced Interferon Beta Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao-jen; Lin, Hui-Ju; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Hsu, Yu-An; Liu, Chin-San; Hwang, Guang-Yuh; Wan, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus infection is a global public health issue. The effectiveness of antiviral therapies for influenza has been limited by the emergence of drug-resistant viral strains. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify novel antiviral therapies. Here we tested the effects of 300 traditional Chinese medicines on the replication of various influenza virus strains in a lung cell line, A549, using an influenza-specific luciferase reporter assay. Of the traditional medicines tested, Polygonum cuspidatum (PC) and its active components, resveratrol and emodin, were found to attenuate influenza viral replication in A549 cells. Furthermore, they preferentially inhibited the replication of influenza A virus, including clinical strains isolated in 2009 and 2011 in Taiwan and the laboratory strain A/WSN/33 (H1N1). In addition to inhibiting the expression of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, PC, emodin, and resveratrol also increased the expression of interferon beta (IFN-β) through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Moreover, the anti-viral activity of IFN-β or resveratrol was reduced when the A549 cells were treated with neutralizing anti-IFN-β antibodies or a TLR9 inhibitor, suggesting that IFN-β likely acts synergistically with resveratrol to inhibit H1N1 replication. This potential antiviral mechanism, involving direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host immune response, has not been previously described for a single antiviral molecule. In conclusion, our data support the use of PC, resveratrol or emodin for inhibiting influenza virus replication directly and via TLR-9–induced IFN-β production. PMID:25658356

  10. Expression of Active Human Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ji; Swartz, James R.; Georgiou, George

    1998-01-01

    The formation of native disulfide bonds in complex eukaryotic proteins expressed in Escherichia coli is extremely inefficient. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a very important thrombolytic agent with 17 disulfides, and despite numerous attempts, its expression in an active form in bacteria has not been reported. To achieve the production of active tPA in E. coli, we have investigated the effect of cooverexpressing native (DsbA and DsbC) or heterologous (rat and yeast protein disulfide isomerases) cysteine oxidoreductases in the bacterial periplasm. Coexpression of DsbC, an enzyme which catalyzes disulfide bond isomerization in the periplasm, was found to dramatically increase the formation of active tPA both in shake flasks and in fermentors. The active protein was purified with an overall yield of 25% by using three affinity steps with, in sequence, lysine-Sepharose, immobilized Erythrina caffra inhibitor, and Zn-Sepharose resins. After purification, approximately 180 μg of tPA with a specific activity nearly identical to that of the authentic protein can be obtained per liter of culture in a high-cell-density fermentation. Thus, heterologous proteins as complex as tPA may be produced in an active form in bacteria in amounts suitable for structure-function studies. In addition, these results suggest the feasibility of commercial production of extremely complex proteins in E. coli without the need for in vitro refolding. PMID:9835579

  11. Luciferase-Based, High-Throughput Assay for Screening and Profiling Transmission-Blocking Compounds against Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lucantoni, Leonardo; Fidock, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of new antimalarial drugs able to target both the asexual and gametocyte stages of Plasmodium falciparum is critical to the success of the malaria eradication campaign. We have developed and validated a robust, rapid, and cost-effective high-throughput reporter gene assay to identify compounds active against late-stage (stage IV and V) gametocytes. The assay, which is suitable for testing compound activity at incubation times up to 72 h, demonstrates excellent quality and reproducibility, with average Z′ values of 0.85 ± 0.01. We used the assay to screen more than 10,000 compounds from three chemically diverse libraries. The screening outcomes highlighted the opportunity to use collections of compounds with known activity against the asexual stages of the parasites as a starting point for gametocytocidal activity detection in order to maximize the chances of identifying gametocytocidal compounds. This assay extends the capabilities of our previously reported luciferase assay, which tested compounds against early-stage gametocytes, and opens possibilities to profile the activities of gametocytocidal compounds over the entire course of gametocytogenesis. PMID:26787698

  12. Crystal structure of a flavoprotein related to the subunits of bacterial luciferase.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, S A; James, M N; O'Kane, D J; Lee, J

    1993-01-01

    The molecular structure of the luxF protein from the bioluminescent bacterium Photobacterium leiognathi has been determined by X-ray diffraction techniques and refined to a conventional R-factor of 17.8% at 2.3 A resolution. The 228 amino acid polypeptide exists as a symmetrical homodimer and 33% of the monomer's solvent-accessible surface area is buried upon dimerization. The monomer displays a novel fold that contains a central seven-stranded beta-barrel. The solvent-exposed surface of the monomer is covered by seven alpha-helices, whereas the dimer interface is primarily a flat surface composed of beta-strands. The protein monomer binds two molecules of flavin mononucleotide, each of which has C6 of the flavin isoalloxazine moiety covalently attached to the C3' carbon atom of myristic acid. Both myristyl groups of these adducts are buried within the hydrophobic core of the protein. One of the cofactors contributes to interactions at the dimer interface. The luxF protein displays considerable amino acid sequence homology with both alpha- and beta-subunits of bacterial luciferase, especially the beta-subunit. Conserved amino acid residues shared between luxF and the luciferase subunits cluster predominantly in two distinct regions of the luxF protein molecule. These homologous regions in the luciferase subunits probably share a three-dimensional fold similar to that of the luxF protein. Images PMID:8491169

  13. Detection of luciferase gene sequence in nonluminescent Vibrio cholerae by colony hygridization and polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, L.M.; Colwell, R.R. )

    1991-05-01

    Bioluminescence is a trait observed among approximately 10% of Vibrio cholerae isolates. We have demonstrated that not only do some strains of V. cholerae produce low levels of light, undetectable by the human eye, but the luciferase gene sequence is present in strains of V. cholerae which emit no detectable light, evidenced by hybridization with a luciferase DNA probe. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of luciferase regions of amino acid identity. The polymerase chain reaction method of DNA amplification with oligonucleotide primers based on these regions was used to isolate a region of the luxA gene from both luminescent and nonluminescent V. cholerae strains. The nucleotide sequence of this region was determined and reveals that nonluminescent V. cholerae have 99.7% nucleotide sequence similarity in this region with the luminescent biovar V. cholerae by albensis as well as significant similarity to other species of bioluminescent bacteria, a finding that is in accord with the hypothesis that these species have a common luminescent ancestor, most probably from the marine environment.

  14. MiRNA-21 mediates the antiangiogenic activity of metformin through targeting PTEN and SMAD7 expression and PI3K/AKT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Mao; Tan, Xiaoyong; Mu, Lin; Luo, Yulin; Li, Rong; Deng, Xin; Chen, Ni; Ren, Meiping; Li, Yongjie; Wang, Liqun; Wu, Jianbo; Wan, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Metformin, an anti-diabetic drug commonly used for type 2 diabetes therapy, is associated with anti-angiogenic effects in conditions beyond diabetes. miR-21 has been reported to be involved in the process of angiogenesis. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms by which the metformin-induced endothelial suppression and its effects on miR-21-dependent pathways are still unclear. Bioinformatic analysis and identification of miR-21 and its targets and their effects on metformin-induced antiangiogenic activity were assessed using luciferase assays, quantitative real-time PCR, western blots, scratch assays, CCK-8 assays and tubule formation assays. In this study, miR-21 was strikingly downregulated by metformin in a time- and dose-dependent manner. miR-21 directly targeted the 3′-UTR of PTEN and SMAD7, and negatively regulated their expression. Overexpression of miR-21 abrogated the metformin-mediated inhibition of endothelial cells proliferation, migration, tubule formation and the TGF-β-induced AKT, SMAD- and ERK-dependent phosphorylations, and conversely, down-regulation of miR-21 aggravated metformin’s action and revealed significant promotion effects. Our study broadens our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of miR-21 mediating metformin-induced anti-angiogenic effects, providing important implications regarding the design of novel miRNA-based therapeutic strategies against angiogenesis. PMID:28230206

  15. Hypoxia induces H19 expression through direct and indirect Hif-1α activity, promoting oncogenic effects in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weining; Hu, Qi; Nie, Er; Yu, Tianfu; Wu, Youzhi; Zhi, Tongle; Jiang, Kuan; Shen, Feng; Wang, Yingyi; Zhang, Junxia; You, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    H19 expression is elevated in many human tumors including glioblastomas, suggesting an oncogenic role for the long noncoding RNA; yet the upregulation of H19 in glioblastomas remains unclear. Here we report that hypoxia significantly stimulated H19 expression in glioblastoma cell lines, which was related to hypoxia-inducible factors 1α (Hif-1α). Hif-1α promoted H19 expression in U87 and U251 cells. Meanwhile PTEN is an advantageous factor to affect H19 expression, through attenuating Hif-1α stability. Hif-1α also positively correlates with H19 in human glioblastoma samples depending on PTEN status. ChIP and luciferase reporter assays showed that Hif-1α induced H19 transcription through directly binding to the H19 promoter. Furthermore, Hif-1α upregulated specific protein 1 (SP1) expression in glioblastomas cells in vitro and in vivo, and SP1 also strongly interacted with the H19 promoter to promote H19 expression under hypoxia. We also showed that H19 acts as a molecular sponge that binds miR-181d, relieving inhibition of β-catenin expression. Therefore, H19 participates in hypoxia-driven migration and invasion in glioblastoma cells. In summary, our results uncover the mechanisms that stimulate H19 expression under hypoxia to promote malignant effects in glioblastomas and suggest H19 might be a promising therapeutic target. PMID:28327666

  16. Active Learning of Regular Expressions for Entity Extraction.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Alberto; De Lorenzo, Andrea; Medvet, Eric; Tarlao, Fabiano

    2017-03-24

    We consider the automatic synthesis of an entity extractor, in the form of a regular expression, from examples of the desired extractions in an unstructured text stream. This is a long-standing problem for which many different approaches have been proposed, which all require the preliminary construction of a large dataset fully annotated by the user. In this paper, we propose an active learning approach aimed at minimizing the user annotation effort: the user annotates only one desired extraction and then merely answers extraction queries generated by the system. During the learning process, the system digs into the input text for selecting the most appropriate extraction query to be submitted to the user in order to improve the current extractor. We construct candidate solutions with genetic programming (GP) and select queries with a form of querying-by-committee, i.e., based on a measure of disagreement within the best candidate solutions. All the components of our system are carefully tailored to the peculiarities of active learning with GP and of entity extraction from unstructured text. We evaluate our proposal in depth, on a number of challenging datasets and based on a realistic estimate of the user effort involved in answering each single query. The results demonstrate high accuracy with significant savings in terms of computational effort, annotated characters, and execution time over a state-of-the-art baseline.

  17. Cloning, expression and biological activity of equine interleukin (IL)-5.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, F M; Vandergrifft, E; Bailey, S R; Sepulveda, M F; Goode, N T; Horohov, D W

    2003-09-15

    The cytokine, interleukin (IL)-5 stimulates eosinophil differentiation, activation and survival and can prime these cells, increasing the response to other mediators. In view of its many effects on eosinophils, IL-5 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic disease in man. Here we report the cloning of equine IL-5 and expression of the recombinant protein by transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The cloned cDNA sequence consisted of 405 nucleotides and encoded a protein of 135 amino acids. There is >85% identity with feline, bovine, ovine, canine, and human IL-5 sequences at the nucleotide and protein level. Supernatants containing equine IL-5 were also examined for biological activity. CHO supernatant containing equine recombinant (eqr) IL-5, like the human ortholog (hrIL-5), induced concentration dependent equine eosinophil adherence to autologous serum-coated plastic (9.7+/-1.5% with a 1:100 dilution of eqrIL-5 and 9.1+/-1.6% adherence with 1 nM hrIL-5; n = 4). The eqr protein also caused concentration dependent superoxide production (11.9+/-2.4 nmol (reduced cytochrome (cyt) C)/10(6) cells at a 1:50 dilution, n = 4). In contrast, hrIL-5 only caused significant superoxide production when diluted in conditioned CHO medium, an effect that was inhibited by the anti-human mAb, TRFK5 (4.4+/-0.3 versus 0.3+/-0.4 nmol/10(6) cells for 0.5 nM hrIL-5 in the presence of the isotype matched IgG1 control (10 microM) and TRFK5 (10 microM), respectively). TRFK5 also significantly inhibited hrIL-5 induced adherence at concentrations of 0.3 microg/ml and above but had no significant inhibitory effect on either superoxide or adherence caused by eqrIL-5. These results demonstrate that equine IL-5 expressed by CHO cells stimulates equine eosinophils, suggesting that this cytokine could play a role in eosinophil recruitment and activation in equine allergic disease. The anti-human and murine moAb TRFK5 does not appear to recognise the equine protein.

  18. The Hyaluronan Receptor for Endocytosis (HARE) Activates NF-κB-mediated Gene Expression in Response to 40–400-kDa, but Not Smaller or Larger, Hyaluronans*

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Madhu S.; Baggenstoss, Bruce A.; Washburn, Jennifer; Harris, Edward N.; Weigel, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    The hyaluronan (HA) receptor for endocytosis (HARE; Stabilin-2) binds and clears 14 different ligands, including HA and heparin, via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. HA binding to HARE stimulates ERK1/2 activation (Kyosseva, S. V., Harris, E. N., and Weigel, P. H. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 15047–15055). To assess a possible HA size dependence for signaling, we tested purified HA fractions of different weight-average molar mass and with narrow size distributions and Select-HATM for stimulation of HARE-mediated gene expression using an NF-κB promoter-driven luciferase reporter system. Human HARE-mediated gene expression was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner with small HA (sHA) >40 kDa and intermediate HA (iHA) <400 kDa. The hyperbolic dose response saturated at 20–50 nm with an apparent Km ∼10 nm, identical to the Kd for HA-HARE binding. Activation was not detected with oligomeric HA (oHA), sHA <40 kDa, iHA >400 kDa, or large HA (lHA). Similar responses occurred with rat HARE. Activation by sHA-iHA was blocked by excess nonsignaling sHA, iHA, or lHA, deletion of the HA-binding LINK domain, or HA-blocking antibody. Endogenous NF-κB activation also occurred in the absence of luciferase plasmids, as assessed by degradation of IκB-α. ERK1/2 activation was also HA size-dependent. The results show that HA-HARE interactions stimulate NF-κB-activated gene expression and that HARE senses a narrow size range of HA degradation products. We propose a model in which optimal length HA binds multiple HARE proteins to allow cytoplasmic domain interactions that stimulate intracellular signaling. This HARE signaling system during continuous HA clearance could monitor the homeostasis of tissue biomatrix turnover throughout the body. PMID:23530033

  19. Buffer enhanced bioluminescence resonance energy transfer sensor based on Gaussia luciferase for in vitro detection of protease.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengyun; Yu, Junping; Zhang, Zhiping; Cui, Zongqiang; Wang, Dianbing; Wei, Hongping; Zhang, Xian-En

    2012-04-29

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) has gained favors in recent years as a detection technology for protease activity due to its extreme reliability, high sensitivity and low intrinsic backgrounds. Because of the sensitivity of the donors, substrates and the acceptors, it is expected that BRET systems are sensitive to buffer environments. However, no systematic study has been reported on how buffer components would affect the BRET ratio, and thus affect the determination of protease activity based on BRET. We present here that several environmental factors, including buffer agents, pH and divalent metal ions, influenced BRET ratio significantly, when humanized Gaussia luciferase (hGluc) was utilized as the donor and enhanced yellow fluorescence protein (EYFP) as the acceptor. Based on these findings, an enhancing solution was optimized to improve the performance of the BRET sensor for analysis of enterokinase activity in vitro, resulting in 10-fold and 7-fold improvement of the sensitivity and the detection limit, respectively. We anticipate the system will be applicable for improving performance of other in vitro BRET protease sensors, especially when the optimal conditions for protease activity would severely affect the BRET signal.

  20. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression.

  1. 5´-UTR introns enhance protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hoshida, Hisashi; Kondo, Masaki; Kobayashi, Takafumi; Yarimizu, Tohru; Akada, Rinji

    2017-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most suitable microorganisms for recombinant protein production. To enhance protein production, various expression systems have been intensively studied. However, the effect of introns on protein expression has not been examined deeply in S. cerevisiae. In this study, we analyzed the effect of some introns on protein expression. RPS25A, RPS26A, and RPS26B contain single introns within the 5´-untranslated regions (5´-UTRs), and RPS24A has an intron just downstream of the initiation codon. Expression activity of the promoter regions containing introns (intron promoters) were analyzed by luciferase reporter assays. These intron promoters showed higher expression than the TDH3 promoter (TDH3p), which is one of the strongest promoters in S. cerevisiae. Deletion of the introns from these promoters decreased luciferase expression, indicating that introns have a role in enhancing protein expression. To develop artificial strong intron promoters, several chimeric promoters were constructed using the TDH3p and the RPS25A intron promoter. A construct containing the entire TDH3p followed by the RPS25A intron showed about 50-fold higher expression than the TDH3p alone. Inducible expressions driven by the GAL10 promoter and the CUP1 promoter were also enhanced by the RPS25A intron. However, enhancement of mRNA accumulation by the TDH3p and the GAL10 promoter with the RPS25A intron was lower than the effect on luciferase activity, suggesting that the intron affects post-transcriptionally. The chimeric promoter, TDH3p-RPS25A-intron, enhanced expressions of some, but not all proteins examined, indicating that 5'-UTR introns increase production of a certain type of recombinant proteins in S. cerevisiae.

  2. Activation of Egr-1 expression in astrocytes by HIV-1 Tat: new insights into astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; Zou, Wei; Green, Linden A; Kim, Byung Oh; He, Johnny J

    2011-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat plays an important role in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis; the underlying mechanisms are still evolving. We have recently shown that HIV-1 Tat induces expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a characteristic of HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We have also shown that the Tat-induced GFAP expression in astrocytes is regulated by p300 and that deletion of the early growth response 1 (Egr-1) cis-transacting element within the p300 promoter abolishes Tat-induced GFAP expression. In this study, we further examined the relationship between Tat and Egr-1 in astrocytes. We found increased Egr-1 protein expression in Tat-expressing human astrocytoma cells and mouse primary astrocytes. Using the Egr-1 promoter-driven firefly luciferase reporter gene assay and the site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that Tat increased Egr-1 expression by transactivating the Egr-1 promoter and involving specific serum response elements within the promoter. Consistent with these data, we showed that Tat transactivation of the Egr-1 promoter was abrogated when astrocytes were cultured in serum-reduced media. Taken together, these results reveal that Tat directly transactivates Egr-1 expression and suggest that Tat interaction with Egr-1 is probably one of the very upstream molecular events that initiate Tat-induced astrocyte dysfunction and subsequent Tat neurotoxicity.

  3. Expression of Active Tectonics in Erosional Landscapes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipple, K. X.; McDermott, J. A.; Adams, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Landform analysis has become a standard tool in neotectonic studies. Most commonly the offset, tilting, and warping of abandoned depositional landforms is used to infer deformation rates and patterns. The timescales recorded in deformed landforms importantly bridge the gap between geodetic and geologic methods. Whereas such analyses of static landforms has become well developed, complementary approaches to extract quantitative information about tectonics from erosional landscapes are relatively new, rapidly evolving, and can provide powerful insight. Over the last decade, some useful general rules about the expression of rock uplift rate in erosional landscapes have been developed that can guide and augment studies of the spatial distribution of active rock uplift. At catchment scale, the relationship between landscape form and rock uplift is dictated largely by the response of stream profiles to rock uplift (particularly in rocky landscapes where uplift exceeds soil production), which is largely one of changing channel steepness (gradient adjusted for drainage area). Changes in channel steepness along stream can be either abrupt (discrete slope-break knickpoints) or gradual (expressed as zones of enhanced or reduced river profile concavity) depending on the deformation pattern. Landforms can record information about both spatial and temporal patterns in rock uplift rate. Landscapes in various parts of the Himalaya exemplify both spatial and temporal influences. The Siwalik Hills in the Himalayan foreland are a type locality for the topographic expression of spatial patterns in rock uplift rate. Here an independently known pattern of rock uplift rate over a fault-bend fold affords an opportunity to study landscape response and test landscape evolution models. Once calibrated, such models can be used to evaluate along-strike variability in the rate and pattern of rock uplift far more effectively and efficiently than can be achieved with other methods. Applying these

  4. Inhibition of protein kinase CK2 reduces CYP24A1 expression and enhances 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 anti-tumor activity in human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Yu, Wei-Dong; Ma, Yingyu; Chernov, Mikhail; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D has broad range of physiological functions and anti-tumor effects. 24-hydroxylase, encoded by the CYP24A1 gene, is the key enzyme for degrading many forms of vitamin D including the most active form, 1,25D3. Inhibition of CYP24A1 enhances 1,25D3 anti-tumor activity. In order to isolate regulators of CYP24A1 expression in prostate cancer cells, we established a stable prostate cancer cell line PC3 with CYP24A1 promoter driving luciferase expression to screen a small molecular library for compounds that inhibit CYP24A1 promoter activity. From this screening, we identified, 4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzimidazole (TBBz), a protein kinase CK2 selective inhibitor as a disruptor of CYP24A1 promoter activity. We show that TBBz inhibits CYP24A1 promoter activity induced by 1,25D3 in prostate cancer cells. In addition, TBBz downregulates endogenous CYP24A1 mRNA level in TBBz treated PC3 cells. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated CK2 knockdown reduces 1,25D3 induced CYP24A1 mRNA expression in PC3 cells. These results suggest that CK2 contributes to 1,25D3 mediated target gene expression. Lastly, inhibition of CK2 by TBBz or CK2 siRNA significantly enhanced 1,25D3 mediated anti-proliferative effect in vitro and in vivo in a xenograft model. In summary, our findings reveal that protein kinase CK2 is involved in the regulation of CYP24A1 expression by 1,25D3 and CK2 inhibitor enhances 1,25D3 mediated anti-tumor effect. PMID:23358686

  5. Small heterodimer partner attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase by suppression of activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-κB in renal proximal tubule epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Sun; Choi, Hoon In; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan

    2017-03-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor, small heterodimer partner (SHP), plays a negative regulatory role in innate immune responses and is involved in various inflammatory signaling pathways. In the present study, we aimed to ascertain whether SHP is effective in preventing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced kidney tubular inflammation and explored the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of SHP. Renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury was induced in mice by clamping both renal pedicles for 30 min. The effects of H2O2 on cell viability in human renal proximal tubule (HK-2) cells were determined using MTT assays. 2',7'-DCF-DA was used to determine intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). SHP, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression levels were determined by semi-quantitative immunoblotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, SHP, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) promoter activities were determined by luciferase assays. SHP mRNA and protein expression levels were reduced, whereas COX-2 and iNOS levels were increased in mice subjected to renal I/R. H2O2 treatment in HK-2 cells decreased cell viability, increased ROS production, and induced COX-2 and iNOS expression. These changes were counteracted by transient transfection with SHP. H2O2 treatment decreased SHP luciferase activity, which was recovered by treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor Bay11-7082, transfection with dominant-negative c-Jun or treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). AP-1 and NF-κB promoter activities were increased by H2O2 and this increase was blocked by SHP transfection. To conclude, SHP protected HK-2 cells from H2O2-induced tubular injury by inhibition of COX-2 and iNOS through suppression of AP-1 and NF-κB promoter activities.

  6. Development of a Suite of Luciferase Gene Probes for the Screening and Detection of Marine Bioluminescent Systems and Organisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    microorganisms in order to supplement bathyphotometric luminescence measurements with coincident real-time molecular data. (3) to conduct real - time PCR quantification of luciferase mRNA in dinoflagellates under different growth stages.

  7. Impact of site-directed mutant luciferase on quantitative green and orange/red emission intensities in firefly bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Terakado, Kanako; Nakatsu, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Firefly bioluminescence has attracted great interest because of its high quantum yield and intriguing modifiable colours. Modifications to the structure of the enzyme luciferase can change the emission colour of firefly bioluminescence, and the mechanism of the colour change has been intensively studied by biochemists, structural biologists, optical physicists, and quantum-chemistry theorists. Here, we report on the quantitative spectra of firefly bioluminescence catalysed by wild-type and four site-directed mutant luciferases. While the mutation caused different emission spectra, the spectra differed only in the intensity of the green component (λmax ~ 560 nm). In contrast, the orange (λmax ~ 610 nm) and red (λmax ~ 650 nm) components present in all the spectra were almost unaffected by the modifications to the luciferases and changes in pH. Our results reveal that the intensity of the green component is the unique factor that is influenced by the luciferase structure and other reaction conditions.

  8. In-vivo quantification of primary microRNA processing by Drosha with a luciferase based system

    SciTech Connect

    Allegra, Danilo; Mertens, Daniel

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Posttranscriptional regulation of miRNA processing is difficult to quantify. {yields} Our in-vivo processing assay can quantify Drosha cleavage in live cells. {yields} It is based on luciferase reporters fused with pri-miRNAs. {yields} The assay validates the processing defect caused by a mutation in pri-16-1. {yields} It is a sensitive method to quantify pri-miRNA cleavage by Drosha in live cells. -- Abstract: The RNAse III Drosha is responsible for the first step of microRNA maturation, the cleavage of primary miRNA to produce the precursor miRNA. Processing by Drosha is finely regulated and influences the amount of mature microRNA in a cell. We describe in the present work a method to quantify Drosha processing activity in-vivo, which is applicable to any microRNA. With respect to other methods for measuring Drosha activity, our system is faster and scalable, can be used with any cellular system and does not require cell sorting or use of radioactive isotopes. This system is useful to study regulation of Drosha activity in physiological and pathological conditions.

  9. Screening for novel human genes associated with CRE pathway activation with cell microarray.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linjie; Wang, Pingzhang; Guo, Jinhai; Wang, Xinyu; Deng, Weiwei; Zhang, Chenying; Fu, Dongxu; Gao, Xia; Shi, Taiping; Ma, Dalong

    2007-07-01

    In this study, cell microarray technology is used to identify novel human genes associated with CRE pathway activation. By reverse transfection, expression plasmids containing full-length cDNAs were cotransfected with the reporter plasmid pCRE-d2EGFP to monitor the activation of the CRE pathway via enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) expression. Of the 575 predominantly novel genes screened, 22 exhibited relatively higher EGFP fluorescence compared with a negative control. After a functional validation with a dual luciferase reporter system that included both cis- and trans-luciferase assays, 4 of the 22 genes (RNF41, C8orf32, C6orf208, and MEIS3P1) were confirmed as CRE-pathway activators. Western blot analysis revealed that RNF41 can promote CREB phosphorylation. These results demonstrate the successful combination of cell microarray technology with this reporting system and the potential of this tool to characterize functions of novel genes in a highly parallel format.

  10. Xenoestrogenic gene expression: structural features of active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T Wayne; Sinks, Glendon D

    2002-04-01

    Estrogenicity was assessed using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based Lac-Z reporter assay and was reported as the logarithm of the inverse of the 50% molar beta-galactosidase activity (log[EC50(-1)]). In an effort to quantify the relationship between molecular structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and estrogenic gene expression, a series of PAHs were evaluated. With noted exceptions, the results of these studies indicate that the initial two-dimensional structural warning for estrogenicity, the superpositioning of a hydroxylated aromatic system on the phenolic A-ring of 17-beta-estradiol, can be extended to the PAHs. This two-dimensional-alignment criterion correctly identified estrogenicity of 22 of the 29 PAHs evaluated. Moreover, the estrogenic potency of these compounds was directly related to the size of the hydrophobic backbone. The seven compounds classified incorrectly by this structural feature were either dihydroxylated naphthalenes or aromatic nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds; all such compounds were false positives. Results with dihydroxylated naphthalenes reveal derivatives that were nonestrogenic when superimposed on the phenolic A-ring of 17-beta-estradiol had the second hydroxyl group in the position of the C-ring or were catechol-like in structure. Structural alerts for nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds must take into account the position of the hydroxyl group and the in-ring nitrogen atom; compounds with the hydroxyl group and nitrogen atom involved with the same ring were observed to be nonactive.

  11. Regulation of Nox and Duox Enzymatic Activity and Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lambeth, J. David; Kawahara, Tsukasa; Diebold, Becky

    2007-01-01

    Summary In recent years, it has become clear that reactive oxygen species (ROS, which include superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and other metabolites) are produced in biological systems. Rather than being simply a byproduct of aerobic metabolism, it is now recognized that specific enzymes --- the Nox (NADPH-oxidase) and Duox (Dual oxidase) enzymes ---- seem to have the sole function of generating ROS in a carefully regulated manner, and key roles in signal transduction, immune function, hormone biosynthesis and other normal biological functions are being uncovered. The prototypical Nox is the respiratory burst oxidase or phagocyte oxidase, which generates large amounts of superoxide and other reactive species in the phagosomes of neutrophils and macrophages, playing a central role in innate immunity by killing microbes. This enzyme system has been extensively studied over the past two decades, and provides a basis for comparison with the more recently described Nox and Duox enzymes, which generate ROS in a variety of cells and tissues. This review first considers the structure and regulation of the respiratory burst oxidase, and then reviews recent studies relating to the regulation of the activity of the novel Nox/Duox enzymes. The regulation of Nox and Duox expression in tissues and by specific stimuli is also considered here. An accompanying review considers biological and pathological roles of the Nox family of enzymes. PMID:17602947

  12. Gene-expression reversal of lncRNAs and associated mRNAs expression in active vs latent HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Madhavan; Sagar, Vidya; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh

    2016-01-01

    Interplay between lncRNAs and mRNAs is rapidly emerging as a key epigenetic mechanism in controlling various cell functions. HIV can actively infect and/or can persist latently for years by manipulating host epigenetics; however, its molecular essence remains undiscovered in entirety. Here for the first time, we delineate the influence of HIV on global lncRNAs expression in monocytic cells lines. Our analysis revealed the expression modulation of nearly 1060 such lncRNAs which are associated with differentially expressed mRNAs in active and latent infection. This suggests a greater role of lncRNAs in regulating transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene expression during HIV infection. The differentially expressed mRNAs were involved in several different biological pathways where immunological networks were most enriched. Importantly, we discovered that HIV induces expression reversal of more than 150 lncRNAs between its active and latent infection. Also, hundreds of unique lncRNAs were identified in both infection conditions. The pathology specific “gene-expression reversal” and “on-and-off” switching of lncRNAs and associated mRNAs may lead to establish the relationship between active and HIV infection. PMID:27756902

  13. Arabidopsis TTG2 regulates TRY expression through enhancement of activator complex-triggered activation.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Martina; Dartan, Burcu; Birkenbihl, Rainer; Somssich, Imre E; Hülskamp, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Trichome patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana is regulated by a regulatory feedback loop of the trichome promoting factors TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), GLABRA3 (GL3)/ENHANCER OF GL3 (EGL3), and GL1 and a group of homologous R3MYB proteins that act as their inhibitors. Together, they regulate the temporal and spatial expression of GL2 and TTG2, which are considered to control trichome cell differentiation. In this work, we show that TTG2 is a specific activator of TRY (but not CPC or GL2). The WRKY protein TTG2 binds to W-boxes in a minimal promoter fragment of TRY, and these W-boxes are essential for rescue of the try mutant phenotype. We further show that TTG2 alone is not able to activate TRY expression, but rather drastically enhances the activation by TTG1 and GL3. As TTG2 physically interacts with TTG1 and because TTG2 can associate with GL3 through its interaction with TTG1, we propose that TTG2 enhances the activity of TTG1 and GL3 by forming a protein complex.

  14. Network activity-independent coordinated gene expression program for synapse assembly.

    PubMed

    Valor, Luis M; Charlesworth, Paul; Humphreys, Lawrence; Anderson, Chris N G; Grant, Seth G N

    2007-03-13

    Global biological datasets generated by genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics provide new approaches to understanding the relationship between the genome and the synapse. Combined transcriptome analysis and multielectrode recordings of neuronal network activity were used in mouse embryonic primary neuronal cultures to examine synapse formation and activity-dependent gene regulation. Evidence for a coordinated gene expression program for assembly of synapses was observed in the expression of 642 genes encoding postsynaptic and plasticity proteins. This synaptogenesis gene expression program preceded protein expression of synapse markers and onset of spiking activity. Continued expression was followed by maturation of morphology and electrical neuronal networks, which was then followed by the expression of activity-dependent genes. Thus, two distinct sequentially active gene expression programs underlie the genomic programs of synapse function.

  15. HBx and SP1 upregulate DKK1 expression.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Li, Yongguo; Liu, Yunzhi; Zhang, Jingnan; Chen, Ke; Huang, Ailong; Tang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Numerous evidences suggested that the hepatitis B virus (HBV) was recognized as an important factor in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) recently was reported to be involved in the progress of HCC. HBV may regulate DKK1 expression in hematoma carcinogenesis. Here, we demonstrated that HBV could regulate DKK1 promoter activity which resulted in upregulation of its mRNA and protein expression in several HBV existing cell lines, and HBx played a prominent role in this process. Transcription factor binding site search result showed that there is a SP1 site in DKK1 promoter region. Luciferase assay showed that overexpression of SP1 could increase DKK1 promoter activity in a dose dependent manner. Accordingly, siRNA inhibition of SP1 expression reduced DKK1 promoter activity and decreased the expression of DKK1 protein.

  16. The evolution of the adenylate-forming protein family in beetles: multiple luciferase gene paralogues in fireflies and glow-worms.

    PubMed

    Day, John C; Goodall, Tim I; Bailey, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    Bioluminescence in beetles is dependent upon the enzyme luciferase. It has been hypothesised luciferase evolved from a fatty acyl-CoA synthetase gene deriving a novel bioluminescent function (neofunctionalization) after a gene duplication event. We evaluated this hypothesis within a phylogenetic framework using independent evidence obtained from the genome of Tribolium castaneum, published luciferase genes and novel luciferase and luciferase-like sequences. This phylogenetic study provides evidence for a large gene family of luciferase and luciferase-like paralogues in bioluminescent and non-bioluminescent beetles. All luciferase sequences formed a clade supporting a protoluciferase existing prior to the divergence of the Lampyridae, Elateridae and Phengodidae (Elateroidea). Multiple luciferase genes were identified from members of the Photurinae and the Luciolinae indicating complex gene duplication events within lampyrid genomes. The majority of luciferase residues were identified to be under purifying selection as opposed to positive selection. We conclude that beetle luciferase may have arisen from a process of subfunctionalization as opposed to neofunctionalization early on in the evolution of the Elateroidea.

  17. Photoactivation of a psoralen-blocked luciferase gene by blue light.

    PubMed

    Stafforst, Thorsten; Stadler, Jens M

    2013-11-18

    A single psoralen cross-link completely blocks expression of a gene. An aminopyrene derivative has been found that allows the efficient light-triggered activation of cross-linked genes by UV or blue light. This paves the way to apply such psoralen cross-links for the photocleavable protection of nucleic acids.

  18. Heme oxygenase-1 inhibits the expression of adhesion molecules associated with endothelial cell activation via inhibition of NF-kappaB RelA phosphorylation at serine 276.

    PubMed

    Seldon, Mark P; Silva, Gabriela; Pejanovic, Nadja; Larsen, Rasmus; Gregoire, Isabel Pombo; Filipe, Josina; Anrather, Josef; Soares, Miguel P

    2007-12-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; encoded by the Hmox1 gene) catalyzes the degradation of free heme into biliverdin, via a reaction that releases iron (Fe) and carbon monoxide. We report that HO-1 down-regulates the proinflammatory phenotype associated with endothelial cell (EC) activation by reducing intracellular nonprotein-bound Fe (labile Fe). EC isolated from Hmox1(-/-) mice have higher levels of intracellular labile Fe and reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared with EC isolated from Hmox1(+/+) mice. Basal and TNF-induced expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin were increased in Hmox1(-/-) vs Hmox1(+/+) EC, an effect reversed by Fe chelation using deferoxamine mesylate (DFO). Fe chelation inhibits TNF-driven transcription of Vcam-1, Icam-1, and E-selectin, as assessed using luciferase reporter assays. This effect is associated with inhibition of the transcription factor NF-kappaB via a mechanism that is not associated with the inhibition of IkappaBalpha phosphorylation/degradation or NF-kappaB (i.e., RelA) nuclear translocation, although it affects very modestly NF-kappaB binding to DNA kappaB consensus sequences in the Vcam-1 and E-selectin promoters. HO-1 inhibits NF-kappaB (i.e., RelA) phosphorylation at Ser(276), a phosphoacceptor that is critical to sustain TNF-driven NF-kappaB activity in EC. This effect was mimicked by Fe chelation as well as by antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine). In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel mechanism via which HO-1 down-modulates the proinflammatory phenotype of activated EC, i.e., the inhibition of RelA phosphorylation at Ser(276).

  19. Activated human B lymphocytes express three CTLA-4 counterreceptors that costimulate T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Boussiotis, V A; Freeman, G J; Gribben, J G; Daley, J; Gray, G; Nadler, L M

    1993-01-01

    Signaling via the T-cell receptor complex is necessary but not sufficient to induce antigen-specific T lymphocytes to expand clonally. To proliferate, T cells must receive one or more costimulatory signals provided by antigen presenting cells (APCs). One such critical costimulatory signal is delivered by the CD28/CTLA-4 counterreceptor, B7, expressed on APCs. B7 costimulation induces CD28 signaling, resulting in interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion, and T-cell proliferation. Conversely, T-cell receptor signaling in the absence of B7 costimulation results in induction of antigen-specific tolerance. Here, we show that activated human B lymphocytes express two additional CTLA-4 counterreceptors also capable of providing T-cell costimulation. At 24 hr postactivation, B cells express a CTLA-4 counterreceptor not recognized by anti-B7 or -BB-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which induces detectable IL-2 secretion and T-cell proliferation. At 48 and 72 hr postactivation, B cells express both B7 and a third CTLA-4 counterreceptor identified by the anti-BB-1 mAb. BB-1 appears to be a molecule distinct from B7 by its expression on B7- cells and its capacity to induce T cells to proliferate without significant accumulation of IL-2. As observed for B7, costimulatory signals mediated by these alternative CTLA-4/CD28 counterreceptors are likely to be essential for generation of an immune response and their absence may result in antigen-specific tolerance. We propose the following terminology for these CTLA-4 counterreceptors: (i) B7, B7-1; (ii) early CTLA-4 binding counterreceptor, B7-2; and (iii) BB-1, B7-3. PMID:7504293

  20. L-arginine attenuates Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induced Nuclear Factor Kappa-Beta (NF-κB) activation in Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qinghe; Cooney, Mitchell; Yepuri, Natesh; Cooney, Robert N.

    2017-01-01

    Background Specific nutrients like L-arginine (L-Arg) ameliorate intestinal inflammation, however the exact mechanisms of this effect are unclear. We hypothesized the anti-inflammatory effects of L-Arg require active transport and metabolism by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to generate nitric oxide (NO). To test this hypothesis we examined the effects of L-Arg, L-Arg transport activity, NO production and iNOS inhibitor on IL-1β-mediated NF-κB-activation in Caco-2 cells. Methods Caco-2 cells were cultured, transfected with a NF-κB promoter luciferase vector, incubated ± L-Arg, ± IL-1β and luciferase activity was measured. Using siRNA we inhibited the L-Arg cationic amino acid transporter system y+ (CAT1) expression and examined its effects on L-Arg transport activity and IL-1β-mediated NF-κB-activation. Finally, the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO donor) and Nω-nitro-L-arginine (NNA, an iNOS inhibitor) on IL-1β-mediated NF-κB-activation were examined. Results IL-1β increased NF-κB luciferase activity (8-fold) and NF-κB expression (mRNA and protein), both of these were significantly decreased by L-Arg. System y+ CAT1 siRNA decreased CAT1 expression, L-Arg transport activity and attenuated the inhibitory effects of L-Arg on NF- κB activity. SNP attenuated the IL-1β-induced increase in NF-κB luciferase activity and expression, whereas NNA diminished the inhibitory effects of L-Arg on IL-1β-inducible NF- κB luciferase activity. Conclusion The inhibitory effects of L-Arg on IL-1β-mediated NF-κB-activation in Caco-2 cells involve L-Arg transport activity by CAT1, regulation of IL-1β-mediated increases in NF-κB expression, changes in iNOS expression and NO production. Our data suggest the inhibitory effects of L-Arg on NF-κB activation are mediated in part by iNOS since SNP preserves and NNA attenuates the effects of L-Arg on IL-1β-mediated NF-κB-activation and expression. PMID:28334039

  1. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  2. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  3. Regulation of mda-7 gene expression during human melanoma differentiation.

    PubMed

    Madireddi, M T; Dent, P; Fisher, P B

    2000-03-02

    Induction of irreversible growth arrest and terminal differentiation in human melanoma cells following treatment with recombinant human fibroblast interferon (IFN-beta) and mezerein (MEZ) results in elevated expression of a specific melanoma differentiation associated gene, mda-7. Experiments were conducted to define the mechanism involved in the regulation of mda-7 expression in differentiating human melanoma cells. The mda-7 gene is actively transcribed in uninduced HO-1 human melanoma cells and the rate of transcription of mda-7 is not significantly enhanced by treatment with IFN-beta, MEZ or IFN-beta+MEZ. The high basal activity of the mda-7 promoter in uninduced melanoma cells and the absence of enhancing effect upon treatment with differentiation inducers is corroborated by transfection studies using the promoter region of mda-7 linked to a luciferase reporter gene containing the SV40 polyadenylation signal sequence. RT - PCR analysis detects the presence of low levels of mda-7 transcripts in uninduced and concomitant increases in differentiation inducer treated HO-1 cells. However, steady-state mda-7 mRNA is detected only in IFN-beta+MEZ and to a lesser degree in MEZ treated cells. We show that induction of terminal differentiation of HO-1 cells with IFN-beta+MEZ dramatically increases the half-life of mda-7 mRNA while treatment with cycloheximide results in detectable mda-7 mRNA in control and inducer treated cells. These observations confirm constitutive activity of the mda-7 promoter in HO-1 cells irrespective of differentiation status suggesting posttranscriptional processes as important determinants of mda-7 expression during terminal differentiation. The 3' UTR region of mda-7 contains AU-rich elements (ARE) that contribute to rapid mda-7 mRNA turnover during proliferation and reversible differentiation, a process controlled by a labile protein factor(s). Substitution of the SV40 polyadenylation signal sequence in the luciferase reporter plasmid with

  4. Artemisinin triggers a G1 cell cycle arrest of human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase-4 promoter activity and expression by disrupting nuclear factor-κB transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kalvin Q; Tin, Antony S; Firestone, Gary L

    2014-03-01

    Relatively little is known about the antiproliferative effects of artemisinin, a naturally occurring antimalarial compound from Artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood, in human endometrial cancer cells. Artemisinin induced a G1 cell cycle arrest in cultured human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) and CDK4 transcript and protein levels. Analysis of CDK4 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs showed that the artemisinin ablation of CDK4 gene expression was accounted for by the loss of CDK4 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that artemisinin inhibited nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) subunit p65 and p50 interactions with the endogenous Ishikawa cell CDK4 promoter. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that artemisinin disrupts endogenous p65 and p50 nuclear translocation through increased protein-protein interactions with IκB-α, an NF-κB inhibitor, and disrupts its interaction with the CDK4 promoter, leading to a loss of CDK4 gene expression. Artemisinin treatment stimulated the cellular levels of IκB-α protein without altering the level of IκB-α transcripts. Finally, expression of exogenous p65 resulted in the accumulation of this NF-κB subunit in the nucleus of artemisinin-treated and artemisinin-untreated cells, reversed the artemisinin downregulation of CDK4 protein expression and promoter activity, and prevented the artemisinin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a key event in the artemisinin antiproliferative effects in endometrial cancer cells is the transcriptional downregulation of CDK4 expression by disruption of NF-κB interactions with the CDK4 promoter.

  5. Effects of Intensity of Facial Expressions on Amygdalar Activation Independently of Valence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huiyan; Mueller-Bardorff, Miriam; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Buff, Christine; Brinkmann, Leonie; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Straube, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    For several stimulus categories (e.g., pictures, odors, and words), the arousal of both negative and positive stimuli has been shown to modulate amygdalar activation. In contrast, previous studies did not observe similar amygdalar effects in response to negative and positive facial expressions with varying intensity of facial expressions. Reasons for this discrepancy may be related to analytical strategies, experimental design and stimuli. Therefore, the present study aimed at re-investigating whether the intensity of facial expressions modulates amygdalar activation by circumventing limitations of previous research. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess brain activation while participants observed a static neutral expression and positive (happy) and negative (angry) expressions of either high or low intensity from an ecologically valid, novel stimulus set. The ratings of arousal and intensity were highly correlated. We found that amygdalar activation followed a u-shaped activation pattern with highest activation to high intense facial expressions as compared to low intensity facial expressions and to the neutral expression irrespective of valence, suggesting a critical role of the amygdala in valence-independent arousal processing of facial expressions. Additionally, consistent with previous studies, intensity effects were also found in visual areas and generally increased activation to angry versus happy faces were found in visual cortex and insula, indicating enhanced visual representations of high arousing facial expressions and increased visual and somatosensory representations of threat.

  6. Effects of Intensity of Facial Expressions on Amygdalar Activation Independently of Valence

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huiyan; Mueller-Bardorff, Miriam; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Buff, Christine; Brinkmann, Leonie; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.; Straube, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    For several stimulus categories (e.g., pictures, odors, and words), the arousal of both negative and positive stimuli has been shown to modulate amygdalar activation. In contrast, previous studies did not observe similar amygdalar effects in response to negative and positive facial expressions with varying intensity of facial expressions. Reasons for this discrepancy may be related to analytical strategies, experimental design and stimuli. Therefore, the present study aimed at re-investigating whether the intensity of facial expressions modulates amygdalar activation by circumventing limitations of previous research. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess brain activation while participants observed a static neutral expression and positive (happy) and negative (angry) expressions of either high or low intensity from an ecologically valid, novel stimulus set. The ratings of arousal and intensity were highly correlated. We found that amygdalar activation followed a u-shaped activation pattern with highest activation to high intense facial expressions as compared to low intensity facial expressions and to the neutral expression irrespective of valence, suggesting a critical role of the amygdala in valence-independent arousal processing of facial expressions. Additionally, consistent with previous studies, intensity effects were also found in visual areas and generally increased activation to angry versus happy faces were found in visual cortex and insula, indicating enhanced visual representations of high arousing facial expressions and increased visual and somatosensory representations of threat. PMID:28066216

  7. Ultrastructure of granules and immunocytochemical localization of luciferase in photocytes of fireflies.

    PubMed

    Neuwirth, M

    1981-01-01

    Photocyte granules are round to oval, 1-2 micron, contain a peripheral dense area and are of three structural types. Type one granules consist of an amorphous matrix, a bundle of 2-12 microtubules and a flask-shaped vacuole. The type two granule is characterized by a large crystal or several smaller crystals embedded in an amorphous matrix with microtubules lined up along the face of the crystal. The type three granule is filled with a large number of thick-walled tubules (40-50 nm o.d.), usually found in bundles of two to four and a few microtubules. Luciferase has been shown to be localized in these photocyte granules by the immunoferritin technique. Ferritin is not localized over microtubules or flask-shaped vacuoles in type one granules but is randomly distributed over the matrix. In type two granules, ferritin is more densely distributed over the crystals and in type three granules over filamentous structures. There is no ferritin over the microtubules. Other parts of photocytes and of light organs are negative for luciferase. Buffer and anticalliphorin incubated sections showed no ferritin in granules.

  8. Kinetics of inhibition of firefly luciferase by oxyluciferin and dehydroluciferyl-adenylate.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, César; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2008-09-01

    The inhibition mechanisms of the firefly luciferase (Luc) by the two major products of the reactions catalysed by Luc, oxyluciferin and dehydroluciferyl-adenylate (L-AMP), were investigated. Light production in the presence and absence of these inhibitors (0.5 to 2 microM oxyluciferin; 0.0025 to 1.25 microM L-AMP) has been measured in 50 mM Hepes buffer (pH=7.5), 10 nM Luc, 250 microM ATP and D-Luciferin (from 3.75 up to 120 microM). Nonlinear regression analysis with the appropriate kinetic models (Henri-Michaelis-Menten and William-Morrison equations) reveals that oxyluciferin is a competitive inhibitor of luciferase (Ki=0.50+/-0.03 microM) while L-AMP act as a tight-binding competitive inhibitor (Ki=3.8+/-0.7 nM). The Km values obtained both for oxyluciferin and L-AMP were 14.7+/-0.7 and 14.9+/-0.2 microM, respectively. L-AMP is a stronger inhibitor of Luc than oxyluciferin and the major responsible for the characteristic flash profile of in vitro Luc bioluminescence.

  9. A luciferase-based screening method for inhibitors of alphavirus replication applied to nucleoside analogues.

    PubMed

    Pohjala, Leena; Barai, Vladimir; Azhayev, Alex; Lapinjoki, Seppo; Ahola, Tero

    2008-06-01

    Several members of the widespread alphavirus group are pathogenic, but no therapy is available to treat these RNA virus infections. We report here a quantitative assay to screen for inhibitors of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replication, and demonstrate the effects of 29 nucleosides on SFV and Sindbis virus replication. The anti-SFV assay developed is based on a SFV strain containing Renilla luciferase inserted after the nsP3 coding region, yielding a marker virus in which the luciferase is cleaved out during polyprotein processing. The reporter-gene assay was miniaturized, automated and validated, resulting in a Z' value of 0.52. [3H]uridine labeling for 1 h at the maximal viral RNA synthesis time point was used as a comparative method. Anti-SFV screening and counter-screening for cell viability led to the discovery of several new SFV inhibitors. 3'-amino-3'-deoxyadenosine was the most potent inhibitor in this set, with an IC50 value of 18 microM in the reporter-gene assay and 2 microM in RNA synthesis rate detection. Besides the 3'-substituted analogues, certain N6-substituted nucleosides had similar IC50 values for both SFV and Sindbis replication, suggesting the applicability of this methodology to alphaviruses in general.

  10. Early STAT1 activation after systemic delivery of HSV amplicon vectors suppresses transcription of the vector-encoded transgene.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masataka; Chiocca, E Antonio; Saeki, Yoshinaga

    2007-11-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon vector is a powerful gene delivery vehicle that can accommodate up to 150 kilobase of exogenous DNA. However, amplicon-mediated transgene expression is often transient outside the nervous system. In order to define the role of host immune responses in silencing amplicon-encoded transgenes, we evaluated the kinetics of cytokine-/chemokine-expression after tail-vein injection of a luciferase-encoding amplicon into mice. Type I interferons (IFNs) were induced earliest, within an hour after injection, and several other cytokines/chemokines were subsequently upregulated in the livers of wild-type (WT) mice. When the same experiment was performed in signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1)-knockout (KO) mice, the levels of type I IFN expression were significantly lower and chemokine induction was almost non-existent. Importantly, STAT1-KO mice exhibited significantly higher and more sustained luciferase activity than did the WT mice, which is attributable to increased transcriptional activity rather than increased copy numbers of luciferase-encoding vector DNA. Further studies using primary cultured fibroblasts derived from WT and STAT1-KO mice revealed the significance of STAT1 signaling in transcriptional silencing of the amplicon-encoded transgene in vitro. Our results indicate that type I IFNs induced by systemic delivery of HSV amplicon vectors initiate a cascade of immune responses and suppress transgene expression at the transcriptional level by activation of STAT1.

  11. Semisynthetic flavonoid 7-O-galloylquercetin activates Nrf2 and induces Nrf2-dependent gene expression in RAW264.7 and Hepa1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Roubalová, Lenka; Biedermann, David; Papoušková, Barbora; Vacek, Jan; Kuzma, Marek; Křen, Vladimír; Ulrichová, Jitka; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Vrba, Jiří

    2016-12-25

    The natural flavonoid quercetin is known to activate the transcription factor Nrf2, which regulates the expression of cytoprotective enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). In this study, a novel semisynthetic flavonoid 7-O-galloylquercetin (or quercetin-7-gallate, 3) was prepared by direct galloylation of quercetin, and its effect on the Nrf2 pathway was examined. A luciferase reporter assay showed that 7-O-galloylquercetin, like quercetin, significantly activated transcription via the antioxidant response element in a stably transfected human AREc32 reporter cell line. In addition, 7-O-galloylquercetin caused the accumulation of Nrf2 and induced the expression of HO-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels in murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. The induction of HO-1 by 7-O-galloylquercetin was significantly suppressed by N-acetyl-l-cysteine and SB203580, indicating the involvement of reactive oxygen species and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, respectively. HPLC/MS analyses also showed that 7-O-galloylquercetin was not degalloylated to quercetin, but it was conjugated with glucuronic acid and/or methylated in RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, 7-O-galloylquercetin was found to increase the protein levels of Nrf2 and HO-1, and also the activity of NQO1 in murine hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells. Taken together, we conclude that 7-O-galloylquercetin increases Nrf2 activity and induces Nrf2-dependent gene expression in RAW264.7 and Hepa1c1c7 cells.

  12. Detecting microRNA activity from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA) of protein coding genes. They control gene expression by either inhibiting translation or inducing mRNA degradation. A number of computational techniques have been developed to identify the targets of miRNAs. In this study we used predicted miRNA-gene interactions to analyse mRNA gene expression microarray data to predict miRNAs associated with particular diseases or conditions. Results Here we combine correspondence analysis, between group analysis and co-inertia analysis (CIA) to determine which miRNAs are associated with differences in gene expression levels in microarray data sets. Using a database of miRNA target predictions from TargetScan, TargetScanS, PicTar4way PicTar5way, and miRanda and combining these data with gene expression levels from sets of microarrays, this method produces a ranked list of miRNAs associated with a specified split in samples. We applied this to three different microarray datasets, a papillary thyroid carcinoma dataset, an in-house dataset of lipopolysaccharide treated mouse macrophages, and a multi-tissue dataset. In each case we were able to identified miRNAs of biological importance. Conclusions We describe a technique to integrate gene expression data and miRNA target predictions from multiple sources. PMID:20482775

  13. MiR-9 promotes osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells by inhibiting DKK1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyun; Xu, Hao; Kou, Jianqiang; Wang, Qianqian; Zheng, Xiujun; Yu, Tengbo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of miR-9 and its mechanism on the osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Real-time PCR and western blotting were used to study gene expression. Assay of Alkaline phosphatase activity and alizarin red staining were used to examine osteoblast differentiation. Transfection of miR-9 mimics or lent-shmiR-9 was used to modulate the level of miR-9 in C2C12. Overexpression of miR-9 in C2C12 cells stimulated alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast mineralization, as well as the expression of osteoblast marker genes Col I, Ocn and Bsp. Gene silencing of miR-9 in C2C12 resulted in the suppression of alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast mineralization, as well as the expression of Col I, Ocn and Bsp. DKK1 mRNA was not affected by miR-9 overexpression, however, DKK1 protein was significantly decreased. Moreover, DKK1 3'-UTR mediated transcriptional luciferase activity was also significantly suppressed by miR-9 overexpression. DKK1 mRNA was not affected by miR-9 gene silencing, however, DKK1 protein was significantly stimulated. Moreover, DKK1 3'-UTR mediated transcriptional luciferase activity was significantly stimulated by miR-9 gene silencing, and suppressed by miR-9 overexpression, however, DKK1 3'-UTR mutant mediated luciferase activity was unaffected. The siRNA derived gene silencing of DKK1 blocked the inhibiting effect of shmiR-9 on the expression of alkaline phosphatase; and blocked the inhibiting effect of shmiR-9 on the expression of ColI, Ocn and Bsp. MiR-9 promotes osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal cell C2C12 by suppressing the gene expression of DKK1.

  14. Identification and Characterization of a cis-Regulatory Element for Zygotic Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-01-01

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. We predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes. PMID:27172209

  15. Identification and characterization of a cis-regulatory element for zygotic gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGES

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; ...

    2016-03-26

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient tomore » confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. Furthermore, we predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes.« less

  16. Aldosterone does not modify gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Verhovez, A; Williams, T A; Morello, F; Monticone, S; Brizzi, M F; Dentelli, P; Fallo, F; Fabris, B; Amenta, F; Gomez-Sanchez, C; Veglio, F; Mulatero, P

    2012-03-01

    The toxic effects of aldosterone on the vasculature, and in particular on the endothelial layer, have been proposed as having an important role in the cardiovascular pathology observed in mineralocorticoid-excess states. In order to characterize the genomic molecular mechanisms driving the aldosterone-induced endothelial dysfunction, we performed an expression microarray on transcripts obtained from both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human coronary artery endothelial cells stimulated with 10 - 7 M aldosterone for 18 h. The results were then subjected to qRT-PCR confirmation, also including a group of genes known to be involved in the control of the endothelial function or previously described as regulated by aldosterone. The state of activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor was investigated by means of a luciferase-reporter assay using a plasmid encoding a mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid-sensitive promoter. Aldosterone did not determine any significant change in gene expression in either cell type both in the microarray and in the qRT-PCR analysis. The luciferase-reporter assay showed no activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor following aldosterone stimulation. The status of nonfunctionality of the mineralocorticoid receptor expressed in cultured human umbilical and coronary artery endothelial cells does not allow aldosterone to modify gene expression and provides evidence against either a beneficial or harmful genomic effect of aldosterone on healthy endothelial cells.

  17. MMP1 expression is activated by Slug and enhances multi-drug resistance (MDR) in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Chen, Ming-Jenn

    2017-01-01

    High matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) expression is associated with enhanced breast cancer growth and metastasis and also might predict poor prognosis. In this study, we further investigated the functional role of MMP1 and how it is upregulated in multi-drug resistant (MDR) breast cancer cells. By retrieving microarray data in GEO datasets and the survival data in the Kaplan Meier plotter, we observed that MMP1 is significantly upregulated in MCF-7/ADR cells compared to the parental MCF-7 cells, while high MMP1 expression is associated with worse overall survival (OS) and recurrence free survival (RFS) in breast cancer patients after systematic therapy. Functional studies showed that MMP1 overexpression significantly reduced the drug sensitivity in MCF-7 cells, while MMP1 knockdown substantially enhanced the sensitivity in MCF-7/ADR cells. By performing western blotting and immunofluorescent staining, we confirmed that MCF-7/ADR cells had enhanced mesenchymal properties than MCF-7 cells. In MCF-7 cells, enforced Slug expression resulted in significant MMP1 upregulation, while in MCF-7/ADR cells, Slug knockdown led to reduced MMP1 expression. By performing bioinformatic analysis, we observed that the promoter of MMP1 has three putative Slug binding sites. The following dual luciferase assay and ChIP-qPCR verified these three binding sites. Therefore, we infer that Slug enhances MMP1 transcription via directly binding to the promoter region in breast cancer cells, which is a previously unrecognized mechanism in the development of MDR. PMID:28334049

  18. A sensor for adenosine triphosphate fabricated by laser-induced forward transfer of luciferase onto a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Yasuyuki; Furuhata, Yosuke; Kitamura, Noboru

    2007-08-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of the enzyme luciferase was explored as a potential technique to be used in the fabrication of a microchip adenosine triphosphate (ATP) sensor. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was selected as the substrate for deposition of the luciferase. In comparison with other solid substrates, such as glass and polystyrene, it was found that the flexibility of PDMS made it a superior substrate for the immobilization of micro-spots of luciferase. LIFT of luciferase onto a PDMS substrate using a 355 nm laser was successfully carried out, while the bioactivity of the enzyme was maintained. Yellow luminescence ascribed to luciferase was observed from a transferred spot on the PDMS chip from the enzymatic reaction between luciferin and ATP. A microchip ATP sensor was also fabricated by attaching a small photodiode to the PDMS chip. On the basis of the fabricated microchip, the Michaelis-Menten relation between the luminescence intensity from the spot, and the ATP concentration was confirmed. The potential for fabricating biosensors using a combination of the LIFT technique with a PDMS substrate was shown to be very good.

  19. Sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based ratiometric protease assays with fusion proteins of firefly luciferase and red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Rosenberg, Justin C; Ablamsky, Danielle M; Taylor, Kelsey P; Southworth, Tara L; Linder, Samantha J

    2011-07-15

    We report here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyze yellow-green (560nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41nM for caspase 3, 1.0nM for thrombin, and 58nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. Our results demonstrate for the first time that an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence can be employed to assay physiologically important protease activities.

  20. Enhanced microbial biomass assay using mutant luciferase resistant to benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Noriaki; Sakakibara, Tatsuya; Kajiyama, Naoki; Igarashi, Toshinori; Maeda, Masako; Murakami, Seiji

    2003-08-15

    In a biomass assay based on adenosine 5(')-triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence, extracellular ATP is removed; then intracellular ATP is extracted from the microorganism by an ATP extractant and subsequently reacted with luciferase. To provide a highly sensitive assay, the concentration of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) in the ATP extractant was optimized by using a mutant luciferase resistant to BAC. The use of 0.2% BAC, which was acceptable for the luciferase, simultaneously achieved the maximum extraction of intracellular ATP from microorganisms and the inactivation of the ATP-eliminating enzymes for removal of extracellular ATP. The detection limit (blank+3 SD) for ATP was 1.8x10(-14)M (1.8x10(-18)mol/assay) in the presence of the ATP extractant with coefficients of variation of 0.7 to 6.3%. The reagent system coupled with the ATP-eliminating enzymes allowed for the detection of 93 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, 170CFU/ml of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, 170CFU/ml of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 29906, 68CFU/ml of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and 7.7CFU/ml of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051. The yeast cell of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IFO 10217 could be detected at 1CFU/ml. With 54 kinds of microorganisms, the average ATP extraction efficiency compared to the trichloroacetic acid extraction method was 81.0% in 24 strains among gram-negative bacteria, 99.4% in 13 strains among gram-positive bacteria, and 97.0% in 17 strains among yeast. The ATP contents of the gram-negative bacteria, gram-positive bacteria, and yeasts ranged from 0.40 to 2.70x10(-18)mol/CFU (mean=1.5x10(-18)mol/CFU), from 0.41 to 16.7x10(-18)mol/CFU (mean=5.5x10(-18)mol/CFU), and from 0.714 to 54.6x10(-16)mol/CFU (mean=8.00x10(-16)mol/CFU), respectively.

  1. Long-term hydroxytamoxifen treatment of an MCF-7-derived breast cancer cell line irreversibly inhibits the expression of estrogenic genes through chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Badia, E; Duchesne, M J; Semlali, A; Fuentes, M; Giamarchi, C; Richard-Foy, H; Nicolas, J C; Pons, M

    2000-08-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is frequently observed in patients after longterm treatment with tamoxifen, a nonsteroidal antiestrogen widely used for endocrine therapy of breast cancer. In vitro studies in resistant cells showed that the expression of natural estrogen-responsive genes is frequently altered. Using MVLN cells, an MCF-7-derived cell model, we previously demonstrated that 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) treatment irreversibly inactivated an estrogen-regulated chimeric luciferase response by a direct effect of the drug and not through a cell selection process (E. Badia et al., Cancer Res., 54: 5860-5866, 1994). In the present study, we present tamoxifen-resistant but still estrogen-dependent clones isolated after long-term treatment of MVLN cells with OHT and show that progesterone receptor (PR) expression was irreversibly decreased in some of these clones, whereas the PRA:PRB ratio of residual PR remained unchanged. The irreversible inactivation of both chimeric luciferase gene and PR gene expression was associated with the disappearance of DNase 1-hypersensitive sites. In the case of the chimeric gene, at least one of these sites was close to the estrogen responsive element. Genomic sequencing analysis of a clone with very low PR content did not reveal any methylation on CpG dinucleotides or any mutation in the PR gene promoter region. In all of the resistant clones tested and independently of their PR content, estrogen receptor expression was only lowered by half and remained functional, whereas pS2 expression was not modified. We also observed that the residual luciferase activity level (1-2%) of the MVLN clones, the luciferase expression of which had been irreversibly inactivated, was raised 4-fold by trichostatin A treatment. We conclude that long-term OHT treatment may modify the chromatin structure and thus could contribute to differentially silencing natural target genes.

  2. Expression and assembly of a fully active antibody in algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.; Franklin, Scott E.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Although combinatorial antibody libraries have solved the problem of access to large immunological repertoires, efficient production of these complex molecules remains a problem. Here we demonstrate the efficient expression of a unique large single-chain (lsc) antibody in the chloroplast of the unicellular, green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We achieved high levels of protein accumulation by synthesizing the lsc gene in chloroplast codon bias and by driving expression of the chimeric gene using either of two C. reinhardtii chloroplast promoters and 5' and 3' RNA elements. This lsc antibody, directed against glycoprotein D of the herpes simplex virus, is produced in a soluble form by the alga and assembles into higher order complexes in vivo. Aside from dimerization by disulfide bond formation, the antibody undergoes no detectable posttranslational modification. We further demonstrate that accumulation of the antibody can be modulated by the specific growth regime used to culture the alga, and by the choice of 5' and 3' elements used to drive expression of the antibody gene. These results demonstrate the utility of alga as an expression platform for recombinant proteins, and describe a new type of single chain antibody containing the entire heavy chain protein, including the Fc domain.

  3. Activation of the farnesoid X receptor induces hepatic expression and secretion of fibroblast growth factor 21.

    PubMed

    Cyphert, Holly A; Ge, Xuemei; Kohan, Alison B; Salati, Lisa M; Zhang, Yanqiao; Hillgartner, F Bradley

    2012-07-20

    Previous studies have shown that starvation or consumption of a high fat, low carbohydrate (HF-LC) ketogenic diet induces hepatic fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) gene expression in part by activating the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα). Using primary hepatocyte cultures to screen for endogenous signals that mediate the nutritional regulation of FGF21 expression, we identified two sources of PPARα activators (i.e. nonesterified unsaturated fatty acids and chylomicron remnants) that induced FGF21 gene expression. In addition, we discovered that natural (i.e. bile acids) and synthetic (i.e. GW4064) activators of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion. The effects of bile acids were additive with the effects of nonesterified unsaturated fatty acids in regulating FGF21 expression. FXR activation of FGF21 gene transcription was mediated by an FXR/retinoid X receptor binding site in the 5'-flanking region of the FGF21 gene. FGF19, a gut hormone whose expression and secretion is induced by intestinal bile acids, also increased hepatic FGF21 secretion. Deletion of FXR in mice suppressed the ability of an HF-LC ketogenic diet to induce hepatic FGF21 gene expression. The results of this study identify FXR as a new signaling pathway activating FGF21 expression and provide evidence that FXR activators work in combination with PPARα activators to mediate the stimulatory effect of an HF-LC ketogenic diet on FGF21 expression. We propose that the enhanced enterohepatic flux of bile acids during HF-LC consumption leads to activation of hepatic FXR and FGF19 signaling activity and an increase in FGF21 gene expression and secretion.

  4. Remote detection of human toxicants in real time using a human-optimized, bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette bioreporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan; Webb, James; Ripp, Steven; Patterson, Stacey; Sayler, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, human toxicant bioavailability screening has been forced to proceed in either a high throughput fashion using prokaryotic or lower eukaryotic targets with minimal applicability to humans, or in a more expensive, lower throughput manner that uses fluorescent or bioluminescent human cells to directly provide human bioavailability data. While these efforts are often sufficient for basic scientific research, they prevent the rapid and remote identification of potentially toxic chemicals required for modern biosecurity applications. To merge the advantages of high throughput, low cost screening regimens with the direct bioavailability assessment of human cell line use, we re-engineered the bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette to function autonomously (without exogenous stimulation) within human cells. Optimized cassette expression provides for fully endogenous bioluminescent production, allowing continuous, real time monitoring of the bioavailability and toxicology of various compounds in an automated fashion. To access the functionality of this system, two sets of bioluminescent human cells were developed. The first was programed to suspend bioluminescent production upon toxicological challenge to mimic the non-specific detection of a toxicant. The second induced bioluminescence upon detection of a specific compound to demonstrate autonomous remote target identification. These cells were capable of responding to μM concentrations of the toxicant n-decanal, and allowed for continuous monitoring of cellular health throughout the treatment process. Induced bioluminescence was generated through treatment with doxycycline and was detectable upon dosage at a 100 ng/ml concentration. These results demonstrate that leveraging autonomous bioluminescence allows for low-cost, high throughput direct assessment of toxicant bioavailability.

  5. Warm water bath stimulates phase-shifts of the peripheral circadian clocks in PER2::LUCIFERASE mouse.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Tahara, Yu; Kuriki, Daisuke; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks in the peripheral tissues of mice are known to be entrained by pulse stimuli such as restricted feeding, novel wheel running, and several other agents. However, there are no reports on high temperature pulse-mediated entrainment on the phase-shift of peripheral clocks in vivo. Here we show that temperature treatment of mice for two days at 41°C, instead of 37°C, for 1-2 h during the inactive period, using a temperature controlled water bath stimulated phase-advance of peripheral clocks in the kidney, liver, and submandibular gland of PER2::LUCIFERASE mice. On the other hand, treatment for 2 days at 35°C ambient room temperature for 2 h did not cause a phase-advance. Maintenance of mice at 41°C in a water bath, sustained the core body temperature at 40-41°C. However, the use of 37°C water bath or the 35°C ambient room temperature elevated the core body temperature to 38.5°C, suggesting that at least a core body temperature of 40-41°C is necessary to cause phase-advance under light-dark cycle conditions. The temperature pulse stimulation at 41°C, instead of 37°C water bath for 2 h led to the elevated expression of Per1 and Hsp70 in the peripheral tissue of mice. In summary, the present study demonstrates that transient high temperature pulse using water bath during daytime causes phase-advance in mouse peripheral clocks in vivo. The present results suggest that hot water bath may affect the phase of peripheral clocks.

  6. Luciferase Genes as Reporter Reactions: How to Use Them in Molecular Biology?

    PubMed

    Cevenini, L; Calabretta, M M; Calabria, D; Roda, A; Michelini, E

    2016-01-01

    : The latest advances in molecular biology have made available several biotechnological tools that take advantage of the high detectability and quantum efficiency of bioluminescence (BL), with an ever-increasing number of novel applications in environmental, pharmaceutical, food, and forensic fields. Indeed, BL proteins are being used to develop ultrasensitive binding assays and cell-based assays, thanks to their high detectability and to the availability of highly sensitive BL instruments. The appealing aspect of molecular biology tools relying on BL reactions is their general applicability in both in vitro assays, such as cell cultures or purified proteins, and in vivo settings, such as in whole-animal BL imaging. The aim of this chapter is to provide the reader with an overview of state-of-the-art bioluminescent tools based on luciferase genes, highlighting molecular biology strategies that have been applied so far, together with some selected examples.

  7. Hepatic cytochrome P450 activity, abundance, and expression throughout human development

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Ansong, Charles; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Smith, Jordan N.; Corley, Richard A.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2016-07-01

    Cytochrome P450s are Phase I metabolic enzymes that play critical roles in the biotransformation of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. The expression and activity of P450 enzymes can vary considerably throughout human development, especially when comparing fetal development to neonates, children, and adults. In an effort to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the ontogeny of P450 expression and activity we employed a multi-omic characterization of P450 transcript expression, protein abundance, and functional activity. To quantify the functional activity of individual P450s we employ activity-based protein profiling, which uses modified mechanism-based inhibitors of P450s as chemical probes, in tandem with proteomic analyses to quantify activity. Our results reveal life-stage-dependent variability in P450 expression, abundance, and activity throughout human development and frequent discordant relationships between expression and activity. The results were used to distribute P450s into three general classes based upon developmental stage of expression and activity. We have significantly expanded the knowledge of P450 ontogeny, particularly at the level of individual P450 activity. We anticipate that our ontogeny results will be useful for enabling predictive therapeutic dosing, and for avoiding potentially adverse and harmful reactions during maturation from both therapeutic drugs and environmental xenobiotics.

  8. Cloning, expression and functional characterization of carp, Cyprinus carpio, estrogen receptors and their differential activations by estrogens.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Lange, Anke; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Urushitani, Hiroshi; Tatarazako, Norishisa; Kawashima, Yukio; Tyler, Charles R; Iguchi, Taisen

    2013-01-01

    Sex-steroid hormones are essential for normal reproductive activity in both sexes. Estrogens are necessary for ovarian differentiation during a critical developmental stage in vertebrates and promote the growth and differentiation of the female reproductive system. Importantly, environmental estrogens can influence the reproductive system and have been shown to disrupt gametogenesis in males. To understand the molecular mechanisms of estrogen actions and to evaluate estrogen receptor ligand interactions in the carp, Cyprinus carpio, a species used widely for both field- and laboratory-based studies, we cloned all three carp estrogen receptors (ER; ERα, ERβ1 and ERβ2) and applied an estrogen-responsive (ERE)-luciferase reporter assay system to characterize the interactions of these receptors with steroidal and synthetic estrogens. DNA fragments encoding all three ERs in carp, ERα, ERβ1 and ERβ2, were obtained from the ovary using degenerate primer sets and PCR techniques, and full-length carp ER (cER) cDNAs were then obtained using RACE (rapid amplification of the cDNA end) techniques. Amino acid sequences of cERs showed overall homology of 46% (α vs β1), 49% (α vs β2) and 53% (β1 vs β2). In the transient transfection ERE-luciferase reporter assay system (using mammalian cells) the cER proteins displayed estrogen-dependent activation of transcription and cERβ2 showed a higher sensitivity to the natural steroid oestrogen, 17β-estradiol, than cERα. The assay system developed is a powerful assay for toxicology and provides a tool for future studies examining the receptor-environmental chemical interactions and estrogen-disrupting mechanisms in carp. The data presented also expand our knowledge of estrogen receptor evolution.

  9. Ino80 promotes cervical cancer tumorigenesis by activating Nanog expression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Liu, Jie; Chen, Aozheng; Lyu, Jia; Ai, Guihai; Zeng, Qiongjing; Sun, Yi; Chen, Chunxia; Wang, Jinbo; Qiu, Jin; Wu, Yi; Cheng, Jiajing; Shi, Xiujuan; Song, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Ino80 ATPase is an integral component of the INO80 ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, which regulates transcription, DNA repair and replication. We found that Ino80 was highly expressed in cervical cancer cell lines and tumor samples. Ino80 knockdown inhibited cervical cancer cell proliferation, induced G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. However, Ino80 knockdown did not affect cell apoptosis, migration or invasion in vitro. Ino80 overexpression promoted proliferation in the H8 immortalized cervical epithelial cell line, which has low endogenous Ino80 expression as compared to cervical cancer cell lines. Ino80 bound to the Nanog transcription start site (TSS) and enhanced its expression in cervical cancer cells. Nanog overexpression in Ino80 knockdown cell lines promoted cell proliferation. This study demonstrated for the first time that Ino80 was upregulated in cervical cancer and promoted cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Our findings suggest that Ino80 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:27750218

  10. Lack of correlation between telomere length and telomerase activity and expression in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Wysoki, Jacek; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Pernak, Monika; Nowicka, Karina; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowak, Jerzy

    2003-12-01

    The expression of three components of telomerase complex (hTR, hTERT, TP1) along with telomerase activity and telomere length in leukemic cells was investigated. Cells were isolated from peripheral blood and/or bone marrow of children with acute lymphoblastic (ALL) and non-lymphoblastic (ANLL) leukemia. Expression of three components of telomerase as well as telomerase activity was found in all leukemic cells. Chemiluminescent detection of terminal restriction fragments (TRF) from DNA isolated from ALL cells showed variable patterns expressing considerable heterogeneity of telomere length. The ALL cells appeared to have both long and short telomere lengths, in contrast to normal peripheral lymphocytes, which produced limited pattern of TRF. The ANLL cells produced predominantly short telomere pattern despite high telomerase activity and expression. It can be concluded that high telomerase activity and expression in leukemic cells is not always correlated with long telomeres (TRF pattern).

  11. Differences in associations between active transportation and built environmental exposures when expressed using different components of individual activity spaces.

    PubMed

    van Heeswijck, Torbjorn; Paquet, Catherine; Kestens, Yan; Thierry, Benoit; Morency, Catherine; Daniel, Mark

    2015-05-01

    This study assessed relationships between built environmental exposures measured within components of individual activity spaces (i.e., travel origins, destinations and paths in-between), and use of active transportation in a metropolitan setting. Individuals (n=37,165) were categorised as using active or sedentary transportation based on travel survey data. Generalised Estimating Equations analysis was used to test relationships with active transportation. Strength and significance of relationships between exposures and active transportation varied for different components of the activity space. Associations were strongest when including travel paths in expression of the built environment. Land use mix and greenness were negatively related to active transportation.

  12. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  13. Cyclic strain is a weak inducer of prostacyclin synthase expression in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segurola, R. J. Jr; Oluwole, B.; Mills, I.; Yokoyama, C.; Tanabe, T.; Kito, H.; Nakajima, N.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that hemodynamic forces such as cyclic strain and shear stress can increase prostacyclin (PGI2) secretion by endothelial cells (EC) but the effect of these forces on prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) gene expression remains unclear and is the focus of this study. Bovine aortic EC were seeded onto type I collagen coated flexible membranes and grown to confluence. The membranes and attached EC were subjected to 10% average strain at 60 cpm (0.5 sec deformation alternating with 0.5 sec relaxation) for up to 5 days. PGIS gene expression was determined by Northern blot analysis and protein level by Western blot analysis. The effect of cyclic strain on the PGIS promoter was determined by the transfection of a 1-kb human PGIS gene promoter construct coupled to a luciferase reporter gene into EC, followed by determination of luciferase activity. PGIS gene expression increased 1.7-fold in EC subjected to cyclic strain for 24 hr. Likewise, EC transfected with a pGL3B-PGIS (-1070/-10) construct showed an approximate 1.3-fold elevation in luciferase activity in EC subjected to cyclic strain for 3, 4, 8, and 12 hr. The weak stimulation of PGIS gene expression by cyclic strain was reflected in an inability to detect alterations in PGIS protein levels in EC subjected to cyclic strain for as long as 5 days. These data suggest that strain-induced stimulation of PGIS gene expression plays only a minor role in the ability of cyclic strain to stimulate PGI2 release in EC. These findings coupled with our earlier demonstration of a requisite addition of exogenous arachidonate in order to observe strain-induced PGI2 release, implicates a mechanism that more likely involves strain-induced stimulation of PGIS activity.

  14. Calpain activity and expression are increased in splenic inflammatory cells associated with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Shields, D C; Schaecher, K E; Goust, J M; Banik, N L

    1999-09-01

    Since calcium-ac