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Sample records for activated luciferase gene

  1. A Luciferase Reporter Gene System for High-Throughput Screening of γ-Globin Gene Activators.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wensheng; Silvers, Robert; Ouellette, Michael; Wu, Zining; Lu, Quinn; Li, Hu; Gallagher, Kathleen; Johnson, Kathy; Montoute, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Luciferase reporter gene assays have long been used for drug discovery due to their high sensitivity and robust signal. A dual reporter gene system contains a gene of interest and a control gene to monitor non-specific effects on gene expression. In our dual luciferase reporter gene system, a synthetic promoter of γ-globin gene was constructed immediately upstream of the firefly luciferase gene, followed downstream by a synthetic β-globin gene promoter in front of the Renilla luciferase gene. A stable cell line with the dual reporter gene was cloned and used for all assay development and HTS work. Due to the low activity of the control Renilla luciferase, only the firefly luciferase activity was further optimized for HTS. Several critical factors, such as cell density, serum concentration, and miniaturization, were optimized using tool compounds to achieve maximum robustness and sensitivity. Using the optimized reporter assay, the HTS campaign was successfully completed and approximately 1000 hits were identified. In this chapter, we also describe strategies to triage hits that non-specifically interfere with firefly luciferase. PMID:27316998

  2. Luciferase as a reporter of gene activity in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since their development and introduction in the early days of plant genetic engineering, reporter genes have established a proven track record as effective tools for exploring the molecular underpinnings of gene regulation. When driven by appropriate genetic control systems (e.g. transcriptional pr...

  3. Simultaneous analysis of the bidirectional African cassava mosaic virus promoter activity using two different luciferase genes.

    PubMed

    Frey, P M; Schärer-Hernández, N G; Fütterer, J; Potrykus, I; Puonti-Kaerlas, J

    2001-03-01

    The expression of geminivirus genes is controlled by bidirectional promoters which are located in the large intergenic region of the circular DNA genomes and specifically regulated by virus encoded proteins. In order to study the simultaneous regulation of both orientations of the DNA A and DNA B promoters of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV), they were cloned between two different luciferase genes with the firefly luciferase gene in complementary-sense and the Renilla luciferase gene in virion-sense orientation. The regulation of the ACMV promoters by proteins encoded by the complete DNA A, as well as by the individually expressed transactivator (TrAP) or replication-associated (Rep) proteins was assessed in tobacco and cassava protoplasts using dual luciferase assays. In addition, the regulation of the DNA A promoter integrated into tobacco genome was also assessed. The results show that TrAP activates virion-sense expression strongly both in cassava and tobacco protoplasts, but not in transgenic tobacco plants. In contrast to this, DNA A encoded proteins activate virion-sense expression both in protoplasts and in transgenic plants. At the same time they reduce the expression of the complementary-sense Rep gene on DNA A but activate the expression of the complementary-sense movement protein (MPB) gene on DNA B. The degree of MBP activation is higher in cassava than in tobacco protoplasts, indicating that the plant host also influences the promoter strength. Transient transformation experiments using linearized DNA indicate that the different regulation of the ACMV DNA A promoter in protoplasts and transgenic plants could be due to different DNA curvature in free plasmids and in genes integrated in plant genomic DNA. PMID:11324760

  4. Firefly luciferase gene: structure and expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    de Wet, J R; Wood, K V; DeLuca, M; Helinski, D R; Subramani, S

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the luciferase gene from the firefly Photinus pyralis was determined from the analysis of cDNA and genomic clones. The gene contains six introns, all less than 60 bases in length. The 5' end of the luciferase mRNA was determined by both S1 nuclease analysis and primer extension. Although the luciferase cDNA clone lacked the six N-terminal codons of the open reading frame, we were able to reconstruct the equivalent of a full-length cDNA using the genomic clone as a source of the missing 5' sequence. The full-length, intronless luciferase gene was inserted into mammalian expression vectors and introduced into monkey (CV-1) cells in which enzymatically active firefly luciferase was transiently expressed. In addition, cell lines stably expressing firefly luciferase were isolated. Deleting a portion of the 5'-untranslated region of the luciferase gene removed an upstream initiation (AUG) codon and resulted in a twofold increase in the level of luciferase expression. The ability of the full-length luciferase gene to activate cryptic or enhancerless promoters was also greatly reduced or eliminated by this 5' deletion. Assaying the expression of luciferase provides a rapid and inexpensive method for monitoring promoter activity. Depending on the instrumentation employed to detect luciferase activity, we estimate this assay to be from 30- to 1,000-fold more sensitive than assaying chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression. Images PMID:3821727

  5. Bortezomib and ixazomib protect firefly luciferase from degradation and can flaw respective reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonas Philipp; Clemens, Jannick Robert; Theile, Dirk; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-09-15

    Firefly luciferase-based reporter gene assays are the most commonly used assays to investigate the transcriptional regulation of gene expression. However, direct interaction of tested compounds with the firefly luciferase leading to altered enzymatic activity may lead to misinterpretation of experimental data. When investigating the proteasome inhibitors bortezomib, carfilzomib, and ixazomib, we observed increased luminescence for bortezomib and ixazomib, but not for carfilzomib, in a pregnane-X-receptor (PXR) reporter gene assay, which was inconsistent with the mRNA expression levels of the main PXR target gene CYP3A4. To further scrutinize this phenomenon, we performed experiments with constitutively expressed firefly luciferase and demonstrated that the increase in cellular firefly luciferase activity is independent from PXR activation or CYP3A4 promoter. Using cell-free assays with recombinant firefly luciferase enzyme, we made the counterintuitive observation that firefly luciferase activity is inhibited by bortezomib and ixazomib in a reversible and competitive manner. This inhibition stabilizes the firefly luciferase enzyme against proteolytic degradation (e.g., toward trypsin), thereby increasing its half-life with subsequent enhancement of total cellular luminescence that eventually mimicked PXR-driven luciferase induction. These data show that particular compounds can strikingly interfere with firefly luciferase and once more illustrate the importance of careful interpretation of data obtained from luciferase-based assays. PMID:27325500

  6. [Construction and function identification of luciferase reporter gene vectors containing SNPs in NFKBIA gene 3'UTR].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Li, Jia-li; Bi, Hui-chang; Zhou, Shou-ning; Liu, Xiao-man; Zeng, Hang; Hu, Bing-fang; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the function of two SNPs (rs8904C > T and rs696G >A) in 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of NFKBIA gene by constructing luciferase reporter gene. A patient's genomic DNA with rs8904 CC and rs696 GA genotype was used as the PCR template. Full-length 3'UTR of NFKBIA gene was amplified by different primers. After sequencing validation, these fragments were inserted to the luciferase reporter vector, pGL3-promoter to construct recombinant plasmids containing four kinds of haplotypes, pGL3-rs8904C/rs696G, pGL3-rs8904C/rs696A, pGL3-rs8904T/rs696G and pGL3-rs8904T/rs696A. Then these plasmids were transfected into LS174T cells and the luciferase activity was detected. Compared with pGL3-vector transfected cells (negative control), the luciferase activity of the four kinds of recombinant plasmids was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). For rs696G > A, the luciferase activity of the recombinant plasmids containing A allele (pGL3-rs8904C/rs696A and pGL3-rs8904T/rs696A) was about 45.1% (P < 0.05) and 56.1% (P < 0.001) lower than those containing G allele (pGL3-rs8904C/rs696G and pGL3-rs8904T/rs696G), respectively. For rs8904C > T, there were no significant differences in the luciferase activity between the recombinant plasmids containing T allele and those with C allele. Together, the luciferase reporter gene vectors containing SNPs in NFKBIA gene 3'UTR were constructed successfully and rs696G > A could decrease the luciferase activity while rs8904C >T didn't have much effect on the luciferase activity. PMID:27405166

  7. A transgenic rat with ubiquitous expression of firefly luciferase gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamata, Yoji; Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2006-02-01

    In vivo imaging strategies provide cellular and molecular events in real time that helps us to understand biological processes in living animals. The development of molecular tags such as green fluorescent proteins and luciferase from the firefly Photinus pyralis has lead to a revolution in the visualization of complex biochemical processes. We developed a novel inbred transgenic rat strain containing firefly luciferase based on the transgenic (Tg) technique in rats. This Tg rat expressed the luciferase gene ubiquitously under control of the ROSA26 promoter. Cellular immune responsiveness against the luciferase protein was evaluated using conventional skin grafting and resulted in the long-term acceptance of Tg rat skin on wild-type rats. Strikingly, organ transplant with heart and small bowel demonstrated organ viability and graft survival, suggesting that cells from luciferase-Tg are transplantable to track their fate. Taking advantage of the less immunogenic luciferase, we also tested the role of hepatocyte-infusion in a liver injury model, and bone marrow-derived cells in a skin defect model. Employed in conjunction with modern advances in optical imaging, this luciferase-Tg rat system provides an innovative animal tool and a new means of facilitating biomedical research such as in the case of regeneration medicine.

  8. Click beetle luciferases as dual reporters of gene expression in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kapitan, Mario; Eichhof, Isabel; Lagadec, Quentin; Ernst, Joachim F

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic genes encoding functional luciferases of the click beetle (CB) Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus have been expressed in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Both green- and red-emitting CB luciferases (CaCBGluc and CaCBRluc) were produced with high efficiency in transformants under transcriptional control of the growth-dependent ACT1 promoter, as well as by the HWP1 and UME6 promoters, which are upregulated during hyphal morphogenesis, as well as by the YWP1 and EFG1 promoters, which are downregulated. For all hyphally regulated genes, relative bioluminescence values derived from promoter fusions approximated relative transcript levels of native genes, although downregulation of YWP1 promoter activity required correction for the stability of CB luciferases (approximate half-lives 30 min for CaCBRluc and 80 min for CaCBGluc, as determined by immunoblotting). Importantly, the activity of both luciferases could be separately monitored in a single strain, in intact cells, in lysed cells or in cell extracts using luciferin as single substrate and inhibition of hypha formation by farnesol could be easily detected by the HWP1p-CaCBRluc fusion. The results suggest that CB luciferases are convenient tools to measure gene expression in C. albicans and may facilitate screenings for antifungal compounds. PMID:27339610

  9. The smallest natural high-active luciferase: cloning and characterization of novel 16.5-kDa luciferase from copepod Metridia longa.

    PubMed

    Markova, Svetlana V; Larionova, Marina D; Burakova, Ludmila P; Vysotski, Eugene S

    2015-01-30

    Coelenterazine-dependent copepod luciferases containing natural signal peptide for secretion are a very convenient analytical tool as they enable monitoring of intracellular events with high sensitivity, without destroying cells or tissues. This property is well suited for application in biomedical research and development of cell-based assays for high throughput screening. We report the cloning of cDNA gene encoding a novel secreted non-allelic 16.5-kDa isoform (MLuc7) of Metridia longa luciferase, which, in fact, is the smallest natural luciferase of known for today. Despite the small size, isoform contains 10 conservative Cys residues suggesting the presence of up to 5 SS bonds. This hampers the efficient production of functionally active recombinant luciferase in bacterial expression systems. With the use of the baculovirus expression system, we produced substantial amounts of the proper folded MLuc7 luciferase with a yield of ∼3 mg/L of a high purity protein. We demonstrate that MLuc7 produced in insect cells is highly active and extremely thermostable, and is well suited as a secreted reporter when expressed in mammalian cells ensuring higher sensitivity of detection as compared to another Metridia luciferase isoform (MLuc164) which is widely employed in real-time imaging. PMID:25543059

  10. Use of bacterial and firefly luciferases as reporter genes in DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Pazzagli, M; Devine, J H; Peterson, D O; Baldwin, T O

    1992-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three different luciferase genes by placing them in a single reporter vector and expressing them in the same mammalian cell type. The luciferase genes investigated were the luc genes from the fireflies Photinus pyralis (PP) and Luciola mingrelica (LM) and the lux AB5 gene, a translational fusion of the two subunits of the bacterial luciferase from Vibrio harveyi (VH). The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was also included in this study for comparison. The performances of the assay methods of the corresponding enzymes were evaluated using reference materials and the results of the expressed enzymes following transfection were calculated using calibration curves. All of the bioluminescent assays possess high reproducibility both within and between the batches (less than 15%). The comparison of the assay methods shows that firefly luciferases have the highest detection sensitivity (0.05 and 0.08 amol for PP and LM, respectively) whereas the VH bacterial luciferase has 5 amol and CAT 100 amol. On the other hand, the transfection of the various plasmids shows that the content of the expressed enzyme within the cells is much higher for CAT than for the other luciferase genes. VH luciferase is expressed at very low levels in mammalian cells due to the relatively high temperature of growing of the mammalian cells that seems to impair the correct folding of the active enzyme. PP and LM luciferases are both expressed at picomolar level but usually 10 to 70 times less in content with respect to CAT within the transfected cells. On the basis of these results the overall improvement in sensitivity related to the use of firefly luciferases as reporter genes in mammalian cells is about 30 to 50 times with respect to that of CAT. PMID:1443530

  11. Cellular Immune Response Against Firefly Luciferase After Sleeping Beauty–Mediated Gene Transfer In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M.; Vezys, Vaiva; Somia, Nikunj V.; Russell, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been shown to mediate new gene sequence integration resulting in long-term expression. Here the effectiveness of hyperactive SB100X transposase was tested, and we found that hydrodynamic co-delivery of a firefly luciferase transposon (pT2/CaL) along with SB100X transposase (pCMV-SB100X) resulted in remarkably sustained, high levels of luciferase expression. However, after 4 weeks there was a rapid, animal-by-animal loss of luciferase expression that was not observed in immunodeficient mice. We hypothesized that this sustained, high-level luciferase expression achieved using the SB100X transposase elicits an immune response in pT2/CaL co-administered mice, which was supported by the rapid loss of luciferase expression upon challenge of previously treated animals and in naive animals adoptively transferred with splenocytes from previously treated animals. Specificity of the immune response to luciferase was demonstrated by increased cytokine expression in splenocytes after exposure to luciferase peptide in parallel with MHC I–luciferase peptide tetramer binding. This anti-luciferase immune response observed following continuous, high-level luciferase expression in vivo clearly impacts its use as an in vivo reporter. As both an immunogen and an extremely sensitive reporter, luciferase is also a useful model system for the study of immune responses following in vivo gene transfer and expression. PMID:25093708

  12. In vivo bioimaging with tissue-specific transcription factor activated luciferase reporters

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Suzanne M. K.; Delhove, Juliette M. K. M.; Perocheau, Dany P.; Karda, Rajvinder; Rahim, Ahad A.; Howe, Steven J.; Ward, Natalie J.; Birrell, Mark A.; Belvisi, Maria G.; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Johnson, Mark R.; Waddington, Simon N.; McKay, Tristan R.

    2015-01-01

    The application of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter cassettes in vitro is widespread but potential for in vivo application has not yet been realized. Bioluminescence imaging enables non-invasive tracking of gene expression in transfected tissues of living rodents. However the mature immune response limits luciferase expression when delivered in adulthood. We present a novel approach of tissue-targeted delivery of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter lentiviruses to neonatal rodents as an alternative to the existing technology of generating germline transgenic light producing rodents. At this age, neonates acquire immune tolerance to the conditionally responsive luciferase reporter. This simple and transferrable procedure permits surrogate quantitation of transcription factor activity over the lifetime of the animal. We show principal efficacy by temporally quantifying NFκB activity in the brain, liver and lungs of somatotransgenic reporter mice subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. This response is ablated in Tlr4−/− mice or when co-administered with the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone. Furthermore, we show the malleability of this technology by quantifying NFκB-mediated luciferase expression in outbred rats. Finally, we use somatotransgenic bioimaging to longitudinally quantify LPS- and ActivinA-induced upregulation of liver specific glucocorticoid receptor and Smad2/3 reporter constructs in somatotransgenic mice, respectively. PMID:26138224

  13. A novel luciferase knock-in reporter system for studying transcriptional regulation of the human Sox2 gene.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Weifeng; Li, Yan; Liu, Kuan; Zhao, Junli; Sun, Xiaohong; Shan, Linlin; Mao, Qinwen; Xia, Haibin

    2016-02-10

    Sox2 is an important transcriptional factor that has multiple functions in stem cell maintenance and tumorigenesis. To investigate the transcriptional regulation of the Sox2 gene, a luciferase knock-in reporter system was established in HEK293 cells by placing the luciferase gene in the genome under the control of the Sox2 gene promoter using a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated genome editing technique. PCR and Southern blot results confirmed the site-specific integration of a single copy of the exogenous luciferase gene into the genome. To prove the reliability and sensitivity of this novel luciferase knock-in system, a CRISPR/Cas transcription activation system for the Sox2 gene was constructed and applied to the knock-in system. The results indicated that luciferase activity was directly correlated with the activity of the Sox2 endogenous promoter. This novel system will be a useful tool to study the transcriptional regulation of Sox2, and has great potential in medical and industrial applications. PMID:26721181

  14. A route from darkness to light: emergence and evolution of luciferase activity in AMP-CoA-ligases inferred from a mealworm luciferase-like enzyme.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Prado, R A; Neves, D R; Kato, D; Barbosa, J A

    2013-06-11

    The origin of luciferases and of bioluminescence is enigmatic. In beetles, luciferases seem to have evolved from AMP-CoA-ligases. How the new oxygenase luminogenic function originated from AMP-ligases leading to luciferases is one of the most challenging mysteries of bioluminescence. Comparison of the cloned luciferase-like enzyme from the nonluminescent Zophobas morio mealworm and beetle luciferases showed that the oxygenase activity may have emerged as a stereoselective oxidative drift with d-luciferin, a substrate that cannot be easily thioesterified to CoA as in the case of the l-isomer. While the overall kcat displayed by beetle luciferases is orders of magnitude greater than that of the luciferase-like enzyme, the respective oxidation rates and quantum yields of bioluminescence are roughly similar, suggesting that the rate constant of the AMP-ligase activity exerted on the new d-luciferin substrate in beetle protoluciferases was the main enzymatic property that suffered optimization during the evolution of luciferases. The luciferase-like enzyme and luciferases boost the rate of luciferyl-adenylate chemiluminescent oxidation by factors of 10(6) and 10(7), respectively, as compared to the substrate spontaneous oxidation in buffer. A similar enhancement of luciferyl-adenylate chemiluminescence is provided by nucleophilic aprotic solvents, implying that the peptide bonds in the luciferin binding site of beetle luciferase could provide a similar catalytically favorable environment. These data suggest that the luciferase-like enzyme and other similar AMP-ligases are potential alternative oxygenases. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of the luciferase-like enzyme and the red light-producing luciferase of Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm confirm here a critical role for T/S345 in luciferase function. Mutations such as I327T/S in the luciferase-like enzyme, which simultaneously increases luciferase activity and promotes blue shifts in the emission spectrum, could have

  15. Low-cost system for real-time monitoring of luciferase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gailey, P C; Miller, E J; Griffin, G D

    1997-03-01

    In some mammalian cells transfected with luciferase reporter genes, the luciferase/luciferin reaction in a cell monolayer produces a very small light flux. While the low light levels are often measurable with single-photon counting cameras, these devices are expensive and may require long averaging times to acquire an image. We describe an approach for real-time monitoring of light produced by luciferase gene expression in intact, cultured cells using readily available and relatively inexpensive components. The system uses a single-photon counting photomultiplier tube with built-in high voltage supply and photon counting circuitry to rapidly measure average light output from growing cells in a 35 mm culture dish. The fast, accurate and highly sensitive response of the system makes it useful for studying the dynamics of gene expression over time periods ranging from minutes to days. PMID:9067033

  16. Light without substrate amendment: the bacterial luciferase gene cassette as a mammalian bioreporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan M.; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby E.; Jegier, Pat; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-06-01

    Bioluminescent production represents a facile method for bioreporter detection in mammalian tissues. The lack of endogenous bioluminescent reactions in these tissues allows for high signal to noise ratios even at low signal strength compared to fluorescent signal detection. While the luciferase enzymes commonly employed for bioluminescent detection are those from class Insecta (firefly and click beetle luciferases), these are handicapped in that they require concurrent administration of a luciferin compound to elicit a bioluminescent signal. The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette offers the advantages common to other bioluminescent proteins, but is simultaneously capable of synthesizing its own luciferin substrates using endogenously available cellular compounds. The longstanding shortcoming of the lux cassette has been its recalcitrance to function in the mammalian cellular environment. This paper will present an overview of the work completed to date to overcome this limitation and provide examples of mammalian lux-based bioreporter technologies that could provide the framework for advanced, biomedically relevant real-time sensor development.

  17. Recombinant porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus expressing luciferase genes provide a new indication of viral propagation in both permissive and target cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Qu, Zehui; Li, Liwei; Yu, Lingxue; Jiang, Yifeng; Zhou, Yanjun; Yang, Shen; Zheng, Hao; Huang, Qinfeng; Tong, Wu; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-08-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has a condensed single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome that contains several overlapping regions. The transcription regulatory sequence (TRS) is the important cis-acting element participating in PRRSV discontinuous transcription process. Based on reverse genetic system of type 2 highly pathogenic PRRSV cell-passage attenuated strain pHuN4-F112, firefly luciferase or Renilla luciferase genes were inserted between ORF1b and ORF2. An extra TRS6 was embedded behind the foreign luciferase genes. pA-Fluc and pA-Rluc were constructed and successfully rescued in MARC-145 cells. The phenotypical characteristics of the progeny virus were indistinguishable from those of vHuN4-F112 and were genetically stable for at least 25 cell passages. Mutant virus-infected cells were lysed at different time points to assess luciferase activities and measure foreign gene expression levels. The results showed identical variations in the luciferase activities of the recombinants in MARC-145 cells, indicating that they were suitable for monitoring viral propagation in PRRSV-permissive cell cultures. They were also used to infect pulmonary alveolar macrophages, which yielded similar variations in luciferase activities. Therefore, vA-Fluc and vA-Rluc present powerful new tools to monitor PRRSV propagation in both passaged and target cells. PMID:27473986

  18. Fe65 does not stabilize AICD during activation of transcription in a luciferase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Huysseune, Sandra; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noel . E-mail: octave@nchm.ucl.ac.be

    2007-09-21

    The APP intracellular domain (AICD) could be involved in signaling via interaction with the adaptor protein Fe65, and with the histone acetyl transferase Tip60. However, the real function of AICD and Fe65 in regulation of transcription remains controversial. In this study, the human APPGal4 fusion protein was expressed in CHO cells and the transcriptional activity of AICDGal4 was measured in a luciferase-based reporter assay. AICDGal4 was stabilized by expression of Fe65 and levels of AICDGal4 controlled luciferase activity. On the contrary, when human APP was expressed in CHO cells, coexpression of Fe65 increased luciferase activity without affecting the amount of AICD fragment. AICD produced from APP was protected from degradation by orthophenanthroline, but not by lactacystine, indicating that AICD is not a substrate of the chymotryptic activity of the proteasome. It is concluded that Fe65 can control luciferase activity without stabilizing the labile AICD fragment.

  19. Active site hydrophobicity is critical to the bioluminescence activity of Vibrio harveyi luciferase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Hui; Tu, Shiao-Chun

    2005-10-01

    Vibrio harveyi luciferase is an alphabeta heterodimer containing a single active site, proposed earlier to be at a cleft in the alpha subunit. In this work, six conserved phenylalanine residues at this proposed active site were subjected to site-directed mutations to investigate their possible functional roles and to delineate the makeup of luciferase active site. After initial screening of Phe --> Ala mutants, alphaF46, alphaF49, alphaF114, and alphaF117 were chosen for additional mutations to Asp, Ser, and Tyr. Comparisons of the general kinetic properties of wild-type and mutated luciferases indicated that the hydrophobic nature of alphaF46, alphaF49, alphaF114, and alphaF117 was important to luciferase V(max) and V(max)/K(m), which were reduced by 3-5 orders of magnitude for the Phe --> Asp mutants. Both alphaF46 and alphaF117 also appeared to be involved in the binding of reduced flavin substrate. Additional studies on the stability and yield of the 4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate II and measurements of decanal substrate oxidation by alphaF46D, alphaF49D, alphaF114D, and alphaF117D revealed that their marked reductions in the overall quantum yield (phi( degrees )) were a consequence of diminished yields of luciferase intermediates and, with the exception of alphaF114D, emission quantum yield of the excited emitter due to the replacement of the hydrophobic Phe by the anionic Asp. The locations of these four critical Phe residues in relation to other essential and/or hydrophobic residues are depicted in a refined map of the active site. Functional implications of these residues are discussed. PMID:16185065

  20. Detection of luciferase gene sequence in nonluminescent Vibrio cholerae by colony hygridization and polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, L.M.; Colwell, R.R. )

    1991-05-01

    Bioluminescence is a trait observed among approximately 10% of Vibrio cholerae isolates. We have demonstrated that not only do some strains of V. cholerae produce low levels of light, undetectable by the human eye, but the luciferase gene sequence is present in strains of V. cholerae which emit no detectable light, evidenced by hybridization with a luciferase DNA probe. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of luciferase regions of amino acid identity. The polymerase chain reaction method of DNA amplification with oligonucleotide primers based on these regions was used to isolate a region of the luxA gene from both luminescent and nonluminescent V. cholerae strains. The nucleotide sequence of this region was determined and reveals that nonluminescent V. cholerae have 99.7% nucleotide sequence similarity in this region with the luminescent biovar V. cholerae by albensis as well as significant similarity to other species of bioluminescent bacteria, a finding that is in accord with the hypothesis that these species have a common luminescent ancestor, most probably from the marine environment.

  1. Dual luciferase assay for secreted luciferases based on Gaussia and NanoLuc.

    PubMed

    Heise, Kerstin; Oppermann, Henry; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Gebhardt, Rolf; Gaunitz, Frank

    2013-05-01

    Just recently, NanoLuc, a new engineered luciferase based on the small subunit of the luciferase from Oplophorus gracilirostris was introduced. Like the luciferase from Gaussia princeps, this luciferase is secreted into the medium. Both luciferases are the smallest and brightest luciferases known and well-suited for reporter assays. In our experiments, we demonstrate that both luciferases can be used together in a dual-reporter assay by solving the problem that NanoLuc produces a significant signal with coelenterazine, which is the substrate for Gaussia luciferase. We found that the background signal from NanoLuc with coelenterazine can be calculated from the determination of NanoLuc activity in the presence of its substrate furimazine. This in turn allows the precise determination of the activity of Gaussia which does not produce light in the presence of furimazine. Based on this observation, we developed a high sensitive dual secreted luciferase assay which allows the determination of both activities in a single cotransfection experiment. We demonstrate the versatility and robustness of the assay for the normalization of reporter gene activities. Since Gaussia luciferase and NanoLuc are nonhomologous reporters, the method to determine both luciferase activities may also be useful for coincidence reporter gene systems for high-throughput screening. PMID:23679848

  2. Improved luciferase gene expression using ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction therapy in swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Misty L.; Song, Shuxian; Sun, Ryan R.; Fan, Luping; DiBlasi, Robert M.; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen; Loeb, Keith R.; Miao, Carol H.

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasound (US) targeted microbubble (MB) destruction (UTMD) has been shown to be an effective method in delivering drugs and plasmid DNA (pDNA) into cells. We previously reported successful gene transfection of a reporter luciferase gene, pGL4, into livers of mice and rats using UTMD. The challenge is to translate and achieve similar gene expression in large animals, like swine, where the treated tissue volume is substantially larger. The scale-up study requires proportionally increased amount of pDNA/MBs delivered to tissues and an equivalent increase in US energy. We use different MBs and surgical strategies to retain most of pDNA/MB locally during US application in order to maximize the effect of UTMD in gene transfection. Our results show significant increase in luciferase expression in swine injected with MBs and exposed to 2.7 MPa US. We obtained up to 1800-fold enhancement in the pig experiment using Definity® MBs, and 2000-fold and 6300-fold enhancement in two pig studies using RN18 MBs compared to sham. These results represent an important developmental step towards US mediated gene delivery in large animals and clinical trials.

  3. Evaluation of an Hprt-Luciferase Reporter Gene on a Mammalian Artificial Chromosome in Response to Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Takeshi; Noda, Natsumi; Kuromi, Yasushi; Kokura, Kenji; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (Hprt) is known as a house-keeping gene, and has been used as an internal control for real-time quantitative RT-PCR and various other methods of gene expression analysis. To evaluate the Hprt mRNA levels as a reference standard, we engineered a luciferase reporter driven by a long Hprt promoter and measured its response to cytotoxicity. Methods We constructed a reporter vector that harbored a phiC31 integrase recognition site and a mouse Hprt promoter fused with green-emitting luciferase (SLG) coding sequence. The Hprt-SLG vector was loaded onto a mouse artificial chromosome containing a multi-integrase platform using phiC31 integrase in mouse A9 cells. We established three independent clones. Results The established cell lines had similar levels of expression of the Hprt-SLG reporter gene. Hprt-SLG activity increased proportionately under growth conditions and decreased under cytotoxic conditions after blasticidin or cisplatin administration. Similar increases and decreases in the SLG luminescent were observed under growth and cytotoxic conditions, respectively, to those in the fluorescent obtained using the commercially available reagent, alamarBlue. Conclusion By employing a reliable and stable expression system in a mammalian artificial chromosome, the activity of an Hprt-SLG reporter can reflect cell numbers under cell growth condition and cell viability in the evaluation of cytotoxic conditions. PMID:27493490

  4. Effect of antiangiogenic therapy on luciferase activity in a cytomegalovirus- or HSP70-promoter-transfected M21 tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundt, Walter; Schink, Christian; Steinbach, Silke; O'Connell-Rodwell, Caitlin E.; Kiessling, Andreas; Librizzi, Damiano; Burbelko, Mykhaylo; Guccione, Samira

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of targeted gene therapy on heat shock protein 70 expression (Hsp70) and protein production (HSP70) in a melanoma tumor model (M21; M21-L). M21 and M21-L cells transfected with a plasmid containing the Hsp70 (Hspa1b) or the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter and the luciferase reporter gene were injected into mice; the resulting tumors grew to a size of 650 mm3. Mice (five per group) were intravenously treated with an Arg-Gly-Asp peptide-nanoparticle/Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein complex [RGD-NP/RAF(-)] or with a nanoparticle control. Bioluminescence imaging (IVIS®, Xenogen, USA) was performed at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after the treatment cycle. Western blot analysis of HSP70 protein was performed to monitor protein expression. The size of the treated M21 tumors remained fairly constant (647.8+/-103.4 mm2 at the beginning versus 704.8+/-94.4 mm3 at the end of the experiment). The size of the M21-L tumors increased, similar to the untreated control tumors. Bioluminescent imaging demonstrated that when transcription was controlled by the CMV promoter, luciferase activity decreased to 17.9%+/-4.3% of baseline values in the treated M21 tumors. When transcription was controlled by the Hsp70 promoter, the highest luciferase activity (4.5+/-0.7-fold increase over base-line values) was seen 24 h after injection in the M21 tumors; however, no luciferase activity was seen in the M21-L tumors. In accordance with bioluminescent imaging, western blot analysis showed a peak in HSP70 production at 24 h after the injection of the RGD-NP/RAF(-) complex in the M21 tumors; however, no HSP70 protein induction was seen in the M21-L tumors. Thus, targeted antiangiogenic therapy can induce Hsp70 expression and HSP70 protein in melanoma tumors.

  5. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  6. Structure–function studies on the active site of the coelenterazine-dependent luciferase from Renilla

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jongchan; Howell, Matthew H.; von Arnim, Albrecht G.

    2008-01-01

    Renilla luciferase (RLUC) is a versatile tool for gene expression assays and in vivo biosensor applications, but its catalytic mechanism remains to be elucidated. RLUC is evolutionarily related to the α/β hydrolase family. Its closest known homologs are bacterial dehalogenases, raising the question of how a protein with a hydrolase fold can function as a decarboxylating oxygenase. Molecular docking simulations with the coelenterazine substrate against an RLUC homology model as well as a recently determined RLUC crystal structure were used to build hypotheses to identify functionally important residues, which were subsequently tested by site-directed mutagenesis, heterologous expression, and bioluminescence emission spectroscopy. The data highlighted two triads of residues that are critical for catalysis. The putative catalytic triad residues D120, E144, and H285 bear only limited resemblance to those found in the active site of aequorin, a coelenterazine-utilizing photoprotein, suggesting that the reaction scheme employed by RLUC differs substantially from the one established for aequorin. The role of H285 in catalysis was further supported by inhibition using diethylpyrocarbonate. Multiple substitutions of N53, W121, and P220—three other residues implicated in product binding in the homologous dehalogenase Sphingomonas LinB—also supported their involvement in catalysis. Together with luminescence spectra, our data lead us to propose that the conserved catalytic triad of RLUC is directly involved in the decarboxylation reaction of coelenterazine to produce bioluminescence, while the other active-site residues are used for binding of the substrate. PMID:18359861

  7. Effects of nanomaterials on luciferase with significant protection and increased enzyme activity observed for zinc oxide nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Barber, S; Abdelhakiem, M; Ghosh, K; Mitchell, L; Spidle, R; Jacobs, B; Washington, L; Li, J; Wanekaya, A; Glaspell, G; DeLong, R K

    2011-12-01

    This principle goal of this research was to examine the effects of various nanomaterials on the activity and behavior of the firefly enzyme luciferase. Nanomaterials have been found to stabilize, and in some instances, shown to increase the activity of enzymes. In this study gold, manganese oxide (MnO), and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanomaterials were utilized in order to test their effects on enzyme activity. Luciferase was used because its activity is easy to analyze, as it typically produces a large amount of bioluminescence easily detected by a Microtiter plate reader. Following incubation with the various nanomaterials, luciferase was subjected to degradation by several protein denaturing agents, such as heat, SDS, urea, ethanol, protease, hydrogen peroxide, and pH changes. Results indicated that luciferase activity is indeed affected when combined with nanomaterials, accompanied by both increases and decreases in enzyme activity depending on the type of nanomaterial and denaturing agent used. In most of the experiments, when incubated with ZnO nanomaterials, luciferase depicted significant increases in activity and bioluminescence. Additional experiments, in which human A375 cells were treated with luciferase-nanomaterial mixtures, also depicted increased enzyme activity and bioluminescence for luciferase incubated with ZnO nanomaterials. Ultimately, our findings indicated that when luciferase was subjected to multiple types of denaturation, zinc oxide nanomaterials dramatically preserved and increased enzyme activity and bioluminescence. PMID:22408903

  8. Latent luciferase activity in the fruit fly revealed by a synthetic luciferin

    PubMed Central

    Mofford, David M.; Reddy, Gadarla Randheer; Miller, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Beetle luciferases are thought to have evolved from fatty acyl-CoA synthetases present in all insects. Both classes of enzymes activate fatty acids with ATP to form acyl-adenylate intermediates, but only luciferases can activate and oxidize d-luciferin to emit light. Here we show that the Drosophila fatty acyl-CoA synthetase CG6178, which cannot use d-luciferin as a substrate, is able to catalyze light emission from the synthetic luciferin analog CycLuc2. Bioluminescence can be detected from the purified protein, live Drosophila Schneider 2 cells, and from mammalian cells transfected with CG6178. Thus, the nonluminescent fruit fly possesses an inherent capacity for bioluminescence that is only revealed upon treatment with a xenobiotic molecule. This result expands the scope of bioluminescence and demonstrates that the introduction of a new substrate can unmask latent enzymatic activity that differs significantly from an enzyme’s normal function without requiring mutation. PMID:24616520

  9. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Masser, Anna E; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan; Andréasson, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon-optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half-lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano-Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat-shock promoter (PCYC1-HSE ), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C-terminus of a temperature-sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26860732

  10. Tracking of dendritic cell migration into lymph nodes using molecular imaging with sodium iodide symporter and enhanced firefly luciferase genes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Won; Yoon, Seung Yun; Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Choi, Yoon Ju; Lee, Hong Je; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Lee, Jaetae

    2015-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the feasibility of molecular imaging using the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene as a reporter, in addition to the enhanced firefly luciferase (effluc) gene, for tracking dendritic cell (DCs) migration in living mice. A murine dendritic cell line (DC2.4) co-expressing hNIS and effluc genes (DC/NF) was established. For the DC-tracking study, mice received either parental DCs or DC/NF cells in the left or right footpad, respectively, and combined I-124 PET/CT and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were performed. In vivo PET/CT imaging with I-124 revealed higher activity of the radiotracer in the draining popliteal lymph nodes (DPLN) of the DC/NF injection site at day 1 than DC injection site (p < 0.05). The uptake value further increased at day 4 (p < 0.005). BLI also demonstrated migration of DC/NF cells to the DPLNs at day 1 post-injection, and signals at the DPLNs were much higher at day 4. These data support the feasibility of hNIS reporter gene imaging in the tracking of DC migration to lymphoid organs in living mice. DCs expressing the NIS reporter gene could be a useful tool to optimize various strategies of cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:25974752

  11. GENERATION OF TWO NOVEL CELL LINES THAT STABLY EXPRESS HAR AND FIREFLY LUCIFERASE GENES FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of Two Novel Cell Lines that Stably Express hAR and Firefly Luciferase Genes for Endocrine Screening
    K.L. Bobseine*1, W.R. Kelce2, P.C. Hartig*1, and L.E. Gray, Jr.1
    1USEPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC, 2Searle, Reproductive Toxicology Divi...

  12. Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Tadatsugu

    2007-05-21

    Interactions between luciferase and a nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface were explored by molecular-dynamics simulations. The structural changes in the active-site residues, the residues affecting the luciferin binding, and the residues affecting the bioluminescence color were smaller on the nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface than on both a hydrophobic Si surface and a hydrophilic Si surface. The nanofabrication and wet-treatment techniques are expected to prevent the decrease in activity of luciferase on the Si surface.

  13. Localization of the active site of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase, using two-quantum affinity modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benimetskaya, L. Z.; Gitelzon, I. I.; Kozionov, Andrew L.; Novozhilov, S. Y.; Petushkov, V. N.; Rodionova, N. S.; Stockman, Mark I.

    1991-11-01

    For the first time the method of two-quantum affinity modification has been employed to probe the structure of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase. Position of the flavin-binding site of this enzyme, which was previously unknown, has been established. The obtained data indicate that the flavin site is positioned on the (alpha) -subunit. The closest contact of the protein chain of the enzyme with the chromophoric group of the flavin takes place near 80 +/- 10 and 120 +/- 10 amino acid residues; the regions 50 +/- 10 and 215 +/- 10 are also close to the flavin. The established localization does not contradict suggestions on positions of the flavin and phosphate sites of the bacterial luciferase, which had earlier been made from the data on evolutionary stability of various luciferases. The present method can, in principle, be applied to a great number of enzymes, including all flavin-dependent enzymes. Enzymatic catalysis has high speed and specificity. Creation of a method of determination of the elements of the primary structure of a protein, making up the active site (in which substratum conversion occurs), could be a significant advance in clearing up mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis. It was proposed to localize active sites of the enzymes, whose substrata are chromophores, using this method of two-quantum affinity modification. An enzyme- substratum complex is irradiated with laser light of sufficiently long wavelength ((lambda) 300 nm) which is not directly absorbed by the enzyme. Two-quantum quasiresonant excitation of the substratum activates it to the state with energy 5-7 eV, which is then radiativelessly transferred to neighboring protein groups. This energy exceeds the energy of activation of peptide bond breakage. Therefore, the enzyme will be disrupted in the vicinity of its active site. In the present paper the above approach has been implemented for the first time. Information has been obtained about the position of the flavin-binding site of bacterial

  14. Generation of recombinant rabies viruses encoding NanoLuc luciferase for antiviral activity assays.

    PubMed

    Anindita, Paulina Duhita; Sasaki, Michihito; Nobori, Haruaki; Sato, Akihiko; Carr, Michael; Ito, Naoto; Sugiyama, Makoto; Orba, Yasuko; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2016-04-01

    Rabies is an invariably fatal disease caused by Rabies virus (RABV), a member of the family Rhabdoviridae, genus Lyssavirus. Once central nervous infection occurs and symptoms develop, the case fatality rate approaches 100% despite availability of post-exposure prophylaxis. Therefore, new antiviral therapies for rabies are urgently required. Antivirals which can inhibit virus replication can be identified through screening of small compounds, however, as RABV infection does not generate easily discernible cytopathic effects in vitro, cell viability assays may not be feasible to observe antiviral activity of small compounds against RABV. In this study, recombinant RABVs (rRABVs) encoding NanoLuc luciferase (NanoLuc) were generated to facilitate the screening of small compound libraries. NanoLuc expression was confirmed in single-step growth cures of virus infection and showed that the rRABVs were capable of viral replication without decrease of luciferase activity through ten serial passages. Furthermore, the rRABVs were able to quantify the antiviral activity of the nucleoside analogue ribavirin against RABV in vitro. These findings confirm the potential of the rRABV encoding NanoLuc system to facilitate screening of small compounds to inhibit RABV infection. PMID:26869397

  15. A dioxin response element in the multiple cloning site of the pGL3 luciferase reporter influences transcriptional activity1

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Sharon; Liu, Jing; Fernando, Tharu; Fecher, Roger; Sulentic, Courtney E.W.

    2012-01-01

    Luciferase reporter plasmids (pGL3 backbone, Promega) have been utilized to characterize the transcriptional effects of the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands. Following ligand activation, the AhR and its dimerization partner AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) regulate transcription by binding dioxin response elements (DREs) in regulatory regions of dioxin-sensitive genes. Upon sequencing of our luciferase reporters, we unexpectedly identified a DRE core motif within the multiple cloning site (mcsDRE) of the pGL3 luciferase plasmid backbone in a subset of our reporters. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine if the mcsDRE inadvertently influences reporter activity. Utilizing deletional analysis we determined that the mcsDRE did significantly alter the transcriptional effect induced by TCDD. Since many chemicals have been shown to interact with the AhR and influence transcription through the DRE, the presence of the mcsDRE in the pGL3 luciferase plasmid may inappropriately influence promoter and enhancer analysis. As such, insertion of regulatory elements into pGL3 reporters should be designed to avoid retaining the mcsDRE core motif (GCGTG) and currently utilized pGL3 reporters should be evaluated for the presence of the mcsDRE. PMID:22652426

  16. Development of HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter gene assays in human cells for assessing the oxidative damage induced by silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lili; Wang, Jianshu; Zhang, Leshuai W; Che, Bizhong; Dong, Guangzhu; Fan, Guoqiang; Cheng, Kaiming

    2016-08-01

    The exponential increase in the total number of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products requires novel tools for rapid and cost-effective toxicology screening. In order to assess the oxidative damage induced by nanoparticles, toxicity test systems based on a human HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter in HepG2, LO2, A549, and HBE cells were established. After treated with heat shock and a group of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different primary particle sizes, the cell viability, oxidative damage, and luciferase activity were determined. The time-dependent Ag(+) ions release from AgNPs in cell medium was also evaluated. Our results showed that heat shock produced a strong time-dependent induction of relative luciferase activity in the four luciferase reporter cells. Surprisingly, at 4h of recovery, the relative luciferase activity was >98× the control level in HepG2-luciferase cells. Exposure to different sizes of AgNPs resulted in activation of the HSPA1A promoter in a dose-dependent manner, even at low cytotoxic or non-cytotoxic doses. The smaller (5nm) AgNPs were more potent in luciferase induction than the larger (50 and 75nm) AgNPs. These results were generally in accordance with the oxidative damage indicated by malondialdehyde concentration, reactive oxygen species induction and glutathione depletion, and Ag(+) ions release in cell medium. Compared with the other three luciferase reporter cells, the luciferase signal in HepG2-luciferase cells is obviously more sensitive and stable. We conclude that the luciferase reporter cells, especially the HepG2-luciferase cells, could provide a valuable tool for rapid screening of the oxidative damage induced by AgNPs. PMID:27211842

  17. Coupling ex vivo electroporation of mouse retinas and luciferase reporter assays to assess rod-specific promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Boulling, Arnaud; Escher, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Ex vivo electroporation of mouse retinas is an established tool to modulate gene expression and to study cell type-specific gene expression. Here we coupled ex vivo electroporation to luciferase reporter assays to facilitate the study of rod-photoreceptor-specific gene promoters. The activity of the rod-specific proximal bovine rhodopsin promoter was significantly increased in C57BL/6J wild-type retinas at postnatal days 1 and 7 by 3.4-fold and 8.7-fold respectively. In C57BL/6J Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) retinas, where the rod photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor Nr2e3 is not expressed, a significant increase by 2.5-fold was only observed at postnatal day 7. Cone-specific S-opsin promoter activity was not modulated in C57BL/6J wild-type and Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) retinas. Taken together, we describe an easily implementable protocol to assess rod-specific promoter activity in a physiological context resembling that of the developing postnatal mouse retina. PMID:27268947

  18. A highly sensitive assay of IRE1 activity using the small luciferase NanoLuc: Evaluation of ALS-related genetic and pathological factors.

    PubMed

    Hikiji, Takahiro; Norisada, Junpei; Hirata, Yoko; Okuda, Kensuke; Nagasawa, Hideko; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Sobue, Gen; Kiuchi, Kazutoshi; Oh-hashi, Kentaro

    2015-08-01

    Activation of inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) due to abnormal conditions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is responsible for the cleavage of an unspliced form of X-box binding protein 1 (uXBP1), producing its spliced form (sXBP1). To estimate IRE1 activation, several analytical procedures using green fluorescence protein and firefly luciferase have been developed and applied to clarify the roles of IRE1-XBP1 signaling pathways during development and disease progression. In this study, we established a highly sensitive assay of IRE1 activity using a small luciferase, NanoLuc, which has approximately 100-fold higher activity than firefly luciferase. The NanoLuc reporter, which contained a portion of the spliced region of XBP1 upstream of NanoLuc, was highly sensitive and compatible with several types of cell lines. We found that NanoLuc was secreted into the extracellular space independent of the ER-Golgi pathway. The NanoLuc activity of an aliquot of culture medium from the neuroblastoma-spinal neuron hybrid cell line NSC-34 reflected the toxic stimuli-induced elevation of intracellular activity well. Using this technique, we evaluated the effects of several genetic and pathological factors associated with the onset and progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on NanoLuc reporter activity. Under our experimental conditions, inhibition of ER-Golgi transport by the overexpression of mutant Sar1 activated luciferase activity, whereas the co-expression of mutant SOD1 or the C-terminal fragment of TDP-43 (TDP-25) did not. The addition of homocysteine elevated the reporter activity; however, we did not observe any synergistic effect due to the overexpression of the mutant genes described above. Taken together, these data show that our analytical procedure is highly sensitive and convenient for screening useful compounds that modulate IRE1-XBP1 signaling pathways as well as for estimating IRE1 activation in several pathophysiological diseases. PMID:26056941

  19. Comparison of red-shifted firefly luciferase Ppy RE9 and conventional Luc2 as bioluminescence imaging reporter genes for in vivo imaging of stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yajie; Walczak, Piotr; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2012-01-01

    One critical issue for noninvasive imaging of transplanted bioluminescent cells is the large amount of light absorption in tissue when emission wavelengths below 600 nm are used. Luciferase with a red-shifted spectrum can potentially bypass this limitation. We assessed and compared a mutant of firefly luciferase (Ppy RE9, PRE9) against the yellow luciferase luc2 gene for use in cell transplantation studies. C17.2 neural stem cells expressing PRE9-Venus and luc2-Venus were sorted by flow cytometry and assessed for bioluminescence in vitro in culture and in vivo after transplantation into the brain of immunodeficient Rag2-/- mice. We found that the luminescence from PRE9 was stable, with a peak emission at 620 nm, shifted to the red compared to that of luc2. The emission peak for PRE9 was pH-independent, in contrast to luc2, and much less affected by tissue absorbance compared to that of luc2. However, the total emitted light radiance from PRE9 was substantially lower than that of luc2, both in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that PRE9 has favorable properties as compared to luc2 in terms of pH independence, red-shifted spectrum, tissue light penetration, and signal quantification, justifying further optimization of protein expression and enzymatic activity.

  20. Structural evolution of luciferase activity in Zophobas mealworm AMP/CoA-ligase (protoluciferase) through site-directed mutagenesis of the luciferin binding site.

    PubMed

    Prado, R A; Barbosa, J A; Ohmiya, Y; Viviani, V R

    2011-07-01

    The structural origin and evolution of bioluminescent activity of beetle luciferases from AMP/CoA ligases remains a mystery. Previously we cloned the luciferase-like enzyme from Zophobas morio mealworm, a reasonable protoluciferase model that could shine light on this mystery. Kinetic characterization and studies with D- and L-luciferin and their adenylates showed that stereoselectivity constitutes a critical feature for the origin of luciferase activity in AMP/CoA ligases. Comparison of the primary structures and modeling studies of this protoluciferase and the three main families of beetle luciferases showed that the carboxylic acid substrate binding site of this enzyme is smaller and more hydrophobic than the luciferin binding site of beetle luciferases, showing several substitutions of otherwise conserved residues. Thus, here we performed a site-directed mutagenesis survey of the carboxylic binding site motifs of the protoluciferase by replacing their residues by the respective conserved ones found in beetle luciferases in order to identify the structural determinants of luciferase/oxygenase activity. Although most of the substitutions had negative impact on the luminescence activity of the protoluciferase, only the substitution I327T improved the luminescence activity, resulting in a broad and 15 nm blue-shifted luminescence spectrum. Such substitution indicates the importance of the loop motif 322YGMSEI327 (341YGLTETT347 in Photinus pyralis luciferase) for luciferase activity, and indicates a possible route for the evolution of bioluminescence function of beetle luciferases. PMID:21505686

  1. Determination of relative assay response factors for toxic chlorinated and bromiated dioxins/furans using an enyme immunoassay (EIA) and a chemically-activated luciferase gene expression cell bioassay (CALUX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of dioxin-like activity requires knowledge of both the concentration and toxicity to evaluate the risk of adverse human health and environmental effects. The dioxin-like response of several polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PBDDs/Fs) and polybrominated/chlori...

  2. In Vitro Infectivity Assessment by Drug Susceptibility Comparison of Recombinant Leishmania major Expressing Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein or EGFP-Luciferase Fused Genes with Wild-Type Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Seyed, Negar; Etemadzadeh, Mohammad-Hossein; Abediankenari, Saeid; Rafati, Sima; Taheri, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a worldwide uncontrolled parasitic disease due to the lack of effective drug and vaccine. To speed up effective drug development, we need powerful methods to rapidly assess drug effectiveness against the intracellular form of Leishmania in high throughput assays. Reporter gene technology has proven to be an excellent tool for drug screening in vitro. The effects of reporter proteins on parasite infectivity should be identified both in vitro and in vivo. In this research, we initially compared the infectivity rate of recombinant Leishmania major expressing stably enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) alone or EGFP-luciferase (EGFP-LUC) with the wild-type strain. Next, we evaluated the sensitivity of these parasites to amphotericin B (AmB) as a standard drug in 2 parasitic phases, promastigote and amastigote. This comparison was made by MTT and nitric oxide (NO) assay and by quantifying the specific signals derived from reporter genes like EGFP intensity and luciferase activity. To study the amastigote form, both B10R and THP-1 macrophage cell lines were infected in the stationary phase and were exposed to AmB at different time points. Our results clearly revealed that the 3 parasite lines had similar in vitro infectivity rates with comparable parasite-induced levels of NO following interferon-γ/lipopolysaccharide induction. Based on our results we proposed the more reporter gene, the faster and more sensitive evaluation of the drug efficiency. PMID:26323836

  3. Interaction of firefly luciferase and silver nanoparticles and its impact on enzyme activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käkinen, Aleksandr; Ding, Feng; Chen, Pengyu; Mortimer, Monika; Kahru, Anne; Ke, Pu Chun

    2013-08-01

    We report on the dose-dependent inhibition of firefly luciferase activity induced by exposure of the enzyme to 20 nm citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The inhibition mechanism was examined by characterizing the physicochemical properties and biophysical interactions of the enzyme and the AgNPs. Consistently, binding of the enzyme induced an increase in zeta potential from -22 to 6 mV for the AgNPs, triggered a red-shift of 44 nm in the absorbance peak of the AgNPs, and rendered a ‘protein corona’ of 20 nm in thickness on the nanoparticle surfaces. However, the secondary structures of the enzyme were only marginally affected upon formation of the protein corona, as verified by circular dichroism spectroscopy measurement and multiscale discrete molecular dynamics simulations. Rather, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement revealed a significant ion release from the AgNPs. The released silver ions could readily react with the cysteine residues and N-groups of the enzyme to alter the physicochemical environment of their neighboring catalytic site and subsequently impair the enzymatic activity.

  4. Identification of cellular genes critical to recombinant protein production using a Gaussia luciferase-based siRNA screening system.

    PubMed

    Lwa, Teng Rhui; Tan, Chuan Hao; Lew, Qiao Jing; Chu, Kai Ling; Tan, Janice; Lee, Yih Yean; Chao, Sheng-Hao

    2010-04-15

    Development of high-throughput functional genomic screening, including siRNA screening, provides a novel approach for quick identification of critical factors involved in biological processes. Here, we apply this strategy to search for cellular genes involved in recombinant protein production. Since most of biopharmaceutical proteins are secreted proteins, we develop a cell-based reporter assay using a secreted luciferase, Gaussia luciferase (Gluc), as the reporter. Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells transiently transfected with the Gluc reporter plasmid are used to screen our siRNA panel. Three cellular genes, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein gamma (CEBPG), potassium channel tetramerisation domain containing 2 (KCTD2), transmembrane protein 183A (TMEM183A), were isolated from the screening. Production of erythropoietin (EPO) was significantly inhibited when CEBPG, KCTD2, and TMEM183A were knocked down. Furthermore, overexpression of CEBPG is shown to significantly improve production of recombinant EPO, interferon gamma, and monoclonal antibody in HEK293 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Collectively, this novel Gluc-based siRNA screening system is proven to be a useful tool for investigation of secreted protein production in mammalian cells. PMID:20188772

  5. A luciferase reporter gene assay and aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 genotype predict the LD{sub 50} of polychlorinated biphenyls in avian species

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Gillian E.; Farmahin, Reza; Crump, Doug; Jones, Stephanie P.; Klein, Jeff; Konstantinov, Alex; Potter, Dave; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2012-09-15

    Birds differ in sensitivity to the embryotoxic effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which complicates environmental risk assessments for these chemicals. Recent research has shown that the identities of amino acid residues 324 and 380 in the avian aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1) ligand binding domain (LBD) are primarily responsible for differences in avian species sensitivity to selected dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans. A luciferase reporter gene (LRG) assay was developed in our laboratory to measure AHR1-mediated induction of a cytochrome P450 1A5 reporter gene in COS-7 cells transfected with different avian AHR1 constructs. In the present study, the LRG assay was used to measure the concentration-dependent effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and PCBs 126, 77, 105 and 118 on luciferase activity in COS-7 cells transfected with AHR1 constructs representative of 86 avian species in order to predict their sensitivity to PCB-induced embryolethality and the relative potency of PCBs in these species. The results of the LRG assay indicate that the identity of amino acid residues 324 and 380 in the AHR1 LBD are the major determinants of avian species sensitivity to PCBs. The relative potency of PCBs did not differ greatly among AHR1 constructs. Luciferase activity was significantly correlated with embryolethality data obtained from the literature (R{sup 2} ≥ 0.87, p < 0.0001). Thus, the LRG assay in combination with the knowledge of a species' AHR1 LBD sequence can be used to predict PCB-induced embryolethality in potentially any avian species of interest without the use of lethal methods on a large number of individuals. -- Highlights: ► PCB embryolethality in birds can be predicted from a species' AHR1 genotype. ► The reporter gene assay is useful for predicting species sensitivity to PCBs. ► The relative potency of PCBs does not appear to differ between AHR1 genotypes. ► Contamination of PCB 105 and PCB 118 did not affect their

  6. Disruption of bbe02 by Insertion of a Luciferase Gene Increases Transformation Efficiency of Borrelia burgdorferi and Allows Live Imaging in Lyme Disease Susceptible C3H Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kamfai; Alter, Laura; Barthold, Stephen W.; Parveen, Nikhat

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in North America and Europe. The causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi persists in the white-footed mouse. Infection with B. burgdorferi can cause acute to persistent multisystemic Lyme disease in humans. Some disease manifestations are also exhibited in the mouse model of Lyme disease. Genetic manipulation of B. burgdorferi remains difficult. First, B. burgdorferi contains a large number of endogenous plasmids with unique sequences encoding unknown functions. The presence of these plasmids needs to be confirmed after each genetic manipulation. Second, the restriction modification defense systems, including that encoded by bbe02 gene lead to low transformation efficiency in B. burgdorferi. Therefore, studying the molecular basis of Lyme pathogenesis is a challenge. Furthermore, investigation of the role of a specific B. burgdorferi protein throughout infection requires a large number of mice, making it labor intensive and expensive. To overcome the problems associated with low transformation efficiency and to reduce the number of mice needed for experiments, we disrupted the bbe02 gene of a highly infectious and pathogenic B. burgdorferi strain, N40 D10/E9 through insertion of a firefly luciferase gene. The bbe02 mutant shows higher transformation efficiency and maintains luciferase activity throughout infection as detected by live imaging of mice. Infectivity and pathogenesis of this mutant were comparable to the wild-type N40 strain. This mutant will serve as an ideal parental strain to examine the roles of various B. burgdorferi proteins in Lyme pathogenesis in the mouse model in the future. PMID:26069970

  7. Ah-receptor controlled luciferase expression: A novel species-specific bioassay for Ah-receptor active compounds in environmental matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Murk, A.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Koeman, J.H.; Brouwer, A.; Denison, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    Polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent lipophilic compounds that accumulate especially in sediments and in top predators of the aquatic foodchain. PHAHs elicit a number of common toxic responses, which are highly species-specific. The most toxic, planar, PHAHs share a common mechanism of action mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Based on this mechanism, the toxic equivalency factor (TEF) concept has been developed, allowing hazard and risk assessment for mixtures of PHAHs. The TEF-approach assumes additive responses, but also synergistic and antagonistic interactions have been observed. In addition, the often large number of compounds in a mixture, low levels of individual congeners, possible presence of unknown AhR-active substances, and species differences in inducibility, ask for an comprehensive approach in hazard assessment. A number of recombinant cell lines, including Hepa1c1c7 mouse and H411E rat hepatoma cell lines, were developed, showing AhR-mediated firefly (Photinuspyralis) luciferase gene expression. The response by 2,3,7,8-TCDD in the CALUX (chemical activated luciferase expression) assay with these cell lines is dose-dependent, and not subjected to substrate inhibition at higher ligand concentrations. The detection limit for 2,3,7,8-TCDD is below 1 pM (0.2 fmol). The luciferase assay has been successfully applied for monitoring the amount of AhR-active compounds in small aliquots of blood plasma and in both sediment and pore-water samples, of which examples will be presented.

  8. Discovery, adaptation and transcriptional activity of two tick promoters: Construction of a dual luciferase reporter system for optimization of RNA interference in rhipicephalus (boophilus) microplus cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tuckow, A P; Temeyer, K B

    2015-08-01

    Dual luciferase reporter systems are valuable tools for functional genomic studies, but have not previously been developed for use in tick cell culture. We evaluated expression of available luciferase constructs in tick cell cultures derived from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, an important vector of bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. Commercial promoters were evaluated for transcriptional activity driving luciferase expression in the tick cell lines. The human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter resulted in detectable firefly luciferase activity within 2 days post-transfection of the R. microplus cell line BME26, with maximal activity at 5 days post-transfection. Several other promoters were weaker or inactive in the tick cells, prompting identification and assessment of transcriptional activity of the homologous ribosomal protein L4 (rpL4, GenBank accession no.: KM516205) and elongation factor 1α (EF-1α, GenBank accession no.: KM516204) promoters cloned from R. microplus. Evaluation of luciferase expression driven by various promoters in tick cell culture resulted in selection of the R. microplus rpL4 promoter and the human PGK promoter driving transcription of sequences encoding modified firefly and NanoLuc® luciferases for construction of a dual luciferase reporter system for use in tick cell culture. PMID:25892533

  9. GENERATION OF TWO STABLE CELL LINES THAT EXPRESS HER-ALPHA OR HER-ALPHA AND -BETA AND FIREFLY LUCIFERASE GENES FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of Two Stable Cell Lines that Express hERa or
    hERa and b and Firefly Luciferase Genes for Endocrine Screening

    K.L. Bobseine*1, W.R. Kelce2, P.C. Hartig*1, and L.E. Gray, Jr.1

    1USEPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC, 2Searle, Reprod...

  10. Establishment of a luciferase assay-based screening system: Fumitremorgin C selectively inhibits cellular proliferation of immortalized astrocytes expressing an active form of AKT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lei; Sasai, Ken Akagi, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Shinya

    2008-08-29

    The AKT pathway is frequently activated in glioblastoma, and as such, inhibitors of this pathway could prove very useful as anti-glioblastoma therapies. Here we established immortalized astrocytes expressing Renilla luciferase as well as those expressing both an active form of AKT and firefly luciferase. Since both luciferase activities represent the numbers of corresponding cell lines, novel inhibitors of the AKT pathway can be identified by treating co-cultures containing the two types of luciferase-expressing cells with individual compounds. Indeed, such a screening system succeeded in identifying fumitremorgin C as an efficient inhibitor of the AKT pathway, which was further confirmed by the ability of fumitremorgin C to selectively inhibit the growth of immortalized astrocytes expressing an active form of AKT. The present study proposes a broadly applicable approach for identifying therapeutic agents that target the pathways and/or molecules responsible for cancer development.

  11. The dark and bright sides of an enzyme: a three dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of Zophobas morio luciferase-like enzyme, inferences on the biological function and origin of oxygenase/luciferase activity.

    PubMed

    Prado, R A; Santos, C R; Kato, D I; Murakami, M T; Viviani, V R

    2016-05-11

    Beetle luciferases, the enzymes responsible for bioluminescence, are special cases of CoA-ligases which have acquired a novel oxygenase activity, offering elegant models to investigate the structural origin of novel catalytic functions in enzymes. What the original function of their ancestors was, and how the new oxygenase function emerged leading to bioluminescence remains unclear. To address these questions, we solved the crystal structure of a recently cloned Malpighian luciferase-like enzyme of unknown function from Zophobas morio mealworms, which displays weak luminescence with ATP and the xenobiotic firefly d-luciferin. The three dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain showed the expected general fold of CoA-ligases, with a unique carboxylic substrate binding pocket, permitting the binding and CoA-thioesterification activity with a broad range of carboxylic substrates, including short-, medium-chain and aromatic acids, indicating a generalist function consistent with a xenobiotic-ligase. The thioesterification activity with l-luciferin, but not with the d-enantiomer, confirms that the oxygenase activity emerged from a stereoselective impediment of the thioesterification reaction with the latter, favoring the alternative chemiluminescence oxidative reaction. The structure and site-directed mutagenesis support the involvement of the main-chain amide carbonyl of the invariant glycine G323 as the catalytic base for luciferin C4 proton abstraction during the oxygenase activity in this enzyme and in beetle luciferases (G343). PMID:27101527

  12. Knock-in Luciferase Reporter Mice for In Vivo Monitoring of CREB Activity

    PubMed Central

    Akhmedov, Dmitry; Rajendran, Kavitha; Mendoza-Rodriguez, Maria G.

    2016-01-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is induced during fasting in the liver, where it stimulates transcription of rate-limiting gluconeogenic genes to maintain metabolic homeostasis. Adenoviral and transgenic CREB reporters have been used to monitor hepatic CREB activity non-invasively using bioluminescence reporter imaging. However, adenoviral vectors and randomly inserted transgenes have several limitations. To overcome disadvantages of the currently used strategies, we created a ROSA26 knock-in CREB reporter mouse line (ROSA26-CRE-luc). cAMP-inducing ligands stimulate the reporter in primary hepatocytes and myocytes from ROSA26-CRE-luc animals. In vivo, these animals exhibit little hepatic CREB activity in the ad libitum fed state but robust induction after fasting. Strikingly, CREB was markedly stimulated in liver, but not in skeletal muscle, after overnight voluntary wheel-running exercise, uncovering differential regulation of CREB in these tissues under catabolic states. The ROSA26-CRE-luc mouse line is a useful resource to study dynamics of CREB activity longitudinally in vivo and can be used as a source of primary cells for analysis of CREB regulatory pathways ex vivo. PMID:27336479

  13. Epirubicin, Identified Using a Novel Luciferase Reporter Assay for Foxp3 Inhibitors, Inhibits Regulatory T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hajime; Momose, Fumiyasu; Umehara, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Nao; Ogo, Naohisa; Muraoka, Daisuke; Shiku, Hiroshi; Harada, Naozumi; Asai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein p3 (Foxp3) is crucial to the development and suppressor function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that have a significant role in tumor-associated immune suppression. Development of small molecule inhibitors of Foxp3 function is therefore considered a promising strategy to enhance anti-tumor immunity. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay system in which the NF-κB luciferase reporter signal is suppressed by the co-expressed Foxp3 protein. Using this system, we screened our chemical library consisting of approximately 2,100 compounds and discovered that a cancer chemotherapeutic drug epirubicin restored the Foxp3-inhibited NF-κB activity in a concentration-dependent manner without influencing cell viability. Using immunoprecipitation assay in a Treg-like cell line Karpas-299, we found that epirubicin inhibited the interaction between Foxp3 and p65. In addition, epirubicin inhibited the suppressor function of murine Tregs and thereby improved effector T cell stimulation in vitro. Administration of low dose epirubicin into tumor-bearing mice modulated the function of immune cells at the tumor site and promoted their IFN-γ production without direct cytotoxicity. In summary, we identified the novel action of epirubicin as a Foxp3 inhibitor using a newly established luciferase-based cellular screen. Our work also demonstrated our screen system is useful in accelerating discovery of Foxp3 inhibitors. PMID:27284967

  14. Remote detection of human toxicants in real time using a human-optimized, bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette bioreporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan; Webb, James; Ripp, Steven; Patterson, Stacey; Sayler, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, human toxicant bioavailability screening has been forced to proceed in either a high throughput fashion using prokaryotic or lower eukaryotic targets with minimal applicability to humans, or in a more expensive, lower throughput manner that uses fluorescent or bioluminescent human cells to directly provide human bioavailability data. While these efforts are often sufficient for basic scientific research, they prevent the rapid and remote identification of potentially toxic chemicals required for modern biosecurity applications. To merge the advantages of high throughput, low cost screening regimens with the direct bioavailability assessment of human cell line use, we re-engineered the bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette to function autonomously (without exogenous stimulation) within human cells. Optimized cassette expression provides for fully endogenous bioluminescent production, allowing continuous, real time monitoring of the bioavailability and toxicology of various compounds in an automated fashion. To access the functionality of this system, two sets of bioluminescent human cells were developed. The first was programed to suspend bioluminescent production upon toxicological challenge to mimic the non-specific detection of a toxicant. The second induced bioluminescence upon detection of a specific compound to demonstrate autonomous remote target identification. These cells were capable of responding to μM concentrations of the toxicant n-decanal, and allowed for continuous monitoring of cellular health throughout the treatment process. Induced bioluminescence was generated through treatment with doxycycline and was detectable upon dosage at a 100 ng/ml concentration. These results demonstrate that leveraging autonomous bioluminescence allows for low-cost, high throughput direct assessment of toxicant bioavailability.

  15. Development of Neh2-luciferase reporter and its application for high throughput screening and real-time monitoring of Nrf2 activators.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Natalya A; Haskew-Layton, Renee E; Basso, Manuela; Hushpulian, Dmitry M; Payappilly, Jimmy B; Speer, Rachel E; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Rakhman, Ilay; Cole, Philip A; Pinto, John T; Ratan, Rajiv R; Gazaryan, Irina G

    2011-06-24

    The NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcriptional regulator of antioxidant defense and detoxification. To directly monitor stabilization of Nrf2, we fused its Neh2 domain, responsible for the interaction with its nucleocytoplasmic regulator, Keap1, to firefly luciferase (Neh2-luciferase). We show that Neh2 domain is sufficient for recognition, ubiquitination, and proteasomal degradation of Neh2-luciferase fusion protein. The Neh2-luc reporter system allows direct monitoring of the adaptive response to redox stress and classification of drugs based on the time course of reporter activation. The reporter was used to screen the Spectrum library of 2000 biologically active compounds to identify activators of Nrf2. The most robust and yet nontoxic Nrf2 activators found--nordihydroguaiaretic acid, fisetin, and gedunin--induced astrocyte-dependent neuroprotection from oxidative stress via an Nrf2-dependent mechanism. PMID:21700211

  16. Development of Neh2-Luciferase Reporter and Its Application for High Throughput Screening and Real-Time Monitoring of Nrf2 Activators

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Natalya A.; Haskew-Layton, Renee E.; Basso, Manuela; Hushpulian, Dmitry M.; Payappilly, Jimmy B.; Speer, Rachel E.; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Rakhman, Ilay; Cole, Philip A.; Pinto, John T.; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Gazaryan, Irina G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcriptional regulator of antioxidant defense and detoxification. To directly monitor stabilization of Nrf2, we fused its Neh2 domain, responsible for the interaction with its nucleocytoplasmic regulator, Keap1, to firefly luciferase (Neh2-luciferase). We show that Neh2 domain is sufficient for recognition, ubiquitination, and proteasomal degradation of Neh2-luciferase fusion protein. The Neh2-luc reporter system allows direct monitoring of the adaptive response to redox stress and classification of drugs based on the time course of reporter activation. The reporter was used to screen the Spectrum library of 2000 biologically active compounds to identify activators of Nrf2. The most robust and yet nontoxic Nrf2 activators found—nordihydroguaiaretic acid, fisetin, and gedunin—induced astrocyte-dependent neuroprotection from oxidative stress via an Nrf2-dependent mechanism. PMID:21700211

  17. [Subunit interactions in luciferase from the firefly Luciola mingrelica. Their role in the manifestation of enzyme activity and during thermoinactivation].

    PubMed

    Brovko, L Iu; Beliaeva, E I; Ugarova, N N

    1982-05-01

    It was shown that the dimers of the firefly luciferase possess the catalytic activity, whereas the monomers do not. The dissociation constant (Kd) for active dimers was determined at pH 7.0--8.4 within the temperature range of 15--35 degrees and at MgSO4 and Na2SO4 concentrations varying from 37 to 370 mM and 49 to 490 mM, respectively. Under variable conditions the Kd value changed only insignificantly and made up to 13 nm. The substitution of Na2SO4 for MgSO4 decreased Kd 2.5 times. The effective rate constant for the enzyme inactivation (kin) was increased more than 5-fold, when the luciferase concentration was decreased from 200 down to 3.5 nM in the presence of 37 mM MgSO4. When the concentration of the latter was increased up to 185 mM, the value of kin ceased to depend on the enzyme concentration. The decrease of kin was also observed at an increase in Na2SO4. An inactivation pattern for the enzyme in solution was determined both for the monomer and for the dimer of the enzyme. The equations allowing to calculate the inactivation constant for the monomer (Ki) and dimer (k2) at different pH values, temperatures and salt concentrations were obtained. The enzyme was found to be stabilized by salts more than 10-fold, the stabilizing effect being far more pronounced for the enzyme monomer than for the dimer. The dependence of the effective kin value on pH and temperature was primarily influenced by the dependence of the inactivation rate constant for the dimer. PMID:7093378

  18. Approaches to engineer stability of beetle luciferases

    PubMed Central

    Koksharov, Mikhail I.; Ugarova, Natalia N.

    2012-01-01

    Luciferase enzymes from fireflies and other beetles have many important applications in molecular biology, biotechnology, analytical chemistry and several other areas. Many novel beetle luciferases with promising properties have been reported in the recent years. However, actual and potential applications of wild-type beetle luciferases are often limited by insufficient stability or decrease in activity of the enzyme at the conditions of a particular assay. Various examples of genetic engineering of the enhanced beetle luciferases have been reported that successfully solve or alleviate many of these limitations. This mini-review summarizes the recent advances in development of mutant luciferases with improved stability and activity characteristics. It discusses the common limitations of wild-type luciferases in different applications and presents the efficient approaches that can be used to address these problems. PMID:24688645

  19. A novel luciferase based reporter system to monitor activation of the ErbB2/Her2/neu pathway non-invasively during radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Frank; Li, Wenrong; Li, Fang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop a split-luciferase based reporter system that allows for non-invasive monitoring of activation of the Her2/neu pathway in vivo in a quantitative and sensitive manner. Methods and Materials Fusion proteins of the ErbB2/Her2/neu receptor to the N-terminal fragment of luciferase as well as of its downstream binding partner Shc to the C-terminal fragment of luciferase have been engineered based on the rationale that upon activation and binding of the Her2 receptor molecule to Shc, luciferase function will be reconstituted. Thus the resulting bioluminescence signals can serve as a surrogate measure of receptor activation. Results We show that our reporter systems functions well in vitro in breast cancer cells and in vivo in xenograft tumors. In particular, the activities of Her2/neu in xenograft tumors could be monitored serially for an extended period of time after radiotherapy. Conclusions We believe that the novel ErbB2/Her2/neu reporter presented here is a powerful tool to study the biology of the Her2-neu pathway in vitro as well as in vivo. It should also facilitate the development and rapid evaluation of new Her2/neu targeted therapeutics. PMID:20934271

  20. Novel Luciferase-Based Reporter System to Monitor Activation of ErbB2/Her2/neu Pathway Noninvasively During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Frank; Li Wenrong; Li Fang; Li Chuanyuan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a split-luciferase-based reporter system that allows for noninvasive monitoring of activation of the Her2/neu pathway in vivo in a quantitative and sensitive manner. Methods and Materials: Fusion proteins of the ErbB2/Her2/neu receptor to the N-terminal fragment of luciferase and of its downstream binding partner Shc to the C-terminal fragment of luciferase have been engineered owing to the rationale that on activation and binding of the Her2 receptor molecule to Shc, luciferase function will be reconstituted. Thus, the resulting bioluminescence signals can serve as a surrogate measure of receptor activation. Results: We have shown that our reporter systems functions well in vitro in breast cancer cells and in vivo in xenograft tumors. In particular, the activities of Her2/neu in xenograft tumors could be monitored serially for an extended period after radiotherapy. Conclusions: We believe that the novel ErbB2/Her2/neu reporter we have presented is a powerful tool to study the biology of the Her2-neu pathway in vitro and in vivo. It should also facilitate the development and rapid evaluation of new Her2/neu-targeted therapeutic agents.

  1. Liganded Thyroid Hormone Receptor Inhibits Phorbol 12-O-Tetradecanoate-13-Acetate-Induced Enhancer Activity via Firefly Luciferase cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Hiroko; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Ohba, Kenji; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Shingo; Ishizuka, Keiko; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR) belongs to the nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) superfamily and regulates the transcription of its target genes in a thyroid hormone (T3)-dependent manner. While the detail of transcriptional activation by T3 (positive regulation) has been clarified, the mechanism of T3-dependent repression (negative regulation) remains to be determined. In addition to naturally occurring negative regulations typically found for the thyrotropin β gene, T3-bound TR (T3/TR) is known to cause artificial negative regulation in reporter assays with cultured cells. For example, T3/TR inhibits the transcriptional activity of the reporter plasmids harboring AP-1 site derived from pUC/pBR322-related plasmid (pUC/AP-1). Artificial negative regulation has also been suggested in the reporter assay with firefly luciferase (FFL) gene. However, identification of the DNA sequence of the FFL gene using deletion analysis was not performed because negative regulation was evaluated by measuring the enzymatic activity of FFL protein. Thus, there remains the possibility that the inhibition by T3 is mediated via a DNA sequence other than FFL cDNA, for instance, pUC/AP-1 site in plasmid backbone. To investigate the function of FFL cDNA as a transcriptional regulatory sequence, we generated pBL-FFL-CAT5 by ligating FFL cDNA in the 5' upstream region to heterologous thymidine kinase promoter in pBL-CAT5, a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT)-based reporter gene, which lacks pUC/AP-1 site. In kidney-derived CV1 and choriocarcinoma-derived JEG3 cells, pBL-FFL-CAT5, but not pBL-CAT5, was strongly activated by a protein kinase C activator, phorbol 12-O-tetradecanoate-13-acetate (TPA). TPA-induced activity of pBL-FFL-CAT5 was negatively regulated by T3/TR. Mutation of nt. 626/640 in FFL cDNA attenuated the TPA-induced activation and concomitantly abolished the T3-dependent repression. Our data demonstrate that FFL cDNA sequence mediates the TPA-induced transcriptional activity

  2. Tagging of Genomic STAT3 and STAT1 with Fluorescent Proteins and Insertion of a Luciferase Reporter in the Cyclin D1 Gene Provides a Modified A549 Cell Line to Screen for Selective STAT3 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Samsonov, Andrey; Zenser, Nathan; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Hongyi; Fetter, John; Malkov, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is an oncogenic protein that is constitutively activated in numerous cancer cell lines and human cancers. Another STAT family member, STAT1, possesses cancer-inhibitory properties and can promote apoptosis in tumor cells upon activation. To better characterize these important cancer related genes, we tagged STAT3 and STAT1 loci with fluorescent protein (FP) sequences (RFP and GFP respectively) by targeted integration via zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) - mediated homologous recombination in A549 cells that express aberrantly activated STAT3. We inserted the FP transgenes at the N-terminus of the STAT3 locus and at the C-terminus of the STAT1 locus. The integration resulted in endogenous expression of fluorescent STAT3 and STAT1 chimeric fusion proteins. When stimulated with IL-6 or IFN-γ, the cells showed robust nuclear translocation of RFP-STAT3 or STAT1-GFP, respectively. Pre-incubation of cells with a known specific STAT3 inhibitor showed that IFN-γ-induced translocation of STAT1-GFP was not impaired. STAT3 activates multiple downstream targets such as genes involved in cell cycle progression - e.g. cyclin D1. To detect changes in expression of endogenous cyclin D1, we used ZFN technology to insert a secreted luciferase reporter behind the cyclin D1 promoter and separated the luciferase and cyclin D1 coding regions by a 2A sequence to induce a translational skip. The luciferase insertion was made in the RFP-STAT3/STAT1-GFP cell line to have all three reporters in a single cell line. Addition of a STAT3 inhibitor led to suppression of cyclin D1 promoter activity and cell growth arrest. The triple-modified cell line provides a simple and convenient method for high-content screening and pre-clinical testing of potential STAT3 inhibitors in live cells while ensuring that the STAT1 pathway is not affected. This approach of reporting endogenous gene activities using ZFN technology could be applied to other cancer

  3. Quantification of dynamic protein complexes using Renilla luciferase fragment complementation applied to protein kinase A activities in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, E.; Aquin, S.; Berger, N.; Landry, C. R.; Nyfeler, B.; Bouvier, M.; Michnick, S. W.

    2007-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily represents the most important class of pharmaceutical targets. Therefore, the characterization of receptor cascades and their ligands is a prerequisite to discovering novel drugs. Quantification of agonist-induced second messengers and downstream-coupled kinase activities is central to characterization of GPCRs or other pathways that converge on GPCR-mediated signaling. Furthermore, there is a need for simple, cell-based assays that would report on direct or indirect actions on GPCR-mediated effectors of signaling. More generally, there is a demand for sensitive assays to quantify alterations of protein complexes in vivo. We describe the development of a Renilla luciferase (Rluc)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) that was designed specifically to investigate dynamic protein complexes. We demonstrate these features for GPCR-induced disassembly of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory and catalytic subunits, a key effector of GPCR signaling. Taken together, our observations show that the PCA allows for direct and accurate measurements of live changes of absolute values of protein complex assembly and disassembly as well as cellular imaging and dynamic localization of protein complexes. Moreover, the Rluc-PCA has a sufficiently high signal-to-background ratio to identify endogenously expressed Gαs protein-coupled receptors. We provide pharmacological evidence that the phosphodiesterase-4 family selectively down-regulates constitutive β-2 adrenergic- but not vasopressin-2 receptor-mediated PKA activities. Our results show that the sensitivity of the Rluc-PCA simplifies the recording of pharmacological profiles of GPCR-based candidate drugs and could be extended to high-throughput screens to identify novel direct modulators of PKA or upstream components of GPCR signaling cascades. PMID:17942691

  4. Supramolecular Control over Split-Luciferase Complementation.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Ralph P G; Briels, Jeroen M; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; de Greef, Tom F A; Merkx, Maarten; Brunsveld, Luc

    2016-07-25

    Supramolecular split-enzyme complementation restores enzymatic activity and allows for on-off switching. Split-luciferase fragment pairs were provided with an N-terminal FGG sequence and screened for complementation through host-guest binding to cucurbit[8]uril (Q8). Split-luciferase heterocomplex formation was induced in a Q8 concentration dependent manner, resulting in a 20-fold upregulation of luciferase activity. Supramolecular split-luciferase complementation was fully reversible, as revealed by using two types of Q8 inhibitors. Competition studies with the weak-binding FGG peptide revealed a 300-fold enhanced stability for the formation of the ternary heterocomplex compared to binding of two of the same fragments to Q8. Stochiometric binding by the potent inhibitor memantine could be used for repeated cycling of luciferase activation and deactivation in conjunction with Q8, providing a versatile module for in vitro supramolecular signaling networks. PMID:27356091

  5. Gene silencing in primary and metastatic tumors by small interfering RNA delivery in mice: quantitative analysis using melanoma cells expressing firefly and sea pansy luciferases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Naoki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2005-07-20

    Silencing of oncogenes or other genes contributing to tumor malignancy or progression by RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising approach to treating tumor patients. To achieve RNAi-based tumor therapy, a small interfering RNA (siRNA) or siRNA-expressing vector needs to be delivered to tumor cells, but little information about its in vivo delivery has been reported. In this study, we examined whether the expression of the target gene in tumor cells can be suppressed by the delivery of RNAi effectors to primary and metastatic tumor cells. To quantitatively evaluate the RNAi effects in tumor cells, mouse melanoma B16-BL6 cells were stably transfected with both firefly (a model target gene) and sea pansy (an internal standard gene) luciferase genes to obtain B16-BL6/dual Luc cells. The target gene expression in subcutaneous primary tumors of B16-BL6/dual Luc cells was significantly suppressed by direct injection of the RNAi effectors followed by electroporation. The expression in metastatic hepatic tumors was also significantly reduced by an intravenous injection of either RNAi effector by the hydrodynamics-based procedure. These results indicate that the both RNAi effectors have a potential to silence target gene in tumor cells in vivo when successfully delivered to tumor cells. PMID:15936841

  6. High-throughput functional screening using a homemade dual-glow luciferase assay.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jessica M; Boyce, Frederick M

    2014-01-01

    We present a rapid and inexpensive high-throughput screening protocol to identify transcriptional regulators of alpha-synuclein, a gene associated with Parkinson's disease. 293T cells are transiently transfected with plasmids from an arrayed ORF expression library, together with luciferase reporter plasmids, in a one-gene-per-well microplate format. Firefly luciferase activity is assayed after 48 hr to determine the effects of each library gene upon alpha-synuclein transcription, normalized to expression from an internal control construct (a hCMV promoter directing Renilla luciferase). This protocol is facilitated by a bench-top robot enclosed in a biosafety cabinet, which performs aseptic liquid handling in 96-well format. Our automated transfection protocol is readily adaptable to high-throughput lentiviral library production or other functional screening protocols requiring triple-transfections of large numbers of unique library plasmids in conjunction with a common set of helper plasmids. We also present an inexpensive and validated alternative to commercially-available, dual luciferase reagents which employs PTC124, EDTA, and pyrophosphate to suppress firefly luciferase activity prior to measurement of Renilla luciferase. Using these methods, we screened 7,670 human genes and identified 68 regulators of alpha-synuclein. This protocol is easily modifiable to target other genes of interest. PMID:24962249

  7. High-throughput Functional Screening using a Homemade Dual-glow Luciferase Assay

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jessica M.; Boyce, Frederick M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a rapid and inexpensive high-throughput screening protocol to identify transcriptional regulators of alpha-synuclein, a gene associated with Parkinson's disease. 293T cells are transiently transfected with plasmids from an arrayed ORF expression library, together with luciferase reporter plasmids, in a one-gene-per-well microplate format. Firefly luciferase activity is assayed after 48 hr to determine the effects of each library gene upon alpha-synuclein transcription, normalized to expression from an internal control construct (a hCMV promoter directing Renilla luciferase). This protocol is facilitated by a bench-top robot enclosed in a biosafety cabinet, which performs aseptic liquid handling in 96-well format. Our automated transfection protocol is readily adaptable to high-throughput lentiviral library production or other functional screening protocols requiring triple-transfections of large numbers of unique library plasmids in conjunction with a common set of helper plasmids. We also present an inexpensive and validated alternative to commercially-available, dual luciferase reagents which employs PTC124, EDTA, and pyrophosphate to suppress firefly luciferase activity prior to measurement of Renilla luciferase. Using these methods, we screened 7,670 human genes and identified 68 regulators of alpha-synuclein. This protocol is easily modifiable to target other genes of interest. PMID:24962249

  8. Detection of traces of tetracyclines from fish with a bioluminescent sensor strain incorporating bacterial luciferase reporter genes.

    PubMed

    Pellinen, Teijo; Bylund, Göran; Virta, Marko; Niemi, Anneli; Karp, Matti

    2002-08-14

    Bioluminescent Escherichia coli K-12 strain for the specific detection of the tetracycline family of antimicrobial agents was optimized to work with fish samples. The biosensing strain contains a plasmid incorporating the bacterial luciferase operon of Photorhabdus luminescens under the control of the tetracycline responsive element from transposon Tn10 (Korpela et al. Anal. Chem. 1998, 70, 4457-4462). The extraction procedure of oxytetracycline from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) tissue was optimized. There was neither need for centrifugation of homogenized tissue nor use of organic solvents. The lowest levels of detection of tetracycline and oxytetracycline from spiked fish tissue were 20 and 50 microg/kg, respectively, in a 2-h assay. The optimized assay protocol was tested with fish that were given a single oral dose of high and low concentrations of oxytetracycline. The assay was able to detect oxytetracycline residues below the European Union maximum residue limits, and the results correlated well with those obtained by conventional HPLC (R = 0.81). PMID:12166964

  9. Sucrose Represses the Developmentally Controlled Transient Activation of the Plastocyanin Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Dijkwel, P. P.; Kock, PAM.; Bezemer, R.; Weisbeek, P. J.; Smeekens, SCM.

    1996-01-01

    The plastocyanin (PC) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is activated independently of light during early seedling development. In etiolated seedlings, PC mRNA levels increase transiently and a maximum dark level is reached after 2 d of growth in darkness. In etiolated transgenic seedlings carrying a chimeric PC-promoter: luciferase fusion gene, luciferase activity is similarly increased after 2 d of growth. The transient increase in PC mRNA and luciferase activity levels can be repressed by sucrose. Nonmetabolizable sugars and polyethylene glycol do not have a major effect on PC gene expression. Also, light-grown seedlings show a similar transient and sucrose-sensitive increase in PC mRNA levels and luciferase activity, as in dark-grown seedlings, but here expression levels are 15- fold higher. These findings suggest the presence of a sucrose-sensitive, developmentally controlled expression mechanism that operates independently of light. PMID:12226197

  10. A novel circadian phenotype based on firefly luciferase expression in transgenic plants.

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A J; Short, S R; Chua, N H; Kay, S A

    1992-01-01

    A 320-bp fragment of the Arabidopsis cab2 promoter is sufficient to mediate transcriptional regulation by both phytochrome and the circadian clock. We fused this promoter fragment to the firefly luciferase (Luc) gene to create a real-time reporter for regulated gene expression in intact plants. Cab2::Luc transcript accumulated in the expected patterns and luciferase activity was closely correlated to cab2::Luc mRNA abundance in both etiolated and green seedlings. The concentration of the bulk of luciferase protein did not reflect these patterns but maintained a relatively constant level, implying that a post-translational mechanism(s) leads to the high-amplitude regulation of luciferase activity. We used a low-light video imaging system to establish that luciferase bioluminescence in vivo accurately reports the temporal and spatial regulation of cab2 transcription in single seedlings. The unique qualities of the firefly luciferase system allowed us to monitor regulated gene expression in real time in individual multicellular organisms. This noninvasive marker for temporal regulation at the molecular level constitutes a circadian phenotype, which may be used to isolate mutants in the circadian clock. PMID:1392609

  11. Creation of High Efficient Firefly Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsu, Toru

    Firefly emits visible yellow-green light. The bioluminescence reaction is carried out by the enzyme luciferase. The bioluminescence of luciferase is widely used as an excellent tool for monitoring gene expression, the measurement of the amount of ATP and in vivo imaging. Recently a study of the cancer metastasis is carried out by in vivo luminescence imaging system, because luminescence imaging is less toxic and more useful for long-term assay than fluorescence imaging by GFP. However the luminescence is much dimmer than fluorescence. Then bioluminescence imaging in living organisms demands the high efficient luciferase which emits near infrared lights or enhances the emission intensity. Here I introduce an idea for creating the high efficient luciferase based on the crystal structure.

  12. Superluminescent variants of marine luciferases for bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sato, Moritoshi; Tao, Hiroaki

    2011-11-15

    In this study, a rational synthesis of superluminescent variants from marine luciferases with prolonged bioluminescence has been demonstrated. A putative active site of a model marine luciferase, Gaussia princeps Luciferase (GLuc), was assigned and modified by a site-directed mutagenesis. The potent variants were found to generate up to 10 times stronger bioluminescence, emitting red shifts of up to 33 nm with natural coelenterazine than native GLuc, rendering an efficient optical signature in bioassays. The advantageous properties were demonstrated with mammalian two-hybrid assays, single-chain probes, and metastases of murine B16 melanoma in BALB/c nude mice. The unique ideas for engineering GLuc are proved to be valid even for other marine luciferases. PMID:21951281

  13. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tiffen, Jessamy C; Bailey, Charles G; Ng, Cynthia; Rasko, John E J; Holst, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7) and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10) cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments. PMID:21092230

  14. Intracellular generation of superoxide as a by-product of Vibrio harveyi luciferase expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    González-Flecha, B; Demple, B

    1994-01-01

    Luciferase genes are widely used as reporters of gene expression because of the high sensitivity of chemiluminescence detection and the possibility of monitoring light production in intact cells. We engineered fusions of the Escherichia coli soxS promoter to the luciferase structural genes (luxAB) from Vibrio harveyi. Since soxS transcription is positively triggered by the activated SoxR protein in response to agents such as paraquat that generate intracellular superoxide, we hoped to use this construct as a sensitive reporter of redox stress agents. Although a soxR+ soxS'::luxAB fusion exhibited a paraquat-inducible synthesis of luciferase, a smaller increase was consistently observed even in the absence of known soxRS inducers. This endogenous induction was soxR dependent and was further characterized by introducing a plasmid carrying the luciferase structural genes without the soxS promoter into a strain carrying a soxS'::lacZ fusion in the bacterial chromosome. These cells exhibited increased beta-galactosidase expression as they grew into mid-log phase. This increase was ascribed to luciferase activity because beta-galactosidase induction was suppressed (but not eliminated) when the substrate n-decanal was present in the medium. The soxS'::luxAB plasmid transformed superoxide dismutase-deficient strains very poorly under aerobic conditions but just as efficiently as a control plasmid under anaerobic conditions. The production of hydrogen peroxide, the dismutation product of superoxide anion, was significantly increased in strains carrying bacterial luciferase and maximal in the absence of n-decanal. Taken collectively, these data point to the generation of significant amounts of intracellular superoxide by bacterial luciferase, the possible mechanism of which is discussed. In addition to providing insights into the role of superoxide in the activation of the SoxR protein, these results suggest caution in the interpretation of experiments using luciferase as a

  15. Coelenterazine-dependent luciferases.

    PubMed

    Markova, S V; Vysotski, E S

    2015-06-01

    Bioluminescence is a widespread natural phenomenon. Luminous organisms are found among bacteria, fungi, protozoa, coelenterates, worms, molluscs, insects, and fish. Studies on bioluminescent systems of various organisms have revealed an interesting feature - the mechanisms underlying visible light emission are considerably different in representatives of different taxa despite the same final result of this biochemical process. Among the several substrates of bioluminescent reactions identified in marine luminous organisms, the most commonly used are imidazopyrazinone derivatives such as coelenterazine and Cypridina luciferin. Although the substrate used is the same, bioluminescent proteins that catalyze light emitting reactions in taxonomically remote luminous organisms do not show similarity either in amino acid sequences or in spatial structures. In this review, we consider luciferases of various luminous organisms that use coelenterazine or Cypridina luciferin as a substrate, as well as modifications of these proteins that improve their physicochemical and bioluminescent properties and therefore their applicability in bioluminescence imaging in vivo. PMID:26531017

  16. Discovery, adaptation and transcriptional activity of two tick promoters: Construction of a dual luciferase reporter system for optimization of RNA interference in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual luciferase reporter systems are valuable tools for functional genomic studies, but have not previously been developed for use in tick cell culture. We evaluated expression of available luciferase constructs in tick cell cultures derived from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, an important vec...

  17. Fre Is the Major Flavin Reductase Supporting Bioluminescence from Vibrio harveyi Luciferase in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Zachary T.; Baldwin, Thomas O.

    2009-01-01

    Unlike the vast majority of flavoenzymes, bacterial luciferase requires an exogenous source of reduced flavin mononucleotide for bioluminescence activity. Within bioluminescent bacterial cells, species-specific oxidoreductases are believed to provide reduced flavin for luciferase activity. The source of reduced flavin in Escherichia coli-expressing bioluminescence is not known. There are two candidate proteins potentially involved in this process in E. coli, a homolog of the Vibrio harveyi Frp oxidoreductase, NfsA, and a luxG type oxidoreductase, Fre. Using single gene knock-out strains, we show that deletion of fre decreased light output by greater than two orders of magnitude, yet had no effect on luciferase expression in E. coli. Purified Fre is capable of supporting bioluminescence in vitro with activity comparable to that with the endogenous V. harveyi reductase (Frp), using either FMN or riboflavin as substrate. In a pull-down experiment, we found that neither Fre nor Frp co-purify with luciferase. In contrast to prior work, we find no evidence for stable complex formation between luciferase and oxidoreductase. We conclude that in E. coli, an enzyme primarily responsible for riboflavin reduction (Fre) can also be utilized to support high levels of bioluminescence. PMID:19139094

  18. A Luciferase Reporter Gene Assay to Measure Ebola Virus Viral Protein 35-Associated Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Stimulated, Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene 1-Mediated Induction of Interferon β.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Valeria; Daino, Gian Luca; Corona, Angela; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection, the type I interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) innate immune response is suppressed by EBOV viral protein 35 (VP35), a validated drug target. Identification of EBOV VP35 inhibitors requires a cellular system able to assess the VP35-based inhibitory functions of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) IFN-β induction. We established a miniaturized luciferase gene reporter assay in A549 cells that measures IFN-β induction by viral dsRNA and is dose-dependently inhibited by VP35 expression. When compared to influenza A virus NS1 protein, EBOV VP35 showed improved inhibition of viral dsRNA-based IFN-β induction. This assay can be used to screen for EBOV VP35 inhibitors. PMID:25926684

  19. Firefly Luciferase Mutants Allow Substrate-Selective Bioluminescence Imaging in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Adams, Spencer T; Mofford, David M; Reddy, G S Kiran Kumar; Miller, Stephen C

    2016-04-11

    Bioluminescence imaging is a powerful approach for visualizing specific events occurring inside live mice. Animals can be made to glow in response to the expression of a gene, the activity of an enzyme, or the growth of a tumor. But bioluminescence requires the interaction of a luciferase enzyme with a small-molecule luciferin, and its scope has been limited by the mere handful of natural combinations. Herein, we show that mutants of firefly luciferase can discriminate between natural and synthetic substrates in the brains of live mice. When using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to express luciferases in the brain, we found that mutant luciferases that are inactive or weakly active with d-luciferin can light up brightly when treated with the aminoluciferins CycLuc1 and CycLuc2 or their respective FAAH-sensitive luciferin amides. Further development of selective luciferases promises to expand the power of bioluminescence and allow multiple events to be imaged in the same live animal. PMID:26991209

  20. Development of stable HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter HepG2 cells for assessing the toxicity of organic pollutants present in air.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lili; Li, Xiaohai; Deng, Huaxin; Kuang, Dan; Dai, Xiayun; Huang, Suli; Wang, Feng; He, Meian; Currie, R William; Wu, Tangchun

    2012-09-01

    HSPA1A (HSP70-1) is a highly inducible heat shock gene up-regulated in response to environmental stresses and pollutants. The aim of our study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the stable metabolically competent HepG2 cells containing a human HSPA1A promoter-driven luciferase reporter (HepG2-luciferase cells) for assessing the toxicity of organic pollutants present in air. The HepG2-luciferase cells were validated by heat shock treatment and testing three organic compounds (pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, and formaldehyde) that are ubiquitous in the air. The maximal level of HSPA1A (HSP70-1) and relative luciferase activity induced by heat shock were over three and nine times the control level, respectively. Pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, and formaldehyde all induced significantly elevated levels of relative luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Extractable organic matter (EOM) from urban traffic and coke oven emissions in ambient air were tested on the HepG2-luciferase cells. The traffic EOM induced significant increase in relative luciferase activity at concentrations of picogram per liter. The coke oven EOM produced a strong dose-dependent induction of relative luciferase activity up to six times the control value. Significant increases in relative luciferase activity were observed at concentrations that were as low, or lower than the concentrations that the tested organic pollutants decreased cell viability, and increased malondialdehyde concentration, Olive tail moment, and micronuclei frequency. Therefore, we conclude that the HepG2-luciferase cells are a valuable tool for rapid screening of the overall toxicity of organic pollutants present in air. PMID:22367790

  1. Real-time monitoring of inflammation status in 3T3-L1 adipocytes possessing a secretory Gaussia luciferase gene under the control of nuclear factor-kappa B response element

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaki, Haruka; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Aoki, Naohito

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation status in adipocytes can be monitored by the new assay system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only an aliquot of conditioned medium is required without cell lysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation-attenuating compounds can be screened more conveniently. -- Abstract: We have established 3T3-L1 cells possessing a secretory Gaussia luciferase (GLuc) gene under the control of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) response element. The 3T3-L1 cells named 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc could differentiate into adipocyte as comparably as parental 3T3-L1 cells. Inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-1{beta} induced GLuc secretion of 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc adipocytes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. GLuc secretion of 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc adipocytes was also induced when cultured with RAW264.7 macrophages and was dramatically enhanced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. An NF-{kappa}B activation inhibitor BAY-11-7085 and an antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine significantly suppressed GLuc secretion induced by macrophages. Finally, we found that rosemary-derived carnosic acid strongly suppressed GLuc secretion induced by macrophages and on the contrary up-regulated adiponectin secretion. Collectively, by using 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc adipocytes, inflammation status can be monitored in real time and inflammation-attenuating compounds can be screened more conveniently.

  2. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  3. Highly sensitive luciferase reporter assay using a potent destabilization sequence of calpain 3.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Mayu; Murotomi, Kazutoshi; Abe, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Tomomi; Nishii, Shigeaki; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Noguchi, Takako; Niwa, Kazuki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-20

    Reporter assays that use luciferases are widely employed for monitoring cellular events associated with gene expression in vitro and in vivo. To improve the response of the luciferase reporter to acute changes of gene expression, a destabilization sequence is frequently used to reduce the stability of luciferase protein in the cells, which results in an increase of sensitivity of the luciferase reporter assay. In this study, we identified a potent destabilization sequence (referred to as the C9 fragment) consisting of 42 amino acid residues from human calpain 3 (CAPN3). Whereas the half-life of Emerald Luc (ELuc) from the Brazilian click beetle Pyrearinus termitilluminans was reduced by fusing PEST (t1/2=9.8 to 2.8h), the half-life of C9-fused ELuc was significantly shorter (t1/2=1.0h) than that of PEST-fused ELuc when measurements were conducted at 37°C. In addition, firefly luciferase (luc2) was also markedly destabilized by the C9 fragment compared with the humanized PEST sequence. These results indicate that the C9 fragment from CAPN3 is a much more potent destabilization sequence than the PEST sequence. Furthermore, real-time bioluminescence recording of the activation kinetics of nuclear factor-κB after transient treatment with tumor necrosis factor α revealed that the response of C9-fused ELuc is significantly greater than that of PEST-fused ELuc, demonstrating that the use of the C9 fragment realizes a luciferase reporter assay that has faster response speed compared with that provided by the PEST sequence. PMID:25528501

  4. Rational and random mutagenesis of firefly luciferase to identify an efficient emitter of red bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchini, Bruce R.; Southworth, Tara L.; Khattak, Neelum F.; Murtiashaw, Martha H.; Fleet, Sarah E.

    2004-06-01

    Firefly luciferase, which emits yellow-green (557 nm) light, and the corresponding cDNA have been used successfully as a bioluminescence reporter of gene expression. One particularly exciting application is in the area of in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Our interest is in developing improved reagents by identifying Photinus pyralis luciferase mutants that efficiently emit red bioluminescence. In this way, the proven advantages of the P. pyralis protein can be combined with the potential advantages of a red-shifted emitter. Using site-directed mutagenesis techniques, we have identified many mutants emitting red bioluminescence. Unfortunately, these enzymes generally have significantly decreased bioluminescence activity. Interestingly, we discovered a mutation, Ile351Ala, that produced a moderate 16 nm red-shift, while maintaining excellent bioluminescence activity. We then undertook a random mutagenesis approach to identify luciferase mutants that emit further red-shifted bioluminescence with minimal loss of activity. Libraries of mutants were created using an error-prone PCR method and the Ile351Ala luciferase mutant as the template DNA. The libraries were screened by in vivo bacterial assays and the promising mutants were purified to enable accurate determination of bioluminescence emission spectra and total bioluminescence activity. We will report the characterization results, including the identification of the randomly altered amino acids, of several mutants that catalyze bioluminescence with emission maxima of approximately 600 nm.

  5. A novel dual luciferase assay for the simultaneous monitoring of HIV infection and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Mitsuki, Yu-Ya; Yamamoto, Takuya; Mizukoshi, Fuminori; Momota, Masatoshi; Terahara, Kazutaka; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Harada, Shigeyoshi; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2016-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reporter cell lines are critical tools for drug development. However, one disadvantage of HIV-1 reporter cell lines is that reductions in reporter gene activity need to be normalized to cytotoxicity, i.e., live cell numbers. Here, we developed a dual luciferase assay based on a R. reniformis luciferase (hRLuc)-expressing R5-type HIV-1 (NLAD8-hRLuc) and a CEM cell line expressing CCR5 and firefly luciferase (R5CEM-FiLuc). The NLAD8-hRLuc reporter virus was replication competent in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The level of hRLuc was correlated with p24 antigen levels (p<0.001, R=0.862). The target cell line, R5CEM-FiLuc, stably expressed the firefly luciferase (FiLuc) reporter gene and allowed the simultaneous monitoring of compound cytotoxicity. The dual reporter assay combining a NLAD8-hRLuc virus with R5CEM-FiLuc cells permitted the accurate determination of drug susceptibility for entry, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and protease inhibitors at different multiplicities of infection. This dual reporter assay provides a rapid and direct method for the simultaneous monitoring of HIV infection and cell viability. PMID:26898957

  6. Detection of neuroendocrine tumors using promoter-specific secreted Gaussia luciferase.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Alan Wei-Shun; Akerstrom, Victoria; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate detection of neuroendocrine (NE) tumors is critically important for better prognosis and treatment outcomes in patients. To demonstrate the efficacy of using an adenoviral vector for the detection of NE tumors, we have constructed a pair of adenoviral vectors which, in combination, can conditionally replicate and release Gaussia luciferase into the circulation after infecting the NE tumors. The expression of these two vectors is regulated upstream by an INSM1-promoter (insulinoma-associated-1) that is specifically active in NE tumors and developing NE tissues, but silenced in normal adult tissues. In order to retain the tumor-specificity of the INSM1 promoter, we have modified the promoter using the core insulator sequence from the chicken β-globin HS4 insulator and the neuronal restrictive silencing element (NRSE). This modified INSM1-promoter can retain NE tumor specificity in an adenoviral construct while driving a mutated adenovirus E1A gene (∆24E1A), the Metridia, or Gaussia luciferase gene. The in vitro cell line and mouse xenograft human tumor studies revealed the NE specificity of the INSM1-promoter in NE lung cancer, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma, retinoblastoma, and insulinoma. When we combined the INSM1-promoter driven Gaussia luciferase with ∆24E1A, the co-infected NE tumor secreted higher levels of Gaussia luciferase as compared to the INSM1p-Gaussia virus alone. In a mouse subcutaneous xenograft tumor model, the combination viruses secreted detectable level of Gaussia luciferase after infecting an INSM1-positive NE lung tumor for ≥12 days. Therefore, the INSM1-promoter specific conditional replicating adenovirus represents a sensitive diagnostic tool to aid clinicians in the detection of NE tumors. PMID:26530405

  7. Inhibition of luciferase expression in transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by Sindbis virus expression of antisense luciferase RNA

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Barbara W.; Olson, Ken E.; Allen-Miura, Tanya; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo; Carlson, Jonathan O.; Coates, Craig J.; Jasinskiene, Nijole; James, Anthony A.; Beaty, Barry J.; Higgs, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    A rapid and reproducible method of inhibiting the expression of specific genes in mosquitoes should further our understanding of gene function and may lead to the identification of mosquito genes that determine vector competence or are involved in pathogen transmission. We hypothesized that the virus expression system based on the mosquito-borne Alphavirus, Sindbis (Togaviridae), may efficiently transcribe effector RNAs that inhibit expression of a targeted mosquito gene. To test this hypothesis, germ-line-transformed Aedes aegypti that express luciferase (LUC) from the mosquito Apyrase promoter were intrathoracically inoculated with a double subgenomic Sindbis (dsSIN) virus TE/3′2J/anti-luc (Anti-luc) that transcribes RNA complementary to the 5′ end of the LUC mRNA. LUC activity was monitored in mosquitoes infected with either Anti-luc or control dsSIN viruses expressing unrelated antisense RNAs. Mosquitoes infected with Anti-luc virus exhibited 90% reduction in LUC compared with uninfected and control dsSIN-infected mosquitoes at 5 and 9 days postinoculation. We demonstrate that a gene expressed from the mosquito genome can be inhibited by using an antisense strategy. The dsSIN antisense RNA expression system is an important tool for studying gene function in vivo. PMID:10557332

  8. Inhibition of luciferase expression in transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by Sindbis virus expression of antisense luciferase RNA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B W; Olson, K E; Allen-Miura, T; Rayms-Keller, A; Carlson, J O; Coates, C J; Jasinskiene, N; James, A A; Beaty, B J; Higgs, S

    1999-11-01

    A rapid and reproducible method of inhibiting the expression of specific genes in mosquitoes should further our understanding of gene function and may lead to the identification of mosquito genes that determine vector competence or are involved in pathogen transmission. We hypothesized that the virus expression system based on the mosquito-borne Alphavirus, Sindbis (Togaviridae), may efficiently transcribe effector RNAs that inhibit expression of a targeted mosquito gene. To test this hypothesis, germ-line-transformed Aedes aegypti that express luciferase (LUC) from the mosquito Apyrase promoter were intrathoracically inoculated with a double subgenomic Sindbis (dsSIN) virus TE/3'2J/anti-luc (Anti-luc) that transcribes RNA complementary to the 5' end of the LUC mRNA. LUC activity was monitored in mosquitoes infected with either Anti-luc or control dsSIN viruses expressing unrelated antisense RNAs. Mosquitoes infected with Anti-luc virus exhibited 90% reduction in LUC compared with uninfected and control dsSIN-infected mosquitoes at 5 and 9 days postinoculation. We demonstrate that a gene expressed from the mosquito genome can be inhibited by using an antisense strategy. The dsSIN antisense RNA expression system is an important tool for studying gene function in vivo. PMID:10557332

  9. An ancestral luciferase in the Malpighi tubules of a non-bioluminescent beetle!

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Prado, R A; Arnoldi, F C G; Abdalla, F C

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of beetle bioluminescence is enigmatic. Previously, weak luciferase activity was found in the non-bioluminescent larvae of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), but the detailed tissular origin and identity of the luciferase-like enzyme remained unknown. Using a closely related giant mealworm, Zophobas morio, here we show that the luciferase-like enzyme is located in the Malpighi tubules. cDNA cloning of this luciferase like enzyme, showed that it is a short AMP-ligase with weak luciferase activity which diverged long ago from beetle luciferases. The results indicate that the potential for bioluminescence in AMP-ligases is very ancient and provide a first reasonable protoluciferase model to investigate the origin and evolution of beetle luciferases. PMID:19247530

  10. Luciferase fragment complementation imaging in preclinical cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Madryn C.; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    The luciferase fragment complementation assay (LFCA) enables molecular events to be non-invasively imaged in live cells in vitro and in vivo in a comparatively cheap and safe manner. It is a development of previous enzyme complementation assays in which reporter genes are split into two, individually enzymatically inactive, fragments that are able to complement one another upon interaction. This complementation can be used to externally visualize cellular activities. In recent years, the number of studies which have used LFCAs to probe questions relevant to cancer have increased, and this review summarizes the most significant and interesting of these. In particular, it focuses on work conducted on the epidermal growth factor, nuclear and chemokine receptor families, and intracellular signaling pathways, including IP3, cAMP, Akt, cMyc, NRF2 and Rho GTPases. LFCAs which have been developed to image DNA methylation and detect RNA transcripts are also discussed. PMID:25594026

  11. Dual-color bioluminescence imaging assay using green- and red-emitting beetle luciferases at subcellular resolution.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Mayu; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is widely used to monitor cellular events, including gene expression in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, recent advances in luciferase technology have made possible imaging at the single-cell level. To improve the bioluminescence imaging system, we have developed a dual-color imaging system in which the green-emitting luciferase from a Brazilian click beetle (Emerald Luc, ELuc) and the red-emitting luciferase from a railroad worm (Stable Luciferase Red, SLR) were used as reporters, which were localized to the peroxisome and the nucleus, respectively. We clearly captured simultaneously the subcellular localization of ELuc in the peroxisome and SLR in the nucleus of a single cell using a high-magnification objective lens with 3-min exposure time without binning using a combination of optical filters. Furthermore, to apply this system to quantitative time-lapse imaging, the activation of nuclear factor triggered by tumor necrosis factor α was measured using nuclear-targeted SLR and peroxisome-targeted ELuc as the test and internal control reporters, respectively. We successfully quantified the kinetics of activation of nuclear factor κB using nuclear-targeted SLR and the transcriptional change of the internal control promoter using peroxisome-targeted ELuc simultaneously in a single cell, and showed that the activation kinetics, including activation rate and amplitude, differed among cells. The results demonstrated that this imaging system can visualize the subcellular localization of reporters and track the expressions of two genes simultaneously at subcellular resolution. PMID:25015042

  12. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound induced Gene Activation in Solid Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan; Zhong, Pei

    2006-05-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to activate trans-gene expression in a mouse tumor model was investigated. 4T1 cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously in the hind limbs of Balb/C mice and adenovirus luciferase gene vectors under the control of heat shock protein 70B promoter (Adeno-hsp70B-Luc) were injected intratumoraly for gene transfection. One day following the virus injection, the transfected tumors were heated to a peak temperature of 55, 65, 75, and 85°C, respectively, in 10s at multiple sites around the center of the tumor using a HIFU transducer operated at either 1.1-MHz (fundamental) or 3.3-MHz (3rd harmonic) frequency. Inducible luciferase gene expression was found to vary from 15-fold to 120-fold of the control group following 1.1-MHz HIFU exposure. The maximum gene activation was produced at a peak temperature of 65˜75°C one day following HIFU exposure and decayed gradually to baseline level within 7 days. The inducible gene activation produced by 3.3-MHz HIFU exposure (75°C-10s) was found to be comparable to that produced by hyperthermia (42°C-30min). Altogether, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using HIFU as a simple and versatile physical means to regulate trans-gene expression in vivo. This unique feature may be explored in the future for a synergistic combination of HIFU-induced thermal ablation with heat-induced gene therapy for improved cancer therapy.

  13. Whole-Body In Vivo Monitoring of Inflammatory Diseases Exploiting Human Interleukin 6-Luciferase Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Makiko; Takai, Jun; Yu, Lei; Motohashi, Hozumi; Moriguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-10-01

    Chronic inflammation underlies the pathological progression of various diseases, and thus many efforts have been made to quantitatively evaluate the inflammatory status of the diseases. In this study, we generated a highly sensitive inflammation-monitoring mouse system using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone containing extended flanking sequences of the human interleukin 6 gene (hIL6) locus, in which the luciferase (Luc) reporter gene is integrated (hIL6-BAC-Luc). We successfully monitored lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation in various tissues of the hIL6-BAC-Luc mice using an in vivo bioluminescence imaging system. When two chronic inflammatory disease models, i.e., a genetic model of atopic dermatitis and a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), were applied to the hIL6-BAC-Luc mice, luciferase bioluminescence was specifically detected in the atopic skin lesion and central nervous system, respectively. Moreover, the Luc activities correlated well with the disease severity. Nrf2 is a master transcription factor that regulates antioxidative and detoxification enzyme genes. Upon EAE induction, the Nrf2-deficient mice crossed with the hIL6-BAC-Luc mice exhibited enhanced neurological symptoms concomitantly with robust luciferase luminescence in the neuronal tissue. Thus, whole-body in vivo monitoring using the hIL6-BAC-Luc transgenic system (WIM-6 system) provides a new and powerful diagnostic tool for real-time in vivo monitoring of inflammatory status in multiple different disease models. PMID:26283726

  14. Comparison of firefly luciferase and NanoLuc luciferase for biophotonic labeling of group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Loh, Jacelyn M S; Proft, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    NanoLuc luciferase (Nluc) is an engineered enzyme that catalyses the substrate, furimazine, to produce light. Nluc has higher sensitivity than the commonly used bioluminescent reporter, firefly luciferase (FFluc). We have introduced Nluc into a toxin-antitoxin stabilised plasmid for the efficient labeling of group A Streptococcus. Comparison of signal strength and kinetic properties between Nluc-labeled bacteria and similarly previously-labeled FFluc bacteria, showed that the bioluminescent signal produced by Nluc-labeled bacteria is up to 15-times higher than FFluc-labeled bacteria during the logarithmic phase. However, with Nluc we were unable to differentiate between bacteria that are metabolically active and inactive because of its ATP-independence. Nluc therefore offers a more sensitive reporter but, perhaps, one more restricted for downstream applications. PMID:24322775

  15. Structure, Mechanism, and Mutation of Bacterial Luciferase.

    PubMed

    Tinikul, Ruchanok; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2016-01-01

    : Bacterial luciferase is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase found in bioluminescent bacteria. The enzyme catalyzes a light-emitting reaction by using reduced flavin, long chain aldehyde, and oxygen as substrates and yields oxidized flavin, carboxylic acid, and water as products with concomitant emission of blue-green light around 485-490 nm. The enzyme is a heterodimer consisting of two homologous subunits, designated as the α- and β-subunits. The reactive reaction center is located in the α-subunit, whereas the β-subunit is required for maintaining the active conformation of the α-subunit. The enzyme reaction occurs through the generation of a reactive C4a-oxygenflavin adduct, presumably C4a-peroxyflavin, before the light-emitting species is generated from the decomposition of an adduct between the C4a-peroxyflavin and the aldehyde. Because the luciferase reaction generates light, the enzyme has the potential to be used as a bioreporter for a wide variety of applications. With the recent invention of the fusion enzyme that can be expressed in mammalian cells, future possibilities for the development of additional bioreporter applications are promising. PMID:25487767

  16. A Novel Bioluminescent Protease Assay Using Engineered Firefly Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Wigdal, Susan S; Anderson, Jessica L; Vidugiris, Gediminas J; Shultz, John; Wood, Keith V; Fan, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in a variety of disease processes. Understanding their biological functions underpins the efforts of drug discovery. We have developed a bioluminescent protease assay using a circularly permuted form of firefly luciferase, wherein the native enzyme termini were joined by a peptide containing a protease site of interest. Protease cleavage of these mutant luciferases greatly activates the enzyme, typically over 100 fold. The mutant luciferase substrates are easily generated by molecular cloning and cell-free translation reactions and thus the protease substrates do not need to be chemically synthesized or purchased. The assay has broad applicability using a variety of proteases and their cognate sites and can sensitively detect protease activity. In this report we further demonstrate its utility for the evaluation of protease recognition sequence specificity and subsequent establishment of an optimized assay for the identification and characterization of protease inhibitors using high throughput screening. PMID:20161840

  17. Labor-effective manipulation of marine and beetle luciferases for bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae

    2012-06-01

    Engineering of luciferases with designed properties and functionalities collects great interest in bioassays. However, such an engineering including mutagenesis accompanies great consumption of time-and-labor. Here, I review an empirical approach to efficiently manipulate marine and beetle luciferases for bioassays, where a putative active site of luciferases is initially assigned with an in silico analysis, prior to the practical engineering, e.g. a hydrophilicity search reveals a characteristic hydrophilic region of luciferases as an engineering target. Amino acids in the hydrophilic region are recommended for a mutagenesis target to generate superluminescent variants of marine luciferases with prolonged bioluminescence. Empirical data suggest that a consecutive fragmentation to the assigned hydrophilic site greatly reduces time-and-labors on construction of single-chain probes. This review summarizes how to relieve the efforts for fabricating single-chain probes and potent variants of luciferases with excellent optical properties. PMID:22514115

  18. Tracking angiogenesis induced by skin wounding and contact hypersensitivity using a Vegfr2-luciferase transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Zuxu; Contag, Pamela R; Purchio, Anthony F; West, David B

    2004-01-15

    The vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (VEGFR2) gene is transcriptionally regulated during angiogenesis. The ability to monitor and quantify VEGFR2 expression in vivo may facilitate a better understanding of the role of VEGFR2 in different states. Here we describe a transgenic mouse, Vegfr2-luc, in which a luciferase reporter is under control of the murine VEGFR2 promoter. In adult mice, luciferase activity was highest in lung and uterus, intermediate in heart, skin, and kidney, and lower in other tissues. Luciferase expression in these tissues correlated with endogenous VEGFR2 mRNA expression. In a cutaneous wound-healing model, Vegfr2-luc expression was induced in the wound tissue. Histologic and immunohistochemical studies showed significant macrophage infiltration into the wound and induction of Vegfr2-luc expression in endothelial and stromal cells. Dexamethasone significantly suppressed Vegfr2-luc expression and macrophage infiltration into the wound, resulting in delayed healing and impaired angiogenesis. In a skin hypersensitivity reaction produced by treatment with oxazolone, Vegfr2-luc expression was induced in the ear. Treatment by dexamethasone markedly suppressed Vegfr2-luc expression and leukocyte infiltration in the ear and was correlated with reduced dermal edema and epidermal hyperplasia. The Vegfr2-luc model will be valuable in monitoring the ability of drugs to affect angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:14512298

  19. Crystal Structures of the Luciferase and Green Fluorescent Protein from Renilla reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Loening, Andreas Markus; Fenn, Timothy David; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2009-01-01

    Due to its ability to emit light, the luciferase from Renilla reniformis (RLuc) is widely employed in molecular biology as a reporter gene in both cell culture experiments and small animal imaging. To accomplish this bioluminesce, the 37 KDa enzyme catalyzes the degradation of its substrate coelenterazine in the presence of molecular oxygen, resulting in the product coelenteramide, carbon dioxide, and the desired photon of light. We successfully crystallized a stabilized variant of this important protein (RLuc8), and present the first structures for any coelenterazine-using luciferase. These structures are based on high resolution data measured to 1.4 Å and demonstrate a classic α/β-hydrolase fold. We also present data of a coe-lenteramide bound-luciferase, and reason that this structure represents a secondary conformational form following shift of the product out of the primary active site. During the course of this work, the structure of the luciferase’s accessory green fluorescent protein (RrGFP) was determined as well and shown to be highly similar to that of Aequorea GFP. PMID:17980388

  20. Transgenic Mouse Model Harboring the Transcriptional Fusion Ccl20-Luciferase as a Novel Reporter of Pro-Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Crispo, Martina; Van Maele, Laurye; Tabareau, Julien; Cayet, Delphine; Errea, Agustina; Ferreira, Ana María; Rumbo, Martin; Sirard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc) encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo. PMID:24265691

  1. Transgenic mouse model harboring the transcriptional fusion ccl20-luciferase as a novel reporter of pro-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Crispo, Martina; Van Maele, Laurye; Tabareau, Julien; Cayet, Delphine; Errea, Agustina; Ferreira, Ana María; Rumbo, Martin; Sirard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc) encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo. PMID:24265691

  2. Comparative spectrochronography of different types of luciferases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednikova, E. Y.; Chikishev, Andrey Y.; Dement'eva, E. I.; Kosobokova, O. V.

    1999-02-01

    We investigated the dynamic properties of two firefly luciferases: Luciola Mingrelica, that contains the only tryptophan residue and Photinus Pyralis, that contains two tryptophan residues by means of fluorescence spectrochronography method. Relaxation time of protein matrix for Luciola mingrelica is estimated to be 2 ns. The dynamic properties of luciferases differ in spite of similar composition. We investigated also the influence of microenvironment on spectral and kinetic properties of luciferin. Fluorescence decay curves and stationary spectra were measured in 7 different solvents and in complex with luciferase. The closest coincidence of decay curves in the solvents with the decay curve in the complex with luciferase was obtained in water. It means that microenvironment of luciferase is not hydrophobic, as it had been determined earlier.

  3. Construction and characterization of a red-emitting luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, Brian F.; Benaron, David A.; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    Red light is transmitted through live tissue more efficiently than other wavelengths of visible light, thus by red-shifting the emission of bioluminescent reporters, we may enhance their utility for in vivo monitoring of biological processes. Codon changes at positions that may shift the yellow-green emission to red, based on studies of a related luciferase, were introduced into a variant of the North American firefly luciferase. Clones containing the desired mutation were selected based on the introduction of unique restriction enzyme sites and transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. Expression levels were evaluated using an intensified charge coupled device camera. Upon spectral analysis, all mutant luciferases demonstrated red-orange emission. Two emission peaks were detected in each spectrum, each clone with different peak heights at 560 nm and 610 nm. Sequence analyses of the compete coding region of several clones confirmed the presence of the target mutations, although sequence variation was observed at several secondary sites, likely resulting from the infidelity of Taq polymerase used in the mutagenesis protocol. A clone that demonstrated a strong 610 nm peak with a minimum shoulder at 560 nm was selected for use in animals. In summary, a red-shifted mutant of a well-characterized luciferase reporter gene was generated. Red light from this enzyme may both penetrate mammalian tissues to a greater extent and provide a tool for multicolor biological assays.

  4. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-03-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals. PMID:26950874

  5. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals. PMID:26950874

  6. Novel mammalian cell lines expressing reporter genes for the detection of environmental chemicals activating endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptors (ArhR) or estrogen receptors (ER).

    PubMed

    Minh, Si Do; Below, Sabine; Müller, Christian; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2008-12-01

    We have constructed two vector systems (pDMS5, pSAB2) containing the promoter regions of the human CYP1A1 gene including xenobiotic response elements or the promoter region of the Xenopus laevis vitellogenin A2 gene including estrogen response elements, respectively, and the genes for green fluorescent protein and firefly luciferase. These vectors were transfected into CHO-K1 cells. Transiently transfected cells consistently responded to 1 nmol/l TCDD (dioxin) or 10 nmol/l 17ss-estradiol, respectively, with a 3-5 fold increase in luciferase activity. Permanent cell lines were selected by culturing transiently transfected cells under continued presence of antibiotics and dilution cloning. Cells which had stably integrated the vector-DNA into the genomic DNA were selected. SiF6 cells responded to treatment with TCDD, PCB126, benzo(a)pyrene or indirubin-3'-monoxime in the concentration range between 0 and 1 micromol/l. SiG12 cells responded to treatment with bisphenol A, 4-MBC and DDT in the concentration range between 0 and 10 micromol/l. Compared with the controls, luciferase mRNA-abundance (semi-quantitative RT-PCR) and luciferase activity (luminescence assay) were elevated up to 3-fold. Resveratrol or tamoxifen, respectively, worked as full antagonists. Luciferase expression was increased upon treatment of cells with extracts of spiked soil samples indicating that our systems are suited for screening of environmental samples. PMID:18835349

  7. Rapid obtention of stable, bioluminescent tumor cell lines using a tCD2-luciferase chimeric construct

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bioluminescent tumor cell lines are experimental tools of major importance for cancer investigation, especially imaging of tumors in xenografted animals. Stable expression of exogenous luciferase in tumor cells combined to systemic injection of luciferin provides an excellent signal/background ratio for external optical imaging. Therefore, there is a need to rationalize and speed up the production of luciferase-positive tumor cell lines representative of multiple tumor phenotypes. For this aim we have designed a fusion gene linking the luciferase 2 protein to the c-terminus of a truncated form of the rat CD2 protein (tCD2-luc2). To allow simultaneous assessment of the wild-type luciferase 2 in a context of tCD2 co-expression, we have made a bicistronic construct for concomitant but separate expression of these two proteins (luc2-IRES-tCD2). Both the mono- and bi-cistronic constructs were transduced in lymphoid and epithelial cells using lentiviral vectors. Results The tCD2-luc2 chimera behaves as a type I membrane protein with surface presentation of CD2 epitopes. One of these epitopes reacts with the OX34, a widely spread, high affinity monoclonal antibody. Stably transfected cells are sorted by flow cytometry on the basis of OX34 staining. In vitro and, moreover, in xenografted tumors, the tCD2-luc2 chimera retains a substantial and stable luciferase activity, although not as high as the wild-type luciferase expressed from the luc2-IRES-tCD2 construct. Expression of the tCD2-luc2 chimera does not harm cell and tumor growth. Conclusion Lentiviral transduction of the chimeric tCD2-luc2 fusion gene allows selection of cell clones with stable luciferase expression in less than seven days without antibiotic selection. We believe that it will be helpful to increase the number of tumor cell lines available for in vivo imaging and assessment of novel therapeutic modalities. On a longer term, the tCD2-luc2 chimera has the potential to be expressed from multi

  8. Mass culture of photobacteria to obtain luciferase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Rich, E., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Inoculating preheated trays containing nutrient agar with photobacteria provides a means for mass culture of aerobic microorganisms in order to obtain large quantities of luciferase. To determine optimum harvest time, growth can be monitored by automated light-detection instrumentation.

  9. Hydrophobin-1 promotes thermostability of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Lohrasbi-Nejad, Azadeh; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2016-07-01

    The thermal sensitivity of firefly luciferase limits its use in certain applications. Firefly luciferase has hydrophobic sites on its surface, which lead to aggregation and inactivation of the enzyme at temperatures over 30 °C. We have successfully stabilized firefly luciferase at high temperatures with the assistance of a unique protein, hydrophobin-1 (HFB1). HFB1 is a small secretory protein belonging to class II of hydrophobins with a low molecular weight (7.5 kDa) and distinct functional hydrophobic patch on its surface. The interaction of HFB1 with hydrophobic sites on the surface of luciferase was confirmed by extrinsic fluorescence studies using 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) as a hydrophobic reporter probe. Calculation of thermodynamic parameters of heat inactivation of luciferase shows that conformational changes and flexibility of enzyme decreased in the presence of HFB1, and thermostability of the HFB1-treated enzyme increased. Furthermore, the addition of HFB1 into the enzymatic solution leads to an increase in catalytic efficiency of luciferase and subsequently improves the utility of the enzyme as an ATP detector. PMID:27191938

  10. A novel firefly luciferase biosensor enhances the detection of apoptosis induced by ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Junwei; Zhang, Huan; Fang, Liurong; Xi, Yongqiang; Zhou, Yanrong; Luo, Rui; Wang, Dang Xiao, Shaobo; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • We developed a novel firefly luciferase based biosensor to detect apoptosis. • The novel biosensor 233-DnaE-DEVDG was reliable, sensitive and convenient. • 233-DnaE-DEVDG faithfully indicated ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced apoptosis. • EsxA, esxT and esxL in ESAT-6 family proteins induced apoptosis. • Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. - Abstract: The activation of caspase-3 is a key surrogate marker for detecting apoptosis. To quantitate caspase-3 activity, we constructed a biosensor comprising a recombinant firefly luciferase containing a caspase-3 cleavage site. When apoptosis was induced, caspase-3 cleavage of the biosensor activated firefly luciferase by a factor greater than 25. The assay conveniently detected apoptosis in real time, indicating that it will facilitate drug discovery. We screened ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and found that esxA, esxT and esxL induced apoptosis. Further, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the NF-κB-regulated genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that this assay is useful for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize proteins and drugs that regulate apoptosis.

  11. CHEMICALLY ACTIVATED LUCIFASE GENE EXPRESSION (CALUX) CELL BIOASSAY ANALYSIS FOR THE ESTIMATION OF DIOXIN-LIKE ACTIVITIY: CRITICAL PARAMETERS OF THE CALUX PROCEDURE THAT IMPACT ASSAY RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chemically Activated Luciferase gene expression (CALUX) in vitro cell bioassay is an emerging bioanalytical tool that is increasingly being used for the screening and relative quantification of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. Since CALUX analyses provide a biological respo...

  12. Monitoring circadian time in rat plasma using a secreted Cypridina luciferase reporter.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoshiko; Nishide, Shin-Ya; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Honma, Ken-Ichi; Honma, Sato

    2013-08-15

    A firefly luciferase reporter enabled us to monitor promoter activity in vivo as well as ex vivo; however, this requires a sufficient supply of the substrate luciferin and specific monitoring devices. To overcome these disadvantages, we developed transgenic rats carrying a secreted enzyme Cypridina luciferase (CLuc) reporter under the promoter of clock gene Per2 (Per2-CLuc). Per2-CLuc activity in serially sampled blood from freely moving rats exhibited robust circadian rhythms with a peak at early morning. The Per2-CLuc bioluminescence could be quantified even with approximately 100pl of plasma. Plasma Per2-CLuc rhythms were phase reversed, and the level was reduced by restricting food access for 2h during the light phase, suggesting that the plasma Per2-CLuc rhythms reflect the phase of peripheral clocks entrained to feeding cues as well as fuel metabolism. Fasting for 2days did not alter the circadian Per2-CLuc rhythms in rats, suggesting that feeding per se did not affect the circadian Per2-CLuc rhythms. Tissue-specific Per2-CLuc rhythms were observed in culture medium of peripheral tissues. The Per2-CLuc reporter is a powerful tool to access gene expression in vivo as well as ex vivo with ordinary laboratory equipment. PMID:23624321

  13. Expression and stabilization of bacterial luciferase in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Stacey S.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Current mammalian bioreporters using either firefly luciferase (luc) or GFP constructs require lysis and/or exogenous excitation to evoke a measurable response. Consequently, these cells cannot serve as continuous, on-line monitoring devices for in vivo imaging. Bacterial luciferase, lux, produces a photonic reaction that is cyclic, resulting in autonomous signal generation without the requirement for exogenous substrates or external activation. Therefore, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporters are the only truly autonomous light-generating sensors in existence. Unfortunately, the bacterial lux system has not yet been efficiently expressed in mammalian cells. In this research, three approaches for optimal expression of the a and b subunits of the bacterial luciferase protein were compared and reporter signal stability was evaluated from stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Maximum light levels were obtained from cells expressing the luciferase subunits linked with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Cells harboring this construct produced bioluminescence equaling 2.6 X 106 photons/sec compared to 7.2 X 104 photons/sec obtained from cells expressing the luciferase from a dual promoter vector and 3.5 X 104 photons/sec from a Lux fusion protein. Furthermore, the bioluminescence levels remained stable for more than forty cell passages (5 months) in the absence of antibiotic selection. After this time, bioluminescence signals dropped at a rate of approximately 5% per cell passage. These data indicate that mammalian cell lines can be engineered to efficiently express the bacterial lux system, thus lending themselves to possible long-term continuous monitoring or imaging applications in vivo.

  14. Bioanalytical systems based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer using firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Darya V; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2015-01-01

    Bioanalytical systems based on the Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) are widely used in fundamental biochemical studies, as well as for screening and analysis of biologically active compounds. The Renilla luciferase is the most often used energy donor in this system despite the fact that it has low bioluminescence quantum yield and demonstrates not so stable luminescence in time as the firefly luciferase. Moreover, the bioluminescence λmax is observed in the green region of the spectrum, which complicates signal recording in tissues during in vivo experiments. The firefly luciferases do not have such drawbacks and show great promise for applications in BRET systems. Different versions of BRET systems based on firefly luciferases and the methods for increasing their efficiency are considered in this review; examples of the use of BRET systems based on the firefly luciferases for highly sensitive determination of proteases and for homogeneous immunoassays are presented. PMID:26377546

  15. Hyperglycemia induces iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress via JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Peixin; CAO, Yuanning; LI, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Objective Maternal diabetes adversely impacts embryonic development. We test the hypothesis that hyperglycemia-induced JNK1/2 activation mediates iNOS induction. Study Design Levels of iNOS mRNA and nitrosylated protein were determined in cultured C57BL/6J conceptuses exposed to hyperglycemia (300 mg/dl glucose) and C57BL/6J embryos exposed to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. iNOS-luciferase activity and endogenous reactive nitrogen species were determined in transfected PYS-2 (mouse teratocarcinoma) cells exposed to hyperglycemia (450 mg/dl glucose). Results Hyperglycemia increased iNOS mRNA and SP600125, a potent JNK1/2 inhibitor, abolished this effect. Hyperglycemia increased iNOS-luciferase activities and SP600125 blocked this effect. Diabetes increased iNOS mRNA and jnk2 gene deletion abrogated this effect. Correlated with iNOS gene induction, both hyperglycemia in vitro and diabetes in vivo enhanced the production of reactive nitrogen species and increased protein nitrosylation. jnk2 gene deletion blocked diabetes-induced protein nitrosylation. Conclusion JNK1/2 activation mediates hyperglycemia-induced iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress in diabetic embryopathy. PMID:20541731

  16. Activity analysis and preliminary inducer screening of the chicken DAZL gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Rui; Zuo, Qisheng; Li, Dong; Lian, Chao; Tang, Beibei; Xiao, Tianrong; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the active control area of chicken DAZL gene core promoter, to screen optimum inducers of the DAZL gene, thus to enhance the differentiation of embryonic stem cells into spermatogonial stem cells. Fragments of chicken DAZL gene promoter were cloned into fluorescent reporter plasmids and transfected into DF-1 cells. Then Dual-Luciferase® Reporter Assay System was used to identify the activity of the DAZL gene under different inducers. Our studies showed that the DAZL core promoter region for the Suqin yellow chicken was -383 to -39 bp. The dual-luciferase® reporter showed that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a retinoic acid receptor alpha agonist (tamibarotene/Am80), or estradiol (E2) could significantly enhance DAZL transcription. The in vitro inductive culture of chicken ESCs demonstrated that, with ATRA treatment, DAZL transcription peaked at 6 days and then decreased slowly; whereas, DAZL transcription was continuous and peaked at 10 days with Am80 treatment. E2 treatment significantly increased DAZL expression after 8 days. All three treatments were associated with the appearance of male germ cell (MGC)-like cells on day 10. These results provide the optimum inducer screening of the DAZL gene and lay the foundation for further screening of compounds that can induce the differentiation of ESCs into MGCs in vitro. PMID:25807265

  17. Activity Analysis and Preliminary Inducer Screening of the Chicken DAZL Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Rui; Zuo, Qisheng; Li, Dong; Lian, Chao; Tang, Beibei; Xiao, Tianrong; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the active control area of chicken DAZL gene core promoter, to screen optimum inducers of the DAZL gene, thus to enhance the differentiation of embryonic stem cells into spermatogonial stem cells. Fragments of chicken DAZL gene promoter were cloned into fluorescent reporter plasmids and transfected into DF-1 cells. Then Dual-Luciferase® Reporter Assay System was used to identify the activity of the DAZL gene under different inducers. Our studies showed that the DAZL core promoter region for the Suqin yellow chicken was −383 to −39 bp. The dual-luciferase® reporter showed that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a retinoic acid receptor alpha agonist (tamibarotene/Am80), or estradiol (E2) could significantly enhance DAZL transcription. The in vitro inductive culture of chicken ESCs demonstrated that, with ATRA treatment, DAZL transcription peaked at 6 days and then decreased slowly; whereas, DAZL transcription was continuous and peaked at 10 days with Am80 treatment. E2 treatment significantly increased DAZL expression after 8 days. All three treatments were associated with the appearance of male germ cell (MGC)-like cells on day 10. These results provide the optimum inducer screening of the DAZL gene and lay the foundation for further screening of compounds that can induce the differentiation of ESCs into MGCs in vitro. PMID:25807265

  18. Reporter enzyme inhibitor study to aid assembly of orthogonal reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pei-i; Yue, Kimberley; Pandey, Pramod; Breault, Lyne; Harbinski, Fred; McBride, Aaron J; Webb, Brian; Narahari, Janaki; Karassina, Natasha; Wood, Keith V; Hill, Adam; Auld, Douglas S

    2013-05-17

    Reporter gene assays (RGAs) are commonly used to measure biological pathway modulation by small molecules. Understanding how such compounds interact with the reporter enzyme is critical to accurately interpret RGA results. To improve our understanding of reporter enzymes and to develop optimal RGA systems, we investigated eight reporter enzymes differing in brightness, emission spectrum, stability, and substrate requirements. These included common reporter enzymes such as firefly luciferase (Photinus pyralis), Renilla reniformis luciferase, and β-lactamase, as well as mutated forms of R. reniformis luciferase emitting either blue- or green-shifted luminescence, a red-light emitting form of Luciola cruciata firefly luciferase, a mutated form of Gaussia princeps luciferase, and a proprietary luciferase termed "NanoLuc" derived from the luminescent sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris. To determine hit rates and structure-activity relationships, we screened a collection of 42,460 PubChem compounds at 10 μM using purified enzyme preparations. We then compared hit rates and chemotypes of actives for each enzyme. The hit rates ranged from <0.1% for β-lactamase to as high as 10% for mutated forms of Renilla luciferase. Related luciferases such as Renilla luciferase mutants showed high degrees of inhibitor overlap (40-70%), while unrelated luciferases such as firefly luciferases, Gaussia luciferase, and NanoLuc showed <10% overlap. Examination of representative inhibitors in cell-based assays revealed that inhibitor-based enzyme stabilization can lead to increases in bioluminescent signal for firefly luciferase, Renilla luciferase, and NanoLuc, with shorter half-life reporters showing increased activation responses. From this study we suggest strategies to improve the construction and interpretation of assays employing these reporter enzymes. PMID:23485150

  19. Folding of firefly luciferase during translation in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, V A; Makeyev, E V; Spirin, A S

    1994-01-01

    In vitro synthesis of firefly luciferase and its folding into an enzymatically active conformation were studied in a wheat germ cell-free translation system. A novel method is described by which the enzymatic activity of newly synthesized luciferase can be monitored continuously in the cell-free system while this protein is being translated from its mRNA. It is shown that ribosome-bound polypeptide chains have no detectable enzymatic activity, but that this activity appears within a few seconds after luciferase has been released from the ribosome. In contrast, the renaturation of denatured luciferase under identical conditions occurs with a half-time of 14 min. These results support the cotranslational folding hypothesis which states that the nascent peptides start to attain their native tertiary structure during protein synthesis on the ribosome. Images PMID:8062837

  20. Disturbance of firefly luciferase-based bioassays by different aluminum species.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Caroline; Sieg, Holger; Lampen, Alfonso; Braeuning, Albert

    2016-07-01

    Luciferase-dependent assays, important for biochemical analyses of cytotoxicity and reporter genes, may be perturbed by compounds interfering with the luciferase reaction. We analyzed the impact of different aluminum (Al) species on a luciferase-based assay for determination of cellular adenosine triphosphate. Al(0) nanoparticles (Al(0)-NPs) but not Al2O3-NPs decreased luminescence, correlated to high absorbance of Al(0)-NPs. By contrast, Al ions increased the luminescent signal. Data demonstrate that luciferase-dependent assays can be reciprocally disturbed by Al-NPs or Al ions in a specific manner, depending on the particular Al species. Careful interpretation of data from such experiments is essential in order to obtain conclusive results. PMID:27059752

  1. Genetic modification in organ transplantation and in vivo luciferase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Takashi; Inoue, Sei-ichiro; Sato, Yuki; Ajiki, Takashi; Ohsawa, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2005-04-01

    The genetic modification for organ transplantation is one of the most promising strategies to regulate allogeneic immune response. Organ-selective gene transfer has especially benefit to control local immune responses. Based on the catheter technique, we tested to deliver naked plasmid DNA to target graft organs of rats (liver and limbs) by a rapid injection (hydrodynamics-based transfection). Recent advances in transplantation have been achieved by visualization of cellular process and delivered gene expression during the inflammatory process by using non-invasive in vivo imaging. Herein, we examined the fate of genetically modified grafts using a firefly luciferase expression plasmid. For liver modification before transplantation, 6.25% of body weight PBS containing plasmid DNA was injected into the liver through the inferior vena cava using a catheter, and the liver was subsequently transplanted to the recipient rat. For limb modification, the femoral caudal epigastric vein was used. In the rat liver transplantation model, substantial luciferase expression was visualized and sustained for only a few days in the grafted liver. We also addressed stress responses by this hydrodynamics procedure using reporter plasmids containing cis-acting enhancer binding site such as NF-kappa B, cAMP, or heat shock response element. In contrast to hepatic transduction, this genetic limb targeting achieved long lasting luciferase expression in the muscle for 2 months or more. Thus, our results suggest that this catheter-based in vivo transfection technique provides an effective strategy for organ-selective gene modification in transplantation, and the bioluminescent imaging is broadening its potential for evaluation to various preclinical studies.

  2. Assessing the estrogenic and dioxin-like activities of chemicals and complex mixtures using in vitro recombinant receptor-reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, P; Joyeux, A; Denison, M S; Vincent, R; Gillesby, B E; Zacharewski, T

    1996-02-01

    In vitro recombinant receptor-reporter gene assays have been used to assess and rank the potency of chemicals and complex mixtures suspected of possessing estrogen and (or) aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated activity. The environmental estrogen (E2) bioassay consists of a Gal4-human estrogen receptor chimeric construct (Gal4-HEGO) and a Gal4-regulated luciferase reporter gene (17m5-G-Luc) that have been stably integrated into HeLa cells. The assay exhibits 10-fold induction in luciferase reporter gene activity following treatment with 1 nM 17 beta-estradiol and has a detection limit of approximately 5 pg of 17 beta-estradiol/mL. The AhR bioassay uses Hepa 1c1c7 wild-type cells transiently transfected with a dioxin response element regulated luciferase reporter gene. These assays were used to assess the estrogen and dioxin-like activities of naringenin, atrazine, and simazine and complex mixtures such as pulp and paper mill black liquor and urban air particulates. The activities of these chemicals and complex mixtures are confirmed using the pure antiestrogen ICI 164,384 and in in vitro gel retardation assays. Results of this study demonstrate the utility of in vitro recombinant receptor-reporter gene assays in identifying and assessing the estrogenic and dioxin-like activities of chemicals and complex mixtures. PMID:8723035

  3. A Luciferase-Based Quick Potency Assay to Predict Chondrogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Oberbauer, Eleni; Steffenhagen, Carolin; Feichtinger, Georg; Hildner, Florian; Hacobian, Ara; Danzer, Martin; Gabriel, Christian; Redl, Heinz; Wolbank, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Chondrogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) is challenging but highly promising for cartilage repair. Large donor variability of chondrogenic differentiation potential raises the risk for transplantation of cells with reduced efficacy and a low chondrogenic potential. Therefore, quick potency assays are required to control the potency of the isolated cells before cell transplantation. Current in vitro methods to analyze the differentiation capacity are time-consuming, and thus, a novel enhancer and tissue-specific promoter combination was used for the detection of chondrogenic differentiation of ASC in a novel quick potency bioassay. Human primary ASC were cotransfected with the Metridia luciferase-based collagen type II reporter gene pCMVE_ACDCII-MetLuc together with a Renilla control plasmid and analyzed for their chondrogenic potential. On day 3 after chondrogenic induction, the luciferase activity was induced in all tested donors under three-dimensional culture conditions and, in a second approach, also under two-dimensional (2D) culture conditions. With our newly developed quick potency bioassay, we can determine chondrogenic potential already after 3 days of chondrogenic induction and under 2D culture conditions. This will enhance the efficiency of testing cell functionality, which should allow in the future to predict the suitability of cells derived from individual patients for cell therapies in a very short time and at low costs. PMID:27019357

  4. Recurrent epimutations activate gene body promoters in primary glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Raman P; Zhang, Bo; Bell, Robert J A; Johnson, Brett E; Olshen, Adam B; Sundaram, Vasavi; Li, Daofeng; Graham, Ashley E; Diaz, Aaron; Fouse, Shaun D; Smirnov, Ivan; Song, Jun; Paris, Pamela L; Wang, Ting; Costello, Joseph F

    2014-05-01

    Aberrant DNA hypomethylation may play an important role in the growth rate of glioblastoma (GBM), but the functional impact on transcription remains poorly understood. We assayed the GBM methylome with MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, adjusting for copy number differences, in a small set of non-glioma CpG island methylator phenotype (non-G-CIMP) primary tumors. Recurrent hypomethylated loci were enriched within a region of chromosome 5p15 that is specified as a cancer amplicon and also encompasses TERT, encoding telomerase reverse transcriptase, which plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. Overall, 76 gene body promoters were recurrently hypomethylated, including TERT and the oncogenes GLI3 and TP73. Recurring hypomethylation also affected previously unannotated alternative promoters, and luciferase reporter assays for three of four of these promoters confirmed strong promoter activity in GBM cells. Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) ChIP-seq on tissue from the GBMs uncovered peaks that coincide precisely with tumor-specific decrease of DNA methylation at 200 loci, 133 of which are in gene bodies. Detailed investigation of TP73 and TERT gene body hypomethylation demonstrated increased expression of corresponding alternate transcripts, which in TP73 encodes a truncated p73 protein with oncogenic function and in TERT encodes a putative reverse transcriptase-null protein. Our findings suggest that recurring gene body promoter hypomethylation events, along with histone H3K4 trimethylation, alter the transcriptional landscape of GBM through the activation of a limited number of normally silenced promoters within gene bodies, in at least one case leading to expression of an oncogenic protein. PMID:24709822

  5. Phytol directly activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) and regulates gene expression involved in lipid metabolism in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kato, Sota; Egawa, Kahori; Ebisu, Shogo; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Fushiki, Tohru; Kawada, Teruo . E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-18

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is one of the indispensable transcription factors for regulating lipid metabolism in various tissues. In our screening for natural compounds that activate PPAR using luciferase assays, a branched-carbon-chain alcohol (a component of chlorophylls), phytol, has been identified as a PPAR{alpha}-specific activator. Phytol induced the increase in PPAR{alpha}-dependent luciferase activity and the degree of in vitro binding of a coactivator, SRC-1, to GST-PPAR{alpha}. Moreover, the addition of phytol upregulated the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes at both mRNA and protein levels in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes. These findings indicate that phytol is functional as a PPAR{alpha} ligand and that it stimulates the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes in intact cells. Because PPAR{alpha} activation enhances circulating lipid clearance, phytol may be important in managing abnormalities in lipid metabolism.

  6. Promoter activity of the 5'-flanking regions of medaka fish soluble guanylate cyclase alpha1 and beta1 subunit genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Suzuki, Norio

    2002-01-01

    We examined the spatial expression pattern of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) soluble guanylate cyclase alpha(1) and beta(1) subunit genes, OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1), and characterized the 5'-flanking region required for expression of both genes by introducing various promoter-luciferase fusion-gene constructs into COS-1 cells and medaka fish embryos. The OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1) gene transcripts were detected in whole brain and kidney in 7-day and 9-day embryos. Primer-extension analysis demonstrated that there were no differences among various adult organs (brain, eye, kidney, ovary and testis) in the transcription start site of the OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1) genes. Neither gene contained the functional TATA box within its 5'-flanking region, and the basal promoter activity was found between nucleotides +33 and +42 in the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene and between nucleotides +146 and +155 in the OlGCS-beta(1) gene. In the assay of medaka fish embryos, the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-beta(1) gene exhibited lower promoter activity than that of the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene. In the experiments on dual-luciferase fusion-gene constructs, the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene connected to the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-beta(1) gene was introduced into medaka fish embryos, and the 5'-flanking regions of both subunit genes were shown to mutually influence each other's promoter activity. PMID:11772405

  7. Intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 is a stress-inducible gene controlled by activating transcription factor 4.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Irina E; Garaeva, Alisa A; Chumakov, Peter M; Evstafieva, Alexandra G

    2016-09-15

    Intermedin or adrenomedullin 2 is a set of calcitonin-related peptides with a putative tumor angiogenesis promoting activity that are formed by proteolytic processing of the ADM2 gene product. It has been proposed that the ADM2 gene is regulated by the estrogen response element (ERE) and hypoxia response elements (HRE) found within its promoter region. In the present study we reveal a functional mechanism by which ADM2 participates in the unfolded protein response (UPR) and in responses to the mitochondrial respiration chain inhibition. We show that the ADM2 gene is controlled by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), the principal regulator of the integrated stress response (ISR). The upregulation of ADM2 mRNA could be prevented by the pharmacological ISR inhibitor ISRIB and by the downregulation of ATF4 with specific shRNA, while ectopic expression of ATF4 cDNA resulted in a notable increase in ADM2 gene transcription. A potential ATF4-binding site was identified in the coding region of the ADM2 gene and the requirement of this site during the ATF4-mediated ADM2 gene promoter activation was validated by the luciferase reporter assay. Mutagenesis of the putative ATF4-response element prevented the induction of luciferase activity in response to ATF4 overproduction, as well as in response to mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibition by piericidin A and ER stress induction by tunicamycin and brefeldin A. Since ADM2 was shown to inhibit ATF4 expression during myocardial ER stress, a feedback mechanism could be proposed for the ADM2 regulation under ER stress conditions. PMID:27328454

  8. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    PubMed Central

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-01-01

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 (Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 Å cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the “off-target” effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism. PMID:20194791

  9. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    SciTech Connect

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-04-07

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 {angstrom} cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the 'off-target' effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism.

  10. Type 1 plaminogen activator inhibitor gene: Functional analysis and glucocorticoid regulation of its promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zonneveld, A.J.; Curriden, S.A.; Loskutoff, D.J. )

    1988-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 is an important component of the fibrinolytic system and its biosynthesis is subject to complex regulation. To study this regulation at the level of transcription, the authors have identified and sequenced the promoter of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene. Nuclease protection experiments were performed by using endothelial cell mRNA and the transcription initiation (cap) site was established. Sequence analysis of the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene revealed a perfect TATA box at position {minus}28 to position {minus}23, the conserved distance from the cap site. Comparative functional studies with the firefly luciferase gene as a reporter gene showed that fragments derived from this 5{prime} flanking region exhibited high promoter activity when transfected into bovine aortic endothelial cells and mouse Ltk{sup {minus}} fibroblasts but were inactive when introduced into HeLa cells. These studies indicate that the fragments contain the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 promoter and that it is expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Although the fragments were also silent in rat FTO2B hepatoma cells, their promoter activity could be induced up to 40-fold with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Promoter deletion mapping experiments and studies involving the fusion of promoter fragments to a heterologous gene indicated that dexamethasone induction is mediated by a glucocorticoid responsive element with enhancer-like properties located within the region between nucleotides {minus}305 and +75 of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene.

  11. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs): In Vitro Mechanism of Estrogenic Activation and Differential Effects on ER Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yin; Luh, Colin J.; Burns, Katherine A.; Arao, Yukitomo; Jiang, Zhongliang; Teng, Christina T.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) influence the activity of estrogen receptors (ERs) and alter the function of the endocrine system. However, the diversity of EDC effects and mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Objectives: We examined the agonistic activity of EDCs through ERα and ERβ. We also investigated the effects of EDCs on ER-mediated target genes. Methods: HepG2 and HeLa cells were used to determine the agonistic activity of EDCs on ERα and ERβ via the luciferase reporter assay. Ishikawa cells stably expressing ERα were used to determine changes in endogenous ER target gene expression by EDCs. Results: Twelve EDCs were categorized into three groups on the basis of product class and similarity of chemical structure. As shown by luciferase reporter analysis, the EDCs act as ER agonists in a cell type– and promoter-specific manner. Bisphenol A, bisphenol AF, and 2-2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (group 1) strongly activated ERα estrogen responsive element (ERE)-mediated responses. Daidzein, genistein, kaempferol, and coumestrol (group 2) activated both ERα and ERβ ERE-mediated activities. Endosulfan and kepone (group 3) weakly activated ERα. Only a few EDCs significantly activated the “tethered” mechanism via ERα or ERβ. Results of real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that bisphenol A and bisphenol AF consistently activated endogenous ER target genes, but the activities of other EDCs on changes of ER target gene expression were compound specific. Conclusion: Although EDCs with similar chemical structures (in the same group) tended to have comparable ERα and ERβ ERE-mediated activities, similar chemical structure did not correlate with previously reported ligand binding affinities of the EDCs. Using ERα-stable cells, we observed that EDCs differentially induced activity of endogenous ER target genes. PMID:23384675

  12. Functional consequences of site-directed mutation of conserved histidyl residues of the bacterial luciferase alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Xin, X; Xi, L; Tu, S C

    1991-11-26

    The available sequences for the different bacterial luciferases reveal five conserved histidyl residues at positions 44, 45, 82, 224, and 285 of the alpha subunit. Ten variants of Vibrio harveyi luciferase were obtained by selective site-directed mutations of these five histidines. The essentiality of alpha His44 and alpha His45 was indicated by 4-7 orders of magnitude of bioluminescence activity reductions resulting from the substitution of either histidine by alanine (alpha H44A or alpha H45A), aspartate (alpha H44D or alpha H45D), or lysine (alpha H45K). Moreover, alpha H44A and alpha H45A were distinct from the native luciferase in thermal stabilities. Mutations at the other three positions also resulted in activity reductions ranging from a fewfold to 3 orders of magnitude. Despite these widely different bioluminescence light outputs, mutated luciferases exhibited, in nonturnover in vitro assays, light emission decay rates mostly similar to that of the native luciferase using octanal, decanal, or dodecanal as a substrate. This is attributed to a similarity in the catalytic rate constants of the light-emitting pathway for the native and mutated luciferases, but various mutated luciferases suffer in different degrees from competing dark reaction(s). In accord with this interpretation, the bioluminescence activities of mutated luciferases showed a general parallel with the relative stabilities of their 4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate species. Furthermore, the drastically reduced bioluminescence activities for luciferases with the alpha His44 or alpha His45 substituted by aspartate, alanine, or lysine were accompanied by little or no activities for consuming the aldehyde substrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1958663

  13. Sp1 trans-activates the murine H(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(2)-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Li, Mei; Zhang, Dongyu; Xu, William; Kone, Bruce C

    2009-07-01

    The H(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha(2) (HKalpha2) gene of the renal collecting duct and distal colon plays a central role in potassium and acid-base homeostasis, yet its transcriptional control remains poorly characterized. We previously demonstrated that the proximal 177 bp of its 5'-flanking region confers basal transcriptional activity in murine inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD3) cells and that NF-kappaB and CREB-1 bind this region to alter transcription. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the -144/-135 Sp element influences basal HKalpha2 gene transcription in these cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays using probes for -154/-127 revealed Sp1-containing DNA-protein complexes in nuclear extracts of mIMCD3 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated that Sp1, but not Sp3, binds to this promoter region of the HKalpha2 gene in mIMCD3 cells in vivo. HKalpha2 minimal promoter-luciferase constructs with point mutations in the -144/-135 Sp element exhibited much lower activity than the wild-type promoter in transient transfection assays. Overexpression of Sp1, but not Sp3, trans-activated an HKalpha2 proximal promoter-luciferase construct in mIMCD3 cells as well as in SL2 insect cells, which lack Sp factors. Conversely, small interfering RNA knockdown of Sp1 inhibited endogenous HKalpha2 mRNA expression, and binding of Sp1 to chromatin associated with the proximal HKalpha2 promoter without altering the binding or regulatory influence of NF-kappaB p65 or CREB-1 on the proximal HKalpha2 promoter. We conclude that Sp1 plays an important and positive role in controlling basal HKalpha2 gene expression in mIMCD3 cells in vivo and in vitro. PMID:19420113

  14. Comparative theoretical study of the binding of luciferyl-adenylate and dehydroluciferyl-adenylate to firefly luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Vieira, João; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2012-08-01

    This is the first report of a study employing a computational approach to study the binding of (D/L)-luciferyl-adenlyates and dehydroluciferyl-adenylate to firefly luciferase. A semi-empirical/molecular mechanics methodology was used to study the interaction between these ligands and active site molecules. All adenylates are complexed with the enzyme, mostly due to electrostatic interactions with cationic residues. Dehydroluciferyl-adenylate is expected to be a competitive inhibitor of luciferyl-adenylate, as their binding mechanism and affinity to luciferase are very similar. Both luciferyl-adenylates adopt the L-orientation in the active site of luciferase.

  15. Multiplex detection of protein-protein interactions using a next generation luciferase reporter.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Lisette G G C; Mattioli, Michela; Ricci, Fernanda; Li, Yao-Cheng; Wade, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Cell-based assays of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) using split reporter proteins can be used to identify PPI agonists and antagonists. Generally, such assays measure one PPI at a time, and thus counterscreens for on-target activity must be run in parallel or at a subsequent stage; this increases both the cost and time during screening. Split luciferase systems offer advantages over those that use split fluorescent proteins (FPs). This is since split luciferase offers a greater signal:noise ratio and, unlike split FPs, the PPI can be reversed upon small molecule treatment. While multiplexed PPI assays using luciferase have been reported, they suffer from low signal:noise and require fairly complex spectral deconvolution during analysis. Furthermore, the luciferase enzymes used are large, which limits the range of PPIs that can be interrogated due to steric hindrance from the split luciferase fragments. Here, we report a multiplexed PPI assay based on split luciferases from Photinus pyralis (firefly luciferase, FLUC) and the deep-sea shrimp, Oplophorus gracilirostris (NanoLuc, NLUC). Specifically, we show that the binding of the p53 tumor suppressor to its two major negative regulators, MDM2 and MDM4, can be simultaneously measured within the same sample, without the requirement for complex filters or deconvolution. We provide chemical and genetic validation of this system using MDM2-targeted small molecules and mutagenesis, respectively. Combined with the superior signal:noise and smaller size of split NanoLuc, this multiplexed PPI assay format can be exploited to study the induction or disruption of pairwise interactions that are prominent in many cell signaling pathways. PMID:26646257

  16. How to Fabricate Functional Artificial Luciferases for Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Fujii, Rika

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces fabrication of artificial luciferases (ALuc(®)) by extracting the consensus amino acids from the alignment of copepod luciferase sequences. The made ALucs have unique sequential identities that are phylogenetically distinctive from those of any existing copepod luciferase. Some ALucs exhibited heat stability, and strong and greatly prolonged optical intensities. The made ALucs are applicable to various bioassays as an optical readout, including live cell imaging, single-chain probes, and bioluminescent tags of antibodies. The present protocol guides on how to fabricate a unique artificial luciferase with designed optical properties and functionalities. PMID:27424894

  17. Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus (PRV) Expressing Firefly Luciferase Effectively Screened for CRISPR/Cas9 Single Guide RNAs and Antiviral Compounds.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Liu, Ji-Ting; Fang, Qiong-Qiong; Wang, Tong-Yun; Sun, Ming-Xia; An, Tong-Qing; Tian, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Xue-Hui

    2016-04-01

    A Pseudorabies virus (PRV) variant has emerged in China since 2011 that is not protected by commercial vaccines, and has not been well studied. The PRV genome is large and difficult to manipulate, but it is feasible to use clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology. However, identification of single guide RNA (sgRNA) through screening is critical to the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and is traditionally time and labor intensive, and not suitable for rapid and high throughput screening of effective PRV sgRNAs. In this study, we developed a recombinant PRV strain expressing firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a reporter virus for PRV-specific sgRNA screens and rapid evaluation of antiviral compounds. Luciferase activity was apparent as soon as 4 h after infection and was stably expressed through 10 passages. In a proof of the principle screen, we were able to identify several PRV specific sgRNAs and confirmed that they inhibited PRV replication using traditional methods. Using the reporter virus, we also identified PRV variants lacking US3, US2, and US9 gene function, and showed anti-PRV activity for chloroquine. Our results suggest that the reporter PRV strain will be a useful tool for basic virology studies, and for developing PRV control and prevention measures. PMID:27043610

  18. Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus (PRV) Expressing Firefly Luciferase Effectively Screened for CRISPR/Cas9 Single Guide RNAs and Antiviral Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan-Dong; Liu, Ji-Ting; Fang, Qiong-Qiong; Wang, Tong-Yun; Sun, Ming-Xia; An, Tong-Qing; Tian, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Xue-Hui

    2016-01-01

    A Pseudorabies virus (PRV) variant has emerged in China since 2011 that is not protected by commercial vaccines, and has not been well studied. The PRV genome is large and difficult to manipulate, but it is feasible to use clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology. However, identification of single guide RNA (sgRNA) through screening is critical to the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and is traditionally time and labor intensive, and not suitable for rapid and high throughput screening of effective PRV sgRNAs. In this study, we developed a recombinant PRV strain expressing firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a reporter virus for PRV-specific sgRNA screens and rapid evaluation of antiviral compounds. Luciferase activity was apparent as soon as 4 h after infection and was stably expressed through 10 passages. In a proof of the principle screen, we were able to identify several PRV specific sgRNAs and confirmed that they inhibited PRV replication using traditional methods. Using the reporter virus, we also identified PRV variants lacking US3, US2, and US9 gene function, and showed anti-PRV activity for chloroquine. Our results suggest that the reporter PRV strain will be a useful tool for basic virology studies, and for developing PRV control and prevention measures. PMID:27043610

  19. Krüppel-like Factor 4 activates HBG gene expression in primary erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Inderdeep S.; Alam, Md M.; Choudhary, Pankaj K.; Pace, Betty S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The SP1/Krüppel-like Factor (SP1/KLF) family of transcription factors plays a role in diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation and control of gene transcription. The discovery of KLF1 (EKLF), a key regulator of HBB (β-globin) gene expression, expanded our understanding of the role of KLFs in erythropoiesis. In this study, we investigated a mechanism of HBG (γ-globin) regulation by KLF4. siRNA-mediated gene silencing and enforced expression of KLF4 in K562 cells substantiated the ability of KLF4 to positively regulate endogenous HBG gene transcription. The physiological significance of this finding was confirmed in primary erythroid cells, where KLF4 knockdown at day 11 significantly attenuated HBG mRNA levels and enforced expression at day 28 stimulated the silenced HBG genes. In vitro binding characterization using the γ-CACCC and β-CACCC probes demonstrated KLF4 preferentially binds the endogenous γ-CACCC, while CREB binding protein (CREBBP) binding was not selective. Co-immunoprecipitation studies confirmed protein-protein interaction between KLF4 and CREBBP. Furthermore, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed co-localization of both factors in the γ-CACCC region. Subsequent luciferase reporter studies demonstrated that KLF4 trans-activated HBG promoter activity and that CREBBP enforced expression resulted in gene repression. Our data supports a model of antagonistic interaction of KLF4/CREBBP trans-factors in HBG regulation. PMID:21539536

  20. Use of Luciferase Chimaera to Monitor PLCζ Expression in Mouse Eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, Karl; Campbell, Karen; Yu, Yuansong; Saunders, Christopher; Lai, F. Anthony

    The microinjection of cRNA encoding phospholipase Cζ (PLC zeta) causes Ca2+ oscillations and the activation of development in mouse eggs. The PLCζ protein that is expressed in eggs after injection of cRNA is effective in causing Ca2+ oscillations at very low concentrations. In order to measure the amount and timecourse of protein expression we have tagged PLCζ with firefly luciferase. The expression of the luciferase protein tag in eggs is then measured by incubation in luciferin combined with luminescence imaging, or by the lysis of eggs in the presence of Mg-ATP and luciferin in a luminometer. The use of luciferase to monitor protein expression after injection of cRNA is a sensitive and effective method that efficiently allows for sets of eggs to be used for PLCζ quantitation, Ca2+ imaging, and studies of embryo development.

  1. Functional characterization of neural-restrictive silencer element in mouse pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hideki; Tominaga, Aiko; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamada, Katsushi; Miyata, Atsuro

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is predominantly localized in the nervous system, but the underlying mechanism in its neuron-specific expression remains unclear. In addition to two neural-restrictive silencer-like element (NRSLE1 and 2), as reported previously, we have identified the third element in -1,601 to -1,581 bp from the translational initiation site of mouse PACAP gene and termed it as NRSLE3, of which, the sequence and location were highly conserved among mouse, rat, and human PACAP genes. In luciferase reporter assay, the deletion or site-directed mutagenesis of NRSLE3 in the reporter gene construct, driven by heterologous SV40 promoter, cancelled the repression of luciferase activity in non-neuronal Swiss-3T3 cells. Furthermore, its promoter activity was significantly repressed in Swiss-3T3 cells, but not in neuronal-differentiated PC12 cells. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) with nuclear extracts of Swiss-3T3 cells demonstrated a specific complex with NRSLE3 probe that exhibited the same migration with the neural-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) probe of rat type II sodium channel gene. During neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells, the increment of PACAP mRNA exhibited the correlation with that of REST4 mRNA, which is a neuron-specific variant form of neural-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF). In undifferentiated PC12 cells, trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which indirectly inhibits NRSF-mediated gene silencing, increased PACAP mRNA level and attenuated the repression of promoter activity of 5' flanking region of mouse PACAP gene containing NRSLEs. These suggest that the NRSE-NRSF system implicates in the regulatory mechanism of neuron-specific expression of PACAP gene. PMID:24939248

  2. Novel application of luciferase assay for the in vitro functional assessment of KAL1 variants in three females with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD)

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Mark J.; Hu, Youli; Gregory, Louise C.; Gaston-Massuet, Carles; Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S.; Saldanha, José W.; Gualtieri, Angelica; Thankamony, Ajay; Hughes, Ieuan; Townshend, Sharron; Martinez-Barbera, Juan-Pedro; Bouloux, Pierre-Marc; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2015-01-01

    KAL1 is implicated in 5% of Kallmann syndrome cases, a disorder which genotypically overlaps with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD). To date, a reporter-based assay to assess the functional consequences of KAL1 mutations is lacking. We aimed to develop a luciferase assay for novel application to functional assessment of rare KAL1 mutations detected in a screen of 422 patients with SOD. Quantitative analysis was performed using L6-myoblasts stably expressing FGFR1, transfected with a luciferase-reporter vector containing elements of the FGF-responsive osteocalcin promoter. The two variants assayed [p.K185N, p.P291T], were detected in three females with SOD (presenting with optic nerve hypoplasia, midline and pituitary defects). Our novel assay revealed significant decreases in transcriptional activity [p.K185N: 21% (p < 0.01); p.P291T: 40% (p < 0.001)]. Our luciferase-reporter assay, developed for assessment of KAL1 mutations, determined that two variants in females with hypopituitarism/SOD are loss-of-function; demonstrating that this assay is suitable for quantitative assessment of mutations in this gene. PMID:26375424

  3. STUDIES ON BIOLUMINESCENCE : IX. CHEMICAL NATURE OF CYPRIDINA LUCIFERIN AND CYPRIDINA LUCIFERASE.

    PubMed

    Harvey, E N

    1919-01-20

    There seems to be very little doubt but that luciferase is a protein or so closely associated with proteins that their removal destroys its characteristic properties. The particular group of proteins to which it belongs may be arrived at by a process of exclusion, and only the group of albumins has properties which agree completely with those of luciferase. Dubois believes Pholas luciferase to be an oxidizing enzyme similar to the oxydones of Battelli and Stern because it is readily destroyed by fat solvents such as chloroform, strong alcohol, etc. He has detected iron in a luciferase solution which has dialyzed against running water for a long time, and believes it to be made up of protein in combination with iron and to act as an "oxyzymase ferrique." Cypridina luciferase, on the other hand, is not readily destroyed by fat solvents. Toluene and chloroform are good preservatives, and I often make use of them for this purpose, keeping the luciferase solutions for many months. Professor A. H. Phillips of Princeton University has very kindly analyzed some whole dried Cypridinoe for me and finds iron, copper, and manganese but no zinc or vanadium to be present. Whether these metals are connected with the action of Cypridina luciferase is uncertain, but it is significant that all three of the metals thought to be concerned in organic oxidations are present. Although a large amount of luciferin mixed with a small amount of luciferase will use up all the latter, I agree with Dubois that luciferase has sufficient properties in common with the enzymes as a class to be considered an enzyme. The peroxidases are well known to be used up in the reactions they accelerate. All workers on enzymes agree that the more enzymes are purified the less active they become. The chemical procedures necessary to remove foreign material bring about irreversible changes in the enzyme itself, a characteristic also of many protein groups and of the colloidal state in general. This is true in

  4. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient γ -ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Timothy O.; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M2 seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione

  5. Immobilization of Firefly Luciferase on PVA-co-PE Nanofibers Membrane as Biosensor for Bioluminescent Detection of ATP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhao, Qinghua; Luo, Mengying; Li, Mufang; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuedan; Liu, Qiongzhen

    2015-09-16

    The bioluminescent reaction catalyzed by firefly luciferase has become widely established as an outstanding analytical system for assay of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). When in solution, the luciferase is unstable and cannot be reused. The problem can be partially solved by immobilizing the luciferase on solid substrates. The poly(vinyl alcohol-co-ethylene) (PVA-co-PE) nanofibers membrane has abundant active hydroxyl groups on the surface. The PVA-co-PE nanofibers membrane was first activated by cyanuric chloride with triazinyl group. Then the activated PVA-co-PE nanofibers membrane was subsequently reacted with 1,3-propanediamine and biotin. The firefly luciferase was immobilized onto the surface of 1,3-propanediamine- and biotin-functionalized membranes. The surface chemical structure and morphologies of nanofibers membranes were characterized by FTIR-ATR spectra and SEM. The hydrophilicity of membranes was tested by water contact angle measurements. The detection of fluorescence intensity displayed that the firefly-luciferase-immobilized PVA-co-PE nanofibers membranes indicated high catalytic activity and efficiency. Especially, the firefly-luciferase-immobilized nanofiber membrane which was functionalized by biotin can be a promising candidate as biosensor for bioluminescent detection of ATP because of its high detection sensitivity. PMID:26275118

  6. A Novel HIV-1 Reporter Virus with a Membrane-Bound Gaussia princeps Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Suree, Nuttee; Koizumi, Naoya; Sahakyan, Anna; Shimizu, Saki; An, Dong Sung

    2014-01-01

    Summary HIV-1 reporter viruses are a critical tool for investigating HIV-1 infection. By having a reporter gene incorporated into the HIV-1 genome, the expressed reporter protein acts as a specific tag, thus enabling specific detection of HIV-1 infected cells. Currently existing HIV-1 reporter viruses utilize reporters for the detection of HIV-1 infected cells by a single assay. A reporter virus enabling the detection of viral particles as well as HIV-1 infected cells by two assays can be more versatile for many applications. In this report, a novel reporter HIV-1 was generated by introducing a membrane-anchored form of the Gaussia princeps luciferase gene (mGluc) upstream of the nef gene in the HIV-1NL4-3 genome using a picornaviral 2A-like sequence. The resulting HIV-1NL4-3mGluc virus expresses Gaussia princeps luciferase efficiently on viral membrane and the cell surface of infected human T cell lines and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This HIV-1 reporter is replication competent and the reporter gene mGluc is expressed during multiple rounds of infection. Importantly, viral particles can be detected by bioluminescence and infected cells can be detected simultaneously by bioluminescence and flow cytometric assays. With the versatility of two sensitive detection methods, this novel luciferase reporter has many applications such as cell-based screening for anti-HIV-1 agents or studies of HIV-1 pathogenicity. PMID:22483780

  7. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios

    SciTech Connect

    Makemson, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively.

  8. Posttranslationally caused bioluminescence burst of the Escherichia coli luciferase reporter strain.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Yamato; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Ryo, Masashi; Motoki, Shogo; Kuwano, Takashi; Tezuka, Takafumi; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We continuously monitored bioluminescence from a wild-type reporter strain of Escherichia coli (lacp::luc+/WT), which carries the promoter of the lac operon (lacp) fused with the firefly luciferase gene (luc+). This strain showed a bioluminescence burst when shifted into the stationary growth phase. Bioluminescence profiles of other wild-type reporter strains (rpsPp::luc+ and argAp::luc+) and gene-deletion reporter strains (lacp::luc+/crp- and lacp::luc+/lacI-) indicate that transcriptional regulation is not responsible for generation of the burst. Consistently, changes in the luciferase protein levels did not recapitulate the profile of the burst. On the other hand, dissolved oxygen levels increased over the period across the burst, suggesting that the burst is, at least partially, caused by an increase in intracellular oxygen levels. We discuss limits of the firefly luciferase when used as a reporter for gene expression and its potential utility for monitoring metabolic changes in cells. PMID:26506945

  9. Use of liposome-mediated DNA transfection to determine promoter activity in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fabunmi, R P

    1999-01-01

    The transfer and expression of DNA plasmids containing promoter fragments of heterologous genes linked to reporter cDNAs in mammalian cells has become an invaluable technique for studying the regulation of gene expression. Several reporter genes such as luciferase, β-galactosidase, chloramphenicol acetyl transferase, and green flourescent protein are ideal to study promoter activities as their gene products are not endogenous to smooth muscle cells (SMC) and their expression can be readily detected using convenient assays (1). Among these genes, a popular choice is the firefly luciferase, as its expression can be easily detected in cells using a highly sensitive chemiluminescent assay (2). The firefly luciferase catalyses a rapid, ATP-dependent oxidation of the substrate, luciferin, which then emits light. Reactions catalyzed by firefly luciferase are: [Formula: see text]. PMID:21341022

  10. Identification of a DNA methylation-dependent activator sequence in the pseudoxanthoma elasticum gene, ABCC6.

    PubMed

    Arányi, Tamás; Ratajewski, Marcin; Bardóczy, Viola; Pulaski, Lukasz; Bors, András; Tordai, Attila; Váradi, András

    2005-05-13

    ABCC6 encodes MRP6, a member of the ABC protein family with an unknown physiological role. The human ABCC6 and its two pseudogenes share 99% identical DNA sequence. Loss-of-function mutations of ABCC6 are associated with the development of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a recessive hereditary disorder affecting the elastic tissues. Various disease-causing mutations were found in the coding region; however, the mutation detection rate in the ABCC6 coding region of bona fide PXE patients is only approximately 80%. This suggests that polymorphisms or mutations in the regulatory regions may contribute to the development of the disease. Here, we report the first characterization of the ABCC6 gene promoter. Phylogenetic in silico analysis of the 5' regulatory regions revealed the presence of two evolutionarily conserved sequence elements embedded in CpG islands. The study of DNA methylation of ABCC6 and the pseudogenes identified a correlation between the methylation of the CpG island in the proximal promoter and the ABCC6 expression level in cell lines. Both activator and repressor sequences were uncovered in the proximal promoter by reporter gene assays. The most potent activator sequence was one of the conserved elements protected by DNA methylation on the endogenous gene in non-expressing cells. Finally, in vitro methylation of this sequence inhibits the transcriptional activity of the luciferase promoter constructs. Altogether these results identify a DNA methylation-dependent activator sequence in the ABCC6 promoter. PMID:15760889

  11. Induction of human adiponectin gene transcription by telmisartan, angiotensin receptor blocker, independently on PPAR-{gamma} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Moriuchi, Akie ||. E-mail: f1195@cc.nagasaki-u-ac.jp; Shimamura, Mika; Kita, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Hironaga; Satoh, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Tsuyoshi; Fujishima, Keiichiro; Fukushima, Keiko |; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nagayama, Yuji; Kawasaki, Eiji

    2007-05-18

    Adiponectin, an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein, has been shown to ameliorate insulin resistance and inhibit the process of atherosclerosis. Recently, several reports have stated that angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), increase adiponectin plasma level, and ameliorate insulin resistance. Telmisartan, a subclass of ARBs, has been shown to be a partial agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{gamma}, and to increase the plasma adiponectin level. However, the transcriptional regulation of the human adiponectin gene by telmisartan has not been determined yet. To elucidate the effect of telmisartan on adiponectin, the stimulatory regulation of human adiponectin gene by telmisartan was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, utilizing adenovirus-mediated luciferase reporter gene-transferring technique. This study indicates that telmisartan may stimulate adiponectin transcription independent of PPAR-{gamma}.

  12. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms and activity analysis of the promoter and enhancer of the pig lactase gene.

    PubMed

    Du, Hai-Ting; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Jia-Mei; Zhao, Wei; Tao, Xiao-Li; Ba, Cai-Feng; Tian, Yu-Min; Su, Yu-Hong

    2014-07-15

    Lactose intolerance in northern Europeans is strongly associated with a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located 14 kb upstream of the human lactase gene: -13,910 C/T. We examined whether SNPs in the 5' flanking region of the pig lactase gene are similar to those in the human gene and whether these polymorphisms play a functional role in regulating pig lactase gene expression. The 5' flanking region of the lactase gene from several different breeds of pigs was cloned and analyzed for gene regulatory activity of a luciferase reporter gene. One SNP was found in the enhancer region (-797 G/A) and two were found in the promoter region (-308G/C and -301 A/G). The promoter C-308,G-301(Pro-CG) strongly promotes the expression of the lactase gene, but the promoter G-308,A-301(Pro-GA) does not. The enhancer A-797(Enh-A) genotype for Pro-GA can significantly enhance promoter activity, but has an inhibitory effect on Pro-CG. The Enhancer G-797(Enh-G) has a significant inhibitory effect on both promoters. In conclusion, the order of effectiveness on the pig lactase gene is Enh-A+Pro-GA>Enh-A/G+Pro-CG>Enh-G+Pro-GA. PMID:24809963

  13. Analysis of LPS-induced, NFκB-dependent interleukin-8 transcription in kidney embryonic cell line expressing TLR4 using luciferase assay.

    PubMed

    Yunusova, Tamara; Akhtar, Mumtaz; Poltoratsky, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is orchestrated by a complex network of signal transduction pathways that typically originate on cell surface receptors and culminate in DNA-binding transcription factors, which translocate to the nucleus and bind cis-regulatory elements in promoter regions of genes, thereby inducing de novo synthesis of the nascent RNA transcripts and their splicing. Gene expression arrays monitor abundance of the matured, spliced cDNA, which undergoes additional posttranscriptional modifications that greatly affect the half-life of the cDNA. Thus, the relative abundance of cDNA is not necessarily commensurable with the activity of promoters of the corresponding genes. In contrast, reporter gene assays provide valuable insight into the regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription and allow for discerning the contribution of individual transcription factors into changes in gene expression. Here, we describe a robust reporter gene assay method that is useful for exploration of transcription regulatory network, which regulates gene expression in response to inflammation. The method is exemplified by using the promoter region of the prototypic pro-inflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8), which plays an important role in immune response as well as carcinogenesis. Using the luciferase reporter gene assay, we analyze the activation status of the IL-8 promoter in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human embryonic kidney cells. PMID:24908317

  14. Heme activates the heme oxygenase-1 gene in renal epithelial cells by stabilizing Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Alam, Jawed; Killeen, Erin; Gong, Pengfei; Naquin, Ryan; Hu, Bin; Stewart, Daniel; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Nath, Karl A

    2003-04-01

    The mechanism of heme oxygenase-1 gene (ho-1) activation by heme in immortalized rat proximal tubular epithelial cells was examined. Analysis of the ho-1 promoter identified the heme-responsive sequences as the stress-response element (StRE), multiple copies of which are present in two enhancer regions, E1 and E2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified Nrf2, MafG, ATF3, and Jun and Fos family members as StRE-binding proteins; binding of Nrf2, MafG, and ATF3 was increased in response to heme. Dominant-negative mutants of Nrf2 and Maf, but not of c-Fos and c-Jun, inhibited basal and heme-induced expression of an E1-controlled luciferase gene. Heme did not affect the transcription activity of Nrf2, dimerization between Nrf2 and MafG, or the level of MafG, but did stimulate expression of Nrf2. Heme did not influence the level of Nrf2 mRNA but increased the half-life of Nrf2 protein from approximately 10 min to nearly 110 min. These results indicate that heme promotes stabilization of Nrf2, leading to accumulation of Nrf2. MafG dimers that bind to StREs to activate the ho-1 gene. PMID:12453873

  15. Efficient transcription of the human angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene requires intronic sequence elements.

    PubMed Central

    Warnecke, C; Willich, T; Holzmeister, J; Bottari, S P; Fleck, E; Regitz-Zagrosek, V

    1999-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms of human angiotensin II type 2 receptor (hAT2) gene regulation we functionally characterized the promoter and downstream regions of the gene. 5'-Terminal deletion mutants from -1417/+100 to -46/+100 elicited significant but low functional activity in luciferase reporter gene assays with PC12W cells. Inclusion into the promoter constructs of intron 1 and the transcribed region of the hAT2 gene up to the translation start enhanced luciferase activity 6.7+/-1.6-fold and 11.6+/-1.7-fold (means+/-S.E.M.) respectively, whereas fusion of the promoter to the spliced 5' untranslated region of hAT2 cDNA did not, which indicated an enhancement caused by intronic sequence elements. Reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR confirmed that the chimaeric hAT2-luciferase mRNA was regularly spliced in PC12W cells. A Northern blot analysis of transfected cells showed levels of luciferase mRNA expression consistent with the respective enzyme activities. Mapping of intron 1 revealed that a 12 bp sequence in the centre of the intron was required for the increase in promoter activity, whereas the 5' adjacent intronic region mediated a decrease in luciferase activity. Mutation of the 12 bp region led to altered protein binding and markedly decreased luciferase activity. Cloned into a promoterless luciferase vector, a 123 bp intron 1 fragment was able to direct reporter gene expression to the same activity as occurred in conjunction with the 5' flanking region. These results indicate that sequence elements in intron 1 are necessary for efficient transcription of hAT2. In reporter gene assays, intron 1 might by itself function as a promoter and initiate transcription from an alternative start point. PMID:10229654

  16. A plant 35S CaMV promoter induces long-term expression of luciferase in Atlantic salmon

    PubMed Central

    Seternes, Tore; Tonheim, Tom C.; Myhr, Anne I.; Dalmo, Roy A.

    2016-01-01

    The long-term persistence and activity of a naked plasmid DNA (pGL3-35S) containing a luc gene (reporter gene) controlled by a plant 35S CaMV promoter was studied in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) after injection. Atlantic salmon (mean weight 70 grams) were injected intramuscularly with 100 μg of plasmid DNA. Blood, different tissues and organs were sampled at different time points up to day 535 after injection. Southern blot analysis suggested the presence of extra-chromosomally open circular, linear and supercoiled topoforms of pGL3-35S at day 150 after injection. At day 536 open circular and supercoiled topoforms were detected. Luciferase activity was detected at the injection site up to 536 days post-injection of pGL3-35S, where it peaked at day 150 and decreased to approximately 17% of its maximum activity by day 536. Our study demonstrated that a plasmid containing the 35S promoter was able to induce expression of a reporter gene/protein in fish in vivo and that the plasmid DNA persisted for a prolonged time after intramuscular injection. PMID:27114167

  17. A plant 35S CaMV promoter induces long-term expression of luciferase in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Seternes, Tore; Tonheim, Tom C; Myhr, Anne I; Dalmo, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    The long-term persistence and activity of a naked plasmid DNA (pGL3-35S) containing a luc gene (reporter gene) controlled by a plant 35S CaMV promoter was studied in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) after injection. Atlantic salmon (mean weight 70 grams) were injected intramuscularly with 100 μg of plasmid DNA. Blood, different tissues and organs were sampled at different time points up to day 535 after injection. Southern blot analysis suggested the presence of extra-chromosomally open circular, linear and supercoiled topoforms of pGL3-35S at day 150 after injection. At day 536 open circular and supercoiled topoforms were detected. Luciferase activity was detected at the injection site up to 536 days post-injection of pGL3-35S, where it peaked at day 150 and decreased to approximately 17% of its maximum activity by day 536. Our study demonstrated that a plasmid containing the 35S promoter was able to induce expression of a reporter gene/protein in fish in vivo and that the plasmid DNA persisted for a prolonged time after intramuscular injection. PMID:27114167

  18. Gaussia Luciferase as a Genetic Fusion Partner with Antibody Fragments for Sensitive Immunoassay Monitoring of Clinical Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hiroyuki; Morita, Izumi; Kiguchi, Yuki; Miyake, Sayaka; Moriuchi, Ayaka; Akisada, Tatsuki; Niwa, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Norihiro

    2015-12-15

    In this study, we show the utility of Gaussia luciferase (GLuc), which is much smaller than previously found luciferases, as the fusion partner with artificial antibody species for developing sensitive immunoassay systems. As an example, we constructed a bioluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BL-ELISA) system determining the major glucocorticoid cortisol. A monoclonal antibody was newly elicited against a cortisol-albumin conjugate, and the genes encoding its variable domains (VH and VL) were cloned and combined to encode a single-chain Fv fragment (scFv). scFv was then linked to the wild-type GLuc gene or that encoding GLuc mutants reported to show improved emission kinetics and expressed in the periplasmic space of several Escherichia coli strains. Notably, the wild-type GLuc fusion protein (scFv-wtGLuc) showed the most suitable luminescent properties for BL-ELISAs. In our system, scFv-wtGLuc was reacted competitively with the analyte and immobilized cortisol moieties, and the bound GLuc activity was monitored with coelenterazine as the substrate. Successful batch-type luminescence detection was achieved using a plate reader without built-in injectors. The midpoint and limit of detection in a typical dose-response curve were 4.1 and 0.26 pg/assay, respectively, thus exhibiting much more sensitivity than conventional cortisol immunoassays. Serum cortisol levels (as the sum with cortisone) for healthy subjects, determined without any pretreatment, were compatible with reported reference ranges. The scFv-wtGLuc probe was stable over a year under storage as periplasmic extracts at -30 °C or with repeated freeze-thawing. These results suggest that GLuc fusions with antibody fragments might serve as useful and highly sensitive immunoassay probes in various clinical settings. PMID:26625180

  19. Enhancer activity of Helitron in sericin-1 gene promoter from Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Li, Chun-Feng; Wu, Jie; Wei, Jun-Hong; Zou, Yong; Han, Min-Jin; Zhou, Ze-Yang

    2016-06-01

    Sericin is a kind of water-soluble protein expressed specifically in the middle silk gland of Bombyx mori. When the sericin-1 gene promoter was cloned and a transgenic vector was constructed to express a foreign protein, a specific Helitron, Bmhel-8, was identified in the sericin-1 gene promoter sequence in some genotypes of Bombyx mori and Bombyx mandarina. Given that the Bmhel-8 Helitron transposon was present only in some genotypes, it could be the source of allelic variation in the sericin-1 promoter. The length of the sericin-1 promoter sequence is approximately 1063 or 643 bp. The larger size of the sequence or allele is ascribed to the presence of Bmhel-8. Silkworm genotypes can be homozygous for either the shorter or larger promoter sequence or heterozygous, containing both alleles. Bmhel-8 in the sericin-1 promoter exhibits enhancer activity, as demonstrated by a dual-luciferase reporter system in BmE cell lines. Furthermore, Bmhel-8 displays enhancer activity in a sericin-1 promoter-driven gene expression system but does not regulate the tissue-specific expression of sericin-1. PMID:27067405

  20. Genetic Analysis of Varicella-Zoster Virus ORF0 to ORF4 by Use of a Novel Luciferase Bacterial Artificial Chromosome System▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Rowe, Jenny; Wang, Weijia; Sommer, Marvin; Arvin, Ann; Moffat, Jennifer; Zhu, Hua

    2007-01-01

    To efficiently generate varicella-zoster virus (VZV) mutants, we inserted a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector in the pOka genome. We showed that the recombinant VZV (VZVBAC) strain was produced efficiently from the BAC DNA and behaved indistinguishably from wild-type virus. Moreover, VZV's cell-associated nature makes characterizing VZV mutant growth kinetics difficult, especially when attempts are made to monitor viral replication in vivo. To overcome this problem, we then created a VZV strain carrying the luciferase gene (VZVLuc). This virus grew like the wild-type virus, and the resulting luciferase activity could be quantified both in vitro and in vivo. Using PCR-based mutagenesis, open reading frames (ORF) 0 to 4 were individually deleted from VZVLuc genomes. The deletion mutant viruses appeared after transfection into MeWo cells, except for ORF4, which was essential. Growth curve analysis using MeWo cells and SCID-hu mice indicated that ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3 were dispensable for VZV replication both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, the ORF0 deletion virus showed severely retarded growth both in vitro and in vivo. The growth defects of the ORF0 and ORF4 mutants could be fully rescued by introducing wild-type copies of these genes back into their native genome loci. This work has validated and justified the use of the novel luciferase VZV BAC system to efficiently generate recombinant VZV variants and ease subsequent viral growth kinetic analysis both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:17581997

  1. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human gene of the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) of protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoof, C.; Cayla, X.; Merlevede, W.; Goris, J.

    1995-07-20

    The PTPA gene encodes a specific phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of the dimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A. PTPA, cloned from human genomic libraries, is encoded by one single-copy gene, composed of 10 exons and 9 introns with a total length of about 60 kb. The transcription start site was determined, and the 5{prime} flanking sequence was analyzed for its potential as a promotor. This region lacks a TATA sequence in the appropriate position relative to the transcription start, is very GC-rich, and contains upstream of the transcription start four Sp1 sites, a feature common to many TATA-less promotors. Based on the homology with DNA binding consensus sequences of transcription factors, we identified in this promotor region several putative DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-{kappa}B, Myb, Ets-1, Myc, and ATF. Transfection experiments with a construct containing the PTPA promotor region inserted 5{prime} of a luciferase reporter gene revealed that the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the PTPA gene indeed displayed promotor activity that seems to be cell-line dependent. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding, the PTPA gene was localized to the 9q34 region. The PTPA gene is positioned centromeric of c-abl in a region embracing several genes implicated in oncogenesis. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Luciferase-based protein-denaturation assay for quantification of radiofrequency field-induced targeted hyperthermia: developing an intracellular thermometer

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Mustafa; Zhu, Cihui; Kaluarachchi, Warna D.; Curley, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported targeted hyperthermia at the cellular level using remote activation of nanoparticles by radiofrequency waves. To date, methods to quantify intracellular thermal dose have not been reported. In this report we study the relationship between radio wave exposure and luciferase denaturation with and without intracellular nanoparticles. The findings are used to devise a strategy to quantify targeted thermal dose in a primary human liver cancer cell line. Methods Water-bath or non-invasive external RF generator (600W, 13.56 MHz) was used for hyperthermia exposures. Luciferase activity was measured using a bioluminescence assay and viability was assessed using Annexin V-FITC and Propidium iodide staining. Heat shock proteins were analyzed using western-blot analysis Results Duration-dependent luciferase denaturation was observed in SNU449 cells exposed to RF field that preceded measurable loss in viability. Loss of luciferase activity was higher in cetuximab-conjugated gold nanoparticle (C225-AuNP) treated cells. Using a standard curve from water-bath experiments, the intracellular thermal dose was calculated. Cells treated with C225-AuNP accumulated 6.07 times higher intracellular thermal dose than the untreated controls over initial 4 minutes of RF exposure. Conclusions Cancer cells when exposed to an external RF field exhibit dose-dependent protein denaturation. Luciferase denaturation assay can be used to quantify thermal dose delivered after RF exposures to cancer cells with and without nanoparticles. PMID:22515341

  3. Basal expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene is dependent on protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, R A; Matthews, R P; Idzerda, R L; McKnight, G S

    1995-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a Cl- channel that becomes activated after phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). We demonstrate that PKA also plays a crucial role in maintaining basal expression of the CFTR gene in the human colon carcinoma cell line T84. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of a dominant-negative regulatory subunit or treatment with the PKA-selective inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89) caused a complete suppression of CFTR gene expression without affecting other constitutively active genes. Basal expression of a 2.2-kb region of the CFTR promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene (CFTR-luc) exhibited the same dependence on PKA. The ability of cAMP to induce CFTR over basal levels is cell-type specific. In T84 cells, both the endogenous CFTR gene and CFTR-luc exhibited only a modest inducibility (approximately 2-fold), whereas in the human choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3, CFTR-luc could be induced at least 4-fold. A variant cAMP-response element is present at position -48 to -41 in the CFTR promoter, and mutation of this sequence blocks basal expression. We conclude that cAMP, acting through PKA, is an essential regulator of basal CFTR gene expression and may mediate an induction of CFTR in responsive cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7543684

  4. Dynamic Analysis of GH Receptor Conformational Changes by Split Luciferase Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Berry, Philip A.; Zhang, Yue; Jiang, Jing; Lobie, Peter E.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Langenheim, John F.; Chen, Wen Y.; Zinn, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane GH receptor (GHR) exists at least in part as a preformed homodimer on the cell surface. Structural and biochemical studies suggest that GH binds GHR in a 1:2 stoichiometry to effect acute GHR conformational changes that trigger the activation of the receptor-associated tyrosine kinase, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), and downstream signaling. Despite information about GHR-GHR association derived from elegant fluorescence resonance energy transfer/bioluminescence resonance energy transfer studies, an assessment of the dynamics of GH-induced GHR conformational changes has been lacking. To this end, we used a split luciferase complementation assay that allowed detection in living cells of specific ligand-independent GHR-GHR interaction. Furthermore, GH treatment acutely augmented complementation of enzyme activity between GHRs fused, respectively, to N- and C-terminal fragments of firefly luciferase. Analysis of the temporal pattern of GH-induced complementation changes, pharmacological manipulation, genetic alteration of JAK2 levels, and truncation of the GHR intracellular domain (ICD) tail suggested that GH acutely enhances proximity of the GHR homodimer partners independent of the presence of JAK2, phosphorylation of GHR-luciferase chimeras, or an intact ICD. However, subsequent reduction of complementation requires JAK2 kinase activity and the ICD tail. This conclusion is in contrast to existing models of the GHR activation process. PMID:25188449

  5. Intrinsic HER4/4ICD transcriptional activation domains are required for STAT5A activated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Han, Wen; Sfondouris, Mary E; Semmes, Eleanor C; Meyer, Alicia M; Jones, Frank E

    2016-10-30

    The epidermal growth factor receptor family member HER4 undergoes proteolytic processing at the cell surface to release the HER4 intracellular domain (4ICD) nuclear protein. Interestingly, 4ICD directly interacts with STAT5 and functions as an obligate STAT5 nuclear chaperone. Once in the nucleus 4ICD binds with STAT5 at STAT5 target genes, dramatically potentiating STAT5 transcriptional activation. These observations raise the possibility that 4ICD directly coactivates STAT5 gene expression. Using both yeast and mammalian transactivation reporter assays, we performed truncations of 4ICD fused to a GAL4 DNA binding domain and identified two independent 4ICD transactivation domains located between residues 1022 and 1090 (TAD1) and 1192 and 1225 (TAD2). The ability of the 4ICD DNA binding domain fusions to transactivate reporter gene expression required deletion of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase domain. In addition, we identified the 4ICD carboxyl terminal TVV residues, a PDZ domain binding motif (PDZ-DBM), as a potent transcriptional repressor. The transactivation activity of the HER4 carboxyl terminal domain lacking the tyrosine kinase (CTD) was significantly lower than similar EGFR or HER2 CTD. However, deletion of the HER4 CTD PDZ-DBM enhanced HER4 CTD transactivation to levels equivalent to the EGFR and HER2 CTDs. To determine if 4ICD TAD1 and TAD2 have a physiologically relevant role in STAT5 transactivation, we coexpressed 4ICD or 4ICD lacking TAD2 or both TAD1 and TAD2 with STAT5 in a luciferase reporter assay. Our results demonstrate that each 4ICD TAD contributes additively to STAT5A transactivation and the ability of STAT5A to transactivate the β-casein promoter requires the 4ICD TADs. Taken together, published data and our current results demonstrate that both 4ICD nuclear chaperone and intrinsic coactivation activities are essential for STAT5 regulated gene expression. PMID:27502417

  6. Botulinum neurotoxin dose-dependently inhibits release of neurosecretory vesicle-vargeted luciferase from neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Pathe-Neuschäfer-Rube, Andrea; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Genz, Lara; Püchel, Gerhard P

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a bacterial toxin that inhibits neurotransmitter release from neurons and thereby causes a flaccid paralysis. It is used as drug to treat a number of serious ailments and, more frequently, for aesthetic medical interventions. Botulinum toxin for pharmacological applications is isolated from bacterial cultures. Due to partial denaturation of the protein, the specific activity of these preparations shows large variations.Because of its extreme potential toxicity, pharmacological preparations must be carefully tested for their activity. For the current gold standard, the mouse lethality assay, several hundred thousand mice are killed per year. Alternative methods have been developed that suffer from one or more of the following deficits: In vitro enzyme assays test only the activity of the catalytic subunit of the toxin. Enzymatic and cell based immunological assays are specific for just one of the different serotypes. The current study takes a completely different approach that overcomes these limitations: Neuronal cell lines were stably transfected with plasmids coding for luciferases of different species, which were N-terminally tagged with leader sequences that redirect the luciferase into neuro-secretory vesicles. From these vesicles, luciferases were released upon depolarization of the cells. The depolarization-dependent release was efficiently inhibited by of botulinum toxin in a concentration range (1 to 100 pM) that is used in pharmacological preparations. The new assay might thus be an alternative to the mouse lethality assay and the immunological assays already in use. PMID:26389683

  7. Activation of rhodopsin gene transcription in cultured retinal precursors of chicken embryo: role of Ca(2+) signaling and hyperpolarization-activated cation channels.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Marianne; Dejos, Camille; Bergès, Thierry; Régnacq, Matthieu; Voisin, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    This study reports that the spontaneous 50-fold activation of rhodopsin gene transcription, observed in cultured retinal precursors from 13-day chicken embryo, relies on a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. Activation of a transiently transfected rhodopsin promoter (luciferase reporter) in these cells was inhibited (60%) by cotransfection of a dominant-negative form of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein. Both rhodopsin promoter activity and rhodopsin mRNA accumulation were blocked by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II inhibitors, but not by protein kinase A inhibitors, suggesting a role of Ca(2+) rather than cAMP. This was confirmed by the inhibitory effect of general and T-type selective Ca(2+) channel blockers. Oscillations in Ca(2+) fluorescence (Fluo8) could be observed in 1/10 cells that activated the rhodopsin promoter (DsRed reporter). A robust and reversible inhibition of rhodopsin gene transcription by ZD7288 indicated a role of hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCN). Cellular localization and developmental expression of HCN1 were compatible with a role in the onset of rhodopsin gene transcription. Together, the data suggest that the spontaneous activation of rhodopsin gene transcription in cultured retinal precursors results from a signaling cascade that involves the pacemaker activity of HCN channels, the opening of voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channels, activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II and phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein. Rhodopsin gene expression in cultured retinal precursors from chicken embryo relies on a Ca2+-dependent mechanism whereby hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) activate T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCC) through membrane depolarization, causing calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) to phosphorylate the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and leading to activation of rhodopsin gene transcription. Photoreceptor localization and development

  8. Food flavonoid aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated agonistic/antagonistic/synergic activities in human and rat reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Bechoux, Nathalie; Muller, Marc; Sergent, Thérèse; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan; Maghuin-Rogister, Guy; Scippo, Marie-Louise

    2009-04-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor mediating the adverse effects of dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this study, we investigated the genetic-, time-, dose-, species- and tissue-dependent AhR-mediated agonistic/antagonistic activities of three food flavonoids: quercetin, chrysin and genistein. To that end, four stably transfected cell lines were used in cell-based luciferase reporter gene assays: three lines were transformed with the ptKLuc vector harbouring four dioxin-responsive elements (DREs) upstream of the thymidine kinase promoter and the luciferase gene (HepG2-Luc, T-47D-Luc and H4IIE-ULg). The fourth is a patented cell line transformed with a different construct: H4IIE DR-CALUX((R)). Both H4IIE cells were compared for their genetic construction. Human hepatoma (HepG2-Luc) and human breast tumour (T-47D-Luc) cells were compared for tissue-dependent effects. Rat hepatoma (H4IIE-ULg) and human hepatoma (HepG2-Luc) cells were compared for species-dependent activities. We concluded that quercetin, chrysin and genistein act in a time-, dose-, species- and tissue-specific way. For example, genistein displayed agonistic activities when exposed to rat hepatoma cells during 6h but not after 24h. Flavonoids displayed agonistic/antagonistic activities in human breast tumour cells, depending on the exposure time, while in human hepatoma cells, only antagonistic activities of flavonoids were measured. In addition, we report, in all the cells, a synergy between an isoflavone and two food contaminants; the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 3-methylcholanthrene, a PAH. In rat cells, this synergy occurred when cells were exposed to flavonoids and contaminant for 6h, while it was observed in human cells only after 24h. PMID:19286049

  9. Lentivirus IL-10 gene therapy down-regulates IL-17 and attenuates mouse orthotopic lung allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, S; Sato, M; Loisel-Meyer, S; Matsuda, Y; Oishi, H; Guan, Z; Saito, T; Yeung, J; Cypel, M; Hwang, D M; Medin, J A; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy to target lung allograft rejection in a mouse orthotopic left lung transplantation model. IL-10 may regulate posttransplant immunity mediated by IL-17. Lentivirus-mediated trans-airway luciferase gene transfer to the donor lung resulted in persistent luciferase activity up to 6 months posttransplant in the isograft (B6 to B6); luciferase activity decreased in minor-mismatched allograft lungs (B10 to B6) in association with moderate rejection. Fully MHC-mismatched allograft transplantation (BALB/c to B6) resulted in severe rejection and complete loss of luciferase activity. In minor-mismatched allografts, IL-10-encoding lentivirus gene therapy reduced the acute rejection score compared with the lentivirus-luciferase control at posttransplant day 28 (3.0 ± 0.6 vs. 2.0 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD); p = 0.025; n = 6/group). IL-10 gene therapy also significantly reduced gene expression of IL-17, IL-23, and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor (ROR)-γt without affecting levels of IL-12 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Cells expressing IL-17 were dramatically reduced in the allograft lung. In conclusion, lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy significantly reduced expression of IL-17 and other associated genes in the transplanted allograft lung and attenuated posttransplant immune responses after orthotopic lung transplantation. PMID:23601206

  10. Staphylococcus aureus Cell Extract Transcription-Translation Assay: Firefly Luciferase Reporter System for Evaluating Protein Translation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Robert W.; Melchior, Earline P.; Hagadorn, Jeanne C.; Marotti, Keith R.

    2001-01-01

    The promoter for the Staphylococcus aureus capsule polysaccharide synthesis gene (cap1A) was cloned in front of the firefly luciferase gene for use in a cell extract S. aureus transcription-translation system. The assay is rapid, reproducible, and sensitive and has a lower background level than the radiolabeled amino acid incorporation translation assays. We present data evaluating a transcription inhibitor and a number of protein translation inhibitors in this system. PMID:11353649

  11. Signaling mechanisms for the activation of an embryonic gene program during the hypertrophy of cardiac ventricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Chien, R

    1992-01-01

    To study the signaling mechanisms which mediate ventricular hypertrophy, we utilized the induction of the ANF gene as a marker of the hypertrophic response. The induction of the atrial natriuretic factor gene (ANF) is one of the most conserved features of ventricular hypertrophy, occurring in multiple species (mouse, rat, hamster, canine, and human) in response to diverse stimuli (hormonal, mechanical, pressure/volume overload, genetic, IHSS, hypertension, etc.). The ANF gene is expressed in both the atrial and ventricular compartments during embryonic development, but shortly after birth ANF expression is down-regulated to negligible levels in the adult myocardium. Since the reactivation of ANF gene expression in the hypertrophied ventricle is a hallmark of the activation of an embryonic gene program, it has also become of interest to determine if similar mechanisms activate ANF expression during hypertrophy and the initial stages of cardiogenesis. A combination of cotransfection, microinjection, and transgenic approaches has been coupled to well characterized cultured cell systems and in vivo murine models employing normal and transgenic mice. The microinjection of oncogenic RAS proteins into living myocardial cells does not lead to the activation of cell proliferation, but activates ANF gene expression, as assessed by immunofluorescence. Co-transfection of mutant and wild-type RAS expression vectors with a ANF-luciferase fusion gene supports a direct effect of activated RAS on ANF gene transcription. Co-transfection of a dominant negative RAS vector effectively inhibits the induction of the ANF gene during alpha adrenergic mediated hypertrophy of ventricular muscle cells, thereby establishing that a RAS-mediated pathway is required for ANF induction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1299210

  12. The CREB Transcription Factor Controls Transcriptional Activity of the Human RIC8B Gene.

    PubMed

    Maureira, Alejandro; Sánchez, Rodolfo; Valenzuela, Nicole; Torrejón, Marcela; Hinrichs, María V; Olate, Juan; Gutiérrez, José L

    2016-08-01

    Proper regulation of gene expression is essential for normal development, cellular growth, and differentiation. Differential expression profiles of mRNA coding for vertebrate Ric-8B during embryo and adult stages have been observed. In addition, Ric-8B is expressed in few cerebral nuclei subareas. These facts point to a dynamic control of RIC8B gene expression. In order to understand the transcriptional regulation of this gene, we searched for cis-elements in the sequence of the human RIC8B promoter region, identifying binding sites for the basic/leucine zipper (bZip) CREB transcription factor family (CRE sites) and C/EBP transcription factor family (C/EBP sites). CRE sites were found clustered near the transcription start site, while the C/EBP sites were found clustered at around 300 bp upstream the CRE sites. Here, we demonstrate the ability of CREB1 and C/EBPβ to bind their respective elements identified in the RIC8B promoter. Comparative protein-DNA interaction analyses revealed only the proximal elements as high affinity sites for CREB1 and only the distal elements as high affinity sites for C/EBPβ. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, carried out using a human neuroblastoma cell line, confirmed the preferential association of CREB to the proximal region of the RIC8B promoter. By performing luciferase reporter assays, we found the CRE sites as the most relevant elements for its transcriptional activity. Taken together, these data show the existence of functional CREB and C/EBP binding sites in the human RIC8B gene promoter, a particular distribution of these sites and demonstrate a relevant role of CREB in stimulating transcriptional activity of this gene. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1797-1805, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26729411

  13. Luciferase-Based, High-Throughput Assay for Screening and Profiling Transmission-Blocking Compounds against Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytes.

    PubMed

    Lucantoni, Leonardo; Fidock, David A; Avery, Vicky M

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of new antimalarial drugs able to target both the asexual and gametocyte stages ofPlasmodium falciparumis critical to the success of the malaria eradication campaign. We have developed and validated a robust, rapid, and cost-effective high-throughput reporter gene assay to identify compounds active against late-stage (stage IV and V) gametocytes. The assay, which is suitable for testing compound activity at incubation times up to 72 h, demonstrates excellent quality and reproducibility, with averageZ' values of 0.85 ± 0.01. We used the assay to screen more than 10,000 compounds from three chemically diverse libraries. The screening outcomes highlighted the opportunity to use collections of compounds with known activity against the asexual stages of the parasites as a starting point for gametocytocidal activity detection in order to maximize the chances of identifying gametocytocidal compounds. This assay extends the capabilities of our previously reported luciferase assay, which tested compounds against early-stage gametocytes, and opens possibilities to profile the activities of gametocytocidal compounds over the entire course of gametocytogenesis. PMID:26787698

  14. Twist1 Is a TNF-Inducible Inhibitor of Clock Mediated Activation of Period Genes

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Daniel; Lopez, Martin; Franken, Paul; Fontana, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Background Activation of the immune system affects the circadian clock. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and Interleukin (IL)-1β inhibit the expression of clock genes including Period (Per) genes and the PAR-bZip clock-controlled gene D-site albumin promoter-binding protein (Dbp). These effects are due to cytokine-induced interference of E-box mediated transcription of clock genes. In the present study we have assessed the two E-box binding transcriptional regulators Twist1 and Twist2 for their role in cytokine induced inhibition of clock genes. Methods The expression of the clock genes Per1, Per2, Per3 and of Dbp was assessed in NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts and the mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line HT22. Cells were treated for 4h with TNF and IL-1β. The functional role of Twist1 and Twist2 was assessed by siRNAs against the Twist genes and by overexpression of TWIST proteins. In luciferase (luc) assays NIH-3T3 cells were transfected with reporter gene constructs, which contain a 3xPer1 E-box or a Dbp E-box. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) was performed using antibodies to TWIST1 and CLOCK, and the E-box consensus sequences of Dbp (CATGTG) and Per1 E-box (CACGTG). Results We report here that siRNA against Twist1 protects NIH-3T3 cells and HT22 cells from down-regulation of Period and Dbp by TNF and IL-1β. Overexpression of Twist1, but not of Twist2, mimics the effect of the cytokines. TNF down-regulates the activation of Per1-3xE-box-luc, the effect being prevented by siRNA against Twist1. Overexpression of Twist1, but not of Twist2, inhibits Per1-3xE-box-luc or Dbp-E-Box-luc activity. ChIP experiments show TWIST1 induction by TNF to compete with CLOCK binding to the E-box of Period genes and Dbp. Conclusion Twist1 plays a pivotal role in the TNF mediated suppression of E-box dependent transactivation of Period genes and Dbp. Thereby Twist1 may provide a link between the immune system and the circadian timing system. PMID:26361389

  15. Development of red-shifted mutants derived from luciferase of Brazilian click beetle Pyrearinus termitilluminans.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Yamada, Toshimichi; Nasu, Yusuke; Ito, Mashiho; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2015-10-01

    Luciferase, a bioluminescent protein, has been used as an analytical tool to visualize intracellular phenomena. Luciferase with red light emission is particularly useful for bioluminescence imaging because of its high transmittance in mammalian tissues. However, the luminescence intensity of existing luciferases with their emission over 600 nm is insufficient for imaging studies because of their weak intensities. We developed mutants of Emerald luciferase (Eluc) from Brazilian click beetle (Pyrearinus termitilluminans), which emits the strongest bioluminescence among beetle luciferases. We successively introduced four amino acid mutations into the luciferase based on a predicted structure of Eluc using homology modeling. Results showed that quadruple mutations R214K/H241K/S246H/H347A into the beetle luciferase emit luminescence with emission maximum at 626 nm, 88-nm red-shift from the wild-type luciferase. This mutant luciferase is anticipated for application in in vivo multicolor imaging in living samples. PMID:26313214

  16. Development of red-shifted mutants derived from luciferase of Brazilian click beetle Pyrearinus termitilluminans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Yamada, Toshimichi; Nasu, Yusuke; Ito, Mashiho; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2015-10-01

    Luciferase, a bioluminescent protein, has been used as an analytical tool to visualize intracellular phenomena. Luciferase with red light emission is particularly useful for bioluminescence imaging because of its high transmittance in mammalian tissues. However, the luminescence intensity of existing luciferases with their emission over 600 nm is insufficient for imaging studies because of their weak intensities. We developed mutants of Emerald luciferase (Eluc) from Brazilian click beetle (Pyrearinus termitilluminans), which emits the strongest bioluminescence among beetle luciferases. We successively introduced four amino acid mutations into the luciferase based on a predicted structure of Eluc using homology modeling. Results showed that quadruple mutations R214K/H241K/S246H/H347A into the beetle luciferase emit luminescence with emission maximum at 626 nm, 88-nm red-shift from the wild-type luciferase. This mutant luciferase is anticipated for application in in vivo multicolor imaging in living samples.

  17. Targeted activation tagging of the Arabidopsis NBS-LRR gene, ADR1, conveys resistance to virulent pathogens.

    PubMed

    Grant, John J; Chini, Andrea; Basu, Debrabata; Loake, Gary J

    2003-08-01

    A transgenic Arabidopsis line containing a chimeric PR-1::luciferase (LUC) reporter gene was subjected to mutagenesis with activation tags. Screening of lines via high-throughput LUC imaging identified a number of dominant Arabidopsis mutants that exhibited enhanced PR-1 gene expression. Here, we report the characterization of one of these mutants, designated activated disease resistance (adr) 1. This line showed constitutive expression of a number of key defense marker genes and accumulated salicylic acid but not ethylene or jasmonic acid. Furthermore, adr1 plants exhibited resistance against the biotrophic pathogens Peronospora parasitica and Erysiphe cichoracearum but not the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Analysis of a series of adr1 double mutants suggested that adr1-mediated resistance against P. parasitica was salicylic acid (SA)-dependent, while resistance against E. cichoracearum was both SA-dependent and partially NPR1-dependent. The ADR1 gene encoded a protein possessing a number of key features, including homology to subdomains of protein kinases, a nucleotide binding domain, and leucine-rich repeats. The controlled, transient expression of ADR1 conveyed striking disease resistance in the absence of yield penalty, highlighting the potential utility of this gene in crop protection. PMID:12906111

  18. Mapping gene activity of Arabidopsis root hairs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative information on gene activity at single cell-type resolution is essential for the understanding of how cells work and interact. Root hairs, or trichoblasts, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specialized cells in the epidermis, represent an ideal model for cell fate acquisition and differentiation in plants. Results Here, we provide an atlas of gene and protein expression in Arabidopsis root hair cells, generated by paired-end RNA sequencing and LC/MS-MS analysis of protoplasts from plants containing a pEXP7-GFP reporter construct. In total, transcripts of 23,034 genes were detected in root hairs. High-resolution proteome analysis led to the reliable identification of 2,447 proteins, 129 of which were differentially expressed between root hairs and non-root hair tissue. Dissection of pre-mRNA splicing patterns showed that all types of alternative splicing were cell type-dependent, and less complex in EXP7-expressing cells when compared to non-root hair cells. Intron retention was repressed in several transcripts functionally related to root hair morphogenesis, indicative of a cell type-specific control of gene expression by alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Concordance between mRNA and protein expression was generally high, but in many cases mRNA expression was not predictive for protein abundance. Conclusions The integrated analysis shows that gene activity in root hairs is dictated by orchestrated, multilayered regulatory mechanisms that allow for a cell type-specific composition of functional components. PMID:23800126

  19. Generation of Luciferase-Expressing Leishmania infantum chagasi and Assessment of Miltefosine Efficacy in Infected Hamsters through Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Reimão, Juliana Q.; Oliveira, Jordana C.; Trinconi, Cristiana T.; Cotrim, Paulo C.; Coelho, Adriano C.; Uliana, Silvia R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The only oral drug available for the treatment of leishmaniasis is miltefosine, described and approved for visceral leishmaniasis in India. Miltefosine is under evaluation for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Americas although its efficacy for the treatment of human visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania infantum chagasi has not been described. Drug efficacy for visceral leishmaniasis is ideally tested in hamsters, an experimental model that mimics human disease. Luciferase has been validated as a quantitative tool for the determination of parasite burden in experimental leishmaniasis. However, there are no reports of luciferase detection in the model of progressive visceral leishmaniasis in hamsters. Therefore, the aims of this study were to generate recombinant Leishmania infantum chagasi expressing the luciferase gene (Lc-LUC), characterize the biological properties of this transgenic line as compared with the wild-type parasites and evaluate miltefosine effectiveness in Lc-LUC infected hamsters. Methodology/Principal Findings A transgenic line containing a luciferase encoding gene integrated into the ribosomal DNA locus was obtained and shown to produce bioluminescence which correlated with the number of parasites. Lc-LUC growth curves and susceptibility to pentavalent antimony and miltefosine in vitro were indistinguishable from the wild-type parasites. The effectiveness of pentavalent antimony was evaluated in Lc-LUC infected hamsters through bioimaging and determination of Leishman Donovan Units. Both methods showed concordant results. Miltefosine was effective in the treatment of Lc-LUC-infected hamsters, as demonstrated by the reduction in parasite burden in a dose-dependent manner and by prolongation of animal survival. Conclusions/Significance Luciferase expressing parasites are a reliable alternative for parasite burden quantification in hamsters with advantages such as the possibility of estimating parasite load before

  20. Non-viral gene-activated matrices

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Erica G.; Duffy, Garry P.; Cryan, Sally-Ann; Curtin, Caroline M.; O’Brien, Fergal J.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of producing enhanced therapeutics for regenerative medicine, our laboratory develops gene-activated matrices (GAMs) using non-viral gene therapy (GT) in combination with collagen-based scaffolds engineered specifically for tissue repair. Non-viral vectors have been referred to as a minority pursuit in GT but considering the concerns associated with viral vectors and as transient gene expression is such a key consideration, further research is clearly warranted for tissue engineering (TE) applications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well regarded for their capability in bone regeneration but as primary cells, they are difficult to transfect. We have recently optimised the non-viral vector, polyethyleneimine (PEI), to achieve high transfection efficiencies in MSCs. Subsequently, a series of PEI-based GAMs were developed using collagen, collagen-glycosaminoglycan and collagen-nanohydroxyapatite (collagen-nHa) scaffolds whereby transgene expression was detected up to 21 d with the collagen-nHa scaffold providing the most prolonged expression. Moreover, all PEI-based GAMs contained a low plasmid DNA dose of 2 µg which is far below doses often required in previous GAMs. Having successfully developed these GAMs, the ephrinB2 gene has recently been incorporated to produce a novel therapeutic GAM for bone repair. Herein, we discuss our recent investigations in the development and application of non-viral GAMs. PMID:23538777

  1. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Legler, Juliette; Dennekamp, Martine; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Koeman, Jan H; van der Burg, Bart; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-07-01

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-)estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-CALUX assay was more sensitive to 17beta-estradiol (E2) than the recombinant yeast screen, with an EC50 of 6 pM E2 compared to 100 pM in the yeast screen. Yeast cells were unable to distinguish the anti-estrogens ICI 182,780 and (4-hydroxy)tamoxifen, which were agonistic in the yeast. Acetone-soluble fractions of hexane/acetone extracts of sediments showed higher estrogenic potency than hexane-soluble extracts in the ER-CALUX assay. Sediments obtained from industrialized areas such as the Port of Rotterdam showed the highest estrogenic potency of the 12 marine sediments tested (up to 40 pmol estradiol equivalents per gram sediment). The estrogenic activity of individual chemicals that can be found in sediments including: alkylphenol ethoxylates and carboxylates; phthalates; and pesticides, was tested. Increasing sidechain length of various nonylphenol ethoxylates resulted in decreased estrogenic activity. Of the phthalates tested, butylbenzylphthalate was the most estrogenic, though with a potency approximately 100,000 times less than E2. The organochlorine herbicides atrazine and simazine failed to induce reporter gene activity. As metabolic activation may be required to induce estrogenic activity, a metabolic transformation step was added to the ER-CALUX assay using incubation of compounds with liver microsomes obtained from PCB-treated rats. Results indicate that metabolites of E2, NP and bisphenol A were less active than the parent compounds, while metabolites of methoxychlor were more estrogenic following microsomal incubations. PMID:12109482

  2. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Deyu; Zhang, Zhixia; Guo, Huarong

    2012-01-01

    p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase) and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase) into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG) cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C) and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation), but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner. PMID:25585933

  3. HIFU-induced gene activation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Zhong, Pei; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan

    2001-05-01

    This work investigated the inducible gene activation in cancer cells that were sublethally injured during HIFU treatment. HeLa cells were transfected by an adenovirus vector that encodes GFP under the control of hsp70B promoter, leading to about 65% transfection efficiency. A volume of 10 μL transfected HeLa cells in suspension (5×107 cells/ml) were placed at the bottom of a PCR tube so that the cell suspension could be heated to a peak temperature of 50°C, 60°C, and 70°C for 120, 10, and 1 s, respectively, by a focused 1.1-MHz HIFU transducer operated at a peak negative pressure of -2.7 MPa at different duty cycles. One day after HIFU treatment, cell viability was determined to be 63%, 35%, and 18%, respectively, based on Trypan Blue exclusion test. Importantly, in all test groups, inducible GFP expression was detected in about 40%-50% of the surviving cells with GFP intensity increased by 25-fold based on flow cytometry analysis. These results demonstrate that even under the short exposure duration of HIFU treatment, inducible gene expression could be produced in sublethally injured cell population in vitro. Further studies are underway to explore the optimal HIFU condition for gene activation in vivo.

  4. Generation of stable L. major(+EGFP-LUC) and simultaneous comparison between EGFP and luciferase sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Tahereh; Saberi Nik, Hana; Seyed, Negar; Doustdari, Fatemeh; Etemadzadeh, Mohammad-Hossein; Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Rafati, Sima

    2015-03-01

    Because of the lack of an accurate and sensitive tool to evaluate the parasitemia level, treatment or prevention of leishmaniasis remains an important challenge worldwide. To monitor and track leishmanial infection by two parameters in real time, we generated stably transgenic Leishmania that express a bi-reporter protein as fused EGFP and firefly luciferase. Using two reporter genes (egfp-luc) simultaneously increases the experimental sensitivity for detection/diagnosis, and in vitro quantification of parasites as well as real-time infection in mice. Through different specific tools, EGFP and LUC signals from the parasite were detectable and measurable within a mammalian host and promastigotes. Here, the LUC protein provided a higher level of sensitivity than did EGFP, so that infection was detectable at an earlier stage of the disease in the footpad (injection site) and lymph nodes by bioluminescence. These results depicted that: (1) both quantitative reporter genes, EGFP and LUC, could be simultaneously used to detect parasitemia in vitro and in vivo and (2) sensitivity of firefly luciferase was 10-fold higher than that of EGFP in promastigotes. PMID:25637784

  5. Endotoxin assay by bioluminescence using mutant firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kenichi; Goto, Hitoshi; Murakami, Yuji; Ahmed, Abo Bakr F; Kuroda, Akio

    2010-02-15

    The Limulus reaction is an application of the defense mechanism of horseshoe crab for endotoxin detection. Endotoxin is a component of the cell wall in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, and causes fever or shock when it enters the human blood stream. For endotoxin detection, gel formation or turbidity of the coagulation factor chromogen or fluorescence-modified peptide is used. However, these conventional methods have problems with regard to their measurement time or sensitivity. We recently obtained a mutant firefly luciferase that has a luminescence intensity over 10-fold higher than that of the wild type. Therefore, we developed a new endotoxin detection method that combines the Limulus reaction and bioluminescence using mutant luciferase. The new method detects 0.0005EU/ml of endotoxin within 15min. PMID:19850001

  6. Functional multiplex reporter assay using tagged Gaussia luciferase

    PubMed Central

    van Rijn, Sjoerd; Nilsson, Jonas; Noske, David P.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Würdinger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a multiplex reporter system to monitor multiple biological variables in real-time. The secreted Gaussia luciferase was fused to ten different epitope tags (Gluctag), each expressed in different tumor cells. By immunobinding of the tags followed by Gluctag detection, this system allowed the independent and real-time monitoring of mixed cell cultures in vitro and of mixed subcutaneous and intracranial tumor subpopulations in vivo. PMID:23308339

  7. Laboratory procedures manual for the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Knust, E. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Vance, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A manual on the procedures and instruments developed for the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) luciferase assay is presented. Data cover, laboratory maintenance, maintenance of bacterial cultures, bacteria measurement, reagents, luciferase procedures, and determination of microbal susceptibility to antibiotics.

  8. Circadian Rhythmicity of Active GSK3 Isoforms Modulates Molecular Clock Gene Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Besing, R.C.; Paul, J.R.; Hablitz, L.M.; Rogers, C.O.; Johnson, R.L.; Young, M.E.; Gamble, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprised of clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least five core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for two weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 μM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN. PMID:25724980

  9. Recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for assessing the estrogenic and dioxin-like activities of xenobiotics and complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharewski, T.

    1995-12-31

    Exposure to naturally occurring or synthetic substances that possess sex steroid and/or dioxin-like activity may have long range effects on human health, reproductive fitness and environmental quality. Results from recent epidemiological studies have suggested that xenobiotics with sex steroid activity may contribute to the development of hormone-dependent cancers and disorders in the male reproductive tract as well as attenuate sperm production. However, most of these compounds, which are referred to as endocrine disruptors, are structurally dissimilar to sex steroids. Yet, based upon ambiguous assays, it has been conceded that the effects of these compounds are mediated by receptors. The authors have taken advantage of the mechanism of action of these compounds to develop recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for environmental estrogens and dioxin-like compounds. The assays use an easily measurable enzyme activity (i.e. firefly luciferase), exhibit improved sensitivity and selectivity and are amenable to automation. Data will be presented demonstrating that phytoestrogens (e.g. genistein) and xenobiotics such as pesticides (e.g. DDT, Kepone), nonionic surfactants (e.g. p-nonylphenol), and precursors used in the manufacture of plastics (e.g. Bisphenol A) exhibit estrogenic activity. In addition, the assays have been used to detect estrogenic and dioxin-like activity in complex mixtures such as pulp and paper mill black liquor and effluent. These results demonstrate the utility of recombinant receptor/reporter gene bioassays for identifying substances or complex mixtures with estrogenic and/or dioxin-like activity.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction induces SESN2 gene expression through Activating Transcription Factor 4.

    PubMed

    Garaeva, Alisa A; Kovaleva, Irina E; Chumakov, Peter M; Evstafieva, Alexandra G

    2016-01-01

    We found that inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes III (myxothiazol) and I (piericidin A) in some epithelial carcinoma cell lines induce transcription of the p53-responsive SESN2 gene that plays an important role in stress response and homeostatic regulation. However, the effect did not depend on p53 because i) there was no induction of p53 after the treatment with piericidin A; ii) after the treatment with myxothiazol the peak of SESN2 gene upregulation occurred as early as 5h, before the onset of p53 activation (13h); iii) a supplementation with uridine that abolishes the p53 activation in response to myxothiazol did not abrogate the induction of SESN2 transcripts; iv) in the p53 negative HCT116 p53 -/- cells SESN2 transcription could be also induced by myxothiazol. In response to the respiratory chain inhibitors we observed an induction of ATF4, the key transcription factor of the integrated stress response (ISR). We found that the induction of SESN2 transcripts could be prevented by the ISR inhibitory small molecule ISRIB. Also, by inhibiting or overexpressing ATF4 with specific shRNA or ATF4-expressing constructs, respectively, we have confirmed the role of ATF4 in the SESN2 gene upregulation induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. At a distance of 228 bp upstream from the SESN2 transcription start site we found a candidate sequence for the ATF4 binding site and confirmed its requirement for the induction of SESN2 in luciferase reporter experiments. We suggest that the upregulation of SESN2 by mitochondrial dysfunction provides a homeostatic feedback that attenuates biosynthetic processes during temporal losses of energy supply from mitochondria thereby assisting better adaptation and viability of cells in hostile environments. PMID:26771712

  11. A study of protein-protein interactions in living cells using luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) from Renilla luciferase to Aequorea GFP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Wang, G; O'Kane, D J; Szalay, A A

    2001-01-01

    We have previously reported that Escherichia coli and mammalian cells containing a fusion protein consisting of the Renilla luciferase linked to Aequorea GFP exhibited luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) from luciferase to GFP in the presence of coelenterazine. In this paper, we describe the construction of two gene fusions in which the cDNA for insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is connected to the cDNA for a "humanized" GFP, and the cDNA for insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 (IGFBP-6) is linked to a cDNA encoding the Renilla luciferase (RUC). The expression of the fusion gene constructs in CHO cells resulted in single polypeptides with the molecular weights expected for IGF-II-GFP and IGFBP-6-RUC, respectively, based on the use of antibodies against GFP and Renilla luciferase. The secretion of IGF-II-GFP from CHO cells was verified by fluorescence microscopy and the presence of IGFBP-6-RUC in the culture medium was confirmed by luminometry. The interaction between the two known binding partners, IGF-II and IGFBP-6, was monitored by measuring LRET from the IGFBP-6-RUC protein to IGF-II-GFP in the presence of coelenterazine, using a low-light imaging system and spectrofluorometry. Based on these data, luciferase-to-GFP LRET holds great promise for the study of protein-protein interactions in eukaryotic cells in real time. PMID:11212912

  12. von Hippel-Lindau β-domain-luciferase fusion protein as a bioluminescent hydroxyproline sensor for a hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase assay.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungchae; Yum, Soohwan; Ha, Nam-Chul; Jung, Yunjin

    2010-12-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylases (HPHs) are responsible for hydroxylation of proline residues in hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α), resulting in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-mediated proteasome degradation of the hydroxylated proteins. Pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme leads to stabilization of HIF-α proteins and consequent activation of HIF, which provides therapeutic benefit for a variety of tissues undergoing ischemic stress. In an effort to develop a new assay for measuring HPH activity, we designed a fusion protein, VHL β-domain-luciferase. Recombinant fusion protein with a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag was purified from Escherichia coli. GST-VHL β-domain-luciferase with C-terminal deletion (GVbL-CD) was obtained as a major product and found to have luciferase activity. In a GVbL-CD capture assay using HIF peptide-bound beads, at least a 13-fold increase in luciferase activity was elicited for HIF peptide with hydroxyproline compared with unhydroxylated HIF peptide. HPH inhibitory activities of known HPH inhibitors or HIF-1α inducers were assessed using this assay, whose results were in good agreement with those obtained from conventional methods. The competitive effect of 2-ketoglutarate on dimethyloxalylglycine-mediated HPH inhibition was assessed very well in the new assay. Taken together, the VHL β-domain protein with luciferase activity is of use for HPH activity assay. PMID:20705044

  13. Engineered luciferase reporter from a deep sea shrimp utilizing a novel imidazopyrazinone substrate.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mary P; Unch, James; Binkowski, Brock F; Valley, Michael P; Butler, Braeden L; Wood, Monika G; Otto, Paul; Zimmerman, Kristopher; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Machleidt, Thomas; Robers, Matthew B; Benink, Hélène A; Eggers, Christopher T; Slater, Michael R; Meisenheimer, Poncho L; Klaubert, Dieter H; Fan, Frank; Encell, Lance P; Wood, Keith V

    2012-11-16

    Bioluminescence methodologies have been extraordinarily useful due to their high sensitivity, broad dynamic range, and operational simplicity. These capabilities have been realized largely through incremental adaptations of native enzymes and substrates, originating from luminous organisms of diverse evolutionary lineages. We engineered both an enzyme and substrate in combination to create a novel bioluminescence system capable of more efficient light emission with superior biochemical and physical characteristics. Using a small luciferase subunit (19 kDa) from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, we have improved luminescence expression in mammalian cells ~2.5 million-fold by merging optimization of protein structure with development of a novel imidazopyrazinone substrate (furimazine). The new luciferase, NanoLuc, produces glow-type luminescence (signal half-life >2 h) with a specific activity ~150-fold greater than that of either firefly (Photinus pyralis) or Renilla luciferases similarly configured for glow-type assays. In mammalian cells, NanoLuc shows no evidence of post-translational modifications or subcellular partitioning. The enzyme exhibits high physical stability, retaining activity with incubation up to 55 °C or in culture medium for >15 h at 37 °C. As a genetic reporter, NanoLuc may be configured for high sensitivity or for response dynamics by appending a degradation sequence to reduce intracellular accumulation. Appending a signal sequence allows NanoLuc to be exported to the culture medium, where reporter expression can be measured without cell lysis. Fusion onto other proteins allows luminescent assays of their metabolism or localization within cells. Reporter quantitation is achievable even at very low expression levels to facilitate more reliable coupling with endogenous cellular processes. PMID:22894855

  14. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Omokoko, Tana A; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard (51)Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the (51)Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  15. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Omokoko, Tana A.; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard 51Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the 51Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  16. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  17. Elemental sulfur: toxicity in vivo and in vitro to bacterial luciferase, in vitro yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, and bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Cetkauskaite, Anolda; Pessala, Piia; Södergren, Anders

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this research was to analyze the effects and the modes of action of elemental sulfur (S(0)) in bioluminescence and respiration of Vibrio fischeri cells and the enzymes crude luciferase, pure catalase, and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Metallic copper removed sulfur and reduced the toxicity of acetone extracts of sediment samples analyzed in the bioluminescence test. The sulfur inhibition of cell bioluminescence was noncompetitive with decanal, the luciferase substrate; reversible, with maximum toxicity after 15 min (EC(50) = 11.8 microg/L); and almost totally recovered after 2 h. In vitro preincubation of crude luciferase extract with sulfur (0.28 ppm) weakly inhibited bioluminescence at 5 min, but at 30 min the inhibition reached 60%. Increasing the concentration of sulfur in the parts per million concentration range in vitro decreased bioluminescence, which was not constant, but depended on exposure time, and no dead-end/total inhibition was observed. The redox state of enzymes in the in vitro system significantly affected inhibition. Hydrogen peroxide restored fully and the reducing agent dithiothreitol, itself toxic, restored only partially luciferase activity in the presence of sulfur. Sulfur (5.5 ppm) slightly inhibited ADH and catalase, and dithiothreitol enhanced sulfur inhibition. High sulfur concentrations (2.2 ppm) inhibited the bioluminescence and enhanced the respiration rate of V. fischeri cells. Elemental sulfur data were interpreted to show that sulfur acted on at least a few V. fischeri cell sites: reversibly modifying luciferase at sites sensitive to/protected by oxidative and reducing agents and by affecting electron transport processes, resulting in enhanced oxygen consumption. Sulfur together with an enzyme reducing agent inhibited the oxidoreductive enzymes ADH and catalase, which have --SH groups, metal ion cofactors, or heme, respectively, in their active centers. PMID:15269910

  18. Hypoxia-induced endothelial NO synthase gene transcriptional activation is mediated through the tax-responsive element in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiho; Jin, Yoon-Mi; Moon, Je-Sung; Sung, Min-Sun; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2006-06-01

    Although hypoxia is known to induce upregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) gene expression, the underlying mechanism is largely unclear. In this study, we show that hypoxia increases eNOS gene expression through the binding of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein (pCREB) to the eNOS gene promoter. Hypoxia (1% O2) increased both eNOS expression and NO production, peaking at 24 hours, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, and these increases were accompanied by increases in pCREB. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 or transfection with dominant-negative inhibitor of CREB reversed the hypoxia-induced increases in eNOS expression and NO production, with concomitant inhibition of the phosphorylation of CREB induced by hypoxia, suggesting an involvement of protein kinase A/pCREB-mediated pathway. To map the regulatory elements of the eNOS gene responsible for pCREB binding under hypoxia, we constructed an eNOS gene promoter (-1600 to +22 nucleotides) fused with a luciferase reporter gene [pGL2-eNOS(-1600)]. Hypoxia (for 24-hour incubation) increased the promoter activity by 2.36+/-0.18-fold in the bovine aortic endothelial cells transfected with pGL2-eNOS(-1600). However, progressive 5'-deletion from -1600 to -873 completely attenuated the hypoxia-induced increase in promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift, anti-pCREB antibody supershift, and site-specific mutation analyses showed that pCREB is bound to the Tax-responsive element (TRE) site, a cAMP-responsive element-like site, located at -924 to -921 of the eNOS promoter. Our data demonstrate that the interaction between pCREB and the Tax-responsive element site within the eNOS promoter may represent a novel mechanism for the mediation of hypoxia-stimulated eNOS gene expression. PMID:16651461

  19. Using luciferase to image bacterial infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mi Hee; Cirillo, Suat L G; Cirillo, Jeffrey D

    2011-01-01

    Imaging is a valuable technique that can be used to monitor biological processes. In particular, the presence of cancer cells, stem cells, specific immune cell types, viral pathogens, parasites and bacteria can be followed in real-time within living animals. Application of bioluminescence imaging to the study of pathogens has advantages as compared to conventional strategies for analysis of infections in animal models. Infections can be visualized within individual animals over time, without requiring euthanasia to determine the location and quantity of the pathogen. Optical imaging allows comprehensive examination of all tissues and organs, rather than sampling of sites previously known to be infected. In addition, the accuracy of inoculation into specific tissues can be directly determined prior to carrying forward animals that were unsuccessfully inoculated throughout the entire experiment. Variability between animals can be controlled for, since imaging allows each animal to be followed individually. Imaging has the potential to greatly reduce animal numbers needed because of the ability to obtain data from numerous time points without having to sample tissues to determine pathogen load. This protocol describes methods to visualize infections in live animals using bioluminescence imaging for recombinant strains of bacteria expressing luciferase. The click beetle (CBRLuc) and firefly luciferases (FFluc) utilize luciferin as a substrate. The light produced by both CBRluc and FFluc has a broad wavelength from 500 nm to 700 nm, making these luciferases excellent reporters for the optical imaging in living animal models. This is primarily because wavelengths of light greater than 600 nm are required to avoid absorption by hemoglobin and, thus, travel through mammalian tissue efficiently. Luciferase is genetically introduced into the bacteria to produce light signal. Mice are pulmonary inoculated with bioluminescent bacteria intratracheally to allow monitoring of

  20. Application of luciferase assay for ATP to antimicrobial drug susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The susceptibility of bacteria, particularly those derived from body fluids, to antimicrobial agents is determined in terms of an ATP index measured by culturing a bacterium in a growth medium. The amount of ATP is assayed in a sample of the cultured bacterium by measuring the amount of luminescent light emitted when the bacterial ATP is reacted with a luciferase-luciferin mixture. The sample of the cultured bacterium is subjected to an antibiotic agent. The amount of bacterial adenosine triphosphate is assayed after treatment with the antibiotic by measuring the luminescent light resulting from the reaction. The ATP index is determined from the values obtained from the assay procedures.

  1. A novel virus-inducible enhancer of the interferon-β gene with tightly linked promoter and enhancer activities

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, A. Raja; Kim, Yoon Jung; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Long-range enhancers of transcription are a key component of the genomic regulatory architecture. Recent studies have identified bi-directionally transcribed RNAs emanating from these enhancers known as eRNAs. However, it remains unclear how tightly coupled eRNA production is with enhancer activity. Through our systematic search for long-range elements that interact with the interferon-β gene, a model system for studying inducible transcription, we have identified a novel enhancer, which we have named L2 that regulates the expression of interferon-β. We have demonstrated its virus-inducible enhancer activity by analyzing epigenomic profiles, transcription factor association, nascent RNA production and activity in reporter assays. This enhancer exhibits intimately linked virus-inducible enhancer and bidirectional promoter activity that is largely dependent on a conserved Interferon Stimulated Response Element and robustly generates virus inducible eRNAs. Notably, its enhancer and promoter activities are fully retained in reporter assays even upon a complete elimination of its associated eRNA sequences. Finally, we show that L2 regulates IFNB1 expression by siRNA knockdown of eRNAs, and the deletion of L2 in a BAC transfection assay. Thus, L2 is a novel enhancer that regulates IFNB1 and whose eRNAs exert significant activity in vivo that is distinct from those activities recapitulated in the luciferase reporter assays. PMID:25348400

  2. Functional analysis of the promoter region of the human phosphotyrosine phosphatase activator gene: Yin Yang 1 is essential for core promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, V; Van Hoof, C; De Baere, I; Merlevede, W; Goris, J

    1999-01-01

    The phosphotyrosine phosphatase activator (PTPA) has been isolated as an in vitro regulator of protein phosphatase 2A. Human PTPA is encoded by a single gene, the structure and chromosomal localization of which have been determined in our previous work. Here we describe the further isolation, sequencing and functional characterization of the PTPA promoter region. In agreement with its ubiquitous expression, the PTPA promoter displays several characteristics of housekeeping genes: it lacks both a TATA-box and a CAAT-box, it is very GC-rich and it contains an unmethylated CpG island surrounding the transcription initiation site. Transient transfection experiments in different cell types with several truncated chimaeric luciferase reporter gene plasmids revealed the importance of the region between positions -67 and -39 for basal promoter activity. This region coincides remarkably well with the determined CpG island. Further analysis of this region demonstrated the presence of a Yin Yang 1 (YY1) binding motif at positions -52 to -44. Binding of YY1 to this sequence is demonstrated in bandshift and DNase I footprinting experiments. Another YY1 binding motif is found in the 5' untranslated region, at positions +27 to +35. Mutations in either of these sites, abolishing YY1 binding in vitro, have differential effects on promoter activity. Point mutations in both sites completely abolish promoter activity. Moreover, induction of promoter activity by co-transfection with a YY1 expression plasmid is fully dependent upon the presence of both intact YY1 binding sites. Thus YY1 apparently mediates basal transcription of the human PTPA gene through two binding sites within its proximal promoter. PMID:10585862

  3. Aerosol delivery of kinase-deficient Akt1 attenuates Clara cell injury induced by naphthalene in the lungs of dual luciferase mice.

    PubMed

    Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Park, Young-Chan; Hwang, Soon-Kyung; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Chang, Seung-Hee; Park, Sung-Jin; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Kim, Ji-Eun; Shin, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kang, Bitna; Hong, Seong-Ho; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2011-12-01

    Conventional lung cancer therapies are associated with poor survival rates; therefore, new approaches such as gene therapy are required for treating cancer. Gene therapies for treating lung cancer patients can involve several approaches. Among these, aerosol gene delivery is a potentially more effective approach. In this study, Akt1 kinase-deficient (KD) and wild-type (WT) Akt1 were delivered to the lungs of CMV-LucR-cMyc-IRES-LucF dual reporter mice through a nose only inhalation system using glucosylated polyethylenimine and naphthalene was administrated to the mice via intraperitoneal injection. Aerosol delivery of Akt1 WT and naphthalene treatment increased protein levels of downstream substrates of Akt signaling pathway while aerosol delivery of Akt1 KD did not. Our results showed that naphthalene affected extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) protein levels, ERK-related signaling, and induced Clara cell injury. However, Clara cell injury induced by naphthalene was considerably attenuated in mice exposed to Akt1 KD. Furthermore, a dual luciferase activity assay showed that aerosol delivery of Akt1 WT and naphthalene treatment enhanced cap-dependent protein translation, while reduced cap-dependent protein translation was observed after delivering Akt1 KD. These studies demonstrated that our aerosol delivery is compatible for in vivo gene delivery. PMID:22122896

  4. Enrichment of Conserved Synaptic Activity-Responsive Element in Neuronal Genes Predicts a Coordinated Response of MEF2, CREB and SRF

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tornos, Fernanda M.; San Aniceto, Iñigo; Cubelos, Beatriz; Nieto, Marta

    2013-01-01

    A unique synaptic activity-responsive element (SARE) sequence, composed of the consensus binding sites for SRF, MEF2 and CREB, is necessary for control of transcriptional upregulation of the Arc gene in response to synaptic activity. We hypothesize that this sequence is a broad mechanism that regulates gene expression in response to synaptic activation and during plasticity; and that analysis of SARE-containing genes could identify molecular mechanisms involved in brain disorders. To search for conserved SARE sequences in the mammalian genome, we used the SynoR in silico tool, and found the SARE cluster predominantly in the regulatory regions of genes expressed specifically in the nervous system; most were related to neural development and homeostatic maintenance. Two of these SARE sequences were tested in luciferase assays and proved to promote transcription in response to neuronal activation. Supporting the predictive capacity of our candidate list, up-regulation of several SARE containing genes in response to neuronal activity was validated using external data and also experimentally using primary cortical neurons and quantitative real time RT-PCR. The list of SARE-containing genes includes several linked to mental retardation and cognitive disorders, and is significantly enriched in genes that encode mRNA targeted by FMRP (fragile X mental retardation protein). Our study thus supports the idea that SARE sequences are relevant transcriptional regulatory elements that participate in plasticity. In addition, it offers a comprehensive view of how activity-responsive transcription factors coordinate their actions and increase the selectivity of their targets. Our data suggest that analysis of SARE-containing genes will reveal yet-undescribed pathways of synaptic plasticity and additional candidate genes disrupted in mental disease. PMID:23382855

  5. Anti-inflammatory/Anti-oxidative stress activities and differential regulation of Nrf2-mediated genes by non-polar fractions of tea Chrysanthemum zawadskii and licorice Glycyrrhiza uralensis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tien-Yuan; Khor, Tin Oo; Saw, Constance Lay Lay; Loh, Stephanie C; Chen, Alvin I; Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Cai, Li; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2011-03-01

    Accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies indicates that chronic inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in neoplastic development. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative stress activities, and differential regulation of Nrf2-mediated genes by tea Chrysanthemum zawadskii (CZ) and licorice Glycyrrhiza uralensis (LE) extracts. The anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress activities of hexane/ethanol extracts of CZ and LE were investigated using in vitro and in vivo approaches, including quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and microarray. Additionally, the role of the transcriptional factor Nrf2 (nuclear erythroid-related factor 2) signaling pathways was examined. Our results show that CZ and LE extracts exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activities by suppressing the mRNA and protein expression levels of pro-inflammatory biomarkers IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and iNOS in LPS-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. CZ and LE also significantly suppressed the NO production of LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Additionally, CZ and LE suppressed the NF-κB luciferase activity in human HT-29 colon cancer cells. Both extracts also showed strong Nrf2-mediated antioxidant/Phase II detoxifying enzymes induction. CZ and LE induced NQO1, Nrf2, and UGT and antioxidant response element (ARE)-luciferase activity in human hepatoma HepG2 C8 cells. Using Nrf2 knockout [Nrf2 (-/-)] and Nrf2 wild-type (+/+) mice, LE and CZ showed Nrf2-dependent transactivation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant and phase II detoxifying genes. In summary, CZ and LE possess strong inhibitory effects against NF-κB-mediated inflammatory as well as strong activation of the Nrf2-ARE-anti-oxidative stress signaling pathways, which would contribute to their overall health promoting pharmacological effects against diseases including cancer. PMID:20967519

  6. Oxygen-evoked changes in transcriptional activity of the 5'-flanking region of the human amiloride-sensitive sodium channel (alphaENaC) gene: role of nuclear factor kappaB.

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Deborah L; Janes, Mandy; Newman, David J; Best, Oliver G

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the alpha-subunit of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel (alphaENaC) is regulated by a number of factors in the lung, including oxygen partial pressure (PO2). As transcriptional activation is a mechanism for raising cellular mRNA levels, we investigated the effect of physiological changes in PO2 on the activity of the redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and transcriptional activity of 5'-flanking regions of the human alphaENaC gene using luciferase reporter-gene vectors transiently transfected into human adult alveolar carcinoma A549 cells. By Western blotting we confirmed the presence of NF-kappaB p65 but not p50 in these cells. Transiently increasing PO2 from 23 to 42 mmHg for 24 h evoked a significant increase in NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity and transactivation of a NF-kappaB-driven luciferase construct (pGLNF-kappaBpro), which was blocked by the NF-kappaB activation inhibitor sulphasalazine (5 mM). Transcriptional activity of alphaENaC-luciferase constructs containing 5'-flanking sequences (including the NF-kappaB consensus) were increased by raising PO2 from 23 to 142 mmHg if they contained transcriptional initiation sites (TIS) for exons 1A and 1B (pGL3E2.2) or the 3' TIS of exon 1B alone (pGL3E0.8). Sulphasalazine had no significant effect on the activity of these constructs, suggesting that the PO2-evoked rise in activity was not a direct consequence of NF-kappaB activation. Conversely, the relative luciferase activity of a construct that lacked the 3' TIS, a 3' intron and splice site but still retained the 5' TIS and NF-kappaB consensus sequence was suppressed significantly by raising PO2. This effect was reversed by sulphasalazine, suggesting that activation of NF-kappaB mediated PO2-evoked suppression of transcription from the exon 1A TIS of alphaENaC. PMID:12023897

  7. Cytochrome P4501A induction in avian hepatocyte cultures exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls: Comparisons with AHR1-mediated reporter gene activity and in ovo toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Gillian E.; Mundy, Lukas J.; Crump, Doug; Jones, Stephanie P.; Chiu, Suzanne; Klein, Jeff; Konstantinov, Alex; Potter, Dave; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2013-01-01

    Avian-specific toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) were developed by the World Health Organization to simplify environmental risk assessments of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs), but TEFs do not account for differences in the toxic and biochemical potencies of DLCs among species of birds. Such variability may be due to differences in species sensitivity to individual DLCs. The sensitivity of avian species to DLCs was recently associated with the identity of amino acids 324 and 380 in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1) ligand binding domain. A luciferase reporter gene (LRG) assay, measuring AHR1-mediated induction of a cytochrome P450 1A5 (CYP1A5) reporter gene, in combination with a species' AHR1 ligand binding domain sequence, were also shown to predict avian species sensitivity to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and PCB relative potency in a given species. The goals of the present study were to (1) characterize the concentration-dependent effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and PCBs 126, 77, 105 and 118 on induction of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity and CYP1A4/5 mRNA in chicken, ring-necked pheasant and Japanese quail embryo hepatocytes and (2) compare these in vitro results to those previously generated by the LRG assay and in ovo toxicity studies. EROD activity and CYP1A4/5 mRNA expression data support and complement the findings of the LRG assay. CYP1A enzyme activity and mRNA expression were significantly correlated both with luciferase activity and in ovo toxicity induced by PCBs. Relative potency values were generally similar between the LRG and EROD assays and indicate that the relative potency of some PCBs may differ among species. -- Highlights: ► The chicken isn't the most sensitive species to CYP1A induction by PCB 105 and 118. ► The relative potency of PCBs differs between avian species. ► EROD activity was correlated with luciferase activity from the LRG assay. ► EROD activity was a better predictor of toxicity than CYP

  8. PAX5 IS THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVATOR OF MUCOLIPIN-2 (MCOLN2) GENE

    PubMed Central

    Valadez, Jessica A.; Cuajungco, Math P.

    2014-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Mucolipin (TRPML) proteins belong to the TRP superfamily of non-selective cation channels. The TRPML1, -2, and -3 proteins are encoded by Mucolipin (MCOLN)-1, -2 and -3 genes, respectively. TRPML1 has been associated with Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV), while no disease phenotype has been linked with TRPML2 or -3 protein. The TRPML proteins share high sequence similarities, form hetero-tetramers, and serve in membrane trafficking, autophagy, and metal homeostasis. Previous studies suggest that TRPML2 serves a role in the immune system; however, the evidence is mostly indirect. We hypothesize that if TRPML2 is involved in immune function its expression would be likely regulated by an immune-associated transcription factor protein. Thus, we set out to identify the core promoter region and the transcription factor responsible for MCOLN2 gene expression. Using dual-luciferase assay and over-expression analyses, we reveal for the first time that B-cell lineage specific activator protein (BSAP), also known as paired box 5 (PAX5), controls MCOLN2 expression. Specifically, heterologous expression of PAX5 in HEK-293 cells significantly increased endogenous MCOLN2 transcript and TRPML2 protein levels, while RNA interference targeting endogenous PAX5 reduced its effect. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that the core promoter and PAX5 binding region to be between -79 and -60 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site. Thus, our findings add to a growing list of evidence for TRPML2’s possible involvement in the immune system. The knowledge gained from this study could be used to further characterize the role of TRPML2 in B-cell development and function. PMID:25445271

  9. Truncated Variants of Gaussia Luciferase with Tyrosine Linker for Site-Specific Bioconjugate Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Eric A.; Moutsiopoulou, Angeliki; Ioannou, Stephanie; Ahern, Katelyn; Woodward, Kristen; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia; Deo, Sapna K.

    2016-01-01

    Gaussia luciferase (Gluc)—with its many favorable traits such as small size, bright emission, and exceptional stability—has become a prominent reporter protein for a wide range of bioluminescence-based detection applications. The ten internal cysteine residues crucial to functional structure formation, however, make expression of high quantities of soluble protein in bacterial systems difficult. In addition to this challenge, the current lack of structural data further complicates the use of Gluc for in vitro applications, such as biosensors, or cellular delivery, both of which rely heavily on robust and reproducible bioconjugation techniques. While Gluc is already appreciably small for a luciferase, a reduction in size that still retains significant bioluminescent activity, in conjunction with a more reproducible bioorthogonal method of chemical modification and facile expression in bacteria, would be very beneficial in biosensor design and cellular transport studies. We have developed truncated variants of Gluc, which maintain attractive bioluminescent features, and have characterized their spectral and kinetic properties. These variants were purified in high quantities from a bacterial system. Additionally, a C-terminal linker has been incorporated into these variants that can be used for reliable, specific modification through tyrosine-based bioconjugation techniques, which leave the sensitive network of cysteine residues undisturbed. PMID:27271118

  10. Truncated Variants of Gaussia Luciferase with Tyrosine Linker for Site-Specific Bioconjugate Applications.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Eric A; Moutsiopoulou, Angeliki; Ioannou, Stephanie; Ahern, Katelyn; Woodward, Kristen; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia; Deo, Sapna K

    2016-01-01

    Gaussia luciferase (Gluc)-with its many favorable traits such as small size, bright emission, and exceptional stability-has become a prominent reporter protein for a wide range of bioluminescence-based detection applications. The ten internal cysteine residues crucial to functional structure formation, however, make expression of high quantities of soluble protein in bacterial systems difficult. In addition to this challenge, the current lack of structural data further complicates the use of Gluc for in vitro applications, such as biosensors, or cellular delivery, both of which rely heavily on robust and reproducible bioconjugation techniques. While Gluc is already appreciably small for a luciferase, a reduction in size that still retains significant bioluminescent activity, in conjunction with a more reproducible bioorthogonal method of chemical modification and facile expression in bacteria, would be very beneficial in biosensor design and cellular transport studies. We have developed truncated variants of Gluc, which maintain attractive bioluminescent features, and have characterized their spectral and kinetic properties. These variants were purified in high quantities from a bacterial system. Additionally, a C-terminal linker has been incorporated into these variants that can be used for reliable, specific modification through tyrosine-based bioconjugation techniques, which leave the sensitive network of cysteine residues undisturbed. PMID:27271118

  11. Correspondence between Resting-State Activity and Brain Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Zhong; Belgard, T Grant; Mao, Deng; Chen, Leslie; Berto, Stefano; Preuss, Todd M; Lu, Hanzhang; Geschwind, Daniel H; Konopka, Genevieve

    2015-11-18

    The relationship between functional brain activity and gene expression has not been fully explored in the human brain. Here, we identify significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and functional activity by comparing fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) from two independent human fMRI resting-state datasets to regional cortical gene expression from a newly generated RNA-seq dataset and two additional gene expression datasets to obtain robust and reproducible correlations. We find significantly more genes correlated with fALFF than expected by chance and identify specific genes correlated with the imaging signals in multiple expression datasets in the default mode network. Together, these data support a population-level relationship between regional steady-state brain gene expression and resting-state brain activity. PMID:26590343

  12. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24500196

  13. Promoter activity and regulation of the corneal CYP4B1 gene by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mastyugin, Vladimir; Mezentsev, Alexandre; Zhang, Wen-Xiang; Ashkar, Silvia; Dunn, Michael W; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal

    2004-04-15

    Hypoxic injury to the ocular surface provokes an inflammatory response that is mediated, in part, by corneal epithelial-derived 12-hydroxyeicosanoids. Recent studies indicate that a cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenase, identified as CYP4B1, is involved in the production of these eicosanoids which exhibit potent inflammatory and angiogenic properties. We have isolated and cloned a corneal epithelial CYP4B1 full-length cDNA and demonstrated that the CYP4B1 mRNA is induced by hypoxia in vitro and in vivo. To further understand the molecular regulation that underlies the synthesis of these potent inflammatory eicosanoids in response to hypoxic injury, we isolated and cloned the CYP4B1 promoter region. GenomeWalker libraries constructed from rabbit corneal epithelial genomic DNA were used as templates for primary and nested PCR amplifications with gene- and adaptor-specific primers. A 3.41-kb DNA fragment of the 5'-flanking region of the CYP4B1 promoter was isolated, cloned, sequenced, and analyzed by computer software for the presence of known cis-acting elements. Analysis of the promoter sequence revealed the presence of consensus DNA binding sequences for factors known to activate gene transcription in response to hypoxia including HIF-1, NFkappaB, and AP-1. Transient transfection of luciferase reporter (pGL3-Basic) vectors containing different lengths of the CYP4B1 promoter fragment demonstrated hypoxia-induced transcription in rabbit corneal epithelial (RCE) cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed a marked induction of nuclear binding activity for the labeled HIF-1 probe from the CYP4B1 promoter in nuclear extracts of cells exposed to hypoxia. This binding activity was due to sequence-specific binding to the HIF-1 oligonucleotide probe as shown by competition with excess unlabeled probe for the HIF-1 but not with unlabeled NFkappaB probe. The nuclear binding activity of AP-1 and NFkappaB probes from the CYP4B1 promoter was also enhanced in

  14. Isorhamnetin protects against oxidative stress by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Han, Jae Yun; Kim, Mi Gwang; Wi, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Isorhamentin is a 3′-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, the effects of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation and on the expressions of its downstream genes in hepatocytes have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isorhamnetin has the ability to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II antioxidant enzyme expression, and to determine the protective role of isorhamnetin on oxidative injury in hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, isorhamnetin increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and consistently, increased antioxidant response element (ARE) reporter gene activity and the protein levels of hemeoxygenase (HO-1) and of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which resulted in intracellular GSH level increases. The specific role of Nrf2 in isorhamnetin-induced Nrf2 target gene expression was verified using an ARE-deletion mutant plasmid and Nrf2-knockout MEF cells. Deletion of the ARE in the promoter region of the sestrin2 gene, which is recently identified as the Nrf2 target gene by us, abolished the ability of isorhamnetin to increase luciferase activity. In addition, Nrf2 deficiency completely blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to induce HO-1 and GCL. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment blocked t-BHP-induced ROS production and reversed GSH depletion by t-BHP and consequently, due to reduced ROS levels, decreased t-BHP-induced cell death. In addition isorhamnetin increased ERK1/2, PKCδ and AMPK phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that Nrf2 deficiency blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to protect cells from injury induced by t-BHP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that isorhamnetin is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against oxidative stress by Nrf2 activation and in inducing the expressions of its downstream genes. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation. • Isorhamnetin increased Nrf2

  15. Transcriptional activation of human 12-lipoxygenase gene promoter is mediated through Sp1 consensus sites in A431 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y W; Arakawa, T; Yamamoto, S; Chang, W C

    1997-01-01

    The functional 5' flanking region of the human 12-lipoxygenase in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells was characterized. By a primer extension method, the transcription initiation sites were mapped at -47 adenosine, -48 guanosine and -55 guanosine upstream of the ATG translation start codon. Transient transfection with a series of 5' and 3' deletion constructs showed that the 5' flanking region spanning from -224 to -100 bp was important for the basal expression of 12-lipoxygenase gene. Gel mobility shift assays with antibodies of transcription factors showed that both Sp1 and Sp3 required highly GC-rich Sp1 sites within this region for binding. Disruption of two Sp1 recognition motifs residing at -158 to -150 bp and -123 to -114 bp by site-directed mutagenesis markedly reduced the basal 12-lipoxygenase promoter activity and abolished the retarded bands in a gel-shift assay, indicating that these two Sp1-binding sites were essential for gene expression. The same two Sp1-binding sites in this promoter region were also responsible for epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced expression of 12-lipoxygenase gene. Moreover, EGF also induced the transcriptional activation of luciferase driven by SV40 early promoter, which contained rich Sp1-binding sites. Taken together, the results suggest that two specific Sp1 consensus sites are involved in the mediation of the basal promoter activity as well as EGF induction of the 12-lipoxygenase gene and that Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors might have a role in their regulation. PMID:9164849

  16. Long-term ex vivo and in vivo monitoring of tumor progression by using dual luciferases.

    PubMed

    Morita, Naoki; Haga, Sanae; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Michitaka

    2016-03-15

    We propose a new concept of tumor progression monitoring using dual luciferases in living animals to reduce stress for small animals and the cost of luciferin. The secreted Cypridina luciferase (CLuc) was used as an ex vivo indicator to continuously monitor tumor progression. On the other hand, the non-secreted firefly luciferase was used as an in vivo indicator to analyze the spatial distribution of the tumor at suitable time points indicated by CLuc. Thus, the new monitoring systems that use dual luciferases are available, allowing long-term bioluminescence imaging under minimal stress for the experimental animals. PMID:26717897

  17. Assessment of Estrogenic Endocrine-Disrupting Chemical Actions in the Brain Using in Vivo Somatic Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Trudeau, Vance L.; Turque, Nathalie; Le Mével, Sébastien; Alliot, Caroline; Gallant, Natacha; Coen, Laurent; Pakdel, Farzad; Demeneix, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals abnormally stimulate vitellogenin gene expression and production in the liver of many male aquatic vertebrates. However, very few studies demonstrate the effects of estrogenic pollutants on brain function. We have used polyethylenimine-mediated in vivo somatic gene transfer to introduce an estrogen response element–thymidine kinase–luciferase (ERE-TK-LUC) construct into the brain. To determine if waterborne estrogenic chemicals modulate gene transcription in the brain, we injected the estrogen-sensitive construct into the brains of Nieuwkoop-Faber stage 54 Xenopus laevis tadpoles. Both ethinylestradiol (EE2; p < 0.002) and bisphenol A (BPA; p < 0.03) increased luciferase activity by 1.9- and 1.5-fold, respectively. In contrast, low physiologic levels of 17β-estradiol had no effect (p > 0.05). The mixed antagonist/agonist tamoxifen was estrogenic in vivo and increased (p < 0.003) luciferase activity in the tadpole brain by 2.3-fold. There have been no previous reports of somatic gene transfer to the fish brain; therefore, it was necessary to optimize injection and transfection conditions for the adult goldfish (Carassius auratus). Following third brain ventricle injection of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-green fluorescent protein or CMV-LUC gene constructs, we established that cells in the telencephalon and optic tectum are transfected. Optimal transfections were achieved with 1 μg DNA complexed with 18 nmol 22 kDa polyethylenimine 4 days after brain injections. Exposure to EE2 increased brain luciferase activity by 2-fold in males (p < 0.05) but not in females. Activation of an ERE-dependent luciferase reporter gene in both tadpole and fish indicates that waterborne estrogens can directly modulate transcription of estrogen-responsive genes in the brain. We provide a method adaptable to aquatic organisms to study the direct regulation of estrogen-responsive genes in vivo. PMID:15743723

  18. Chromatin Remodeling Inactivates Activity Genes and Regulates Neural Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kelly K.; Hemberg, Martin; Reddy, Naveen C.; Cho, Ha Y.; Guthrie, Arden N.; Oldenborg, Anna; Heiney, Shane A.; Ohmae, Shogo; Medina, Javier F.; Holy, Timothy E.; Bonni, Azad

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcription influences neuronal connectivity, but the roles and mechanisms of inactivation of activity-dependent genes have remained poorly understood. Genome-wide analyses in the mouse cerebellum revealed that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex deposits the histone variant H2A.z at promoters of activity-dependent genes, thereby triggering their inactivation. Purification of translating mRNAs from synchronously developing granule neurons (Sync-TRAP) showed that conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 impairs inactivation of activity-dependent genes when neurons undergo dendrite pruning. Chd4 knockout or expression of NuRD-regulated activity genes impairs dendrite pruning. Imaging of behaving mice revealed hyperresponsivity of granule neurons to sensorimotor stimuli upon Chd4 knockout. Our findings define an epigenetic mechanism that inactivates activity-dependent transcription and regulates dendrite patterning and sensorimotor encoding in the brain. PMID:27418512

  19. Cyclical strain modulates metalloprotease and matrix gene expression in human tenocytes via activation of TGFβ☆

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Eleanor R.; Jones, Gavin C.; Legerlotz, Kirsten; Riley, Graham P.

    2013-01-01

    Tendinopathies are a range of diseases characterised by degeneration and chronic tendon pain and represent a significant cause of morbidity. Relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms; however onset is often associated with physical activity. A number of molecular changes have been documented in tendinopathy such as a decrease in overall collagen content, increased extracellular matrix turnover and protease activity. Metalloproteinases are involved in the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix and expression is regulated by mechanical strain. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of strain upon matrix turnover by measuring metalloproteinase and matrix gene expression and to elucidate the mechanism of action. Primary Human Achilles tenocytes were seeded in type I rat tail collagen gels in a Flexcell™ tissue train system and subjected to 5% cyclic uniaxial strain at 1 Hz for 48 h. TGFβ1 and TGFβRI inhibitor were added to selected cultures. RNA was measured using qRT-PCR and TGFβ protein levels were determined using a cell based luciferase assay. We observed that mechanical strain regulated the mRNA levels of multiple protease and matrix genes anabolically, and this regulation mirrored that seen with TGFβ stimulation alone. We have also demonstrated that the inhibition of the TGFβ signalling pathway abrogated the strain induced changes in mRNA and that TGFβ activation, rather than gene expression, was increased with mechanical strain. We concluded that TGFβ activation plays an important role in mechanotransduction. Targeting this pathway may have its place in the treatment of tendinopathy. PMID:23830915

  20. Saporin suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarovni, Natasa; Vago, Riccardo; Fabbrini, Maria Serena

    2009-01-01

    New genes useful in suicide gene therapy are those encoding toxins such as plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), which can irreversibly block protein synthesis, triggering apoptotic cell death. Plasmids expressing a cytosolic saporin (SAP) gene from common soapwort (Saponaria officinalis) are generated by placing the region encoding the mature plant toxin under the control of strong viral promoters and may be placed under tumor-specific promoters. The ability of the resulting constructs to inhibit protein synthesis is tested in cultured tumor cells co-transfected with a luciferase reporter gene. SAP expression driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (pCI-SAP) demonstrates that only 10 ng ofplasmid DNA per 1.6 x 10(4) B16 melanoma cells drastically reduces luciferase reporter activity to 18% of that in control cells (1). Direct intratumoral injections are performed in an aggressive melanoma model. B16 melanoma-bearing mice injected with pCI-SAP complexed with lipofectamine or N-(2,3-dioleoyloxy-1-propyl) trimethylammonium methyl sulfate (DOTAP) show a noteworthy attenuation in tumor growth, and this effect is significantly augmented by repeated administrations of the DNA complexes. Here, we describe in detail this cost-effective and safe suicide gene approach. PMID:19565907

  1. AMPK activation represses the human gene promoter of the cardiac isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase: Role of nuclear respiratory factor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Tasneem; Opie, Lionel H.; Essop, M. Faadiel

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} AMPK inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta gene promoter activity. {yields} Nuclear respiratory factor-1 inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta promoter activity. {yields} AMPK regulates acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta at transcriptional level. -- Abstract: The cardiac-enriched isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC{beta}) produces malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. AMPK inhibits ACC{beta} activity, lowering malonyl-CoA levels and promoting mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation. Previously, AMPK increased promoter binding of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), a pivotal transcriptional modulator controlling gene expression of mitochondrial proteins. We therefore hypothesized that NRF-1 inhibits myocardial ACC{beta} promoter activity via AMPK activation. A human ACC{beta} promoter-luciferase construct was transiently transfected into neonatal cardiomyocytes {+-} a NRF-1 expression construct. NRF-1 overexpression decreased ACC{beta} gene promoter activity by 71 {+-} 4.6% (p < 0.001 vs. control). Transfections with 5'-end serial promoter deletions revealed that NRF-1-mediated repression of ACC{beta} was abolished with a pPII{beta}-18/+65-Luc deletion construct. AMPK activation dose-dependently reduced ACC{beta} promoter activity, while NRF-1 addition did not further decrease it. We also investigated NRF-1 inhibition in the presence of upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF1), a known transactivator of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter. Here NRF-1 blunted USF1-dependent induction of ACC{beta} promoter activity by 58 {+-} 7.5% (p < 0.001 vs. control), reversed with a dominant negative NRF-1 construct. NRF-1 also suppressed endogenous USF1 transcriptional activity by 55 {+-} 6.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control). This study demonstrates that NRF-1 is a novel transcriptional inhibitor of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter in the mammalian heart. Our data extends AMPK regulation of ACC{beta} to the transcriptional level.

  2. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPAR gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) induce carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA (CPT-1A) via independent gene elements

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shulan; Attia, Ramy R.; Connaughton, Sara; Niesen, Melissa I.; Ness, Gene C.; Elam, Marshall B.; Hori, Roderick T.; Cook, George A.; Park, Edwards A.

    2010-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids and pharmacologic ligands for the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activate expression of genes involved in fatty acid and glucose oxidation including carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT-1A) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4). CPT-1A catalyzes the transfer of long chain fatty acids from acyl-CoA to carnitine for translocation across the mitochondrial membranes and is an initiating step in the mitochondrial oxidation of long chain fatty acids. PDK4 phosphorylates and inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) which catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in the glucose oxidation pathway. The activity of CPT-1A is modulated both by transcriptional changes as well as by malonyl-CoA inhibition. In the liver, CPT-1A and PDK4 gene expression are induced by starvation, high fat diets and PPARα ligands. Here, we characterized a binding site for PPARα in the second intron of the rat CPT-1A gene. Our studies indicated that WY14643 and long chain fatty acids induce CPT-1A gene expression through this element. In addition, we found that mutation of the PPARα binding site reduced the expression of CPT-1A-luciferase vectors in the liver of fasted rats. We had demonstrated previously that CPT-1A was stimulated by the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) via sequences in the first intron of the rat CPT-1A gene. Surprisingly, PGC-1α did not enhance CPT-1A transcription through the PPARα binding site in the second intron. Following knockdown of PGC-1α with short hairpin RNA, the CPT-1A and PDK4 genes remained responsive to WY14643. Overall, our studies indicated that PPARα and PGC-1α stimulate transcription of the CPT-1A gene through different regions of the CPT-1A gene. PMID:20638986

  3. A cytotoxic nonstructural protein, NS1, of human parvovirus B19 induces activation of interleukin-6 gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, S; Tanaka, N; Tada, K; Nose, M; Nakamura, M; Muraoka, O; Hirano, T; Sugamura, K

    1996-01-01

    We examined the biological function of a nonstructural regulatory protein, NS1, of human parvovirus B19. Because of the cytotoxic activity of NS1, human hematopoietic cell lines, K562, Raji, and THP-1, were established as transfectants which produce the viral NS1 protein upon induction by using bacterial lactose repressor/operator system. NS1 was significantly produced in the three transfectant cells in an inducer dose- and time-dependent manner. Surprisingly, these three transfectants secreted an inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), in response to induction. However, no production of other related cytokines, IL-1beta, IL-8, or tumor necrosis factor alpha, was seen. Moreover, NS1-primed IL-6 induction was transiently demonstrated in primary human endothelial cells. Analysis with luciferase reporter plasmids carrying IL-6 promoter mutant fragments demonstrated that NS1 effect is mediated by a NF-kappaB binding site in the IL-6 promoter region, strongly implying that NS1 functions as a trans-acting transcriptional activator on the IL-6 promoter. Our novel finding, IL-6 induction by NS1, supports the possible relationship between parvovirus B19 infection and polyclonal activation of B cells in rheumatoid arthritis and indicates that NS1 protein may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of some B19-associated diseases by modulating the expression of host cellular genes. PMID:8970971

  4. Full color modulation of firefly luciferase through engineering with unified Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Cai, Duanjun; Marques, Miguel A L; Nogueira, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    The firefly luciferase has been a unique marking tool used in various bioimaging techniques. Extensive color modulation is strongly required to meet special marking demands; however, intentional and accurate wavelength tuning has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate that the color shift of the firefly chromophore (OxyLH2-1) by internal and external fields can be described as a unified Stark shift. Electrostatic microenvironmental effects on fluorescent spectroscopy are modeled in vacuo through effective electric fields by using time-dependent density functional theory. A complete visible fluorescence spectrum of firefly chromophore is depicted, which enables one to control the emission in a specific color. As an application, the widely observed pH-correlated color shift is proved to be associated with the local Stark field generated by the trace water-ions (vicinal hydronium and hydroxide ions) at active sites close to the OxyLH2-1. PMID:24087879

  5. Modeling the Activity of Single Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, Eric; Gibson, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that information is stored in DNA, transcribed to messenger RNA (mRNA) and then translated into proteins. This picture is significantly augmentated when we consider the action of certain proteins in regulating transcription. These transcription factors provide a feedback pathway by which genes can regulate one another's expression as mRNA and then as protein. To review: DNA, RNA and proteins have different functions. DNA is the molecular storehouse of genetic information. When cells divide, the DNA is replicated, so that each daughter cell maintains the same genetic information as the mother cell. RNA acts as a go-between from DNA to proteins. Only a single copy of DNA is present, but multiple copies of the same piece of RNA may be present, allowing cells to make huge amounts of protein. In eukaryotes (organisms with a nucleus), DNA is found in the nucleus only. RNA is copied in the nucleus then translocates(moves) outside the nucleus, where it is transcribed into proteins. Along the way, the RNA may be spliced, i.e., may have pieces cut out. RNA then attaches to ribosomes and is translated to proteins. Proteins are the machinery of the cell other than DNA and RNA, all the complex molecules of the cell are proteins. Proteins are specialized machines, each of which fulfills its own task, which may be transporting oxygen, catalyzing reactions, or responding to extracellular signals, just to name a few. One of the more interesting functions a protein may have is binding directly or indirectly to DNA to perform transcriptional regulation, thus forming a closed feedback loop of gene regulation. The structure of DNA and the central dogma were understood in the 50s; in the early 80s it became possible to make arbitrary modifications to DNA and use cellular machinery to transcribe and translate the resulting genes; more recently, genomes (i.e., the complete DNA sequence) of many organisms have been sequenced. This large

  6. Imprinted control of gene activity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Golic, K G; Golic, M M; Pimpinelli, S

    1998-11-19

    Genetic imprinting is defined as a reversible, differential marking of genes or chromosomes that is determined by the sex of the parent from whom the genetic material is inherited [1]. Imprinting was first observed in insects where, in some species, most notably among the coccoids (scale insects and allies), the differential marking of paternally and maternally transmitted chromosome sets leads to inactivation or elimination of paternal chromosomes [2]. Imprinting is also widespread in plants and mammals [3,4], in which paternally and maternally inherited alleles may be differentially expressed. Despite imprinting having been discovered in insects, clear examples of parental imprinting are scarce in the model insect species Drosophila melanogaster. We describe a case of imprint-mediated control of gene expression in Drosophila. The imprinted gene - the white+ eye-color gene - is expressed at a low level when transmitted by males, and at a high level when transmitted by females. Thus, in common with coccoids, Drosophila is capable of generating an imprint, and can respond to that imprint by silencing the paternal allele. PMID:9822579

  7. Gene Regulatory Networks Activated during Chronic Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic tuberculosis represents a burden for most of world’s population. Several genes were found to be up-regulated at the late stage of chronic tuberculosis when DNA microarray protocol was used to analyze murine tuberculosis. Rv0348 is a potential transcriptional regulator that is highly expresse...

  8. Secreted Gaussia princeps Luciferase as a Reporter of Escherichia coli Replication in a Mouse Tissue Cage Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyu; Blinn, Christina; McLeod, Sarah M.; Wiseman, John W.; Newman, Joseph V.; Fisher, Stewart L.; Walkup, Grant K.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of bacterial burden in animal infection models is a key component for both bacterial pathogenesis studies and therapeutic agent research. The traditional quantification means for in vivo bacterial burden requires frequent animal sacrifice and enumerating colony forming units (CFU) recovered from infection loci. To address these issues, researchers have developed a variety of luciferase-expressing bacterial reporter strains to enable bacterial detection in living animals. To date, all such luciferase-based bacterial reporters are in cell-associated form. Production of luciferase-secreting recombinant bacteria could provide the advantage of reporting CFU from both infection loci themselves and remote sampling (eg. body fluid and plasma). Toward this end, we have genetically manipulated a pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain, ATCC25922, to secrete the marine copepod Gaussia princeps luciferase (Gluc), and assessed the use of Gluc as both an in situ and ex situ reporter for bacterial burden in mouse tissue cage infections. The E. coli expressing Gluc demonstrates in vivo imaging of bacteria in a tissue cage model of infection. Furthermore, secreted Gluc activity and bacterial CFUs recovered from tissue cage fluid (TCF) are correlated along 18 days of infection. Importantly, secreted Gluc can also be detected in plasma samples and serve as an ex situ indicator for the established tissue cage infection, once high bacterial burdens are achieved. We have demonstrated that Gluc from marine eukaryotes can be stably expressed and secreted by pathogenic E. coli in vivo to enable a facile tool for longitudinal evaluation of persistent bacterial infection. PMID:24595353

  9. Firefly luciferase inhibitor-conjugated peptide quenches bioluminescence: a versatile tool for real time monitoring cellular uptake of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, Pekka K; Rönkkö, Teemu; Hinkkanen, Ari E; Palvimo, Jorma J; Närvänen, Ale; Turhanen, Petri; Laatikainen, Reino; Weisell, Janne; Pulkkinen, Juha T

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, novel firefly luciferase-specific inhibitor compounds (FLICs) are evaluated as potential tools for cellular trafficking of transporter conjugates. As a proof-of-concept, we designed FLICs that were suitable for solid phase peptide synthesis and could be covalently conjugated to peptides via an amide bond. The spacer between inhibitor and peptide was optimized to gain efficient inhibition of recombinant firefly luciferase (FLuc) without compromising the activity of the model peptides. The hypothesis of using FLICs as tools for cellular trafficking studies was ensured with U87Fluc glioblastoma cells expressing firefly luciferase. Results show that cell penetrating peptide (penetratin) FLIC conjugate 9 inhibited FLuc penetrated cells efficiently (IC50 = 1.6 μM) and inhibited bioluminescence, without affecting the viability of the cells. Based on these results, peptide-FLIC conjugates can be used for the analysis of cellular uptake of biomolecules in a new way that can at the same time overcome some downsides seen with other methods. Thus, FLICs can be considered as versatile tools that broaden the plethora of methods that take advantage of the bioluminescence phenomena. PMID:24341748

  10. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  11. Saporin as a novel suicide gene in anticancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarovni, N; Vago, R; Soldà, T; Monaco, L; Fabbrini, M S

    2007-02-01

    We used a non-viral gene delivery approach to explore the potential of the plant saporin (SAP) gene as an alternative to the currently employed suicide genes in cancer therapy. Plasmids expressing cytosolic SAP were generated by placing the region encoding the mature plant ribosome-inactivating protein under the control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) or simian virus 40 (SV40) promoters. Their ability to inhibit protein synthesis was first tested in cultured tumor cells co-transfected with a luciferase reporter gene. In particular, SAP expression driven by CMV promoter (pCI-SAP) demonstrated that only 10 ng of plasmid per 1.6 x 10(4) B16 cells drastically reduced luciferase activity to 18% of that in control cells. Direct intratumoral injection of pCI-SAP complexed with either lipofectamine or N-(2,3-dioleoyloxy-1-propyl) trimethylammonium methyl sulfate (DOTAP) in B16 melanoma-bearing mice resulted in a noteworthy attenuation of tumor growth. This antitumor effect was increased in mice that received repeated intratumoral injections. A SAP catalytic inactive mutant (SAP-KQ) failed to exert any antitumor effect demonstrating that this was specifically owing to the SAP N-glycosidase activity. Our overall data strongly suggest that the gene encoding SAP, owing to its rapid and effective action and its independence from the proliferative state of target cells might become a suitable candidate suicide gene for oncologic applications. PMID:17008932

  12. Identification, characterization and use of two tick promoters for construction of a dual luciferase reporter vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual luciferase reporter systems are valuable tools for functional genomic studies, but have not previously been developed for use in tick cell culture. We evaluated expression of available luciferase constructs in tick cell cultures derived from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, an important vec...

  13. A Cytoplasmic Form of Gaussia luciferase Provides a Highly Sensitive Test for Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Saori; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya; Yamakage, Kohji; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Tada, Masako

    2016-01-01

    The elimination of unfavorable chemicals from our environment and commercial products requires a sensitive and high-throughput in vitro assay system for drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Some previous methods for evaluating hepatotoxicity measure the amounts of cytoplasmic enzymes secreted from damaged cells into the peripheral blood or culture medium. However, most of these enzymes are proteolytically digested in the extracellular milieu, dramatically reducing the sensitivity and reliability of such assays. Other methods measure the decrease in cell viability following exposure to a compound, but such endpoint assays are often confounded by proliferation of surviving cells that replace dead or damaged cells. In this study, with the goal of preventing false-negative diagnoses, we developed a sensitive luminometric cytotoxicity test using a stable form of luciferase. Specifically, we converted Gaussia luciferase (G-Luc) from an actively secreted form to a cytoplasmic form by adding an ER-retention signal composed of the four amino acids KDEL. The bioluminescent signal was >30-fold higher in transgenic HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cells expressing G-Luc+KDEL than in cells expressing wild-type G-Luc. Moreover, G-Luc+KDEL secreted from damaged cells was stable in culture medium after 24 hr at 37°C. We evaluated the accuracy of our cytotoxicity test by subjecting identical samples obtained from chemically treated transgenic HepG2 cells to the G-Luc+KDEL assay and luminometric analyses based on secretion of endogenous adenylate kinase or cellular ATP level. Time-dependent accumulation of G-Luc+KDEL in the medium increased the sensitivity of our assay above those of existing tests. Our findings demonstrate that strong and stable luminescence of G-Luc+KDEL in human hepatocyte-like cells, which have high levels of metabolic activity, make it suitable for use in a high-throughput screening system for monitoring time-dependent cytotoxicity in a limited number of cells. PMID

  14. Searching for biomarkers: humoral response profiling with luciferase immunoprecipitation systems.

    PubMed

    Burbelo, Peter D; Ching, Kathryn H; Bren, Kathleen E; Iadarola, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    B-cell-mediated humoral responses are triggered in many human diseases, including autoimmune diseases, cancer, and neurologic and infectious diseases. However, the full exploitation of the information contained within a patient's antibody repertoire for diagnosis, monitoring and even disease prediction has been limited due to the poor diagnostic performance of many immunoassay formats. We have developed luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) that harnesses light-emitting proteins to generate high-definition antibody profiles that are optimal for both diagnostics and biomarker discovery. Here, we describe the results and implications from a range of LIPS-antibody profiling studies performed in our laboratory. These include highly sensitive diagnostics for domestic and global pathogens, insights into infection-related diseases, discovery of new biomarkers for human diseases, subcategorization of symptoms and identification of pathogenic autoantibodies against self-proteins. These investigations highlight the types of humoral response profiles associated with different diseases, provide new information related to disease pathogenesis and offer a framework for incorporating LIPS antibody profiling into global health initiatives and disease monitoring. PMID:21679112

  15. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    PubMed

    Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Petrunia, Igor V; Komarova, Tatiana V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S; Kiryanov, Gleb I; Dorokhov, Yuri L

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  16. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  17. Using shotgun sequence data to find active restriction enzyme genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Posfai, Janos; Morgan, Richard D; Vincze, Tamas; Roberts, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequence analysis has become the standard method for beginning to determine a genome sequence. The preparation of the shotgun sequence clones is, in fact, a biological experiment. It determines which segments of the genome can be cloned into Escherichia coli and which cannot. By analyzing the complete set of sequences from such an experiment, it is possible to identify genes lethal to E. coli. Among this set are genes encoding restriction enzymes which, when active in E. coli, lead to cell death by cleaving the E. coli genome at the restriction enzyme recognition sites. By analyzing shotgun sequence data sets we show that this is a reliable method to detect active restriction enzyme genes in newly sequenced genomes, thereby facilitating functional annotation. Active restriction enzyme genes have been identified, and their activity demonstrated biochemically, in the sequenced genomes of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 and Methylococcus capsulatus. PMID:18988632

  18. The g.-165 T>C Rather than Methylation Is Associated with Semen Motility in Chinese Holstein Bulls by Regulating the Transcriptional Activity of the HIBADH Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Zhihua; Wang, Xiuge; Jiang, Qiang; Sun, Yan; Huang, Jinming; Zhong, Jifeng; Wang, Changfa

    2015-01-01

    The 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH) is regarded as a human sperm-motility marker. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of expression of the HIBADH gene in bulls remain largely unknown. HIBADH was detected in the testis, epididymis, and sperm via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. It is also expressed in the seminiferous epithelium, spermatids, and the entire epididymis, as detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, HIBADH was expressed in the neck-piece and mid-piece of bull spermatids, as shown in the immunofluorescence assay. Using serially truncated bovine HIBADH promoters and luciferase constructs, we discovered an 878 bp (-703 bp to +175 bp) fragment that constitutes the core promoter region. One SNP g.-165 T>C of HIBADH was identified and genotyped in 307 Chinese Holstein bulls. Correlation analysis revealed that bulls with the TT genotype had higher initial sperm motility than those with the CC genotype (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the T- or C-containing loci (designated as pGL3-T and pGL3-C) were transiently transfected into MLTC-1 to test the effect of SNP on HIBADH expression. The luciferase reporter assay showed that the pGL3-T genotype exhibited 58% higher transcriptional activity than the pGL3-C genotype (P < 0.05). The bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the methylation pattern of the core promoter presented hypomethylation in the ejaculated semen in high-motility and low-motility bulls. The results demonstrated for the first time that the g.-165 T>C rather than methylation in the 5'-flanking region could affect the bovine sperm motility through the regulation of HIBADH gene transcriptional activity. PMID:26133183

  19. The g.-165 T>C Rather than Methylation Is Associated with Semen Motility in Chinese Holstein Bulls by Regulating the Transcriptional Activity of the HIBADH Gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Chunhong; Ju, Zhihua; Wang, Xiuge; Jiang, Qiang; Sun, Yan; Huang, Jinming; Zhong, Jifeng; Wang, Changfa

    2015-01-01

    The 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH) is regarded as a human sperm-motility marker. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of expression of the HIBADH gene in bulls remain largely unknown. HIBADH was detected in the testis, epididymis, and sperm via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. It is also expressed in the seminiferous epithelium, spermatids, and the entire epididymis, as detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, HIBADH was expressed in the neck-piece and mid-piece of bull spermatids, as shown in the immunofluorescence assay. Using serially truncated bovine HIBADH promoters and luciferase constructs, we discovered an 878 bp (-703 bp to +175 bp) fragment that constitutes the core promoter region. One SNP g.-165 T>C of HIBADH was identified and genotyped in 307 Chinese Holstein bulls. Correlation analysis revealed that bulls with the TT genotype had higher initial sperm motility than those with the CC genotype (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the T- or C-containing loci (designated as pGL3-T and pGL3-C) were transiently transfected into MLTC-1 to test the effect of SNP on HIBADH expression. The luciferase reporter assay showed that the pGL3-T genotype exhibited 58% higher transcriptional activity than the pGL3-C genotype (P < 0.05). The bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the methylation pattern of the core promoter presented hypomethylation in the ejaculated semen in high-motility and low-motility bulls. The results demonstrated for the first time that the g.-165 T>C rather than methylation in the 5'-flanking region could affect the bovine sperm motility through the regulation of HIBADH gene transcriptional activity. PMID:26133183

  20. RNA interference screening of interferon-stimulated genes with antiviral activities against classical swine fever virus using a reporter virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Lian-Feng; Shen, Liang; Zhang, Lingkai; Yu, Jiahui; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-04-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of pigs, which leads to significant economic losses in many countries. Viral infection can induce the production of interferons (IFNs), giving rise to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) to exert antiviral effects. Although numerous ISGs have been identified to possess antiviral activities against different viruses, rare anti-CSFV ISGs have been reported to date. In this study, to screen anti-CSFV ISGs, twenty-one ISGs reported previously were individually knocked down using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) followed by infection with a reporter CSFV expressing Renilla luciferase (Rluc). As a result, four novel anti-CSFV ISGs were identified, including natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase III A (NT5C3A), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), and 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), which were further verified to exhibit antiviral activities against wild-type CSFV. We conclude that the reporter virus is a useful tool for efficient screening anti-CSFV ISGs. PMID:26868874

  1. Heat treatment results in a loss of transgene-encoded activities in several tobacco lines.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, K; Dröge-Laser, W; Köhne, S; Broer, I

    1997-01-01

    Heat treatment (37 degrees C) of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants led to a reversible reduction or complete loss of transgene-encoded activities in about 40% of 10 independent transformants carrying the luciferase-coding region fused to the 355 cauliflower mosaic virus or the soybean small subunit promoter and the nopaline synthase promoter driving the neomycin phosphotransferase gene, whereas the other lines had temperature-tolerant activities. Temperature sensitivity or tolerance of transgene-encoded activities was heritable. In some of the lines, temperature sensitivity of the transgene-encoded activities depended on the stage of development, occurring in either seedlings (40% luciferase and 50% neomycin phosphotransferase) or adult plants (both 40%). The phenomenon did not correlate with copy numbers or the homo- or hemizygous state of the transgenes. In lines harboring a temperature-sensitive luciferase activity, reduction of bioluminescence was observed after 2 to 3 h at 37 degrees C. Activity was regained after 2 h of subsequent cultivation at 25 degrees C. Irrespective of the reaction to the heat treatment, the level of luciferase RNA was slightly increased at 37 degrees C. Only in lines showing temperature sensitivity of transgene-encoded activities was the amount of luciferase and neomycin phosphotransferase strongly reduced. In sterile culture, heat treatment for 15 d did not cause visible damage or changes in plant morphology. In all plants tested a slight induction of the heat-shock response was observed at 37 degrees C. PMID:9390430

  2. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  3. Regulation of human hepatic hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase gene expression by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hai-Lin; Strom, Stephen C; Cai, Hongbo; Falany, Charles N; Kocarek, Thomas A; Runge-Morris, Melissa

    2005-04-01

    Human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase or (HUMAN)SULT2A1 catalyzes the sulfonation of procarcinogen xenobiotics, hydroxysteroids, and bile acids and plays a dynamic role in hepatic cholesterol homeostasis. The treatment of primary cultured human hepatocytes with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-activating concentration of ciprofibrate (10(-) (4) M) increased (HUMAN)SULT2A1 mRNA, immunoreactive protein, and enzymatic activity levels by approximately 2-fold. By contrast, expression of (RAT)SULT2A3, the rat counterpart to (HUMAN)SULT2A1, was induced by treatment of primary hepatocyte cultures with an activator of the pregnane X receptor, but not PPARalpha. In HepG2 cells, transient transfection analyses of luciferase reporter constructs containing upstream regions of the (HUMAN)SULT2A1 gene implicated a candidate peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) at nucleotides (nt) -5949 to -5929 relative to the transcription start site. Site-directed mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay studies confirmed that this distal PPRE (dPPRE), a direct repeat nuclear receptor motif containing one intervening nt, represented a functional PPRE. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that the (HUMAN)SULT2A1 dPPRE was also a functional element in the context of the human genome. These data support a major role for the PPARalpha transcription factor in the regulation of hepatic (HUMAN)SULT2A1. Results also indicate that important species differences govern the transactivation of SULT2A gene transcription by nuclear receptors. PMID:15635043

  4. A stable luciferase reporter plasmid for in vivo imaging in murine models of Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    PubMed

    Bacconi, Marta; Haag, Andreas F; Torre, Antonina; Castagnetti, Andrea; Chiarot, Emiliano; Delany, Isabel; Bensi, Giuliano

    2016-04-01

    In vivo imaging of bioluminescent bacteria permits their visualization in infected mice, allowing spatial and temporal evaluation of infection progression. Most available bioluminescent strains were obtained by integration of the luciferase genes into the bacterial chromosome, a challenging and time-consuming approach. Recently, episomal plasmids were used, which were introduced in bacteria and expressed all genes required for bioluminescence emission. However, the plasmid was progressively lost in vitro and in vivo, if bacteria were not maintained under antibiotic selective pressure. Increased stability could be obtained inserting into the plasmid backbone sequences that assured plasmid partition between daughter bacterial cells, or caused death of bacteria that had lost the plasmid. So far, no detailed analysis was performed of either plasmid stability in vivo or contribution of different stabilizing sequence types. Here we report the construction of a plasmid, which includes the Photorhabdus luminescens lux cassette expressed under the control of a Staphylococcus aureus specific gene promoter, and toxin/antitoxin (T/A) and partition sequences (Par) conferring stability and transmissibility of the plasmid. Following infection of mice with S. aureus carrying this plasmid, we demonstrated that the promoter-lux fusion was functional in vivo, that the plasmid was retained by 70-100% of bacterial cells 7 days post-infection, and that both stabilizing sequence types were required to maximize plasmid retention. These data suggest that the plasmid can be a valuable tool to study gene expression and bacterial spread in small laboratory animals infected with S. aureus or possibly other Gram-positive human pathogens. PMID:26685857

  5. A New Screen for Tuberculosis Drug Candidates Utilizing a Luciferase-Expressing Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guéren

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Masayuki; Doe, Matsumi; Tamaru, Aki; Kinoshita, Naoko; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Sawa, Ryuichi; Umekita, Maya; Enany, Shymaa; Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Niki, Mamiko; Tateishi, Yoshitaka; Hatano, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious infectious disease caused by a bacterial pathogen. Mortality from tuberculosis was estimated at 1.5 million deaths worldwide in 2013. Development of new TB drugs is needed to not only to shorten the medication period but also to treat multi-drug resistant and extensively drug-resistant TB. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) grows slowly and only multiplies once or twice per day. Therefore, conventional drug screening takes more than 3 weeks. Additionally, a biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) facility is required. Thus, we developed a new screening method to identify TB drug candidates by utilizing luciferase-expressing recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guéren (rBCG). Using this method, we identified several candidates in 4 days in a non-BSL-3 facility. We screened 10,080 individual crude extracts derived from Actinomyces and Streptomyces and identified 137 extracts which possessed suppressive activity to the luciferase of rBCG. Among them, 41 compounds inhibited the growth of both Mtb H37Rv and the extensively drug-resistant Mtb (XDR-Mtb) strains. We purified the active substance of the 1904–1 extract, which possessed strong activity toward rBCG, Mtb H37Rv, and XDR-Mtb but was harmless to the host eukaryotic cells. The MIC of this substance was 0.13 μg/ml, 0.5 μg/ml, and 2.0–7.5 μg/ml against rBCG, H37Rv, and 2 XDR-strains, respectively. Its efficacy was specific to acid-fast bacterium except for the Mycobacterium avium intracellular complex. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses revealed that the active substance of 1904–1 was cyclomarin A. To confirm the mode of action of the 1904-1-derived compound, resistant BCG clones were used. Whole genome DNA sequence analysis showed that these clones contained a mutation in the clpc gene which encodes caseinolytic protein, an essential component of an ATP-dependent proteinase, and the likely target of the active substance of 1904–1. Our method provides a

  6. Rational design of a triple reporter gene for multimodality molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Hwu, Luen; Ke, Chien-Chih; Yeh, Skye Hsin-Hsien; Lin, Chien-Feng; Chen, Fu-Du; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Lin, Kang-Ping; Chen, Ran-Chou; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging using noncytotoxic triple fusion (TF) reporter genes is an important application for cell-based tracking, drug screening, and therapy. The firefly luciferase (fl), monomeric red fluorescence protein (mrfp), and truncated herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase SR39 mutant (ttksr39) were fused together to create TF reporter gene constructs with different order. The enzymatic activities of TF protein in vitro and in vivo were determined by luciferase reporter assay, H-FEAU cellular uptake experiment, bioluminescence imaging, and micropositron emission tomography (microPET). The TF construct expressed in H1299 cells possesses luciferase activity and red fluorescence. The tTKSR39 activity is preserved in TF protein and mediates high levels of H-FEAU accumulation and significant cell death from ganciclovir (GCV) prodrug activation. In living animals, the luciferase and tTKSR39 activities of TF protein have also been successfully validated by multimodality imaging systems. The red fluorescence signal is relatively weak for in vivo imaging but may expedite FACS-based selection of TF reporter expressing cells. We have developed an optimized triple fusion reporter construct DsRedm-fl-ttksr39 for more effective and sensitive in vivo animal imaging using fluorescence, bioluminescence, and PET imaging modalities, which may facilitate different fields of biomedical research and applications. PMID:24809057

  7. Identification and characterization of a cis-regulatory element for zygotic gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-03-26

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient tomore » confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. Furthermore, we predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes.« less

  8. Identification and Characterization of a cis-Regulatory Element for Zygotic Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-01-01

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. We predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes. PMID:27172209

  9. Identification and Characterization of a cis-Regulatory Element for Zygotic Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-01-01

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. We predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes. PMID:27172209

  10. Physical activity in adulthood: genes and mortality.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Sira; Waller, Katja; Silvennoinen, Mika; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Kujala, Urho M

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies report a strong inverse relationship between leisure-time physical activity and all-cause mortality. Despite suggestive evidence from population-based associations, scientists have not been able to show a beneficial effect of physical activity on the risk of death in controlled intervention studies among individuals who have been healthy at baseline. On the other hand, high cardiorespiratory fitness is known to be a strong predictor of reduced mortality, even more robust than physical activity level itself. Here, in both animals and/or human twins, we show that the same genetic factors influence physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk of death. Previous observational follow-up studies in humans suggest that increasing fitness through physical activity levels could prolong life; however, our controlled interventional study with laboratory rats bred for low and high intrinsic fitness contrast with these findings. Also, we find no evidence for the suggested association using pairwise analysis among monozygotic twin pairs who are discordant in their physical activity levels. Based on both our animal and human findings, we propose that genetic pleiotropy might partly explain the frequently observed associations between high baseline physical activity and later reduced mortality in humans. PMID:26666586

  11. Physical activity in adulthood: genes and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Karvinen, Sira; Waller, Katja; Silvennoinen, Mika; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Kujala, Urho M.

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies report a strong inverse relationship between leisure-time physical activity and all-cause mortality. Despite suggestive evidence from population-based associations, scientists have not been able to show a beneficial effect of physical activity on the risk of death in controlled intervention studies among individuals who have been healthy at baseline. On the other hand, high cardiorespiratory fitness is known to be a strong predictor of reduced mortality, even more robust than physical activity level itself. Here, in both animals and/or human twins, we show that the same genetic factors influence physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk of death. Previous observational follow-up studies in humans suggest that increasing fitness through physical activity levels could prolong life; however, our controlled interventional study with laboratory rats bred for low and high intrinsic fitness contrast with these findings. Also, we find no evidence for the suggested association using pairwise analysis among monozygotic twin pairs who are discordant in their physical activity levels. Based on both our animal and human findings, we propose that genetic pleiotropy might partly explain the frequently observed associations between high baseline physical activity and later reduced mortality in humans. PMID:26666586

  12. Micronuclei in Cord Blood Lymphocytes and Associations with Biomarkers of Exposure to Carcinogens and Hormonally Active Factors, Gene Polymorphisms, and Gene Expression: The NewGeneris Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Domenico Franco; Agramunt, Silvia; Anna, Lívia; Besselink, Harrie; Botsivali, Maria; Brady, Nigel J.; Ceppi, Marcello; Chatzi, Leda; Chen, Bowang; Decordier, Ilse; Farmer, Peter B.; Fleming, Sarah; Fontana, Vincenzo; Försti, Asta; Fthenou, Eleni; Gallo, Fabio; Georgiadis, Panagiotis; Gmuender, Hans; Godschalk, Roger W.; Granum, Berit; Hardie, Laura J.; Hemminki, Kari; Hochstenbach, Kevin; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kovács, Katalin; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Løvik, Martinus; Nielsen, Jeanette K; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Pedersen, Marie; Rydberg, Per; Schoket, Bernadette; Segerbäck, Dan; Singh, Rajinder; Sunyer, Jordi; Törnqvist, Margareta; van Loveren, Henk; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Vande Loock, Kim; von Stedingk, Hans; Wright, John; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; van Delft, Joost H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Leukemia incidence has increased in recent decades among European children, suggesting that early-life environmental exposures play an important role in disease development. Objectives: We investigated the hypothesis that childhood susceptibility may increase as a result of in utero exposure to carcinogens and hormonally acting factors. Using cord blood samples from the NewGeneris cohort, we examined associations between a range of biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and hormonally acting factors with micronuclei (MN) frequency as a proxy measure of cancer risk. Associations with gene expression and genotype were also explored. Methods: DNA and protein adducts, gene expression profiles, circulating hormonally acting factors, and GWAS (genome-wide association study) data were investigated in relation to genomic damage measured by MN frequency in lymphocytes from 623 newborns enrolled between 2006 and 2010 across Europe. Results: Malondialdehyde DNA adducts (M1dG) were associated with increased MN frequency in binucleated lymphocytes (MNBN), and exposure to androgenic, estrogenic, and dioxin-like compounds was associated with MN frequency in mononucleated lymphocytes (MNMONO), although no monotonic exposure–outcome relationship was observed. Lower frequencies of MNBN were associated with a 1-unit increase expression of PDCD11, LATS2, TRIM13, CD28, SMC1A, IL7R, and NIPBL genes. Gene expression was significantly higher in association with the highest versus lowest category of bulky and M1dG–DNA adducts for five and six genes, respectively. Gene expression levels were significantly lower for 11 genes in association with the highest versus lowest category of plasma AR CALUX® (chemically activated luciferase expression for androgens) (8 genes), ERα CALUX® (for estrogens) (2 genes), and DR CALUX® (for dioxins). Several SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) on chromosome 11 near FOLH1 significantly modified associations between androgen activity and MNBN

  13. Proposed ionic bond between Arg300 and Glu270 and Glu271 are not involved in inactivation of a mutant firefly luciferase (LRR).

    PubMed

    Sobhani-Damavandifar, Zahra; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Sajedi, Reza H

    2016-05-01

    The weakness of firefly luciferase is its rapid inactivation. Many studies have been done to develop thermostable luciferases. One of these modifications was LRR mutant in which the Leu300 was substituted with Arg in the E(354)RR(356)Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase as template. LRR was more thermostable than the wild type but with only 0.02% activity. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was used to change the proposed ionic bond between the Arg and two neighboring residues (Glu270 and Glu271), to understand if the induced interactions were responsible for inactivation in LRR. Our results showed that substitution of Glu270 and 271 with Ala removed the interactions but the activity of enzyme did not return. The E270A mutant was more active than LRR but the E271A and E270A/E271A mutants were inactive. Fluorescence and CD measurements showed that these mutations were accompanied by conformational changes. Extrinsic fluorescence measurement and obtained quenching data by KI and acrylamide also confirmed that the mutants were less compact than the LRR enzyme. In conclusion, in LRR, the interactions between Arg300 and Glu270 and Glu271 were not responsible for the enzyme inactivation and it is proposed that the enzyme inactivation is due to conformational changes of LRR mutant of firefly luciferase. PMID:26992788

  14. Mechanisms of specificity in neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Michelle R.; West, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is a highly adaptable organ that is capable of converting sensory information into changes in neuronal function. This plasticity allows behavior to be accommodated to the environment, providing an important evolutionary advantage. Neurons convert environmental stimuli into long-lasting changes in their physiology in part through the synaptic activity-regulated transcription of new gene products. Since the neurotransmitter-dependent regulation of Fos transcription was first discovered nearly 25 years ago, a wealth of studies have enriched our understanding of the molecular pathways that mediate activity-regulated changes in gene transcription. These findings show that a broad range of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators can be engaged by neuronal activity to sculpt complex programs of stimulus-regulated gene transcription. However, the shear scope of the transcriptional pathways engaged by neuronal activity raises the question of how specificity in the nature of the transcriptional response is achieved in order to encode physiologically relevant responses to divergent stimuli. Here we summarize the general paradigms by which neuronal activity regulates transcription while focusing on the molecular mechanisms that confer differential stimulus-, cell-type-, and developmental-specificity upon activity-regulated programs of neuronal gene transcription. In addition, we preview some of the new technologies that will advance our future understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of activity-regulated gene transcription in the brain. PMID:21620929

  15. The role of an inverted CCAAT element in transcriptional activation of the human DNA topoisomerase IIalpha gene by heat shock.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, M; Uchiumi, T; Nomoto, M; Takano, H; Morimoto, R I; Naito, S; Kuwano, M; Kohno, K

    1998-04-24

    Expression of the DNA topoisomerase IIalpha (topoIIalpha) gene is highly sensitive to various environmental stimuli including heat shock. The amount of topoIIalpha mRNA was increased 1.5-3-fold 6-24 h after exposure of T24 human urinary bladder cancer cells to heat shock stress at 43 degreesC for 1 h. The effect of heat shock on the transcriptional activity of the human topoIIalpha gene promoter was investigated by transient transfection of T24 cells with luciferase reporter plasmids containing various lengths of the promoter sequence. The transcriptional activity of the full-length promoter (nucleotides (nt) -295 to +85) and of three deletion constructs (nt -197 to +85, -154 to +85, and -74 to +85) was increased approximately 3-fold 24 h after heat shock stress. In contrast, the transcriptional activity of the minimal promoter (nt -20 to +85), which lacks the first inverted CCAAT element (ICE1), the GC box, and the heat shock element located between nt -74 and -21, was not increased by heat shock. Furthermore, the transcriptional activity of promoter constructs containing mutations in the GC box or heat shock element, but not that of a construct containing mutations in ICE1, was significantly increased by heat shock. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed reduced binding of a nuclear factor to an oligonucleotide containing ICE1 when nuclear extracts were derived from cells cultured for 3-24 h after heat shock. No such change in factor binding was apparent with an oligonucleotide containing the heat shock element of the topoIIalpha gene promoter. Finally, in vivo footprint analysis of the topoIIalpha gene promoter revealed that two G residues of ICE1 that were protected in control cells became sensitive to dimethyl sulfate modification after heat shock. These results suggest that transcriptional activation of the topoIIalpha gene by heat shock requires the release of a negative regulatory factor from ICE1. PMID:9553115

  16. Promoter-directed expression of recombinant fire-fly luciferase in the salivary glands of Hermes-transformed Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Coates, C J; Jasinskiene, N; Pott, G B; James, A A

    1999-01-21

    Molecular genetic analyses of biological properties characteristic of insect vectors of disease, such as hematophagy and competence for pathogens, require the ability to isolate and characterize genes involved in these processes. We have been working to develop molecular approaches for studying the promoter function of genes that are expressed specifically in the adult salivary glands of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Genomic DNA fragments containing cis-acting promoter elements from the Maltase-like I (MalI) and Apyrase (Apy) genes were cloned so as to direct the expression of the reporter gene, luciferase (luc). The function of the promoters was assayed transiently in cultured insect cells and by germ-line transformation of Ae. aegypti. MalI and Apy DNA fragments consisting of at least 650 nucleotides (nt) of DNA immediately adjacent to the 5'-end of the initiation codon of the mosquito genes directed constitutive expression of the luc reporter gene in cultured cells. When introduced into Ae. aegypti chromosomes, approximately 1.5 kilobases (kb) of each promoter were able to direct the predicted developmental-, sex- and tissue-specific expression of the reporter gene in patterns identical to those determined for the respective endogenous genes. PMID:9931506

  17. Tissue-specific expression of the human brain natriuretic peptide gene in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    LaPointe, M C; Wu, G; Garami, M; Yang, X P; Gardner, D G

    1996-03-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac hormone constitutively expressed in the adult heart. To identify the cis-acting elements involved in regulation of the human BNP gene, we subcloned the full-length promoter (-1818 to +100) and deletions thereof upstream from a luciferase reporter gene and transiently transfected them into primary cultures of neonatal rat atrial and ventricular myocytes and myocardial fibroblasts. Luciferase activity of the full-length construct was higher in ventricular (39064 +/- 8488 relative light units, N=11) and atrial (11225 +/- 1907, N=17) myocytes than myocardial fibroblasts (329 +/- 113, n=5). Maximal promoter activity in ventricular and atrial myocytes was maintained by sequences positioned between -1818 and -1283 relative to the transcription start site. Deletion to -1175 resulted in a decrease, whereas further deletion to -500 effected an increase in reporter activity in both cell types. In ventricular and atrial myocytes, deletion from -500 to -40 reduced luciferase activity 20-fold and 2-fold, respectively, whereas in myocardial fibroblasts, deletion to -40 upregulated the BNP promoter 2-fold. Of note, deleting 16 bp between -127 and -111 reduced luciferase activity 7-fold and 4-fold in ventricular and atrial myocytes, respectively, but had essentially no effect on luciferase activity in fibroblasts. Placement of sequences lying between -127 and -40 upstream from a heterologous thymidine kinase promoter resulted in reporter expression that was 7.4-fold greater than the vector alone in ventricular myocytes, approximately 2-fold greater in atrial myocytes, and equivalent to the vector alone in fibroblasts. For study of activity of the human BNP promoter in adult myocytes, either 408 or 97 bp of 5' flanking sequence coupled to the luciferase reporter gene was injected into the apex of adult male Sprague-Dawley rat hearts. After 7 days, luciferase activity in the injected myocardium was 9.8-fold higher for the longer construct

  18. A Novel Peroxisome Proliferator Response Element Modulates Hepatic Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Transcription in Response to PPARδ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Vikram R.; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    The hepatic expression of LDLR gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative PPAR-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at −768 to −752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin mediated transactivation. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression. PMID:26443862

  19. Absence of canonical active chromatin marks in developmentally regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated to stable production of RNA, while unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and de-activation during development. In this case, regulation by transcription factors would play a comparatively more important regulatory role. PMID:26280901

  20. High-Throughput Luciferase-Based Assay for the Discovery of Therapeutics That Prevent Malaria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify the most attractive starting points for drugs that can be used to prevent malaria, a diverse chemical space comprising tens of thousands to millions of small molecules may need to be examined. Achieving this throughput necessitates the development of efficient ultra-high-throughput screening methods. Here, we report the development and evaluation of a luciferase-based phenotypic screen of malaria exoerythrocytic-stage parasites optimized for a 1536-well format. This assay uses the exoerythrocytic stage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, and a human hepatoma cell line. We use this assay to evaluate several biased and unbiased compound libraries, including two small sets of molecules (400 and 89 compounds, respectively) with known activity against malaria erythrocytic-stage parasites and a set of 9886 diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS)-derived compounds. Of the compounds screened, we obtain hit rates of 12–13 and 0.6% in preselected and naïve libraries, respectively, and identify 52 compounds with exoerythrocytic-stage activity less than 1 μM and having minimal host cell toxicity. Our data demonstrate the ability of this method to identify compounds known to have causal prophylactic activity in both human and animal models of malaria, as well as novel compounds, including some exclusively active against parasite exoerythrocytic stages. PMID:27275010

  1. Archaeal promoter architecture and mechanism of gene activation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Nan; Ao, Xiang; Liang, Yun Xiang; She, Qunxin

    2011-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus islandicus contain several genes exhibiting D-arabinose-inducible expression and these systems are ideal for studying mechanisms of archaeal gene expression. At sequence level, only two highly conserved cis elements are present on the promoters: a regulatory element named ara box directing arabinose-inducible expression and the basal promoter element TATA, serving as the binding site for the TATA-binding protein. Strikingly, these promoters possess a modular structure that allows an essentially inactive basal promoter to be strongly activated. The invoked mechanisms include TFB (transcription factor B) recruitment by the ara-box-binding factor to activate gene expression and modulation of TFB recruitment efficiency to yield differential gene expression. PMID:21265754

  2. A methylation-dependent DNA-binding activity recognising the methylated promoter region of the mouse Xist gene.

    PubMed

    Huntriss, J; Lorenzi, R; Purewal, A; Monk, M

    1997-06-27

    Differential methylation of CpG sites in the promoter region of the mouse Xist gene is correlated with Xist expression and X-chromosome inactivation in the female. Using oligonucleotides encompassing the differentially methylated sites as probes in band-shift assays, we have identified a nuclear protein which binds to a specific region of the promoter (between base pairs -45 and -30 upstream from the transcription start site) only when CpG sites within the CG rich region (GCGCCGCGG, -44 to -36) are methylated. Competition experiments with methylated or unmethylated heterologous oligonucleotides demonstrate that the activity is sequence-specific as well as methylation-dependent. Analysis by Southwestern blot identifies a protein of approximately 100 kDa molecular weight and confirms strong binding to the methylated Xist promoter oligonucleotide. Using a 233bp Xist-promoter luciferase construct in which the cytosines in the three CpG sites in the -44 to -36 region are mutated to thymine, we have established that this region is required for transcription from the mouse Xist promoter. Therefore, we suggest that the binding of the 100kDa protein to the methylated sequence leads to repression of transcription from the methylated Xist allele, thus suggesting a role in the regulation of both imprinted and random Xist transcription and X-chromosome inactivation. PMID:9207230

  3. Transcription Factor ZBED6 Mediates IGF2 Gene Expression by Regulating Promoter Activity and DNA Methylation in Myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Liang-Zhi; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Li, Ming-Xun; Sun, Yu-Jia; Li, Cong-Jun; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were upregulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels were negatively associated with the methylation status in beef cattle (P < 0.05). A luciferase assay for the IGF2 intron 3 and P3 promoter showed that the mutant-type 439 A-SNP-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the wild-type 439 G-SNP-pGL3 construct (P < 0.05). An over-expression assay revealed that ZBED6 regulate IGF2 expression and promote myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of ZBED6 led to IGF2 expression change in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that ZBED6 inhibits IGF2 activity and expression via a G to A transition disrupts the interaction. Thus, we propose that ZBED6 plays a critical role in myogenic differentiation.

  4. DETECTION OF ANDROGENIC ACTIVITY IN EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL FUEL AND BIOMASS COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study evaluated both diesel fuel exhaust and biomass (wood) burn extracts for androgen receptor¿mediated activity using MDA-kb2 cells, which contain an androgen-responsive promoter-luciferase reporter gene construct. This assay and analytical fractionization of the sa...

  5. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the human p27kip1 gene (-838C>A) affects basal promoter activity and the risk of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    González, Pelayo; Díez-Juan, Antonio; Coto, Eliecer; Álvarez, Victoria; Reguero, Julian R; Batalla, Alberto; Andrés, Vicente

    2004-01-01

    Background Excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and leukocytes within the artery wall is a major event in the development of atherosclerosis. The growth suppressor p27kip1 associates with several cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin complexes, thereby abrogating their capacity to induce progression through the cell cycle. Recent studies have implicated p27kip1 in the control of neointimal hyperplasia. For instance, p27kip1 ablation in apolipoprotein-E-null mice enhanced arterial cell proliferation and accelerated atherogenesis induced by dietary cholesterol. Therefore, p27kip1 is a candidate gene to modify the risk of developing atherosclerosis and associated ischaemic events (i.e., myocardial infarction and stroke). Results In this study we found three common single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the human p27kip1 gene (+326T>G [V109G], -79C>T, and -838C>A). The frequency of -838A carriers was significantly increased in myocardial infarction patients compared to healthy controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 1.12–2.70). In addition, luciferase reporter constructs driven by the human p27kip1 gene promoter containing A at position -838 had decreased basal transcriptional activity when transiently transfected in Jurkat cells, compared with constructs bearing C in -838 (P = 0.04). Conclusions These data suggest that -838A is associated with reduced p27kip1 promoter activity and increased risk of myocardial infarction. PMID:15061869

  6. Effect of 60 Hz magnetic fields on the activation of hsp70 promoter in cultured INER-37 and RMA E7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Rojas, J Antonio; Rodríguez de la Fuente, Abraham Octavio; Alcocer González, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Santoyo-Stephano, Martha A; Castañeda-Garza, Esperanza; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S

    2010-10-01

    It has been reported that 50-60 Hz magnetic fields (MF) with flux densities ranging from microtesla to millitesla are able to induce heat shock factor or heat shock proteins in various cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal MF at 8 and 80 μT on the expression of the luciferase gene contained in a plasmid labeled as electromagnetic field-plasmid (pEMF). This gene construct contains the specific sequences previously described for the induction of hsp70 expression by MF, as well as the reporter for the luciferase gene. The pEMF vector was transfected into INER-37 and RMA E7 cell lines that were later exposed to either MF or thermal shock (TS). Cells that received the MF or TS treatments and their controls were processed according to the luciferase assay system for evaluate luciferase activity. An increased luciferase gene expression was observed in INER-37 cells exposed to MF and TS compared with controls (p < 0.05), but MF exposure had no effect on the RMA E7 cell line. PMID:20835776

  7. FIREFLY LUCIFERASE ATP ASSAY DEVELOPMENT FOR MONITORING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATIONS IN WATER SUPPLIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was initiated to develop a rapid, automatable system for measuring total viable microorganisms in potable drinking water supplies using the firefly luciferase ATP assay. The assay was adapted to an automatable flow system that provided comparable sensitivity...

  8. Novel screening method for potential skin-whitening compounds by a luciferase reporter assay.

    PubMed

    Shirasugi, Ichiro; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Yamasaki, Masao; Nishiyama, Kazuo; Matsui, Takashi; Liu, Ming-Cheh; Suiko, Masahito

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of the melanin content by using B16 melanoma cells is generally applied to find novel skin-whitening agents. However, this measurement method using B16 melanoma cells has such disadvantages, as the time taken, its sensitivity, and troublesomeness. We therefore attempted in the present study to establish a reporter assay system by measuring the tyrosinase promoter activity to use for convenient, high-throughput screening of new melanogenesis inhibitors. We first confirmed the validity of this reporter assay system by using such known skin-whitening agents, as arbutin, sulforaphane, and theaflavin 3,3'-digallate. We then compared the effect of 56 compounds on the tyrosinase promoter activity to test this reporter assay system. Carnosol, and rottlerin strongly inhibited the tyrosinase promoter activity. Moreover, carnosol and rottlerin decreased melanin synthesis and tyrosinase expression in a dose-dependent manner when using B16 melanoma cells. These results indicate this new luciferase reported assay system to be an effective and convenient method for screening potential skin-whitening compounds. PMID:21071833

  9. Monitoring Tumorigenesis and Senescence In Vivo with a p16INK4a-Luciferase Model

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Christin E.; Sorrentino, Jessica A.; Clark, Kelly S.; Darr, David B.; Krishnamurthy, Janakiraman; Deal, Allison M.; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Castrillon, Diego H.; Beach, David H.; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Monitoring cancer and aging in vivo remains experimentally challenging. Here, we describe a luciferase knockin mouse (p16LUC), which faithfully reports expression of p16INK4a, a tumor suppressor and aging biomarker. Lifelong assessment of luminescence in p16+/LUC mice revealed an exponential increase with aging, which was highly variable in a cohort of contemporaneously housed, syngeneic mice. Expression of p16INK4a with aging did not predict cancer development, suggesting that the accumulation of senescent cells is not a principal determinant of cancer-related death. In 14 of 14 tested tumor models, expression of p16LUC was focally activated by early neoplastic events, enabling visualization of tumors with sensitivity exceeding other imaging modalities. Activation of p16INK4a was noted in the emerging neoplasm and surrounding stromal cells. This work suggests that p16INK4a activation is a characteristic of all emerging cancers, making the p16LUC allele a sensitive, unbiased reporter of neoplastic transformation. PMID:23332765

  10. A Coiled-Coil Enabled Split-Luciferase Three-Hybrid System: Applied Toward Profiling Inhibitors of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Jester, Benjamin W.; Cox, Kurt J.; Gaj, Alicia; Shomin, Carolyn D.; Porter, Jason R.; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2010-01-01

    The 518 protein kinases encoded in the human genome are exquisitely regulated and their aberrant function(s) are often associated with human disease. Thus, in order to advance therapeutics and to probe signal transduction cascades there is considerable interest in the development of inhibitors that can selectively target protein kinases. However, identifying specific compounds against such a large array of protein kinases is difficult to routinely achieve utilizing traditional activity assays, where purified protein kinases are necessary. Toward a simple, rapid, and practical method for identifying specific inhibitors, we describe the development and application of a split-protein methodology utilizing a coiled-coil assisted three-hybrid system. In this approach, a protein kinase of interest is attached to the C-terminal fragment of split-firefly luciferase and the coiled-coil Fos, which is specific for the coiled-coil Jun, is attached to the N-terminal fragment. Upon addition of Jun conjugated to a pan-kinase inhibitor such as staurosporine, a three-hybrid complex is established with concomitant reassembly of the split-luciferase enzyme. An inhibitor can be potentially identified by the commensurate loss in split-luciferase activity by displacement of the modified staurosporine. We demonstrate that this new three-hybrid approach is potentially general by testing protein kinases from the different kinase families. To interrogate whether this method allows for screening inhibitors, we tested six different protein kinases against a library of 80 known protein kinase inhibitors. Finally, we demonstrate that this three-hybrid system can potentially provide a rapid method for structure/function analysis as well as aid in the identification of allosteric inhibitors. PMID:20669947

  11. Total Synthesis and Biological Studies of TMC-205 and Analogues as Anticancer Agents and Activators of SV40 Promoter

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    TMC-205 is a natural fungal metabolite with antiproliferative activity against cancer cell lines. The light- and air-sensitivity prevented in-depth exploitation of this novel indole derivative. Herein, we report the first synthesis of TMC-205. On the basis of its reactivity with reactive oxygen species, we developed air-stable analogues of TMC-205. These analogues are 2–8-fold more cytotoxic than TMC-205 against HCT-116 colon cancer cell line. Importantly, at noncytotoxic dose levels, these analogues activated the transcription of luciferase reporter gene driven by simian virus 40 promoter (SV40). Further, these small molecules also inhibit firefly luciferase, presumably by direct interaction. PMID:25147604

  12. Positive and negative regulation of the human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Takahashi, Y; Ito, K; Nagano, T; Shibahara, S; Miura, T

    1999-10-28

    To elucidate the regulation of the human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) gene expression, we assessed approximately 4 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the hHO-1 gene for basal promoter activity and sequenced approximately 2 kb of the 5'-flanking region. A series of deletion mutants of the 5'-flanking region linked to the luciferase gene was constructed. Basal level expression of these constructs was tested in HepG2 human hepatoma cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. By measuring luciferase activity, which was transiently expressed in the transfected cells, we found a positive regulatory region at position -1976 to -1655 bp. This region functions in HepG2 cells but not in HeLa cells. A negative regulatory region was also found at position -981 to -412 bp that functions in both HepG2 cells and HeLa cells. PMID:10542320

  13. Development and Characterization of a Human Reporter Cell Line for the Assessment of Thyroid Receptor Transcriptional Activity: A Case of Organotin Endocrine Disruptors.

    PubMed

    Illés, Peter; Brtko, Július; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2015-08-12

    We developed and characterized the human luciferase reporter cell line PZ-TR for the assessment of thyroid receptor (TR) transcriptional activity. Triiodothyronine (T3) induced luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the sensitivity of assay allowed for the detection of nanomolar T3 concentrations. The luciferase activity was induced by a maximum of (2.42 ± 0.14)-(2.73 ± 0.23)-fold after 24 h of exposure to 10 nM T3. We did not observe a nonspecific induction of luciferase activity by other steroid hormones and VDR ligands, with the exception of partial activation by retinoic acids. Cryopreservation of PZ-TR cells did not influence their functionality, responsivity to T3, or cell morphology, even after long-term cultivation. PZ-TR cells were used to evaluate the effects of organic tin compounds on TR. We found that the tributyltin and triphenyltin derivatives induced luciferase activity and that application of organotins in combination with T3 enhanced the effect of T3. These findings indicate that organic tin compounds have potential to interfere with TR-mediated regulation of gene expression and influence the physiological activity of thyroid hormones. PMID:26208032

  14. Systematic identification of signal-activated stochastic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Neuert, Gregor; Munsky, Brian; Tan, Rui Zhen; Teytelman, Leonid; Khammash, Mustafa; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    Although much has been done to elucidate the biochemistry of signal transduction and gene regulatory pathways, it remains difficult to understand or predict quantitative responses. We integrate single-cell experiments with stochastic analyses, to identify predictive models of transcriptional dynamics for the osmotic stress response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We generate models with varying complexity and use parameter estimation and cross-validation analyses to select the most predictive model. This model yields insight into several dynamical features, including multistep regulation and switchlike activation for several osmosensitive genes. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts the transcriptional dynamics of cells in response to different environmental and genetic perturbations. Because our approach is general, it should facilitate a predictive understanding for signal-activated transcription of other genes in other pathways or organisms. PMID:23372015

  15. Clara Cell 10-kDa Protein Gene Transfection Inhibits NF-κB Activity in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiao-Bo; Hu, Shuang; Wang, Nan; Zhen, Hong-Tao; Cui, Yong-Hua; Liu, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Clara cell 10-kDa protein (CC10) is a multifunctional protein with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Induction of CC10 expression by gene transfection may possess potential therapeutic effect. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) plays a key role in the inflammatory processes of airway diseases. Method/Results To investigate potential therapeutic effect of CC10 gene transfection in controlling airway inflammation and the underlying intracellular mechanisms, in this study, we constructed CC10 plasmid and transfected it into bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B cells and CC10 knockout mice. In BEAS-2B cells, CC10's effect on interleukin (IL)-1β induced IL-8 expression was explored by means of RT-PCR and ELISA and its effect on NF-κB classical signaling pathway was studied by luciferase reporter, western blot, and immunoprecipitation assay. The effect of endogenous CC10 on IL-1β evoked IL-8 expression was studied by means of nasal explant culture. In mice, CC10's effect on IL-1β induced IL-8 and nuclear p65 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. First, we found that the CC10 gene transfer could inhibit IL-1β induced IL-8 expression in BEAS-2B cells. Furthermore, we found that CC10 repressed IL-1β induced NF-κB activation by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IκB-α but not IκB kinase-α/β in BEAS-2B cells. Nevertheless, we did not observe a direct interaction between CC10 and p65 subunit in BEAS-2B cells. In nasal explant culture, we found that IL-1β induced IL-8 expression was inversely correlated with CC10 levels in human sinonasal mucosa. In vivo study revealed that CC10 gene transfer could attenuate the increase of IL-8 and nuclear p65 staining in nasal epithelial cells in CC10 knockout mice evoked by IL-1β administration. Conclusion These results indicate that CC10 gene transfer may inhibit airway inflammation through suppressing the activation of NF-κB, which may provide us a new consideration in the therapy of airway

  16. ARMADA: Using motif activity dynamics to infer gene regulatory networks from gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Pemberton-Ross, Peter J; Pachkov, Mikhail; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of gene expression data remains one of the most promising avenues toward reconstructing genome-wide gene regulatory networks. However, the large dimensionality of the problem prohibits the fitting of explicit dynamical models of gene regulatory networks, whereas machine learning methods for dimensionality reduction such as clustering or principal component analysis typically fail to provide mechanistic interpretations of the reduced descriptions. To address this, we recently developed a general methodology called motif activity response analysis (MARA) that, by modeling gene expression patterns in terms of the activities of concrete regulators, accomplishes dramatic dimensionality reduction while retaining mechanistic biological interpretations of its predictions (Balwierz, 2014). Here we extend MARA by presenting ARMADA, which models the activity dynamics of regulators across a time course, and infers the causal interactions between the regulators that drive the dynamics of their activities across time. We have implemented ARMADA as part of our ISMARA webserver, ismara.unibas.ch, allowing any researcher to automatically apply it to any gene expression time course. To illustrate the method, we apply ARMADA to a time course of human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with TNF. Remarkably, ARMADA is able to reproduce the complex observed motif activity dynamics using a relatively small set of interactions between the key regulators in this system. In addition, we show that ARMADA successfully infers many of the key regulatory interactions known to drive this inflammatory response and discuss several novel interactions that ARMADA predicts. In combination with ISMARA, ARMADA provides a powerful approach to generating plausible hypotheses for the key interactions between regulators that control gene expression in any system for which time course measurements are available. PMID:26164700

  17. Bioorthogonal Catalysis: A General Method To Evaluate Metal-Catalyzed Reactions in Real Time in Living Systems Using a Cellular Luciferase Reporter System.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiao-Tieh; Trantow, Brian M; Waymouth, Robert M; Wender, Paul A

    2016-02-17

    The development of abiological catalysts that can function in biological systems is an emerging subject of importance with significant ramifications in synthetic chemistry and the life sciences. Herein we report a biocompatible ruthenium complex [Cp(MQA)Ru(C3H5)](+)PF6(-) 2 (Cp = cyclopentadienyl, MQA = 4-methoxyquinoline-2-carboxylate) and a general analytical method for evaluating its performance in real time based on a luciferase reporter system amenable to high throughput screening in cells and by extension to evaluation in luciferase transgenic animals. Precatalyst 2 activates alloc-protected aminoluciferin 4b, a bioluminescence pro-probe, and releases the active luminophore, aminoluciferin (4a), in the presence of luciferase-transfected cells. The formation and enzymatic turnover of 4a, an overall process selected because it emulates pro-drug activation and drug turnover by an intracellular target, is evaluated in real time by photon counting as 4a is converted by intracellular luciferase to oxyaminoluciferin and light. Interestingly, while the catalytic conversion (activation) of 4b to 4a in water produces multiple products, the presence of biological nucleophiles such as thiols prevents byproduct formation and provides almost exclusively luminophore 4a. Our studies show that precatalyst 2 activates 4b extracellularly, exhibits low toxicity at concentrations relevant to catalysis, and is comparably effective in two different cell lines. This proof of concept study shows that precatalyst 2 is a promising lead for bioorthogonal catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy, similarly activatable pro-drugs. More generally, this study provides an analytical method to measure abiological catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy with our earlier studies on pro-Taxol, similarly activatable pro-drugs in real time using a coupled biological catalyst that mediates a bioluminescent readout, providing tools for the study of imaging signal amplification

  18. Hypomethylation and activation of syncytin-1 gene in endometriotic tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyuan; Li, Jinping; Podratz, Karl C; Tipton, Tracy; Marzolf, Susan; Chen, Hai Bin; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Syncytin-1 plays a critical role in the maintenance of normal pregnancy by mediating the formation of syncytiotrophoblasts through a fosugenic action. Encoded by the human endogenous retrovirus envelope gene HERV-W, syncytin-1 trophoblast-specific expression is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms. In non-placental tissues, the syncytin-1 gene is suppressed by hypermethylation in the LTR promoter region. Hypomethylated and activated syncytin-1 gene is found in placental trophoblast lineages and malignant cells. We here demonstrate that while syncytin-1 gene remains silenced in the eutopic endometrium from endometriotic patients, syncytin-1 mRNA and protein are detected in ectopic, endometriotic lesions; particularly the endometrioid glandular endothelial cells. LINE-1 COBRA assay and immunohistochemistry using the 5-MC-specific antibody did not detect any changes in global DNA methylation in the endometriotic tissues. However, results from COBRA and bisulfite sequencing indicated that the LTR region of the syncytin-1 promoter is hypomethylated in endometriotic tissues, highlighting the significance of DNA demethylation in syncytin-1 gene activation. Analysis of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) mRNA levels revealed that DNMT3B3, an isoform carrying methyltransferase activity, is downregulated; whereas DNMT3B7, the isoform without enzymatic activity, is upregulated in the endometriotic tissues, pointing to positive and negative regulatory functions, respectively, of these isoforms on syncytin-1 methylation. These results have provided the first evidence supporting the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms for syncytin-1 upregulation in endometriotic tissues. Considering recent findings on the nonfusogenic activity of syncytin-1, its expression in endometriotic tissues suggests that this multifunctional protein may be implicated in the pathogenesis and/or progression of endometriosis. PMID:23888948

  19. Cell-free production of Gaussia princeps luciferase – antibody fragment bioconjugates for ex vivo detection of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kedar G.; Ng, Patrick P.; Kuo, Chiung-Chi; Levy, Shoshana; Levy, Ronald; Swartz, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody fragments (scFvs) fused to luciferase reporter proteins have been used as highly sensitive optical imaging probes. Gaussia princeps luciferase (GLuc) is an attractive choice for a reporter protein because it is small and bright and does not require ATP to stimulate bioluminescence-producing reactions. Both GLuc and scFv proteins contain multiple disulfide bonds, and consequently the production of active and properly folded GLuc–scFv fusions is challenging. We therefore produced both proteins individually in active form, followed by covalent coupling to produce the intended conjugate. We used an Escherichia coli-based cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) platform to produce GLuc and scFv proteins containing non-natural amino acids (nnAAs) for subsequent conjugation by azide–alkyne click chemistry. GLuc mutants with exposed alkyne reactive groups were produced by global replacement of methionine residues in CFPS. Antibody fragment scFvs contained a single exposed azide group using a scheme for site-specific incorporation of tyrosine analogs. Incorporation of tyrosine analogs at specific sites in proteins was performed using an engineered orthogonal tRNA–tRNA synthetase pair from an archaebacterium. The unique azide and alkyne side chains in GLuc and the antibody fragment scFv facilitated conjugation by click chemistry. GLuc–scFv conjugates were shown to differentiate between cells expressing a surface target of the scFv and cells that did not carry this marker. PMID:19852937

  20. Synapsins are late activity-induced genes regulated by birdsong

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Tarciso A. F.; Mello, Claudio V.

    2008-01-01

    The consolidation of long-lasting sensory memories requires the activation of gene expression programs in the brain. In spite of considerable knowledge about the early components of this response, little is known about late components (i.e. genes regulated 2-6 hr after stimulation) and the relationship between early and late genes. Birdsong represents one of the best natural behaviors to study sensory-induced gene expression in awake, freely behaving animals. Here we show that the expression of several isoforms of synapsins, a group of phosphoproteins thought to regulate the dynamics of synaptic vesicle storage and release, is induced by auditory stimulation with birdsong in the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM) of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) brain. This induction occurs mainly in excitatory (non-GABAergic) neurons and is modulated (suppressed) by early song-inducible proteins. We also show that ZENK, an early song-inducible transcription factor, interacts with the syn3 promoter in vivo, consistent with a direct regulatory effect and an emerging novel view of ZENK action. These results demonstrate that synapsins are a late component of the genomic response to neuronal activation and that their expression depends on a complex set of regulatory interactions between early and late regulated genes. PMID:19005052

  1. Identification of agents that promote endoplasmic reticulum stress using an assay that monitors luciferase secretion

    PubMed Central

    Doudican, Nicole A.; Wen, Shih Ya; Mazumder, Amitabha; Orlow, Seth J.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of protein processing in the secretory pathway is a measurable hallmark of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of ER stress-mediated pathways has been implicated in numerous diseases including cancer. To identify agents that induce ER stress, we established a screen for compounds that reduce secretion of the reporter protein Gaussia luciferase (GLUC). Given the clinically validated importance of targeting ER stress-mediated pathways in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), we used this hematological malignancy as a model for validating our screening system. From a screen of 2000 marketed drugs and natural compounds in KMS11 and ARP1 MM cells, we identified 97 agents that reduced GLUC secretion in both cell lines by at least 30%. In order to confirm inducers of ER stress, we applied a secondary screen that assessed splicing of the unfolded protein response (UPR) transcription factor XBP1. One agent, theaflavin-3,3′–digallate (TF-3), was chosen based on its history of safe human consumption and further validated through studies of ER stress-related pathways including the UPR and apoptosis. Given these promising results, this screen could be a useful tool to identify agents targeting ER stress-related mechanisms in other cellular systems wherein ER stress plays a role in disease etiology. PMID:24371212

  2. NanoLuc: A Small Luciferase Is Brightening Up the Field of Bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    England, Christopher G; Ehlerding, Emily B; Cai, Weibo

    2016-05-18

    The biomedical field has greatly benefited from the discovery of bioluminescent proteins. Currently, scientists employ bioluminescent systems for numerous biomedical applications, ranging from highly sensitive cellular assays to bioluminescence-based molecular imaging. Traditionally, these systems are based on Firefly and Renilla luciferases; however, the applicability of these enzymes is limited by their size, stability, and luminescence efficiency. NanoLuc (NLuc), a novel bioluminescence platform, offers several advantages over established systems, including enhanced stability, smaller size, and >150-fold increase in luminescence. In addition, the substrate for NLuc displays enhanced stability and lower background activity, opening up new possibilities in the field of bioluminescence imaging. The NLuc system is incredibly versatile and may be utilized for a wide array of applications. The increased sensitivity, high stability, and small size of the NLuc system have the potential to drastically change the field of reporter assays in the future. However, as with all such technology, NLuc has limitations (including a nonideal emission for in vivo applications and its unique substrate) which may cause it to find restricted use in certain areas of molecular biology. As this unique technology continues to broaden, NLuc may have a significant impact in both preclinical and clinical fields, with potential roles in disease detection, molecular imaging, and therapeutic monitoring. This review will present the NLuc technology to the scientific community in a nonbiased manner, allowing the audience to adopt their own views of this novel system. PMID:27045664

  3. A novel screening system based on VanX-mediated autolysis-Application to Gaussia luciferase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nan; Kamioka, Tetsuya; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    We report a novel bacterial screening protocol based on co-expressing the target protein with VanX, an enzyme which mediates Escherichia coli's autolysis and the release of the target protein into the culture medium, thereby facilitating activity measurement and screening from crude medium. This protocol as assessed with 19 Gaussia luciferase (GLuc) expressing colonies, was able to detect bioluminescence wavelength shift as small as 1.5 nm. We demonstrate the performance and versatility of this protocol by applying it to a semi-rational search for GLuc variants with red-shifted bioluminescence. Six GLuc's sites, F113, I114, W143, L144, A149, and F151, were randomly mutated, and for each site, 50 colonies were cultivated in 3 mL samples, from which bioluminescence was measured without purification. We identified two GLuc single mutation red-shifted variants: W143V and L144A. Their red shifted bioluminescence and biophysical/biochemical properties were confirmed using HPLC purified variants. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1413-1420. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26694096

  4. Probing Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Rod-Luciferase Nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M; Doane, Tennyson L; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2016-02-23

    We describe the necessary design criteria to create highly efficient energy transfer conjugates containing luciferase enzymes derived from Photinus pyralis (Ppy) and semiconductor quantum rods (QRs) with rod-in-rod (r/r) microstructure. By fine-tuning the synthetic conditions, CdSe/CdS r/r-QRs were prepared with two different emission colors and three different aspect ratios (l/w) each. These were hybridized with blue, green, and red emitting Ppy, leading to a number of new BRET nanoconjugates. Measurements of the emission BRET ratio (BR) indicate that the resulting energy transfer is highly dependent on QR energy accepting properties, which include absorption, quantum yield, and optical anisotropy, as well as its morphological and topological properties, such as aspect ratio and defect concentration. The highest BR was found using r/r-QRs with lower l/w that were conjugated with red Ppy, which may be activating one of the anisotropic CdSe core energy levels. The role QR surface defects play on Ppy binding, and energy transfer was studied by growth of gold nanoparticles at the defects, which indicated that each QR set has different sites. The Ppy binding at those sites is suggested by the observed BRET red-shift as a function of Ppy-to-QR loading (L), where the lowest L results in highest efficiency and furthest shift. PMID:26760436

  5. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  6. Measurement of fluoride-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress using Gaussia luciferase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ramaswamy; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Tannous, Bakhos A; Bartlett, John D

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and its consequent activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway have been implicated in several pathophysiologic disorders as well as in drug resistance to treatment of tumors. Several techniques have been devised that qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrate the presence of ER stress and the activation of the UPR; however, most of these methods cannot be used to measure ER stress in real time. Here we describe the use of cells stably transduced with a secreted reporter, Gaussia luciferase (Gluc), to measure fluoride-induced ER stress. Factors that affect ER homeostasis, such as high-dose fluoride, will cause decreased Gluc secretion that can be measured as a decrease in Gluc activity in the culture medium supernatant. Gluc catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of coelenterazine (CTZ) to coeleneteramide, resulting in blue bioluminescence (λ(max) 485 nm). Therefore, Gluc activity can be easily quantified by mixing a small aliquot of the medium supernatant with CTZ and measuring the resulting bioluminescence in a luminometer. Among the various reporters used so far, Gluc is regarded as the most sensitive indicator of ER stress. A second advantage for using Gluc is its ability to function in a wide pH range. This is especially useful for studying fluoride-mediated toxicity as fluoride-induced stress is enhanced under acidic conditions. Since Gluc can be measured in a noninvasive manner, it has been used in several in vitro and in vivo applications. In this chapter, we detail our methodology for using Gluc to monitor fluoride-induced ER stress. PMID:21329797

  7. Hydra myc2, a unique pre-bilaterian member of the myc gene family, is activated in cell proliferation and gametogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Markus; Glasauer, Stella; Valovka, Taras; Breuker, Kathrin; Hobmayer, Bert; Bister, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The myc protooncogene encodes the Myc transcription factor which is the essential part of the Myc–Max network controlling fundamental cellular processes. Deregulation of myc leads to tumorigenesis and is a hallmark of many human cancers. We have recently identified homologs of myc (myc1, myc2) and max in the early diploblastic cnidarian Hydra and have characterized myc1 in detail. Here we show that myc2 is transcriptionally activated in the interstitial stem cell system. Furthermore, in contrast to myc1, myc2 expression is also detectable in proliferating epithelial stem cells throughout the gastric region. myc2 but not myc1 is activated in cycling precursor cells during early oogenesis and spermatogenesis, suggesting that the Hydra Myc2 protein has a possible non-redundant function in cell cycle progression. The Myc2 protein displays the principal design and properties of vertebrate Myc proteins. In complex with Max, Myc2 binds to DNA with similar affinity as Myc1–Max heterodimers. Immunoprecipitation of Hydra chromatin revealed that both Myc1 and Myc2 bind to the enhancer region of CAD, a classical Myc target gene in mammals. Luciferase reporter gene assays showed that Myc1 but not Myc2 transcriptionally activates the CAD promoter. Myc2 has oncogenic potential when tested in primary avian fibroblasts but to a lower degree as compared to Myc1. The identification of an additional myc gene in Cnidaria, a phylum that diverged prior to bilaterians, with characteristic expression patterns in tissue homeostasis and developmental processes suggests that principle functions of myc genes have arisen very early in metazoan evolution. PMID:24771621

  8. Hydra myc2, a unique pre-bilaterian member of the myc gene family, is activated in cell proliferation and gametogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Markus; Glasauer, Stella; Valovka, Taras; Breuker, Kathrin; Hobmayer, Bert; Bister, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The myc protooncogene encodes the Myc transcription factor which is the essential part of the Myc-Max network controlling fundamental cellular processes. Deregulation of myc leads to tumorigenesis and is a hallmark of many human cancers. We have recently identified homologs of myc (myc1, myc2) and max in the early diploblastic cnidarian Hydra and have characterized myc1 in detail. Here we show that myc2 is transcriptionally activated in the interstitial stem cell system. Furthermore, in contrast to myc1, myc2 expression is also detectable in proliferating epithelial stem cells throughout the gastric region. myc2 but not myc1 is activated in cycling precursor cells during early oogenesis and spermatogenesis, suggesting that the Hydra Myc2 protein has a possible non-redundant function in cell cycle progression. The Myc2 protein displays the principal design and properties of vertebrate Myc proteins. In complex with Max, Myc2 binds to DNA with similar affinity as Myc1-Max heterodimers. Immunoprecipitation of Hydra chromatin revealed that both Myc1 and Myc2 bind to the enhancer region of CAD, a classical Myc target gene in mammals. Luciferase reporter gene assays showed that Myc1 but not Myc2 transcriptionally activates the CAD promoter. Myc2 has oncogenic potential when tested in primary avian fibroblasts but to a lower degree as compared to Myc1. The identification of an additional myc gene in Cnidaria, a phylum that diverged prior to bilaterians, with characteristic expression patterns in tissue homeostasis and developmental processes suggests that principle functions of myc genes have arisen very early in metazoan evolution. PMID:24771621

  9. Comparison of human optimized bacterial luciferase, firefly luciferase, and green fluorescent protein for continuous imaging of cell culture and animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan M.; Hahn, Ruth E.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Baek, Seung J.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-04-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent reporter systems have enabled the rapid and continued growth of the optical imaging field over the last two decades. Of particular interest has been noninvasive signal detection from mammalian tissues under both cell culture and whole animal settings. Here we report on the advantages and limitations of imaging using a recently introduced bacterial luciferase (lux) reporter system engineered for increased bioluminescent expression in the mammalian cellular environment. Comparison with the bioluminescent firefly luciferase (Luc) system and green fluorescent protein system under cell culture conditions demonstrated a reduced average radiance, but maintained a more constant level of bioluminescent output without the need for substrate addition or exogenous excitation to elicit the production of signal. Comparison with the Luc system following subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection into nude mice hosts demonstrated the ability to obtain similar detection patterns with in vitro experiments at cell population sizes above 2.5 × 104 cells but at the cost of increasing overall image integration time.

  10. Titration-based screening for evaluation of natural product extracts: identification of an aspulvinone family of luciferase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, P.G.; Auld, D.S.; Schultz, P.J.; Lovell, S.; Battaile, K.P.; MacArthur, R.; Shen, M.; Tamayo-Castillo, G.; Inglese, J.; Sherman, D.H.

    2011-11-28

    The chemical diversity of nature has tremendous potential for the discovery of molecular probes and medicinal agents. However, sensitivity of HTS assays to interfering components of crude extracts derived from plants, and macro- and microorganisms has curtailed their use in lead discovery. Here, we describe a process for leveraging the concentration-response curves obtained from quantitative HTS to improve the initial selection of actives from a library of partially fractionated natural product extracts derived from marine actinomycetes and fungi. By using pharmacological activity, the first-pass CRC paradigm improves the probability that labor-intensive subsequent steps of reculturing, extraction, and bioassay-guided isolation of active component(s) target the most promising strains and growth conditions. We illustrate how this process identified a family of fungal metabolites as potent inhibitors of firefly luciferase, subsequently resolved in molecular detail by X-ray crystallography.

  11. Replication Competent Molecular Clones of HIV-1 Expressing Renilla Luciferase Facilitate the Analysis of Antibody Inhibition in PBMC

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Tara G.; Ding, Haitao; Yuan, Xing; Wei, Qing; Smith, Kendra S.; Conway, Joan A.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Brown, Bruce; Polonis, Victoria; West, John T.; Montefiori, David C.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Effective vaccine development for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will require assays that ascertain the capacity of vaccine immunogens to elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAb) to diverse HIV-1 strains. To facilitate NAb assessment in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based assays, we developed an assay-adaptable platform based on a Renilla luciferase (LucR) expressing HIV-1 proviral backbone. LucR was inserted into pNL4-3 DNA, preserving all viral open reading frames. The proviral genome was engineered to facilitate expression of diverse HIV-1 env sequences, allowing analysis in an isogenic background. The resulting Env-IMC-LucR viruses are infectious, and LucR is stably expressed over multiple replications in PBMC. HIV-1 neutralization, targeting TZM-bl cells, was highly correlative comparing virus (LucR) and cell (firefly luciferase) readouts. In PBMC, NAb activity can be analyzed either within a single or multiple cycles of replication. These results represent advancement toward a standardizable PBMC-based neutralization assay for assessing HIV-1 vaccine immunogen efficacy. PMID:20863545

  12. Firefly Luciferase-Based Sequential Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Protease Assays.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyzes yellow-green (560 nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-Infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41 nM for caspase 3, 1.0 nM for thrombin, and 58 nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. This method successfully employs an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence to assay physiologically important protease activities and should be generally applicable to the measurement of any endoprotease lacking accessible cysteine residues. PMID:27424898

  13. Tbx16 regulates hox gene activation in mesodermal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Payumo, Alexander Y; McQuade, Lindsey E; Walker, Whitney J; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor T-box 16 (Tbx16, or Spadetail) is an essential regulator of paraxial mesoderm development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Mesodermal progenitor cells (MPCs) fail to differentiate into trunk somites in tbx16 mutants and instead accumulate within the tailbud in an immature state. However, the mechanisms by which Tbx16 controls mesoderm patterning have remained enigmatic. We describe here the use of photoactivatable morpholino oligonucleotides to determine the Tbx16 transcriptome in MPCs. We identified 124 Tbx16-regulated genes that were expressed in zebrafish gastrulae, including several developmental signaling proteins and regulators of gastrulation, myogenesis and somitogenesis. Unexpectedly, we observed that a loss of Tbx16 function precociously activated posterior hox genes in MPCs, and overexpression of a single posterior hox gene was sufficient to disrupt MPC migration. Our studies support a model in which Tbx16 regulates the timing of collinear hox gene activation to coordinate the anterior-posterior fates and positions of paraxial MPCs. PMID:27376691

  14. A cluster region of AP-1 responsive elements is required for transcriptional activity of mouse ODC gene by hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Laura; Tacchini, Lorenza; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2002-05-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity is regulated by a variety of mechanisms including transcription, translation, and RNA and protein half-life. Since in mouse B16-F1 melanoma cells an early and remarkable (about 6-fold) increase in steady state mRNA levels was observed after hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) treatment, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of mouse ODC promoter. Transient transfection of various ODC-luciferase promoter constructs into the B16-Fl cells in combination with electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified the HGF-responsive element as a cluster of three AP-1 binding sites (-1660 to -1572). Even if each site differs from the canonical TPA responsive element for one nucleotide, only the first two AP-1 consensus sequences seemed to be functional since allowed DNA-binding activity of nuclear proteins after HGF treatment. Comparison of the results of transfection assays with the pOD2.5-luc (2.5 kb gene fragment) and with the construct deprived of the AP-1 cluster pOD-B-luc showed that this 50 bp region was required for ODC transactivating activity in response to HGF. Since in B16-F1 cells HGF increased AP-1 activity and the mRNA expression of various AP-1 subunits, we may conclude that HGF-induced transcription of mouse ODC was largely due to triggering of AP-1 pathway. PMID:12054494

  15. A novel type 2 diabetes risk allele increases the promoter activity of the muscle-specific small ankyrin 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rengna; Lai, Shanshan; Yang, Yang; Shi, Hongfei; Cai, Zhenming; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Du, Hong; Chen, Huimei

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified Ankyrin-1 (ANK1) as a common type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility locus. However, the underlying causal variants and functional mechanisms remain unknown. We screened for 8 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ANK1 between 2 case-control studies. Genotype analysis revealed significant associations of 3 SNPs, rs508419 (first identified here), rs515071, and rs516946 with T2D (P < 0.001). These SNPs were in linkage disequilibrium (r(2) > 0.80); subsequent analysis indicated that the CCC haplotype associated with increased T2D susceptibility (OR 1.447, P < 0.001). Further mapping showed that rs508419 resides in the muscle-specific ANK1 gene promoter. Allele-specific mRNA and protein level measurements confirmed association of the C allele with increased small ANK1 (sAnk1) expression in human skeletal muscle (P = 0.018 and P < 0.001, respectively). Luciferase assays showed increased rs508419-C allele transcriptional activity in murine skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts, and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated altered rs508419 DNA-protein complex formation. Glucose uptake was decreased with excess sAnk1 expression upon insulin stimulation. Thus, the ANK1 rs508419-C T2D-risk allele alters DNA-protein complex binding leading to increased promoter activity and sAnk1 expression; thus, increased sAnk1 expression in skeletal muscle might contribute to T2D susceptibility. PMID:27121283

  16. A novel type 2 diabetes risk allele increases the promoter activity of the muscle-specific small ankyrin 1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rengna; Lai, Shanshan; Yang, Yang; Shi, Hongfei; Cai, Zhenming; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Du, Hong; Chen, Huimei

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified Ankyrin-1 (ANK1) as a common type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility locus. However, the underlying causal variants and functional mechanisms remain unknown. We screened for 8 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ANK1 between 2 case-control studies. Genotype analysis revealed significant associations of 3 SNPs, rs508419 (first identified here), rs515071, and rs516946 with T2D (P < 0.001). These SNPs were in linkage disequilibrium (r2 > 0.80); subsequent analysis indicated that the CCC haplotype associated with increased T2D susceptibility (OR 1.447, P < 0.001). Further mapping showed that rs508419 resides in the muscle-specific ANK1 gene promoter. Allele-specific mRNA and protein level measurements confirmed association of the C allele with increased small ANK1 (sAnk1) expression in human skeletal muscle (P = 0.018 and P < 0.001, respectively). Luciferase assays showed increased rs508419-C allele transcriptional activity in murine skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts, and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated altered rs508419 DNA-protein complex formation. Glucose uptake was decreased with excess sAnk1 expression upon insulin stimulation. Thus, the ANK1 rs508419-C T2D-risk allele alters DNA-protein complex binding leading to increased promoter activity and sAnk1 expression; thus, increased sAnk1 expression in skeletal muscle might contribute to T2D susceptibility. PMID:27121283

  17. [Photoreactivation of UV-irradiated Escherichia coli K12 AB1886 uvrA6 with assistance of luminescence of Photobacterium leiognathi Luciferase].

    PubMed

    Melkina, O E; Kotova, V Yu; Konopleva, M N; Manukhov, I V; Pustovoit, K S; Zavilgelsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    The bioluminescence induced by luciferases of marine bacteria promotes repair of UV damaged DNA of Escherichia coli AB1886 uvrA6. It is shown that bacterial photolyase that implements photoreactivation activity is the major contributor to DNA repair. However, the intensity of bioluminescence increasing induced by UV-irradiation (SOS-induction) in bacterial cells is not enough for efficient photoreactivation. PMID:26710787

  18. Expression of heat shock gene construct in transformed fish cell culture (RTG-2) after toxicant exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Rexrode, M.; Gedamu, L.; Chen, T.T.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have developed a transformed fish cell line (RTG-2) that can be used as a noninvasive compliment for the evaluation of toxicants (metals and organometal compounds) in the laboratory. Gene transfer and integration into the cell line was accomplished through the insertion of multiple copies of a heat shock gene that had been fused to the structural gene for firefly luciferase (luc). Transcription of the hsp70-luc transgene was inducible through heat-shock and acute exposure to metals (Cd, Cu) and organometal (TBT) compounds in the laboratory. Induction resulted in a rapid luminescence intensity proportional to the concentration of luciferase activity and presents a novel noninvasive diagnostic tool that produced dose-response curves comparable to conventional trout acute studies.

  19. Introduction of Foreign Genes into Tissues of Living Mice by DNA-Coated Microprojectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders Williams, R.; Johnston, Stephen A.; Riedy, Mark; Devit, Michael J.; McElligott, Sandra G.; Sanford, John C.

    1991-04-01

    Foreign genes were expressed in liver and skin cells of live mice by using a new apparatus to accelerate DNA-coated microprojectiles into tissues. After introduction of a plasmid in which the firefly luciferase gene was controlled by the human β-actin promoter, luciferase activity was detectable for up to 14 days in mouse tissues (skin and liver). In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that microprojectiles penetrated through multiple cell layers without evidence of tissue injury and that 10-20% of the cells in the bombarded area expressed the foreign gene. An advantage of the new design is that internal organs, such as liver, can be transfected without subjecting the tissue to a vacuum. This procedure potentially is applicable to a wide variety of tissues and cell types for studies of transcriptional control elements and for expression of foreign proteins in intact animals.

  20. Quantitative High-Throughput Luciferase Screening in Identifying CAR Modulators.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Caitlin; Zhao, Jinghua; Wang, Hongbing; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is responsible for the transcription of multiple drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. There are two possible methods of activation for CAR, direct ligand binding and a ligand-independent method, which makes this a unique nuclear receptor. Both of these mechanisms require translocation of CAR from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. Interestingly, CAR is constitutively active in immortalized cell lines due to the basal nuclear location of this receptor. This creates an important challenge in most in vitro assay models because immortalized cells cannot be used without inhibiting the high basal activity. In this book chapter, we go into detail of how to perform quantitative high-throughput screens to identify hCAR1 modulators through the employment of a double stable cell line. Using this line, we are able to identify activators, as well as deactivators, of the challenging nuclear receptor, CAR. PMID:27518621

  1. Establishment of a novel method to evaluate peritoneal microdissemination and therapeutic effect using luciferase assay.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryo; Yokobori, Takehiko; Osone, Katsuya; Tatsuki, Hironori; Takada, Takahiro; Suto, Toshinaga; Yajima, Reina; Kato, Toshihide; Fujii, Takaaki; Tsutsumi, Souichi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Asao, Takayuki

    2016-03-01

    Peritoneal dissemination is a major cause of recurrence in patients with malignant tumors in the peritoneal cavity. Effective anticancer agents and treatment protocols are necessary to improve outcomes in these patients. However, previous studies using mouse models of peritoneal dissemination have not detected any drug effect against peritoneal micrometastasis. Here we used the luciferase assay to evaluate peritoneal micrometastasis in living animals and established an accurate mouse model of early peritoneal microdissemination to evaluate tumorigenesis and drug efficacy. There was a positive correlation between luminescence intensity in in vivo luciferase assay and the extent of tumor dissemination evaluated by ex vivo luciferase assay and mesenteric weight. This model has advantages over previous models because optimal luciferin concentration without cell damage was validated and peritoneal microdissemination could be quantitatively evaluated. Therefore, it is a useful model to validate peritoneal micrometastasis formation and to evaluate drug efficacy without killing mice. PMID:26716425

  2. Problem areas in the use of the firefly luciferase assay for bacterial detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Knust, E. A.; Tuttle, S. A.; Curtis, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    By purifying the firefly luciferase extract and adding all necessary chemicals but ATP in excess, an assay for ATP was performed by measuring the amount of light produced when a sample containing soluble ATP is added to the luciferase reaction mixture. Instrumentation, applications, and basic characteristics of the luciferase assay are presented. Effect of the growth medium and length of time grown in this medium on ATP per viable E. coli values is shown in graphic form, along with an ATP concentration curve showing relative light units versus ATP injected. Reagent functions and concentration methods are explored. Efforts to develop a fast automatable system to detect the presence of bacteria in biological fluids, especially urine, resulted in the optimization of procedures for use with different types of samples.

  3. Adaptation of muscle gene expression to changes in contractile activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Babij, P.; Thomason, D. B.; Wong, T. S.; Morrison, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the existing literature regarding the effects of different types of physical activities on the gene expression of adult skeletal muscles leads us to conclude that each type of exercise training program has, as a result, a different phenotype, which means that there are multiple mechanisms, each producing a unique phenotype. A portion of the facts which support this position is presented and interpreted here. [Abstract translated from the original French by NASA].

  4. Differentially expressed genes in embryonic cardiac tissues of mice lacking Folr1 gene activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huiping; Cabrera, Robert M; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Bozinov, Daniel; Wang, Deli; Schwartz, Robert J; Finnell, Richard H

    2007-01-01

    redox status, which may contribute to cardiovascular abnormalities in mouse embryos lacking Folr1 gene activity. PMID:18028541

  5. Metronidazole activation and isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum electron transport genes.

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, J D; Jones, D T; Woods, D R

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli F19 recA, nitrate reductase-deficient mutant was constructed by transposon mutagenesis and shown to be resistant to metronidazole. This mutant was a most suitable host for the isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum genes on recombinant plasmids, which activated metronidazole and rendered the E. coli F19 strain sensitive to metronidazole. Twenty-five E. coli F19 clones containing different recombinant plasmids were isolated and classified into five groups on the basis of their sensitivity to metronidazole. The clones were tested for nitrate reductase, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and hydrogenase activities. DNA hybridization and restriction endonuclease mapping revealed that four of the C. acetobutylicum insert DNA fragments on recombinant plasmids were linked in an 11.1-kb chromosomal fragment. DNA sequencing and amino acid homology studies indicated that this DNA fragment contained a flavodoxin gene which encoded a protein of 160 amino acids that activated metronidazole and made the E. coli F19 mutant very sensitive to metronidazole. The flavodoxin and hydrogenase genes which are involved in electron transfer systems were linked on the 11.1-kb DNA fragment from C. acetobutylicum. Images PMID:1991710

  6. IRF1 marks activated genes in SLE and can induce target gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Shi, Lihua; Song, Li; Ephrem, Elshaddai; Petri, Michelle; Sullivan, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective IRF1 both mediates responses to type I interferons and the induction of interferons. It has been implicated in murine lupus models as a critical mediator of inflammation. A previous study of chromatin modifications in SLE patient monocytes implicated IRF1 as associated with increased histone acetylation in SLE patients. This study directly investigated IRF1 binding sites on chromatin using ChIP-seq. Methods Nine female SLE patients and seven female controls were examined. Monocytes were purified from peripheral blood and subjected to library preparation using a validated antibody to IRF1. The effect of IRF1 on target gene expression was confirmed using an overexpression system in cell lines and co-immunoprecipitation was used to define protein interactions. Results IRF1 binding around transcribed regions was increased in SLE patient monocytes but histone modifications at potential IRF1 binding sites without detectable IRF1 binding were also increased. IRF1 overexpression was sufficient to drive transcription of target genes. IRF1 overexpression was also able to alter histone modifications at a focus set of target genes and the use of an IRF1 inhibitor decreased both expression and histone modifications at target genes. IRF1 was found to interact with a select set of histone modifying enzymes and other transcription factors. Conclusions IRF1 is an important signaling protein in the interferon pathway. IRF1 not only activates gene expression as a transcription factor but may perpetuate disease by leading to a dysregulated epigenome. PMID:25418955

  7. Dynamic multiphosphorylation passwords for activity-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Deisseroth, Karl; Tsien, Richard W

    2002-04-11

    Synapse-to-nucleus signaling leading to CREB-mediated transcription is important for neuronal plasticity. Nuclear CREB phosphorylation at Ser133 allows convergence of multiple kinase pathways driven by neuronal activity and links them to transcriptional activation. But, can various pathways share a common effector mechanism (phosphorylating Ser133) while generating distinct patterns of gene expression? We review three Neuron articles that highlight novel ways Ca(2+) signals can trigger multiple phosphorylation events working in combination to control CREB and its interaction with coactivator molecules. PMID:11970860

  8. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M.; Gazdhar, A.; Weitzel, T.; Schmid, R.; Krause, T.

    2006-12-01

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and humans.

  9. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and induce CYP1A genes expression in human hepatocytes and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Dořičáková, Aneta; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-25

    The effects of four copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui1)(L)]NO3·H2O (1-3) and [Cu(qui2)(phen)]NO3 (4), where qui1=2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, Hqui2=2-(4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-propyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone-7-carboxamide, L=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (2), bathophenanthroline (bphen) (3), on transcriptional activities of steroid receptors, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors have been studied. The complexes (1-4) did not influence basal or ligand-inducible activities of glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, thyroid receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor, as revealed by gene reporter assays. The complexes 1 and 2 dose-dependently induced luciferase activity in stable gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, and this induction was reverted by resveratrol, indicating involvement of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the process. The complexes 1, 2 and 3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA in LS180 cells and CYP1A1/CYP1A2 in human hepatocytes through AhR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay EMSA showed that the complexes 1 and 2 transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form. Collectively, we demonstrate that the complexes 1 and 2 activate AhR and induce AhR-dependent genes in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines. In conclusion, the data presented here might be of toxicological importance, regarding the multiple roles of AhR in human physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:27180721

  10. Illuminating Cancer Systems With Genetically-Engineered Mouse Models and Coupled Luciferase Reporters In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Brandon; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is a powerful non-invasive tool that has dramatically accelerated the in vivo interrogation of cancer systems and longitudinal analysis of mouse models of cancer over the past decade. Various luciferase enzymes have been genetically engineered into mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer which permit investigation of cellular and molecular events associated with oncogenic transcription, post-transcriptional processing, protein-protein interactions, transformation and oncogene addiction in live cells and animals. Luciferase-coupled GEMMs ultimately serve as a non-invasive, repetitive, longitudinal, and physiological means by which cancer systems and therapeutic responses can be investigated accurately within the autochthonous context of a living animal. PMID:23585416

  11. Quantum/molecular mechanics study of firefly bioluminescence on luciferase oxidative conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2014-07-01

    This is the first report of a computational study of the color tuning mechanism of firefly bioluminescence, using the oxidative conformation of luciferase. The results of these calculations demonstrated that the electrostatic field generated by luciferase is fundamental both for the emission shift and efficiency. Further calculations indicated that a shift in emission is achieved by modulating the energy, at different degrees, of the emissive and ground states. These differences in energy modulation will then lead to changes in the energy gap between the states.

  12. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  13. Imaging Dendrimer-Grafted Graphene Oxide Mediated Anti-miR-21 Delivery With an Activatable Luciferase Reporter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu; Zhang, Beilei; Zhou, Lin; Shi, Yaru; Li, Zhiqiang; Xia, Yuqiong; Tian, Jie

    2016-04-13

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of post-transcriptional gene regulators involved in various physiological processes including carcinogenesis, and they have emerged as potential targets for tumor theranostics. However, the employment of antisense oligonucleotides, termed anti-miRs, for antagonizing miRNA functions in vivo has largely been impeded by a lack of effective delivery carriers. Here, we describe the development of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-functionalized nanographene oxide (NGO) conjugate (NGO-PEG-dendrimer) for the efficient delivery of anti-miR-21 into non-small-cell lung cancer cells. To monitor the delivery of anti-miR-21 into cells and tumors, we also constructed an activatable luciferase reporter (Fluc-3xPS) containing three perfectly complementary sequences against miR-21 in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the reporter. Compared with bare dendrimer and Lipofectamine 2000 (Lipo2000), NGO-PEG-dendrimer showed considerably lower cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency. As demonstrated by in vitro bioluminescence imaging and Western blotting assays, NGO-PEG-dendrimer effectively delivered anti-miR-21 into the cytoplasm and resulted in the upregulation of luciferase intensity and PTEN target protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, transfection with anti-miR-21 by NGO-PEG-dendrimer led to stronger inhibition of cell migration and invasion than did bare dendrimer or Lipo2000 transfection. The intravenous delivery of anti-miR-21 via NGO-PEG-dendrimer induced a significant increase in the bioluminescence signal within the Fluc-3xPS reporter-transplanted tumor areas. These results suggest that NGO-PEG-dendrimer could be an efficient and a potential nanocarrier for delivering RNA oligonucleotides. In addition, the strategy of combining NGO-PEG-dendrimer with an activatable luciferase reporter allows the image-guided monitoring of the delivery process, which can provide insights into the RNA

  14. Bioluminescence of beetle luciferases with 6'-amino-D-luciferin analogues reveals excited keto-oxyluciferin as the emitter and phenolate/luciferin binding site interactions modulate bioluminescence colors.

    PubMed

    Viviani, Vadim R; Neves, Deimison Rodrigues; Amaral, Danilo Trabuco; Prado, Rogilene A; Matsuhashi, Takuto; Hirano, Takashi

    2014-08-19

    Beetle luciferases produce different bioluminescence colors from green to red using the same d-luciferin substrate. Despite many studies of the mechanisms and structural determinants of bioluminescence colors with firefly luciferases, the identity of the emitters and the specific active site interactions responsible for bioluminescence color modulation remain elusive. To address these questions, we analyzed the bioluminescence spectra with 6'-amino-D-luciferin (aminoluciferin) and its 5,5-dimethyl analogue using a set of recombinant beetle luciferases that naturally elicit different colors and different pH sensitivities (pH-sensitive, Amydetes vivianii λmax=538 nm, Macrolampis sp2 λmax=564 nm; pH-insensitive, Phrixotrix hirtus λmax=623 nm, Phrixotrix vivianii λmax=546 nm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans λmax=534 nm), a luciferase-like enzyme (Tenebrionidae, Zophobas morio λmax=613 nm), and mutants of C311 (S314). The green-yellow-emitting luciferases display red-shifted bioluminescence spectra with aminoluciferin in relation to those with D-luciferin, whereas the red-emitting luciferases displayed blue-shifted spectra. Bioluminescence spectra with 5,5-dimethylaminoluciferin, in which enolization is blocked, were almost identical to those of aminoluciferin. Fluorescence probing using 2-(4-toluidino)naphthalene-6-sulfonate and inference with aminoluciferin confirm that the luciferin binding site of the red-shifted luciferases is more polar than in the case of the green-yellow-emitting luciferases. Altogether, the results show that the keto form of excited oxyluciferin is the emitter in beetle bioluminescence and that bioluminescence colors are essentially modulated by interactions of the 6'-hydroxy group of oxyluciferin and basic moieties under the influence of the microenvironment polarity of the active site: a strong interaction between a base moiety and oxyluciferin phenol in a hydrophobic microenvironment promotes green-yellow emission, whereas a more polar

  15. Interactive Roles of Ets-1, Sp1, and Acetylated Histones in the Retinoic Acid-dependent Activation of Guanylyl Cyclase/Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Gene Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prerna; Garg, Renu; Bolden, Gevoni; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac hormones atrial and brain natriuretic peptides activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), which plays a critical role in reduction of blood pressure and blood volume. Currently, the mechanisms responsible for regulating the Npr1 gene (coding for GC-A/NPRA) transcription are not well understood. The present study was conducted to examine the interactive roles of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), Ets-1, Sp1, and histone acetylation on the transcriptional regulation and function of the Npr1 gene. Deletion analysis of the Npr1 promoter and luciferase assays showed that ATRA enhanced a 16-fold Npr1 promoter activity and greatly stimulated guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity of the receptor protein in both atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-dependent and -independent manner. As confirmed by gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, ATRA enhanced the binding of both Ets-1 and Sp1 to the Npr1 promoter. The retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) was recruited by Ets-1 and Sp1 to form a transcriptional activator complex with their binding sites in the Npr1 promoter. Interestingly, ATRA also increased the acetylation of histones H3 and H4 and enhanced their recruitment to Ets-1 and Sp1 binding sites within the Npr1 promoter. Collectively, the present results demonstrate that ATRA regulates Npr1 gene transcription and GC activity of the receptor by involving the interactive actions of Ets-1, Sp1, and histone acetylation. PMID:20864529

  16. Insertional activation of a promoterless thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, S.; Hengstler, M.; Kunze, M.; Knippers, R.

    1988-08-01

    A plasmid carrying a promoterless herpes complex virus thymidine kinase gene was transfected via calcium phosphate precipitation into LM (tk/sup -/) mouse fibroblast cells. The transfected gene was efficiently expressed, as the transfected cells grew perfectly well in selective hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium, suggesting that the thymidine kinase-coding region became linked to a promoterlike element on integration into the recipient genome. To investigate the structure of the surrogate promoter, the authors first isolated the integrated gene from a genomic library. The nucleotide sequence of the DNA adjacent to the thymidine kinase-coding sequence was then determined. They found, first, that the integration of the transfected DNA apparently occurred by a blunt end ligation mechanism involving no obvious sequence similarities between integrated and recipient DNA and, second, that the 5'-flanking region included a TATA box, to CCAAT boxes, and a GC box element. However, the TATA box motif and the most proximal CCAAT box appeared to be sufficient of full promoter activity, as determined by the transfection efficiencies of appropriate plasmid constructs. Except for these canonical promoter elements, the surrogate promoter had no obvious similarities to known thymidine kinase gene promoters.

  17. Titanium nanotubes activate genes related to bone formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pozio, Alfonso; Palmieri, Annalisa; Girardi, Ambra; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium is used worldwide to make osseointegrable devices, thanks to its favorable characteristics as mechanical proprieties and biocompatibility, demonstrated by in vivo studies with animal models and clinical trials over a forty-year period. However, the exact genetic effect of the titanium layer on cells is still not well characterized. Materials and Methods: To investigate how titanium nanotubes stimulate osteoblasts differentiation and proliferation, some osteoblast genes (SP7, RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL, SPP1 and FOSL1) were analyzed by quantitative Real Time RT- PCR. Results: After 15 days, osteoblasts cultivated on titanium naotube showed the up-regulation of bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and SPP1 and the down-regulation of RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, and ALPL. After 30 days of treatment, the bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and RUNX2 were up-regulated while COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL and SPP1 were down-regulated. Conclusions: Our results, demonstrates that titanium nanotubes can lead to osteoblast differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization in dental pulp stem cells by the activation of osteoblast related genes SPP1, FOSL1 and RUNX2. PMID:23814577

  18. Contributions to gene activation by multiple functions of Bicoid.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, X; Yuan, D; Scarborough, T; Ma, J

    1999-01-01

    Bicoid is a Drosophila morphogenetic protein required for the development of anterior structures in the embryo. To gain a better understanding of how Bicoid works as a transcriptional activator, we systematically analysed various functions of Bicoid required for gene activation. We provide evidence suggesting that Bicoid is an intrinsically weak activator. First, our biochemical experiments demonstrate that the Bicoid-DNA complexes are very unstable, suggesting a weak DNA-binding function of Bicoid. This idea is further supported by our experiments demonstrating that the same number of LexA-Bicoid fusion molecules can activate transcription more effectively from LexA sites than from Bicoid sites. Secondly, we demonstrate that transcriptional activation by the weak activator Bicoid is readily influenced by the local enhancer environment. These influences are decreased when the Bicoid function is enforced by attaching to it either a known dimerization domain or the strong activation domain VP16. VP16 can also compensate for the loss of some Bicoid sites in an enhancer element. Our experiments demonstrate that the outcome of transcriptional activation by Bicoid is determined by multiple weak functions that are interconnected, a finding that can further help us to understand how this morphogenetic protein achieves its molecular functions. PMID:10024522

  19. Phytochemicals Mediate the Expression and Activity of OCTN2 as Activators of the PPARγ/RXRα Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Qu, Jian; Yang, Rui; Ge, Meng-Xue; Mei, Yin; Zhou, Bo-Ting; Qu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Many phytochemicals exert activities as agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). This study aims to investigate whether phytochemicals are agonists of the PPARγ/RXRα pathway and modulate the target gene OCTN2. In this study, a luciferase reporter gene system was used to screen novel OCTN2 activators from 39 phytochemicals. Kaempferol, curcumin, and puerarin were found to show the significant PPRE-mediated luciferase activities (>150%) at 20 μM and showed a dose-dependent manner. Phytochemicals also elevated the mRNA and protein expression of OCTN2 in a dose-dependent fashion in colorectal cancer SW480 cells. These induction effects were gradually inhibited by PPARγ antagonist GW9662 in the luciferase reporter gene system and in SW480 cells. Moreover, the results of cell viability assay imply that three phytochemicals probably induce OCTN2 expression leading to the enhanced uptake of its substrate, oxaliplatin, thereby making cells more sensitive to oxaliplatin. The molecular docking study showed the possible binding sites of phytochemicals in PPARγ protein, and all of the docked phytochemicals fitted the same active pocket in PPARγ as troglitazone. All three phytochemicals exhibited hydrogen bonds between their polar moieties and the amino acid residues. Thus, we identified three phytochemicals as PPARγ ligands, which potentiated the expression and activity of OCTN2. PMID:27445823

  20. Cellular Bioenergetics is an Important Determinant of the Molecular Imaging Signal Derived from Luciferase and the Sodium-Iodide Symporter

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Connie; Chan, Angel; Lin, Xiaoping; Higuchi, Takahiro; Terrovitis, John; Afzal, Junaid M.; Rittenbach, Andrew; Sun, Dongdong; Vakrou, Styliani; Woldemichael, Kirubel; O’Rourke, Brian; Wahl, Richard; Pomper, Martin; Tsui, Benjamin; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Molecular imaging is useful for longitudinal assessment of engraftment. However, it is not known which factors, other than cell number can influence the molecular imaging signal obtained from reporter genes. Objective The effects of cell dissociation/suspension on cellular bioenergetics and the signal obtained by firefly luciferase(fluc) and human Na-I symporter(hNIS) labeling of cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) was investigated. Methods and Results 18FDG uptake, ATP levels, 99mTc-pertechnetate uptake and bioluminescence were measured in vitro, in adherent and suspended CDCs. In vivo dual isotope SPECT-CT imaging or bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were performed 1hr and 24hrs following CDC transplantation. SPECT quantification was performed using a phantom for signal calibration. Cell loss between 1hr & 24hrs post-transplantation was quantified by qPCR and ex vivo luciferase assay. Cell dissociation followed by suspension for 1hr resulted in decreased glucose uptake, cellular ATP, 99mTc uptake and BLI signal by 82%, 43%, 42%, and 44% respectively, when compared to adherent cells, in vitro. In vivo 99mTc uptake was significantly lower at 1hr, when compared to 24hrs following cell transplantation in the non-infarct (p<0.001, n=3) and infarct (p<0.001, n =4) model, despite significant cell loss during this period. The in vivo BLI signal was significantly higher at 1hr than at 24hrs (p<0.01), with the BLI signal being higher when CDCs were suspended in glucose-containing medium compared to saline(PBS). Conclusion Adhesion is an important determinant of cellular bioenergetics, 99mTc-pertechnetate uptake and BLI signal. BLI and NIS imaging may be useful for in vivo optimization of bioenergetics in transplanted cells. PMID:23255420

  1. Protein sterilization method of firefly luciferase using reduced pressure and molecular sieves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Rich, E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The sterilization of the protein fruitfly luciferase under conditions that prevent denaturation is examined. Denaturation is prevented by heating the protein in contact with molecular seives and under a reduced pressure of the order of 0.00005 millimeters of mercury.

  2. NanoLuc reporter for dual luciferase imaging in living animals.

    PubMed

    Stacer, Amanda C; Nyati, Shyam; Moudgil, Pranav; Iyengar, Rahul; Luker, Kathryn E; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Luker, Gary D

    2013-10-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is widely used for cell-based assays and animal imaging studies in biomedical research and drug development, capitalizing on the high signal to background of this technique. A relatively small number of luciferases are available for imaging studies, substantially limiting the ability to image multiple molecular and cellular events, as done commonly with fluorescence imaging. To advance dual reporter bioluminescence molecular imaging, we tested a recently developed, adenosine triphosphate–independent luciferase enzyme from Oplophorus gracilirostris (NanoLuc [NL]) as a reporter for animal imaging. We demonstrated that NL could be imaged in superficial and deep tissues in living mice, although the detection of NL in deep tissues was limited by emission of predominantly blue light by this enzyme. Changes in bioluminescence from NL over time could be used to quantify tumor growth, and secreted NL was detectable in small volumes of serum. We combined NL and firefly luciferase reporters to quantify two key steps in transforming growth factor β signaling in intact cells and living mice, establishing a novel dual luciferase imaging strategy for quantifying signal transduction and drug targeting. Our results establish NL as a new reporter for bioluminescence imaging studies in intact cells and living mice that will expand imaging of signal transduction in normal physiology, disease, and drug development. PMID:24371848

  3. Generation of a Gaussia luciferase-expressing endotheliotropic cytomegalovirus for screening approaches and mutant analyses.

    PubMed

    Falk, Jessica J; Laib Sampaio, Kerstin; Stegmann, Cora; Lieber, Diana; Kropff, Barbara; Mach, Michael; Sinzger, Christian

    2016-09-01

    For many questions in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) research, assays are desired that allow robust and fast quantification of infection efficiencies under high-throughput conditions. The secreted Gaussia luciferase has been demonstrated as a suitable reporter in the context of a fibroblast-adapted HCMV strain, which however is greatly restricted in the number of cell types to which it can be applied. We inserted the Gaussia luciferase expression cassette into the BAC-cloned virus strain TB40-BAC4, which displays the natural broad cell tropism of HCMV and hence allows application to screening approaches in a variety of cell types including fibroblasts, epithelial, and endothelial cells. Here, we applied the reporter virus TB40-BAC4-IE-GLuc to identify mouse hybridoma clones that preferentially neutralize infection of endothelial cells. In addition, as the Gaussia luciferase is secreted into culture supernatants from infected cells it allows kinetic analyses in living cultures. This can speed up and facilitate phenotypic characterization of BAC-cloned mutants. For example, we analyzed a UL74 stop-mutant of TB40-BAC4-IE-GLuc immediately after reconstitution in transfected cultures and found the increase of luciferase delayed and reduced as compared to wild type. Phenotypic monitoring directly in transfected cultures can minimize the risk of compensating mutations that might occur with extended passaging. PMID:27326666

  4. The lipopolysaccharide-binding protein is a secretory class 1 acute-phase protein whose gene is transcriptionally activated by APRF/STAT/3 and other cytokine-inducible nuclear proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, R R; Kirschning, C J; Unbehaun, A; Aberle, H P; Knope, H P; Lamping, N; Ulevitch, R J; Herrmann, F

    1996-01-01

    Acute-phase reactants (APRs) are proteins synthesized in the liver following induction by interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, and glucocorticoids, involving transcriptional gene activation. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) is a recently identified hepatic secretory protein potentially involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis, capable of binding the bacterial cell wall product endotoxin and directing it to its cellular receptor, CD14. In order to examine the transcriptional induction mechanisms by which the LBP gene is activated, we have investigated the regulation of expression of its mRNA in vitro and in vivo as well as the organization of 5' upstream regulatory DNA sequences. We show that induction of LBP expression is transcriptionally regulated and is dependent on stimulation with IL-1beta, IL-6, and dexamethasone. By definition, LBP thus has to be viewed as a class 1 acute-phase protein and represents the first APR identified which is capable of detecting pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, cloning of the LBP promoter revealed the presence of regulatory elements, including the common APR promoter motif APRE/STAT-3 (acute-phase response element/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). Luciferase reporter gene assays utilizing LBP promoter truncation and point mutation variants indicated that transcriptional activation of the LBP gene required a functional APRE/STAT-3 binding site downstream of the transcription start site, as well as an AP-1 and a C/EBP (CCAAT enhancer-binding protein) binding site. Gel retardation and supershift assays confirmed that upon cytokine stimulation APRF/STAT-3 binds to its recognition site, leading to strong activation of the LBP gene. Unraveling of the mechanism of transcriptional activation of the LBP gene, involving three known transcription factors, may contribute to our understanding of the acute-phase response and the pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock. PMID:8668165

  5. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Teodorov, E.; Ferrari, M.F.R.; Fior-Chadi, D.R.; Camarini, R.; Felício, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  6. Activation of Tax protein by c-Jun-N-terminal kinase is not dependent on the presence or absence of the early growth response-1 gene product.

    PubMed

    Parra, Eduardo; Gutierréz, Luís; Ferreira, Jorge

    2016-02-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 plays a major role in the pathogenesis of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive neoplasia of CD4+ T cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the EGR-1 pathway is involved in the regulation of Tax-induced JNK expression in human Jurkat T cells transfected to express the Tax protein in the presence or absence of PMA or ionomycin. Overexpression of EGR-1 in Jurkat cells transfected to express Tax, promoted the activation of several genes, with the most potent being those that contained AP-1 (Jun/c-Fos), whereas knockdown of endogenous EGR-1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) somewhat reduced Tax-mediated JNK-1 transcription. Additionally, luciferase-based AP-1 and NF-κB reporter gene assays demonstrated that inhibition of EGR-1 expression by an siRNA did not affect the transcriptional activity of a consensus sequence of either AP-1 or NF-κB. On the other hand, the apoptosis assay, using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) as an inducer of apoptosis, confirmed that siRNA against EGR-1 failed to suppress ATRA-induced apoptosis in Jurkat and Jurkat-Tax cells, as noted by the low levels of both DEVDase activity and DNA fragmentation, indicating that the induction of apoptosis by ATRA was Egr-1-independent. Finally, our data showed that activation of Tax by JNK-1 was not dependent on the EGR-1 cascade of events, suggesting that EGR-1 is important but not a determinant for the activity for Tax-induced proliferation of Jurkat cells. PMID:26573109

  7. Markedly Enhanced Skeletal Muscle Transfection Achieved by the Ultrasound-Targeted Delivery of Non-Viral Gene Nanocarriers with Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Caitlin W.; Suk, Jung Soo; Kim, Anthony J.; Hsiang, Yu-Han J.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hanes, Justin; Price, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to enhance ultrasound (US)-targeted skeletal muscle transfection through the use of poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG)/polyethylenimine (PEI) nanocomplex gene carriers and adjustments to US and microbubble (MB) parameters. C57BL/6 mice received an intravenous infusion of MBs and either “naked” luciferase plasmid or luciferase plasmid condensed in PEG/PEI nanocomplexes. Pulsed ultrasound (1MHz; 0.6 MPa or 0.8 MPa) was applied to the right hindlimb for 12 mins. Luciferase activity in both hindlimbs was assessed at 3, 5, 7, and 10 days post-treatment by bioluminescent imaging. When targeted to hindlimb using unsorted MBs and 0.6 MPa US, 7 days after treatment, we observed a >60-fold increase in luciferase activity in PEG/PEI nanocomplex treated muscles over muscles treated with “naked” plasmid DNA. Luciferase activity was consistently greater after treatment with PEG/PEI nanocomplexes at 0.6 MPa as compared to 0.8 MPa. The combination of small diameter MBs and 0.6 MPa US also resulted in significantly greater gene expression when compared to concentration matched intramuscular injections, a control condition in which considerably more PEG/PEI nanocomplexes were present in tissue. This result suggests that, in addition to facilitating PEG/PEI nanocomplex delivery from the bloodstream to tissue, US enhances transfection via one or more secondary mechanisms, including increased cellular uptake and/or trafficking to the nucleus of PEG/PEI nanocomplexes. We conclude that PEG/PEI nanocomplexes may be used to markedly enhance the amplitude of US-MB-targeted skeletal muscle transfection and that activating “small” MBs with a moderate level (0.6 MPa) of acoustic pressure can further enhance these effects. PMID:22800583

  8. Metallothionein gene activation in the earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus)

    PubMed Central

    Höckner, M.; Dallinger, R.; Stürzenbaum, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    In order to cope with changing environmental conditions, organisms require highly responsive stress mechanisms. Heavy metal stress is handled by metallothioneins (MTs), the regulation of which is evolutionary conserved in insects and vertebrates and involves the binding of metal transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) to metal responsive elements (MREs) positioned in the promoter of MT genes. However, in most invertebrate phyla, the transcriptional activation of MTs is different and the exact mechanism is still unknown. Interestingly, although MREs are typically present also in invertebrate MT gene promoters, MTF-1 is notably absent. Here we use Lumbricus rubellus, the red earthworm, to study the elusive mechanism of wMT-2 activation in control and Cd-exposed conditions. EMSA and DNase I footprinting approaches were used to pinpoint functional binding sites within the wMT-2 promoter region, which revealed that the cAMP responsive element (CRE) is a promising candidate which may act as a transcriptional activator of invertebrate MTs. PMID:25797623

  9. F-18 Labeled Diabody-Luciferase Fusion Proteins for Optical-ImmunoPET

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Anna M

    2013-01-18

    The goal of the proposed work is to develop novel dual-labeled molecular imaging probes for multimodality imaging. Based on small, engineered antibodies called diabodies, these probes will be radioactively tagged with Fluorine-18 for PET imaging, and fused to luciferases for optical (bioluminescence) detection. Performance will be evaluated and validated using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Multimodality probes for optical-PET imaging will be based on diabodies that are dually labeled with 18F for PET detection and fused to luciferases for optical imaging. 1) Two sets of fusion proteins will be built, targeting the cell surface markers CEA or HER2. Coelenterazine-based luciferases and variant forms will be evaluated in combination with native substrate and analogs, in order to obtain two distinct probes recognizing different targets with different spectral signatures. 2) Diabody-luciferase fusion proteins will be labeled with 18F using amine reactive [18F]-SFB produced using a novel microwave-assisted, one-pot method. 3) Sitespecific, chemoselective radiolabeling methods will be devised, to reduce the chance that radiolabeling will inactivate either the target-binding properties or the bioluminescence properties of the diabody-luciferase fusion proteins. 4) Combined optical and PET imaging of these dual modality probes will be evaluated and validated in vitro and in vivo using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Each imaging modality has its strengths and weaknesses. Development and use of dual modality probes allows optical imaging to benefit from the localization and quantitation offered by the PET mode, and enhances the PET imaging by enabling simultaneous detection of more than one probe.

  10. Photographic and luminometric detection of luciferase reporter phages for drug susceptibility testing of clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Guarín, Nora; Ferro, Beatriz Eugenia; Rodríguez, Ana Lucía; Labrada, Luz Angela; Tovar, Rafael; Riska, Paul F; Jacobs, William R

    2003-10-01

    Luciferase reporter phages (LRPs) have proven to be efficient tools for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Luminometric detection of LRP activity offers higher sensitivity and quantitative results, while a Polaroid film detection method offers a "low-tech" inexpensive alternative that is called the Bronx box. In this work we evaluated, improved, and compared the performance of the luminometer and the Bronx box formats for drug susceptibility testing with LRPs by using 51 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, with the agar proportion method (PM) serving as reference. The sensitivity in detecting resistance to isoniazid and rifampin, antibiotics that define multidrug resistance (MDR), was 100% for both methods. The turnaround time for results was reduced from 3 weeks for PM to 54 or 94 h for luminometry or the Bronx box, respectively. These results support the utility of LRPs as a screening test for the surveillance of MDR tuberculosis. PMID:14532245

  11. The regulation of gene expression in transformed maize aleurone and endosperm protoplasts. Analysis of promoter activity, intron enhancement, and mRNA untranslated regions on expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, D R; Young, T E

    1994-01-01

    Gene expression in the aleurone and endosperm is highly regulated during both seed development and germination. Studies of alpha-amylase expression in the aleurone of barley (Hordeum vulgare) have generated the current paradigm for hormonal control of gene expression in germinating cereal grain. Gene expression studies in both the aleurone and endosperm tissues of maize (Zea mays) seed have been hampered because of a lack of an efficient transformation system. We report here the rapid isolation of protoplasts from maize aleurone and endosperm tissue, their transformation using polyethylene glycol or electroporation, and the regulation of gene expression in these cells. Adh1 promoter activity was reduced relative to the 35S promoter in aleurone and endosperm protoplasts compared to Black Mexican Sweet suspension cells in which it was nearly as strong as the 35S promoter. Intron-mediated stimulation of expression was substantially higher in transformed aleurone or endosperm protoplasts than in cell-suspension culture protoplasts, and the data suggest that the effect of an intron may be affected by cell type. To examine cytoplasmic regulation, the 5' and 3' untranslated regions from a barley alpha-amylase were fused to the firefly luciferase-coding region, and their effect on translation and mRNA stability was examined following the delivery of in vitro synthesized mRNA to aleurone and endosperm protoplasts. The alpha-amylase untranslated regions regulated translational efficiency in a tissue-specific manner, increasing translation in aleurone or endosperm protoplasts but not in maize or carrot cell-suspension protoplasts, in animal cells, or in in vitro translation lysates. PMID:7824660

  12. The Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer from Firefly Luciferase to a Synthetic Dye and its Application for the Rapid Homogeneous Immunoassay of Progesterone.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Daria V; Samsonova, Jeanne V; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2016-01-01

    The sensitive BRET system for the homogeneous immunoassay of a low-molecular weight antigen was developed using progesterone as an example. Two thermostable mutants of the Luciola mingrelica firefly luciferase (Luc)-the "red" mutant with λmax.em = 590 nm (RedLuc) and the "green" mutant with λmax.em = 550 nm (GreenLuc)-were tested as the donors. The water-soluble Alexa Fluor 610× (AF) dye was selected as the acceptor because its two absorption maxima, located at 550 and 610 nm, are close to the bioluminescence maxima of the GreenLuc and RedLuc, respectively. The methods for the synthesis of the luciferase-progesterone (Luc-Pg) conjugate and the conjugate of the dye and the polyclonal antiprogesterone antibody (AF-Ab) were developed. Both conjugates retained their functional properties, had high antigen-antibody binding activity, and demonstrated a high BRET signal. The homogeneous immunoassay system based on the BRET from the firefly luciferase to the synthetic dye was established to assay progesterone as a model antigen. Optimization of the assay conditions, the composition of the reaction mixture, and the concentrations of the donor and the acceptor made it possible to reach the minimum detectable progesterone concentration of 0.5 ng mL(-1) . PMID:26650341

  13. Effects of triclocarban on the transcription of estrogen, androgen and aryl hydrocarbon receptor responsive genes in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tarnow, Patrick; Tralau, Tewes; Hunecke, Danele; Luch, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an antimicrobial agent that is used in detergents, soaps and other personal hygiene products. Similarly to triclosan the widespread use of TCC has raised concerns about its endocrine potential. In luciferase-based reporter assays TCC has been shown to enhance estrogenic and androgenic activities following cellular coexposure with estrogen or dihydrotestosterone, respectively. The present study demonstrates that although coexposure with TCC enhances the estrogenic and androgenic readout of luciferase-based reporter cell lines such as HeLa9908 and MDA-kb2, it fails to act as a xenoandrogen on transcriptional level, nor does it induce cell proliferation in the estrogen sensitive E-screen. In addition TCC did not alter the expression of estrogen responsive genes in human mammary carcinoma MCF-7 cells exposed to 17β-estradiol, bisphenol A, butylparaben or genistein. However, TCC was shown to interfere with the regulon of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) as TCC showed a costimulatory effect on transcription of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, effectively lowering the transcriptional threshold for both genes in the presence of estrogens. It thus seems, that while the induction of the respective luciferase reporter assays by TCC is an unspecific false positive signal caused by luciferase stabilisation, TCC has the potential to interfere with the regulatory crosstalk of the estrogen receptor (ER) and the AhR regulon. PMID:23524099

  14. Photodynamic therapy using luciferase nanoconjugate as a treatment for colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koritarov, Tamara

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) has proven itself in previous studies to be a successful therapeutic treatment for surface tumors, but its effectiveness is limited to only shallow depths that allow for the penetration of light. This study demonstrates that we have improved upon the conventional method of PDT and have overcome the previous depth limitation by creating the light at the location of the tumor in situ. We conjugated a bioluminescent protein, Luciferase, to a semiconductor nanoparticle, TiO2, and with a cell specific antibody, anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody C225. The nanoconjugate, TiDoL-C225, was then activated by ATP and Luciferin in a reaction that creates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induces apoptosis in the tumor cells. We created the optimal nanoconjugate synthesis protocol to make TiDoL and TiDoL-C225 for use in the PDT treatment. The TiDoL-C225 nanoconjugate is able to bind specifically to colon caner cells as the C225 antibody recognizes EGFR expressed at the surface of the cells, and further, when activated it will react only with the tumor cells. The optimal cell staining protocols were developed to visualize the treatment process and later analyze with the laser confocal microscope. The TiDoL nanoconjugate was found to only be operational and effective at killing tumor cells after being activated by Luciferin and ATP, which then enhances the control we have over the therapy. The TiDoL-C225 nanoconjugate increases the efficacy of binding to tumor cells and the speed of the reaction in the cells to begin apoptosis, even in lower concentrations when compared to the free TiDoL nanoconjugate. Finally, our PDT technique allowed us to monitor the tumor cells as they begin to undergo apoptosis in less than five minutes after the Luciferin was added to activate the reaction. The advantage of our method of PDT with the TiDoL-C225 nanoconjugate is that it can be used for early detection as well as developed into an effective treatment for cancers in all

  15. Resveratrol inhibits LXRα-dependent hepatic lipogenesis through novel antioxidant Sestrin2 gene induction

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, So Hee; Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Seo, Kyuhwa; Shin, Sang Mi; Cho, Il Je; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2013-08-15

    Liver X receptor-α (LXRα), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors, regulates de novo fatty acid synthesis that leads to stimulate hepatic steatosis. Although, resveratrol has beneficial effects on metabolic disease, it is not known whether resveratrol affects LXRα-dependent lipogenic gene expression. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanism. Resveratrol inhibited the ability of LXRα to activate sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and thereby inhibited target gene expression in hepatocytes. Moreover, resveratrol decreased LXRα–RXRα DNA binding activity and LXRE-luciferase transactivation. Resveratrol is known to activate Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), although its precise mechanism of action remains controversial. We found that the ability of resveratrol to repress T0901317-induced SREBP-1c expression was not dependent on AMPK and Sirt1. It is well established that hepatic steatosis is associated with antioxidant and redox signaling. Our data showing that expression of Sestrin2 (Sesn2), which is a novel antioxidant gene, was significantly down-regulated in the livers of high-fat diet-fed mice. Moreover, resveratrol up-regulated Sesn2 expression, but not Sesn1 and Sesn3. Sesn2 overexpression repressed LXRα-activated SREBP-1c expression and LXRE-luciferase activity. Finally, Sesn2 knockdown using siRNA abolished the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-induced FAS luciferase gene transactivation. We conclude that resveratrol affects Sesn2 gene induction and contributes to the inhibition of LXRα-mediated hepatic lipogenesis. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis. • Resveratrol attenuated the ability of the LXRα-mediated lipogenic gene expression. • Resveratrol’s effects on T090-induced lipogenesis is not dependent on Sirt1 or AMPK.

  16. Inhibiting activator protein-1 activity alters cocaine-induced gene expression and potentiates sensitization.

    PubMed

    Paletzki, R F; Myakishev, M V; Polesskaya, O; Orosz, A; Hyman, S E; Vinson, C

    2008-04-01

    We have expressed A-FOS, an inhibitor of activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding, in adult mouse striatal neurons. We observed normal behavior including locomotion and exploratory activities. Following a single injection of cocaine, locomotion increased similarly in both the A-FOS expressing and littermate controls. However, following repeated injections of cocaine, the A-FOS expressing mice showed increased locomotion relative to littermate controls, an increase that persisted following a week of withdrawal and subsequent cocaine administration. These results indicate that AP-1 suppresses this behavioral response to cocaine. We analyzed mRNA from the striatum before and 4 and 24 h after a single cocaine injection in both A-FOS and control striata using Affymetrix microarrays (430 2.0 Array) to identify genes mis-regulated by A-FOS that may mediate the increased locomotor sensitization to cocaine. A-FOS expression did not change gene expression in the basal state or 4 h following cocaine treatment relative to controls. However, 24 h after an acute cocaine treatment, 84 genes were identified that were differentially expressed between the A-FOS and control mice. Fifty-six genes are down-regulated while 28 genes are up-regulated including previously identified candidates for addiction including brain-derived neurotrophic factor and period homolog 1. Using a random sample of identified genes, quantitative PCR was used to verify the microarray studies. The chromosomal location of these 84 genes was compared with human genome scans of addiction to identify potential genes in humans that are involved in addiction. PMID:18355967

  17. A Bayesian Framework for the Classification of Microbial Gene Activity States

    PubMed Central

    Disselkoen, Craig; Greco, Brian; Cook, Kaitlyn; Koch, Kristin; Lerebours, Reginald; Viss, Chase; Cape, Joshua; Held, Elizabeth; Ashenafi, Yonatan; Fischer, Karen; Acosta, Allyson; Cunningham, Mark; Best, Aaron A.; DeJongh, Matthew; Tintle, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous methods for classifying gene activity states based on gene expression data have been proposed for use in downstream applications, such as incorporating transcriptomics data into metabolic models in order to improve resulting flux predictions. These methods often attempt to classify gene activity for each gene in each experimental condition as belonging to one of two states: active (the gene product is part of an active cellular mechanism) or inactive (the cellular mechanism is not active). These existing methods of classifying gene activity states suffer from multiple limitations, including enforcing unrealistic constraints on the overall proportions of active and inactive genes, failing to leverage a priori knowledge of gene co-regulation, failing to account for differences between genes, and failing to provide statistically meaningful confidence estimates. We propose a flexible Bayesian approach to classifying gene activity states based on a Gaussian mixture model. The model integrates genome-wide transcriptomics data from multiple conditions and information about gene co-regulation to provide activity state confidence estimates for each gene in each condition. We compare the performance of our novel method to existing methods on both simulated data and real data from 907 E. coli gene expression arrays, as well as a comparison with experimentally measured flux values in 29 conditions, demonstrating that our method provides more consistent and accurate results than existing methods across a variety of metrics. PMID:27555837

  18. Percutaneous arterial gene transfer in a rabbit model. Efficiency in normal and balloon-dilated atherosclerotic arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, G; Gal, D; Takeshita, S; Nikol, S; Weir, L; Isner, J M

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of using an exclusively percutaneous strategy to deliver foreign DNA to normal and balloon-dilated atherosclerotic arteries was studied by analysis of transfection efficiency in a rabbit model. A total of 22 external iliac arteries from 22 rabbits (10 normal and 12 atherosclerotic) were transfected with a solution of luciferase expression vector plasmid and liposome, using a dual balloon-catheter system. Analysis of the transfected segments revealed luciferase activity in 10 of the 22 arteries (4/10 normal vs 6/12 balloon-injured atherosclerotic, P = NS); no activity could be detected in the contralateral limb arterial segments used as controls. Luciferase activity levels in successfully transfected segments measured 4.10 +/- 1.19 (m +/- SEM) Turner light units (TLU), with 3.03 +/- 1.16 TLU found in normals vs 4.81 +/- 1.87 TLU in balloon-injured atherosclerotic arteries (P = NS). In situ hybridization of successfully transfected atherosclerotic sections showed expression of the luciferase gene mRNA from rare cells (less than 1/1,000) limited to the neointimal lesion. Thus, expression of new genetic material may be achieved in both normal and balloon-dilated atherosclerotic arteries following an exclusively percutaneous approach. The low efficiency of the current delivery strategy, however, represents a potential limitation that must be improved if this strategy is to be applied as a therapeutic approach to human vascular disease. Images PMID:1387886

  19. Role of Specificity Protein-1 and Activating Protein-2 Transcription Factors in the Regulation of the Gap Junction Protein Beta-2 Gene in the Epididymis of the Rat.

    PubMed

    Adam, Cécile; Cyr, Daniel G

    2016-06-01

    In prepubertal rats, connexin 26 (GJB2) is expressed between adjacent columnar cells of the epididymis. At 28 days of age, when columnar cells differentiate into adult epithelial cell types, Gjb2 mRNA levels decrease to barely detectable levels. There is no information on the regulation of GJB2 in the epididymis. The present study characterized regulation of the Gjb2 gene promoter in the epididymis. A single transcription start site at position -3829 bp relative to the ATG was identified. Computational analysis revealed several TFAP2A, SP1, and KLF4 putative binding sites. A 1.5-kb fragment of the Gjb2 promoter was cloned into a vector containing a luciferase reporter gene. Transfection of the construct into immortalized rat caput epididymal (RCE-1) cells indicated that the promoter contained sufficient information to drive expression of the reporter gene. Deletion constructs showed that the basal activity of the promoter resides in the first -230 bp of the transcriptional start site. Two response elements necessary for GJB2 expression were identified: an overlapping TFAP2A/SP1 site (-136 to -126 bp) and an SP1 site (-50 bp). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that SP1 and TFAP2A were bound to the promoter. ChIP analysis of chromatin from young and pubertal rats indicated that TFAP2A and SP1 binding decreased with age. SP1 and TFAP2A knockdown indicated that SP1 is necessary for Gjb2 expression. DNA methylation did not appear to be involved in the regulation of Gjb2 expression. Results indicate that SP1 and TFAP2A regulate Gjb2 promoter activity during epididymal differentiation in rat. PMID:27053364

  20. Porcine E. coli: Virulence-Associated Genes, Resistance Genes and Adhesion and Probiotic Activity Tested by a New Screening Method

    PubMed Central

    Schierack, Peter; Rödiger, Stefan; Kuhl, Christoph; Hiemann, Rico; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Li, Ganwu; Weinreich, Jörg; Berger, Enrico; Nolan, Lisa K.; Nicholson, Bryon; Römer, Antje; Frömmel, Ulrike; Wieler, Lothar H.; Schröder, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We established an automated screening method to characterize adhesion of Escherichia coli to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and their probiotic activity against infection by enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). 104 intestinal E. coli isolates from domestic pigs were tested by PCR for the occurrence of virulence-associated genes, genes coding for resistances to antimicrobial agents and metals, and for phylogenetic origin by PCR. Adhesion rates and probiotic activity were examined for correlation with the presence of these genes. Finally, data were compared with those from 93 E. coli isolates from wild boars. Isolates from domestic pigs carried a broad variety of all tested genes and showed great diversity in gene patterns. Adhesions varied with a maximum of 18.3 or 24.2 mean bacteria adherence per epithelial cell after 2 or 6 hours respectively. Most isolates from domestic pigs and wild boars showed low adherence, with no correlation between adhesion/probiotic activity and E. coli genes or gene clusters. The gene sfa/foc, encoding for a subunit of F1C fimbriae did show a positive correlative association with adherence and probiotic activity; however E. coli isolates from wild boars with the sfa/foc gene showed less adhesion and probiotic activity than E. coli with the sfa/foc gene isolated from domestic pigs after 6 hour incubation. In conclusion, screening porcine E. coli for virulence associated genes genes, adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, and probiotic activity revealed a single important adhesion factor, several probiotic candidates, and showed important differences between E. coli of domestic pigs and wild boars. PMID:23658605

  1. Macrophage nitric oxide synthase gene: two upstream regions mediate induction by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, C J; Alley, E W; Raval, P; Snowman, A M; Snyder, S H; Russell, S W; Murphy, W J

    1993-01-01

    The promoter region of the mouse gene for macrophage-inducible nitric oxide synthase (mac-NOS; EC 1.14.13.39) has been characterized. A putative TATA box is 30 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Computer analysis reveals numerous potential binding sites for transcription factors, many of them associated with stimuli that induce mac-NOS expression. To localize functionally important portions of the regulatory region, we constructed deletion mutants of the mac-NOS 5' flanking region and placed them upstream of a luciferase reporter gene. The macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, when transfected with a minimal promoter construct, expresses little luciferase activity when stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), or both. Maximal expression depends on two discrete regulatory regions upstream of the putative TATA box. Region I (position -48 to -209) increases luciferase activity approximately 75-fold over the minimal promoter construct. Region I contains LPS-related responsive elements, including a binding site for nuclear factor interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and the kappa B binding site for NF-kappa B, suggesting that this region regulates LPS-induced expression of the mac-NOS gene. Region II (position -913 to -1029) alone does not increase luciferase expression, but together with region I it causes an additional 10-fold increase in expression. Together the two regions increase expression 750-fold over activity obtained from a minimal promoter construct. Region II contains motifs for binding IFN-related transcription factors and thus probably is responsible for IFN-mediated regulation of LPS-induced mac-NOS. Delineation of these two cooperative regions explains at the level of transcription how IFN-gamma and LPS act in concert to induce maximally the mac-NOS gene and, furthermore, how IFN-gamma augments the inflammatory response to LPS. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7692452

  2. Chicken STING Mediates Activation of the IFN Gene Independently of the RIG-I Gene.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Sun, Yingjie; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan; Sun, Jianhe

    2015-10-15

    Stimulator of IFN genes (STING) is an adaptor that functions downstream of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in mammalian cells; however, RIG-I is absent in chickens. We identified chicken STING (chSTING) as a critical mediator of virus-triggered type I IFN signaling in RIG-I-null chicken cells. Overexpression of chSTING in DF-1 cells inhibited Newcastle disease virus and avian influenza virus (AIV) viral replication and activated IRF-7 and NF-κB to induce expression of type I IFNs. Knockdown of endogenous chSTING abolished virus-triggered activation of IRF-7 and IFN-β and increased viral yield. chSTING was a critical component in the virus-triggered IRF-7 activation pathway and the cellular antiviral response. chSTING predominantly localized to the outer membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum and was also found in the mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, knockdown of chSTING blocked polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-, poly(deoxyadenylic-deoxythymidylic) acid-, and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5)-stimulated induction of IFN-β. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that chicken MDA5 could interact with chSTING, and this interaction was enhanced by ectopically expressed chicken mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein. Together, these results indicated that chSTING is an important regulator of chicken innate immune signaling and might be involved in the MDA5 signaling pathway in chicken cells. These results help with understanding the biological role of STING in innate immunity during evolution. PMID:26392466

  3. Genes Important for Catalase Activity in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Baureder, Michael; Hederstedt, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Little in general is known about how heme proteins are assembled from their constituents in cells. The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme and does not depend on it for growth. However, when supplied with heme in the growth medium the cells can synthesize two heme proteins; catalase (KatA) and cytochrome bd (CydAB). To identify novel factors important for catalase biogenesis libraries of E. faecalis gene insertion mutants were generated using two different types of transposons. The libraries of mutants were screened for clones deficient in catalase activity using a colony zymogram staining procedure. Analysis of obtained clones identified, in addition to katA (encoding the catalase enzyme protein), nine genes distributed over five different chromosomal loci. No factors with a dedicated essential role in catalase biogenesis or heme trafficking were revealed, but the results indicate the RNA degradosome (srmB, rnjA), an ABC-type oligopeptide transporter (oppBC), a two-component signal transducer (etaR), and NADH peroxidase (npr) as being important for expression of catalase activity in E. faecalis. It is demonstrated that catalase biogenesis in E. faecalis is independent of the CydABCD proteins and that a conserved proline residue in the N-terminal region of KatA is important for catalase assembly. PMID:22590595

  4. Production of the Ramoplanin Activity Analogue by Double Gene Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jungang; Chen, Junsheng; Shao, Lei; Zhang, Junliang; Dong, Xiaojing; Liu, Pengyu; Chen, Daijie

    2016-01-01

    Glycopeptides such as vancomycin and telavancin are essential for treating infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. But the dwindling availability of new antibiotics and the emergence of resistant bacteria are making effective antibiotic treatment increasingly difficult. Ramoplanin, an inhibitor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, is a highly effective antibiotic against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-intermediate resistant Clostridium difficile and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. Here, two tailoring enzyme genes in the biosynthesis of ramoplanin were deleted by double in-frame gene knockouts to produce new ramoplanin derivatives. The deschlororamoplanin A2 aglycone was purified and its structure was identified with LC-MS/MS. Deschlororamoplanin A2 aglycone and ramoplanin aglycone showed similar activity to ramoplanin A2. The results showed that α-1,2-dimannosyl disaccharide at Hpg11 and chlorination at Chp17 in the ramoplanin structure are not essential for its antimicrobial activity. This work provides new precursor compounds for the semisynthetic modification of ramoplanin. PMID:27149627

  5. Characteristics of a thyroid hormone responsive reporter gene transduced into a Xenopus laevis cell line using lentivirus vector.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Shin-Ichiro; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2005-12-01

    We introduced a self-inactivation (SIN) lentivirus vector (LV) into Xenopus laevis cell lines and established a permanent cell line expressing a reporter gene in a 3,5,3'-l-triiodothyronine (T(3)) dependent manner. The SIN LV contained the luciferase gene downstream from the X. laevis T(3)-response elements (TREs) and the SV40 promoter, and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene downstream from the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. It was integrated into the genome of X. laevis XL58, XTC2, and KR cells. The SIN LV transduced the X. laevis cells as efficiently as mammalian cells; however, the expression of EGFP in the transgene decreased with increasing culture time. A cell clone exhibiting the highest TH-dependent luciferase gene expression (XL58-TRE-Luc clone) was isolated from the EGFP-positive XL58 cell pool and characterized. The minimum effective concentration of T(3) that significantly induced the luciferase gene expression was 10(-11)M in the XL58-TRE-Luc clone. The application of the luciferase gene assay using the permanent XL58-TRE-Luc clone for the screening of thyroid-disrupting chemicals revealed that tetrachlorobisphenol A, at 10(-6)M, had a weak T(3)-agonist activity, whereas trichlorobisphenol A, at 10(-8) - 10(-6)M had a weak T(3)-antagonist activity. Our results indicated that the permanent X. laevis cell line containing a T(3)-response transgene could be used as a bioassay, with small intra-assay variation, for the rapid screening, identification, and characterization of the thyroid-disrupting chemicals. PMID:16102758

  6. Isolation and characterization of a novel B cell activation gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.X.; Wilson, G.L.; Fox, C.H.; Kehrl, J.H. )

    1993-05-01

    Using subtractive cDNA cloning, the authors have isolated a series of cDNA clones that are differentially expressed between B and T lymphocytes. Whereas some of the isolated cDNA are from known B cell-specific genes, many of them represent previously uncharacterized genes. One of these unknown genes was denoted as BL34. Northern blot analysis performed with the BL34 cDNA revealed a 1.6-kb mRNA transcript that was present at low levels in RNA extracted from resting B lymphocytes, but whose expression was markedly increased in RNA prepared from mitogen-activated B cells. Similarly, RNA prepared from several B cell lines treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) contained high levels of BL34 mRNA. In contrast, RNA from purified T cells treated with phytohemagglutinin and PMA had undetectable amounts of BL34 mRNA. In addition, high levels of BL34 mRNA were detected in RNA purified from PBMC of a patient with B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Southern blot analysis of human DNA from various tissues and cells lines demonstrated that BL34 is a single-copy gene without evidence of rearrangement. Two full length BL34 cDNA were sequenced, and an open reading frame of 588 bp was identified that was predicted to encode for a 196 amino acid protein. Searches of several protein data bases failed to find any homologous proteins. To directly analyze the expression of BL34 mRNA in lymphoid tissues in situ, hybridization studies with human tonsil tissue sections were performed. BL34 mRNA was detected in a portion of the cells in the germinal center region and adjacent to the mantle region. Further characterization of the BL34 gene and its protein should lead to insights to its role in B cell function and the consequences of its over-expression in acute lymphocytic leukemia. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Characterization and isolation of a T-DNA tagged banana promoter active during in vitro culture and low temperature stress

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Efrén; Remy, Serge; Thiry, Els; Windelinckx, Saskia; Swennen, Rony; Sági, László

    2009-01-01

    Background Next-generation transgenic plants will require a more precise regulation of transgene expression, preferably under the control of native promoters. A genome-wide T-DNA tagging strategy was therefore performed for the identification and characterization of novel banana promoters. Embryogenic cell suspensions of a plantain-type banana were transformed with a promoterless, codon-optimized luciferase (luc+) gene and low temperature-responsive luciferase activation was monitored in real time. Results Around 16,000 transgenic cell colonies were screened for baseline luciferase activity at room temperature 2 months after transformation. After discarding positive colonies, cultures were re-screened in real-time at 26°C followed by a gradual decrease to 8°C. The baseline activation frequency was 0.98%, while the frequency of low temperature-responsive luciferase activity was 0.61% in the same population of cell cultures. Transgenic colonies with luciferase activity responsive to low temperature were regenerated to plantlets and luciferase expression patterns monitored during different regeneration stages. Twenty four banana DNA sequences flanking the right T-DNA borders in seven independent lines were cloned via PCR walking. RT-PCR analysis in one line containing five inserts allowed the identification of the sequence that had activated luciferase expression under low temperature stress in a developmentally regulated manner. This activating sequence was fused to the uidA reporter gene and back-transformed into a commercial dessert banana cultivar, in which its original expression pattern was confirmed. Conclusion This promoter tagging and real-time screening platform proved valuable for the identification of novel promoters and genes in banana and for monitoring expression patterns throughout in vitro development and low temperature treatment. Combination of PCR walking techniques was efficient for the isolation of candidate promoters even in a multicopy T

  8. A novel steroid receptor co-activator protein (SRAP) as an alternative form of steroid receptor RNA-activator gene: expression in prostate cancer cells and enhancement of androgen receptor activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Hidenori; Takano, Haruna; Sugita, Syozo; Takahara, Yuki; Sugimura, Kazunobu; Nakatani, Tatsuya

    2003-01-01

    We have cloned a cDNA coding for a novel steroid receptor co-activator protein termed SRAP from a rat prostate library. Although the nucleotide sequence of the SRAP has 78.2% identity to that of the human steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), a novel RNA molecule which was reported to act as an RNA transcript without being translated into protein [Lanz, McKenna, Onate, Albrecht, Wong, Tsai, Tsai and O'Malley (1999) Cell 97, 17-27], the cDNA of SRAP is capable of generating a functional protein. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays showed that SRAP associates with the partial androgen receptor (AR) protein composed of a DNA-binding domain and an activation function 2. Luciferase assays demonstrated that SRAP enhances the transactivation activity of the AR, the glucocorticoid receptor and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma(1) in a ligand-dependent manner. Using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion-protein construct, we demonstrated in vivo translation of the GFP-SRAP fusion protein in HeLa cells co-transfected with pSG5AR and reporter gene in the presence of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Co-transfection of the GFP-SRAP fusion protein expression plasmid enhanced the transactivation activity of AR whereas incorporation of mutations in SRAP of the fusion protein resulted in loss of enhancement of the transactivation activity. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcriptase PCR assays showed that SRAP and SRA are expressed in rat and human prostate cancer cell lines respectively. In HeLa cells and the human prostate cancer cells line DU-145, co-transfected with SRAP, the DHT-dependent transactivation activities of AR were not completely inhibited by the anti-androgen flutamide, but the transactivation activities still remained high even in the presence of 5 microM flutamide, suggesting that SRAP may play an important role in enhancing AR activity in prostate cancer. PMID:12350225

  9. Histone acetyltransferase activity of yeast Gcn5p is required for the activation of target genes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Min-Hao; Zhou, Jianxin; Jambeck, Per; Churchill, Mair E.A.; Allis, C. David

    1998-01-01

    Gcn5p is a transcriptional coactivator required for correct expression of various genes in yeast. Several transcriptional regulators, including Gcn5p, possess intrinsic histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity in vitro. However, whether the HAT activity of any of these proteins is required for gene activation remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the HAT activity of Gcn5p is critical for transcriptional activation of target genes in vivo. Core histones are hyperacetylated in cells overproducing functional Gcn5p, and promoters of Gcn5p-regulated genes are associated with hyperacetylated histones upon activation by low-copy Gcn5p. Point mutations within the Gcn5p catalytic domain abolish both promoter-directed histone acetylation and Gcn5p-mediated transcriptional activation. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that promoter-specific histone acetylation, catalyzed by functional Gcn5p, plays a critical role in gene activation. PMID:9499399

  10. Polyphenols from Chilean Propolis and Pinocembrin Reduce MMP-9 Gene Expression and Activity in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Nicolás; Cuevas, Alejandro; Cavalcante, Marcela F.; Dörr, Felipe A.; Saavedra, Kathleen; Zambrano, Tomás; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols from diverse sources have shown anti-inflammatory activity. In the context of atherosclerosis, macrophages play important roles including matrix metalloproteinases synthesis involved in degradation of matrix extracellular components affecting the atherosclerotic plaque stability. We prepared a propolis extract and pinocembrin in ethanol solution. Propolis extract was chemically characterized using LC-MS. The effect of treatments on gene expression and proteolytic activity was measured in vitro using murine macrophages activated with LPS. Cellular toxicity associated with both treatments and the vehicle was determined using MTT and apoptosis/necrosis detection assays. MMP-9 gene expression and proteolytic activity were measured using qPCR and zymography, respectively. Thirty-two compounds were identified in the propolis extract, including pinocembrin among its major components. Treatment with either ethanolic extract of propolis or pinocembrin inhibits MMP-9 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, an inhibitory effect was observed in proteolytic activity. However, the effect showed by ethanolic extract of propolis was higher than the effect of pinocembrin, suggesting that MMP-9 inhibition results from a joint contribution between the components of the extract. These data suggest a potential role of polyphenols from Chilean propolis in the control of extracellular matrix degradation in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27119082

  11. Endothelin‑1 induces oncostatin M expression in osteoarthritis osteoblasts by trans‑activating the oncostatin M gene promoter via Ets‑1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ren; Wang, Wanchun; Huang, Guoliang; Mao, Xinzhan; Chen, You; Tang, Qi; Liao, Lele

    2016-04-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM) contributes to cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA) and was demonstrated to be expressed in OA osteoblasts. Endothelin‑1 (ET‑1) is implicated in the degradation of OA articular cartilage, and osteoblast proliferation and bone development. In the present study, the effects of ET‑1 on OSM expression in human OA osteoblasts were investigated, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. Primary human OA osteoblasts were treated with ET‑1 (1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 nM) for 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h with or without the selective ETA receptor (ETAR) antagonist, BQ123, ETB receptor antagonist, BQ788 or the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, BKM120. ET‑1 treatment induced OSM mRNA expression, and the intracellular and secreted protein levels of OA osteoblasts in a dose‑dependent manner. This effect was suppressed by BQ123 and BKM120, but not BQ788 administration. In combination with electrophoretic mobility shift assays, deletional and mutational analyses on the activity of a human OSM promoter/luciferase reporter demonstrated that ET‑1 induced OSM expression in OA osteoblasts by trans‑activating the OSM gene promoter through specific binding of Ets‑1 to an Ets‑1 binding site in the OSM promoter in an ETAR‑ and PI3K‑dependent manner. Furthermore, ET‑1 treatment increased the expression of Ets‑1 in a dose‑dependent manner, however the knockdown of Ets‑1 suppressed the ET1‑induced expression of OSM in OA osteoblasts. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that ET‑1 induces the expression of OSM in OA osteoblasts by trans‑activating the OSM gene promoter primarily through increasing the expression level of Ets‑1 in an ETAR‑ and PI3K‑dependent manner. The current study suggested novel insights into the mechanistic role of ET‑1 in the pathophysiology of OA. PMID:26934912

  12. Searching for Extant Life on Mars - The ATP-Firefly LuciferinLuciferase Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obousy, R. K.; Tziolas, A. C.; Kaltsas, K.; Sims, M. R.; Grant, W. D.

    We have investigated the use of the ATP-Firefly Luciferin/Luciferase (FFL) enzymic photoluminescent reaction as a possible means of detecting extant life in the Martian environment. Experiments carried out by the authors illustrate the capacity of the method to successfully detect extant forms of life on Mars assuming ATP is an intrinsic part of the biochemistry of such life-forms. A photodiode based apparatus, built to test the assumptions and applicability of the ATP-Firefly Luciferase/Luciferin technique to an exobiologically inclined mission to Mars, revealed the adequate resolution and reproducibility of the methodology plus areas of improvement. Also detailed are extraction, delivery and analysis system concepts, proposed for future Mars missions.

  13. Near infrared bioluminescence resonance energy transfer from firefly luciferase--quantum dot bionanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M; Doane, Tennyson L; Zylstra, Joshua; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2014-12-12

    The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between firefly luciferase enzymes and semiconductive quantum dots (QDs) with near infrared emission is described. The QD were phase transferred to aqueous buffers using a histidine mediated phase transfer route, and incubated with a hexahistidine tagged, green emitting variant of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis (PPyGRTS). The PPyGRTS were bound to the QD interface via the hexahistidine tag, which effectively displaces the histidine layer and binds directly to the QD interfaces, allowing for short donor-acceptor distances (∼5.5 nm). Due to this, high BRET efficiency ratios of ∼5 were obtained. These PPyGRTS-QD bio-nano conjugates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and BRET emission studies. The final optimized conjugate was easily observable by night vision imaging, demonstrating the potential of these materials in imaging and signaling/sensing applications. PMID:25414169

  14. Hormonal modulation of a gene injected into rat heart in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kitsis, R N; Buttrick, P M; McNally, E M; Kaplan, M L; Leinwand, L A

    1991-01-01

    We demonstrate gene transfer into rat heart in vivo by the direct injection of plasmid DNA. Injection of gene constructs driven by retroviral and cellular promoters resulted in detectable levels of reporter gene activities. The cellular promoter and 5' flanking sequence (positions -613 to +32) were derived from the rat alpha-myosin heavy chain gene whose expression in vivo is restricted to cardiac muscle and is positively regulated by thyroid hormone. After DNA injection, activity of the firefly luciferase gene coupled to the myosin heavy chain promoter and regulatory sequence was detected in heart but not in skeletal muscle and was significantly increased in response to thyroid hormone treatment. Consequently, expression of injected genes can be targeted to specific cell types in vivo and can be modulated by the hormonal status of the animal. This approach provides a means of mapping the elements of genes that regulate their responses to complex stimuli that cannot be modeled in vitro. Images PMID:2034660

  15. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation. PMID:26689875

  16. Intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility and accuracy of the LuSens assay: A reporter gene-cell line to detect keratinocyte activation by skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Stein, Nadine; Aumann, Alexandra; Remus, Tina; Edwards, Amber; Norman, Kimberly G; Ryan, Cindy; Bader, Jackie E; Fehr, Markus; Burleson, Florence; Foertsch, Leslie; Wang, Xiaohong; Gerberick, Frank; Beilstein, Paul; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Mehling, Annette; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Several non-animal methods are now available to address the key events leading to skin sensitization as defined by the adverse outcome pathway. The KeratinoSens assay addresses the cellular event of keratinocyte activation and is a method accepted under OECD TG 442D. In this study, the results of an inter-laboratory evaluation of the "me-too" LuSens assay, a bioassay that uses a human keratinocyte cell line harboring a reporter gene construct composed of the rat antioxidant response element (ARE) of the NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene and the luciferase gene, are described. Earlier in-house validation with 74 substances showed an accuracy of 82% in comparison to human data. When used in a battery of non-animal methods, even higher predictivity is achieved. To meet European validation criteria, a multicenter study was conducted in 5 laboratories. The study was divided into two phases, to assess 1) transferability of the method, and 2) reproducibility and accuracy. Phase I was performed by testing 8 non-coded test substances; the results showed a good transferability to naïve laboratories even without on-site training. Phase II was performed with 20 coded test substances (performance standards recommended by OECD, 2015). In this phase, the intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility as well as accuracy of the method was evaluated. The data demonstrate a remarkable reproducibility of 100% and an accuracy of over 80% in identifying skin sensitizers, indicating a good concordance with in vivo data. These results demonstrate good transferability, reliability and accuracy of the method thereby achieving the standards necessary for use in a regulatory setting to detect skin sensitizers. PMID:26796489

  17. Imaging Tumor Vascularity and Response to Anti-Angiogenic Therapy Using Gaussia Luciferase.

    PubMed

    Kantar, Rami S; Lashgari, Ghazal; Tabet, Elie I; Lewandrowski, Grant K; Carvalho, Litia A; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel approach to assess tumor vascularity using recombinant Gaussia luciferase (rGluc) protein and bioluminescence imaging. Upon intravenous injection of rGluc followed by its substrate coelenterazine, non-invasive visualization of tumor vascularity by bioluminescence imaging was possible. We applied this method for longitudinal monitoring of tumor vascularity in response to the anti-angiogenic drug tivozanib. This simple and sensitive method could be extended to image blood vessels/vasculature in many different fields. PMID:27198044

  18. Bioluminescent microassay of various metabolites using bacterial luciferase co-immobilized with multienzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Ugarova, N N; Lebedeva, O V; Frumkina, I G

    1988-09-01

    Co-immobilization methods have been developed for a bienzymatic system of luminescent Beneckea harveyi bacteria with formate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglucomutase. Bioluminescent assays have been devised for NADH, NAD, FMN, glucose 6-phosphate, and glucose 1-phosphate using the co-immobilized enzyme preparation. The lowest detection limits were in the picomole range with the bacterial extract and in the femtomole range with the partially purified enzymes, bacterial luciferase, and NADH:FMN oxidoreductase. PMID:3263818

  19. Imaging Tumor Vascularity and Response to Anti-Angiogenic Therapy Using Gaussia Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Kantar, Rami S.; Lashgari, Ghazal; Tabet, Elie I.; Lewandrowski, Grant K.; Carvalho, Litia A.; Tannous, Bakhos A.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel approach to assess tumor vascularity using recombinant Gaussia luciferase (rGluc) protein and bioluminescence imaging. Upon intravenous injection of rGluc followed by its substrate coelenterazine, non-invasive visualization of tumor vascularity by bioluminescence imaging was possible. We applied this method for longitudinal monitoring of tumor vascularity in response to the anti-angiogenic drug tivozanib. This simple and sensitive method could be extended to image blood vessels/vasculature in many different fields. PMID:27198044

  20. Activity-dependent genes in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Fischl, Adrian M; Heron, Paula M; Stromberg, Arnold J; McClintock, Timothy S

    2014-06-01

    Activity-dependent survival of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) may allow animals to tune their olfactory systems to match their odor environment. Activity-dependent genes should play important roles in this process, motivating experiments to identify them. Both unilateral naris occlusion of mice for 6 days and genetic silencing of OSNs decreased S100A5, Lrrc3b, Kirrel2, Slc17a6, Rasgrp4, Pcp4l1, Plcxd3, and Kcnn2 while increasing Kirrel3. Naris occlusion also decreased Eml5, Ptprn, and Nphs1. OSN number was unchanged and stress-response mRNAs were unaffected after 6 days of naris occlusion. This leaves odor stimulation as the most likely cause of differential abundance of these mRNAs, but through a mechanism that is slow or indirect for most because 30-40 min of odor stimulation increased only 3 of 11 mRNAs decreased by naris occlusion: S100A5, Lrrc3b, and Kirrel2. Odorant receptor (OR) mRNAs were significantly more variable than the average mRNA, consistent with difficulty in reliably detecting changes in these mRNAs after 6 days of naris occlusion. One OR mRNA, Olfr855, was consistently decreased, however. These results suggest that the latency from the cessation of odor stimulation to effects on activity-dependent OSN survival must be a week or more in juvenile mice. PMID:24692514

  1. Activity-Dependent Genes in Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Activity-dependent survival of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) may allow animals to tune their olfactory systems to match their odor environment. Activity-dependent genes should play important roles in this process, motivating experiments to identify them. Both unilateral naris occlusion of mice for 6 days and genetic silencing of OSNs decreased S100A5, Lrrc3b, Kirrel2, Slc17a6, Rasgrp4, Pcp4l1, Plcxd3, and Kcnn2 while increasing Kirrel3. Naris occlusion also decreased Eml5, Ptprn, and Nphs1. OSN number was unchanged and stress-response mRNAs were unaffected after 6 days of naris occlusion. This leaves odor stimulation as the most likely cause of differential abundance of these mRNAs, but through a mechanism that is slow or indirect for most because 30–40min of odor stimulation increased only 3 of 11 mRNAs decreased by naris occlusion: S100A5, Lrrc3b, and Kirrel2. Odorant receptor (OR) mRNAs were significantly more variable than the average mRNA, consistent with difficulty in reliably detecting changes in these mRNAs after 6 days of naris occlusion. One OR mRNA, Olfr855, was consistently decreased, however. These results suggest that the latency from the cessation of odor stimulation to effects on activity-dependent OSN survival must be a week or more in juvenile mice. PMID:24692514

  2. Post-transcriptional gene silencing activity of human GIGYF2.

    PubMed

    Kryszke, Marie-Hélène; Adjeriou, Badia; Liang, Feifei; Chen, Hong; Dautry, François

    2016-07-01

    In mammalian post-transcriptional gene silencing, the Argonaute protein AGO2 indirectly recruits translation inhibitors, deadenylase complexes, and decapping factors to microRNA-targeted mRNAs, thereby repressing mRNA translation and accelerating mRNA decay. However, the exact composition and assembly pathway of the microRNA-induced silencing complex are not completely elucidated. As the GYF domain of human GIGYF2 was shown to bind AGO2 in pulldown experiments, we wondered whether GIGYF2 could be a novel protein component of the microRNA-induced silencing complex. Here we show that full-length GIGYF2 coimmunoprecipitates with AGO2 in human cells, and demonstrate that, upon tethering to a reporter mRNA, GIGYF2 exhibits strong, dose-dependent silencing activity, involving both mRNA destabilization and translational repression. PMID:27157137

  3. Application of Gaussia luciferase in bicistronic and non-conventional secretion reporter constructs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Secreted luciferases are highly useful bioluminescent reporters for cell-based assays and drug discovery. A variety of secreted luciferases from marine organisms have been described that harbor an N-terminal signal peptide for release along the classical secretory pathway. Here, we have characterized the secretion of Gaussia luciferase in more detail. Results We describe three basic mechanisms by which GLUC can be released from cells: first, classical secretion by virtue of the N-terminal signal peptide; second, internal signal peptide-mediated secretion and third, non-conventional secretion in the absence of an N-terminal signal peptide. Non-conventional release of dNGLUC is not stress-induced, does not require autophagy and can be enhanced by growth factor stimulation. Furthermore, we have identified the golgi-associated, gamma adaptin ear containing, ARF binding protein 1 (GGA1) as a suppressor of release of dNGLUC. Conclusions Due to its secretion via multiple secretion pathways GLUC can find multiple applications as a research tool to study classical and non-conventional secretion. As GLUC can also be released from a reporter construct by internal signal peptide-mediated secretion it can be incorporated in a novel bicistronic secretion system. PMID:25007711

  4. DNA nanoparticles: detection of long-term transgene activity in brain using bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Yurek, David M; Fletcher, Anita M; McShane, Matthew; Kowalczyk, Tomasz H; Padegimas, Linas; Weatherspoon, Marcy R; Kaytor, Michael D; Cooper, Mark J; Ziady, Assem G

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we used bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to track long-term transgene activity following the transfection of brain cells using a nonviral gene therapy technique. Formulations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) combined with 30-mer lysine polymers (substituted with 10 kDa polyethylene glycol) form nanoparticles that transfect brain cells in vivo and produce transgene activity. Here we show that a single intracerebral injection of these DNA nanoparticles (DNPs) into the rat cortex, striatum, or substantia nigra results in long-term and persistent luciferase transgene activity over an 8- to 11-week period as evaluated by in vivo BLI analysis, and single injections of DNPs into the mouse striatum showed stable luciferase transgene activity for 1 year. Compacted DNPs produced in vivo signals 7- to 34-fold higher than DNA alone. In contrast, ex vivo BLI analysis, which is subject to less signal quenching from surrounding tissues, demonstrated a DNP to DNA alone ratio of 76- to 280-fold. Moreover, the ex vivo BLI analysis confirmed that signals originated from the targeted brain structures. In summary, BLI permits serial analysis of luciferase transgene activity at multiple brain locations following gene transfer with DNPs. Ex vivo analysis may permit more accurate determination of relative activities of gene transfer vectors. PMID:21521549

  5. Endothelial protective genes induced by statin is mimicked by FTI-277 and GGTI-298 drug combination-mediated ERK5 activation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Uyen B.; Duellman, Tyler; Weaver, Sara J.; Tao, Yunting; Yang, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Background Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis and are clinically beneficial in preventing cardiovascular diseases, however, the therapeutic utility of these drugs is limited by myotoxicity. Here, we explored the mechanism of statin-mediated activation of ERK5 in the human endothelium with the goal of identifying compounds that confer endothelial protection but are nontoxic to muscle. Methods An ERK5-one hybrid luciferase reporter transfected into COS-7 cells with pharmacological and molecular manipulations dissected the signaling pathway leading to statin activation of ERK5. qRT-PCR of HUVEC cells documented the transcriptional activation of endothelial-protective genes. Lastly, morphological and cellular ATP analysis, and induction of atrogin-1 in C2C12 myotubes were used to assess statin-induced myopathy. Results Statin activation of ERK5 is dependent on the cellular reduction of GGPPs. Furthermore, we found that the combination of FTI-277 (inhibitor of farnesyl transferase) and GGTI-298 (inhibitor of geranylgeranyl transferase I) mimicked the statin-mediated activation of ERK5. FTI-277 and GGTI-298 together recapitulated the beneficial effects of statins by transcriptionally upregulating anti-inflammatory mediators such as eNOS, THBD, and KLF2. Finally, C2C12 skeletal myotubes treated with both FTI-277 and GGTI-298 evoked less morphological and cellular changes recognized as biomarkers of statin-associated myopathy. Conclusions Statin-induced endothelial protection and myopathy are mediated by distinct metabolic intermediates and co-inhibition of farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase I confer endothelial protection without myopathy. General Significance The combinatorial FTI-277 and GGTI-298 drug regimen provides a promising alternative avenue for endothelial protection without myopathy. PMID:25829196

  6. Comparison of in vitro hormone activities of novel flame retardants TBB, TBPH and their metabolites TBBA and TBMEPH using reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Klopčič, Ivana; Skledar, Darja Gramec; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2016-10-01

    The anti-androgenic and anti-thyroid hormonal activities of the two novel brominated flame retardants, TBB and TBPH and of their metabolites TBBA and TBMEPH have been compared using the luciferase reporter gene assays. Only the parent compounds TBB and TBPH exhibited anti-glucocorticoid activity with IC50 values of 1.9 μM and 0.3 μM. Furthermore, mode of action for these two compounds is by direct competing to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) with IC50 values of 0.03 μM and 0.002 μM. All four tested compounds possess anti-androgenic and anti-thyroid hormonal activities, without agonist activities on the respective receptors. Anti-androgenic activities with IC50 values of 43.5 μM, 0.1 μM, 47.5 μM and 1.3 μM were found for TBB, TBPH, TBBA and TBMEPH. The anti-thyroid hormonal IC50 values of 37.5 μM, 0.1 μM, 22.8 μM and 32.3 μM for TBB, TBPH, TBBA and TBMEPH, together with the above quoted results, indicate that metabolism can modify anti-androgenic, anti-glucocorticoid and anti-thyroid hormonal effects of these novel brominated flame retardants. Furthermore, the parent flame retardants are shown to be able to disrupt the function of the GR as antagonists by direct competition to the receptor. PMID:27380226

  7. Gene silencing activity of siRNA polyplexes based on biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Varkouhi, Amir K; Lammers, Twan; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Steenbergen, Mies J; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert

    2011-04-01

    Cationic polymers are used as non-viral vectors for nucleic acid delivery. In this study, two biodegradable cationic polymers were evaluated for the purpose of siRNA delivery: pHPMA-MPPM (poly((2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide 1-methyl-2-piperidine methanol)) and TMC (O-methyl-free N,N,N-trimethylated chitosan). The silencing activity and the cellular cytotoxicity of polyplexes based on these biodegradable polymers were compared with those based on non-biodegradable pDMAEMA (poly(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) and PEI (polyethylenimine) and with the regularly used lipidic transfection agent Lipofectamine. To promote endosomal escape, either the endosomolytic peptide diINF-7 was added to the formulations or photochemical internalization (PCI) was applied. Incubation of H1299 human lung cancer cells expressing firefly luciferase with polyplexes based on pHPMA-MPPM and TMC showed 30-40% silencing efficiency. This silencing activity was equal to or better than that obtained with the standard transfectants. Under all experimental conditions tested, the cytotoxicity of the biodegradable polymers was low. The application of PCI, as well as the addition of the diINF-7 peptide to the formulations increased their silencing activity up to 70-80%. This demonstrates that pHPMA-MPPM- and TMC-based polyplexes benefit substantially from endosomal escape enhancement. Importantly, the polyplexes retained their silencing activity in the presence of serum, and they showed low cytotoxicity. These biodegradable vectors are therefore attractive systems for further in vivo evaluations. PMID:21118719

  8. The Daiokanzoto (TJ-84) Kampo Formulation Reduces Virulence Factor Gene Expression in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Possesses Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Protease Activities.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Larente, Jade; Azelmat, Jabrane; Yoshioka, Masami; Hinode, Daisuke; Grenier, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Kampo formulations used in Japan to treat a wide variety of diseases and to promote health are composed of mixtures of crude extracts from the roots, bark, leaves, and rhizomes of a number of herbs. The present study was aimed at identifying the beneficial biological properties of Daiokanzoto (TJ-84), a Kampo formulation composed of crude extracts of Rhubarb rhizomes and Glycyrrhiza roots, with a view to using it as a potential treatment for periodontal disease. Daiokanzoto dose-dependently inhibited the expression of major Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence factors involved in host colonization and tissue destruction. More specifically, Daiokanzoto reduced the expression of the fimA, hagA, rgpA, and rgpB genes, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The U937-3xκB-LUC monocyte cell line transfected with a luciferase reporter gene was used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of Daiokanzoto. Daiokanzoto attenuated the P. gingivalis-mediated activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. It also reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and CXCL8) by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated oral epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts. Lastly, Daiokanzoto, dose-dependently inhibited the catalytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (-1 and -9). In conclusion, the present study provided evidence that Daiokanzoto shows potential for treating and/or preventing periodontal disease. The ability of this Kampo formulation to act on both bacterial pathogens and the host inflammatory response, the two etiological components of periodontal disease, is of high therapeutic interest. PMID:26859747

  9. The Daiokanzoto (TJ-84) Kampo Formulation Reduces Virulence Factor Gene Expression in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Possesses Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Protease Activities

    PubMed Central

    Fournier-Larente, Jade; Azelmat, Jabrane; Yoshioka, Masami; Hinode, Daisuke; Grenier, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Kampo formulations used in Japan to treat a wide variety of diseases and to promote health are composed of mixtures of crude extracts from the roots, bark, leaves, and rhizomes of a number of herbs. The present study was aimed at identifying the beneficial biological properties of Daiokanzoto (TJ-84), a Kampo formulation composed of crude extracts of Rhubarb rhizomes and Glycyrrhiza roots, with a view to using it as a potential treatment for periodontal disease. Daiokanzoto dose-dependently inhibited the expression of major Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence factors involved in host colonization and tissue destruction. More specifically, Daiokanzoto reduced the expression of the fimA, hagA, rgpA, and rgpB genes, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The U937-3xκB-LUC monocyte cell line transfected with a luciferase reporter gene was used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of Daiokanzoto. Daiokanzoto attenuated the P. gingivalis-mediated activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. It also reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and CXCL8) by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated oral epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts. Lastly, Daiokanzoto, dose-dependently inhibited the catalytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (-1 and -9). In conclusion, the present study provided evidence that Daiokanzoto shows potential for treating and/or preventing periodontal disease. The ability of this Kampo formulation to act on both bacterial pathogens and the host inflammatory response, the two etiological components of periodontal disease, is of high therapeutic interest. PMID:26859747

  10. Identification of an oxygen-responsive element in the 5'-flanking sequence of the rat cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-1 gene, modulating its glucagon-dependent activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bratke, J; Kietzmann, T; Jungermann, K

    1999-01-01

    The glucagon-stimulated transcription of the cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-1 (PCK1) gene is mediated by cAMP and positively modulated by oxygen in primary hepatocytes. Rat hepatocytes were transfected with constructs containing the first 2500, 493 or 281 bp of the PCK1 5'-flanking region in front of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene. With all three constructs glucagon induced CAT activity with decreasing efficiency maximally under arterial pO2 and to about 65% under venous pO2. Rat hepatocytes were then transfected with constructs containing the first 493 bp of the PCK1 5'-flanking region in front of the luciferase (LUC) reporter gene, which were block-mutated at the CRE1 (cAMP-response element-1; -93/-86), putative CRE2 (-146/-139), promoter element (P) 1 (-118/-104), P2 (-193/-181) or P4 (-291/-273) sites. Glucagon induced LUC activity strongly when the P1 and P2 sites were mutated and weakly when the P4 site was mutated; induction of the P1, P2 and P4 mutants was positively modulated by the pO2. Glucagon also induced LUC activity strongly when the putative CRE2 site was altered; however, induction of the CRE2 mutant was not modulated by the pO2. Glucagon did not induce LUC activity when the CRE1 site was modified. These experiments suggested that the CRE1 but not the putative CRE2 was an essential site necessary for the cAMP-mediated PCK1 gene activation by glucagon and that the putative CRE2 site was involved in the oxygen-dependent modulation of PCK1 gene activation. To confirm these conclusions rat hepatocytes were transfected with simian virus 40 (SV40)-promoter-driven LUC-gene constructs containing three CRE1 sequences (-95/-84), three CRE2 sequences (-148/-137) or three CRE1 sequences plus two CRE2 sequences of the PCK1 gene in front of the SV40 promoter. Glucagon induced LUC activity markedly when the CRE1, but not when the CRE2, sites were in front of the SV40-LUC gene; however, induction of the (CRE1)3SV40-LUC

  11. Identification of the Drosophila Mes4 gene as a novel target of the transcription factor DREF

    SciTech Connect

    Suyari, Osamu; Ida, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Kato, Yasuko; Hashimoto, Reina; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2009-05-01

    The Mes4 gene has been identified as one of the maternal Dorsal target genes in Drosophila. In the present study, we found a DNA replication-related element (DRE, 5'-TATCGATA) in the Mes4 promoter recognized by the DRE-binding factor (DREF). Luciferase transient expression assays in S2 cells using Mes4 promoter-luciferase fusion plasmids revealed that the DRE sequence is essential for Mes4 promoter activity. Requirement of DRE for Mes4 promoter activity was further confirmed by anti-{beta}-galactosidase antibody-staining of various tissues from transgenic flies carrying Mes4 promoter-lacZ fusion genes. Furthermore, wild type Mes4 promoter activity was decreased by 40% in DREF-depleted S2 cells. These results indicate that DREF positively regulates Mes4 gene expression. Band mobility shift analyses using Kc cell nuclear extracts further indicated that the DRE sequence in the Mes4 promoter is especially important for binding to DREF. Moreover, specific binding of DREF to the involved genomic region could be demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using anti-DREF antibodies. These results, taken together, indicate that the DRE/DREF system activates transcription of the Mes4 gene. In addition, knockdown of the Mes4 gene in wing imaginal discs using the GAL4-UAS system caused an atrophied wing phenotype, suggesting that Mes4 is required for wing morphogenesis.

  12. Cohesin and Polycomb Proteins Functionally Interact to Control Transcription at Silenced and Active Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Cheri A.; Misulovin, Ziva; Gause, Maria; Koenig, Amanda; Gohara, David W.; Watson, Audrey; Dorsett, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Cohesin is crucial for proper chromosome segregation but also regulates gene transcription and organism development by poorly understood mechanisms. Using genome-wide assays in Drosophila developing wings and cultured cells, we find that cohesin functionally interacts with Polycomb group (PcG) silencing proteins at both silenced and active genes. Cohesin unexpectedly facilitates binding of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) to many active genes, but their binding is mutually antagonistic at silenced genes. PRC1 depletion decreases phosphorylated RNA polymerase II and mRNA at many active genes but increases them at silenced genes. Depletion of cohesin reduces long-range interactions between Polycomb Response Elements in the invected-engrailed gene complex where it represses transcription. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized role for PRC1 in facilitating productive gene transcription and provide new insights into how cohesin and PRC1 control development. PMID:23818863

  13. Urokinase plasminogen activator gene deficiency inhibits fracture cartilage remodeling.

    PubMed

    Popa, Nicoleta L; Wergedal, Jon E; Lau, K-H William; Mohan, Subburaman; Rundle, Charles H

    2014-03-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates a proteolytic cascade of extracellular matrix degradation that functions in tissue development and tissue repair. The development and remodeling of the skeletal extracellular matrix during wound healing suggests that uPA might regulate bone development and repair. To determine whether uPA functions regulate bone development and repair, we examined the basal skeletal phenotype and endochondral bone fracture repair in uPA-deficient mice. The skeletal phenotype of uPA knockout mice was compared with that of control mice under basal conditions by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-CT analysis, and during femur fracture repair by micro-CT and histological examination of the fracture callus. No effects of uPA gene deficiency were observed in the basal skeletal phenotype of the whole body or the femur. However, uPA gene deficiency resulted in increased fracture callus cartilage abundance during femur fracture repair at 14 days healing. The increase in cartilage corresponded to reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining for osteoclasts in the uPA knockout fracture callus at this time, consistent with impaired osteoclast-mediated remodeling of the fracture cartilage. CD31 staining was reduced in the knockout fracture tissues at this time, suggesting that angiogenesis was also reduced. Osteoclasts also colocalized with CD31 expression in the endothelial cells of the fracture tissues during callus remodeling. These results indicate that uPA promotes remodeling of the fracture cartilage by osteoclasts that are associated with angiogenesis and suggest that uPA promotes angiogenesis and remodeling of the fracture cartilage at this time of bone fracture repair. PMID:23700285

  14. Nuclear Factor-Y is an adipogenic factor that regulates leptin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Dallner, Olof Stefan; Birsoy, Kivanc; Fayzikhodjaeva, Gulya; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Leptin gene expression is highly correlated with cellular lipid content in adipocytes but the transcriptional mechanisms controlling leptin expression in vivo are poorly understood. In this report, we set out to identify cis- and trans-regulatory elements controlling leptin expression. Methods Leptin-BAC luciferase transgenic mice combining with other computational and molecular techniques were used to identify transcription regulatory elements including a CCAAT-binding protein Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y). The function of NF-Y in adipocyte was studied in vitro with 3T3-L1 cells and in vivo with adipocyte-specific knockout of NF-Y. Results Using Leptin-BAC luciferase mice, we showed that DNA sequences between −22 kb and +8.8 kb can confer quantitative expression of a leptin reporter. Computational analysis of sequences and gel shift assays identified a 32 bp sequence (chr6: 28993820–2899385) consisting a CCAAT binding site for Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) and this was confirmed by a ChIP assay in vivo. A deletion of this 32 bp sequence in the −22 kb to +8.8 kb leptin-luciferase BAC reporter completely abrogates luciferase reporter activity in vivo. RNAi mediated knockdown of NF-Y interfered with adipogenesis in vitro and adipocyte-specific knockout of NF-Y in mice reduced expression of leptin and other fat specific genes in vivo. Further analyses of the fat specific NF-Y knockout revealed that these animals develop a moderately severe lipodystrophy that is remediable with leptin therapy. Conclusions These studies advance our understanding of leptin gene expression and show that NF-Y controls the expression of leptin and other adipocyte genes and identifies a new form of lipodystrophy. PMID:25973387

  15. Transcriptome analysis reveals dysregulation of innate immune response genes and neuronal activity-dependent genes in autism

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Simone; Ellis, Shannon E.; Ashar, Foram N.; Moes, Anna; Bader, Joel S.; Zhan, Jianan; West, Andrew B.; Arking, Dan E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of genomic variation associated with autism have suggested the existence of extreme heterogeneity. Large-scale transcriptomics should complement these results to identify core molecular pathways underlying autism. Here we report results from a large-scale RNA sequencing effort, utilizing region-matched autism and control brains to identify neuronal and microglial genes robustly dysregulated in autism cortical brain. Remarkably, we note that a gene expression module corresponding to M2-activation states in microglia is negatively correlated with a differentially expressed neuronal module, implicating dysregulated microglial responses in concert with altered neuronal activity-dependent genes in autism brains. These observations provide pathways and candidate genes that highlight the interplay between innate immunity and neuronal activity in the aetiology of autism. PMID:25494366

  16. Development of a luciferase based viral inhibition assay to evaluate vaccine induced CD8 T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Fernandez-Fernandez, Natalia; Kappes, John C.; Hayes, Peter; Ahmed, Tina; Icyuz, Mert; Edmonds, Tara G.; Bergin, Philip; Anzala, Omu; Hanke, Tomas; Clark, Lorna; Cox, Josephine H.; Cormier, Emmanuel; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Gilmour, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of SIV and HIV specific CD8 T cells has been shown to correlate with control of in vivo replication. Poor correlation between IFN-γ ELISPOT responses and in vivo control of the virus has triggered the development of more relevant assays to assess functional HIV-1 specific CD8 T-cell responses for the evaluation and prioritization of new HIV-1 vaccine candidates. We previously established a viral inhibition assay (VIA) that measures the ability of vaccine-induced CD8 T-cell responses to inhibit viral replication in autologous CD4 T cells. In this assay, viral replication is determined by measuring p24 in the culture supernatant. Here we describe the development of a novel VIA, referred to as IMC LucR VIA that exploits replication-competent HIV-1 infectious molecular clones (IMCs) in which the complete proviral genome is strain-specific and which express the Renilla luciferase (LucR) gene to determine viral growth and inhibition. The introduction of the luciferase readout does provide significant improvement of the read out time. In addition to switching to the LucR read out, changes made to the overall protocol resulted in the miniaturization of the assay from a 48 to a 96-well plate format, which preserved sample and allowed for the introduction of replicates. The overall assay time was reduced from 13 to 8 days. The assay has a high degree of specificity, and the previously observed non-specific background inhibition in cells from HIV-1 negative volunteers has been reduced dramatically. Importantly, we observed an increase in positive responses, indicating an improvement in sensitivity compared to the original VIA. Currently, only a limited number of “whole-genome” IMC-LucR viruses are available and our efforts will focus on expanding the panel to better evaluate anti-viral breadth. Overall, we believe the IMC LucR VIA provides a platform to assess functional CD8 T-cell responses in large-scale clinical trial testing, which will enhance the ability

  17. Functional mapping of a trans-activating gene required for expression of a baculovirus delayed-early gene.

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, L A; Summers, M D

    1986-01-01

    The temporal regulation of an early gene of the baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus was examined. We constructed a plasmid (plasmid 39CAT) in which the bacterial gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was placed under the control of the promoter for the gene for a A. californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus 39,000-dalton protein (39K). A transient expression assay of plasmid 39CAT revealed that the 39K gene was expressed in infected cells but not in uninfected cells, indicating that the 39K gene should be classified as a delayed-early gene. The 39K promoter also efficiently directed the synthesis of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase when the plasmid was cotransfected with viral DNA which had been restricted with several restriction enzymes. To map the location of the gene(s) required for the synthesis of 39K, plasmid 39CAT was cotransfected with purified restriction fragments of A. californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA. Fragments which mapped between 90.7 and 100.8 map units induced plasmid 39CAT. Plasmid pEcoRI-B, containing EcoRI fragment B (90 to 100 map units), activated plasmid 39CAT. Functional mapping of plasmid pEcoRI-B indicated that the essential region was located between 95.0 and 97.5 map units. The 5' end of this gene was mapped, and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was inserted under the control of its promoter. Transient assay experiments indicated that the trans-acting regulatory gene was expressed in uninfected cells and is therefore an immediate-early gene. This gene was named IE-1. Images PMID:3944847

  18. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  19. Impact of Site-Directed Mutant Luciferase on Quantitative Green and Orange/Red Emission Intensities in Firefly Bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Terakado, Kanako; Nakatsu, Toru

    2013-08-01

    Firefly bioluminescence has attracted great interest because of its high quantum yield and intriguing modifiable colours. Modifications to the structure of the enzyme luciferase can change the emission colour of firefly bioluminescence, and the mechanism of the colour change has been intensively studied by biochemists, structural biologists, optical physicists, and quantum-chemistry theorists. Here, we report on the quantitative spectra of firefly bioluminescence catalysed by wild-type and four site-directed mutant luciferases. While the mutation caused different emission spectra, the spectra differed only in the intensity of the green component (λmax ~ 560 nm). In contrast, the orange (λmax ~ 610 nm) and red (λmax ~ 650 nm) components present in all the spectra were almost unaffected by the modifications to the luciferases and changes in pH. Our results reveal that the intensity of the green component is the unique factor that is influenced by the luciferase structure and other reaction conditions.

  20. Thermostable luciferase from Luciola cruciate for imaging of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotubes carrying doxorubicin using in vivo imaging system.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Ramy; Eita, Mohamed; Barrefelt, Asa; Ye, Fei; Jain, Himanshu; Fares, Mona; Lundin, Arne; Crona, Mikael; Abu-Salah, Khalid; Muhammed, Mamoun; Hassan, Moustapha

    2013-04-10

    In the present study, we introduce a novel method for in vivo imaging of the biodistribution of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) labeled with recombinant thermo-stable Luciola cruciata luciferase (LcL). In addition, we highlight a new application for green fluorescent proteins in which they are utilized as imaging moieties for SWNTs. Carbon nanotubes show great positive potential compared to other drug nanocarriers with respect to loading capacity, cell internalization, and biodegradability. We have also studied the effect of binding mode (chemical conjugation and physical adsorption) on the chemiluminescence activity, decay rate, and half-life. We have shown that through proper chemical conjugation of LcL to CNTs, LcL remained biologically active for the catalysis of d-luciferin in the presence of ATP to release detectable amounts of photons for in vivo imaging. Chemiluminescence of LcL allows imaging of CNTs and their cargo in nonsuperficial locations at an organ resolution with no need of an excitation source. Loading LcL-CNTs with the antitumor antibiotic doxorubicin did not alter their biological activity for imaging. In vivo imaging of LcL-CNTs has been carried out using "IVIS spectrum" showing the uptake of LcL-CNTs by different organs in mice. We believe that the LcL-CNT system is an advanced powerful tool for in vivo imaging and therefore a step toward the advancement of the nanomedicine field. PMID:23520995

  1. In-vivo quantification of primary microRNA processing by Drosha with a luciferase based system

    SciTech Connect

    Allegra, Danilo; Mertens, Daniel

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Posttranscriptional regulation of miRNA processing is difficult to quantify. {yields} Our in-vivo processing assay can quantify Drosha cleavage in live cells. {yields} It is based on luciferase reporters fused with pri-miRNAs. {yields} The assay validates the processing defect caused by a mutation in pri-16-1. {yields} It is a sensitive method to quantify pri-miRNA cleavage by Drosha in live cells. -- Abstract: The RNAse III Drosha is responsible for the first step of microRNA maturation, the cleavage of primary miRNA to produce the precursor miRNA. Processing by Drosha is finely regulated and influences the amount of mature microRNA in a cell. We describe in the present work a method to quantify Drosha processing activity in-vivo, which is applicable to any microRNA. With respect to other methods for measuring Drosha activity, our system is faster and scalable, can be used with any cellular system and does not require cell sorting or use of radioactive isotopes. This system is useful to study regulation of Drosha activity in physiological and pathological conditions.

  2. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist, AZD4619, induces alanine aminotransferase-1 gene and protein expression in human, but not in rat hepatocytes: Correlation with serum ALT levels.

    PubMed

    Thulin, Petra; Bamberg, Krister; Buler, Marcin; Dahl, Björn; Glinghammar, Björn

    2016-09-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in serum is the standard biomarker for liver injury. We have previously described a clinical trial with a novel selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist (AZD4619), which unexpectedly caused increased serum levels of ALT in treated individuals without any other evidence of liver injury. We pinpointed a plausible mechanism through which AZD4619 could increase serum ALT levels; namely through the PPARα-specific activation of the human ALT1 gene at the transcriptional level. In the present study, we present data from the preceding rat toxicity study, demonstrating that AZD4619 had no effect on rat serum ALT activity levels, and further experiments were performed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for this species-related difference. Our results revealed that AZD4619 increased ALT1 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner in human, but not in rat primary hepatocytes. Cloning of the human and rat ALT1 promoters into luciferase vectors confirmed that AZD4619 induced only the human, but not the rat ALT1 gene promoter in a dose-dependent manner. In PPARα-GAL4 reporter gene assays, AZD4619 was >100-fold more potent on the human vs. rat PPARα levels, explaining the differences in induction of the ALT1 gene between the species at the concentration range tested. These data demonstrate the usefulness of the human and rat ALT1 reporter gene assays for testing future drug candidates at the preclinical stage. In drug discovery projects, these assays elucidate whether elevations in ALT levels observed in vivo or in the clinic are due to metabolic effects rather than a toxic event in the liver. PMID:27430334

  3. Comparison of gene activation by two TAL effectors from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis reveals candidate host susceptibility genes in cassava.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Megan; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2016-08-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam) employs transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors to promote bacterial growth and symptom formation during infection of cassava. TAL effectors are secreted via the bacterial type III secretion system into plant cells, where they are directed to the nucleus, bind DNA in plant promoters and activate the expression of downstream genes. The DNA-binding activity of TAL effectors is carried out by a central domain which contains a series of repeat variable diresidues (RVDs) that dictate the sequence of bound nucleotides. TAL14Xam668 promotes virulence in Xam strain Xam668 and has been shown to activate multiple cassava genes. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to identify the full target repertoire of TAL14Xam668 in cassava, which includes over 50 genes. A subset of highly up-regulated genes was tested for activation by TAL14CIO151 from Xam strain CIO151. Although TAL14CIO151 and TAL14Xam668 differ by only a single RVD, they display differential activation of gene targets. TAL14CIO151 complements the TAL14Xam668 mutant defect, implying that shared target genes are important for TAL14Xam668 -mediated disease susceptibility. Complementation with closely related TAL effectors is a novel approach to the narrowing down of biologically relevant susceptibility genes of TAL effectors with multiple targets. This study provides an example of how TAL effector target activation by two strains within a single species of Xanthomonas can be dramatically affected by a small change in RVD-nucleotide affinity at a single site, and reflects the parameters of RVD-nucleotide interaction determined using designer TAL effectors in transient systems. PMID:26575863

  4. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  5. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  6. Characterization of four esterase genes and esterase activity from the gut of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four esterase genes and general esterase activity were investigated in the gut of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes. Two genes (RfEst1 and RfEst2) share significant translated identity with a number of insect JH esterases. The two remaining genes (RfEst3 and RfEst4) apparently code for much shorte...

  7. A simple Gateway-assisted construction system of TALEN genes for plant genome editing.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Hiroaki; Onodera, Hitomi; Kihira, Miho; Aoki, Hiromi; Matsuzaki, Hikaru; Shimada, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    TALEN is an artificial nuclease being applied for sequence-specific genome editing. For the plant genome editing, a pair of TALEN genes is expressed in the cells, and a binary plasmid for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation should be assembled. We developed a novel procedure using the Gateway-assisted plasmids, named Emerald-Gateway TALEN system. We constructed entry vectors, pPlat plasmids, for construction of a desired TALEN gene using Platinum Gate TALEN kit. We also created destination plasmid, pDual35SGw1301, which allowed two TALEN genes to both DNA strands to recruit using Gateway technology. Resultant TALEN genes were evaluated by the single-strand annealing (SSA) assay in E. coli cells. By this assay, the TALENs recognized the corresponding targets in the divided luciferase gene, and induced a specific recombination to generate an active luciferase gene. Using the TALEN genes constructed, we created a transformant potato cells in which a site-specific mutation occurred at the target site of the GBSS gene. This suggested that our system worked effectively and was applicable as a convenient tool for the plant genome editing. PMID:27452606

  8. A simple Gateway-assisted construction system of TALEN genes for plant genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Kusano, Hiroaki; Onodera, Hitomi; Kihira, Miho; Aoki, Hiromi; Matsuzaki, Hikaru; Shimada, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    TALEN is an artificial nuclease being applied for sequence-specific genome editing. For the plant genome editing, a pair of TALEN genes is expressed in the cells, and a binary plasmid for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation should be assembled. We developed a novel procedure using the Gateway-assisted plasmids, named Emerald–Gateway TALEN system. We constructed entry vectors, pPlat plasmids, for construction of a desired TALEN gene using Platinum Gate TALEN kit. We also created destination plasmid, pDual35SGw1301, which allowed two TALEN genes to both DNA strands to recruit using Gateway technology. Resultant TALEN genes were evaluated by the single-strand annealing (SSA) assay in E. coli cells. By this assay, the TALENs recognized the corresponding targets in the divided luciferase gene, and induced a specific recombination to generate an active luciferase gene. Using the TALEN genes constructed, we created a transformant potato cells in which a site-specific mutation occurred at the target site of the GBSS gene. This suggested that our system worked effectively and was applicable as a convenient tool for the plant genome editing. PMID:27452606

  9. Chromatin remodeling during Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 gene activation.

    PubMed

    Verdone, L; Camilloni, G; Di Mauro, E; Caserta, M

    1996-05-01

    We have analyzed at both low and high resolution the distribution of nucleosomes over the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 promoter region in its chromosomal location, both under repressing (high-glucose) conditions and during derepression. Enzymatic treatments (micrococcal nuclease and restriction endonucleases) were used to probe the in vivo chromatin structure during ADH2 gene activation. Under glucose-repressed conditions, the ADH2 promoter was bound by a precise array of nucleosomes, the principal ones positioned at the RNA initiation sites (nucleosome +1), at the TATA box (nucleosome -1), and upstream of the ADR1-binding site (UAS1) (nucleosome -2). The UAS1 sequence and the adjacent UAS2 sequence constituted a nucleosome-free region. Nucleosomes -1 and +1 were destabilized soon after depletion of glucose and had become so before the appearance of ADH2 mRNA. When the transcription rate was high, nucleosomes -2 and +2 also underwent rearrangement. When spheroplasts were prepared from cells grown in minimal medium, detection of this chromatin remodeling required the addition of a small amount of glucose. Cells lacking the ADR1 protein did not display any of these chromatin modifications upon glucose depletion. Since the UAS1 sequence to which Adr1p binds is located immediately upstream of nucleosome -1, Adr1p is presumably required for destabilization of this nucleosome and for aiding the TATA-box accessibility to the transcription machinery. PMID:8628264

  10. Functional activity of the porcine Gnrhr2 gene promoter in testis-derived cells is partially conferred by nuclear factor-κB, specificity protein 1 and 3 (SP1/3) and overlapping early growth response 1/SP1/3 binding sites.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Vanessa M; Wiarda-Bell, Jocelyn R; Desaulniers, Amy T; Cederberg, Rebecca A; White, Brett R

    2016-08-10

    Unlike the classical gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH1), the second mammalian isoform (GnRH2) is ubiquitously expressed, suggesting a divergent function. Indeed, we demonstrated that GnRH2 governs LH-independent testosterone secretion in porcine testes via interaction with its receptor (GnRHR2) on Leydig cells. Transient transfections with luciferase reporter vectors containing 3009bp of 5' flanking sequence for the porcine Gnrhr2 gene (-3009pGL3) revealed promoter activity in all 15 cell lines examined, including swine testis-derived (ST) cells. Therefore, ST cells were utilized to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation of the porcine Gnrhr2 gene in the testis. Reporter plasmids containing progressive 5' deletions of the Gnrhr2 promoter indicated that the -708/-490 region contained elements critical to promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) with radiolabeled oligonucleotides spanning the -708/-490bp region and ST nuclear extracts, identified specific binding complexes for the -513/-490, -591/-571 and -606/-581bp segments of promoter. Antibody addition to EMSAs indicated that the p65 and p52 subunits of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) comprised the specific complex bound to the oligonucleotide probe for the -513/-490bp promoter region, specificity protein (SP) 1 and 3 bound the -591/-571bp probe and early growth response 1 (EGR1), SP1 and SP3 bound the -606/-581 radiolabeled oligonucleotide. Transient transfections with vectors containing mutations of the NF-κB (-499/-493), SP1/3 (-582/-575) or overlapping EGR1/SP1/3 (-597/-587) binding sites reduced luciferase activity by 26%, 61% and 56%, respectively (P<0.05). Thus, NF-κB, SP1/3 and overlapping EGR1/SP1/3 binding sites are critical to expression of the porcine Gnrhr2 gene in ST cells. PMID:27134031

  11. Regions flanking exon 1 regulate constitutive expression of the human antithrombin gene.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rachubinski, F A; Weiner, J H; Blajchman, M A

    1996-11-15

    We have identified cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors that regulate constitutive expression of the human antithrombin gene. The activity of the sequences flanking the first exon of the gene was investigated using a luciferase-based reporter assay in transiently transfected HepG2, COS1, BSC40, and HeLa cells. Deletion analysis allowed the mapping of two elements able to promote antithrombin gene transcription in HepG2 and COS1 cells. The first element is located upstream of the first exon (-150/+68 nucleotides). The second element is in the first intervening sequence (+300/+700 nucleotides) and functions in an orientation opposite to that of the first. Footprint analysis showed three protected areas in the 5' upstream element at -92/-68 (element A), -14/+37 (element B), and -126/-100 nucleotides (element C). These elements acted as enhancers in luciferase reporter assays. Gel retardation analysis demonstrated that two liver-enriched transcription factors, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPa), bound to the 5' upstream element. HNF4 bound to elements A and C, whereas C/EBPa bound to element B. Element A also interacted with the ubiquitous nuclear hormone receptors chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor 1 (COUP-TF1), thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRalpha), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha(PPARalpha), and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha). In HepG2 and BSC40 cells, HNF4, C/EBPalpha, and RXRalpha activated luciferase expression from a reporter construct containing the 5'-upstream minimal antithrombin gene promoter, while COUP-TF1, TRalpha, and HNF3 (alpha or beta) repressed such expression. Our results show that constitutive expression of the human antithrombin gene depends in part upon the interplay of these transcription factors and suggest that signaling pathways regulated by these factors can modulate antithrombin gene transcription. PMID:8910619

  12. HOS1, a genetic locus involved in cold-responsive gene expression in arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Ishitani, M; Xiong, L; Lee, H; Stevenson, B; Zhu, J K

    1998-01-01

    Low-temperature stress induces the expression of a variety of genes in plants. However, the signal transduction pathway(s) that activates gene expression under cold stress is poorly understood. Mutants defective in cold signaling should facilitate molecular analysis of plant responses to low temperature and eventually lead to the identification and cloning of a cold stress receptor(s) and intracellular signaling components. In this study, we characterize a plant mutant affected in its response to low temperatures. The Arabidopsis hos1-1 mutation identified by luciferase imaging causes superinduction of cold-responsive genes, such as RD29A, COR47, COR15A, KIN1, and ADH. Although these genes are also induced by abscisic acid, high salt, or polyethylene glycol in addition to cold, the hos1-1 mutation only enhances their expression under cold stress. Genetic analysis revealed that hos1-1 is a single recessive mutation in a nuclear gene. Our studies using the firefly luciferase reporter gene under the control of the cold-responsive RD29A promoter have indicated that cold-responsive genes can be induced by temperatures as high as 19 degrees C in hos1-1 plants. In contrast, wild-type plants do not express the luciferase reporter at 10 degrees C or higher. Compared with the wild type, hos1-1 plants are l ess cold hardy. Nonetheless, after 2 days of cold acclimation, hos1-1 plants acquired the same degree of freezing tolerance as did the wild type. The hos1-1 plants flowered earlier than did the wild-type plants and appeared constitutively vernalized. Taken together, our findings show that the HOS1 locus is an important negative regulator of cold signal transduction in plant cells and that it plays critical roles in controlling gene expression under cold stress, freezing tolerance, and flowering time. PMID:9668134

  13. Measurements of serum glucose using the luciferin/Luciferase system and a liquid scintillation spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Idahl, L.A.; Sandstroem, P.E.; Sehlin, J.

    1986-05-15

    A single-step assay for serum glucose measurements is described. The assay is based on the phosphorylation of D-glucose by glucokinase and the measurement of ATP consumption by firefly luciferase. The luminescence is recorded in an ordinary liquid scintillation spectrometer. The use of stable reagents and a stable final signal (light emission) makes it possible to analyze a large number of samples in each assay run. The assay is of particular value when repeated serum glucose determinations are performed on samples from small laboratory animals.

  14. NanoLuc Luciferase – A Multifunctional Tool for High Throughput Antibody Screening

    PubMed Central

    Boute, Nicolas; Lowe, Peter; Berger, Sven; Malissard, Martine; Robert, Alain; Tesar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Based on the recent development of NanoLuc luciferase (Nluc), a small (19 kDa), highly stable, ATP independent, bioluminescent protein, an extremely robust and ultra high sensitivity screening system has been developed whereby primary hits of therapeutic antibodies and antibody fragments could be characterized and quantified without purification. This system is very versatile allowing cellular and solid phase ELISA but also homogeneous BRET based screening assays, relative affinity determinations with competition ELISA and direct Western blotting. The new Nluc protein fusion represents a “swiss army knife solution” for today and future high throughput antibody drug screenings. PMID:26924984

  15. NanoLuc Luciferase - A Multifunctional Tool for High Throughput Antibody Screening.

    PubMed

    Boute, Nicolas; Lowe, Peter; Berger, Sven; Malissard, Martine; Robert, Alain; Tesar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Based on the recent development of NanoLuc luciferase (Nluc), a small (19 kDa), highly stable, ATP independent, bioluminescent protein, an extremely robust and ultra high sensitivity screening system has been developed whereby primary hits of therapeutic antibodies and antibody fragments could be characterized and quantified without purification. This system is very versatile allowing cellular and solid phase ELISA but also homogeneous BRET based screening assays, relative affinity determinations with competition ELISA and direct Western blotting. The new Nluc protein fusion represents a "swiss army knife solution" for today and future high throughput antibody drug screenings. PMID:26924984

  16. Activation tag screening to identify novel genes for trichothecene resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of our research is to identify plant genes which enhance trichothecene resistance and, ultimately, Fusarium Head Blight resistance in wheat and barley. We are taking a two pronged approach using Arabidopsis to identify plant genes which confer resistance to trichothecenes. The first approac...

  17. Functional Characterization of a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in the 3' Untranslated Region of Sheep DLX3 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Enguang; Zhang, Zhiwei; Qiao, Shupei; Yang, Hua; Yan, Xiaohong; Li, Hui; Wang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    The Distal-less 3 (homeobox protein DLX-3), a transcription factor, is critical for the development of hair follicle and hair formation and regeneration. We previously identified and found that four SNPs (c. *118T>C, c. *228T>C, c. *688A>G and c. *1,038_1,039 insC) in 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of sheep DLX3 were in high linkage disequilibrium with each other and significantly associated with wool crimp (P<0.05), however, the underlying mechanisms by which these SNPs affect the wool crimp remains unknown. In the present study, we performed association analysis between these four identified SNPs and DLX3 gene expression in sheep skin using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The results showed that these SNPs were significantly associated with sheep skin DLX3 mRNA expression levels. Then, we constructed DLX3 3′UTR luciferase reporters and validated the association. The reporter assays showed that the three major haplotypes, derived from the four SNPs, had significantly different effects on luciferase reporter activity and the four SNPs also had significantly different allelic effects on the luciferase reporter activity (p < 0.05). Bioinformatics analysis showed that the SNP (c. *1,038_1,039 insC) was located within a potential miR-188 binding site of the 3′UTR of sheep DLX3 mRNA. This SNP may affect miR-188-mediated DLX3 gene expression and result in phenotypic variation. To test the hypothesis, we investigated the effects of miR-188 mimic and inhibitor on the activity of the DLX3 3′UTR luciferase reporter with different SNP alleles. The results showed that in both sheep fetal fibroblasts (SFFs) and human HaCaT cells, miR-188 mimic could significantly decrease the allele D (deletion) luciferase reporter activity (p < 0.05), but miR-188 inhibitor could increased the reporter activitiy. However, neither miR-188 mimc nor inhibitor could influence the allele I (insertion) reporter activity. In addition, transfection of miR-188 mimic dramatically decreased the

  18. Functional Characterization of a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in the 3' Untranslated Region of Sheep DLX3 Gene.

    PubMed

    Rong, Enguang; Zhang, Zhiwei; Qiao, Shupei; Yang, Hua; Yan, Xiaohong; Li, Hui; Wang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    The Distal-less 3 (homeobox protein DLX-3), a transcription factor, is critical for the development of hair follicle and hair formation and regeneration. We previously identified and found that four SNPs (c. *118T>C, c. *228T>C, c. *688A>G and c. *1,038_1,039 insC) in 3' untranslated region (UTR) of sheep DLX3 were in high linkage disequilibrium with each other and significantly associated with wool crimp (P<0.05), however, the underlying mechanisms by which these SNPs affect the wool crimp remains unknown. In the present study, we performed association analysis between these four identified SNPs and DLX3 gene expression in sheep skin using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The results showed that these SNPs were significantly associated with sheep skin DLX3 mRNA expression levels. Then, we constructed DLX3 3'UTR luciferase reporters and validated the association. The reporter assays showed that the three major haplotypes, derived from the four SNPs, had significantly different effects on luciferase reporter activity and the four SNPs also had significantly different allelic effects on the luciferase reporter activity (p < 0.05). Bioinformatics analysis showed that the SNP (c. *1,038_1,039 insC) was located within a potential miR-188 binding site of the 3'UTR of sheep DLX3 mRNA. This SNP may affect miR-188-mediated DLX3 gene expression and result in phenotypic variation. To test the hypothesis, we investigated the effects of miR-188 mimic and inhibitor on the activity of the DLX3 3'UTR luciferase reporter with different SNP alleles. The results showed that in both sheep fetal fibroblasts (SFFs) and human HaCaT cells, miR-188 mimic could significantly decrease the allele D (deletion) luciferase reporter activity (p < 0.05), but miR-188 inhibitor could increased the reporter activitiy. However, neither miR-188 mimc nor inhibitor could influence the allele I (insertion) reporter activity. In addition, transfection of miR-188 mimic dramatically decreased the endogenous

  19. A 24-base-pair sequence 3' to the human erythropoietin gene contains a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Madan, A; Curtin, P T

    1993-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis increases in response to hypoxia. The hepatoma cell line Hep 3B produces low basal levels of Epo mRNA which increase markedly with hypoxia. To define the sequences necessary for this response, we linked fragments of the human Epo gene to a luciferase vector, introduced these plasmids into Hep 3B cells and assayed for luciferase activity after growth in 1% or 21% oxygen. A 621-bp Epo promoter fragment resulted in a 2.4-fold increase in luciferase activity with hypoxia. We tested several Epo gene fragments upstream of this Epo promoter fragment and found that a 613-bp Bgl II-Pvu II 3' fragment had a 10-fold increase in activity with hypoxia regardless of orientation. This fragment had a similar level of activity when linked to a simian virus 40 promoter. Portions of this fragment retained activity, including a 38-bp Apa I-Taq I fragment that had a 17-fold increase in activity with hypoxia. Deletion of nt 4-13 or 19-28 from this 38-bp fragment resulted in a loss of activity. The 24-bp upstream portion of the 38-bp fragment showed an 8-fold increase in activity with hypoxia. However, deletion of nt 19-24 or mutagenesis of nt 21 or 22 in this 24-bp fragment resulted in loss of activity. Our studies indicate that the transcriptional response of the human Epo gene to hypoxia is mediated in part by promoter sequences and to a greater degree by an enhancer element located in a 24-bp portion of the 3' flanking sequence of the gene. PMID:8387202

  20. Correlation between upstream human activities and riverine antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Pruden, Amy; Arabi, Mazdak; Storteboom, Heather N

    2012-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance remains a serious and growing human health challenge. The water environment may represent a key dissemination pathway of resistance elements to and from humans. However, quantitative relationships between landscape features and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have not previously been identified. The objective of this study was to examine correlations between ARGs and putative upstream anthropogenic sources in the watershed. sul1 (sulfonamide) and tet(W) (tetracycline) were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in bed and suspended sediment within the South Platte River Basin, which originates from a pristine region in the Rocky Mountains and runs through a gradient of human activities. A geospatial database was constructed to delineate surface water pathways from animal feeding operations, wastewater treatment plants, and fish hatchery and rearing units to river monitoring points. General linear regression models were compared. Riverine sul1 correlated with upstream capacities of animal feeding operations (R(2) = 0.35, p < 0.001) and wastewater treatment plants (R(2) = 0.34, p < 0.001). Weighting for the inverse distances from animal feeding operations along transport pathways strengthened the observed correlations (R(2) = 0.60-0.64, p < 0.001), suggesting the importance of these pathways in ARG dissemination. Correlations were upheld across the four sampling events during the year, and averaging sul1 measurements in bed and suspended sediments over all events yielded the strongest correlation (R(2) = 0.92, p < 0.001). Conversely, a significant relationship with landscape features was not evident for tet(W), which, in contrast to sul1, is broadly distributed in the pristine region and also relatively more prevalent in animal feeding operation lagoons. The findings highlight the need to focus attention on quantifying the contribution of water pathways to the antibiotic resistance disease burden in humans and offer insight

  1. Identification and characterization of the activation domain of Ifh1, an activator of model TATA-less genes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Peipei; Melcher, Karsten

    2010-01-29

    In yeast, TATA box-binding protein TBP can be delivered to protein-coding genes by direct interactions with two different coactivators: TFIID, which delivers TBP preferentially to TATA-less promoters, and SAGA, which strongly favors TATA box-containing promoters. Transcriptional activators of SAGA-dependant genes are characterized by prototypic acidic activation domains (ADs) that efficiently recruit SAGA, but not TFIID, to UAS elements even in the absence of a core promoter. In contrast to the well-studied acidic activation domains, little is known about the activation domains of activators of TFIID-dependent genes, even though these genes constitute more than 80% of eukaryotic protein-coding genes. The paradigm for TATA-less genes are the ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). Here we have identified the AD of the RPG activator Ifh1p and demonstrate that a minimal Ifh1 AD represents a new class of AD that significantly differs from acidic ADs in amino acid signature, relative coactivator affinities, and core promoter selectivity. PMID:20059977

  2. CD1d induction in solid tumor cells by histone deacetylase inhibitors through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and activation of Sp1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Lin, Pei-Jie; Chen, Ching-Chow

    2012-04-01

    CD1d is a MHC class-like molecule that presents glycolipids to natural killer T (NKT) cells, then regulates innate and adaptive immunity. The regulation of CD1d gene expression in solid tumors is still largely unknown. Gene expression can be epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation and histone acetylation. We found that histone deacetylase inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), induced CD1d gene expression in human (A549 and NCI-H292) and mouse (TC-1 and B16/F0) cancer cells. Simultaneous knockdown of HDAC1 and 2 induced CD1d gene expression. Sp1 inhibitor mitramycin A (MTM) blocked TSA- and SAHA-induced CD1d mRNA expression and Sp1 luciferase activity. Co-transfection of GAL4-Sp1 and Fc-luciferase reporters demonstrated that TSA and SAHA induced Sp1 luciferase reporter activity by enhancing Sp1 transactivation activity. The binding of Sp1 to CD1d promoter and histone H3 acetylation on Sp1 sites were increased by TSA and SAHA. These results indicate that TSA and SAHA could up-regulate CD1d expression in tumor cells through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and activation of Sp1. PMID:22419072

  3. 17beta-estradiol potently suppresses cAMP-induced insulin-like growth factor-I gene activation in primary rat osteoblast cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Ji, C.; Shu, H.; Casinghino, S.; Crothers, K.; Rotwein, P.; Centrella, M.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a key factor in bone remodeling. In osteoblasts, IGF-I synthesis is enhanced by parathyroid hormone and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) through cAMP-activated protein kinase. In rats, estrogen loss after ovariectomy leads to a rise in serum IGF-I and an increase in bone remodeling, both of which are reversed by estrogen treatment. To examine estrogen-dependent regulation of IGF-I expression at the molecular level, primary fetal rat osteoblasts were co-transfected with the estrogen receptor (hER, to ensure active ER expression), and luciferase reporter plasmids controlled by promoter 1 of the rat IGF-I gene (IGF-I P1), used exclusively in these cells. As reported, 1 microM PGE2 increased IGF-I P1 activity by 5-fold. 17beta-Estradiol alone had no effect, but dose-dependently suppressed the stimulatory effect of PGE2 by up to 90% (ED50 approximately 0.1 nM). This occurred within 3 h, persisted for at least 16 h, required ER, and appeared specific, since 17alpha-estradiol was 100-300-fold less effective. By contrast, 17beta-estradiol stimulated estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent reporter expression by up to 10-fold. 17beta-Estradiol also suppressed an IGF-I P1 construct retaining only minimal promoter sequence required for cAMP-dependent gene activation, but did not affect the 60-fold increase in cAMP induced by PGE2. There is no consensus ERE in rat IGF-I P1, suggesting novel downstream interactions in the cAMP pathway that normally enhances IGF-I expression in skeletal cells. To explore this, nuclear extract from osteoblasts expressing hER were examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay using the atypical cAMP response element in IGF-I P1. Estrogen alone did not cause DNA-protein binding, while PGE2 induced a characteristic gel shift complex. Co-treatment with both hormones caused a gel shift greatly diminished in intensity, consistent with their combined effects on IGF-I promoter activity. Nonetheless, hER did not bind

  4. Elevated Gene Copy Number Does Not Always Explain Elevated Amylase Activities in Fishes.

    PubMed

    German, Donovan P; Foti, Dolly M; Heras, Joseph; Amerkhanian, Hooree; Lockwood, Brent L

    2016-01-01

    Amylase activity variation in the guts of several model organisms appears to be explained by amylase gene copy number variation. We tested the hypothesis that amylase gene copy number is always elevated in animals with high amylolytic activity. We therefore sequenced the amylase genes and examined amylase gene copy number in prickleback fishes (family Stichaeidae) with different diets including two species of convergently evolved herbivores with the elevated amylase activity phenotype. We found elevated amylase gene copy number (six haploid copies) with sequence variation among copies in one herbivore (Cebidichthys violaceus) and modest gene copy number (two to three haploid copies) with little sequence variation in the remaining taxa, which included herbivores, omnivores, and a carnivore. Few functional differences in amylase biochemistry were observed, and previous investigations showed similar digestibility among the convergently evolved herbivores with differing amylase genetics. Hence, the phenotype of elevated amylase activity can be achieved by different mechanisms (i.e., elevated expression of fewer genes, increased gene copy number, or expression of more efficient amylase proteins) with similar results. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of available fish amylase genes show mostly lineage-specific duplication events leading to gene copy number variation, although a whole-genome duplication event or chromosomal translocation may have produced multiple amylase copies in the Ostariophysi, again showing multiple routes to the same result. PMID:27327179

  5. Cooperative antiproliferative signaling by aspirin and indole-3-carbinol targets microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene expression and promoter activity in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Poindexter, Kevin M; Matthew, Susanne; Aronchik, Ida; Firestone, Gary L

    2016-04-01

    Antiproliferative signaling of combinations of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural indolecarbinol compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, was investigated in human melanoma cells. Melanoma cell lines with distinct mutational profiles were sensitive to different extents to the antiproliferative response of aspirin, with oncogenic BRAF-expressing G361 cells and wild-type BRAF-expressing SK-MEL-30 cells being the most responsive. I3C triggered a strong proliferative arrest of G361 melanoma cells and caused only a modest decrease in the proliferation of SK-MEL-30 cells. In both cell lines, combinations of aspirin and I3C cooperatively arrested cell proliferation and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, and nearly ablated protein and transcript levels of the melanocyte master regulator microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoform M (MITF-M). In melanoma cells transfected with a -333/+120-bp MITF-M promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid, treatment with aspirin and I3C cooperatively disrupted MITF-M promoter activity, which accounted for the loss of MITF-M gene products. Mutational analysis revealed that the aspirin required the LEF1 binding site, whereas I3C required the BRN2 binding site to mediate their combined and individual effects on MITF-M promoter activity. Consistent with LEF1 being a downstream effector of Wnt signaling, aspirin, but not I3C, downregulated protein levels of the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein-6 and β-catenin and upregulated the β-catenin destruction complex component Axin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that aspirin-regulated Wnt signaling and I3C-targeted signaling pathways converge at distinct DNA elements in the MITF-M promoter to cooperatively disrupt MITF-M expression and melanoma cell proliferation. PMID:27055402

  6. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-01-01

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  7. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-11-30

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  8. EIN3 and ORE1 Accelerate Degreening during Ethylene-Mediated Leaf Senescence by Directly Activating Chlorophyll Catabolic Genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Kai; Li, Zhongpeng; Yang, Zhen; Chen, Junyi; Wu, Shouxin; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Shan; Gao, Jiong; Ren, Guodong; Kuai, Benke; Zhou, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Degreening, caused by chlorophyll degradation, is the most obvious symptom of senescing leaves. Chlorophyll degradation can be triggered by endogenous and environmental cues, and ethylene is one of the major inducers. ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) is a key transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway. It was previously reported that EIN3, miR164, and a NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) transcription factor ORE1/NAC2 constitute a regulatory network mediating leaf senescence. However, how this network regulates chlorophyll degradation at molecular level is not yet elucidated. Here we report a feed-forward regulation of chlorophyll degradation that involves EIN3, ORE1, and chlorophyll catabolic genes (CCGs). Gene expression analysis showed that the induction of three major CCGs, NYE1, NYC1 and PAO, by ethylene was largely repressed in ein3 eil1 double mutant. Dual-luciferase assay revealed that EIN3 significantly enhanced the promoter activity of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Furthermore, Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) indicated that EIN3 could directly bind to NYE1, NYC1 and PAO promoters. These results reveal that EIN3 functions as a positive regulator of CCG expression during ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation. Interestingly, ORE1, a senescence regulator which is a downstream target of EIN3, could also activate the expression of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO by directly binding to their promoters in EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, EIN3 and ORE1 promoted NYE1 and NYC1 transcriptions in an additive manner. These results suggest that ORE1 is also involved in the direct regulation of CCG transcription. Moreover, ORE1 activated the expression of ACS2, a major ethylene biosynthesis gene, and subsequently promoted ethylene production. Collectively, our work reveals that EIN3, ORE1 and CCGs constitute a coherent feed-forward loop involving in the robust regulation of ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation

  9. Transposable Elements Contribute to Activation of Maize Genes in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Makarevitch, Irina; Waters, Amanda J.; West, Patrick T.; Stitzer, Michelle; Hirsch, Candice N.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Springer, Nathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for a large portion of the genome in many eukaryotic species. Despite their reputation as “junk” DNA or genomic parasites deleterious for the host, TEs have complex interactions with host genes and the potential to contribute to regulatory variation in gene expression. It has been hypothesized that TEs and genes they insert near may be transcriptionally activated in response to stress conditions. The maize genome, with many different types of TEs interspersed with genes, provides an ideal system to study the genome-wide influence of TEs on gene regulation. To analyze the magnitude of the TE effect on gene expression response to environmental changes, we profiled gene and TE transcript levels in maize seedlings exposed to a number of abiotic stresses. Many genes exhibit up- or down-regulation in response to these stress conditions. The analysis of TE families inserted within upstream regions of up-regulated genes revealed that between four and nine different TE families are associated with up-regulated gene expression in each of these stress conditions, affecting up to 20% of the genes up-regulated in response to abiotic stress, and as many as 33% of genes that are only expressed in response to stress. Expression of many of these same TE families also responds to the same stress conditions. The analysis of the stress-induced transcripts and proximity of the transposon to the gene suggests that these TEs may provide local enhancer activities that stimulate stress-responsive gene expression. Our data on allelic variation for insertions of several of these TEs show strong correlation between the presence of TE insertions and stress-responsive up-regulation of gene expression. Our findings suggest that TEs provide an important source of allelic regulatory variation in gene response to abiotic stress in maize. PMID:25569788

  10. Inhibition of protein synthesis by the T cell receptor-inducible human TDAG51 gene product.

    PubMed

    Hinz, T; Flindt, S; Marx, A; Janssen, O; Kabelitz, D

    2001-05-01

    The T cell death associated gene 51 (TDAG51) was shown to be required for T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent induction of Fas/Apo1/CD95 expression in a murine T cell hybridoma. Despite the absence of a nuclear localization sequence and a nucleic acid binding domain, it was suggested to be localized in the nucleus and to function as a transcription factor regulating Fas-expression. However, we demonstrate that the human (h)TDAG51 protein is localized in the cytoplasm and the nucleoli, suggesting a role in ribosome biogenesis and/or translation regulation. Indeed, it strongly inhibited translation of a luciferase mRNA in a reticulocyte translational extract. Furthermore, cotransfection of hTDAG51 and the luciferase gene into 293T cells resulted in a strong inhibition of luciferase mRNA translation. Our findings were further strengthened by isolating in a yeast two-hybrid screen three proteins which are involved in the regulation of translation. We speculate that hTDAG51 couples TCR signaling to inhibition of protein biosynthesis in activated T lymphocytes. PMID:11369516

  11. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression. PMID:25691743

  12. CpG-free plasmid expression cassettes for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Ian A; Hyde, Stephen C; Connolly, Mary M; Lawton, Anna E; Xu, Bihui; Nunez-Alonso, Graciela; Davies, Lee A; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Gill, Deborah R

    2012-10-01

    Clinical studies are underway for the aerosol delivery of plasmid DNA complexed with Genzyme Lipid GL67A to the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Plasmid vectors contain several functional elements all of which play a role in determining the efficacy of the final clinical product. To optimise the final plasmid, variations of CpG-free 5' enhancer elements and 3'UTR regions were inserted into a common CpG-free, plasmid backbone containing Luciferase or CFTR transgenes. Plasmids were compared in immortalised cell culture, human airway liquid interface primary cell cultures, and mouse lung models to determine which design directed optimal transgene expression. Following aerosol delivery to mouse lung, plasmids containing the murine CMV enhancer showed higher peak Luciferase activity than the human CMV enhancer, but the human version resulted in persistent expression. In cell culture, the SV40 3'UTR and a novel BGH2 3'UTR exhibited up to 20-fold higher Luciferase activity than the commonly used BGH 3'UTR, but in mouse lung aerosol studies the activity and duration was greater for BGH 3'UTR. Systematic evaluation of each functional component of the plasmid has resulted in an improved design, exhibiting superior levels and duration of lung gene expression. PMID:22727465

  13. Genomic organization, promoter analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for the mouse glial high-affinity glutamate transporter Slc1a3

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kohichi; Maeno-Hikichi, Yuka

    1996-05-01

    The mouse gene encoding glial high-affinity, Na -dependent glutamate transporter Slcla3 (GluT-1/GLAST) was isolated, and its structural organization was characterized. The gene appeared to exist as a single copy in the mouse genome and comprised 10 exons spanning more than 56 kilobases. The transcription initiation sites were mapped to positions 503, which is the first transcriptional point (defined as +1), 128 (+376), and 64 (+440) basepairs upstream of the 3{prime}-end of exon 1 by primer extension. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the mouse GluT-1 gene had a typical CCAAT box and a GC box but lacked at TATA box. These features of the promoter region were characteristic of housekeeping genes. The fusion plasmids containing approximately 4 kb of the 5{prime}-flanking region (-3830 to +450) and the firefly luciferase gene induced a significant luciferase activity when transfected into COS-1 cells. Distal deletion of the 5{prime}-flanking region, leaving 619 bp (-169 to +450), resulted in a marked decrease in luciferase activity in COS-1 cells, suggesting that a CCAAT box, which was positioned at -200, is necessary for the expression of this gene. In situ hybridization localized this gene. In situ hybridization localized this gene to mouse chromosome 15A2. These structural features will lead to a better understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the expression of the GluT-1 gene by ischemia and will also provide a basis for future evolutionary comparisons with other neurotransmitter transporters. 40 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. The rolB gene activates the expression of genes encoding microRNA processing machinery.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Victor P; Veremeichik, Galina N; Shkryl, Yuri N

    2015-04-01

    The rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes renders cells more tolerant of environmental stresses and increases their defense potential. However, these effects, coupled with the developmental abnormalities caused by rolB, have not yet been explained. In rolB-transformed Arabidopsis thaliana cells, we detected a 2.2 to 7-fold increase in the expression of genes encoding core and accessory proteins (DCL1, SE, HYL1, AGO1, TGH, DDL, HEN1, AGO4 and RDR2) of the microRNA processing machinery. However, the rolB gene did not affect the expression of DCL2, DCL3 and HST. The diverse and complex effects of rolB on transformed plant cells may be attributable to changes caused by this gene in particular RNA silencing pathways. PMID:25491479

  15. mef2 activity levels differentially affect gene expression during Drosophila muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Elgar, Stuart J.; Han, Jun; Taylor, Michael V.

    2008-01-01

    Cell differentiation is controlled by key transcription factors, and a major question is how they orchestrate cell-type-specific genetic programs. Muscle differentiation is a well studied paradigm in which the conserved Mef2 transcription factor plays a pivotal role. Recent genomic studies have identified a large number of mef2-regulated target genes with distinct temporal expression profiles during Drosophila myogenesis. However, the question remains as to how a single transcription factor can control such diverse patterns of gene expression. In this study we used a strategy combining genomics and developmental genetics to address this issue in vivo during Drosophila muscle development. We found that groups of mef2-regulated genes respond differently to changes in mef2 activity levels: some require higher levels for their expression than others. Furthermore, this differential requirement correlates with when the gene is first expressed during the muscle differentiation program. Genes that require higher levels are activated later. These results implicate mef2 in the temporal regulation of muscle gene expression, and, consistent with this, we show that changes in mef2 activity levels can alter the start of gene expression in a predictable manner. Together these results indicate that Mef2 is not an all-or-none regulator; rather, its action is more subtle, and levels of its activity are important in the differential expression of muscle genes. This suggests a route by which mef2 can orchestrate the muscle differentiation program and contribute to the stringent regulation of gene expression during myogenesis. PMID:18198273

  16. Characterization of orderly spatiotemporal patterns of clock gene activation in mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Nicholas C.; Tong, Tina Y.; Foley, Duncan; LeSauter, Joseph; Welsh, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Because we can observe oscillation within individual cells and in the tissue as a whole, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) presents a unique system in the mammalian brain for the analysis of individual cells and the networks of which they are a part. While dispersed cells of the SCN sustain circadian oscillations in isolation, they are unstable oscillators that require network interactions for robust cycling. Using cluster analysis to assess bioluminescence in acute brain slices from PERIOD2∷Luciferase (PER2∷LUC) knockin mice, and immunochemistry of SCN from animals harvested at various circadian times, we assessed the spatiotemporal activation patterns of PER2 to explore the emergence of a coherent oscillation at the tissue level. The results indicate that circadian oscillation is characterized by a stable daily cycle of PER2 expression involving orderly serial activation of specific SCN subregions, followed by a silent interval, with substantial symmetry between the left and right side of the SCN. The biological significance of the clusters identified in living slices was confirmed by co-expression of LUC and PER2 in fixed, immunochemically stained brain sections, with the spatiotemporal pattern of LUC expression resembling that revealed in the cluster analysis of bioluminescent slices. We conclude that the precise timing of PER2 expression within individual neurons is dependent on their location within the nucleus, and that small groups of neurons within the SCN give rise to distinctive and identifiable subregions. We propose that serial activation of these subregions is the basis of robustness and resilience of the daily rhythm of the SCN. PMID:21488990

  17. Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that the ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) functions as a transcriptional repressor in diverse microorganisms. Recent studies demonstrated that Fur also functions as a transcriptional activator. In this study we defined Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Analysis of 37 genes which were previously determined to be iron induced and which contained putative Fur boxes revealed that only 30 of these genes exhibited reduced transcription in a gonococcal fur mutant strain. Fur-mediated activation was established by examining binding of Fur to the putative promoter regions of 16 Fur-activated genes with variable binding affinities observed. Only ∼50% of the newly identified Fur-regulated genes bound Fur in vitro, suggesting that additional regulatory circuits exist which may function through a Fur-mediated indirect mechanism. The gonococcal Fur-activated genes displayed variable transcription patterns in a fur mutant strain, which correlated with the position of the Fur box in each (promoter) region. These results suggest that Fur-mediated direct transcriptional activation is fulfilled by multiple mechanisms involving either competing with a repressor or recruiting RNA polymerase. Collectively, our studies have established that gonococcal Fur functions as an activator of gene transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:22287521

  18. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Afsar U.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Hannigan, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  19. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Afsar U; Williams, Bryan R G; Hannigan, Gregory E

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  20. Properties of a Telomerase-Specific Cre/Lox Switch for Transcriptionally Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Bilsland, Alan E.; Fletcher-Monaghan, Aileen; Keith, W. Nicol

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Telomerase expression represents a good target for cancer gene therapy. The promoters of the core telomerase catalytic [human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)] and RNA [human telomerase RNA (hTR)] subunits show selective activity in cancer cells but not in normal cells. This property can be harnessed to express therapeutic transgenes in a wide range of cancer cells. Unfortunately, weak hTR and hTERT promoter activities in some cancer cells could limit the target cell range. Therefore, strategies to enhance telomerase-specific gene therapy are of interest. We constructed a Cre/Lox reporter switch coupling telomerase promoter specificity with Cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter activity, which is generally considered to be constitutively high. In this approach, a telomerase-specific vector expressing Cre recombinase directs excisive recombination on a second vector, removing a transcriptional blockade to CMV-dependent luciferase expression. We tested switch activation in cell lines over a wide range of telomerase promoter activities. However, Cre/Lox–dependent luciferase expression was not enhanced relative to expression using hTR or hTERT promoters directly. Cell-specific differences between telomerase and CMV promoter activities and incomplete sigmoid switch activation were limiting factors. Notably, CMV activity was not always significantly stronger than telomerase promoter activity. Our conclusions provide a general basis for a more rational design of novel recombinase switches in gene therapy. PMID:16331888

  1. Ab initio quantum-chemical study on emission spectra of bioluminescent luciferases by fragment molecular orbital method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagami, Ayumu; Ishibashi, Nobuhiro; Kato, Dai-ichiro; Taguchi, Naoki; Mochizuki, Yuji; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Ito, Mika; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2009-04-01

    Bioluminescence spectra of firefly Luciola cruciata were theoretically analyzed on the basis of the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. The CIS(D) and PR-CIS(Ds) methods were employed for the calculations of emission energies of wild-type and mutant luciferase-oxyluciferin systems, and various multi-layer FMO calculations were performed changing the sizes of the luciferase protein and of the chromophore to which the excited-state calculations were applied. We have thus reproduced the experimental emission energies of wild-type and mutant luciferase systems with good accuracy, which provides useful information concerning the roles of protein environment for the color tuning of the bioluminescence spectra of firefly.

  2. Process and genes for expression and overexpression of active [FeFe] hydrogenases

    DOEpatents

    Seibert, Michael; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Posewitz, Matthew C; Smolinski, Sharon L

    2014-09-16

    A process for expression of active [FeFe]-hydrogenase in a host organism that does not contain either the structural gene(s) for [FeFe]-hydrogenases and/or homologues for the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HyG, comprising: cloning the structural hydrogenase gene(s) and/or the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HydG from an organisms that contains these genes into expression plasmids; transferring the plasmids into an organism that lacks a native [FeFe]-hydrogenase or that has a disrupted [FeFe]-hydrogenase and culturing it aerobically; and inducing anaerobiosis to provide [FeFe] hydrogenase biosynthesis and H?2#191 production.

  3. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W; Baldwin, Ransom L; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  4. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W.; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  5. Effect of cadmium on lake water bacteria as determined by the luciferase assay of adenosine triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Seyfried, P.L.; Horgan, C.B.L.

    1981-10-01

    A firefly luciferase assay of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was developed to measure the toxic effects of cadmium ions on aquatic organisms. Toxicity was monitored using intracellular (I/C) ATP (in micrograms per litre) as well as plate counts (colony-forming units per millilitre). The bacteria, which belonged mainly to the families Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae, exhibited varying degrees of resistance to up to 100 ppm cadmium when grown in a glucose-salts medium at pH 6.8. Among the organisms tested, cadmium resistance decreased in the following order: Pseudomonas vesicularis > P. aeruginosa > Enterobacter sp. > P. fluorescens > Chromobacter sp. > Serratia sp. A rise in the pH of the growth medium from 5 to 7 resulted in increased toxicity of cadmium.

  6. A real-time kinetic study of luciferase inactivation by pulsed ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, D.H.; Gould, J.M.; Patterson, L.K.

    1982-06-01

    The real-time kinetics of radiation-induced inactivation of the luminescent firefly luciferase-luciferin system were investigated. A single, microsecond pulse from a Van de Graaff accelerator delivered to the system is sufficient to decrease the luminescence by over 60%. This decrease exhibits exponential behavior and has a half-time of 46 +/- 6 msec. In both steady-state and pulsed studies, the dose dependence of the inactivation is independent of the dose rate. Likewise, the decay kinetics are independent of the dose per pulse. These studies suggest that the enzyme is altered in a way that inteferes with the initial steps of catalysis without affecting the subsequent steps which lead to light emission.

  7. Individual subunits of bacterial luciferase are molten globules and interact with molecular chaperones.

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, G C; Beckers, C J; Baase, W A; Dahlquist, F W

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the assembly of a large heterodimeric protein, bacterial luciferase, by mixing purified subunits expressed separately in bacteria. The individual subunits alpha and beta contain much (66% and 50%, respectively) of the alpha-helix content of the native heterodimer as measured by circular dichroism, yet the alpha subunit lacks observable tertiary structure as measured by NMR. These results are consistent with the alpha subunit existing in a molten globule or collapsed form prior to assembly. The molecular chaperone GroEL binds reversibly to both subunits prior to assembly. Since these observations were obtained under physiological conditions, we propose that the molten globule exists as a stable form during folding or assembly in the cell. Either the molten globule form of the subunits is an authentic folding intermediate or it is in rapid equilibrium with one. GroEL may function by facilitating assembly through stabilization of these incompletely folded subunits. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7902573

  8. Profiling Gene Expression Induced by Protease-Activated Receptor 2 (PAR2) Activation in Human Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suen, Jacky Y.; Gardiner, Brooke; Grimmond, Sean; Fairlie, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Protease-Activated Receptor-2 (PAR2) has been implicated through genetic knockout mice with cytokine regulation and arthritis development. Many studies have associated PAR2 with inflammatory conditions (arthritis, airways inflammation, IBD) and key events in tumor progression (angiogenesis, metastasis), but they have relied heavily on the use of single agonists to identify physiological roles for PAR2. However such probes are now known not to be highly selective for PAR2, and thus precisely what PAR2 does and what mechanisms of downstream regulation are truly affected remain obscure. Effects of PAR2 activation on gene expression in Human Embryonic Kidney cells (HEK293), a commonly studied cell line in PAR2 research, were investigated here by comparing 19,000 human genes for intersecting up- or down-regulation by both trypsin (an endogenous protease that activates PAR2) and a PAR2 activating hexapeptide (2f-LIGRLO-NH2). Among 2,500 human genes regulated similarly by both agonists, there were clear associations between PAR2 activation and cellular metabolism (1,000 genes), the cell cycle, the MAPK pathway, HDAC and sirtuin enzymes, inflammatory cytokines, and anti-complement function. PAR-2 activation up-regulated four genes more than 5 fold (DUSP6, WWOX, AREG, SERPINB2) and down-regulated another six genes more than 3 fold (TXNIP, RARG, ITGB4, CTSD, MSC and TM4SF15). Both PAR2 and PAR1 activation resulted in up-regulated expression of several genes (CD44, FOSL1, TNFRSF12A, RAB3A, COPEB, CORO1C, THBS1, SDC4) known to be important in cancer. This is the first widespread profiling of specific activation of PAR2 and provides a valuable platform for better understanding key mechanistic roles of PAR2 in human physiology. Results clearly support the development of both antagonists and agonists of human PAR2 as potential disease modifying therapeutic agents. PMID:21072196

  9. A Cbx8-containing polycomb complex facilitates the transition to gene activation during ES cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Creppe, Catherine; Palau, Anna; Malinverni, Roberto; Valero, Vanesa; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2014-12-01

    Polycomb proteins play an essential role in maintaining the repression of developmental genes in self-renewing embryonic stem cells. The exact mechanism allowing the derepression of polycomb target genes during cell differentiation remains unclear. Our project aimed to identify Cbx8 binding sites in differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells. Therefore, we used a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation of endogenous Cbx8 coupled to direct massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq). Our analysis identified 171 high confidence peaks. By crossing our data with previously published microarray analysis, we show that several differentiation genes transiently recruit Cbx8 during their early activation. Depletion of Cbx8 partially impairs the transcriptional activation of these genes. Both interaction analysis, as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments support the idea that activating Cbx8 acts in the context of an intact PRC1 complex. Prolonged gene activation results in eviction of PRC1 despite persisting H3K27me3 and H2A ubiquitination. The composition of PRC1 is highly modular and changes when embryonic stem cells commit to differentiation. We further demonstrate that the exchange of Cbx7 for Cbx8 is required for the effective activation of differentiation genes. Taken together, our results establish a function for a Cbx8-containing complex in facilitating the transition from a Polycomb-repressed chromatin state to an active state. As this affects several key regulatory differentiation genes this mechanism is likely to contribute to the robust execution of differentiation programs. PMID:25500566

  10. BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-06-12

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  11. Cluster Analysis of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Canine Leukocytes Identifies Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Julie-Anne; Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system undergo activation and subsequent proliferation in the normal course of an immune response. Infrequently, the molecular and cellular events that underlie the mechanisms of proliferation are dysregulated and may lead to oncogenesis, leading to tumor formation. The most common forms of immunological cancers are lymphomas, which in dogs account for 8%–20% of all cancers, affecting up to 1.2% of the dog population. Key genes involved in negatively regulating proliferation of lymphocytes include a group classified as tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). These genes are also known to be associated with progression of lymphoma in humans, mice, and dogs and are potential candidates for pathological grading and diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze TSG profiles in stimulated leukocytes from dogs to identify genes that discriminate an activated phenotype. A total of 554 TSGs and three gene set collections were analyzed from microarray data. Cluster analysis of three subsets of genes discriminated between stimulated and unstimulated cells. These included 20 most upregulated and downregulated TSGs, TSG in hallmark gene sets significantly enriched in active cells, and a selection of candidate TSGs, p15 (CDKN2B), p18 (CDKN2C), p19 (CDKN1A), p21 (CDKN2A), p27 (CDKN1B), and p53 (TP53) in the third set. Analysis of two subsets suggested that these genes or a subset of these genes may be used as a specialized PCR set for additional analysis. PMID:27478369

  12. Gene-Specific Involvement of β-Oxidation in Wound-Activated Responses in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, M. Cruz; Martínez, Cristina; Buchala, Antony; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; León, José

    2004-01-01

    The coordinated induced expression of β-oxidation genes is essential to provide the energy supply for germination and postgerminative development. However, very little is known about other functions of β-oxidation in nonreserve organs. We have identified a gene-specific pattern of induced β-oxidation gene expression in wounded leaves of Arabidopsis. Mechanical damage triggered the local and systemic induction of only ACX1 among acyl-coenzyme A oxidase (ACX) genes, and KAT2/PED1 among 3-ketoacyl-coenzyme A thiolase (KAT) genes in Arabidopsis. In turn, wounding induced KAT5/PKT2 only systemically. Although most of the β-oxidation genes were activated by wound-related factors such as dehydration and abscisic acid, jasmonic acid (JA) induced only ACX1 and KAT5. Reduced expression of ACX1 or KAT2 genes, in transgenic plants expressing their corresponding mRNAs in antisense orientation, correlated with defective wound-activated synthesis of JA and with reduced expression of JA-responsive genes. Induced expression of JA-responsive genes by exogenous application of JA was unaffected in those transgenic plants, suggesting that ACX1 and KAT2 play a major role in driving wound-activated responses by participating in the biosynthesis of JA in wounded Arabidopsis plants. PMID:15141068

  13. A dual activation mechanism for Myb-responsive genes in myelomonocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Yamkamon, Vichanan; Ivanova, Olga; Braas, Daniel; Chayka, Olesya; Patmasiriwat, Pimpicha; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    The retroviral oncogene v-myb encodes a transcription factor (v-Myb) which is responsible for the transformation of myelomonocytic cells by avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV). v-Myb is thought to exert its biological effects by deregulating the expression of specific target genes. Here we have used DNaseI hypersensitive site mapping and reporter gene assays to study the activation of three Myb target genes--mim-1, the lysozyme gene and the C/EBPbeta gene--all of which are activated by Myb in myelomonocytic cells but not in other hematopoietic lineages. We have found that these genes are activated by Myb via more than one cis-regulatory region. Our data suggest that all three genes are activated by Myb by dual mechanisms involving the promoters as well as enhancers. Using a cell line that expresses an estrogen-inducible v-Myb/estrogen receptor fusion protein we have also determined the effect of Myb on the expression of the C/EBPalpha gene. Our results show that C/EBPalpha expression is down-regulated by v-Myb. Thus, v-Myb affects the expression of two C/EBP family members in opposite directions. PMID:17950008

  14. Identification of two peanut germin-like genes and the potential superoxide dismutase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Germin and germin-like protein (GLP) genes are members of large multigene families. These genes have been reported to play a role directly or indirectly in plant defense response. A number of GLPs have been demonstrated to have superoxidase dismutase (SOD) or oxalate oxidase (OxO) activity, leading ...

  15. ACTIVATION OF THE LAC GENES OF TN951 BY INSERTION SEQUENCES FROM PSUEDOMONAS CEPACIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have identified several transposable gene-activating elements from Psuedomonas cepacia on the basis of their ability to increase expression of the genes of the broad-hos-range plasmid pGC9l.14. hen introduced into auxotrophic derivatives of P. cepacia 249 (ATCC 17616), this pl...

  16. Expression, purification and luminescence properties of coelenterazine-utilizing luciferases from Renilla, Oplophorus and Gaussia: comparison of substrate specificity for C2-modified coelenterazines.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara-Miura, Yuiko; Sato, Jun-ichi; Iimori, Rie; Yoshida, Suguru; Hosoya, Takamitsu

    2013-03-01

    The cold-induced expression system in Escherichia coli is useful and we have applied this system to prepare the coelenterazine-utilizing luciferases including Renilla luciferase (RLase), a red-shifted variant of Renilla luciferase (RLase-547), the catalytic domain of Oplophorus luciferase (19kOLase) and Gaussia luciferase (GLase). The luminescence properties of the purified luciferases were characterized by using 10 kinds of C2-modified coelenterazine analogues as a substrate. The order of the maximal luminescence intensity for native coelenterazine was GLase (100%)>RLase (8.0%)>RLase-547 (0.73%)>19kOLase (0.09%) under our assay conditions. The substrate specificities of coelenterazine-utilizing luciferases for the C2-modified analogues showed significant differences, but the emission peaks catalyzed by coelenterazine-utilizing luciferases were not affected by the C2-substituted coelenterazine. These results suggest that the catalytic environment for the oxygenation process of coelenterazine and the excited species of coelenteramide might be different among coelenterazine-utilizing luciferases. PMID:23274053

  17. Effect Of Simulated Microgravity On Activated T Cell Gene Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Maureen A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of T lymphocytes under the shear stress environment of clinorotation have demonstrated an inhibition of activation in response to TCR mediated signaling. These results mimic those observed during space flight. This work investigates the molecular signaling events of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation. Purified human T lymphocytes and the T cell clone Jurkat exhibit an uncoupling of signaling as mediated through the TCR. Activation of the transcription factor AP-1 is inhibited while activation of NFAT occurs. NFAT dephosphorylation and activation is dependent on sustained Ca(++) influx. Alternatively, AP-1, which consists of two transcription factors, jun and fos, is activated by PKC and Ras mediated pathways. TCR signaling is known to be dependent on cytoskeletal rearrangements, in particular, raft aggregation is critical. Raft aggregation, as mediated through GM, crosslinking, overcomes the inhibition of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation, indicating that the block is occurring upstream of raft aggregation. Clinorotation is shown to have an effect similar to a weak TCR signal.

  18. Next-Generation Sequencing of Apoptotic DNA Breakpoints Reveals Association with Actively Transcribed Genes and Gene Translocations

    PubMed Central

    Fullwood, Melissa J.; Lee, Joanne; Lin, Lifang; Li, Guoliang; Huss, Mikael; Ng, Patrick; Sung, Wing-Kin; Shenolikar, Shirish

    2011-01-01

    DNA fragmentation is a well-recognized hallmark of apoptosis. However, the precise DNA sequences cleaved during apoptosis triggered by distinct mechanisms remain unclear. We used next-generation sequencing of DNA fragments generated in Actinomycin D-treated human HL-60 leukemic cells to generate a high-throughput, global map of apoptotic DNA breakpoints. These data highlighted that DNA breaks are non-random and show a significant association with active genes and open chromatin regions. We noted that transcription factor binding sites were also enriched within a fraction of the apoptotic breakpoints. Interestingly, extensive apoptotic cleavage was noted within genes that are frequently translocated in human cancers. We speculate that the non-random fragmentation of DNA during apoptosis may contribute to gene translocations and the development of human cancers. PMID:22087219

  19. Manganese peroxidase gene transcription in Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Activation by manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.; Alic, M. Gold, M.H. )

    1991-07-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on Mn, and initial work suggested that Mn regulates transcription of the mnp gene. In this study, using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of kinetic, dose-response, and inhibitor experiments, the authors demonstrate unequivocally that Mn regulates mnp gene transcription. The amount of mnp mRNA in cells of 4-day-old nitrogen-limited cultures is a direct function of the concentration of Mn in the culture medium up to a maximum of 180 {mu}M. Addition of Mn to nitrogen-limited Mn-deficient secondary metabolic (4-, 5-, and 6-day-old) cultures results in the appearance of mnp mRNA within 40 min. The appearance of this message is completely inhibited by the RNA synthesis inhibitor dactinomycin but not by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore, the amount of mnp mRNA produced is a direct function of the concentration of added Mn. In contrast, addition of Mn to low-nitrogen Mn-deficient 2- or 3-day-old cultures does not result in the appearance of mnp mRNA. Manganese peroxidase protein is detected by specific immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of poly(A) RNA isolated from Mn-supplemented (but nor from Mn-deficient) cells. All of these results demonstrate that Mn, the substrate for the enzyme, regulates mnp gene transcription via a growth-stage-specific and concentration-dependent mechanism.

  20. Identification of novel target genes specifically activated by deregulated E2F in human normal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Hodaka; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P; Okuno, Junko; Shimizu, Emi; Kurayoshi, Kenta; Kugawa, Kazuyuki; Toh, Hiroyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The transcription factor E2F is the principal target of the tumor suppressor pRB. E2F plays crucial roles not only in cell proliferation by activating growth-related genes but also in tumor suppression by activating pro-apoptotic and growth-suppressive genes. We previously reported that, in human normal fibroblasts, the tumor suppressor genes ARF, p27(Kip1) and TAp73 are activated by deregulated E2F activity induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but not by physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. In contrast, growth-related E2F targets are activated by both E2F activities, underscoring the roles of deregulated E2F in tumor suppression in the context of dysfunctional pRB. In this study, to further understand the roles of deregulated E2F, we explored new targets that are specifically activated by deregulated E2F using DNA microarray. The analysis identified nine novel targets (BIM, RASSF1, PPP1R13B, JMY, MOAP1, RBM38, ABTB1, RBBP4 and RBBP7), many of which are involved in the p53 and RB tumor suppressor pathways. Among these genes, the BIM gene was shown to be activated via atypical E2F-responsive promoter elements and to contribute to E2F1-mediated apoptosis. Our results underscore crucial roles of deregulated E2F in growth suppression to counteract loss of pRB function. PMID:26201719

  1. Transcriptional regulation of two conceptus interferon tau genes expressed in Japanese black cattle during peri-implantation period.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Toshihiro; Nakagawa, So; Kim, Min-Su; Bai, Hanako; Bai, Rulan; Li, Junyou; Min, Kwan-Sik; Ideta, Atsushi; Aoyagi, Yoshito; Imakawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT), produced by the mononuclear trophectoderm, signals the process of maternal recognition of pregnancy in ruminants. However, its expression in vivo and its transcriptional regulation are not yet well characterized. Objectives of this study were to determine conceptus IFNT gene isoforms expressed in the bovine uterus and to identify differences in promoter sequences of IFNT genes that differ in their expression. RNA-seq data analysis of bovine conceptuses on days 17, 20, and 22 (day 0  =  day of estrus) detected the expression of two IFNT transcripts, IFNT1 and IFNTc1, which were indeed classified into the IFNT gene clade. RNA-seq and quantitative RT-PCR analyses also revealed that the expression levels of both IFNT mRNAs were highest on day 17, and then decreased on days 20 and 22. Bovine ear-derived fibroblast (EF) cells, a model system commonly used for bovine IFNT gene transcription study in this laboratory, were cotransfected with luciferase reporter constructs carrying upstream (positions -637 to +51) regions of IFNT1 or IFNTc1 gene and various transcription factor expression plasmids including CDX2, AP-1 (Jun) and ETS2. CDX2, either alone or with the other transcription factors, markedly increased luciferase activity. The upstream regions of IFNT1 and IFNTc1 loci were then serially deleted or point-mutated at potential CDX-, AP-1-, and ETS-binding sites. Compared to the wild-type constructs, deletion or mutation at CDX2 or ETS2 binding sites similarly reduced the luciferase activities of IFNT1- or IFNTc1-promoter constructs. However, with the AP-1 site mutated construct, IFNT1- and IFNTc1-reporters behaved differently. These results suggest that two forms of bovine conceptus IFNT genes are expressed in utero and their transcriptional regulations differ. PMID:24348910

  2. Using a split luciferase assay (SLA) to measure the kinetics of cell-cell fusion mediated by herpes simplex virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Saw, Wan Ting; Matsuda, Zene; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Atanasiu, Doina

    2015-11-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require the envelope proteins gD, gH/gL and gB. We propose that receptor-activated conformational changes to gD activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB (the fusogen) into an active form. To study this dynamic process, we have adapted a dual split protein assay originally developed to study the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediated fusion. This assay uses a chimera of split forms of renilla luciferase (RL) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Effector cells are co-transfected with the glycoproteins and one of the split reporters. Receptor-bearing target cells are transfected with the second reporter. Co-culture results in fusion and restoration of RL, which can convert a membrane permeable substrate into a luminescent product, thereby enabling one to monitor initiation and extent of fusion in live cells in real time. Restoration of GFP can also be studied by fluorescence microscopy. Two sets of split reporters have been developed: the original one allows one to measure fusion kinetics over hours whereas the more recent version was designed to enhance the sensitivity of RL activity allowing one to monitor both initiation and rates of fusion in minutes. Here, we provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol for the optimization of the assay (which we call the SLA for split luciferase assay) using the HSV system. We also show several examples of the power of this assay to examine both the initiation and kinetics of cell-cell fusion by wild type forms of gD, gB, gH/gL of both serotypes of HSV as well as the effect of mutations and antibodies that alter the kinetics of fusion. The SLA can be applied to other viral systems that carry out membrane fusion. PMID:26022509

  3. Distinct DNA-based epigenetic switches trigger transcriptional activation of silent genes in human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pandian, Ganesh N.; Taniguchi, Junichi; Junetha, Syed; Sato, Shinsuke; Han, Le; Saha, Abhijit; AnandhaKumar, Chandran; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Vaijayanthi, Thangavel; Taylor, Rhys D.; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The influential role of the epigenome in orchestrating genome-wide transcriptional activation instigates the demand for the artificial genetic switches with distinct DNA sequence recognition. Recently, we developed a novel class of epigenetically active small molecules called SAHA-PIPs by conjugating selective DNA binding pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PIPs) with the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA. Screening studies revealed that certain SAHA-PIPs trigger targeted transcriptional activation of pluripotency and germ cell genes in mouse and human fibroblasts, respectively. Through microarray studies and functional analysis, here we demonstrate for the first time the remarkable ability of thirty-two different SAHA-PIPs to trigger the transcriptional activation of exclusive clusters of genes and noncoding RNAs. QRT-PCR validated the microarray data, and some SAHA-PIPs activated therapeutically significant genes like KSR2. Based on the aforementioned results, we propose the potential use of SAHA-PIPs as reagents capable of targeted transcriptional activation. PMID:24457603

  4. Xenobiotics shape the physiology and gene expression of the active human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Corinne Ferrier; Haiser, Henry Joseph; Turnbaugh, Peter James

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The human gut contains trillions of microorganisms that influence our health by metabolizing xenobiotics, including host-targeted drugs and antibiotics. Recent efforts have characterized the diversity of this host-associated community, but it remains unclear which microorganisms are active and what perturbations influence this activity. Here, we combine flow cytometry, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and metatranscriptomics to demonstrate that the gut contains a distinctive set of active microorganisms, primarily Firmicutes. Short-term exposure to a panel of xenobiotics significantly affected the physiology, structure, and gene expression of this active gut microbiome. Xenobiotic-responsive genes were found across multiple bacterial phyla, encoding antibiotic resistance, drug metabolism, and stress response pathways. These results demonstrate the power of moving beyond surveys of microbial diversity to better understand metabolic activity, highlight the unintended consequences of xenobiotics, and suggest that attempts at personalized medicine should consider inter-individual variations in the active human gut microbiome. PMID:23332745

  5. Evaluation of a bioluminescent mouse model expressing aromatase PII-promoter-controlled luciferase as a tool for the study of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Rivest, Patricia Devine, Patrick J. Sanderson, J. Thomas

    2010-11-15

    Dysfunction of the enzyme aromatase (CYP19) is associated with endocrine pathologies such as osteoporosis, impaired fertility and development of hormone-dependent cancers. Certain endocrine disrupting chemicals affect aromatase expression and activity in vitro, but little is known about their ability to do so in vivo. We evaluated a bioluminescent mouse model (LPTA (registered)) CD-1-Tg(Cyp19-luc)-Xen) expressing luciferase under control of the gonadal aromatase pII promoter as an in vivo screening tool for chemicals that may affect aromatase expression. We studied the effects of forskolin, pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and atrazine in this model (atrazine was previously shown to induced pII-promoter-driven aromatase expression in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells). About 2-4 out of every group of 10 male or female Cyp19-luc mice injected i.p. with 10 mg/kg forskolin had increased gonadal bioluminescence after 3-5 days compared to controls; the others appeared non-responsive. Similarly, about 4 per group of 9 individual females injected with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin had increased ovarian bioluminescence after 24 h. There was a statistically significant correlation between ovarian bioluminescence and plasma estradiol concentrations (n = 14; p = 0.022). Males exposed to a single dose of 100 mg/kg or males and females exposed to 5 daily injections of 30 mg/kg atrazine showed no change in gonadal bioluminescence over a 7 day period, but a significant interaction was found between atrazine (100 mg/kg) and time in female mice (p < 0.05; two-way ANOVA). Ex vivo luciferase activity in dissected organs was increased by forskolin in testis, epididymis and ovaries. Atrazine (30 mg/kg/day) increased (30%) luciferase activity significantly in epididymis only. In conclusion, certain individual Cyp19-luc mice are highly responsive to aromatase inducers, suggesting this model, with further optimization, may have potential as an in vivo screening tool for

  6. A VSV-G Pseudotyped Last Generation Lentiviral Vector Mediates High Level and Persistent Gene Transfer in Models of Airway Epithelium In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Copreni, Elena; Palmieri, Lucia; Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency and duration of gene expression mediated by a VSV-G pseudotyped last generation lentiviral (LV) vector. We studied LV efficiency in ex-vivo models of respiratory epithelial cells, obtained from bronchial biopsies and nasal polyps, by GFP epifluorescence and cytofluorimetry. In vivo efficiency and persistence of gene expression was investigated by GFP immunohistochemistry and luciferase activity in lung cryosections and homogenates, respectively, upon intranasal and intratracheal administration protocols in C57Bl/6 mice. Both primary bronchial and nasal epithelial cells were transduced up to 70–80% 72 hr after the LV infection. In vivo nasal luciferase expression was increased by lysophosphatidylcholine pre-treatment of the nose. Conversely, the bronchial epithelium was transduced in the absence of any pre-conditioning treatment and luciferase expression lasted for at least 6 months without any decline. We conclude that a last generation LV vector is a promising gene transfer agent in the target organ of genetic and acquired lung diseases, as in the case of cystic fibrosis. PMID:21994695

  7. Mutational analysis of the hepatitis B virus P gene product: domain structure and RNase H activity.

    PubMed Central

    Radziwill, G; Tucker, W; Schaller, H

    1990-01-01

    To correlate the hepatitis B virus P gene with the enzymatic activities predicted to participate in hepadnavirus reverse transcription, a series of P gene mutants containing missense mutations, in-phase insertions, and in-phase deletions was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. These mutants were tested in the context of otherwise intact hepatitis B virus genomes for the ability to produce core particles containing the virus-associated polymerase activity. The results obtained suggest that the P protein consists of three functional domains and a nonessential spacer arranged in the following order: terminal protein, spacer, reverse transcriptase/DNA polymerase, and RNase H. The first two domains are separated by a spacer region which could be deleted to a large extent without significant loss of endogenous polymerase activity. In cotransfection experiments, all P gene mutants could be complemented in trans by constructs expressing the wild-type gene product but not by a second P gene mutant. This indicates that the multifunctional P gene is expressed as a single translational unit and independent of the core gene and furthermore that the gene product is freely diffusible and not processed before core assembly. Images PMID:2153228

  8. Ectopic Activation of Germline and Placental Genes Identifies Aggressive Metastasis-Prone Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rousseaux, Sophie; Debernardi, Alexandra; Jacquiau, Baptiste; Vitte, Anne-Laure; Vesin, Aurélien; Nagy-Mignotte, Hélène; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Brichon, Pierre-Yves; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Hainaut, Pierre; Laffaire, Julien; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Beer, David G.; Timsit, Jean-François; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Activation of normally silent tissue-specific genes and the resulting cell “identity crisis” are the unexplored consequences of malignant epigenetic reprogramming. We designed a strategy for investigating this reprogramming, which consisted of identifying a large number of tissue-restricted genes that are epigenetically silenced in normal somatic cells and then detecting their expression in cancer. This approach led to the demonstration that large-scale “off-context” gene activations systematically occur in a variety of cancer types. In our series of 293 lung tumors, we identified an ectopic gene expression signature associated with a subset of highly aggressive tumors, which predicted poor prognosis independently of the TNM (tumor size, node positivity, and metastasis) stage or histological subtype. The ability to isolate these tumors allowed us to reveal their common molecular features characterized by the acquisition of embryonic stem cell/germ cell gene expression profiles and the down-regulation of immune response genes. The methodical recognition of ectopic gene activations in cancer cells could serve as a basis for gene signature–guided tumor stratification, as well as for the discovery of oncogenic mechanisms, and expand the understanding of the biology of very aggressive tumors. PMID:23698379

  9. Insights into GATA-1 Mediated Gene Activation versus Repression via Genome-wide Chromatin Occupancy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ming; Riva, Laura; Xie, Huafeng; Schindler, Yocheved; Moran, Tyler B.; Cheng, Yong; Yu, Duonan; Hardison, Ross; Weiss, Mitchell J; Orkin, Stuart H.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Fraenkel, Ernest; Cantor, Alan B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor GATA-1 is required for terminal erythroid maturation and functions as an activator or repressor depending on gene context. Yet its in vivo site selectivity and ability to distinguish between activated versus repressed genes remain incompletely understood. In this study, we performed GATA-1 ChIP-seq in erythroid cells and compared it to GATA-1 induced gene expression changes. Bound and differentially expressed genes contain a greater number of GATA binding motifs, a higher frequency of palindromic GATA sites, and closer occupancy to the transcriptional start site versus non-differentially expressed genes. Moreover, we show that the transcription factor Zbtb7a occupies GATA-1 bound regions of some direct GATA-1 target genes, that the presence of SCL/TAL1 helps distinguish transcriptional activation versus repression, and that Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is involved in epigenetic silencing of a subset of GATA-1 repressed genes. These data provide insights into GATA-1 mediated gene regulation in vivo. PMID:19941827

  10. Transcriptomic Analysis of Musca domestica to Reveal Key Genes of the Prophenoloxidase-Activating System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dianxiang; Liang, Yongli; Wang, Xianwei; Wang, Lei; Qi, Mei; Yu, Yang; Luan, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    The proPO system regulates melanization in arthropods. However, the genes that are involved in the proPO system in housefly Musca domestica remain unclear. Thus, this study analyzed the combined transcriptome obtained from M. domestica larvae, pupae, and adults that were either normal or bacteria-challenged by an Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus mixture. A total of 54,821,138 clean reads (4.93 Gb) were yielded by Illumina sequencing, which were de novo assembled into 89,842 unigenes. Of the 89,842 unigenes, based on a similarity search with known genes in other insects, 24 putative genes related to the proPO system were identified. Eight of the identified genes encoded for peptidoglycan recognition receptors, two encoded for prophenoloxidases, three encoded for prophenoloxidase-activating enzymes, and 11 encoded for serine proteinase inhibitors. The expression levels of these identified genes were investigated by qRT-PCR assay, which were consistent with expected activation process of the proPO system, and their activation functions were confirmed by the measurement of phenoloxidase activity in bacteria-infected larvae after proPO antibody blockage, suggesting these candidate genes might have potentially different roles in the activation of proPO system. Collectively, this study has provided the comprehensive transcriptomic data of an insect and some fundamental basis toward achieving understanding of the activation mechanisms and immune functions of the proPO system in M. domestica. PMID:26156588

  11. Collinear activation of Hoxb genes during gastrulation is linked to mesoderm cell ingression.

    PubMed

    Iimura, Tadahiro; Pourquié, Olivier

    2006-08-01

    The vertebral column exhibits segmentation and regionalization along the antero-posterior axis. During embryogenesis, the rhythmic production of the precursors