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Sample records for activated luciferase gene

  1. Synthetic versions of firefly luciferase and Renilla luciferase reporter genes that resist transgene silencing in sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Down-regulation or silencing of transgene expression can be a major hurdle to both molecular studies and biotechnology applications in many plant species. Sugarcane is particularly effective at silencing introduced transgenes, including reporter genes such as the firefly luciferase gene. Synthesizing transgene coding sequences optimized for usage in the host plant is one method of enhancing transgene expression and stability. Using specified design rules we have synthesised new coding sequences for both the firefly luciferase and Renilla luciferase reporter genes. We have tested these optimized versions for enhanced levels of luciferase activity and for increased steady state luciferase mRNA levels in sugarcane. Results The synthetic firefly luciferase (luc*) and Renilla luciferase (Renluc*) coding sequences have elevated G + C contents in line with sugarcane codon usage, but maintain 75% identity to the native firefly or Renilla luciferase nucleotide sequences and 100% identity to the protein coding sequences. Under the control of the maize pUbi promoter, the synthetic luc* and Renluc* genes yielded 60x and 15x higher luciferase activity respectively, over the native firefly and Renilla luciferase genes in transient assays on sugarcane suspension cell cultures. Using a novel transient assay in sugarcane suspension cells combining co-bombardment and qRT-PCR, we showed that synthetic luc* and Renluc* genes generate increased transcript levels compared to the native firefly and Renilla luciferase genes. In stable transgenic lines, the luc* transgene generated significantly higher levels of expression than the native firefly luciferase transgene. The fold difference in expression was highest in the youngest tissues. Conclusions We developed synthetic versions of both the firefly and Renilla luciferase reporter genes that resist transgene silencing in sugarcane. These transgenes will be particularly useful for evaluating the expression patterns conferred

  2. Firefly luciferase gene contains a cryptic promoter

    PubMed Central

    Vopálenský, Václav; Mašek, Tomáš; Horváth, Ondřej; Vicenová, Blanka; Mokrejš, Martin; Pospíšek, Martin

    2008-01-01

    A firefly luciferase (FLuc) counts among the most popular reporters of present-day molecular and cellular biology. In this study, we report a cryptic promoter activity in the luc+ gene, which is the most frequently used version of the firefly luciferase. The FLuc coding region displays cryptic promoter activity both in mammalian and yeast cells. In human CCL13 and Huh7 cells, cryptic transcription from the luc+ gene is 10–16 times weaker in comparison to the strong immediate-early cytomegalovirus promoter. Additionally, we discuss a possible impact of the FLuc gene cryptic promoter on experimental results especially in some fields of the RNA-oriented research, for example, in analysis of translation initiation or analysis of miRNA/siRNA function. Specifically, we propose how this newly described cryptic promoter activity within the FLuc gene might contribute to the previous determination of the strength of the cryptic promoter found in the cDNA corresponding to the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site. Our findings should appeal to the researchers to be more careful when designing firefly luciferase-based assays as well as open the possibility of performing some experiments with the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site, which could not be considered until now. PMID:18697919

  3. Use Of Low Light Image Microscopy To Monitor Genetically Engineered Bacterial Luciferase Gene Expression In Living Cells And Gene Activation Throughout The Development Of A Transgenic Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langridge, W. H.; Escher, Alan P.; Baga, M.; O'Kane, Dennis J.; Wampler, John E.; Koncz, C.; Schell, John D.; Szalay, A. A.

    1989-12-01

    Procaryotic and eucaryotic expression vectors which contain a marker gene for selection of transformants linked to genes encoding bacterial luciferase for detection of promoter activated gene expression in vivo were used to transform the appropriate host organisms and drug resistant colonies, cells, or calli were obtained. Bacterial luciferase expression was measured by a luminescence assay for quantitative determination of promoter activation. The cellular localization of bacteria inside the host plant cell cytoplasm was achieved in a single infected plant cell based on the light emitting ability of the genetically engineered bacteria. In addition, the bacterial luciferase marker gene fusions were used to monitor cell type, tissue, and organ specific gene expression in transgenic plants in vivo. To monitor physiological changes during ontogeny of a transformed plant, low light video microscopy, aided by real time image processing techniques developed specifically to enhance extreme low light images, was successfully applied.

  4. Oestrogenic activity of a textile industrial wastewater treatment plant effluent evaluated by the E-screen test and MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay.

    PubMed

    Schilirò, Tiziana; Porfido, Arianna; Spina, Federica; Varese, Giovanna Cristina; Gilli, Giorgio

    2012-08-15

    This study quantified the biological oestrogenic activity in the effluent of a textile industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWWTP) in northwestern Italy. Samples of the IWWTP effluent were collected monthly, both before and after tertiary treatment (ozonation). After solid phase extraction, all samples were subjected to two in vitro tests of total estrogenic activity, the human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 BUS) proliferation assay, or E-screen test, and the luciferase-transfected human breast cancer cell line (MELN) gene-reporter assay, to measure the 17β-oestradiol equivalent quantity (EEQ). In the E-screen test, the mean EEQ values were 2.35±1.68 ng/L pre-ozonation and 0.72±0.58 ng/L post-ozonation; in the MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay, the mean EEQ values were 4.18±3.54 ng/L pre-ozonation and 2.53±2.48 ng/L post-ozonation. These results suggest that the post-ozonation IWWTP effluent had a lower oestrogenic activity (simple paired t-tests, p<0.05). The average reduction of estrogenic activity of IWWTP effluent after ozonation was 67±26% and 52±27% as measured by E-screen test and MELN gene-reporter luciferase assay, respectively. There was a positive and significant correlation between the two tests (Rho S=0.650, p=0.022). This study indicates that the environmental risk is low because oestrogenic substances are deposited into the river via IWWTP at concentrations lower than those at which chronic exposure has been reported to affect the endocrine system of living organisms.

  5. Identification of a functional luciferase gene in the non-luminous diurnal firefly, Lucidina biplagiata.

    PubMed

    Oba, Y; Furuhashi, M; Inouye, S

    2010-12-01

    We isolated a luciferase gene (LbLuc) from the non-luminous diurnal firefly, Lucidina biplagiata, with high similarity to that from the nocturnal firefly, Photinus pyralis. The recombinant LbLuc showed luminescence activity comparable to that of the luciferases from P. pyralis and Luciola cruciata. To understand the non-luminosity of L. biplagiata, we determined the amount of luciferase in the adult specimen using the luciferin-luciferase reaction and found that the content of luciferase in L. biplagiata was estimated to be only 0.1% of that in L. cruciata. As previously reported, the content of luciferin in L. biplagiata was less than 0.1% of that in L. cruciata. Thus, the non-luminosity of L. biplagiata might be explained by low levels of both luciferase and luciferin.

  6. [Nucleotide sequence of genes for alpha- and beta-subunits of luciferase from Photobacterium leiognathi].

    PubMed

    Illarionov, B A; Protopopova, M V; Karginov, V A; Mertvetsov, N P; Gitel'zon, I I

    1988-03-01

    Nucleotide sequence of the Photobacterium leiognathi DNA containing genes of alpha and beta subunits of luciferase has been determined. We also deduced amino acid sequence and molecular mass of luciferase and localized luciferase genes in the sequenced DNA fragment.

  7. A transgenic rat with ubiquitous expression of firefly luciferase gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamata, Yoji; Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2006-02-01

    In vivo imaging strategies provide cellular and molecular events in real time that helps us to understand biological processes in living animals. The development of molecular tags such as green fluorescent proteins and luciferase from the firefly Photinus pyralis has lead to a revolution in the visualization of complex biochemical processes. We developed a novel inbred transgenic rat strain containing firefly luciferase based on the transgenic (Tg) technique in rats. This Tg rat expressed the luciferase gene ubiquitously under control of the ROSA26 promoter. Cellular immune responsiveness against the luciferase protein was evaluated using conventional skin grafting and resulted in the long-term acceptance of Tg rat skin on wild-type rats. Strikingly, organ transplant with heart and small bowel demonstrated organ viability and graft survival, suggesting that cells from luciferase-Tg are transplantable to track their fate. Taking advantage of the less immunogenic luciferase, we also tested the role of hepatocyte-infusion in a liver injury model, and bone marrow-derived cells in a skin defect model. Employed in conjunction with modern advances in optical imaging, this luciferase-Tg rat system provides an innovative animal tool and a new means of facilitating biomedical research such as in the case of regeneration medicine.

  8. Firefly luciferase genes from the subfamilies Psilocladinae and Ototretinae (Lampyridae, Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Oba, Yuichi; Yoshida, Mayumi; Shintani, Takeru; Furuhashi, Mana; Inouye, Satoshi

    2012-02-01

    Firefly luciferase genes have been isolated from approximately 20 species of Lampyrinae, Luciolinae, and Photurinae. These are mostly nocturnal luminescent species that use light signals for sexual communication. In this study, we isolated three cDNAs for firefly luciferase from Psilocladinae (Cyphonocerus ruficollis) and Ototretinae (Drilaster axillaris and Stenocladius azumai), which are diurnal non-luminescent or weakly luminescent species that may use pheromones for communication. The amino acid sequences deduced from the three cDNAs showed 81-89% identities to each other and 60-81% identities with known firefly luciferases. The three purified recombinant proteins showed luminescence and fatty acyl-CoA synthetic activities, as observed in other firefly luciferases. The emission maxima by the three firefly luciferases (λmax, 545-546nm) were shorter than those by known luciferases from the nocturnal fireflies (λmax, 550-568nm). These results suggest that the primary structures and enzymatic properties of luciferases are conserved in Lampyridae, but the luminescence colors were red-shifted in nocturnal species compared to diurnal species.

  9. Engineering an Enhanced, Thermostable, Monomeric Bacterial Luciferase Gene As a Reporter in Plant Protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future. PMID:25271765

  10. The fusion Vibrio campbellii luciferase as a eukaryotic gene reporter.

    PubMed

    Tinikul, Ruchanok; Thotsaporn, Kittisak; Thaveekarn, Wichit; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2012-12-31

    Bacterial luciferase from Vibrio campbellii is a thermostable enzyme with an in vitro thermal inactivation half-life of ~1020 min at 37°C. The enzyme also binds tightly to reduced FMN. In this study, a V. campbellii fusion luciferase construct in which the α and β subunits are linked with a decapeptide was made and characterized. In general, the overall enzymatic properties of the two enzymes are similar. Expression of the enzymes in Escherichia coli demonstrated that the V. campbellii fusion luciferase emits less light than the native luciferase, but still emits a much greater amount of light than native luciferase from Vibrio harveyi and Photobacterium leiognathi TH1. The intensity of light emitted by the V. campbellii fusion luciferase was more than 80-fold greater than that from the V. harveyi native luciferase when expressed at 37°C. Biochemical characterization has shown that the V. campbellii fusion luciferase also retains a high binding affinity for reduced flavin mononucleotide and high thermostability. The levels of bioluminescence emitted by the V. campbellii fusion luciferase expressed in HEK293T cells reached ~1×10(6) Relative Light Units/mg total protein. These findings suggest that the V. campbellii fusion luciferase is a promising candidate for further development as a luciferase-based reporter for eukaryotic systems.

  11. In vivo bioimaging with tissue-specific transcription factor activated luciferase reporters

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Suzanne M. K.; Delhove, Juliette M. K. M.; Perocheau, Dany P.; Karda, Rajvinder; Rahim, Ahad A.; Howe, Steven J.; Ward, Natalie J.; Birrell, Mark A.; Belvisi, Maria G.; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Johnson, Mark R.; Waddington, Simon N.; McKay, Tristan R.

    2015-01-01

    The application of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter cassettes in vitro is widespread but potential for in vivo application has not yet been realized. Bioluminescence imaging enables non-invasive tracking of gene expression in transfected tissues of living rodents. However the mature immune response limits luciferase expression when delivered in adulthood. We present a novel approach of tissue-targeted delivery of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter lentiviruses to neonatal rodents as an alternative to the existing technology of generating germline transgenic light producing rodents. At this age, neonates acquire immune tolerance to the conditionally responsive luciferase reporter. This simple and transferrable procedure permits surrogate quantitation of transcription factor activity over the lifetime of the animal. We show principal efficacy by temporally quantifying NFκB activity in the brain, liver and lungs of somatotransgenic reporter mice subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. This response is ablated in Tlr4−/− mice or when co-administered with the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone. Furthermore, we show the malleability of this technology by quantifying NFκB-mediated luciferase expression in outbred rats. Finally, we use somatotransgenic bioimaging to longitudinally quantify LPS- and ActivinA-induced upregulation of liver specific glucocorticoid receptor and Smad2/3 reporter constructs in somatotransgenic mice, respectively. PMID:26138224

  12. Systemic activation of NF-κB driven luciferase activity in transgenic mice fed advanced glycation end products modified albumin.

    PubMed

    Nass, Norbert; Bayreuther, Kristina; Simm, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are stable end products of the Maillard reaction and accumulate with progressing ageing and degenerative diseases. Significant amounts of AGE-modified peptides are also consumed with processed food. AGEs bind to specific receptors, especially the receptor of AGEs (RAGE). Activation of RAGE then evokes intracellular signalling, finally resulting in the activation of the NF-κB transcription factor and therefore a proinflammatory state. We here analysed, whether NF-κB is activated in short term upon feeding an AGE-modified protein in-vivo. Transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of an NF-κB responsive promoter were intraperitoneally injected or fed with AGE-modified- or control albumin and luciferase expression was analysed by in-vivo imaging and by in-vitro by determination of luciferase enzyme activity in heart, lung, gut, spleen, liver and kidney. In all organs, an activation of the luciferase reporter gene was observed in response to AGE-BSA feeding, however with different intensity and timing. The gut exhibited highest luciferase activity and this activity peaked 6-8 h post AGE-feeding. In heart and kidney, luciferase activity increased for up to 12 h post feeding. All other organs tested, exhibited highest activity at 10 h after AGE-consumption. Altogether, these data demonstrate that feeding AGE-modified protein resulted in a transient and systemic activation of the NF-κB reporter.

  13. Cellular Immune Response Against Firefly Luciferase After Sleeping Beauty–Mediated Gene Transfer In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M.; Vezys, Vaiva; Somia, Nikunj V.; Russell, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been shown to mediate new gene sequence integration resulting in long-term expression. Here the effectiveness of hyperactive SB100X transposase was tested, and we found that hydrodynamic co-delivery of a firefly luciferase transposon (pT2/CaL) along with SB100X transposase (pCMV-SB100X) resulted in remarkably sustained, high levels of luciferase expression. However, after 4 weeks there was a rapid, animal-by-animal loss of luciferase expression that was not observed in immunodeficient mice. We hypothesized that this sustained, high-level luciferase expression achieved using the SB100X transposase elicits an immune response in pT2/CaL co-administered mice, which was supported by the rapid loss of luciferase expression upon challenge of previously treated animals and in naive animals adoptively transferred with splenocytes from previously treated animals. Specificity of the immune response to luciferase was demonstrated by increased cytokine expression in splenocytes after exposure to luciferase peptide in parallel with MHC I–luciferase peptide tetramer binding. This anti-luciferase immune response observed following continuous, high-level luciferase expression in vivo clearly impacts its use as an in vivo reporter. As both an immunogen and an extremely sensitive reporter, luciferase is also a useful model system for the study of immune responses following in vivo gene transfer and expression. PMID:25093708

  14. A destabilized bacterial luciferase for dynamic gene expression studies

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Michael S.; Wilgus, John R.; Chewning, Christopher S.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    Fusions of genetic regulatory elements with reporter genes have long been used as tools for monitoring gene expression and have become a major component in synthetic gene circuit implementation. A major limitation of many of these systems is the relatively long half-life of the reporter protein(s), which prevents monitoring both the initiation and the termination of transcription in real-time. Furthermore, when used as components in synthetic gene circuits, the long time constants associated with reporter protein decay may significantly degrade circuit performance. In this study, short half-life variants of LuxA and LuxB from Photorhabdus luminescens were constructed in Escherichia coli by inclusion of an 11-amino acid carboxy-terminal tag that is recognized by endogenous tail-specific proteases. Results indicated that the addition of the C-terminal tag affected the functional half-life of the holoenzyme when the tag was added to luxA or to both luxA and luxB, but modification of luxB alone did not have a significant effect. In addition, it was also found that alteration of the terminal three amino acid residues of the carboxy-terminal tag fused to LuxA generated variants with half-lives of intermediate length in a manner similar to that reported for GFP. This report is the first instance of the C-terminal tagging approach for the regulation of protein half-life to be applied to an enzyme or monomer of a multi-subunit enzyme complex and will extend the utility of the bacterial luciferase reporter genes for the monitoring of dynamic changes in gene expression. PMID:19003433

  15. A novel luciferase knock-in reporter system for studying transcriptional regulation of the human Sox2 gene.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Weifeng; Li, Yan; Liu, Kuan; Zhao, Junli; Sun, Xiaohong; Shan, Linlin; Mao, Qinwen; Xia, Haibin

    2016-02-10

    Sox2 is an important transcriptional factor that has multiple functions in stem cell maintenance and tumorigenesis. To investigate the transcriptional regulation of the Sox2 gene, a luciferase knock-in reporter system was established in HEK293 cells by placing the luciferase gene in the genome under the control of the Sox2 gene promoter using a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated genome editing technique. PCR and Southern blot results confirmed the site-specific integration of a single copy of the exogenous luciferase gene into the genome. To prove the reliability and sensitivity of this novel luciferase knock-in system, a CRISPR/Cas transcription activation system for the Sox2 gene was constructed and applied to the knock-in system. The results indicated that luciferase activity was directly correlated with the activity of the Sox2 endogenous promoter. This novel system will be a useful tool to study the transcriptional regulation of Sox2, and has great potential in medical and industrial applications.

  16. Active-site properties of Phrixotrix railroad worm green and red bioluminescence-eliciting luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Arnoldi, F G C; Venkatesh, B; Neto, A J S; Ogawa, F G T; Oehlmeyer, A T L; Ohmiya, Y

    2006-10-01

    The luciferases of the railroad worm Phrixotrix (Coleoptera: Phengodidae) are the only beetle luciferases that naturally produce true red bioluminescence. Previously, we cloned the green- (PxGR) and red-emitting (PxRE) luciferases of railroad worms Phrixotrix viviani and P. hirtus[OLE1]. These luciferases were expressed and purified, and their active-site properties were determined. The red-emitting PxRE luciferase displays flash-like kinetics, whereas PxGR luciferase displays slow-type kinetics. The substrate affinities and catalytic efficiency of PxRE luciferase are also higher than those of PxGR luciferase. Fluorescence studies with 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid and 6-p-toluidino-2-naphthalene sulfonic acid showed that the PxRE luciferase luciferin-binding site is more polar than that of PxGR luciferase, and it is sensitive to guanidine. Mutagenesis and modelling studies suggest that several invariant residues in the putative luciferin-binding site of PxRE luciferase cannot interact with excited oxyluciferin. These results suggest that one portion of the luciferin-binding site of the red-emitting luciferase is tighter than that of PxGR luciferase, whereas the other portion could be more open and polar.

  17. Genomic structure of the luciferase gene and phylogenetic analysis in the Hotaria-group fireflies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Soo; Bae, Jin Sik; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Seong Ryul; Kim, Iksoo; Kim, Jong Gill; Kim, Keun Young; Kim, Sam Eun; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Lee, Sang Mong; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2003-02-01

    The luminescent fireflies have species specific flash patterns, being recognized as sexual communication. The luciferase gene is the sole enzyme responsible for bioluminescence. We describe here the complete nucleotide sequence and the exon-intron structure of the luciferase gene of the Hotaria-group fireflies, H. unmunsana, H. papariensis and H. tsushimana. The luciferase gene of the Hotaria-group firefly including the known H. parvula spans 1950 bp and consisted of six introns and seven exons coding for 548 amino acid residues, suggesting highly conserved structure among the Hotaria-group fireflies. Although only one luciferase gene was cloned from H. papariensis, each of the two sequences of the gene was found in H. unmunsana (U1 and Uc) and H. tsushimana (T1 and T2). The amino acid sequence divergence among H. unmunsana, H. papariensis, and H. tsushimana only ranged from zero to three amino acid residues, but H. parvula differed by 10-11 amino acid residues from the other Hotaria-group fireflies, suggesting a divergent relationship of this species. Phylogenetic analysis using the deduced amino acid sequences of the luciferase gene resulted in a monophyletic group in the Hotaria excluding H. parvula, suggesting a close relationship among H. unmunsana, H. papariensis and H. tsushimana. Additionally, we also analyzed the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene of the Hotaria-group fireflies. The deduced amino acid sequence of the COI gene of H. unmunsana was identical to that of H. papariensis and H. tsushimana, but different by three positions from H. parvula. In terms of nucleotide sequences of the COI gene, intraspecific sequence divergence was sometimes larger than interspecies level, and phylogenetic analysis placed the three species into monophyletic groups unresolved among them, but excluded H. parvula. In conclusion, our results suggest that H. unmunsana, H. papariensis and H. tsushimana are very closely related or might be an identical species, at

  18. Low-cost system for real-time monitoring of luciferase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gailey, P C; Miller, E J; Griffin, G D

    1997-03-01

    In some mammalian cells transfected with luciferase reporter genes, the luciferase/luciferin reaction in a cell monolayer produces a very small light flux. While the low light levels are often measurable with single-photon counting cameras, these devices are expensive and may require long averaging times to acquire an image. We describe an approach for real-time monitoring of light produced by luciferase gene expression in intact, cultured cells using readily available and relatively inexpensive components. The system uses a single-photon counting photomultiplier tube with built-in high voltage supply and photon counting circuitry to rapidly measure average light output from growing cells in a 35 mm culture dish. The fast, accurate and highly sensitive response of the system makes it useful for studying the dynamics of gene expression over time periods ranging from minutes to days.

  19. Construction and evaluation of luciferase reporter phages for the detection of active and non-replicating tubercle bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Dusthackeer, Azger; Kumar, Vanaja; Subbian, Selvakumar; Sivaramakrishnan, Gomathi; Zhu, Guofang; Subramanyam, Balaji; Hassan, Sameer; Nagamaiah, Selvakumar; Chan, John; Rama, Narayanan Paranji

    2008-01-01

    The luciferase reporter phages (LRP) show great promise for diagnostic mycobacteriology. Though conventional constructs developed from lytic phages such as D29 and TM4 are highly specific, they lack sensitivity. We have isolated and characterized Che12, the first true temperate phage infecting M. tuberculosis. Since the tuberculosis (TB) cases among HIV infected population result from the reactivation of latent bacilli, it would be useful to develop LRP that can detect dormant bacteria. During dormancy, pathogenic mycobacteria switch their metabolism involving divergent genes than during normal, active growth phase. Since the promoters of these genes can potentially function during dormancy, they were exploited for the construction of novel mycobacterial luciferase reporter phages. The promoters of hsp60, isocitrate lyase (icl), and alpha-crystallin (acr) genes from M. tuberculosis were used for expressing firefly luciferase gene (FFlux) in both Che12 and TM4 phages and their efficiency was evaluated in detecting dormant bacteria from clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. These LRP constructs exhibited detectable luciferase activity in dormant as well as in actively growing M. tuberculosis. The TM4 ts mutant based constructs showed about one log increase in light output in three of the five tested clinical isolates and in M. tuberculosis H37Rv compared to conventional lytic reporter phage, phAE129. By refining the LRP assay format further, an ideal rapid assay can be designed not only to diagnose active and dormant TB but also to differentiate the species and to find their drug susceptibility pattern. PMID:18272245

  20. Improvement of thermostability and activity of firefly luciferase through [TMG][Ac] ionic liquid mediator.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mehdi; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Heydari, Akbar; Khavari-Nejad, Ramazan Ali; Akbari, Jafar

    2012-10-01

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes production of light from luciferin in the presence of Mg(2+)-ATP and oxygen. This enzyme has wide range of applications in biotechnology and development of biosensors. The low thermal stability of wild-type firefly luciferase is a limiting factor in most applications. Improvements in activity and stability of few enzymes in the presence of ionic liquids were shown in many reports. In this study, kinetic and thermal stability of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis in the presence of three tetramethylguanidine-based ionic liquids was investigated. The enzyme has shown improved activity in the presence of [1, 1, 3, 3-tetramethylguanidine][acetate], but in the presence of [TMG][trichloroacetate] and [TMG][triflouroacetate] activity, it decreased or unchanged significantly. Among these ionic liquids, only [TMG][Ac] has increased the thermal stability of luciferase. Incubation of [TMG][Ac] with firefly luciferase brought about with decrease of K(m) for ATP.

  1. Adaptation of a Luciferase Gene Reporter and lac Expression System to Borrelia burgdorferi▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Jon S.; Revel, Andrew T.; Smith, Alexandra H.; Bachlani, Gulnaz N.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    The development of new genetic systems for studying the complex regulatory events that occur within Borrelia burgdorferi is an important goal of contemporary Lyme disease research. Although recent advancements have been made in the genetic manipulation of B. burgdorferi, there still remains a paucity of basic molecular systems for assessing differential gene expression in this pathogen. Herein, we describe the adaptation of two powerful genetic tools for use in B. burgdorferi. The first is a Photinus pyralis firefly luciferase gene reporter that was codon optimized to enhance translation in B. burgdorferi. Using this modified reporter, we demonstrated an increase in luciferase expression when B. burgdorferi transformed with a shuttle vector encoding the outer surface protein C (OspC) promoter fused to the luciferase reporter was cultivated in the presence of fresh rabbit blood. The second is a lac operator/repressor system that was optimized to achieve the tightest degree of regulation. Using the aforementioned luciferase reporter, we assessed the kinetics and maximal level of isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-dependent gene expression. This lac-inducible expression system also was used to express the gene carried on lp25 required for borrelial persistence in ticks (bptA). These advancements should be generally applicable for assessing further the regulation of other genes potentially involved in virulence expression by B. burgdorferi. PMID:17220265

  2. Light without substrate amendment: the bacterial luciferase gene cassette as a mammalian bioreporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan M.; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby E.; Jegier, Pat; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-06-01

    Bioluminescent production represents a facile method for bioreporter detection in mammalian tissues. The lack of endogenous bioluminescent reactions in these tissues allows for high signal to noise ratios even at low signal strength compared to fluorescent signal detection. While the luciferase enzymes commonly employed for bioluminescent detection are those from class Insecta (firefly and click beetle luciferases), these are handicapped in that they require concurrent administration of a luciferin compound to elicit a bioluminescent signal. The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette offers the advantages common to other bioluminescent proteins, but is simultaneously capable of synthesizing its own luciferin substrates using endogenously available cellular compounds. The longstanding shortcoming of the lux cassette has been its recalcitrance to function in the mammalian cellular environment. This paper will present an overview of the work completed to date to overcome this limitation and provide examples of mammalian lux-based bioreporter technologies that could provide the framework for advanced, biomedically relevant real-time sensor development.

  3. Fe65 does not stabilize AICD during activation of transcription in a luciferase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Huysseune, Sandra; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noel . E-mail: octave@nchm.ucl.ac.be

    2007-09-21

    The APP intracellular domain (AICD) could be involved in signaling via interaction with the adaptor protein Fe65, and with the histone acetyl transferase Tip60. However, the real function of AICD and Fe65 in regulation of transcription remains controversial. In this study, the human APPGal4 fusion protein was expressed in CHO cells and the transcriptional activity of AICDGal4 was measured in a luciferase-based reporter assay. AICDGal4 was stabilized by expression of Fe65 and levels of AICDGal4 controlled luciferase activity. On the contrary, when human APP was expressed in CHO cells, coexpression of Fe65 increased luciferase activity without affecting the amount of AICD fragment. AICD produced from APP was protected from degradation by orthophenanthroline, but not by lactacystine, indicating that AICD is not a substrate of the chymotryptic activity of the proteasome. It is concluded that Fe65 can control luciferase activity without stabilizing the labile AICD fragment.

  4. In-depth Characterization of Firefly Luciferase as a Reporter of Circadian Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Kevin A.; Putker, Marrit; Brancaccio, Marco; O’Neill, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Firefly luciferase (Fluc) is frequently used to report circadian gene expression rhythms in mammalian cells and tissues. During longitudinal assays it is generally assumed that enzymatic substrates are in saturating excess, such that total bioluminescence is directly proportional to Fluc protein level. To test this assumption, we compared the enzyme kinetics of purified luciferase with its activity in mammalian cells. We found that Fluc activity in solution has a lower Michaelis constant (Km) for luciferin, lower temperature dependence, and lower catalytic half-life than Fluc in cells. In consequence, extracellular luciferin concentration significantly affects the apparent circadian amplitude and phase of the widely used PER2::LUC reporter in cultured fibroblasts, but not in SCN, and we suggest that this arises from differences in plasma membrane luciferin transporter activity. We found that at very high concentrations (>1 mM), luciferin lengthens circadian period, in both fibroblasts and organotypic SCN slices. We conclude that the amplitude and phase of circadian gene expression inferred from bioluminescence recordings should be treated with some caution, and we suggest that optimal luciferin concentration should be determined empirically for each luciferase reporter and cell type. PMID:28112045

  5. Formation of active bacterial luciferase between interspecific subunits in vivo.

    PubMed

    Almashanu, S; Tuby, A; Hadar, R; Einy, R; Kuhn, J

    1995-01-01

    Interspecific complementation between luxAs and luxBs from Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium leiognathi and Xenorhabdus luminescens was examined in vivo. The individual genes from these species were cloned on different compatible plasmids or amplified by PCR and brought together to yield cis combinations without extraneous DNA. The beta subunits from V. harveyi and X. luminescens form active enzyme only with alpha subunits from one of these species. All other combinations yield active enzymes. The lack of activity of the V. harveyi and X. luminescens beta subunits with the alpha subunits from V. fischeri and P. leiognathi results from a lack of association. This was shown by in vivo competition in which these beta subunits were overproduced in comparison with the beta and alpha of V. fischeri. No reduction in light was found. Overall, the in vivo results parallel those found in vitro using isolated denatured subunits and renaturation by removal of the denaturant.

  6. Monitoring cell-autonomous circadian clock rhythms of gene expression using luciferase bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Khan, Sanjoy K; Kathale, Nimish D; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Andrew C

    2012-09-27

    In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology such as sleep-wake cycles and liver metabolism are regulated by endogenous circadian clocks (reviewed). The circadian time-keeping system is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizing and coordinating extra-SCN and peripheral clocks elsewhere. Individual cells are the functional units for generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, and these oscillators of different tissue types in the organism share a remarkably similar biochemical negative feedback mechanism. However, due to interactions at the neuronal network level in the SCN and through rhythmic, systemic cues at the organismal level, circadian rhythms at the organismal level are not necessarily cell-autonomous. Compared to traditional studies of locomotor activity in vivo and SCN explants ex vivo, cell-based in vitro assays allow for discovery of cell-autonomous circadian defects. Strategically, cell-based models are more experimentally tractable for phenotypic characterization and rapid discovery of basic clock mechanisms. Because circadian rhythms are dynamic, longitudinal measurements with high temporal resolution are needed to assess clock function. In recent years, real-time bioluminescence recording using firefly luciferase as a reporter has become a common technique for studying circadian rhythms in mammals, as it allows for examination of the persistence and dynamics of molecular rhythms. To monitor cell-autonomous circadian rhythms of gene expression, luciferase reporters can be introduced into cells via transient transfection or stable transduction. Here we describe a stable transduction protocol using lentivirus-mediated gene delivery. The lentiviral vector system is superior to traditional methods such as transient transfection and germline transmission because of its efficiency and versatility: it permits efficient delivery and stable integration into the host

  7. Detection of luciferase gene sequence in nonluminescent Vibrio cholerae by colony hygridization and polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, L.M.; Colwell, R.R. )

    1991-05-01

    Bioluminescence is a trait observed among approximately 10% of Vibrio cholerae isolates. We have demonstrated that not only do some strains of V. cholerae produce low levels of light, undetectable by the human eye, but the luciferase gene sequence is present in strains of V. cholerae which emit no detectable light, evidenced by hybridization with a luciferase DNA probe. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of luciferase regions of amino acid identity. The polymerase chain reaction method of DNA amplification with oligonucleotide primers based on these regions was used to isolate a region of the luxA gene from both luminescent and nonluminescent V. cholerae strains. The nucleotide sequence of this region was determined and reveals that nonluminescent V. cholerae have 99.7% nucleotide sequence similarity in this region with the luminescent biovar V. cholerae by albensis as well as significant similarity to other species of bioluminescent bacteria, a finding that is in accord with the hypothesis that these species have a common luminescent ancestor, most probably from the marine environment.

  8. Safe and Sensitive Antiviral Screening Platform Based on Recombinant Human Coronavirus OC43 Expressing the Luciferase Reporter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liang; Yang, Yang; Ye, Fei; Liu, Gaoshan; Desforges, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause 15 to 30% of mild upper respiratory tract infections. However, no specific antiviral drugs are available to prevent or treat HCoV infections to date. Here, we developed four infectious recombinant HCoVs-OC43 (rHCoVs-OC43) which express the Renilla luciferase (Rluc) reporter gene. Among these four rHCoVs-OC43, rOC43-ns2DelRluc (generated by replacing ns2 with the Rluc gene) showed robust luciferase activity with only a slight impact on its growth characteristics. Additionally, this recombinant virus remained stable for at least 10 passages in BHK-21 cells. rOC43-ns2DelRluc was comparable to its parental wild-type virus (HCoV-OC43-WT) with respect to the quantity of the antiviral activity of chloroquine and ribavirin. We showed that chloroquine strongly inhibited HCoV-OC43 replication in vitro, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.33 μM. However, ribavirin showed inhibition of HCoV-OC43 replication only at high concentrations which may not be applicable to humans in clinical treatment, with an IC50 of 10 μM. Furthermore, using a luciferase-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening assay, we identified double-stranded-RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) and DEAD box RNA helicases (DDX3X) that exhibited antiviral activities, which were further verified by the use of HCoV-OC43-WT. Therefore, rOC43-ns2DelRluc represents a promising safe and sensitive platform for high-throughput antiviral screening and quantitative analysis of viral replication. PMID:27381385

  9. Effects of iodide on the fluorescence and activity of the hydroperoxyflavin intermediate of Vibrio harveyi luciferase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shouqin; Tu, Shiao-Chun

    2005-01-01

    The 4a-hydroperoxy-4a,5-dihydroFMN intermediate (II or HFOOH) of Vibrio harveyi luciferase is known to transform from a low quantum yield IIx to a high quantum yield (lambdamax 485 nm, uncorrected) IIy fluorescent species on exposure to excitation light. Similar results were observed with II prepared from the alphaH44A luciferase mutant, which is very weak in bioluminescence activity. Because of the rapid decay of the alphaH44A II, its true fluorescence was obscured by the more intense 520 nm fluorescence (uncorrected) from its decay product oxidized flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Potassium iodide (KI) at 0.2 M was effective in quenching the FMN fluorescence, leaving the 485 nm fluorescence of II from both the wild-type (WT) and alphaH44A luciferase readily detectable. For both II species, the luciferase-bound peroxyflavin was well shielded from KI quenching. KI also enhanced the decay rates of both the WT and alphaH44A II. For alphaH44A, the transformation of IIx to IIy can be induced by KI in the dark, and it is proposed to be a consequence of a luciferase conformational change. The WT II formed a bioluminescence-inactive complex with KI, resulting in two distinct decay time courses based on absorption changes and decreases of bioluminescence activity of II.

  10. Optical imaging of Renilla luciferase reporter gene expression in living mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhaumik, S.; Gambhir, S. S.

    2002-01-01

    Imaging reporter gene expression in living subjects is a rapidly evolving area of molecular imaging research. Studies have validated the use of reporter genes with positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), MRI, fluorescence with wild-type and mutants of green fluorescent protein, as well as bioluminescence using Firefly luciferase enzyme/protein (FL). In the current study, we validate for the first time the ability to image bioluminescence from Renilla luciferase enzyme/protein (RL) by injecting the substrate coelenterazine in living mice. A highly sensitive cooled charge-coupled device camera provides images within a few minutes of photon counting. Cells, transiently expressing the Rluc were imaged while located in the peritoneum, s.c. layer, as well as in the liver and lungs of living mice tail-vein injected with coelenterazine. Furthermore, d-luciferin (a substrate for FL) does not serve as a substrate for RL, and coelenterazine does not serve as a substrate for FL either in cell culture or in living mice. We also show that both Rluc and Fluc expression can be imaged in the same living mouse and that the kinetics of light production are distinct. The approaches validated will have direct applications to various studies where two molecular events need to be tracked, including cell trafficking of two cell populations, two gene therapy vectors, and indirect monitoring of two endogenous genes through the use of two reporter genes. PMID:11752410

  11. Effect of antiangiogenic therapy on luciferase activity in a cytomegalovirus- or HSP70-promoter-transfected M21 tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundt, Walter; Schink, Christian; Steinbach, Silke; O'Connell-Rodwell, Caitlin E.; Kiessling, Andreas; Librizzi, Damiano; Burbelko, Mykhaylo; Guccione, Samira

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effect of targeted gene therapy on heat shock protein 70 expression (Hsp70) and protein production (HSP70) in a melanoma tumor model (M21; M21-L). M21 and M21-L cells transfected with a plasmid containing the Hsp70 (Hspa1b) or the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter and the luciferase reporter gene were injected into mice; the resulting tumors grew to a size of 650 mm3. Mice (five per group) were intravenously treated with an Arg-Gly-Asp peptide-nanoparticle/Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein complex [RGD-NP/RAF(-)] or with a nanoparticle control. Bioluminescence imaging (IVIS®, Xenogen, USA) was performed at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after the treatment cycle. Western blot analysis of HSP70 protein was performed to monitor protein expression. The size of the treated M21 tumors remained fairly constant (647.8+/-103.4 mm2 at the beginning versus 704.8+/-94.4 mm3 at the end of the experiment). The size of the M21-L tumors increased, similar to the untreated control tumors. Bioluminescent imaging demonstrated that when transcription was controlled by the CMV promoter, luciferase activity decreased to 17.9%+/-4.3% of baseline values in the treated M21 tumors. When transcription was controlled by the Hsp70 promoter, the highest luciferase activity (4.5+/-0.7-fold increase over base-line values) was seen 24 h after injection in the M21 tumors; however, no luciferase activity was seen in the M21-L tumors. In accordance with bioluminescent imaging, western blot analysis showed a peak in HSP70 production at 24 h after the injection of the RGD-NP/RAF(-) complex in the M21 tumors; however, no HSP70 protein induction was seen in the M21-L tumors. Thus, targeted antiangiogenic therapy can induce Hsp70 expression and HSP70 protein in melanoma tumors.

  12. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  13. High-throughput Analysis of Mammalian Olfactory Receptors: Measurement of Receptor Activation via Luciferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Trimmer, Casey; Snyder, Lindsey L.; Mainland, Joel D.

    2014-01-01

    Odorants create unique and overlapping patterns of olfactory receptor activation, allowing a family of approximately 1,000 murine and 400 human receptors to recognize thousands of odorants. Odorant ligands have been published for fewer than 6% of human receptors1-11. This lack of data is due in part to difficulties functionally expressing these receptors in heterologous systems. Here, we describe a method for expressing the majority of the olfactory receptor family in Hana3A cells, followed by high-throughput assessment of olfactory receptor activation using a luciferase reporter assay. This assay can be used to (1) screen panels of odorants against panels of olfactory receptors; (2) confirm odorant/receptor interaction via dose response curves; and (3) compare receptor activation levels among receptor variants. In our sample data, 328 olfactory receptors were screened against 26 odorants. Odorant/receptor pairs with varying response scores were selected and tested in dose response. These data indicate that a screen is an effective method to enrich for odorant/receptor pairs that will pass a dose response experiment, i.e. receptors that have a bona fide response to an odorant. Therefore, this high-throughput luciferase assay is an effective method to characterize olfactory receptors—an essential step toward a model of odor coding in the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:24961834

  14. Stable Tagging of Rhizobium meliloti with the Firefly Luciferase Gene for Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Cebolla, Angel; Ruiz-Berraquero, Francisco; Palomares, Antonio Jose

    1993-01-01

    A system for stable tagging of gram-negative bacteria with the firefly luciferase gene, luc, is described. A previously constructed fusion constitutively expressing luc from the λpR promoter was used. Stable integration into the bacterial genome was achieved by use of mini-Tn5 delivery vectors. The procedure developed was applied for tagging of representative gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Rhizobium meliloti, Pseudomonas putida, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The system permitted the detection of tagged R. meliloti in the presence of more than 105 CFU per plate without the use of any selective markers (such as antibiotic resistance genes). No significant differences in growth rates or soil survival were found between the marked strain and the wild-type strain. Studies of bioluminescent R. meliloti also revealed a good correlation between cell biomass and bioluminescence. The firefly luciferase tagging system is an easy, safe, and sensitive method for the detection and enumeration of bacteria in the environment. Images PMID:16349015

  15. The evolution of the adenylate-forming protein family in beetles: multiple luciferase gene paralogues in fireflies and glow-worms.

    PubMed

    Day, John C; Goodall, Tim I; Bailey, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    Bioluminescence in beetles is dependent upon the enzyme luciferase. It has been hypothesised luciferase evolved from a fatty acyl-CoA synthetase gene deriving a novel bioluminescent function (neofunctionalization) after a gene duplication event. We evaluated this hypothesis within a phylogenetic framework using independent evidence obtained from the genome of Tribolium castaneum, published luciferase genes and novel luciferase and luciferase-like sequences. This phylogenetic study provides evidence for a large gene family of luciferase and luciferase-like paralogues in bioluminescent and non-bioluminescent beetles. All luciferase sequences formed a clade supporting a protoluciferase existing prior to the divergence of the Lampyridae, Elateridae and Phengodidae (Elateroidea). Multiple luciferase genes were identified from members of the Photurinae and the Luciolinae indicating complex gene duplication events within lampyrid genomes. The majority of luciferase residues were identified to be under purifying selection as opposed to positive selection. We conclude that beetle luciferase may have arisen from a process of subfunctionalization as opposed to neofunctionalization early on in the evolution of the Elateroidea.

  16. Latent luciferase activity in the fruit fly revealed by a synthetic luciferin

    PubMed Central

    Mofford, David M.; Reddy, Gadarla Randheer; Miller, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Beetle luciferases are thought to have evolved from fatty acyl-CoA synthetases present in all insects. Both classes of enzymes activate fatty acids with ATP to form acyl-adenylate intermediates, but only luciferases can activate and oxidize d-luciferin to emit light. Here we show that the Drosophila fatty acyl-CoA synthetase CG6178, which cannot use d-luciferin as a substrate, is able to catalyze light emission from the synthetic luciferin analog CycLuc2. Bioluminescence can be detected from the purified protein, live Drosophila Schneider 2 cells, and from mammalian cells transfected with CG6178. Thus, the nonluminescent fruit fly possesses an inherent capacity for bioluminescence that is only revealed upon treatment with a xenobiotic molecule. This result expands the scope of bioluminescence and demonstrates that the introduction of a new substrate can unmask latent enzymatic activity that differs significantly from an enzyme’s normal function without requiring mutation. PMID:24616520

  17. Development of a stably transfected estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene assay in the human T47D breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Legler, J; van den Brink, C E; Brouwer, A; Murk, A J; van der Saag, P T; Vethaak, A D; van der Burg, B

    1999-03-01

    Development of an estrogen receptor-mediated, chemical-activated luciferase reporter gene-expression (ER-CALUX) assay was attempted by stable transfection of luciferase reporter genes in a number of cell lines. Stable transfection of the chimeric Gal4 estrogen receptor and luciferase gene constructs in MCF-7 breast cancer and Hepa.1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cell lines, as well as transfection of a newly constructed luciferase reporter gene pEREtata-Luc in the ECC-1 human endometrial cell line, resulted in constitutive, non-estradiol-inducible clones. Stable transfection of pEREtata-Luc in the T47D breast cancer cell line, however, resulted in an extremely sensitive, highly responsive cell line. Following a 24-h exposure to estradiol (E2), stably transfected T47D.Luc cells demonstrated a detection limit of 0.5 pM, an EC50 of 6 pM, and a maximum induction of 100-fold relative to solvent controls. No clear reduction in responsiveness has been found over extended culture periods (50 passages). Anti-estrogens ICI 182,780, TCDD, and tamoxifen inhibited the estradiol-mediated luciferase induction. Genistein, nonylphenol, and o,p'DDT were the most potent (pseudo-)estrogens tested in this system (EC50 100, 260, and 660 nM, respectively). Determination of interactive effects of the (pseudo-)estrogens nonylphenol, o,p'DDT, chlordane, endosulfan, dieldrin, and methoxychlor revealed that, in combination with 3 pM E2, (pseudo-)estrogens were additive. Slightly more than additive effects (less than 2-fold) were found for combinations of dieldrin and endosulfan tested in the range of 3 to 6 microM. At these concentrations, the combination of endosulfan and chlordane demonstrated additive interaction. The ER-CALUX assay with T47D cells can provide a sensitive, responsive, and rapid in vitro system to detect and measure substances with potential (anti-)estrogenic activity.

  18. Luciferase Genes as Reporter Reactions: How to Use Them in Molecular Biology?

    PubMed

    Cevenini, L; Calabretta, M M; Calabria, D; Roda, A; Michelini, E

    2016-01-01

    : The latest advances in molecular biology have made available several biotechnological tools that take advantage of the high detectability and quantum efficiency of bioluminescence (BL), with an ever-increasing number of novel applications in environmental, pharmaceutical, food, and forensic fields. Indeed, BL proteins are being used to develop ultrasensitive binding assays and cell-based assays, thanks to their high detectability and to the availability of highly sensitive BL instruments. The appealing aspect of molecular biology tools relying on BL reactions is their general applicability in both in vitro assays, such as cell cultures or purified proteins, and in vivo settings, such as in whole-animal BL imaging. The aim of this chapter is to provide the reader with an overview of state-of-the-art bioluminescent tools based on luciferase genes, highlighting molecular biology strategies that have been applied so far, together with some selected examples.

  19. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Masser, Anna E.; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon‐optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half‐lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano‐Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat‐shock promoter (PCYC1–HSE), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C‐terminus of a temperature‐sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26860732

  20. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Masser, Anna E; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan; Andréasson, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon-optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half-lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano-Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in < 50 cells. Using the unstable yNlucPEST to report on the rapid and transient expression of a heat-shock promoter (PCYC1-HSE ), we found a close match between the intensity of the bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C-terminus of a temperature-sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Autonomous Bioluminescent Expression of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) in a Mammalian Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan M.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Ripp, Steven; Baek, Seung J.; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE) whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH2) was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp) from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background. Conclusions/Significance The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies. PMID:20805991

  2. Tracking of dendritic cell migration into lymph nodes using molecular imaging with sodium iodide symporter and enhanced firefly luciferase genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Won; Yoon, Seung Yun; Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Choi, Yoon Ju; Lee, Hong Je; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Lee, Jaetae

    2015-05-14

    We sought to evaluate the feasibility of molecular imaging using the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene as a reporter, in addition to the enhanced firefly luciferase (effluc) gene, for tracking dendritic cell (DCs) migration in living mice. A murine dendritic cell line (DC2.4) co-expressing hNIS and effluc genes (DC/NF) was established. For the DC-tracking study, mice received either parental DCs or DC/NF cells in the left or right footpad, respectively, and combined I-124 PET/CT and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were performed. In vivo PET/CT imaging with I-124 revealed higher activity of the radiotracer in the draining popliteal lymph nodes (DPLN) of the DC/NF injection site at day 1 than DC injection site (p < 0.05). The uptake value further increased at day 4 (p < 0.005). BLI also demonstrated migration of DC/NF cells to the DPLNs at day 1 post-injection, and signals at the DPLNs were much higher at day 4. These data support the feasibility of hNIS reporter gene imaging in the tracking of DC migration to lymphoid organs in living mice. DCs expressing the NIS reporter gene could be a useful tool to optimize various strategies of cell-based immunotherapy.

  3. GENERATION OF TWO NOVEL CELL LINES THAT STABLY EXPRESS HAR AND FIREFLY LUCIFERASE GENES FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of Two Novel Cell Lines that Stably Express hAR and Firefly Luciferase Genes for Endocrine Screening
    K.L. Bobseine*1, W.R. Kelce2, P.C. Hartig*1, and L.E. Gray, Jr.1
    1USEPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC, 2Searle, Reproductive Toxicology Divi...

  4. [Comparison of the relative luciferase activity in secondary CEF by different heterogenous strong promoters, MDV gB promoter and the composed promoters].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ya-Feng; Ge, Fei-Fei; Xu, Xue-Qing; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2006-04-01

    To improve the protection efficiency of the recombinant Marek' s disease viruses (MDV) in chickens with or without maternal antibodies,the work of selecting the optimal promoters for the construction of recombinant MDV was carried out. Combined with the efficient genetic manipulation, the composed promoters was constructed by use of the MDV gB core promoter with the regulatory elements from the early immediately promoter and enhancer of hCMV, the promoter and enhancer of SV40 or the partial enhancer of hCMV. And these composed promoters were ligased to the luciferase to construct the eukaryotic expressing vectors and named PhCMV-gB, Psv-gB and Pen-gB, respectively. In vitro, these vectors and internal standard plasmid (pSV-beta-LacZ) were transiently co-transfected into secondary CEF by FuGene 6 Transfection Reagent. Furthermore, cells were harvested 48 hours after transfection. Then the luciferase activity was detected by a luciferase assay kit, at the same time, the beta-galactosidase enzyme activity was detected by a beta-galactosidase enzyme assay kit, and the luciferase activity was corrected by the beta-galactosidase enzyme activity to get the relative luciferase activity. The relative luciferase activity was used as the transcriptional activity. By comparison of the relative luciferase activity of every promoter, it was found that these composed promoters could more effectively drive the reporter gene expression than the full legth of gB promoter did. Among them, PhCMV-gB robustly drove the reporter gene expression. On the other hand, PSV-gB and Pen-gB appeared to have the same strength; But compared with the commercial strong promoters, the transcriptional activity of the composed promoter were less than as or the same as that of the strong promoters. Therefore, at a sense, it can be proposed that these composed promoters have not only the characteristic of MDV gB promoter, but also that of the commercial strong promoters. These provide the choices for

  5. Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Tadatsugu

    2007-05-21

    Interactions between luciferase and a nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface were explored by molecular-dynamics simulations. The structural changes in the active-site residues, the residues affecting the luciferin binding, and the residues affecting the bioluminescence color were smaller on the nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface than on both a hydrophobic Si surface and a hydrophilic Si surface. The nanofabrication and wet-treatment techniques are expected to prevent the decrease in activity of luciferase on the Si surface.

  6. Localization of the active site of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase, using two-quantum affinity modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benimetskaya, L. Z.; Gitelzon, I. I.; Kozionov, Andrew L.; Novozhilov, S. Y.; Petushkov, V. N.; Rodionova, N. S.; Stockman, Mark I.

    1991-11-01

    For the first time the method of two-quantum affinity modification has been employed to probe the structure of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase. Position of the flavin-binding site of this enzyme, which was previously unknown, has been established. The obtained data indicate that the flavin site is positioned on the (alpha) -subunit. The closest contact of the protein chain of the enzyme with the chromophoric group of the flavin takes place near 80 +/- 10 and 120 +/- 10 amino acid residues; the regions 50 +/- 10 and 215 +/- 10 are also close to the flavin. The established localization does not contradict suggestions on positions of the flavin and phosphate sites of the bacterial luciferase, which had earlier been made from the data on evolutionary stability of various luciferases. The present method can, in principle, be applied to a great number of enzymes, including all flavin-dependent enzymes. Enzymatic catalysis has high speed and specificity. Creation of a method of determination of the elements of the primary structure of a protein, making up the active site (in which substratum conversion occurs), could be a significant advance in clearing up mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis. It was proposed to localize active sites of the enzymes, whose substrata are chromophores, using this method of two-quantum affinity modification. An enzyme- substratum complex is irradiated with laser light of sufficiently long wavelength ((lambda) 300 nm) which is not directly absorbed by the enzyme. Two-quantum quasiresonant excitation of the substratum activates it to the state with energy 5-7 eV, which is then radiativelessly transferred to neighboring protein groups. This energy exceeds the energy of activation of peptide bond breakage. Therefore, the enzyme will be disrupted in the vicinity of its active site. In the present paper the above approach has been implemented for the first time. Information has been obtained about the position of the flavin-binding site of bacterial

  7. Identification of circadian-clock-regulated enhancers and genes of Drosophila melanogaster by transposon mobilization and luciferase reporting of cyclical gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Stempfl, Thomas; Vogel, Marion; Szabo, Gisela; Wülbeck, Corinna; Liu, Jian; Hall, Jeffrey C; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    A new way was developed to isolate rhythmically expressed genes in Drosophila by modifying the classic enhancer-trap method. We constructed a P element containing sequences that encode firefly luciferase as a reporter for oscillating gene expression in live flies. After generation of 1176 autosomal insertion lines, bioluminescence screening revealed rhythmic reporter-gene activity in 6% of these strains. Rhythmically fluctuating reporter levels were shown to be altered by clock mutations in genes that specify various circadian transcription factors or repressors. Intriguingly, rhythmic luminescence in certain lines was affected by only a subset of the pacemaker mutations. By isolating genes near 13 of the transposon insertions and determining their temporal mRNA expression pattern, we found that four of the loci adjacent to the trapped enhancers are rhythmically expressed. Therefore, this approach is suitable for identifying genetic loci regulated by the circadian clock. One transposon insert caused a mutation in the rhythmically expressed gene numb. This novel numb allele, as well as previously described ones, was shown to affect the fly's rhythm of locomotor activity. In addition to its known role in cell fate determination, this gene and the phosphotyrosine-binding protein it encodes are likely to function in the circadian system. PMID:11861563

  8. The Evolution of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) as a Real-Time Bioreporter

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby; Rogers, Alexandra; Crossley, Robert; Price, Sarah; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted. PMID:22368493

  9. Fimbrolide Natural Products Disrupt Bioluminescence of Vibrio By Targeting Autoinducer Biosynthesis and Luciferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weining; Lorenz, Nicola; Jung, Kirsten; Sieber, Stephan A

    2016-01-18

    Vibrio is a model organism for the study of quorum sensing (QS) signaling and is used to identify QS-interfering drugs. Naturally occurring fimbrolides are important tool compounds known to affect QS in various organisms; however, their cellular targets have so far remained elusive. Here we identify the irreversible fimbrolide targets in the proteome of living V. harveyi and V. campbellii via quantitative mass spectrometry utilizing customized probes. Among the major hits are two protein targets with essential roles in Vibrio QS and bioluminescence. LuxS, responsible for autoinducer 2 biosynthesis, and LuxE, a subunit of the luciferase complex, were both covalently modified at their active-site cysteines leading to inhibition of activity. The identification of LuxE unifies previous reports suggesting inhibition of bioluminescence downstream of the signaling cascade and thus contributes to a better mechanistic understanding of these QS tool compounds.

  10. Coupling ex vivo electroporation of mouse retinas and luciferase reporter assays to assess rod-specific promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Boulling, Arnaud; Escher, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Ex vivo electroporation of mouse retinas is an established tool to modulate gene expression and to study cell type-specific gene expression. Here we coupled ex vivo electroporation to luciferase reporter assays to facilitate the study of rod-photoreceptor-specific gene promoters. The activity of the rod-specific proximal bovine rhodopsin promoter was significantly increased in C57BL/6J wild-type retinas at postnatal days 1 and 7 by 3.4-fold and 8.7-fold respectively. In C57BL/6J Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) retinas, where the rod photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor Nr2e3 is not expressed, a significant increase by 2.5-fold was only observed at postnatal day 7. Cone-specific S-opsin promoter activity was not modulated in C57BL/6J wild-type and Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) retinas. Taken together, we describe an easily implementable protocol to assess rod-specific promoter activity in a physiological context resembling that of the developing postnatal mouse retina.

  11. Photoactivation of a psoralen-blocked luciferase gene by blue light.

    PubMed

    Stafforst, Thorsten; Stadler, Jens M

    2013-11-18

    A single psoralen cross-link completely blocks expression of a gene. An aminopyrene derivative has been found that allows the efficient light-triggered activation of cross-linked genes by UV or blue light. This paves the way to apply such psoralen cross-links for the photocleavable protection of nucleic acids.

  12. A method to rapidly and accurately compare relative efficacies of non-invasive imaging reporter genes in a mouse model, and its application to luciferase reporters

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Jose S.; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Herschman, Harvey R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Our goal is to develop a simple, quantitative, robust method to compare the efficacy of imaging reporter genes in culture and in vivo. We describe an adenoviral vector-liver transduction procedure, and compare the luciferase reporter efficacies. Procedures Alternative reporter genes are expressed in a common adenoviral vector. Vector amounts used in vivo are based on cell culture titrations, ensuring the same transduction efficacy is used for each vector. After imaging, in vivo and in vitro values are normalized to hepatic vector transduction using quantitative real-time PCR. Results We assayed standard firefly luciferase (FLuc), enhanced firefly luciferase (EFLuc), luciferase 2 (Luc2), humanized Renilla luciferase (hRLuc), Renilla luciferase 8.6-535 (RLuc8.6), and a membrane-bound Gaussia luciferase variant (extGLuc) in cell culture and in vivo. We observed a greater that 100-fold increase in bioluminescent signal for both EFLuc and Luc2 when compared to FLuc, and a greater than 106-fold increase for RLuc8.6 when compared to hRLuc. ExtGLuc was not detectable in liver. Conclusions Our findings contrast, in some cases, with conclusions drawn in prior comparisons of these reporter genes, and demonstrate the need for a standardized method to evaluate alternative reporter genes in vivo. Our procedure can be adapted for reporter genes that utilize alternative imaging modalities (fluorescence, bioluminescence, MRI, SPECT, PET). PMID:21850545

  13. Bioluminescent Reaction by Immobilized Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryuta; Takahama, Eriko; Iinuma, Masataka; Ikeda, Takeshi; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    We have investigated an effect of immobilization of luciferase molecules at the optical fiber end on a bioluminescent reaction. The time dependence of measured count rates of emitted photons has been analyzed by fitting with numerical solution of differential equations including the effect of the product-inhibitor and the deactivation of the luciferase. Through the analysis, we have successfully extracted kinetic constants such as, reaction rate, number of active luciferase molecules, etc. Ratio of active molecules to total luciferase molecules in immobilization was one order of magnitude lower than that in solution. The reaction rate of the bioluminescent process was also different from the one of free luciferase in solution.

  14. Structural evolution of luciferase activity in Zophobas mealworm AMP/CoA-ligase (protoluciferase) through site-directed mutagenesis of the luciferin binding site.

    PubMed

    Prado, R A; Barbosa, J A; Ohmiya, Y; Viviani, V R

    2011-07-01

    The structural origin and evolution of bioluminescent activity of beetle luciferases from AMP/CoA ligases remains a mystery. Previously we cloned the luciferase-like enzyme from Zophobas morio mealworm, a reasonable protoluciferase model that could shine light on this mystery. Kinetic characterization and studies with D- and L-luciferin and their adenylates showed that stereoselectivity constitutes a critical feature for the origin of luciferase activity in AMP/CoA ligases. Comparison of the primary structures and modeling studies of this protoluciferase and the three main families of beetle luciferases showed that the carboxylic acid substrate binding site of this enzyme is smaller and more hydrophobic than the luciferin binding site of beetle luciferases, showing several substitutions of otherwise conserved residues. Thus, here we performed a site-directed mutagenesis survey of the carboxylic binding site motifs of the protoluciferase by replacing their residues by the respective conserved ones found in beetle luciferases in order to identify the structural determinants of luciferase/oxygenase activity. Although most of the substitutions had negative impact on the luminescence activity of the protoluciferase, only the substitution I327T improved the luminescence activity, resulting in a broad and 15 nm blue-shifted luminescence spectrum. Such substitution indicates the importance of the loop motif 322YGMSEI327 (341YGLTETT347 in Photinus pyralis luciferase) for luciferase activity, and indicates a possible route for the evolution of bioluminescence function of beetle luciferases.

  15. Determination of relative assay response factors for toxic chlorinated and bromiated dioxins/furans using an enyme immunoassay (EIA) and a chemically-activated luciferase gene expression cell bioassay (CALUX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of dioxin-like activity requires knowledge of both the concentration and toxicity to evaluate the risk of adverse human health and environmental effects. The dioxin-like response of several polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PBDDs/Fs) and polybrominated/chlori...

  16. Generation of a recombinant classical swine fever virus stably expressing the firefly luciferase gene for quantitative antiviral assay.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Li, Yongfeng; Chen, Jianing; Li, Chao; Huang, Junhua; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2014-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is a highly contagious swine disease leading to significant economic losses worldwide. Vaccines are widely used to control the disease, and no CSFV-specific antivirals are currently available. To facilitate anti-CSFV molecule discovery, we developed a reporter virus CSFV-N(pro)Fluc stably expressing the firefly luciferase (Fluc) gene in the N(pro) gene. The reporter virus enabled more sensitive and convenient detection of the N(pro) protein expression and the viral replication by luciferase reporter assay than by traditional methods. The CSFV N(pro) protein was detectable as early as 4.5h post-infection. As a proof-of-concept for its utility in rapid antiviral screening, this reporter virus was used to quantify anti-CSFV neutralizing antibodies of 50 swine sera and to assess 12 small interfering RNAs targeting different regions of the CSFV genome. The results were comparable to those obtained by traditional methods. Taken together, the reporter virus CSFV-N(pro)Fluc represents a useful tool for rapid and quantitative screening and evaluation of antivirals against CSFV.

  17. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of luciferase gene mRNA requires CRM1/Exportin1 and RanGTPase.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tominori; Hashimoto, Iwao; Nishikawa, Masao; Yamada, Hisao

    2009-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev (regulator of the expression of the virion) protein was shown to reduce the expression level of the co-transfected luciferase reporter gene (luc+) introduced to monitor transfection efficiency. We studied the mechanism of the inhibitory Rev effect. The effect, caused by nuclear retention of luc+ mRNA, was reversed if rev had a point mutation that makes its nuclear export signal (NES) unable to associate with cellular transport factors. The Rev NES receptor CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-specific inhibitor, leptomycin B, blocked luc+ mRNA export. This finding was also supported by the overexpression of delta CAN, another specific CRM1 inhibitor that caused inhibition of luciferase gene expression. Experiments involving tsBN2 cells, which have a temperature-sensitive RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation 1) allele, demonstrated that luc+ expression required generation of the GTP-bound form of RanGTPase (RanGTP) by RCC1. The constitutive transport element (CTE)-mediated nuclear export of luc+ mRNA was found to also depend upon RanGTP. Nuclear export of luc+ mRNA is thus suggested to involve CRM1 and RanGTP, which Rev employs to transport viral mRNA. The Rev effect is therefore considered to involve competition between two molecules for common transport factors.

  18. Food-associated estrogenic compounds induce estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase gene expression in transgenic male mice.

    PubMed

    Ter Veld, Marcel G R; Zawadzka, E; van den Berg, J H J; van der Saag, Paul T; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Murk, Albertinka J

    2008-07-30

    The present paper aims at clarifying to what extent seven food-associated compounds, shown before to be estrogenic in vitro, can induce estrogenic effects in male mice with an estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated luciferase (luc) reporter gene system. The luc induction was determined in different tissues 8h after dosing the ER-luc male mice intraperitoneally (IP) or 14h after oral dosing. Estradiol-propionate (EP) was used as a positive control at 0.3 and 1mg/kg bodyweight (bw), DMSO as solvent control. The food-associated estrogenic compounds tested at non-toxic doses were bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP) (both at 10 and 50mg/kgbw), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE; at 5 and 25mg/kgbw), quercetin (at 1.66 and 16.6mg/kgbw), di-isoheptyl phthalate (DIHP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) all at 30 and 100mg/kgbw. In general IP dosing resulted in higher luc inductions than oral dosing. EP induced luc activity in the liver in a statistically significant dose-related way with the highest induction of all compounds tested which was 20,000 times higher than the induction by the DMSO-control. NP, DDE, DEHA and DIHP did not induce luc activity in any of the tissues tested. BPA induced luc in the liver up to 420 times via both exposure routes. BPA, DEHP and quercetin induced luc activity in the liver after oral exposure. BPA (50mg/kgbw IP) also induced luc activity in the testis, kidneys and tibia. The current study reveals that biomarker-responses in ER-luc male mice occur after a single oral exposure to food-associated estrogenic model compounds at exposure levels 10 to 10(4) times higher than the established TDI's for some of these compounds. Given the facts that (i) the present study did not include chronic exposure and that (ii) simultaneous exposure to multiple estrogenic compounds may be a realistic exposure scenario, it remains to be seen whether this margin is sufficiently high.

  19. Exploiting NanoLuc luciferase for smartphone-based bioluminescence cell biosensor for (anti)-inflammatory activity and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cevenini, Luca; Calabretta, Maria Maddalena; Lopreside, Antonia; Tarantino, Giuseppe; Tassoni, Annalisa; Ferri, Maura; Roda, Aldo; Michelini, Elisa

    2016-12-01

    The availability of smartphones with high-performance digital image sensors and processing power has completely reshaped the landscape of point-of-need analysis. Thanks to the high maturity level of reporter gene technology and the availability of several bioluminescent proteins with improved features, we were able to develop a bioluminescence smartphone-based biosensing platform exploiting the highly sensitive NanoLuc luciferase as reporter. A 3D-printed smartphone-integrated cell biosensor based on genetically engineered Hek293T cells was developed. Quantitative assessment of (anti)-inflammatory activity and toxicity of liquid samples was performed with a simple and rapid add-and-measure procedure. White grape pomace extracts, known to contain several bioactive compounds, were analyzed, confirming the suitability of the smartphone biosensing platform for analysis of untreated complex biological matrices. Such approach could meet the needs of small medium enterprises lacking fully equipped laboratories for first-level safety tests and rapid screening of new bioactive products. Graphical abstract Smartphone-based bioluminescence cell biosensor.

  20. Assessment of shikonin for potential estrogenic activity by dual-luciferase reporter based bioluminescent measurements in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Ping-Ping

    2011-02-01

    Shikonin, an active component of Lithospermum erythrorhizon Sieb. et Zucc., shows multiple pharmacological properties. However, the estrogenic activity of shikonin is remaining unclear. We assessed the potential estrogenic activity of shikonin with dual-luciferase reporter assay and bioluminescent measurements, by using transient cotransfection with estrogen dependent plasmid pERE-TK-Luc and internal control plasmid pRL-TK in MCF-7 cells. Estrogenic activity of shikonin, even at high concentration did not alter significantly compared to negative control (p > 0.05) and were significantly lower than those with E2 (p < 0.01). Concluding, shikonin demonstrates no estrogenic activity in vitro.

  1. A luciferase reporter gene assay and aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 genotype predict the LD{sub 50} of polychlorinated biphenyls in avian species

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Gillian E.; Farmahin, Reza; Crump, Doug; Jones, Stephanie P.; Klein, Jeff; Konstantinov, Alex; Potter, Dave; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2012-09-15

    Birds differ in sensitivity to the embryotoxic effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which complicates environmental risk assessments for these chemicals. Recent research has shown that the identities of amino acid residues 324 and 380 in the avian aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1) ligand binding domain (LBD) are primarily responsible for differences in avian species sensitivity to selected dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans. A luciferase reporter gene (LRG) assay was developed in our laboratory to measure AHR1-mediated induction of a cytochrome P450 1A5 reporter gene in COS-7 cells transfected with different avian AHR1 constructs. In the present study, the LRG assay was used to measure the concentration-dependent effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and PCBs 126, 77, 105 and 118 on luciferase activity in COS-7 cells transfected with AHR1 constructs representative of 86 avian species in order to predict their sensitivity to PCB-induced embryolethality and the relative potency of PCBs in these species. The results of the LRG assay indicate that the identity of amino acid residues 324 and 380 in the AHR1 LBD are the major determinants of avian species sensitivity to PCBs. The relative potency of PCBs did not differ greatly among AHR1 constructs. Luciferase activity was significantly correlated with embryolethality data obtained from the literature (R{sup 2} ≥ 0.87, p < 0.0001). Thus, the LRG assay in combination with the knowledge of a species' AHR1 LBD sequence can be used to predict PCB-induced embryolethality in potentially any avian species of interest without the use of lethal methods on a large number of individuals. -- Highlights: ► PCB embryolethality in birds can be predicted from a species' AHR1 genotype. ► The reporter gene assay is useful for predicting species sensitivity to PCBs. ► The relative potency of PCBs does not appear to differ between AHR1 genotypes. ► Contamination of PCB 105 and PCB 118 did not affect their

  2. Construction and testing of a bacterial luciferase reporter gene system for in vivo measurement of nonsense suppression in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Weiser, J; Buriánková, K; Kalachová, L; Branny, P; Pernodet, J L

    2006-01-01

    A reporter gene system, based on luciferase genes from Vibrio harvei, was constructed for measurement of translation nonsense suppression in Streptomyces. Using the site-directed mutagenesis the TCA codon in position 13 of the luxB gene was replaced by all of the three stop codons individually. By cloning of luxA and luxB genes under the control of strong constitutive Streptomyces promoter ermE* in plasmid pUWL201 we created Wluxl with the wild-type sequence and pWlux2, pWlux3 and pWlux4 plasmids containing TGA-, TAG- and TAA-stop codons, respectively. Streptomyces lividans TK 24 was transformed with the plasmids and the reporter system was tested by growth of the strain in the presence of streptomycin as a translation accuracy modulator. Streptomycin increased nonsense suppression on UAA nearly 10-fold and more than 20-fold on UAG. On the other hand, UGA, the most frequent stop signal in Streptomyces, the effect was negligible.

  3. Design of disulfide bridge as an alternative mechanism for color shift in firefly luciferase and development of secreted luciferase.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Mahboobeh; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2011-07-01

    The bioluminescence reaction, which uses luciferin, Mg(2+)-ATP and molecular oxygen to yield an electronically excited oxyluciferin, is carried out by luciferase and emits visible light. The bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases is determined by the luciferase structure and assay conditions. It is proposed that the stability of a protein can be increased by introduction of disulfide bridge that decreases the configurational entropy of unfolding. A disulfide bridge is introduced into Photinus pyralis firefly luciferase to make three separate mutant enzymes with a single bridge. Moreover, C(81)-A(105)C mutant luciferase was modified and successfully secreted to the extracellular medium. By introduction of disulfide bridges using site-directed mutagenesis in Photinus pyralis luciferase the color of emitted light was changed to red and the optimum temperature of activity was also increased (up to 10 °C more than wild type). Amongst mutants with a disulfide bridge, P(451)C-V(469)C and L(306)C-L(309)C mutants exhibit a single peak in the red region of the spectrum at pH 7.8. It is worthwhile to note that with the design of a secreted luciferase, the increased optimum temperature, thermostability and emission of red light might make mutant luciferase suitable reporters for the study of gene expression in high through-put screening.

  4. Establishment of a luciferase assay-based screening system: Fumitremorgin C selectively inhibits cellular proliferation of immortalized astrocytes expressing an active form of AKT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lei; Sasai, Ken Akagi, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Shinya

    2008-08-29

    The AKT pathway is frequently activated in glioblastoma, and as such, inhibitors of this pathway could prove very useful as anti-glioblastoma therapies. Here we established immortalized astrocytes expressing Renilla luciferase as well as those expressing both an active form of AKT and firefly luciferase. Since both luciferase activities represent the numbers of corresponding cell lines, novel inhibitors of the AKT pathway can be identified by treating co-cultures containing the two types of luciferase-expressing cells with individual compounds. Indeed, such a screening system succeeded in identifying fumitremorgin C as an efficient inhibitor of the AKT pathway, which was further confirmed by the ability of fumitremorgin C to selectively inhibit the growth of immortalized astrocytes expressing an active form of AKT. The present study proposes a broadly applicable approach for identifying therapeutic agents that target the pathways and/or molecules responsible for cancer development.

  5. GENERATION OF TWO STABLE CELL LINES THAT EXPRESS HER-ALPHA OR HER-ALPHA AND -BETA AND FIREFLY LUCIFERASE GENES FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of Two Stable Cell Lines that Express hERa or
    hERa and b and Firefly Luciferase Genes for Endocrine Screening

    K.L. Bobseine*1, W.R. Kelce2, P.C. Hartig*1, and L.E. Gray, Jr.1

    1USEPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC, 2Searle, Reprod...

  6. Construction of a cytosolic firefly luciferase reporter cassette for use in PCR-mediated gene deletion and fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, W B; Rome, C M; Hjortsø, M A; Benton, M G

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring promoter response to environmental changes using reporter systems has provided invaluable information regarding cellular state. With the development of in vivo luciferase reporter systems, inexpensive, sensitive and accurate promoter assays have been developed without the variability reported between in vitro samplings. Current luciferase reporter systems, however, are largely inflexible to modifications to the promoter of interest. To overcome problems in flexibility and stability of these expression vectors, we report the creation of a novel vector system which introduces a cytosol-localized Photinus pyralis luciferase [LUC*(-SKL)] capable of one-step, in vivo measurements into a promoter-reporter system via PCR-based gene deletion and fusion. After introduction of the reporter under HUG1 promoter control, cytosolic localization was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The dose-response of this novel construct was then compared with that of a similar HUG1Δ::yEGFP1 promoter-reporter system and shown to give a similar response pattern.

  7. Firefly luciferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Leitão, João M M; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2010-10-05

    Firefly luciferase (Luc) is the most studied of the luciferase enzymes and the mechanism and kinetics of the reactions catalyzed by this enzyme have been relatively well characterized. Luc catalyzes the bioluminescent reaction involving firefly luciferin (D-LH(2)), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), magnesium ion and molecular oxygen with the formation of an electronically excited species (oxyluciferin), inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), carbon dioxide and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Luc also catalyzes other non-luminescent reactions, which can interfere with the light production mechanism. Following electronic relaxation, the excited oxyluciferin emits radiation in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum (550-570 nm). Among the various possible compounds, several classes of inhibitory substances interfere with the activity of this enzyme: here, we consider substrate-related compounds, intermediates or products of the Luc catalyzed reactions, in addition to anesthetics and, fatty acids. This review summarizes the main inhibitors of Luc and the corresponding inhibition kinetic parameters.

  8. Development of a Suite of Luciferase Gene Probes for the Screening and Detection of Marine Bioluminescent Systems and Organisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    microorganisms in order to supplement bathyphotometric luminescence measurements with coincident real-time molecular data. (3) to conduct real - time PCR quantification of luciferase mRNA in dinoflagellates under different growth stages.

  9. Relationship of the luminous bacterial symbiont of the Caribbean flashlight fish, Kryptophanaron alfredi (family Anomalopidae) to other luminous bacteria based on bacterial luciferase (luxA) genes.

    PubMed

    Haygood, M G

    1990-01-01

    Flashlight fishes (family Anomalopidae) have light organs that contain luminous bacterial symbionts. Although the symbionts have not yet been successfully cultured, the luciferase genes have been cloned directly from the light organ of the Caribbean species, Kryptophanaron alfredi. The goal of this project was to evaluate the relationship of the symbiont to free-living luminous bacteria by comparison of genes coding for bacterial luciferase (lux genes). Hybridization of a lux AB probe from the Kryptophanaron alfredi symbiont to DNAs from 9 strains (8 species) of luminous bacteria showed that none of the strains tested had lux genes highly similar to the symbiont. The most similar were a group consisting of Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio splendidus and Vibrio orientalis. The nucleotide sequence of the luciferase alpha subunit gene luxA) of the Kryptophanaron alfredi symbiont was determined in order to do a more detailed comparison with published luxA sequences from Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio fischeri and Photobacterium leiognathi. The hybridization results, sequence comparisons and the mol% G + C of the Kryptophanaron alfredi symbiont luxA gene suggest that the symbiont may be considered as a new species of luminous Vibrio related to Vibrio harveyi.

  10. Identification of mutant firefly luciferases that efficiently utilize aminoluciferins.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Katryn R; Mofford, David M; Reddy, Gadarla R; Miller, Stephen C

    2011-12-23

    Firefly luciferase-catalyzed light emission from D-luciferin is widely used as a reporter of gene expression and enzymatic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Despite the power of bioluminescence for imaging and drug discovery, light emission from firefly luciferase is fundamentally limited by the physical properties of the D-luciferin substrate. We and others have synthesized aminoluciferin analogs that exhibit light emission at longer wavelengths than D-luciferin and have increased affinity for luciferase. However, although these substrates can emit an intense initial burst of light that approaches that of D-luciferin, this is followed by much lower levels of sustained light output. Here we describe the creation of mutant luciferases that yield improved sustained light emission with aminoluciferins in both lysed and live mammalian cells, allowing the use of aminoluciferins for cell-based bioluminescence experiments.

  11. Remote detection of human toxicants in real time using a human-optimized, bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette bioreporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan; Webb, James; Ripp, Steven; Patterson, Stacey; Sayler, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, human toxicant bioavailability screening has been forced to proceed in either a high throughput fashion using prokaryotic or lower eukaryotic targets with minimal applicability to humans, or in a more expensive, lower throughput manner that uses fluorescent or bioluminescent human cells to directly provide human bioavailability data. While these efforts are often sufficient for basic scientific research, they prevent the rapid and remote identification of potentially toxic chemicals required for modern biosecurity applications. To merge the advantages of high throughput, low cost screening regimens with the direct bioavailability assessment of human cell line use, we re-engineered the bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette to function autonomously (without exogenous stimulation) within human cells. Optimized cassette expression provides for fully endogenous bioluminescent production, allowing continuous, real time monitoring of the bioavailability and toxicology of various compounds in an automated fashion. To access the functionality of this system, two sets of bioluminescent human cells were developed. The first was programed to suspend bioluminescent production upon toxicological challenge to mimic the non-specific detection of a toxicant. The second induced bioluminescence upon detection of a specific compound to demonstrate autonomous remote target identification. These cells were capable of responding to μM concentrations of the toxicant n-decanal, and allowed for continuous monitoring of cellular health throughout the treatment process. Induced bioluminescence was generated through treatment with doxycycline and was detectable upon dosage at a 100 ng/ml concentration. These results demonstrate that leveraging autonomous bioluminescence allows for low-cost, high throughput direct assessment of toxicant bioavailability.

  12. Development of Neh2-Luciferase Reporter and Its Application for High Throughput Screening and Real-Time Monitoring of Nrf2 Activators

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Natalya A.; Haskew-Layton, Renee E.; Basso, Manuela; Hushpulian, Dmitry M.; Payappilly, Jimmy B.; Speer, Rachel E.; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Rakhman, Ilay; Cole, Philip A.; Pinto, John T.; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Gazaryan, Irina G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcriptional regulator of antioxidant defense and detoxification. To directly monitor stabilization of Nrf2, we fused its Neh2 domain, responsible for the interaction with its nucleocytoplasmic regulator, Keap1, to firefly luciferase (Neh2-luciferase). We show that Neh2 domain is sufficient for recognition, ubiquitination, and proteasomal degradation of Neh2-luciferase fusion protein. The Neh2-luc reporter system allows direct monitoring of the adaptive response to redox stress and classification of drugs based on the time course of reporter activation. The reporter was used to screen the Spectrum library of 2000 biologically active compounds to identify activators of Nrf2. The most robust and yet nontoxic Nrf2 activators found—nordihydroguaiaretic acid, fisetin, and gedunin—induced astrocyte-dependent neuroprotection from oxidative stress via an Nrf2-dependent mechanism. PMID:21700211

  13. Thermostabilization of firefly luciferase by in vivo directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2011-11-01

    Firefly luciferase is widely used in a number of areas of biotechnology and molecular biology. However, rapid inactivation of wild-type (WT) luciferases at elevated temperatures often hampers their application. A simple non-lethal in vivo screening scheme was used to identify thermostable mutants of luciferase in Escherichia coli colonies. This scheme allowed carrying out each cycle of mutagenesis in a rapid and efficient manner. Four rounds of directed evolution were conducted on a part of the gene coding for amino acid residues 130-390 of Luciola mingrelica luciferase. The resultant mutant designated 4TS had a half-life of 10 h at 42°C, which is 65-fold higher compared with the WT luciferase. Moreover, the mutant 4TS showed a 1.9-fold increase in specific activity, 5.7-fold reduction of K(m) for ATP and a higher-temperature optimum compared with the WT enzyme. 4TS contains eight mutations, four of which are suggested to be mainly responsible for the enhancement of thermostability: R211L, A217V, E356K and S364C. Thus, directed evolution with non-lethal colony screening for in vivo bioluminescence activity proved to be an effective and efficient approach for increasing thermal stability of luciferase while retaining high catalytic activity.

  14. An enzymatic assay based on luciferase Ebola virus-like particles for evaluation of virolytic activity of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Peskova, Marie; Heger, Zbynek; Janda, Petr; Adam, Vojtech; Pekarik, Vladimir

    2017-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are currently considered as promising antiviral compounds. Current assays to evaluate the effectivity of peptides against enveloped viruses based on liposomes or hemolysis are encumbered by the artificial nature of liposomes or distinctive membrane composition of used erythrocytes. We propose a novel assay system based on enzymatic Ebola virus-like particles containing sensitive luciferase reporter. The assay was validated with several cationic and anionic peptides and compared with lentivirus inactivation and hemolytic assays. The assay is sensitive and easy to perform in standard biosafety level laboratory with potential for high-throughput screens. The use of virus-like particles in the assay provides a system as closely related to the native viruses as possible eliminating some issues associated with other more artificial set ups. We have identified CAM-W (KWKLWKKIEKWGQGIGAVLKWLTTWL) as a peptide with the greatest antiviral activity against infectious lentiviral vectors and filoviral virus-like particles.

  15. Long-term luciferase expression monitored by bioluminescence imaging after adeno-associated virus-mediated fetal gene delivery in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Tarantal, Alice F; Lee, C Chang I

    2010-02-01

    The safety and efficiency of fetal adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery in rhesus monkeys and long-term monitoring of transgene expression by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were evaluated. Early second-trimester fetal monkeys were administered AAV2/5, AAV2/9, or AAV2/10 vector supernatant preparations expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter, using an intrathoracic (n = 6) or intramyocardial (n = 6) approach and established ultrasound-guided techniques. Postnatal BLI was performed monthly up to 6 months postnatal age (n = 12) and then every 3 months thereafter to monitor transgene expression up to 24 months postnatal age (27 months after gene transfer; n = 6). All AAV serotypes showed greater than 1.0 x 10(9) photons/sec at all time points evaluated with limited biodistribution to nontargeted anatomical sites. The highest levels of bioluminescence (photons per second) observed were noted with AAV2/9 and AAV2/10 when the three vector constructs were compared. To correlate in vivo findings at the tissue level, specimens were collected from selected animals and analyzed. Three-dimensional reconstruction showed that firefly luciferase expression was consistent with imaging and morphometric measures. These findings suggest that (1) high levels of AAV-mediated firefly luciferase expression can be found after fetal AAV gene transfer and without any evidence of adverse effects; (2) the intercostal muscles, myocardium, and muscular component of the diaphragm of developing fetuses are readily transduced with AAV2/5, AAV2/9, or AAV2/10; and (3) postnatal outcomes and long-term luciferase expression can be effectively monitored by BLI in young rhesus monkeys.

  16. Firefly bioluminescence: a mechanistic approach of luciferase catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Marques, Simone M; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2009-01-01

    Luciferase is a general term for enzymes catalyzing visible light emission by living organisms (bioluminescence). The studies carried out with Photinus pyralis (firefly) luciferase allowed the discovery of the reaction leading to light production. It can be regarded as a two-step process: the first corresponds to the reaction of luciferase's substrate, luciferin (LH(2)), with ATP-Mg(2+) generating inorganic pyrophosphate and an intermediate luciferyl-adenylate (LH(2)-AMP); the second is the oxidation and decarboxylation of LH(2)-AMP to oxyluciferin, the light emitter, producing CO(2), AMP, and photons of yellow-green light (550- 570 nm). In a dark reaction LH(2)-AMP is oxidized to dehydroluciferyl-adenylate (L-AMP). Luciferase also shows acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity, which leads to the formation of dehydroluciferyl-coenzyme A (L-CoA), luciferyl-coenzyme A (LH(2)-CoA), and fatty acyl-CoAs. Moreover luciferase catalyzes the synthesis of dinucleoside polyphosphates from nucleosides with at least a 3'-phosphate chain plus an intact terminal pyrophosphate moiety. The LH(2) stereospecificity is a particular feature of the bioluminescent reaction where each isomer, D-LH(2) or L-LH(2), has a specific function. Practical applications of the luciferase system, either in its native form or with engineered proteins, encloses the analytical assay of metabolites like ATP and molecular biology studies with luc as a reporter gene, including the most recent and increasing field of bioimaging.

  17. A novel luciferase based reporter system to monitor activation of the ErbB2/Her2/neu pathway non-invasively during radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Frank; Li, Wenrong; Li, Fang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop a split-luciferase based reporter system that allows for non-invasive monitoring of activation of the Her2/neu pathway in vivo in a quantitative and sensitive manner. Methods and Materials Fusion proteins of the ErbB2/Her2/neu receptor to the N-terminal fragment of luciferase as well as of its downstream binding partner Shc to the C-terminal fragment of luciferase have been engineered based on the rationale that upon activation and binding of the Her2 receptor molecule to Shc, luciferase function will be reconstituted. Thus the resulting bioluminescence signals can serve as a surrogate measure of receptor activation. Results We show that our reporter systems functions well in vitro in breast cancer cells and in vivo in xenograft tumors. In particular, the activities of Her2/neu in xenograft tumors could be monitored serially for an extended period of time after radiotherapy. Conclusions We believe that the novel ErbB2/Her2/neu reporter presented here is a powerful tool to study the biology of the Her2-neu pathway in vitro as well as in vivo. It should also facilitate the development and rapid evaluation of new Her2/neu targeted therapeutics. PMID:20934271

  18. Novel Luciferase-Based Reporter System to Monitor Activation of ErbB2/Her2/neu Pathway Noninvasively During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Frank; Li Wenrong; Li Fang; Li Chuanyuan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a split-luciferase-based reporter system that allows for noninvasive monitoring of activation of the Her2/neu pathway in vivo in a quantitative and sensitive manner. Methods and Materials: Fusion proteins of the ErbB2/Her2/neu receptor to the N-terminal fragment of luciferase and of its downstream binding partner Shc to the C-terminal fragment of luciferase have been engineered owing to the rationale that on activation and binding of the Her2 receptor molecule to Shc, luciferase function will be reconstituted. Thus, the resulting bioluminescence signals can serve as a surrogate measure of receptor activation. Results: We have shown that our reporter systems functions well in vitro in breast cancer cells and in vivo in xenograft tumors. In particular, the activities of Her2/neu in xenograft tumors could be monitored serially for an extended period after radiotherapy. Conclusions: We believe that the novel ErbB2/Her2/neu reporter we have presented is a powerful tool to study the biology of the Her2-neu pathway in vitro and in vivo. It should also facilitate the development and rapid evaluation of new Her2/neu-targeted therapeutic agents.

  19. Computational analysis and functional expression of ancestral copepod luciferase.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Noda-Ogura, Akiko; Imanishi, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Gojobori, Takashi; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2013-10-10

    We recently reported the cDNA sequences of 11 copepod luciferases from the superfamily Augaptiloidea in the order Calanoida. They were classified into two groups, Metridinidae and Heterorhabdidae/Lucicutiidae families, by phylogenetic analyses. To elucidate the evolutionary processes, we have now further isolated 12 copepod luciferases from Augaptiloidea species (Metridia asymmetrica, Metridia curticauda, Pleuromamma scutullata, Pleuromamma xiphias, Lucicutia ovaliformis and Heterorhabdus tanneri). Codon-based synonymous/nonsynonymous tests of positive selection for 25 identified copepod luciferases suggested that positive Darwinian selection operated in the evolution of Heterorhabdidae luciferases, whereas two types of Metridinidae luciferases had diversified via neutral mechanism. By in silico analysis of the decoded amino acid sequences of 25 copepod luciferases, we inferred two protein sequences as ancestral copepod luciferases. They were expressed in HEK293 cells where they exhibited notable luciferase activity both in intracellular lysates and cultured media, indicating that the luciferase activity was established before evolutionary diversification of these copepod species.

  20. Firefly Luciferase Enzyme Fragment Complementation for Imaging in Cells and Living Animals

    PubMed Central

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-01-01

    We identified different fragments of the firefly luciferase gene based on the crystal structure of firefly luciferase. These split reporter genes which encode for protein fragments, unlike the fragments currently used for studying protein–protein interactions, can self-complement and provide luciferase enzyme activity in different cell lines in culture and in living mice. The comparison of the fragment complementation associated recovery of firefly luciferase enzyme activity with intact firefly luciferase was estimated for different fragment combinations and ranged from 0.01 to 4% of the full firefly luciferase activity. Using a cooled optical charge-coupled device camera, the analysis of firefly luciferase fragment complementation in transiently transfected subcutaneous 293T cell implants in living mice showed significant detectable enzyme activity upon injecting D-luciferin, especially from the combinations of fragments identified (Nfluc and Cfluc are the N and C fragments of the firefly luciferase gene, respectively): Nfluc (1–475)/Cfluc (245–550), Nfluc (1–475)/Cfluc (265–550), and Nfluc (1–475)/Cfluc (300–550). The Cfluc (265–550) fragment, upon expression with the nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide of SV40, shows reduced enzyme activity when the cells are cotransfected with the Nfluc (1–475) fragment expressed without NLS. We also proved in this study that the complementing fragments could be efficiently used for screening macromolecule delivery vehicles by delivering TAT–Cfluc (265–550) to cells stably expressing Nfluc (1–475) and recovering signal. These complementing fragments should be useful for many reporter-based assays including intracellular localization of proteins, studying cellular macromolecule delivery vehicles, studying cell–cell fusions, and also developing intracellular phosphorylation sensors based on fragment complementation. PMID:15732910

  1. A Luciferase Gene Driven by an Alphaherpesviral Promoter Also Responds to Immediate Early Antigens of the Betaherpesvirus HCMV, Allowing Comparative Analyses of Different Human Herpesviruses in One Reporter Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Villinger, Clarissa; Schubert, Axel; Walther, Paul; Sinzger, Christian; Lieber, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Widely used methods for quantification of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in cell culture such as immunoblotting or plaque reduction assays are generally restricted to low throughput and require time-consuming evaluation. Up to now, only few HCMV reporter cell lines have been generated to overcome these restrictions and they are afflicted with other limitations because permanently expandable cell lines are normally not fully permissive to HCMV. In this work, a previously existing epithelial cell line hosting a luciferase gene under control of a Varicella-zoster virus promoter was adopted to investigate HCMV infection. The cells were susceptible to different HCMV strains at infection efficiencies that corresponded to their respective degree of epithelial cell tropism. Expression of early and late viral antigens, formation of nuclear inclusions, release of infectious virus progeny, and focal growth indicated productive viral replication. However, viral release and spread occurred at lower levels than in primary cell lines which appears to be due to a malfunction of virion morphogenesis during the nuclear stage. Expression of the luciferase reporter gene was specifically induced in HCMV infected cultures as a function of the virus dose and dependent on viral immediate early gene expression. The level of reporter activity accurately reflected infection efficiencies as determined by viral antigen immunostaining, and hence could discriminate the cell tropism of the tested virus strains. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate that this cell line is applicable to evaluate drug resistance of clinical HCMV isolates and the neutralization capacity of human sera, and that it allows comparative and simultaneous analysis of HCMV and human herpes simplex virus type 1. In summary, the permanent epithelial reporter cell line allows robust, rapid and objective quantitation of HCMV infection and it will be particularly useful in higher throughput analyses as well as in

  2. Creation of High Efficient Firefly Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsu, Toru

    Firefly emits visible yellow-green light. The bioluminescence reaction is carried out by the enzyme luciferase. The bioluminescence of luciferase is widely used as an excellent tool for monitoring gene expression, the measurement of the amount of ATP and in vivo imaging. Recently a study of the cancer metastasis is carried out by in vivo luminescence imaging system, because luminescence imaging is less toxic and more useful for long-term assay than fluorescence imaging by GFP. However the luminescence is much dimmer than fluorescence. Then bioluminescence imaging in living organisms demands the high efficient luciferase which emits near infrared lights or enhances the emission intensity. Here I introduce an idea for creating the high efficient luciferase based on the crystal structure.

  3. Monitoring Protein–Protein Interactions Using Split Synthetic Renilla Luciferase Protein-Fragment-Assisted Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Paulmurugan, R.; Gambhir, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we developed an inducible synthetic renilla luciferase protein-fragment-assisted complementation-based bioluminescence assay to quantitatively measure real time protein–protein interactions in mammalian cells. We identified suitable sites to generate fragments of N and C portions of the protein that yield significant recovered activity through complementation. We validate complementation-based activation of split synthetic renilla luciferase protein driven by the interaction of two strongly interacting proteins, MyoD and Id, in five different cell lines utilizing transient transfection studies. The expression level of the system was also modulated by tumor necrosis factor α through NFκB-promoter/enhancer elements used to drive expression of the N portion of synthetic renilla luciferase reporter gene. This new system should help in studying protein–protein interactions and when used with other split reporters (e.g., split firefly luciferase) should help to monitor different components of an intracellular network. PMID:12705589

  4. Visualizing and quantifying protein secretion using a Renilla luciferase-GFP fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Wang, Y; Szalay, A A; Escher, A

    2000-01-01

    We have shown previously that an engineered form of Renilla luciferase (SRUC) can be secreted as a functional enzyme by mammalian cells, and that fusing wild-type Renilla luciferase with the green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria (GFP) yields a chimeric protein retaining light-emission properties similar to that of unfused Renilla luciferase and GFP. In the work presented here, SRUC was fused with GFP to determine whether it could be used to both visualize and quantify protein secretion in mammalian cells. Simian COS-7 and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were transiently transfected with gene constructs encoding a secreted or an intracellular version of a Renilla luciferase-GFP fusion protein. Renilla luciferase activity was measured from COS-7 cell lysates and culture media, and GFP activity was detected in CHO cells using fluorescence microscopy. Data indicated that the SRUC-GFP fusion protein was secreted as a chimeric protein that had both Renilla luciferase and GFP activity. This fusion protein could be a useful marker for the study of protein secretion in mammalian cells.

  5. Assessing Activity and Inhibition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Papain-Like and 3C-Like Proteases Using Luciferase-Based Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kilianski, Andy; Mielech, Anna M.; Deng, Xufang

    2013-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is associated with an outbreak of more than 90 cases of severe pneumonia with high mortality (greater than 50%). To date, there are no antiviral drugs or specific therapies to treat MERS-CoV. To rapidly identify potential inhibitors of MERS-CoV replication, we expressed the papain-like protease (PLpro) and the 3-chymotrypsin-like protease (3CLpro) from MERS-CoV and developed luciferase-based biosensors to monitor protease activity in cells. We show that the expressed MERS-CoV PLpro recognizes and processes the canonical CoV-PLpro cleavage site RLKGG in the biosensor. However, existing CoV PLpro inhibitors were unable to block MERS-CoV PLpro activity, likely due to the divergence of the amino acid sequence in the drug binding site. To investigate MERS-CoV 3CLpro activity, we expressed the protease in context with flanking nonstructural protein 4 (nsp4) and the amino-terminal portion of nsp6 and detected processing of the luciferase-based biosensors containing the canonical 3CLpro cleavage site VRLQS. Importantly, we found that a small-molecule inhibitor that blocks replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV and murine CoV also inhibits the activity of MERS-CoV 3CLpro. Overall, the protease expression and biosensor assays developed here allow for rapid evaluation of viral protease activity and the identification of protease inhibitors. These biosensor assays can now be used to screen for MERS-CoV-specific or broad-spectrum coronavirus PLpro and 3CLpro inhibitors. PMID:23986593

  6. Discovery, adaptation and transcriptional activity of two tick promoters: Construction of a dual luciferase reporter system for optimization of RNA interference in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual luciferase reporter systems are valuable tools for functional genomic studies, but have not previously been developed for use in tick cell culture. We evaluated expression of available luciferase constructs in tick cell cultures derived from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, an important vec...

  7. Relationship between stability and bioluminescence color of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Maghami, Parvaneh; Ranjbar, Bijan; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Moradi, Ali; Gill, Pooria

    2010-03-01

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes the oxidation of luciferin in the presence of ATP, Mg(2+) and molecular oxygen. The bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases is identified by the luciferase structure and assay conditions. Amongst different types of beetles, luciferase from Phrixotrix railroad worm (PhRE) with a unique additional residue (Arg353) naturally emits red bioluminescence color. By insertion of Arg356 in luciferase of Lampyris turkestanicus, corresponding to Arg353 in Phrixotrix hirtus, the color of the emitted light was changed to red. To understand the effect of this position on the bioluminescence color shift, four residues with similar sizes but different charges (Arg, Lys, Glu, and Gln) were inserted into Photinus pyralis luciferase. Comparison of mutants with native luciferase shows that mutation brought an increase in the content of secondary structure and globular compactness of (P. pylalis) luciferase. Comparative study of chemical denaturation of native and mutant luciferases by activity measurement, intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence, circular dichroism, and DSC techniques revealed that insertion of positively charged residues (Arg, Lys) in the flexible loop (352-358) plays a significant role on the stability of (P. pyralis) luciferase and changes the light color to red.

  8. Fully Codon-Optimized luciferase Uncovers Novel Temperature Characteristics of the Neurospora Clock▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gooch, Van D.; Mehra, Arun; Larrondo, Luis F.; Fox, Julie; Touroutoutoudis, Melissa; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete reconstruction of the firefly luciferase gene, fully codon optimized for expression in Neurospora crassa. This reporter enhances light output by approximately 4 log orders over that with previously available versions, now producing light that is visible to the naked eye and sufficient for monitoring the activities of many poorly expressed genes. Time lapse photography of strains growing in race tubes, in which the frq or eas/ccg-2 promoter is used to drive luciferase, shows the highest levels of luciferase activity near the growth front and newly formed conidial bands. Further, we have established a sorbose medium colony assay that will facilitate luciferase-based screens. The signals from sorbose-grown colonies of strains in which the frq promoter drives luciferase exhibit the properties of circadian rhythms and can be tracked for many days to weeks. This reporter now makes it possible to follow the clock in real time, even in strains or under conditions in which the circadian rhythm in conidial banding is not expressed. This property has been used to discover short, ca. 15-h period rhythms at high temperatures, at which banding becomes difficult to observe in race tubes, and to generate a high-resolution temperature phase-response curve. PMID:17766461

  9. Making temporal maps using bacterial luciferase: Bacteriophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Broza, Rachel; Verkin, Ekaterina

    2004-06-01

    A method for making temporal maps in bacteria, plasmids and bacteriophages is described. A cassette containing both the genes for bacterial luciferase and kanamycin resistance can be introduced at precise sites. The technique involves clonging followed by genetic recombination. The result is formation of structures that have the luciferase genes in place of the normal DNA and this allows the very precise measurement of transcription/translation of the substituted regions. Very low levels of transcription as well as the kinetics of induction can be easily ascertained. As a specific demonstration of this general method, the technique was used with bacteriophage λ, one of the best known organisms. By measuring light emission, the expression of luciferase was followed after induction for both early and late genes. The exact timing of initial expression of genes was also determined by sampling at very short intervals. The results show that the early genes express almost without delay implying that the function of the N antitermination system is not temporal regulation.

  10. A Luciferase Reporter Gene Assay to Measure Ebola Virus Viral Protein 35-Associated Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Stimulated, Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene 1-Mediated Induction of Interferon β.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Valeria; Daino, Gian Luca; Corona, Angela; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection, the type I interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) innate immune response is suppressed by EBOV viral protein 35 (VP35), a validated drug target. Identification of EBOV VP35 inhibitors requires a cellular system able to assess the VP35-based inhibitory functions of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) IFN-β induction. We established a miniaturized luciferase gene reporter assay in A549 cells that measures IFN-β induction by viral dsRNA and is dose-dependently inhibited by VP35 expression. When compared to influenza A virus NS1 protein, EBOV VP35 showed improved inhibition of viral dsRNA-based IFN-β induction. This assay can be used to screen for EBOV VP35 inhibitors.

  11. Firefly Luciferase Mutants Allow Substrate-Selective Bioluminescence Imaging in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Adams, Spencer T; Mofford, David M; Reddy, G S Kiran Kumar; Miller, Stephen C

    2016-04-11

    Bioluminescence imaging is a powerful approach for visualizing specific events occurring inside live mice. Animals can be made to glow in response to the expression of a gene, the activity of an enzyme, or the growth of a tumor. But bioluminescence requires the interaction of a luciferase enzyme with a small-molecule luciferin, and its scope has been limited by the mere handful of natural combinations. Herein, we show that mutants of firefly luciferase can discriminate between natural and synthetic substrates in the brains of live mice. When using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to express luciferases in the brain, we found that mutant luciferases that are inactive or weakly active with d-luciferin can light up brightly when treated with the aminoluciferins CycLuc1 and CycLuc2 or their respective FAAH-sensitive luciferin amides. Further development of selective luciferases promises to expand the power of bioluminescence and allow multiple events to be imaged in the same live animal.

  12. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  13. Real-time monitoring of inflammation status in 3T3-L1 adipocytes possessing a secretory Gaussia luciferase gene under the control of nuclear factor-kappa B response element

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaki, Haruka; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Aoki, Naohito

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation status in adipocytes can be monitored by the new assay system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only an aliquot of conditioned medium is required without cell lysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation-attenuating compounds can be screened more conveniently. -- Abstract: We have established 3T3-L1 cells possessing a secretory Gaussia luciferase (GLuc) gene under the control of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) response element. The 3T3-L1 cells named 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc could differentiate into adipocyte as comparably as parental 3T3-L1 cells. Inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-1{beta} induced GLuc secretion of 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc adipocytes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. GLuc secretion of 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc adipocytes was also induced when cultured with RAW264.7 macrophages and was dramatically enhanced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. An NF-{kappa}B activation inhibitor BAY-11-7085 and an antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine significantly suppressed GLuc secretion induced by macrophages. Finally, we found that rosemary-derived carnosic acid strongly suppressed GLuc secretion induced by macrophages and on the contrary up-regulated adiponectin secretion. Collectively, by using 3T3-L1-NF-{kappa}B-RE-GLuc adipocytes, inflammation status can be monitored in real time and inflammation-attenuating compounds can be screened more conveniently.

  14. Conditionally replicating luciferase reporter phages: improved sensitivity for rapid detection and assessment of drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Carrière, C; Riska, P F; Zimhony, O; Kriakov, J; Bardarov, S; Burns, J; Chan, J; Jacobs, W R

    1997-01-01

    TM4 is a lytic mycobacteriophage which infects mycobacteria of clinical importance. A luciferase reporter phage, phAE40, has been constructed from TM4 and was previously shown to be useful for the rapid detection and drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, the lytic nature of the phage results in a loss of detectable light output and limits the sensitivity of detection. We describe several strategies aimed at improving the luciferase activity generated by TM4 luciferase phages, including (i) varying the position of the luciferase gene in the phage genome, (ii) isolating host-range mutants of the phage, and (iii) introducing temperature-sensitive mutations in the phage such that it will not replicate at the infecting temperature. Several new phages generated by these methods show increased intensity of luciferase production compared to the first-generation reporter phage phAE40, and one phage, phAE88, also demonstrates an enhanced duration of luciferase activity. This has allowed the detection of as few as 120 BCG cells and the determination of drug susceptibilities of M. tuberculosis in as little as 1 day. PMID:9399525

  15. Isolation and properties of the luciferase stored in the ovary of the scyphozoan medusa Periphylla periphylla.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, O; Flood, P R; Inouye, S; Bryan, B; Shimomura, A

    2001-12-01

    Bioluminescence of the medusa Periphylla is based on the oxidation of coelenterazine catalyzed by luciferase. Periphylla has two types of luciferase: the soluble form luciferase L, which causes the exumbrellar bioluminescence display of the medusa, and the insoluble aggregated form, which is stored as particulate material in the ovary, in an amount over 100 times that of luciferase L. The eggs are especially rich in the insoluble luciferase, which drastically decreases upon fertilization. The insoluble form could be solubilized by 2-mercaptoethanol, yielding a mixture of luciferase oligomers with molecular masses in multiples of approximately 20 kDa. Those having the molecular masses of 20 kDa, 40 kDa, and 80 kDa were isolated and designated, respectively, as luciferase A, luciferase B, and luciferase C. The luminescence activities of Periphylla luciferases A, B, and C were 1.2 approximately 4.1 x 10(16) photon/mg. s, significantly higher than any coelenterazine luciferase known, and the quantum yields of coelenterazine catalyzed by these luciferases (about 0.30 at 24 degrees C) are comparable to that catalyzed by Oplophorus luciferase (0.34 at 22 degrees C), which has been considered the most efficient coelenterazine luciferase until now. Luciferase L (32 kDa) could also be split by 2-mercaptoethanol into luciferase A and an accessory protein (approx. 12 kDa), as yet uncharacterized. Luciferases A, B, and C are highly resistant to inactivation: their luminescence activities are only slightly diminished at pH 1 and pH 11 and are enhanced in the presence of 1 approximately 2 M guanidine hydrochloride; but they are less stable to heating than luciferase L, which is practically unaffected by boiling.

  16. Chaperones rescue luciferase folding by separating its domains.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Zackary N; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2014-10-10

    Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made toward understanding how small single-domain proteins fold. However, very little is known about folding mechanisms of medium and large multidomain proteins that predominate the proteomes of all forms of life. Large proteins frequently fold cotranslationally and/or require chaperones. Firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase (Luciferase, 550 residues) has been a model of a cotranslationally folding protein whose extremely slow refolding (approximately days) is catalyzed by chaperones. However, the mechanism by which Luciferase misfolds and how chaperones assist Luciferase refolding remains unknown. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (atomic force microscopy (AFM)/single-molecule force spectroscopy) with steered molecular dynamic computer simulations to unravel the mechanism of chaperone-assisted Luciferase refolding. Our AFM and steered molecular dynamic results show that partially unfolded Luciferase, with the N-terminal domain remaining folded, can refold robustly without chaperones. Complete unfolding causes Luciferase to get trapped in very stable non-native configurations involving interactions between N- and C-terminal residues. However, chaperones allow the completely unfolded Luciferase to refold quickly in AFM experiments, strongly suggesting that chaperones are able to sequester non-natively contacting residues. More generally, we suggest that many chaperones, rather than actively promoting the folding, mimic the ribosomal exit tunnel and physically separate protein domains, allowing them to fold in a cotranslational-like sequential process.

  17. Chaperones Rescue Luciferase Folding by Separating Its Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Zackary N.; Yang, Weitao; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, significant progress has been made toward understanding how small single-domain proteins fold. However, very little is known about folding mechanisms of medium and large multidomain proteins that predominate the proteomes of all forms of life. Large proteins frequently fold cotranslationally and/or require chaperones. Firefly (Photinus pyralis) luciferase (Luciferase, 550 residues) has been a model of a cotranslationally folding protein whose extremely slow refolding (approximately days) is catalyzed by chaperones. However, the mechanism by which Luciferase misfolds and how chaperones assist Luciferase refolding remains unknown. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (atomic force microscopy (AFM)/single-molecule force spectroscopy) with steered molecular dynamic computer simulations to unravel the mechanism of chaperone-assisted Luciferase refolding. Our AFM and steered molecular dynamic results show that partially unfolded Luciferase, with the N-terminal domain remaining folded, can refold robustly without chaperones. Complete unfolding causes Luciferase to get trapped in very stable non-native configurations involving interactions between N- and C-terminal residues. However, chaperones allow the completely unfolded Luciferase to refold quickly in AFM experiments, strongly suggesting that chaperones are able to sequester non-natively contacting residues. More generally, we suggest that many chaperones, rather than actively promoting the folding, mimic the ribosomal exit tunnel and physically separate protein domains, allowing them to fold in a cotranslational-like sequential process. PMID:25160632

  18. Rational and random mutagenesis of firefly luciferase to identify an efficient emitter of red bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchini, Bruce R.; Southworth, Tara L.; Khattak, Neelum F.; Murtiashaw, Martha H.; Fleet, Sarah E.

    2004-06-01

    Firefly luciferase, which emits yellow-green (557 nm) light, and the corresponding cDNA have been used successfully as a bioluminescence reporter of gene expression. One particularly exciting application is in the area of in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Our interest is in developing improved reagents by identifying Photinus pyralis luciferase mutants that efficiently emit red bioluminescence. In this way, the proven advantages of the P. pyralis protein can be combined with the potential advantages of a red-shifted emitter. Using site-directed mutagenesis techniques, we have identified many mutants emitting red bioluminescence. Unfortunately, these enzymes generally have significantly decreased bioluminescence activity. Interestingly, we discovered a mutation, Ile351Ala, that produced a moderate 16 nm red-shift, while maintaining excellent bioluminescence activity. We then undertook a random mutagenesis approach to identify luciferase mutants that emit further red-shifted bioluminescence with minimal loss of activity. Libraries of mutants were created using an error-prone PCR method and the Ile351Ala luciferase mutant as the template DNA. The libraries were screened by in vivo bacterial assays and the promising mutants were purified to enable accurate determination of bioluminescence emission spectra and total bioluminescence activity. We will report the characterization results, including the identification of the randomly altered amino acids, of several mutants that catalyze bioluminescence with emission maxima of approximately 600 nm.

  19. Alternative luciferase for monitoring bacterial cells under adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Siouxsie; Ferguson, Kathryn; Stefanidou, Martha; Young, Douglas B; Robertson, Brian D

    2005-07-01

    The availability of cloned luciferase genes from fireflies (luc) and from bacteria (luxAB) has led to the widespread use of bioluminescence as a reporter to measure cell viability and gene expression. The most commonly occurring bioluminescence system in nature is the deep-sea imidazolopyrazine bioluminescence system. Coelenterazine is an imidazolopyrazine derivative which, when oxidized by an appropriate luciferase enzyme, produces carbon dioxide, coelenteramide, and light. The luciferase from the marine copepod Gaussia princeps (Gluc) has recently been cloned. We expressed the Gluc gene in Mycobacterium smegmatis using a shuttle vector and compared its performance with that of an existing luxAB reporter. In contrast to luxAB, the Gluc luciferase retained its luminescence output in the stationary phase of growth and exhibited enhanced stability during exposure to low pH, hydrogen peroxide, and high temperature. The work presented here demonstrated the utility of the copepod luciferase bioluminescent reporter as an alternative to bacterial luciferase, particularly for monitoring responses to environmental stress stimuli.

  20. An enhanced chimeric firefly luciferase-inspired enzyme for ATP detection and bioluminescence reporter and imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Southworth, Tara L; Fontaine, Danielle M; Kohrt, Dawn; Talukder, Munya; Michelini, Elisa; Cevenini, Luca; Roda, Aldo; Grossel, Martha J

    2015-09-01

    Firefly luciferases, which emit visible light in a highly specific ATP-dependent process, have been adapted for a variety of applications, including gene reporter assays, whole-cell biosensor measurements, and in vivo imaging. We previously reported the approximately 2-fold enhanced activity and 1.4-fold greater bioluminescence quantum yield properties of a chimeric enzyme that contains the N-domain of Photinus pyralis luciferase joined to the C-domain of Luciola italica luciferase. Subsequently, we identified 5 amino acid changes based on L. italica that are the main determinants of the improved bioluminescence properties. Further engineering to enhance thermal and pH stability produced a novel luciferase called PLG2. We present here a systematic comparison of the spectral and physical properties of the new protein with P. pyralis luciferase and demonstrate the potential of PLG2 for use in assays based on the detection of femtomole levels of ATP. In addition, we compared the performance of a mammalian codon-optimized version of the cDNA for PLG2 with the luc2 gene in HEK293T cells. Using an optimized low-cost assay system, PLG2 activity can be monitored in mammalian cell lysates and living cells with 4.4-fold and approximately 3.0-fold greater sensitivity, respectively. PLG2 could be an improved alternative to Promega's luc2 for reporter and imaging applications.

  1. Trigger factor assists the refolding of heterodimeric but not monomeric luciferases.

    PubMed

    Melkina, O E; Goryanin, I I; Manukhov, I V; Baranova, A V; Kolb, V A; Svetlov, M S; Zavilgelsky, G B

    2014-01-01

    The refolding of thermally inactivated protein by ATP-independent trigger factor (TF) and ATP-dependent DnaKJE chaperones was comparatively analyzed. Heterodimeric (αβ) bacterial luciferases of Aliivibrio fischeri, Photobacterium leiognathi, and Vibrio harveyi as well as monomeric luciferases of Vibrio harveyi and Luciola mingrelica (firefly) were used as substrates. In the presence of TF, thermally inactivated heterodimeric bacterial luciferases refold, while monomeric luciferases do not refold. These observations were made both in vivo (Escherichia coli ΔdnaKJ containing plasmids with tig gene) and in vitro (purified TF). Unlike TF, the DnaKJE chaperone system refolds both monomeric and heterodimeric luciferases with equal efficiency.

  2. Visualization of Malaria Parasites in the Skin Using the Luciferase Transgenic Parasite, Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Ryuta; Arai, Meiji; Hirai, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    We produced a transgenic rodent malaria parasite (Plasmodium berghei) that contained the luciferase gene under a promoter region of elongation factor-1α. These transgenic (TG) parasites expressed luciferase in all stages of their life cycle, as previously reported. However, we were the first to succeed in observing sporozoites as a mass in mouse skin following their deposition by the probing of infective mosquitoes. Our transgenic parasites may have emitted stronger bioluminescence than previous TG parasites. The estimated number of injected sporozoites by mosquitoes was between 34 and 775 (median 80). Since luciferase activity diminished immediately after the death of the parasites, luciferase activity could be an indicator of the existence of live parasites. Our results indicated that sporozoites survived at the probed site for more than 42 hours. We also detected sporozoites in the liver within 15 min of the intravenous injection. Bioluminescence was not observed in the lung, kidney or spleen. We confirmed the observation that the liver was the first organ in which malaria parasites entered and increased in number.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids improve firefly luciferase properties.

    PubMed

    Noori, Ali Reza; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Ghiasi, Parisa; Akbari, Jafar; Heydari, Akbar

    2014-03-01

    Ionic liquids as neoteric solvents, microwave irradiation, and alternative energy source are becoming as a solvent for many enzymatic reactions. We recently showed that the incubation of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis with various ionic liquids increased the activity and stability of luciferase. Magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids have been obtained by covalent bonding of ionic liquids-silane on magnetic silica nanoparticles. In the present study, the effects of [γ-Fe2O3@SiO2][BMImCl] and [γ-Fe2O3@SiO2][BMImI] were investigated on the structural properties and function of luciferase using circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and bioluminescence assay. Enzyme activity and structural stability increased in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquids. Furthermore, the effect of ingredients which were used was not considerable on K(m) value of luciferase for adenosine-5'-triphosphate and also K(m) value for luciferin.

  4. Screening for novel human genes associated with CRE pathway activation with cell microarray.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linjie; Wang, Pingzhang; Guo, Jinhai; Wang, Xinyu; Deng, Weiwei; Zhang, Chenying; Fu, Dongxu; Gao, Xia; Shi, Taiping; Ma, Dalong

    2007-07-01

    In this study, cell microarray technology is used to identify novel human genes associated with CRE pathway activation. By reverse transfection, expression plasmids containing full-length cDNAs were cotransfected with the reporter plasmid pCRE-d2EGFP to monitor the activation of the CRE pathway via enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) expression. Of the 575 predominantly novel genes screened, 22 exhibited relatively higher EGFP fluorescence compared with a negative control. After a functional validation with a dual luciferase reporter system that included both cis- and trans-luciferase assays, 4 of the 22 genes (RNF41, C8orf32, C6orf208, and MEIS3P1) were confirmed as CRE-pathway activators. Western blot analysis revealed that RNF41 can promote CREB phosphorylation. These results demonstrate the successful combination of cell microarray technology with this reporting system and the potential of this tool to characterize functions of novel genes in a highly parallel format.

  5. Luciferase fragment complementation imaging in preclinical cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Madryn C.; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    The luciferase fragment complementation assay (LFCA) enables molecular events to be non-invasively imaged in live cells in vitro and in vivo in a comparatively cheap and safe manner. It is a development of previous enzyme complementation assays in which reporter genes are split into two, individually enzymatically inactive, fragments that are able to complement one another upon interaction. This complementation can be used to externally visualize cellular activities. In recent years, the number of studies which have used LFCAs to probe questions relevant to cancer have increased, and this review summarizes the most significant and interesting of these. In particular, it focuses on work conducted on the epidermal growth factor, nuclear and chemokine receptor families, and intracellular signaling pathways, including IP3, cAMP, Akt, cMyc, NRF2 and Rho GTPases. LFCAs which have been developed to image DNA methylation and detect RNA transcripts are also discussed. PMID:25594026

  6. Enhanced Beetle Luciferase for High-Resolution Bioluminescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Tomomi; Nishii, Shigeaki; Noguchi, Takako; Hoshino, Hideto; Niwa, Kazuki; Viviani, Vadim R.; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    We developed an enhanced green-emitting luciferase (ELuc) to be used as a bioluminescence imaging (BLI) probe. ELuc exhibits a light signal in mammalian cells that is over 10-fold stronger than that of the firefly luciferase (FLuc), which is the most widely used luciferase reporter gene. We showed that ELuc produces a strong light signal in primary cells and tissues and that it enables the visualization of gene expression with high temporal resolution at the single-cell level. Moreover, we successfully imaged the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of importin α by fusing ELuc at the intracellular level. These results demonstrate that the use of ELuc allows a BLI spatiotemporal resolution far greater than that provided by FLuc. PMID:20368807

  7. Dual-color bioluminescence imaging assay using green- and red-emitting beetle luciferases at subcellular resolution.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Mayu; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is widely used to monitor cellular events, including gene expression in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, recent advances in luciferase technology have made possible imaging at the single-cell level. To improve the bioluminescence imaging system, we have developed a dual-color imaging system in which the green-emitting luciferase from a Brazilian click beetle (Emerald Luc, ELuc) and the red-emitting luciferase from a railroad worm (Stable Luciferase Red, SLR) were used as reporters, which were localized to the peroxisome and the nucleus, respectively. We clearly captured simultaneously the subcellular localization of ELuc in the peroxisome and SLR in the nucleus of a single cell using a high-magnification objective lens with 3-min exposure time without binning using a combination of optical filters. Furthermore, to apply this system to quantitative time-lapse imaging, the activation of nuclear factor triggered by tumor necrosis factor α was measured using nuclear-targeted SLR and peroxisome-targeted ELuc as the test and internal control reporters, respectively. We successfully quantified the kinetics of activation of nuclear factor κB using nuclear-targeted SLR and the transcriptional change of the internal control promoter using peroxisome-targeted ELuc simultaneously in a single cell, and showed that the activation kinetics, including activation rate and amplitude, differed among cells. The results demonstrated that this imaging system can visualize the subcellular localization of reporters and track the expressions of two genes simultaneously at subcellular resolution.

  8. Effect of solvents on the fluorescence spectra of bacterial luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukovataya, Irina E.; Tyulkova, Natalya A.; Kaykova, Elisaveta V.

    2006-08-01

    Bacteria luciferases catalyze the oxidation reaction of the long-chain aliphatic aldehyde and reduced flavinmononucleotide involving molecular oxygen to a respective fatty acid emitting light quanta in the visible spectrum. Fluorescence emission of luciferases from Photobacterium leiognathi dissolved in organic solvent-water mixtures was investigated. Methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide were used as organic solvents. As the methanol and acetone concentration is increased the emission maximum peak is decrease. In contrast, with dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide addition induced a increasing of the emission maximum intensity. The values of wavelength maximum (λ max) at the addition of this solvent can shows the spectra shifted to the red by about 12 nm. These increasing in the fluorescence intensity and in the λ max may be due to luciferase denaturation, resulting from the more intensive contact of chromospheres of luciferase with the solvent. At all used concentrations of methanol, acetone and formamide the shape of the fluorescence spectra was not changed. These studies demonstrate that the luciferase tryptophan fluorescence is sensitive to changes of physical-chemical property of enzyme environment. A comparison of activation/inactivation and fluorescence spectra of luciferase in methanol or acetone solutions shows that the extent of inactivation is larger than the extent of fluorescence changes at the same methanol or acetone concentration.

  9. Visualization and Quantification of Browning Using a Ucp1-2A-Luciferase Knock-in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liufeng; Nie, Baoming; Nie, Tao; Hui, Xiaoyan; Gao, Xuefei; Lin, Xiaoliang; Liu, Xin; Xu, Yong; Tang, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Ran; Li, Kuai; Li, Peng; Ding, Ke; Wang, Yu; Xu, Aimin; Fei, Jian; Han, Weiping; Liu, Pentao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Zhou, Zhiguang; Ding, Sheng; Wu, Donghai

    2017-02-01

    Both mammals and adult humans possess classic brown adipocytes and beige adipocytes, and the amount and activity of these adipocytes are considered key factors in combating obesity and its associated metabolic diseases. Uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) is the functional marker of both brown and beige adipocytes. To facilitate a reliable, easy, and sensitive measurement of Ucp1 expression both in vivo and in vitro, we generated a Ucp1-2A-luciferase knock-in mouse by deleting the stop codon for the mouse Ucp1 gene and replacing it with a 2A peptide. This peptide was followed by the luciferase coding sequence to recapitulate the expression of the Ucp1 gene at the transcriptional and translational levels. With this mouse, we discovered a cold-sensitive brown/beige adipose depot underneath the skin of the ears, which we named uBAT. Because of the sensitivity and high dynamic range of luciferase activity, the Ucp1-2A-luciferase mouse is useful for both in vitro quantitative determination and in vivo visualization of nonshivering thermogenesis. With the use of this model, we identified and characterized axitinib, an oral small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as an effective browning agent.

  10. Firefly luciferase as the reporter for transcriptional response to the environment in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Masashi; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Doi, Shosei; Motoki, Shogo; Niimi, Atsuko; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2013-12-15

    We demonstrate that firefly luciferase is a good reporter in Escherichia coli for transcription dynamics in response to the environment. E. coli strains, carrying a fusion of the promoter of the ycgZ gene and the coding region of the luciferase gene, showed transient bioluminescence on receiving blue light. This response was compromised in mutants lacking known regulators in manners consistent with each regulator's function. We also show that relA, a gene encoding a (p)ppGpp synthetase, affects ycgZ dynamics when nullified. Moreover, two unstable luciferase variants showed improved response dynamics and should be useful to study quick changes of gene expression.

  11. Real-Time GnRH Gene Transcription in GnRH Promoter-Driven Luciferase-Expressing Transgenic Mice: Effect of Kisspeptin.

    PubMed

    Choe, Han Kyoung; Chun, Sung Kook; Kim, Jeongah; Kim, Doyeon; Kim, Hee-Dae; Kim, Kyungjin

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile secretion of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is indispensable for controlling proper pituitary gonadotrope functions; however, the mechanism underlying GnRH pulse generation remains largely unknown. It is important to understand the cellular oscillator in individual GnRH neurons and temporal synchronization among GnRH neurons. In this brief review, we summarize our recent findings on episodic GnRH gene transcription at the single GnRH neuron level and in synchronized multicellular burst in relation to the temporal pattern of GnRH secretion. We also detail the effects of kisspeptin on ultradian rhythmic GnRH gene transcription and secretion. We extend our discussion to the hierarchical interaction between circadian and ultradian rhythms. Taken together, the current review elucidates the genomic control of GnRH pulse generation in hypothalamic neurons.

  12. Structure, Mechanism, and Mutation of Bacterial Luciferase.

    PubMed

    Tinikul, Ruchanok; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2016-01-01

    : Bacterial luciferase is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase found in bioluminescent bacteria. The enzyme catalyzes a light-emitting reaction by using reduced flavin, long chain aldehyde, and oxygen as substrates and yields oxidized flavin, carboxylic acid, and water as products with concomitant emission of blue-green light around 485-490 nm. The enzyme is a heterodimer consisting of two homologous subunits, designated as the α- and β-subunits. The reactive reaction center is located in the α-subunit, whereas the β-subunit is required for maintaining the active conformation of the α-subunit. The enzyme reaction occurs through the generation of a reactive C4a-oxygenflavin adduct, presumably C4a-peroxyflavin, before the light-emitting species is generated from the decomposition of an adduct between the C4a-peroxyflavin and the aldehyde. Because the luciferase reaction generates light, the enzyme has the potential to be used as a bioreporter for a wide variety of applications. With the recent invention of the fusion enzyme that can be expressed in mammalian cells, future possibilities for the development of additional bioreporter applications are promising.

  13. Persistent synchronized oscillations in prolactin gene promoter activity in living pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    McFerran, D W; Stirland, J A; Norris, A J; Khan, R A; Takasuka, N; Seymour, Z C; Gill, M S; Robertson, W R; Loudon, A S; Davis, J R; White, M R

    2001-07-01

    PRL gene expression in the anterior pituitary gland responds rapidly to different hormonal signals. We have investigated the long-term timing of transcriptional activation from the PRL, GH, and cytomegalovirus promoters in response to different stimulus duration, using real-time imaging of luciferase expression in living stably transfected GH3 cells. Long-term stimulation of serum-starved cells with 50% serum induced a homogeneous rise in PRL promoter activity, with subsequent heterogeneous fluctuations in luciferase activity in individual cells. When cells were subjected to a 2-h pulse of 50% serum, followed by serum-free medium, there were long-term (approximately 50 h) synchronized, homogeneous oscillations in PRL promoter activity. This response was PRL-specific, because in GH3 cells expressing luciferase from the GH or cytomegalovirus promoters, a serum pulse elicited no oscillations in luciferase expression after an initial transient response to serum. The PRL promoter may therefore be a template for an unstable transcription complex subject to stochastic regulation, allowing an oscillatory transcriptional response to physiological signals. This suggests that precise timing and coordination of cell responses to different signal-duration may represent a novel mechanism for coordinating long-term dynamic changes in transcription in cell populations.

  14. Crystal structure of native and a mutant of Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase implicate in bioluminescence color shift.

    PubMed

    Kheirabadi, Mitra; Sharafian, Zohreh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Heineman, Udo; Gohlke, Ulrich; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2013-12-01

    Firefly bioluminescence reaction in the presence of Mg(2+), ATP and molecular oxygen is carried out by luciferase. The luciferase structure alterations or modifications of assay conditions determine the bioluminescence color of firefly luciferase. Among different beetle luciferases, Phrixothrix hirtus railroad worm emits either yellow or red bioluminescence color. Sequence alignment analysis shows that the red-emitter luciferase from Phrixothrix hirtus has an additional arginine residue at 353 that is absent in other firefly luciferases. It was reported that insertion of Arg in an important flexible loop350-359 showed changes in bioluminescence color from green to red and the optimum temperature activity was also increased. To explain the color tuning mechanism of firefly luciferase, the structure of native and a mutant (E354R/356R/H431Y) of Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase is determined at 2.7Å and 2.2Å resolutions, respectively. The comparison of structure of both types of Lampyris turkestanicus luciferases reveals that the conformation of this flexible loop is significantly changed by addition of two Arg in this region. Moreover, its surface accessibility is affected considerably and some ionic bonds are made by addition of two positive charge residues. Furthermore, we noticed that the hydrogen bonding pattern of His431 with the flexible loop is changed by replacing this residue with Tyr at this position. Juxtaposition of a flexible loop (residues 351-359) in firefly luciferase and corresponding ionic and hydrogen bonds are essential for color emission.

  15. Inhibition of luciferase expression by synthetic hammerhead ribozymes and their cellular uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Bramlage, B; Alefelder, S; Marschall, P; Eckstein, F

    1999-01-01

    Two synthetic hammerhead ribozymes, one unmodified and the other with 2"-modifications and four phosphorothioate groups, targeting a single GUA site in the luciferase mRNA, were compared for their inhibition of gene expression in cell cultureand their cellular uptake was also analysed. A HeLa X1/5 cell line stably expressing luciferase, under an inducible promoter, was treated with these ribozymes by liposome-mediated transfection to determine their activity.Luciferase expression in cells was inhibited to approximately 50% with little difference between the unmodified and the 2"-modified ribozyme. A similar degree of inhibition was observed with two catalytically inactive ribozymes, indicating that inhibition was mainly due to an antisense effect. A ribozyme carrying a cholesterol moiety, applied to the cells without carrier, showed no inhibition. Northern blotting indicated a similar amount of cellular uptake of all ribozymes. The unmodified ribozyme was essentially evenly distributed between cytoplasm and nucleus, whereas a higher proportion of the phosphorothioate-containing ribozyme was observed in the nucleus. Fluorescence microscopy, including confocal microscopy using 5"-fluorescein-labelled ribozymes, showed that the unmodified and 2"-modified ribozymes were present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus to a similar extent, whereas the fluorescence of the phosphorothioate-containing ribozyme was much stronger in the nucleus. Both ribozymes inhibited luciferase expression to a comparable degree, suggesting that the ribozyme in the nucleus did not contribute significantly to the inhibition. Ribozymes with a cholesterol moiety were predominantly trapped in the cell membrane, explaining their inability to interfere with gene expression. PMID:10454613

  16. In Vivo Imaging of Human MDR1 Transcription in the Brain and Spine of MDR1-Luciferase Reporter Mice.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuto; Cline, Cynthia; Lin, Yvonne S; Scheib, Rachel; Ganguly, Samit; Thirumaran, Ranjit K; Chaudhry, Amarjit; Kim, Richard B; Schuetz, Erin G

    2015-11-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) [the product of the MDR1 (ABCB1) gene] at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits central nervous system (CNS) entry of many prescribed drugs, contributing to the poor success rate of CNS drug candidates. Modulating Pgp expression could improve drug delivery into the brain; however, assays to predict regulation of human BBB Pgp are lacking. We developed a transgenic mouse model to monitor human MDR1 transcription in the brain and spinal cord in vivo. A reporter construct consisting of ∼10 kb of the human MDR1 promoter controlling the firefly luciferase gene was used to generate a transgenic mouse line (MDR1-luc). Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the MDR1-luciferase transgene on chromosome 3. Reporter gene expression was monitored with an in vivo imaging system following D-luciferin injection. Basal expression was detectable in the brain, and treatment with activators of the constitutive androstane, pregnane X, and glucocorticoid receptors induced brain and spinal MDR1-luc transcription. Since D-luciferin is a substrate of ABCG2, the feasibility of improving D-luciferin brain accumulation (and luciferase signal) was tested by coadministering the dual ABCB1/ABCG2 inhibitor elacridar. The brain and spine MDR1-luc signal intensity was increased by elacridar treatment, suggesting enhanced D-luciferin brain bioavailability. There was regional heterogeneity in MDR1 transcription (cortex > cerebellum) that coincided with higher mouse Pgp protein expression. We confirmed luciferase expression in brain vessel endothelial cells by ex vivo analysis of tissue luciferase protein expression. We conclude that the MDR1-luc mouse provides a unique in vivo system to visualize MDR1 CNS expression and regulation.

  17. In Vivo Imaging of Human MDR1 Transcription in the Brain and Spine of MDR1-Luciferase Reporter Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Kazuto; Cline, Cynthia; Lin, Yvonne S.; Scheib, Rachel; Ganguly, Samit; Thirumaran, Ranjit K.; Chaudhry, Amarjit; Kim, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) [the product of the MDR1 (ABCB1) gene] at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits central nervous system (CNS) entry of many prescribed drugs, contributing to the poor success rate of CNS drug candidates. Modulating Pgp expression could improve drug delivery into the brain; however, assays to predict regulation of human BBB Pgp are lacking. We developed a transgenic mouse model to monitor human MDR1 transcription in the brain and spinal cord in vivo. A reporter construct consisting of ∼10 kb of the human MDR1 promoter controlling the firefly luciferase gene was used to generate a transgenic mouse line (MDR1-luc). Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the MDR1-luciferase transgene on chromosome 3. Reporter gene expression was monitored with an in vivo imaging system following D-luciferin injection. Basal expression was detectable in the brain, and treatment with activators of the constitutive androstane, pregnane X, and glucocorticoid receptors induced brain and spinal MDR1-luc transcription. Since D-luciferin is a substrate of ABCG2, the feasibility of improving D-luciferin brain accumulation (and luciferase signal) was tested by coadministering the dual ABCB1/ABCG2 inhibitor elacridar. The brain and spine MDR1-luc signal intensity was increased by elacridar treatment, suggesting enhanced D-luciferin brain bioavailability. There was regional heterogeneity in MDR1 transcription (cortex > cerebellum) that coincided with higher mouse Pgp protein expression. We confirmed luciferase expression in brain vessel endothelial cells by ex vivo analysis of tissue luciferase protein expression. We conclude that the MDR1-luc mouse provides a unique in vivo system to visualize MDR1 CNS expression and regulation. PMID:26281846

  18. Transgenic Mouse Model Harboring the Transcriptional Fusion Ccl20-Luciferase as a Novel Reporter of Pro-Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Crispo, Martina; Van Maele, Laurye; Tabareau, Julien; Cayet, Delphine; Errea, Agustina; Ferreira, Ana María; Rumbo, Martin; Sirard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc) encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo. PMID:24265691

  19. Transgenic mouse model harboring the transcriptional fusion ccl20-luciferase as a novel reporter of pro-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Crispo, Martina; Van Maele, Laurye; Tabareau, Julien; Cayet, Delphine; Errea, Agustina; Ferreira, Ana María; Rumbo, Martin; Sirard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc) encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo.

  20. Allele-specific transcriptional activity of the variable number of tandem repeats in 5' region of the DRD4 gene is stimulus specific in human neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Paredes, U M; Quinn, J P; D'Souza, U M

    2013-03-01

    The dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene includes several variable number of tandem repeat loci that have been suggested to modulate DRD4 gene expression patterns. Previous studies showed differential basal activity of the two most common variants of a tandem repeat (120 bp per repeat unit) located in the 5' region adjacent to the DRD4 promoter in human cell lines. In this communication, we further characterized the ability of this polymorphic repeat to elicit tissue-, allele- and stimuli-specific transcriptional activity in vitro. The short and long variants of the DRD4 5' tandem repeat were cloned into a luciferase reporter gene construct containing the SV40 promoter. The luciferase constructs were cotransfected with expression vectors of two ubiquitously expressed human transcription factors (TFs), CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2), into human cell lines and primary cultures of neonate rat cortex and luciferase activity measured. Overexpression with these TFs resulted in differential cell- and allele-specific transcriptional activities of the luciferase constructs. The results of our experiments show that variants of this tandem repeat in the 5' promoter of the DRD4 gene will direct differential reporter gene transcriptional activity in a cell-type-specific manner dependent on the signal pathways activated.

  1. RNA-mediated gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Alan L; Slack, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has become a new paradigm in biology. RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways have been studied extensively, revealing diverse epigenetic and posttranscriptional mechanisms. In contrast, the roles of ncRNAs in activating gene expression remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gene activation by small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and enhancer-derived RNAs, with an emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24185374

  2. Complementation of subunits from different bacterial luciferases. Evidence for the role of the. beta. subunit in the bioluminescent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meighen, E.A.; Bartlet, I.

    1980-12-10

    Complementation of the nonidentical subunits (..cap alpha.. and ..beta..) of luciferases isolated from two different bioluminescent strains, Beneckea harveyi and Photobacterium phosphoreum, has resulted in the formation of a functional hybrid luciferase (..cap alpha../sub h/..beta../sub p/) containing the ..cap alpha.. subunit from B. harveyi luciferase (..cap alpha../sub h/) and the ..beta.. subunit from P. phosphoreum luciferase (..beta../sub p/). The complementation was unidirectional; activity could not be restored by complementing the ..cap alpha.. subunit of P. phosphoreum luciferase with the ..beta.. subunit of B. harveyi luciferase, showing that the subunits from these luciferases were not identical. Kinetic parameters of the hybrid luciferase reflecting the intermediate and later steps of the bioluminescent reaction as well as the overall activity and specificity were essentially identical to the same kinetic parameters for B. harveyi luciferase, the source of the ..cap alpha.. subunit, and quite distinct from those of P. phosphoreum luciferase. However, kinetic parameters that reflected the initial step in the reaction involving interaction of FMNH/sub 2/ and luciferase were altered in the hybrid luciferase compared to both the parental luciferases, the K/sub d/ for FMNH/sub 2/ actually being closer to that observed for the P. phosphoreum luciferase (the source of the ..beta.. subunit). These results provide direct evidence that modification or alteration of the ..beta.. subunit in a dimeric luciferase molecule can affect the kinetic properties and indicates that the ..beta.. subunit plays a functional role in the bioluminescent mechanism. It is proposed that both the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits are involved with the initial interaction with FMNH/sub 2/, whereas subsequent steps in the mechanism are dictated exclusively by the ..cap alpha.. subunit and are unaffected by alterations in the ..beta.. subunit.

  3. A Panel of Trypanosoma brucei Strains Tagged with Blue and Red-Shifted Luciferases for Bioluminescent Imaging in Murine Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Van Reet, Nick; Van de Vyver, Hélène; Pyana, Patient Pati; Van der Linden, Anne Marie; Büscher, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic engineering with luciferase reporter genes allows monitoring Trypanosoma brucei (T.b.) infections in mice by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Until recently, luminescent T.b. models were based on Renilla luciferase (RLuc) activity. Our study aimed at evaluating red-shifted luciferases for in vivo BLI in a set of diverse T.b. strains of all three subspecies, including some recently isolated from human patients. Methodology/Principal findings We transfected T.b. brucei, T.b. rhodesiense and T.b. gambiense strains with either RLuc, click beetle red (CBR) or Photinus pyralis RE9 (PpyRE9) luciferase and characterised their in vitro luciferase activity, growth profile and drug sensitivity, and their potential for in vivo BLI. Compared to RLuc, the red-shifted luciferases, CBR and PpyRE9, allow tracking of T.b. brucei AnTaR 1 trypanosomes with higher details on tissue distribution, and PpyRE9 allows detection of the parasites with a sensitivity of at least one order of magnitude higher than CBR luciferase. With CBR-tagged T.b. gambiense LiTaR1, T.b. rhodesiense RUMPHI and T.b. gambiense 348 BT in an acute, subacute and chronic infection model respectively, we observed differences in parasite tropism for murine tissues during in vivo BLI. Ex vivo BLI on the brain confirmed central nervous system infection by all luminescent strains of T.b. brucei AnTaR 1, T.b. rhodesiense RUMPHI and T.b. gambiense 348 BT. Conclusions/Significance We established a genetically and phenotypically diverse collection of bioluminescent T.b. brucei, T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense strains, including drug resistant strains. For in vivo BLI monitoring of murine infections, we recommend trypanosome strains transfected with red-shifted luciferase reporter genes, such as CBR and PpyRE9. Red-shifted luciferases can be detected with a higher sensitivity in vivo and at the same time they improve the spatial resolution of the parasites in the entire body due to the better

  4. Luciferase protection against proteolytic degradation: a key for improving signal in nano-system biology.

    PubMed

    Ataei, Farangis; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Khajeh, Khosro

    2009-10-26

    Luciferase is most widely used bioluminescence protein in biotechnological processes, but the enzyme is susceptible to proteolytic degradation, thereby its intracellular half-life decreased. Osmolytes are known to enhance the stability of proteins and protect them in a native folded and functional state. The effects of osmolytes, including sucrose, glycine and DMSO on the stability of luciferase were investigated. To different extents, all osmolytes protected the luciferase towards proteolytic degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. The results showed that 1.5M sucrose, 1.5M glycine and 15% DMSO are the best. The ability of these osmolytes to protect luciferase against proteolysis decreased from sucrose, glycine, and finally DMSO. Enzymatic kinetic data showed that the luciferase activity is significantly kept in the presence of sucrose and glycine compared to DMSO, particularly at high temperatures. Bioluminescence intensity, circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic and ANS fluorescence experiments showed change in secondary and tertiary luciferase structure. These results suggest that osmolytes exert an important effect on stabilization of luciferase conformation; decreasing the unfolding rate, preventing adaptation and binding of luciferase at the active site of proteases, thereby the proteolytic digestion reduced and its active conformation was kept.

  5. Expression, purification and characterization of the secreted luciferase of the copepod Metridia longa from Sf9 insect cells.

    PubMed

    Stepanyuk, Galina A; Xu, Hao; Wu, Chia-Kuei; Markova, Svetlana V; Lee, John; Vysotski, Eugene S; Wang, Bi-Cheng

    2008-10-01

    Metridia luciferase is a secreted luciferase from a marine copepod and uses coelenterazine as a substrate to produce a blue bioluminescence (lambda(max)=480 nm). This luciferase has been successfully applied as a bioluminescent reporter in mammalian cells. The main advantage of secreted luciferase as a reporter is the capability of measuring intracellular events without destroying the cells or tissues and this property is well suited for development of high throughput screening technologies. However because Metridia luciferase is a Cys-rich protein, Escherichia coli expression systems produce an incorrectly folded protein, hindering its biochemical characterization and application for development of in vitro bioluminescent assays. Here we report the successful expression of Metridia luciferase with its signal peptide for secretion, in insect (Sf9) cells using the baculovirus expression system. Functionally active luciferase secreted by insect cells into the culture media has been efficiently purified with a yield of high purity protein of 2-3 mg/L. This Metridia luciferase expressed in the insect cell system is a monomeric protein showing 3.5-fold greater bioluminescence activity than luciferase expressed and purified from E. coli. The near coincidence of the experimental mass of Metridia luciferase purified from insect cells with that calculated from amino acid sequence, indicates that luciferase does not undergo post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation or glycosylation and also, the cleavage site of the signal peptide for secretion is at VQA-KS, as predicted from sequence analysis.

  6. Mass culture of photobacteria to obtain luciferase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Rich, E., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Inoculating preheated trays containing nutrient agar with photobacteria provides a means for mass culture of aerobic microorganisms in order to obtain large quantities of luciferase. To determine optimum harvest time, growth can be monitored by automated light-detection instrumentation.

  7. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-03-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals.

  8. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals. PMID:26950874

  9. Comparison of in vivo and in vitro reporter gene assays for short-term screening of estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Legler, Juliette; Zeinstra, Laura M; Schuitemaker, Femke; Lanser, Peter H; Bogerd, Jan; Brouwer, Abraham; Vethaak, A Dick; De Voogt, Pim; Murk, Albertinka J; Van der Burg, Bart

    2002-10-15

    Functional in vitro and in vivo reporter gene assays have recently been developed for the rapid determination of exposure to (xeno)estrogens. The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated chemically activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) assay uses T47D human breast cancer cells stably transfected with an ER-mediated luciferase gene construct. In the in vivo assay, transgenic zebrafish are used in which the same luciferase construct has been stably introduced. In both assays, luciferase reporter gene activity can be easily quantified following short-term exposure to chemicals activating endogenous estrogen receptors. The objective of this study was to compare responses by known (xeno)estrogenic compounds in both assays. Exposure to the (xeno)estrogens estradiol (E2), estrone, ethynylestradiol (EE2), o,p'-DDT, nonylphenol (NP), and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) revealed that EE2 was the most potent (xeno)estrogen tested and was 100 times more potent than E2 in the transgenic zebrafish assay, whereas in the in vitro ER-CALUX assay, EE2 and E2 were equipotent Although the xenoestrogens o,p'-DDT and NP were full estrogen agonists in the in vitro ER-CALUX assay, only o,p'-DDT demonstrated weak dose-related estrogenic activity in vivo. To determine if differences in reporter gene activity may be explained by differential affinity of (xeno)estrogens to human and zebrafish ERs, full-length sequences of the zebrafish ER subtypes alpha, beta, and gamma were cloned, and transactivation by (xeno)estrogens was compared to human ERalpha and ERbeta. Using transiently transfected recombinant ER and reporter gene constructs, EE2 also showed relatively potent activation of zebrafish ERalpha and ERbeta compared to human ERalpha and ERbeta. Zebrafish ERbeta and ERgamma showed higher transactivation by (xeno)estrogens relative to E2 than human ERbeta.

  10. A novel firefly luciferase biosensor enhances the detection of apoptosis induced by ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Junwei; Zhang, Huan; Fang, Liurong; Xi, Yongqiang; Zhou, Yanrong; Luo, Rui; Wang, Dang Xiao, Shaobo; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • We developed a novel firefly luciferase based biosensor to detect apoptosis. • The novel biosensor 233-DnaE-DEVDG was reliable, sensitive and convenient. • 233-DnaE-DEVDG faithfully indicated ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced apoptosis. • EsxA, esxT and esxL in ESAT-6 family proteins induced apoptosis. • Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. - Abstract: The activation of caspase-3 is a key surrogate marker for detecting apoptosis. To quantitate caspase-3 activity, we constructed a biosensor comprising a recombinant firefly luciferase containing a caspase-3 cleavage site. When apoptosis was induced, caspase-3 cleavage of the biosensor activated firefly luciferase by a factor greater than 25. The assay conveniently detected apoptosis in real time, indicating that it will facilitate drug discovery. We screened ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and found that esxA, esxT and esxL induced apoptosis. Further, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the NF-κB-regulated genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that this assay is useful for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize proteins and drugs that regulate apoptosis.

  11. Expression and stabilization of bacterial luciferase in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Stacey S.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Current mammalian bioreporters using either firefly luciferase (luc) or GFP constructs require lysis and/or exogenous excitation to evoke a measurable response. Consequently, these cells cannot serve as continuous, on-line monitoring devices for in vivo imaging. Bacterial luciferase, lux, produces a photonic reaction that is cyclic, resulting in autonomous signal generation without the requirement for exogenous substrates or external activation. Therefore, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporters are the only truly autonomous light-generating sensors in existence. Unfortunately, the bacterial lux system has not yet been efficiently expressed in mammalian cells. In this research, three approaches for optimal expression of the a and b subunits of the bacterial luciferase protein were compared and reporter signal stability was evaluated from stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Maximum light levels were obtained from cells expressing the luciferase subunits linked with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Cells harboring this construct produced bioluminescence equaling 2.6 X 106 photons/sec compared to 7.2 X 104 photons/sec obtained from cells expressing the luciferase from a dual promoter vector and 3.5 X 104 photons/sec from a Lux fusion protein. Furthermore, the bioluminescence levels remained stable for more than forty cell passages (5 months) in the absence of antibiotic selection. After this time, bioluminescence signals dropped at a rate of approximately 5% per cell passage. These data indicate that mammalian cell lines can be engineered to efficiently express the bacterial lux system, thus lending themselves to possible long-term continuous monitoring or imaging applications in vivo.

  12. Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III Overexpression By Gene Therapy Exerts Antitumoral Activity In Mouse Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    González, Raúl; De la Rosa, Ángel J; Romero-Brufau, Santiago; Barrera-Pulido, Lydia; Gallardo-Chamizo, Francisco; Pereira, Sheila; Marín, Luís M; Álamo, José M; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ángeles; Padillo, Francisco J; Muntané, Jordi

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in cirrhotic liver. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase type III (NOS-3) overexpression induces cell death in hepatoma cells. The study developed gene therapy designed to specifically overexpress NOS-3 in cultured hepatoma cells, and in tumors derived from orthotopically implanted tumor cells in fibrotic livers. Liver fibrosis was induced by CCl4 administration in mice. Hepa 1-6 cells were used for in vitro and in vivo experiments. The first generation adenovirus was designed to overexpress NOS-3 (or GFP) and luciferase cDNA under the regulation of murine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and Rous Sarcoma Virus (RSV) promoters, respectively. Both adenoviruses were administered through the tail vein two weeks after orthotopic tumor cell implantation. AFP-NOS-3/RSV-Luciferase increased oxidative-related DNA damage, p53, CD95/CD95L expression and caspase-8 activity in cultured Hepa 1-6 cells. The increased expression of CD95/CD95L and caspase-8 activity was abolished by l-NAME or p53 siRNA. The tail vein infusion of AFP-NOS- 3/RSV-Luciferase adenovirus increased cell death markers, and reduced cell proliferation of established tumors in fibrotic livers. The increase of oxidative/nitrosative stress induced by NOS-3 overexpression induced DNA damage, p53, CD95/CD95L expression and cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The effectiveness of the gene therapy has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Automatic polymerase chain reaction product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger protein fused to luciferase.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Wataru; Kezuka, Aki; Murakami, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Jinhee; Abe, Koichi; Motoki, Hiroaki; Matsuo, Takafumi; Shimura, Nobuaki; Noda, Mamoru; Igimi, Shizunobu; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2013-11-01

    An automatic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger (ZF) protein fused to luciferase was developed. ZF protein fused to luciferase specifically binds to target double stranded DNA sequence and has luciferase enzymatic activity. Therefore, PCR products that comprise ZF protein recognition sequence can be detected by measuring the luciferase activity of the fusion protein. We previously reported that PCR products from Legionella pneumophila and Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 genomic DNA were detected by Zif268, a natural ZF protein, fused to luciferase. In this study, Zif268-luciferase was applied to detect the presence of Salmonella and coliforms. Moreover, an artificial zinc finger protein (B2) fused to luciferase was constructed for a Norovirus detection system. In the luciferase activity detection assay, several bound/free separation process is required. Therefore, an analyzer that automatically performed the bound/free separation process was developed to detect PCR products using the ZF-luciferase fusion protein. By means of the automatic analyzer with ZF-luciferase fusion protein, target pathogenic genomes were specifically detected in the presence of other pathogenic genomes. Moreover, we succeeded in the detection of 10 copies of E. coli BL21 without extraction of genomic DNA by the automatic analyzer and E. coli was detected with a logarithmic dependency in the range of 1.0×10 to 1.0×10(6) copies.

  14. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  15. Human DJ-1-specific transcriptional activation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2010-12-17

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice.

  16. Firefly Luciferase and Rluc8 Exhibit Differential Sensitivity to Oxidative Stress in Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Czupryna, Julie; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, firefly Luciferase (fLuc) has been used in a wide range of biological assays, providing insight into gene regulation, protein-protein interactions, cell proliferation, and cell migration. However, it has also been well established that fLuc activity can be highly sensitive to its surrounding environment. In this study, we found that when various cancer cell lines (HeLa, MCF-7, and 293T) stably expressing fLuc were treated with staurosporine (STS), there was a rapid loss in bioluminescence. In contrast, a stable variant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc), RLuc8, exhibited significantly prolonged functionality under the same conditions. To identify the specific underlying mechanism(s) responsible for the disparate sensitivity of RLuc8 and fLuc to cellular stress, we conducted a series of inhibition studies that targeted known intracellular protein degradation/modification pathways associated with cell death. Interestingly, these studies suggested that reactive oxygen species, particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), was responsible for the diminution of fLuc activity. Consistent with these findings, the direct application of H2O2 to HeLa cells also led to a reduction in fLuc bioluminescence, while H2O2 scavengers stabilized fLuc activity. Comparatively, RLuc8 was far less sensitive to ROS. These observations suggest that fLuc activity can be substantially altered in studies where ROS levels become elevated and can potentially lead to ambiguous or misleading findings. PMID:21603648

  17. Influenza A virus encoding secreted Gaussia luciferase as useful tool to analyze viral replication and its inhibition by antiviral compounds and cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Nadine; Wrensch, Florian; Gärtner, Sabine; Palanisamy, Navaneethan; Goedecke, Ulrike; Jäger, Nils; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Winkler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Reporter genes inserted into viral genomes enable the easy and rapid quantification of virus replication, which is instrumental to efficient in vitro screening of antiviral compounds or in vivo analysis of viral spread and pathogenesis. Based on a published design, we have generated several replication competent influenza A viruses carrying either fluorescent proteins or Gaussia luciferase. Reporter activity could be readily quantified in infected cultures, but the virus encoding Gaussia luciferase was more stable than viruses bearing fluorescent proteins and was therefore analyzed in detail. Quantification of Gaussia luciferase activity in the supernatants of infected culture allowed the convenient and highly sensitive detection of viral spread, and enzymatic activity correlated with the number of infectious particles released from infected cells. Furthermore, the Gaussia luciferase encoding virus allowed the sensitive quantification of the antiviral activity of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) zanamivir and the host cell interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) proteins 1-3, which are known to inhibit influenza virus entry. Finally, the virus was used to demonstrate that influenza A virus infection is sensitive to a modulator of endosomal cholesterol, in keeping with the concept that IFITMs inhibit viral entry by altering cholesterol levels in the endosomal membrane. In sum, we report the characterization of a novel influenza A reporter virus, which allows fast and sensitive detection of viral spread and its inhibition, and we show that influenza A virus entry is sensitive to alterations of endosomal cholesterol levels.

  18. Engineering luciferase enzymes and substrates for novel assay capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Keith V.

    2004-06-01

    In the development of HTS as a central paradigm of drug discovery, fluorescent reporter molecules have generally been adopted as the favored signal transducer. Nevertheless, luminescence has maintained a prominent position among certain methodologies, most notably genetic reporters. Recently, there has been growing partiality for luminescent assays across a broader range of applications due to their sensitivity, extensive linearity, and robustness to library compounds and complex biological samples. This trend has been fostered by development several new assay designs for diverse targets such as kinases, cytochrome p450's, proteases, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. This review addresses recent progress made in the use of bioluminescent assays for drug discovery, highlighting new detection capabilities brought about by engineering luciferase enzymes and substrates. In reporter gene applications, modified luciferases have provided greatly improved expression efficiency in mammalian cells, improved responsiveness to changes of transcriptional rate, and increased the magnitude of the reporter response. Highly stabilized luciferase mutants have enabled new assays strategies for high-throughput screening based on detection of ATP and luciferin. Assays based on ATP support rapid analysis of cell metabolism and enzymatic processes coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Although luciferin is found natively only in luminous beetles, coupled assays have been designed using modified forms of luciferin requiring the action of second enzyme to yield luminescence. Due to the very low inherent background and protection of the photon-emitter afforded by the enzyme, bioluminescent assays often outperform the analogous fluorescent assays for analyses performed in multiwell plates.

  19. Detection of allergenic compounds using an IL-4/luciferase/CNS-1 transgenic mice model.

    PubMed

    Bae, Chang Joon; Lee, Jae Won; Bae, Hee Sook; Shim, Sun Bo; Jee, Seung Wan; Lee, Su Hae; Lee, Chang Kyu; Hong, Jin Tae; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2011-04-01

    The interleukin-4 (IL-4) signaling cascade has been identified as a potentially important pathway in the development of allergies. The principal objective of this study was to produce novel transgenic (Tg) mice harboring the luciferase gene under the control of the human IL-4 promoter and the enhancer of IL-4 (CNS-1), in an effort to evaluate three types of allergens including a respiratory sensitizer, vaccine additives, and crude extracts of natural allergens in vivo. A new lineage of Tg mice was generated by the microinjection of pIL-4/Luc/CNS-1 constructs into a fertilized mice egg. The luciferase activity was successfully regulated by the IL-4 promoter in splenocytes cultured from IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice. From the first five founder lines, one (#57) evidencing a profound response to ovalbumin was selected for use in evaluating the allergens. Additionally, the lungs, thymus, and lymph nodes of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice evidenced high luciferase activity in response to allergens such as phthalic anhydride (PA), trimellitic anhydride, ovalbumin, gelatin, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extracts, and Japanese cedar pollen, whereas key allergy-related indicators including ear thickness, Immunoglobulin E concentration, and the infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes in response to PA were unaltered in the Tg mice relative to the non-Tg mice. Furthermore, the expression levels of endogenous type 2 helper T cells cytokines and proinflammatory cytokines were similarly increased in these organs of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice in response to allergens. These results indicate that IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice may be used as an animal model for the evaluation and prediction of the human body response to a variety of allergens originating from the environment and from certain industrial products.

  20. Reporter enzyme inhibitor study to aid assembly of orthogonal reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pei-i; Yue, Kimberley; Pandey, Pramod; Breault, Lyne; Harbinski, Fred; McBride, Aaron J; Webb, Brian; Narahari, Janaki; Karassina, Natasha; Wood, Keith V; Hill, Adam; Auld, Douglas S

    2013-05-17

    Reporter gene assays (RGAs) are commonly used to measure biological pathway modulation by small molecules. Understanding how such compounds interact with the reporter enzyme is critical to accurately interpret RGA results. To improve our understanding of reporter enzymes and to develop optimal RGA systems, we investigated eight reporter enzymes differing in brightness, emission spectrum, stability, and substrate requirements. These included common reporter enzymes such as firefly luciferase (Photinus pyralis), Renilla reniformis luciferase, and β-lactamase, as well as mutated forms of R. reniformis luciferase emitting either blue- or green-shifted luminescence, a red-light emitting form of Luciola cruciata firefly luciferase, a mutated form of Gaussia princeps luciferase, and a proprietary luciferase termed "NanoLuc" derived from the luminescent sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris. To determine hit rates and structure-activity relationships, we screened a collection of 42,460 PubChem compounds at 10 μM using purified enzyme preparations. We then compared hit rates and chemotypes of actives for each enzyme. The hit rates ranged from <0.1% for β-lactamase to as high as 10% for mutated forms of Renilla luciferase. Related luciferases such as Renilla luciferase mutants showed high degrees of inhibitor overlap (40-70%), while unrelated luciferases such as firefly luciferases, Gaussia luciferase, and NanoLuc showed <10% overlap. Examination of representative inhibitors in cell-based assays revealed that inhibitor-based enzyme stabilization can lead to increases in bioluminescent signal for firefly luciferase, Renilla luciferase, and NanoLuc, with shorter half-life reporters showing increased activation responses. From this study we suggest strategies to improve the construction and interpretation of assays employing these reporter enzymes.

  1. Split luciferase-based biosensors for characterizing EED binders.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Feng, Lijian; Shi, Minlong; Zeng, Jue; Chen, Zijun; Zhong, Li; Huang, Li; Guo, Weihui; Huang, Ying; Qi, Wei; Lu, Chris; Li, En; Zhao, Kehao; Gu, Justin

    2017-04-01

    The EED (embryonic ectoderm development) subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) plays an important role in the feed forward regulation of the PRC2 enzymatic activity. We recently identified a new class of allosteric PRC2 inhibitors that bind to the H3K27me3 pocket of EED. Multiple assays were developed and used to identify and characterize this type of PRC2 inhibitors. One of them is a genetically encoded EED biosensor based on the EED[G255D] mutant and the split firefly luciferase. This EED biosensor can detect the compound binding in the transfected cells and in the in vitro biochemical assays. Compared to other commonly used cellular assays, the EED biosensor assay has the advantage of shorter compound incubation with cells. The in vitro EED biosensor is much more sensitive than other label-free biophysical assays (e.g. DSF, ITC). Based on the crystal structure, the DSF data as well as the biosensor assay data, it's most likely that compound-induced increase in the luciferase activity of the EED[G255D] biosensor results from the decreased non-productive interactions between the EED subdomain and other subdomains within the biosensor construct. This new insight of the mechanism might help to broaden the use of the split luciferase based biosensors.

  2. High-throughput, luciferase-based reverse genetics systems for identifying inhibitors of Marburg and Ebola viruses.

    PubMed

    Uebelhoer, Luke S; Albariño, César G; McMullan, Laura K; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Vincent, Joel P; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2014-06-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus (EBOV), members of the family Filoviridae, represent a significant challenge to global public health. Currently, no licensed therapies exist to treat filovirus infections, which cause up to 90% mortality in human cases. To facilitate development of antivirals against these viruses, we established two distinct screening platforms based on MARV and EBOV reverse genetics systems that express secreted Gaussia luciferase (gLuc). The first platform is a mini-genome replicon to screen viral replication inhibitors using gLuc quantification in a BSL-2 setting. The second platform is complementary to the first and expresses gLuc as a reporter gene product encoded in recombinant infectious MARV and EBOV, thereby allowing for rapid quantification of viral growth during treatment with antiviral compounds. We characterized these viruses by comparing luciferase activity to virus production, and validated luciferase activity as an authentic real-time measure of viral growth. As proof of concept, we adapt both mini-genome and infectious virus platforms to high-throughput formats, and demonstrate efficacy of several antiviral compounds. We anticipate that both approaches will prove highly useful in the development of anti-filovirus therapies, as well as in basic research on the filovirus life cycle.

  3. Genetic modification in organ transplantation and in vivo luciferase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Takashi; Inoue, Sei-ichiro; Sato, Yuki; Ajiki, Takashi; Ohsawa, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2005-04-01

    The genetic modification for organ transplantation is one of the most promising strategies to regulate allogeneic immune response. Organ-selective gene transfer has especially benefit to control local immune responses. Based on the catheter technique, we tested to deliver naked plasmid DNA to target graft organs of rats (liver and limbs) by a rapid injection (hydrodynamics-based transfection). Recent advances in transplantation have been achieved by visualization of cellular process and delivered gene expression during the inflammatory process by using non-invasive in vivo imaging. Herein, we examined the fate of genetically modified grafts using a firefly luciferase expression plasmid. For liver modification before transplantation, 6.25% of body weight PBS containing plasmid DNA was injected into the liver through the inferior vena cava using a catheter, and the liver was subsequently transplanted to the recipient rat. For limb modification, the femoral caudal epigastric vein was used. In the rat liver transplantation model, substantial luciferase expression was visualized and sustained for only a few days in the grafted liver. We also addressed stress responses by this hydrodynamics procedure using reporter plasmids containing cis-acting enhancer binding site such as NF-kappa B, cAMP, or heat shock response element. In contrast to hepatic transduction, this genetic limb targeting achieved long lasting luciferase expression in the muscle for 2 months or more. Thus, our results suggest that this catheter-based in vivo transfection technique provides an effective strategy for organ-selective gene modification in transplantation, and the bioluminescent imaging is broadening its potential for evaluation to various preclinical studies.

  4. Marker gene tethering by nucleoporins affects gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah; Galinha, Carla; Desset, Sophie; Tolmie, Frances; Evans, David; Tatout, Christophe; Graumann, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In non-plant systems, chromatin association with the nuclear periphery affects gene expression, where interactions with nuclear envelope proteins can repress and interactions with nucleoporins can enhance transcription. In plants, both hetero- and euchromatin can localize at the nuclear periphery, but the effect of proximity to the nuclear periphery on gene expression remains largely unknown. This study explores the putative function of Seh1 and Nup50a nucleoporins on gene expression by using the Lac Operator / Lac Repressor (LacI-LacO) system adapted to Arabidopsis thaliana. We used LacO fused to the luciferase reporter gene (LacO:Luc) to investigate whether binding of the LacO:Luc transgene to nucleoporin:LacI protein fusions alters luciferase expression. Two separate nucleoporin-LacI-YFP fusions were introduced into single insert, homozygous LacO:Luc Arabidopsis plants. Homozygous plants carrying LacO:Luc and a single insert of either Seh1-LacI-YFP or Nup50a-LacI-YFP were tested for luciferase activity and compared to plants containing LacO:Luc only. Seh1-LacI-YFP increased, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP decreased luciferase activity. Seh1-LacI-YFP accumulated at the nuclear periphery as expected, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP was nucleoplasmic and was not selected for further study. Protein and RNA levels of luciferase were quantified by western blotting and RT-qPCR, respectively. Increased luciferase activity in LacO:Luc+Seh1-LacI-YFP plants was correlated with increased luciferase protein and RNA levels. This change of luciferase expression was abolished by disruption of LacI-LacO binding by treating with IPTG in young seedlings, rosette leaves and inflorescences. This study suggests that association with the nuclear periphery is involved in the regulation of gene expression in plants.

  5. Posttranslationally caused bioluminescence burst of the Escherichia coli luciferase reporter strain.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Yamato; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Ryo, Masashi; Motoki, Shogo; Kuwano, Takashi; Tezuka, Takafumi; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We continuously monitored bioluminescence from a wild-type reporter strain of Escherichia coli (lacp::luc+/WT), which carries the promoter of the lac operon (lacp) fused with the firefly luciferase gene (luc+). This strain showed a bioluminescence burst when shifted into the stationary growth phase. Bioluminescence profiles of other wild-type reporter strains (rpsPp::luc+ and argAp::luc+) and gene-deletion reporter strains (lacp::luc+/crp- and lacp::luc+/lacI-) indicate that transcriptional regulation is not responsible for generation of the burst. Consistently, changes in the luciferase protein levels did not recapitulate the profile of the burst. On the other hand, dissolved oxygen levels increased over the period across the burst, suggesting that the burst is, at least partially, caused by an increase in intracellular oxygen levels. We discuss limits of the firefly luciferase when used as a reporter for gene expression and its potential utility for monitoring metabolic changes in cells.

  6. Suitability of Macrolampis firefly and Pyrearinus click beetle luciferases for bacterial light off toxicity biosensor.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Gabriele V M; Lopes, P S; Viviani, V R

    2014-01-15

    Bioluminescence is widely used in biosensors. For water toxicity analysis, the naturally bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri have been used extensively. We investigated the suitability of two new beetle luciferases for Escherichia coli light off biosensors: Macrolampis firefly and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle luciferases. The bioluminescence detection assay using this system is very sensitive, being comparable or superior to V. fischeri. The luciferase of P. termitilluminans produces a strong and sustained bioluminescence that is useful for less sensitive and inexpensive assays that require integration of the emission, whereas Macrolampis luciferase displays a flash-like luminescence that is useful for fast and more sensitive assays. The effect of heavy metals and sanitizing agents was analyzed. Zinc, copper, 1-propanol, and iodide had inhibitory effects on bioluminescence and growth assays; however, in these cases the bioluminescence was not a very reliable indicator of cell growth and metabolic activity because these agents also inhibited the luciferase. On the other hand, mercury and silver strongly affected cell bioluminescence and growth but not the luciferase activity, indicating that bioluminescence was a reliable indicator of cell growth and metabolic activity in this case. Finally, bioluminescent E. coli immobilized in agarose matrix gave a more stable format for environmental assays.

  7. Increase of segmental mobility through insertion of a flexible linker in split point of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Parisa; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure of Photinus pyralis luciferase shows a unique molecular architecture consisting of a large N-terminal domain and a small C-terminal domain which is separated by a wide cleft. Protein engineering methods attempts to design the peptide linkers that make a connection between different protein domains or subunits to allow for separating domains and improve kinetics and structural features of proteins. In regard to this; introduction of a flexible linker at split point of luciferase which has a strong self-association activity, may leads to conformational change and improve general flexibility of protein. In this study, two flexible linkers in the split point of luciferase are introduced in order to test the effect of linker on flexibility of luciferase activity. Glycine-rich linkers are introduced into P. pyralis firefly luciferase to make two separate mutant enzymes. Enzymatic properties of mutant and native forms were measured using luminescence assay. Results show that lengthening of luciferase domains through insertion of a flexible linker did not affect bioluminescence emission spectra. Also adding linkers do not have remarkable effect on thermostability. The Km values of mutants were increased compared to native form, indicating lower affinity of mutants toward substrates.

  8. Phytol directly activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) and regulates gene expression involved in lipid metabolism in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kato, Sota; Egawa, Kahori; Ebisu, Shogo; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Fushiki, Tohru; Kawada, Teruo . E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-18

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is one of the indispensable transcription factors for regulating lipid metabolism in various tissues. In our screening for natural compounds that activate PPAR using luciferase assays, a branched-carbon-chain alcohol (a component of chlorophylls), phytol, has been identified as a PPAR{alpha}-specific activator. Phytol induced the increase in PPAR{alpha}-dependent luciferase activity and the degree of in vitro binding of a coactivator, SRC-1, to GST-PPAR{alpha}. Moreover, the addition of phytol upregulated the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes at both mRNA and protein levels in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes. These findings indicate that phytol is functional as a PPAR{alpha} ligand and that it stimulates the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes in intact cells. Because PPAR{alpha} activation enhances circulating lipid clearance, phytol may be important in managing abnormalities in lipid metabolism.

  9. Enhanced Gaussia luciferase blood assay for monitoring of in vivo biological processes.

    PubMed

    Bovenberg, M Sarah S; Degeling, M Hannah; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2012-01-17

    Secreted Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) has been shown to be a useful tool for ex vivo monitoring of in vivo biological processes. The Gluc level in the blood was used to detect tumor growth, metastasis and response to therapy, gene transfer, and circulating cells viability, as well as transcription factors activation, complementing in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The sensitivity of the Gluc blood assay is limited due to the absorption of blue light by pigmented molecules such as hemoglobin, resulting in quenching of the signal and therefore lower sensitivity. To overcome this problem, we designed an alternative microtiter well-based binding assay in which Gluc is captured first from blood using a specific antibody followed by the addition of coelenterazine and signal acquisition using a luminometer. This assay showed to be over 1 order of magnitude more sensitive in detecting Gluc in the blood as compared to the direct Gluc blood assay enhancing ex vivo monitoring of biological processes.

  10. A real time Metridia luciferase based non-invasive reporter assay of mammalian cell viability and cytotoxicity via the β-actin promoter and enhancer.

    PubMed

    Lupold, Shawn E; Johnson, Tamara; Chowdhury, Wasim H; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Secreted reporter molecules offer a means to evaluate biological processes in real time without the need to sacrifice samples at pre-determined endpoints. Here we have adapted the secreted bioluminescent reporter gene, Metridia luciferase, for use in a real-time viability assay for mammalian cells. The coding region of the marine copepod gene has been codon optimized for expression in human cells (hMLuc) and placed under the control of the human β-actin promoter and enhancer. Metridia luciferase activity of stably transfected cell models corresponded linearly with cell number over a 4-log dynamic range, detecting as few as 40 cells. When compared to standard endpoint viability assays, which measure the mitochondrial dehydrogenase reduction of tetrazolium salts, the hMLuc viability assay had a broader linear range of detection, was applicable to large tissue culture vessels, and allowed the same sample to be repeatedly measured over several days. Additional studies confirmed that MLuc activity was inhibited by serum, but demonstrated that assay activity remained linear and was measurable in the serum of mice bearing subcutaneous hMLuc-expressing tumors. In summary, these comparative studies demonstrate the value of humanized Metridia luciferase as an inexpensive and non-invasive method for analyzing viable cell number, growth, tumor volume, and therapeutic response in real time.

  11. Intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 is a stress-inducible gene controlled by activating transcription factor 4.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Irina E; Garaeva, Alisa A; Chumakov, Peter M; Evstafieva, Alexandra G

    2016-09-15

    Intermedin or adrenomedullin 2 is a set of calcitonin-related peptides with a putative tumor angiogenesis promoting activity that are formed by proteolytic processing of the ADM2 gene product. It has been proposed that the ADM2 gene is regulated by the estrogen response element (ERE) and hypoxia response elements (HRE) found within its promoter region. In the present study we reveal a functional mechanism by which ADM2 participates in the unfolded protein response (UPR) and in responses to the mitochondrial respiration chain inhibition. We show that the ADM2 gene is controlled by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), the principal regulator of the integrated stress response (ISR). The upregulation of ADM2 mRNA could be prevented by the pharmacological ISR inhibitor ISRIB and by the downregulation of ATF4 with specific shRNA, while ectopic expression of ATF4 cDNA resulted in a notable increase in ADM2 gene transcription. A potential ATF4-binding site was identified in the coding region of the ADM2 gene and the requirement of this site during the ATF4-mediated ADM2 gene promoter activation was validated by the luciferase reporter assay. Mutagenesis of the putative ATF4-response element prevented the induction of luciferase activity in response to ATF4 overproduction, as well as in response to mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibition by piericidin A and ER stress induction by tunicamycin and brefeldin A. Since ADM2 was shown to inhibit ATF4 expression during myocardial ER stress, a feedback mechanism could be proposed for the ADM2 regulation under ER stress conditions.

  12. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    SciTech Connect

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-04-07

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 {angstrom} cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the 'off-target' effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism.

  13. Molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the MFG-E8 gene promoter activity in physiological and inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Bu, Heng-Fu; Liu, Shirley XL; De Plaen, Isabelle G.; Tan, Xiao-Di

    2015-01-01

    Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) is expressed by macrophages and plays an important role in attenuating inflammation and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Previously, we and others found that LPS inhibits MFG-E8 gene expression in macrophages. Here, we characterized the 5′-flanking region of the mouse MFG-E8 gene. To functionally analyze the upstream regulatory region of the MFG-E8 gene, a series of luciferase reporter gene constructs containing deleted or mutated regulatory elements were prepared. Using the luciferase assay, we revealed that Sp1 binding motifs within the proximal promoter region were necessary for full activity of the MFG-E8 promoter, whereas AP-1 like binding sequence at −372 played a role in governing the promoter activity at a homeostatic level. With chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we showed that Sp1 and c-Jun physically interact with the MFG-E8 promoter region in vivo. In addition, Sp1 was found to regulate the MFG-E8 promoter activity positively and c-Jun negatively. Furthermore, we demonstrated that LPS inhibited MFG-E8 promoter activity via targeting Sp1 and AP-1-like motifs in the 5′-flanking region. Collectively, our data indicate that Sp1 and AP-1-related factors are involved in the regulation of MFG-E8 gene transcription by targeting their binding sites in the 5′-flanking region under physiological and inflammatory states. PMID:25711369

  14. Multiplex detection of protein-protein interactions using a next generation luciferase reporter.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Lisette G G C; Mattioli, Michela; Ricci, Fernanda; Li, Yao-Cheng; Wade, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Cell-based assays of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) using split reporter proteins can be used to identify PPI agonists and antagonists. Generally, such assays measure one PPI at a time, and thus counterscreens for on-target activity must be run in parallel or at a subsequent stage; this increases both the cost and time during screening. Split luciferase systems offer advantages over those that use split fluorescent proteins (FPs). This is since split luciferase offers a greater signal:noise ratio and, unlike split FPs, the PPI can be reversed upon small molecule treatment. While multiplexed PPI assays using luciferase have been reported, they suffer from low signal:noise and require fairly complex spectral deconvolution during analysis. Furthermore, the luciferase enzymes used are large, which limits the range of PPIs that can be interrogated due to steric hindrance from the split luciferase fragments. Here, we report a multiplexed PPI assay based on split luciferases from Photinus pyralis (firefly luciferase, FLUC) and the deep-sea shrimp, Oplophorus gracilirostris (NanoLuc, NLUC). Specifically, we show that the binding of the p53 tumor suppressor to its two major negative regulators, MDM2 and MDM4, can be simultaneously measured within the same sample, without the requirement for complex filters or deconvolution. We provide chemical and genetic validation of this system using MDM2-targeted small molecules and mutagenesis, respectively. Combined with the superior signal:noise and smaller size of split NanoLuc, this multiplexed PPI assay format can be exploited to study the induction or disruption of pairwise interactions that are prominent in many cell signaling pathways.

  15. Illuminating insights into firefly luciferase and other bioluminescent reporters used in chemical biology

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Natasha; Inglese, James; Auld, Douglas S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Understanding luciferase enzymology and the structure of compounds that modulate luciferase activity can be used to improve the design of luminescence-based assays. This review provides an overview of these popular reporters with an emphasis on the commonly used firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis (FLuc). Large-scale chemical profile studies have identified a variety of scaffolds that inhibit FLuc. In some cell-based assays these inhibitors can act in a counter-intuitive way –leading to a gain in luminescent signal. Although formerly attributed to transcriptional activation, intracellular stabilization of FLuc is the primary mechanism underlying this observation. FLuc inhibition/stabilization can be complex, as illustrated by the compound PTC124, which is converted by FLuc in the presence of ATP to a high affinity multi-substrate-adduct inhibitor, PTC124-AMP. The potential influence these findings can have on drug discovery efforts is provided here. PMID:20609414

  16. A Photinus pyralis and Luciola italica chimeric firefly luciferase produces enhanced bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Southworth, Tara L; Fontaine, Danielle M; Davis, Audrey L; Behney, Curran E; Murtiashaw, Martha H

    2014-10-14

    We report the enhanced bioluminescence properties of a chimeric enzyme (PpyLit) that contains the N-domain of recombinant Photinus pyralis luciferase joined to the C-domain of recombinant Luciola italica luciferase. Compared to the P. pyralis enzyme, the novel PpyLit chimera exhibited 1.8-fold enhanced flash-height specific activity, 2.0-fold enhanced integration-based specific activity, 2.9-fold enhanced catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km), and a 1.4-fold greater bioluminescence quantum yield. The results of this study provide an underlying basis of this unusual example of a chimeric enzyme with enhanced catalytic properties that are not simply the sum of the contributions of the two luciferases.

  17. Cloning and transcriptional activity analysis of the porcine cofilin 2 gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Mei; Lang, Bin; Zhu, Hong-yan; Du, Hai-ting; Tian, Yu-min; Su, Yu-hong

    2014-09-01

    Cofilins (CFL), including CFL1 and CFL2, are members of the family of actin-binding proteins in eukaryote. CFL2 is predominantly expressed in mammalian skeletal muscle and heart and is important to muscle fiber formation and muscular regeneration. To study transcriptional regulation of porcine CFL2, a 2.5 kb upstream sequence starting from the major CFL2 transcriptional start site was cloned by genome walking. Twelve DNA fragments of the 5' flank region of the porcine CFL2 gene were further isolated from porcine genomic DNA via PCR and inserted into the luciferase reporter vector pGL4.10 to make 12 CFL2 reporter constructs. All reporter vectors were transfected into C2C12, NIH3T3, or Hela cells and their relative luciferase activity measured after 48 h, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that there were two TATA-boxes at the -508 bp and -453 bp, as well as a GC-box and a CAAT-box in this sequence. Additional transcription factor binding sites including SP1, AP1, AP2, and GATA-1 sites were also predicted. The transcriptional activity of pGL4.10-1554 (1502 bp to +51 bp) was the strongest, and the promoter's active region was mapped to a region from -1502 bp to -1317 bp. Our data provide a foundation for future studies into transcriptional regulation of CFL2.

  18. Bioluminescence is produced from a trapped firefly luciferase conformation predicted by the domain alternation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce R; Rosenberg, Justin C; Fontaine, Danielle M; Southworth, Tara L; Behney, Curran E; Uzasci, Lerna

    2011-07-27

    According to the domain alternation mechanism and crystal structure evidence, the acyl-CoA synthetases, one of three subgroups of a superfamily of adenylating enzymes, catalyze adenylate- and thioester-forming half-reactions in two different conformations. The enzymes accomplish this by presenting two active sites through an ~140° rotation of the C-domain. The second half-reaction catalyzed by another subgroup, the beetle luciferases, is a mechanistically dissimilar oxidative process that produces bioluminescence. We have demonstrated that a firefly luciferase variant containing cysteine residues at positions 108 and 447 can be intramolecularly cross-linked by 1,2-bis(maleimido)ethane, trapping the enzyme in a C-domain-rotated conformation previously undocumented in the available luciferase crystal structures. The cross-linked luciferase cannot adenylate luciferin but is nearly fully capable of bioluminescence with synthetic luciferyl adenylate because it retains the ability to carry out the oxidative half-reaction. The cross-linked luciferase is apparently trapped in a conformation similar to those adopted by acyl-CoA synthetases as they convert acyl adenylates into the corresponding CoA thioesters.

  19. The circadian Clock gene regulates acrosin activity of sperm through serine protease inhibitor A3K

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shuting; Liang, Xin; Wang, Yuhui; Jiang, Zhou; Liu, Yanyou; Hou, Wang; Li, Shiping; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study found that CLOCK knockdown in the testes of male mice led to a reduced fertility, which might be associated with the lower acrosin activity. In this present study, we examined the differential expression in proteins of CLOCK knockdown sperm. Clock gene expression was knocked down in cells to confirm those differentially expressions and serine protease inhibitor SERPINA3K was identified as a potential target. The up-regulated SERPINA3K revealed an inverse relationship with Clock knockdown. Direct treatment of normal sperm with recombinant SERPINA3K protein inhibited the acrosin activity and reduced in vitro fertilization rate. The luciferase reporter gene assay showed that the down-regulated of Clock gene could activate the Serpina3k promoter, but this activation was not affected by the mutation of E-box core sequence. Co-IP demonstrated a natural interaction between SERPIAN3K and RORs (α and β). Taken together, these results demonstrated that SERPINA3K is involved in the Clock gene-mediated male fertility by regulating acrosin activity and provide the first evidence that SERPINA3K could be regulated by Clock gene via retinoic acid-related orphan receptor response elements. PMID:26264441

  20. Expression of firefly luciferase in Candida albicans and its use in the selection of stable transformants.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Timothy C; Nawotka, Kevin A; Purchio, Anthony F; Akin, Ali R; Francis, Kevin P; Contag, Pamela R

    2006-02-01

    The infectious yeast Candida albicans is a model organism for understanding the mechanisms of fungal pathogenicity. We describe the functional expression of the firefly luciferase gene, a reporter commonly used to tag genes in many other cellular systems. Due to a non-standard codon usage by this yeast, the CUG codons were first mutated to UUG to allow functional expression. When integrated into the chromosome of C. albicans with a strong constitutive promoter, cells bioluminesce when provided with luciferin substrate in their media. When fused to the inducible promoter from the HWP1 gene, expression and bioluminescence was only detected in cultures conditioning hyphal growth. We further used the luciferase gene as a selection to isolate transformed cell lines from clinical isolates of C. albicans, using a high-density screening strategy that purifies transformed colonies by virtue of light emission. This strategy requires no drug or auxotrophic selectable marker, and we were thus able to generate stable transformants of clinical isolates that are identical to the parental strain in all aspects tested, other than their bioluminescence. The firefly luciferase gene can, therefore, be used as a sensitive reporter to analyze gene function both in laboratory and clinical isolates of this medically important yeast.

  1. Organization of human ACAT-2 gene and its cell-type-specific promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Song, B L; Qi, W; Yang, X Y; Chang, C C; Zhu, J Q; Chang, T Y; Li, B L

    2001-03-30

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) plays important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Two ACAT genes exist in mammals. We report here the genomic organization of human ACAT-2 gene and analysis of its promoter activity in various cell lines. The human ACAT-2 gene spans over 18 kb and contains 15 exons. Three transcription start sites and one poly(A) site are identified by the 5'/3'-RACE. In addition, the human ACAT-2 gene is linked to the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 (IGFBP-6) gene in a head-to-tail manner with a small intergenic region of about 1.2 kb. The 5'-flanking region of human ACAT-2 gene contains many potential cis-acting elements for multiple transcriptional regulatory factors but lacks TATA and CCAAT boxes. Using promoter-luciferase reporter assays, we demonstrate the transcriptional activity of ACAT-2 gene promoter is high in Caco-2 cells, especially after these cells become postconfluent and behave as intestinal enterocytes.

  2. Reporter gene assay for fish-killing activity produced by Pfiesteria piscicida.

    PubMed

    Fairey, E R; Edmunds, J S; Deamer-Melia, N J; Glasgow, H; Johnson, F M; Moeller, P R; Burkholder, J M; Ramsdell, J S

    1999-09-01

    Collaborative studies were performed to develop a functional assay for fish-killing activity produced by Pfiesteria piscicida. Eight cell lines were used to screen organic fractions and residual water fraction by using a 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-(2-4)]-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cytotoxicity assay. Diethyl ether and a residual water fraction were cytotoxic to several cell lines including rat pituitary (GH(4)C(1)) cells. Residual water as well as preextracted culture water containing P. piscicida cells induced c-fos-luciferase expressed in GH(4)C(1) cells with a rapid time course of induction and sensitive detection. The reporter gene assay detected activity in toxic isolates of P. piscicida from several North Carolina estuaries in 1997 and 1998 and may also be suitable for detecting toxic activity in human and animal serum.

  3. Reporter gene assay for fish-killing activity produced by Pfiesteria piscicida.

    PubMed Central

    Fairey, E R; Edmunds, J S; Deamer-Melia, N J; Glasgow, H; Johnson, F M; Moeller, P R; Burkholder, J M; Ramsdell, J S

    1999-01-01

    Collaborative studies were performed to develop a functional assay for fish-killing activity produced by Pfiesteria piscicida. Eight cell lines were used to screen organic fractions and residual water fraction by using a 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-(2-4)]-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cytotoxicity assay. Diethyl ether and a residual water fraction were cytotoxic to several cell lines including rat pituitary (GH(4)C(1)) cells. Residual water as well as preextracted culture water containing P. piscicida cells induced c-fos-luciferase expressed in GH(4)C(1) cells with a rapid time course of induction and sensitive detection. The reporter gene assay detected activity in toxic isolates of P. piscicida from several North Carolina estuaries in 1997 and 1998 and may also be suitable for detecting toxic activity in human and animal serum. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10464070

  4. Fabrication of Adenosine Triphosphate-Molecule Recognition Chip by Means of Bioluminous Enzyme Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanii, Takashi; Goto, Tomomi; Iida, Tomoyuki; Koh-Masahara, Meishoku; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2001-10-01

    We have succeeded in detecting the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration in a solution quantitatively using an ATP-molecule recognition chip. The ATP-molecule recognition chip is composed of a silicon photodiode on which bioluminous enzyme luciferase is immobilized. When the chip was immersed in an ATP-containing solution, the luciferase emitted light and the photoinduced current detected by the photodiode was in proportion to the ATP concentration. We found that the photoinduced current fits the Michaelis-Menten plot. These results indicate that the luciferase is successfully immobilized on the silicon chip without losing the bioluminous activity and that the proposed device enables us to detect the ATP concentration in a solution by measuring the photoinduced current.

  5. Novel application of luciferase assay for the in vitro functional assessment of KAL1 variants in three females with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD)

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Mark J.; Hu, Youli; Gregory, Louise C.; Gaston-Massuet, Carles; Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S.; Saldanha, José W.; Gualtieri, Angelica; Thankamony, Ajay; Hughes, Ieuan; Townshend, Sharron; Martinez-Barbera, Juan-Pedro; Bouloux, Pierre-Marc; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2015-01-01

    KAL1 is implicated in 5% of Kallmann syndrome cases, a disorder which genotypically overlaps with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD). To date, a reporter-based assay to assess the functional consequences of KAL1 mutations is lacking. We aimed to develop a luciferase assay for novel application to functional assessment of rare KAL1 mutations detected in a screen of 422 patients with SOD. Quantitative analysis was performed using L6-myoblasts stably expressing FGFR1, transfected with a luciferase-reporter vector containing elements of the FGF-responsive osteocalcin promoter. The two variants assayed [p.K185N, p.P291T], were detected in three females with SOD (presenting with optic nerve hypoplasia, midline and pituitary defects). Our novel assay revealed significant decreases in transcriptional activity [p.K185N: 21% (p < 0.01); p.P291T: 40% (p < 0.001)]. Our luciferase-reporter assay, developed for assessment of KAL1 mutations, determined that two variants in females with hypopituitarism/SOD are loss-of-function; demonstrating that this assay is suitable for quantitative assessment of mutations in this gene. PMID:26375424

  6. The influence of hypoxia on bioluminescence in luciferase-transfected gliosarcoma tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Eduardo H; Niedre, Mark J; Jarvi, Mark T; Mocanu, Joseph D; Moriyama, Yumi; Subarsky, Patrick; Li, Buhong; Lilge, Lothar D; Wilson, Brian C

    2008-06-01

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes the emission of light from luciferin in the presence of oxygen and adenosine triphosphate. This bioluminescence is commonly employed in imaging mode to monitor tumor growth and treatment responses in vivo. A potential concern is that, since solid tumors are often hypoxic, either constitutively and/or as a result of treatment, the oxygen available for the bioluminescence reaction could be reduced to limiting levels, leading to underestimation of the actual number of luciferase-labeled cells during in vivo experiments. We present studies of the oxygen dependence of bioluminescence in vitro in rat 9 L gliosarcoma cells tagged with the firefly luciferase gene (9L(luc)). We demonstrate that the bioluminescence signal decreases at pO(2) luciferase expression or oxygen itself.

  7. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient γ-ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Timothy O; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-06-01

    Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M(2) seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione depletion

  8. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios.

    PubMed Central

    Makemson, J C

    1986-01-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively. PMID:3944057

  9. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios

    SciTech Connect

    Makemson, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively.

  10. Properties of recombinant fluorescent proteins from Photobacterium leiognathi and their interaction with luciferase intermediates.

    PubMed

    Petushkov, V N; Gibson, B G; Lee, J

    1995-03-14

    Ligand binding and luciferase interaction properties of the recombinant protein corresponding to the lumazine protein gene (EMBL X56534) of Photobacterium leiognathi have been determined by fluorescence dynamics, circular dichroism, gel filtration, and SDS-PAGE. Scatchard analysis of a fluorescence titration shows that the apoprotein possess one binding site, and at 30 degrees C the KdS (microM) are as follows: 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine, 0.26; riboflavin, 0.53; and much more weakly bound FMN, 30. All holoproteins are highly fluorescent and have absorption spectra distinct from each other and from the free ligands. The longest wavelength absorption maxima are, respectively (nm, 2 degrees C), 420, 463, and 458. Ligand binding produces no change in the far-UV circular dichroism; all have mean residual ellipticity at 210 nm of -6500 deg cm2 dmol-1, the same as the native protein. However, in the bioluminescence reaction only the lumazine holoprotein shows a bioluminescence effect. Fluorescence emission anisotropy decay was used to establish that none of these holoproteins complexed with native luciferase and that the lumazine protein alone formed a 1:1 complex with the luciferase hydroxyflavin fluorescent transient and the luciferase peroxyflavin intermediates, revealed by a dominant channel of anisotropy loss, with rotational correlation time of 2.5 ns, and attributed to excitation transfer from the luciferase flavin donor to the acceptor, the lumazine ligand. The complex stability was sufficient to allow its isolation by FPLC gel filtration and verification by SDS-PAGE. These methods also confirmed the absence of interaction of the holoflavoproteins.

  11. Codon optimization of genes for efficient protein expression in mammalian cells by selection of only preferred human codons.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara-Miura, Yuiko; Sato, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Takahiro

    2015-05-01

    A simple design method for codon optimization of genes to express a heterologous protein in mammalian cells is described. Codon optimization was performed by choosing only codons preferentially used in humans and with over 60% GC content, and the method was named the "preferred human codon-optimized method." To test our simple rule for codon optimization, the preferred human codon-optimized genes for six proteins containing photoproteins (aequorin and clytin II) and luciferases (Gaussia luciferase, Renilla luciferase, and firefly luciferases from Photinus pyralis and Luciola cruciata) were chemically synthesized and transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells. All preferred human codon-optimized genes showed higher luminescence activity than the corresponding wild-type genes. Our simple design method could be used to improve protein expression in mammalian cells efficiently.

  12. Bioluminescence Imaging of β Cells and Intrahepatic Insulin Gene Activity under Normal and Pathological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yukari; Nagasaki, Haruka; Daassi, Dhouha; Tai, Pei-Han; Ema, Masatsugu; Kudo, Takashi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    In diabetes research, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has been applied in studies of β-cell impairment, development, and islet transplantation. To develop a mouse model that enables noninvasive imaging of β cells, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse in which a mouse 200-kbp genomic fragment comprising the insulin I gene drives luciferase expression (Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mouse). BLI of mice was performed using the IVIS Spectrum system after intraperitoneal injection of luciferin, and the bioluminescence signal from the pancreatic region analyzed. When compared with MIP-Luc-VU mice [FVB/N-Tg(Ins1-luc)VUPwrs/J] expressing luciferase under the control of the 9.2-kbp mouse insulin I promoter (MIP), the bioluminescence emission from Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice was enhanced approximately 4-fold. Streptozotocin-treated Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice developed severe diabetes concomitant with a sharp decline in the BLI signal intensity in the pancreas. Conversely, mice fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed an increase in the signal, reflecting a decrease or increase in the β-cell mass. Although the bioluminescence intensity of the islets correlated well with the number of isolated islets in vitro, the intensity obtained from a living mouse in vivo did not necessarily reflect an absolute quantification of the β-cell mass under pathological conditions. On the other hand, adenovirus-mediated gene transduction of β-cell-related transcription factors in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice generated luminescence from the hepatic region for more than 1 week. These results demonstrate that BLI in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice provides a noninvasive method of imaging islet β cells and extrapancreatic activity of the insulin gene in the liver under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23593212

  13. Delicate balance of electrostatic interactions and disulfide bridges in thermostability of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Somayeh; Moradi, Maryam; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2012-12-01

    The wild type Photinus pyralis luciferase does not have any disulfide bridge. Disulfide bridges are determinant in inherent stability of protein at moderate temperatures. Meanwhile, arginin is responsible for thermostability at higher temperatures. In this study, by concomitant introduction of disulfide bridge and a surface arginin in a mutant (A296C-A326C/I232R), the contribution of disulfide bridge introduction and surface hydrophilic residue on activity and global stability of P. pyralis luciferase is investigated. In addition to the mentioned mutant; I232R, A296C-A326C and wild type luciferases are characterized. Though addition of Arg caused stability against proteolysis but in combination with disulfide bridge resulted in decreased thermal stability compared to A296C-A326C mutant. In spite of long distance of two different mutations (A296C-A326C and I232R) from each other in the three-dimensional structure, combination of their effects on the stability of luciferase was not cumulative.

  14. [Effect of glucose on luciferase expression in Photobacterium leiognathi].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Takuya; Yoshikawa, Naoki; Ueno, Yukihiro; Mikami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Tatsuji

    2004-10-01

    Photobacterium leiognathi cultured in marine broth emits a luminescence that is temporarily enhanced and then extinguished by glucose. Glucose reduces the luciferase level and the expression of lux ABG mRNA in P. leiognathi. The amount of ATP in P. leiognathi is temporarily increased and then declines to the normal level. These results indicate that the extinguishing by glucose in P. leiognathi is induced by the interruption of the translation of luciferase.

  15. The influence of the region between residues 220 and 344 and beyond in Phrixotrix railroad worm luciferases green and red bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Viviani, Vadim R; Joaquim da Silva Neto, Antonio; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2004-02-01

    To find the regions having a major influence on the bioluminescence spectra of railroad worm luciferases, we constructed new chimeric luciferases switching the fragments from residues 1-219 and from 220-545 between Phrixotrix viviani (PxvGR; lambda(max) = 548 nm) green light-emitting luciferase and Phrixothrix hirtus (PxhRE; lambda(max) = 623 nm) red light-emitting luciferases. The emission spectrum (lambda(max) = 571 nm) and K(M) for luciferin in the chimera PxRE220GR (1-219, PxhRE; 220-545, PxvGR) suggested that the region above residue 220 of PxvGR had a major effect on the active site. However, switching the sequence between the residues 220-344 from PxvGR luciferase into PxhRE (PxREGRRE) luciferase resulted in red light emission (lambda(max) = 603 nm), indicating that the region 220-344 by itself does not determine the emission spectrum. Furthermore, the sequence before residue 220 of the green-emitting luciferase is incompatible for light emission with the sequence above residue 220 of PxhRE. These results suggest that the fragments before and after residue 220, which correspond to distinct subdomains, may fold differently in the green- and red-emitting luciferases, affecting the active site conformation.

  16. Characterization of human TCR Vbeta gene promoter. Role of the dodecamer motif in promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, X; Sun, G R; Zheng, Q; Li, Y

    1998-09-11

    During T-lymphocyte development, the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) gene expression is controlled by its promoter and enhancer elements and regulated in tissue- and development stage-specific manner. To uncover the promoter function and to define positive and negative regulatory elements in TCR gene promoters, the promoter activities from 13 human TCR Vbeta genes were determined by the transient transfection system and luciferase reporter assay. Although most of the TCR Vbeta gene promoters that we tested are inactive by themselves, some promoters were found to be constitutively strong. Among them, Vbeta6.7 is the strongest. 5'-Deletion and fragmentation experiments have narrowed the full promoter activity of Vbeta6.7 to a fragment of 147 base pairs immediately 5' to the transcription initiation site. A decanucleotide motif with the consensus sequence AGTGAYRTCA has been found to be conserved in most TCR Vbeta gene promoters. There are three such decamer motifs in the promoter region of Vbeta6.7, and the contribution of each such motif to the promoter activity has been examined. Further site-directed mutagenesis analyses showed that: 1) when two Ts in the decamer were mutated, the promoter activity was totally abolished; 2) when two additional nucleotides 3' to the end of decamer were mutated, the promoter activity was decreased to two-thirds of the full level; and 3) when the element with the sequence AGTGATGTCACT was inserted into other promoters, the original weak promoters become very strong. Taken together, our data suggest that the positive regulatory element in Vbeta6.7 should be considered a dodecamer rather than a decamer and that it confers strong basal transcriptional activity on TCR Vbeta genes.

  17. Cyclical strain modulates metalloprotease and matrix gene expression in human tenocytes via activation of TGFβ.

    PubMed

    Jones, Eleanor R; Jones, Gavin C; Legerlotz, Kirsten; Riley, Graham P

    2013-12-01

    Tendinopathies are a range of diseases characterised by degeneration and chronic tendon pain and represent a significant cause of morbidity. Relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms; however onset is often associated with physical activity. A number of molecular changes have been documented in tendinopathy such as a decrease in overall collagen content, increased extracellular matrix turnover and protease activity. Metalloproteinases are involved in the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix and expression is regulated by mechanical strain. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of strain upon matrix turnover by measuring metalloproteinase and matrix gene expression and to elucidate the mechanism of action. Primary Human Achilles tenocytes were seeded in type I rat tail collagen gels in a Flexcell™ tissue train system and subjected to 5% cyclic uniaxial strain at 1Hz for 48h. TGFβ1 and TGFβRI inhibitor were added to selected cultures. RNA was measured using qRT-PCR and TGFβ protein levels were determined using a cell based luciferase assay. We observed that mechanical strain regulated the mRNA levels of multiple protease and matrix genes anabolically, and this regulation mirrored that seen with TGFβ stimulation alone. We have also demonstrated that the inhibition of the TGFβ signalling pathway abrogated the strain induced changes in mRNA and that TGFβ activation, rather than gene expression, was increased with mechanical strain. We concluded that TGFβ activation plays an important role in mechanotransduction. Targeting this pathway may have its place in the treatment of tendinopathy.

  18. Induction of human adiponectin gene transcription by telmisartan, angiotensin receptor blocker, independently on PPAR-{gamma} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Moriuchi, Akie ||. E-mail: f1195@cc.nagasaki-u-ac.jp; Shimamura, Mika; Kita, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Hironaga; Satoh, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Tsuyoshi; Fujishima, Keiichiro; Fukushima, Keiko |; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nagayama, Yuji; Kawasaki, Eiji

    2007-05-18

    Adiponectin, an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein, has been shown to ameliorate insulin resistance and inhibit the process of atherosclerosis. Recently, several reports have stated that angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), increase adiponectin plasma level, and ameliorate insulin resistance. Telmisartan, a subclass of ARBs, has been shown to be a partial agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{gamma}, and to increase the plasma adiponectin level. However, the transcriptional regulation of the human adiponectin gene by telmisartan has not been determined yet. To elucidate the effect of telmisartan on adiponectin, the stimulatory regulation of human adiponectin gene by telmisartan was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, utilizing adenovirus-mediated luciferase reporter gene-transferring technique. This study indicates that telmisartan may stimulate adiponectin transcription independent of PPAR-{gamma}.

  19. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms and activity analysis of the promoter and enhancer of the pig lactase gene.

    PubMed

    Du, Hai-Ting; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Jia-Mei; Zhao, Wei; Tao, Xiao-Li; Ba, Cai-Feng; Tian, Yu-Min; Su, Yu-Hong

    2014-07-15

    Lactose intolerance in northern Europeans is strongly associated with a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located 14 kb upstream of the human lactase gene: -13,910 C/T. We examined whether SNPs in the 5' flanking region of the pig lactase gene are similar to those in the human gene and whether these polymorphisms play a functional role in regulating pig lactase gene expression. The 5' flanking region of the lactase gene from several different breeds of pigs was cloned and analyzed for gene regulatory activity of a luciferase reporter gene. One SNP was found in the enhancer region (-797 G/A) and two were found in the promoter region (-308G/C and -301 A/G). The promoter C-308,G-301(Pro-CG) strongly promotes the expression of the lactase gene, but the promoter G-308,A-301(Pro-GA) does not. The enhancer A-797(Enh-A) genotype for Pro-GA can significantly enhance promoter activity, but has an inhibitory effect on Pro-CG. The Enhancer G-797(Enh-G) has a significant inhibitory effect on both promoters. In conclusion, the order of effectiveness on the pig lactase gene is Enh-A+Pro-GA>Enh-A/G+Pro-CG>Enh-G+Pro-GA.

  20. ZNF395 Is an Activator of a Subset of IFN-Stimulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Linda; Herwartz, Christine; Jordanovski, Darko

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the interferon (IFN) pathway in response to infection with pathogens results in the induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) including proinflammatory cytokines, which mount the proper antiviral immune response. However, aberrant expression of these genes is pathogenic to the host. In addition to IFN-induced transcription factors non-IFN-regulated factors contribute to the transcriptional control of ISGs. Here, we show by genome wide expression analysis, siRNA-mediated suppression and Doxycycline-induced overexpression that the cellular transcription factor ZNF395 activates a subset of ISGs including the chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL11 in keratinocytes. We found that ZNF395 acts independently of IFN but enhances the IFN-induced expression of CXCL10 and CXCL11. Luciferase reporter assays revealed a requirement of intact NFκB-binding sites for ZNF395 to stimulate the CXCL10 promoter. The transcriptional activation of CXCL10 and CXCL11 by ZNF395 was abolished after inhibition of IKK by BMS-345541, which increased the stability of ZNF395. ZNF395 encodes at least two motifs that mediate the enhanced degradation of ZNF395 in response to IKK activation. Thus, IKK is required for ZNF395-mediated activation of transcription and enhances its turn-over to keep the activity of ZNF395 low. Our results support a previously unrecognized role of ZNF395 in the innate immune response and inflammation. PMID:28316371

  1. Synchronous activation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene transcription and secretion by pulsatile kisspeptin stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Han Kyoung; Kim, Hee-Dae; Park, Sung Ho; Lee, Han-Woong; Park, Jae-Yong; Seong, Jae Young; Lightman, Stafford L.; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile release of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is essential for pituitary gonadotrope function. Although the importance of pulsatile GnRH secretion has been recognized for several decades, the mechanisms underlying GnRH pulse generation in hypothalamic neural networks remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the ultradian rhythm of GnRH gene transcription in single GnRH neurons using cultured hypothalamic slices prepared from transgenic mice expressing a GnRH promoter-driven destabilized luciferase reporter. Although GnRH promoter activity in each GnRH neuron exhibited an ultradian pattern of oscillations with a period of ∼10 h, GnRH neuronal cultures exhibited partially synchronized bursts of GnRH transcriptional activity at ∼2-h intervals. Surprisingly, pulsatile administration of kisspeptin, a potent GnRH secretagogue, evoked dramatic synchronous activation of GnRH gene transcription with robust stimulation of pulsatile GnRH secretion. We also addressed the issue of hierarchical interaction between the circadian and ultradian rhythms by using Bmal1-deficient mice with defective circadian clocks. The circadian molecular oscillator barely affected basal ultradian oscillation of GnRH transcription but was heavily involved in kisspeptin-evoked responses of GnRH neurons. In conclusion, we have clearly shown synchronous bursts of GnRH gene transcription in the hypothalamic GnRH neuronal population in association with episodic neurohormone secretion, thereby providing insight into GnRH pulse generation. PMID:23509283

  2. Structural basis for the spectral difference in luciferase bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Toru; Ichiyama, Susumu; Hiratake, Jun; Saldanha, Adrian; Kobashi, Nobuyuki; Sakata, Kanzo; Kato, Hiroaki

    2006-03-16

    Fireflies communicate with each other by emitting yellow-green to yellow-orange brilliant light. The bioluminescence reaction, which uses luciferin, Mg-ATP and molecular oxygen to yield an electronically excited oxyluciferin species, is carried out by the enzyme luciferase. Visible light is emitted during relaxation of excited oxyluciferin to its ground state. The high quantum yield of the luciferin/luciferase reaction and the change in bioluminescence colour caused by subtle structural differences in luciferase have attracted much research interest. In fact, a single amino acid substitution in luciferase changes the emission colour from yellow-green to red. Although the crystal structure of luciferase from the North American firefly (Photinus pyralis) has been described, the detailed mechanism for the bioluminescence colour change is still unclear. Here we report the crystal structures of wild-type and red mutant (S286N) luciferases from the Japanese Genji-botaru (Luciola cruciata) in complex with a high-energy intermediate analogue, 5'-O-[N-(dehydroluciferyl)-sulfamoyl]adenosine (DLSA). Comparing these structures to those of the wild-type luciferase complexed with AMP plus oxyluciferin (products) reveals a significant conformational change in the wild-type enzyme but not in the red mutant. This conformational change involves movement of the hydrophobic side chain of Ile 288 towards the benzothiazole ring of DLSA. Our results indicate that the degree of molecular rigidity of the excited state of oxyluciferin, which is controlled by a transient movement of Ile 288, determines the colour of bioluminescence during the emission reaction.

  3. Effect of Regulatory Element DNA Methylation on Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rivier-Cordey, Anne-Sophie; Caetano, Carlos; Fish, Richard J.; Kruithof, Egbert K. O.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the tissue-type plasminogen activator gene (t-PA; gene name PLAT) is regulated, in part, by epigenetic mechanisms. We investigated the relationship between PLAT methylation and PLAT expression in five primary human cell types and six transformed cell lines. CpG methylation was analyzed in the proximal PLAT gene promoter and near the multihormone responsive enhancer (MHRE) -7.3 kilobase pairs upstream of the PLAT transcriptional start site (TSS, -7.3 kb). In Bowes melanoma cells, the PLAT promoter and the MHRE were fully unmethylated and t-PA secretion was extremely high. In other cell types the region from -647 to -366 was fully methylated, whereas an unmethylated stretch of DNA from -121 to +94 was required but not sufficient for detectable t-PA mRNA and t-PA secretion. DNA methylation near the MHRE was not correlated with t-PA secretion. Specific methylation of the PLAT promoter region -151 to +151, inserted into a firefly luciferase reporter gene, abolished reporter gene activity. The region -121 to + 94 contains two well-described regulatory elements, a PMA-responsive element (CRE) near -106 and a GC-rich region containing an Sp1 binding site near +59. Methylation of double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the CRE or the GC-rich region had little or no effect on transcription factor binding. Methylated CpGs may attract co-repressor complexes that contain histone deacetylases (HDAC). However, reporter gene activity of methylated plasmids was not restored by the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin. In conclusion, efficient PLAT gene expression requires a short stretch of unmethylated CpG sites in the proximal promoter. PMID:27973546

  4. Enhanced red-emitting railroad worm luciferase for bioassays and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueyan; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Niwa, Kazuki; Viviani, Vadim R; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    A luciferase from the railroad worm (Phrixothrix hirtus) is the only red-emitting bioluminescent enzyme in nature that is advantageous in multicolor luciferase assays and in bioluminescence imaging (BLI). However, it is not used widely in scientific or industrial applications because of its low activity and stability. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we produced red-emitting mutants with higher activity and better stability. Compared with the wild-type (WT), the luminescent activities from extracts of cultured mammalian cells expressing mutant luciferase were 9.8-fold in I212L/N351K, 8.4-fold in I212L, and 7.8-fold in I212L/S463R; and the cell-based activities were 3.6-fold in I212L/N351K and 3.4-fold in N351K. The remaining activities after incubation at 37 degrees C for 10 min were 50.0% for I212L/S463R, 31.8% for I212L, and 23.0% for I212L/N351K, but only 5.2% for WT. To demonstrate an application of I212L/N351K, cell-based BLI was performed, and the luminescence signal was 3.6-fold higher than in WT. These results indicate that the mutants might improve the practicability of this signaling in bioassays and BLI.

  5. Interspecific luciferase beta subunit hybrids between Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio fischeri and Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Almashanu, S; Gendler, I; Hadar, R; Kuhn, J

    1996-09-01

    Bacterial luciferase (EC 1.14.14.3) is a heterodimer composed of alpha- and beta-chains encoded by luxA and luxB, respectively. Although some interspecific combinations of these subunits lead to active enzyme, others do not. The beta subunits of Vibrio fischeri and Photobacterium leiognathi form active enzyme with the alpha subunits of V.fischeri, P.leiognathi and Vibrio harveyi, while the beta subunit from V.harveyi only complements the alpha subunit of V.harveyi. Inactivity is caused by a lack of dimerization of the beta subunit of V.harveyi with the alpha subunits of V.fischeri and P.leiognathi. These observations served as the basis for a search to discover which segment of the beta polypeptide confers the ability to dimerize with the alpha subunits of V.fischeri and P.leiognathi. Intragenic beta subunit hybrids were made between V.harveyi, V.fischeri and P.leiognathi. Unique restriction sites were introduced into the respective luxB genes to divide them into four roughly equal segments. In all, 78 hybrids were constructed by in vitro techniques. The N-terminal segment of the peptide contains the signals that differentiate between the beta subunits of V.fischeri and P. leiognathi and the beta subunit of V. harveyi, and allow the former to dimerize with their alpha subunits. The second segment has no major effect on enzyme activity but does exhibit some context effects. Important interactions were found between the third and fourth segments of the polypeptide with respect to enzymatic activity.

  6. Evaluation of estrogenic activities of pesticides using an in vitro reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Mihoko; Fukunaga, Kenji; Sasaki, Mari; Nakamura, Masafumi; Tsuji, Motohiro; Nishiyama, Toshimasa

    2005-08-01

    The estrogenic activities of 32 pesticides in agricultural products were evaluated using the E-CALUX assay system developed by Xenobiotic Detection Systems Inc (North Carolina, USA). This system utilizes human ovarian carcinoma cells (BG1) stably transfected with an estrogen-responsive luciferase reporter gene plasmid. It was found that tolclofos-methyl, prothiofos, diazinon, Thiabenclazole (TBZ) and pyriproxyfen had estrogenic activity. Several pesticides are often present in agricultural products. Therefore the estrogenicity of the mixtures of two kinds of pesticides was evaluated. The activity of diazinon/tolclofos-methyl, pyriproxyfen/prothiofos and TBZ/o-phenylphenol (OPP) was increased up to 1.2-5.3 fold. On the other hand, chlorfluazuron, imazalil and chlorfenapyr had anti-estrogenic activity. Further, to evaluate the change in the estrogenic activity of pesticide metabolites, an experimental system was established using a rat S9 mixture. Metabolites of permethrin and OPP had no estrogenic activity, but they had weak activity after the metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolites of TBZ exhibited less estrogenic activity than the original compounds.

  7. [Expression of thermostable recombiant Luciola lateralis luciferase and development of heat-stable pyrosequencing system].

    PubMed

    Xu, Shu; Zou, Bingjie; Wang, Jianping; Wu, Haiping; Zhou, Guohua

    2012-06-01

    Pyrosequencing is a tool based on bioluminescence reaction for real-time analyzing DNA sequences. The sensitivity of pyrosequencing mainly depends on luciferase in reaction mixture. However, the instability of pyrosequencing reagents caused by fragile wild Photinus pyralis luciferase (PpL) in conventional pyrosequencing usually leads to unsatisfied results, which limits the application of pyrosequencing. In order to improve the stability of pyrosequencing reagents, the coding sequences of mutant thermostable Luciola lateralis luciferase (rt-LlL) was synthesized, and inserted into the plasmid of pET28a(+) to express the thermostable rt-LlL with a 6 x His-tag in the N terminal. The purified rt-LlL with the molecular mass of 60 kDa was obtained by Ni-affinity chromatography. The specific activity of rt-LlL was determined as 4.29 x 10(10) RLU/mg. Moreover, the thermostability of rt-LlL was investigated, and the results showed that rt-LlL had activity at 50 degrees C, and remained 90% of activity after incubated at 40 degrees C for 25 min. Finally, rt-LlL was used to substitute commercial Photinus pyralis luciferase in conventional pyrosequencing reagent to get thermostable pyrosequencing reagent. Comparing with conventional pyrosequencing reagent, the thermostable pyrosequencing reagent is more stable, and it's activity would not lose when incubated at 37 degrees C for 1 h. This study laid foundation of establishing reliable and stable pyrosequencing system which would be applied in Point-of-Care Testing.

  8. Bone Regeneration Using Gene-Activated Matrices.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Sheetal; Atluri, Keerthi; Geary, Sean M; Hong, Liu; Elangovan, Satheesh; Salem, Aliasger K

    2017-01-01

    Gene delivery to bone is a potential therapeutic strategy for directed, sustained, and regulated protein expression. Tissue engineering strategies for bone regeneration include delivery of proteins, genes (viral and non-viral-mediated delivery), and/or cells to the bone defect site. In addition, biomimetic scaffolds and scaffolds incorporating bone anabolic agents greatly enhance the bone repair process. Regional gene therapy has the potential of enhancing bone defect healing and bone regeneration by delivering osteogenic genes locally to the osseous lesions, thereby reducing systemic toxicity and the need for using supraphysiological dosages of therapeutic proteins. By implanting gene-activated matrices (GAMs), sustained gene expression and continuous osteogenic protein production in situ can be achieved in a way that stimulates osteogenesis and bone repair within osseous defects. Critical parameters substantially affecting the therapeutic efficacy of gene therapy include the choice of osteogenic transgene(s), selection of non-viral or viral vectors, the wound environment, and the selection of ex vivo and in vivo gene delivery strategies, such as GAMs. It is critical for gene therapy applications that clinically beneficial amounts of proteins are synthesized endogenously within and around the lesion in a sustained manner. It is therefore necessary that reliable and reproducible methods of gene delivery be developed and tested for their efficacy and safety before translating into clinical practice. Practical considerations such as the age, gender, and systemic health of patients and the nature of the disease process also need to be taken into account in order to personalize the treatments and progress towards developing a clinically applicable gene therapy for healing bone defects. This review discusses tissue engineering strategies to regenerate bone with specific focus on non-viral gene delivery systems.

  9. Aly/ REF, a factor for mRNA transport, activates RH gene promoter function.

    PubMed

    Suganuma, Hiroshi; Kumada, Maki; Omi, Toshinori; Gotoh, Takaya; Lkhagvasuren, Munkhtulga; Okuda, Hiroshi; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kajii, Eiji; Iwamoto, Sadahiko

    2005-06-01

    The rhesus (Rh) blood group antigens are of considerable importance in transfusion medicine as well as in newborn or autoimmune hemolytic diseases due to their high antigenicity. We identified a major DNaseI hypersensitive site at the 5' flanking regions of both RHD and RHCE exon 1. A 34 bp fragment located at -191 to -158 from a translation start position, and containing the TCCCCTCCC sequence, was involved in enhancing promoter activity, which was assessed by luciferase reporter gene assay. A biotin-labelled 34 bp probe isolated an mRNA transporter protein, Aly/REF. The specific binding of Aly/REF to RH promoter in erythroid was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The silencing of Aly/REF by siRNA reduced not only the RH promoter activity of the reporter gene but also transcription from the native genome. These facts provide second proof of Aly/REF as a transcription coactivator, initially identified as a coactivator for the TCRalpha enhancer function. Aly/REF might be a novel transcription cofactor for erythroid-specific genes.

  10. Increased AICD generation does not result in increased nuclear translocation or activation of target gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Elaine; Isbert, Simone; Kern, Andreas; Jaeger, Sebastian; Martin, Anne M.; Hebert, Sebastien S.; Behl, Christian; Weggen, Sascha; De Strooper, Bart; Pietrzik, Claus U.

    2008-08-01

    A sequence of amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavages culminates in the sequential release of the APP intracellular domain (AICD) and the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) and/or p3 fragment. One of the environmental factors favouring the accumulation of AICD appears to be a rise in intracellular pH. Here we further identified the metabolism and subcellular localization of artificially expressed constructs under such conditions. We also co-examined the mechanistic lead up to the AICD accumulation and explored possible significances for its increased expression. We found that most of the AICD generated under pH neutralized conditions is likely cleaved from C83. While the AICD surplus was unable to further activate transcription of a luciferase reporter via a Gal4-DNA-binding domain, it failed entirely via the endogenous promoter regions of proposed target genes, APP and KAI1. The lack of a specific transactivation potential was also demonstrated by the unchanged levels of target gene mRNA. However, rather than translocating to the nucleus, the AICD surplus remains membrane tethered or free in the cytosol where it interacts with Fe65. Therefore we provide strong evidence that an increase in AICD generation does not directly promote gene activation of previously proposed target 0011gen.

  11. Botulinum neurotoxin dose-dependently inhibits release of neurosecretory vesicle-vargeted luciferase from neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Pathe-Neuschäfer-Rube, Andrea; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Genz, Lara; Püchel, Gerhard P

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a bacterial toxin that inhibits neurotransmitter release from neurons and thereby causes a flaccid paralysis. It is used as drug to treat a number of serious ailments and, more frequently, for aesthetic medical interventions. Botulinum toxin for pharmacological applications is isolated from bacterial cultures. Due to partial denaturation of the protein, the specific activity of these preparations shows large variations.Because of its extreme potential toxicity, pharmacological preparations must be carefully tested for their activity. For the current gold standard, the mouse lethality assay, several hundred thousand mice are killed per year. Alternative methods have been developed that suffer from one or more of the following deficits: In vitro enzyme assays test only the activity of the catalytic subunit of the toxin. Enzymatic and cell based immunological assays are specific for just one of the different serotypes. The current study takes a completely different approach that overcomes these limitations: Neuronal cell lines were stably transfected with plasmids coding for luciferases of different species, which were N-terminally tagged with leader sequences that redirect the luciferase into neuro-secretory vesicles. From these vesicles, luciferases were released upon depolarization of the cells. The depolarization-dependent release was efficiently inhibited by of botulinum toxin in a concentration range (1 to 100 pM) that is used in pharmacological preparations. The new assay might thus be an alternative to the mouse lethality assay and the immunological assays already in use.

  12. Creation of artificial luciferases to expand their analytical potential.

    PubMed

    Frank, Ludmila A

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescent proteins have been intensively used as high sensitive reporters in all kinds of binding assays (immuno-, nucleic acid hybridization assays, etc.) and in bioimaging. But natural luciferases do not always meet the requirements set for them as the assay reporters: thermostabitity, definite bioluminescence spectral and kinetics characteristics, stability to chemical modifications, etc. Luciferases with different appropriate characteristics as well as various luciferin derivatives were obtained using mutagenesis and chemical synthesis. Thanks to rigorous efforts of many researchers bioluminescencebased analytical techniques offer a great potential for solving analytical tasks in the field of biotechnology, biomedicine, pharmacology, etc.

  13. Basal expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene is dependent on protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, R A; Matthews, R P; Idzerda, R L; McKnight, G S

    1995-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a Cl- channel that becomes activated after phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). We demonstrate that PKA also plays a crucial role in maintaining basal expression of the CFTR gene in the human colon carcinoma cell line T84. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of a dominant-negative regulatory subunit or treatment with the PKA-selective inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89) caused a complete suppression of CFTR gene expression without affecting other constitutively active genes. Basal expression of a 2.2-kb region of the CFTR promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene (CFTR-luc) exhibited the same dependence on PKA. The ability of cAMP to induce CFTR over basal levels is cell-type specific. In T84 cells, both the endogenous CFTR gene and CFTR-luc exhibited only a modest inducibility (approximately 2-fold), whereas in the human choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3, CFTR-luc could be induced at least 4-fold. A variant cAMP-response element is present at position -48 to -41 in the CFTR promoter, and mutation of this sequence blocks basal expression. We conclude that cAMP, acting through PKA, is an essential regulator of basal CFTR gene expression and may mediate an induction of CFTR in responsive cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7543684

  14. Implication of an unfavorable residue (Thr346) in intrinsic flexibility of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Maryam; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Emamzadeh, Rahman

    2012-09-10

    In order to better understand the functional role of an unusual residue (Thr346) of firefly luciferase mutagenesis at this residue was performed. Firefly luciferase, catalyzes the bioluminescence reaction and is an excellent tool as a reporter in nano-system biology studies. Nonetheless, the enzyme rapidly loses its activity at temperatures above 30 °C and this leads to reduced sensitivity and precision in analytical applications. Residue Thr346 in a connecting loop (341-348) of firefly luciferase is located in a disallowed region of Ramachandran plot. In this study, we have substituted this residue (T346) with anomalous dihedral angles with Val, Gly and Pro to clarify the role of this residue in structure and function of the enzyme using site-directed mutagenesis. Substitution of this unfavorable residue (T346) with atypical dihedral angles (ψ, φ) with other residues brought about an increase of thermostability and decrease of specific activity. Structural and functional properties of the mutants were analyzed using different spectroscopic methods. It seems that this residue is a critically conserved residue to support the functional flexibility for a fast kinetic bioluminescence reaction at the expense of lower stability.

  15. Constitutively active RAS signaling reduces 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D-mediated gene transcription in intestinal epithelial cells by reducing vitamin D receptor expression.

    PubMed

    DeSmet, Marsha L; Fleet, James C

    2017-01-16

    High vitamin D status is associated with reduced colon cancer risk but these studies ignore the diversity in the molecular etiology of colon cancer. RAS activating mutations are common in colon cancer and they activate pro-proliferative signaling pathways. We examined the impact of RAS activating mutations on 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D)-mediated gene expression in cultured colon and intestinal cell lines. Transient transfection of Caco-2 cells with a constitutively active mutant K-RAS (G12 V) significantly reduced 1,25(OH)2D-induced activity of both a human 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 24 hydroxyase (CYP24A1) promoter-luciferase and an artificial 3X vitamin D response element (VDRE) promoter-luciferase reporter gene. Young Adult Mouse Colon (YAMC) and Rat Intestinal Epithelial (RIE) cell lines with stable expression of mutant H-RAS had suppressed 1,25(OH)2D-mediated induction of CYP24A1 mRNA. The RAS effects were associated with lower Vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA and protein levels in YAMC and RIE cells and they could be partially reversed by VDR overexpression. RAS-mediated suppression of VDR levels was not due to either reduced VDR mRNA stability or increased VDR gene methylation. However, chromatin accessibility to the VDR gene at the proximal promoter (-300bp), an enhancer region at -6kb, and an enhancer region located in exon 3 was significantly reduced in RAS transformed YAMC cells (YAMC-RAS). These data show that constitutively active RAS signaling suppresses 1,25(OH)2D-mediated gene transcription in colon epithelial cells by reducing VDR gene transcription but the mechanism for this suppression is not yet known. These data suggest that cancers with RAS-activating mutations may be less responsive to vitamin D mediated treatment or chemoprevention.

  16. Luciferase-Based, High-Throughput Assay for Screening and Profiling Transmission-Blocking Compounds against Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lucantoni, Leonardo; Fidock, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of new antimalarial drugs able to target both the asexual and gametocyte stages of Plasmodium falciparum is critical to the success of the malaria eradication campaign. We have developed and validated a robust, rapid, and cost-effective high-throughput reporter gene assay to identify compounds active against late-stage (stage IV and V) gametocytes. The assay, which is suitable for testing compound activity at incubation times up to 72 h, demonstrates excellent quality and reproducibility, with average Z′ values of 0.85 ± 0.01. We used the assay to screen more than 10,000 compounds from three chemically diverse libraries. The screening outcomes highlighted the opportunity to use collections of compounds with known activity against the asexual stages of the parasites as a starting point for gametocytocidal activity detection in order to maximize the chances of identifying gametocytocidal compounds. This assay extends the capabilities of our previously reported luciferase assay, which tested compounds against early-stage gametocytes, and opens possibilities to profile the activities of gametocytocidal compounds over the entire course of gametocytogenesis. PMID:26787698

  17. Efficient gene delivery with osmotically active and hyperbranched poly(ester amine)s.

    PubMed

    Arote, Rohidas B; Lee, Eun-Sun; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, You-Kyoung; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Myung-Haing; Cho, Chong-Su

    2009-12-01

    Degradable and hyperbranched poly (ester amine)s (PEAs) were successfully synthesized by Michael addition reaction between hydrophilic glycerol triacrylate (GTA) and low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (LMW-PEI) and evaluated as nonviral gene carriers. PEAs effectively condensed DNA with particle sizes below 200 nm and suitable surface charges (15-45 mV), suitable for intracellular delivery. PEAs degraded in a controlled fashion showing half-lives of more than 12 days and were essentially nontoxic in three different cell lines. Elevated transfection levels by luciferase assay revealed the superiority of PEAs over PEI 25K and Lipofectamine. PEAs synthesized using 1:4 mol ratio of GTA to PEI [GTA/PEI-1.2(1:4)] showed highest transfection efficiency in HepG2 cells. PEAs showed significant gene expression in vitro as well as in vivo through aerosol administration. Reduction in packed cell volume (PCV) of cells when treated with polyplexes supported the hyperosmotic effect of PEAs. Effect of bafilomycin A1 on transfection efficiency of PEAs on 293T cells indicated its endosomal buffering capacity. High transfection efficiency was attributed to the synergism from hyperosmotic glycerol backbone in the PEAs and endosomal buffering capacity of PEI amine groups. Therefore, this convergence of osmotically active biodegradable PEAs suggests their potential as a safe and efficient gene delivery vector.

  18. Detection of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Some Chemicals in Food Using a Reporter Gene Assay

    PubMed Central

    Amakura, Yoshiaki; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Yoshimura, Morio; Nakamura, Masafumi; Handa, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Rieko; Teshima, Reiko; Watanabe, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a simple bioassay used for the detection of dioxins (DXNs) could be applied to detect trace amounts of harmful DXN-like substances in food products. To identify substances with possible DXN-like activity, we assessed the ability of various compounds in the environment to bind the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) that binds specifically to DXNs. The compounds tested included 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 20 PAH derivatives (nitrated, halogenated, and aminated derivatives), 23 pesticides, six amino acids, and eight amino acid metabolites. The AhR binding activities (AhR activity) of these compounds were measured using the chemical activated luciferase gene expression (CALUX) reporter gene assay system. The majority of the PAHs exhibited marked AhR activity that increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, there was a positive link between AhR activity and the number of aromatic rings in the PAH derivatives. Conversely, there appeared to be a negative correlation between AhR activity and the number of chlorine residues present on halogenated PAH derivatives. However, there was no correlation between AhR activity and the number and position of substituents among nitrated and aminated derivatives. Among the pesticides tested, the indole-type compounds carbendazim and thiabendazole showed high levels of activity. Similarly, the indole compound tryptamine was the only amino acid metabolite to induce AhR activity. The results are useful in understanding the identification and characterization of AhR ligands in the CALUX assay. PMID:28231110

  19. Characteristics of endogenous flavin fluorescence of Photobacterium leiognathi luciferase and Vibrio fischeri NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Vetrova, E V; Kudryasheva, N S; Visser, A J W G; van Hoek, A

    2005-01-01

    The bioluminescent bacterial enzyme system NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase-luciferase has been used as a test system for ecological monitoring. One of the modes to quench bioluminescence is the interaction of xenobiotics with the enzymes, which inhibit their activity. The use of endogenous flavin fluorescence for investigation of the interactions of non-fluorescent compounds with the bacterial luciferase from Photobacterium leiognathi and NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase from Vibrio fischeri has been proposed. Fluorescence spectroscopy methods have been used to study characteristics of endogenous flavin fluorescence (fluorophore lifetime, the rotational correlation time). The fluorescence anisotropy behaviour of FMN has been analysed and compared to that of the enzyme-bound flavin. The fluorescence characteristics of endogenous flavin of luciferase and NAD(P)H:FMN-oxidoreductase have been shown to be applicable in studying enzymes' interactions with non-fluorescent compounds.

  20. Development of red-shifted mutants derived from luciferase of Brazilian click beetle Pyrearinus termitilluminans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Yamada, Toshimichi; Nasu, Yusuke; Ito, Mashiho; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2015-10-01

    Luciferase, a bioluminescent protein, has been used as an analytical tool to visualize intracellular phenomena. Luciferase with red light emission is particularly useful for bioluminescence imaging because of its high transmittance in mammalian tissues. However, the luminescence intensity of existing luciferases with their emission over 600 nm is insufficient for imaging studies because of their weak intensities. We developed mutants of Emerald luciferase (Eluc) from Brazilian click beetle (Pyrearinus termitilluminans), which emits the strongest bioluminescence among beetle luciferases. We successively introduced four amino acid mutations into the luciferase based on a predicted structure of Eluc using homology modeling. Results showed that quadruple mutations R214K/H241K/S246H/H347A into the beetle luciferase emit luminescence with emission maximum at 626 nm, 88-nm red-shift from the wild-type luciferase. This mutant luciferase is anticipated for application in in vivo multicolor imaging in living samples.

  1. The role of proline substitutions within flexible regions on thermostability of luciferase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haoran; Zhao, Yang; Guo, Chao; Gan, Yiru; Huang, He

    2015-01-01

    Improving the stability of firefly luciferase has been a critical issue for its wider industrial applications. Studies about hyperthermophile proteins show that flexibility could be an effective indicator to find out weak spots to engineering thermostability of proteins. However, the relationship among flexibility, activity and stability in most of proteins is unclear. Proline is the most rigid residue and can be introduced to rigidify flexible regions to enhance thermostability of proteins. We firstly apply three different methods, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, B-FITTER and framework rigidity optimized dynamics algorithm (FRODA) to determine the flexible regions of Photinus pyralis luciferase: Fragment 197-207; Fragment 471-481 and Fragment 487-495. Then, introduction of proline is used to rigidify these flexible regions. Two mutants D476P and H489P within most flexible regions are finally designed. In the results, H489P mutant shows improved thermostability while maintaining its catalytic efficiency compared to that of wild type luciferase. Flexibility analysis confirms that the overall rigidity and local rigidity of H489P mutant are greatly strengthened. D476P mutant shows decreased thermosatbility and the reason for this is elucidated at the molecular level. S307P mutation is randomly chosen outside the flexible regions as a control. Thermostability analysis shows that S307P mutation has decreased kinetic stability and enhanced thermodynamic stability.

  2. Highly Potent Cell-Permeable and Impermeable NanoLuc Luciferase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Walker, Joel R; Hall, Mary P; Zimprich, Chad A; Robers, Matthew B; Duellman, Sarah J; Machleidt, Thomas; Rodriguez, Jacquelynn; Zhou, Wenhui

    2017-02-22

    Novel engineered NanoLuc (Nluc) luciferase being smaller, brighter, and superior to traditional firefly (Fluc) or Renilla (Rluc) provides a great opportunity for the development of numerous biological, biomedical, clinical, and food and environmental safety applications. This new platform created an urgent need for Nluc inhibitors that could allow selective bioluminescent suppression and multiplexing compatibility with existing luminescence or fluorescence assays. Starting from thienopyrrole carboxylate 1, a hit from a 42 000 PubChem compound library with a low micromolar IC50 against Nluc, we derivatized four different structural fragments to discover a family of potent, single digit nanomolar, cell permeable inhibitors. Further elaboration revealed a channel that allowed access to the external Nluc surface, resulting in a series of highly potent cell impermeable Nluc inhibitors with negatively charged groups likely extending to the protein surface. The permeability was evaluated by comparing EC50 shifts calculated from both live and lysed cells expressing Nluc cytosolically. Luminescence imaging further confirmed that cell permeable compounds inhibit both intracellular and extracellular Nluc, whereas less permeable compounds differentially inhibit extracellular Nluc and Nluc on the cell surface. The compounds displayed little to no toxicity to cells and high luciferase specificity, showing no activity against firefly luciferase or even the closely related NanoBit system. Looking forward, the structural motifs used to gain access to the Nluc surface can also be appended with other functional groups, and therefore interesting opportunities for developing assays based on relief-of-inhibition can be envisioned.

  3. Core promoter analysis of porcine Six1 gene and its regulation of the promoter activity by CpG methylation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wangjun; Ren, Zhuqing; Liu, Honglin; Wang, Linjie; Huang, Ruihua; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Li, Pinghua; Xiong, Yuanzhu

    2013-10-25

    Six1, an evolutionary conserved transcription factor, has been shown to play an important role in organogenesis and diseases. However, no reports were shown to investigate its transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. In the present study, we first identified porcine Six1 gene core promoter region (+170/-360) using luciferase reporter assay system and found that promoter activities were significantly higher in the mouse myoblast C2C12 cells than that in the mouse fibroblast C3H10T1/2 cells, implying that Six1 promoter could possess muscle-specific characteristics. Moreover, our results showed that promoter activities of Six1 were decreased as induction of differentiation of C2C12 cells, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of mRNA expression of Six1 gene. In addition, we found that the DNA methylation of Six1 promoters in vitro obviously influences the promoter activities and the DNA methylation level of Six1 promoter core region was negatively correlated to Six1 gene expression in vivo. Taken together, we preliminarily clarified transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of Six1 gene, which should be useful for investigating its subtle transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in the future. On the other hand, based on Six1 involved in tumorigenesis, our data also provide a genetic foundation to control the generation of diseases via pursuing Six1 as therapeutic target gene.

  4. Visualization of Oxidative Stress Induced by Experimental Periodontitis in Keap1-Dependent Oxidative Stress Detector-Luciferase Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kota; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Irie, Koichiro; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Uchida, Yoko; Fukuhara, Daiki; Morita, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a Keap1-dependent oxidative stress detector-luciferase (OKD-LUC) mouse model would be useful for the visualization of oxidative stress induced by experimental periodontitis. A ligature was placed around the mandibular first molars for seven days to induce periodontitis. Luciferase activity was measured with an intraperitoneal injection of d-luciferin on days 0, 1, and 7. The luciferase activity in the periodontitis group was significantly greater than that in the control group at seven days. The expressions of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and malondialdehyde in periodontal tissue were significantly higher in the periodontitis group than in the control group. Immunofluorescent analysis confirmed that the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) occurred more frequently in the periodontitis group than in the control group. This study found that under oxidative stress induced by experimental periodontitis, the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway was activated and could be visualized from the luciferase activity in the OKD-LUC model. Thus, the OKD-LUC mouse model may be useful for exploring the mechanism underlying the relationship between the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway and periodontitis by enabling the visualization of oxidative stress over time. PMID:27854327

  5. Transcription of the protein kinase C-δ gene is activated by JNK through c-Jun and ATF2 in response to the anticancer agent doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byong Wook; Kim, Chang Gun; Ko, Jesang; Lim, Yoongho

    2008-01-01

    Expression of protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) is up-regulated by apoptosis-inducing stimuli. However, very little is known about the signaling pathways that control PKCδ gene transcription. In the present study, we demonstrate that JNK stimulates PKCδ gene expression via c-Jun and ATF2 in response to the anticancer agent doxorubicin (DXR) in mouse lymphocytic leukemia L1210 cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that DXR-induced activation of the PKCδ promoter was enhanced by ectopic expression of JNK1, c-Jun, or ATF2, whereas it was strongly reduced by expression of dominant negative JNK1 or by treatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Furthermore, point mutations in the core sequence of the c-Jun/ATF2 binding site suppressed DXR-induced activation of the PKCδ promoter. Our results suggest an additional role for a JNK signaling cascade in DXR-induced PKCδ gene expression. PMID:19116455

  6. A puzzling homology: a brittle star using a putative cnidarian-type luciferase for bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Delroisse, Jérôme; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Blaue, Stefanie; Ortega-Martinez, Olga; Eeckhaut, Igor; Flammang, Patrick; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2017-04-01

    Bioluminescence relies on the oxidation of a luciferin substrate catalysed by a luciferase enzyme. Luciferins and luciferases are generic terms used to describe a large variety of substrates and enzymes. Whereas luciferins can be shared by phylogenetically distant organisms which feed on organisms producing them, luciferases have been thought to be lineage-specific enzymes. Numerous light emission systems would then have co-emerged independently along the tree of life resulting in a plethora of non-homologous luciferases. Here, we identify for the first time a candidate luciferase of a luminous echinoderm, the ophiuroid Amphiura filiformis Phylogenomic analyses identified the brittle star predicted luciferase as homologous to the luciferase of the sea pansy Renilla (Cnidaria), contradicting with the traditional viewpoint according to which luciferases would generally be of convergent origins. The similarity between the Renilla and Amphiura luciferases allowed us to detect the latter using anti-Renilla luciferase antibodies. Luciferase expression was specifically localized in the spines which were demonstrated to be the bioluminescent organs in vivo However, enzymes homologous to the Renilla luciferase but unable to trigger light emission were also identified in non-luminous echinoderms and metazoans. Our findings strongly indicate that those enzymes, belonging to the haloalkane dehalogenase family, might then have been convergently co-opted into luciferases in cnidarians and echinoderms. In these two benthic suspension-feeding species, similar ecological pressures would constitute strong selective forces for the functional shift of these enzymes and the emergence of bioluminescence.

  7. Mutagenesis of solvent-exposed amino acids in Photinus pyralis luciferase improves thermostability and pH-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Law, G H Erica; Gandelman, Olga A; Tisi, Laurence C; Lowe, Christopher R; Murray, James A H

    2006-07-15

    Firefly luciferase catalyses a two-step reaction, using ATP-Mg2+, firefly luciferin and molecular oxygen as substrates, leading to the efficient emission of yellow-green light. We report the identification of novel luciferase mutants which combine improved pH-tolerance and thermostability and that retain the specific activity of the wild-type enzyme. These were identified by the mutagenesis of solvent-exposed non-conserved hydrophobic amino acids to hydrophilic residues in Photinus pyralis firefly luciferase followed by in vivo activity screening. Mutants F14R, L35Q, V182K, I232K and F465R were found to be the preferred substitutions at the respective positions. The effects of these amino acid replacements are additive, since combination of the five substitutions produced an enzyme with greatly improved pH-tolerance and stability up to 45 degrees C. All mutants, including the mutant with all five substitutions, showed neither a decrease in specific activity relative to the recombinant wild-type enzyme, nor any substantial differences in kinetic constants. It is envisaged that the combined mutant will be superior to wild-type luciferase for many in vitro and in vivo applications.

  8. A luciferase-based screening method for inhibitors of alphavirus replication applied to nucleoside analogues.

    PubMed

    Pohjala, Leena; Barai, Vladimir; Azhayev, Alex; Lapinjoki, Seppo; Ahola, Tero

    2008-06-01

    Several members of the widespread alphavirus group are pathogenic, but no therapy is available to treat these RNA virus infections. We report here a quantitative assay to screen for inhibitors of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replication, and demonstrate the effects of 29 nucleosides on SFV and Sindbis virus replication. The anti-SFV assay developed is based on a SFV strain containing Renilla luciferase inserted after the nsP3 coding region, yielding a marker virus in which the luciferase is cleaved out during polyprotein processing. The reporter-gene assay was miniaturized, automated and validated, resulting in a Z' value of 0.52. [3H]uridine labeling for 1 h at the maximal viral RNA synthesis time point was used as a comparative method. Anti-SFV screening and counter-screening for cell viability led to the discovery of several new SFV inhibitors. 3'-amino-3'-deoxyadenosine was the most potent inhibitor in this set, with an IC50 value of 18 microM in the reporter-gene assay and 2 microM in RNA synthesis rate detection. Besides the 3'-substituted analogues, certain N6-substituted nucleosides had similar IC50 values for both SFV and Sindbis replication, suggesting the applicability of this methodology to alphaviruses in general.

  9. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Deyu; Zhang, Zhixia; Guo, Huarong

    2012-01-01

    p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase) and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase) into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG) cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C) and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation), but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner. PMID:25585933

  10. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Legler, Juliette; Dennekamp, Martine; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Koeman, Jan H; van der Burg, Bart; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-07-03

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-)estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The ER-CALUX assay was more sensitive to 17beta-estradiol (E2) than the recombinant yeast screen, with an EC50 of 6 pM E2 compared to 100 pM in the yeast screen. Yeast cells were unable to distinguish the anti-estrogens ICI 182,780 and (4-hydroxy)tamoxifen, which were agonistic in the yeast. Acetone-soluble fractions of hexane/acetone extracts of sediments showed higher estrogenic potency than hexane-soluble extracts in the ER-CALUX assay. Sediments obtained from industrialized areas such as the Port of Rotterdam showed the highest estrogenic potency of the 12 marine sediments tested (up to 40 pmol estradiol equivalents per gram sediment). The estrogenic activity of individual chemicals that can be found in sediments including: alkylphenol ethoxylates and carboxylates; phthalates; and pesticides, was tested. Increasing sidechain length of various nonylphenol ethoxylates resulted in decreased estrogenic activity. Of the phthalates tested, butylbenzylphthalate was the most estrogenic, though with a potency approximately 100,000 times less than E2. The organochlorine herbicides atrazine and simazine failed to induce reporter gene activity. As metabolic activation may be required to induce estrogenic activity, a metabolic transformation step was added to the ER-CALUX assay using incubation of compounds with liver microsomes obtained from PCB-treated rats. Results indicate that metabolites of E2, NP and bisphenol A were less active than the parent compounds, while metabolites of methoxychlor were more estrogenic following microsomal incubations.

  11. Laboratory procedures manual for the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Knust, E. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Vance, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A manual on the procedures and instruments developed for the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) luciferase assay is presented. Data cover, laboratory maintenance, maintenance of bacterial cultures, bacteria measurement, reagents, luciferase procedures, and determination of microbal susceptibility to antibiotics.

  12. Optimization of the firefly luciferase reaction for analytical purposes.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Arne

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of assays has two purposes: (1) to increase the sensitivity of the assay so that low levels of the analyte can be determined; and (2) to prevent small changes of the reaction conditions from having a large impact on the outcome of the assay. The two purposes are usually equally important, as has been recognized in well-established branches of analytical chemistry, such as clinical chemistry. The firefly luciferase reaction can be used for many types of assays. The way to optimize these assays is not trivial, as there are many parameters to consider. Furthermore, as there are now several types of recombinant luciferases available, one has to decide which is the most suitable for each individual assay. The optimization is influenced by the conditions and requirements under which the assay is performed. Special attention is given to ways to calibrate assays. Examples on optimization are mainly taken from the author's own work during 40 years using assays based on the firefly luciferase reaction.

  13. Long-term gene therapy with thrombospondin 2 inhibits TGF-β activation, inflammation and angiogenesis in chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Christoph; Vogelbacher, Regina; Stief, Andrea; Grigo, Christina; Hugo, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We recently identified Thrombospondin-2 (TSP-2) as a regulator of matrix remodelling and inflammation in experimental kidney disease by using TSP-2 null mice and successfully proved TSP-2 overexpression as a therapeutic concept in a short term glomerulonephritis model in the rat. In this current study, we investigated if long-term TSP-2 overexpression is also capable to ameliorate the progression of chronic kidney disease in the setting of the chronic allograft nephropathy F344-Lewis model in the rat. Two weeks after renal transplantation, two rat thigh muscles were transfected once only with either a TSP-2 overexpressing plasmid (n = 8) or a luciferase-expressing plasmid as control (n = 8). Rats were monitored for renal function, histological changes and gene expression in the graft for up to 30 weeks after transplantation. Unexpectedly, only in the TSP-2 treated group 2 rats died before the end of the experiment and renal function tended to be worsened in the TSP-2 group compared to the luciferase-treated controls. In addition, glomerular sclerosis and tubular interstitial injury as well as cortical fibronectin deposition was significantly increased in the TSP-2 treated kidneys despite reduced TGF-β activation and marked anti-inflammatory (macrophages, T-cells and B-cells) effects in this group. Long-term TSP-2 therapy impaired repair of renal endothelium, as demonstrated by significant higher glomerular and peritubular endothelial rarefaction and reduced endothelial cell proliferation in the transplanted kidneys from TSP-2 treated rats compared to controls. This TSP-2 effect was associated with decreased levels of renal VEGF but not VEGF1 receptor. In conclusion, despite its anti-inflammatory and TGF-β activation blocking effects, TSP-2 gene therapy did not ameliorate but rather worsened experimental chronic allograft nephropathy most likely via its anti-angiogenic properties on the renal microvasculature.

  14. Circadian Rhythmicity of Active GSK3 Isoforms Modulates Molecular Clock Gene Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Besing, R.C.; Paul, J.R.; Hablitz, L.M.; Rogers, C.O.; Johnson, R.L.; Young, M.E.; Gamble, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprised of clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least five core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for two weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 μM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN. PMID:25724980

  15. Transcriptional activity of novel ALDH1L1 promoters in the rat brain following AAV vector-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mudannayake, Janitha M; Mouravlev, Alexandre; Fong, Dahna M; Young, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, member L1 (ALDH1L1) is a recently characterized pan-astrocytic marker that is more homogenously expressed throughout the brain than the classic astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein. We generated putative promoter sequence variants of the rat ALDH1L1 gene for use in adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer, with an aim to achieve selective regulation of transgene expression in astrocytes in the rat brain. Unexpectedly, ALDH1L1 promoter variants mediated transcriptional activity exclusively in neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta as assessed by luciferase reporter expression at 3 weeks postvector infusion. This selectivity for neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta also persisted in the context of adeno-associated viral serotype 5, 8 or 9 vector-mediated gene delivery. An in vivo promoter comparison showed the highest performing ALDH1L1 promoter variant mediated higher transgene expression than the neuronal-specific synapsin 1 and tyrosine hydroxylase promoters. The ALDH1L1 promoter was also transcriptionally active in dentate granule neurons following intrahippocampal adeno-associated viral vector infusion, whereas transgene expression was detected in both striatal neurons and astrocytes following vector infusion into the striatum. Our results demonstrate the potential suitability of the ALDH1L1 promoter as a new tool in the development of gene therapy and disease modelling applications. PMID:27990448

  16. Activation by zinc of the human gastrin gene promoter in colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kathryn M; Laval, Marie; Estacio, Ortis; Hudson, Damien F; Kalitsis, Paul; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; Patel, Oneel

    2015-10-01

    Over-expression of growth factors can contribute to the development and progression of cancer, and gastrins in particular have been implicated in accelerating the development of gastrointestinal cancers. Previously our group showed that hypoxia, cobalt chloride (a hypoxia mimetic) and zinc chloride could activate the expression of the gastrin gene in vitro. To characterise activation of the gastrin promoter by zinc ions further in vivo, TALEN technology was used to engineer a luciferase reporter construct into the endogenous human gastrin gene promoter in SW480 colon cancer cells. Gastrin promoter activity in the resultant Gast(luc) SW480 colon cancer cells was then measured by bioluminescence in cell culture and in tumour xenografts in SCID mice. Activation of intracellular signalling pathways was assessed by Western blotting. Activation of the gastrin promoter by zinc ions was concentration dependent in vitro and in vivo. Zinc ions significantly stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (MAPK pathway) but not of Akt (PI3K pathway). We conclude that the endogenous gastrin promoter is responsive to zinc ions, likely via activation of the MAPK pathway.

  17. Engineered Luciferase Reporter from a Deep Sea Shrimp Utilizing a Novel Imidazopyrazinone Substrate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bioluminescence methodologies have been extraordinarily useful due to their high sensitivity, broad dynamic range, and operational simplicity. These capabilities have been realized largely through incremental adaptations of native enzymes and substrates, originating from luminous organisms of diverse evolutionary lineages. We engineered both an enzyme and substrate in combination to create a novel bioluminescence system capable of more efficient light emission with superior biochemical and physical characteristics. Using a small luciferase subunit (19 kDa) from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, we have improved luminescence expression in mammalian cells ∼2.5 million-fold by merging optimization of protein structure with development of a novel imidazopyrazinone substrate (furimazine). The new luciferase, NanoLuc, produces glow-type luminescence (signal half-life >2 h) with a specific activity ∼150-fold greater than that of either firefly (Photinus pyralis) or Renilla luciferases similarly configured for glow-type assays. In mammalian cells, NanoLuc shows no evidence of post-translational modifications or subcellular partitioning. The enzyme exhibits high physical stability, retaining activity with incubation up to 55 °C or in culture medium for >15 h at 37 °C. As a genetic reporter, NanoLuc may be configured for high sensitivity or for response dynamics by appending a degradation sequence to reduce intracellular accumulation. Appending a signal sequence allows NanoLuc to be exported to the culture medium, where reporter expression can be measured without cell lysis. Fusion onto other proteins allows luminescent assays of their metabolism or localization within cells. Reporter quantitation is achievable even at very low expression levels to facilitate more reliable coupling with endogenous cellular processes. PMID:22894855

  18. Engineered luciferase reporter from a deep sea shrimp utilizing a novel imidazopyrazinone substrate.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mary P; Unch, James; Binkowski, Brock F; Valley, Michael P; Butler, Braeden L; Wood, Monika G; Otto, Paul; Zimmerman, Kristopher; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Machleidt, Thomas; Robers, Matthew B; Benink, Hélène A; Eggers, Christopher T; Slater, Michael R; Meisenheimer, Poncho L; Klaubert, Dieter H; Fan, Frank; Encell, Lance P; Wood, Keith V

    2012-11-16

    Bioluminescence methodologies have been extraordinarily useful due to their high sensitivity, broad dynamic range, and operational simplicity. These capabilities have been realized largely through incremental adaptations of native enzymes and substrates, originating from luminous organisms of diverse evolutionary lineages. We engineered both an enzyme and substrate in combination to create a novel bioluminescence system capable of more efficient light emission with superior biochemical and physical characteristics. Using a small luciferase subunit (19 kDa) from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, we have improved luminescence expression in mammalian cells ~2.5 million-fold by merging optimization of protein structure with development of a novel imidazopyrazinone substrate (furimazine). The new luciferase, NanoLuc, produces glow-type luminescence (signal half-life >2 h) with a specific activity ~150-fold greater than that of either firefly (Photinus pyralis) or Renilla luciferases similarly configured for glow-type assays. In mammalian cells, NanoLuc shows no evidence of post-translational modifications or subcellular partitioning. The enzyme exhibits high physical stability, retaining activity with incubation up to 55 °C or in culture medium for >15 h at 37 °C. As a genetic reporter, NanoLuc may be configured for high sensitivity or for response dynamics by appending a degradation sequence to reduce intracellular accumulation. Appending a signal sequence allows NanoLuc to be exported to the culture medium, where reporter expression can be measured without cell lysis. Fusion onto other proteins allows luminescent assays of their metabolism or localization within cells. Reporter quantitation is achievable even at very low expression levels to facilitate more reliable coupling with endogenous cellular processes.

  19. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Omokoko, Tana A.; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard 51Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the 51Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  20. Insulin-activated Elk-1 recruits the TIP60/NuA4 complex to increase prolactin gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Muktar A; Stanley, Frederick M

    2014-01-25

    Insulin increases prolactin gene expression in GH4 cells through phosphorylation of Elk-1 (Jacob and Stanley, 2001). We preformed a reverse two-hybrid screen using Elk-1-B42 as bait to identify proteins from GH4 cells that might serve as co-activators or co-repressors for insulin-increased prolactin gene expression. A number of the components of the TIP60/NuA4 complex interacted with Elk-1 suggesting that Elk-1 might activate transcription by recruiting the TIP60 chromatin-remodeling complex to the prolactin promoter. Inhibition of insulin-increased prolactin-luciferase expression by wild type and mutant adenovirus E1A protein provided physiological context for these yeast studies. Inhibition of histone deacetylases dramatically increased both basal and insulin-increased prolactin gene transcription. Co-immune precipitation experiments demonstrated Elk-1 and TIP60 associate in vitro. Transient or stable expression of TIP60 activated insulin-increased prolactin gene expression while a mutated TIP60 blocked insulin-increased prolactin gene expression. Analysis of the prolactin mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR showed that insulin-increased prolactin mRNA accumulation and that this was inhibited in GH4 cells that stably expressed mutant TIP60. Finally, ChIP experiments demonstrate the insulin-dependent occupancy of the prolactin promoter by Elk-1 and TIP60. Our studies suggest that insulin activates prolactin gene transcription by activating Elk-1 that recruits the NuA4 complex to the promoter.

  1. Isorhamnetin protects against oxidative stress by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Han, Jae Yun; Kim, Mi Gwang; Wi, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Isorhamentin is a 3'-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, the effects of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation and on the expressions of its downstream genes in hepatocytes have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isorhamnetin has the ability to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II antioxidant enzyme expression, and to determine the protective role of isorhamnetin on oxidative injury in hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, isorhamnetin increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and consistently, increased antioxidant response element (ARE) reporter gene activity and the protein levels of hemeoxygenase (HO-1) and of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which resulted in intracellular GSH level increases. The specific role of Nrf2 in isorhamnetin-induced Nrf2 target gene expression was verified using an ARE-deletion mutant plasmid and Nrf2-knockout MEF cells. Deletion of the ARE in the promoter region of the sestrin2 gene, which is recently identified as the Nrf2 target gene by us, abolished the ability of isorhamnetin to increase luciferase activity. In addition, Nrf2 deficiency completely blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to induce HO-1 and GCL. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment blocked t-BHP-induced ROS production and reversed GSH depletion by t-BHP and consequently, due to reduced ROS levels, decreased t-BHP-induced cell death. In addition isorhamnetin increased ERK1/2, PKCδ and AMPK phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that Nrf2 deficiency blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to protect cells from injury induced by t-BHP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that isorhamnetin is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against oxidative stress by Nrf2 activation and in inducing the expressions of its downstream genes.

  2. High level constitutive expression of luciferase reporter by lsd90 promoter in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Verma, Hemant Kumar; Shukla, Poonam; Alfatah, Md; Khare, Asheesh Kumar; Upadhyay, Udita; Ganesan, Kaliannan; Singh, Jagmohan

    2014-01-01

    Because of a large number of molecular similarities with higher eukaryotes, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been considered a potentially ideal host for expressing human proteins having therapeutic and pharmaceutical applications. However, efforts in this direction are hampered by lack of a strong promoter. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a strong, constitutive promoter from S. pombe. A new expression vector was constructed by cloning the putative promoter region of the lsd90 gene (earlier reported to be strongly induced by heat stress) into a previously reported high copy number vector pJH5, which contained an ARS element corresponding to the mat2P flanking region and a truncated URA3m selectable marker. The resulting vector was used to study and compare the level of expression of the luciferase reporter with that achieved with the known vectors containing regulatable promoter nmt1 and the strong constitutive promoter adh1 in S. pombe and the methanol-inducible AOX1 promoter in Pichia pastoris. Following growth in standard media the new vector containing the putative lsd90 promoter provided constitutive expression of luciferase, at a level, which was 19-, 39- and 10-fold higher than that achieved with nmt1, adh1 and AOX1 promoters, respectively. These results indicate a great potential of the new lsd90 promoter-based vector for commercial scale expression of therapeutic proteins in S. pombe.

  3. Rapid and scalable assembly of firefly luciferase substrates†

    PubMed Central

    McCutcheon, David C.; Porterfield, William B.; Prescher, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging with luciferase-luciferin pairs is a popular method for visualizing biological processes in vivo. Unfortunately, most luciferins are difficult to access and remain prohibitively expensive for some imaging applications. Here we report cost-effective and efficient syntheses of D-luciferin and 6′-aminoluciferin, two widely used bioluminescent substrates. Our approach employs inexpensive anilines and Appel's salt to generate the luciferin cores in a single pot. Additionally, the syntheses are scalable and can provide multi-gram quantities of both substrates. The streamlined production and improved accessibility of luciferin reagents will bolster in vivo imaging efforts. PMID:25525906

  4. Application of luciferase assay for ATP to antimicrobial drug susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The susceptibility of bacteria, particularly those derived from body fluids, to antimicrobial agents is determined in terms of an ATP index measured by culturing a bacterium in a growth medium. The amount of ATP is assayed in a sample of the cultured bacterium by measuring the amount of luminescent light emitted when the bacterial ATP is reacted with a luciferase-luciferin mixture. The sample of the cultured bacterium is subjected to an antibiotic agent. The amount of bacterial adenosine triphosphate is assayed after treatment with the antibiotic by measuring the luminescent light resulting from the reaction. The ATP index is determined from the values obtained from the assay procedures.

  5. Nuclear actin activates human transcription factor genes including the OCT4 gene.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; Tokunaga, Makio; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    RNA microarray analyses revealed that nuclear actin activated many human transcription factor genes including OCT4, which is required for gene reprogramming. Oct4 is known to be activated by nuclear actin in Xenopus oocytes. Our findings imply that this process of OCT4 activation is conserved in vertebrates and among cell types and could be used for gene reprogramming of human cells.

  6. A mouse model for studying the clearance of hepatitis B virus in vivo using a luciferase reporter.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sheng-qiang; Du, Juan; Yan, Hu; Zhou, Qian-qian; Zhou, Yong; Yuan, Zhen-nan; Yan, Shao-duo; Fu, Qiu-xia; Wang, Xiao-hui; Jia, Shuai-zheng; Peng, Jian-chun; Zhang, Yang-gen; Zhan, Lin-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection remains a global problem, despite the effectiveness of the Hepatitis B vaccine in preventing infection. The resolution of Hepatitis B virus infection has been believed to be attributable to virus-specific immunity. In vivo direct evaluation of anti-HBV immunity in the liver is currently not possible. We have developed a new assay system that detects HBV clearance in the liver after the hydrodynamic transfer of a reporter gene and over-length, linear HBV DNA into hepatocytes, followed by bioluminescence imaging of the reporter gene (Fluc). We employed bioluminescence detection of luciferase expression in HBV-infected hepatocytes to measure the Hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg)-specific immune responses directed against these infected hepatocytes. Only HBcAg-immunized, but not mock-treated, animals decreased the amounts of luciferase expression, HBsAg and viral DNA from the liver at day 28 after hydrodynamic infection with over-length HBV DNA, indicating that control of luciferase expression correlates with viral clearance from infected hepatocytes.

  7. Identification and analysis of the promoter region of the STGC3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Suyun; Wang, Lili; Xie, Yuanjie; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a common malignant tumor of the head and neck. The STGC3 gene is related to development of nasopharyngeal cancer. The aim of this study is to explore the promoter region of the STGC3 gene. Material and methods The bioinformatic technique was applied to predict its promoter region and construct the gene promoter region luciferase for the gene vector and transfection of the human embryonic kidney epithelial 293T cell line, human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 cell line and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial NP69 cell line. The recombinant plasmid pGL3-en283, pGL3-en281, pGL3-en571, empty plasmid pGL3-control, negative control pGL3-enhance and internal control of marine intestine luciferase expression vector pRL-SV40 were transfected into NP69 cells, 293T cells and CNE2 cells. Dual luciferase activity detection showed luciferase luminescence values and marine intestine luciferase luminescence values. Relative luciferase activity (RLA) in each cell was calculated. Results We observed strong promoter activity of plasmid pGL3-en283, pGL3-en281 and pGL3-en571 in NP69, 293T and CNE2 cells compared with the negative control pGL3-enhance plasmid. Among them, pGL3-en281 showed the strongest promoter activity, and these three kinds of recombinant plasmids showed stronger promoter activity in 293T cells than in CNE2 cells. Conclusions The pGL3-en281 plasmid showed stronger promoter activity than pGL3-en571 in the three cells, indicating that –11048 bp to –653 bp might be the core promoter region. PMID:26528355

  8. Biological measurement of estrogenic activity in urine and bile conjugates with the in vitro ER-CALUX reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Legler, Juliette; Jonas, Arjen; Lahr, Joost; Vethaak, A Dick; Brouwer, Abraham; Murk, Albertinka J

    2002-03-01

    Although estrogens are excreted as biologically inactive conjugates, they can be reconverted to an active form, possibly by bacteria. A simple method was developed to deconjugate estrogen metabolites present in human urine and fish bile back to active estrogens by enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-glucuronidase or live Escherichia coli cells. Deconjugated extracts were tested for estrogenic activity in the in vitro stable estrogen receptor-mediated chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) assay. Estrogen glucuronides in urine obtained from human males and females were effectively converted to active forms after incubation with beta-glucuronidase or E. coli. The highest estrogenic activity was found in deconjugated metabolites from urine of a pregnant woman, in which levels up to 3,000 nmol estradiol equivalents per liter of urine were found after overnight incubation of urine with E. coli. Bile sampled from male bream and flounder from various freshwater and marine locations was also deconjugated and a good correlation was found between high biliary estrogenic activity and elevated levels of xenoestrogenic activity in surface water as well as in plasma vitellogenin. Therefore, the measurement of deconjugated bile could form a useful (indirect) biomarker for internal dose of xenoestrogens in male fish.

  9. NonO binds to the CpG island of oct4 promoter and functions as a transcriptional activator of oct4 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoojin; Lee, Ja-Myong; Hwang, Min-Young; Son, Gi-hoon; Geum, Dongho

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between oct4 gene expression patterns and CpG sites methylation profiles during ES cell differentiation into neurons, and identified relevant binding factor. The oct4 gene expression level gradually declined as ES cell differentiation progressed, and the CpG sites in the oct4 proximal enhancer (PE) and promoter regions were methylated in concert with ES cell differentiation. An electro-mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that putative proteins bind to CpG sites in the oct4 PE/promoter. We purified CpG binding proteins with DNAbinding purification method, and NonO was identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. EMSA with specific competitors revealed that NonO specifically binds to the conserved CCGGTGAC sequence in the oct4 promoter. Methylation at a specific cytosine residue (CC* GGTGAC) reduced the binding affinity of NonO for the recognition sequence. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that NonO binds to the unmethylated oct4 promoter. There were no changes in the NonO mRNA and protein levels between ES cells and differentiated cells. The transcriptional role of NonO in oct4 gene expression was evaluated by luciferase assays and knockdown experiments. The luciferase activity significantly increased threefold when the NonO expression vector was cotransfected with the NonO recognition sequence, indicating that NonO has a transcription activator effect on oct4 gene expression. In accordance with this effect, when NonO expression was inhibited by siRNA treatment, oct4 expression was also significantly reduced. In summary, we purified NonO, a novel protein that binds to the CpG island of oct4 promoter, and positively regulates oct4 gene expression in ES cells.

  10. Luciferase imaging for evaluation of oncolytic adenovirus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guse, K; Dias, J D; Bauerschmitz, G J; Hakkarainen, T; Aavik, E; Ranki, T; Pisto, T; Särkioja, M; Desmond, R A; Kanerva, A; Hemminki, A

    2007-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses kill cancer cells by tumor-selective replication. Clinical data have established the safety of the approach but also the need of improvements in potency. Efficacy of oncolysis is linked to effective infection of target cells and subsequent productive replication. Other variables include intratumoral barriers, access to target cells, uptake by non-target organs and immune response. Each of these aspects relates to the location and degree of virus replication. Unfortunately, detection of in vivo replication has been difficult, labor intensive and costly and therefore not much studied. We hypothesized that by coinfection of a luciferase expressing E1-deleted virus with an oncolytic virus, both viruses would replicate when present in the same cell. Photon emission due to conversion of D-Luciferin is sensitive and penetrates tissues well. Importantly, killing of animals is not required and each animal can be imaged repeatedly. Two different murine xenograft models were used and intratumoral coinjections of luciferase encoding virus were performed with eight different oncolytic adenoviruses. In both models, we found significant correlation between photon emission and infectious virus production. This suggests that the system can be used for non-invasive quantitation of the amplitude, persistence and dynamics of oncolytic virus replication in vivo, which could be helpful for the development of more effective and safe agents.

  11. Reporter Gene-Facilitated Detection of Compounds in Arabidopsis Leaf Extracts that Activate the Karrikin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yueming K.; Flematti, Gavin R.; Smith, Steven M.; Waters, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Karrikins are potent germination stimulants generated by the combustion of plant matter. Treatment of Arabidopsis with karrikins triggers a signaling process that is dependent upon a putative receptor protein KARRIKIN INSENSITIVE 2 (KAI2). KAI2 is a homolog of DWARF 14 (D14), the receptor for endogenous strigolactone hormones. Genetic analyses suggest that KAI2 also perceives endogenous signal(s) that are not strigolactones. Activation of KAI2 by addition of karrikins to Arabidopsis plants induces expression of transcripts including D14-LIKE 2 (DLK2). We constructed the synthetic reporter gene DLK2:LUC in Arabidopsis, which comprises the firefly luciferase gene (LUC) driven by the DLK2 promoter. Here we describe a luminescence-based reporter assay with Arabidopsis seeds to detect chemical signals that can activate the KAI2 signaling pathway. We demonstrate that the DLK2:LUC assay can selectively and sensitively detect karrikins and a functionally similar synthetic strigolactone analog. Crucially we show that crude extracts from Arabidopsis leaves can also activate DLK2:LUC in a KAI2-dependent manner. Our work provides the first direct evidence for the existence of endogenous chemical signals that can activate the KAI2-mediated signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. This sensitive reporter system can now be used for the bioassay-guided purification and identification of putative endogenous KAI2 ligands or their precursors, and endogenous compounds that might modulate the KAI2 signaling pathway. PMID:27994609

  12. Hypoxia-induced endothelial NO synthase gene transcriptional activation is mediated through the tax-responsive element in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiho; Jin, Yoon-Mi; Moon, Je-Sung; Sung, Min-Sun; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2006-06-01

    Although hypoxia is known to induce upregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) gene expression, the underlying mechanism is largely unclear. In this study, we show that hypoxia increases eNOS gene expression through the binding of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein (pCREB) to the eNOS gene promoter. Hypoxia (1% O2) increased both eNOS expression and NO production, peaking at 24 hours, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, and these increases were accompanied by increases in pCREB. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 or transfection with dominant-negative inhibitor of CREB reversed the hypoxia-induced increases in eNOS expression and NO production, with concomitant inhibition of the phosphorylation of CREB induced by hypoxia, suggesting an involvement of protein kinase A/pCREB-mediated pathway. To map the regulatory elements of the eNOS gene responsible for pCREB binding under hypoxia, we constructed an eNOS gene promoter (-1600 to +22 nucleotides) fused with a luciferase reporter gene [pGL2-eNOS(-1600)]. Hypoxia (for 24-hour incubation) increased the promoter activity by 2.36+/-0.18-fold in the bovine aortic endothelial cells transfected with pGL2-eNOS(-1600). However, progressive 5'-deletion from -1600 to -873 completely attenuated the hypoxia-induced increase in promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift, anti-pCREB antibody supershift, and site-specific mutation analyses showed that pCREB is bound to the Tax-responsive element (TRE) site, a cAMP-responsive element-like site, located at -924 to -921 of the eNOS promoter. Our data demonstrate that the interaction between pCREB and the Tax-responsive element site within the eNOS promoter may represent a novel mechanism for the mediation of hypoxia-stimulated eNOS gene expression.

  13. Cancer genes: rare recombinants instead of activated oncogenes (a review).

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1987-01-01

    The 20 known transforming (onc) genes of retroviruses are defined by sequences that are transduced from cellular genes termed protooncogenes or cellular oncogenes. Based on these sequences, viral onc genes have been postulated to be transduced cellular cancer genes, and proto-onc genes have been postulated to be latent cancer genes that can be activated from within the cell to cause virus-negative tumors. The hypothesis is popular because it promises direct access to cellular cancer genes. However, the existence of latent cancer genes presents a paradox, since such genes are clearly undesirable. The hypothesis predicts that viral onc genes and proto-onc genes are isogenic; that expression of proto-onc genes induces tumors; that activated proto-onc genes transform diploid cells upon transfection, like viral onc genes; and that diploid tumors exist. As yet, none of these predictions is confirmed. Instead: Structural comparisons between viral onc genes, essential retroviral genes, and proto-onc genes show that all viral onc genes are indeed new genes, rather than transduced cellular cancer genes. They are recombinants put together from truncated viral and truncated proto-onc genes. Proto-onc genes are frequently expressed in normal cells. To date, not one activated proto-onc gene has been isolated that transforms diploid cells. Above all, no diploid tumors with activated proto-onc genes have been found. Moreover, the probability of spontaneous transformation in vivo is at least 10(9) times lower than predicted from the mechanisms thought to activate proto-onc genes. Therefore, the hypothesis that proto-onc genes are latent cellular oncogenes appears to be an overinterpretation of sequence homology to structural and functional homology with viral onc genes. Here it is proposed that only rare truncations and illegitimate recombinations that alter the germ-line configuration of cellular genes generate viral and possibly cellular cancer genes. The clonal chromosome

  14. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  15. Nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NFKB (NF-kappaB) after exposure of human monocytes to pulsed ultra-wideband electromagnetic fields (1 kV/cm) fails to transactivate kappaB-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, M; Nayak, B K; Galindo, C; Mathur, S P; Roldan, F N; Meltz, M L

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether exposure of human monocytes to a pulsed ultra-wideband electromagnetic field (EMF) of 1 kV/cm average peak power triggers a signaling pathway responsible for the transcriptional regulation of NFKB (NF-kappaB)-dependent gene expression. Human Mono Mac 6 (MM6) cells were exposed intermittently to EMF pulses for a total of 90 min. The pulse width was 0.79+/-0.01 ns and the pulse repetition rate was 250 pps. The temperature of the medium was maintained at 37 degrees C in both sham- and EMF-exposed flasks. Total NFKB DNA-binding activity was measured in the nuclear extracts by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Cells exposed to the EMFs and incubated for 24 h postexposure showed a 3.5+/-0.2-fold increase in the NFKB DNA-binding activity. Since activation of NFKB was observed, the possibility of kappaB-dependent gene expression in response to exposure to the EMFs was investigated using NFKB signal-specific gene arrays. The results revealed no difference in the NFKB-dependent gene expression profiles at 8 or 24 h postexposure, indicating that activated NFKB does not lead to the differential expression of kappaB-dependent target genes. To determine whether the absence of the kappaB-dependent gene expression was due to compromised transcriptional regulation of NFKB, the functional activity of NFKB was examined in cells transiently transfected with Mercury Pathway constructs containing 4x NFKB binding sites associated either with the luciferase reporter system or a control vector. Pulsed EMF exposure did not induce NFKB-driven luciferase activity in these cells, indicating that the activation of NFKB at 24 h after the 1 kV/cm EMF exposure is functionally inactive. From these results, it is clear that the EMF-induced NFKB activation is only a transient response, with minimal or no downstream effect.

  16. Monitoring the dynamics of clonal tumour evolution in vivo using secreted luciferases

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Joël P.; Fuchs, Jeannette; Hefter, Mirjam; Vischedyk, Jonas B.; Kleint, Maximilian; Vogiatzi, Fotini; Schäfer, Jonas A.; Nist, Andrea; Timofeev, Oleg; Wanzel, Michael; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Tumours are heterogeneous cell populations that undergo clonal evolution during tumour progression, metastasis and response to therapy. Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) generate stable loss-of-function phenotypes and are versatile experimental tools to explore the contribution of individual genetic alterations to clonal evolution. In these experiments tumour cells carrying shRNAs are commonly tracked with fluorescent reporters. While this works well for cell culture studies and leukaemia mouse models, fluorescent reporters are poorly suited for animals with solid tumours—the most common tumour types in cancer patients. Here we develop a toolkit that uses secreted luciferases to track the fate of two different shRNA-expressing tumour cell clones competitively, both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that secreted luciferase activities can be measured robustly in the blood stream of tumour-bearing mice to accurately quantify, in a minimally invasive manner, the dynamic evolution of two genetically distinct tumour subclones in preclinical mouse models of tumour development, metastasis and therapy. PMID:24889111

  17. Monitoring the dynamics of clonal tumour evolution in vivo using secreted luciferases.

    PubMed

    Charles, Joël P; Fuchs, Jeannette; Hefter, Mirjam; Vischedyk, Jonas B; Kleint, Maximilian; Vogiatzi, Fotini; Schäfer, Jonas A; Nist, Andrea; Timofeev, Oleg; Wanzel, Michael; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2014-06-03

    Tumours are heterogeneous cell populations that undergo clonal evolution during tumour progression, metastasis and response to therapy. Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) generate stable loss-of-function phenotypes and are versatile experimental tools to explore the contribution of individual genetic alterations to clonal evolution. In these experiments tumour cells carrying shRNAs are commonly tracked with fluorescent reporters. While this works well for cell culture studies and leukaemia mouse models, fluorescent reporters are poorly suited for animals with solid tumours--the most common tumour types in cancer patients. Here we develop a toolkit that uses secreted luciferases to track the fate of two different shRNA-expressing tumour cell clones competitively, both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that secreted luciferase activities can be measured robustly in the blood stream of tumour-bearing mice to accurately quantify, in a minimally invasive manner, the dynamic evolution of two genetically distinct tumour subclones in preclinical mouse models of tumour development, metastasis and therapy.

  18. Identification of Follistatin-Like 1 by Expression Cloning as an Activator of the Growth Differentiation Factor 15 Gene and a Prognostic Biomarker in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Widera, Christian; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Kempf, Tibor; Korf-Klingebiel, Mortimer; Fiedler, Beate; Sharma, Sarita; Katus, Hugo A.; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Shimano, Masayuki; Walsh, Kenneth; Wollert, Kai C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is a stress-responsive cytokine and biomarker that is produced after myocardial infarction and that is related to prognosis in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We hypothesized that secreted proteins that activate GDF15 production may represent new ACS biomarkers. METHODS We expressed clones from an infarcted mouse heart cDNA library in COS1 cells and assayed for activation of a luciferase reporter gene controlled by a 642-bp fragment of the mouse growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) gene promoter. We measured the circulating concentrations of follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) and GDF15 in 1369 patients with ACS. RESULTS One cDNA clone that activated the GDF15 promoter–luciferase reporter encoded the secreted protein FSTL1. Treatment with FSTL1 activated GDF15 production in cultured cardiomyocytes. Transgenic production of FSTL1 stimulated GDF15 production in the murine heart, whereas cardiomyocyte-selective deletion of FSTL1 decreased production of GDF15 in cardiomyocytes, indicating that FSTL1 is sufficient and required for GDF15 production. In ACS, FSTL1 emerged as the strongest independent correlate of GDF15 (partial R2 = 0.26). A total of 106 patients died of a cardiovascular cause during a median follow-up of 252 days. Patients with an FSTL1 concentration in the top quartile had a 3.7-fold higher risk of cardiovascular death compared with patients in the first 3 quartiles (P < 0.001). FSTL1 remained associated with cardiovascular death after adjustment for clinical, angiographic, and biochemical variables. CONCLUSIONS Our study is the first to use expression cloning for biomarker discovery upstream of a gene of interest and to identify FSTL1 as an independent prognostic biomarker in ACS. PMID:22675198

  19. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 suppresses renin gene transcription by blocking the activity of the cyclic AMP response element in the renin gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Weihua; Pan, Wei; Kong, Juan; Zheng, Wei; Szeto, Frances L; Wong, Kari E; Cohen, Ronald; Klopot, Anna; Zhang, Zhongyi; Li, Yan Chun

    2007-10-12

    We have shown that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) down-regulates renin expression. To explore the molecular mechanism, we analyzed the mouse Ren-1c gene promoter by luciferase reporter assays. Deletion analysis revealed two DNA fragments from -2,725 to -2,647 (distal fragment) and from -117 to +6 (proximal fragment) that are sufficient to mediate the repression. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE) in the distal fragment blunted forskolin stimulation as well as 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) inhibition of the transcriptional activity, suggesting the involvement of CRE in 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-induced suppression. EMSA revealed that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) markedly inhibited nuclear protein binding to the CRE in the promoter. ChIP and GST pull-down assays demonstrated that liganded VDR blocked the binding of CREB to the CRE by directly interacting with CREB with the ligand-binding domain, and the VDR-mediated repression can be rescued by CREB, CBP, or p300 overexpression. These data indicate that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) suppresses renin gene expression at least in part by blocking the formation of CRE-CREB-CBP complex.

  20. Cruciform-extruding regulatory element controls cell-specific activity of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, E L; Peng, H; Esparza, F M; Maltchenko, S Z; Stachowiak, M K

    1998-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is expressed specifically in catecholaminergic cells. We have identified a novel regulatory sequence in the upstream region of the bovine TH gene promoter formed by a dyad symmetry element (DSE1;-352/-307 bp). DSE1 supports TH promoter activity in TH-expressing bovine adrenal medulla chromaffin (BAMC) cells and inhibits promoter activity in non-expressing TE671 cells. DNase I footprinting of relaxed TH promoter DNA showed weak binding of nuclear BAMC cell proteins to a short sequence in the right DSE1 arm. In BAMC cells, deletion of the right arm markedly reduced the expression of luciferase from the TH promoter. However, deletion of the left DSE1 arm or its reversed orientation (RevL) also inactivated the TH promoter. In supercoiled TH promoter, DSE1 assumes a cruciform-like conformation i.e., it binds cruciform-specific 2D3 antibody, and S1 nuclease-cleavage and OsO4-modification assays have identified an imperfect cruciform extruded by the DSE1. DNase I footprinting of supercoiled plasmid showed that cruciformed DSE1 is targeted by nuclear proteins more efficiently than the linear duplex isomer and that the protected site encompasses the left arm and center of DSE1. Our results suggest that the disruption of intrastrand base-pairing preventing cruciform formation and protein binding to DSE1 is responsible for its inactivation in DSE1 mutants. DSE1 cruciform may act as a target site for activator (BAMC cells) and repressor (TE671) proteins. Its extrusion emerges as a novel mechanism that controls cell-specific promoter activity. PMID:9512554

  1. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  2. Enrichment of Conserved Synaptic Activity-Responsive Element in Neuronal Genes Predicts a Coordinated Response of MEF2, CREB and SRF

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tornos, Fernanda M.; San Aniceto, Iñigo; Cubelos, Beatriz; Nieto, Marta

    2013-01-01

    A unique synaptic activity-responsive element (SARE) sequence, composed of the consensus binding sites for SRF, MEF2 and CREB, is necessary for control of transcriptional upregulation of the Arc gene in response to synaptic activity. We hypothesize that this sequence is a broad mechanism that regulates gene expression in response to synaptic activation and during plasticity; and that analysis of SARE-containing genes could identify molecular mechanisms involved in brain disorders. To search for conserved SARE sequences in the mammalian genome, we used the SynoR in silico tool, and found the SARE cluster predominantly in the regulatory regions of genes expressed specifically in the nervous system; most were related to neural development and homeostatic maintenance. Two of these SARE sequences were tested in luciferase assays and proved to promote transcription in response to neuronal activation. Supporting the predictive capacity of our candidate list, up-regulation of several SARE containing genes in response to neuronal activity was validated using external data and also experimentally using primary cortical neurons and quantitative real time RT-PCR. The list of SARE-containing genes includes several linked to mental retardation and cognitive disorders, and is significantly enriched in genes that encode mRNA targeted by FMRP (fragile X mental retardation protein). Our study thus supports the idea that SARE sequences are relevant transcriptional regulatory elements that participate in plasticity. In addition, it offers a comprehensive view of how activity-responsive transcription factors coordinate their actions and increase the selectivity of their targets. Our data suggest that analysis of SARE-containing genes will reveal yet-undescribed pathways of synaptic plasticity and additional candidate genes disrupted in mental disease. PMID:23382855

  3. Cytochrome P4501A induction in avian hepatocyte cultures exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls: Comparisons with AHR1-mediated reporter gene activity and in ovo toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Gillian E.; Mundy, Lukas J.; Crump, Doug; Jones, Stephanie P.; Chiu, Suzanne; Klein, Jeff; Konstantinov, Alex; Potter, Dave; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2013-01-01

    Avian-specific toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) were developed by the World Health Organization to simplify environmental risk assessments of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs), but TEFs do not account for differences in the toxic and biochemical potencies of DLCs among species of birds. Such variability may be due to differences in species sensitivity to individual DLCs. The sensitivity of avian species to DLCs was recently associated with the identity of amino acids 324 and 380 in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1) ligand binding domain. A luciferase reporter gene (LRG) assay, measuring AHR1-mediated induction of a cytochrome P450 1A5 (CYP1A5) reporter gene, in combination with a species' AHR1 ligand binding domain sequence, were also shown to predict avian species sensitivity to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and PCB relative potency in a given species. The goals of the present study were to (1) characterize the concentration-dependent effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and PCBs 126, 77, 105 and 118 on induction of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity and CYP1A4/5 mRNA in chicken, ring-necked pheasant and Japanese quail embryo hepatocytes and (2) compare these in vitro results to those previously generated by the LRG assay and in ovo toxicity studies. EROD activity and CYP1A4/5 mRNA expression data support and complement the findings of the LRG assay. CYP1A enzyme activity and mRNA expression were significantly correlated both with luciferase activity and in ovo toxicity induced by PCBs. Relative potency values were generally similar between the LRG and EROD assays and indicate that the relative potency of some PCBs may differ among species. -- Highlights: ► The chicken isn't the most sensitive species to CYP1A induction by PCB 105 and 118. ► The relative potency of PCBs differs between avian species. ► EROD activity was correlated with luciferase activity from the LRG assay. ► EROD activity was a better predictor of toxicity than CYP

  4. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates proliferation and migration of human prostate cancer cells through activation of activator protein-1 and up-regulation of the heparin affin regulatory peptide gene.

    PubMed

    Polytarchou, Christos; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2005-12-09

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that hydrogen peroxide (HP) plays a role in cell proliferation and migration. In the present study we found that exogenous HP significantly induced human prostate cancer LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP) seems to be involved in the stimulatory effect of HP, because the latter had no effect on stably transfected LNCaP cells that did not express HARP. Moreover, HP significantly increased HARP mRNA and protein amounts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Curcumin and activator protein-1 (AP-1) decoy oligonucleotides abrogated both HP-induced HARP expression and LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. HP increased luciferase activity of the 5'-flanking region of the HARP gene introduced in a reporter gene vector, an effect that was abolished when even one of the two putative AP-1 binding sites of the HARP promoter was mutated. The effect of HP seems to be due to the binding of Fra-1, JunD, and phospho-c-Jun to the HARP promoter. These results support the notion that HARP is important for human prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration, establish the role of AP-1 in the up-regulation of HARP expression by low concentrations of HP, and characterize the AP-1 dimers involved.

  5. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells.

  6. A novel luciferase fusion protein for highly sensitive optical imaging: from single-cell analysis to in vivo whole-body bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, Laura; Blankevoort, Vicky; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Kaijzel, Eric L

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have different advantages and disadvantages depending on the application. Bioluminescence imaging is now the most sensitive optical technique for tracking cells, promoter activity studies, or for longitudinal in vivo preclinical studies. Far-red and near-infrared fluorescence imaging have the advantage of being suitable for both ex vivo and in vivo analysis and have translational potential, thanks to the availability of very sensitive imaging instrumentation. Here, we report the development and validation of a new luciferase fusion reporter generated by the fusion of the firefly luciferase Luc2 to the far-red fluorescent protein TurboFP635 by a 14-amino acid linker peptide. Expression of the fusion protein, named TurboLuc, was analyzed in human embryonic kidney cells, (HEK)-293 cells, via Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and in vivo optical imaging. The created fusion protein maintained the characteristics of the original bioluminescent and fluorescent protein and showed no toxicity when expressed in living cells. To assess the sensitivity of the reporter for in vivo imaging, transfected cells were subcutaneously injected in animals. Detection limits of cells were 5 × 10(3) and 5 × 10(4) cells for bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging, respectively. In addition, hydrodynamics-based in vivo gene delivery using a minicircle vector expressing TurboLuc allowed for the analysis of luminescent signals over time in deep tissue. Bioluminescence could be monitored for over 30 days in the liver of animals. In conclusion, TurboLuc combines the advantages of both bioluminescence and fluorescence and allows for highly sensitive optical imaging ranging from single-cell analysis to in vivo whole-body bioluminescence imaging.

  7. Human endogenous retrovirus W family envelope gene activates the small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel in human neuroblastoma cells through CREB.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Liu, Z C; Yin, S J; Chen, Y T; Yu, H L; Zeng, J; Zhang, Q; Zhu, F

    2013-09-05

    Numerous studies have shown that human endogenous retrovirus W family (HERV-W) envelope gene (env) is related to various diseases but the underlying mechanism has remained poorly understood. Our previous study showed that there was abnormal expression of HERV-W env in sera of patients with schizophrenia. In this paper, we reported that overexpression of the HERV-W env elevated the levels of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel protein 3 (SK3) in human neuroblastoma cells. Using a luciferase reporter system and RNA interference method, we found that functional cAMP response element site was required for the expression of SK3 triggered by HERV-W env. In addition, it was also found that the SK3 channel was activated by HERV-W env. Further study indicated that cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) was required for the activation of the SK3 channel. Thus, a novel signaling mechanism of how HERV-W env influences neuronal activity and contributes to mental illnesses such as schizophrenia was proposed.

  8. Correspondence between resting state activity and brain gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guang-Zhong; Belgard, T. Grant; Mao, Deng; Chen, Leslie; Berto, Stefano; Preuss, Todd M.; Lu, Hanzhang; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Konopka, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The relationship between functional brain activity and gene expression has not been fully explored in the human brain. Here, we identify significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and functional activity by comparing fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations (fALFF) from two independent human fMRI resting state datasets to regional cortical gene expression from a newly generated RNA-seq dataset and two additional gene expression datasets to obtain robust and reproducible correlations. We find significantly more genes correlated with fALFF than expected by chance, and identify specific genes correlated with the imaging signals in multiple expression datasets in the default mode network. Together, these data support a population-level relationship between regional steady state brain gene expression and resting state brain activity. PMID:26590343

  9. A novel tool for monitoring endogenous alpha-synuclein transcription by NanoLuciferase tag insertion at the 3′end using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technique

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sambuddha; Adams, Levi; Guhathakurta, Subhrangshu; Kim, Yoon-Seong

    2017-01-01

    α-synuclein (α-SYN) is a major pathologic contributor to Parkinson’s disease (PD). Multiplication of α-SYN encoding gene (SNCA) is correlated with early onset of the disease underlining the significance of its transcriptional regulation. Thus, monitoring endogenous transcription of SNCA is of utmost importance to understand PD pathology. We developed a stable cell line expressing α-SYN endogenously tagged with NanoLuc luciferase reporter using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. This allows efficient measurement of transcriptional activity of α-SYN in its native epigenetic landscape which is not achievable using exogenous transfection-based luciferase reporter assays. The NanoLuc activity faithfully monitored the transcriptional regulation of SNCA following treatment with different drugs known to regulate α-SYN expression; while exogenous promoter-reporter assays failed to reproduce the similar outcomes. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing endogenous monitoring of α-SYN transcription, thus making it an efficient drug screening tool that can be used for therapeutic intervention in PD. PMID:28374838

  10. Role of activator protein-1 in the down-regulation of the human CYP2J2 gene in hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Marden, Nicole Y; Fiala-Beer, Eva; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Murray, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2J2 arachidonic acid epoxygenase gene was down-regulated at a pre-translational level in human hepatoma-derived HepG2 cells incubated in a hypoxic environment; under these conditions, the expression of c-Jun and c-Fos mRNA and protein was increased. The 5'-upstream region of the CYP2J2 gene was isolated by amplification of a 2341 bp fragment and putative regulatory elements that resembled activator protein-1 (AP-1)-like sequences were identified. From transient transfection analysis, c-Jun was found to strongly activate a CYP2J2 -luciferase reporter construct, but co-transfection with plasmids encoding c-Fos or c-Fos-related antigens, Fra-1 and -2, abrogated reporter activity. Using a series of deletion-reporter constructs, a c-Jun-responsive module was identified between bp -152 and -50 in CYP2J2 : this region contained an AP-1-like element between bp -56 and -63. The capacity of this element to interact directly with c-Jun, but not c-Fos, was confirmed by electromobility-shift assay analysis. Mutagenesis of the -56/-63 element abolished most, but not all, of the activation of CYP2J2 by c-Jun, thus implicating an additional site within the c-Jun-responsive region. The present results establish an important role for c-Jun in the control of CYP2J2 expression in liver cells. Activation of c-Fos expression by hypoxia promotes the formation of c-Jun/c-Fos heterodimers, which decrease the binding of c-Jun to the CYP2J2 upstream region, leading to gene down-regulation. PMID:12737630

  11. Isorhamnetin protects against oxidative stress by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Han, Jae Yun; Kim, Mi Gwang; Wi, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Isorhamentin is a 3′-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, the effects of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation and on the expressions of its downstream genes in hepatocytes have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isorhamnetin has the ability to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II antioxidant enzyme expression, and to determine the protective role of isorhamnetin on oxidative injury in hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, isorhamnetin increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and consistently, increased antioxidant response element (ARE) reporter gene activity and the protein levels of hemeoxygenase (HO-1) and of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which resulted in intracellular GSH level increases. The specific role of Nrf2 in isorhamnetin-induced Nrf2 target gene expression was verified using an ARE-deletion mutant plasmid and Nrf2-knockout MEF cells. Deletion of the ARE in the promoter region of the sestrin2 gene, which is recently identified as the Nrf2 target gene by us, abolished the ability of isorhamnetin to increase luciferase activity. In addition, Nrf2 deficiency completely blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to induce HO-1 and GCL. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment blocked t-BHP-induced ROS production and reversed GSH depletion by t-BHP and consequently, due to reduced ROS levels, decreased t-BHP-induced cell death. In addition isorhamnetin increased ERK1/2, PKCδ and AMPK phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that Nrf2 deficiency blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to protect cells from injury induced by t-BHP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that isorhamnetin is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against oxidative stress by Nrf2 activation and in inducing the expressions of its downstream genes. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation. • Isorhamnetin increased Nrf2

  12. Evolution of Brain Active Gene Promoters in Human Lineage Towards the Increased Plasticity of Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Gunbin, Konstantin V; Ponomarenko, Mikhail P; Suslov, Valentin V; Gusev, Fedor; Fedonin, Gennady G; Rogaev, Evgeny I

    2017-02-24

    Adaptability to a variety of environmental conditions is a prominent feature of Homo sapiens. We hypothesize that this feature can be explained by evolutionary changes in gene promoters active in the brain prefrontal cortex leading to a more flexible gene regulation network. The genotype-dependent range of gene expression can be broader in humans than in other higher primates. Thus, we searched for specific signatures of evolutionary changes in promoter architectures of multiple hominid genes, including the genes active in human cortical neurons that may indicate an increase of variability of gene expression rather than just changes in the level of expression, such as downregulation or upregulation of the genes. We performed a whole-genome search for genetic-based alterations that may impact gene regulation "flexibility" in a process of hominids evolution, such as (i) CpG dinucleotide content, (ii) predicted nucleosome-DNA dissociation constant, and (iii) predicted affinities for TATA-binding protein (TBP) in gene promoters. We tested all putative promoter regions across the human genome and especially gene promoters in active chromatin state in neurons of prefrontal cortex, the brain region critical for abstract thinking and social and behavioral adaptation. Our data imply that the origin of modern man has been associated with an increase of flexibility of promoter-driven gene regulation in brain. In contrast, after splitting from the ancestral lineages of H. sapiens, the evolution of ape species is characterized by reduced flexibility of gene promoter functioning, underlying reduced variability of the gene expression.

  13. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein genes during serum starvation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ojha, Sandeep; Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2015-06-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves all three RNA polymerases which are co-ordinately regulated to produce equimolar amounts of rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (RPs). Unlike model organisms where transcription of rRNA and RP genes slows down during stress, in E. histolytica rDNA transcription continues but pre-rRNA processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during serum starvation. To investigate the regulation of RP genes under stress we measured transcription of six selected RP genes from the small- and large-ribosomal subunits (RPS6, RPS3, RPS19, RPL5, RPL26, RPL30) representing the early-, mid-, and late-stages of ribosomal assembly. Transcripts of these genes persisted in growth-stressed cells. Expression of luciferase reporter under the control of two RP genes (RPS19 and RPL30) was studied during serum starvation and upon serum replenishment. Although luciferase transcript levels remained unchanged during starvation, luciferase activity steadily declined to 7.8% and 15% of control cells, respectively. After serum replenishment the activity increased to normal levels, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Mutations in the sequence -2 to -9 upstream of AUG in the RPL30 gene resulted in the phenotype expected of post-transcriptional regulation. Transcription of luciferase reporter was unaffected in this mutant, and luciferase activity did not decline during serum starvation, showing that this sequence is required to repress translation of RPL30 mRNA, and mutations in this region relieve repression. Our data show that during serum starvation E. histolytica blocks ribosome biogenesis post-transcriptionally by inhibiting pre-rRNA processing on the one hand, and the translation of RP mRNAs on the other.

  14. SpyTag/SpyCatcher Cyclization Enhances the Thermostability of Firefly Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Si, Meng; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    SpyTag can spontaneously form a covalent isopeptide bond with its protein partner SpyCatcher. Firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis was cyclized in vivo by fusing SpyCatcher at the N terminus and SpyTag at the C terminus. Circular LUC was more thermostable and alkali-tolerant than the wild type, without compromising the specific activity. Structural analysis indicated that the cyclized LUC increased the thermodynamic stability of the structure and remained more properly folded at high temperatures when compared with the wild type. We also prepared an N-terminally and C-terminally shortened form of the SpyCatcher protein and cyclization using this truncated form led to even more thermostability than the original form. Our findings suggest that cyclization with SpyTag and SpyCatcher is a promising and effective strategy to enhance thermostability of enzymes. PMID:27658030

  15. Full color modulation of firefly luciferase through engineering with unified Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Cai, Duanjun; Marques, Miguel A L; Nogueira, Fernando

    2013-11-07

    The firefly luciferase has been a unique marking tool used in various bioimaging techniques. Extensive color modulation is strongly required to meet special marking demands; however, intentional and accurate wavelength tuning has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate that the color shift of the firefly chromophore (OxyLH2-1) by internal and external fields can be described as a unified Stark shift. Electrostatic microenvironmental effects on fluorescent spectroscopy are modeled in vacuo through effective electric fields by using time-dependent density functional theory. A complete visible fluorescence spectrum of firefly chromophore is depicted, which enables one to control the emission in a specific color. As an application, the widely observed pH-correlated color shift is proved to be associated with the local Stark field generated by the trace water-ions (vicinal hydronium and hydroxide ions) at active sites close to the OxyLH2-1.

  16. Firefly luciferase inhibitor-conjugated peptide quenches bioluminescence: a versatile tool for real time monitoring cellular uptake of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, Pekka K; Rönkkö, Teemu; Hinkkanen, Ari E; Palvimo, Jorma J; Närvänen, Ale; Turhanen, Petri; Laatikainen, Reino; Weisell, Janne; Pulkkinen, Juha T

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, novel firefly luciferase-specific inhibitor compounds (FLICs) are evaluated as potential tools for cellular trafficking of transporter conjugates. As a proof-of-concept, we designed FLICs that were suitable for solid phase peptide synthesis and could be covalently conjugated to peptides via an amide bond. The spacer between inhibitor and peptide was optimized to gain efficient inhibition of recombinant firefly luciferase (FLuc) without compromising the activity of the model peptides. The hypothesis of using FLICs as tools for cellular trafficking studies was ensured with U87Fluc glioblastoma cells expressing firefly luciferase. Results show that cell penetrating peptide (penetratin) FLIC conjugate 9 inhibited FLuc penetrated cells efficiently (IC50 = 1.6 μM) and inhibited bioluminescence, without affecting the viability of the cells. Based on these results, peptide-FLIC conjugates can be used for the analysis of cellular uptake of biomolecules in a new way that can at the same time overcome some downsides seen with other methods. Thus, FLICs can be considered as versatile tools that broaden the plethora of methods that take advantage of the bioluminescence phenomena.

  17. Interaction of Photobacterium leiognathi and Vibrio fischeri Y1 luciferases with fluorescent (antenna) proteins: bioluminescence effects of the aliphatic additive.

    PubMed

    Petushkov, V N; Ketelaars, M; Gibson, B G; Lee, J

    1996-09-17

    The kinetics of the bacterial bioluminescence reaction is altered in the presence of the fluorescent (antenna) proteins, lumazine protein (LumP) from Photobacterium or the yellow fluorescence proteins (YFP) having FMN or Rf bound, from Vibrio fischeri strain Y1. Depending on reaction conditions, the bioluminescence intensity and its decay rate may be either enhanced or strongly quenched in the presence of the fluorescent proteins. These effects can be simply explained on the basis of the same protein-protein complex model that accounts for the bioluminescence spectral shifts induced by these fluorescent proteins. In such a complex, where the fluorophore evidently is in proximity to the luciferase active site, it is expected that the on-off rate of certain aliphatic components of the reaction should be altered with a consequent shift in the equilibria among the luciferase intermediates, as recently elaborated in a kinetic scheme. These aliphatic components are the bioluminescence reaction substrate, tetradecanal or other long-chain aldehyde, its carboxylic acid product, or dodecanol used as a stabilizer of the luciferase peroxyflavin. No evidence can be found for the protein-protein interaction in the absence of the aliphatic component.

  18. Orthogonal gene knock out and activation with a catalytically active Cas9 nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Dahlman, James E.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Joung, Julia; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Zhang, Feng; Konermann, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a CRISPR-based method that uses catalytically active Cas9 and distinct sgRNA constructs to knock out and activate different genes in the same cell. These sgRNAs, with 14 15 bp target sequences and MS2 binding loops, can activate gene expression using an active Cas9 nuclease, without inducing DSBs. We use these ‘dead RNAs’ to perform orthogonal gene knockout and transcriptional activation in human cells. PMID:26436575

  19. Identification, characterization and use of two tick promoters for construction of a dual luciferase reporter vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dual luciferase reporter systems are valuable tools for functional genomic studies, but have not previously been developed for use in tick cell culture. We evaluated expression of available luciferase constructs in tick cell cultures derived from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, an important vec...

  20. Point mutations in firefly luciferase C-domain demonstrate its significance in green color of bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Modestova, Yulia; Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2014-09-01

    Firefly luciferase is a two-domain enzyme that catalyzes the bioluminescent reaction of firefly luciferin oxidation. Color of the emitted light depends on the structure of the enzyme, yet the exact color-tuning mechanism remains unknown by now, and the role of the C-domain in it is rarely discussed, because a very few color-shifting mutations in the C-domain were described. Recently we reported a strong red-shifting mutation E457K in the C-domain; the bioluminescence spectra of this enzyme were independent of temperature or pH. In the present study we investigated the role of the residue E457 in the enzyme using the Luciola mingrelica luciferase with a thermostabilized N-domain as a parent enzyme for site-directed mutagenesis. We obtained a set of mutants and studied their catalytic properties, thermal stability and bioluminescence spectra. Experimental spectra were represented as a sum of two components (bioluminescence spectra of putative "red" and "green" emitters); λmax of these components were constant for all the mutants, but the ratio of these emitters was defined by temperature and mutations in the C-domain. We suggest that each emitter is stabilized by a specific conformation of the active site; thus, enzymes with two forms of the active site coexist in the reactive media. The rigid structure of the C-domain is crucial for maintaining the conformation corresponding to the "green" emitter. We presume that the emitters are the keto- and enol forms of oxyluciferin.

  1. The murine Sry gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, R.A.; Ostrer, H.

    1994-09-01

    The Sry gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The murine Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORF) share a conserved 79 amino acid motif, the HMG-box, that binds DNA. Outside this region the two genes share no additional homology. These studies were undertaken to determine whether the Sry/SRY genes encode nuclear transcriptional regulators. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and murine SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The murine Sry HMG-box selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when presented with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. The murine Sry ORF, when expressed in HeLa cells, activates transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was observed for a GAL4-responsive gene when the murine Sry ORF was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a C-terminal glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins, and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  2. Inhibin alpha gene expression in human trophoblasts is regulated by interactions between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Depoix, Christophe L; Debiève, Frédéric; Hubinont, Corinne

    2014-11-01

    Inhibin α (Inha) gene expression is regulated, in rat granulosa cells, via a cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-response element (CRE) found in a region of the promoter that is homologous to the human INHA promoter. We previously found that during in vitro cytotrophoblast differentiation, human INHA gene expression was regulated by TFAP2A via association with an AP-2 site located upstream of this CRE. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the human INHA gene was also regulated by cAMP in trophoblasts, and to investigate the possible crosstalk between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways in the regulation of INHA gene expression. Treatment with cAMP or forskolin increased INHA mRNA expression by 7- and 2-fold in primary cytotrophoblasts and choriocarcinoma-derived BeWo cells, respectively. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 reduced forskolin-induced luciferase activity by ∼40% in BeWo cells transfected with an INHA promoter-driven luciferase reporter vector. TFAP2 overexpression increased basal luciferase activity, whereas the dominant repressor KCREB abolished it. Surprisingly, mutation of the CRE also eliminated the TFAP2-induced transcription, although TFAP2 overexpression was still able to increase forskolin-induced luciferase activity when the AP-2 binding site, but not the CRE site, was mutated. Thus, INHA gene expression is upregulated by cAMP via CRE in human trophoblasts, and TFAP2 regulates this expression by interacting with CRE.

  3. Diversity of zebrafish peripheral oscillators revealed by luciferase reporting.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Maki; Hernandez-Borsetti, Nancy; Cahill, Gregory M

    2006-09-26

    In various multicellular organisms, circadian clocks are present not only in the central nervous system, but also in peripheral organs and tissues. In mammals peripheral oscillators are not directly responsive to light, but are entrained by the central oscillator in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. These individual oscillators are diverse in their free-running periods and phases. In contrast, cultured peripheral tissues and cell lines from zebrafish are not only rhythmic, but can also be directly entrained by light. Because of the convenience of studying rhythms in cultured cells, however, little has been known about properties of individual oscillators in intact zebrafish. Here, we show the remarkable diversity and consistency of oscillator properties in various peripheral organs and tissues from the period3-luciferase (per3-luc) transgenic zebrafish. Tissue-dependent differences were found in free-running period, phase, response to light, and temperature compensation. Furthermore, cycling amplitudes were reduced at lower temperatures in some, but not all, of the organs tested. Finally, we found that per3-luc rhythms can free run in both constant dark and constant light with remarkably similar amplitudes, phases, and periods, despite the fact that the mRNA of per2 and per1 has been shown not to oscillate in constant light.

  4. AMPK activation represses the human gene promoter of the cardiac isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase: Role of nuclear respiratory factor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Tasneem; Opie, Lionel H.; Essop, M. Faadiel

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} AMPK inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta gene promoter activity. {yields} Nuclear respiratory factor-1 inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta promoter activity. {yields} AMPK regulates acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta at transcriptional level. -- Abstract: The cardiac-enriched isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC{beta}) produces malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. AMPK inhibits ACC{beta} activity, lowering malonyl-CoA levels and promoting mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation. Previously, AMPK increased promoter binding of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), a pivotal transcriptional modulator controlling gene expression of mitochondrial proteins. We therefore hypothesized that NRF-1 inhibits myocardial ACC{beta} promoter activity via AMPK activation. A human ACC{beta} promoter-luciferase construct was transiently transfected into neonatal cardiomyocytes {+-} a NRF-1 expression construct. NRF-1 overexpression decreased ACC{beta} gene promoter activity by 71 {+-} 4.6% (p < 0.001 vs. control). Transfections with 5'-end serial promoter deletions revealed that NRF-1-mediated repression of ACC{beta} was abolished with a pPII{beta}-18/+65-Luc deletion construct. AMPK activation dose-dependently reduced ACC{beta} promoter activity, while NRF-1 addition did not further decrease it. We also investigated NRF-1 inhibition in the presence of upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF1), a known transactivator of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter. Here NRF-1 blunted USF1-dependent induction of ACC{beta} promoter activity by 58 {+-} 7.5% (p < 0.001 vs. control), reversed with a dominant negative NRF-1 construct. NRF-1 also suppressed endogenous USF1 transcriptional activity by 55 {+-} 6.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control). This study demonstrates that NRF-1 is a novel transcriptional inhibitor of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter in the mammalian heart. Our data extends AMPK regulation of ACC{beta} to the transcriptional level.

  5. API2-MALT1 fusion protein induces transcriptional activation of the API2 gene through NF-{kappa}B binding elements: Evidence for a positive feed-back loop pathway resulting in unremitting NF-{kappa}B activation

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, Yoshitaka . E-mail: yhosokaw@aichi-cc.jp; Suzuki, Hiroko; Nakagawa, Masao; Lee, Tae H.; Seto, Masao

    2005-08-19

    t(11;18)(q21;q21) is a characteristic as well as the most frequent chromosomal translocation in mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type lymphoma, and this translocation results in a fusion transcript, API2-MALT1. Although API2-MALT1 has been shown to enforce activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling, the transcriptional target genes of this fusion protein remains to be identified. Our analyses of the API2-MALT transfectants suggested that one of the target genes may be the apoptotic inhibitor API2 gene. Luciferase reporter assays with deletion and mutational constructs of the API2 promoter and electrophoretic mobility shift assays established that API2-MALT1 induces transcriptional activation of the API2 gene through two NF-{kappa}B binding elements. Moreover, supershift experiments indicated that these elements are recognized by the NF-{kappa}B p50/p65 heterodimer. Taken together, our results strongly indicated that API2-MALT1 possesses a novel mechanism of self-activation by up-regulating its own expression in t(11;18)(q21;q21)-carrying MALT lymphomas, highlighting a positive feedback-loop pathway resulting in unremitting NF-{kappa}B activation.

  6. miR-150 exerts antileukemia activity in vitro and in vivo through regulating genes in multiple pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhi Hong; Wang, Si Li; Zhao, Jin Tao; Lin, Zhi Juan; Chen, Lin Yan; Su, Rui; Xie, Si Ting; Carter, Bing Z; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs, have been implicated to regulate gene expression in virtually all important biological processes. Although accumulating evidence demonstrates that miR-150, an important regulator in hematopoiesis, is deregulated in various types of hematopoietic malignancies, the precise mechanisms of miR-150 action are largely unknown. In this study, we found that miR-150 is downregulated in samples from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and chronic myeloid leukemia, and normalized after patients achieved complete remission. Restoration of miR-150 markedly inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of leukemia cells, and reduced tumorigenicity in a xenograft leukemia murine model. Microarray analysis identified multiple novel targets of miR-150, which were validated by quantitative real-time PCR and luciferase reporter assay. Gene ontology and pathway analysis illustrated potential roles of these targets in small-molecule metabolism, transcriptional regulation, RNA metabolism, proteoglycan synthesis in cancer, mTOR signaling pathway, or Wnt signaling pathway. Interestingly, knockdown one of four miR-150 targets (EIF4B, FOXO4B, PRKCA, and TET3) showed an antileukemia activity similar to that of miR-150 restoration. Collectively, our study demonstrates that miR-150 functions as a tumor suppressor through multiple mechanisms in human leukemia and provides a rationale for utilizing miR-150 as a novel therapeutic agent for leukemia treatment. PMID:27899822

  7. Characterization of P1 promoter activity of the beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase I gene (siat 1) in cervical and hepatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Milflores-Flores, Lorena; Millán-Pérez, Lourdes; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2012-06-01

    The level of beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase I (ST6Gal I) mRNA, encoded by the gene siat1, is increased in malignant tissues. Expression is regulated by different promoters - P1, P2 and P3 - generating three mRNA isoforms H, X and YZ. In cervical cancer tissue the mRNA isoform H, which results from P1 promoter activity, is increased. To study the regulation of P1 promoter, different constructs from P1 promoter were evaluated by luciferase assays in cervical and hepatic cell lines. Deletion of a fragment of 1048 bp (-89 to +24 bp) increased 5- and 3-fold the promoter activity in C33A and HepG2 cell lines, respectively. The minimal region with promoter activity was a 37 bp fragment in C33A cells. The activity of this region does not require the presence of an initiator sequence. In HepG2 cells the minimal promoter activity was detected in the 66 bp fragment. Sp1 (-32) mutation increased the promoter activity only in HepG2 cells. HNF1 mutation decreased promoter activity in HepG2 cell line but not in C33A cells. We identified a large region that plays a negative regulation role. The regulation of promoter activity is cell type specific. Our study provides new insights into the complex transcriptional regulation of siat1 gene.

  8. Identification of an activator protein-1-like sequence as the glucocorticoid response element in the rat tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Rani, C S Sheela; Elango, Narayanasamy; Wang, Shou-Shu; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Strong, Randy

    2009-03-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) generally stimulate gene transcription via consensus glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) located in the promoter region. To identify the GRE in the rat tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene promoter, we transiently transfected PC12 cells with a 9-kilobase (kb) TH promoter-luciferase (Luc) construct. Dexamethasone (Dex) stimulated Luc activity, which was abolished by mifepristone (RU486). Serial deletion mutations revealed a Dex-responsive 7-base pair (bp) sequence, TGACTAA, located at -5734 to -5728. Deletion of just these seven nucleotides from the 9-kb promoter completely abolished the Dex response and partially reduced the response to phorbol ester but not to forskolin. The Dex response was fully retained in a construct in which most of the 9-kb promoter was deleted, except for 100 bp around the -5.7-kb region, clearly identifying this 7-bp sequence as solely responsible for GC responsiveness. Conversely, deletion of the proximal cAMP-response element (-45/-38) or activator protein-1 (AP-1) (-207/-201) sites in the 9-kb promoter did not affect Dex and phorbol ester responses. A radiolabeled 25-bp promoter fragment bearing the 7-bp TH-GRE/AP-1 showed specific binding to PC12 nuclear proteins. Using antibodies against the glucocorticoid receptors and AP-1 family of proteins and primers for the TH-GRE/AP-1 region, we detected a specific DNA amplicon in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. This 7-bp TH-GRE/AP-1 sequence (TGACTAA) does not bear similarity to any known GRE but closely resembles the consensus AP-1 binding site, TGACTCA. Our studies describe for the first time a novel GRE/AP-1 site present in the TH gene promoter that is critical for glucocorticoid regulation of the TH gene.

  9. [Photoreactivation of UV-irradiated Escherichia coli K12 AB1886 uvrA6 with assistance of luminescence of Photobacterium leiognathi Luciferase].

    PubMed

    Melkina, O E; Kotova, V Yu; Konopleva, M N; Manukhov, I V; Pustovoit, K S; Zavilgelsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    The bioluminescence induced by luciferases of marine bacteria promotes repair of UV damaged DNA of Escherichia coli AB1886 uvrA6. It is shown that bacterial photolyase that implements photoreactivation activity is the major contributor to DNA repair. However, the intensity of bioluminescence increasing induced by UV-irradiation (SOS-induction) in bacterial cells is not enough for efficient photoreactivation.

  10. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPAR gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) induce carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA (CPT-1A) via independent gene elements

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shulan; Attia, Ramy R.; Connaughton, Sara; Niesen, Melissa I.; Ness, Gene C.; Elam, Marshall B.; Hori, Roderick T.; Cook, George A.; Park, Edwards A.

    2010-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids and pharmacologic ligands for the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activate expression of genes involved in fatty acid and glucose oxidation including carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT-1A) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4). CPT-1A catalyzes the transfer of long chain fatty acids from acyl-CoA to carnitine for translocation across the mitochondrial membranes and is an initiating step in the mitochondrial oxidation of long chain fatty acids. PDK4 phosphorylates and inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) which catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in the glucose oxidation pathway. The activity of CPT-1A is modulated both by transcriptional changes as well as by malonyl-CoA inhibition. In the liver, CPT-1A and PDK4 gene expression are induced by starvation, high fat diets and PPARα ligands. Here, we characterized a binding site for PPARα in the second intron of the rat CPT-1A gene. Our studies indicated that WY14643 and long chain fatty acids induce CPT-1A gene expression through this element. In addition, we found that mutation of the PPARα binding site reduced the expression of CPT-1A-luciferase vectors in the liver of fasted rats. We had demonstrated previously that CPT-1A was stimulated by the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) via sequences in the first intron of the rat CPT-1A gene. Surprisingly, PGC-1α did not enhance CPT-1A transcription through the PPARα binding site in the second intron. Following knockdown of PGC-1α with short hairpin RNA, the CPT-1A and PDK4 genes remained responsive to WY14643. Overall, our studies indicated that PPARα and PGC-1α stimulate transcription of the CPT-1A gene through different regions of the CPT-1A gene. PMID:20638986

  11. Constitutive androstane receptor activation evokes the expression of glycolytic genes.

    PubMed

    Yarushkin, Andrei A; Kazantseva, Yuliya A; Prokopyeva, Elena A; Markova, Diana N; Pustylnyak, Yuliya A; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O

    2016-09-23

    It is well-known that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) increases the liver-to-body weight ratio. CAR-mediated liver growth is correlated with increased expression of the pleiotropic transcription factor cMyc, which stimulates cell cycle regulatory genes and drives proliferating cells into S phase. Because glycolysis supports cell proliferation and cMyc is essential for the activation of glycolytic genes, we hypothesized that CAR-mediated up-regulation of cMyc in mouse livers might play a role in inducing the expression of glycolytic genes. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of long-term CAR activation on glycolytic genes in a mouse model not subjected to metabolic stress. We demonstrated that long-term CAR activation by TCPOBOP increases expression of cMyc, which was correlated with reduced expression of gluconeogenic genes and up-regulation of glucose transporter, glycolytic and mitochondrial pyruvate metabolising genes. These changes in gene expression after TCPOBOP treatment were strongly correlated with changes in levels of glycolytic intermediates in mouse livers. Moreover, we demonstrated a significant positive regulatory effect of TCPOBOP-activated CAR on both mRNA and protein levels of Pkm2, a master regulator of glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Thus, our findings provide evidence to support the conclusion that CAR activation initiates a transcriptional program that facilitates the coordinated metabolic activities required for cell proliferation.

  12. Modeling the Activity of Single Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, Eric; Gibson, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that information is stored in DNA, transcribed to messenger RNA (mRNA) and then translated into proteins. This picture is significantly augmentated when we consider the action of certain proteins in regulating transcription. These transcription factors provide a feedback pathway by which genes can regulate one another's expression as mRNA and then as protein. To review: DNA, RNA and proteins have different functions. DNA is the molecular storehouse of genetic information. When cells divide, the DNA is replicated, so that each daughter cell maintains the same genetic information as the mother cell. RNA acts as a go-between from DNA to proteins. Only a single copy of DNA is present, but multiple copies of the same piece of RNA may be present, allowing cells to make huge amounts of protein. In eukaryotes (organisms with a nucleus), DNA is found in the nucleus only. RNA is copied in the nucleus then translocates(moves) outside the nucleus, where it is transcribed into proteins. Along the way, the RNA may be spliced, i.e., may have pieces cut out. RNA then attaches to ribosomes and is translated to proteins. Proteins are the machinery of the cell other than DNA and RNA, all the complex molecules of the cell are proteins. Proteins are specialized machines, each of which fulfills its own task, which may be transporting oxygen, catalyzing reactions, or responding to extracellular signals, just to name a few. One of the more interesting functions a protein may have is binding directly or indirectly to DNA to perform transcriptional regulation, thus forming a closed feedback loop of gene regulation. The structure of DNA and the central dogma were understood in the 50s; in the early 80s it became possible to make arbitrary modifications to DNA and use cellular machinery to transcribe and translate the resulting genes; more recently, genomes (i.e., the complete DNA sequence) of many organisms have been sequenced. This large

  13. Proposed ionic bond between Arg300 and Glu270 and Glu271 are not involved in inactivation of a mutant firefly luciferase (LRR).

    PubMed

    Sobhani-Damavandifar, Zahra; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Sajedi, Reza H

    2016-05-01

    The weakness of firefly luciferase is its rapid inactivation. Many studies have been done to develop thermostable luciferases. One of these modifications was LRR mutant in which the Leu300 was substituted with Arg in the E(354)RR(356)Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase as template. LRR was more thermostable than the wild type but with only 0.02% activity. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was used to change the proposed ionic bond between the Arg and two neighboring residues (Glu270 and Glu271), to understand if the induced interactions were responsible for inactivation in LRR. Our results showed that substitution of Glu270 and 271 with Ala removed the interactions but the activity of enzyme did not return. The E270A mutant was more active than LRR but the E271A and E270A/E271A mutants were inactive. Fluorescence and CD measurements showed that these mutations were accompanied by conformational changes. Extrinsic fluorescence measurement and obtained quenching data by KI and acrylamide also confirmed that the mutants were less compact than the LRR enzyme. In conclusion, in LRR, the interactions between Arg300 and Glu270 and Glu271 were not responsible for the enzyme inactivation and it is proposed that the enzyme inactivation is due to conformational changes of LRR mutant of firefly luciferase.

  14. A New Screen for Tuberculosis Drug Candidates Utilizing a Luciferase-Expressing Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guéren

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Masayuki; Doe, Matsumi; Tamaru, Aki; Kinoshita, Naoko; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Sawa, Ryuichi; Umekita, Maya; Enany, Shymaa; Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Niki, Mamiko; Tateishi, Yoshitaka; Hatano, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious infectious disease caused by a bacterial pathogen. Mortality from tuberculosis was estimated at 1.5 million deaths worldwide in 2013. Development of new TB drugs is needed to not only to shorten the medication period but also to treat multi-drug resistant and extensively drug-resistant TB. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) grows slowly and only multiplies once or twice per day. Therefore, conventional drug screening takes more than 3 weeks. Additionally, a biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) facility is required. Thus, we developed a new screening method to identify TB drug candidates by utilizing luciferase-expressing recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guéren (rBCG). Using this method, we identified several candidates in 4 days in a non-BSL-3 facility. We screened 10,080 individual crude extracts derived from Actinomyces and Streptomyces and identified 137 extracts which possessed suppressive activity to the luciferase of rBCG. Among them, 41 compounds inhibited the growth of both Mtb H37Rv and the extensively drug-resistant Mtb (XDR-Mtb) strains. We purified the active substance of the 1904–1 extract, which possessed strong activity toward rBCG, Mtb H37Rv, and XDR-Mtb but was harmless to the host eukaryotic cells. The MIC of this substance was 0.13 μg/ml, 0.5 μg/ml, and 2.0–7.5 μg/ml against rBCG, H37Rv, and 2 XDR-strains, respectively. Its efficacy was specific to acid-fast bacterium except for the Mycobacterium avium intracellular complex. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses revealed that the active substance of 1904–1 was cyclomarin A. To confirm the mode of action of the 1904-1-derived compound, resistant BCG clones were used. Whole genome DNA sequence analysis showed that these clones contained a mutation in the clpc gene which encodes caseinolytic protein, an essential component of an ATP-dependent proteinase, and the likely target of the active substance of 1904–1. Our method provides a

  15. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberger, T; Flint, Y B; Blank, M; Etkin, S; Lavi, S

    1988-01-01

    We report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later. Images PMID:2835673

  16. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberger, T.; Flint, Y.B.; Blank, M.; Etkin, S.; Lavi, S.

    1988-03-01

    The authors report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later.

  17. Correlation between luminescence intensity and cytotoxicity in cell-based cytotoxicity assay using luciferase.

    PubMed

    Wakuri, S; Yamakage, K; Kazuki, Y; Kazuki, K; Oshimura, M; Aburatani, S; Yasunaga, M; Nakajima, Y

    2017-04-01

    The luciferase reporter assay has become one of the conventional methods for cytotoxicity evaluation. Typically, the decrease of luminescence expressed by a constitutive promoter is used as an index of cytotoxicity. However, to our knowledge, there have been no reports of the correlation between cytotoxicity and luminescence intensity. In this study, to accurately verify the correlation between them, beetle luciferase was stably expressed in human hepatoma HepG2 cells harboring the multi-integrase mouse artificial chromosome vector. We showed that the cytotoxicity assay using luciferase does not depend on the stability of luciferase protein and the kind of constitutive promoter. Next, HepG2 cells in which green-emitting beetle luciferase was expressed under the control of CAG promoter were exposed to 58 compounds. The luminescence intensity and cytotoxicity curves of cells exposed to 48 compounds showed similar tendencies, whereas those of cells exposed to 10 compounds did not do so, although the curves gradually approached each other with increasing exposure time. Finally, we demonstrated that luciferase expressed under the control of a constitutive promoter can be utilized both as an internal control reporter for normalizing a test reporter and for monitoring cytotoxicity when two kinds of luciferases are simultaneously used in the cytotoxicity assay.

  18. RNA interference screening of interferon-stimulated genes with antiviral activities against classical swine fever virus using a reporter virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Lian-Feng; Shen, Liang; Zhang, Lingkai; Yu, Jiahui; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-04-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of pigs, which leads to significant economic losses in many countries. Viral infection can induce the production of interferons (IFNs), giving rise to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) to exert antiviral effects. Although numerous ISGs have been identified to possess antiviral activities against different viruses, rare anti-CSFV ISGs have been reported to date. In this study, to screen anti-CSFV ISGs, twenty-one ISGs reported previously were individually knocked down using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) followed by infection with a reporter CSFV expressing Renilla luciferase (Rluc). As a result, four novel anti-CSFV ISGs were identified, including natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase III A (NT5C3A), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), and 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), which were further verified to exhibit antiviral activities against wild-type CSFV. We conclude that the reporter virus is a useful tool for efficient screening anti-CSFV ISGs.

  19. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  20. Probing the emitter site of Renilla luciferase using small organic molecules; an attempt to understand the molecular architecture of the emitter site.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Farajollah; Emamzadeh, Rahman; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Rasa, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Renilla luciferase is a sensitive enzyme and has wide applications in biotechnology such as drug screening. Previous studies have tried to show the catalytic residues, nevertheless, the accurate architecture and molecular behavior of its emitter site remains uncharacterized. In this study, the activity of Renilla luciferase, in the presence of two small organic molecules including dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and isopropanol was considered and the structure was studied by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, the interaction of small organic molecules with the Renilla luciferase was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetics studies showed that at low concentration of DMSO (16.6-66mM) and isopropanol (19.3-76mM) the Km changed and a competitive inhibition pattern was observed. Moreover, spectroscopy studies reveled that the changes of activity of Renilla luciferase in the presence of low concentrations of small organic molecules was not associated with structural collapse or severe changes in the enzyme conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that DMSO and isopropanol, as probing molecules, were both able to bind to the emitter site and remained with the residues of the emitter site. Based on the probing data, the architecture of the emitter site in the "non-binding" model was proposed.

  1. A novel peroxisome proliferator response element modulates hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor gene transcription in response to PPARδ activation.

    PubMed

    Shende, Vikram R; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-12-15

    The hepatic expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at -768 to -752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin (RSV)-mediated transactivation. EMSA and ChIP assay further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression.

  2. In vitro methylation of nuclear respiratory factor-2 binding sites suppresses the promoter activity of the human TOMM70 gene.

    PubMed

    Blesa, José R; Hegde, Anita A; Hernández-Yago, José

    2008-12-31

    TOMM70 is a subunit of the outer mitochondrial membrane translocase that plays a major role as a receptor of hydrophobic preproteins targeted to mitochondria. We have previously reported that two binding sites for transcription factor NRF-2 in the promoter region of the human TOMM70 gene are essential in activating transcription (Blesa et al., Mitochondrion 2004; 3:251-59. Blesa et al., Biochem Cell Biol 2006; 84:813-22). This region contains thirteen CpG methylation sites, three of which occur in the sequence 5'-CCGG-3' that is specifically recognized by HpaII methylase which modifies the internal cytosine residue. Interestingly, each NRF-2 site contains one CCGG sequence, allowing specific methylation of the NRF-2 sites and, therefore, providing an ideal model to study how methylation of these sites affects promoter activity. In this paper we report that site-specific methylation of the NRF-2 binding sites in the TOMM70 promoter down-regulated expression of a luciferase reporter in HeLa S3 cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed abrogation of NRF-2 binding at the methylated sites. These results suggest that methylation of the TOMM70 promoter in mammalian cells may silence TOMM70 expression. However, studies of methylation degree on DNAs from different sources found no methylation in the promoter regions of TOMM70 and other TOMM/TIMM family genes. Thus, although in vitro methylation inactivates the expression of TOMM70, our results suggest that this is not the mechanism modulating its expression in vivo. Since a number of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial translocases have NRF-2 binding sequences containing CpG methylation sites, a possible role of methylation as a regulatory mechanism of mitochondrial biogenesis can be ruled out.

  3. A dual-color luciferase assay system reveals circadian resetting of cultured fibroblasts by co-cultured adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Ikeda, Masaaki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms of various organs and tissues are synchronized by pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal glands can synchronize circadian rhythms in other tissues. Many hormones show circadian rhythms in their plasma concentrations; however, whether organs outside the SCN can serve as master synchronizers to entrain circadian rhythms in target tissues is not well understood. To further delineate the function of the adrenal glands and the interactions of circadian rhythms in putative master synchronizing organs and their target tissues, here we report a simple co-culture system using a dual-color luciferase assay to monitor circadian rhythms separately in various explanted tissues and fibroblasts. In this system, circadian rhythms of organs and target cells were simultaneously tracked by the green-emitting beetle luciferase from Pyrearinus termitilluminans (ELuc) and the red-emitting beetle luciferase from Phrixothrix hirtus (SLR), respectively. We obtained tissues from the adrenal glands, thyroid glands, and lungs of transgenic mice that expressed ELuc under control of the promoter from a canonical clock gene, mBmal1. The tissues were co-cultured with Rat-1 fibroblasts as representative target cells expressing SLR under control of the mBmal1 promoter. Amplitudes of the circadian rhythms of Rat-1 fibroblasts were potentiated when the fibroblasts were co-cultured with adrenal gland tissue, but not when co-cultured with thyroid gland or lung tissue. The phases of Rat-1 fibroblasts were reset by application of adrenal gland tissue, whereas the phases of adrenal gland tissue were not influenced by Rat-1 fibroblasts. Furthermore, the effect of the adrenal gland tissue on the fibroblasts was blocked by application of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist. These results demonstrate that glucocorticoids are strong circadian synchronizers for fibroblasts and that this co

  4. High-Throughput Luciferase-Based Assay for the Discovery of Therapeutics That Prevent Malaria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify the most attractive starting points for drugs that can be used to prevent malaria, a diverse chemical space comprising tens of thousands to millions of small molecules may need to be examined. Achieving this throughput necessitates the development of efficient ultra-high-throughput screening methods. Here, we report the development and evaluation of a luciferase-based phenotypic screen of malaria exoerythrocytic-stage parasites optimized for a 1536-well format. This assay uses the exoerythrocytic stage of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, and a human hepatoma cell line. We use this assay to evaluate several biased and unbiased compound libraries, including two small sets of molecules (400 and 89 compounds, respectively) with known activity against malaria erythrocytic-stage parasites and a set of 9886 diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS)-derived compounds. Of the compounds screened, we obtain hit rates of 12–13 and 0.6% in preselected and naïve libraries, respectively, and identify 52 compounds with exoerythrocytic-stage activity less than 1 μM and having minimal host cell toxicity. Our data demonstrate the ability of this method to identify compounds known to have causal prophylactic activity in both human and animal models of malaria, as well as novel compounds, including some exclusively active against parasite exoerythrocytic stages. PMID:27275010

  5. Identification and Characterization of a cis-Regulatory Element for Zygotic Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-01-01

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. We predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes. PMID:27172209

  6. Identification and characterization of a cis-regulatory element for zygotic gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGES

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; ...

    2016-03-26

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient tomore » confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. Furthermore, we predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes.« less

  7. Physical activity in adulthood: genes and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Karvinen, Sira; Waller, Katja; Silvennoinen, Mika; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Kujala, Urho M.

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies report a strong inverse relationship between leisure-time physical activity and all-cause mortality. Despite suggestive evidence from population-based associations, scientists have not been able to show a beneficial effect of physical activity on the risk of death in controlled intervention studies among individuals who have been healthy at baseline. On the other hand, high cardiorespiratory fitness is known to be a strong predictor of reduced mortality, even more robust than physical activity level itself. Here, in both animals and/or human twins, we show that the same genetic factors influence physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk of death. Previous observational follow-up studies in humans suggest that increasing fitness through physical activity levels could prolong life; however, our controlled interventional study with laboratory rats bred for low and high intrinsic fitness contrast with these findings. Also, we find no evidence for the suggested association using pairwise analysis among monozygotic twin pairs who are discordant in their physical activity levels. Based on both our animal and human findings, we propose that genetic pleiotropy might partly explain the frequently observed associations between high baseline physical activity and later reduced mortality in humans. PMID:26666586

  8. Measuring fast gene dynamics in single cells with time-lapse luminescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mazo-Vargas, Anyimilehidi; Park, Heungwon; Aydin, Mert; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2014-01-01

    Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy is an important tool for measuring in vivo gene dynamics in single cells. However, fluorescent proteins are limited by slow chromophore maturation times and the cellular autofluorescence or phototoxicity that arises from light excitation. An alternative is luciferase, an enzyme that emits photons and is active upon folding. The photon flux per luciferase is significantly lower than that for fluorescent proteins. Thus time-lapse luminescence microscopy has been successfully used to track gene dynamics only in larger organisms and for slower processes, for which more total photons can be collected in one exposure. Here we tested green, yellow, and red beetle luciferases and optimized substrate conditions for in vivo luminescence. By combining time-lapse luminescence microscopy with a microfluidic device, we tracked the dynamics of cell cycle genes in single yeast with subminute exposure times over many generations. Our method was faster and in cells with much smaller volumes than previous work. Fluorescence of an optimized reporter (Venus) lagged luminescence by 15–20 min, which is consistent with its known rate of chromophore maturation in yeast. Our work demonstrates that luciferases are better than fluorescent proteins at faithfully tracking the underlying gene expression. PMID:25232010

  9. Micronuclei in Cord Blood Lymphocytes and Associations with Biomarkers of Exposure to Carcinogens and Hormonally Active Factors, Gene Polymorphisms, and Gene Expression: The NewGeneris Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Domenico Franco; Agramunt, Silvia; Anna, Lívia; Besselink, Harrie; Botsivali, Maria; Brady, Nigel J.; Ceppi, Marcello; Chatzi, Leda; Chen, Bowang; Decordier, Ilse; Farmer, Peter B.; Fleming, Sarah; Fontana, Vincenzo; Försti, Asta; Fthenou, Eleni; Gallo, Fabio; Georgiadis, Panagiotis; Gmuender, Hans; Godschalk, Roger W.; Granum, Berit; Hardie, Laura J.; Hemminki, Kari; Hochstenbach, Kevin; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kovács, Katalin; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Løvik, Martinus; Nielsen, Jeanette K; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Pedersen, Marie; Rydberg, Per; Schoket, Bernadette; Segerbäck, Dan; Singh, Rajinder; Sunyer, Jordi; Törnqvist, Margareta; van Loveren, Henk; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Vande Loock, Kim; von Stedingk, Hans; Wright, John; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; van Delft, Joost H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Leukemia incidence has increased in recent decades among European children, suggesting that early-life environmental exposures play an important role in disease development. Objectives: We investigated the hypothesis that childhood susceptibility may increase as a result of in utero exposure to carcinogens and hormonally acting factors. Using cord blood samples from the NewGeneris cohort, we examined associations between a range of biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and hormonally acting factors with micronuclei (MN) frequency as a proxy measure of cancer risk. Associations with gene expression and genotype were also explored. Methods: DNA and protein adducts, gene expression profiles, circulating hormonally acting factors, and GWAS (genome-wide association study) data were investigated in relation to genomic damage measured by MN frequency in lymphocytes from 623 newborns enrolled between 2006 and 2010 across Europe. Results: Malondialdehyde DNA adducts (M1dG) were associated with increased MN frequency in binucleated lymphocytes (MNBN), and exposure to androgenic, estrogenic, and dioxin-like compounds was associated with MN frequency in mononucleated lymphocytes (MNMONO), although no monotonic exposure–outcome relationship was observed. Lower frequencies of MNBN were associated with a 1-unit increase expression of PDCD11, LATS2, TRIM13, CD28, SMC1A, IL7R, and NIPBL genes. Gene expression was significantly higher in association with the highest versus lowest category of bulky and M1dG–DNA adducts for five and six genes, respectively. Gene expression levels were significantly lower for 11 genes in association with the highest versus lowest category of plasma AR CALUX® (chemically activated luciferase expression for androgens) (8 genes), ERα CALUX® (for estrogens) (2 genes), and DR CALUX® (for dioxins). Several SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) on chromosome 11 near FOLH1 significantly modified associations between androgen activity and MNBN

  10. DETECTION OF ANDROGENIC ACTIVITY IN EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL FUEL AND BIOMASS COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study evaluated both diesel fuel exhaust and biomass (wood) burn extracts for androgen receptor¿mediated activity using MDA-kb2 cells, which contain an androgen-responsive promoter-luciferase reporter gene construct. This assay and analytical fractionization of the sa...

  11. Activation of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase gene promoter by hepatocyte nuclear factor-1beta in human papillary thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jimin; Capezzone, Marco; Xu, Xiao; Hershman, Jerome M

    2005-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that the human nicotinamide N-methytransferase (NNMT) gene was highly expressed in many papillary thyroid cancers and cell lines. The expression in other papillary and follicular cancers or cell lines and normal thyroid cells was low or undetectable. To gain an understanding of the molecular mechanism of this cell-specific expression, the NNMT promoter was cloned and studied by luciferase reporter gene assay. The promoter construct was expressed highly in papillary cancer cell lines, including those with higher (e.g. BHP 2-7) and lower (e.g. BHP 14-9) NNMT gene expression, and expressed weakly in follicular thyroid cancer cell lines. Further study with 5'-deletion promoter construct suggested that the NNMT promoter was regulated differently in BHP 2-7 and BHP 14-9 cells. In BHP 2-7 cells, promoter activity was dependent on an upstream sequence. In BHP 14-9 cells, sequence in the basal promoter region contributed notably to the overall promoter activity. RT-PCR or Western blot analysis indicated that hepatocyte nuclear factor-1beta (HNF-1beta) was expressed in only papillary cancer cell lines with high NNMT gene expression. HNF-1beta was not expressed or expressed very weakly in other papillary, follicular, and Hurthle cancer cell lines and primary cultures of normal thyroid cells and benign thyroid conditions. A HNF-1 binding site was identified in the NNMT basal promoter region. Mutations in this site decreased NNMT promoter activity in the HNF-1beta-positive BHP 2-7 cells, but not in the HNF-1beta-negative BHP 14-9 cells. HNF-1beta bound to the HNF-1 site specifically as a homodimer as determined by gel retardation assays with HNF-1beta-specific antibody. Cotransfection of a HNF-1beta expression plasmid increased NNMT promoter activity significantly in both HNF-1beta-positive and -negative thyroid cancer cell lines and Hep G2 liver cancer cells. Furthermore, transient expression of HNF-1beta in BHP 14-9 cells increased endogenous NNMT

  12. Cloning of penaeidin gene promoter in tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Ho, Shih-Hu; Song, Yen-Ling

    2009-07-01

    Penaeidins belong to a family of antimicrobial peptides that are expressed in the hemocytes of penaeid shrimps. Using an extender PCR method and a nested PCR, we cloned two types of genomic fragment flanking the 5' end of penaeidin gene in tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon): Type536 and Type411 sequences. Both fragments contained TATA box, GATA, dorsal and AP-1 motifs and were ligated to an expression vector with a luciferase reporter gene. The constructs were then delivered into Drosophila S2 cell line. The promoter functions of the two fragments were determined using a luciferase expression assay. The study demonstrated that Type411 sequence performed higher transcriptional activity than Type536. Alignment of the upstream sequences of penaeidin genes in P. monodon and Litopenaeus vannamei showed that the promoter regions were obviously more diverse than the 5'UTRs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated the presence of two types of promoters that are not species-specific in the two shrimps.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well. PMID:20936127

  15. HSD17B1 expression enhances estrogen signaling stimulated by the low active estrone, evidenced by an estrogen responsive element-driven reporter gene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Järvensivu, Päivi; Saloniemi-Heinonen, Taija; Awosanya, Michael; Koskimies, Pasi; Saarinen, Niina; Poutanen, Matti

    2015-06-05

    Hydroxysteroid (17beta) dehydrogenase 1 (HSD17B1) belongs to a family of short-chain-dehydrogenases. The enzyme utilizes NAD(P) and NAD(P)H as cofactors, and catalyzes the reversible reaction between estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) in vitro. Of these steroids, E1 presents with lower estrogenic activity, but is converted to highly active E2 by HSD17B1. HSD17B1 is expressed especially in tissues with a high E2-producing capacity such as human ovaries and placenta, but also in several peripheral estrogen target tissues in humans, and inhibiting the enzyme activity is, thus, considered a promising approach to treat estrogen-dependent diseases. By analyzing transgenic mice universally expressing human HSD17B1 and carrying estrogen-response element (ERE)-driven luciferase reporter gene (Bi-transgenic ERELuc-HSD17B1TG mice) we showed a markedly higher reporter gene activity in various peripheral tissues of these mice as compared with ERELuc mice, indicating enhanced estrogen response generated by human HSD17B1 expression. An increased response after E1 administration was also evident in the Bi-TG mice, indicated by the increased uterus growth response and by the higher ERELuc reporter gene activity in the uterus. Moreover, a HSD17B1 inhibitor significantly reduced E1-induced increase in the uterus weight and uterine epithelial proliferation in the Bi-TG mice. Also the E1-induced ERELuc activity in the inhibitor-treated uterus was reduced by the HSD17B1 inhibitor in immature mice ex vivo, as well as in the liver of adult mice. The data, thus, demonstrate the potential use of the Bi-TG mice as a preclinical in vivo model for screening the efficacy of HSD17B1 inhibitors. As compared with the existing models, the Bi-TG mice present with luciferase activity as an additional, easily quantitative endpoint for the estrogen action.

  16. Control of luciferase synthesis in a newly isolated strain of Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, R; Ulitzur, S

    1977-12-15

    In previous studies with luminous bacteria of all different species it has been reported that the synthesis of luciferase is autoinducible: during growth at low cell densities synthesis is effectively repressed while after induction, at higher cell densities, the rate of synthesis of enzyme is up to five times the growth rate. In this paper we report on newly isolated strains of Photobacterium leiognathi which show continued luciferase synthesis irrespective of the cell density. The specific synthesis rate may nevertheless differ from the rate of growth and depends on the luciferase content of the inoculated cells. A ratio of 1 was established for cells having a maximum luciferase content varying to a ratio of about 2 for cells that contained only 1% of the maximum.

  17. Excitation transfer in the in-vitro reaction of photobacterium luciferase bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, John W.

    1992-04-01

    Fluorescence dynamics methods are used to probe the mechanism by which the chemi- energized intermediates of the bacterial luciferase catalyzed oxidation of FMNH2 and tetradecanal are able to excite the ligand of lumazine protein to its first excited singlet state. A fluorescence dynamics study of the effect of lumazine protein on the reaction of several types of luciferase has recently been published (Biochemistry 30 6825, 1991). This present report examines the case of the Photobacterium leiognathi luciferase reaction in more detail. The fluorescence anisotropy of a mixture of this luciferase fluorescent transient mixed with lumazine protein decays rapidly with a correlation time of 5 ns, interpreted as due to energy transfer. There is no sign of a longer time corresponding to the rotation of the proteins themselves. No rise time of the lumazine (acceptor) fluorescence on exciting into the fluorescent transient (donor) absorption is measureable, so that no straightforward estimate of the energy transfer rate can be made.

  18. A Novel Peroxisome Proliferator Response Element Modulates Hepatic Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Transcription in Response to PPARδ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Vikram R.; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    The hepatic expression of LDLR gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative PPAR-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at −768 to −752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin mediated transactivation. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression. PMID:26443862

  19. Does pressure antagonize anesthesia? High-pressure stopped-flow study of firefly luciferase and anatomy of initial flash.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, I; Minami, H; Matsuki, H; Inoue, T

    1999-01-01

    The antagonizing effect of high pressure against anesthesia is well known. With purified firefly luciferase, however,. Biophys. J. 60:1309-1314) reported that high pressure did not affect the initial flash intensity. Firefly luciferase emits a burst of light when the substrates luciferin and ATP are added in the presence of O2. The light intensity decays rapidly and the weak light lasts for hours. The initial flash is a transient event and is not in a steady state. The steady state is represented by the slope of the linear part of the integral of the light output. The present study used a high-pressure stopped-flow system to compare the pressure effects on the initial flash intensity and the steady-state light intensity. The flash intensity did not change by the application of hydrostatic pressure in the presence or absence of chloroform or 1-octanol. In contrast, high pressure increased the steady-state light intensity. The application of 12 MPa pressure increased the steady-state light intensity of firefly luciferase inhibited by 5 mM chloroform or 0.7 mM 1-octanol by 19.7% and 18.8%, respectively. When analyzed by the rapid reaction kinetics of the transition state theory, the initial peak intensity represents the total amount of active enzyme and is unrelated to the reaction rate. Anesthetics inhibited the initial flash by unfolding the protein, thereby decreasing the concentration of the active enzyme. Pressure affected the steady-state light intensity by changing the reaction rates. PMID:9876160

  20. Effect of charge distribution in a flexible loop on the bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Alipour, Bagher Said

    2009-01-27

    Firefly luciferase is a monooxygenase that catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of firefly luciferin into a luciferyl-adenylate, which is oxidized to an electronically excited oxyluciferin in a multistep reaction and produces visible light with a remarkable quantum yield. The bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases is determined by the luciferase structure and assay conditions. Among different beetles, only luciferase from Phrixotrix railroad worm (Ph(RE)) emits red bioluminescence, naturally. The presence of Arg353 in Ph(RE) luciferase, which corresponds to the deleted residue in the other luciferases, is an important distinctive structural feature of it. Insertion of Arg356 into a green-emitter luciferase (Lampyris turkestanicus), corresponding to Arg353 in Phrixotrix hirtus, changed the emitted light from green to red. To further clarify the effect of this position on the light shift mechanism, four residues with similar sizes but different charges (Arg, Lys, Glu, and Gln) were inserted into Photinus pyralis luciferase, using site-specific insertion mutagenesis. Insertion of a residue with a positive side chain (Arg356 and Lys356) changed the light color to red, while insertion of a residue with a negative side chain (Glu356) had little effect on color. Insertion of a neutral residue (Gln356) at this position was performed without any change in bioluminescence spectra. Insertion of positively charged residues in this loop took place with a series of structural changes which were confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and homology modeling. Homology modeling reveals the appearance of a bulge in a flexible loop (T352-P359) upon mutation which shifts to the left side with a color change from green to red.

  1. Effect of 60 Hz magnetic fields on the activation of hsp70 promoter in cultured INER-37 and RMA E7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Rojas, J Antonio; Rodríguez de la Fuente, Abraham Octavio; Alcocer González, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Santoyo-Stephano, Martha A; Castañeda-Garza, Esperanza; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S

    2010-10-01

    It has been reported that 50-60 Hz magnetic fields (MF) with flux densities ranging from microtesla to millitesla are able to induce heat shock factor or heat shock proteins in various cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of 60 Hz sinusoidal MF at 8 and 80 μT on the expression of the luciferase gene contained in a plasmid labeled as electromagnetic field-plasmid (pEMF). This gene construct contains the specific sequences previously described for the induction of hsp70 expression by MF, as well as the reporter for the luciferase gene. The pEMF vector was transfected into INER-37 and RMA E7 cell lines that were later exposed to either MF or thermal shock (TS). Cells that received the MF or TS treatments and their controls were processed according to the luciferase assay system for evaluate luciferase activity. An increased luciferase gene expression was observed in INER-37 cells exposed to MF and TS compared with controls (p < 0.05), but MF exposure had no effect on the RMA E7 cell line.

  2. Transcription Factor ZBED6 Mediates IGF2 Gene Expression by Regulating Promoter Activity and DNA Methylation in Myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Liang-Zhi; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Li, Ming-Xun; Sun, Yu-Jia; Li, Cong-Jun; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were upregulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels were negatively associated with the methylation status in beef cattle (P < 0.05). A luciferase assay for the IGF2 intron 3 and P3 promoter showed that the mutant-type 439 A-SNP-pGL3 in driving reporter gene transcription is significantly higher than that of the wild-type 439 G-SNP-pGL3 construct (P < 0.05). An over-expression assay revealed that ZBED6 regulate IGF2 expression and promote myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of ZBED6 led to IGF2 expression change in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that ZBED6 inhibits IGF2 activity and expression via a G to A transition disrupts the interaction. Thus, we propose that ZBED6 plays a critical role in myogenic differentiation.

  3. Bifunctional role of leucine 300 of firefly luciferase in structural rigidity.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Farzad; Ataei, Farangis; Mortazavi, Mojtaba; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2017-03-18

    Firefly luciferase is susceptible to thermal inactivation, thereby its intracellular half-life decreased. Previous reports indicated that L(300)R mutation (LRR mutant) in E(354)R/Arg(356) double mutant (ERR mutant) from Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase has increased its thermal stability and rigidity through induction of some ionic bonds with Asp 270 and 271. Disruption of the deduced ionic bonds in an ultra-rigid mutant of firefly luciferase did not reverse the flexibility of the protein. In this study, we investigated the effects of this residue to find the truth behind an extraordinary increase in thermal stability and rigidity of luciferase after replacement of leucine 300 by arginine based on previous reports. For this purpose, L(300)R, L(300)K and L(300)E mutations were performed to compare the effects of these mutations on the native firefly luciferase. In spite of increase of intrinsic fluorescence of the mutants a slight increase in thermostability and retention of kinetic properties was observed. Based on our results, we can conclude that L(300)R mutation in LRR mutant accompanying with alteration in a flexible loop (352-359) increased thermostability and rigidity of luciferase.

  4. Sensitive Dual Color in vivo Bioluminescence Imaging Using a New Red Codon Optimized Firefly Luciferase and a Green Click Beetle Luciferase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    better separation in deeper tissues [27]. Recently, Hida and colleagues applied multicolor luciferases to study protein-protein interaction and proposed...fluorescence imaging with a multivariate curve resolution spectral unmixing technique. J Biomed Opt 14: 064011. 28. Hida N, Awais M, Takeuchi M, Ueno N

  5. Absence of canonical active chromatin marks in developmentally regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated to stable production of RNA, while unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and de-activation during development. In this case, regulation by transcription factors would play a comparatively more important regulatory role. PMID:26280901

  6. Promoter analysis of mouse Scn3a gene and regulation of the promoter activity by GC box and CpG methylation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guang-Fei; Qin, Jia-Ming; Sun, Xun-Sha; Kuang, Zu-Ying; Su, Tao; Zhao, Qi-Hua; Shi, Yi-Wu; Liu, Xiao-Rong; Yu, Mei-Juan; Yi, Yong-Hong; Liao, Wei-Ping; Long, Yue-Sheng

    2011-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel α-subunit type III (Na(v)1.3) is mainly expressed in the central nervous system and is associated with neurological disorders. The expression of mouse Scn3a product (Na(v)1.3) mainly occurs in embryonic and early postnatal brain but not in adult brain. Here, we report for the first time the identification and characterization of the mouse Scn3a gene promoter region and regulation of the promoter activity by GC box and CpG methylation. Luciferase assay showed that the promoter region F1.2 (nt -1,049 to +157) had significantly higher activity in PC12 cells, comparing with that in SH-SY5Y cells and HEK293 cells. A stepwise 5' truncation of the promoter region found that the minimal functional promoter located within the region nt -168 to +157. Deletion of a GC box (nt -254 to -258) in the mouse Scn3a promoter decreased the promoter activity. CpG methylation of the F1.2 without the GC box completely repressed the promoter activity, suggesting that the GC box is a critical element in the CpG-methylated Scn3a promoter. These results suggest that the GC box and CpG methylation might play important roles in regulating mouse Scn3a gene expression.

  7. Regulation of photoreceptor gene transcription via a highly conserved transcriptional regulatory element by vsx gene products

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Comiskey, Daniel F.; Kelly, Lisa E.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The photoreceptor conserved element-1 (PCE-1) sequence is found in the transcriptional regulatory regions of many genes expressed in photoreceptors. The retinal homeobox (Rx or Rax) gene product functions by binding to PCE-1 sites. However, other transcriptional regulators have also been reported to bind to PCE-1. One of these, vsx2, is expressed in retinal progenitor and bipolar cells. The purpose of this study is to identify Xenopus laevis vsx gene products and characterize vsx gene product expression and function with respect to the PCE-1 site. Methods X. laevis vsx gene products were amplified with PCR. Expression patterns were determined with in situ hybridization using whole or sectioned X. laevis embryos and digoxigenin- or fluorescein-labeled antisense riboprobes. DNA binding characteristics of the vsx gene products were analyzed with electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) using in vitro translated proteins and radiolabeled oligonucleotide probes. Gene transactivation assays were performed using luciferase-based reporters and in vitro transcribed effector gene products, injected into X. laevis embryos. Results We identified one vsx1 and two vsx2 gene products. The two vsx2 gene products are generated by alternate mRNA splicing. We verified that these gene products are expressed in the developing retina and that expression resolves into distinct cell types in the mature retina. Finally, we found that vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and that the two vsx2 isoforms have different gene transactivation activities. Conclusions vsx gene products are expressed in the developing and mature neural retina. vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and influence the expression of a rhodopsin promoter-luciferase reporter gene. The two isoforms of vsx have different gene transactivation activities in this reporter gene system. PMID:28003732

  8. Delineation of a slow-twitch-myofiber-specific transcriptional element by using in vivo somatic gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Corin, S J; Levitt, L K; O'Mahoney, J V; Joya, J E; Hardeman, E C; Wade, R

    1995-01-01

    Contractile proteins are encoded by multigene families, most of whose members are differentially expressed in fast- versus slow-twitch myofibers. This fiber-type-specific gene regulation occurs by unknown mechanisms and does not occur within cultured myocytes. We have developed a transient, whole-animal assay using somatic gene transfer to study this phenomenon and have identified a fiber-type-specific regulatory element within the promoter region of a slow myofiber-specific gene. A plasmid-borne luciferase reporter gene fused to various muscle-specific contractile gene promoters was differentially expressed when injected into slow- versus fast-twitch rat muscle: the luciferase gene was preferentially expressed in slow muscle when fused to a slow troponin I promoter, and conversely, was preferentially expressed in fast muscle when fused to a fast troponin C promoter. In contrast, the luciferase gene was equally well expressed by both muscle types when fused to a nonfiber-type-specific skeletal actin promoter. Deletion analysis of the troponin I promoter region revealed that a 157-bp enhancer conferred slow-muscle-preferential activity upon a minimal thymidine kinase promoter. Transgenic analysis confirmed the role of this enhancer in restricting gene expression to slow-twitch myofibers. Hence, somatic gene transfer may be used to rapidly define elements that direct myofiber-type-specific gene expression prior to the generation of transgenic mice. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7597099

  9. Tbx16 regulates hox gene activation in mesodermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Payumo, Alexander Y.; McQuade, Lindsey E.; Walker, Whitney J.; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor T-box 16 (Tbx16/Spadetail) is an essential regulator of paraxial mesoderm development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Mesodermal progenitor cells (MPCs) fail to differentiate into trunk somites in tbx16 mutants and instead accumulate within the tailbud in an immature state. The mechanisms by which Tbx16 controls mesoderm patterning have remained enigmatic, and we describe here the application of photoactivatable morpholino oligonucleotides to determine the Tbx16 transcriptome in MPCs. We identify 124 Tbx16-regulated genes that are expressed in zebrafish gastrulae, including several developmental signaling proteins and regulators of gastrulation, myogenesis, and somitogenesis. Unexpectedly, we observe that loss of Tbx16 function precociously activates posterior hox genes in MPCs, and overexpression of a single posterior hox gene is sufficient to disrupt MPC migration. Our studies support a model in which Tbx16 regulates the timing of collinear hox gene activation to coordinate the anterior-posterior fates and positions of paraxial MPCs. PMID:27376691

  10. Identifying a Kinase Network Regulating FGF14:Nav1.6 Complex Assembly Using Split-Luciferase Complementation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Nenov, Miroslav N.; Shavkunov, Alexander; Panova, Neli; Zhan, Ming; Laezza, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Kinases play fundamental roles in the brain. Through complex signaling pathways, kinases regulate the strength of protein:protein interactions (PPI) influencing cell cycle, signal transduction, and electrical activity of neurons. Changes induced by kinases on neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and brain connectivity are linked to complex brain disorders, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these cellular events remain for the most part elusive. To further our understanding of brain disease, new methods for rapidly surveying kinase pathways in the cellular context are needed. The bioluminescence-based luciferase complementation assay (LCA) is a powerful, versatile toolkit for the exploration of PPI. LCA relies on the complementation of two firefly luciferase protein fragments that are functionally reconstituted into the full luciferase enzyme by two interacting binding partners. Here, we applied LCA in live cells to assay 12 kinase pathways as regulators of the PPI complex formed by the voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.6, a transmembrane ion channel that elicits the action potential in neurons and mediates synaptic transmission, and its multivalent accessory protein, the fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14). Through extensive dose-dependent validations of structurally-diverse kinase inhibitors and hierarchical clustering, we identified the PI3K/Akt pathway, the cell-cycle regulator Wee1 kinase, and protein kinase C (PKC) as prospective regulatory nodes of neuronal excitability through modulation of the FGF14:Nav1.6 complex. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis shows convergence of these pathways on glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and functional assays demonstrate that inhibition of GSK3 impairs excitability of hippocampal neurons. This combined approach provides a versatile toolkit for rapidly surveying PPI signaling, allowing the discovery of new modular pathways centered on GSK3 that might be the basis for functional alterations between the normal and

  11. Replication of Subgenomic Hepatitis A Virus RNAs Expressing Firefly Luciferase Is Enhanced by Mutations Associated with Adaptation of Virus to Growth in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yi, MinKyung; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2002-01-01

    Replication of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in cultured cells is inefficient and difficult to study due to its protracted and generally noncytopathic cycle. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved, we constructed a subgenomic HAV replicon by replacing most of the P1 capsid-coding sequence from an infectious cDNA copy of the cell culture-adapted HM175/18f virus genome with sequence encoding firefly luciferase. Replication of this RNA in transfected Huh-7 cells (derived from a human hepatocellular carcinoma) led to increased expression of luciferase relative to that in cells transfected with similar RNA transcripts containing a lethal premature termination mutation in 3Dpol (RNA polymerase). However, replication could not be confirmed in either FrhK4 cells or BSC-1 cells, cells that are typically used for propagation of HAV. Replication was substantially slower than that observed with replicons derived from other picornaviruses, as the basal luciferase activity produced by translation of input RNA did not begin to increase until 24 to 48 h after transfection. Replication of the RNA was reversibly inhibited by guanidine. The inclusion of VP4 sequence downstream of the viral internal ribosomal entry site had no effect on the basal level of luciferase or subsequent increases in luciferase related to its amplification. Thus, in this system this sequence does not contribute to viral translation or replication, as suggested previously. Amplification of the replicon RNA was profoundly enhanced by the inclusion of P2 (but not 5′ noncoding sequence or P3) segment mutations associated with adaptation of wild-type virus to growth in cell culture. These results provide a simple reporter system for monitoring the translation and replication of HAV RNA and show that critical mutations that enhance the growth of virus in cultured cells do so by promoting replication of viral RNA in the absence of encapsidation, packaging, and cellular export of the viral genome. PMID

  12. Bioorthogonal Catalysis: A General Method To Evaluate Metal-Catalyzed Reactions in Real Time in Living Systems Using a Cellular Luciferase Reporter System

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of abiological catalysts that can function in biological systems is an emerging subject of importance with significant ramifications in synthetic chemistry and the life sciences. Herein we report a biocompatible ruthenium complex [Cp(MQA)Ru(C3H5)]+PF6–2 (Cp = cyclopentadienyl, MQA = 4-methoxyquinoline-2-carboxylate) and a general analytical method for evaluating its performance in real time based on a luciferase reporter system amenable to high throughput screening in cells and by extension to evaluation in luciferase transgenic animals. Precatalyst 2 activates alloc-protected aminoluciferin 4b, a bioluminescence pro-probe, and releases the active luminophore, aminoluciferin (4a), in the presence of luciferase-transfected cells. The formation and enzymatic turnover of 4a, an overall process selected because it emulates pro-drug activation and drug turnover by an intracellular target, is evaluated in real time by photon counting as 4a is converted by intracellular luciferase to oxyaminoluciferin and light. Interestingly, while the catalytic conversion (activation) of 4b to 4a in water produces multiple products, the presence of biological nucleophiles such as thiols prevents byproduct formation and provides almost exclusively luminophore 4a. Our studies show that precatalyst 2 activates 4b extracellularly, exhibits low toxicity at concentrations relevant to catalysis, and is comparably effective in two different cell lines. This proof of concept study shows that precatalyst 2 is a promising lead for bioorthogonal catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy, similarly activatable pro-drugs. More generally, this study provides an analytical method to measure abiological catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy with our earlier studies on pro-Taxol, similarly activatable pro-drugs in real time using a coupled biological catalyst that mediates a bioluminescent readout, providing tools for the study of imaging signal amplification and

  13. Electrical stimulation of neonatal cardiomyocytes results in the sequential activation of nuclear genes governing mitochondrial proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Buja, L. Maximilian; Scarpulla, Richard C.; McMillin, Jeanie B.

    1997-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of neonatal cardiac myocytes produces hypertrophy and cellular maturation with increased mitochondrial content and activity. To investigate the patterns of gene expression associated with these processes, cardiac myocytes were stimulated for varying times up to 72 hr in serum-free culture. The mRNA contents for genes associated with transcriptional activation [c-fos, c-jun, JunB, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1)], mitochondrial proliferation [cytochrome c (Cyt c), cytochrome oxidase], and mitochondrial differentiation [carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) isoforms] were measured. The results establish a temporal pattern of mRNA induction beginning with c-fos (0.25–3 hr) and followed sequentially by c-jun (0.5–3 hr), JunB (0.5–6 hr), NRF-1 (1–12 hr), Cyt c (12–72 hr), and muscle-specific CPT-I (48–72 hr). Induction of the latter was accompanied by a marked decrease in the liver-specific CPT-I mRNA, thus supporting the developmental fidelity of this pattern of gene regulation. Consistent with a transcriptional mechanism, electrical stimulation increased c-fos, β-myosin heavy chain, and Cyt c promoter activities. These increases coincided with a rise in their respective endogenous gene transcripts. NRF-1, cAMP response element, and Sp-1 site mutations within the Cyt c promoter reduced luciferase expression in both stimulated and nonstimulated myocytes. Mutations in the NRF-1 and CRE sites inhibited the induction by electrical stimulation (5-fold and 2-fold, respectively) whereas mutation of the Sp-1 site maintained or increased the fold induction. This finding is consistent with the appearance of NRF-1 and fos/jun mRNAs prior to that of Cyt c and suggests that induction of these transcription factors is a prerequisite for the transcriptional activation of Cyt c expression. These results support a regulatory role for NRF-1 and possibly AP-1 in the initiation of mitochondrial proliferation. PMID:9326621

  14. Constitutive transcription of the human interleukin-6 gene by rheumatoid synoviocytes: spontaneous activation of NF-kappaB and CBF1.

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, K.; Mori, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Okudaira, H.

    1998-01-01

    The involvement of IL-6 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been recently demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the spontaneous IL-6 production by the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) obtained from patients with RA. Cloned FLSs were established from the bulk cultures of FLSs by the limiting dilution method. Some FLS clones spontaneously produced large amounts of IL-6, whereas others produced low amounts of it. Neither anti-human TNF-alpha nor IL-1 antibody affected spontaneous IL-6 production of these FLS clones, suggesting that IL-6 production of the FLSs was endogenously up-regulated. A luciferase reporter plasmid containing the human IL-6 promoter region was significantly transcribed when transfected into the IL-6 high-producing clones, indicating that the rheumatoid FLSs retained constitutive transcriptional activity of the IL-6 gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that the binding activity of p50 and p65 NF-kappaB subunits and CBF1 was significantly enhanced in the IL-6 high-producing clones compared with that of IL-6 low-producing clones and cultured sarcoma cells, suggesting that spontaneous activation of NF-kappaB and CBF1 may lead to the constitutive transcription of the IL-6 gene by rheumatoid FLSs. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9502421

  15. Fireflies in the coalmine: luciferase technologies in next-generation toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Steven O

    2011-09-01

    Whole-animal studies have been the mainstay of toxicity testing for decades. These approaches are too expensive and laborious to effectively characterize all of the chemicals currently in commercial use. In addition, there are social and ethical pressures to reduce, refine and replace animal testing in toxicology. The National Research Council (NRC) has outlined a new strategy to transition from animal-based tests to high throughput, cell-based assays and computational modeling approaches to characterize chemical toxicants. Critical to this vision, assays that measure toxicity pathways associated with adverse health effects must be developed. Bioluminescent assays are particularly well suited to the demands of next-generation toxicity testing because they measure a wide range of biological activities in a quantitative and high throughput manner. This review describes the limitations of traditional, animal-based toxicity testing and discusses the current and developing uses of bioluminescent technologies in next-generation testing based on three general assay formats: luciferase-limited assays, ATP-limited assays and luciferin-limited assays.

  16. Probing Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer in Quantum Rod-Luciferase Nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M; Doane, Tennyson L; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2016-02-23

    We describe the necessary design criteria to create highly efficient energy transfer conjugates containing luciferase enzymes derived from Photinus pyralis (Ppy) and semiconductor quantum rods (QRs) with rod-in-rod (r/r) microstructure. By fine-tuning the synthetic conditions, CdSe/CdS r/r-QRs were prepared with two different emission colors and three different aspect ratios (l/w) each. These were hybridized with blue, green, and red emitting Ppy, leading to a number of new BRET nanoconjugates. Measurements of the emission BRET ratio (BR) indicate that the resulting energy transfer is highly dependent on QR energy accepting properties, which include absorption, quantum yield, and optical anisotropy, as well as its morphological and topological properties, such as aspect ratio and defect concentration. The highest BR was found using r/r-QRs with lower l/w that were conjugated with red Ppy, which may be activating one of the anisotropic CdSe core energy levels. The role QR surface defects play on Ppy binding, and energy transfer was studied by growth of gold nanoparticles at the defects, which indicated that each QR set has different sites. The Ppy binding at those sites is suggested by the observed BRET red-shift as a function of Ppy-to-QR loading (L), where the lowest L results in highest efficiency and furthest shift.

  17. [Cascade of gene activation in Landouzy Dejerine muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Belayew, A

    2010-01-01

    Our laboratory studies the Landouzy Dejerine muscular dystrophy or FSHD, a genetic disease which affects 7 in 100,000 individuals. The genetic defect is a deletion on chromosome 4 that decreases the copy number of a repeated DNA element, disturbs chromatin structure and activates the expression of neighbouring genes. The originality of our team has been to identify a gene within the repeated element itself and to show its activation in FSHD muscle cells. This gene expresses DUX4, a transcription factor that targets tens of genes, some of which express other transcription factors which target other genes, leading to a general deregulation. This DUX4-mediated cascade recapitulates by itself the major pathological features of FSHD: muscle atrophy, differentiation defect, oxidative stress... The homologous DUX4c gene located 42 kb from the repeat array expresses a protein that triggers myoblast proliferation. Its high expression level in severe cases of FSHD most probably contributes to the pathology by interfering with myoblast fusion with the muscle fibers at the last steps of muscle regeneration. We are performing global analyses of proteins and metabolites in healthy and FSHD myotubes (collaboration R Wattiez and JM Colet, UMONS) to identify abnormalities and their links with DUX4 or DUX4C.

  18. The activation of the rat insulin gene II by BETA2 and PDX-1 in rat insulinoma cells is repressed by Pax6.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gabriele; Hessabi, Behnam; Karkour, Anke; Henrion, Ulrike; Dahlhaus, Meike; Ostmann, Annett; Giese, Bernd; Fraunholz, Martin; Grabarczyk, Piotr; Jack, Robert; Walther, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    The transcriptional transactivator Pax6 binds the pancreatic islet cell-specific enhancer sequence (PISCES) of the rat insulin I gene. However the human, mouse, and rat insulin gene II promoters do not contain a PISCES element. To analyze the role of Pax6 in those PISCES-less promoters, we investigated its influence on rat insulin gene II expression and included in our studies the main activators: pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein-1 (PDX-1) and BETA2/E47. Luciferase assays, Northern blots, and RIA were used to study effects of Pax6 overexpression, gel shift and chromatin precipitation assays to study its binding to the DNA, and yeast two-hybrid assays and glutathione S transferase capture assays to investigate its interactions with PDX-1 and BETA2. Finally, glucose-dependent intracellular transport of Pax6 was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. Overexpression of Pax6 prevents activation of the rat insulin II gene by BETA2 and PDX-1 and hence suppresses insulin synthesis and secretion. In vitro, Pax6 binds to the A-boxes, thereby blocking binding of PDX-1, and at the same time, its paired domain interacts with BETA2. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the nuclear-cytoplasmic localization of Pax6 and PDX-1 are oppositely regulated by glucose. From the results, it is suggested that at low concentrations of glucose, Pax6 is localized in the nucleus and prevents the activation of the insulin gene by occupying the PDX-1 binding site and by interacting with BETA2.

  19. The neurotensin gene is a downstream target for Ras activation.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Zhou, Z; Celano, P; Li, J

    1995-01-01

    Ras regulates novel patterns of gene expression and the differentiation of various eukaryotic cell types. Stable transfection of Ha-ras into the human colon cancer line CaCo2 results in the morphologic differentiation to a small bowel phenotype. The purpose of our study was to determine whether the Ras regulatory pathway plays a role in the expression of the neurotensin gene (NT/N), a terminally differentiated endocrine product specifically localized in the gastrointestinal tract to the adult small bowel. We found that CaCo2-ras cells, but not parental CaCo2, express high levels of the human NT/N gene and, moreover, that this increase in gene expression is regulated at the level of transcription. Transfection experiments using NT/N-CAT mutation constructs identify the proximal 200 bp of NT/N flanking sequence as sufficient for maximal Ras-mediated NT/N reporter gene induction. Furthermore, a proximal AP-1/CRE motif is crucial for this Ras-mediated NT/N activation. Wild-type Ha-ras induces NT/N gene expression, albeit at lower levels than activated Ras; a dominant-negative Raf blocks this NT/N induction, suggesting that Raf lies down-stream of Ras in this pathway. In addition, postconfluent cultures of CaCo2 cells, which are differentiated to a small bowel phenotype, express the NT/N gene by 6 d after reaching confluency; this increase of NT/N expression is associated with concomitant increases of cellular p21ras protein. We conclude that Ras (both wild-type and activated) enhances expression of the NT/N gene in the gut-derived CaCo2 cell line, suggesting an important role for the Ras signaling pathway in NT/N gene transcription. Our results underscore the possibility that tissue-specific genes (such as NT/N) expressed in distinct subpopulations of the gut may be subject to Ras regulation. Finally, we speculate that the NT/N gene and the CaCo2 and CaCo2-ras cell systems will provide unique models to further define the cellular mechanisms leading to mammalian

  20. Transcriptional activation of virulence genes of Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luyao; Lacroix, Benoît; Guo, Jianhua; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2017-01-09

    Recently, Rhizobium etli has emerged, in addition to Agrobacterium spp., as a prokaryotic species that encodes a functional machinery for DNA transfer to plant cells. To understand this R. etli-mediated genetic transformation, it would be useful to define how its vir genes respond to the host plants. Here, we explored the transcriptional activation of the vir genes contained on the R. etli p42a plasmid. Using a reporter construct harboring lacZ under the control of the R. etli virE promoter, we showed that the signal phenolic molecule acetosyringone (AS) induced R. etli vir gene expression both in R. etli and in A. tumefaciens background. Furthermore, in both bacterial backgrounds, the p42a plasmid also promoted plant genetic transformation with a reporter T-DNA. Importantly, the R. etli vir genes were transcriptionally activated by AS in a bacterial species-specific fashion in regard to the VirA/VirG signal sensor system, and this activation was induced by signals from the natural host species of this bacterium, but not from non-host plants. Early kinetics of transcriptional activation of the major vir genes of R. etli also revealed several features distinct from those known for A. tumefaciens: the expression of the virG gene reached saturation relatively quickly, and virB2, which in R. etli is located outside of the virB operon, was expressed only at low levels and did not respond to AS. These differences in vir gene transcription may contribute to the lower efficiency of T-DNA transfer of R. etli p42a versus pTiC58 of A. tumefaciens IMPORTANCE: The region encoding homologs of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes in the Rhizobium etli CE3 p42a plasmid was the first endogenous virulence system encoded by a non-Agrobacterium species demonstrated to be functional in DNA transfer and stable integration into plant cell genome. In this study, we explore the transcriptional regulation and induction of virulence genes in R. etli and show similarities and differences

  1. RNA activation of haploinsufficient Foxg1 gene in murine neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Su, Qin; Gao, Guangping; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    More than one hundred distinct gene hemizygosities are specifically linked to epilepsy, mental retardation, autism, schizophrenia and neuro-degeneration. Radical repair of these gene deficits via genome engineering is hardly feasible. The same applies to therapeutic stimulation of the spared allele by artificial transactivators. Small activating RNAs (saRNAs) offer an alternative, appealing approach. As a proof-of-principle, here we tested this approach on the Rett syndrome-linked, haploinsufficient, Foxg1 brain patterning gene. We selected a set of artificial small activating RNAs (saRNAs) upregulating it in neocortical precursors and their derivatives. Expression of these effectors achieved a robust biological outcome. saRNA-driven activation (RNAa) was limited to neural cells which normally express Foxg1 and did not hide endogenous gene tuning. saRNAs recognized target chromatin through a ncRNA stemming from it. Gene upregulation required Ago1 and was associated to RNApolII enrichment throughout the Foxg1 locus. Finally, saRNA delivery to murine neonatal brain replicated Foxg1-RNAa in vivo. PMID:27995975

  2. Linear topology confers in vivo gene transfer activity to polyethylenimines.

    PubMed

    Brissault, B; Leborgne, C; Guis, C; Danos, O; Cheradame, H; Kichler, A

    2006-01-01

    Although polyethylenimines (PEIs) are frequently used transfection agents, it is still unclear which of their properties are required for efficient gene delivery. This is even more striking when working in vivo since some PEIs are able to generate significant gene expression, whereas others are not. To facilitate a rational development of compounds with improved transfection activities, studies aimed at identifying the properties involved in the transfection process seem indispensable. In the present work, we investigated how transfection with linear PEI of 22 kDa allows for high reporter gene expression in lungs after intravenous injection, whereas the branched PEI of 25 kDa does not. To this end, we synthesized L-PEI derivatives that are intermediates between linear and branched PEIs. Our results show that the topology plays a crucial role in obtaining in vivo reporter gene expression, whereas the content of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines is only of minor importance.

  3. The Effect of Surface Charge Saturation on Heat-induced Aggregation of Firefly Luciferase.

    PubMed

    Gharanlar, Jamileh; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Sajedi, Reza H; Yaghmaei, Parichehr

    2015-01-01

    We present here the effect of firefly luciferase surface charge saturation and the presence of some additives on its thermal-induced aggregation. Three mutants of firefly luciferase prepared by introduction of surface Arg residues named as 2R, 3R and 5R have two, three and five additional arginine residues substituted at their surface compared to native luciferase; respectively. Turbidimetric study of heat-induced aggregation indicates that all three mutants were reproducibly aggregated at higher rates relative to wild type in spite of their higher thermostability. Among them, 2R had most evaluated propensity to heat-induced aggregation. Therefore, the hydrophilization followed by appearing of more substituted arginine residues with positive charge on the firefly luciferase surface was not reduced its thermal aggregation. Nevertheless, at the same condition in the presence of charged amino acids, e.g. Arg, Lys and Glu, as well as a hydrophobic amino acid, e.g. Val, the heat-induced aggregation of wild type and mutants of firefly luciferases was markedly decelerated than those in the absence of additives. On the basis of obtained results it seems, relinquishment of variety in charge of amino acid side chains, they via local interactions with proteins cause to decrease rate and extent of their thermal aggregation.

  4. Effects of NV gene knock-out recombinant viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) on Mx gene expression in Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells and olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Ki Hong

    2012-03-01

    To determine whether the NV gene of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is related to the type I interferon response of hosts, expression of Mx gene in Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells and in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) in response to infection with either wild-type VHSV or recombinant VHSVs (rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP and rVHSV-wild) was investigated. A reporter vector was constructed for measuring Mx gene expression using olive flounder Mx promoter, in which the reporter Metridia luciferase was designed to be excreted to culture medium to facilitate measurement. The highest increase of luciferase activity was detected from supernatant of cells infected with rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP. In contrast cells infected with wild-type VHSV showed a slight increase of the luciferase activity. Interestingly, cells infected with rVHSV-wild that has artificially changed nucleotides just before and after the NV gene ORF, also showed highly increased luciferase activity, but the increased amplitude was lower than that by rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP. These results strongly suggest that the NV protein of VHSV plays an important role in suppressing interferon response in host cells, which provides a condition for the viruses to efficiently proliferate in host cells. In an in vivo experiment, the Mx gene expression in olive flounder challenged with the rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP was clearly higher than fish challenged with rVHSV-wild or wild-type VHSV, suggesting that lacking of the NV gene in the genome of rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP brought to strong interferon response that subsequently inhibit viral replication in fish.

  5. Titration-based screening for evaluation of natural product extracts: identification of an aspulvinone family of luciferase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, P.G.; Auld, D.S.; Schultz, P.J.; Lovell, S.; Battaile, K.P.; MacArthur, R.; Shen, M.; Tamayo-Castillo, G.; Inglese, J.; Sherman, D.H.

    2011-11-28

    The chemical diversity of nature has tremendous potential for the discovery of molecular probes and medicinal agents. However, sensitivity of HTS assays to interfering components of crude extracts derived from plants, and macro- and microorganisms has curtailed their use in lead discovery. Here, we describe a process for leveraging the concentration-response curves obtained from quantitative HTS to improve the initial selection of actives from a library of partially fractionated natural product extracts derived from marine actinomycetes and fungi. By using pharmacological activity, the first-pass CRC paradigm improves the probability that labor-intensive subsequent steps of reculturing, extraction, and bioassay-guided isolation of active component(s) target the most promising strains and growth conditions. We illustrate how this process identified a family of fungal metabolites as potent inhibitors of firefly luciferase, subsequently resolved in molecular detail by X-ray crystallography.

  6. Firefly Luciferase-Based Sequential Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Protease Assays.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyzes yellow-green (560 nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-Infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41 nM for caspase 3, 1.0 nM for thrombin, and 58 nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. This method successfully employs an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence to assay physiologically important protease activities and should be generally applicable to the measurement of any endoprotease lacking accessible cysteine residues.

  7. Replication Competent Molecular Clones of HIV-1 Expressing Renilla Luciferase Facilitate the Analysis of Antibody Inhibition in PBMC

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Tara G.; Ding, Haitao; Yuan, Xing; Wei, Qing; Smith, Kendra S.; Conway, Joan A.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Brown, Bruce; Polonis, Victoria; West, John T.; Montefiori, David C.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Effective vaccine development for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will require assays that ascertain the capacity of vaccine immunogens to elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAb) to diverse HIV-1 strains. To facilitate NAb assessment in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based assays, we developed an assay-adaptable platform based on a Renilla luciferase (LucR) expressing HIV-1 proviral backbone. LucR was inserted into pNL4-3 DNA, preserving all viral open reading frames. The proviral genome was engineered to facilitate expression of diverse HIV-1 env sequences, allowing analysis in an isogenic background. The resulting Env-IMC-LucR viruses are infectious, and LucR is stably expressed over multiple replications in PBMC. HIV-1 neutralization, targeting TZM-bl cells, was highly correlative comparing virus (LucR) and cell (firefly luciferase) readouts. In PBMC, NAb activity can be analyzed either within a single or multiple cycles of replication. These results represent advancement toward a standardizable PBMC-based neutralization assay for assessing HIV-1 vaccine immunogen efficacy. PMID:20863545

  8. Comparison of human optimized bacterial luciferase, firefly luciferase, and green fluorescent protein for continuous imaging of cell culture and animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan M.; Hahn, Ruth E.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Baek, Seung J.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-04-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent reporter systems have enabled the rapid and continued growth of the optical imaging field over the last two decades. Of particular interest has been noninvasive signal detection from mammalian tissues under both cell culture and whole animal settings. Here we report on the advantages and limitations of imaging using a recently introduced bacterial luciferase (lux) reporter system engineered for increased bioluminescent expression in the mammalian cellular environment. Comparison with the bioluminescent firefly luciferase (Luc) system and green fluorescent protein system under cell culture conditions demonstrated a reduced average radiance, but maintained a more constant level of bioluminescent output without the need for substrate addition or exogenous excitation to elicit the production of signal. Comparison with the Luc system following subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection into nude mice hosts demonstrated the ability to obtain similar detection patterns with in vitro experiments at cell population sizes above 2.5 × 104 cells but at the cost of increasing overall image integration time.

  9. Activity-Regulated Genes as Mediators of Neural Circuit Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Jennifer H.; Nedivi, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Modifications of neuronal circuits allow the brain to adapt and change with experience. This plasticity manifests during development and throughout life, and can be remarkably long lasting. Many electrophysiological and molecular mechanisms are common to the seemingly diverse types of activity-dependent functional adaptation that take place during developmental critical periods, learning and memory, and alterations to sensory map representations in the adult. Experience-dependent plasticity is triggered when neuronal excitation activates cellular signaling pathways from the synapse to the nucleus that initiate new programs of gene expression. The protein products of activity-regulated genes then work via a diverse array of cellular mechanisms to modify neuronal functional properties. They fine-tune brain circuits by strengthening or weakening synaptic connections or by altering synapse numbers. Their effects are further modulated by posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, often also dependent on activity, that control activity-regulated gene transcript and protein function. Thus, the cellular response to neuronal activity integrates multiple tightly coordinated mechanisms to precisely orchestrate long-lasting, functional and structural changes in brain circuits. PMID:21601615

  10. Constitutive Activation of the Aromatic Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Yi; Puga, Alvaro

    1998-01-01

    The ligand-activated aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) dimerizes with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) to form a functional complex that transactivates expression of the cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 gene and other genes in the dioxin-inducible [Ah] gene battery. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the activity of the CYP1A1 enzyme negatively regulates this process. To study the relationship between CYP1A1 activity and Ah receptor activation we used CYP1A1-deficient mouse hepatoma c37 cells and CYP1A1- and AHR-deficient African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Using gel mobility shift and luciferase reporter gene expression assays, we found that c37 cells that had not been exposed to exogenous Ah receptor ligands already contained transcriptionally active AHR-ARNT complexes, a finding that we also observed in wild-type Hepa-1 cells treated with Ellipticine, a CYP1A1 inhibitor. In CV-1 cells, transient expression of AHR and ARNT leads to high levels of AHR–ARNT-dependent luciferase gene expression even in the absence of an agonist. Using a green fluorescent protein-tagged AHR, we showed that elevated reporter gene expression correlates with constitutive nuclear localization of the AHR. Transcriptional activation of the luciferase reporter gene observed in CV-1 cells is significantly decreased by (i) expression of a functional CYP1A1 enzyme, (ii) competition with chimeric or truncated AHR proteins containing the AHR ligand-binding domain, and (iii) treatment with the AHR antagonist α-naphthoflavone. These results suggest that a CYP1A1 substrate, which accumulates in cells lacking CYP1A1 enzymatic activity, is an AHR ligand responsible for endogenous activation of the Ah receptor. PMID:9418899

  11. Transcriptional activation of cloned human beta-globin genes by viral immediate-early gene products.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Treisman, R; Maniatis, T

    1983-11-01

    When the human beta-globin gene is transfected into Hela cells, no beta-globin RNA is detected unless the gene is linked to a viral transcription enhancer. In this paper we show that trans-acting adenovirus and herpesvirus (pseudorabies) transcriptional regulatory proteins can circumvent this enhancer requirement for detectable beta-globin transcription in transient expression assays. The viral gene products can be provided by constitutively expressed, integrated viral genes in established cell lines, by viral infection of permissive cells, or by transfection of cells with bacterial plasmids carrying the viral immediate-early genes. These results demonstrate the utility of transient expression assays for studying regulatory mechanisms involving trans-acting factors. Analysis of beta-globin promoter mutants indicates that between 75 and 128 bp of sequence 5' to the mRNA cap site is required for enhancer-dependent transcription in Hela cells. In contrast, beta-globin transcription in the presence of viral immediate-early gene products requires only 36 bp of 5'-flanking sequence, which includes the TATA box. Thus both cis and trans-acting viral factors activate beta-globin gene transcription in transient expression experiments, but the mechanisms by which they act appear to be fundamentally different.

  12. Interaction of aromatic compounds with Photobacterium leiognathi luciferase: fluorescence anisotropy study.

    PubMed

    Kudryasheva, N S; Nemtseva, E V; Visser, A J W G; Van Hoek, A

    2003-01-01

    The time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence techniques were employed to elucidate possible interactions of four aromatic compounds (anthracene, POPOP, MSB and 1,4-naphthalendiol) with bacterial luciferase. Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence anisotropy decays of these compounds were studied in ethanol, water-ethanol solutions and in the presence of bacterial luciferase. Shifts of fluorescent spectra and differences in rotational correlation times are interpreted in terms of weak (hydrophobic) interactions of the molecules with the enzyme. These interactions suggest the feasibility of intermolecular energy transfer by an exchange resonance mechanism with a collision-interaction radius as a way of excitation of these compounds in the reaction catalysed by bacterial luciferase.

  13. Problem areas in the use of the firefly luciferase assay for bacterial detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Knust, E. A.; Tuttle, S. A.; Curtis, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    By purifying the firefly luciferase extract and adding all necessary chemicals but ATP in excess, an assay for ATP was performed by measuring the amount of light produced when a sample containing soluble ATP is added to the luciferase reaction mixture. Instrumentation, applications, and basic characteristics of the luciferase assay are presented. Effect of the growth medium and length of time grown in this medium on ATP per viable E. coli values is shown in graphic form, along with an ATP concentration curve showing relative light units versus ATP injected. Reagent functions and concentration methods are explored. Efforts to develop a fast automatable system to detect the presence of bacteria in biological fluids, especially urine, resulted in the optimization of procedures for use with different types of samples.

  14. β-Catenin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ coordinate dynamic chromatin loops for the transcription of vascular endothelial growth factor A gene in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Injoo; Kim, Jeeho; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2012-11-30

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) mRNA is regulated by β-catenin and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor δ (PPAR-δ) activation in colon cancer cells, but the detailed mechanism remains to be elucidated. As chromatin loops are generally hubs for transcription factors, we tested here whether β-catenin could modulate chromatin looping near the VEGFA gene and play any important role for PPAR-δ activated VEGFA transcription. First, we identified the far upstream site as an important site for VEGFA transcription by luciferase assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation in colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells. Chromatin conformation capture analysis also revealed the chromatin loops formed by the β-catenin bindings on these sites near the VEGFA gene. Dynamic association and dissociation of β-catenin/TCF-4/PPAR-δ on the far upstream site and β-catenin/NF-κB p65 on the downstream site were also detected depending on PPAR-δ activation. Interestingly, β-catenin-mediated chromatin loops were relieved by PPAR-δ activation, suggesting a regulatory role of β-catenin for VEGFA transcription. Based on these data, we propose a model for PPAR-δ-activated VEGFA transcription that relies on β-catenin-mediated chromatin looping as a prerequisite for the activation. Our findings could extend to other β-catenin regulated target genes and could provide a general mechanism and novel paradigm for β-catenin-mediated oncogenesis.

  15. Quantitative High-throughput Luciferase Screening in Identifying CAR Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Caitlin; Zhao, Jinghua; Wang, Hongbing; Xia, Menghang

    2017-01-01

    Summary The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is responsible for the transcription of multiple drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. There are two possible methods of activation for CAR, direct ligand binding and a ligand-independent method, which makes this a unique nuclear receptor. Both of these mechanisms require translocation of CAR from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. Interestingly, CAR is constitutively active in immortalized cell lines due to the basal nuclear location of this receptor. This creates an important challenge in most in vitro assay models because immortalized cells cannot be used without inhibiting the basal activity. In this book chapter, we go into detail of how to perform quantitative high-throughput screens to identify hCAR1 modulators through the employment of a double stable cell line. Using this line, we are able to identify activators, as well as deactivators, of the challenging nuclear receptor, CAR. PMID:27518621

  16. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  17. Minicircle HBV cccDNA with a Gaussia luciferase reporter for investigating HBV cccDNA biology and developing cccDNA-targeting drugs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Murphy, Christopher M.; Reszka-Blanco, Natalia J.; Wu, Yaxu; Chi, Liqun; Hu, Jianming; Su, Lishan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection is generally not curable with current anti-viral drugs. Virus rebounds after stopping treatment from the stable HBV covalently-closed-circular DNA (cccDNA). The development of drugs that directly target cccDNA is hampered by the lack of robust HBV cccDNA models. We report here a novel HBV cccDNA technology that will meet the need. We engineered a minicircle HBV cccDNA with a Gaussia Luciferase reporter (mcHBV-GLuc cccDNA), which serves as a surrogate to measure cccDNA activity. The mcHBV-GLuc cccDNA was easily produced in bacteria, and it formed minichromosomes as HBV cccDNA episome DNA does when it was transfected into human hepatocytes. Compared to non-HBV minicircle plasmids, mcHBV-GLuc cccDNA showed persistent HBV-GLuc activity and HBx-dependent gene expression. Importantly, the mcHBV-GLuc cccDNA showed resistance to interferons (IFN) treatment, indicating its unique similarity to HBV cccDNA that is usually resistant to long-term IFN treatment in chronic HBV patients. Most importantly, GLuc illuminates cccDNA as a surrogate of cccDNA activity, providing a very sensitive and quick method to detect trace amount of cccDNA. The mcHBV-GLuc cccDNA model is independent of HBV infection, and will be valuable for investigating HBV cccDNA biology and for developing cccDNA-targeting drugs. PMID:27819342

  18. Metallothionein gene activation in the earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus).

    PubMed

    Höckner, M; Dallinger, R; Stürzenbaum, S R

    2015-05-08

    In order to cope with changing environmental conditions, organisms require highly responsive stress mechanisms. Heavy metal stress is handled by metallothioneins (MTs), the regulation of which is evolutionary conserved in insects and vertebrates and involves the binding of metal transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) to metal responsive elements (MREs) positioned in the promoter of MT genes. However, in most invertebrate phyla, the transcriptional activation of MTs is different and the exact mechanism is still unknown. Interestingly, although MREs are typically present also in invertebrate MT gene promoters, MTF-1 is notably absent. Here we use Lumbricus rubellus, the red earthworm, to study the elusive mechanism of wMT-2 activation in control and Cd-exposed conditions. EMSA and DNase I footprinting approaches were used to pinpoint functional binding sites within the wMT-2 promoter region, which revealed that the cAMP responsive element (CRE) is a promising candidate which may act as a transcriptional activator of invertebrate MTs.

  19. "Active" cancer immunotherapy by anti-Met antibody gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Elisa; Pacchiana, Giovanni; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Chiriaco, Cristina; Fontani, Lara; Basilico, Cristina; Pennacchietti, Selma; Comoglio, Paolo M

    2008-11-15

    Gene therapy provides a still poorly explored opportunity to treat cancer by "active" immunotherapy as it enables the transfer of genes encoding antibodies directed against specific oncogenic proteins. By a bidirectional lentiviral vector, we transferred the cDNA encoding the heavy and light chains of a monoclonal anti-Met antibody (DN-30) to epithelial cancer cells. In vitro, the transduced cells synthesized and secreted correctly assembled antibodies with the expected high affinity, inducing down-regulation of the Met receptor and strong inhibition of the invasive growth response. The inhibitory activity resulted (a) from the interference of the antibody with the Met receptor intracellular processing ("cell autonomous activity," in cis) and (b) from the antibody-induced cleavage of Met expressed at the cell surface ("bystander effect," in trans). The monoclonal antibody gene transferred into live animals by systemic administration or by local intratumor delivery resulted in substantial inhibition of tumor growth. These data provide proof of concept both for targeting the Met receptor and for a gene transfer-based immunotherapy strategy.

  20. CRISPR RNA-guided activation of endogenous human genes.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Linder, Samantha J; Cascio, Vincent M; Fu, Yanfang; Ho, Quan H; Joung, J Keith

    2013-10-01

    Short guide RNAs (gRNAs) can direct catalytically inactive CRISPR-associated 9 nuclease (dCas9) to repress endogenous genes in bacteria and human cells. Here we show that single or multiple gRNAs can direct dCas9 fused to a VP64 transcriptional activation domain to increase expression of endogenous human genes. This proof-of-principle work shows that clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems can target heterologous effector domains to endogenous sites in human cells.

  1. Quantum/molecular mechanics study of firefly bioluminescence on luciferase oxidative conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2014-07-01

    This is the first report of a computational study of the color tuning mechanism of firefly bioluminescence, using the oxidative conformation of luciferase. The results of these calculations demonstrated that the electrostatic field generated by luciferase is fundamental both for the emission shift and efficiency. Further calculations indicated that a shift in emission is achieved by modulating the energy, at different degrees, of the emissive and ground states. These differences in energy modulation will then lead to changes in the energy gap between the states.

  2. Identification and characterization of a cis-regulatory element for zygotic gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-03-26

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. Furthermore, we predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes.

  3. Baicalein inhibits TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation and expression of NF-κB-regulated target gene products.

    PubMed

    Li, Junbo; Ma, Juan; Wang, Ke Si; Mi, Chunliu; Wang, Zhe; Piao, Lian Xun; Xu, Guang Hua; Li, Xuezheng; Lee, Jung Joon; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-11-01

    The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors control many physiological processes including inflammation, immunity, apoptosis and angiogenesis. In our search for NF-κB inhibitors from natural resources, we identified baicalein from Scutellaria baicalensis as an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. As examined by the NF-κB luciferase reporter assay, we found that baicalein suppressed TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner. It also inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of p65 through inhibition of phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Furthermore, baicalein blocked the TNF-α-induced expression of NF-κB target genes involved in anti-apoptosis (cIAP-1, cIAP-2, FLIP and BCL-2), proliferation (COX-2, cyclin D1 and c-Myc), invasion (MMP‑9), angiogenesis (VEGF) and major inflammatory cytokines (IL-8 and MCP1). The flow cytometric analysis indicated that baicalein potentiated TNF-α-induced apoptosis and induced G1 phase arrest in HeLa cells. Moreover, baicalein significantly blocked activation of p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Our results imply that baicalein could be a lead compound for the modulation of inflammatory diseases as well as certain cancers in which inhibition of NF-κB activity may be desirable.

  4. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer using luciferase-immobilized quantum dots for self-illuminated photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Ching-Wen; Yu, Hsiu-Ping; Lin, Yan-Fu; Lai, Ping-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an innovative method for cancer treatment that involves the administration of a photosensitizing agent followed by exposure to visible light. An appreciable amount of a particular light source is a key to activate photosensitizers in PDT. However, the external excitation light source is a problem for clinical application because of the limitation of tissue-penetrating properties. Additionally, the wavelength of laser emission should match the absorption wavelength of each photosensitizer for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species and cell killing. In this study, Renilla luciferase-immobilized quantum dots-655 (QD-RLuc8) was used for bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-mediated PDT to resolve these problems. The bioluminescent QD-RLuc8 conjugate exhibits self-illumination at 655 nm after coelenterazine addition, which can activate the photosensitizer, Foscan(®)-loaded micelles for PDT. Our results show that BRET-mediated PDT by QD-RLuc8 plus coelenterazine (20 μg/mL) successfully generated reactive oxygen species (40.8%), killed ~ 50% A549 cells at 2 μg/mL equivalent Foscan(®)in vitro and significantly delayed tumor growth in vivo due to cell apoptosis under TUNEL analysis without obvious weight loss. Based on immunohistochemical observations, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-negative area of tumor sections after BRET-mediated PDT was obviously increased compared to the PDT-untreated groups without an external light source. We conclude that this nanotechnology-based PDT possesses several clinical benefits, such as overcoming light penetration issues and treating deeper lesions that are intractable by PDT alone.

  5. Titration-based screening for evaluation of natural product extracts: identification of an aspulvinone family of luciferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Patricia G.; Auld, Douglas S.; Schultz, Pamela J.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; MacArthur, Ryan; Shen, Min; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Inglese, James; Sherman, David H.

    2011-01-01

    The chemical diversity of nature has tremendous potential for discovery of new molecular probes and medicinal agents. However, sensitivity of HTS assays to interfering components of crude extracts derived from plants, macro- and microorganisms has curtailed their use in lead discovery efforts. Here we describe a process for leveraging the concentration-response curves (CRCs) obtained from quantitative HTS to improve the initial selection of “actives” from a library of partially fractionated natural product extracts derived from marine actinomycetes and fungi. By using pharmacological activity, the first-pass CRC paradigm aims to improve the probability that labor-intensive subsequent steps of re-culturing, extraction and bioassay-guided isolation of active component(s) target the most promising strains and growth conditions. We illustrate how this process identified a family of fungal metabolites as potent inhibitors of firefly luciferase, subsequently resolved in molecular detail by x-ray crystallography. PMID:22118678

  6. Bioluminescence of beetle luciferases with 6'-amino-D-luciferin analogues reveals excited keto-oxyluciferin as the emitter and phenolate/luciferin binding site interactions modulate bioluminescence colors.

    PubMed

    Viviani, Vadim R; Neves, Deimison Rodrigues; Amaral, Danilo Trabuco; Prado, Rogilene A; Matsuhashi, Takuto; Hirano, Takashi

    2014-08-19

    Beetle luciferases produce different bioluminescence colors from green to red using the same d-luciferin substrate. Despite many studies of the mechanisms and structural determinants of bioluminescence colors with firefly luciferases, the identity of the emitters and the specific active site interactions responsible for bioluminescence color modulation remain elusive. To address these questions, we analyzed the bioluminescence spectra with 6'-amino-D-luciferin (aminoluciferin) and its 5,5-dimethyl analogue using a set of recombinant beetle luciferases that naturally elicit different colors and different pH sensitivities (pH-sensitive, Amydetes vivianii λmax=538 nm, Macrolampis sp2 λmax=564 nm; pH-insensitive, Phrixotrix hirtus λmax=623 nm, Phrixotrix vivianii λmax=546 nm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans λmax=534 nm), a luciferase-like enzyme (Tenebrionidae, Zophobas morio λmax=613 nm), and mutants of C311 (S314). The green-yellow-emitting luciferases display red-shifted bioluminescence spectra with aminoluciferin in relation to those with D-luciferin, whereas the red-emitting luciferases displayed blue-shifted spectra. Bioluminescence spectra with 5,5-dimethylaminoluciferin, in which enolization is blocked, were almost identical to those of aminoluciferin. Fluorescence probing using 2-(4-toluidino)naphthalene-6-sulfonate and inference with aminoluciferin confirm that the luciferin binding site of the red-shifted luciferases is more polar than in the case of the green-yellow-emitting luciferases. Altogether, the results show that the keto form of excited oxyluciferin is the emitter in beetle bioluminescence and that bioluminescence colors are essentially modulated by interactions of the 6'-hydroxy group of oxyluciferin and basic moieties under the influence of the microenvironment polarity of the active site: a strong interaction between a base moiety and oxyluciferin phenol in a hydrophobic microenvironment promotes green-yellow emission, whereas a more polar

  7. Adiponectin gene ADIPOQ SNP associations with serum adiponectin in two female populations and effects of SNPs on promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Theodosios; Collins, Laura J; Spencer-Jones, Nicola J; Malcolm, Claire; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Burling, Keith A; Hart, Deborah J; Spector, Tim D; O'Dell, Sandra D

    2008-01-01

    Adiponectin is an insulin sensitiser in muscle and liver, and low serum levels characterise obesity and insulin resistance. Eight tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) in the ADIPOQ gene and promoter were selected, and association with serum adiponectin was tested, in two independent samples of Caucasian women: the Chingford Study (n = 808, mean age 62.8 +/- 5.9 years) and Twins UK (n = 2,718, mean age 47.4 +/- 12.6 years). In the Chingford cohort, -11391 G/A, -10066 G/A (rs182052), -7734 C/A (rs16861209), +276 G/T (rs1501299) and +3228 C/T (rs1063537) were significantly associated with fasting serum adiponectin (Ps = 1.00 x 10(-4) to 1.40 x 10(-2)). Associations with all except +3228 C/T were replicated in the Twins UK cohort (Ps = 3.19 x 10(-9) to 6.00 x 10(-3)). In Chingford subjects, the 12 most common 8-SNP haplotypes (frequency 1.90%) explained 2.85% (p = 5.00 x 10(-2)) and in Twins UK subjects, the four most common 5-SNP haplotypes (frequency > 5.00%) explained 1.66% of the variance (p = 5.83 x 10(-7)). To investigate effects of -11391 G/A (rs17300539) and -11377 C/G (rs266729) on promoter activity, 1.2 kb of the ADIPOQ promoter region was cloned in a luciferase reporter plasmid, and the four haplotypes were transfected in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. No significant allelic effects on promoter activity were found.

  8. A novel type 2 diabetes risk allele increases the promoter activity of the muscle-specific small ankyrin 1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rengna; Lai, Shanshan; Yang, Yang; Shi, Hongfei; Cai, Zhenming; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Du, Hong; Chen, Huimei

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified Ankyrin-1 (ANK1) as a common type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility locus. However, the underlying causal variants and functional mechanisms remain unknown. We screened for 8 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ANK1 between 2 case-control studies. Genotype analysis revealed significant associations of 3 SNPs, rs508419 (first identified here), rs515071, and rs516946 with T2D (P < 0.001). These SNPs were in linkage disequilibrium (r2 > 0.80); subsequent analysis indicated that the CCC haplotype associated with increased T2D susceptibility (OR 1.447, P < 0.001). Further mapping showed that rs508419 resides in the muscle-specific ANK1 gene promoter. Allele-specific mRNA and protein level measurements confirmed association of the C allele with increased small ANK1 (sAnk1) expression in human skeletal muscle (P = 0.018 and P < 0.001, respectively). Luciferase assays showed increased rs508419-C allele transcriptional activity in murine skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts, and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated altered rs508419 DNA-protein complex formation. Glucose uptake was decreased with excess sAnk1 expression upon insulin stimulation. Thus, the ANK1 rs508419-C T2D-risk allele alters DNA-protein complex binding leading to increased promoter activity and sAnk1 expression; thus, increased sAnk1 expression in skeletal muscle might contribute to T2D susceptibility. PMID:27121283

  9. A high throughput system for the evaluation of protein kinase C inhibitors based on Elk1 transcriptional activation in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sharif, T R; Sharif, M

    1999-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) designates a family of kinases that regulate many essential functions including cell growth and differentiation. The tight regulation of PKC activity is crucial for maintaining normal cellular proliferation and excessive activity leads to abnormal or uncontrolled cell growth. Recent reports indicate that malignant glioma cell lines express 100 to 1000-fold higher PKC activity when compared to non-neoplastic astrocytes. This high activity correlates well with the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro. We recently reported on the anti-proliferative properties of selective PKC inhibitors on the growth of U-373MG human astrocytoma cell line, and their ability to block mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway activated by substance P (SP) neuropeptide receptor signaling via a PKC-dependent mechanism. Therefore, inhibiting PKC activity by selective PKC inhibitors may present a promising approach for improving astroglial brain tumor therapy. For this purpose, we constructed a high throughput model cell system to evaluate the efficacy of PKC inhibitors. This system is based on the measurement of light production in U-373MG cells stably transfected with the luciferase reporter gene whose expression depends on the transcriptional activation of GAL4-Elk1 fusion protein by enzyme components of the MAP kinase pathway and the upstream activation of PKC (PKC activation-->MAP kinases-->GAL4-Elk1 phosphorylation-->luciferase expression-->luciferase activity). In brief, we have demonstrated that the PKC activator 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced luciferase activity in this cell system is mediated via the MAP kinase pathway and can be blocked in the presence of MEK1 selective inhibitors (PD 098059 or U0126). We also demonstrated that TPA-induced luciferase activity in U-373MG stable clones can be blocked by PKC inhibitors (CGP 41251, Go 6976, and GF 109203X) in a concentration dependent manner. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF

  10. Long Term Non-Invasive Imaging of Embryonic Stem Cells Using Reporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ning; Lee, Andrew; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Development of non-invasive and accurate methods to track cell fate following delivery will greatly expedite transition of embryonic stem (ES) cell therapy to the clinic. Here we describe a protocol for the in vivo monitoring of stem cell survival, proliferation, and migration using reporter genes. We established stable ES cell lines constitutively expressing double fusion (DF; enhanced green fluorescent protein and firefly luciferase) or triple fusion (TF; monomeric red fluorescent protein, firefly luciferase, and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) reporter genes using lentiviral transduction. We used fluorescence activated cell sorting to purify these populations in vitro, bioluminescence imaging and positron emission tomography imaging to track them in vivo, and fluorescence immunostaining to confirm the results ex vivo. Unlike other methods of cell tracking such as iron particle and radionuclide labeling, reporter genes are inherited genetically and can be used to monitor cell proliferation and survival for the lifetime of transplanted cells and their progeny. PMID:19617890

  11. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more regions of active chromatin: Connection to a stochastic paradigm for sequential gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marlene; Mauro, James A; Ramsamooj, Michael; Blanck, George

    2015-08-03

    Apoptosis- and proliferation-effector genes are substantially regulated by the same transactivators, with E2F-1 and Oct-1 being notable examples. The larger proliferation-effector genes have more binding sites for the transactivators that regulate both sets of genes, and proliferation-effector genes have more regions of active chromatin, i.e, DNase I hypersensitive and histone 3, lysine-4 trimethylation sites. Thus, the size differences between the 2 classes of genes suggest a transcriptional regulation paradigm whereby the accumulation of transcription factors that regulate both sets of genes, merely as an aspect of stochastic behavior, accumulate first on the larger proliferation-effector gene "traps," and then accumulate on the apoptosis effector genes, thereby effecting sequential activation of the 2 different gene sets. As IRF-1 and p53 levels increase, tumor suppressor proteins are first activated, followed by the activation of apoptosis-effector genes, for example during S-phase pausing for DNA repair. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more IRF-1 and p53 binding sites, thereby likewise suggesting a paradigm for transcription sequencing based on stochastic interactions of transcription factors with different gene classes. In this report, using the ENCODE database, we determined that tumor suppressor genes have a greater number of open chromatin regions and histone 3 lysine-4 trimethylation sites, consistent with the idea that a larger gene size can facilitate earlier transcriptional activation via the inclusion of more transactivator binding sites.

  12. Screening to Identify Commonly Used Chinese Herbs That Affect ERBB2 and ESR1 Gene Expression Using the Human Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Wu, Jing-Chong; Wen, Che-Sheng; Chen, Jiun-Liang; Chen, Wei-Shone; Shyr, Yi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Our aim the was to screen the commonly used Chinese herbs in order to detect changes in ERBB2 and ESR1 gene expression using MCF-7 cells. Methods. Using the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line, cell cytotoxicity and proliferation were evaluated by MTT and trypan blue exclusion assays, respectively. A luciferase reporter assay was established by transient transfecting MCF-7 cells with plasmids containing either the ERBB2 or the ESR1 promoter region linked to the luciferase gene. Chinese herbal extracts were used to treat the cells at 24 h after transfection, followed by measurement of their luciferase activity. The screening results were verified by Western blotting to measure HER2 and ERα protein expression. Results. At concentrations that induced little cytotoxicity, thirteen single herbal extracts and five compound recipes were found to increase either ERBB2 or ESR1 luciferase activity. By Western blotting, Si-Wu-Tang, Kuan-Shin-Yin, and Suan-Tsao-Ren-Tang were found to increase either HER2 or ERα protein expression. In addition, Ligusticum chuanxiong was shown to have a great effect on ERBB2 gene expression and synergistically with estrogen to stimulate MCF-7 cell growth. Conclusion. Our results provide important information that should affect clinical treatment strategies among breast cancer patients who are receiving hormonal or targeted therapies. PMID:24987437

  13. Rapid activation of the bivalent gene Sox21 requires displacement of multiple layers of gene-silencing machinery

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Harini; Ormsbee, Briana D.; Mallanna, Sunil K.; Rizzino, Angie

    2011-01-01

    The rapid formation of numerous tissues during development is highly dependent on the swift activation of key developmental regulators. Recent studies indicate that many key regulatory genes are repressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), yet poised for rapid activation due to the presence of both activating (H3K4 trimethylation) and repressive (H3K27 trimethylation) histone modifications (bivalent genes). However, little is known about bivalent gene regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of the bivalent gene Sox21, which is activated rapidly when ESCs differentiate in response to increases in Sox2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that prior to differentiation, the Sox21 gene is bound by a complex array of repressive and activating transcriptional machinery. Upon activation, all identified repressive machinery and histone modifications associated with the gene are lost, but the activating modifications and transcriptional machinery are retained. Notably, these changes do not occur when ESCs differentiate in response to retinoic acid. Moreover, ESCs lacking a functional PRC2 complex fail to activate this gene, apparently due to its association with other repressive complexes. Together, these findings suggest that bivalent genes, such as Sox21, are silenced by a complex set of redundant repressive machinery, which exit rapidly in response to appropriate differentiation signals.—Chakravarthy, H., Ormsbee, B. D., Mallanna, S. K., Rizzino, A. Rapid activation of the bivalent gene Sox21 requires displacement of multiple layers of gene-silencing machinery. PMID:20876214

  14. Novel Cationic Lipids with Enhanced Gene Delivery and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fein, David E.; Bucki, Robert; Byfield, Fitzroy; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Janmey, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic lipids facilitate plasmid delivery, and some cationic sterol-based compounds have antimicrobial activity because of their amphiphilic character. These dual functions are relevant in the context of local ongoing infection during intrapulmonary gene transfer for cystic fibrosis. The transfection activities of two cationic lipids, dexamethasone spermine (DS) and disubstituted spermine (D2S), were tested as individual components and mixtures in bovine aortic endothelial cells and A549 cells. The results showed a 3- to 7-fold improvement in transgene expression for mixtures of DS with 20 to 40 mol% D2S. D2S and coformulations with DS, dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, and DNA exhibited potent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli MG1655, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, which was maintained in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Complete bacterial killing was demonstrated at ∼5 μM, including gene delivery formulations, with 2 orders of magnitude higher tolerance before eukaryotic membrane disruption (erythrocyte hemolysis). D2S also exhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) scavenging activity resulting in significant inhibition of LPS-mediated activation of human neutrophils with 85 and 65% lower interleukin-8 released at 12 and 24 h, respectively. Mixtures of DS and D2S can improve transfection activity over common lipofection reagents, and D2S has strong antimicrobial action suited for the suppression of bacterial-mediated inflammation. PMID:20573781

  15. Phytochemicals Mediate the Expression and Activity of OCTN2 as Activators of the PPARγ/RXRα Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Qu, Jian; Yang, Rui; Ge, Meng-Xue; Mei, Yin; Zhou, Bo-Ting; Qu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Many phytochemicals exert activities as agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). This study aims to investigate whether phytochemicals are agonists of the PPARγ/RXRα pathway and modulate the target gene OCTN2. In this study, a luciferase reporter gene system was used to screen novel OCTN2 activators from 39 phytochemicals. Kaempferol, curcumin, and puerarin were found to show the significant PPRE-mediated luciferase activities (>150%) at 20 μM and showed a dose-dependent manner. Phytochemicals also elevated the mRNA and protein expression of OCTN2 in a dose-dependent fashion in colorectal cancer SW480 cells. These induction effects were gradually inhibited by PPARγ antagonist GW9662 in the luciferase reporter gene system and in SW480 cells. Moreover, the results of cell viability assay imply that three phytochemicals probably induce OCTN2 expression leading to the enhanced uptake of its substrate, oxaliplatin, thereby making cells more sensitive to oxaliplatin. The molecular docking study showed the possible binding sites of phytochemicals in PPARγ protein, and all of the docked phytochemicals fitted the same active pocket in PPARγ as troglitazone. All three phytochemicals exhibited hydrogen bonds between their polar moieties and the amino acid residues. Thus, we identified three phytochemicals as PPARγ ligands, which potentiated the expression and activity of OCTN2. PMID:27445823

  16. Regulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes introduced into intact maize tissues by microprojectiles

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Theodore M.; Roth, Bradley A.; Fromm, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    We have employed microprojectiles to deliver genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis to cells within intact aleurone and embryo tissues of maize. Clones of the A1 or Bz1 genes were introduced into aleurone tissue that lacked anthocyanins due to mutations of the endogenous A1 or Bz1 gene. Following bombardment, cells within the aleurone developed purple pigmentation, indicating that the mutation in the a1 or bz1 genotypes was corrected by the introduced gene. To analyze the expression of these genes in different genetic backgrounds, chimeric genes containing the 5′ and 3′ regions of the A1 or Bz1 genes fused to a luciferase coding region were constructed. These constructs were introduced into aleurones of genotypes carrying either dominant or recessive alleles of the C1 and R genes, which are known to regulate anthocyanin production. Levels of luciferase activity in permissive backgrounds (C1, R) were 30- to 200-fold greater than those detected in tissue carrying one or both of the recessive alleles (c1, r) of these genes. These results show that genes delivered to intact tissues by microprojectiles are regulated in a manner similar to the endogenous genes. The transfer of genes directly to intact tissues provides a rapid means for analyzing the genetic and tissue-specific regulation of gene expression. Images PMID:16594066

  17. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and induce CYP1A genes expression in human hepatocytes and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Dořičáková, Aneta; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-25

    The effects of four copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui1)(L)]NO3·H2O (1-3) and [Cu(qui2)(phen)]NO3 (4), where qui1=2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, Hqui2=2-(4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-propyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone-7-carboxamide, L=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (2), bathophenanthroline (bphen) (3), on transcriptional activities of steroid receptors, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors have been studied. The complexes (1-4) did not influence basal or ligand-inducible activities of glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, thyroid receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor, as revealed by gene reporter assays. The complexes 1 and 2 dose-dependently induced luciferase activity in stable gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, and this induction was reverted by resveratrol, indicating involvement of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the process. The complexes 1, 2 and 3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA in LS180 cells and CYP1A1/CYP1A2 in human hepatocytes through AhR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay EMSA showed that the complexes 1 and 2 transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form. Collectively, we demonstrate that the complexes 1 and 2 activate AhR and induce AhR-dependent genes in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines. In conclusion, the data presented here might be of toxicological importance, regarding the multiple roles of AhR in human physiology and pathophysiology.

  18. Adaptation of muscle gene expression to changes in contractile activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Babij, P.; Thomason, D. B.; Wong, T. S.; Morrison, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the existing literature regarding the effects of different types of physical activities on the gene expression of adult skeletal muscles leads us to conclude that each type of exercise training program has, as a result, a different phenotype, which means that there are multiple mechanisms, each producing a unique phenotype. A portion of the facts which support this position is presented and interpreted here. [Abstract translated from the original French by NASA].

  19. A new humanized in vivo model of KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis monitored using a secreted luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Siham; Zhang, Yanyan; Hugonin, Caroline; Mangean, Mallorie Depond; He, Liang; Wedeh, Ghaith; Launay, Jean-Marie; Van Rijn, Sjoerd; Würdinger, Thomas; Louache, Fawzia; Arock, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis are rare neoplasms characterized by accumulation of mast cells in at least one internal organ. The majority of systemic mastocytosis patients carry KIT D816V mutation, which activates constitutively the KIT receptor. Patient with advanced forms of systemic mastocytosis, such as aggressive systemic mastocytosis or mast cell leukemia, are poorly treated to date. Unfortunately, the lack of in vivo models reflecting KIT D816V+ advanced disease hampers pathophysiological studies and preclinical development of new therapies for such patients. Here, we describe a new in vivo model of KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis developed by transplantation of the human ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc mast cell line in NOD-SCID IL-2R g−/− mice, using Gaussia princeps luciferase as a reporter. Intravenous injection of ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc cells led, in 4 weeks, to engraftment in all injected primary recipient mice. Engrafted cells were found at high levels in bone marrow, and at lower levels in spleen, liver and peripheral blood. Disease progression was easily monitored by repeated quantification of Gaussia princeps luciferase activity in peripheral blood. This quantification evidenced a linear relationship between the number of cells injected and the neoplastic mast cell burden in mice. Interestingly, the secondary transplantation of ROSAKIT D816V-Gluc cells increased their engraftment capability. To conclude, this new in vivo model mimics at the best the features of human KIT D816V+ advanced systemic mastocytosis. In addition, it is a unique and convenient tool to study the kinetics of the disease and the potential in vivo activity of new drugs targeting neoplastic mast cells. PMID:27783996

  20. Protein sterilization method of firefly luciferase using reduced pressure and molecular sieves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Rich, E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The sterilization of the protein fruitfly luciferase under conditions that prevent denaturation is examined. Denaturation is prevented by heating the protein in contact with molecular seives and under a reduced pressure of the order of 0.00005 millimeters of mercury.

  1. Metronidazole activation and isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum electron transport genes.

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, J D; Jones, D T; Woods, D R

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli F19 recA, nitrate reductase-deficient mutant was constructed by transposon mutagenesis and shown to be resistant to metronidazole. This mutant was a most suitable host for the isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum genes on recombinant plasmids, which activated metronidazole and rendered the E. coli F19 strain sensitive to metronidazole. Twenty-five E. coli F19 clones containing different recombinant plasmids were isolated and classified into five groups on the basis of their sensitivity to metronidazole. The clones were tested for nitrate reductase, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and hydrogenase activities. DNA hybridization and restriction endonuclease mapping revealed that four of the C. acetobutylicum insert DNA fragments on recombinant plasmids were linked in an 11.1-kb chromosomal fragment. DNA sequencing and amino acid homology studies indicated that this DNA fragment contained a flavodoxin gene which encoded a protein of 160 amino acids that activated metronidazole and made the E. coli F19 mutant very sensitive to metronidazole. The flavodoxin and hydrogenase genes which are involved in electron transfer systems were linked on the 11.1-kb DNA fragment from C. acetobutylicum. Images PMID:1991710

  2. The E-screen test and the MELN gene-reporter assay used for determination of estrogenic activity in fruits and vegetables in relation to pesticide residues.

    PubMed

    Schilirò, Tiziana; Porfido, Arianna; Longo, Annalisa; Coluccia, Sara; Gilli, Giorgio

    2013-12-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may lead to adverse systemic effects by interfering with normal hormone homeostasis, and diet is considered to be among the main routes of EDC exposure. The present study investigated the total estrogenic activity of fruits and vegetables by calculating the 17-β-estradiol equivalent quantity (EEQ) using two in vitro tests: the human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 BUS) proliferation assay (E-screen test) and the luciferase-transfected human breast cancer cell line (MELN) gene-reporter assay. Of the 24 analyzed fruits and vegetables, 14 contained from 1 to 4 pesticide residues in concentrations ranging from 0.02 to 1.19 ppm, whereas the other 10 did not contain any pesticide residues. The EEQ values for all positive samples ranged from 0.010 to 0.616 μg/100g for the above in vitro tests. Our study demonstrates that estrogenic activity was present in fruits and vegetables and that the concentration of allowable pesticide residues and EEQ values were positively correlated; however, no correlation was found by comparing the estrogenic activity and the intrinsic content of phytoestrogens obtained from the available literature. A theoretical adult dietary intake of 0.7-0.9 ng EEQ/L/day from fruits and vegetables was calculated.

  3. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M.; Gazdhar, A.; Weitzel, T.; Schmid, R.; Krause, T.

    2006-12-01

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and humans.

  4. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  5. Sensation-seeking genes and physical activity in youth.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, A V; Gabriel, K P; Wang, J; Bondy, M L; Dong, Q; Wu, X; Shete, S; Spitz, M R

    2013-03-01

    Many studies examining genetic influences on physical activity (PA) have evaluated the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to the development of lifestyle-related chronic diseases, under the hypothesis that they would be associated with PA. However, PA is a multidetermined behavior and associated with a multitude of health consequences. Thus, examining a broader range of candidate genes associated with a broader range of PA correlates may provide new insights into the genetic underpinnings of PA. In this study, we focus on one such correlate - sensation-seeking behavior. Participants (N = 1130 Mexican origin youth) provided a saliva sample and data on PA and sensation-seeking tendencies in 2008-2009. Participants were genotyped for 630 functional and tagging variants in the dopamine, serotonin and cannabinoid pathways. Overall 30% of participants (males - 37.6% and females - 22.0%) reported ≥60 min of PA on 5 of 7 days. After adjusting for gender, age and population stratification, and applying the Bayesian False Discovery Probability approach for assessing noteworthiness, four gene variants were significantly associated with PA. In a multivariable model, being male, having higher sensation-seeking tendencies and at least one copy of the minor allele for SNPs in angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene [ACE; rs8066276 odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; P = 0.012] and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene (TPH2; rs11615016 OR = 1.73; P = 0.021) were associated with increased likelihood of meeting PA recommendations. Participants with at least one copy of the minor allele for SNPs in synaptosomal-associated protein 25 gene (SNAP25; rs363035 OR = 0.53; P = 0.005) and cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1; rs6454672 OR = 0.62; P = 0.022) have decreased likelihood of meeting PA recommendations. Our findings extend current knowledge of the complex relationship between PA and possible genetic underpinnings.

  6. F-18 Labeled Diabody-Luciferase Fusion Proteins for Optical-ImmunoPET

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Anna M

    2013-01-18

    The goal of the proposed work is to develop novel dual-labeled molecular imaging probes for multimodality imaging. Based on small, engineered antibodies called diabodies, these probes will be radioactively tagged with Fluorine-18 for PET imaging, and fused to luciferases for optical (bioluminescence) detection. Performance will be evaluated and validated using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Multimodality probes for optical-PET imaging will be based on diabodies that are dually labeled with 18F for PET detection and fused to luciferases for optical imaging. 1) Two sets of fusion proteins will be built, targeting the cell surface markers CEA or HER2. Coelenterazine-based luciferases and variant forms will be evaluated in combination with native substrate and analogs, in order to obtain two distinct probes recognizing different targets with different spectral signatures. 2) Diabody-luciferase fusion proteins will be labeled with 18F using amine reactive [18F]-SFB produced using a novel microwave-assisted, one-pot method. 3) Sitespecific, chemoselective radiolabeling methods will be devised, to reduce the chance that radiolabeling will inactivate either the target-binding properties or the bioluminescence properties of the diabody-luciferase fusion proteins. 4) Combined optical and PET imaging of these dual modality probes will be evaluated and validated in vitro and in vivo using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Each imaging modality has its strengths and weaknesses. Development and use of dual modality probes allows optical imaging to benefit from the localization and quantitation offered by the PET mode, and enhances the PET imaging by enabling simultaneous detection of more than one probe.

  7. Firefly luciferase in chemical biology: A compendium of inhibitors, mechanistic evaluation of chemotypes, and suggested use as a reporter

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Natasha; Shen, Min; Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton; Lovell, Scott; Auld, Douglas S.; Inglese, James

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Firefly luciferase (FLuc) is frequently used as a reporter in high-throughput screening assays owing to the exceptional sensitivity, dynamic range, and rapid measurement that bioluminescence affords. However, interaction of small molecules with FLuc has, to some extent, confounded its use in chemical biology and drug discovery. To identify and characterize chemotypes interacting with FLuc, we determined potency values for 360,864 compounds, found in the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository, available in PubChem. FLuc inhibitory activity was observed for 12% of this library with discernible SAR. Characterization of 151 inhibitors demonstrated a variety of inhibition modes including FLuc-catalyzed formation of multisubstrate-adduct enzyme inhibitor complexes. As in some cell-based FLuc reporter assays compounds acting as FLuc inhibitors yield paradoxical luminescence increases, data on compounds acquired from FLuc-dependent assays requires careful analysis as described in this report. PMID:22921073

  8. An activating transcription factor of Litopenaeus vannamei involved in WSSV genes Wsv059 and Wsv166 regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Yun; Yue, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Bi, Hai-Tao; Chen, Yong-Gui; Weng, Shao-Ping; Chan, Siuming; He, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2014-12-01

    Members of activating transcription factor/cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate response element binding protein (ATF/CREB) family are induced by various stress signals and function as effector molecules. Consequently, cellular changes occur in response to discrete sets of instructions. In this work, we found an ATF transcription factor in Litopenaeus vannamei designated as LvATFβ. The full-length cDNA of LvATFβ was 1388 bp long with an open reading frame of 939 bp that encoded a putative 313 amino acid protein. The protein contained a basic region-leucine zipper (bZip) domain that was a common feature among ATF/CREB transcription factors. LvATFβ was highly expressed in intestines, gills, and heart. LvATFβ expression was dramatically upregulated by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Pull-down assay revealed that LvATFβ had strong affinity to promoters of WSSV genes, namely, wsv059 and wsv166. Dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that LvATFβ could upregulate the expression of wsv059 and wsv166. Knocked down LvATFβ resulted in decreased expression of wsv059 and wsv166 in WSSV-challenged L. vannamei. Knocked down expression of wsv059 and wsv166 by RNA interference inhibited the replication and reduce the mortality of L. vannamei during WSSV challenge inoculation. The copy numbers of WSSV in wsv059 and wsv166 knocked down group were significant lower than in the control. These results suggested that LvATFβ may be involved in WSSV replication by regulating the expression of wsv059 and wsv166.

  9. Photodynamic therapy using luciferase nanoconjugate as a treatment for colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koritarov, Tamara

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) has proven itself in previous studies to be a successful therapeutic treatment for surface tumors, but its effectiveness is limited to only shallow depths that allow for the penetration of light. This study demonstrates that we have improved upon the conventional method of PDT and have overcome the previous depth limitation by creating the light at the location of the tumor in situ. We conjugated a bioluminescent protein, Luciferase, to a semiconductor nanoparticle, TiO2, and with a cell specific antibody, anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody C225. The nanoconjugate, TiDoL-C225, was then activated by ATP and Luciferin in a reaction that creates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induces apoptosis in the tumor cells. We created the optimal nanoconjugate synthesis protocol to make TiDoL and TiDoL-C225 for use in the PDT treatment. The TiDoL-C225 nanoconjugate is able to bind specifically to colon caner cells as the C225 antibody recognizes EGFR expressed at the surface of the cells, and further, when activated it will react only with the tumor cells. The optimal cell staining protocols were developed to visualize the treatment process and later analyze with the laser confocal microscope. The TiDoL nanoconjugate was found to only be operational and effective at killing tumor cells after being activated by Luciferin and ATP, which then enhances the control we have over the therapy. The TiDoL-C225 nanoconjugate increases the efficacy of binding to tumor cells and the speed of the reaction in the cells to begin apoptosis, even in lower concentrations when compared to the free TiDoL nanoconjugate. Finally, our PDT technique allowed us to monitor the tumor cells as they begin to undergo apoptosis in less than five minutes after the Luciferin was added to activate the reaction. The advantage of our method of PDT with the TiDoL-C225 nanoconjugate is that it can be used for early detection as well as developed into an effective treatment for cancers in all

  10. Androgen receptor stimulates bone sialoprotein (BSP) gene transcription via cAMP response element and activator protein 1/glucocorticoid response elements.

    PubMed

    Takai, Hideki; Nakayama, Youhei; Kim, Dong-Soon; Arai, Masato; Araki, Shouta; Mezawa, Masaru; Nakajima, Yu; Kato, Naoko; Masunaga, Hiroshi; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2007-09-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an early marker of osteoblast differentiation. Androgens are steroid hormones that are essential for skeletal development. The androgen receptor (AR) is a transcription factor and a member of the steroid receptor superfamily that plays an important role in male sexual differentiation and prostate cell proliferation. To determine the molecular mechanism involved in the stimulation of bone formation, we have analyzed the effects of androgens and AR effects on BSP gene transcription. AR protein levels were increased after AR overexpression in ROS17/2.8 cells. BSP mRNA levels were increased by AR overexpression. However, the endogenous and overexpressed BSP mRNA levels were not changed by DHT (10(-8) M, 24 h). Whereas luciferase (LUC) activities in all constructs, including a short construct (nts -116 to +60), were increased by AR overexpression, the basal and LUC activities enhanced by AR overexpression were not induced by DHT (10(-8)M, 24 h). The effect of AR overexpression was abrogated by 2 bp mutations in either the cAMP response element (CRE) or activator protein 1 (AP1)/glucocorticoid response element (GRE). Gel shift analyses showed that AR overexpression increased binding to the CRE and AP1/GRE elements. Notably, the CRE-protein complexes were supershifted by phospho-CREB antibody, and CREB, c-Fos, c-Jun, and AR antibodies disrupted the complexes formation. The AP1/GRE-protein complexes were supershifted by c-Fos antibody and c-Jun, and AR antibodies disrupted the complexes formation. These studies demonstrate that AR stimulates BSP gene transcription by targeting the CRE and AP1/GRE elements in the promoter of the rat BSP gene.

  11. EIN3 and ORE1 Accelerate Degreening during Ethylene-Mediated Leaf Senescence by Directly Activating Chlorophyll Catabolic Genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Li, Zhongpeng; Yang, Zhen; Chen, Junyi; Wu, Shouxin; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Shan; Gao, Jiong; Ren, Guodong; Kuai, Benke; Zhou, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Degreening, caused by chlorophyll degradation, is the most obvious symptom of senescing leaves. Chlorophyll degradation can be triggered by endogenous and environmental cues, and ethylene is one of the major inducers. ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) is a key transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway. It was previously reported that EIN3, miR164, and a NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) transcription factor ORE1/NAC2 constitute a regulatory network mediating leaf senescence. However, how this network regulates chlorophyll degradation at molecular level is not yet elucidated. Here we report a feed-forward regulation of chlorophyll degradation that involves EIN3, ORE1, and chlorophyll catabolic genes (CCGs). Gene expression analysis showed that the induction of three major CCGs, NYE1, NYC1 and PAO, by ethylene was largely repressed in ein3 eil1 double mutant. Dual-luciferase assay revealed that EIN3 significantly enhanced the promoter activity of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Furthermore, Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) indicated that EIN3 could directly bind to NYE1, NYC1 and PAO promoters. These results reveal that EIN3 functions as a positive regulator of CCG expression during ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation. Interestingly, ORE1, a senescence regulator which is a downstream target of EIN3, could also activate the expression of NYE1, NYC1 and PAO by directly binding to their promoters in EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, EIN3 and ORE1 promoted NYE1 and NYC1 transcriptions in an additive manner. These results suggest that ORE1 is also involved in the direct regulation of CCG transcription. Moreover, ORE1 activated the expression of ACS2, a major ethylene biosynthesis gene, and subsequently promoted ethylene production. Collectively, our work reveals that EIN3, ORE1 and CCGs constitute a coherent feed-forward loop involving in the robust regulation of ethylene-mediated chlorophyll degradation

  12. High-throughput Screening for Chemical Modulators of Post-transcriptionally Regulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sidarovich, Viktoryia; Adami, Valentina; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation have a profound impact on genes expression. However, commonly adopted cell-based screening assays focus on transcriptional regulation, being essentially aimed at the identification of promoter-targeting molecules. As a result, post-transcriptional mechanisms are largely uncovered by gene expression targeted drug development. Here we describe a cell-based assay aimed at investigating the role of the 3' untranslated region (3’ UTR) in the modulation of the fate of its mRNA, and at identifying compounds able to modify it. The assay is based on the use of a luciferase reporter construct containing the 3’ UTR of a gene of interest stably integrated into a disease-relevant cell line. The protocol is divided into two parts, with the initial focus on the primary screening aimed at the identification of molecules affecting luciferase activity after 24 hr of treatment. The second part of the protocol describes the counter-screening necessary to discriminate compounds modulating luciferase activity specifically through the 3’ UTR. In addition to the detailed protocol and representative results, we provide important considerations about the assay development and the validation of the hit(s) on the endogenous target. The described cell-based reporter gene assay will allow scientists to identify molecules modulating protein levels via post-transcriptional mechanisms dependent on a 3’ UTR. PMID:25867708

  13. Activation of Tax protein by c-Jun-N-terminal kinase is not dependent on the presence or absence of the early growth response-1 gene product.

    PubMed

    Parra, Eduardo; Gutierréz, Luís; Ferreira, Jorge

    2016-02-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 plays a major role in the pathogenesis of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive neoplasia of CD4+ T cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the EGR-1 pathway is involved in the regulation of Tax-induced JNK expression in human Jurkat T cells transfected to express the Tax protein in the presence or absence of PMA or ionomycin. Overexpression of EGR-1 in Jurkat cells transfected to express Tax, promoted the activation of several genes, with the most potent being those that contained AP-1 (Jun/c-Fos), whereas knockdown of endogenous EGR-1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) somewhat reduced Tax-mediated JNK-1 transcription. Additionally, luciferase-based AP-1 and NF-κB reporter gene assays demonstrated that inhibition of EGR-1 expression by an siRNA did not affect the transcriptional activity of a consensus sequence of either AP-1 or NF-κB. On the other hand, the apoptosis assay, using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) as an inducer of apoptosis, confirmed that siRNA against EGR-1 failed to suppress ATRA-induced apoptosis in Jurkat and Jurkat-Tax cells, as noted by the low levels of both DEVDase activity and DNA fragmentation, indicating that the induction of apoptosis by ATRA was Egr-1-independent. Finally, our data showed that activation of Tax by JNK-1 was not dependent on the EGR-1 cascade of events, suggesting that EGR-1 is important but not a determinant for the activity for Tax-induced proliferation of Jurkat cells.

  14. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation.

  15. Transcriptional activation of ribosomal RNA genes during compensatory renal hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Ouellette, A.J.; Moonka, R.; Zelenetz, A.; Malt, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The overall rate of rDNA transcription increases by 50% during the first 24 hours of compensatory renal hypertrophy in the mouse. To study mechanisms of ribosome accumulation after uninephrectomy, transcription rates were measured in isolated kidneys by transcriptional runoff. /sup 32/P-labeled nascent transcripts were hybridized to blots containing linearized, denatured cloned rDNA, and hybridization was quantitated autoradiographically and by direct counting. Overall transcriptional activity of rDNA was increased by 30% above control levels at 6 hrs after nephrectomy and by 50% at 12, 18, and 24 hrs after operation. Hybridizing RNA was insensitive to inhibiby alpha-amanitin, and no hybridization was detected to vector DNA. Thus, accelerated rDNA transcription is one regulatory element in the accretion of ribosomes in renal growth, and the regulatory event is an early event. Mechanisms of activation may include enhanced transcription of active genes or induction of inactive DNA.

  16. Reporter gene assays for algal-derived toxins.

    PubMed

    Fairey, E R; Ramsdell, J S

    1999-01-01

    We have modified the cell-based directed cytotoxicity assay for sodium channel and calcium channel active phycotoxins using a c-fos-luciferase reporter gene construct. In this report we describe the conceptual basis to the development of reporter gene assays for algal-derived toxins and summarize both published and unpublished data using this method. N2A mouse neuroblastoma cells, which express voltage-dependent sodium channels, were stably transfected with the reporter gene c-fos-luc, which contains the firefly luciferase gene under the transcriptional regulation of the human c-fos response element. The characteristics of the N2A reporter gene assay were determined by dose response with brevetoxin and ciguatoxin. Brevetoxin-1 and ciguatoxin-1 induced c-fos-luc with an EC50 of 4.6 and 3.0 ng ml(-1), respectively. Saxitoxin caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of brevetoxin-1 induction of c-fos-luc with an EC50 of 3.5 ng ml(-1). GH4C1 rat pituitary cells, which lack voltage-dependent sodium channels but express voltage-dependent calcium channels, were also stably transfected with the c-fos-luc. GH4C1 cells expressing c-fos-luciferase were responsive to maitotoxin (1 ng ml(-1)) and a putative toxin produced by Pfiesteria piscicida. Although reporter gene assays are not designed to replace existing detection methods used to measure toxin activity in seafood, they do provide a valuable means to screen algal cultures for toxin activity, to conduct assay-guided fractionation and to characterize pharmacologic properties of algal toxins.

  17. Comparison of human optimized bacterial luciferase, firefly luciferase, and green fluorescent protein for continuous imaging of cell culture and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan M.; Hahn, Ruth E.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Baek, Seung J.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent reporter systems have enabled the rapid and continued growth of the optical imaging field over the last two decades. Of particular interest has been noninvasive signal detection from mammalian tissues under both cell culture and whole animal settings. Here we report on the advantages and limitations of imaging using a recently introduced bacterial luciferase (lux) reporter system engineered for increased bioluminescent expression in the mammalian cellular environment. Comparison with the bioluminescent firefly luciferase (Luc) system and green fluorescent protein system under cell culture conditions demonstrated a reduced average radiance, but maintained a more constant level of bioluminescent output without the need for substrate addition or exogenous excitation to elicit the production of signal. Comparison with the Luc system following subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection into nude mice hosts demonstrated the ability to obtain similar detection patterns with in vitro experiments at cell population sizes above 2.5 × 104 cells but at the cost of increasing overall image integration time. PMID:21529093

  18. Recovering glycoside hydrolase genes from active tundra cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pinnell, Lee J; Dunford, Eric; Ronan, Patrick; Hausner, Martina; Neufeld, Josh D

    2014-07-01

    Bacteria responsible for cellulose hydrolysis in situ are poorly understood, largely because of the relatively recent development of cultivation-independent methods for their detection and characterization. This study combined DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) and metagenomics for identifying active bacterial communities that assimilated carbon from glucose and cellulose in Arctic tundra microcosms. Following DNA-SIP, bacterial fingerprint analysis of gradient fractions confirmed isotopic enrichment. Sequenced fingerprint bands and clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes identified active bacterial taxa associated with cellulose-associated labelled DNA, including Bacteroidetes (Sphingobacteriales), Betaproteobacteria (Burkholderiales), Alphaproteobacteria (Caulobacteraceae), and Chloroflexi (Anaerolineaceae). We also compared glycoside hydrolase metagenomic profiles from bulk soil and heavy DNA recovered from DNA-SIP incubations. Active populations consuming [(13)C]glucose and [(13)C]cellulose were distinct, based on ordinations of light and heavy DNA. Metagenomic analysis demonstrated a ∼3-fold increase in the relative abundance of glycoside hydrolases in DNA-SIP libraries over bulk-soil libraries. The data also indicate that multiple displacement amplification introduced bias into the resulting metagenomic analysis. This research identified DNA-SIP incubation conditions for glucose and cellulose that were suitable for Arctic tundra soil and confirmed that DNA-SIP enrichment can increase target gene frequencies in metagenomic libraries.

  19. Mechanisms guiding Polycomb activities during gene silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    He, Chongsheng; Huang, Hai; Xu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins act in an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic pathway that regulates chromatin structures in plants and animals, repressing many developmentally important genes by modifying histones. PcG proteins can form at least two multiprotein complexes: Polycomb Repressive Complexes 1 and 2 (PRC1 and PRC2, respectively). The functions of Arabidopsis thaliana PRCs have been characterized in multiple stages of development and have diverse roles in response to environmental stimuli. Recently, the mechanism that precisely regulates Arabidopsis PcG activity was extensively studied. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries in the regulations of PcG at the three different layers: the recruitment of PRCs to specific target loci, the polyubiquitination and degradation of PRC2, and the antagonism of PRC2 activity by the Trithorax group proteins. Current knowledge indicates that the powerful activity of the PcG pathway is strictly controlled for specific silencing of target genes during plant development and in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:24312106

  20. Promoter analysis of the DHCR24 (3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase) gene: characterization of SREBP (sterol-regulatoryelement-binding protein)-mediated activation

    PubMed Central

    Daimiel, Lidia A.; Fernández-Suárez, María E.; Rodríguez-Acebes, Sara; Crespo, Lorena; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Gómez-Coronado, Diego; Martínez-Botas, Javier

    2012-01-01

    DHCR24 (3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase) catalyses the reduction of the C-24 double bond of sterol intermediates during cholesterol biosynthesis. DHCR24 has also been involved in cell growth, senescence and cellular response to oncogenic and oxidative stress. Despite its important roles, little is known about the transcriptional mechanisms controlling DHCR24 gene expression. We analysed the proximal promoter region and the cholesterol-mediated regulation of DHCR24. A putative SRE (sterol-regulatory element) at −98/−90 bp of the transcription start site was identified. Other putative regulatory elements commonly found in SREBP (SRE-binding protein)-targeted genes were also identified. Sterol responsiveness was analysed by luciferase reporter assays of approximately 1 kb 5′-flanking region of the human DHCR24 gene in HepG2 and SK-N-MC cells. EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) and ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) assays demonstrated cholesterol-dependent recruitment and binding of SREBPs to the putative SRE. Given the presence of several CACCC-boxes in the DHCR24 proximal promoter, we assessed the role of KLF5 (Krüppel-like factor 5) in androgen-regulated DHCR24 expression. DHT (dihydrotestosterone) increased DHCR24 expression synergistically with lovastatin. However, DHT was unable to activate the DHCR24 proximal promoter, whereas KLF5 did, indicating that this mechanism is not involved in the androgen-induced stimulation of DHCR24 expression. The results of the present study allow the elucidation of the mechanism of regulation of the DHCR24 gene by cholesterol availability and identification of other putative cis-acting elements which may be relevant for the regulation of DHCR24 expression. PMID:23050906

  1. Resveratrol inhibits LXRα-dependent hepatic lipogenesis through novel antioxidant Sestrin2 gene induction

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, So Hee; Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Seo, Kyuhwa; Shin, Sang Mi; Cho, Il Je; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2013-08-15

    Liver X receptor-α (LXRα), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors, regulates de novo fatty acid synthesis that leads to stimulate hepatic steatosis. Although, resveratrol has beneficial effects on metabolic disease, it is not known whether resveratrol affects LXRα-dependent lipogenic gene expression. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanism. Resveratrol inhibited the ability of LXRα to activate sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and thereby inhibited target gene expression in hepatocytes. Moreover, resveratrol decreased LXRα–RXRα DNA binding activity and LXRE-luciferase transactivation. Resveratrol is known to activate Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), although its precise mechanism of action remains controversial. We found that the ability of resveratrol to repress T0901317-induced SREBP-1c expression was not dependent on AMPK and Sirt1. It is well established that hepatic steatosis is associated with antioxidant and redox signaling. Our data showing that expression of Sestrin2 (Sesn2), which is a novel antioxidant gene, was significantly down-regulated in the livers of high-fat diet-fed mice. Moreover, resveratrol up-regulated Sesn2 expression, but not Sesn1 and Sesn3. Sesn2 overexpression repressed LXRα-activated SREBP-1c expression and LXRE-luciferase activity. Finally, Sesn2 knockdown using siRNA abolished the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-induced FAS luciferase gene transactivation. We conclude that resveratrol affects Sesn2 gene induction and contributes to the inhibition of LXRα-mediated hepatic lipogenesis. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of resveratrol in LXRα-mediated lipogenesis. • Resveratrol attenuated the ability of the LXRα-mediated lipogenic gene expression. • Resveratrol’s effects on T090-induced lipogenesis is not dependent on Sirt1 or AMPK.

  2. Robust heat-inducible gene expression by two endogenous hsp70-derived promoters in transgenic Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Carpenetti, Tiffany L. G.; Aryan, Azadeh; Myles, Kevin M.; Adelman, Zach N.

    2011-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is an important vector of the viruses that cause dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and yellow fever. Reverse genetic approaches to the study of gene function in this mosquito have been limited by the lack of a robust inducible promoter to allow precise temporal control over a protein-encoding or hairpin RNA transgene. Likewise, investigations into the molecular and biochemical basis of vector competence would benefit from the ability to activate an anti-pathogen molecule at specific times during infection. We have characterized the ability of genomic sequences derived from two Ae. aegypti hsp70 genes to drive heat-inducible expression of a reporter in both transient and germline transformation contexts. AaHsp70-luciferase transcripts accumulated specifically after heat shock, and displayed a pattern of rapid induction and decay similar to endogenous AaHsp70 genes. Luciferase expression in transgenic Ae. aegypti increased by ∼25-50 fold in whole adults by four hours after heat-shock, with significant activity (∼20 fold) remaining at 24 hr. Heat-induced expression was even more dramatic in midgut tissues, with one strain showing a ∼2500-fold increase in luciferase activity. The AaHsp70 promoters described could be valuable for gene function studies as well as for the precise timing of the expression of anti-pathogen molecules. PMID:22142225

  3. Rapid activation of the bivalent gene Sox21 requires displacement of multiple layers of gene-silencing machinery.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Harini; Ormsbee, Briana D; Mallanna, Sunil K; Rizzino, Angie

    2011-01-01

    The rapid formation of numerous tissues during development is highly dependent on the swift activation of key developmental regulators. Recent studies indicate that many key regulatory genes are repressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), yet poised for rapid activation due to the presence of both activating (H3K4 trimethylation) and repressive (H3K27 trimethylation) histone modifications (bivalent genes). However, little is known about bivalent gene regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of the bivalent gene Sox21, which is activated rapidly when ESCs differentiate in response to increases in Sox2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that prior to differentiation, the Sox21 gene is bound by a complex array of repressive and activating transcriptional machinery. Upon activation, all identified repressive machinery and histone modifications associated with the gene are lost, but the activating modifications and transcriptional machinery are retained. Notably, these changes do not occur when ESCs differentiate in response to retinoic acid. Moreover, ESCs lacking a functional PRC2 complex fail to activate this gene, apparently due to its association with other repressive complexes. Together, these findings suggest that bivalent genes, such as Sox21, are silenced by a complex set of redundant repressive machinery, which exit rapidly in response to appropriate differentiation signals.

  4. Macrophage nitric oxide synthase gene: two upstream regions mediate induction by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, C J; Alley, E W; Raval, P; Snowman, A M; Snyder, S H; Russell, S W; Murphy, W J

    1993-10-15

    The promoter region of the mouse gene for macrophage-inducible nitric oxide synthase (mac-NOS; EC 1.14.13.39) has been characterized. A putative TATA box is 30 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Computer analysis reveals numerous potential binding sites for transcription factors, many of them associated with stimuli that induce mac-NOS expression. To localize functionally important portions of the regulatory region, we constructed deletion mutants of the mac-NOS 5' flanking region and placed them upstream of a luciferase reporter gene. The macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, when transfected with a minimal promoter construct, expresses little luciferase activity when stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), or both. Maximal expression depends on two discrete regulatory regions upstream of the putative TATA box. Region I (position -48 to -209) increases luciferase activity approximately 75-fold over the minimal promoter construct. Region I contains LPS-related responsive elements, including a binding site for nuclear factor interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and the kappa B binding site for NF-kappa B, suggesting that this region regulates LPS-induced expression of the mac-NOS gene. Region II (position -913 to -1029) alone does not increase luciferase expression, but together with region I it causes an additional 10-fold increase in expression. Together the two regions increase expression 750-fold over activity obtained from a minimal promoter construct. Region II contains motifs for binding IFN-related transcription factors and thus probably is responsible for IFN-mediated regulation of LPS-induced mac-NOS. Delineation of these two cooperative regions explains at the level of transcription how IFN-gamma and LPS act in concert to induce maximally the mac-NOS gene and, furthermore, how IFN-gamma augments the inflammatory response to LPS.

  5. Inhibition of retinoic acid-induced activation of 3' human HOXB genes by antisense oligonucleotides affects sequential activation of genes located upstream in the four HOX clusters.

    PubMed Central

    Faiella, A; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F; Boncinelli, E

    1994-01-01

    Most homeobox genes belonging to the Hox family are sequentially activated in embryonal carcinoma cells upon treatment with retinoic acid. Genes located at the 3' end of each one of the four Hox clusters are activated first, whereas upstream Hox genes are activated progressively later. This activation has been extensively studied for human HOX genes in the NT2/D1 cell line and shown to take place at the transcriptional level. To understand the molecular mechanisms of sequential HOX gene activation in these cells, we tried to modulate the expression of 3' HOX genes through the use of antisense oligonucleotides added to the culture medium. We chose the HOXB locus. A 5- to 15-fold reduction of the expression of HOXB1 and HOXB3 was sufficient to produce a significant inhibition of the activation of the upstream HOXB genes, as well as of their paralogs in the HOXA, HOXC, and HOXD clusters. Conversely, no effect was detectable on downstream HOX genes. The extent of this inhibition increased for progressively more-5' genes. The stability of the corresponding mRNAs appeared to be unaffected, supporting the idea that the observed effect might be mediated at the transcriptional level. These data suggest a cascade model of progressive activation of Hox genes, with a 3'-to-5' polarity. Images PMID:7911240

  6. Hormonal activity of polycyclic musks evaluated by reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taiki; Iida, Mitsuru; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Kohra, Shinya; Takao, Yuji; Takemasa, Takehiro; Arizono, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic musk fragrance compounds, such as polycyclic musks (PCMs), are a group of chemicals used extensively as personal care products, and can be found in the environment and the human body. PCMs, such as 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexa-methylcyclopenta-gamma-2-benzopyran (HHCB) and 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyltetralin (AHTN), are known to have agonistic activities toward human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha) and hERbeta, and have antagonistic activity toward the human androgen receptor (hAR), as shown in several reporter gene assays. However, little is known about the interaction of PCMs with the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR), and the hormonal effects of other PCMs except for HHCB and AHTN. In this study, we focus on the interactions of six PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, 4-acetyl-1,1-dimethyl-6-tert-butyl-indan (ADBI), 6-acetyl-1,1,2,3,3,5-hexamethylindan (AHMI), 6,7-dihydro-1,1,2,3,3-pentamethyl-4(5H)-indanone (DPMI), and 5-acetyl-1,1,2,6-tetramethyl-3-isopropy-lindan (ATII) with hERalpha, hAR, and hTRbeta by in vitro reporter gene assay using Chinese hamster ovary cells. All the samples were found to be agonists toward hERalpha, whereas no agonistic activities of these PCMs for hAR and hTRbeta were observed. No antagonistic activities for hERalpha and hTRbeta were observed at the concentrations tested. However, several PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, ATII, ADBI, and AHMI, showed dose-dependent antagonistic activities for hAR, and the IC50 values of these compounds were estimated to be 1.0 x 10(-7), 1.5 x 10(-7), 1.4 x 10(-7), 9.8 x 10(-6), and 1.4 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The results suggest that these PCMs interact with hERalpha and hAR but have no hormonal effect on hTRbeta. This is the first report on the agonistic and antagonistic activities of ATII, ADBI, AHMI, and DPMI for hERalpha and hAR as determined by in vitro reporter gene assay using stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  7. A Bayesian Framework for the Classification of Microbial Gene Activity States

    PubMed Central

    Disselkoen, Craig; Greco, Brian; Cook, Kaitlyn; Koch, Kristin; Lerebours, Reginald; Viss, Chase; Cape, Joshua; Held, Elizabeth; Ashenafi, Yonatan; Fischer, Karen; Acosta, Allyson; Cunningham, Mark; Best, Aaron A.; DeJongh, Matthew; Tintle, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous methods for classifying gene activity states based on gene expression data have been proposed for use in downstream applications, such as incorporating transcriptomics data into metabolic models in order to improve resulting flux predictions. These methods often attempt to classify gene activity for each gene in each experimental condition as belonging to one of two states: active (the gene product is part of an active cellular mechanism) or inactive (the cellular mechanism is not active). These existing methods of classifying gene activity states suffer from multiple limitations, including enforcing unrealistic constraints on the overall proportions of active and inactive genes, failing to leverage a priori knowledge of gene co-regulation, failing to account for differences between genes, and failing to provide statistically meaningful confidence estimates. We propose a flexible Bayesian approach to classifying gene activity states based on a Gaussian mixture model. The model integrates genome-wide transcriptomics data from multiple conditions and information about gene co-regulation to provide activity state confidence estimates for each gene in each condition. We compare the performance of our novel method to existing methods on both simulated data and real data from 907 E. coli gene expression arrays, as well as a comparison with experimentally measured flux values in 29 conditions, demonstrating that our method provides more consistent and accurate results than existing methods across a variety of metrics. PMID:27555837

  8. Cloning and analysis of rat osteoclast inhibitory lectin gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Quan, Jin-Xing; Zheng, Fang; Li, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Li-Ling; Sun, Zi-Yang; Jiao, Yan-Li; Wang, Bao-Li

    2009-03-01

    Osteoclast inhibitory lectin (OCIL) is a novel regulator of bone remodeling, however, little is known concerning how OCIL is regulated to date. In this study, approximately 4.4 kb of the 5'-flanking sequence of rat OCIL gene was cloned into the promoter-less reporter vector pGL3-basic and transiently transfected into three different cell lines. The differences in the levels of luciferase activity paralleled well with the levels of OCIL mRNA expression in these cells, suggesting that the regulation of rat OCIL gene expression occurs mainly at the transcriptional level. Additional luciferase assays using a series of constructs containing unidirectionally deleted fragments showed that the construct-1819/pGL3 (-1819 to +118) exhibited the highest luciferase activity, suggesting the presence of functional promoter in this region. The region from -4370 to -2805 might contain negative regulatory elements, while the region from -1819 to -1336 might have important positive regulatory elements that enhance OCIL transcription. Sequence analysis of the promoter revealed the absence of both TATA and CAAT boxes. However, in the proximal promoter region (-81 to +118), several potential transcription factor binding sites that may be responsible for the basal transcriptional activity of rat OCIL promoter were observed. The promoter contains several potential Sp1 binding sites, and cotransfection of a shRNA expression plasmid that knockdowns Sp1 significantly reduced OCIL promoter activity and endogenous gene expression and moreover, overexpressing Sp7, a Sp1 family member that also binds to Sp1 binding sequence, increased OCIL promoter activity and gene expression, suggesting a role of Sp1 family proteins in regulation of OCIL transcription.

  9. Structure-activity relationship in cationic lipid mediated gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Heyes, James; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-07-01

    Non-viral synthetic vectors for gene delivery represent a safer alternative to viral vectors. Their main drawback is the low transfection efficiency, especially in vivo. Among the non-viral vectors currently in use, the cationic liposomes composed of cationic lipids are the most common. This review discusses the physicochemical properties of cationic lipids, the formation, macrostructure and specific parameters of the corresponding formulated liposomes, and the effect of all these parameters on transfection efficiency. The optimisation of liposomal vectors requires both the understanding of the biological variables involved in the transfection process, and the effect of the structural elements of the cationic lipids on these biological variables. The biological barriers relevant for in vitro and in vivo transfection are identified, and solutions to overcome them based on rational design of the cationic lipids are discussed. The review focuses on the relationship between the structure of the cationic lipid and the transfection activity. The structure is analysed in a modular manner. The hydrophobic domain, the cationic head group, the backbone that acts as a scaffold for the other domains, the linkers between backbone, hydrophobic domain and cationic head group, the polyethyleneglycol chains and the targeting moiety are identified as distinct elements of the cationic lipids used in gene therapy. The main chemical functionalities used to built these domains, as well as overall molecular features such as architecture and geometry, are presented. Studies of structure-activity relationships of each cationic lipid domain, including the authors', and the trends identified by these studies, help furthering the understanding of the mechanism governing the formation and behaviour of cationic liposomes in gene delivery, and therefore the rational design of new improved cationic lipids vectors capable of achieving clinical significance.

  10. GeneSet2miRNA: finding the signature of cooperative miRNA activities in the gene lists

    PubMed Central

    Antonov, Alexey V.; Dietmann, Sabine; Wong, Philip; Lutter, Dominik; Mewes, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    GeneSet2miRNA is the first web-based tool which is able to identify whether or not a gene list has a signature of miRNA-regulatory activity. As input, GeneSet2miRNA accepts a list of genes. As output, a list of miRNA-regulatory models is provided. A miRNA-regulatory model is a group of miRNAs (single, pair, triplet or quadruplet) that is predicted to regulate a significant subset of genes from the submitted list. GeneSet2miRNA provides a user friendly dialog-driven web page submission available for several model organisms. GeneSet2miRNA is freely available at http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/proj/gene2mir/. PMID:19420064

  11. Crystal structure of a flavoprotein related to the subunits of bacterial luciferase.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, S A; James, M N; O'Kane, D J; Lee, J

    1993-01-01

    The molecular structure of the luxF protein from the bioluminescent bacterium Photobacterium leiognathi has been determined by X-ray diffraction techniques and refined to a conventional R-factor of 17.8% at 2.3 A resolution. The 228 amino acid polypeptide exists as a symmetrical homodimer and 33% of the monomer's solvent-accessible surface area is buried upon dimerization. The monomer displays a novel fold that contains a central seven-stranded beta-barrel. The solvent-exposed surface of the monomer is covered by seven alpha-helices, whereas the dimer interface is primarily a flat surface composed of beta-strands. The protein monomer binds two molecules of flavin mononucleotide, each of which has C6 of the flavin isoalloxazine moiety covalently attached to the C3' carbon atom of myristic acid. Both myristyl groups of these adducts are buried within the hydrophobic core of the protein. One of the cofactors contributes to interactions at the dimer interface. The luxF protein displays considerable amino acid sequence homology with both alpha- and beta-subunits of bacterial luciferase, especially the beta-subunit. Conserved amino acid residues shared between luxF and the luciferase subunits cluster predominantly in two distinct regions of the luxF protein molecule. These homologous regions in the luciferase subunits probably share a three-dimensional fold similar to that of the luxF protein. Images PMID:8491169

  12. Tandem orientation of duplicated xanthine dehydrogenase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana: differential gene expression and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hesberg, Christine; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian

    2004-04-02

    Xanthine dehydrogenase from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed on molecular and biochemical levels. Whereas most other organisms appear to own only one gene for xanthine dehydrogenase A. thaliana possesses two genes in tandem orientation spaced by 704 base pairs. The cDNAs as well as the proteins AtXDH1 and AtXDH2 share an overall identity of 93% and show high homologies to xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms. Whereas AtXDH2 mRNA is expressed constitutively, alterations of AtXDH1 transcript levels were observed at various stresses like drought, salinity, cold, and natural senescence, but also after abscisic acid treatment. Transcript alteration did not mandatorily result in changes of xanthine dehydrogenase activities. Whereas salt treatment had no effect on xanthine dehydrogenase activities, cold stress caused a decrease, but desiccation and senescence caused a strong increase of activities in leaves. Because AtXDH1 presumably is the more important isoenzyme in A. thaliana it was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and used for biochemical studies. AtXDH1 protein is a homodimer of about 300 kDa consisting of identical subunits of 150 kDa. Like xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms AtXDH1 uses hypoxanthine and xanthine as main substrates and is strongly inhibited by allopurinol. AtXDH1 could be activated by the purified molybdenum cofactor sulfurase ABA3 that converts inactive desulfo-into active sulfoenzymes. Finally it was found that AtXDH1 is a strict dehydrogenase and not an oxidase, but is able to produce superoxide radicals indicating that besides purine catabolism it might also be involved in response to various stresses that require reactive oxygen species.

  13. Activation of tissue plasminogen activator gene transcription by Neovastat, a multifunctional antiangiogenic agent.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Denis; Nyalendo, Carine; Di Tomasso, Geneviève; Annabi, Borhane; Béliveau, Richard

    2004-07-16

    We recently reported that Neovastat, an antiangiogenic drug that is currently undergoing Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, may inhibit angiogenesis through an increase in tPA activity. Here, we show that Neovastat also stimulates tPA gene transcription in endothelial cells, in a TNFalpha-like manner. RT-PCR analysis and gene reporter assays using the human tPA promoter indicated that upregulation of the tPA gene transcription by both Neovastat and TNFalpha was correlated with the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and of IkappaB and that SP600125 and BAY11-7082, inhibitors of JNK and IkappaK, respectively, inhibit the increase of tPA gene transcription induced by Neovastat and TNFalpha. These results suggest that Neovastat induces tPA gene transcription through activation of the JNK and NFkappaB signaling pathways, leading to an increase of tPA secretion by endothelial cells. This may lead to the localized destruction of the fibrin provisional matrix that is necessary for neovessel formation and thus contribute to the reported antiangiogenic properties of this compound.

  14. Polyphenols in alcoholic beverages activating constitutive androstane receptor CAR.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ruiqing; Yasuoka, Akihito; Kamei, Asuka; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Rogi, Tomohiro; Taieishi, Norifumi; Tsuruoka, Nobuo; Kiso, Yoshionobu; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor CAR is a xenosensing nuclear receptor that can be activated by natural polyphenols such as flavonoids and catechins. We examined alcoholic beverage phytochemicals for their ability to activate CAR. HepG2 cells were transfected with CAR expression vector and its reporter gene, and then treated with trans-resveratrol, ellagic acid, β-caryophyllene, myrcene, and xanthohumol. A luciferase assay revealed that ellagic acid and trans-resveratrol activated both human and mouse CAR. Since CAR regulates many genes involved in energy metabolism, the possibility exists that these polyphenols would reduce the risk of certain alcohol-induced metabolic disorders with the help of CAR.

  15. Endothelin‑1 induces oncostatin M expression in osteoarthritis osteoblasts by trans‑activating the oncostatin M gene promoter via Ets‑1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ren; Wang, Wanchun; Huang, Guoliang; Mao, Xinzhan; Chen, You; Tang, Qi; Liao, Lele

    2016-04-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM) contributes to cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA) and was demonstrated to be expressed in OA osteoblasts. Endothelin‑1 (ET‑1) is implicated in the degradation of OA articular cartilage, and osteoblast proliferation and bone development. In the present study, the effects of ET‑1 on OSM expression in human OA osteoblasts were investigated, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. Primary human OA osteoblasts were treated with ET‑1 (1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 nM) for 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h with or without the selective ETA receptor (ETAR) antagonist, BQ123, ETB receptor antagonist, BQ788 or the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, BKM120. ET‑1 treatment induced OSM mRNA expression, and the intracellular and secreted protein levels of OA osteoblasts in a dose‑dependent manner. This effect was suppressed by BQ123 and BKM120, but not BQ788 administration. In combination with electrophoretic mobility shift assays, deletional and mutational analyses on the activity of a human OSM promoter/luciferase reporter demonstrated that ET‑1 induced OSM expression in OA osteoblasts by trans‑activating the OSM gene promoter through specific binding of Ets‑1 to an Ets‑1 binding site in the OSM promoter in an ETAR‑ and PI3K‑dependent manner. Furthermore, ET‑1 treatment increased the expression of Ets‑1 in a dose‑dependent manner, however the knockdown of Ets‑1 suppressed the ET1‑induced expression of OSM in OA osteoblasts. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that ET‑1 induces the expression of OSM in OA osteoblasts by trans‑activating the OSM gene promoter primarily through increasing the expression level of Ets‑1 in an ETAR‑ and PI3K‑dependent manner. The current study suggested novel insights into the mechanistic role of ET‑1 in the pathophysiology of OA.

  16. Activator protein 1 promotes the transcriptional activation of IRAK-M.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peipei; Bo, Lulong; Liu, Yongjian; Lu, Wenbin; Lin, Shengwei; Bian, Jinjun; Deng, Xiaoming

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M) is a well-known negative regulator for Toll-like receptor signaling, which can regulate immune homeostasis and tolerance in a number of pathological settings. However, the mechanism for IRAK-M regulation at transcriptional level remains largely unknown. In this study, a 1.4kb upstream sequence starting from the major IRAK-M transcriptional start site was cloned into luciferase reporter vector pGL3-basic to construct the full-length IRAK-M promoter. Luciferase reporter plasmids harboring the full-length and the deletion mutants of IRAK-M were transfected into 293T and A549 cells, and their relative luciferase activity was measured. The results demonstrated that activator protein 1(AP-1) cis-element plays a crucial role in IRAK-M constitutive gene transcription. Silencing of c-Fos and/or c-Jun expression suppressed the IRAK-M promoter activity as well as its mRNA and protein expressions. As a specific inhibitor for AP-1 activation, SP600125 also significantly suppressed the basal transcriptional activity of IRAK-M, the binding activity of c-Fos/c-Jun with IRAK-M promoter, and IRAK-M protein expression. Taken together, the result of this study highlights the importance of AP-1 in IRAK-M transcription, which offers more information on the role of IRAK-M in infectious and non-infectious diseases.

  17. Polyphenols from Chilean Propolis and Pinocembrin Reduce MMP-9 Gene Expression and Activity in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Nicolás; Cuevas, Alejandro; Cavalcante, Marcela F.; Dörr, Felipe A.; Saavedra, Kathleen; Zambrano, Tomás; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols from diverse sources have shown anti-inflammatory activity. In the context of atherosclerosis, macrophages play important roles including matrix metalloproteinases synthesis involved in degradation of matrix extracellular components affecting the atherosclerotic plaque stability. We prepared a propolis extract and pinocembrin in ethanol solution. Propolis extract was chemically characterized using LC-MS. The effect of treatments on gene expression and proteolytic activity was measured in vitro using murine macrophages activated with LPS. Cellular toxicity associated with both treatments and the vehicle was determined using MTT and apoptosis/necrosis detection assays. MMP-9 gene expression and proteolytic activity were measured using qPCR and zymography, respectively. Thirty-two compounds were identified in the propolis extract, including pinocembrin among its major components. Treatment with either ethanolic extract of propolis or pinocembrin inhibits MMP-9 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, an inhibitory effect was observed in proteolytic activity. However, the effect showed by ethanolic extract of propolis was higher than the effect of pinocembrin, suggesting that MMP-9 inhibition results from a joint contribution between the components of the extract. These data suggest a potential role of polyphenols from Chilean propolis in the control of extracellular matrix degradation in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27119082

  18. Entinostat up-regulates the CAMP gene encoding LL-37 via activation of STAT3 and HIF-1α transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Miraglia, Erica; Nylén, Frank; Johansson, Katarina; Arnér, Elias; Cebula, Marcus; Farmand, Susan; Ottosson, Håkan; Strömberg, Roger; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H.; Agerberth, Birgitta; Bergman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance against classical antibiotics is a growing problem and the development of new antibiotics is limited. Thus, novel alternatives to antibiotics are warranted. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of innate immunity that can be induced by several compounds, including vitamin D and phenyl-butyrate (PBA). Utilizing a luciferase based assay, we recently discovered that the histone deacetylase inhibitor Entinostat is a potent inducer of the CAMP gene encoding the human cathelicidin LL-37. Here we investigate a mechanism for the induction and also find that Entinostat up-regulates human β-defensin 1. Analysis of the CAMP promoter sequence revealed binding sites for the transcription factors STAT3 and HIF-1α. By using short hairpin RNA and selective inhibitors, we found that both transcription factors are involved in Entinostat-induced expression of LL-37. However, only HIF-1α was found to be recruited to the CAMP promoter, suggesting that Entinostat activates STAT3, which promotes transcription of CAMP by increasing the expression of HIF-1α. Finally, we provide in vivo relevance to our findings by showing that Entinostat-elicited LL-37 expression was impaired in macrophages from a patient with a STAT3-mutation. Combined, our findings support a role for STAT3 and HIF-1α in the regulation of LL-37 expression. PMID:27633343

  19. Skin sensitizers induce antioxidant response element dependent genes: application to the in vitro testing of the sensitization potential of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Natsch, Andreas; Emter, Roger

    2008-03-01

    Tests for skin sensitization are required prior to the market launch of new cosmetic ingredients and in vitro tests are needed to replace the current animal tests. Protein reactivity is the common feature of skin sensitizers and it is a crucial question whether a cellular in vitro assay can detect protein reactivity of diverse test chemicals. The signaling pathway involving the repressor protein Keap1 and the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2, which binds to the antioxidant response element (ARE) in the promoter of many phase II detoxification genes, is a potential cellular marker because Keap1 had been shown to be covalently modified by electrophiles which leads to activation of ARE-dependent genes. To evaluate whether this regulatory pathway can be used to develop a predictive cellular in vitro test for sensitization, 96 different chemicals of known skin sensitization potential were added to Hepa1C1C7 cells and the induction of the ARE-regulated quinone reductase (QR) activity was determined. In parallel, 102 chemicals were tested on the reporter cell line AREc32, which contains an eightfold repeat of the ARE sequence upstream of a luciferase gene. Among the strong/extreme skin sensitizers 14 out of 15 and 30 out of 34 moderate sensitizers induced the ARE-dependent luciferase activity and in many cases this response was paralleled by an induction of QR activity in Hepa1C1C7 cells. Sixty percent of the weak sensitizers also induced luciferase activity, and the overall accuracy of the assay was 83 percent. Only four of 30 tested nonsensitizers induced low levels of luciferase activity, indicating a high specificity of the assay. Thus, measurement of the induction of this signaling pathway provides an interesting in vitro test to screen for the skin sensitization potential of novel chemicals.

  20. The Hyaluronan Receptor for Endocytosis (HARE) Activates NF-κB-mediated Gene Expression in Response to 40–400-kDa, but Not Smaller or Larger, Hyaluronans*

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Madhu S.; Baggenstoss, Bruce A.; Washburn, Jennifer; Harris, Edward N.; Weigel, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    The hyaluronan (HA) receptor for endocytosis (HARE; Stabilin-2) binds and clears 14 different ligands, including HA and heparin, via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. HA binding to HARE stimulates ERK1/2 activation (Kyosseva, S. V., Harris, E. N., and Weigel, P. H. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 15047–15055). To assess a possible HA size dependence for signaling, we tested purified HA fractions of different weight-average molar mass and with narrow size distributions and Select-HATM for stimulation of HARE-mediated gene expression using an NF-κB promoter-driven luciferase reporter system. Human HARE-mediated gene expression was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner with small HA (sHA) >40 kDa and intermediate HA (iHA) <400 kDa. The hyperbolic dose response saturated at 20–50 nm with an apparent Km ∼10 nm, identical to the Kd for HA-HARE binding. Activation was not detected with oligomeric HA (oHA), sHA <40 kDa, iHA >400 kDa, or large HA (lHA). Similar responses occurred with rat HARE. Activation by sHA-iHA was blocked by excess nonsignaling sHA, iHA, or lHA, deletion of the HA-binding LINK domain, or HA-blocking antibody. Endogenous NF-κB activation also occurred in the absence of luciferase plasmids, as assessed by degradation of IκB-α. ERK1/2 activation was also HA size-dependent. The results show that HA-HARE interactions stimulate NF-κB-activated gene expression and that HARE senses a narrow size range of HA degradation products. We propose a model in which optimal length HA binds multiple HARE proteins to allow cytoplasmic domain interactions that stimulate intracellular signaling. This HARE signaling system during continuous HA clearance could monitor the homeostasis of tissue biomatrix turnover throughout the body. PMID:23530033

  1. Buffer enhanced bioluminescence resonance energy transfer sensor based on Gaussia luciferase for in vitro detection of protease.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengyun; Yu, Junping; Zhang, Zhiping; Cui, Zongqiang; Wang, Dianbing; Wei, Hongping; Zhang, Xian-En

    2012-04-29

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) has gained favors in recent years as a detection technology for protease activity due to its extreme reliability, high sensitivity and low intrinsic backgrounds. Because of the sensitivity of the donors, substrates and the acceptors, it is expected that BRET systems are sensitive to buffer environments. However, no systematic study has been reported on how buffer components would affect the BRET ratio, and thus affect the determination of protease activity based on BRET. We present here that several environmental factors, including buffer agents, pH and divalent metal ions, influenced BRET ratio significantly, when humanized Gaussia luciferase (hGluc) was utilized as the donor and enhanced yellow fluorescence protein (EYFP) as the acceptor. Based on these findings, an enhancing solution was optimized to improve the performance of the BRET sensor for analysis of enterokinase activity in vitro, resulting in 10-fold and 7-fold improvement of the sensitivity and the detection limit, respectively. We anticipate the system will be applicable for improving performance of other in vitro BRET protease sensors, especially when the optimal conditions for protease activity would severely affect the BRET signal.

  2. MBD3 Localizes at Promoters, Gene Bodies and Enhancers of Active Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Takashi; Du, Ying; Grimm, Sara A.; Dhasarathy, Archana; Mav, Deepak; Shah, Ruchir R.; Shi, Huidong; Wade, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mi-2/nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex is a multiprotein machine proposed to regulate chromatin structure by nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation activities. Recent reports describing localization of NuRD provide new insights that question previous models on NuRD action, but are not in complete agreement. Here, we provide location analysis of endogenous MBD3, a component of NuRD complex, in two human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) using two independent genomic techniques: DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) and ChIP-seq. We observed concordance of the resulting genomic localization, suggesting that these studies are converging on a robust map for NuRD in the cancer cell genome. MBD3 preferentially associated with CpG rich promoters marked by H3K4me3 and showed cell-type specific localization across gene bodies, peaking around the transcription start site. A subset of sites bound by MBD3 was enriched in H3K27ac and was in physical proximity to promoters in three-dimensional space, suggesting function as enhancers. MBD3 enrichment was also noted at promoters modified by H3K27me3. Functional analysis of chromatin indicated that MBD3 regulates nucleosome occupancy near promoters and in gene bodies. These data suggest that MBD3, and by extension the NuRD complex, may have multiple roles in fine tuning expression for both active and silent genes, representing an important step in defining regulatory mechanisms by which NuRD complex controls chromatin structure and modification status. PMID:24385926

  3. Intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility and accuracy of the LuSens assay: A reporter gene-cell line to detect keratinocyte activation by skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Stein, Nadine; Aumann, Alexandra; Remus, Tina; Edwards, Amber; Norman, Kimberly G; Ryan, Cindy; Bader, Jackie E; Fehr, Markus; Burleson, Florence; Foertsch, Leslie; Wang, Xiaohong; Gerberick, Frank; Beilstein, Paul; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Mehling, Annette; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Several non-animal methods are now available to address the key events leading to skin sensitization as defined by the adverse outcome pathway. The KeratinoSens assay addresses the cellular event of keratinocyte activation and is a method accepted under OECD TG 442D. In this study, the results of an inter-laboratory evaluation of the "me-too" LuSens assay, a bioassay that uses a human keratinocyte cell line harboring a reporter gene construct composed of the rat antioxidant response element (ARE) of the NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene and the luciferase gene, are described. Earlier in-house validation with 74 substances showed an accuracy of 82% in comparison to human data. When used in a battery of non-animal methods, even higher predictivity is achieved. To meet European validation criteria, a multicenter study was conducted in 5 laboratories. The study was divided into two phases, to assess 1) transferability of the method, and 2) reproducibility and accuracy. Phase I was performed by testing 8 non-coded test substances; the results showed a good transferability to naïve laboratories even without on-site training. Phase II was performed with 20 coded test substances (performance standards recommended by OECD, 2015). In this phase, the intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility as well as accuracy of the method was evaluated. The data demonstrate a remarkable reproducibility of 100% and an accuracy of over 80% in identifying skin sensitizers, indicating a good concordance with in vivo data. These results demonstrate good transferability, reliability and accuracy of the method thereby achieving the standards necessary for use in a regulatory setting to detect skin sensitizers.

  4. An estrogen-responsive element-targeted histone deacetylase enzyme has an antiestrogen activity that differs from that of hydroxytamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Demirpence, Ediz; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Oliva, Joan; Balaguer, Patrick; Badia, Eric; Duchesne, Marie-Josèphe; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Pons, Michel

    2002-11-15

    We showed previously that prolonged treatment of a MCF-7-derived cell line with hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) induces the irreversible silencing of some estrogen-responsive genes, whereas OHT-resistant cell growth appears simultaneously (E. Badia et al., Cancer Res., 60: 4130-4138, 2000). Based on the hypothesis that particular gene silencings could be involved in triggering the resistance phenomenon, we focused our study on the mechanism of OHT-induced silencing. More precisely, we wished to determine to what extent the recruited histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, which is known to be involved in the repressive effect induced by antagonist ligands of nuclear receptors, could participate in various aspects of OHT effects, particularly in gene silencing. A fusion protein (HDAC-EG) of human HDAC1 fused with the estrogen receptor DNA-binding domain and the glucocorticoid receptor ligand-binding domain allowed targeting of chimeric HDAC1 activity on estrogen-responsive elements (EREs) in the presence of glucocorticoid ligands. When HDAC-EG was transiently expressed in HeLa cells together with estrogen receptor, an antiestrogen-like effect was obtained on an ERE-controlled luciferase reporter gene in the presence of agonist or antagonist glucocorticoids. In MCF-7-derived cells stably expressing HDAC-EG and an estrogen-regulated luciferase, liganded HDAC-EG again produced an antiestrogenic effect on expression of natural estrogen-regulated genes such as pS2, progesterone receptor, and cathepsin D and cell growth together with chimeric luciferase gene expression. However, a prolonged HDAC-EG-mediated antiestrogen effect did not lead to irreversible luciferase gene silencing, as OHT does. It nevertheless accelerated the OHT-driven phenomenon. The antiestrogen effect of OHT thus differs from that of an ERE-targeted HDAC1 activity that might participate in irreversible silencing but is not sufficient to trigger it.

  5. Thiazolidinediones repress ob gene expression in rodents via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, P; Lefebvre, A M; Miller, S G; Guerre-Millo, M; Wong, K; Saladin, R; Hamann, L G; Staels, B; Briggs, M R; Auwerx, J

    1996-01-01

    The ob gene product, leptin, is a signaling factor regulating body weight and energy balance. ob gene expression in rodents is increased in obesity and is regulated by feeding patterns and hormones, such as insulin and glucocorticoids. In humans with gross obesity, ob mRNA levels are higher, but other modulators of human ob expression are unknown. In view of the importance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) in adipocyte differentiation, we analyzed whether ob gene expression is subject to regulation by factors activating PPARs. Treatment of rats with the PPARalpha activator fenofibrate did not change adipose tissue and body weight and had no significant effect on ob mRNA levels. However, administration of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653, a PPARgamma ligand, increased food intake and adipose tissue weight while reducing ob mRNA levels in rats in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of the thiazolidinedione BRL49653 on ob mRNA levels was also observed in vitro. Thiazolidinediones reduced the expression of the human ob promoter in primary adipocytes, however, in undifferentiated 3T3-L1 preadipocytes lacking endogenous PPARgamma, cotransfection of PPARgamma was required to observe the decrease. In conclusion, these data suggest that PPARgamma activators reduce ob mRNA levels through an effect of PPARgamma on the ob promoter. PMID:8770873

  6. Gene silencing activity of siRNA polyplexes based on biodegradable polymers.

    PubMed

    Varkouhi, Amir K; Lammers, Twan; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Steenbergen, Mies J; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert

    2011-04-01

    Cationic polymers are used as non-viral vectors for nucleic acid delivery. In this study, two biodegradable cationic polymers were evaluated for the purpose of siRNA delivery: pHPMA-MPPM (poly((2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide 1-methyl-2-piperidine methanol)) and TMC (O-methyl-free N,N,N-trimethylated chitosan). The silencing activity and the cellular cytotoxicity of polyplexes based on these biodegradable polymers were compared with those based on non-biodegradable pDMAEMA (poly(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) and PEI (polyethylenimine) and with the regularly used lipidic transfection agent Lipofectamine. To promote endosomal escape, either the endosomolytic peptide diINF-7 was added to the formulations or photochemical internalization (PCI) was applied. Incubation of H1299 human lung cancer cells expressing firefly luciferase with polyplexes based on pHPMA-MPPM and TMC showed 30-40% silencing efficiency. This silencing activity was equal to or better than that obtained with the standard transfectants. Under all experimental conditions tested, the cytotoxicity of the biodegradable polymers was low. The application of PCI, as well as the addition of the diINF-7 peptide to the formulations increased their silencing activity up to 70-80%. This demonstrates that pHPMA-MPPM- and TMC-based polyplexes benefit substantially from endosomal escape enhancement. Importantly, the polyplexes retained their silencing activity in the presence of serum, and they showed low cytotoxicity. These biodegradable vectors are therefore attractive systems for further in vivo evaluations.

  7. Impact of site-directed mutant luciferase on quantitative green and orange/red emission intensities in firefly bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Terakado, Kanako; Nakatsu, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Firefly bioluminescence has attracted great interest because of its high quantum yield and intriguing modifiable colours. Modifications to the structure of the enzyme luciferase can change the emission colour of firefly bioluminescence, and the mechanism of the colour change has been intensively studied by biochemists, structural biologists, optical physicists, and quantum-chemistry theorists. Here, we report on the quantitative spectra of firefly bioluminescence catalysed by wild-type and four site-directed mutant luciferases. While the mutation caused different emission spectra, the spectra differed only in the intensity of the green component (λmax ~ 560 nm). In contrast, the orange (λmax ~ 610 nm) and red (λmax ~ 650 nm) components present in all the spectra were almost unaffected by the modifications to the luciferases and changes in pH. Our results reveal that the intensity of the green component is the unique factor that is influenced by the luciferase structure and other reaction conditions.

  8. MiR-9 promotes osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells by inhibiting DKK1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyun; Xu, Hao; Kou, Jianqiang; Wang, Qianqian; Zheng, Xiujun; Yu, Tengbo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of miR-9 and its mechanism on the osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Real-time PCR and western blotting were used to study gene expression. Assay of Alkaline phosphatase activity and alizarin red staining were used to examine osteoblast differentiation. Transfection of miR-9 mimics or lent-shmiR-9 was used to modulate the level of miR-9 in C2C12. Overexpression of miR-9 in C2C12 cells stimulated alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast mineralization, as well as the expression of osteoblast marker genes Col I, Ocn and Bsp. Gene silencing of miR-9 in C2C12 resulted in the suppression of alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast mineralization, as well as the expression of Col I, Ocn and Bsp. DKK1 mRNA was not affected by miR-9 overexpression, however, DKK1 protein was significantly decreased. Moreover, DKK1 3'-UTR mediated transcriptional luciferase activity was also significantly suppressed by miR-9 overexpression. DKK1 mRNA was not affected by miR-9 gene silencing, however, DKK1 protein was significantly stimulated. Moreover, DKK1 3'-UTR mediated transcriptional luciferase activity was significantly stimulated by miR-9 gene silencing, and suppressed by miR-9 overexpression, however, DKK1 3'-UTR mutant mediated luciferase activity was unaffected. The siRNA derived gene silencing of DKK1 blocked the inhibiting effect of shmiR-9 on the expression of alkaline phosphatase; and blocked the inhibiting effect of shmiR-9 on the expression of ColI, Ocn and Bsp. MiR-9 promotes osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal cell C2C12 by suppressing the gene expression of DKK1.

  9. In-vivo quantification of primary microRNA processing by Drosha with a luciferase based system

    SciTech Connect

    Allegra, Danilo; Mertens, Daniel

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Posttranscriptional regulation of miRNA processing is difficult to quantify. {yields} Our in-vivo processing assay can quantify Drosha cleavage in live cells. {yields} It is based on luciferase reporters fused with pri-miRNAs. {yields} The assay validates the processing defect caused by a mutation in pri-16-1. {yields} It is a sensitive method to quantify pri-miRNA cleavage by Drosha in live cells. -- Abstract: The RNAse III Drosha is responsible for the first step of microRNA maturation, the cleavage of primary miRNA to produce the precursor miRNA. Processing by Drosha is finely regulated and influences the amount of mature microRNA in a cell. We describe in the present work a method to quantify Drosha processing activity in-vivo, which is applicable to any microRNA. With respect to other methods for measuring Drosha activity, our system is faster and scalable, can be used with any cellular system and does not require cell sorting or use of radioactive isotopes. This system is useful to study regulation of Drosha activity in physiological and pathological conditions.

  10. Human dipeptidyl peptidase IV gene promoter: tissue-specific regulation from a TATA-less GC-rich sequence characteristic of a housekeeping gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, S K; Gum, J R; Erickson, R H; Hicks, J W; Kim, Y S

    1995-01-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase IV gene encodes a plasma-membrane exopeptidase that is highly expressed in small intestine, lung and kidney. In order to better understand the mechanisms responsible for this tissue-specific expression we cloned, sequenced and functionally characterized the 5'-flanking region of the human dipeptidyl peptidase IV gene. The first 500 bases of the 5'-flanking sequence constituted an unmethylated CpG island, contained several Sp1-binding sites and lacked a consensus TATA box, all characteristics of gene promoters lacking tissue-specific expression. RNase-protection analysis using both small intestinal and Caco2 cell RNA indicated that the dipeptidyl peptidase IV transcript was initiated from no fewer than six major and 12 minor start sites. The 5'-flanking sequence also exhibited functional promoter activity in transient transfection experiments. Here, various lengths of the sequence were cloned upstream of a luciferase gene and introduced into cultured cells using lipofectin. A region located between bases -150 and -109 relative to the start of translation was found to be important for high-level promoter activity in both Caco2 and HepG2 cells. Moreover, Caco2 cells and HepG2 cells, which express high levels of dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity, exhibited much higher normalized luciferase activity after transfection than did 3T3, Jurkat or COS-7 cells, which have low enzyme levels. Sodium butyrate was found to increase both enzyme activity and normalized luciferase in HepG2 cells. Thus the dipeptidyl peptidase IV promoter possesses the ability to initiate transcription in a tissue-specific fashion in spite of having the sequence characteristics of a housekeeping gene promoter. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7487939

  11. Identification of the Drosophila Mes4 gene as a novel target of the transcription factor DREF

    SciTech Connect

    Suyari, Osamu; Ida, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Kato, Yasuko; Hashimoto, Reina; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2009-05-01

    The Mes4 gene has been identified as one of the maternal Dorsal target genes in Drosophila. In the present study, we found a DNA replication-related element (DRE, 5'-TATCGATA) in the Mes4 promoter recognized by the DRE-binding factor (DREF). Luciferase transient expression assays in S2 cells using Mes4 promoter-luciferase fusion plasmids revealed that the DRE sequence is essential for Mes4 promoter activity. Requirement of DRE for Mes4 promoter activity was further confirmed by anti-{beta}-galactosidase antibody-staining of various tissues from transgenic flies carrying Mes4 promoter-lacZ fusion genes. Furthermore, wild type Mes4 promoter activity was decreased by 40% in DREF-depleted S2 cells. These results indicate that DREF positively regulates Mes4 gene expression. Band mobility shift analyses using Kc cell nuclear extracts further indicated that the DRE sequence in the Mes4 promoter is especially important for binding to DREF. Moreover, specific binding of DREF to the involved genomic region could be demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using anti-DREF antibodies. These results, taken together, indicate that the DRE/DREF system activates transcription of the Mes4 gene. In addition, knockdown of the Mes4 gene in wing imaginal discs using the GAL4-UAS system caused an atrophied wing phenotype, suggesting that Mes4 is required for wing morphogenesis.

  12. Nuclear Factor-Y is an adipogenic factor that regulates leptin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Dallner, Olof Stefan; Birsoy, Kivanc; Fayzikhodjaeva, Gulya; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Leptin gene expression is highly correlated with cellular lipid content in adipocytes but the transcriptional mechanisms controlling leptin expression in vivo are poorly understood. In this report, we set out to identify cis- and trans-regulatory elements controlling leptin expression. Methods Leptin-BAC luciferase transgenic mice combining with other computational and molecular techniques were used to identify transcription regulatory elements including a CCAAT-binding protein Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y). The function of NF-Y in adipocyte was studied in vitro with 3T3-L1 cells and in vivo with adipocyte-specific knockout of NF-Y. Results Using Leptin-BAC luciferase mice, we showed that DNA sequences between −22 kb and +8.8 kb can confer quantitative expression of a leptin reporter. Computational analysis of sequences and gel shift assays identified a 32 bp sequence (chr6: 28993820–2899385) consisting a CCAAT binding site for Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) and this was confirmed by a ChIP assay in vivo. A deletion of this 32 bp sequence in the −22 kb to +8.8 kb leptin-luciferase BAC reporter completely abrogates luciferase reporter activity in vivo. RNAi mediated knockdown of NF-Y interfered with adipogenesis in vitro and adipocyte-specific knockout of NF-Y in mice reduced expression of leptin and other fat specific genes in vivo. Further analyses of the fat specific NF-Y knockout revealed that these animals develop a moderately severe lipodystrophy that is remediable with leptin therapy. Conclusions These studies advance our understanding of leptin gene expression and show that NF-Y controls the expression of leptin and other adipocyte genes and identifies a new form of lipodystrophy. PMID:25973387

  13. Oligomeric TTR V30M aggregates compromise cell viability, erythropoietin gene expression and promoter activity in the human hepatoma cell line Hep3B.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Luciana; Beirão, João Melo; Beirão, Idalina; Pinho e Costa, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, ATTRV30M (p. TTRV50M) amyloidosis, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by systemic extracellular amyloid deposition of a mutant transthyretin, TTR V30M. Anemia, with low erythropoietin (EPO) levels and spared kidney function, affects about 25% of symptomatic patients, suggesting a blockage of EPO-producing cells. Early non-fibrillar TTR aggregates are highly cytotoxic, inducing oxidative stress, the expression of apoptosis-related molecules and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, factors capable of inhibiting EPO production. Low EPO levels in these patients are not related to renal amyloid deposition or the presence of circulating TTR V30M. However, the role of early non-fibrillar TTR aggregates remains unexplored. We used the EPO producing Hep3B human hepatoma cell line to study the effect of TTR oligomeric aggregates on EPO expression. Hep3B cells were incubated with soluble and oligomeric TTR V30M, and cell proliferation as well as caspase 3/7 activation was evaluated. Relative quantification of EPO mRNA transcripts was performed by real-time PCR. Significant reductions in cell viability (13 ± 7.3%) and activation of caspases 3/7 were seen after 24 h in the presence of oligomeric TTR V30M. Also, EPO expression was significantly reduced (50 ± 2.8%), in normoxic conditions. A reporter assay was constructed with a PCR fragment of the EPO promoter linked to the luciferase gene to evaluate the role of transcription factors targeting the promoter. A significant reduction of EPO promoter activity (53 ± 6.5%) was observed in transfected cells exposed to TTR oligomers. Our results show that oligomeric TTR V30M reduces EPO expression, at least in part through inhibition of promoter activity.

  14. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  15. Species-specificity of rRNA gene transcription in plants manifested as a switch in RNA polymerase specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Doelling, J H; Pikaard, C S

    1996-01-01

    Rapid evolution of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene promoters often prevents their recognition in a foreign species. Unlike animal systems, we show that foreign plant rRNA gene promoters are recognized in an alien species, but tend to program transcription by a different polymerase. In plants, RNA polymerase I transcripts initiate at a TATATA element (+1 is underlined) important for promoter strength and start-site selection. However, transcripts initiate from +32 following transfection of a tomato promoter into Arabidopsis. The rRNA gene promoter of a more closely related species, Brassica oleracea, programs both +1 and +29 transcription. A point mutation at +2 improving the identity between the Brassica and Arabidopsis promoters increases +1 transcription, indicating a role for the initiator element in species-specificity. Brassica +29 transcripts can be translated to express a luciferase reporter gene, implicating RNA polymerase II. TATA mutations that disrupt TATA-binding protein (TBP) interactions inhibit +29 transcription and luciferase expression. Co-expressed TBP proteins bearing compensatory mutations restore +29 transcription and luciferase activity, suggesting a direct TBP-TATA interaction. Importantly, +1 transcription is unaffected by the TATA mutations, suggesting that in the context of pol I recognition, the TATA-containing initiator element serves a function other than TBP binding. PMID:8972859

  16. Non-invasive gene targeting to the fetal brain after intravenous administration and transplacental transfer of plasmid DNA using PEGylated immunoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Cornford, Eain M; Hyman, Shigeyo; Cornford, Marcia E; Chytrova, Gabriela; Rhee, Jennifer; Suzuki, Toshimitsu; Yamagata, Tetsushi; Yamakawa, Kazuhiro; Penichet, Manuel L; Pardridge, William M

    2016-01-01

    Research was undertaken to establish transplacental delivery of active genes to fetal brain by a non-viral vector, antibody-specific targeted therapeutic procedure. PEGylated immunoliposomes (PILs) containing firefly luciferase DNA under the influence of the SV40 promoter injected intravenously into near-term pregnant mice produced luminometric evidence of CNS tissue luciferase activity at 48-h post-injection in all newborn pups. In utero delivery of this pGL3 DNA was shown after a single i.v. injection in maternal and neonatal brains, spleen and lesser amounts in lungs, with only negligible background levels in negative controls exposed to unencapsulated pDNA. In addition to studies of normal wild-type mice, we similarly injected pregnant Lafora Knockout (EPM2a null-mutant) and demonstrated luciferase activity days later in the maternal and newborn pup brains of both types. Delivery of PILs containing a second reporter gene (the pSV40 beta-galactosidase transgene) transplacentally by the same procedure was also successful. Histochemical and biochemical demonstration of beta-galactosidase was documented for all mutant and non-mutant neonates. Brain areas of highest Lafora body development (such as the hippocampus and pontine nuclei) showed intraneuronal beta-glucosidase activity. We conclude that receptor-mediated transport of PIL-borne gene therapeutics across both the placental barrier as well as the fetal BBB in utero is feasible.

  17. Behavioral science and the study of gene-nutrition and gene-physical activity interactions in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Faith, Myles S

    2008-12-01

    This report summarizes emerging opportunities for behavioral science to help advance the field of gene-environment and gene-behavior interactions, based on presentations at The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Workshop, "Gene-Nutrition and Gene-Physical Activity Interactions in the Etiology of Obesity." Three opportunities are highlighted: (i) designing potent behavioral "challenges" in experiments, (ii) determining viable behavioral phenotypes for genetics studies, and (iii) identifying specific measures of the environment or environmental exposures. Additional points are underscored, including the need to incorporate novel findings from neuroimaging studies regarding motivation and drive for eating and physical activity. Advances in behavioral science theory and methods can play an important role in advancing understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in obesity onset.

  18. A high-throughput cell-based Gaussia luciferase reporter assay for identifying modulators of fibulin-3 secretion.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, John D; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2013-07-01

    An R345W mutation in fibulin-3 causes its inefficient secretion, increased intracellular steady-state levels, and the macular dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese (ML), a disease similar to age-related macular degeneration. It is unknown whether R345W causes ML through increased intracellular levels, by the secretion of a potentially aggregation-prone protein, or both. To identify small molecules that alter the secretion of fibulin-3, we developed ARPE19 retinal cell lines that inducibly express wild-type (WT) or R345W fibulin-3 fused to an enhanced Gaussia luciferase (eGLuc2). Screening of the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds demonstrated that these cell lines and the GLuc assay are suitable for high-throughput chemical screening. Two estrogen-related compounds enhanced fibulin-3 secretion, whereas a diverse series of small molecules reduced fibulin-3 secretion. A counterscreen identified compounds that did not substantially alter the secretion of unfused eGLuc2, demonstrating at least partial selectivity for fibulin-3. A secondary assay using untagged fibulin-3 confirmed that the top three inhibitory compounds reduced R345W fibulin-3 secretion. Interestingly, in untagged fibulin-3 studies, one compound, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, reduced R345W fibulin-3 secretion while minimally enhancing WT fibulin-3 secretion, the desired activity and selectivity we sought for ML. The identified compounds could serve as tools for probing the etiology of fibulin-3-related diseases.

  19. A High-Throughput Cell-Based Gaussia Luciferase Reporter Assay for Identifying Modulators of Fibulin-3 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Hulleman, John D.; Brown, Steven J.; Rosen, Hugh; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2015-01-01

    An R345W mutation in fibulin-3 causes its inefficient secretion, increased intracellular steady-state levels, and the macular dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese (ML), a disease similar to age-related macular degeneration. It is unknown whether R345W causes ML through increased intracellular levels, by the secretion of a potentially aggregation-prone protein, or both. To identify small molecules that alter the secretion of fibulin-3, we developed ARPE19 retinal cell lines that inducibly express wild-type (WT) or R345W fibulin-3 fused to an enhanced Gaussia luciferase (eGLuc2). Screening of the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds demonstrated that these cell lines and the GLuc assay are suitable for high-throughput chemical screening. Two estrogen-related compounds enhanced fibulin-3 secretion, whereas a diverse series of small molecules reduced fibulin-3 secretion. A counterscreen identified compounds that did not substantially alter the secretion of unfused eGLuc2, demonstrating at least partial selectivity for fibulin-3. A secondary assay using untagged fibulin-3 confirmed that the top three inhibitory compounds reduced R345W fibulin-3 secretion. Interestingly, in untagged fibulin-3 studies, one compound, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, reduced R345W fibulin-3 secretion while minimally enhancing WT fibulin-3 secretion, the desired activity and selectivity we sought for ML. The identified compounds could serve as tools for probing the etiology of fibulin-3–related diseases. PMID:23230284

  20. A strategy to establish a gene-activated matrix on titanium using gene vectors protected in a polylactide coating.

    PubMed

    Kolk, Andreas; Haczek, Cornelia; Koch, Christian; Vogt, Stephan; Kullmer, Martin; Pautke, Christoph; Deppe, Herbert; Plank, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Bioactive implants are promising tools in regenerative medicine. Here we describe a versatile procedure for preparing a gene-activated matrix on titanium. Lyophilized copolymer-protected gene vectors (COPROGs) suspended in poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA) solutions in ethyl acetate were used to varnish solid surfaces. The gene-activated PDLLA surfaces were first established on polypropylene 96-well plates. Vector release from these surfaces in aqueous buffer, cell viability and gene transfer efficiency to NIH 3T3 fibroblasts was strongly dependent on the vector dose and its ratio to PDLLA film thickness. A detailed analysis of these relationships allowed establishing correlations which can be used to calculate suitable combinations of COPROGs and PDLLA yielding optimal gene transfer efficiency. This was verified with COPROG-activated PDLLA coatings on titanium foils. HEK 293 and mesenchymal stem cells expressed the BMP-2 gene comprised in the gene-activated surface in a manner that was consistent with the predicted dose-response and toxicity profiles found in NIH 3T3 cells. The systematic procedure presented here for identifying optimal coating compositions can be applied to any combination of vector type and coating material.

  1. Setting limits on homeotic gene function: restraint of Sex combs reduced activity by teashirt and other homeotic genes.

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, D J; Horner, M A; Petitt, M G; Smolik, S M; Scott, M P

    1994-01-01

    Each of the homeotic genes of the HOM or HOX complexes is expressed in a limited domain along the anterior-posterior axis. Each homeotic protein directs the formation of characteristic structures, such as wings or ribs. In flies, when a heat shock-inducible homeotic gene is used to produce a homeotic protein in all cells of the embryo, only some cells respond by altering their fates. We have identified genes that limit where the homeotic gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) can affect cell fates in the Drosophila embryo. In the abdominal cuticle Scr is prevented from inducing prothoracic structures by the three bithorax complex (BX-C) homeotic genes. However, two of the BX-C homeotic genes, Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and abdominal-A (abd-A), have no effect on the ability of Scr to direct the formation of salivary glands. Instead, salivary gland induction by Scr is limited in the trunk by the homeotic gene teashirt (tsh) and in the last abdominal segment by the third BX-C gene, Abdominal-B (AbdB). Therefore, spatial restrictions on homeotic gene activity differ between tissues and result both from the regulation of homeotic gene transcription and from restraints on where homeotic proteins can function. Images PMID:7907545

  2. A viral gene that activates lytic cycle expression of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ren; Lin, Su-Fang; Gradoville, Lyndle; Yuan, Yan; Zhu, Fanxiu; Miller, George

    1998-01-01

    Herpesviruses exist in two states, latency and a lytic productive cycle. Here we identify an immediate-early gene encoded by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus eight (HHV8) that activates lytic cycle gene expression from the latent viral genome. The gene is a homologue of Rta, a transcriptional activator encoded by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). KSHV/Rta activated KSHV early lytic genes, including virus-encoded interleukin 6 and polyadenylated nuclear RNA, and a late gene, small viral capsid antigen. In cells dually infected with Epstein–Barr virus and KSHV, each Rta activated only autologous lytic cycle genes. Expression of viral cytokines under control of the KSHV/Rta gene is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated diseases. PMID:9724796

  3. Compact and highly active next-generation libraries for CRISPR-mediated gene repression and activation

    PubMed Central

    Horlbeck, Max A; Gilbert, Luke A; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Adamson, Britt; Pak, Ryan A; Chen, Yuwen; Fields, Alexander P; Park, Chong Yon; Corn, Jacob E; Kampmann, Martin; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    We recently found that nucleosomes directly block access of CRISPR/Cas9 to DNA (Horlbeck et al., 2016). Here, we build on this observation with a comprehensive algorithm that incorporates chromatin, position, and sequence features to accurately predict highly effective single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for targeting nuclease-dead Cas9-mediated transcriptional repression (CRISPRi) and activation (CRISPRa). We use this algorithm to design next-generation genome-scale CRISPRi and CRISPRa libraries targeting human and mouse genomes. A CRISPRi screen for essential genes in K562 cells demonstrates that the large majority of sgRNAs are highly active. We also find CRISPRi does not exhibit any detectable non-specific toxicity recently observed with CRISPR nuclease approaches. Precision-recall analysis shows that we detect over 90% of essential genes with minimal false positives using a compact 5 sgRNA/gene library. Our results establish CRISPRi and CRISPRa as premier tools for loss- or gain-of-function studies and provide a general strategy for identifying Cas9 target sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19760.001 PMID:27661255

  4. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  5. Aurora kinase B activity is modulated by thyroid hormone during transcriptional activation of pituitary genes.

    PubMed

    Tardáguila, Manuel; González-Gugel, Elena; Sánchez-Pacheco, Aurora

    2011-03-01

    Covalent histone modifications clearly play an essential role in ligand-dependent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors. One of the predominant mechanisms used by nuclear receptors to activate or repress target-gene transcription is the recruitment of coregulatory factors capable of covalently modify the amino terminal ends of histones. Here we show that the thyroid hormone (T3) produces a rapid increase in histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation (H3Ser10ph) concomitant to the rapid displacement of the heterochromatin protein 1β (HP1β) to the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we found that T3-mediated pituitary gene transcription is associated with an increase in H3Ser10ph. Interestingly, the Aurora kinase B inhibitor ZM443979 abolishes the effect of T3 on H3Ser10ph, blocks HP1β delocalization, and significantly reduces ligand-dependent transactivation. Similar effects were shown when Aurora kinase B expression was abrogated in small interfering RNA assays. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanism by which T3 increases H3Ser10ph, we demonstrate that liganded thyroid hormone receptor directly interacts with Aurora kinase B, increasing its kinase activity. Moreover, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have shown that Aurora kinase B participates of a mechanism that displaces HP1β from promoter region, thus preparing the chromatin for the transcriptional activation of T3 regulated genes. Our findings reveal a novel role for Aurora kinase B during transcriptional initiation in GO/G1, apart from its well-known mitotic activity.

  6. Allele-specific transcriptional activity of the variable number of tandem repeats of the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene is associated with idiopathic achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Michela; Palumbo, Ilaria; Pesce, Marcella; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Annese, Vito; Petruzzelli, Raffaella; Izzo, Paola; Sepulveres, Rossana; Bruzzese, Dario; Esposito, Giuseppe; Cuomo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms of genes involved in the regulation of the immune response are risk factors for achalasia, but their contribution to disease pathogenesis is unknown. Nitric oxide is involved both in immune function and inhibitory neurotransmission. Objective The objective of this article is to assess the association and the functional relevance of the CCTTT-inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) gene promoter polymorphism in achalasia. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from 181 achalasia patients and 220 controls. Genotyping of the (CCTTT)n repeats was performed by PCR and capillary electrophoresis, and data analyzed by considering the frequency of the different alleles. HT29 cells were transfected with iNOS luciferase promoter-reporter plasmids containing different (CCTTT)n. Results The alleles’ distribution ranged from 7 to 18, with a peak frequency at 12 repeats. Analysis of the allele frequencies revealed that individuals carrying 10 and 13 CCTTT repeats were respectively less and more frequent in achalasia (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3–0.5 and OR 1.6, 95% CI 1–2.4, all p < 0.05). Long repeats were also significantly associated with an earlier onset of the disease (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.13–2.53, p = 0.01). Transfection experiments revealed a similar allele-specific iNOS transcriptional activity. Conclusion The functional polymorphism (CCTTT) of NOS2 promoter is associated with achalasia, likely by an allele-specific modulation of nitric oxide production. PMID:28344787

  7. Zearalenone activates pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and aryl hydrocarbon receptor and corresponding phase I target genes mRNA in primary cultures of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Pascussi, Jean Marc; Maurel, Patrick; Bacha, Hassen; Hassen, Wafa

    2011-01-01

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) is found worldwide as a contaminant in cereals and grains. ZEN subchronic and chronic toxicities are dominated by reproductive disorders in different mammalian species which have made ZEN established mammalian endocrine disrupter. Over the last 30 years of ZEN biotransformation study, the toxin was thought to undergo reductive metabolism only, with the generation in several species of α- and β-isomers of zearalenol. However, recent investigations have noticed that the mycoestrogen is prone to oxidative metabolism leading to hydroxylation of ZEN though the involvement of different cytochromes P450 (CYPs) isoforms. The aim of the present study was to further explore the effect of ZEN on regulation of some CYPs using primary cultures of human hepatocytes. For this aim, using real time RT-PCR, we monitored in a first time, the effect of ZEN on mRNA levels of pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), nuclear receptors known to be involved in the regulation of some CYPs. In a second time, we looked for ZEN effect on expression of PXR, CAR and AhR corresponding phase I target genes (CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2). Finally, we realised the luciferase assay in HepG2 treated with the toxin and transiently transfected with p-CYP3A4-Luc in the presence of a hPXR vector or transfected with p-CYPA1-Luc.Our results clearly showed that ZEN activated human PXR, CAR and AhR mRNA levels in addition to some of their phase I target genes mainly CYP3A4, CYP2B6 and CYP1A1 and at lesser extent CYP3A5 and CYP2C9 at ZEN concentrations as low as 0.1 μM.

  8. A simple Gateway-assisted construction system of TALEN genes for plant genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Kusano, Hiroaki; Onodera, Hitomi; Kihira, Miho; Aoki, Hiromi; Matsuzaki, Hikaru; Shimada, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    TALEN is an artificial nuclease being applied for sequence-specific genome editing. For the plant genome editing, a pair of TALEN genes is expressed in the cells, and a binary plasmid for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation should be assembled. We developed a novel procedure using the Gateway-assisted plasmids, named Emerald–Gateway TALEN system. We constructed entry vectors, pPlat plasmids, for construction of a desired TALEN gene using Platinum Gate TALEN kit. We also created destination plasmid, pDual35SGw1301, which allowed two TALEN genes to both DNA strands to recruit using Gateway technology. Resultant TALEN genes were evaluated by the single-strand annealing (SSA) assay in E. coli cells. By this assay, the TALENs recognized the corresponding targets in the divided luciferase gene, and induced a specific recombination to generate an active luciferase gene. Using the TALEN genes constructed, we created a transformant potato cells in which a site-specific mutation occurred at the target site of the GBSS gene. This suggested that our system worked effectively and was applicable as a convenient tool for the plant genome editing. PMID:27452606

  9. A simple Gateway-assisted construction system of TALEN genes for plant genome editing.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Hiroaki; Onodera, Hitomi; Kihira, Miho; Aoki, Hiromi; Matsuzaki, Hikaru; Shimada, Hiroaki

    2016-07-25

    TALEN is an artificial nuclease being applied for sequence-specific genome editing. For the plant genome editing, a pair of TALEN genes is expressed in the cells, and a binary plasmid for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation should be assembled. We developed a novel procedure using the Gateway-assisted plasmids, named Emerald-Gateway TALEN system. We constructed entry vectors, pPlat plasmids, for construction of a desired TALEN gene using Platinum Gate TALEN kit. We also created destination plasmid, pDual35SGw1301, which allowed two TALEN genes to both DNA strands to recruit using Gateway technology. Resultant TALEN genes were evaluated by the single-strand annealing (SSA) assay in E. coli cells. By this assay, the TALENs recognized the corresponding targets in the divided luciferase gene, and induced a specific recombination to generate an active luciferase gene. Using the TALEN genes constructed, we created a transformant potato cells in which a site-specific mutation occurred at the target site of the GBSS gene. This suggested that our system worked effectively and was applicable as a convenient tool for the plant genome editing.

  10. Cloning and characterization of the human beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2-GPI) gene promoter: roles of the atypical TATA box and hepatic nuclear factor-1alpha in regulating beta2-GPI promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsueh-Hsiao; Chiang, An-Na

    2004-01-01

    Beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2-GPI) is a plasma glycoprotein primarily synthesized in the liver. The interindividual variability of beta2-GPI expression in subjects with various metabolic syndromes and disease states suggests that it may have clinical importance. However, the regulation of beta2-GPI gene expression has not been clarified. To gain more insight into the control of beta2-GPI gene expression, we cloned the 4.1-kb 5'-flanking region and characterized the proximal promoter of the beta2- GPI gene in this study. Cis -acting elements required for beta2-GPI promoter activity were identified with transient transfection assays in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Huh7 and in non-hepatic HeLa cells. Serial deletion analyses of the beta2-GPI 5'-flanking sequence revealed that the region from -197 to +7 had strong promoter activity in hepatoma cells but not in HeLa cells. Truncation and site-directed mutagenesis of putative cis -elements within this region showing an atypical TATA box and a HNF-1 (hepatic nuclear factor-1) element were both essential for the beta2-GPI promoter activity. Subsequent gel mobility shift assays confirmed the interaction of HNF-1alpha with the HNF-1 site residing downstream of the TATA box. Co-transfection of beta2-GPI promoter-luciferase vector with HNF-1alpha expression vector in Huh7 and HNF-1-deficient HeLa cells demonstrated the transactivation effect of HNF-1alpha on beta2-GPI promoter activity. In addition, overexpression of HNF-1alpha enhanced the endogenous beta2-GPI expression. These results suggest that the atypical TATA box and HNF-1 cis-element are critical for beta2-GPI transcription and HNF-1alpha may play an important role in cell-specific regulation of beta2-GPI gene expression. PMID:14984368

  11. Network activity-independent coordinated gene expression program for synapse assembly.

    PubMed

    Valor, Luis M; Charlesworth, Paul; Humphreys, Lawrence; Anderson, Chris N G; Grant, Seth G N

    2007-03-13

    Global biological datasets generated by genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics provide new approaches to understanding the relationship between the genome and the synapse. Combined transcriptome analysis and multielectrode recordings of neuronal network activity were used in mouse embryonic primary neuronal cultures to examine synapse formation and activity-dependent gene regulation. Evidence for a coordinated gene expression program for assembly of synapses was observed in the expression of 642 genes encoding postsynaptic and plasticity proteins. This synaptogenesis gene expression program preceded protein expression of synapse markers and onset of spiking activity. Continued expression was followed by maturation of morphology and electrical neuronal networks, which was then followed by the expression of activity-dependent genes. Thus, two distinct sequentially active gene expression programs underlie the genomic programs of synapse function.

  12. Ultrastructure of granules and immunocytochemical localization of luciferase in photocytes of fireflies.

    PubMed

    Neuwirth, M

    1981-01-01

    Photocyte granules are round to oval, 1-2 micron, contain a peripheral dense area and are of three structural types. Type one granules consist of an amorphous matrix, a bundle of 2-12 microtubules and a flask-shaped vacuole. The type two granule is characterized by a large crystal or several smaller crystals embedded in an amorphous matrix with microtubules lined up along the face of the crystal. The type three granule is filled with a large number of thick-walled tubules (40-50 nm o.d.), usually found in bundles of two to four and a few microtubules. Luciferase has been shown to be localized in these photocyte granules by the immunoferritin technique. Ferritin is not localized over microtubules or flask-shaped vacuoles in type one granules but is randomly distributed over the matrix. In type two granules, ferritin is more densely distributed over the crystals and in type three granules over filamentous structures. There is no ferritin over the microtubules. Other parts of photocytes and of light organs are negative for luciferase. Buffer and anticalliphorin incubated sections showed no ferritin in granules.

  13. Kinetics of inhibition of firefly luciferase by oxyluciferin and dehydroluciferyl-adenylate.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, César; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2008-09-01

    The inhibition mechanisms of the firefly luciferase (Luc) by the two major products of the reactions catalysed by Luc, oxyluciferin and dehydroluciferyl-adenylate (L-AMP), were investigated. Light production in the presence and absence of these inhibitors (0.5 to 2 microM oxyluciferin; 0.0025 to 1.25 microM L-AMP) has been measured in 50 mM Hepes buffer (pH=7.5), 10 nM Luc, 250 microM ATP and D-Luciferin (from 3.75 up to 120 microM). Nonlinear regression analysis with the appropriate kinetic models (Henri-Michaelis-Menten and William-Morrison equations) reveals that oxyluciferin is a competitive inhibitor of luciferase (Ki=0.50+/-0.03 microM) while L-AMP act as a tight-binding competitive inhibitor (Ki=3.8+/-0.7 nM). The Km values obtained both for oxyluciferin and L-AMP were 14.7+/-0.7 and 14.9+/-0.2 microM, respectively. L-AMP is a stronger inhibitor of Luc than oxyluciferin and the major responsible for the characteristic flash profile of in vitro Luc bioluminescence.

  14. Xenoestrogenic gene expression: structural features of active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T Wayne; Sinks, Glendon D

    2002-04-01

    Estrogenicity was assessed using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based Lac-Z reporter assay and was reported as the logarithm of the inverse of the 50% molar beta-galactosidase activity (log[EC50(-1)]). In an effort to quantify the relationship between molecular structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and estrogenic gene expression, a series of PAHs were evaluated. With noted exceptions, the results of these studies indicate that the initial two-dimensional structural warning for estrogenicity, the superpositioning of a hydroxylated aromatic system on the phenolic A-ring of 17-beta-estradiol, can be extended to the PAHs. This two-dimensional-alignment criterion correctly identified estrogenicity of 22 of the 29 PAHs evaluated. Moreover, the estrogenic potency of these compounds was directly related to the size of the hydrophobic backbone. The seven compounds classified incorrectly by this structural feature were either dihydroxylated naphthalenes or aromatic nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds; all such compounds were false positives. Results with dihydroxylated naphthalenes reveal derivatives that were nonestrogenic when superimposed on the phenolic A-ring of 17-beta-estradiol had the second hydroxyl group in the position of the C-ring or were catechol-like in structure. Structural alerts for nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds must take into account the position of the hydroxyl group and the in-ring nitrogen atom; compounds with the hydroxyl group and nitrogen atom involved with the same ring were observed to be nonactive.

  15. Long-term hydroxytamoxifen treatment of an MCF-7-derived breast cancer cell line irreversibly inhibits the expression of estrogenic genes through chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Badia, E; Duchesne, M J; Semlali, A; Fuentes, M; Giamarchi, C; Richard-Foy, H; Nicolas, J C; Pons, M

    2000-08-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is frequently observed in patients after longterm treatment with tamoxifen, a nonsteroidal antiestrogen widely used for endocrine therapy of breast cancer. In vitro studies in resistant cells showed that the expression of natural estrogen-responsive genes is frequently altered. Using MVLN cells, an MCF-7-derived cell model, we previously demonstrated that 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) treatment irreversibly inactivated an estrogen-regulated chimeric luciferase response by a direct effect of the drug and not through a cell selection process (E. Badia et al., Cancer Res., 54: 5860-5866, 1994). In the present study, we present tamoxifen-resistant but still estrogen-dependent clones isolated after long-term treatment of MVLN cells with OHT and show that progesterone receptor (PR) expression was irreversibly decreased in some of these clones, whereas the PRA:PRB ratio of residual PR remained unchanged. The irreversible inactivation of both chimeric luciferase gene and PR gene expression was associated with the disappearance of DNase 1-hypersensitive sites. In the case of the chimeric gene, at least one of these sites was close to the estrogen responsive element. Genomic sequencing analysis of a clone with very low PR content did not reveal any methylation on CpG dinucleotides or any mutation in the PR gene promoter region. In all of the resistant clones tested and independently of their PR content, estrogen receptor expression was only lowered by half and remained functional, whereas pS2 expression was not modified. We also observed that the residual luciferase activity level (1-2%) of the MVLN clones, the luciferase expression of which had been irreversibly inactivated, was raised 4-fold by trichostatin A treatment. We conclude that long-term OHT treatment may modify the chromatin structure and thus could contribute to differentially silencing natural target genes.

  16. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  17. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  18. Providencia stuartii genes activated by cell-to-cell signaling and identification of a gene required for production or activity of an extracellular factor.

    PubMed

    Rather, P N; Ding, X; Baca-DeLancey, R R; Siddiqui, S

    1999-12-01

    By utilizing reporter transposons, five Providencia stuartii genes that are activated by the accumulation of self-produced extracellular signals have been identified. These genes have been designated cma for conditioned medium activated. The presence of conditioned medium from stationary-phase cultures grown in rich media resulted in the premature activation of each gene in cells at early log phase, with activation values ranging from 6- to 26-fold. Preparation of conditioned medium from an M9 salts medium and fractionation by gel filtration chromatography resulted in fractions within the included volume which activated three of the cma fusions. In addition, depending on the reporter fusion, peak activity was found in different fractions. The partially purified factors activated in a dose-dependent manner. Characterization of the factors activating the cma fusions indicated that they were stable to heat, alkali, and acid. Furthermore, for each cma fusion, factor activity was not reproduced by the addition of homoserine lactone, homocysteine thiolactone, pyruvate, Casamino Acids, or alpha-ketoglutarate. The identities of three cma genes have been determined and revealed physiological roles in amino acid biosynthesis and nutrient import. To begin to address the pathways for production of or response to the extracellular factors, we have identified a locus, aarA, that is required for the activation of four cma fusions. The AarA product was required for factor activity in extracellular supernatants, indicating a possible role in biosynthesis or export.

  19. The lux genes of the luminous bacterial symbiont, Photobacterium leiognathi, of the ponyfish. Nucleotide sequence, difference in gene organization, and high expression in mutant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y; Szittner, R B; Meighen, E A

    1991-10-01

    The lux genes required for light expression in the luminescent bacterium Photobacterium leiognathi (ATCC 25521) have been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and their organization and nucleotide sequence determined. Transformation of a recombinant 9.5-kbp chromosomal DNA fragment of P. leiognathi into an E. coli mutant (43R) gave luminescent colonies that were as bright as those of the parental strain. Moreover, expression of the lux genes in the mutant E. coli was strong enough so that not only were high levels of luciferase detected in crude extracts, but the fatty-acid reductase activity responsible for synthesis of the aldehyde substrate for the luminescent reaction could readily be measured. Determination of the 7.3-kbp nucleotide sequence of P. leiognathi DNA, including the genes for luciferase (luxAB) and fatty-acid reductase (luxCDE) as well as a new lux gene (luxG) found recently in luminescent Vibrio species, showed that the order of the lux genes was luxCDABEG. Moreover, luxF, a gene homologous to luxB and located between luxB and luxE in Photobacterium but not Vibrio strains, was absent. In spite of this different lux gene organization, an intergenic stem-loop structure between luxB and luxE was discovered to be highly conserved in other Photobacterium species after luxF.

  20. Identification of a novel polymorphism involving a CGG repeat in the PTCH gene and a genome-wide screening of CGG-containing genes.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kazuaki; Fujii, Katsunori; Yamada, Masao; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the human homologue of the Drosophila patched gene (PTCH) are responsible for the hereditary disorder called nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). PTCH has a CGG triplet repeat located 4 bp upstream of the first methionine codon. Here we report a novel polymorphism involving the number of the CGG-repeat. The major allele (86.3%) contained a repeat size of seven, whereas the minor allele contained eight. No significant difference in the distributions of genotypes was observed between normal and NBCCS individuals. However, when the repeat was inserted between a heterologous promoter and the luciferase gene, the longer repeats tended to induce higher luciferase activities, suggesting that the repeat length potentially affects the levels of gene expression. A genome-wide screening revealed that 68 and 146 genes contained a CGG/CCG repeat in the coding region and in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), respectively. None of the genes had this repeat in 3'-UTR. Interestingly, the number of genes with a CGG repeat in the 5'-UTR was significantly higher than that with a CCG repeat in the 5'-UTR. The localization of a CGG/CCG repeat in PTCH is quite unique in that only four other genes have been found in which the repeat is localized up to 4 bp upstream of the first methionine.