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Sample records for activated m2 phenotype

  1. Monocyte Differentiation towards Protumor Activity Does Not Correlate with M1 or M2 Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chimal-Ramírez, G. Karina; Espinoza-Sánchez, Nancy Adriana; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages facilitate breast cancer progression. Macrophages were initially classified as M1 or M2 based on their distinct metabolic programs and then expanded to include antitumoral (M1) and protumoral (M2) activities. However, it is still uncertain what markers define the pro- and antitumoral phenotypes and what conditions lead to their formation. In this study, monocytic cell lines and primary monocytes were subjected to commonly reported protocols of M1/M2 polarization and conditions known to engage monocytes into protumoral functions. The results showed that only IDO enzyme and CD86 M1 markers were upregulated correlating with M1 polarization. TNF-α, CCR7, IL-10, arginase I, CD36, and CD163 were expressed indistinguishably from M1 or M2 polarization. Similarly, protumoral engaging resulted in upregulation of both M1 and M2 markers, with conditioned media from the most aggressive breast cancer cell line promoting the greatest changes. In spite of the mixed phenotype, M1-polarized macrophages exhibited the highest expression/secretion of inflammatory mediators, many of which have previously been associated with breast cancer aggressiveness. These data argue that although the existence of protumoral macrophages is unquestionable, their associated phenotypes and the precise conditions driving their formation are still unclear, and those conditions may need both M1 and M2 stimuli. PMID:27376091

  2. Alternatively Activated (M2) Macrophage Phenotype Is Inducible by Endothelin-1 in Cultured Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Stefano; Pizzorni, Carmen; Paolino, Sabrina; Trombetta, Amelia Chiara; Montagna, Paola; Brizzolara, Renata; Ruaro, Barbara; Sulli, Alberto; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternatively activated (M2) macrophages are phenotypically characterized by the expression of specific markers, mainly macrophage scavenger receptors (CD204 and CD163) and mannose receptor-1 (CD206), and participate in the fibrotic process by over-producing pro-fibrotic molecules, such as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta1) and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is implicated in the fibrotic process, exerting its pro-fibrotic effects through the interaction with its receptors (ETA and ETB). The study investigated the possible role of ET-1 in inducing the transition from cultured human macrophages into M2 cells. Methods Cultured human monocytes (THP-1 cell line) were activated into macrophages (M0 macrophages) with phorbol myristate acetate and subsequently maintained in growth medium (M0-controls) or treated with either ET-1 (100nM) or interleukin-4 (IL-4, 10ng/mL, M2 inducer) for 72 hours. Similarly, primary cultures of human peripheral blood monocyte (PBM)-derived macrophages obtained from healthy subjects, were maintained in growth medium (untreated cells) or treated with ET-1 or IL-4 for 6 days. Both M0 and PBM-derived macrophages were pre-treated with ET receptor antagonist (ETA/BRA, bosentan 10-5M) for 1 hour before ET-1 stimulation. Protein and gene expression of CD204, CD206, CD163, TGFbeta1 were analysed by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Gene expression of interleukin(IL)-10 and macrophage derived chemokine (CCL-22) was evaluated by qRT-PCR. MMP-9 production was investigated by gel zymography. Results ET-1 significantly increased the expression of M2 phenotype markers CD204, CD206, CD163, IL-10 and CCL-22, and the production of MMP-9 in both cultures of M0 and PBM-derived macrophages compared to M0-controls and untreated cells. In cultured PBM-derived macrophages, ET-1 increased TGFbeta1 protein and gene expression compared to untreated cells. The ET-1

  3. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Díaz, José Manuel; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages. PMID:25309919

  4. [Nle4, D-Phe7]-α-MSH Inhibits Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)2- and TLR4-Induced Microglial Activation and Promotes a M2-Like Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carniglia, Lila; Ramírez, Delia; Durand, Daniela; Saba, Julieta; Caruso, Carla; Lasaga, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is an anti-inflammatory peptide, proved to be beneficial in many neuroinflammatory disorders acting through melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R). We previously determined that rat microglial cells express MC4R and that NDP-MSH, an analog of α-MSH, induces PPAR-γ expression and IL-10 release in these cells. Given the great importance of modulation of glial activation in neuroinflammatory disorders, we tested the ability of NDP-MSH to shape microglial phenotype and to modulate Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. Primary rat cultured microglia were stimulated with NDP-MSH followed by the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4 or the TLR4 agonist LPS. NDP-MSH alone induced expression of the M2a/M2c marker Ag1 and reduced expression of the M2b marker Il-4rα and of the LPS receptor Tlr4. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunits p65 and c-Rel was induced by LPS and these effects were partially prevented by NDP-MSH. NDP-MSH reduced LPS- and Pam3CSK4-induced TNF-α release but did not affect TLR-induced IL-10 release. Also, NDP-MSH inhibited TLR2-induced HMGB1 translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm and TLR2-induced phagocytic activity. Our data show that NDP-MSH inhibits TLR2- and TLR4-mediated proinflammatory mechanisms and promotes microglial M2-like polarization, supporting melanocortins as useful tools for shaping microglial activation towards an alternative immunomodulatory phenotype.

  5. [Nle4, D-Phe7]-α-MSH Inhibits Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)2- and TLR4-Induced Microglial Activation and Promotes a M2-Like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carniglia, Lila; Ramírez, Delia; Durand, Daniela; Saba, Julieta; Caruso, Carla; Lasaga, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is an anti-inflammatory peptide, proved to be beneficial in many neuroinflammatory disorders acting through melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R). We previously determined that rat microglial cells express MC4R and that NDP-MSH, an analog of α-MSH, induces PPAR-γ expression and IL-10 release in these cells. Given the great importance of modulation of glial activation in neuroinflammatory disorders, we tested the ability of NDP-MSH to shape microglial phenotype and to modulate Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. Primary rat cultured microglia were stimulated with NDP-MSH followed by the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4 or the TLR4 agonist LPS. NDP-MSH alone induced expression of the M2a/M2c marker Ag1 and reduced expression of the M2b marker Il-4rα and of the LPS receptor Tlr4. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunits p65 and c-Rel was induced by LPS and these effects were partially prevented by NDP-MSH. NDP-MSH reduced LPS- and Pam3CSK4-induced TNF-α release but did not affect TLR-induced IL-10 release. Also, NDP-MSH inhibited TLR2-induced HMGB1 translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm and TLR2-induced phagocytic activity. Our data show that NDP-MSH inhibits TLR2- and TLR4-mediated proinflammatory mechanisms and promotes microglial M2-like polarization, supporting melanocortins as useful tools for shaping microglial activation towards an alternative immunomodulatory phenotype. PMID:27359332

  6. The adult murine heart has a sparse, phagocytically active macrophage population that expands through monocyte recruitment and adopts an ‘M2phenotype in response to Th2 immunologic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mylonas, Katie J.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; Castellan, Raphael F.P.; Ruckerl, Dominik; McGregor, Kieran; Phythian-Adams, Alexander T.; Hewitson, James P.; Campbell, Sharon M.; MacDonald, Andrew S.; Allen, Judith E.; Gray, Gillian A.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue resident macrophages have vital homeostatic roles in many tissues but their roles are less well defined in the heart. The present study aimed to identify the density, polarisation status and distribution of macrophages in the healthy murine heart and to investigate their ability to respond to immune challenge. Histological analysis of hearts from CSF-1 receptor (csf1-GFP; MacGreen) and CX3CR1 (Cx3cr1GFP/+) reporter mice revealed a sparse population of GFP positive macrophages that were evenly distributed throughout the left and right ventricular free walls and septum. F4/80+CD11b+ cardiac macrophages, sorted from myocardial homogenates, were able to phagocytose fluorescent beads in vitro and expressed markers typical of both ‘M1’ (IL-1β, TNF and CCR2) and ‘M2activation (Ym1, Arg 1, RELMα and IL-10), suggesting no specific polarisation in healthy myocardium. Exposure to Th2 challenge by infection of mice with helminth parasites Schistosoma mansoni, or Heligmosomoides polygyrus, resulted in an increase in cardiac macrophage density, adoption of a stellate morphology and increased expression of Ym1, RELMα and CD206 (mannose receptor), indicative of ‘M2’ polarisation. This was dependent on recruitment of Ly6ChighCCR2+ monocytes and was accompanied by an increase in collagen content. In conclusion, in the healthy heart resident macrophages are relatively sparse and have a phagocytic role. Following Th2 challenge this population expands due to monocyte recruitment and adopts an ‘M2phenotype associated with increased tissue fibrosis. PMID:25700973

  7. The adult murine heart has a sparse, phagocytically active macrophage population that expands through monocyte recruitment and adopts an 'M2' phenotype in response to Th2 immunologic challenge.

    PubMed

    Mylonas, Katie J; Jenkins, Stephen J; Castellan, Raphael F P; Ruckerl, Dominik; McGregor, Kieran; Phythian-Adams, Alexander T; Hewitson, James P; Campbell, Sharon M; MacDonald, Andrew S; Allen, Judith E; Gray, Gillian A

    2015-07-01

    Tissue resident macrophages have vital homeostatic roles in many tissues but their roles are less well defined in the heart. The present study aimed to identify the density, polarisation status and distribution of macrophages in the healthy murine heart and to investigate their ability to respond to immune challenge. Histological analysis of hearts from CSF-1 receptor (csf1-GFP; MacGreen) and CX3CR1 (Cx3cr1(GFP/+)) reporter mice revealed a sparse population of GFP positive macrophages that were evenly distributed throughout the left and right ventricular free walls and septum. F4/80+CD11b+ cardiac macrophages, sorted from myocardial homogenates, were able to phagocytose fluorescent beads in vitro and expressed markers typical of both 'M1' (IL-1β, TNF and CCR2) and 'M2' activation (Ym1, Arg 1, RELMα and IL-10), suggesting no specific polarisation in healthy myocardium. Exposure to Th2 challenge by infection of mice with helminth parasites Schistosoma mansoni, or Heligmosomoides polygyrus, resulted in an increase in cardiac macrophage density, adoption of a stellate morphology and increased expression of Ym1, RELMα and CD206 (mannose receptor), indicative of 'M2' polarisation. This was dependent on recruitment of Ly6ChighCCR2+ monocytes and was accompanied by an increase in collagen content. In conclusion, in the healthy heart resident macrophages are relatively sparse and have a phagocytic role. Following Th2 challenge this population expands due to monocyte recruitment and adopts an 'M2' phenotype associated with increased tissue fibrosis.

  8. M2 Phenotype Microglia-derived Cytokine Stimulates Proliferation and Neuronal Differentiation of Endogenous Stem Cells in Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ja Yong; Kim, Jong Youl; Kim, Jae Young; Park, Joohyun; Lee, Won Taek

    2017-01-01

    Microglia play a key role in the immune response and inflammatory reaction that occurs in response to ischemic stroke. Activated microglia promote neuronal damage or protection in injured brain tissue. Extracellular signals polarize the microglia towards the M1/M2 phenotype. The M1/M2 phenotype microglia released pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines which induce the activation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). In this study, we investigated how the cytokines released by microglia affect the activation of NSPCs. First, we treated BV2 cells with a lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 20 ng/ml) for M1 phenotype microglia and interleukin-4 (IL-4; 20 ng/ml) for M2 phenotype microglia in BV2 cells. Mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) for 1 h. In ex vivo, brain sections containing the subventricular zone (SVZ) were cultured in conditioned media of M1 and M2 phenotype-conditioned media for 3 d. We measured the expression of cytokines in the conditioned media by RT-PCR and ELISA. The M2 phenotype microglia-conditioned media led to the proliferation and neural differentiation of NSPCs in the ipsilateral SVZ after ischemic stroke. The RT-PCR and ELISA results showed that the expression of TGF-α mRNA was significantly higher in the M2 phenotype microglia-conditioned media. These data support that M2 phenotype microglia-derived TGF-α is one of the key factors to enhance proliferation and neural differntiation of NSPCs after ischemic stroke. PMID:28243165

  9. Chlorogenic acid inhibits glioblastoma growth through repolarizating macrophage from M2 to M1 phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Nina; Zhou, Qin; Ji, Ming; Jin, Jing; Lai, Fangfang; Chen, Ju; Zhang, Mengtian; Jia, Jing; Yang, Huarong; Zhang, Jie; Li, Wenbin; Jiang, Jiandong; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive tumor that is associated with distinctive infiltrating microglia/macrophages populations. Previous studies demonstrated that chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid, CHA), a phenolic compound with low molecular weight, has an anti-tumor effect in multiple malignant tumors. In the present study, we focused on the macrophage polarization to investigate the molecular mechanisms behind the anti-glioma response of CHA in vitro and in vivo. We found that CHA treatment increased the expression of M1 markers induced by LPS/IFNγ, including iNOS, MHC II (I-A/I-E subregions) and CD11c, and reduced the expression of M2 markers Arg and CD206 induced by IL-4, resulting in promoting the production of apoptotic-like cancer cells and inhibiting the growth of tumor cells by co-culture experiments. The activations of STAT1 and STAT6, which are two crucial signaling events in M1 and M2-polarization, were significantly promoted and suppressed by CHA in macrophages, respectively. Furthermore, In G422 xenograft mice, CHA increased the proportion of CD11c-positive M1 macrophages and decreased the distribution of CD206-positive M2 macrophages in tumor tissue, consistent with the reduction of tumor weight observed in CHA-treated mice. Overall these findings indicated CHA as a potential therapeutic approach to reduce glioma growth through promoting M1-polarized macrophage and inhibiting M2 phenotypic macrophage. PMID:28045028

  10. Fasciola hepatica tegumental antigens indirectly induce an M2 macrophage-like phenotype in vivo.

    PubMed

    Adams, P N; Aldridge, A; Vukman, K V; Donnelly, S; O'Neill, S M

    2014-10-01

    The M2 subset of macrophages has a critical role to play in host tissue repair, tissue fibrosis and modulation of adaptive immunity during helminth infection. Infection with the helminth, Fasciola hepatica, is associated with M2 macrophages in its mammalian host, and this response is mimicked by its excretory-secretory products (FhES). The tegumental coat of F. hepatica (FhTeg) is another major source of immune-modulatory molecules; we have previously shown that FhTeg can modulate the activity of both dendritic cells and mast cells inhibiting their ability to prime a Th1 immune response. Here, we report that FhTeg does not induce Th2 immune responses but can induce M2-like phenotype in vivo that modulates cytokine production from CD4(+) cells in response to anti-CD3 stimulation. FhTeg induces a RELMα expressing macrophage population in vitro, while in vivo, the expression of Arg1 and Ym-1/2 but not RELMα in FhTeg-stimulated macrophages was STAT6 dependent. To support this finding, FhTeg induces RELMα expression in vivo prior to the induction of IL-13. FhTeg can induce IL-13-producing peritoneal macrophages following intraperitoneal injection This study highlights the important role of FhTeg as an immune-modulatory source during F. hepatica infection and sheds further light on helminth-macrophage interactions.

  11. Paraoxonase 2 Induces a Phenotypic Switch in Macrophage Polarization Favoring an M2 Anti-Inflammatory State.

    PubMed

    Koren-Gluzer, Marie; Rosenblat, Mira; Hayek, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory processes are involved in atherosclerosis development. Macrophages play a major role in the early atherogenesis, and they are present in the atherosclerotic lesion in two phenotypes: proinflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2). Paraoxonase 2 (PON2) is expressed in macrophages, and it was shown to protect against atherosclerosis. Thus, the aim of our study was to analyze the direct effect of PON2 on macrophage inflammatory phenotypes. Ex vivo studies were performed with murine peritoneal macrophages (MPM) harvested from control C57BL/6 and PON2-deficient (PON2KO) mice. PON2KO MPM showed an enhanced proinflammatory phenotype compared to the control, both in the basal state and following M1 activation by IFNγ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In parallel, PON2KO MPM also showed reduced anti-inflammatory responses in the basal state and also following M2 activation by IL-4. Moreover, the PON2-null MPM demonstrated enhanced phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the basal state and following M1 activation. The direct effect of PON2 was shown by transfecting human PON2 (hPON2) into PON2KO MPM. PON2 transfection attenuated the macrophages' response to M1 activation and enhanced M2 response. These PON2 effects were associated with attenuation of macrophages' abilities to phagocyte and to generate ROS. We conclude that PON2 promotes an M1 to M2 switch in macrophage phenotypes.

  12. Paraoxonase 2 Induces a Phenotypic Switch in Macrophage Polarization Favoring an M2 Anti-Inflammatory State

    PubMed Central

    Koren-Gluzer, Marie; Rosenblat, Mira; Hayek, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory processes are involved in atherosclerosis development. Macrophages play a major role in the early atherogenesis, and they are present in the atherosclerotic lesion in two phenotypes: proinflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2). Paraoxonase 2 (PON2) is expressed in macrophages, and it was shown to protect against atherosclerosis. Thus, the aim of our study was to analyze the direct effect of PON2 on macrophage inflammatory phenotypes. Ex vivo studies were performed with murine peritoneal macrophages (MPM) harvested from control C57BL/6 and PON2-deficient (PON2KO) mice. PON2KO MPM showed an enhanced proinflammatory phenotype compared to the control, both in the basal state and following M1 activation by IFNγ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In parallel, PON2KO MPM also showed reduced anti-inflammatory responses in the basal state and also following M2 activation by IL-4. Moreover, the PON2-null MPM demonstrated enhanced phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the basal state and following M1 activation. The direct effect of PON2 was shown by transfecting human PON2 (hPON2) into PON2KO MPM. PON2 transfection attenuated the macrophages' response to M1 activation and enhanced M2 response. These PON2 effects were associated with attenuation of macrophages' abilities to phagocyte and to generate ROS. We conclude that PON2 promotes an M1 to M2 switch in macrophage phenotypes. PMID:26779262

  13. From Monocytes to M1/M2 Macrophages: Phenotypical vs. Functional Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Italiani, Paola; Boraschi, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Studies on monocyte and macrophage biology and differentiation have revealed the pleiotropic activities of these cells. Macrophages are tissue sentinels that maintain tissue integrity by eliminating/repairing damaged cells and matrices. In this M2-like mode, they can also promote tumor growth. Conversely, M1-like macrophages are key effector cells for the elimination of pathogens, virally infected, and cancer cells. Macrophage differentiation from monocytes occurs in the tissue in concomitance with the acquisition of a functional phenotype that depends on microenvironmental signals, thereby accounting for the many and apparently opposed macrophage functions. Many questions arise. When monocytes differentiate into macrophages in a tissue (concomitantly adopting a specific functional program, M1 or M2), do they all die during the inflammatory reaction, or do some of them survive? Do those that survive become quiescent tissue macrophages, able to react as naïve cells to a new challenge? Or, do monocyte-derived tissue macrophages conserve a “memory” of their past inflammatory activation? This review will address some of these important questions under the general framework of the role of monocytes and macrophages in the initiation, development, resolution, and chronicization of inflammation. PMID:25368618

  14. Orosomucoid 1 drives opportunistic infections through the polarization of monocytes to the M2b phenotype.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kiwamu; Ito, Ichiaki; Kobayashi, Makiko; Herndon, David N; Suzuki, Fujio

    2015-05-01

    Orosomucoid (ORM, composed of two isoforms, ORM1 and ORM2) has been described as an inducer of M2 macrophages, which are cells that decrease host antibacterial innate immunities. However, it is unknown which phenotypes of M2 macrophages are induced by ORM. In this study, healthy donor monocytes stimulated with ORM (ORM-monocytes) were characterized phenotypically and biologically. CCL1 (a biomarker of M2b macrophages) and IL-10 were detected in monocyte cultures supplemented with ORM1; however, CCL17 (a biomarker of M2a macrophages) and CXCL13 (a biomarker of M2c macrophages) were not produced in these cultures. All of these soluble factors were not detected in the culture fluids of monocytes stimulated with ORM2. Monocytes stimulated with ORM1 were characterized as CD64(-)CD209(-)CD163(+)CCL1(+) cells. MRSA and Enterococcus faecalis infections were accelerated in chimeras (NOD/scid IL-2Rγ(null) mice reconstituted with white blood cells) after inoculation with monocytes stimulated with ORM1 or treatment with ORM1; however, the infections were greatly mitigated in both chimeras inoculated with ORM1-stimulated monocytes and treated with ORM1, after an additional treatment with an inhibitor of M2b macrophages (CCL1 antisense ODN). These results indicate that ORM1 stimulates quiescent monocytes to polarize to M2b monocytes. The regulation of M2b macrophages may be beneficial in controlling opportunistic infections in patients with a large amount of plasma ORM1.

  15. HMGB1 enhances the protumoral activities of M2 macrophages by a RAGE-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Armando; Delgado-López, Fernando; Perez-Castro, Ramón; Gonzalez, Ileana; Romero, Jacqueline; Rojas, Israel; Araya, Paulina; Añazco, Carolina; Morales, Erik; Llanos, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    The monocyte-macrophage lineage shows a high degree of diversity and plasticity. Once they infiltrate tissues, they may acquire two main functional phenotypes, being known as the classically activated type 1 macrophages (M1) and the alternative activated type 2 macrophages (M2). The M1 phenotype can be induced by bacterial products and interferon-γ and exerts a cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. Conversely, the alternatively activated M2 phenotype is induced by Il-4/IL13 and promotes tumor cell growth and vascularization. Although receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) engagement in M1 macrophages has been reported by several groups to promote inflammation, nothing is known about the functionality of RAGE in M2 macrophages. In the current study, we demonstrate that RAGE is equally expressed in both macrophage phenotypes and that RAGE activation by high-mobility group protein box1 (HMGB1) promotes protumoral activities of M2 macrophages. MKN45 cells co-cultured with M2 macrophages treated with HMGB1 at different times displayed higher invasive abilities. Additionally, conditioned medium from HMGB1-treated M2 macrophages promotes angiogenesis in vitro. RAGE-targeting knockdown abrogates these activities. Overall, the present findings suggest that HMGB1 may contribute, by a RAGE-dependent mechanism, to the protumoral activities of the M2 phenotype.

  16. Pomegranate juice polyphenols induce a phenotypic switch in macrophage polarization favoring a M2 anti-inflammatory state.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Saar; Lati, Yoni; Aviram, Michael; Fuhrman, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    It was documented that pomegranate has anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated a direct effect of pomegranate juice (PJ) and its polyphenols on macrophage inflammatory phenotype. In vitro, PJ and its major polyphenols dose-dependently attenuated macrophage response to M1 proinflammatory activation in J774.A1 macrophage-like cell line. This was evidenced by a significant decrease in TNFα and IL-6 secretion in response to stimulation by IFNγ and Lipopolysaccharide. In addition, PJ and punicalagin dose-dependently promoted the macrophages toward a M2 anti-inflammatory phenotype, as determined by a significant increase in the spontaneous secretion of IL-10. In mice, supplementation with dietary PJ substantially inhibited the M2 to M1 macrophage phenotypic shift associated with age, toward a favorable anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. This effect was also reflected in the mice atherosclerotic plaques, as evaluated by the distinct expression of arginase isoforms. PJ consumption inhibited the increment of arginase II (Arg II, M1) mRNA expression during aging, and maintained the levels of Arg I (M2) expression similar to those in young mice aorta. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that pomegranate polyphenols directly suppress macrophage inflammatory responses and promote M1 to M2 switch in macrophage phenotype. Furthermore, this study indicates that PJ consumption may inhibit the progressive proinflammatory state in the aorta along atherosclerosis development with aging, due to a switch in macrophage phenotype from proinflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2.

  17. Vitamin D prevents podocyte injury via regulation of macrophage M1/M2 phenotype in diabetic nephropathy rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Guo, Yin-Feng; Song, Zhi-Xia; Zhou, Min

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the heterogeneity of macrophage phenotype and function ultimately determines the outcome of diabetic nephropathy (DN). This study aimed to investigate the effects of vitamin D on macrophage M1/M2 phenotype and its role in preventing podocyte impairment in streptozotocin-induced DN rats. Calcitriol, a bioactive 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, ameliorated proteinuria and renal damage as well as reversed the decline of both nephrin and podocin, crucial structural proteins in podocytes. DN rats showed increased infiltrating macrophages with M1 phenotype characterized by elevated expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-α in glomeruli and interstitium, which were inhibited after calcitriol treatment. Interestingly, calcitriol promoted M2 macrophage activation with enhanced expression of CD163, arginase-1, and mannose receptor at week 18 but not at week 8 or 14. The ratio of CD163 to CD68, considered as the proportion of M2 macrophages, was about 2.9-fold higher at week 18 after calcitriol treatment. Furthermore, the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a crucial marker of M1 macrophages, was negatively correlated with the expression of either nephrin or podocin, whereas CD163, indicating M2 macrophages, was positively correlated. In vitro, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 switched high-glucose-induced M1 macrophages toward an M2 phenotype in either U937-derived macrophages or RAW264.7 cells. Our results suggest that vitamin D not only reduces macrophage infiltration and inhibits M1 macrophage activation but also enhances M2 macrophage phenotype to protect against podocyte injury.

  18. Human cytomegalovirus interleukin-10 polarizes monocytes toward a deactivated M2c phenotype to repress host immune responses.

    PubMed

    Avdic, Selmir; Cao, John Z; McSharry, Brian P; Clancy, Leighton E; Brown, Rebecca; Steain, Megan; Gottlieb, David J; Abendroth, Allison; Slobedman, Barry

    2013-09-01

    Several human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genes encode products that modulate cellular functions in a manner likely to enhance viral pathogenesis. This includes UL111A, which encodes homologs of human interleukin-10 (hIL-10). Depending upon signals received, monocytes and macrophages become polarized to either classically activated (M1 proinflammatory) or alternatively activated (M2 anti-inflammatory) subsets. Skewing of polarization toward an M2 subset may benefit the virus by limiting the proinflammatory responses to infection, and so we determined whether HCMV-encoded viral IL-10 influenced monocyte polarization. Recombinant viral IL-10 protein polarized CD14(+) monocytes toward an anti-inflammatory M2 subset with an M2c phenotype, as demonstrated by high expression of CD163 and CD14 and suppression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II. Significantly, in the context of productive HCMV infection, viral IL-10 produced by infected cells polarized uninfected monocytes toward an M2c phenotype. We also assessed the impact of viral IL-10 on heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), which is an enzyme linked with suppression of inflammatory responses. Polarization of monocytes by viral IL-10 resulted in upregulation of HO-1, and inhibition of HO-1 function resulted in a loss of capacity of viral IL-10 to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-1β, implicating HO-1 in viral IL-10-induced suppression of proinflammatory cytokines by M2c monocytes. In addition, a functional consequence of monocytes polarized with viral IL-10 was a decreased capacity to activate CD4(+) T cells. This study identifies a novel role for viral IL-10 in driving M2c polarization, which may limit virus clearance by restricting proinflammatory and CD4(+) T cell responses at sites of infection.

  19. Understanding the Mysterious M2 Macrophage through Activation Markers and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rőszer, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    The alternatively activated or M2 macrophages are immune cells with high phenotypic heterogeneity and are governing functions at the interface of immunity, tissue homeostasis, metabolism, and endocrine signaling. Today the M2 macrophages are identified based on the expression pattern of a set of M2 markers. These markers are transmembrane glycoproteins, scavenger receptors, enzymes, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and cytokine receptors with diverse and often yet unexplored functions. This review discusses whether these M2 markers can be reliably used to identify M2 macrophages and define their functional subdivisions. Also, it provides an update on the novel signals of the tissue environment and the neuroendocrine system which shape the M2 activation. The possible evolutionary roots of the M2 macrophage functions are also discussed. PMID:26089604

  20. miR-181a Induces Macrophage Polarized to M2 Phenotype and Promotes M2 Macrophage-mediated Tumor Cell Metastasis by Targeting KLF6 and C/EBPα

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jia; Zeng, Xianxin; Zhao, Lin; Wei, Qian; Yu, Lifeng; Wang, Xinnan; Yu, Zhaojin; Cao, Yaming; Shan, Fengping; Wei, Minjie

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages can acquire a variety of polarization status and functions: classically activated macrophages (M1 macrophages); alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages). However, the molecular basis of the process is still unclear. Here, this study addresses that microRNA-181a (miR-181a) is a key molecule controlling macrophage polarization. We found that miR-181a is overexpressed in M2 macrophages than in M1 macrophages. miR-181a expression was decreased when M2 phenotype converted to M1, whereas it increased when M1 phenotype converted to M2. Overexpression of miR-181a in M1 macrophages diminished M1 phenotype expression while promoting polarization to the M2 phenotype. In contrast, knockdown of miR-181a in M2 macrophages promoted M1 polarization and diminished M2 phenotype expression. Mechanistically, Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) is a potential target of miR-181a and luciferase assay confirmed that KLF6 and C/EBPα translation is suppressed by miR-181a through interaction with the 3′UTR of KLF6 and C/EBPα mRNA. Further analysis showed that induction of miR-181a suppressed KLF6 and C/EBPα protein expression. Importantly, miR-181a also diminishes M2 macrophages-mediated migration and invasion capacity of tumor cells. Collectively, our results suggest that miR-181a plays a significant role in regulating macrophage polarization through directly target KLF6 and C/EBPα. PMID:27673564

  1. Regulation of Macrophage Motility by the Water Channel Aquaporin-1: Crucial Role of M0/M2 Phenotype Switch

    PubMed Central

    Tyteca, Donatienne; Nishino, Tomoya; Debaix, Huguette; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N'Kuli, Francisca; Hoffmann, Delia; Cnops, Yvette; Rabolli, Virginie; van Loo, Geert; Beyaert, Rudi; Huaux, François; Devuyst, Olivier; Courtoy, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) promotes migration of many cell types. Although AQP1 is expressed in macrophages, its potential role in macrophage motility, particularly in relation with phenotype polarization, remains unknown. We here addressed these issues in peritoneal macrophages isolated from AQP1-deficient mice, either undifferentiated (M0) or stimulated with LPS to orientate towards pro-inflammatory phenotype (classical macrophage activation; M1). In non-stimulated macrophages, ablation of AQP1 (like inhibition by HgCl2) increased by 2–3 fold spontaneous migration in a Src/PI3K/Rac-dependent manner. This correlated with cell elongation and formation of lamellipodia/ruffles, resulting in membrane lipid and F4/80 recruitment to the leading edge. This indicated that AQP1 normally suppresses migration of resting macrophages, as opposed to other cell types. Resting Aqp1-/- macrophages exhibited CD206 redistribution into ruffles and increased arginase activity like IL4/IL13 (alternative macrophage activation; M2), indicating a M0-M2 shift. In contrast, upon M1 orientation by LPS in vitro or peritoneal inflammation in vivo, migration of Aqp1-/- macrophages was reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that AQP1 oppositely regulates macrophage migration, depending on stimulation or not by LPS, and that macrophage phenotypic and migratory changes may be regulated independently of external cues. PMID:25719758

  2. IL-4/IL-13-mediated polarization of renal macrophages/dendritic cells to an M2a phenotype is essential for recovery from acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yinqiu; Niu, Aolei; Wang, Suwan; Zou, Chenhang; Harris, Raymond C

    2017-02-01

    Cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 play important roles in polarization of macrophages/dendritic cells to an M2 phenotype, which is important for recovery from acute kidney injury. Both IL-4 and IL-13 activate JAK3/STAT6 signaling. In mice with diphtheria toxin receptor expression in proximal tubules (selective injury model), a relatively selective JAK3 inhibitor, tofacitinib, led to more severe kidney injury, delayed recovery from acute kidney injury, increased inflammatory M1 phenotype markers and decreased reparative M2 phenotype markers of macrophages/dendritic cells, and development of more severe renal fibrosis after diphtheria toxin administration. Similarly, there was delayed recovery and increased tubulointerstitial fibrosis in these diphtheria toxin-treated mice following tamoxifen-induced deletion of both IL-4 and IL-13, with increased levels of M1 and decreased levels of M2 markers in the macrophages/dendritic cells. Furthermore, deletion of IL-4 and IL-13 led to a decrease of tissue reparative M2a phenotype markers but had no effect on anti-inflammatory M2c phenotype markers. Deletion of IL-4 and IL-13 also inhibited recovery from ischemia-reperfusion injury in association with increased M1 and decreased M2 markers and promoted subsequent tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Thus, IL-4 and IL-13 are required to effectively polarize macrophages/dendritic cells to an M2a phenotype and to promote recovery from acute kidney injury.

  3. Hypoxia induces macrophage polarization and re-education toward an M2 phenotype in U87 and U251 glioblastoma models

    PubMed Central

    Leblond, Marine M; Gérault, Aurélie N; Corroyer-Dulmont, Aurélien; MacKenzie, Eric T; Petit, Edwige; Bernaudin, Myriam; Valable, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors, particularly in glioblastoma (GBM), and known to be a poor prognosis factor in GBM patients. The growth of GBM is also associated with a marked inflammation partially characterized by an accumulation of macrophage (MΦ) of the M2 phenotype. However, the transition between M1 MΦ (antitumoral) and M2 MΦ (protumoral) phenotypes is a dynamic process. We made the assumption that oxygen (O2) availability could be a major regulator of this transition and that the intratumoral O2 gradient is of importance. We evaluated, in vivo, the impact of hypoxia on MΦ tropism and polarization in two models of human GBM, well differentiated by their degree of hypoxia. MΦ migration in the tumor was more pronounced in the more hypoxic tumor of the two GBM models. In the more hypoxic of the models, we have shown that MΦ migrated at the tumor site only when hypoxia takes place. We also demonstrated that the acquisition of the M2 phenotype was clearly an evolving phenomenon with hypoxia as the major trigger for this transition. In support of these in vivo finding, M0 but also M1 MΦ cultured in moderate or severe hypoxia displayed a phenotype close to that of M2 MΦ whose phenotype was further reinforced by severe hypoxia. These results highlight the role of hypoxia in the aggressiveness of GBM, in part, by transforming MΦ such that a protumoral activity is expressed. PMID:26942063

  4. Parkin Regulates the Activity of Pyruvate Kinase M2*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Li, Fanzhou; Han, Haichao; Chen, Yue; Mao, Zebin; Luo, Jianyuan; Zhao, Yingming; Zheng, Bin; Gu, Wei; Zhao, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Parkin, a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is mutated in most cases of autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson disease. It was discovered that Parkin is also mutated in glioblastoma and other human malignancies and that it inhibits tumor cell growth. Here, we identified pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) as a unique substrate for parkin through biochemical purification. We found that parkin interacts with PKM2 both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction dramatically increases during glucose starvation. Ubiquitylation of PKM2 by parkin does not affect its stability but decreases its enzymatic activity. Parkin regulates the glycolysis pathway and affects the cell metabolism. Our studies revealed the novel important roles of parkin in tumor cell metabolism and provided new insight for therapy of Parkinson disease. PMID:26975375

  5. Chronic hepatitis C infection–induced liver fibrogenesis is associated with M2 macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Bility, Moses T.; Nio, Kouki; Li, Feng; McGivern, David R.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Feeney, Eoin R.; Chung, Raymond T.; Su, Lishan

    2016-01-01

    The immuno-pathogenic mechanisms of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remain to be elucidated and pose a major hurdle in treating or preventing chronic HCV-induced advanced liver diseases such as cirrhosis. Macrophages are a major component of the inflammatory milieu in chronic HCV–induced liver disease, and are generally derived from circulating inflammatory monocytes; however very little is known about their role in liver diseases. To investigate the activation and role of macrophages in chronic HCV–induced liver fibrosis, we utilized a recently developed humanized mouse model with autologous human immune and liver cells, human liver and blood samples and cell culture models of monocyte/macrophage and/or hepatic stellate cell activation. We showed that M2 macrophage activation was associated with liver fibrosis during chronic HCV infection in the livers of both humanized mice and patients, and direct-acting antiviral therapy attenuated M2 macrophage activation and associated liver fibrosis. We demonstrated that supernatant from HCV-infected liver cells activated human monocytes/macrophages with M2-like phenotypes. Importantly, HCV-activated monocytes/macrophages promoted hepatic stellate cell activation. These results suggest a critical role for M2 macrophage induction in chronic HCV-associated immune dysregulation and liver fibrosis. PMID:28000758

  6. Chronic hepatitis C infection-induced liver fibrogenesis is associated with M2 macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Bility, Moses T; Nio, Kouki; Li, Feng; McGivern, David R; Lemon, Stanley M; Feeney, Eoin R; Chung, Raymond T; Su, Lishan

    2016-12-21

    The immuno-pathogenic mechanisms of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remain to be elucidated and pose a major hurdle in treating or preventing chronic HCV-induced advanced liver diseases such as cirrhosis. Macrophages are a major component of the inflammatory milieu in chronic HCV-induced liver disease, and are generally derived from circulating inflammatory monocytes; however very little is known about their role in liver diseases. To investigate the activation and role of macrophages in chronic HCV-induced liver fibrosis, we utilized a recently developed humanized mouse model with autologous human immune and liver cells, human liver and blood samples and cell culture models of monocyte/macrophage and/or hepatic stellate cell activation. We showed that M2 macrophage activation was associated with liver fibrosis during chronic HCV infection in the livers of both humanized mice and patients, and direct-acting antiviral therapy attenuated M2 macrophage activation and associated liver fibrosis. We demonstrated that supernatant from HCV-infected liver cells activated human monocytes/macrophages with M2-like phenotypes. Importantly, HCV-activated monocytes/macrophages promoted hepatic stellate cell activation. These results suggest a critical role for M2 macrophage induction in chronic HCV-associated immune dysregulation and liver fibrosis.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide preconditioning facilitates M2 activation of resident microglia after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kentaro; Okazaki, Rentaro; Morioka, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Kozo; Tanaka, Sakae; Ogata, Toru

    2014-12-01

    The inflammatory response following spinal cord injury (SCI) has both harmful and beneficial effects; however, it can be modulated for therapeutic benefit. Endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning, a well-established method for modifying the immune reaction, has been shown to attenuate damage induced by stroke and brain trauma in rodent models. Although such effects likely are conveyed by tissue-repairing functions of the inflammatory response, the mechanisms that control the effects have not yet been elucidated. The present study preconditioned C57BL6/J mice with 0.05 mg/kg of LPS 48 hr before inducing contusion SCI to investigate the effect of LPS preconditioning on the activation of macrophages/microglia. We found that LPS preconditioning promotes the polarization of M1/M2 macrophages/microglia toward an M2 phenotype in the injured spinal cord on quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analyses. Flow cytometric analyses reveal that LPS preconditioning facilitates M2 activation in resident microglia but not in infiltrating macrophages. Augmented M2 activation was accompanied by vascularization around the injured lesion, resulting in improvement in both tissue reorganization and functional recovery. Furthermore, we found that M2 activation induced by LPS preconditioning is regulated by interleukin-10 gene expression, which was preceded by the transcriptional activation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3, as demonstrated by Western blotting and an IRF-3 binding assay. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that LPS preconditioning has a therapeutic effect on SCI through the modulation of M1/M2 polarization of resident microglia. The present study suggests that controlling M1/M2 polarization through endotoxin signal transduction could become a promising therapeutic strategy for various central nervous system diseases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. M1/M2-macrophage phenotypes regulate renal calcium oxalate crystal development

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazumi; Okada, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Unno, Rei; Moritoki, Yoshinobu; Ando, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Kentaro; Tozawa, Keiichi; Kohri, Kenjiro; Yasui, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    In our previous report, M2-macrophage (Mφs) deficient mice showed increased renal calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal formation; however, the role of Mφs-related-cytokines and chemokines that affect kidney stone formation remains unknown. Here, we investigated the role of M1/M2s in crystal development by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. The crystal phagocytic rate of bone marrow-derived M2Mφs was higher than that of bone marrow-derived Mφs and M1Mφs and increased on co-culture with renal tubular cells (RTCs). However, the amount of crystal attachment on RTCs reduced on co-culture with M2Mφs. In six hyperoxaluric C57BL/6J mice, M1Mφ transfusion and induction by LPS and IFN-γ facilitated renal crystal formation, whereas M2Mφ transfusion and induction by IL-4 and IL-13 suppressed renal crystal formation compared with the control. These M2Mφ treatments reduced the expression of crystal-related genes, such as osteopontin and CD44, whereas M1Mφ treatment increased the expression of pro-inflammatory and adhesion-related genes such as IL-6, inducible NOS, TNF-α, C3, and VCAM-1. The expression of M2Mφ-related genes was lower whereas that of M1Mφ-related genes was higher in papillary tissue of CaOx stone formers. Overall, our results suggest that renal crystal development is facilitated by M1Mφs, but suppressed by M2Mφs. PMID:27731368

  9. Atorvastatin promotes human monocyte differentiation toward alternative M2 macrophages through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ou; Zhang, Jinying

    2015-05-01

    M1 and M2 macrophages are detectable in human atherosclerotic lesions, and M2 macrophages are present at locations distant from the lipid core in more stable zones of the plaque and appear to exert anti-inflammatory properties on M1 macrophages. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Although both statins and PPARγ ligands have been reported to protect against the progression of atherosclerosis, no data are currently available regarding the implication of statins in the alternative differentiation of human monocytes. In the present study, we hypothesized that atorvastatin may exert novel effects to prime human monocytes toward an anti-inflammatory alternative M2 phenotype. To this aim, we first found that abundant M2 markers were expressed in human circulating monocytes after atorvastatin treatment. Moreover, atorvastatin was able to induce PPARγ expression and activation in human monocytes in vivo and in vitro, resulting in priming primary human monocytes differentiation into M2 macrophages with a more pronounced paracrine anti-inflammatory activity in M1 macrophages. Additional data with molecular approaches revealed that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation was involved in atorvastatin-mediated PPARγ activation and enhanced alternative M2 macrophage phenotype. Collectively, our data demonstrated that atorvastatin promotes human monocyte differentiation toward alternative M2 macrophages via p38 MAPK-dependent PPARγ activation.

  10. The adenosine-dependent angiogenic switch of macrophages to an M2-like phenotype is independent of interleukin-4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) signaling.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Christopher James; Pinhal-Enfield, Grace; Elson, Genie; Cronstein, Bruce Neil; Hasko, Gyorgy; Outram, Shalini; Leibovich, Samuel Joseph

    2013-08-01

    Murine macrophages are activated by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and/or Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists such as bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) to express an inflammatory (M1) phenotype characterized by the expression of nitric oxide synthase-2 (iNOS) and inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-12. In contrast, Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 activate macrophages by inducing the expression of arginase-1 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in an IL-4 receptor-α (IL-4Rα)-dependent manner. Macrophages activated in this way are designated as "alternatively activated" (M2a) macrophages. We have shown previously that adenosine A2A receptor (A(2A)R) agonists act synergistically with TLR2, TLR4, TLR7, and TLR9 agonists to switch macrophages into an "M2-like" phenotype that we have termed "M2d." Adenosine signaling suppresses the TLR-dependent expression of TNF-α, IL-12, IFN-γ, and several other inflammatory cytokines by macrophages and induces the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and IL-10. We show here using mice lacking a functional IL-4Rα gene (IL-4Rα(-/-) mice) that this adenosine-mediated switch does not require IL-4Rα-dependent signaling. M2d macrophages express high levels of VEGF, IL-10, and iNOS, low levels of TNF-α and IL-12, and mildly elevated levels of arginase-1. In contrast, M2d macrophages do not express Ym1, Fizz1 (RELM-α), or CD206 at levels greater than those induced by LPS, and dectin-1 expression is suppressed. The use of these markers in vivo to identify "M2" macrophages thus provides an incomplete picture of macrophage functional status and should be viewed with caution.

  11. Myeloperoxidase-Oxidized LDLs Enhance an Anti-Inflammatory M2 and Antioxidant Phenotype in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sauvage, Aude; Van Steenbrugge, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages and oxidized LDLs play a key role in atherogenesis but their heterogeneity has been neglected up to now. Macrophages are prone to polarization and subsets of polarized macrophages have been described in atheromas. LDLs can be oxidized not only chemically by copper (Ox-LDLs) but also enzymatically by myeloperoxidase (MpOx-LDLs) resulting in oxidized LDLs poor in lipid peroxides. The effects of physiologically relevant myeloperoxidase-oxidized LDLs on macrophage polarization or on polarized macrophages remain largely unknown. In this study, the effects of LDLs on macrophage polarization were investigated by monitoring the expression of M1 and M2 genes following stimulation with native LDLs, Ox-LDLs, or MpOx-LDLs in RAW 264.7 cells. Except for MRC1, which is induced only by Ox-LDLs, MpOx-LDLs induced an overexpression of most of the selected marker genes at the mRNA level. MpOx-LDLs also modulate marker gene expression in polarized macrophages favoring notably anti-inflammatory Arg1 expression in M2 cells and also in the other phenotypes. Noteworthy, MpOx-LDLs were the most efficient to accumulate lipids intracellularly in (un)polarized macrophages whatever the phenotype. These data were largely confirmed in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. Our data suggest that MpOx-LDLs were the most efficient to accumulate within cells and to enhance an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant phenotype in M2 cells and also in the other macrophage phenotypes. PMID:27656049

  12. Serum from patients with systemic vasculitis induces alternatively activated macrophage M2c polarization.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Susanne M; Linge, Carl Petrus; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Lood, Christian; Johansson, Asa; Ohlsson, Sophie; Lundqvist, Andrea; Bengtsson, Anders A; Carlsson, Fredric; Hellmark, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitides (AAV) are conditions defined by an autoimmune small vessel inflammation. Dying neutrophils are found around the inflamed vessels and the balance between infiltrating neutrophils and macrophages is important to prevent autoimmunity. Here we investigate how sera from AAV patients may regulate macrophage polarization and function. Macrophages from healthy individuals were differentiated into M0, M1, M2a, M2b or M2c macrophages using a standardized protocol, and phenotyped according to their expression surface markers and cytokine production. These phenotypes were compared with those of macrophages stimulated with serum from AAV patients or healthy controls. While the healthy control sera induced a M0 macrophage, AAV serum promoted polarization towards the M2c subtype. No sera induced M1, M2a or M2b macrophages. The M2c subtype showed increased phagocytosis capacity compared with the other subtypes. The M2c polarization found in AAV is consistent with previous reports of increased levels of M2c-associated cytokines.

  13. IL-10 enhances the phenotype of M2 macrophages induced by IL-4 and confers the ability to increase eosinophil migration.

    PubMed

    Makita, Naoyuki; Hizukuri, Yoshiyuki; Yamashiro, Kyoko; Murakawa, Masao; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    M2 macrophages have been subdivided into subtypes such as IL-4-induced M2a and IL-10-induced M2c in vitro. Although it was reported that IL-10 stimulation leads to an increase in IL-4Rα, the effect of IL-4 and IL-10 in combination with macrophage subtype differentiation remains unclear. Thus, we sought to clarify whether IL-10 enhanced the M2 phenotype induced by IL-4. In this study, we showed that IL-10 enhanced IL-4Rα expression in M-CSF-induced bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Global gene expression analysis of M2 macrophages induced by IL-4, IL-10 or IL-4 + IL-10 showed that IL-10 enhanced gene expression of M2a markers induced by IL-4 in M-CSF-induced BMDMs. Moreover, IL-4 and IL-10 synergistically induced CCL24 (Eotaxin-2) production. Enhanced CCL24 expression was also observed in GM-CSF-induced BMDMs and zymosan-elicited, thioglycolate-elicited and naive peritoneal macrophages. CCL24 is a CCR3 agonist and an eosinophil chemoattractant. In vitro, IL-4 + IL-10-stimulated macrophages produced a large amount of CCL24 and increased eosinophil migration, which was inhibited by anti-CCL24 antibody. We also showed that IL-4 + IL-10-stimulated (but not IL-4 or IL-10 alone) macrophages transferred into the peritoneum of C57BL/6J mice increased eosinophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity. These results demonstrate that IL-4 + IL-10-simulated macrophages have enhanced M2a macrophage-related gene expression, CCL24 production and eosinophil infiltration-inducing activity, thereby suggesting their contribution to eosinophil-related diseases.

  14. Roles of alternatively activated M2 macrophages in allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kotaro; Meguro, Kazuyuki; Nakagomi, Daiki; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2017-03-17

    Alternatively activated macrophages (M2 macrophages) play key roles in the suppression of Th1 cell responses and the orchestration of tissue repair. However, recent studies have shown that M2 macrophages have potentials to produce high levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, suggesting that M2 macrophages may exacerbate inflammation in some settings. In this regard, we have recently shown that large numbers of M2 macrophages accumulate in the sites of hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS), an animal model of allergic contact dermatitis, and that M2 macrophages exacerbate hapten-induced CHS by producing matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12). We have also shown that suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), a member of SOCS family proteins that are cytokine-inducible negative regulators of the JAK/STAT signaling pathways, is highly and preferentially expressed in M2 macrophages in hapten-induced CHS and that SOCS3 expressed in M2 macrophages is involved in the attenuation of CHS by suppressing MMP12 production. These findings underscore the importance of M2 macrophage-derived MMP12 in the development of CHS, and suggest that inhibition of M2 macrophages or MMP12 could be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of allergic contact dermatitis.

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus M2-1 protein induces the activation of nuclear factor kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, Kerstin . E-mail: reimers.kerstin@mh-hannover.de; Buchholz, Katja; Werchau, Hermann

    2005-01-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induces the production of a number of cytokines and chemokines by activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). The activation of NF-{kappa}B has been shown to depend on viral replication in the infected cells. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of RSV M2-1 protein, a transcriptional processivity and anti-termination factor, is sufficient to activate NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells. Electromobility shift assays show increased NF-{kappa}B complexes in the nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells. M2-1 protein is found in nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells and in RSV-infected cells. Co-immunoprecipitations of nuclear extracts of M2-1-expressing cells and of RSV-infected cells revealed an association of M2-1 with Rel A protein. Furthermore, the activation of NF-{kappa}B depends on the C-terminus of the RSV M2-1 protein, as shown by NF-{kappa}B-induced gene expression of a reporter gene construct.

  16. A humanized anti-M2 scFv shows protective in vitro activity against influenza

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Velappan, Nileena; Schmidt, Jurgen G

    2008-01-01

    M2 is one of the most conserved influenza proteins, and has been widely prospected as a potential universal vaccine target, with protection predominantly mediated by antibodies. In this paper we describe the creation of a humanized single chain Fv from 14C2, a potent monoclonal antibody against M2. We show that the humanized scFv demonstrates similar activity to the parental mAb: it is able to recognize M2 in its native context on cell surfaces and is able to show protective in vitro activity against influenza, and so represents a potential lead antibody candidate for universal prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in influenza.

  17. Polarisation of Tumor-Associated Macrophages toward M2 Phenotype Correlates with Poor Response to Chemoradiation and Reduced Survival in Patients with Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Enrica; Pedone Anchora, Luigi; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Tropeano, Giovanna; Fagotti, Anna; Scambia, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Objective we investigate the prognostic role of pre-treatment ratio between Type 1 (M1) and Type 2 (M2) tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) patients treated with chemoradiation (CT/RT). Methods 84 consecutive LACC patients treated with cisplatin-based CT/RT for a total dose of 50.0 Gy, followed by radical surgery were analysed. Double-staining immunohistochemistry of CD163/p-STAT, CD68/pSTAT1, CD163/c-MAF, and CD68/c-MAF was performed on tumor samples taken at the time of diagnosis. TAMs with CD163+pSTAT1+, or CD68+pSTAT1+ were defined M1; CD163+c-MAF+ or CD68+c-MAF+ defined the M2 phenotype. The number of M1 and M2 cells was counted at low magnification by evaluating for each case the same tumour area. The ratio between M1 and M2 (M1/M2) was finally calculated. Results At diagnosis, we observed a direct correlation between the number of circulating monocytes and of TAMs (p-value = 0.001). Patients with high M1/M2 experienced more frequently complete pathologic response (no residual tumor) to CT/RT, compared to cases with low M1/M2 (55.0% Vs 29.5%; p-value = 0.029). At multivariate analysis M1/M2 (OR = 2.067; p-value = 0.037) emerged as independent predictor of pathologic response to CT/RT. Women with high M1/M2 showed a longer 5-yrs Disease-free (67.2% Vs. 44.3%; p-value = 0.019), and 5-yrs Overall (69.3% Vs. 46.9%; p-value = 0.037) survival, compared to cases with low M1/M2. The presence of a high M1/M2 ratio was independently associated with an unfavourable survival outcome in multivariate analysis. Conclusions polarisation of TAMs toward a M2 phenotype, as reflected by a lower M1/M2 ratio, is an independent predictor of poor response to CT/RT, and shorter survival in LACC. PMID:26335330

  18. RGS4 regulates partial agonism of the M2 muscarinic receptor-activated K+ currents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Shan; Furutani, Kazuharu; Inanobe, Atsushi; Kurachi, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Partial agonists are used clinically to avoid overstimulation of receptor-mediated signalling, as they produce a submaximal response even at 100% receptor occupancy. The submaximal efficacy of partial agonists is due to conformational change of the agonist–receptor complex, which reduces effector activation. In addition to signalling activators, several regulators help control intracellular signal transductions. However, it remains unclear whether these signalling regulators contribute to partial agonism. Here we show that regulator of G-protein signalling (RGS) 4 is a determinant for partial agonism of the M2 muscarinic receptor (M2R). In rat atrial myocytes, pilocarpine evoked smaller G-protein-gated K+ inwardly rectifying (KG) currents than those evoked by ACh. In a Xenopus oocyte expression system, pilocarpine acted as a partial agonist in the presence of RGS4 as it did in atrial myocytes, while it acted like a full agonist in the absence of RGS4. Functional couplings within the agonist–receptor complex/G-protein/RGS4 system controlled the efficacy of pilocarpine relative to ACh. The pilocarpine–M2R complex suppressed G-protein-mediated activation of KG currents via RGS4. Our results demonstrate that partial agonism of M2R is regulated by the RGS4-mediated inhibition of G-protein signalling. This finding helps us to understand the molecular components and mechanism underlying the partial agonism of M2R-mediated physiological responses. PMID:24421355

  19. Macrophages are recruited to hypoxic tumor areas and acquire a Pro-Angiogenic M2-Polarized phenotype via hypoxic cancer cell derived cytokines Oncostatin M and Eotaxin

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Chakrapani; Tewari, Brij Nath; Kanchan, Ranjana Kumari; Baghel, Khemraj Singh; Nautiyal, Naveen; Shrivastava, Richa; Kaur, Harbeer; Bhatt, Madan Lal Bramha; Bhadauria, Smrati

    2014-01-01

    TAMs, a unique and distinct M2-skewed myeloid population of tumor stroma, exhibiting pro-tumor functions is fast emerging as a potential target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Macrophage-recruitment and M2-polarization represent key TAMs-related phenomenon that are amenable to therapeutic intervention. However successful translation of these approaches into effective therapeutic regimen requires better characterization of tumor-microenvironment derived signals that regulate macrophage recruitment and their polarization. Owing to hypoxic milieu being a persistent feature of tumor-microenvironment and a major contributor to malignancy and treatment resistance, the current study was planned with an aim to decipher tumor cell responses to hypoxia vis-a-vis macrophage homing and phenotype switching. Here, we show that hypoxia-primed cancer cells chemoattract and polarize macrophages to pro-angiogenic M2-polarized subtype via Eotaxin and Oncostatin M. Concordantly, hypoxic regions of human breast-cancer specimen exhibited elevated Eotaxin and Oncostatin M levels with concurrently elevated M2-macrophage content. Blockade of Eotaxin/Oncostatin M not only prevented hypoxic breast-cancer cells from recruiting and polarizing macrophages towards an M2-polarized phenotype and retarded tumor progression in 4T1/BALB/c-syngenic-mice-model of breast-cancer but also enhanced the efficacy of anti-angiogenic Bevacizumab. The findings established these two cytokines as novel targets for devising effective anticancer therapy particularly for tumors that are refractory or develop resistance to anti-angiogenic therapeutics. PMID:25051364

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) induces M2 polarization of human macrophages via STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2012-08-24

    It is known that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone secreted postprandially from the L-cells of the small intestine and regulates glucose homeostasis. GLP-1 is now used for the treatment of diabetes because of its beneficial role against insulin resistance. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed on many cell types, including macrophages, and GLP-1 suppresses the development of atherosclerosis by inhibiting macrophage function. However, there have so far been few studies that have investigated the significance of GLP-1/GLP-1R signaling in macrophage activation. In the present study, we examined the effect of GLP-1 and exenatide, a GLP-1R agonist, on human monocyte-derived macrophage (HMDM) activation. We found that GLP-1 induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation. Silencing of GLP-1R suppressed the GLP-1-induced STAT3 activation. In addition, alternatively activated (M2) macrophage-related molecules, such as IL-10, CD163, and CD204 in HMDM, were significantly upregulated by GLP-1. Furthermore, the co-culture of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with GLP-1-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages increased the secretion of adiponectin compared to co-culture of the 3T3-L1 adipocytes with untreated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results demonstrate that GLP-1 induces macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype, which may contribute to the protective effects of GLP-1 against diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Conformational variability of the glycine receptor M2 domain in response to activation by different agonists.

    PubMed

    Pless, Stephan A; Dibas, Mohammed I; Lester, Henry A; Lynch, Joseph W

    2007-12-07

    Models describing the structural changes mediating Cys loop receptor activation generally give little attention to the possibility that different agonists may promote activation via distinct M2 pore-lining domain structural rearrangements. We investigated this question by comparing the effects of different ligands on the conformation of the external portion of the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor M2 domain. Conformational flexibility was assessed by tethering a rhodamine fluorophore to cysteines introduced at the 19' or 22' positions and monitoring fluorescence and current changes during channel activation. During glycine activation, fluorescence of the label attached to R19'C increased by approximately 20%, and the emission peak shifted to lower wavelengths, consistent with a more hydrophobic fluorophore environment. In contrast, ivermectin activated the receptors without producing a fluorescence change. Although taurine and beta-alanine were weak partial agonists at the alpha1R19'C glycine receptor, they induced large fluorescence changes. Propofol, which drastically enhanced these currents, did not induce a glycine-like blue shift in the spectral emission peak. The inhibitors strychnine and picrotoxin elicited fluorescence and current changes as expected for a competitive antagonist and an open channel blocker, respectively. Glycine and taurine (or beta-alanine) also produced an increase and a decrease, respectively, in the fluorescence of a label attached to the nearby L22'C residue. Thus, results from two separate labeled residues support the conclusion that the glycine receptor M2 domain responds with distinct conformational changes to activation by different agonists.

  2. Effect of modulation of PPAR-γ activity on Kupffer cells M1/M2 polarization in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenjing; Xu, Qinyu; Wang, Qi; Wu, Huimin; Hua, Jing

    2017-03-16

    Abnormal lipid-mediated hepatic inflammatory-immune dysfunction and chronic low grade inflammation play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Macrophage polarization is an important mechanism for the regulation of inflammatory response. Since PPAR-γ has emerged as a master regulator of macrophage polarization, we aimed to investigate the lipid-induced macrophage/Kupffer cell polarization in vivo and in vitro, and explore the association between PPAR-γ activity and macrophages M1/M2 polarization shifting. Here we showed that long-term high-fat diet increased Kupffer cells content with M1-predominant phenotype and increasing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Saturated fatty acids polarized Kupffer cells/macrophages to an M1-predominant phenotype while n-3 PUFA polarized Kupffer cells/macrophages to an M2 phenotype, which was associated with activation of NF-κB signal pathway and PPAR-γ respectively. Furthermore, up-regulation of PPAR-γ shifted lipid-induced macrophages polarization from M1-predominant phenotype to M2 phenotype. Macrophages polarization switch was associated with the interaction between PPAR-γ and NF-κBp65 signal pathway. Rosiglitazone restored high-fat diet-induced imblance of Kupffer cells M1/M2 polarization and alleviated hepatic steatosis as well as local pro-inflammatory response. These findings suggest that manipulation of PPAR-γ activity has the potential to balance lipid-induced M1/M2 macrophage/Kupffer cell polarization, and leading to prevent the development of NAFLD.

  3. Effect of modulation of PPAR-γ activity on Kupffer cells M1/M2 polarization in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenjing; Xu, Qinyu; Wang, Qi; Wu, Huimin; Hua, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal lipid-mediated hepatic inflammatory-immune dysfunction and chronic low grade inflammation play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Macrophage polarization is an important mechanism for the regulation of inflammatory response. Since PPAR-γ has emerged as a master regulator of macrophage polarization, we aimed to investigate the lipid-induced macrophage/Kupffer cell polarization in vivo and in vitro, and explore the association between PPAR-γ activity and macrophages M1/M2 polarization shifting. Here we showed that long-term high-fat diet increased Kupffer cells content with M1-predominant phenotype and increasing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Saturated fatty acids polarized Kupffer cells/macrophages to an M1-predominant phenotype while n-3 PUFA polarized Kupffer cells/macrophages to an M2 phenotype, which was associated with activation of NF-κB signal pathway and PPAR-γ respectively. Furthermore, up-regulation of PPAR-γ shifted lipid-induced macrophages polarization from M1-predominant phenotype to M2 phenotype. Macrophages polarization switch was associated with the interaction between PPAR-γ and NF-κBp65 signal pathway. Rosiglitazone restored high-fat diet-induced imblance of Kupffer cells M1/M2 polarization and alleviated hepatic steatosis as well as local pro-inflammatory response. These findings suggest that manipulation of PPAR-γ activity has the potential to balance lipid-induced M1/M2 macrophage/Kupffer cell polarization, and leading to prevent the development of NAFLD. PMID:28300213

  4. Activation of the α7 nicotinic receptor promotes lipopolysaccharide-induced conversion of M1 microglia to M2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qichun; Lu, Ying; Bian, Huimin; Guo, Liwei; Zhu, Huaxu

    2017-01-01

    The α7 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) plays an essential role in the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway that regulates macrophage/microglia function in inflammation. Similar to M1 and M2 macrophages, M1 and M2 microglia exhibit pro-inflammation and anti-inflammation properties, respectively. In the present study, we analyzed function-associated phenotypes to detect the transformation of microglia with activation of α7 nAChRs. We used lentivirus-mediated shRNA to knockdown the expression of α7 nAChR in BV-2 microglia incubated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS, 0.1 μg/mL) and measured the acetylcholine (Ach, 1 μg/mL)-mediated release of cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, in the culture supernatant via radioimmunoassay. After stimulation with Ach, the expression of typical biomarkers for different microglia phenotypes, Iba-1 and Arg-1, was determined by cellular immunofluorescence. Furthermore, the expression of signaling molecules, including p38, JAK2/STAT3, PI3K/Akt and miR-124, was analyzed via western blotting and real-time PCR. We found that Ach inhibited LPS-induced IL-1β and IL-6 elevation and promoted IL-4 and IL-10 production and that knockdown of the α7 nAChR abolished these effects of Ach. In addition, Ach decreased LPS-induced Iba-1 expression and increased Arg-1 levels in an α7 nAChR-dependent manner. The LPS-inhibited activation of JAK2/STAT3 and PI3K/Akt was also rescued by Ach, an effect that was blocked by knockdown of the α7 nAChR. In contrast, Ach triggered the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 that was otherwise inactivated by LPS in BV-2 cells. Finally, the levels of miR-124 and downstream targets C/EBPα and PU.1 were significantly enhanced in LPS-treated BV-2 microglia, and the effect of Ach on this signaling pathway was blocked by α7 nAChR knockdown as expected. Overall, our data demonstrate that activation ofα7 nAChRs inhibits the transformation of M1 microglia and promotes the M2

  5. Alternative (M2) activation of Kupffer cells by PPARδ ameliorates obesity-induced insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Odegaard, Justin I.; Ricardo-Gonzalez, Roberto R.; Eagle, Alex Red; Vats, Divya; Morel, Christine R.; Goforth, Matthew H.; Subramanian, Vidya; Mukundan, Lata; Ferrante, Anthony W.; Chawla, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Macrophage infiltration and activation in metabolic tissues underlie obesity-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. While inflammatory activation of resident hepatic macrophages potentiates insulin resistance, the functions of alternatively activated Kupffer cells in metabolic disease remain unknown. Here we show that, in response to the Th2 cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor δ (PPARδ) directs expression of the alternative phenotype in Kupffer cells and adipose tissue macrophages of lean mice. However, adoptive transfer of PPARδ null bone marrow into wild type mice only diminishes alternative activation of hepatic macrophages, causing hepatic dysfunction and systemic insulin resistance. Suppression of hepatic oxidative metabolism is recapitulated by treatment of primary hepatocytes with conditioned media from PPARδ null macrophages, indicating direct involvement of Kupffer cells in liver lipid metabolism. Taken together, these data suggest an unexpected beneficial role for alternatively activated Kupffer cells in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:18522831

  6. Pyruvate kinase M2 activators promote tetramer formation and suppress tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Yu, Yimin; Israelsen, William J.; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Boxer, Matthew B.; Hong, Bum Soo; Tempel, Wolfram; Dimov, Svetoslav; Shen, Min; Jha, Abhishek; Yang, Hua; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Metallo, Christian M.; Fiske, Brian P.; Courtney, Kevin D.; Malstrom, Scott; Khan, Tahsin M.; Kung, Charles; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Veith, Henrike; Southall, Noel; Walsh, Martin J.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Leister, William; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Yen, Katharine E.; Kunii, Kaiko; Davidson, Shawn M.; Christofk, Heather R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James; Harris, Marian H.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Salituro, Francesco G.; Jin, Shengfang; Dang, Lenny; Auld, Douglas S.; Park, Hee-Won; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thomas, Craig J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2012-08-26

    Cancer cells engage in a metabolic program to enhance biosynthesis and support cell proliferation. The regulatory properties of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) influence altered glucose metabolism in cancer. The interaction of PKM2 with phosphotyrosine-containing proteins inhibits enzyme activity and increases the availability of glycolytic metabolites to support cell proliferation. This suggests that high pyruvate kinase activity may suppress tumor growth. We show that expression of PKM1, the pyruvate kinase isoform with high constitutive activity, or exposure to published small-molecule PKM2 activators inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. Structural studies reveal that small-molecule activators bind PKM2 at the subunit interaction interface, a site that is distinct from that of the endogenous activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). However, unlike FBP, binding of activators to PKM2 promotes a constitutively active enzyme state that is resistant to inhibition by tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. This data supports the notion that small-molecule activation of PKM2 can interfere with anabolic metabolism.

  7. Pyruvate kinase M2 activators promote tetramer formation and suppress tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Yu, Yimin; Israelsen, William J.; Jiang, Jian-kang; Boxer, Matthew B.; Hong, Bum Soo; Tempel, Wolfram; Dimov, Svetoslav; Shen, Min; Jha, Abhishek; Yang, Hua; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Metallo, Christian M.; Fiske, Brian P.; Courtney, Kevin D.; Malstrom, Scott; Khan, Tahsin M.; Kung, Charles; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Veith, Henrike; Southall, Noel; Walsh, Martin J.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Leister, William; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Yen, Katharine E.; Kunii, Kaiko; Davidson, Shawn M.; Christofk, Heather R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James; Harris, Marian H.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Salituro, Francesco G.; Jin, Shengfang; Dang, Lenny; Auld, Douglas S.; Park, Hee-Won; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thomas, Craig J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells engage in a metabolic program to enhance biosynthesis and support cell proliferation. The regulatory properties of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) influence altered glucose metabolism in cancer. PKM2 interaction with phosphotyrosine-containing proteins inhibits enzyme activity and increases availability of glycolytic metabolites to support cell proliferation. This suggests that high pyruvate kinase activity may suppress tumor growth. We show that expression of PKM1, the pyruvate kinase isoform with high constitutive activity, or exposure to published small molecule PKM2 activators inhibit growth of xenograft tumors. Structural studies reveal that small molecule activators bind PKM2 at the subunit interaction interface, a site distinct from that of the endogenous activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). However, unlike FBP, binding of activators to PKM2 promotes a constitutively active enzyme state that is resistant to inhibition by tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. These data support the notion that small molecule activation of PKM2 can interfere with anabolic metabolism. PMID:22922757

  8. IKKβ Activity Drives Fetal Lung Macrophage Maturation Along a Non-M1/M2 Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Stouch, Ashley N.; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Barham, Whitney J.; Stinnett, Amanda M.; Slaughter, James C.; Yull, Fiona E.; Hoffman, Hal M.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Prince, Lawrence S.

    2014-01-01

    In preterm infants, exposure to inflammation increases the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a chronic, developmental lung disease. While macrophages are the key cells that initiate lung inflammation, less is known about lung macrophage phenotype and maturation. We hypothesized that fetal lung macrophages mature into distinct subpopulations during mouse development, and that activation could influence macrophage maturation. Expression of the fetal macrophage markers CD68, CD86, CD206, Ym1, fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2), and indolamine-2, 3-dioxygenase (Ido1) were developmentally regulated, with each marker having different temporal patterns. Flow cytometry analysis showed macrophages within the fetal lung were less diverse than the distinctly separate subpopulations in newborn and adult lungs. Similar to adult alveolar macrophages, fetal lung macrophages responded to the TLR4 agonist LPS and the alternative activation cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. Using a macrophage-specific constitutively active IKKβ transgenic model (IKFM), we demonstrated that macrophage activation increased proinflammatory gene expression and reduced the response of fetal lung macrophages to IL-4 and IL-13. Activation also increased fetal lung macrophage proliferation. Fetal IKFM lungs contained increased percentages of more mature, CD11bloF4/80hi cells that also expressed higher levels of the alternative activation markers CD204 and CD206. Development of fetal lung macrophages into mature alveolar macrophages may therefore include features of both proinflammatory and alternative activation paradigms. PMID:24981452

  9. Cardiac M2 muscarinic cholinoceptor activation by human chagasic autoantibodies: association with bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Goin, J; Borda, E; Auger, S; Storino, R; Sterin-Borda, L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess whether exposure of cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) to activating chagasic antimyocardial immunoglobulins results in bradycardia and other dysautonomic symptoms associated with the regulation of heart rate.
METHODS—Trypanosoma cruzi infected patients with bradycardia and other abnormalities in tests of the autonomic nervous system were studied and compared with normal subjects. Antipeptide antibodies in serum were demonstrated by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using a synthetic 24-mer-peptide corresponding antigenically to the second extracellular loop of the human heart M2 mAChR. The functional effect of affinity purified antipeptide IgG from chagasic patients on spontaneous beating frequency and cAMP production of isolated normal rat atria was studied.
RESULTS—There was a strong association between the finding of antipeptide antibodies in chagasic patients and the presence of basal bradycardia and an altered Valsalva manoeuvre (basal bradycardia: χ2 = 37.5, p < 0.00001; Valsalva manoeuvre: χ2 = 70.0, p < 0.00001). The antipeptide autoantibodies also showed agonist activity, decreasing the rate of contraction and cAMP production. The effects on rat atria resembled the effects of the authentic agonist and those of the total polyclonal chagasic IgG, being selectively blunted by atropine and AF-DX 116, and neutralised by the synthetic peptide corresponding in amino acid sequence to the second extracellular loop of the human M2 mAChR.
CONCLUSIONS—There is an association between circulating antipeptide autoantibodies in chagasic patients and the presence of bradycardia and other dysautonomic symptoms. Thus these autoantibodies are a marker of autoimmune cardiac autonomic dysfunction. The results support the hypothesis that autoimmune mechanisms play a role in the pathogenesis of chagasic cardioneuromyopathy.


Keywords: heart rate; bradycardia; autoantibodies; chagasic cardiomyopathy PMID

  10. Phenotypic, functional, and plasticity features of classical and alternatively activated human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tarique, Abdullah A; Logan, Jayden; Thomas, Emma; Holt, Patrick G; Sly, Peter D; Fantino, Emmanuelle

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are dynamic cells that mature under the influence of signals from the local microenvironment into either classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated macrophages with specific functional and phenotypic properties. Although the phenotypic identification of M1 and M2 macrophages is well established in mice, this is less clear for human macrophages. In addition, the persistence and reversibility of polarized human phenotypes is not well established. Human peripheral blood monocytes were differentiated into uncommitted macrophages (M0) and then polarized to M1 and M2 phenotypes using LPS/IFN-γ and IL-4/IL-13, respectively. M1 and M2 were identified as CD64(+)CD80(+) and CD11b(+)CD209(+), respectively, by flow cytometry. Polarized M1 cells secreted IP-10, IFN-γ, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, and RANTES, whereas M2 cells secreted IL-13, CCL17, and CCL18. Functionally, M2 cells were highly endocytic. In cytokine-deficient medium, the polarized macrophages reverted back to the M0 state within 12 days. If previously polarized macrophages were given the alternative polarizing stimulus after 6 days of resting in cytokine-deficient medium, a switch in polarization was seen (i.e., M1 macrophages switched to M2 and expressed CD11b(+)CD209(+) and vice versa). In summary, we report phenotypic identification of human M1 and M2 macrophages, their functional characteristics, and their ability to be reprogrammed given the appropriate stimuli.

  11. Inhibitory and Activating Effects of Some Flavonoid Derivatives on Human Pyruvate Kinase Isoenzyme M2.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Krohn, Karsten; Guler, Caglar; Comaklı, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Kuzu, Muslum

    2016-02-01

    Pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 (PKM2) is expressed excessively in many different cancer types and it plays an important role in the control of glucose metabolism. Thus, it is evaluated as an important target in the development of medication for cancer. The flavonoids comprise a large group of natural products with variable phenolic structures and occur mainly in plants. They are of great interest due to their biological properties. In this study, the effects of various flavonoid derivatives on the PKM2 enzyme activity were analyzed in vitro. The flavonoid derivatives 1 and 2 showed inhibition effect with IC50 values of <60 μM. IC50 values of compounds 3-8 were calculated as 134, 415, 145, 163, 295 μM, and 3.5 mM, respectively. The molecules 9-12 showed an activation effect with values of AC50 of less than 90 μM. The IC50 values of the derivatives 13-17 were calculated as 115, 150, 200, 221, and 275 μM, respectively. The results show that catechin derivatives can be probably used as lead compounds for the design of PKM2 enzyme activators and inhibitors.

  12. Tumor hypoxia enhances non-small cell lung cancer metastasis by selectively promoting macrophage M2 polarization through the activation of ERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shenglin; Dong, Rong; Meng, Wen; Ying, Meidan; Weng, Qinjie; Chen, Zibo; Ma, Jian; Fang, Qingxia; He, Qiaojun; Yang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common phenomenon occurring in the majority of human tumors and has been proved to play an important role in tumor progression. However, it remains unclear that whether the action of hypoxia on macrophages is a main driving force of hypoxia-mediated aggressive tumor behaviors. In the present study, we observe that high density of M2 macrophages is associated with metastasis in adenocarcinoma Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) patients. By applying the in vivo hypoxia model, the results suggest that intermittent hypoxia significantly promotes the metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC), accompanied with more CD209+ macrophages infiltrated in primary tumor tissue. More intriguingly, by skewing macrophages polarization away from the M1- to a tumor-promoting M2-like phenotype, hypoxia and IL-6 cooperate to enhance the LLC metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we also demonstrate that skewing of macrophage M2 polarization by hypoxia relies substantially on activation of ERK signaling. Collectively, these observations unveil a novel tumor hypoxia concept involving the macrophage phenotype shift and provide direct evidence for lung cancer intervention through modulating the phenotype of macrophages. PMID:25313135

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus ginsengihumi Strain M2.11 with Phytase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Suleimanova, Aliya D.; Boulygina, Eugenia A.; Kazakov, Sergey V.; Baranova, Daria S.; Akhmetova, Alina I.; Mardanova, Ayslu M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper announces the genome sequence of Bacillus ginsengihumi strain M2.11, which has been characterized as a strain which produces the enzyme with the ability to degrade phytase. The genome of the strain M2.11 is 3.7 Mb and harbors 3,082 coding sequences. PMID:26272561

  14. Activation and Proton Transport Mechanism in Influenza A M2 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories 2 μs in length have been generated for the pH-activated, tetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus in all protonation states of the pH sensor located at the His37 tetrad. All simulated structures are in very good agreement with high-resolution structures. Changes in the channel caused by progressive protonation of His37 provide insight into the mechanism of proton transport. The channel is closed at both His37 and Trp41 sites in the singly and doubly protonated states, but it opens at Trp41 upon further protonation. Anions access the charged His37 and by doing so stabilize the protonated states of the channel. The narrow opening at the His37 site, further blocked by anions, is inconsistent with the water-wire mechanism of proton transport. Instead, conformational interconversions of His37 correlated with hydrogen bonding to water molecules indicate that these residues shuttle protons in high-protonation states. Hydrogen bonds between charged and uncharged histidines are rare. The valve at Val27 remains on average quite narrow in all protonation states but fluctuates sufficiently to support water and proton transport. A proton transport mechanism in which the channel, depending on pH, opens at either the histidine or valine gate is only partially supported by the simulations. PMID:24209848

  15. Adrenergic receptor β2 activation by stress promotes breast cancer progression through macrophages M2 polarization in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jun-fang; Jin, Feng-jiao; Li, Ning; Guan, Hai-tao; Lan, Lan; Ni, Hong; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Stress and its related hormones epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) play a crucial role in tumor progression. Macrophages in the tumor microenvironment (TME) polarized to M2 is also a vital pathway for tumor deterioration. Here, we explore the underlying role of macrophages in the effect of stress and E promoting breast cancer growth. It was found that the weight and volume of tumor in tumor bearing mice were increased, and dramatically accompanied with the rising E level after chronic stress using social isolation. What is most noteworthy, the number of M2 macrophages inside tumor was up-regulated with it. The effects of E treatment appear to be directly related to the change of M2 phenotype is reproduced in vitro. Moreover, E receptor ADRβ2 involved in E promoting M2 polarization was comprehended simultaneously. Our results imply psychological stress is influential on specific immune system, more essential for the comprehensive treatment against tumors. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(5): 295-300] PMID:25748171

  16. Haemophilus ducreyi-induced interleukin-10 promotes a mixed M1 and M2 activation program in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2012-12-01

    During microbial infection, macrophages are polarized to classically activated (M1) or alternatively activated (M2) cells in response to microbial components and host immune mediators. Proper polarization of macrophages is critical for bacterial clearance. To study the role of macrophage polarization during Haemophilus ducreyi infection, we analyzed a panel of macrophage surface markers in skin biopsy specimens of pustules obtained from experimentally infected volunteers. Lesional macrophages expressed markers characteristic of both M1 and M2 polarization. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) also expressed a mixed M1 and M2 profile of surface markers and cytokines/chemokines upon infection with H. ducreyi in vitro. Endogenous interleukin 10 (IL-10) produced by infected MDM downregulated and enhanced expression of several M1 and M2 markers, respectively. Bacterial uptake, mediated mainly by class A scavenger receptors, and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathways were required for H. ducreyi-induced IL-10 production in MDM. Compared to M1 cells, IL-10-polarized M2 cells displayed enhanced phagocytic activity against H. ducreyi and similar bacterial killing. Thus, IL-10-modulated macrophage polarization may contribute to H. ducreyi clearance during human infection.

  17. Hofbauer cells of M2a, M2b and M2c polarization may regulate feto-placental angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Loegl, J; Hiden, U; Nussbaumer, E; Schliefsteiner, C; Cvitic, S; Lang, I; Wadsack, C; Huppertz, B; Desoye, G

    2016-11-01

    The human placenta comprises a special type of tissue macrophages, the Hofbauer cells (HBC), which exhibit M2 macrophage phenotype. Several subtypes of M2-polarized macrophages (M2a, M2b and M2c) exist in almost all tissues. Macrophage polarization depends on the way of macrophage activation and leads to the expression of specific cell surface markers and the acquisition of specific functions, including tissue remodeling and the promotion of angiogenesis. The placenta is a highly vascularized and rapidly growing organ, suggesting a role of HBC in feto-placental angiogenesis. We here aimed to characterize the specific polarization and phenotype of HBC and investigated the role of HBC in feto-placental angiogenesis. Therefore, HBC were isolated from third trimester placentas and their phenotype was determined by the presence of cell surface markers (FACS analysis) and secretion of cytokines (ELISA). HBC conditioned medium (CM) was analyzed for pro-angiogenic factors, and the effect of HBC CM on angiogenesis, proliferation and chemoattraction of isolated primary feto-placental endothelial cells (fpEC) was determined in vitro Our results revealed that isolated HBC possess an M2 polarization, with M2a, M2b and M2c characteristics. HBC secreted the pro-angiogenic molecules VEGF and FGF2. Furthermore, HBC CM stimulated the in vitro angiogenesis of fpEC. However, compared with control medium, chemoattraction of fpEC toward HBC CM was reduced. Proliferation of fpEC was not affected by HBC CM. These findings demonstrate a paracrine regulation of feto-placental angiogenesis by HBC in vitro Based on our collective results, we propose that the changes in HBC number or phenotype may affect feto-placental angiogenesis.

  18. M2 Muscarinic Receptors Induce Airway Smooth Muscle Activation via a Dual, Gβγ-mediated Inhibition of Large Conductance Ca2+-activated K+ Channel Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Bo; Wulfsen, Iris; Lutz, Susanne; Utku, Emine; Sausbier, Ulrike; Ruth, Peter; Wieland, Thomas; Korth, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle is richly endowed with muscarinic receptors of the M2 and M3 subtype. Stimulation of these receptors inhibits large conductance calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels, a negative feed back regulator, in a pertussis toxinsensitive manner and thus facilitates contraction. The underlying mechanism, however, is unknown. We therefore studied the activity of bovine trachea BK channels in HEK293 cells expressing the M2 or M3 receptor (M2RorM3R). In M2R- but not M3R-expressing cells, maximal effective concentrations of carbamoylcholine (CCh) inhibited whole cell BK currents by 53%. This M2R-induced inhibition was abolished by pertussis toxin treatment or overexpression of the Gβγ scavenger transducin-α. In inside-out patches, direct application of 300 nm purified Gβγ decreased channel open probability by 55%. The physical interaction of Gβγ with BK channels was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Interestingly, inhibition of phospholipase C as well as protein kinase C activities also reversed the CCh effect but to a smaller (∼20%) extent. Mouse tracheal cells responded similarly to CCh, purified Gβγ and phospholipase C/protein kinase C inhibition as M2R-expressing HEK293 cells. Our results demonstrate that airway M2Rs inhibit BK channels by a dual, Gβγ-mediated mechanism, a direct membrane-delimited interaction, and the activation of the phospholipase C/protein kinase C pathway. PMID:18524769

  19. Silencing MicroRNA-155 Attenuates Cardiac Injury and Dysfunction in Viral Myocarditis via Promotion of M2 Phenotype Polarization of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Mengying; Li, Xueqin; Tang, Zongsheng; Wang, Xiangmin; Zhong, Min; Suo, Qifeng; Zhang, Yao; Lv, Kun

    2016-03-02

    Macrophage infiltration is a hallmark feature of viral myocarditis. As studies have shown that microRNA-155 regulates the differentiation of macrophages, we aimed to investigate the role of microRNA-155 in VM. We report that silencing microRNA-155 protects mice from coxsackievirus B3 induced myocarditis. We found that microRNA-155 expression was upregulated and localized primarily in heart-infiltrating macrophages and CD4(+) T lymphocytes during acute myocarditis. In contrast with wildtype (WT) mice, microRNA-155(-/-) mice developed attenuated viral myocarditis, which was characterized by decreased cardiac inflammation and decreased intracardiac CD45(+) leukocytes. Hearts of microRNA-155(-/-) mice expressed decreased levels of the IFN-γ and increased levels of the cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. Although total CD4(+) and regulatory T cells were unchanged in miR-155(-/-) spleen proportionally, the activation of T cells and CD4(+) T cell proliferation in miR-155(-/-) mice were significantly decreased. Beyond the acute phase, microRNA-15(5-/-) mice had reduced mortality and improved cardiac function during 5 weeks of follow-up. Moreover, silencing microRNA-155 led to increased levels of alternatively-activated macrophages (M2) and decreased levels of classically-activated macrophages (M1) in the heart. Combined, our studies suggest that microRNA-155 confers susceptibility to viral myocarditis by affecting macrophage polarization, and thus may be a potential therapeutic target for viral myocarditis.

  20. Characterization of inhibition of M2 ion channel activity by BL-1743, an inhibitor of influenza A virus.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Q; Pinto, L H; Luo, G; Shaughnessy, M A; Mullaney, D; Kurtz, S; Krystal, M; Lamb, R A

    1996-01-01

    The influenza A virus M2 integral membrane protein has ion channel activity that can be inhibited by the antiviral drug amantadine. Recently, a spirene-containing compound, BL-1743 (2-[3-azaspiro (5,5)undecanol]-2-imidazoline), that inhibits influenza virus growth was identified (S. Kurtz, G. Lao, K. M. Hahnenberger, C. Brooks, O. Gecha, K. Ingalls, K.-I. Numata, and M. Krystal, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 39:2204-2209, 1995). We have examined the ability of BL-1743 to inhibit the M2 ion channel when expressed in oocytes of Xenopus laevis. BL-1743 inhibition is complete as far as can be measured by electrophysiological methods and is reversible, with a reverse reaction rate constant of 4.0 x 10(-3) s(-1). In contrast, amantadine inhibition is irreversible within the time frame of the experiment. However, BL-1743 inhibition and amantadine inhibition have similar properties. The majority of isolated influenza viruses resistant to BL-1743 are also amantadine resistant. In addition, all known amino acid changes which result in amantadine resistance also confer BL-1743 resistance. However, one BL-1743-resistant virus isolated, designated M2-I35T, contained the change Ile-35-->Thr. This virus is >70-fold more resistant to BL-1743 and only 10-fold more resistant to amantadine than the wild-type virus. When the ion channel activity of M2-I35T was examined in oocytes, it was found that M2-I35T is BL-1743 resistant but is reversibly inhibited by amantadine. These findings suggest that these two drugs interact differently with the M2 protein transmembrane pore region. PMID:8676445

  1. Inflammatory Regulation by Driving Microglial M2 Polarization: Neuroprotective Effects of Cannabinoid Receptor-2 Activation in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Yihao, Tao; Zhou, Feng; Yin, Niu; Qiang, Tan; Haowen, Zheng; Qianwei, Chen; Jun, Tang; Yuan, Zhang; Gang, Zhu; Hua, Feng; Yunfeng, Yang; Zhi, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2R) was initially thought to be the “peripheral cannabinoid receptor.” Recent studies, however, have documented CB2R expression in the brain in both glial and neuronal cells, and increasing evidence suggests an important role for CB2R in the central nervous system inflammatory response. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), which occurs when a diseased cerebral vessel ruptures, accounts for 10–15% of all strokes. Although surgical techniques have significantly advanced in the past two decades, ICH continues to have a high mortality rate. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of CB2R stimulation in acute phase after experimental ICH in rats and its related mechanisms. Data showed that stimulation of CB2R using a selective agonist, JWH133, ameliorated brain edema, brain damage, and neuron death and improved neurobehavioral outcomes in acute phase after ICH. The neuroprotective effects were prevented by SR144528, a selective CB2R inhibitor. Additionally, JWH133 suppressed neuroinflammation and upregulated the expression of microglial M2-associated marker in both gene and protein level. Furthermore, the expression of phosphorylated cAMP-dependent protein kinase (pPKA) and its downstream effector, cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), were facilitated. Knockdown of CREB significantly inversed the increase of M2 polarization in microglia, indicating that the JWH133-mediated anti-inflammatory effects are closely associated with PKA/CREB signaling pathway. These findings demonstrated that CB2R stimulation significantly protected the brain damage and suppressed neuroinflammation by promoting the acquisition of microglial M2 phenotype in acute stage after ICH. Taken together, this study provided mechanism insight into neuroprotective effects by CB2R stimulation after ICH. PMID:28261199

  2. Inflammatory Regulation by Driving Microglial M2 Polarization: Neuroprotective Effects of Cannabinoid Receptor-2 Activation in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Yihao, Tao; Zhou, Feng; Yin, Niu; Qiang, Tan; Haowen, Zheng; Qianwei, Chen; Jun, Tang; Yuan, Zhang; Gang, Zhu; Hua, Feng; Yunfeng, Yang; Zhi, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2R) was initially thought to be the "peripheral cannabinoid receptor." Recent studies, however, have documented CB2R expression in the brain in both glial and neuronal cells, and increasing evidence suggests an important role for CB2R in the central nervous system inflammatory response. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), which occurs when a diseased cerebral vessel ruptures, accounts for 10-15% of all strokes. Although surgical techniques have significantly advanced in the past two decades, ICH continues to have a high mortality rate. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of CB2R stimulation in acute phase after experimental ICH in rats and its related mechanisms. Data showed that stimulation of CB2R using a selective agonist, JWH133, ameliorated brain edema, brain damage, and neuron death and improved neurobehavioral outcomes in acute phase after ICH. The neuroprotective effects were prevented by SR144528, a selective CB2R inhibitor. Additionally, JWH133 suppressed neuroinflammation and upregulated the expression of microglial M2-associated marker in both gene and protein level. Furthermore, the expression of phosphorylated cAMP-dependent protein kinase (pPKA) and its downstream effector, cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), were facilitated. Knockdown of CREB significantly inversed the increase of M2 polarization in microglia, indicating that the JWH133-mediated anti-inflammatory effects are closely associated with PKA/CREB signaling pathway. These findings demonstrated that CB2R stimulation significantly protected the brain damage and suppressed neuroinflammation by promoting the acquisition of microglial M2 phenotype in acute stage after ICH. Taken together, this study provided mechanism insight into neuroprotective effects by CB2R stimulation after ICH.

  3. EPA protects against muscle damage in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by promoting a shift from the M1 to M2 macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Samara Camaçari de; Apolinário, Leticia Montanholi; Matheus, Selma Maria Michelin; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2013-11-15

    In dystrophic mdx mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, inflammation contributes to myonecrosis. Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreased inflammation and necrosis in dystrophic muscle. In the present study, we examined the effects of EPA and the corticoid deflazacort (DFZ) as modulators of M1 (iNOS-expressing cells) and M2 (CD206-expressing cells) macrophages. Mdx mice (14 days old) received EPA or DFZ for 16 days. The diaphragm, biceps brachii and quadriceps muscles were studied. Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and ELISA assays showed that EPA increased interleucin-10, reduced interferon-γ and was more effective than DFZ in promoting a shift from M1 to M2.

  4. Anxiolytic activity of pyridoindole derivatives SMe1EC2 and SMe1M2: behavioral analysis using rat model

    PubMed Central

    Sedláčková, Natália; Ponechalová, Veronika; Ujházy, Eduard; Dubovický, Michal; Mach, Mojmír

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety and mood disorders have become very significant affections in the last decades. According to WHO at least one mental disease occurred per year in 27% of EU inhabitants (more than 82 mil. people). It is estimated that by 2020, depression will be the main cause of morbidity in the developed countries. These circumstances call for research for new prospective drugs with anxiolytic and antidepressive properties exhibiting no toxicity and withdrawal effect and possessing beneficial properties, like antioxidant and/or neuroprotective effects. The aim of this study was to obtain information about psychopharmacological properties of pyridoindole derivatives SMe1EC2 and SMe1M2, using non-invasive behavioral methods in rats. The battery of ethological tests (open field, elevated plus-maze, light/dark box exploration, forced swim test) was used to obtain information about anxiolytic and antidepressant activity of the pyridoindole derivatives. The substances were administered intraperitoneally 30 minutes before the tests at doses of 1, 10 and 25 mg/kg. In the behavioral tests, SMe1EC2 was found to exert anxiolytic activity in elevated plus maze with no affection of locomotor activity. The highest dose of SMe1M2 increased the time spent in the lit part of the Light/Dark box, however this result was influenced by inhibition of motor activity of the rats. Similar findings were observed also in elevated plus-maze, although these results were not statistically significant. In conclusion, from the results of our study it is evident that both pyridoindoles acted on the CNS. In the highest dose, SMe1M2 was found to possess rather sedative than anxiolytic or antidepressant activity. PMID:22319256

  5. M2 priority screening system for near-term activities: Project documentation. Final report December 11, 1992--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1993-08-12

    From May through August, 1993, the M-2 Group within M Division at LANL conducted with the support of the LANL Integration and Coordination Office (ICO) and Applied Decision Analysis, Inc. (ADA), whose purpose was to develop a system for setting priorities among activities. This phase of the project concentrated on prioritizing near-tenn activities (i.e., activities that must be conducted in the next six months) necessary for setting up this new group. Potential future project phases will concentrate on developing a tool for setting priorities and developing annual budgets for the group`s operations. The priority screening system designed to address the near-term problem was developed, applied in a series of meeting with the group managers, and used as an aid in the assignment of tasks to group members. The model was intended and used as a practical tool for documenting and explaining decisions about near-term priorities, and not as a substitute for M-2 management judgment and decision-making processes.

  6. Adsorption of Reactive Red M-2BE dye from water solutions by multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernando M; Bergmann, Carlos P; Fernandes, Thais H M; Lima, Eder C; Royer, Betina; Calvete, Tatiana; Fagan, Solange B

    2011-09-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and powdered activated carbon were used as adsorbents for the successful removal of Reactive Red M-2BE textile dye from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of pH, shaking time and temperature on adsorption capacity were studied. In the acidic pH region (pH 2.0), the adsorption of the dye was favourable using both adsorbents. The contact time to obtain equilibrium at 298K was fixed at 1h for both adsorbents. The activation energy of the adsorption process was evaluated from 298 to 323K for both adsorbents. The Avrami fractional-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental data compared with pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order kinetic adsorption models. For Reactive Red M-2BE dye, the equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. Simulated dyehouse effluents were used to check the applicability of the proposed adsorbents for effluent treatment.

  7. TACI deficiency leads to alternatively activated macrophage phenotype and susceptibility to Leishmania infection

    PubMed Central

    Allman, Windy R.; Dey, Ranadhir; Liu, Lunhua; Siddiqui, Shafiuddin; Coleman, Adam S.; Bhattacharya, Parna; Yano, Masahide; Uslu, Kadriye; Takeda, Kazuyo; Nakhasi, Hira L.; Akkoyunlu, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The TNF family member, transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI), is a key molecule for plasma cell maintenance and is required in infections where protection depends on antibody response. Here, we report that compared with WT mouse, TACI KO Μϕs expressed lower levels of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), CD14, myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88, and adaptor protein Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-β and responded poorly to TLR agonists. Analysis of Μϕ phenotype revealed that, in the absence of TACI, Μϕs adapt the alternatively activated (M2) phenotype. Steady-state expression levels for M2 markers IL-4Rα, CD206, CCL22, IL-10, Arg1, IL1RN, and FIZZ1 were significantly higher in TACI KO Μϕ than in WT cells. Confirming their M2 phenotype, TACI-KO Mϕs were unable to control Leishmania major infection in vitro, and intradermal inoculation of Leishmania resulted in a more severe manifestation of disease than in the resistant C57BL/6 strain. Transfer of WT Μϕs to TACI KO mice was sufficient to significantly reduce disease severity. TACI is likely to influence Mϕ phenotype by mediating B cell-activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF) and a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) signals because both these ligands down-regulated M2 markers in WT but not in TACI-deficient Μϕs. Moreover, treatment of Μϕs with BAFF or APRIL enhanced the clearance of Leishmania from cells only when TACI is expressed. These findings may have implications for understanding the shortcomings of host response in newborns where TACI expression is reduced and in combined variable immunodeficiency patients where TACI signaling is ablated. PMID:26170307

  8. The classification of microglial activation phenotypes on neurodegeneration and regeneration in Alzheimer’s disease brain

    PubMed Central

    Varnum, Megan M.; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive decline of cognitive function and memory formation. There is no therapeutic that can halt or reverse its progression. Contemporary research suggests that age-dependent neuroinflammatory changes may play a significant role in the decreased neurogenesis and cognitive impairments in AD. The innate immune response is characterized by pro-inflammatory (M1) activation of macrophages and subsequent production of specific cytokines, chemokines, and reactive intermediates, followed by resolution and alternative activation for anti-inflammatory signaling (M2a) and wound healing (M2c). We propose that microglial activation phenotypes are analogous to those of macrophages and that their activation plays a significant role in regulating neurogenesis in the brain. Microglia undergo a switch from an M2- to an M1-skewed activation phenotype during aging. This review will assess the neuroimmunological studies that led to characterization of the different microglial activation states using AD mouse models. It will also discuss the roles of microglial activation on neurogenesis in AD and propose anti-inflammatory molecules as exciting therapeutic targets for research. Molecules like interleukin-4 and CD200 have proven to be important anti-inflammatory molecules in the regulation of neuroinflammation in the brain, and they will be discussed in detail for their therapeutic potential. PMID:22710659

  9. The classification of microglial activation phenotypes on neurodegeneration and regeneration in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Varnum, Megan M; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2012-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive decline of cognitive function. There is no therapy that can halt or reverse its progression. Contemporary research suggests that age-dependent neuroinflammatory changes may play a significant role in the decreased neurogenesis and cognitive impairments in AD. The innate immune response is characterized by pro-inflammatory (M1) activation of macrophages and subsequent production of specific cytokines, chemokines, and reactive intermediates, followed by resolution and alternative activation for anti-inflammatory signaling (M2a) and wound healing (M2c). We propose that microglial activation phenotypes are analogous to those of macrophages and that their activation plays a significant role in regulating neurogenesis in the brain. Microglia undergo a switch from an M2- to an M1-skewed activation phenotype during aging. This review will assess the neuroimmunological studies that led to characterization of the different microglial activation states in AD mouse models. It will also discuss the roles of microglial activation on neurogenesis in AD and propose anti-inflammatory molecules as exciting therapeutic targets for research. Molecules such as interleukin-4 and CD200 have proven to be important anti-inflammatory mediators in the regulation of neuroinflammation in the brain, which will be discussed in detail for their therapeutic potential.

  10. IgG4 can induce an M2-like phenotype in human monocyte-derived macrophages through FcγRI.

    PubMed

    Swisher, Jennifer F A; Haddad, Devin A; McGrath, Anna G; Boekhoudt, Gunther H; Feldman, Gerald M

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies evoke cellular responses through the binding of their Fc region to Fc receptors, most of which contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif domains and are thus considered "activating." However, there is a growing appreciation of these receptors for their ability to deliver an inhibitory signal as well. We previously described one such phenomenon whereby interferon (IFN)γ signaling is inhibited by immune complex signaling through FcγRI. To understand the implications of this in the context of therapeutic antibodies, we assessed individual IgG subclasses to determine their ability to deliver this anti-inflammatory signal in monocyte-derived macrophages. Like IgG1, we found that IgG4 is fully capable of inhibiting IFNγ-mediated events. In addition, F(ab')2 fragments that interfere with FcγRI signaling reversed this effect. For mAbs developed with either an IgG1 or an IgG4 constant region for indications where inflammation is undesirable, further examination of a potential Fc-dependent contribution to their mechanism of action is warranted.

  11. Targeting Ribonucleotide Reductase M2 and NF-κB Activation with Didox to Circumvent Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, Khyati N; Wilson, Elizabeth A; Malla, Ritu; Elford, Howard L; Faridi, Jesika S

    2015-11-01

    Tamoxifen is widely used as an adjuvant therapy for patients with estrogen receptor (ERα)-positive tumors. However, the clinical benefit is often limited because of the emergence of drug resistance. In this study, overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase M2 (RRM2) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells resulted in a reduction in the effectiveness of tamoxifen, through downregulation of ERα66 and upregulation of the 36-kDa variant of ER (ERα36). We identified that NF-κB, HIF1α, and MAPK/JNK are the major pathways that are affected by RRM2 overexpression and result in increased NF-κB activity and increased protein levels of EGFR, HER2, IKKs, Bcl-2, RelB, and p50. RRM2-overexpressing cells also exhibited higher migratory and invasive properties. Through time-lapse microscopy and protein profiling studies of tamoxifen-treated MCF-7 and T-47D cells, we have identified that RRM2, along with other key proteins, is altered during the emergence of acquired tamoxifen resistance. Inhibition of RRM2 using siRRM2 or the ribonucleotide reductase (RR) inhibitor didox not only eradicated and effectively prevented the emergence of tamoxifen-resistant populations but also led to the reversal of many of the proteins altered during the process of acquired tamoxifen resistance. Because didox also appears to be a potent inhibitor of NF-κB activation, combining didox with tamoxifen treatment cooperatively reverses ER-α alterations and inhibits NF-κB activation. Finally, inhibition of RRM2 by didox reversed tamoxifen-resistant in vivo tumor growth and decreased in vitro migratory and invasive properties, revealing a beneficial effect of combination therapy that includes RRM2 inhibition to delay or abrogate tamoxifen resistance.

  12. E2F1 promote the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer by activating the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zejun; Gong, Chaoju; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Mei, Lingming; Song, Mintao; Qiu, Lanlan; Luo, Shuchai; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhang, Ronghui; Gu, Hongqian; Chen, Xiang

    2015-08-21

    As the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit, the high expression of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 (RRM2) induces cancer and contributes to tumor growth and invasion. In several colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, we found that the expression levels of RRM2 were closely related to the transcription factor E2F1. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis. Ectopic overexpression of E2F1 promoted RRM2 transactivation while knockdown of E2F1 reduced the levels of RRM2 mRNA and protein. To further investigate the roles of RRM2 which was activated by E2F1 in CRC, CCK-8 assay and EdU incorporation assay were performed. Overexpression of E2F1 promoted cell proliferation in CRC cells, which was blocked by RRM2 knockdown attenuation. In the migration and invasion tests, overexpression of E2F1 enhanced the migration and invasion of CRC cells which was abrogated by silencing RRM2. Besides, overexpression of RRM2 reversed the effects of E2F1 knockdown partially in CRC cells. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM2 and E2F1 were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. Further analysis showed that the protein expression levels of E2F1 and RRM2 were parallel with each other and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM), TNM stage and distant metastasis. Consistently, the patients with low E2F1 and RRM2 levels have a better prognosis than those with high levels. Therefore, we suggest that E2F1 can promote CRC proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis by regulating RRM2 transactivation. Understanding the role of E2F1 in activating RRM2 transcription will help to explain the relationship between E2F1 and RRM2 in CRC and provide a novel predictive marker for diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. - Highlights: • E2F1 promotes RRM2 transactivation in CRC cells. • E2F1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells by activating RRM2. • E2F1 promotes the migration and

  13. RBP-J is required for M2 macrophage polarization in response to chitin and mediates expression of a subset of M2 genes.

    PubMed

    Foldi, Julia; Shang, Yingli; Zhao, Baohong; Ivashkiv, Lionel B; Hu, Xiaoyu

    2016-03-01

    Development of alternatively activated (M2) macrophage phenotypes is a complex process that is coordinately regulated by a plethora of pathways and factors. Here, we report that RBP-J, a DNA-binding protein that integrates signals from multiple pathways including the Notch pathway, is critically involved in polarization of M2 macrophages. Mice deficient in RBP-J in the myeloid compartment exhibited impaired M2 phenotypes in vivo in a chitin-induced model of M2 polarization. Consistent with the in vivo findings, M2 polarization was partially compromised in vitro in Rbpj-deficient macrophages as demonstrated by reduced expression of a subset of M2 effector molecules including arginase 1. Functionally, myeloid Rbpj deficiency impaired M2 effector functions including recruitment of eosinophils and suppression of T cell proliferation. Collectively, we have identified RBP-J as an essential regulator of differentiation and function of alternatively activated macrophages.

  14. Activating autoantibodies to the beta1-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors facilitate atrial fibrillation in patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Stavrakis, Stavros; Yu, Xichun; Patterson, Eugene; Huang, Shijun; Hamlett, Sean R.; Chalmers, Laura; Pappy, Reji; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Morshed, Syed A.; Davies, Terry F.; Lazzara, Ralph; Kem, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We studied activating autoantibodies to β1-adrenergic (AAβ1AR) and M2 muscarinic receptors (AAM2R) in the genesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) in Graves’ hyperthyroidism. Background AF frequently complicates hyperthyroidism. AAβ1AR and AAM2R have been described in some patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and AF. We hypothesized their co-presence would facilitate AF in autoimmune Graves’ hyperthyroidism. Methods IgG purified from 38 patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism with AF (n=17) or sinus rhythm (n=21) and 10 healthy controls was tested for its effects on isolated canine Purkinje fiber contractility with and without atropine and nadolol. IgG electrophysiologic effects were studied using intracellular recordings from isolated canine pulmonary veins. Potential cross-reactivity of AAβ1AR and AAM2R with stimulating thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) antibodies was evaluated before and after adsorption to CHO cells expressing human TSHRs using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results The frequency of AAβ1AR and/or AAM2R differed significantly between patients with AF and sinus rhythm (AAβ1AR = 94% vs. 38%, p<0.001; AAM2R = 88% vs. 19%, p<0.001; and AAβ1AR+AAM2R = 82% vs. 10%, p<0.001). The co-presence of AAβ1AR and AAM2R was the strongest predictor of AF (odds ratio 33.61, 95% CI 1.17 - 964.11, p=0.04). IgG from autoantibody-positive patients induced hyperpolarization, decreased action potential duration, enhanced early afterdepolarization formation and facilitated triggered firing in pulmonary veins by local autonomic nerve stimulation. Imunoadsorption studies demonstrated that AAβ1AR and AAM2R were immunologically distinct from TSHR antibodies. Conclusions AAβ1AR and AAM2R when present in patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism facilitate development of AF. PMID:19778674

  15. Negative Immune Regulator TIPE2 Promotes M2 Macrophage Differentiation through the Activation of PI3K-AKT Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Wenwen; Chen, Youhai H.; Zhang, Cui

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. Classically activated macrophages and alternatively activated macrophages are the two major forms of macrophages and have opposing functionalities. Tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8–2 is expressed primarily by immune cells and negatively regulates type 1 innate and adaptive immune responses to maintain immune tolerance. While previous studies indicate that TIPE2 promotes M2 but inhibits M1 macrophage differentiation, the underlying molecular mechanism by which TIPE2 promotes M2 macrophage differentiation remains unclear. Our current study shows that TIPE2-deficient bone-marrow cells are defective in IL-4 induced M2 macrophage differentiation in vitro. Mechanistic studies revealed that TIPE2 promotes phosphoinositide metabolism and the activation of the down-stream AKT signaling pathway, which in turn leads to the expression of markers specific for M2 macrophages. In addition, our results showed that Tipe2-deficiency does not affect the activation of the JAK-STAT6 signaling pathway that also plays an important role during M2 macrophage differentiation. Taken together, these results indicate that TIPE2 promotes M2 macrophage differentiation through the activation of PI3K-AKT signaling pathway, and may play an important role during the resolution of inflammation, parasite control, as well as tissue repair. PMID:28122045

  16. TNF counterbalances the emergence of M2 tumor macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kratochvill, Franz; Neale, Geoffrey; Haverkamp, Jessica M.; de Velde, Lee-Ann Van; Smith, Amber M.; Kawauchi, Daisuke; McEvoy, Justina; Roussel, Martine F.; Dyer, Michael A.; Qualls, Joseph E.; Murray, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a form of non-resolving, persistent inflammation where varying numbers of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) infiltrate and adopt different activation states between anti-tumor M1 and pro-tumor M2 phenotypes. Here we resolve a cascade causing differential macrophage phenotypes in the tumor microenvironment. Reduction in TNF mRNA production or loss of Type I TNF receptor signaling resulted in a striking pattern of enhanced M2 mRNA expression. M2 gene expression was driven in part by IL-13 from eosinophils co-recruited with inflammatory monocytes, a pathway that was suppressed by TNF. Our data define regulatory nodes within the tumor microenvironment that balance M1 and M2 populations. Our results show macrophage polarization in cancer is dynamic and dependent on the balance between TNF and IL-13, thus providing a strategy for manipulating TAMs. PMID:26365184

  17. Binding of SycH chaperone to YscM1 and YscM2 activates effector yop expression in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Cambronne, Eric D; Sorg, Joseph A; Schneewind, Olaf

    2004-02-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica transports YscM1 and YscM2 via the type III pathway, a mechanism that is required for the establishment of bacterial infections. Prior to host cell contact, YscM1 and YscM2 exert posttranscriptional regulation to inhibit expression of effector yop genes, which encode virulence factors that travel the type III pathway into the cytoplasm of macrophages. Relief from repression has been predicted to occur via the type III secretion of YscM1 and YscM2 into the extracellular medium, resulting in the depletion of regulatory molecules from the bacterial cytoplasm. Using digitonin fractionation and fluorescence microscopy of FlAsH-labeled polypeptides in Yersinia-infected cells, we have localized YscM1 and YscM2 within the host cell cytoplasm. Type III injection of YscM1 and YscM2 required the SycH chaperone. Expression of C-terminal fusions of YscM1 and YscM2 to the neomycin phosphotransferase reporter revealed sequences required for regulatory activity and for secretion in the absence of SycH. Coexpression of SycH and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-YscM1 or GST-YscM2, hybrid GST variants that cannot be transported by the type III apparatus, also relieved repression of Yop synthesis. GST-SycH bound to YscM1 and YscM2 and activated effector yop expression without initiation of the bound regulatory molecules into the type III pathway. Further, regulation of yop expression by YscM1, YscM2, and SycH is shown to act independently of factors that regulate secretion, and gel filtration chromotography revealed populations of YscM1 and YscM2 that are not bound to SycH under conditions where Yop synthesis is repressed. Taken together, these results suggest that YscM1- and YscM2-mediated repression may be relieved through binding to the cytoplasmic chaperone SycH prior to their type III injection into host cells.

  18. Binding of SycH Chaperone to YscM1 and YscM2 Activates Effector yop Expression in Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    Cambronne, Eric D.; Sorg, Joseph A.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica transports YscM1 and YscM2 via the type III pathway, a mechanism that is required for the establishment of bacterial infections. Prior to host cell contact, YscM1 and YscM2 exert posttranscriptional regulation to inhibit expression of effector yop genes, which encode virulence factors that travel the type III pathway into the cytoplasm of macrophages. Relief from repression has been predicted to occur via the type III secretion of YscM1 and YscM2 into the extracellular medium, resulting in the depletion of regulatory molecules from the bacterial cytoplasm. Using digitonin fractionation and fluorescence microscopy of FlAsH-labeled polypeptides in Yersinia-infected cells, we have localized YscM1 and YscM2 within the host cell cytoplasm. Type III injection of YscM1 and YscM2 required the SycH chaperone. Expression of C-terminal fusions of YscM1 and YscM2 to the neomycin phosphotransferase reporter revealed sequences required for regulatory activity and for secretion in the absence of SycH. Coexpression of SycH and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-YscM1 or GST-YscM2, hybrid GST variants that cannot be transported by the type III apparatus, also relieved repression of Yop synthesis. GST-SycH bound to YscM1 and YscM2 and activated effector yop expression without initiation of the bound regulatory molecules into the type III pathway. Further, regulation of yop expression by YscM1, YscM2, and SycH is shown to act independently of factors that regulate secretion, and gel filtration chromotography revealed populations of YscM1 and YscM2 that are not bound to SycH under conditions where Yop synthesis is repressed. Taken together, these results suggest that YscM1- and YscM2-mediated repression may be relieved through binding to the cytoplasmic chaperone SycH prior to their type III injection into host cells. PMID:14729710

  19. Jacalin-Activated Macrophages Exhibit an Antitumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Pereira Ruas, Luciana; Chain Veronez, Luciana; Herrero Geraldino, Thais; Rossetto de Morais, Fabiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an ambiguous and complex role in the carcinogenic process, since these cells can be polarized into different phenotypes (proinflammatory, antitumor cells or anti-inflammatory, protumor cells) by the tumor microenvironment. Given that the interactions between tumor cells and TAMs involve several players, a better understanding of the function and regulation of TAMs is crucial to interfere with their differentiation in attempts to skew TAM polarization into cells with a proinflammatory antitumor phenotype. In this study, we investigated the modulation of macrophage tumoricidal activities by the lectin jacalin. Jacalin bound to macrophage surface and induced the expression and/or release of mainly proinflammatory cytokines via NF-κB signaling, as well as increased iNOS mRNA expression, suggesting that the lectin polarizes macrophages toward the antitumor phenotype. Therefore, tumoricidal activities of jacalin-stimulated macrophages were evaluated. High rates of tumor cell (human colon, HT-29, and breast, MCF-7, cells) apoptosis were observed upon incubation with supernatants from jacalin-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that jacalin, by exerting a proinflammatory activity, can direct macrophages to an antitumor phenotype. Deep knowledge of the regulation of TAM functions is essential for the development of innovative anticancer strategies. PMID:27119077

  20. Novel Markers to Delineate Murine M1 and M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Kyle A.; Amici, Stephanie A.; Webb, Lindsay M.; Ruiz-Rosado, Juan de Dios; Popovich, Phillip G.; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia

    2015-01-01

    Classically (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages exhibit distinct phenotypes and functions. It has been difficult to dissect macrophage phenotypes in vivo, where a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes exists, and also in vitro, where low or non-selective M2 marker protein expression is observed. To provide a foundation for the complexity of in vivo macrophage phenotypes, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional signature of murine M0, M1 and M2 macrophages and identified genes common or exclusive to either subset. We validated by real-time PCR an M1-exclusive pattern of expression for CD38, G-protein coupled receptor 18 (Gpr18) and Formyl peptide receptor 2 (Fpr2) whereas Early growth response protein 2 (Egr2) and c-Myc were M2-exclusive. We further confirmed these data by flow cytometry and show that M1 and M2 macrophages can be distinguished by their relative expression of CD38 and Egr2. Egr2 labeled more M2 macrophages (~70%) than the canonical M2 macrophage marker Arginase-1, which labels 24% of M2 macrophages. Conversely, CD38 labeled most (71%) in vitro M1 macrophages. In vivo, a similar CD38+ population greatly increased after LPS exposure. Overall, this work defines exclusive and common M1 and M2 signatures and provides novel and improved tools to distinguish M1 and M2 murine macrophages. PMID:26699615

  1. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C.; Nunes-Correia, Isabel; Santos, Armanda E.; Custódio, José B.A.

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. - Highlights: • MK-801 and memantine decrease melanoma cell proliferation. • The combination of MK-801 with antiestrogens inhibits melanoma cell proliferation. • These combinations greatly enhance the effects of the compounds individually. • MK-801 combined with tamoxifen active metabolites induces cell cycle arrest in G1. • The combination of MK-801 and antiestrogens is an innovative strategy for melanoma.

  2. Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection potentiates adipose tissue macrophage polarization toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype and contributes to diabetes progression in a diet-induced obesity model

    PubMed Central

    Cabalén, María E.; Cabral, María F.; Sanmarco, Liliana M.; Andrada, Marta C.; Onofrio, Luisina I.; Ponce, Nicolás E.; Aoki, María P.; Gea, Susana; Cano, Roxana C.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity and Chagas disease (caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi) represent serious public health concerns. The interrelation between parasite infection, adipose tissue, immune system and metabolism in an obesogenic context, has not been entirely explored. A novel diet-induced obesity model (DIO) was developed in C57BL/6 wild type mice to examine the effect of chronic infection (DIO+I) on metabolic parameters and on obesity-related disorders. Dyslipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and cardiac/hepatic steatosis were strongly developed in DIO mice. Strikingly, although these metabolic alterations were collectively improved by infection, plasmatic apoB100 levels remain significantly increased in DIO+I, suggesting the presence of pro-atherogenic small and dense LDL particles. Moreover, acute insulin resistance followed by chronic hyperglycemia with hypoinsulinemia was found, evidencing an infection-related-diabetes progression. These lipid and glucose metabolic changes seemed to be highly dependent on TLR4 expression since TLR4−/− mice were protected from obesity and its complications. Notably, chronic infection promoted a strong increase in MCP-1 producing macrophages with a M2 (F4/80+CD11c-CD206+) phenotype associated to oxidative stress in visceral adipose tissue of DIO+I mice. Importantly, infection reduced lipid content but intensified inflammatory infiltrates in target tissues. Thus, parasite persistence in an obesogenic environment and the resulting host immunometabolic dysregulation may contribute to diabetes/atherosclerosis progression. PMID:26921251

  3. Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection potentiates adipose tissue macrophage polarization toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype and contributes to diabetes progression in a diet-induced obesity model.

    PubMed

    Cabalén, María E; Cabral, María F; Sanmarco, Liliana M; Andrada, Marta C; Onofrio, Luisina I; Ponce, Nicolás E; Aoki, María P; Gea, Susana; Cano, Roxana C

    2016-03-22

    Chronic obesity and Chagas disease (caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi) represent serious public health concerns. The interrelation between parasite infection, adipose tissue, immune system and metabolism in an obesogenic context, has not been entirely explored. A novel diet-induced obesity model (DIO) was developed in C57BL/6 wild type mice to examine the effect of chronic infection (DIO+I) on metabolic parameters and on obesity-related disorders. Dyslipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and cardiac/hepatic steatosis were strongly developed in DIO mice. Strikingly, although these metabolic alterations were collectively improved by infection, plasmatic apoB100 levels remain significantly increased in DIO+I, suggesting the presence of pro-atherogenic small and dense LDL particles. Moreover, acute insulin resistance followed by chronic hyperglycemia with hypoinsulinemia was found, evidencing an infection-related-diabetes progression. These lipid and glucose metabolic changes seemed to be highly dependent on TLR4 expression since TLR4-/- mice were protected from obesity and its complications. Notably, chronic infection promoted a strong increase in MCP-1 producing macrophages with a M2 (F4/80+CD11c-CD206+) phenotype associated to oxidative stress in visceral adipose tissue of DIO+I mice. Importantly, infection reduced lipid content but intensified inflammatory infiltrates in target tissues. Thus, parasite persistence in an obesogenic environment and the resulting host immunometabolic dysregulation may contribute to diabetes/atherosclerosis progression.

  4. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype.

  5. HCV core protein inhibits polarization and activity of both M1 and M2 macrophages through the TLR2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qianqian; Wang, Yang; Zhai, Naicui; Song, Hongxiao; Li, Haijun; Yang, Yang; Li, Tianyang; Guo, Xiaolin; Chi, Baorong; Niu, Junqi; Crispe, Ian Nicholas; Su, Lishan; Tu, Zhengkun

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) establishes persistent infection in most infected patients, and eventually causes chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in some patients. Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens, but their roles in HCV infection remains unclear. We have reported that HCV core protein (HCVc) manipulates human blood-derived dendritic cell development. In the present study, we tested whether HCVc affects human blood-derived monocyte differentiating into macrophages. Results showed that HCVc inhibits monocyte differentiation to either M1 or M2 macrophages through TLR2, associated with impaired STATs signaling pathway. Moreover, HCVc inhibits phagocytosis activity of M1 and M2 macrophages, M1 macrophage-induced autologous and allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation, but promotes M2 macrophage-induced autologous and allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation. In conclusion, HCVc inhibits monocyte-derived macrophage polarization via TLR2 signaling, leading to dysfunctions of both M1 and M2 macrophages in chronic HCV infected patients. This may contribute to the mechanism of HCV persistent infection, and suggest that blockade of HCVc might be a novel therapeutic approach to treating HCV infection. PMID:27786268

  6. Phenotypic Approaches to Identify Inhibitors of B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suzie; Wiener, Jake; Rao, Navin L.; Milla, Marcos E.; DiSepio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An EPIC label-free phenotypic platform was developed to explore B cell receptor (BCR) and CD40R-mediated B cell activation. The phenotypic assay measured the association of RL non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma B cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-coated EPIC plates. Anti-IgM (immunoglobulin M) mediated BCR activation elicited a response that was blocked by LFA-1/ICAM-1 specific inhibitors and a panel of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors. LFA-1/ICAM-1 association was further increased on coapplication of anti-IgM and mega CD40L when compared to individual application of either. Anti-IgM, mega CD40L, or the combination of both displayed distinct kinetic profiles that were inhibited by treatment with a BTK inhibitor. We also established a FLIPR-based assay to measure B cell activation in Ramos Burkitt’s lymphoma B cells and an RL cell line. Anti-IgM-mediated BCR activation elicited a robust calcium response that was inhibited by a panel of BTK inhibitors. Conversely, CD40R activation did not elicit a calcium response in the FLIPR assay. Compared to the FLIPR, the EPIC assay has the propensity to identify inhibitors of both BCR and CD40R-mediated B cell activation and may provide more pharmacological depth or novel mechanisms of action for inhibition of B cell activation. PMID:25948491

  7. COMPASS: Continuous Open Mouse Phenotyping of Activity and Sleep Status

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background  Disruption of rhythms in activity and rest occur in many diseases, and provide an important indicator of healthy physiology and behaviour. However, outside the field of sleep and circadian rhythm research, these rhythmic processes are rarely measured due to the requirement for specialised resources and expertise. Until recently, the primary approach to measuring activity in laboratory rodents has been based on voluntary running wheel activity. By contrast, measuring sleep requires the use of electroencephalography (EEG), which involves invasive surgical procedures and time-consuming data analysis. Methods Here we describe a simple, non-invasive system to measure home cage activity in mice based upon passive infrared (PIR) motion sensors. Careful calibration of this system will allow users to simultaneously assess sleep status in mice. The use of open-source tools and simple sensors keeps the cost and the size of data-files down, in order to increase ease of use and uptake. Results In addition to providing accurate data on circadian activity parameters, here we show that extended immobility of >40 seconds provides a reliable indicator of sleep, correlating well with EEG-defined sleep (Pearson’s r >0.95, 4 mice).  Conclusions Whilst any detailed analysis of sleep patterns in mice will require EEG, behaviourally-defined sleep provides a valuable non-invasive means of simultaneously phenotyping both circadian rhythms and sleep. Whilst previous approaches have relied upon analysis of video data, here we show that simple motion sensors provide a cheap and effective alternative, enabling real-time analysis and longitudinal studies extending over weeks or even months. The data files produced are small, enabling easy deposition and sharing. We have named this system COMPASS - Continuous Open Mouse Phenotyping of Activity and Sleep Status. This simple approach is of particular value in phenotyping screens as well as providing an ideal tool to assess activity

  8. Evaluation of Substituted N,N′-Diarylsulfonamides as Activators of the Tumor Cell Specific M2 Isoform of Pyruvate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Matthew B.; Jiang, Jian-kang; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Shen, Min; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Southall, Noel; Veith, Henrike; Leister, William; Austin, Christopher P.; Park, Hee Won; Inglese, James; Cantley, Lewis C.; Auld, Douglas S.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2009-01-01

    The metabolism of cancer cells is altered to support rapid proliferation. Pharmacological activators of a tumor cell specific pyruvate kinase isozyme (PKM2) may be an approach for altering the classic Warburg effect characteristic of aberrant metabolism in cancer cells yielding a novel anti-proliferation strategy. In this manuscript we detail the discovery of a series of substituted N,N′-diarylsulfonamides as activators of PKM2. The synthesis of numerous analogues and the evaluation of structure activity relationships are presented as well as assessments of mechanism and selectivity. Several agents are found that have good potencies and appropriate solubility for use as chemical probes of PKM2 including 55 (AC50 = 43 nM, maximum response = 84%; solubility = 7.3 μg/mL), 56 (AC50 = 99 nM, maximum response = 84%; solubility = 5.7 μg/mL) and 58 (AC50 = 38 nM, maximum response = 82%; solubility = 51.2 μg/mL). The small molecules described here represent first-in-class activators of PKM2 PMID:20017496

  9. Higenamine promotes M2 macrophage activation and reduces Hmgb1 production through HO-1 induction in a murine model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Li, Mingchao; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jian; Li, Jiaping

    2014-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is considered to be primarily associated with loss of motor function and leads to the activation of diverse cellular mechanisms in the central nervous system to attempt to repair the damaged spinal cord tissue. Higenamine (HG) (1-[(4-hydroxyphenyl) methyl]-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-6,7-diol), an active ingredient of Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparata, has been traditionally used as a heart stimulant and anti-inflammatory agent in oriental countries. However, the function and related mechanism of HG on SCI have never been investigated. In our current study, HG treatment displayed increased myelin sparring and enhanced spinal cord repair process. The numbers of CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, Ly6G(+) neutrophils and CD11b(+) macrophages were all significantly lower in the HG-treated group than that in the control group after SCI. HG administration increased the expression of IL-4 and IL-10 and promoted M2 macrophage activation. Significantly reduced Hmgb1 expression was also observed in HG-treated mice with SCI. Furthermore, HG treatment promoted HO-1 production. The increased number of M2 macrophages, decreased expression of Hmgb1 and promoted locomotor recovery induced by HG were all reversed with additional HO-1 inhibitor treatment. In conclusion, HG promotes M2 macrophage activation and reduces Hmgb1 expression dependent on HO-1 induction and then promotes locomotor function after SCI.

  10. Modulation of macrophage activity by aflatoxins B1 and B2 and their metabolites aflatoxins M1 and M2.

    PubMed

    Bianco, G; Russo, R; Marzocco, S; Velotto, S; Autore, G; Severino, L

    2012-05-01

    Aflatoxins are natural contaminants frequently found both in food and feed. Many of them exert immunomodulatory properties in mammals; therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate immune-effects of AFB1, AFB2, AFM1 and AFM2, alone and differently combined, in J774A.1 murine macrophages. MTT assay showed that AFB1, alone and combined with AFB2, possess antiproliferative activity only at the highest concentration; such effect was not shown by their hydroxylated metabolites, AFM1 and AFM2, respectively. However, the immunotoxic effects of the aflatoxins evaluated in the current study may be due to the inhibition of production of active oxygen metabolites such as NO. Cytofluorimetric assay in macrophages exposed to aflatoxins (10-100 μM) revealed that their cytoxicity is not related to apoptotic pathways. Nevertheless, a significant increase of the S phase cell population accompanied by a decrease in G0/G1 phase cell population was observed after AFB1 treatment. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggest that aflatoxins could compromise the macrophages functions; in particular, co-exposure to AFB1, AFB2, AFM1 and AFM2 may exert interactions which can significantly affect immunoreactivity.

  11. N-Terminal Fatty Acid Substitution Increases the Leishmanicidal Activity of CA(1-7)M(2-9), a Cecropin-Melittin Hybrid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Chicharro, Cristina; Granata, Cesare; Lozano, Rosario; Andreu, David; Rivas, Luis

    2001-01-01

    In order to improve the leishmanicidal activity of the synthetic cecropin A-melittin hybrid peptide CA(1-7)M(2-9) (KWKLFKKIGAVLKVL-NH2), a systematic study of its acylation with saturated linear fatty acids was carried out. Acylation of the Nɛ-7 lysine residue led to a drastic decrease in leishmanicidal activity, whereas acylation at lysine 1, in either the α or the ɛ NH2 group, increased up to 3 times the activity of the peptide against promastigotes and increased up to 15 times the activity of the peptide against amastigotes. Leishmanicidal activity increased with the length of the fatty acid chain, reaching a maximum for the lauroyl analogue (12 carbons). According to the fast kinetics, dissipation of membrane potential, and parasite membrane permeability to the nucleic acid binding probe SYTOX green, the lethal mechanism was directly related to plasma membrane permeabilization. PMID:11502512

  12. Evaluation of thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole[3,2-d]pyridazinones as activators of the tumor cell specific M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-kang; Boxer, Matthew B; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Shen, Min; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P; Southall, Noel; Veith, Henrike; Leister, William; Austin, Christopher P; Park, Hee Won; Inglese, James; Cantley, Lewis C; Auld, Douglas S; Thomas, Craig J

    2010-06-01

    Cancer cells have distinct metabolic needs that are different from normal cells and can be exploited for development of anti-cancer therapeutics. Activation of the tumor specific M2 form of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) is a potential strategy for returning cancer cells to a metabolic state characteristic of normal cells. Here, we describe activators of PKM2 based upon a substituted thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole[3,2-d]pyridazinone scaffold. The synthesis of these agents, structure-activity relationships, analysis of activity at related targets (PKM1, PKR and PKL) and examination of aqueous solubility are investigated. These agents represent the second reported chemotype for activation of PKM2.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of IL-10-stimulated (M2c) macrophages by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lurier, Emily B; Dalton, Donald; Dampier, Will; Raman, Pichai; Nassiri, Sina; Ferraro, Nicole M; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishan; Sarmady, Mahdi; Spiller, Kara L

    2017-02-20

    Alternatively activated "M2" macrophages are believed to function during late stages of wound healing, behaving in an anti-inflammatory manner to mediate the resolution of the pro-inflammatory response caused by "M1" macrophages. However, the differences between two main subtypes of M2 macrophages, namely interleukin-4 (IL-4)-stimulated "M2a" macrophages and IL-10-stimulated "M2c" macrophages, are not well understood. M2a macrophages are characterized by their ability to inhibit inflammation and contribute to the stabilization of angiogenesis. However, the role and temporal profile of M2c macrophages in wound healing are not known. Therefore, we performed next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify biological functions and gene expression signatures of macrophages polarized in vitro with IL-10 to the M2c phenotype in comparison to M1 and M2a macrophages and an unactivated control (M0). We then explored the expression of these gene signatures in a publicly available data set of human wound healing. RNA-seq analysis showed that hundreds of genes were upregulated in M2c macrophages compared to the M0 control, with thousands of alternative splicing events. Following validation by Nanostring, 39 genes were found to be upregulated by M2c macrophages compared to the M0 control, and 17 genes were significantly upregulated relative to the M0, M1, and M2a phenotypes (using an adjusted p-value cutoff of 0.05 and fold change cutoff of 1.5). Many of the identified M2c-specific genes are associated with angiogenesis, matrix remodeling, and phagocytosis, including CD163, MMP8, TIMP1, VCAN, SERPINA1, MARCO, PLOD2, PCOCLE2 and F5. Analysis of the macrophage-conditioned media for secretion of matrix-remodeling proteins showed that M2c macrophages secreted higher levels of MMP7, MMP8, and TIMP1 compared to the other phenotypes. Interestingly, temporal gene expression analysis of a publicly available microarray data set of human wound healing showed that M2c-related genes were

  14. Relative impact of residues at the intracellular and extracellular ends of the human GABAC rho1 receptor M2 domain on picrotoxinin activity.

    PubMed

    Carland, Jane E; Johnston, Graham A R; Chebib, Mary

    2008-02-02

    The relative impact on picrotoxinin activity of residues at the intracellular (2' and 6' residues) and extracellular (15' and 17' residues) ends of the second transmembrane (M2) domain of the human gamma-aminobutyric acid-C (GABA(C)) rho1 receptor was investigated. A series of GABA(C) rho1 subunits were produced containing either single or multiple mutations at the positions of interest. Wild-type and mutant subunits (containing one or more of the following mutations: P2'S, T6'M, I15'N, G17'H) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized using agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Changes in agonist activity were observed for mutant receptors. Most notably, mutation at the 2' position resulted in decreased agonist potency, while mutation at the 15' and 17' residues increased agonist potency. The affinity of the competitive antagonist (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) was unchanged compared to wild-type at all mutant receptors. Of the four residues studied, mutation of residues at the 2' and 6' positions had the greatest impact on picrotoxinin activity. Inclusion of the P2'S mutation typically produced receptors with increased picrotoxinin potency, while the T6'M mutation reduced picrotoxinin potency. Picrotoxinin is a mixed antagonist at wild-type and all mutant receptors, with the exception of the double mutant rho1P2'S/T6'M receptors at which the non-competitive component was isolated. It is proposed that the contribution of M2 domain residues to picrotoxinin activity is potentially two-fold: (1) their role as a potential picrotoxinin binding site within the pore; and (2) they are critical for receptor activation properties of the receptor, thus may alter the allosteric mechanism of picrotoxinin.

  15. SUB-THz AND H{alpha} ACTIVITY DURING THE PREFLARE AND MAIN PHASES OF A GOES CLASS M2 EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, Pierre; Gimenez de Castro, C. Guillermo; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Correia, Emilia; Fernandes, Luis Olavo; De Souza, Rodney V.; Marcon, Rogerio; White, Stephen M.; Godoy, Rodolfo; Marun, Adolfo; Pereyra, Pablo

    2011-12-01

    Radio and optical observations of the evolution of flare-associated phenomena have shown an initial and rapid burst at 0.4 THz only followed subsequently by a localized chromospheric heating producing an H{alpha} brightening with later heating of the whole active region. A major instability occurred several minutes later producing one impulsive burst at microwaves only, associated with an M2.0 GOES X-ray flare that exhibited the main H{alpha} brightening at the same site as the first flash.The possible association between long-enduring time profiles at soft X-rays, microwaves, H{alpha}, and sub-THz wavelengths is discussed. In the decay phase, the H{alpha} movie shows a disrupting magnetic arch structure ejecting dark, presumably chromospheric, material upward. The time sequence of events suggests genuine interdependent and possibly non-thermal instabilities triggering phenomena, with concurrent active region plasma heating and material ejection.

  16. The Transcription Factor p53 Influences Microglial Activation Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Nesser, Nicole K.; Hopkins, Stephanie; Myers, Scott J.; Case, Amanda; Lee, Rona J.; Seaburg, Luke A.; Uo, Takuma; Murphy, Sean P.; Morrison, Richard S.; Garden, Gwenn A.

    2011-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are influenced by the innate immune response in the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia, have pro-inflammatory and subsequently neurotoxic actions as well as anti-inflammatory functions that promote recovery and repair. Very little is known about the transcriptional control of these specific microglial behaviors. We have previously shown that in HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), the transcription factor p53 accumulates in microglia and that microglial p53 expression is required for the in vitro neurotoxicity of the HIV coat glycoprotein gp120. These findings suggested a novel function for p53 in regulating microglial activation. Here we report that in the absence of p53, microglia demonstrate a blunted response to interferon-γ, failing to increase expression of genes associated with classical macrophage activation or secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. Microarray analysis of global gene expression profiles revealed increased expression of genes associated with anti-inflammatory functions, phagocytosis and tissue repair in p53 knockout (p53−/−) microglia compared with those cultured from strain matched p53 expressing (p53+/+) mice. We further observed that p53−/− microglia demonstrate increased phagocytic activity in vitro and expression of markers for alternative macrophage activation both in vitro and in vivo. In HAND brain tissue, the alternative activation marker CD163 was expressed in a separate subset of microglia than those demonstrating p53 accumulation. These data suggest that p53 influences microglial behavior, supporting the adoption of a pro-inflammatory phenotype, while p53 deficiency promotes phagocytosis and gene expression associated with alternative activation and anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:21598312

  17. Succinyl-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-ribose 5'-Phosphate (SAICAR) Activates Pyruvate Kinase Isoform M2 (PKM2) in Its Dimeric Form.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Tokuda, Joshua M; Pollack, Lois; Bowman, Gregory D; Lee, Young-Sam

    2016-08-23

    Human pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) is a glycolytic enzyme isoform implicated in cancer. Malignant cancer cells have higher levels of dimeric PKM2, which is regarded as an inactive form of tetrameric pyruvate kinase. This perceived inactivity has fueled controversy about how the dimeric form of pyruvate kinase might contribute to cancer. Here we investigate enzymatic properties of PKM2(G415R), a variant derived from a cancer patient, which we show by size-exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering to be a dimer that cannot form a tetramer in solution. Although PKM2(G415R) binds to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), unlike the wild type this PKM2 variant shows no activation by FBP. In contrast, PKM2(G415R) is activated by succinyl-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-ribose 5'-phosphate (SAICAR), an endogenous metabolite that we previously showed correlates with an increased level of cell proliferation and promotes protein kinase activity of PKM2. Our results demonstrate an important and unexpected enzymatic activity of the PKM2 dimer that likely has a key role in cancer progression.

  18. Structural environment built by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells drives M2 macrophages during inflammation recovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Hye Shin; Seo, Ji Hae; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Gelman, Irwin H; Lo, Eng H; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2017-02-16

    Macrophages exhibit phenotypic plasticity, as they have the ability to switch their functional phenotypes during inflammation and recovery. Simultaneously, the mechanical environment actively changes. However, how these dynamic alterations affect the macrophage phenotype is unknown. Here, we observed that the extracellular matrix (ECM) constructed by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells (CMCs) generated M2 macrophages by regulating their shape during recovery. Notably, rounded macrophages were present in the linear and loose ECM of inflamed colons and polarized to the M1 phenotype. In contrast, ramified macrophages emerged in the contracted ECM of recovering colons and mainly expressed M2 macrophage markers. These contracted structures were not observed in the inflamed colons of AKAP12 knockout (KO) mice. Consequently, the proportion of M2 macrophages in inflamed colons was lower in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In addition, clinical symptoms and histological damage were more severe in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In experimentally remodeled collagen gels, WT CMCs drove the formation of a more compacted structure than AKAP12 KO CMCs, which promoted the polarization of macrophages toward an M2 phenotype. These results demonstrated that tissue contraction during recovery provides macrophages with the physical cues that drive M2 polarization.

  19. Structural environment built by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells drives M2 macrophages during inflammation recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Hye Shin; Seo, Ji Hae; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Gelman, Irwin H.; Lo, Eng H.; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit phenotypic plasticity, as they have the ability to switch their functional phenotypes during inflammation and recovery. Simultaneously, the mechanical environment actively changes. However, how these dynamic alterations affect the macrophage phenotype is unknown. Here, we observed that the extracellular matrix (ECM) constructed by AKAP12+ colon mesenchymal cells (CMCs) generated M2 macrophages by regulating their shape during recovery. Notably, rounded macrophages were present in the linear and loose ECM of inflamed colons and polarized to the M1 phenotype. In contrast, ramified macrophages emerged in the contracted ECM of recovering colons and mainly expressed M2 macrophage markers. These contracted structures were not observed in the inflamed colons of AKAP12 knockout (KO) mice. Consequently, the proportion of M2 macrophages in inflamed colons was lower in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In addition, clinical symptoms and histological damage were more severe in AKAP12 KO mice than in WT mice. In experimentally remodeled collagen gels, WT CMCs drove the formation of a more compacted structure than AKAP12 KO CMCs, which promoted the polarization of macrophages toward an M2 phenotype. These results demonstrated that tissue contraction during recovery provides macrophages with the physical cues that drive M2 polarization. PMID:28205544

  20. Arylesterase Phenotype-Specific Positive Association Between Arylesterase Activity and Cholinesterase Specific Activity in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yutaka; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Strickland, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cholinesterase (ChE) specific activity is the ratio of ChE activity to ChE mass and, as a biomarker of exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors, has a potential advantage over simple ChE activity. Objective: To examine the association of several potential correlates (serum arylesterase/paraoxonase activity, serum albumin, sex, age, month of blood collection, and smoking) with plasma ChE specific activity. Methods: We analyzed data from 195 cancer-free controls from a nested case-control study, accounting for potential confounding. Results: Arylesterase activity had an independent, statistically significant positive association with ChE specific activity, and its magnitude was the greatest for the arylesterase phenotype corresponding to the QQ PON1192 genotype followed by phenotypes corresponding to QR and RR genotypes. Serum albumin was positively associated with ChE specific activity. Conclusions: Plasma arylesterase activity was positively associated with plasma ChE specific activity. This observation is consistent with protection conferred by a metabolic phenotype resulting in reduced internal dose. PMID:24473115

  1. Serum Stability and Affinity Optimization of an M2 Macrophage-Targeting Peptide (M2pep)

    PubMed Central

    Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Gustafson, Heather H.; Pineda, Julio M.; Kacherovsky, Nataly A.; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Pun, Suzie H.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major stromal component of the tumor microenvironment in several cancers. TAMs are a potential target for adjuvant cancer therapies due to their established roles in promoting proliferation of cancer cells, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We previously discovered an M2 macrophage-targeting peptide (M2pep) which was successfully used to target and deliver a pro-apoptotic KLA peptide to M2-like TAMs in a CT-26 colon carcinoma model. However, the effectiveness of in vivo TAM-targeting using M2pep is limited by its poor serum stability and low binding affinity. In this study, we synthesized M2pep derivatives with the goals of increasing serum stability and binding affinity. Serum stability evaluation of M2pepBiotin confirmed its rapid degradation attributed to exolytic cleavage from the N-terminus and endolytic cleavages at the W10/W11 and S16/K17 sites. N-terminal acetylation of M2pepBiotin protected the peptide against the exolytic degradation while W10w and K(17,18,19)k substitutions were able to effectively protect endolytic degradation at their respective cleavage sites. However, no tested amino acid changes at the W10 position resulted in both protease resistance at that site and retention of binding activity. Therefore, cyclization of M2pep was investigated. Cyclized M2pep better resisted serum degradation without compromising binding activity to M2 macrophages. During the serum stability optimization process, we also discovered that K9R and W10Y substitutions significantly enhanced binding affinity of M2pep. In an in vitro binding study of different M2pep analogs pre-incubated in mouse serum, cyclic M2pep with K9R and W10Y modifications (cyclic M2pep(RY)) retained the highest binding activity to M2 macrophages over time due to its improved serum stability. Finally, we evaluated the in vivo accumulation of sulfo-Cy5-labeled M2pep and cyclic M2pep(RY) in both the CT-26 and 4T1 breast carcinoma models. Cyclic M2pep

  2. Phenotypic dysregulation of microglial activation in young offspring rats with maternal sleep deprivation-induced cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiuying; Xie, Xiaofang; Fan, Yonghua; Zhang, Jinqiang; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Xiaohui; Yan, Shuo; Chen, Yubo; Peng, Cheng; You, Zili

    2015-01-01

    Despite the potential adverse effects of maternal sleep deprivation (MSD) on physiological and behavioral aspects of offspring, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. The present study was intended to investigate the roles of microglia on neurodevelopment and cognition in young offspring rats with prenatal sleep deprivation. Pregnant Wistar rats received 72 h sleep deprivation in the last trimester of gestation, and their prepuberty male offspring were given the intraperitoneal injection with or without minocycline. The results showed the number of Iba1+ microglia increased, that of hippocampal neurogenesis decreased, and the hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory were impaired in MSD offspring. The classical microglial activation markers (M1 phenotype) IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, CD68 and iNOS were increased, while the alternative microglial activation markers (M2 phenotype) Arg1, Ym1, IL-4, IL-10 and CD206 were reduced in hippocampus of MSD offspring. After minocycline administration, the MSD offspring showed improvement in MWM behaviors and increase in BrdU+/DCX+ cells. Minocycline reduced Iba1+ cells, suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory molecules, and reversed the reduction of M2 microglial markers in the MSD prepuberty offspring. These results indicate that dysregulation in microglial pro- and anti-inflammatory activation is involved in MSD-induced inhibition of neurogenesis and impairment of spatial learning and memory. PMID:25830666

  3. M1 and M2 Functional Imprinting of Primary Microglia: Role of P2X7 Activation and miR-125b

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Chiara; Napoli, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a most frequently occurring and severe form of motor neuron disease, causing death within 3–5 years from diagnosis and with a worldwide incidence of about 2 per 100,000 person-years. Mutations in over twenty genes associated with familial forms of ALS have provided insights into the mechanisms leading to motor neuron death. Moreover, mutations in two RNA binding proteins, TAR DNA binding protein 43 and fused in sarcoma, have raised the intriguing possibility that perturbations of RNA metabolism, including that of the small endogenous RNA molecules that repress target genes at the posttranscriptional level, that is, microRNAs, may contribute to disease pathogenesis. At present, the mechanisms by which microglia actively participate to both toxic and neuroprotective actions in ALS constitute an important matter of research. Among the pathways involved in ALS-altered microglia responses, in previous works we have uncovered the hyperactivation of P2X7 receptor by extracellular ATP and the overexpression of miR-125b, both leading to uncontrolled toxic M1 reactions. In order to shed further light on the complexity of these processes, in this short review we will describe the M1/M2 functional imprinting of primary microglia and a role played by P2X7 and miR-125b in ALS microglia activation. PMID:28090150

  4. An M2-V27A channel blocker demonstrates potent in vitro and in vivo antiviral activities against amantadine-sensitive and -resistant influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanmei; Musharrafieh, Rami; Ma, Chunlong; Zhang, Jiantao; Smee, Donald F; DeGrado, William F; Wang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Adamantanes such as amantadine (1) and rimantadine (2) are FDA-approved anti-influenza drugs that act by inhibiting the wild-type M2 proton channel from influenza A viruses, thereby inhibiting the uncoating of the virus. Although adamantanes have been successfully used for more than four decades, their efficacy was curtailed by emerging drug resistance. Among the limited number of M2 mutants that confer amantadine resistance, the M2-V27A mutant was found to be the predominant mutant under drug selection pressure, thereby representing a high profile antiviral drug target. Guided by molecular dynamics simulations, we previously designed first-in-class M2-V27A inhibitors. One of the potent lead compounds, spiroadamantane amine (3), inhibits both the M2-WT and M2-V27A mutant with IC50 values of 18.7 and 0.3 μM, respectively, in in vitro electrophysiological assays. Encouraged by these findings, in this study we further examine the in vitro and in vivo antiviral activity of compound 3 in inhibiting both amantadine-sensitive and -resistant influenza A viruses. Compound 3 not only had single to sub-micromolar EC50 values against M2-WT- and M2-V27A-containing influenza A viruses in antiviral assays, but also rescued mice from lethal viral infection by either M2-WT- or M2-V27A-containing influenza A viruses. In addition, we report the design of two analogs of compound 3, and one was found to have improved in vitro antiviral activity over compound 3. Collectively, this study represents the first report demonstrating the in vivo antiviral efficacy of inhibitors targeting M2 mutants. The results suggest that inhibitors targeting drug-resistant M2 mutants are promising antiviral drug candidates worthy of further development.

  5. CREB1 directly activates the transcription of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 and promotes the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zejun; Lin, Aifen; Chen, Jiaoe; Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Hong; Li, Hongzhang; Hu, Yanyan; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Jiangang; Qiu, Lanlan; Mei, Lingming; Shao, Jimin; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    As the small subunit of Ribonucleotide reductase (RR), RRM2 displays a very important role in various critical cellular processes such as cell proliferation, DNA repair, and senescence, etc. Importantly, RRM2 functions like a tumor driver in most types of cancer but little is known about the regulatory mechanism of RRM2 in cancer development. In this study, we found that the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) acted as a transcription factor of RRM2 gene in human colorectal cancer (CRC). CREB1 directly bound to the promoter of RRM2 gene and induced its transcriptional activation. Knockdown of CREB1 decreased the expression of RRM2 at both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, knockdown of RRM2 attenuated CREB1-induced aggressive phenotypes of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the data from TCGA database and clinical CRC specimens with immunohistochemical staining also demonstrated a strong correlation between the co-expression of CREB1 and RRM2. Decreased disease survivals were observed in CRC patients with high expression levels of CREB1 or RRM2. Our results indicate CREB1 as a critical transcription factor of RRM2 which promotes tumor aggressiveness, and imply a significant correlation between CREB1 and RRM2 in CRC specimens. These may provide the possibility that CREB1 and RRM2 could be used as biomarkers or targets for CRC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27801665

  6. The E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degradation protein 1 (Nrdp1) promotes M2 macrophage polarization by ubiquitinating and activating transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding Protein β (C/EBPβ).

    PubMed

    Ye, Shuo; Xu, Hongmei; Jin, Jing; Yang, Mingjin; Wang, Chunmei; Yu, Yizhi; Cao, Xuetao

    2012-08-03

    Macrophage activation, including classical (M1) activation and alternative (M2) activation, plays important roles in host immune response and pathogenesis of diseases. Ubiquitination has been shown to be involved in the differentiation of immune cells and in the regulation of immune responses. However, the role of ubiquitination during M1 versus M2 polarization is poorly explored. Here, we showed that arginase 1 (Arg1), a well recognized marker of M2 macrophages, is highly up-regulated in peritoneal macrophages derived from E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 transgenic (Nrdp1-TG) mice. Furthermore, other M2 feature markers such as MR, Ym1, and Fizz1, as well as Th2 cytokine IL-10, are also up-regulated in Nrdp1-TG macrophages after IL-4 stimulation. Knockdown of Nrdp1 expression effectively inhibits IL-4-induced expression of M2-related genes in macrophages. Moreover, Nrdp1 inhibits LPS-induced production of inducible NOS and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in macrophages. Immunoprecipitation assays show that Nrdp1 interacts with and ubiquitinates transcriptional factor C/EBPβ via Lys-63-linked ubiquitination. Nrdp1 enhances C/EBPβ-triggered transcriptional activation of the Arg1 reporter gene in the presence of IL-4 stimulation. Thus, we demonstrate that Nrdp1-mediated ubiquitination and activation of C/EBPβ contributes to a ubiquitin-dependent nonproteolytic pathway that up-regulates Arg1 expression and promotes M2 macrophage polarization.

  7. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Neuregulin Receptor Degradation Protein 1 (Nrdp1) Promotes M2 Macrophage Polarization by Ubiquitinating and Activating Transcription Factor CCAAT/Enhancer-binding Protein β (C/EBPβ)*

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shuo; Xu, Hongmei; Jin, Jing; Yang, Mingjin; Wang, Chunmei; Yu, Yizhi; Cao, Xuetao

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage activation, including classical (M1) activation and alternative (M2) activation, plays important roles in host immune response and pathogenesis of diseases. Ubiquitination has been shown to be involved in the differentiation of immune cells and in the regulation of immune responses. However, the role of ubiquitination during M1 versus M2 polarization is poorly explored. Here, we showed that arginase 1 (Arg1), a well recognized marker of M2 macrophages, is highly up-regulated in peritoneal macrophages derived from E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 transgenic (Nrdp1-TG) mice. Furthermore, other M2 feature markers such as MR, Ym1, and Fizz1, as well as Th2 cytokine IL-10, are also up-regulated in Nrdp1-TG macrophages after IL-4 stimulation. Knockdown of Nrdp1 expression effectively inhibits IL-4-induced expression of M2-related genes in macrophages. Moreover, Nrdp1 inhibits LPS-induced production of inducible NOS and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in macrophages. Immunoprecipitation assays show that Nrdp1 interacts with and ubiquitinates transcriptional factor C/EBPβ via Lys-63-linked ubiquitination. Nrdp1 enhances C/EBPβ-triggered transcriptional activation of the Arg1 reporter gene in the presence of IL-4 stimulation. Thus, we demonstrate that Nrdp1-mediated ubiquitination and activation of C/EBPβ contributes to a ubiquitin-dependent nonproteolytic pathway that up-regulates Arg1 expression and promotes M2 macrophage polarization. PMID:22707723

  8. Advanced Glycation End Products Enhance Macrophages Polarization into M1 Phenotype through Activating RAGE/NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xian; Yao, Tongqing; Zhou, Zhong'e; Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Song; Hu, Wei; Shen, Chengxing

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are accelerated in patients with diabetes. M1 (classically activated in contrast to M2 alternatively activated) macrophages play key roles in the progression of atherosclerosis. Since advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are major pathogenic factors and active inflammation inducers in diabetes mellitus, this study assessed the effects of AGEs on macrophage polarization. The present study showed that AGEs significantly promoted macrophages to express IL-6 and TNF-α. M1 macrophage markers such as iNOS and surface markers including CD11c and CD86 were significantly upregulated while M2 macrophage markers such as Arg1 and CD206 remained unchanged after AGEs stimulation. AGEs significantly increased RAGE expression in macrophages and activated NF-κB pathway, and the aforementioned effects were partly abolished by administration of anti-RAGE antibody or NF-κB inhibitor PDTC. In conclusion, our results suggest that AGEs enhance macrophage differentiation into proinflammatory M1 phenotype at least partly via RAGE/NF-κB pathway activation.

  9. Advanced Glycation End Products Enhance Macrophages Polarization into M1 Phenotype through Activating RAGE/NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xian; Yao, Tongqing; Zhou, Zhong'e; Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Song; Hu, Wei; Shen, Chengxing

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are accelerated in patients with diabetes. M1 (classically activated in contrast to M2 alternatively activated) macrophages play key roles in the progression of atherosclerosis. Since advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are major pathogenic factors and active inflammation inducers in diabetes mellitus, this study assessed the effects of AGEs on macrophage polarization. The present study showed that AGEs significantly promoted macrophages to express IL-6 and TNF-α. M1 macrophage markers such as iNOS and surface markers including CD11c and CD86 were significantly upregulated while M2 macrophage markers such as Arg1 and CD206 remained unchanged after AGEs stimulation. AGEs significantly increased RAGE expression in macrophages and activated NF-κB pathway, and the aforementioned effects were partly abolished by administration of anti-RAGE antibody or NF-κB inhibitor PDTC. In conclusion, our results suggest that AGEs enhance macrophage differentiation into proinflammatory M1 phenotype at least partly via RAGE/NF-κB pathway activation. PMID:26114112

  10. Identification and characterization of PERK activators by phenotypic screening and their effects on NRF2 activation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wensheng; Pariollaud, Marie; Wixted, William E; Chitnis, Nilesh; Fornwald, James; Truong, Maggie; Pao, Christina; Liu, Yan; Ames, Robert S; Callahan, James; Solari, Roberto; Sanchez, Yolanda; Diehl, Alan; Li, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress plays a critical role to restore the homeostasis of protein production in eukaryotic cells. This vital process is hence involved in many types of diseases including COPD. PERK, one branch in the ER stress signaling pathways, has been reported to activate NRF2 signaling pathway, a known protective response to COPD. Based on this scientific rationale, we aimed to identify PERK activators as a mechanism to achieve NRF2 activation. In this report, we describe a phenotypic screening assay to identify PERK activators. This assay measures phosphorylation of GFP-tagged eIF2α upon PERK activation via a cell-based LanthaScreen technology. To obtain a robust assay with sufficient signal to background and low variation, multiple parameters were optimized including GFP-tagged eIF2α BacMam concentration, cell density and serum concentration. The assay was validated by a tool compound, Thapsigargin, which induces phosphorylation of eIF2α. In our assay, this compound showed maximal signal window of approximately 2.5-fold with a pEC50 of 8.0, consistent with literature reports. To identify novel PERK activators through phosphorylation of eIF2α, a focused set of 8,400 compounds was screened in this assay at 10 µM. A number of hits were identified and validated. The molecular mechanisms for several selected hits were further characterized in terms of PERK activation and effects on PERK downstream components. Specificity of these compounds in activating PERK was demonstrated with a PERK specific inhibitor and in PERK knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. In addition, these hits showed NRF2-dependent anti-oxidant gene induction. In summary, our phenotypic screening assay is demonstrated to be able to identify PERK specific activators. The identified PERK activators could potentially be used as chemical probes to further investigate this pathway as well as the link between PERK activation and NRF2 pathway activation.

  11. Activation of a GTP-binding protein and a GTP-binding-protein-coupled receptor kinase (beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1) by a muscarinic receptor m2 mutant lacking phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, K; Haga, K; Haga, T; Moro, O; Sadée, W

    1994-12-01

    A mutant of the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor), lacking a large part of the third intracellular loop, was expressed and purified using the baculovirus/insect cell culture system. The mutant was not phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, as expected from the previous assignment of phosphorylation sites to the central part of the third intracellular loop. However, the m2 receptor mutant was capable of stimulating beta-adrenergic-receptor-kinase-1-mediated phosphorylation of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the m2 phosphorylation sites in an agonist-dependent manner. Both mutant and wild-type m2 receptors reconstituted with the guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G protein), G(o) and G(i)2, displayed guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, as assessed by displacement of [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding with carbamoylcholine, and both stimulated guanosine 5'-3-O-[35S]thiotriphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding in the presence of carbamoylcholine and GDP. The Ki values of carbamoylcholine effects on [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding were indistinguishable for the mutant and wild-type m2 receptors. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the wild-type m2 receptor by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1 did not affect m2 interaction with G proteins as assessed by the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [35S]GTP[S]. These results indicate that (a) the m2 receptor serves both as an activator and as a substrate of beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, and (b) a large part of the third intracellular loop of the m2 receptor does not contribute to interaction with G proteins and its phosphorylation by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase does not uncouple the receptor and G proteins in reconstituted lipid vesicles.

  12. Moving M2 mirror without pointing offset.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragazzoni, R.; Bortoletto, F.

    1991-09-01

    Moving the secondary mirror M2 to introduce an amount of decentering coma is one of the tasks of active optics. The authors show that this target is accomplished with high accuracy rotating the mirror around a point located near, but not exactly at the center of curvature of M2. Ray tracing results are compared to analytical ones in the case of the Italian Galileo telescope, that will be equipped with an high precision M2 driving device; the close matching with the analytical calculations is demonstrated.

  13. Gut dysbiosis promotes M2 macrophage polarization and allergic airway inflammation via fungi-induced PGE₂.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Gi; Udayanga, Kankanam Gamage Sanath; Totsuka, Naoya; Weinberg, Jason B; Núñez, Gabriel; Shibuya, Akira

    2014-01-15

    Although imbalances in gut microbiota composition, or "dysbiosis," are associated with many diseases, the effects of gut dysbiosis on host systemic physiology are less well characterized. We report that gut dysbiosis induced by antibiotic (Abx) treatment promotes allergic airway inflammation by shifting macrophage polarization in the lung toward the alternatively activated M2 phenotype. Adoptive transfer of alveolar macrophages derived from Abx-treated mice was sufficient to increase allergic airway inflammation. Abx treatment resulted in the overgrowth of a commensal fungal Candida species in the gut and increased plasma concentrations of prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂), which induced M2 macrophage polarization in the lung. Suppression of PGE₂ synthesis by the cyclooxygenase inhibitors aspirin and celecoxib suppressed M2 macrophage polarization and decreased allergic airway inflammatory cell infiltration in Abx-treated mice. Thus, Abx treatment can cause overgrowth of particular fungal species in the gut and promote M2 macrophage activation at distant sites to influence systemic responses including allergic inflammation.

  14. Regular physical activity prevents chronic pain by altering resident muscle macrophage phenotype and increasing IL-10 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Audrey; Gregory, Nicholas S.; Allen, Lee-Ann H.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity in healthy individuals prevents development of chronic musculoskeletal pain; however, the mechanisms underlying this exercise-induced analgesia are not well understood. Interleukin-10(IL-10), an anti-inflammatory cytokine which can reduce nociceptor sensitization, increases during regular physical activity. Since macrophages play a major role in cytokine production and are present in muscle tissue, we propose that physical activity alters macrophage phenotype to increase IL-10 and prevent chronic pain. Physical activity was induced by allowing C57BL/6J mice free access to running wheels for 8 weeks and compared to sedentary mice with no running wheels. Using immunohistochemical staining of the gastrocnemius muscle to label regulatory (M2, secretes anti-inflammatory cytokines) and classical (M1, secretes proinflammatory cytokines) macrophages, the percentage of M2-macrophages increased significantly in physically active mice (68.5±4.6% of total) compared to sedentary mice (45.8±7.1% of total). Repeated acid injections into the muscle enhanced mechanical sensitivity of the muscle and paw in sedentary animals that does not occur in physically active mice; no sex differences occur in either sedentary or physically active mice. Blockade of IL-10 systemically or locally prevented the analgesia in physically active mice, i.e. mice developed hyperalgesia. Conversely, sedentary mice pretreated systemically or locally with IL-10 had reduced hyperalgesia after repeated acid injections. Thus, these results suggest that regular physical activity increases the percentage of regulatory macrophages in muscle and that IL-10 is an essential mediator in the analgesia produced by regular physical activity. PMID:26230740

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Controls M2 Macrophage Differentiation and Foam Cell Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jisu; Riek, Amy E.; Weng, Sherry; Petty, Marvin; Kim, David; Colonna, Marco; Cella, Marina; Bernal-Mizrachi, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are essential in atherosclerosis progression, but regulation of the M1 versus M2 phenotype and their role in cholesterol deposition are unclear. We demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key regulator of macrophage differentiation and cholesterol deposition. Macrophages from diabetic patients were classically or alternatively stimulated and then exposed to oxidized LDL. Alternative stimulation into M2 macrophages lead to increased foam cell formation by inducing scavenger receptor CD36 and SR-A1 expression. ER stress induced by alternative stimulation was necessary to generate the M2 phenotype through JNK activation and increased PPARγ expression. The absence of CD36 or SR-A1 signaling independently of modified cholesterol uptake decreased ER stress and prevented the M2 differentiation typically induced by alternative stimulation. Moreover, suppression of ER stress shifted differentiated M2 macrophages toward an M1 phenotype and subsequently suppressed foam cell formation by increasing HDL- and apoA-1-induced cholesterol efflux indicating suppression of macrophage ER stress as a potential therapy for atherosclerosis. PMID:22356914

  16. Activity and structural comparisons of solution associating and monomeric channel-forming peptides derived from the glycine receptor m2 segment.

    PubMed

    Cook, Gabriel A; Prakash, Om; Zhang, Ke; Shank, Lalida P; Takeguchi, Wade A; Robbins, Ashley; Gong, Yu-Xi; Iwamoto, Takeo; Schultz, Bruce D; Tomich, John M

    2004-03-01

    A number of channel-forming peptides derived from the second transmembrane (TM) segment (M2) of the glycine receptor alpha(1) subunit (M2GlyR), including the 22-residue sequence NK(4)-M2GlyR p22 wild type (WT) (KKKKPARVGLGITTVLTMTTQS), induce anion permeation across epithelial cell monolayers. In vitro assays suggest that this peptide or related sequences might function as a candidate for ion channel replacement therapy in treating channelopathies such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The wild-type sequence forms soluble associations in water that diminish its efficacy. Introduction of a single substitution S22W at the C-terminus, NK(4)-M2GlyR p22 S22W, eliminates the formation of higher molecular weight associations in solution. The S22W peptide also reduces the concentration of peptide required for half-maximal anion transport induced across Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK) monolayers. A combination of 2D double quantum filtered correlation spectroscopy (DQF-COSY), total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), and rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) data were recorded for both the associating WT and nonassociating S22W peptides and used to compare the primary structures and to assign the secondary structures. High-resolution structural studies were recorded in the solvent system (40% 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol (TFE)/water), which gave the largest structural difference between the two peptides. Nuclear Overhauser effect crosspeak intensity provided interproton distances and the torsion angles were measured by spin-spin coupling constants. These constraints were put into the DYANA modeling program to generate a group of structures. These studies yielded energy-minimized structures for this mixed solvent environment. Structure for both peptides is confined to the 15-residue transmembrane segments. The energy-minimized structure for the WT peptide shows a partially helical extended structure. The S22W

  17. Active Learning Strategies for Phenotypic Profiling of High-Content Screens.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin; Horvath, Peter

    2014-06-01

    High-content screening is a powerful method to discover new drugs and carry out basic biological research. Increasingly, high-content screens have come to rely on supervised machine learning (SML) to perform automatic phenotypic classification as an essential step of the analysis. However, this comes at a cost, namely, the labeled examples required to train the predictive model. Classification performance increases with the number of labeled examples, and because labeling examples demands time from an expert, the training process represents a significant time investment. Active learning strategies attempt to overcome this bottleneck by presenting the most relevant examples to the annotator, thereby achieving high accuracy while minimizing the cost of obtaining labeled data. In this article, we investigate the impact of active learning on single-cell-based phenotype recognition, using data from three large-scale RNA interference high-content screens representing diverse phenotypic profiling problems. We consider several combinations of active learning strategies and popular SML methods. Our results show that active learning significantly reduces the time cost and can be used to reveal the same phenotypic targets identified using SML. We also identify combinations of active learning strategies and SML methods which perform better than others on the phenotypic profiling problems we studied.

  18. M2-F1 cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This photo shows the cockpit configuration of the M2-F1 wingless lifting body. With a top speed of about 120 knots, the M2-F1 had a simple instrument panel. Besides the panel itself, the ribs of the wooden shell (left) and the control stick (center) are also visible. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C-47

  19. Mitsubishi A6M2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Captured at Akutan Island, Alaska, in August 1942. This Mitsubishi A6M2 fighter was the first 'Zero' to fall intact into Allied hands during WW II. After limited flying on the West Coast, the 'Zero' arrived at Langley for installation of test equipment prior to in-depth flight testing by the Navy at Patuxent River, Maryland.

  20. Activation of nematode G protein GOA-1 by the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype. Functional coupling of G-protein-coupled receptor and G protein originated from evolutionarily distant animals.

    PubMed

    Minaba, Masaomi; Ichiyama, Susumu; Kojima, Katsura; Ozaki, Mamiko; Kato, Yusuke

    2006-12-01

    Signal transduction mediated by heterotrimeric G proteins regulates a wide variety of physiological functions. We are interested in the manipulation of G-protein-mediating signal transduction using G-protein-coupled receptors, which are derived from evolutionarily distant organisms and recognize unique ligands. As a model, we tested the functionally coupling GOA-1, G alpha(i/o) ortholog in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, with the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype (M2), which is one of the mammalian G alpha(i/o)-coupled receptors. GOA-1 and M2 were prepared as a fusion protein using a baculovirus expression system. The affinity of the fusion protein for GDP was decreased by addition of a muscarinic agonist, carbamylcholine and the guanosine 5'-[3-O-thio]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding was increased with an increase in the carbamylcholine concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These effects evoked by carbamylcholine were completely abolished by a full antagonist, atropine. In addition, the affinity for carbamylcholine decreased under the presence of GTP as reported for M2-G alpha(i/o) coupling. These results indicate that the M2 activates GOA-1 as well as G alpha(i/o).

  1. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  2. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  3. Palmitoylation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes: reduction in their ability to activate G proteins by mutation of a putative palmitoylation site, cysteine 457, in the carboxyl-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M K; Haga, T

    1997-04-15

    A putative palmitoylation site, Cys457, of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor) was eliminated by conversion to alanine or stop codon by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant m2 receptor C457A was not metabolically labeled with [3H] palmitic acid when expressed in Sf9 cells, whereas the wild-type m2 receptor was labeled under the same conditions. These results confirm that the Cys457 is the palmitoylation site. The rate of palmitoylation was markedly accelerated by addition of agonist, indicating that the palmitoylation reaction is affected by conformational changes of the receptor induced by agonist binding. The m2 receptor mutants without palmitoylation were purified and reconstituted with G proteins into phospholipid vesicles. Both mutants were good substrates of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and the phosphorylation was stimulated by agonist and G protein beta gamma subunits, as was the case for wild-type receptors. The mutant receptors interacted with and activate Gi2 and G(o). However, the rate of [35S] GTP gamma S binding to Gi2 was half as much for the mutants as that for the wild type, and the proportion of guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding sites was significantly less for mutants (42-42%) compared to wild type (62%). These results indicate that the palmitoylation of m2 receptors is not an absolute requirement for their interaction with G proteins but enhances the ability of the receptors to interact with G proteins.

  4. In vitro residual activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase variants and correlation with metabolic phenotypes in PKU.

    PubMed

    Trunzo, Roberta; Santacroce, Rosa; Shen, Nan; Jung-Klawitter, Sabine; Leccese, Angelica; De Girolamo, Giuseppe; Margaglione, Maurizio; Blau, Nenad

    2016-12-05

    Hyperphenylalaninemias (HPAs) are genetic diseases predominantly caused by a wide range of variants in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. In vitro expression analysis of PAH variants offers the opportunity to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in HPAs and to clarify whether a disease-associated variant is genuinely pathogenic, while investigating the severity of a metabolic phenotype, and determining how a variant exerts its deleterious effects on the PAH enzyme. To study the effects of gene variants on PAH activity, we investigated eight variants: c.611A>G (p.Y204C), c.635T>C (p.L212P), c.746T>C (p.L249P), c.745C>T (p.L249F), c.809G>A (p.R270K), c.782G>C (p.R261P), c.587C>A (p.S196Y) and c.1139C>T (p.T380M), associated with different phenotypic groups. Transient expression of mutant full-length cDNAs in COS-7 cells yielded PAH proteins with PAH activity levels between 7% and 51% compared to the wild-type enzyme. With one exception (p.Y204C, which had no significant impact on PAH function), lower PAH activity was associated with a more severe phenotype (e.g. p.L249P with 7% PAH activity, 100% of classic PKU and no BH4 responsiveness), while higher activity correlated with milder phenotypes (e.g. p.T380M with 28% PAH activity, 97% of mild HPA and 83% of BH4 responsiveness). The results of the in vitro residual PAH activity have major implications, both for our understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations, and thereby existing inconsistencies, but also for the elucidation of the molecular basis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) responsiveness.

  5. Graded activation of the MEK1/MT1-MMP axis determines renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mahimkar, Rajeev; Alfonso-Jaume, Maria Alejandra; Cape, Leslie M.; Dahiya, Rajvir; Lovett, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of Raf/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and elevated expression of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) are associated with von Hippel–Lindau gene alterations in renal cell carcinoma. We postulated that the degree of MEK activation was related to graded expression of MT1-MMP and the resultant phenotype of renal epithelial tumors. Madin Darby canine kidney epithelial cells transfected with a MEK1 expression plasmid yielded populations with morphologic phenotypes ranging from epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal to mesenchymal. Clones were analyzed for MEK1 activity, MT1-MMP expression and extent of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Phenotypes of the MDCK-MEK1 clones were evaluated in vivo with nu/nu mice. Tissue microarray of renal cell cancers was quantitatively assessed for expression of phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP proteins and correlations drawn to Fuhrman nuclear grade. Graded increases in the MEK signaling module were associated with graded induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition of the MDCK cells and induction of MT1-MMP transcription and synthesis. Inhibition of MEK1 and MT1-MMP activity reversed the epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Tumors generated by epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal and mesenchymal MDCK clones demonstrated a gradient of phenotypes extending from well-differentiated, fully encapsulated non-invasive tumors to tumors with an anaplastic morphology, high Fuhrman nuclear score, neoangiogenesis and invasion. Tumor microarray demonstrated a statistically significant association between the extent of phosphorylated MEK1, MT1-MMP expression and nuclear grade. We conclude that graded increases in the MEK1 signaling module are correlated with M1-MMP expression, renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype, invasive activity and nuclear grade. Phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP may represent novel, and mechanistic, biomarkers for the assessment of renal

  6. Graded activation of the MEK1/MT1-MMP axis determines renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mahimkar, Rajeev; Alfonso-Jaume, Maria Alejandra; Cape, Leslie M; Dahiya, Rajvir; Lovett, David H

    2011-12-01

    Activation of Raf/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and elevated expression of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) are associated with von Hippel-Lindau gene alterations in renal cell carcinoma. We postulated that the degree of MEK activation was related to graded expression of MT1-MMP and the resultant phenotype of renal epithelial tumors. Madin Darby canine kidney epithelial cells transfected with a MEK1 expression plasmid yielded populations with morphologic phenotypes ranging from epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal to mesenchymal. Clones were analyzed for MEK1 activity, MT1-MMP expression and extent of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Phenotypes of the MDCK-MEK1 clones were evaluated in vivo with nu/nu mice. Tissue microarray of renal cell cancers was quantitatively assessed for expression of phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP proteins and correlations drawn to Fuhrman nuclear grade. Graded increases in the MEK signaling module were associated with graded induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the MDCK cells and induction of MT1-MMP transcription and synthesis. Inhibition of MEK1 and MT1-MMP activity reversed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Tumors generated by epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal and mesenchymal MDCK clones demonstrated a gradient of phenotypes extending from well-differentiated, fully encapsulated non-invasive tumors to tumors with an anaplastic morphology, high Fuhrman nuclear score, neoangiogenesis and invasion. Tumor microarray demonstrated a statistically significant association between the extent of phosphorylated MEK1, MT1-MMP expression and nuclear grade. We conclude that graded increases in the MEK1 signaling module are correlated with M1-MMP expression, renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype, invasive activity and nuclear grade. Phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP may represent novel, and mechanistic, biomarkers for the assessment of renal cell

  7. Nucleation process of an M2 earthquake in a deep gold mine in South Africa inferred from on-fault foreshock activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Yasuo; Nakatani, Masao; Naoi, Makoto; Philipp, Joachim; Janssen, Christoph; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Katsura, Taishi; Kawakata, Hironori; Georg, Dresen; Ogasawara, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Using a network of sensitive high-frequency acoustic emission sensors, we observed foreshock activity of an Mw 2.2 earthquake (main shock) in a deep gold mine in South Africa. Foreshock activity, which selectively occurred on a part of the rupture plane of the forthcoming main shock, lasted for at least 6 months until the main shock. Rock samples recovered from the main shock source region showed evidence of ancient hydrothermal alteration on the main shock rupture plane, suggesting that the foreshock activity occurred on a preexisting weakness. The foreshocks during 3 months before the main shock were concentrated in three clusters (F1-F3), which we interpret as representing localized preslip at multiple sites. While the location of mining area, the source of stress perturbations, changed with time, the locations of foreshock clusters did not change, suggesting that the preslip patches were controlled by strength heterogeneity rather than stress distribution. Activity over the entire foreshock area was generally constant, but the largest cluster (F2) showed accelerated activity starting at least 7 days before the main shock, while mining stress did not increase in this period. The main shock initiated at a point close to F1, away from F2. All the six foreshocks during the final 41 h occurred in F1 and F2 and in-between. These suggest that in the last stage of the preparation process of the main shock, preslip patches interacted with each other through the stress concentration ahead of the expanding preslip patch (F2), which should be the only driving force of the preparation process under the constant external load.

  8. Combining structure-based pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening, and in silico ADMET analysis to discover novel tetrahydro-quinoline based pyruvate kinase isozyme M2 activators with antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Can; Wang, Ting; Wu, Fengbo; Huang, Wei; He, Gu; Ouyang, Liang; Xiang, Mingli; Peng, Cheng; Jiang, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    Compared with normal differentiated cells, cancer cells upregulate the expression of pyruvate kinase isozyme M2 (PKM2) to support glycolytic intermediates for anabolic processes, including the synthesis of nucleic acids, amino acids, and lipids. In this study, a combination of the structure-based pharmacophore modeling and a hybrid protocol of virtual screening methods comprised of pharmacophore model-based virtual screening, docking-based virtual screening, and in silico ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) analysis were used to retrieve novel PKM2 activators from commercially available chemical databases. Tetrahydroquinoline derivatives were identified as potential scaffolds of PKM2 activators. Thus, the hybrid virtual screening approach was applied to screen the focused tetrahydroquinoline derivatives embedded in the ZINC database. Six hit compounds were selected from the final hits and experimental studies were then performed. Compound 8 displayed a potent inhibitory effect on human lung cancer cells. Following treatment with Compound 8, cell viability, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were examined in A549 cells. Finally, we evaluated the effects of Compound 8 on mice xenograft tumor models in vivo. These results may provide important information for further research on novel PKM2 activators as antitumor agents. PMID:25214764

  9. Adenosine augments IL-10-induced STAT3 signaling in M2c macrophages.

    PubMed

    Koscsó, Balázs; Csóka, Balázs; Kókai, Endre; Németh, Zoltán H; Pacher, Pál; Virág, László; Leibovich, S Joseph; Haskó, György

    2013-12-01

    The alternatively activated macrophage phenotype induced by IL-10 is called M2c. Adenosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that accumulates in the extracellular space in response to metabolic disturbances, hypoxia, inflammation, physical damage, or apoptosis. As adenosine is known to regulate classically activated M1 and IL4- and IL-13-activated M2a macrophages, the goal of the present study was to explore its effects on M2c macrophages. We found that adenosine augmented the IL-10-induced expression of TIMP-1 and arginase-1 by the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and by mouse BMDMs. The effects of AR stimulation on IL-10-induced TIMP-1 or arginase-1 expression were lacking in A2BAR KO macrophages. The role of A2BAR on TIMP-1 production of RAW 264.7 cells was confirmed with specific agonist BAY606583 and antagonist PSB0788. AR stimulation augmented IL-10-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in macrophages, and pharmacological inhibition or silencing of STAT3 using siRNA reduced the stimulatory effect of AR stimulation on TIMP-1 production. In contrast to its stimulatory effect on IL-10-induced STAT3 activation, adenosine inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and SAA3 expression. In conclusion, adenosine enhances IL-10-induced STAT3 signaling and M2c macrophage activation.

  10. Novel active heterogeneous Fenton system based on Fe3-xMxO4 (Fe, Co, Mn, Ni): the role of M2+ species on the reactivity towards H2O2 reactions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Regina C C; Lelis, M F F; Oliveira, L C A; Fabris, J D; Ardisson, J D; Rios, R R V A; Silva, C N; Lago, R M

    2006-02-28

    In this work, the effect of incorporation of M2+ species, i.e. Co2+, Mn2+ and Ni2+, into the magnetite structure to increase the reactivity towards H2O2 reactions was investigated. The following magnetites Fe3-xMnxO4, Fe3-xCoxO4 and Fe3-xNixO4 and the iron oxides Fe3O4, gamma-Fe2O3 and alpha-Fe2O3 were prepared and characterized by Mössbauer spectroscopy, XRD, BET surface area, magnetization and chemical analyses. The obtained results showed that the M2+ species at the octahedral site in the magnetite strongly affects the reactivity towards H2O2, i.e. (i) the peroxide decomposition to O2 and (ii) the oxidation of organic molecules, such as the dye methylene blue and chlorobenzene in aqueous medium. Experiments with maghemite, gamma-Fe2O3 and hematite, alpha-Fe2O3, showed very low activities compared to Fe3O4, suggesting that the presence of Fe2+ in the oxide plays an important role for the activation of H2O2. The presence of Co or Mn in the magnetite structure produced a remarkable increase in the reactivity, whereas Ni inhibited the H2O2 reactions. The obtained results suggest a surface initiated reaction involving Msurf2+ (Fe, Co or Mn), producing HO radicals, which can lead to two competitive reactions, i.e. the decomposition of H2O2 or the oxidation of organics present in the aqueous medium. The unique effect of Co and Mn is discussed in terms of the thermodynamically favorable Cosurf3+ and Mnsurf3+ reduction by Femagnetite2+ regenerating the active species M2+.

  11. Endocannabinoids drive the acquisition of an alternative phenotype in microglia.

    PubMed

    Mecha, M; Feliú, A; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Rueda-Zubiaurre, A; Ortega-Gutiérrez, S; de Sola, R García; Guaza, C

    2015-10-01

    The ability of microglia to acquire diverse states of activation, or phenotypes, reflects different features that are determinant for their contribution to homeostasis in the adult CNS, and their activity in neuroinflammation, repair or immunomodulation. Despite the widely reported immunomodulatory effects of cannabinoids in both the peripheral immune system and the CNS, less is known about how the endocannabinoid signaling system (eCBSS) influence the microglial phenotype. The general aim of the present study was to investigate the role of endocannabinoids in microglia polarization by using microglia cell cultures. We show that alternative microglia (M2a) and acquired deactivated microglia (M2c) exhibit changes in the eCB machinery that favor the selective synthesis of 2-AG and AEA, respectively. Once released, these eCBs might be able to act through CB1 and/or CB2 receptors in order to influence the acquisition of an M2 phenotype. We present three lines of evidence that the eCBSS is critical for the acquisition of the M2 phenotype: (i) M2 polarization occurs on exposure to the two main endocannabinoids 2-AG and AEA in microglia cultures; (ii) cannabinoid receptor antagonists block M2 polarization; and (iii) M2 polarization is dampened in microglia from CB2 receptor knockout mice. Taken together, these results indicate the interest of eCBSS for the regulation of microglial activation in normal and pathological conditions.

  12. HOXA10 Controls Osteoblastogenesis by Directly Activating Bone Regulatory and Phenotypic Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohammad Q.; Tare, Rahul; Lee, Suk Hee; Mandeville, Matthew; Weiner, Brian; Montecino, Martin; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2007-01-01

    HOXA10 is necessary for embryonic patterning of skeletal elements, but its function in bone formation beyond this early developmental stage is unknown. Here we show that HOXA10 contributes to osteogenic lineage determination through activation of Runx2 and directly regulates osteoblastic phenotypic genes. In response to bone morphogenic protein BMP2, Hoxa10 is rapidly induced and functions to activate the Runx2 transcription factor essential for bone formation. A functional element with the Hox core motif was characterized for the bone-related Runx2 P1 promoter. HOXA10 also activates other osteogenic genes, including the alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein genes, and temporally associates with these target gene promoters during stages of osteoblast differentiation prior to the recruitment of RUNX2. Exogenous expression and small interfering RNA knockdown studies establish that HOXA10 mediates chromatin hyperacetylation and trimethyl histone K4 (H3K4) methylation of these genes, correlating to active transcription. HOXA10 therefore contributes to early expression of osteogenic genes through chromatin remodeling. Importantly, HOXA10 can induce osteoblast genes in Runx2 null cells, providing evidence for a direct role in mediating osteoblast differentiation independent of RUNX2. We propose that HOXA10 activates RUNX2 in mesenchymal cells, contributing to the onset of osteogenesis, and that HOXA10 subsequently supports bone formation by direct regulation of osteoblast phenotypic genes. PMID:17325044

  13. Effects of activated fibroblasts on phenotype modulation, EGFR signalling and cell cycle regulation in OSCC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, Alexander; Büttner, Robert; Gühne, Stefanie; Gleinig, Anna; Richter, Petra; Chen, Yuan; Franz, Marcus; Liebmann, Claus

    2014-04-01

    Crosstalk between carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells is suggested to mediate phenotype transition of cancer cells as a prerequisite for tumour progression, to predict patients’ outcome, and to influence the efficacy of EGFR inhibitor therapies. Here we investigate the influence of activated fibroblasts as a model for CAFs on phenotype and EGFR signalling in OSCC cells in vitro. For this, immortalised hTERT-BJ1 fibroblasts were activated with TGFβ1 and PDGFAB to generate a myofibroblast or proliferative phenotype, respectively. Conditioned media (FCM{sub TGF}, FCM{sub PDGF}) were used to stimulate PE/CA-PJ15 OSCC cells. Results were compared to the effect of conditioned media of non-stimulated fibroblasts (FCM{sub B}). FCM{sub TGF} stimulation leads to an up-regulation of vimentin in the OSCC cells and an enhancement of invasive behaviour, indicating EMT-like effects. Similarly, FCM{sub TGF}≫FCM{sub PDGF} induced up-regulation of EGFR, but not of ErbB2/ErbB3. In addition, we detected an increase in basal activities of ERK, PI3K/Akt and Stat3 (FCM{sub TGF}>FCM{sub PDGF}) accompanied by protein interaction of vimentin with pERK. These effects are correlated with an increased proliferation. In summary, our results suggest that the activated myofibroblast phenotype provides soluble factors which are able to induce EMT-like phenomena and to increase EGFR signalling as well as cell proliferation in OSCC cells. Our results indicate a possible influence of activated myofibroblasts on EGFR-inhibitor therapy. Therefore, CAFs may serve as promising novel targets for combined therapy strategies. - Highlights: • A cell culture model for cancer associated fibroblasts is described. • The mutual interaction with OSCC cells leads to up-regulation of EGFR in tumour cells. • mCAF induces EGFR downstream signalling with increased proliferation in OSCC. • Erk activation is associated with protein interaction with vimentin

  14. Chronic Opisthorchis viverrini infection and associated hepatobiliary disease is associated with iron loaded M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bility, Moses T; Sripa, Banchob

    2014-12-01

    Chronic Opisthorchis viverrini-induced hepatobiliary disease is associated with significant leukocyte infiltration, including activated macrophages; however, the polarization of infiltrating macrophages remains to be fully characterized. In this study, we characterized macrophage polarization and phenotype in chronic O. viverrini-induced hepatobiliary disease in humans and hamsters using gene expression and histochemical analysis. Chronic O. viverrini infection and associated hepatobiliary diseases were associated with iron loaded M2-like macrophages in both humans and hamsters. This study provides suggestive evidence that iron loaded M2-like macrophages promote hepatobiliary disease in chronic O. viverrini infection.

  15. Linking trait-based phenotypes to prefrontal cortex activation during inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Achala H; Di Domenico, Stefano I; Graves, Bryanna; Lam, Jaeger; Ayaz, Hasan; Bagby, R Michael; Ruocco, Anthony C

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control is subserved in part by discrete regions of the prefrontal cortex whose functionality may be altered according to specific trait-based phenotypes. Using a unified model of normal range personality traits, we examined activation within lateral and medial aspects of the prefrontal cortex during a manual go/no-go task. Evoked hemodynamic oxygenation within the prefrontal cortex was measured in 106 adults using a 16-channel continuous-wave functional near-infrared spectroscopy system. Within lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex, greater activation was associated with higher trait levels of extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness, and lower neuroticism. Higher agreeableness was also related to more activation in the medial prefrontal cortex during inhibitory control. These results suggest that personality traits reflecting greater emotional stability, extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness may be associated with more efficient recruitment of control processes subserved by lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex. These findings highlight key links between trait-based phenotypes and neural activation patterns in the prefrontal cortex underlying inhibitory control.

  16. Lactate Activates HIF-1 in Oxidative but Not in Warburg-Phenotype Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Saedeleer, Christophe J.; Copetti, Tamara; Porporato, Paolo E.; Verrax, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can be envisioned as a metabolic disease driven by pressure selection and intercellular cooperativeness. Together with anaerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, formally corresponding to uncoupling glycolysis from oxidative phosphorylation, directly participates in cancer aggressiveness, supporting both tumor progression and dissemination. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key contributor to glycolysis. It stimulates the expression of glycolytic transporters and enzymes supporting high rate of glycolysis. In this study, we addressed the reverse possibility of a metabolic control of HIF-1 in tumor cells. We report that lactate, the end-product of glycolysis, inhibits prolylhydroxylase 2 activity and activates HIF-1 in normoxic oxidative tumor cells but not in Warburg-phenotype tumor cells which also expressed lower basal levels of HIF-1α. These data were confirmed using genotypically matched oxidative and mitochondria-depleted glycolytic tumor cells as well as several different wild-type human tumor cell lines of either metabolic phenotype. Lactate activates HIF-1 and triggers tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo, an activity that we found to be under the specific upstream control of the lactate transporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expressed in tumor cells. Because MCT1 also gates lactate-fueled tumor cell respiration and mediates pro-angiogenic lactate signaling in endothelial cells, MCT1 inhibition is confirmed as an attractive anticancer strategy in which a single drug may target multiple tumor-promoting pathways. PMID:23082126

  17. Structure-Activity Relationships in Salinomycin: Cytotoxicity and Phenotype Selectivity of Semi-synthetic Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Björn; Huang, Xiaoli; Hegardt, Cecilia; Oredsson, Stina; Strand, Daniel

    2017-02-10

    The ionophore salinomycin has attracted attention for its exceptional ability to selectively reduce the proportion of cells with stem-like properties in cancer cell populations of varying origin. Targeting the tumorigenicity of such cells is of interest as they are implicated in recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance. Structural derivatives of salinomycin are thus sought after, both as tools for probing the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the observed phenotype effects, and for improving selectivity and activity against cancer stem cells. Synthetic strategies for modification of each of the directly accessible functional groups of salinomycin are presented and the resulting library of analogues was investigated to establish structure-activity relationships, both with respect to cytotoxicity and phenotype selectivity in breast cancer cells. 20-O-Acylated derivatives stand out by exhibiting both improved selectivity and activity. Mechanistically, the importance of the ionophore properties of salinomycin is highlighted by a significant loss of activity by modifications directly interfering with either of the two primary ion coordinating motifs in salinomycin, the C11 ketone and the C1 carboxylate.

  18. Linking trait-based phenotypes to prefrontal cortex activation during inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Achala H.; Di Domenico, Stefano I.; Graves, Bryanna; Lam, Jaeger; Ayaz, Hasan; Bagby, R. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control is subserved in part by discrete regions of the prefrontal cortex whose functionality may be altered according to specific trait-based phenotypes. Using a unified model of normal range personality traits, we examined activation within lateral and medial aspects of the prefrontal cortex during a manual go/no-go task. Evoked hemodynamic oxygenation within the prefrontal cortex was measured in 106 adults using a 16-channel continuous-wave functional near-infrared spectroscopy system. Within lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex, greater activation was associated with higher trait levels of extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness, and lower neuroticism. Higher agreeableness was also related to more activation in the medial prefrontal cortex during inhibitory control. These results suggest that personality traits reflecting greater emotional stability, extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness may be associated with more efficient recruitment of control processes subserved by lateral regions of the prefrontal cortex. These findings highlight key links between trait-based phenotypes and neural activation patterns in the prefrontal cortex underlying inhibitory control. PMID:26163672

  19. Phenotypic Diversity Caused by Differential RpoS Activity among Environmental Escherichia coli Isolates▿†

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Sarah M.; Dong, Tao; Edge, Thomas A.; Schellhorn, Herb E.

    2011-01-01

    Enteric bacteria deposited into the environment by animal hosts are subject to diverse selective pressures. These pressures may act on phenotypic differences in bacterial populations and select adaptive mutations for survival in stress. As a model to study phenotypic diversity in environmental bacteria, we examined mutations of the stress response sigma factor, RpoS, in environmental Escherichia coli isolates. A total of 2,040 isolates from urban beaches and nearby fecal pollution sources on Lake Ontario (Canada) were screened for RpoS function by examining growth on succinate and catalase activity, two RpoS-dependent phenotypes. The rpoS sequence was determined for 45 isolates, including all candidate RpoS mutants, and of these, six isolates were confirmed as mutants with the complete loss of RpoS function. Similarly to laboratory strains, the RpoS expression of these environmental isolates was stationary phase dependent. However, the expression of RpoS regulon members KatE and AppA had differing levels of expression in several environmental isolates compared to those in laboratory strains. Furthermore, after plating rpoS+ isolates on succinate, RpoS mutants could be readily selected from environmental E. coli. Naturally isolated and succinate-selected RpoS mutants had lower generation times on poor carbon sources and lower stress resistance than their rpoS+ isogenic parental strains. These results show that RpoS mutants are present in the environment (with a frequency of 0.003 among isolates) and that, similarly to laboratory and pathogenic strains, growth on poor carbon sources selects for rpoS mutations in environmental E. coli. RpoS selection may be an important determinant of phenotypic diversification and, hence, the survival of E. coli in the environment. PMID:21948830

  20. Secondary Hyperalgesia Phenotypes Exhibit Differences in Brain Activation during Noxious Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Mads Utke; Mårtensson, Johan; Larsson, Henrik B. W.; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2015-01-01

    Noxious stimulation of the skin with either chemical, electrical or heat stimuli leads to the development of primary hyperalgesia at the site of injury, and to secondary hyperalgesia in normal skin surrounding the injury. Secondary hyperalgesia is inducible in most individuals and is attributed to central neuronal sensitization. Some individuals develop large areas of secondary hyperalgesia (high-sensitization responders), while others develop small areas (low-sensitization responders). The magnitude of each area is reproducible within individuals, and can be regarded as a phenotypic characteristic. To study differences in the propensity to develop central sensitization we examined differences in brain activity and anatomy according to individual phenotypical expression of secondary hyperalgesia by magnetic resonance imaging. Forty healthy volunteers received a first-degree burn-injury (47°C, 7 min, 9 cm2) on the non-dominant lower-leg. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia were assessed 100 min after the injury. We measured neuronal activation by recording blood-oxygen-level-dependent-signals (BOLD-signals) during mechanical noxious stimulation before burn injury and in both primary and secondary hyperalgesia areas after burn-injury. In addition, T1-weighted images were used to measure differences in gray-matter density in cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. We found significant differences in neuronal activity between high- and low-sensitization responders at baseline (before application of the burn-injury) (p < 0.05). After the burn-injury, we found significant differences between responders during noxious stimulation of both primary (p < 0.01) and secondary hyperalgesia (p ≤ 0.04) skin areas. A decreased volume of the right (p = 0.001) and left caudate nucleus (p = 0.01) was detected in high-sensitization responders in comparison to low-sensitization responders. These findings suggest that brain-structure and neuronal activation to noxious stimulation

  1. Secondary hyperalgesia phenotypes exhibit differences in brain activation during noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Pereira, Manuel Pedro; Werner, Mads Utke; Mårtensson, Johan; Larsson, Henrik B W; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2015-01-01

    Noxious stimulation of the skin with either chemical, electrical or heat stimuli leads to the development of primary hyperalgesia at the site of injury, and to secondary hyperalgesia in normal skin surrounding the injury. Secondary hyperalgesia is inducible in most individuals and is attributed to central neuronal sensitization. Some individuals develop large areas of secondary hyperalgesia (high-sensitization responders), while others develop small areas (low-sensitization responders). The magnitude of each area is reproducible within individuals, and can be regarded as a phenotypic characteristic. To study differences in the propensity to develop central sensitization we examined differences in brain activity and anatomy according to individual phenotypical expression of secondary hyperalgesia by magnetic resonance imaging. Forty healthy volunteers received a first-degree burn-injury (47 °C, 7 min, 9 cm(2)) on the non-dominant lower-leg. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia were assessed 100 min after the injury. We measured neuronal activation by recording blood-oxygen-level-dependent-signals (BOLD-signals) during mechanical noxious stimulation before burn injury and in both primary and secondary hyperalgesia areas after burn-injury. In addition, T1-weighted images were used to measure differences in gray-matter density in cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. We found significant differences in neuronal activity between high- and low-sensitization responders at baseline (before application of the burn-injury) (p < 0.05). After the burn-injury, we found significant differences between responders during noxious stimulation of both primary (p < 0.01) and secondary hyperalgesia (p ≤ 0.04) skin areas. A decreased volume of the right (p = 0.001) and left caudate nucleus (p = 0.01) was detected in high-sensitization responders in comparison to low-sensitization responders. These findings suggest that brain-structure and neuronal activation to noxious

  2. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Immunity by Polarizing Human Macrophages to a M2 Profile

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, María Carolina; Lefimil, Claudia; Rodas, Paula I.; Vernal, Rolando; Lopez, Mercedes; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mónica; Escobar, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Current data suggest that Neisseria gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. The present report is focused on gonococcus evasion mechanism on macrophages (MФ) and its impact in the subsequent immune response. In response to various signals MФ may undergo classical-M1 (M1-MФ) or alternative-M2 (M2-MФ) activation. Until now there are no reports of the gonococcus effects on human MФ polarization. We assessed the phagocytic ability of monocyte-derived MФ (MDM) upon gonococcal infection by immunofluorescence and gentamicin protection experiments. Then, we evaluated cytokine profile and M1/M2 specific-surface markers on MФ challenged with N. gonorrhoeae and their proliferative effect on T cells. Our findings lead us to suggest N. gonorrhoeae stimulates a M2-MФ phenotype in which some of the M2b and none of the M1-MФ-associated markers are induced. Interestingly, N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1), widely known as an immunosuppressive molecule. Moreover, functional results showed that N. gonorrhoeae-treated MФ are unable to induce proliferation of human T-cells, suggesting a more likely regulatory phenotype. Taken together, our data show that N. gonorroheae interferes with MФ polarization. This study has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of clearance versus long-term persistence of N. gonorroheae infection and might be applicable for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26125939

  3. Translating DPYD genotype into DPD phenotype: using the DPYD gene activity score.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Linda M; Lunenburg, Carin A T C; Meulendijks, Didier; Gelderblom, Hans; Cats, Annemieke; Swen, Jesse J; Schellens, Jan H M; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase enzyme (DPD, encoded by the gene DPYD) plays a key role in the metabolism of fluoropyrimidines. DPD deficiency occurs in 4-5% of the population and is associated with severe fluoropyrimidine-related toxicity. Several SNPs in DPYD have been described that lead to absent or reduced enzyme activity, including DPYD*2A, DPYD*13, c.2846A>T and c.1236G>A/haplotype B3. Since these SNPs differ in their effect on DPD enzyme activity, a differentiated dose adaption is recommended. We propose the gene activity score for translating DPYD genotype into phenotype, accounting for differences in functionality of SNPs. This method can be used to standardize individualized fluoropyrimidine dose adjustments, resulting in optimal safety and effectiveness.

  4. Persistent ERK/MAPK Activation Promotes Lactotrope Differentiation and Diminishes Tumorigenic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Allyson; Trudeau, Tammy; Gomez, Crystal; Lucia, M. Scott

    2014-01-01

    The signaling pathways that govern the lactotrope-specific differentiated phenotype, and those that control lactotrope proliferation in both physiological and pathological lactotrope expansion, are poorly understood. Moreover, the specific role of MAPK signaling in lactotrope proliferation vs differentiation, whether activated phosphorylated MAPK is sufficient for prolactinoma tumor formation remain unknown. Given that oncogenic Ras mutations and persistently activated phosphorylated MAPK are found in human tumors, including prolactinomas and other pituitary tumors, a better understanding of the role of MAPK in lactotrope biology is required. Here we directly examined the role of persistent Ras/MAPK signaling in differentiation, proliferation, and tumorigenesis of rat pituitary somatolactotrope GH4 cells. We stimulated Ras/MAPK signaling in a persistent, long-term manner (over 6 d) in GH4 cells using two distinct approaches: 1) a doxycycline-inducible, oncogenic V12Ras expression system; and 2) continuous addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor. We find that long-term activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway over 6 days promotes differentiation of the bihormonal somatolactotrope GH4 precursor cell into a prolactin-secreting, lactotrope cell phenotype in vitro and in vivo with GH4 cell xenograft tumors. Furthermore, we show that persistent activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway not only fails to promote cell proliferation, but also diminishes tumorigenic characteristics in GH4 cells in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that activated MAPK promotes differentiation and is not sufficient to drive tumorigenesis, suggesting that pituitary lactotrope tumor cells have the ability to evade the tumorigenic fate that is often associated with Ras/MAPK activation. PMID:25361391

  5. Basophil phenotypes in chronic idiopathic urticaria in relation to disease activity and autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Eckman, John A; Hamilton, Robert G; Gober, Laura M; Sterba, Patricia M; Saini, Sarbjit S

    2008-08-01

    Potentially pathogenic IgG autoantibodies to IgE or its receptor, Fc epsilonRIalpha, have been detected in approximately 40% of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) patients. CIU patients' basophils display distinct altered Fc epsilonRIalpha-mediated degranulation. CIU patients with basophil histamine release in response to polyclonal goat anti-human IgE > or = 10% are classified as CIU responders (CIU-R) and < 10% are CIU non-responders (CIU-NR). We compared the presence of autoantibodies to basophil degranulation phenotypes and to disease status (active or inactive). Sera were collected from non-CIU subjects and CIU subjects who participated in a longitudinal study of disease severity and had defined basophil degranulation phenotypes. Immunoenzymetric assays (IEMA) quantified IgG anti-Fc epsilonRIalpha and anti-IgE. IgG anti-Fc epsilonRIalpha antibody was detected in 57% of CIU-R (n=35), 55% of CIU-NR (n=29), and 57% of non-CIU subjects (n=23), whereas IgG anti-IgE was present in 43% of CIU-R, 45% of CIU-NR, and 30% of non-CIU subjects. Both the autoantibody levels and the functional basophil phenotype remained stable in subjects with active disease (n=16), whereas there was an enhancement in basophil function as subjects evolved into a state of remission (n=6), which appears independent of the presence of autoantibody. IEMAs detected a similar frequency of autoantibodies in CIU-R, CIU-NR, and non-CIU subjects. Basophil function may be independent of IEMA-detected autoantibodies.

  6. Down-regulation of Stathmin Is Required for the Phenotypic Changes and Classical Activation of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kewei; Harrison, Rene E

    2015-07-31

    Macrophages are important cells of innate immunity with specialized capacity for recognition and elimination of pathogens and presentation of antigens to lymphocytes for adaptive immunity. Macrophages become activated upon exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines and pathogenic stimuli. Classical activation of macrophages with interferon-γ (IFNγ) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggers a wide range of signaling events and morphological changes to induce the immune response. Our previous microtubule (MT) proteomic work revealed that the stathmin association with MTs is considerably reduced in activated macrophages, which contain significantly more stabilized MTs. Here, we show that there is a global decrease in stathmin levels, an MT catastrophe protein, in activated macrophages using both immunoblotting and immunofluorescent microscopy. This is an LPS-specific response that induces proteasome-mediated degradation of stathmin. We explored the functions of stathmin down-regulation in activated macrophages by generating a stable cell line overexpressing stathmin-GFP. We show that stathmin-GFP overexpression impacts MT stability, impairs cell spreading, and reduces activation-associated phenotypes. Furthermore, overexpressing stathmin reduces complement receptor 3-mediated phagocytosis and cellular activation, implicating a pivotal inhibitory role for stathmin in classically activated macrophages.

  7. Down syndrome individuals with Alzheimer's disease have a distinct neuroinflammatory phenotype compared to sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, Donna M; Hurban, Jennifer; Helman, Alex M; Sudduth, Tiffany L; McCarty, Katie L; Beckett, Tina L; Ferrell, Joshua C; Murphy, M Paul; Abner, Erin L; Schmitt, Frederick A; Head, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and is primarily caused by the triplication of chromosome 21. The overexpression of amyloid precursor protein gene may be sufficient to drive Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology that is observed in virtually all individuals with DS by the age of 40 years. There is relatively little information about inflammation in the DS brain and how the genetics of DS may alter inflammatory responses and modify the course of AD pathogenesis in this disorder. Using the macrophage classification system of M1, M2a, M2b, and M2c inflammatory phenotypes, we have shown that the early stages of AD are associated with a bias toward an M1 or M2a phenotype. In later stages of AD, markers of M1, M2a and M2c are elevated. We now report the inflammatory phenotype in a DS autopsy series to compare this with the progression in sporadic AD. Tissue from young DS cases (under 40 years of age, pre-AD) show a bias toward M1 and M2b states with little M2a or M2c observed. Older DS cases (over 40 with AD pathology) show a distinct bias toward an M2b phenotype. Importantly, this is distinct from sporadic AD where the M2b phenotype has been rarely, if ever observed in postmortem studies. Stimulated by immune complex activation of microglial cells and toll-like receptor activation, the M2b phenotype represents a unique neuroinflammatory state in diseased brain and may have significant implications for therapeutic intervention for persons with DS.

  8. Phenotypic differences in matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity between fibroblasts from 3 bovine muscles.

    PubMed

    Archile-Contreras, A C; Mandell, I B; Purslow, P P

    2010-12-01

    Different muscles in a beef carcass are known to respond differently to the same stimulus or animal growth pattern or both. This may complicate the search by the meat industry for production methods to render meat tender. One of the major differences between muscles in the same carcass is in the expression of intramuscular connective tissue. Current study investigates the existence of a phenotypic difference among fibroblasts from 3 bovine skeletal muscles as exemplified by the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) the main enzymes responsible for connective tissue turnover. The sensitivity of phenotypic differences to cell culture conditions (passage number, presence of growth factors from fetal serum) was also examined. Fibroblasts, the main cells responsible for the production and turnover of collagen were isolated from LM, semitendinosus (STN), and sternomandibularis (SMD) muscles from a bull calf and grown in DMEM, 10% fetal bovine serum, and 5% CO(2). Cell doubling times, survival time, resting expression, and activity of MMP and the effect of serum withdrawal in the culture media on MMP expression and activity were determined for each cell line during 15 passages. Fibroblasts isolated from the 3 muscles had different growth potentials. The shortest (P < 0.0001) cell doubling times for almost every passage were found in cells from STN muscle. Cells from the LM had a shorter (P < 0.0001) survival time in comparison with STN and SMD. Cells derived from the STN had greater values (P > 0.05) of MMP-2 activity in comparison with LM and SMD cells until passage 4. At passage 15, no activity was detected for any cell line. Serum withdrawal generally reduced MMP-2 activation but did not eliminate differences in activity between fibroblasts from the 3 muscles. These results suggest that fibroblasts from different locations are phenotypically different and may respond differently to the same growth or nutritional stimulus in vitro. This may be related to in vivo

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ modulates mast cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pei-Li; Morales, Jose L; Gonzalez, Frank J; Peters, Jeffrey M

    2017-04-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) is known to have multiple anti-inflammatory effects, typically observed in endothelial cells, macrophages, T cells and B cells. Despite the fact that mast cells are important mediators of inflammation, to date, the role of PPARβ/δ in mast cells has not been examined. Hence, the present study examined the hypothesis that PPARβ/δ modulates mast cell phenotype. Bone-marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) and peritoneal mast cells from Pparβ/δ(+/+) mice expressed higher levels of high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) compared with Pparβ/δ(-/-) mice. BMMCs from Pparβ/δ(+/+) mice also exhibited dense granules, associated with higher expression of enzymes and proteases compared with Pparβ/δ(-/-) mice. Resting BMMCs from Pparβ/δ(+/+) mice secreted lower levels of inflammatory cytokines, associated with the altered activation of phospholipase Cγ1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases compared with Pparβ/δ(-/-) mice. Moreover, the production of cytokines by mast cells induced by various stimuli was highly dependent on PPARβ/δ expression. This study demonstrates that PPARβ/δ is an important regulator of mast cell phenotype.

  10. Identification of Tumor Endothelial Cells with High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity and a Highly Angiogenic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Yasuhiro; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Iida, Junichiro; Shindoh, Masanobu; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hida, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Tumor blood vessels play an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. It has been reported that tumor endothelial cells (TECs) exhibit highly angiogenic phenotypes compared with those of normal endothelial cells (NECs). TECs show higher proliferative and migratory abilities than those NECs, together with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). Furthermore, compared with NECs, stem cell markers such as Sca-1, CD90, and multidrug resistance 1 are upregulated in TECs, suggesting that stem-like cells exist in tumor blood vessels. In this study, to reveal the biological role of stem-like TECs, we analyzed expression of the stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in TECs and characterized ALDHhigh TECs. TECs and NECs were isolated from melanoma-xenografted nude mice and normal dermis, respectively. ALDH mRNA expression and activity were higher in TECs than those in NECs. Next, ALDHhigh/low TECs were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting to compare their characteristics. Compared with ALDHlow TECs, ALDHhigh TECs formed more tubes on Matrigel-coated plates and sustained the tubular networks longer. Furthermore, VEGFR2 expression was higher in ALDHhigh TECs than that in ALDHlow TECs. In addition, ALDH was expressed in the tumor blood vessels of in vivo mouse models of melanoma and oral carcinoma, but not in normal blood vessels. These findings indicate that ALDHhigh TECs exhibit an angiogenic phenotype. Stem-like TECs may have an essential role in tumor angiogenesis. PMID:25437864

  11. M1 and M2 macrophage proteolytic and angiogenic profile analysis in atherosclerotic patients reveals a distinctive profile in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Roma-Lavisse, Charlotte; Tagzirt, Madjid; Zawadzki, Christophe; Lorenzi, Rodrigo; Vincentelli, André; Haulon, Stephan; Juthier, Francis; Rauch, Antoine; Corseaux, Delphine; Staels, Bart; Jude, Brigitte; Van Belle, Eric; Susen, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Dupont, Annabelle

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate atherosclerotic mediators' expression levels in M1 and M2 macrophages and to focus on the influence of diabetes on M1/M2 profiles. Macrophages from 36 atherosclerotic patients (19 diabetics and 17 non-diabetics) were cultured with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or IL-4 to induce M1 or M2 phenotype, respectively. The atherosclerotic mediators' expression was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that M1 and M2 macrophages differentially expressed mediators involved in proteolysis and angiogenesis processes. The proteolytic balance (matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), MMP-9/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and MMP-9/tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) ratios) was higher in M1 versus M2, whereas M2 macrophages presented higher angiogenesis properties (increased vascular endothelial growth factor/TFPI-2 and tissue factor/TFPI-2 ratios). Moreover, M1 macrophages from diabetics displayed more important proangiogenic and proteolytic activities than non-diabetics. This study reveals that M1 and M2 macrophages could differentially modulate major atherosclerosis-related pathological processes. Moreover, M1 macrophages from diabetics display a deleterious phenotype that could explain the higher plaque vulnerability observed in these subjects.

  12. Stress and host immunity amplify Mycobacterium tuberculosis phenotypic heterogeneity and induce nongrowing metabolically active forms.

    PubMed

    Manina, Giulia; Dhar, Neeraj; McKinney, John D

    2015-01-14

    Nonreplicating and metabolically quiescent bacteria are implicated in latent tuberculosis infections and relapses following "sterilizing" chemotherapy. However, evidence linking bacterial dormancy and persistence in vivo is largely inconclusive. Here we measure the single-cell dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication and ribosomal activity using quantitative time-lapse microscopy and a reporter of ribosomal RNA gene expression. Single-cell dynamics exhibit heterogeneity under standard growth conditions, which is amplified by stressful conditions such as nutrient limitation, stationary phase, intracellular replication, and growth in mouse lungs. Additionally, the lungs of chronically infected mice harbor a subpopulation of nongrowing but metabolically active bacteria, which are absent in mice lacking interferon-γ, a cytokine essential for antituberculosis immunity. These cryptic bacterial forms are prominent in mice treated with the antituberculosis drug isoniazid, suggesting a role in postchemotherapeutic relapses. Thus, amplification of bacterial phenotypic heterogeneity in response to host immunity and drug pressure may contribute to tuberculosis persistence.

  13. Retention of sedentary obese visceral white adipose tissue phenotype with intermittent physical activity despite reduced adiposity.

    PubMed

    Wainright, Katherine S; Fleming, Nicholas J; Rowles, Joe L; Welly, Rebecca J; Zidon, Terese M; Park, Young-Min; Gaines, T'Keaya L; Scroggins, Rebecca J; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K; Hasty, Alyssa H; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Padilla, Jaume

    2015-09-01

    Regular physical activity is effective in reducing visceral white adipose tissue (AT) inflammation and oxidative stress, and these changes are commonly associated with reduced adiposity. However, the impact of multiple periods of physical activity, intercalated by periods of inactivity, i.e., intermittent physical activity, on markers of AT inflammation and oxidative stress is unknown. In the present study, 5-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were randomized into three groups (n = 10/group): sedentary, regular physical activity, and intermittent physical activity, for 24 wk. All animals were singly housed and fed a diet containing 45% kcal from fat. Regularly active mice had access to voluntary running wheels throughout the study period, whereas intermittently active mice had access to running wheels for 3-wk intervals (i.e., 3 wk on/3 wk off) throughout the study. At death, regular and intermittent physical activity was associated with similar reductions in visceral AT mass (approximately -24%, P < 0.05) relative to sedentary. However, regularly, but not intermittently, active mice exhibited decreased expression of visceral AT genes related to inflammation (e.g., monocyte chemoattractant protein 1), immune cell infiltration (e.g., CD68, CD11c, F4/80, CD11b/CD18), oxidative stress (e.g., p47 phagocyte oxidase), and endoplasmic reticulum stress (e.g., CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein; all P < 0.05). Furthermore, regular, but not intermittent, physical activity was associated with a trend toward improvement in glucose tolerance (P = 0.059). Collectively, these findings suggest that intermittent physical activity over a prolonged period of time may lead to a reduction in adiposity but with retention of a sedentary obese white AT and metabolic phenotype.

  14. Antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of seven Cameroonian dietary plants against bacteria expressing MDR phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Seukep, Jackson A; Fankam, Aimé G; Djeussi, Doriane E; Voukeng, Igor K; Tankeo, Simplice B; Noumdem, Jaurès Ak; Kuete, Antoine Hln; Kuete, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality caused by bacterial infections significantly increased with resistance to commonly used antibiotics. This is partially due to the activation of efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. The present work designed to assess the in vitro antibacterial activities of seven Cameroonian dietary plants (Sesamum indicum, Sesamum radiatum, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Corchous olitorius, Cyperus esculentus, Adansonia digitata, Aframomum kayserianum), against multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria over expressing active efflux pumps. The standard phytochemical methods were used to detect the main classes of secondary metabolites in the extracts. The antibacterial activities of the studied extracts in the absence or presence of an efflux pump inhibitor (PAβN) were evaluated using liquid microbroth dilution method. The results obtained indicated that apart from the extract of C. esculentus, all other samples contained alkaloids, phenols and polyphenols meanwhile other classes of chemicals were selectively present. The studied extracts displayed antibacterial activities with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) values ranged from 64 to 1024 μg/mL on the majority of the 27 tested microbial strains. The extract of S. indicum was active against 77.77% of the tested microorganisms whilst the lowest MIC value (64 μg/mL) was recorded with that of A. kayserianum against E. aerogenes EA294. The results of the present work provide baseline information on the possible used of the tested Cameroonian dietary plants in the treatment of bacterial infections including multi-drug resistant phenotypes.

  15. IRF5 regulates lung macrophages M2 polarization during severe acute pancreatitis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kang; He, Song-Bing; Qu, Jian-Guo; Dang, Sheng-Chun; Chen, Ji-Xiang; Gong, Ai-Hua; Xie, Rong; Zhang, Jian-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) in reversing polarization of lung macrophages during severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in vitro. METHODS A mouse SAP model was established by intraperitoneal (ip) injections of 20 μg/kg body weight caerulein. Pathological changes in the lung were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Lung macrophages were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The quantity and purity of lung macrophages were detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). They were treated with IL-4/IRF5 specific siRNA (IRF5 siRNA) to reverse their polarization and were evaluated by detecting markers expression of M1/M2 using RT-PCR. RESULTS SAP associated acute lung injury (ALI) was induced successfully by ip injections of caerulein, which was confirmed by histopathology. Lung macrophages expressed high levels of IRF5 as M1 phenotype during the early acute pancreatitis stages. Reduction of IRF5 expression by IRF5 siRNA reversed the action of macrophages from M1 to M2 phenotype in vitro. The expressions of M1 markers, including IRF5 (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.013 ± 0.01 vs 0.054 ± 0.047, P < 0.01), TNF-α (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.0003 ± 0.0002 vs 0.019 ± 0.018, P < 0.001), iNOS (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.0003 ± 0.0002 vs 0.026 ± 0.018, P < 0.001) and IL-12 (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.000005 ± 0.00004 vs 0.024 ± 0.016, P < 0.001), were decreased. In contrast, the expressions of M2 markers, including IL-10 (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.060 ± 0.055 vs 0.0230 ± 0.018, P < 0.01) and Arg-1 (S + IRF5 siRNA vs S + PBS, 0.910 ± 0.788 vs 0.0036 ± 0.0025, P < 0.001), were increased. IRF5 siRNA could reverse the lung macrophage polarization more effectively than IL-4. CONCLUSION Treatment with IRF5 siRNA can reverse the pancreatitis-induced activation of lung macrophages from M1 phenotype to M2 phenotype in SAP associated with ALI. PMID:27895424

  16. Human T helper type 1 dichotomy: origin, phenotype and biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Annunziato, Francesco; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Liotta, Francesco; Maggi, Enrico; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The great variety of pathogens present in the environment has obliged the immune system to evolve different mechanisms for tailored and maximally protective responses. Initially, two major types of CD4+ T helper (Th) effector cells were identified, and named as type 1 (Th1) and type 2 (Th2) cells because of the different cytokines they produce. More recently, a third type of CD4+ Th effectors has been identified and named as Th17 cells. Th17 cells, however, have been found to exhibit high plasticity because they rapidly shift into the Th1 phenotype in the inflammatory sites. Therefore, in these sites there is usually a dichotomous mixture of classic and non-classic (Th17-derived) Th1 cells. In humans, non-classic Th1 cells express CD161, as well as the retinoic acid orphan receptor C, interleukin-17 receptor E (IL-17RE), IL-1RI, CCR6, and IL-4-induced gene 1 and Tob-1, which are all virtually absent from classic Th1 cells. The possibility to distinguish between these two cell subsets may allow the opportunity to better establish their respective pathogenic role in different chronic inflammatory disorders. In this review, we discuss the different origin, the distinctive phenotypic features and the major biological activities of classic and non-classic Th1 cells. PMID:25284714

  17. Activating mutations in RRAS underlie a phenotype within the RASopathy spectrum and contribute to leukaemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Flex, Elisabetta; Jaiswal, Mamta; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Martinelli, Simone; Strullu, Marion; Fansa, Eyad K.; Caye, Aurélie; De Luca, Alessandro; Lepri, Francesca; Dvorsky, Radovan; Pannone, Luca; Paolacci, Stefano; Zhang, Si-Cai; Fodale, Valentina; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Rossi, Cesare; Burkitt-Wright, Emma M.M.; Farrotti, Andrea; Stellacci, Emilia; Cecchetti, Serena; Ferese, Rosangela; Bottero, Lisabianca; Castro, Silvana; Fenneteau, Odile; Brethon, Benoît; Sanchez, Massimo; Roberts, Amy E.; Yntema, Helger G.; Van Der Burgt, Ineke; Cianci, Paola; Bondeson, Marie-Louise; Cristina Digilio, Maria; Zampino, Giuseppe; Kerr, Bronwyn; Aoki, Yoko; Loh, Mignon L.; Palleschi, Antonio; Di Schiavi, Elia; Carè, Alessandra; Selicorni, Angelo; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Cirstea, Ion C.; Stella, Lorenzo; Zenker, Martin; Gelb, Bruce D.; Cavé, Hélène; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2014-01-01

    RASopathies, a family of disorders characterized by cardiac defects, defective growth, facial dysmorphism, variable cognitive deficits and predisposition to certain malignancies, are caused by constitutional dysregulation of RAS signalling predominantly through the RAF/MEK/ERK (MAPK) cascade. We report on two germline mutations (p.Gly39dup and p.Val55Met) in RRAS, a gene encoding a small monomeric GTPase controlling cell adhesion, spreading and migration, underlying a rare (2 subjects among 504 individuals analysed) and variable phenotype with features partially overlapping Noonan syndrome, the most common RASopathy. We also identified somatic RRAS mutations (p.Gly39dup and p.Gln87Leu) in 2 of 110 cases of non-syndromic juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia, a childhood myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disease caused by upregulated RAS signalling, defining an atypical form of this haematological disorder rapidly progressing to acute myeloid leukaemia. Two of the three identified mutations affected known oncogenic hotspots of RAS genes and conferred variably enhanced RRAS function and stimulus-dependent MAPK activation. Expression of an RRAS mutant homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans enhanced RAS signalling and engendered protruding vulva, a phenotype previously linked to the RASopathy-causing SHOC2S2G mutant. Overall, these findings provide evidence of a functional link between RRAS and MAPK signalling and reveal an unpredicted role of enhanced RRAS function in human disease. PMID:24705357

  18. Activating mutations in RRAS underlie a phenotype within the RASopathy spectrum and contribute to leukaemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Flex, Elisabetta; Jaiswal, Mamta; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Martinelli, Simone; Strullu, Marion; Fansa, Eyad K; Caye, Aurélie; De Luca, Alessandro; Lepri, Francesca; Dvorsky, Radovan; Pannone, Luca; Paolacci, Stefano; Zhang, Si-Cai; Fodale, Valentina; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Rossi, Cesare; Burkitt-Wright, Emma M M; Farrotti, Andrea; Stellacci, Emilia; Cecchetti, Serena; Ferese, Rosangela; Bottero, Lisabianca; Castro, Silvana; Fenneteau, Odile; Brethon, Benoît; Sanchez, Massimo; Roberts, Amy E; Yntema, Helger G; Van Der Burgt, Ineke; Cianci, Paola; Bondeson, Marie-Louise; Cristina Digilio, Maria; Zampino, Giuseppe; Kerr, Bronwyn; Aoki, Yoko; Loh, Mignon L; Palleschi, Antonio; Di Schiavi, Elia; Carè, Alessandra; Selicorni, Angelo; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Cirstea, Ion C; Stella, Lorenzo; Zenker, Martin; Gelb, Bruce D; Cavé, Hélène; Ahmadian, Mohammad R; Tartaglia, Marco

    2014-08-15

    RASopathies, a family of disorders characterized by cardiac defects, defective growth, facial dysmorphism, variable cognitive deficits and predisposition to certain malignancies, are caused by constitutional dysregulation of RAS signalling predominantly through the RAF/MEK/ERK (MAPK) cascade. We report on two germline mutations (p.Gly39dup and p.Val55Met) in RRAS, a gene encoding a small monomeric GTPase controlling cell adhesion, spreading and migration, underlying a rare (2 subjects among 504 individuals analysed) and variable phenotype with features partially overlapping Noonan syndrome, the most common RASopathy. We also identified somatic RRAS mutations (p.Gly39dup and p.Gln87Leu) in 2 of 110 cases of non-syndromic juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia, a childhood myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disease caused by upregulated RAS signalling, defining an atypical form of this haematological disorder rapidly progressing to acute myeloid leukaemia. Two of the three identified mutations affected known oncogenic hotspots of RAS genes and conferred variably enhanced RRAS function and stimulus-dependent MAPK activation. Expression of an RRAS mutant homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans enhanced RAS signalling and engendered protruding vulva, a phenotype previously linked to the RASopathy-causing SHOC2(S2G) mutant. Overall, these findings provide evidence of a functional link between RRAS and MAPK signalling and reveal an unpredicted role of enhanced RRAS function in human disease.

  19. Activation of phenotypically-distinct neuronal subpopulations of the rat amygdala following exposure to predator odor.

    PubMed

    Butler, R K; Sharko, A C; Oliver, E M; Brito-Vargas, P; Kaigler, K F; Fadel, J R; Wilson, M A

    2011-02-23

    Exposure of rats to an odor of a predator can elicit an innate fear response. In addition, such exposure has been shown to activate limbic brain regions such as the amygdala. However, there is a paucity of data on the phenotypic characteristics of the activated amygdalar neurons following predator odor exposure. In the current experiments, rats were exposed to cloth which contained either ferret odor, butyric acid, or no odor for 30 min. Ferret odor-exposed rats displayed an increase in defensive burying versus control rats. Sections of the brains were prepared for dual-labeled immunohistochemistry and counts of c-Fos co-localized with Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), parvalbumin, or calbindin were made in the basolateral (BLA), central (CEA), and medial (MEA) nucleus of the amygdala. Dual-labeled immunohistochemistry showed a significant increase in the percentage of CaMKII-positive neurons also immunoreactive for c-Fos in the BLA, CEA and MEA of ferret odor-exposed rats compared to control and butyric acid-exposed groups. Further results showed a significant decrease in calbindin-immunoreactive neurons that were also c-Fos-positive in the anterior portion of the BLA of ferret odor-exposed rats compared to control and butyric acid-exposed rats, whereas the MEA expressed a significant decrease in calbindin/c-Fos dual-labeled neurons in butyric acid-exposed rats compared to controls and ferret odor-exposed groups. These results enhance our understanding of the functioning of the amygdala following exposure to predator threats by showing phenotypic characteristics of activated amygdalar neurons. With this knowledge, specific neuronal populations could be targeted to further elucidate the fundamental underpinnings of anxiety and could possibly indicate new targets for the therapeutic treatment of anxiety.

  20. Induction of protection against divergent H5N1 influenza viruses using a recombinant fusion protein linking influenza M2e to Onchocerca volvulus activation associated protein-1 (ASP-1) adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyu; Du, Lanying; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Shihui; Lin, Yongping; Chen, Min; Kou, Zhihua; He, Yuxian; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Zhou, Yusen

    2010-10-18

    Our previous studies have shown the adjuvanticity of an Onchocerca volvulus recombinant protein, Ov-ASP-1 (ASP-1), when administered in an aqueous formulation with bystander vaccine antigens or commercial vaccines. In this study, we reported a novel formulation that took advantage of the protein nature of the ASP-1 adjuvant by creating recombinant fusion protein vaccines linking the highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 protein (M2e) consensus sequence of H5N1 influenza viruses with the ASP-1 adjuvant. Two recombinant fusion proteins designated M2e-ASP-1 and M2e3-ASP-1 were studied, in which ASP-1 was fused with one or three tandem copies of the M2e antigen. Our results show that these novel recombinant influenza vaccines, particularly M2e3-ASP-1, induced strong anti-M2e-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in the established mouse model. Furthermore, M2e3-ASP-1 was able to provide significant cross-clade protection against divergent H5N1 viruses. Consequently, this study has demonstrated a potential novel vaccine formulation that could provide a complementary prophylactic strategy in preventing the threat of future influenza outbreak resulting from rapid evolution of the H5N1 virus and co-circulation of multiple antigenic variants in various regions.

  1. Recruitment and Activation of Natural Killer (Nk) Cells in Vivo Determined by the Target Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Rickard; Franksson, Lars; Une, Clas; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Öhlén, Claes; Örn, Anders; Kärre, Klas

    2000-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can spontaneously lyse certain virally infected and transformed cells. However, early in immune responses NK cells are further activated and recruited to tissue sites where they perform effector functions. This process is dependent on cytokines, but it is unclear if it is regulated by NK cell recognition of susceptible target cells. We show here that infiltration of activated NK cells into the peritoneal cavity in response to tumor cells is controlled by the tumor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I phenotype. Tumor cells lacking appropriate MHC class I expression induced NK cell infiltration, cytotoxic activation, and induction of transcription of interferon γ in NK cells. The induction of these responses was inhibited by restoration of tumor cell MHC class I expression. The NK cells responding to MHC class I–deficient tumor cells were ∼10 times as active as endogenous NK cells on a per cell basis. Although these effector cells showed a typical NK specificity in that they preferentially killed MHC class I–deficient cells, this specificity was even more distinct during induction of the intraperitoneal response. Observations are discussed in relation to a possible adaptive component of the NK response, i.e., recruitment/activation in response to challenges that only NK cells are able to neutralize. PMID:10620611

  2. M2A and M2C Macrophage Subsets Ameliorate Inflammation and Fibroproliferation in Acute Lung Injury Through Interleukin 10 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lunxian; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Chunmei; Li, Hongqiang; Zhang, Qian; Bai, Jianwen

    2016-12-09

    The role of M2 macrophages in the resolution and fibroproliferation of acute lung injury (ALI) is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of two M2 macrophage subtypes, M2a induced by interleukin (IL)-4/IL-13 and M2c induced by IL-10/transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, on the pathogenesis of ALI. M2a and M2c were adoptively transferred into LPS-induced ALI mice model. Data showed that Vybrant-labeled macrophages appeared in the lungs of ALI mice. Subsequently, we observed that both subsets significantly reduced lung inflammation and injury including a reduction of neutrophil influx into the lung and an augmentation of apoptosis. Interestingly, M2c macrophages more effectively suppressed indices of lung injury than M2a macrophages. M2c macrophages were also more effective than M2a in reduction of lung fibrosis. In addition, we found that M2c but not M2a macrophages increased IL-10 level in lung tissues of the recipient ALI mice partially mediated by activating the JAK1/STAT3/SOCS3 signaling pathway. After blocking IL-10, these superior effects of M2c over M2a were abolished. These data imply that M2c are more potent than M2a macrophages in protecting against lung injury and subsequent fibrosis due to their ability to produce IL-10. Therefore, reprogramming macrophages to M2c subset may be a novel treatment modality with transitional potential.

  3. Soluble NKG2D ligand promotes MDSC expansion and skews macrophage to the alternatively activated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Gang; Wang, Xuanjun; Sheng, Jun; Lu, Shengjun; Yu, Xuezhong; Wu, Jennifer D

    2015-02-20

    Expression of surface NKG2D ligand MIC on tumor cells is deemed to stimulate NK and co-stimulate CD8 T cell anti-tumor immunity. Human cancer cells however frequently adopt a proteinase-mediated shedding strategy to generate soluble MIC (sMIC) to circumvent host immunity. High levels of sMIC have been shown to correlate with advanced disease stages in cancer patients. The underlying mechanism is currently understood as systemic downregulation of NKG2D expression on CD8 T and NK cells and perturbing NK cell periphery maintenance. Herein we report a novel mechanism by which sMIC poses immune suppressive effect on host immunity and tumor microenvironment. We demonstrate that sMIC facilitates expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and skews macrophages to the more immune suppressive alternative phenotype through activation of STAT3. These findings further endorse that sMIC is an important therapeutic target for cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Antimicrobial Activity of Gallium Protoporphyrin IX against Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Displaying Different Antibiotic Resistance Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Arivett, Brock A.; Fiester, Steven E.; Ohneck, Emily J.; Penwell, William F.; Kaufman, Cynthia M.; Relich, Ryan F.

    2015-01-01

    A paucity of effective, currently available antibiotics and a lull in antibiotic development pose significant challenges for treatment of patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies must be evaluated to meet the demands of treatment of these often life-threatening infections. Accordingly, we examined the antibiotic activity of gallium protoporphyrin IX (Ga-PPIX) against a collection of A. baumannii strains, including nonmilitary and military strains and strains representing different clonal lineages and isolates classified as susceptible or MDR. Susceptibility testing demonstrated that Ga-PPIX inhibits the growth of all tested strains when cultured in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth, with a MIC of 20 μg/ml. This concentration significantly reduced bacterial viability, while 40 μg/ml killed all cells of the A. baumannii ATCC 19606T and ACICU MDR isolate after 24-h incubation. Recovery of ATCC 19606T and ACICU strains from infected A549 human alveolar epithelial monolayers was also decreased when the medium was supplemented with Ga-PPIX, particularly at a 40-μg/ml concentration. Similarly, the coinjection of bacteria with Ga-PPIX increased the survival of Galleria mellonella larvae infected with ATCC 19606T or ACICU. Ga-PPIX was cytotoxic only when monolayers or larvae were exposed to concentrations 16-fold and 1,250-fold higher than those showing antibacterial activity, respectively. These results indicate that Ga-PPIX could be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of recalcitrant A. baumannii infections regardless of the resistance phenotype, clone lineage, time and site of isolation of strains causing these infections and their iron uptake phenotypes or the iron content of the media. PMID:26416873

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Gallium Protoporphyrin IX against Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Displaying Different Antibiotic Resistance Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Arivett, Brock A; Fiester, Steven E; Ohneck, Emily J; Penwell, William F; Kaufman, Cynthia M; Relich, Ryan F; Actis, Luis A

    2015-12-01

    A paucity of effective, currently available antibiotics and a lull in antibiotic development pose significant challenges for treatment of patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies must be evaluated to meet the demands of treatment of these often life-threatening infections. Accordingly, we examined the antibiotic activity of gallium protoporphyrin IX (Ga-PPIX) against a collection of A. baumannii strains, including nonmilitary and military strains and strains representing different clonal lineages and isolates classified as susceptible or MDR. Susceptibility testing demonstrated that Ga-PPIX inhibits the growth of all tested strains when cultured in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth, with a MIC of 20 μg/ml. This concentration significantly reduced bacterial viability, while 40 μg/ml killed all cells of the A. baumannii ATCC 19606(T) and ACICU MDR isolate after 24-h incubation. Recovery of ATCC 19606(T) and ACICU strains from infected A549 human alveolar epithelial monolayers was also decreased when the medium was supplemented with Ga-PPIX, particularly at a 40-μg/ml concentration. Similarly, the coinjection of bacteria with Ga-PPIX increased the survival of Galleria mellonella larvae infected with ATCC 19606(T) or ACICU. Ga-PPIX was cytotoxic only when monolayers or larvae were exposed to concentrations 16-fold and 1,250-fold higher than those showing antibacterial activity, respectively. These results indicate that Ga-PPIX could be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of recalcitrant A. baumannii infections regardless of the resistance phenotype, clone lineage, time and site of isolation of strains causing these infections and their iron uptake phenotypes or the iron content of the media.

  6. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  7. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  8. Molecular Imaging of Activated von Willebrand Factor to Detect High-Risk Atherosclerotic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Owen J. T.; Conley, Robert B.; Shentu, Weihui; Tormoen, Garth W.; Zha, Daogang; Xie, Aris; Qi, Yue; Zhao, Yan; Carr, Chad; Belcik, Todd; Keene, Douglas R.; de Groot, Philip G.; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We hypothesized that noninvasive molecular imaging of activated von Willebrand factor (vWF) on the vascular endothelium could be used to detect a high-risk atherosclerotic phenotype. BACKGROUND Platelet-endothelial interactions have been linked to increased inflammatory activation and prothrombotic state in atherosclerosis. These interactions are mediated, in part, by platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, suggesting that dysregulated endothelial vWF is a marker for high-risk atherosclerotic disease. METHODS Microbubbles targeted to activated vWF were prepared by surface conjugation of recombinant GPIbα. Flow-chamber studies were used to evaluate attachment of targeted microbubbles to immobile platelet aggregates bearing activated vWF. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) molecular imaging of the aorta from mice was performed: 1) ex vivo after focal crush injury and blood perfusion; and 2) in vivo in mice with advanced atherosclerosis produced by deletion of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and ApoBec-1 editing peptide (LDLR−/−/ApoBec-1−/−). RESULTS In flow-chamber studies, tracer attachment to vWF was >10-fold greater for microbubbles bearing GPIbα compared with control microbubbles (p < 0.01). In the ex vivo aortic injury model, CEU signal enhancement for vWF-targeted microbubbles occurred primarily at the injury site and was 4-fold greater than at noninjured sites (p < 0.05). In LDLR−/−/ApoBec-1−/− mice, inflammatory cell infiltrates and dense vWF expression on the intact endothelium were seen in regions of severe plaque formation. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated widespread platelet-endothelial interaction and only few sites of endothelial erosion. On CEU, signal enhancement for vWF-targeted microbubbles was approximately 4-fold greater (p < 0.05) in LDLR−/−/ApoBec-1−/− compared with wild-type mice. En face aortic microscopy demonstrated regions where platelet adhesion and microbubble attachment colocalized. CONCLUSIONS

  9. Present and Future of M2M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Satoru; Watanabe, Takashi

    In recent years, the rapid progress in the development of hardware and software technologies enables tiny and low cost information devices hereinafter referred to as Machine to be widely available. M2M (Machine to Machine) has been of much attention where many tiny machines are connected to each other through networks with minimal human intervention to provide smooth and intelligent management. M2M is a promising core technology providing timely, flexible, efficient and comprehensive service at low cost. M2M has wide variety of applications including energy management system, environmental monitoring system, intelligent transport system, industrial automation system and other applications. M2M consists of terminals and networks that connect them. In this paper, we mainly focus on M2M networking and mention the future direction of the technology.

  10. Understanding Laser Beam Quality Beyond M2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soskind, Y. G.; Soskind, M. G.

    2016-09-01

    The laser beam M2 quality parameter is based on the second moments' theory, as defined by ISO standards, and provides a common approach for defining the propagation characteristics of laser beams as a whole. At the same time, the M2 parameter fails to quantitatively distinguish the quality of laser beams with different spatial characteristics. For example, several laser beams with very different spatial profiles may have the same M2 value. To overcome this ambiguity, a different beam quality criterion is introduced, allowing for a quantitative definition of both the structured laser beam shape and its propagation characteristics. This criterion, called the encircled power M2 (EPM2), bridges the gap between the M2 quality parameter and the structured laser beam shape. Based on several examples we demonstrate the utility of EPM2 as applied to characterization of several structured laser beam types.

  11. Renal tubular epithelium-targeted peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ maintains the epithelial phenotype and antagonizes renal fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Guixia; Xu, Ying; Bai, Mi; Zhang, Yue; Jia, Zhanjun; Huang, Songming; Zhang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that loss of the renal tubular epithelial phenotype plays an important role in the pathogenesis of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Systemic activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) has been shown to be protective against renal fibrosis, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. The present study aimed to define the role of renal tubular epithelium-targeted PPAR-γ in protection of the epithelial phenotype and the antagonism of renal fibrosis and to define the underlying mechanisms. In response to TGF-β1 challenge, PPAR-γ expression and activity in the renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTECs) were significantly reduced, and the reduction was accompanied by decreased E-cadherin and elevated α-SMA, indicating a loss of the epithelial phenotype. Oxidative stress induced by TGF-β1 was shown to be attributed to the alteration of the epithelial phenotype and PPAR-γ inhibition. Activation of PPAR-γ by its agonists of rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2 or genetic overexpression of PPAR-γ prevented the loss of the epithelial phenotype induced by TGF-β1 in line with the inhibition of oxidative stress. To explore the role of PPAR-γ in renal tubular epithelial in antagonizing fibrogenesis, PPAR-γ was specifically deleted from RPTECs in mice. Following unilateral ureteral obstruction, the fibrosis was markedly deteriorated in mice with PPAR-γ invalidation in RPTECs. Treatment with rosiglitazone attenuated tubulointerstitial fibrosis and epithelial phenotype transition in WT but not proximal tubule PPAR-γ KO mice. Taken together, these findings identified an important role of renal tubular epithelium-targeted PPAR-γ in maintaining the normal epithelial phenotype and opposing fibrogenesis, possibly via antagonizing oxidative stress. PMID:27602490

  12. Macrophages in T cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma strongly express metal-binding proteins and show a bi-activated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sylvia; Tousseyn, Thomas; Döring, Claudia; Flüchter, Patricia; Hackstein, Holger; Herreman, An; Ponzoni, Maurilio; de Wolf-Peeters, Chris; Facchetti, Fabio; Gascoyne, Randy D; Küppers, Ralf; Steidl, Christian; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2013-12-01

    Abundant macrophage infiltration in tumors often correlates with a poor prognosis. T cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma (THRLBCL) is a distinct aggressive B cell lymphoma entity showing a high macrophage content. To further elucidate the role of tumor-associated macrophages in THRLBCL, we performed gene expression profiling of microdissected histiocyte subsets of THRLBCL, nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL), Piringer lymphadenitis, sarcoidosis, nonspecific lymphadenitis and monocytes from peripheral blood. In a supervised principal component analysis, histiocytes from THRLBCL were most closely related to epithelioid cells from NLPHL, with both types of cells expressing genes related to proinflammatory and regulatory macrophage activity. Moreover, histiocytes from THRLBCL strongly expressed metal-binding proteins like MT2A, by which histiocytes of THRLBCL can be distinguished from the other histiocyte subsets investigated. Interestingly, the validation at the protein level showed a strong expression of TXN, CXCL9, MT2A and SOD2 not only in macrophages of THRLBCL but also in the tumor cells of NLPHL and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Overall, the present findings indicate that macrophages in the microenvironment of THRLBCL have acquired a distinct gene expression pattern that is characterized by a mixed M1/M2 phenotype and a strong expression of several metal binding proteins. The microenvironments in NLPHL and THRLBCL appear to have a similar influence on the macrophage phenotype. The high expression of metal binding proteins in histiocytes of THRLBCL may be diagnostically useful, but a potential pathophysiological role remains to be identified.

  13. Phenotypic plasticity of cyanogenesis in lima bean Phaseolus lunatus-activity and activation of beta-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Ballhorn, Daniel J; Heil, Martin; Lieberei, Reinhard

    2006-02-01

    Cyanogenesis, the release of toxic HCN from damaged plant tissues, is generally considered as a constitutive plant defense. We found phenotypic plasticity of cyanogenesis in young leaves of lima bean Phaseolus lunatus based on increased activity of the beta-glucosidase in response to herbivore attack. Two aspects of plant cyanogenesis have to be considered in ecological analyses: (1) the cyanogenic potential (HCNp), which indicates the total amount of cyanide-containing compounds present in a given tissue, and (2) the cyanogenic capacity (HCNc), representing the release of HCN per unit time. This release is catalyzed by specific beta-glucosidases, whose activity is a crucial parameter determining overall toxicity. Enzymatic activity of beta-glucosidase-and, in consequence, the rate of HCN release-was increased significantly after 72 hr of incubation with spider mites as compared to non-infested leaves. Feeding by L1 larvae of Mexican bean beetles also led to enhanced enzymatic activity, whereas mechanical damage of leaf tissue had no effect on beta-glucosidase activity and the release of HCN. The results place plant cyanogenesis in the group of induced resistance traits, whose degree of activity depends on the feeding by a particular herbivore.

  14. Magnetic resonance image features identify glioblastoma phenotypic subtypes with distinct molecular pathway activities

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Haruka; Achrol, Achal S.; Mitchell, Lex A.; Loya, Joshua J.; Liu, Tiffany; Westbroek, Erick M.; Feroze, Abdullah H.; Rodriguez, Scott; Echegaray, Sebastian; Azad, Tej D.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Gevaert, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly lethal primary malignant brain tumor in adults. There is a dire need for easily accessible, noninvasive biomarkers that can delineate underlying molecular activities and predict response to therapy. To this end, we sought to identify subtypes of GBM, differentiated solely by quantitative MR imaging features, that could be used for better management of GBM patients. Quantitative image features capturing the shape, texture, and edge sharpness of each lesion were extracted from MR images of 121 patients with de novo, solitary, unilateral GBM. Three distinct phenotypic “clusters” emerged in the development cohort using consensus clustering with 10,000 iterations on these image features. These three clusters—pre-multifocal, spherical, and rim-enhancing, names reflecting their image features—were validated in an independent cohort consisting of 144 multi-institution patients with similar tumor characteristics from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Each cluster mapped to a unique set of molecular signaling pathways using pathway activity estimates derived from analysis of TCGA tumor copy number and gene expression data with the PARADIGM algorithm. Distinct pathways, such as c-Kit and FOXA, were enriched in each cluster, indicating differential molecular activities as determined by image features. Each cluster also demonstrated differential probabilities of survival, indicating prognostic importance. Our imaging method offers a noninvasive approach to stratify GBM patients and also provides unique sets of molecular signatures to inform targeted therapy and personalized treatment of GBM. PMID:26333934

  15. Circumventing furin enhances factor VIII biological activity and ameliorates bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia models

    PubMed Central

    Siner, Joshua I.; Samelson-Jones, Benjamin J.; Crudele, Julie M.; French, Robert A.; Lee, Benjamin J.; Zhou, Shanzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth; Raymer, Robin; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Processing by the proprotein convertase furin is believed to be critical for the biological activity of multiple proteins involved in hemostasis, including coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). This belief prompted the retention of the furin recognition motif (amino acids 1645–1648) in the design of B-domain–deleted FVIII (FVIII-BDD) products in current clinical use and in the drug development pipeline, as well as in experimental FVIII gene therapy strategies. Here, we report that processing by furin is in fact deleterious to FVIII-BDD secretion and procoagulant activity. Inhibition of furin increases the secretion and decreases the intracellular retention of FVIII-BDD protein in mammalian cells. Our new variant (FVIII-ΔF), in which this recognition motif is removed, efficiently circumvents furin. FVIII-ΔF demonstrates increased recombinant protein yields, enhanced clotting activity, and higher circulating FVIII levels after adeno-associated viral vector–based liver gene therapy in a murine model of severe hemophilia A (HA) compared with FVIII-BDD. Moreover, we observed an amelioration of the bleeding phenotype in severe HA dogs with sustained therapeutic FVIII levels after FVIII-ΔF gene therapy at a lower vector dose than previously employed in this model. The immunogenicity of FVIII-ΔF did not differ from that of FVIII-BDD as a protein or a gene therapeutic. Thus, contrary to previous suppositions, FVIII variants that can avoid furin processing are likely to have enhanced translational potential for HA therapy. PMID:27734034

  16. Substance P Induces HO-1 Expression in RAW 264.7 Cells Promoting Switch towards M2-Like Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Montana, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is a neuropeptide that mediates many physiological as well as inflammatory responses. Recently, SP has been implicated in the resolution of inflammation through induction of M2 macrophages phenotype. The shift between M1-like and M2-like, allowing the resolution of inflammatory processes, also takes place by means of hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 is induced in response to oxidative stress and inflammatory stimuli and modulates the immune response through macrophages polarisation. SP induces HO-1 expression in human periodontal ligament (PDL), the latter potentially plays a role in cytoprotection. We demonstrated that SP promotes M2-like phenotype from resting as well as from M1 macrophages. Indeed, SP triggers the production of interleukine-10 (IL-10), interleukine-4 (IL-4) and arginase-1 (Arg1) without nitric oxide (NO) generation. In addition, SP increases HO-1 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Here we report that SP, without affecting cell viability, significantly reduces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukine-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and ameliorates migration and phagocytic properties in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. M2-like conversion required retention of NF-κB p65 into the cytoplasm and HO-1 induced expression. Silencing of the HO-1 mRNA expression reversed the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines in RAW 264.7 stimulated by LPS and down-regulated anti-inflammatory hallmarks of M2 phenotype. In conclusion, our data show that SP treatment might be associated with anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells by suppressing NF-κB activation and inducing HO-1 expression. PMID:27907187

  17. TIR-Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Interferon-β (TRIF) Is Essential for MPTP-Induced Dopaminergic Neuroprotection via Microglial Cell M1/M2 Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Minghui; Lin, Sen; Li, Shurong; Du, Yuchen; Zhao, Haixia; Hong, Huarong; Yang, Ming; Yang, Xi; Wu, Yongmei; Ren, Liyi; Peng, Jiali; Sun, Jing; Zhou, Hongli; Su, Bingyin

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic changes of two phenotypes of microglia, M1 and M2, are critically associated with the neurodegeneration of Parkinson's disease. However, the regulation of the M1/M2 paradigm is still unclear. In the MPTP induced neurodegeneration model, we examined the concentration of dopamine (DA) related metabolites and the survival of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells in WT and Trif −/− mice. In in vitro experiments, MN9D cells were co-cultured with BV2 cells to mimic the animal experiments. Inhibition of TRIF aggravated TH+ cell loss, and DA-related metabolites decreased. TRIF inhibition was able to interrupt the microglial M1/M2 dynamic transformation. More BV2 cells were activated and migrated across the membrane of transwell plates by siTRIF treatment. Also, TRIF interruption inhibits the transformation of BV2 cells from the M1 to M2 phenotype which played a beneficial role in neuronal degenerative processes, and increased MN9D apoptosis. Moreover, MPP+ treatment decreases the (DAT) dopamine transporter and TH synthesis by MN9D. Taken together, the current results suggest that TRIF plays a key switch function in contributing to the microglial M1/M2 phenotype dynamic transformation. The interruption of TRIF may decrease the survival of MN9D cells as well as DAT and TH protein production. The current study sheds some light on the PD mechanism research by innate inflammation regulation. PMID:28275337

  18. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity selects for the holoclone phenotype in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, R.E.; Haywood-Small, S.L.; Sisley, K.; Cross, N.A.

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated ALDH{sup Hi} PC3 cells preferentially form primitive holoclone-type colonies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primitive holoclone colonies are predominantly ALDH{sup Lo} but contain rare ALDH{sup Hi} cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Holoclone-forming cells are not restricted to the ALDH{sup Hi} population. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH phenotypic plasticity occurs in PC3 cells (ALDH{sup Lo} to ALDH{sup Hi} and vice versa). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH{sup Hi} cells are observed but very rare in PC3 spheroids grown in stem cell medium. -- Abstract: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH) activity is considered to be a marker of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in many tumour models, since these cells are more proliferative and tumourigenic than ALDH{sup Lo} cells in experimental models. However it is unclear whether all CSC-like cells are within the ALDH{sup Hi} population, or whether all ALDH{sup Hi} cells are highly proliferative and tumourigenic. The ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in vitro, whereby sub-populations of cells have differing proliferative and differentiation capacities, is an alternate indication of the presence of stem cell-like populations within cell lines. In this study, we have examined the interaction between ALDH status and the ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in PC3 prostate cancer cells. We demonstrate that PC3 cells contain a stem cell hierarchy, and isolation of ALDH{sup Hi} cells enriches for the most primitive holoclone population, however holoclone formation is not restricted to ALDH{sup Hi} cells. In addition, we show that ALDH activity undergoes phenotypic plasticity, since the ALDH{sup Lo} population can develop ALDH{sup Hi} populations comparable to parental cells within 2 weeks in culture. Furthermore, we show that the majority of ALDH{sup Hi} cells are found within the least primitive paraclone population, which is circumvented by culturing PC3 cells as spheroids in

  19. Infant nerve injury induces delayed microglial polarization to the M1 phenotype, and exercise reduces delayed neuropathic pain by modulating microglial activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingrui; Chen, Yongmei; Fu, Bao; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Mazhong

    2017-02-27

    Neuropathic pain is absent in infants and emergent years after injury. Adult spinal cord microglia play a key role in initiating neuropathic pain, and modulation of microglia is a potential target for treating neuropathic pain. In this study, we evaluated the role of microglia after infant peripheral nerve injury and the effect of exercise on the delayed-onset neuropathic pain. Rat pups received spared nerve injury, and behavior tests were performed to evaluate their pain threshold. qPCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot were used for M1 and M2 marker expression analysis. In contrast to the microglial polarization to the M1 phenotype observed in the adult spinal cord, in infant nerve injury, microglial polarization immediately shifted to the M2 phenotype. In adolescence, microglia polarized to the M1 phenotype, which was concomitant with the emergence of neuropathic pain. Exercise shifted spinal cord microglia polarization to the M2 phenotype and reduced neuropathic pain. In addition, IL-10 increased and TNF-α decreased after exercise, and intrathecal injection of the IL-10 antibody reduced the exercise-induced analgesia. Our study found that infant nerve injury induced delayed spinal cord microglia polarization to the M1 phenotype and that exercise was effective in the treatment of delayed adolescent neuropathic pain via the modulation of microglial polarization.

  20. Bone marrow adipocytes promote the Warburg phenotype in metastatic prostate tumors via HIF-1α activation

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Jonathan D.; Rajagurubandara, Erandi; Herroon, Mackenzie K.; Mahapatra, Gargi; Hüttemann, Maik; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation is increasingly recognized as a key factor in tumor progression, yet its involvement in metastatic bone disease is not understood. Bone is as an adipocyte-rich organ, and a major site of metastasis from prostate cancer. Bone marrow adipocytes are metabolically active cells capable of shaping tumor metabolism via lipolysis and lipid transfer. In this study, using in vitro and in vivo models of marrow adiposity, we demonstrate that marrow fat cells promote Warburg phenotype in metastatic prostate cancer cells. We show increased expression of glycolytic enzymes, increased lactate production, and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in tumor cells exposed to adipocytes that require paracrine signaling between the two cell types. We also reveal that prostate cancer cells are capable of inducing adipocyte lipolysis as a postulated mechanism of sustenance. We provide evidence that adipocytes drive metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells via oxygen-independent mechanism of HIF-1α activation that can be reversed by HIF-1α downregulation. Importantly, we also demonstrate that the observed metabolic signature in tumor cells exposed to adipocytes mimics the expression patterns seen in patients with metastatic disease. Together, our data provide evidence for a functional relationship between marrow adipocytes and tumor cells in bone that has likely implications for tumor growth and survival within the metastatic niche. PMID:27588494

  1. Microglial phenotype is regulated by activity of the transcription factor, NFAT

    PubMed Central

    Nagamoto-Combs, Kumi

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor family, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), regulates immune cell phenotype. Four different calcium/calmodulin-regulated isoforms have been identified in the periphery, but isoform expression in microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, has not been fully defined. In this study microglial NFAT isoform expression and involvement in regulating inflammatory responses in murine primary microglia culture was examined. Western blot analysis demonstrated robust detection of NFATc1 and c2 isoforms in microglia. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated increased NFAT-DNA binding from nuclear extracts of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated microglia. Moreover, LPS-stimulated microglia behaved similarly to T cell receptor agonist antibody-stimulated Jurkat cells demonstrating a transient increase in NFAT-driven luciferase reporter gene expression. LPS-induced NFAT-luciferase activity in microglia was attenuated by pretreatment with tat-VIVIT, a cell-permeable NFAT inhibitory peptide. Furthermore, LPS-mediated secretion of microglial cytokines, TNF-α and MCP-1, was decreased by treatment with tat-VIVIT but not with tat-VEET, a negative control peptide. These results demonstrate that NFAT plays a role in regulating proinflammatory responses in cultured murine microglia. PMID:20631193

  2. Unprimed, M1 and M2 Macrophages Differentially Interact with Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Lenzo, Jason C.; Fong, Shao B.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis. Tissue macrophages are amongst the first immune cells to respond to bacteria and depending on the cytokine profile at the infection site, macrophages are primed to react to infection in different ways. Priming of naive macrophages with IFN-γ produces a classical pro-inflammatory, antibacterial M1 macrophage after TLR ligation, whereas priming with IL-4 induces an anti-inflammatory tissue-repair M2 phenotype. Previous work has shown that M1 are preferentially generated in gingival tissue following infection with P. gingivalis. However, few studies have investigated the interactions of macrophage subsets with P. gingivalis cells. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of naive, M1 and M2 macrophages to phagocytose P. gingivalis and investigate how this interaction affects both the bacterial cell and the macrophage. M1 and M2 macrophages were both found to have enhanced phagocytic capacity compared with that of naive macrophages, however only the naive and M1 macrophages were able to produce a respiratory burst in order to clear the bacteria from the phagosome. P. gingivalis was found to persist in naive and M2, but not M1 macrophages for 24 hours. Phagocytosis of P. gingivalis also induced high levels of TNF-α, IL-12 and iNOS in M1 macrophages, but not in naive or M2 macrophages. Furthermore, infection of macrophages with P. gingivalis at high bacteria to macrophage ratios, while inducing an inflammatory response, was also found to be deleterious to macrophage longevity, with high levels of apoptotic cell death found in macrophages after infection. The activation of M1 macrophages observed in this study may contribute to the initiation and maintenance of a pro-inflammatory state during chronic periodontitis. PMID:27383471

  3. Mitsubishi A6M2 'Zero'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Mitsubishi A6M2 'Zero': Captured at Akutan Island, Alaska, in August 1942, this Mitsubishi A6M2 fighter was the first 'Zero' to fall intact into Allied hands during WW II. After limited flying on the West Coast, the 'Zero' arrived at Langley for installation of test equipment prior to in-depth flight testing by the Navy at Patuxent River, Maryland.

  4. Genetic contributions to circadian activity rhythm and sleep pattern phenotypes in pedigrees segregating for severe bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Lucia; St Clair, Patricia A; Teshiba, Terri M; Service, Susan K; Fears, Scott C; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Ramirez, Margarita; Castrillón, Gabriel; Gomez-Makhinson, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C; Montoya, Gabriel; Montoya, Claudia P; Aldana, Ileana; Navarro, Linda; Freimer, Daniel G; Safaie, Brian; Keung, Lap-Woon; Greenspan, Kiefer; Chou, Katty; Escobar, Javier I; Ospina-Duque, Jorge; Kremeyer, Barbara; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Cantor, Rita M; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I; Sabatti, Chiara; Bearden, Carrie E; Takahashi, Joseph S; Freimer, Nelson B

    2016-02-09

    Abnormalities in sleep and circadian rhythms are central features of bipolar disorder (BP), often persisting between episodes. We report here, to our knowledge, the first systematic analysis of circadian rhythm activity in pedigrees segregating severe BP (BP-I). By analyzing actigraphy data obtained from members of 26 Costa Rican and Colombian pedigrees [136 euthymic (i.e., interepisode) BP-I individuals and 422 non-BP-I relatives], we delineated 73 phenotypes, of which 49 demonstrated significant heritability and 13 showed significant trait-like association with BP-I. All BP-I-associated traits related to activity level, with BP-I individuals consistently demonstrating lower activity levels than their non-BP-I relatives. We analyzed all 49 heritable phenotypes using genetic linkage analysis, with special emphasis on phenotypes judged to have the strongest impact on the biology underlying BP. We identified a locus for interdaily stability of activity, at a threshold exceeding genome-wide significance, on chromosome 12pter, a region that also showed pleiotropic linkage to two additional activity phenotypes.

  5. Genetic contributions to circadian activity rhythm and sleep pattern phenotypes in pedigrees segregating for severe bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Lucia; St. Clair, Patricia A.; Teshiba, Terri M.; Service, Susan K.; Fears, Scott C.; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Ramirez, Margarita; Castrillón, Gabriel; Gomez-Makhinson, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C.; Montoya, Gabriel; Montoya, Claudia P.; Aldana, Ileana; Navarro, Linda; Freimer, Daniel G.; Safaie, Brian; Keung, Lap-Woon; Greenspan, Kiefer; Chou, Katty; Escobar, Javier I.; Ospina-Duque, Jorge; Kremeyer, Barbara; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Cantor, Rita M.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I.; Sabatti, Chiara; Bearden, Carrie E.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Freimer, Nelson B.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in sleep and circadian rhythms are central features of bipolar disorder (BP), often persisting between episodes. We report here, to our knowledge, the first systematic analysis of circadian rhythm activity in pedigrees segregating severe BP (BP-I). By analyzing actigraphy data obtained from members of 26 Costa Rican and Colombian pedigrees [136 euthymic (i.e., interepisode) BP-I individuals and 422 non–BP-I relatives], we delineated 73 phenotypes, of which 49 demonstrated significant heritability and 13 showed significant trait-like association with BP-I. All BP-I–associated traits related to activity level, with BP-I individuals consistently demonstrating lower activity levels than their non–BP-I relatives. We analyzed all 49 heritable phenotypes using genetic linkage analysis, with special emphasis on phenotypes judged to have the strongest impact on the biology underlying BP. We identified a locus for interdaily stability of activity, at a threshold exceeding genome-wide significance, on chromosome 12pter, a region that also showed pleiotropic linkage to two additional activity phenotypes. PMID:26712028

  6. Cells transformed by murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) release compounds with transforming and transformed phenotype suppressing activity resembling growth factors.

    PubMed

    Šupolíková, M; Staňová, A Vojs; Kúdelová, M; Marák, J; Zelník, V; Golais, F

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the medium of three cell lines transformed with murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) in vitro and in vivo, 68/HDF, 68/NIH3T3, and S11E, for the presence of compounds resembling growth factors of some herpesviruses which have displayed transforming and transformed phenotype suppressing activity in normal and tumor cells. When any of spent medium was added to cell culture we observed the onset of transformed phenotype in baby hamster kidney cells (BHK-21) cells and transformed phenotype suppressing activity in tumor human epithelial cells (HeLa). In media tested, we have identified the presence of putative growth factor related to MHV-68 (MHGF-68). Its bivalent properties have been blocked entirely by antisera against MHV-68 and two monoclonal antibodies against glycoprotein B (gB) of MHV-68 suggesting viral origin of MHGF-68. The results of initial efforts to separate MHGF-68 on FPLC Sephadex G15 column in the absence of salts revealed the loss of its transforming activity but transformed phenotype suppressing activity retained. On the other hand, the use of methanol-water mobile phase on RP-HPLC C18 column allowed separation of MHGF-68 to two compounds. Both separated fractions, had only the transforming activity to normal cells. Further experiments exploring the nature and the structure of hitherto unknown MHGF-68 are now in the progress to characterize its molecular and biological properties.

  7. A model of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jöhren, Kirstin; Höltje, Hans-Dieter

    2002-11-01

    The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor belongs to the family of rhodopsin like G-Protein Coupled Receptors. This subtype of muscarinic receptors is of special interest because it bears, aside from an orthosteric binding site, also an allosteric binding site. Based on the X-ray structure of bovine rhodopsin a complete homology model of the human M2 receptor was developed. For the orthosteric binding site point mutations and binding studies with different agonists and antagonists are available. This knowledge was utilized for an initial verification of the M2 model. Allosteric modulation of activity is mediated by structurally different ligands such as gallamine, caracurine V salts or W84 (a hexamethonium-derivative). Caracurine V derivatives with different affinities to M2 were docked using GRID-fields. Subsequent molecular dynamics simulations yielded different binding energies based on diverse electrostatic and lipophilic interactions. The calculated affinities are in good agreement to experimentally determined affinities.

  8. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-04-20

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. Systemic and Cardiac Depletion of M2 Macrophage through CSF-1R Signaling Inhibition Alters Cardiac Function Post Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Leblond, Anne-Laure; Klinkert, Kerstin; Martin, Kenneth; Turner, Elizebeth C; Kumar, Arun H; Browne, Tara; Caplice, Noel M

    2015-01-01

    The heart hosts tissue resident macrophages which are capable of modulating cardiac inflammation and function by multiple mechanisms. At present, the consequences of phenotypic diversity in macrophages in the heart are incompletely understood. The contribution of cardiac M2-polarized macrophages to the resolution of inflammation and repair response following myocardial infarction remains to be fully defined. In this study, the role of M2 macrophages was investigated utilising a specific CSF-1 receptor signalling inhibition strategy to achieve their depletion. In mice, oral administration of GW2580, a CSF-1R kinase inhibitor, induced significant decreases in Gr1lo and F4/80hi monocyte populations in the circulation and the spleen. GW2580 administration also induced a significant depletion of M2 macrophages in the heart after 1 week treatment as well as a reduction of cardiac arginase1 and CD206 gene expression indicative of M2 macrophage activity. In a murine myocardial infarction model, reduced M2 macrophage content was associated with increased M1-related gene expression (IL-6 and IL-1β), and decreased M2-related gene expression (Arginase1 and CD206) in the heart of GW2580-treated animals versus vehicle-treated controls. M2 depletion was also associated with a loss in left ventricular contractile function, infarct enlargement, decreased collagen staining and increased inflammatory cell infiltration into the infarct zone, specifically neutrophils and M1 macrophages. Taken together, these data indicate that CSF-1R signalling is critical for maintaining cardiac tissue resident M2-polarized macrophage population, which is required for the resolution of inflammation post myocardial infarction and, in turn, for preservation of ventricular function.

  10. Wound administration of M2-polarized macrophages does not improve murine cutaneous healing responses.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Nadine; Roumans, Nadia; Gijbels, Marion J; Romano, Andrea; Post, Mark J; de Winther, Menno P J; van der Hulst, Rene R W J; Xanthoulea, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in all stages of cutaneous wound healing responses and dysregulation of macrophage function can result in derailed wound repair. The phenotype of macrophages is influenced by the wound microenvironment and evolves during healing from a more pro-inflammatory (M1) profile in early stages, to a less inflammatory pro-healing (M2) phenotype in later stages of repair. The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential of exogenous administration of M2 macrophages to promote wound healing in an experimental mouse model of cutaneous injury. Bone marrow derived macrophages were stimulated in-vitro with IL-4 or IL-10 to obtain two different subsets of M2-polarized cells, M2a or M2c respectively. Polarized macrophages were injected into full-thickness excisional skin wounds of either C57BL/6 or diabetic db/db mice. Control groups were injected with non-polarized (M0) macrophages or saline. Our data indicate that despite M2 macrophages exhibit an anti-inflammatory phenotype in-vitro, they do not improve wound closure in wild type mice while they delay healing in diabetic mice. Examination of wounds on day 15 post-injury indicated delayed re-epithelialization and persistence of neutrophils in M2 macrophage treated diabetic wounds. Therefore, topical application of ex-vivo generated M2 macrophages is not beneficial and contraindicated for cell therapy of skin wounds.

  11. Parthenolide Relieves Pain and Promotes M2 Microglia/Macrophage Polarization in Rat Model of Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Kolosowska, Natalia; Piotrowska, Anna; Makuch, Wioletta; Rojewska, Ewelina; Jurga, Agnieszka M; Pilat, Dominika; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain treatment remains a challenge because pathomechanism is not fully understood. It is believed that glial activation and increased spinal nociceptive factors are crucial for neuropathy. We investigated the effect of parthenolide (PTL) on the chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve (CCI)-induced neuropathy in rat. We analyzed spinal changes in glial markers and M1 and M2 polarization factors, as well as intracellular signaling pathways. PTL (5 µg; i.t.) was preemptively and then daily administered for 7 days after CCI. PTL attenuated the allodynia and hyperalgesia and increased the protein level of IBA1 (a microglial/macrophage marker) but did not change GFAP (an astrocyte marker) on day 7 after CCI. PTL reduced the protein level of M1 (IL-1β, IL-18, and iNOS) and enhanced M2 (IL-10, TIMP1) factors. In addition, it downregulated the phosphorylated form of NF-κB, p38MAPK, and ERK1/2 protein level and upregulated STAT3. In primary microglial cell culture we have shown that IL-1β, IL-18, iNOS, IL-6, IL-10, and TIMP1 are of microglial origin. Summing up, PTL directly or indirectly attenuates neuropathy symptoms and promotes M2 microglia/macrophages polarization. We suggest that neuropathic pain therapies should be shifted from blanketed microglia/macrophage suppression toward maintenance of the balance between neuroprotective and neurotoxic microglia/macrophage phenotypes.

  12. Parthenolide Relieves Pain and Promotes M2 Microglia/Macrophage Polarization in Rat Model of Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Kolosowska, Natalia; Makuch, Wioletta; Rojewska, Ewelina; Jurga, Agnieszka M.; Pilat, Dominika

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain treatment remains a challenge because pathomechanism is not fully understood. It is believed that glial activation and increased spinal nociceptive factors are crucial for neuropathy. We investigated the effect of parthenolide (PTL) on the chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve (CCI)-induced neuropathy in rat. We analyzed spinal changes in glial markers and M1 and M2 polarization factors, as well as intracellular signaling pathways. PTL (5 µg; i.t.) was preemptively and then daily administered for 7 days after CCI. PTL attenuated the allodynia and hyperalgesia and increased the protein level of IBA1 (a microglial/macrophage marker) but did not change GFAP (an astrocyte marker) on day 7 after CCI. PTL reduced the protein level of M1 (IL-1β, IL-18, and iNOS) and enhanced M2 (IL-10, TIMP1) factors. In addition, it downregulated the phosphorylated form of NF-κB, p38MAPK, and ERK1/2 protein level and upregulated STAT3. In primary microglial cell culture we have shown that IL-1β, IL-18, iNOS, IL-6, IL-10, and TIMP1 are of microglial origin. Summing up, PTL directly or indirectly attenuates neuropathy symptoms and promotes M2 microglia/macrophages polarization. We suggest that neuropathic pain therapies should be shifted from blanketed microglia/macrophage suppression toward maintenance of the balance between neuroprotective and neurotoxic microglia/macrophage phenotypes. PMID:26090236

  13. Differential S1P Receptor Profiles on M1- and M2-Polarized Macrophages Affect Macrophage Cytokine Production and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jan; von Bernstorff, Wolfram; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Macrophages are key players in complex biological processes. In response to environmental signals, macrophages undergo polarization towards a proinflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lysophospholipid that acts via 5 G-protein coupled receptors (S1P1–5) in order to influence a broad spectrum of biological processes. This study assesses S1P receptor expression on macrophages before and after M1 and M2 polarization and performs a comparative analysis of S1P signalling in the two activational states of macrophages. Methods. Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) from C57 BL/6 mice were cultured under either M1- or M2-polarizing conditions. S1P-receptor expression was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Influence of S1P on macrophage activation, migration, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion was assessed in vitro. Results. All 5 S1P receptor subclasses were expressed in macrophages. Culture under both M1- and M2-polarizing conditions led to significant downregulation of S1P1. In contrast, M1-polarized macrophages significantly downregulated S1P4. The expression of the remaining three S1P receptors did not change. S1P increased expression of iNOS under M2-polarizing conditions. Furthermore, S1P induced chemotaxis in M1 macrophages and changed cytokine production in M2 macrophages. Phagocytosis was not affected by S1P-signalling. Discussion. The expression of different specific S1P receptor profiles may provide a possibility to selectively influence M1- or M2-polarized macrophages. PMID:28367448

  14. Spreading depression requires microglia and is decreased by their M2a polarization from environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Kae M; Pusic, Aya D; Kemme, Jordan; Kraig, Richard P

    2014-07-01

    Microglia play an important role in fine-tuning neuronal activity. In part, this involves their production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), which increases neuronal excitability. Excessive synaptic activity is necessary to initiate spreading depression (SD). Increased microglial production of proinflammatory cytokines promotes initiation of SD, which, when recurrent, may play a role in conversion of episodic to high frequency and chronic migraine. Previous work shows that this potentiation of SD occurs through increased microglial production of TNFα and reactive oxygen species, both of which are associated with an M1-skewed microglial population. Hence, we explored the role of microglia and their M1 polarization in SD initiation. Selective ablation of microglia from rat hippocampal slice cultures confirmed that microglia are essential for initiation of SD. Application of minocycline to dampen M1 signaling led to increased SD threshold. In addition, we found that SD threshold was increased in rats exposed to environmental enrichment. These rats had increased neocortical levels of interleukin-11 (IL-11), which decreases TNFα signaling and polarized microglia to an M2a-dominant phenotype. M2a microglia reduce proinflammatory signaling and increase production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and therefore may protect against SD. Nasal administration of IL-11 to mimic effects of environmental enrichment likewise increased M2a polarization and increased SD threshold, an effect also seen in vitro. Similarly, application of conditioned medium from M2a polarized primary microglia to slice cultures also increased SD threshold. Thus, microglia and their polarization state play an essential role in SD initiation, and perhaps by extension migraine with aura and migraine.

  15. Nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) oncoprotein induces the T regulatory cell phenotype by activating STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzycka, Monika; Marzec, Michal; Liu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Qian; Wasik, Mariusz A.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms of malignant cell transformation mediated by the oncogenic, chimeric nucleophosmin/anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM/ALK) tyrosine kinase remain only partially understood. Here we report that the NPM/ALK-carrying T cell lymphoma (ALK+TCL) cells secrete IL-10 and TGF-β and express FoxP3, indicating their T regulatory (Treg) cell phenotype. The secreted IL-10 suppresses proliferation of normal immune, CD3/CD28-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and enhances viability of the ALK+TCL cells. The Treg phenotype of the affected cells is strictly dependent on NPM/ALK expression and function as demonstrated by transfection of the kinase into BaF3 cells and inhibition of its enzymatic activity and expression in ALK+TCL cells. NPM/ALK, in turn, induces the phenotype through activation of its key signal transmitter, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). These findings identify a mechanism of NPM/ALK-mediated oncogenesis based on induction of the Treg phenotype of the transformed CD4+ T cells. These results also provide an additional rationale to therapeutically target the chimeric kinase and/or STAT3 in ALK+TCL. PMID:16766651

  16. Activity of single-agent melphalan 220-300 mg/m2 with amifostine cytoprotection and autologous hematopoietic stem cell support in non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Phillips, G L; Meisenberg, B R; Reece, D E; Adams, V R; Badros, A Z; Brunner, J L; Fenton, R G; Filicko, J; Grosso, D L; Hale, G A; Howard, D S; Johnson, V P; Kniska, A; Marshall, K W; Mookerjee, B; Nath, R; Rapoport, A P; Sarkodee-Adoo, C; Takebe, N; Vesole, D H; Wagner, J L; Flomenberg, N

    2004-04-01

    High-dose chemotherapy using melphalan (HDMEL) is an important component of many conditioning regimens that are given before autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). In contrast to the situation in myeloma, and to a lesser degree acute leukemia, only a very limited published experience exists with the use of HDMEL conditioning as a single agent in doses requiring AHSCT for lymphoma, both Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Thus, we report results of treating 26 lymphoma patients (22 with NHL and four with HL) with HDMEL 220-300 mg/m(2) plus amifostine (AF) cytoprotection and AHSCT as part of a phase I-II trial. Median age was 51 years (range 24-62 years); NHL histology was varied, but was aggressive (including transformed from indolent) in 19 patients, indolent in two patients and mantle cell in one. All 26 patients had been extensively treated; 11 were refractory to the immediate prior therapy on protocol entry and two had undergone prior AHSCT. All were deemed ineligible for other, 'first-line' AHSCT regimens. Of these 26 patients, 22 survived to initial tumor evaluation on D +100. At this time, 13 were in complete remission, including four patients who were in second CR before HDMEL+AF+AHSCT. Responses occurred at all HDMEL doses. Currently, seven patients are alive, including five without progression, with a median follow-up in these latter patients of D +1163 (range D +824 to D +1630); one of these patients had a nonmyeloablative allograft as consolidation on D +106. Conversely, 14 patients relapsed or progressed, including five who had previously achieved CR with the AHSCT procedure. Two patients, both with HL, remain alive after progression; one is in CR following salvage radiotherapy. Six patients died due to nonrelapse causes, including two NHL patients who died while in CR. We conclude that HDMEL+AF+AHSCT has significant single-agent activity in relapsed or refractory NHL and HL. This experience may be used

  17. Revisiting the endocytosis of the m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Ockenga, Wymke; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2015-05-12

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles.

  18. Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ockenga, Wymke; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2015-01-01

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles. PMID:25985102

  19. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow, high above Rogers Dry Lake near the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. R. Dale Reed effectively advocated the project with the support of NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Together, they gained the support of Flight Research Center Director Paul Bikle. After a six-month feasibility study, Bikle gave approval in the fall of 1962 for the M2-F1 to be built. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Flight Research Center management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA's Ames and Langley research centers--the M2-F2 and the HL

  20. All Trans Retinoic Acid, Transforming Growth Factor β and Prostaglandin E2 in Mouse Plasma Synergize with Basophil-Secreted Interleukin-4 to M2 Polarize Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Elisia, Ingrid; Lam, Vivian; Hsu, Brian E.; Lai, June; Luk, Beryl; Samudio, Ismael; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    In previous studies we found that macrophages (MФs) from SH2-containing inositol-5′-phosphatase (SHIP) deficient mice are M2 polarized while their wild type (WT) counterparts are M1 polarized and that this difference in MФ phenotype can be recapitulated during in vitro derivation from bone marrow if mouse plasma (MP), but not fetal calf serum, is added to standard M-CSF-containing cultures. In the current study we investigated the mechanism by which MP skews SHIP-/- but not +/+ MФs to an M2 phenotype. Our results suggest that SHIP-/- basophils constitutively secrete higher levels of IL-4 than SHIP+/+ basophils and this higher level of IL-4 is sufficient to skew both SHIP+/+ and SHIP-/- MФs to an M2 phenotype, but only when MP is present to increase the sensitivity of the MФs to this level of IL-4. MP increases the IL-4 sensitivity of both SHIP+/+ and -/- MФs not by increasing cell surface IL-4 or CD36 receptor levels, but by triggering the activation of Erk and Akt and the production of ROS, all of which play a critical role in sensitizing MФs to IL-4-induced M2 skewing. Studies to identify the factor(s) in MP responsible for promoting IL-4-induced M2 skewing suggests that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), TGFβ and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) all play a role. Taken together, these results indicate that basophil-secreted IL-4 plays an essential role in M2 skewing and that ATRA, TGFβ and PGE2 within MP collaborate to dramatically promote M2 skewing by acting directly on MФs to increase their sensitivity to IL-4. PMID:27977740

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Higashimura, Yasuki

    2014-12-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting enzymatic step of heme degradation and produces carbon monoxide, free iron, and biliverdin. HO-1, a stress-inducible protein, is induced by various oxidative and inflammatory signals. Consequently, HO-1 expression has been regarded as an adaptive cellular response against inflammatory response and oxidative injury. Although several transcriptional factors and signaling cascades are involved in HO-1 regulation, the two main pathways of Nrf2/Bach1 system and IL-10/HO-1 axis exist in monocyte/macrophage. Macrophages are broadly divisible into two groups: pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. More recently, several novel macrophage subsets have been identified including Mhem, Mox, and M4 macrophages. Of these, M2 macrophages, Mhem, and Mox are HO-1 highly expressing macrophages. HO-1 has been recognized as having major immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, which have been demonstrated in HO-1 deficient mice and human cases of genetic HO-1 deficiency. However, the mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory actions of HO-1 remains poorly defined. This review specifically addresses macrophage polarization. The present current evidence indicates that HO-1 induction mediated by multiple pathways can drive the phenotypic shift to M2 macrophages and suggests that HO-1 induction in macrophages is a potential therapeutic approach to immunomodulation in widely diverse human diseases.

  2. M2-F1 simulator cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This early simulator of the M2-F1 lifting body was used for pilot training, to test landing techniques before the first ground tow attempts, and to test new control configurations after the first tow attempts and wind-tunnel tests. The M2-F1 simulator was limited in some ways by its analog simulator. It had only limited visual display for the pilot, as well. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne

  3. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow by an unseen C-47 at the NASA Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The low-cost vehicle was the first piloted lifting body to be test flown. The lifting-body concept originated in the mid-1950s at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Mountain View California. By February 1962, a series of possible shapes had been developed, and R. Dale Reed was working to gain support for a research vehicle. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at

  4. TNFα enhances cancer stem cell-like phenotype via Notch-Hes1 activation in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hee; Hong, Hannah S; Liu, Zi Xiao; Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Park, No-Hee; Shin, Ki-Hyuk

    2012-07-20

    Cancer stem-like cell (CSC; also known as tumor initiating cell) is defined as a small subpopulation of cancer cells within a tumor and isolated from various primary tumors and cancer cell lines. CSCs are highly tumorigenic and resistant to anticancer treatments. In this study, we found that prolonged exposure to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), a major proinflammatory cytokine, enhances CSC phenotype of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells, such as an increase in tumor sphere-forming ability, stem cell-associated genes expression, chemo-radioresistance, and tumorigenicity. Moreover, activation of Notch1 signaling was detected in the TNFα-exposed cells, and suppression of Notch1 signaling inhibited CSC phenotype. Furthermore, we demonstrated that inhibition of a Notch downstream target, Hes1, led to suppression of CSC phenotype in the TNFα-exposed cells. We also found that Hes1 expression is commonly upregulated in OSCC lesions compared to precancerous dysplastic lesions, suggesting the possible involvement of Hes1 in OSCC progression and CSC in vivo. In conclusion, inflammatory cytokine exposure may enhance CSC phenotype of OSCC, in part by activating the Notch-Hes1 pathway.

  5. Behavioral Phenotype of Fmr1 Knock-Out Mice during Active Phase in an Altered Light/Dark Cycle.

    PubMed

    Saré, R Michelle; Levine, Merlin; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and is a disorder that is also highly associated with autism. FXS occurs as a result of an expanded CGG repeat sequence leading to transcriptional silencing. In an animal model of FXS in which Fmr1 is knocked out (Fmr1 KO), many physical, physiological, and behavioral characteristics of the human disease are recapitulated. Prior characterization of the mouse model was conducted during the day, the inactive phase of the circadian cycle. Circadian rhythms are an important contributor to behavior and may play a role in the study of disease phenotype. Moreover, changes in the parameters of circadian rhythm are known to occur in FXS animal models. We conducted an investigation of key behavioral phenotypes in Fmr1 KO mice during their active phase. We report that phase did not alter the Fmr1 KO phenotype in open field activity, anxiety, and learning and memory. There was a slight effect of phase on social behavior as measured by time in chamber, but not by time spent sniffing. Our data strengthen the existing data characterizing the phenotype of Fmr1 KO mice, indicating that it is independent of circadian phase.

  6. M1 and m2 muscarinic receptor subtypes regulate antidepressant-like effects of the rapidly acting antidepressant scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J M; Overshiner, C; Li, X; Catlow, J T; Wishart, G N; Schober, D A; Heinz, B A; Nikolayev, A; Tolstikov, V V; Anderson, W H; Higgs, R E; Kuo, M-S; Felder, C C

    2014-11-01

    Scopolamine produces rapid and significant symptom improvement in patients with depression, and most notably in patients who do not respond to current antidepressant treatments. Scopolamine is a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, and it is not known which one or more of the five receptor subtypes in the muscarinic family are mediating these therapeutic effects. We used the mouse forced-swim test, an antidepressant detecting assay, in wild-type and transgenic mice in which each muscarinic receptor subtype had been genetically deleted to define the relevant receptor subtypes. Only the M1 and M2 knockout (KO) mice had a blunted response to scopolamine in the forced-swim assay. In contrast, the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine were not significantly altered by gene deletion of any of the five muscarinic receptors. The muscarinic antagonists biperiden, pirenzepine, and VU0255035 (N-[3-oxo-3-[4-(4-pyridinyl)-1-piper azinyl]propyl]-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4-sulfonamide) with selectivity for M1 over M2 receptors also demonstrated activity in the forced-swim test, which was attenuated in M1 but not M2 receptor KO mice. An antagonist with selectivity of M2 over M1 receptors (SCH226206 [(2-amino-3-methyl-phenyl)-[4-[4-[[4-(3 chlorophenyl)sulfonylphenyl]methyl]-1-piperidyl]-1-piperidyl]methanone]) was also active in the forced-swim assay, and the effects were deleted in M2 (-/-) mice. Brain exposure and locomotor activity in the KO mice demonstrated that these behavioral effects of scopolamine are pharmacodynamic in nature. These data establish muscarinic M1 and M2 receptors as sufficient to generate behavioral effects consistent with an antidepressant phenotype and therefore as potential targets in the antidepressant effects of scopolamine.

  7. Discrete functions of M2a and M2c macrophage subsets determine their relative efficacy in treating chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junyu; Cao, Qi; Zheng, Dong; Sun, Yan; Wang, Changqi; Yu, Xiao; Wang, Ya; Lee, Vincent W S; Zheng, Guoping; Tan, Thian K; Wang, Xin; Alexander, Stephen I; Harris, David C H; Wang, Yiping

    2013-10-01

    Two types of alternatively activated macrophages, M(2a) induced by IL-4/IL-13 and M(2c) by IL-10/TGF-β, exhibit anti-inflammatory functions in vitro and protect against renal injury in vivo. Since their relative therapeutic efficacy is unclear, we compared the effects of these two macrophage subsets in murine adriamycin nephrosis. Both subsets significantly reduced renal inflammation and renal injury; however, M(2c) macrophages more effectively reduced glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, interstitial expansion, and proteinuria than M(2a) macrophages. The M(2c) macrophages were also more effective than M(2a) in reduction of macrophage and CD4(+) T-cell infiltration in kidney. Moreover, nephrotic mice treated with M(2c) had a greater reduction in renal fibrosis than those treated with M(2a). M(2c) but not M(2a) macrophages induced regulatory T cells (Tregs) from CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells in vitro, and increased Treg numbers in local draining lymph nodes of nephrotic mice. To determine whether the greater protection with M(2c) was due to their capability to induce Tregs, the Tregs were depleted by PC61 antibody in nephrotic mice treated with M(2a) or M(2c). Treg depletion diminished the superior effects of M(2c) compared to M(2a) in protection against renal injury, inflammatory infiltrates, and renal fibrosis. Thus, M(2c) are more potent than M(2a) macrophages in protecting against renal injury due to their ability to induce Tregs.

  8. TLR4 and DC-SIGN receptors recognized Mycobacterium scrofulaceum promoting semi-activated phenotype on bone marrow dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Aguilar, Marisa; Castillo-Rodal, Antonia I; Schcolnik-Cabrera, Alejandro; Bonifaz, Laura C; Molina, Gabriela; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2016-07-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are recognized as emerging pathogens and their immune regulatory mechanisms are not well described yet. From them, Mycobacterium avium is known to be a weak activator of dendritic cells (DCs) that impairs the response induced by BCG vaccine. However, whether other NTM such as Mycobacterium scrofulaceum may modulate the activation of DCs, has not been extensively studied. Here, we exposed bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) to M. scrofulaceum and we analyzed the effect on the activation of DCs. We found that M. scrofulaceum has a comparable ability to induce a semi-mature DC phenotype, which was produced by its interaction with DC-SIGN and TLR4 receptors in a synergic effect. BMDCs exposed to M. scrofulaceum showed high expression of PD-L2 and production of IL-10, as well as low levels of co-stimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition to immunophenotype induced on DCs, changes in morphology, re-organization of cytoskeleton and decreased migratory capacity are consistent with a semi-mature phenotype. However, unlike other pathogenic mycobacteria, the DC-semi-mature phenotype induced by M. scrofulaceum was reversed after re-exposure to BCG, suggesting that modulation mechanisms of DC-activation used by M. scrofulaceum are different to other known pathogenic mycobacteria. This is the first report about the immunophenotypic characterization of DC stimulated by M. scrofulaceum.

  9. What is $$\\Delta m^2_{ee}$$ ?

    DOE PAGES

    Parke, Stephen

    2016-03-09

    Here, the current short baseline reactor experiments, Daya Bay and RENO (Double Chooz) have measured (or are capable of measuring) an effective Δm2 associated with the atmospheric oscillation scale of 0.5 km/MeV in electron antineutrino disappearance. In this paper, I compare and contrast the different definitions of such an effective Δm2 and argue that the simple, L/E independent definition given by Δmee2≡cos2θ12Δm312+sin2θ12Δm322, i.e. “the νe weighted average of Δm312 and Δm322,” is superior to all other definitions and is useful for both short baseline experiments mentioned above and for the future medium baseline experiments JUNO and RENO-50.

  10. Role for Microglia in Sex Differences after ischemic stroke: Importance of M2

    PubMed Central

    Bodhankar, Sheetal; Lapato, Andrew; Chen, Yingxin; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Saugstad, Julie A.; Offner, Halina

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. This process depends, in part, upon proinflammatory factors released by activated resident central nervous system (CNS) microglia (MG). Previous studies demonstrated that transfer of IL-10+ B-cells reduced infarct volumes in male C57BL/6J recipient mice when given 24 h prior to or therapeutically at 4 h or 24 h after experimental stroke induced by 60 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The present study assesses possible sex differences in immunoregulation by IL-10+ B-cells on primary male vs. female MG cultured from naïve and ischemic stroke-induced mice. Thus, MG cultures were treated with recombinant (r)IL-10, rIL-4 or IL-10+ B-cells after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation and evaluated by flow cytometry for production of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors. We found that IL-10+ B-cells significantly reduced MG production of TNF-α, IL-1β and CCL3 post-MCAO and increased their expression of the anti-inflammatory M2 marker, CD206, by cell-cell interactions. Moreover, MG from female vs. male mice had higher expression of IL-4 and IL-10 receptors and increased production of IL-4, especially after treatment with IL-10+ B-cells. These findings indicate that IL-10-producing B-cells play a crucial role in regulating MG activation, proinflammatory cytokine release and M2 phenotype induction, post-MCAO, with heightened sensitivity of female MG to IL-4 and IL-10. This study, coupled with our previous demonstration of increased numbers of transferred IL-10+ B-cells in the ischemic hemisphere, provide a mechanistic basis for local regulation by secreted IL-10 and IL-4 as well as direct B-cell/MG interactions that promote M2+-MG. PMID:26246072

  11. Foxa2 acts as a co-activator potentiating expression of the Nurr1-induced DA phenotype via epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sang-Hoon; He, Xi-Biao; Rhee, Yong-Hee; Park, Chang-Hwan; Takizawa, Takumi; Nakashima, Kinichi; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2014-02-01

    Understanding how dopamine (DA) phenotypes are acquired in midbrain DA (mDA) neuron development is important for bioassays and cell replacement therapy for mDA neuron-associated disorders. Here, we demonstrate a feed-forward mechanism of mDA neuron development involving Nurr1 and Foxa2. Nurr1 acts as a transcription factor for DA phenotype gene expression. However, Nurr1-mediated DA gene expression was inactivated by forming a protein complex with CoREST, and then recruiting histone deacetylase 1 (Hdac1), an enzyme catalyzing histone deacetylation, to DA gene promoters. Co-expression of Nurr1 and Foxa2 was established in mDA neuron precursor cells by a positive cross-regulatory loop. In the presence of Foxa2, the Nurr1-CoREST interaction was diminished (by competitive formation of the Nurr1-Foxa2 activator complex), and CoREST-Hdac1 proteins were less enriched in DA gene promoters. Consequently, histone 3 acetylation (H3Ac), which is responsible for open chromatin structures, was strikingly increased at DA phenotype gene promoters. These data establish the interplay of Nurr1 and Foxa2 as the crucial determinant for DA phenotype acquisition during mDA neuron development.

  12. Human placental glucose dehydrogenase: IEF polymorphism in two Italian populations and enzyme activity in the six common phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Scacchi, R; Corbo, R M; Calzolari, E; Laconi, G; Palmarino, R; Lucarelli, P

    1985-01-01

    Glucose dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) has been assayed qualitatively and quantitatively in more than 600 human placentae collected in two Italian populations. The gene frequencies for GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3 were, respectively, 0.66, 0.21 and 0.12 in Continental Italy and 0.65, 0.23 and 0.12 in Sardinia. Among the six common phenotypes there was no difference in catalytic activity.

  13. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This 25-second clip shows Milt Thompson being towed in the M2-F1 behind a C-47 aircraft. The M2-F1 lifting body, dubbed the 'flying bathtub' by the media, was the precursor of a remarkable series of wingless flying vehicles that contributed data used in the Space Shuttles, the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator for the next century's Reusable Launch Vehicle, and the X-38 Technology Demonstrator for crew return from the International Space Station. Based on the ideas and basic design of Alfred J. Eggers and others at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (now the Ames Research Center), Mountain View, California, in the mid-1950's, the M2-F1 was built in 1962-63 over a four-month period for a cost of only about $30,000, plus an additional $8,000-$10,000 for an ejection seat. Engineers and technicians at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden) kept costs low by designing and fabricating it partly in-house, with the plywood shell constructed by a local sailplane builder. Someone at the time estimated that it would have cost a major aircraft company $150,000 to build the same vehicle. Unlike the later lifting bodies, the M2-F1 was unpowered and was initially towed by a souped-up Pontiac convertible until it was airborne. Later a C-47 took over the towing duties. Flown by such famous research pilots as Milt Thompson, Bruce Peterson, Chuck Yeager, and Bill Dana, the lightweight flying bathtub demonstrated that a wingless vehicle shaped for reentry into the Earth's atmosphere from space could be flown and landed safely. Flown from 1963 to 1966, the lightweight M2-F1 paved the way for the heavyweight M2-F2, M2-F3, HL-10, X-24A, and X-24B lifting bodies that flew under rocket power after launch from a B-52 mothership. The heavyweights flew from 1966 to 1975, demonstrating the viability and versatility of the wingless configuration and the ability of a vehicle with low lift-over-drag characteristics to fly to high altitudes and then to land precisely with their rocket

  14. Lipid-laden cells differentially distributed in the aging brain are functionally active and correspond to distinct phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Shimabukuro, Marilia Kimie; Langhi, Larissa Gutman Paranhos; Cordeiro, Ingrid; Brito, José M; Batista, Claudia Maria de Castro; Mattson, Mark P; Mello Coelho, Valeria de

    2016-03-31

    We characterized cerebral Oil Red O-positive lipid-laden cells (LLC) of aging mice evaluating their distribution, morphology, density, functional activities and inflammatory phenotype. We identified LLC in meningeal, cortical and neurogenic brain regions. The density of cerebral LLC increased with age. LLC presenting small lipid droplets were visualized adjacent to blood vessels or deeper in the brain cortical and striatal parenchyma of aging mice. LLC with larger droplets were asymmetrically distributed in the cerebral ventricle walls, mainly located in the lateral wall. We also found that LLC in the subventricular region co-expressed beclin-1 or LC3, markers for autophagosome or autophagolysosome formation, and perilipin (PLIN), a lipid droplet-associated protein, suggesting lipophagic activity. Some cerebral LLC exhibited β galactosidase activity indicating a senescence phenotype. Moreover, we detected production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in cortical PLIN(+) LLC. Some cortical NeuN(+) neurons, GFAP(+) glia limitans astrocytes, Iba-1(+) microglia and S100β(+) ependymal cells expressed PLIN in the aging brain. Our findings suggest that cerebral LLC exhibit distinct cellular phenotypes and may participate in the age-associated neuroinflammatory processes.

  15. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) mutations and their allelic linkage in unrelated caucasian individuals: Correlation with phenotypic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cascorbi, I.; Drakoulis, N.; Brockmoeller, J.

    1995-09-01

    The polymorphic arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2; EC2.3.1.5) is supposed to be a susceptibility factor for several drug side effects and certain malignancies. A group of 844 unrelated German subjects was genotyped for their acetylation type, and 563 of them were also phenotyped. Seven mutations of the NAT2 gene were evaluated by allele-specific PCR (mutation 341C to T) and PCR-RFLP for mutations at nt positions 191, 282, 481, 590, 803, and 857. From the mutation pattern eight different alleles, including the wild type coding for rapid acetylation and seven alleles coding for slow phenotype, were determined. Four hundred ninety-seven subjects had a genotype of slow acetylation (58.9%; 95% confidence limits 55.5%-62.2%). Phenotypic acetylation capacity was expressed as the ratio of 5-acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil and 1-methylxanthine in urine after caffeine intake. Some 6.7% of the cases deviated in genotype and phenotype, but sequencing DNA of these probands revealed no new mutations. Furthermore, linkage pattern of the mutations was always confirmed, as tested in 533 subjects. In vivo acetylation capacity of homozygous wild-type subjects (NAT2{sup *}4/{sup *}4) was significantly higher than in heterozygous genotypes (P = .001). All mutant alleles showed low in vivo acetylation capacities, including the previously not-yet-defined alleles {sup *}5A, {sup *}5C, and {sup *}13. Moreover, distinct slow genotypes differed significantly among each other, as reflected in lower acetylation capacity of {sup *}6A, {sup *}7B, and {sup *}13 alleles than the group of {sup *}5 alleles. The study demonstrated differential phenotypic activity of various NAT2 genes and gives a solid basis for clinical and molecular-epidemiological investigations. 34 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Pseudoexon activation increases phenotype severity in a Becker muscular dystrophy patient

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Kane; Mizzi, Kayla; Rice, Emily; Kuster, Lukas; Barrero, Roberto A; Bellgard, Matthew I; Lynch, Bryan J; Foley, Aileen Reghan; O Rathallaigh, Eoin; Wilton, Steve D; Fletcher, Sue

    2015-01-01

    We report a dystrophinopathy patient with an in-frame deletion of DMD exons 45–47, and therefore a genetic diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy, who presented with a more severe than expected phenotype. Analysis of the patient DMD mRNA revealed an 82 bp pseudoexon, derived from intron 44, that disrupts the reading frame and is expected to yield a nonfunctional dystrophin. Since the sequence of the pseudoexon and canonical splice sites does not differ from the reference sequence, we concluded that the genomic rearrangement promoted recognition of the pseudoexon, causing a severe dystrophic phenotype. We characterized the deletion breakpoints and identified motifs that might influence selection of the pseudoexon. We concluded that the donor splice site was strengthened by juxtaposition of intron 47, and loss of intron 44 silencer elements, normally located downstream of the pseudoexon donor splice site, further enhanced pseudoexon selection and inclusion in the DMD transcript in this patient. PMID:26247048

  17. Pseudoexon activation increases phenotype severity in a Becker muscular dystrophy patient.

    PubMed

    Greer, Kane; Mizzi, Kayla; Rice, Emily; Kuster, Lukas; Barrero, Roberto A; Bellgard, Matthew I; Lynch, Bryan J; Foley, Aileen Reghan; O Rathallaigh, Eoin; Wilton, Steve D; Fletcher, Sue

    2015-07-01

    We report a dystrophinopathy patient with an in-frame deletion of DMD exons 45-47, and therefore a genetic diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy, who presented with a more severe than expected phenotype. Analysis of the patient DMD mRNA revealed an 82 bp pseudoexon, derived from intron 44, that disrupts the reading frame and is expected to yield a nonfunctional dystrophin. Since the sequence of the pseudoexon and canonical splice sites does not differ from the reference sequence, we concluded that the genomic rearrangement promoted recognition of the pseudoexon, causing a severe dystrophic phenotype. We characterized the deletion breakpoints and identified motifs that might influence selection of the pseudoexon. We concluded that the donor splice site was strengthened by juxtaposition of intron 47, and loss of intron 44 silencer elements, normally located downstream of the pseudoexon donor splice site, further enhanced pseudoexon selection and inclusion in the DMD transcript in this patient.

  18. Phase II enzyme-inducing and antioxidant activities of beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extracts from phenotypes of different pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Wettasinghe, Mahinda; Bolling, Bradley; Plhak, Leslie; Xiao, Hang; Parkin, Kirk

    2002-11-06

    Free-radical scavenging, reducing, and phase II enzyme-inducing activities of aqueous and 5% aqueous ethanol extracts of freeze-dried root tissue of four beet (Beta vulgaris L.) strains (red, white, orange, and high-pigment (red) phenotypes) were determined. Aqueous and ethanolic tissue extracts of the regular and high-pigment red phenotypes were most capable of inhibiting metmyoglobin/H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of 2-2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)-mediated bleaching of beta-carotene. These same extracts were also most efficient at reducing ABTS radical cation and inducing quinone reductase in murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells in vitro.

  19. White to brown fat phenotypic switch induced by genetic and environmental activation of a hypothalamic-adipocyte axis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lei; Choi, Eugene Y.; Liu, Xianglan; Martin, Adam; Wang, Chuansong; Xu, Xiaohua; During, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Living in an enriched environment with complex physical and social stimulation leads to improved cognitive and metabolic health. In white fat, enrichment induced the upregulation of the brown fat cell fate determining gene Prdm16, brown fat specific markers, and genes involved in thermogenesis and β-adrenergic signaling. Moreover, pockets of cells with prototypical brown fat morphology and high UCP1 levels were observed in the white fat of enriched mice associated with resistance to diet-induced obesity. Hypothalamic overexpression of BDNF reproduced the enrichment-associated activation of the brown fat gene program and lean phenotype. Inhibition of BDNF signaling by genetic knockout or dominant negative trkB reversed this phenotype. Our genetic and pharmacologic data suggest a mechanism whereby induction of hypothalamic BDNF expression in response to environmental stimuli leads to selective sympathoneural modulation of white fat to induce “browning” and increased energy dissipation. PMID:21907139

  20. LOSA-M2 aerosol Raman lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Balin, Yu S; Bairashin, G S; Kokhanenko, G P; Penner, I E; Samoilova, S V

    2011-10-31

    The scanning LOSA-M2 aerosol Raman lidar, which is aimed at probing atmosphere at wavelengths of 532 and 1064 nm, is described. The backscattered light is received simultaneously in two regimes: analogue and photon-counting. Along with the signals of elastic light scattering at the initial wavelengths, a 607-nm Raman signal from molecular nitrogen is also recorded. It is shown that the height range of atmosphere probing can be expanded from the near-Earth layer to stratosphere using two (near- and far-field) receiving telescopes, and analogue and photon-counting lidar signals can be combined into one signal. Examples of natural measurements of aerosol stratification in atmosphere along vertical and horizontal paths during the expeditions to the Gobi Desert (Mongolia) and Lake Baikal areas are presented.

  1. Macrophages Undergo M1-to-M2 Transition in Adipose Tissue Regeneration in a Rat Tissue Engineering Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijin; Xu, Fangfang; Wang, Zhifa; Dai, Taiqiang; Ma, Chao; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yanpu

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages are involved in the full processes of tissue healing or regeneration and play an important role in the regeneration of a variety of tissues. Although recent evidence suggests the role of different macrophage phenotypes in adipose tissue expansion, metabolism, and remodeling, the spectrum of macrophage phenotype in the adipose tissue engineering field remains unknown. The present study established a rat model of adipose tissue regeneration using a tissue engineering chamber. Macrophage phenotypes were assessed during the regenerative process in the model. Neo-adipose tissue was generated 6 weeks after implantation. Macrophages were obvious in the chamber constructs 3 days after implantation, peaked at day 7, and significantly decreased thereafter. At day 3, macrophages were predominantly M1 macrophages (CCR7+), and there were few M2 macrophages (CD206+). At day 7, the percentage of M2 macrophages significantly increased and remained stable at day 14. M2 macrophages became the predominant macrophage population at 42 days. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated transition of cytokines from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory, which was consistent with the transition of macrophage phenotype from M1 to M2. These results showed distinct transition of macrophage phenotypes from a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype to an anti-inflammatory M2 in adipose tissue regeneration in our tissue engineering model. This study provides new insight into macrophage phenotype transition in the regeneration of adipose tissue.

  2. Combined effect of neonatal immune activation and mutant DISC1 on phenotypic changes in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Ibi, Daisuke; Nagai, Taku; Koike, Hiroyuki; Kitahara, Yuko; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Niwa, Minae; Jaaro-Peled, Hanna; Nitta, Atsumi; Yoneda, Yukio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Sawa, Akira; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2010-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Transgenic mice expressing dominant-negative DISC1 (DN-DISC1 mice) show some histological and behavioral endophenotypes relevant to schizophrenia. Viral infection during neurodevelopment provides a major environmental risk for schizophrenia. Neonatal injection of polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (polyI:C), which mimics innate immune responses elicited by viral infection, leads to schizophrenia-like behavioral alteration in mice after puberty. To study how gene-environmental interaction during neurodevelopment results in phenotypic changes in adulthood, we treated DN-DISC1 mice or wild-type littermates with injection of polyI:C during the neonatal stage, according to the published method, respectively, and the behavioral and histological phenotypes were examined in adulthood. We demonstrated that neonatal polyI:C treatment in DN-DISC1 mice resulted in the deficits of short-term, object recognition, and hippocampus-dependent fear memories after puberty, although polyI:C treatment by itself had smaller influences on wild-type mice. Furthermore, polyI:C-treated DN-DISC1 mice exhibited signs of impairment of social recognition and interaction, and augmented susceptibility to MK-801-induced hyperactivity as compared with vehicle-treated wild-type mice. Of most importance, additive effects of polyI:C and DN-DISC1 were observed by a marked decrease in parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex. These results suggest that combined effect of neonatal polyI:C treatment and DN-DISC1 affects some behavioral and histological phenotypes in adulthood. PMID:19716847

  3. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-12-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD4/sup +/ or CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD8/sup +/) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by /sup 51/Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype.

  4. Evidence of paired M2 muscarinic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, L.T.; Ballesteros, L.A.; Bichajian, L.H.; Ferrendelli, C.A.; Fisher, A.; Hanchett, H.E.; Zhang, R. )

    1991-02-01

    Binding assays involving various antagonists, including N-(3H) methylscopolamine, (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate, AFDX-116, pirenzepine, and propylbenzilylcholine mustard, disclosed only a single population of M2 muscarinic receptors in membranes from the rat brainstem (medulla, pons, and colliculi). However, competition curves between N-(3H)methylscopolamine and various agonists, including oxotremorine, cis-dioxolane, and acetylethylcholine mustard, showed approximately equal numbers of guanine nucleotide-sensitive high affinity (H) sites and guanine nucleotide-insensitive low affinity (L) sites. This 50% H phenomenon persisted in different buffers, at different temperatures, after the number of receptors was halved (and, thus, the remaining receptor to guanine nucleotide-binding protein ratio was doubled), after membrane solubilization with digitonin, and when rabbit cardiac membranes were used instead of rat brainstem membranes. Preferential occupation of H sites with acetylethylcholine mustard, and of L sites with quinuclidinyl benzilate or either mustard, yielded residual free receptor populations showing predominantly L and H sites, respectively. Low concentrations of (3H)-oxotremorine-M labeled only H sites, and the Bmax for these sites was 49% of the Bmax found with (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate plus guanine nucleotide. These and other results are most consistent with the idea that H and L receptor sites exist on separate but dimeric receptor molecules and with the hypothesis that only the H receptors cycle between high and low affinity, depending upon interactions between this receptor molecule and a guanine nucleotide-binding protein.

  5. The transglutaminase type 2 and pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 interplay in autophagy regulation.

    PubMed

    Altuntas, Sara; Rossin, Federica; Marsella, Claudia; D'Eletto, Manuela; Diaz-Hidalgo, Laura; Farrace, Maria Grazia; Campanella, Michelangelo; Antonioli, Manuela; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro

    2015-12-29

    Autophagy is a self-degradative physiological process by which the cell removes worn-out or damaged components. Constant at basal level it may become highly active in response to cellular stress. The type 2 transglutaminase (TG2), which accumulates under stressful cell conditions, plays an important role in the regulation of autophagy and cells lacking this enzyme display impaired autophagy/mitophagy and a consequent shift their metabolism to glycolysis. To further define the molecular partners of TG2 involved in these cellular processes, we analysed the TG2 interactome under normal and starved conditions discovering that TG2 interacts with various proteins belonging to different functional categories. Herein we show that TG2 interacts with pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), a rate limiting enzyme of glycolysis which is responsible for maintaining a glycolytic phenotype in malignant cells and displays non metabolic functions, including transcriptional co-activation and protein kinase activity. Interestingly, the ablation of PKM2 led to the decrease of intracellular TG2's transamidating activity paralleled by an increase of its tyrosine phosphorylation. Along with this, a significant decrease of ULK1 and Beclin1 was also recorded, thus suggesting a block in the upstream regulation of autophagosome formation. These data suggest that the PKM2/TG2 interplay plays an important role in the regulation of autophagy in particular under cellular stressful conditions such as those displayed by cancer cells.

  6. The transglutaminase type 2 and pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 interplay in autophagy regulation

    PubMed Central

    Altuntas, Sara; Rossin, Federica; Marsella, Claudia; D'Eletto, Manuela; Hidalgo, Laura Diaz; Farrace, Maria Grazia; Campanella, Michelangelo; Antonioli, Manuela; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a self-degradative physiological process by which the cell removes worn-out or damaged components. Constant at basal level it may become highly active in response to cellular stress. The type 2 transglutaminase (TG2), which accumulates under stressful cell conditions, plays an important role in the regulation of autophagy and cells lacking this enzyme display impaired autophagy/mitophagy and a consequent shift their metabolism to glycolysis. To further define the molecular partners of TG2 involved in these cellular processes, we analysed the TG2 interactome under normal and starved conditions discovering that TG2 interacts with various proteins belonging to different functional categories. Herein we show that TG2 interacts with pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), a rate limiting enzyme of glycolysis which is responsible for maintaining a glycolytic phenotype in malignant cells and displays non metabolic functions, including transcriptional co-activation and protein kinase activity. Interestingly, the ablation of PKM2 led to the decrease of intracellular TG2's transamidating activity paralleled by an increase of its tyrosine phosphorylation. Along with this, a significant decrease of ULK1 and Beclin1 was also recorded, thus suggesting a block in the upstream regulation of autophagosome formation. These data suggest that the PKM2/TG2 interplay plays an important role in the regulation of autophagy in particular under cellular stressful conditions such as those displayed by cancer cells. PMID:26702927

  7. Antibacterial activities of Beilschmiedia obscura and six other Cameroonian medicinal plants against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapid spread of bacteria expressing multi-drug resistance propels the search for new antibacterial agents. The present study was designed to evaluate the antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts from Beilschmiedia obscura and six other Cameroonian plants against a panel of twenty nine Gram-negative bacteria including Multi-drug resistant (MDR) phenotypes. Methods The phytochemical investigations of the extracts were carried out according to the standard methods and the liquid micro-dilution assay was used for all antibacterial assays. Results Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of alkaloids in all studied extracts. Other chemical classes of secondary metabolites such as anthocyanines, anthraquinones flavonoids, saponins, tannins, sterols and triterpenes were selectively detected in the extracts. The extract from the fruits of Beilschmiedia obscura, Pachypodanthium staudtii leaves and Peperomia fernandopoiana (whole plant) displayed the best spectrum of activity with MIC values ranging from 16 to 1024 μg/mL against at least 65% and above of the tested bacteria. The extract from Beilschmiedia obscura was the most active with MIC values below 100 μg/mL against ten of the tested bacteria. This extract also showed MBC values below 1024 μg/mL against 55.17% of the studied microorganisms. Phenylalanine arginine β-naphthylamide (PAβN) significantly modulated the activities of extracts from the leaves and fruits of Pachypodanthium staudtii and Beilschmiedia obscura respectively, by increasing their inhibitory activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae KP55 strain at least four fold. Conclusion The overall results of the present investigation provide information for the possible use of the methanol extracts of the studied plant species, especially B. obscura to fight infectious diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria including MDR phenotypes. PMID:25023038

  8. Direct Interaction of GABAB Receptors with M2 Muscarinic Receptors Enhances Muscarinic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Stephanie B.; Clancy, Sinead M.; Terunuma, Miho; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Thomas, Steven M.; Moss, Stephen J.; Slesinger, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Down-regulation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) provides an important mechanism for reducing neurotransmitter signaling during sustained stimulation. Chronic stimulation of M2 muscarinic receptors (M2R) causes internalization of M2R and G protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels in neuronal PC12 cells, resulting in loss of function. Here, we show that co-expression of GABAB R2 receptors (GBR2) rescues both surface expression and function of M2R, including M2R-induced activation of GIRKs and inhibition of cAMP production. GBR2 showed significant association with M2R at the plasma membrane but not other GPCRs (M1R, μOR), as detected by FRET measured with TIRF microscopy. Unique regions of the proximal C-terminal domains of GBR2 and M2R mediate specific binding between M2R and GBR2. In the brain, GBR2, but not GBR1, biochemically coprecipitates with M2R and overlaps with M2R expression in cortical neurons. This novel heteromeric association between M2R and GBR2 provides a possible mechanism for altering muscarinic signaling in the brain and represents a previously unrecognized role for GBR2. PMID:20016095

  9. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-03

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  10. Novel mutatıons and diverse clinical phenotypes in recombınase-activating gene 1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe combined immunodeficiency is within a heterogeneous group of inherited defects throughout the development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Mutations in recombinase-activating genes 1 or 2 (RAG1/2) represent approximately 10% of all SCID cases. RAG1/2 are essential for V(D)J rearrangement of the B- and T-cell receptors. Objectives The aim of this study was to review clinical, immunological and molecular findings of Turkish SCID patients with RAG1 defects and to draw attention to novel mutations, genotype-phenotype correlations and the high rate of BCG infections within this group. Methods Eleven patients (F/M: 6/5) were included. Molecular, immunological and clinical data were evaluated. Results Five patients were classified as T-B-NK + SCID, four patients as T + B-NK + SCID (two of these patients were diagnosed as classical Omenn syndrome) and two patients as T + B + NK + SCID with respect to clinical presentations and immunological data. Mean age of the whole study group, mean age at onset of symptoms and mean age at diagnosis were: 33.0 ± 42.8, 3.1 ± 3.3 and 10.4 ± 13.5 months, respectively. Consanguinity rate was 54%. Some novel mutations were found in RAG1 gene in addition to previously reported mutations. Genotype-phenotype correlation was not significantly apparent in most of the cases. BCG infection was observed in 36.4% of patients (two BCG-osis and two BCG-itis). Conclusion Epigenetic factors such as compound genetic defects, enviromental factors, and exposure to recurrent infections may modify phenotypical characteristics of RAG deficiencies. Inoculation of live vaccines such as BCG should be postponed until primary immunodeficiency disease is excluded with appropriate screening tests in suspected cases. PMID:22424479

  11. Influence of autologous dendritic cells on cytokine-induced killer cell proliferation, cell phenotype and antitumor activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jingsong; Chen, Cong; Wang, Yuhuan; Chen, Xuecheng; Chen, Zeying; Luo, Xiaoling

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DCs) are essential antigen processing and presentation cells that play a key role in the immune response. In this study, DCs were co-cultured with cytokine-induced killer cells (DC-CIKs) in vitro to detect changes in cell proliferation, cell phenotype and cell cytotoxicity. The results revealed that the DCs were suitable for co-culture with CIKs at day 7, and that cell quantity of DC-CIKs was lower than that of CIKs until day 11, but it was significantly improved to 1.17-fold that of CIKs at day 13. Flow cytometry was used to detect the cell phenotype of CIKs and DC-CIKs. Compared with CIKs at day 13, the percentage of CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+) and CD3(+)CD56(+) T cells in DC-CIKs was significantly improved 1.02, 1.79, 1.26 and 2.44-fold, respectively. In addition, trypan blue staining analysis demonstrated that the cell viability of CIKs and DC-CIKs was 96% and 98%, respectively. Furthermore, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis verified that CIK and DC-CIK cytotoxicity in Hela cells was 58% and 80%, respectively, with a significant difference. Taken together, our results indicate that the cell proliferation, cell phenotype and antitumor activity of CIKs were all enhanced following co-culture with DCs in vitro. These results are likely to be useful for DC-CIK application in antitumor therapies.

  12. Pronounced phenotype in activated regulatory T cells during a chronic helminth infection.

    PubMed

    Layland, Laura E; Mages, Jörg; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Hoerauf, Achim; Wagner, Hermann; Lang, Roland; da Costa, Clarissa U Prazeres

    2010-01-15

    Although several markers have been associated with the characterization of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and their function, no studies have investigated the dynamics of their phenotype during infection. Since the necessity of Tregs to control immunopathology has been demonstrated, we used the chronic helminth infection model Schistosoma mansoni to address the impact on the Treg gene repertoire. Before gene expression profiling, we first studied the localization and Ag-specific suppressive nature of classically defined Tregs during infection. The presence of Foxp3+ cells was predominantly found in the periphery of granulomas and isolated CD4+CD25(hi)Foxp3+ Tregs from infected mice and blocked IFN-gamma and IL-10 cytokine secretion from infected CD4+CD25- effector T cells. Furthermore, the gene expression patterns of Tregs and effector T cells showed that 474 genes were significantly regulated during schistosomiasis. After k-means clustering, we identified genes exclusively regulated in all four populations, including Foxp3, CD103, GITR, OX40, and CTLA-4--classic Treg markers. During infection, however, several nonclassical genes were upregulated solely within the Treg population, such as Slpi, Gzmb, Mt1, Fabp5, Nfil3, Socs2, Gpr177, and Klrg1. Using RT-PCR, we confirmed aspects of the microarray data and also showed that the expression profile of Tregs from S. mansoni-infected mice is simultaneously unique and comparable with Tregs derived from other infections.

  13. Activation of Phenotypic Subpopulations in Response to Ciprofloxacin Treatment in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    MacGuire, Ashley E.; Ching, Meining Carly; Diamond, Brett H.; Kazakov, Alexey; Novichkov, Pavel; Godoy, Veronica G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The multidrug-resistant, opportunistic pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, has spread swiftly through hospitals worldwide. Previously, we demonstrated that A. baumannii regulates the expression of various genes in response to DNA damage. Some of these regulated genes, especially those encoding the multiple error-prone DNA polymerases, can be implicated in induced mutagenesis, leading to antibiotic resistance. Here, we further explore the DNA damage-inducible system at the single cell level using chromosomal transcriptional reporters for selected DNA damage response genes. We found the genes examined respond in a bimodal fashion to ciprofloxacin treatment, forming two phenotypic subpopulations: induced and uninduced. This bimodal response to ciprofloxacin treatment in A. baumannii is unique and quite different than the Escherichia coli paradigm. The subpopulations are not genetically different, with each subpopulation returning to a starting state and differentiating with repeated treatment. We then identified a palindromic motif upstream of certain DNA damage response genes, and have shown alterations to this sequence to diminish the bimodal induction in response to DNA damaging treatment. Lastly, we are able to show a biological advantage for a bimodal response, finding that one subpopulation survives ciprofloxacin treatment better than the other. PMID:24612352

  14. Role of Parp Activity in Lung Cancer-induced Cachexia: Effects on Muscle Oxidative Stress, Proteolysis, Anabolic Markers and Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Mateu-Jimenez, Mercè; Langohr, Klaus; Fermoselle, Clara; García-Arumí, Elena; Andreu, Antoni L; Yelamos, Jose; Barreiro, Esther

    2017-02-08

    Strategies to treat cachexia are still at its infancy. Enhanced muscle protein breakdown and ubiquitin-proteasome system are common features of cachexia associated with chronic conditions including lung cancer (LC). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP), which play a major role in chromatin structure regulation, also underlie maintenance of muscle metabolism and body composition. We hypothesized that protein catabolism, proteolytic markers, muscle fiber phenotype, and muscle anabolism may improve in respiratory and limb muscles of LC-cachectic Parp-1-deficient (Parp-1(-/-) ) and Parp-2(-/-) mice. In diaphragm and gastrocnemius of LC (LP07 adenocarcinoma) bearing mice (wild type, Parp-1(-/-) and Parp-2(-/-) ), PARP activity (ADP-ribose polymers, pADPr), redox balance, muscle fiber phenotype, apoptotic nuclei, tyrosine release, protein ubiquitination, muscle-specific E3 ligases, NFkB signaling pathway, markers of muscle anabolism (Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, and mitochondrial DNA) were evaluated along with body and muscle weights and limb muscle force. Compared to wild type cachectic animals, in both respiratory and limb muscles of Parp-1(-/-) and Parp-2(-/-) cachectic mice: cancer induced-muscle wasting characterized by increased PARP activity, protein oxidation, tyrosine release, and ubiquitin-proteasome system (total protein ubiquitination, atrogin-1, and 20S proteasome C8 subunit) were blunted, the reduction in contractile myosin and atrophy of the fibers was attenuated, while no effects were seen in other structural features (inflammatory cells, internal or apoptotic nuclei), and markers of muscle anabolism partly improved. Activation of either PARP-1 or -2 is likely to play a role in muscle protein catabolism via oxidative stress, NF-kB signaling, and enhanced proteasomal degradation in cancer-induced cachexia. Therapeutic potential of PARP activity inhibition deserves attention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibacterial activities of selected Cameroonian spices and their synergistic effects with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) phenotypes is a major public health problem today in the treatment of bacterial infections. The present study was designed to evaluate the antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of eleven Cameroonian spices on a panel of twenty nine Gram negative bacteria including MDR strains. Methods The phytochemical analysis of the extracts was carried out by standard tests meanwhile the liquid micro-broth dilution was used for all antimicrobial assays. Results Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of alkaloids, phenols and tannins in all plants extracts. The results of the antibacterial assays indicated that all tested extracts exert antibacterial activities, with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values varying from 32 to 1024 μg/ml. The extracts from Dichrostachys glomerata, Beilschmiedia cinnamomea, Aframomum citratum, Piper capense, Echinops giganteus, Fagara xanthoxyloïdes and Olax subscorpioïdea were the most active. In the presence of efflux pump inhibitor, PAßN, the activity of the extract from D. glomerata significantly increased on 69.2% of the tested MDR bacteria. At MIC/5, synergistic effects were noted with the extract of D. glomerata on 75% of the tested bacteria for chloramphenicol (CHL), tetracycline (TET) and norfloxacin (NOR). With B. cinnamomea synergy were observed on 62.5% of the studied MDR bacteria with CHL, cefepime (FEP), NOR and ciprofloxacin (CIP) and 75% with erythromycin (ERY). Conclusion The overall results provide information for the possible use of the studied extracts of the spices in the control of bacterial infections involving MDR phenotypes. PMID:22044718

  16. Kinin-B1 and B2 receptor activity in proliferation and neural phenotype determination of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Isis C; Glaser, Talita; Nery, Arthur A; Pillat, Micheli M; Pesquero, João B; Ulrich, Henning

    2015-11-01

    The kinins bradykinin and des-arg(9) -bradykinin cleaved from kininogen precursors by kallikreins exert their biological actions by stimulating kinin-B2 and B1 receptors, respectively. In vitro models of neural differentiation such as P19 embryonal carcinoma cells and neural progenitor cells have suggested the involvement of B2 receptors in neural differentiation and phenotype determination; however, the involvement of B1 receptors in these processes has not been established. Here, we show that B1 and B2 receptors are differentially expressed in mouse embryonic E14Tg2A stem cells undergoing neural differentiation. Proliferation and differentiation assays, performed in the presence of receptor subtype-selective agonists and antagonists, revealed that B1 receptor activity is required for the proliferation of embryonic and differentiating cells as well as for neuronal maturation at later stages of differentiation, while the B2 receptor acts on neural phenotype choice, promoting neurogenesis over gliogenesis. Besides the elucidation of bradykinin functions in an in vitro model reflecting early embryogenesis and neurogenesis, this study contributes to the understanding of B1 receptor functions in this process.

  17. Preclinical Testing of Novel Oxytocin Receptor Activators in Models of Autism Phenotypes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: TITLE: Preclinical Testing of Novel Oxytocin Receptor Activators in Models of Autism ...AUG 2013-7 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Preclinical Testing of Novel Oxytocin Receptor Activators in Models of Autism ...Moy. . 14. ABSTRACT Currently, there are no established pharmaceutical strategies that effectively treat core autism spectrum disorder (ASD

  18. The role of macrophage phenotype in vascularization of tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Kara L; Anfang, Rachel R; Spiller, Krista J; Ng, Johnathan; Nakazawa, Kenneth R; Daulton, Jeffrey W; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-05-01

    Angiogenesis is crucial for the success of most tissue engineering strategies. The natural inflammatory response is a major regulator of vascularization, through the activity of different types of macrophages and the cytokines they secrete. Macrophages exist on a spectrum of diverse phenotypes, from "classically activated" M1 to "alternatively activated" M2 macrophages. M2 macrophages, including the subsets M2a and M2c, are typically considered to promote angiogenesis and tissue regeneration, while M1 macrophages are considered to be anti-angiogenic, although these classifications are controversial. Here we show that in contrast to this traditional paradigm, primary human M1 macrophages secrete the highest levels of potent angiogenic stimulators including VEGF; M2a macrophages secrete the highest levels of PDGF-BB, a chemoattractant for stabilizing pericytes, and also promote anastomosis of sprouting endothelial cells in vitro; and M2c macrophages secrete the highest levels of MMP9, an important protease involved in vascular remodeling. In a murine subcutaneous implantation model, porous collagen scaffolds were surrounded by a fibrous capsule, coincident with high expression of M2 macrophage markers, while scaffolds coated with the bacterial lipopolysaccharide were degraded by inflammatory macrophages, and glutaraldehyde-crosslinked scaffolds were infiltrated by substantial numbers of blood vessels, accompanied by high levels of M1 and M2 macrophages. These results suggest that coordinated efforts by both M1 and M2 macrophages are required for angiogenesis and scaffold vascularization, which may explain some of the controversy over which phenotype is the angiogenic phenotype.

  19. Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Alterations and Declined M2 Receptor Density Were Involved in Cardiac Dysfunction in Rats after Long Term Treatment with Autoantibodies against M2 Muscarinic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Wang, Li; Wu, Ye; Wang, Jie; Lv, Tingting; Liu, Huirong

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that autoantibodies (M2-AA) against the second extracellular loop of M2 muscarinic receptor (M2AChR-el2) from dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) serum could induce DCM-like morphological changes in mice hearts. However, the effects of M2-AA on the cardiac function during the process of DCM and the potential mechanisms are not fully known. The present study was designed to dynamically observe the cardiac function, mitochondrial changes, and M2 receptor binding characteristics in rats long-term stimulated with M2-AA in vivo. Methods M2-AA-positive model was established by actively immunizing healthy male Wistar rats with synthetic M2AChR-el2 peptide for 18 months. Meanwhile, vehicle group rats were administrated with physiological saline. The change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was detected by radionuclide imaging. The ultrastructure of mitochondria was observed under electron microscopy. The M2 receptor binding characteristics were determined by radioactive ligand binding assay. Results After immunization for 12 months, compared with vehicle group, M2AChR-el2-immunized rats showed decreased myocardial contractility and cardiac diastolic function evidenced by declined maximal rate of rise of ventricular pressure and increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, respectively. Additionally, mitochondrial swelling and vacuolation were observed. At 18 months, M2AChR-el2-immunized rats manifested significant decreased cardiac systolic and diastolic function and pathological changes such as enlargement of right ventricular cavity and wall thinning; and the mitochondrial damage was aggravated. Furthermore, the M2 receptor maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of the M2AChR-el2-immunized rats significantly decreased, while the M2 receptor dissociation constant (Kd) was increased. Conclusions Our study suggested that long-term stimulation with M2-AA leaded to the ventricular dilatation and gradual deterioration of cardiac dysfunction

  20. Shorter telomeres and high telomerase activity correlate with a highly aggressive phenotype in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ceja-Rangel, Hugo A; Sánchez-Suárez, Patricia; Castellanos-Juárez, Emilio; Peñaroja-Flores, Rubicelia; Arenas-Aranda, Diego J; Gariglio, Patricio; Benítez-Bribiesca, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of telomere length is one function of human telomerase that is crucial for the survival of cancer cells and cancer progression. Both telomeres and telomerase have been proposed as possible biomarkers of cancer risk and cancer invasiveness; however, their clinical relevance is still under discussion. In order to improve our understanding of the relationship between telomere length and telomerase activity with cancer invasiveness, we studied telomere length as well as telomerase levels, activity, and intracellular localization in breast cancer cell lines with diverse invasive phenotypes. We found an apparently paradoxical coincidence of short telomeres and enhanced telomerase activity in the most invasive breast cancer cell lines. We also observed that hTERT intracellular localization could be correlated with its level of activity. There was no association between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) protein expression levels and invasiveness. We propose that simultaneous evaluation of these two biomarkers-telomere length and telomerase activity-could be useful for the assessment of the invasive capacity and aggressiveness of tumor cells from breast cancer patients.

  1. The Carbapenem Inactivation Method (CIM), a Simple and Low-Cost Alternative for the Carba NP Test to Assess Phenotypic Carbapenemase Activity in Gram-Negative Rods

    PubMed Central

    van der Zwaluw, Kim; de Haan, Angela; Pluister, Gerlinde N.; Bootsma, Hester J.; de Neeling, Albert J.; Schouls, Leo M.

    2015-01-01

    A new phenotypic test, called the Carbapenem Inactivation Method (CIM), was developed to detect carbapenemase activity in Gram-negative rods within eight hours. This method showed high concordance with results obtained by PCR to detect genes coding for the carbapenemases KPC, NDM, OXA-48, VIM, IMP and OXA-23. It allows reliable detection of carbapenemase activity encoded by various genes in species of Enterobacteriaceae (e.g., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae), but also in non-fermenters Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. The CIM was shown to be a cost-effective and highly robust phenotypic screening method that can reliably detect carbapenemase activity. PMID:25798828

  2. Constitutively active ESCRT-II suppresses the MVB-sorting phenotype of ESCRT-0 and ESCRT-I mutants.

    PubMed

    Mageswaran, Shrawan Kumar; Johnson, Natalie K; Odorizzi, Greg; Babst, Markus

    2015-02-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) protein complexes function at the endosome in the formation of intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) containing cargo proteins destined for the vacuolar/lysosomal lumen. The early ESCRTs (ESCRT-0 and -I) are likely involved in cargo sorting, whereas ESCRT-III and Vps4 function to sever the neck of the forming ILVs. ESCRT-II links these functions by initiating ESCRT-III formation in an ESCRT-I-regulated manner. We identify a constitutively active mutant of ESCRT-II that partially suppresses the phenotype of an ESCRT-I or ESCRT-0 deletion strain, suggesting that these early ESCRTs are not essential and have redundant functions. However, the ESCRT-III/Vps4 system alone is not sufficient for ILV formation but requires cargo sorting mediated by one of the early ESCRTs.

  3. B cells from African American lupus patients exhibit an activated phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Laurence C.; Habte, Sium; Gonsiorek, Waldemar; Lee, Deborah; Banas, Dana; Holloway, Deborah A.; Cunningham, Mark; Stetsko, Dawn; Casano, Francesca; Kansal, Selena; Davis, Patricia M.; Carman, Julie; Zhang, Clarence K.; Abidi, Ferva; Furie, Richard; Nadler, Steven G.; Suchard, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease driven by both innate and adaptive immune cells. African Americans tend to present with more severe disease at an earlier age compared with patients of European ancestry. In order to better understand the immunological differences between African American and European American patients, we analyzed the frequencies of B cell subsets and the expression of B cell activation markers from a total of 68 SLE patients and 69 normal healthy volunteers. We found that B cells expressing the activation markers CD86, CD80, PD1, and CD40L, as well as CD19+CD27–IgD– double-negative B cells, were enriched in African American patients vs. patients of European ancestry. In addition to increased expression of CD40L, surface levels of CD40 on B cells were lower, suggesting the engagement of the CD40 pathway. In vitro experiments confirmed that CD40L expressed by B cells could lead to CD40 activation and internalization on adjacent B cells. To conclude, these results indicate that, compared with European American patients, African American SLE patients present with a particularly active B cell component, possibly via the activation of the CD40/CD40L pathway. These data may help guide the development of novel therapies. PMID:27699274

  4. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p < 0.03) versus control (no intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p < 0.03) and increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin in HLE B-3 after six days, although only poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced a significant difference versus control (p < 0.01). Our results imply that-contrary to prior uveal biocompatibility understanding-macrophage adherence is not necessary for a strong inflammatory response to an intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal

  5. Activity Suppression Behavior Phenotype in SULT4A1 Frameshift Mutant Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Frank; Thomas, Holly R.; Parant, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Since its identification in 2000, sulfotransferase (SULT) 4A1 has presented an enigma to the field of cytosolic SULT biology. SULT4A1 is exclusively expressed in neural tissue, is highly conserved, and has been identified in every vertebrate studied to date. Despite this singular level of conservation, no substrate or function for SULT4A1 has been identified. Previous studies demonstrated that SULT4A1 does not bind the obligate sulfate donor, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, yet SULT4A1 is classified as a SULT superfamily member based on sequence and structural similarities to the other SULTs. In this study, transcription activator-like effector nucleases were used to generate heritable mutations in the SULT4A1 gene of zebrafish. The mutation (SULT4A1Δ8) consists of an 8-nucleotide deletion within the second exon of the gene, resulting in a frameshift mutation and premature stop codon after 132 AA. During early adulthood, casual observations were made that mutant zebrafish were exhibiting excessively sedentary behavior during the day. These observations were inconsistent with published reports on activity in zebrafish that are largely diurnal organisms and are highly active during the day. Thus, a decrease in activity during the day represents an abnormal behavior and warranted further systematic analysis. EthoVision video tracking software was used to monitor activity levels in wild-type (WT) and SULT4A1Δ8/Δ8 fish over 48 hours of a normal light/dark cycle. SULT4A1Δ8/Δ8 fish were shown to exhibit increased inactivity bout length and frequency as well as a general decrease in daytime activity levels when compared with their WT counterparts. PMID:25934576

  6. Phenotypic plasticity of post-fire activity and thermal biology of a free-ranging small mammal.

    PubMed

    Stawski, Clare; Körtner, Gerhard; Nowack, Julia; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-05-15

    Ecosystems can change rapidly and sometimes irreversibly due to a number of anthropogenic and natural factors, such as deforestation and fire. How individual animals exposed to such changes respond behaviourally and physiologically is poorly understood. We quantified the phenotypic plasticity of activity patterns and torpor use - a highly efficient energy conservation mechanism - in brown antechinus (Antechinus stuartii), a small Australian marsupial mammal. We compared groups in densely vegetated forest areas (pre-fire and control) with a group in a burned, open habitat (post-fire). Activity and torpor patterns differed among groups and sexes. Females in the post-fire group spent significantly less time active than the other groups, both during the day and night. However, in males only daytime activity declined in the post-fire group, although overall activity was also reduced on cold days in males for all groups. The reduction in total or diurnal activity in the post-fire group was made energetically possible by a ~3.4-fold and ~2.2-fold increase in the proportion of time females and males, respectively, used torpor in comparison to that in the pre-fire and control groups. Overall, likely due to reproductive needs, torpor was more pronounced in females than in males, but low ambient temperatures increased torpor bout duration in both sexes. Importantly, for both male and female antechinus and likely other small mammals, predator avoidance and energy conservation - achieved by reduced activity and increased torpor use - appear to be vital for post-fire survival where ground cover and refuges have been obliterated.

  7. Small molecule inhibition of PAX3-FOXO1 through AKT activation suppresses malignant phenotypes of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Jothi, Mathivanan; Mal, Munmun; Keller, Charles; Mal, Asoke K.

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) comprises a rare highly malignant tumor presumed to be associated with skeletal muscle lineage in children. The hallmark of the majority of ARMS is a chromosomal translocation that generates the PAX3-FOXO1 fusion protein, which is an oncogenic transcription factor responsible for the development of the malignant phenotype of this tumor. ARMS cells are dependent to the oncogenic activity of PAX3-FOXO1 and its expression status in ARMS tumors correlates with worst patient outcome, suggesting that blocking this activity of PAX3-FOXO1 may be an attractive therapeutic strategy against this fusion-positive disease. In this study, we screened small-molecule chemical libraries for inhibitors of PAX3-FOXO1 transcriptional activity using a cell-based readout system. We identified the Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA) inhibitor thapsigargin as an effective inhibitor of PAX3-FOXO1. Subsequent experiments in ARMS cells demonstrated that activation of AKT by thapsigargin inhibited PAX3-FOXO1 activity via phosphorylation. Moreover, this AKT activation appears to be associated with the effects of thapsigargin on intracellular calcium levels. Furthermore, thapsigargin inhibited the binding of PAX3-FOXO1 to target genes and subsequently promoted its proteosomal degradation. In addition, thapsigargin treatment decreases the growth and invasive capacity of ARMS cells while inducing apoptosis in vitro. Finally, thapsigargin can suppress the growth of an ARMS xenograft tumor in vivo. These data reveal that thapsigargin-induced activation of AKT is an effective mechanism to inhibit PAX3-FOXO1 and a potential agent for targeted therapy against ARMS. PMID:24107448

  8. Reciprocal Activating Crosstalk between c-Met and Caveolin 1 Promotes Invasive Phenotype in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Korhan, Peyda; Erdal, Esra; Kandemiş, Emine; Çokaklı, Murat; Nart, Deniz; Yılmaz, Funda; Can, Alp; Atabey, Neşe

    2014-01-01

    c-Met, the receptor for Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF), overexpressed and deregulated in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). Caveolin 1 (CAV1), a plasma membrane protein that modulates signal transduction molecules, is also overexpressed in HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate biological and clinical significance of co-expression and activation of c-Met and CAV1 in HCC. We showed that c-Met and CAV1 were co-localized in HCC cells and HGF treatment increased this association. HGF-triggered c-Met activation caused a concurrent rise in both phosphorylation and expression of CAV1. Ectopic expression of CAV1 accelerated c-Met signaling, resulted in enhanced migration, invasion, and branching-morphogenesis. Silencing of CAV1 downregulated c-Met signaling, and decreased migratory/invasive capability of cells and attenuated branching morphogenesis. In addition, activation and co-localization of c-Met and CAV1 were elevated during hepatocarcinogenesis. In conclusion reciprocal activating crosstalk between c-Met and CAV1 promoted oncogenic signaling of c-Met contributed to the initiation and progression of HCC. PMID:25148256

  9. Sexual dimorphism of brain aromatase activity in medaka: induction of a female phenotype by estradiol.

    PubMed

    Melo, A C; Ramsdell, J S

    2001-03-01

    In this study we identified sex-dependent dimorphism of brain aromatase in the teleost medaka and examined its regulation by sex steriods. We first investigated differential distribution of brain aromatase activity in sexually mature male and female medaka in serial coronal sections of the brain and identified the hypothalamic nuclei contained in each section using the brain atlas of medaka. In the brain of male medaka, high levels of activity are localized in sections containing the preoptic (POA) and suprachiasmatic nuclei (SC) (63-75 fmol/hr) and low levels in the nuclei periventricular dorsalis (HD), ventralis (HV), and caudalis (Hc), nuclei diffusus of lobulus inferiores (NDIL), and nuclei tuberi anteriores (TA) and posteriores (TP) (< 25 fmol/hr). In the brain of female medaka high aromatase activity is localized in sections containing the HD, HV, Hc, NDIL, TA, and TP (85-80 fmol/hr) and highly variable levels in the POA and SC (23-70 fmol/hr). The concentration and time dependency of the exposure of male medaka to estradiol on the total brain aromatase activity and morphologic sex characteristics were determined next. Estradiol increased the activity of brain aromatase in a concentration-dependent manner at 2.5 and 25 microg/L, but the increase was lower at higher concentrations of the hormone. The effect was time dependent, gradually increasing up to the fifth day of exposure, after which it reached a plateau. Estradiol induction of brain aromatase analyzed using Lineweaver-Burke plots of saturation assays revealed a non-first-order reaction. The results indicate that a positive feedback mechanism regulates brain aromatase and imply that the sexual dimorphic distribution of aromatase may be highly sensitive to physiologic cues and environmental perturbations in fish.

  10. Functional characterizations of venom phenotypes in the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) and evidence for expression-driven divergence in toxic activities among populations.

    PubMed

    Margres, Mark J; Walls, Robert; Suntravat, Montamas; Lucena, Sara; Sánchez, Elda E; Rokyta, Darin R

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypes frequently vary across and within species. The connection between specific phenotypic effects and function, however, is less understood despite being essential to our understanding of the adaptive process. Snake venoms are ideal for identifying functionally important phenotypic variation because venom variation is common, and venoms can be functionally characterized through simple assays and toxicity measurements. Previous work with the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) used multivariate statistical approaches to identify six unique venom phenotypes. We functionally characterized hemolytic, gelatinase, fibrinogenolytic, and coagulant activity for all six phenotypes, as well as one additional venom, to determine if the statistically significant differences in toxin expression levels previously documented corresponded to differences in venom activity. In general, statistical differences in toxin expression predicted the identified functional differences, or lack thereof, in toxic activity, demonstrating that the statistical approach used to characterize C. adamanteus venoms was a fair representation of biologically meaningful differences. Minor differences in activity not accounted for by the statistical model may be the result of amino-acid differences and/or post-translational modifications, but overall we were able to link variation in protein expression levels to variation in function as predicted by multivariate statistical approaches.

  11. Functional characterizations of venom phenotypes in the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) and evidence for expression-driven divergence in toxic activities among populations

    PubMed Central

    Margres, Mark J.; Walls, Robert; Suntravat, Montamas; Lucena, Sara; Sánchez, Elda E.; Rokyta, Darin R.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes frequently vary across and within species. The connection between specific phenotypic effects and function, however, is less understood despite being essential to our understanding of the adaptive process. Snake venoms are ideal for identifying functionally important phenotypic variation because venom variation is common, and venoms can be functionally characterized through simple assays and toxicity measurements. Previous work with the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) used multivariate statistical approaches to identify six unique venom phenotypes. We functionally characterized hemolytic, gelatinase, fibrinogenolytic, and coagulant activity for all six phenotypes, as well as one additional venom, to determine if the statistically significant differences in toxin expression levels previously documented corresponded to differences in venom activity. In general, statistical differences in toxin expression predicted the identified functional differences, or lack thereof, in toxic activity, demonstrating that the statistical approach used to characterize C. adamanteus venoms was a fair representation of biologically meaningful differences. Minor differences in activity not accounted for by the statistical model may be the result of amino-acid differences and/or post-translational modifications, but overall we were able to link variation in protein expression levels to variation in function as predicted by multivariate statistical approaches. PMID:27179420

  12. Inactivation of ID4 promotes a CRPC phenotype with constitutive AR activation through FKBP52.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Jugal Bharat; Patel, Divya; Morton, Derrick J; Sharma, Pankaj; Zou, Jin; Hewa Bostanthirige, Dhanushka; Gorantla, Yamini; Nagappan, Peri; Komaragiri, Shravan Kumar; Sivils, Jeffrey C; Xie, Huan; Palaniappan, Ravi; Wang, Guangdi; Cox, Marc B; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2016-11-27

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the emergence of prostate cancer cells that have adapted to the androgen-depleted environment of the prostate. In recent years, targeting multiple chaperones and co-chaperones (e.g., Hsp27, FKBP52) that promote androgen receptor (AR) signaling and/or novel AR regulatory mechanisms have emerged as promising alternative treatments for CRPC. We have shown that inactivation of inhibitor of differentiation 4 (ID4), a dominant-negative helix loop helix protein, promotes de novo steroidogenesis and CRPC with a gene expression signature that resembles constitutive AR activity in castrated mice. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism through which loss of ID4 potentiates AR signaling. Proteomic analysis between prostate cancer cell line LNCaP (L+ns) and LNCaP lacking ID4 (L(-)ID4) revealed elevated levels of Hsp27 and FKBP52, suggesting a role for these AR-associated co-chaperones in promoting constitutively active AR signaling in L(-)ID4 cells. Interestingly, protein interaction studies demonstrated a direct interaction between ID4 and the 52-kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP52) in vitro, but not with AR. An increase in FKBP52-dependent AR transcriptional activity was observed in L(-)ID4 cells. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of FKBP52-AR signaling, by treatment with MJC13, attenuated the tumor growth, weight, and volume in L(-)ID4 xenografts. Together, our results demonstrate that ID4 selectively regulates AR activity through direct interaction with FKBP52, and its loss, promotes CRPC through FKBP52-mediated AR signaling.

  13. A truncated peptide from p35, a Cdk5 activator, prevents Alzheimer's disease phenotypes in model mice

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Varsha; Zheng, Ya-Li; Mishra, Santosh K.; Amin, Niranjana D.; Steiner, Joseph; Grant, Philip; Kesavapany, Sashi; Pant, Harish C.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), one of the leading neurodegenerative disorders of older adults, which causes major socioeconomic burdens globally, lacks effective therapeutics without significant side effects. Besides the hallmark pathology of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), it has been reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), a critical neuronal kinase, is hyperactivated in AD brains and is, in part, responsible for the above pathology. Here we show that a modified truncated 24-aa peptide (TFP5), derived from the Cdk5 activator p35, penetrates the blood-brain barrier after intraperitoneal injections, inhibits abnormal Cdk5 hyperactivity, and significantly rescues AD pathology (up to 70–80%) in 5XFAD AD model mice. The mutant mice, injected with TFP5 exhibit behavioral rescue, whereas no rescue was observed in mutant mice injected with either saline or scrambled peptide. However, TFP5 does not inhibit cell cycle Cdks or normal Cdk5/p35 activity, and thereby has no toxic side effects (even at 200 mg/kg), a common problem in most current therapeutics for AD. In addition, treated mice displayed decreased inflammation, amyloid plaques, NFTs, cell death, and an extended life by 2 mo. These results suggest TFP5 as a potential therapeutic, toxicity-free candidate for AD.—Shukla, V., Zheng, Y.-L., Mishra, S. K., Amin, N. D., Steiner, J., Grant, P., Kesavapany, S., Pant, H. C. A truncated peptide from p35, a Cdk5 activator, prevents Alzheimer's disease phenotypes in model mice. PMID:23038754

  14. Reporter phage and breath tests: emerging phenotypic assays for diagnosing active tuberculosis, antibiotic resistance, and treatment efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jain, Paras; Thaler, David S; Maiga, Mamoudou; Timmins, Graham S; Bishai, William R; Hatfull, Graham F; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R

    2011-11-15

    The rapid and accurate diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) and its drug susceptibility remain a challenge. Phenotypic assays allow determination of antibiotic susceptibilities even if sequence data are not available or informative. We review 2 emerging diagnostic approaches, reporter phage and breath tests, both of which assay mycobacterial metabolism. The reporter phage signal, Green fluorescent protein (GFP) or β-galactosidase, indicates transcription and translation inside the recipient bacilli and its attenuation by antibiotics. Different breath tests assay, (1) exhaled antigen 85, (2) mycobacterial urease activity, and (3) detection by trained rats of disease-specific odor in sputum, have also been developed. When compared with culture, reporter phage assays shorten the time for initial diagnosis of drug susceptibility by several days. Both reporter phage and breath tests have promise as early markers to determine the efficacy of treatment. While sputum often remains smear and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA positive early in the course of efficacious antituberculous treatment, we predict that both breath and phage tests will rapidly become negative. If this hypothesis proves correct, phage assays and breath tests could become important surrogate markers in early bactericidal activity (EBA) studies of new antibiotics.

  15. Phenotypes of lung mononuclear phagocytes in HIV seronegative tuberculosis patients: evidence for new recruitment and cell activation.

    PubMed

    Lapa e Silva, J R; Linhares, C; Boechat, N; Rego, L; Almeida, M G; Kriski, A L; Ho, J L

    1996-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis preferentially resides in mononuclear phagocytes. The mechanisms by which mononuclear phagocytes keep M. tuberculosis in check or by which the microbe evades control to cause disease remain poorly understood. As an initial effort to delineate these mechanisms, we examined by immunostaining the phenotype of mononuclear phagocytes obtained from lungs of patients with active tuberculosis. From August 1994 to March 1995, consecutive patients who had an abnormal chest X-ray, no demonstrable acid-fast bacilli in sputum specimens and required a diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were enrolled. Of the 39 patients enrolled, 21 had microbiologically diagnosed tuberculosis. Thirteen of the 21 tuberculosis patients were either HIV seronegative (n = 12) or had no risk factor for HIV and constituted the tuberculosis group. For comparison, M. tuberculosis negative patients who had BAL samples taken during this time (n = 9) or normal healthy volunteers (n = 3) served as control group. Compared to the control group, the tuberculosis group had significantly higher proportion of cells expressing markers of young monocytes (UCHM1) and RFD7, a marker for phagocytic cells, and increased expression of HLA-DR, a marker of cell activation. In addition, tuberculosis group had significantly higher proportion of cells expressing dendritic cell marker (RFD1) and epithelioid cell marker (RFD9). These data suggest that despite recruitment of monocytes probably from the peripheral blood and local cell activation, host defense of the resident lung cells is insufficient to control M. tuberculosis.

  16. Dopamine induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages in rat C6 glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Tian; Wang, Chenlong; Chen, Xuewei; Duan, Chenfan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jing; Chai, Hongyan; Tang, Tian; Chen, Honglei; Yue, Jiang; Li, Ying; Yang, Jing

    2015-07-15

    Dopamine (DA), a monoamine catecholamine neurotransmitter with antiangiogenic activity, stabilizes tumor vessels in colon, prostate and ovarian cancers, thus increases chemotherapeutic efficacy. Here, in the rat C6 glioma models, we investigated the vascular normalization effects of DA and its mechanisms of action. DA (25, 50 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth, while a precursor of DA (levodopa) prolonged the survival time of rats bearing orthotopic C6 glioma. DA improved tumor perfusion, with significant effects from day 3, and a higher level at days 5 to 7. In addition, DA decreased microvessel density and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in tumor tissues, while increasing the coverage of pericyte. Conversely, an antagonist of dopamine receptor 2 (DR2) (eticlopride) but not DR1 (butaclamol) abrogated DA-induced tumor regression and vascular normalization. Furthermore, DA improved the delivery and efficacy of temozolomide therapy. Importantly, DA increased representative M1 markers (iNOS, CXCL9, etc.), while decreasing M2 markers (CD206, arginase-1, etc.). Depletion of macrophages by clodronate or zoledronic acid attenuated the effects of DA. Notably, DA treatment induced M2-to-M1 polarization in RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages, and enhanced the migration of pericyte-like cells (10T1/2), which was reversed by eticlopride or DR2-siRNA. Such changes were accompanied by the downregulation of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling. In summary, DA induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages. Thus, targeting the tumor microvasculature by DA represents a promising strategy for human glioma therapy. - Highlights: • Dopamine induces tumor growth inhibition and vascular normalization in rat C6 glioma. • Dopamine switches macrophage phenotype from M2 to M1. • Dopamine-induced vascular normalization is mediated by macrophage polarization. • Dopamine is a promising agent targeting the microvasculature in tumor

  17. Glucose-activated RUNX2 phosphorylation promotes endothelial cell proliferation and an angiogenic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Adam D; Anglin, Ian E; Vitolo, Michele I; Mochin, Maria T; Underwood, Karen F; Goldblum, Simeon E; Kommineni, Sravya; Passaniti, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    The runt-related protein-2 (RUNX2) is a DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates bone formation, tumor cell metastasis, endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, and angiogenesis. RUNX2 DNA binding is glucose and cell cycle regulated. We propose that glucose may activate RUNX2 through changes in post-translational phosphorylation that are cell cycle-specific and will regulate EC function. Glucose increased cell cycle progression in EC through both G2/M and G1 phases with entry into S-phase occurring only in subconfluent cells. In the absence of nutrients and growth factors (starvation), subconfluent EC were delayed in G1 when RUNX2 expression was reduced. RUNX2 phosphorylation, activation of DNA binding, and pRb phosphorylation were stimulated by glucose and were necessary to promote cell cycle progression. Glucose increased RUNX2 localization at focal subnuclear sites, which co-incided with RUNX2 occupancy of the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p21(Cip1) promoter, a gene normally repressed by RUNX2. Mutation of the RUNX2 cdk phosphorylation site in the C-terminal domain (S451A.RUNX2) reduced RUNX2 phosphorylation and DNA binding. Expression of this cdk site mutant in EC inhibited glucose-stimulated differentiation (in vitro tube formation), monolayer wound healing, and proliferation. These results define a novel relationship between glucose-activated RUNX2 phosphorylation, cell cycle progression, and EC differentiation. These data suggest that inhibition of RUNX2 expression or DNA binding may be a useful strategy to inhibit EC proliferation in tumor angiogenesis.

  18. Effects of early-onset voluntary exercise on adult physical activity and associated phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Wendy; Meek, Thomas H; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Vu, Kim T; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of early-life exercise on adult physical activity (wheel running, home-cage activity), body mass, food consumption, and circulating leptin levels in males from four replicate lines of mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running (High Runner or HR) and their four non-selected control (C) lines. Half of the mice were given wheel access shortly after weaning for three consecutive weeks. Wheel access was then removed for 52 days, followed by two weeks of adult wheel access for all mice. A blood sample taken prior to adult wheel testing was analyzed for circulating leptin concentration. Early-life wheel access significantly increased adult voluntary exercise on wheels during the first week of the second period of wheel access, for both HR and C mice, and HR ran more than C mice. During this same time period, activity in the home cages was not affected by early-age wheel access, and did not differ statistically between HR and C mice. Throughout the study, all mice with early wheel access had lower body masses than their sedentary counterparts, and HR mice had lower body masses than C mice. With wheel access, HR mice also ate significantly more than C mice. Early-life wheel access increased plasma leptin levels (adjusted statistically for fat-pad mass as a covariate) in C mice, but decreased them in HR mice. At sacrifice, early-life exercise had no statistically significant effects on visceral fat pad, heart (ventricle), liver or spleen masses (all adjusted statistically for variation in body mass). Results support the hypothesis that early-age exercise in mice can have at least transitory positive effects on adult levels of voluntary exercise, in addition to reducing body mass, and may be relevant for the public policy debates concerning the importance of physical education for children.

  19. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    INL

    2008-05-30

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  20. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema

    INL

    2016-07-12

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  1. Genes Involved in Interleukin-1 Receptor Type II Activities Are Associated With Asthmatic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Madore, Anne-Marie; Vaillancourt, Vanessa T.; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Sarnowski, Chloé; Monier, Florent; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Demenais, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a key role in inflammation and immunity and its decoy receptor, IL-1R2, has been implicated in transcriptomic and genetic studies of asthma. Methods Two large asthma family collections, the French-Canadian Saguenay—Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) study and the French Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA), were used to investigate the association of SNPs in 10 genes that modulate IL-1R2 activities with asthma, allergic asthma, and atopy. Gene-gene interactions were also tested. Results One SNP in BACE2 was associated with allergic asthma in the SLSJ study and replicated in the EGEA study before statistical correction for multiple testing. Additionally, two SNPs in the MMP2 gene were replicated in both studies prior to statistical correction and reached significance in the combined analysis. Moreover, three gene-gene interactions also survived statistical correction in the combined analyses (BACE1-IL1RAP in asthma and allergic asthma and IL1R1-IL1RAP in atopy). Conclusions Our results highlight the relevance of genes involved in the IL-1R2 activity in the context of asthma and asthma-related traits. PMID:27334786

  2. Phenotypic diversity and amylolytic activity of fast growing rhizobia from pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Paulo Ivan Fernandes; de Lima, Andréa Aparecida; Passos, Samuel Ribeiro; Tuão Gava, Carlos Alberto; de Oliveira, Paulo Jansen; Rumjanek, Norma Gouvêa; Xavier, Gustavo Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated 26 pigeonpea rhizobial isolates according to their cultural characteristics, intrinsic antibiotic resistance, salt and temperature tolerance, carbon source utilization and amylolytic activity. The cultural characterization showed that the majority of them presented the ability to acidify the YMA. Among the 27 isolates evaluated, 25 were able to grow when incubated at 42° C and 11 showed tolerance to 3% (w/v) of NaCl in YMA medium. The patterns of carbon sources utilization was very diverse among the isolates. It was observed the capacity of three strains to metabolize all the carbon sources evaluated and a total of 42% of the bacterial isolates was able to grow in the culture medium supplemented with at least, six carbon sources. The carbon sources mannitol (control) and sucrose were metabilized by all isolates evaluated. The profile of intrinsic resistance to antibiotics showed that the isolates were mostly resistant to streptomycin and ampicillin, but susceptible to kanamycin and chloranphenicol. High amylolytic activity of, at least, four isolates was also demonstrated, especially for isolated 47.3b, which showed the highest enzymatic index. These results indicate the metabolic versatility of the pigeonpea rhizobia, and indicates the isolate 47.3b to further studies regarding the amylase production and characterization. PMID:24031992

  3. Plasma Complement Components and Activation Fragments: Associations with Age-Related Macular Degeneration Genotypes and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Robyn; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth; Atkinson, John P.; Giclas, Patricia C.; Rosner, Bernard; Seddon, Johanna M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Several genes encoding complement system components and fragments are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study was conducted to determine whether alterations in circulating levels of these markers of complement activation and regulation are also independently associated with advanced AMD and whether they are related to AMD genotypes. Methods Plasma and DNA samples were selected from individuals in our AMD registry who had progressed to or developed the advanced stages of AMD, including 58 with geographic atrophy and 62 with neovascular disease. Subjects of similar age and sex, but without AMD, and who did not progress were included as controls (n = 60). Plasma complment components (C3, CFB, CFI, CFH, and factor D) and activation fragments (Bb, C3a, C5a, iC3b, and SC5b-9) were analyzed. DNA samples were genotyped for seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms in six genes previously shown to be associated with AMD: CFB, CFH, C2, C3, and CFI and the LOC387715/ARMS2 gene region. The association between AMD and each complement biomarker was assessed by using logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, and proinflammatory risk factors: smoking and body mass index (BMI). Functional genomic analyses were performed to assess the relationship between the complement markers and genotypes. Concordance, or C, statistics were calculated to assess the effect of complement components and activation fragments in an AMD gene-environment prediction model. Results The highest quartiles of Bb and C5a were significantly associated with advanced AMD, when compared with the lowest quartiles. In multivariate models without genetic variants, the odds ratio (OR) for Bb was 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-8.6), and the OR for C5a was 3.6 (95% CI = 1.2-10.3). With adjustment for genetic variants, these ORs were substantially higher. The alternative pathway regulator CFH was inversely associated with AMD in the model without genotypes (OR = 0.3; P = 0

  4. DNA methylation regulates phenotype-dependent transcriptional activity in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant K.; Baum, Mary; Carbon, John

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is a common epigenetic signaling mechanism associated with silencing of repeated DNA and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes. Here we report that DNA methylation in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is primarily localized within structural genes and modulates transcriptional activity. Major repeat sequences and multigene families are largely free of DNA methylation. Among the genes subject to DNA methylation are those associated with dimorphic transition between yeast and hyphal forms, switching between white and opaque cells, and iron metabolism. Transcriptionally repressed methylated loci showed increased frequency of C-to-T transitions during asexual growth, an evolutionarily stable pattern of repression associated mutation that could bring about genetic alterations under changing environmental or host conditions. Dynamic differential DNA methylation of structural genes may be one factor contributing to morphological plasticity that is cued by nutrition and host interaction. PMID:21730141

  5. Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus in Singapore: clinical phenotypes, disease activity, damage, and autoantibody profiles.

    PubMed

    Tan, J H T; Hoh, S F; Win, M T M; Chan, Y H; Das, L; Arkachaisri, T

    2015-08-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by immune dysregulation affecting patients less than 18 years old. One-fifth of SLE cases are diagnosed during childhood. cSLE presents differently from adults and has a more severe and aggressive course. We describe the clinical and antibody profiles in our cSLE Singapore cohort. All cSLE patients who satisfied the 1997 American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria were captured in our lupus registry from January 2009 to January 2014. Data including demographic, cumulative clinical, serologic data, and damage indices were collected. Adjusted mean SLEDAI-2K (AMS) was used to summarize disease activity over multiple visits. Cluster analysis using non-hierarchical K-means procedure was performed on eight selected antibodies. The 64 patients (female:male ratio 5:1; Chinese 45.3%, Malay 28.1%, Indian 9.4%, and other races 17.2%) had a mean onset age of 11.5 years (range 2.1-16.7) and mean age at diagnosis was 11.9 years (range 2.6-18.0). Our study demonstrated differences in clinical manifestations for which hematologic involvement was the most common manifestation with less renal disease and uncommon neurologic manifestation as compared to other cSLE cohorts reported in our region. Antibody clusters were identified in our cohort but their clinical association/discrimination and outcome prediction required further validation study. Outcomes of our cohort in regard to disease activity after therapy and organ damages were comparable if not better to other cSLE cohorts elsewhere. Steroid-related damage, including symptomatic multifocal avascular necrosis and cataract, were not uncommon locally. Infection remains the major cause of death for the continent. Nevertheless, the five year survival rate of our cohort (98.4%) was high.

  6. Functional/activity network (FAN) analysis of gene-phenotype connectivity liaised by grape polyphenol resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tze-chen; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Bennett, Dylan John; Doonan, Barbara B.; Wu, Erxi; Wu, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol that has witnessed an unprecedented yearly growth in PubMed citations since the late 1990s. Based on the diversity of cellular processes and diseases resveratrol reportedly affects and benefits, it is likely that the interest in resveratrol will continue, although uncertainty regarding its mechanism in different biological systems remains. We hypothesize that insights on disease-modulatory activities of resveratrol might be gleaned by systematically dissecting the publicly available published data on chemicals and drugs. In this study, we tested our hypothesis by querying DTome (Drug-Target Interactome), a web-based tool containing data compiled from open-source databases including DrugBank, PharmGSK, and Protein Interaction Network Analysis (PINA). Four direct protein targets (DPT) and 219 DPT-associated genes were identified for resveratrol. The DPT-associated genes were scrutinized by WebGestalt (WEB-based Gene SeT Analysis Toolkit). This enrichment analysis resulted in 10 identified KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways. Refined analysis of KEGG pathways showed that 2 — one linked to p53 and a second to prostate cancer — have functional connectivity to resveratrol and its four direct protein targets. These results suggest that a functional activity network (FAN) approach may be considered as a new paradigm for guiding future studies of resveratrol. FAN analysis resembles a BioGPS, with capability for mapping a Web-based scientific track that can productively and cost effectively connect resveratrol to its primary and secondary target proteins and to its biological functions. PMID:27232943

  7. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide induces a depressive-like phenotype in rats

    PubMed Central

    Seiglie, Mariel P.; Smith, Karen L.; Blasio, Angelo; Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is a chronic, life-threatening psychiatric condition characterized by depressed mood, psychomotor alterations, and a markedly diminished interest or pleasure in most activities, known as anhedonia. Available pharmacotherapies have limited success and the need for new strategies is clear. Recent studies attribute a major role to the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) system in mediating the response to stress. PACAP knockout mice display profound alterations in depressive-like behaviors and genetic association studies have demonstrated that genetic variants of the PACAP gene are associated with MDD. However, the effects of PACAP on depressive-like behaviors in rodents have not yet been systematically examined. The present study investigated the effects of central administration of PACAP in rats on depressive-like behaviors, using well-established animal models that represent some of the endophenotypes of depression. We used intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) to assess the brain reward function, saccharin preference test to assess anhedonia, social interaction to assess social withdrawal, and forced swim test (FST) to assess behavioral despair. PACAP raised the current threshold for ICSS, elevation blocked by the PACAP antagonist PACAP(6-38). PACAP reduced the preference for a sweet saccharin solution, and reduced the time the rats spent interacting with a novel animal. Interestingly, PACAP administration did not affect immobility in the FST. Our results demonstrate a role for the central PACAP/PAC1R system in the regulation of depressive-like behaviors, and suggest that hyperactivity of the PACAP/PAC1R system may contribute to the pathophysiology of depression, particularly the associated anhedonic symptomatology and social dysfunction. PMID:26264905

  8. M2K Planet Search: Spectroscopic Screening and Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew; Gaidos, E.; Fischer, D.; Lepine, S.

    2010-10-01

    The M2K project is a search for planets orbiting nearby early M and late K dwarf drawn from the SUPERBLINK catalog. M and K dwarfs are highly attractive targets for finding low-mass and habitable planets because (1) close-in planets are more likely to orbit within their habitable zone, (2) planets orbiting them induce a larger Doppler signal and have deeper transits than similar planets around F, G, and early K type stars, (3) planet formation models predict they hold an abundance of super-Earth sized planets, and (4) they represent the vast majority of the stars close enough for direct imaging techniques. In spite of this, only 10% of late K and early M dwarfs are being monitored by current Doppler surveys. As part of the M2K project we have obtained low-resolution spectra for more than 2000 of our sample of 10,000 M and K dwarfs. We vet our sample by screening these stars for high metallicity and low chromospheric activity. We search for transits on targets showing high RMS Doppler signal and photometry candidates provided by SuperWASP project. By using "snapshot” photometry have been able to achieve sub-millimag photometry on numerous transit targets in the same night. With further follow-up observations we will be able to detect planets smaller than 10 Earth masses.

  9. Distinct activation phenotype of a highly conserved novel HLA-B57-restricted epitope during dengue virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Elizabeth; Woda, Marcia; Thomas, Stephen J; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Gibbons, Robert V; Nisalak, Ananda; Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Green, Sharone; Stephens, Henry AF; Rothman, Alan L; Mathew, Anuja

    2014-01-01

    Variation in the sequence of T-cell epitopes between dengue virus (DENV) serotypes is believed to alter memory T-cell responses during second heterologous infections. We identified a highly conserved, novel, HLA-B57-restricted epitope on the DENV NS1 protein. We predicted higher frequencies of B57-NS126–34-specific CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from individuals undergoing secondary rather than primary DENV infection. However, high tetramer-positive T-cell frequencies during acute infection were seen in only one of nine subjects with secondary infection. B57-NS126–34-specific and other DENV epitope-specific CD8+ T cells, as well as total CD8+ T cells, expressed an activated phenotype (CD69+ and/or CD38+) during acute infection. In contrast, expression of CD71 was largely limited to DENV epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. In vitro stimulation of cell lines indicated that CD71 expression was differentially sensitive to stimulation by homologous and heterologous variant peptides. CD71 may represent a useful marker of antigen-specific T-cell activation. PMID:23941420

  10. PME-1 modulates protein phosphatase 2A activity to promote the malignant phenotype of endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wandzioch, Ewa; Pusey, Michelle; Werda, Amy; Bail, Sophie; Bhaskar, Aishwarya; Nestor, Mariya; Yang, Jing-Jing; Rice, Lyndi M

    2014-08-15

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) negatively regulates tumorigenic signaling pathways, in part, by supporting the function of tumor suppressors like p53. The PP2A methylesterase PME-1 limits the activity of PP2A by demethylating its catalytic subunit. Here, we report the finding that PME-1 overexpression correlates with increased cell proliferation and invasive phenotypes in endometrial adenocarcinoma cells, where it helps maintain activated ERK and Akt by inhibiting PP2A. We obtained evidence that PME-1 could bind and regulate protein phosphatase 4 (PP4), a tumor-promoting protein, but not the related protein phosphatase 6 (PP6). When the PP2A, PP4, or PP6 catalytic subunits were overexpressed, inhibiting PME-1 was sufficient to limit cell proliferation. In clinical specimens of endometrial adenocarcinoma, PME-1 levels were increased and we found that PME-1 overexpression was sufficient to drive tumor growth in a xenograft model of the disease. Our findings identify PME-1 as a modifier of malignant development and suggest its candidacy as a diagnostic marker and as a therapeutic target in endometrial cancer.

  11. Distinct activation phenotype of a highly conserved novel HLA-B57-restricted epitope during dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Townsley, Elizabeth; Woda, Marcia; Thomas, Stephen J; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Gibbons, Robert V; Nisalak, Ananda; Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Green, Sharone; Stephens, Henry A F; Rothman, Alan L; Mathew, Anuja

    2014-01-01

    Variation in the sequence of T-cell epitopes between dengue virus (DENV) serotypes is believed to alter memory T-cell responses during second heterologous infections. We identified a highly conserved, novel, HLA-B57-restricted epitope on the DENV NS1 protein. We predicted higher frequencies of B57-NS1(26-34) -specific CD8(+) T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from individuals undergoing secondary rather than primary DENV infection. However, high tetramer-positive T-cell frequencies during acute infection were seen in only one of nine subjects with secondary infection. B57-NS1(26-34) -specific and other DENV epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells, as well as total CD8(+) T cells, expressed an activated phenotype (CD69(+) and/or CD38(+)) during acute infection. In contrast, expression of CD71 was largely limited to DENV epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells. In vitro stimulation of cell lines indicated that CD71 expression was differentially sensitive to stimulation by homologous and heterologous variant peptides. CD71 may represent a useful marker of antigen-specific T-cell activation.

  12. Sprouty1 induces a senescence-associated secretory phenotype by regulating NFκB activity: implications for tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Macià, A; Vaquero, M; Gou-Fàbregas, M; Castelblanco, E; Valdivielso, J M; Anerillas, C; Mauricio, D; Matias-Guiu, X; Ribera, J; Encinas, M

    2014-01-01

    Genes of the Sprouty family (Spry1–4) are feedback inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. As such, they restrain proliferation of many cell types and have been proposed as tumor-suppressor genes. Although their most widely accepted target is the Extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) pathway, the mechanisms by which Spry proteins inhibit RTK signaling are poorly understood. In the present work, we describe a novel mechanism by which Spry1 restricts proliferation, independently of the ERK pathway. In vivo analysis of thyroid glands from Spry1 knockout mice reveals that Spry1 induces a senescence-associated secretory phenotype via activation of the NFκB pathway. Consistently, thyroids from Spry1 knockout mice are bigger and exhibit decreased markers of senescence including Ki67 labeling and senescence-associated β-galactosidase. Although such ‘escape' from senescence is not sufficient to promote thyroid tumorigenesis in adult mice up to 5 months, the onset of Phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten)-induced tumor formation is accelerated when Spry1 is concomitantly eliminated. Accordingly, we observe a reduction of SPRY1 levels in human thyroid malignancies when compared with non-tumoral tissue. We propose that Spry1 acts as a sensor of mitogenic activity that not only attenuates RTK signaling but also induces a cellular senescence response to avoid uncontrolled proliferation. PMID:24270409

  13. GALNT6 expression enhances aggressive phenotypes of ovarian cancer cells by regulating EGFR activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Chi; Chen, Syue-Ting; Huang, Min-Chuan; Huang, John; Hsu, Chia-Lang; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Lin, Ho-Hsiung; Chen, Chi-Hau

    2017-03-28

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal of the gynecologic malignancies. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 6 (GALNT6), an enzyme that mediates the initial step of mucin type-O glycosylation, has been reported to regulate mammary carcinogenesis. However, the expression and role of GALNT6 in ovarian cancer are still unclear. Here we showed that high GALNT6 expression correlates with increased recurrence, lymph node metastasis, and chemoresistance in ovarian endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas; and higher GALNT6 levels are significantly associated with poorer patient survivals. GALNT6 knockdown with two independent siRNAs significantly suppressed viability, migration, and invasion of ovarian cancer cells. Using phospho-RTK array and Western blot analyses, we identified EGFR as a critical target of GALNT6. GALNT6 knockdown decreased phosphorylation of EGFR, whereas GALNT6 overexpression increased the phosphorylation. Lectin pull-down assays with Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) indicated that GALNT6 was able to modify O-glycans on EGFR. Moreover, the GALNT6-enhanced invasive behavior was significantly reversed by erlotinib, an EGFR inhibitor. Our results suggest that GALNT6 expression is associated with poor prognosis of ovarian cancer and enhances the aggressive behavior of ovarian cancer cells by regulating EGFR activity.

  14. Overexpression of SMC4 activates TGFβ/Smad signaling and promotes aggressive phenotype in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Zhou, J; Zhong, D; Zhou, Y; Zhang, W; Wu, W; Zhao, Z; Wang, W; Xu, W; He, L; Ma, Y; Hu, Y; Zhang, W; Li, J

    2017-03-13

    Overexpression of structural maintenance of chromosomes 4 (SMC4) has been reported to be involved in tumor cell growth, migration and invasion, and to be correlated with poor prognosis of cancer patient. However, its clinical significance and biological role in glioma remain unknown. Herein, we found that SMC4 expression at both mRNA and protein level was markedly increased in glioma cells and clinical tissues and that it correlated with poor prognosis. SMC4 overexpression markedly promoted the glioma cell proliferation rate and migration and invasive capability in vitro and in vivo, whereas SMC4 downregulation reduced it. Moreover, the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Smad signaling pathway, which was activated in SMC4-transduced glioma cells and inhibited in SMC4-silenced glioma cells, contributed to SMC4-mediated glioma cell aggressiveness. Our results provide new insight into the oncofunction of SMC4 and the mechanism by which the TGFβ/Smad pathway is hyperactivated in gliomas, indicating that SMC4 is a valuable prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target in gliomas.

  15. Natural product extracts of the Canadian prairie plant, Thermopsis rhombifolia, have anti-cancer activity in phenotypic cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Kernéis, Sophie; Swift, Lucy H; Lewis, Cody W; Bruyère, Céline; Oumata, Nassima; Colas, Pierre; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Bain, John; Golsteyn, Roy M

    2015-01-01

    Many plant species within the terrestrial ecological zones of Canada have not yet been investigated for anti-cancer activity. We examined the scientific literature describing the endemic flora from the prairie ecological zone and selected the species, Thermopsis rhombifolia, locally known as the buffalo bean, for investigation of its anti-cancer potential. We tested it in cell-based assays using phenotypic screens that feature some of the hallmarks of cancer. An ethanolic extract prepared from T. rhombifolia was cytotoxic to HT-29 (colon) and SH-SY5Y (brain) cancer cell lines, and showed little cytotoxicity to a normal human cell line (WI-38). In phenotypic assays, we identified activities in the extracts that target cell death, cell cycle and cell adhesion. These data highlight the anti-cancer potential of previously untested plants found in northern ecological zones and the feasibility of using pertinent phenotypic assays to examine the anti-cancer potential of natural product extracts.

  16. Deficiency in the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 increases M2 polarization of microglia and attenuates brain damage from photothrombotic ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dai-Shi; Li, Chun-Yu; Qin, Chuan; Murugan, Madhuvika; Wu, Long-Jun; Liu, Jun-Li

    2016-10-01

    Microglia become activated during cerebral ischemia and exert pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory role dependent of microglial polarization. NADPH oxidase (NOX)-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in microglia plays an important role in neuronal damage after ischemic stroke. Recently, NOX and ROS are consistently reported to participate in the microglial activation and polarization; NOX2 inhibition or suppression of ROS production are shown to shift the microglial polarization from M1 toward M2 state after stroke. The voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1, is selectively expressed in microglia and is required for NOX-dependent ROS generation in the brain. However, the effect of Hv1 proton channel on microglial M1/M2 polarization state after cerebral ischemia remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of microglial Hv1 proton channel in modulating microglial M1/M2 polarization during the pathogenesis of ischemic cerebral injury using a mouse model of photothrombosis. Following photothrombotic ischemic stroke, wild-type mice presented obvious brain infarct, neuronal damage, and impaired motor coordination. However, mice lacking Hv1 (Hv1(-/-)) were partially protected from brain damage and motor deficits compared to wild-type mice. These rescued phenotypes in Hv1(-/-) mice in ischemic stroke is accompanied by reduced ROS production, shifted the microglial polarization from M1 to M2 state. Hv1 deficiency was also found to shift the M1/M2 polarization in primary cultured microglia. Our study suggests that the microglial Hv1 proton channel is a unique target for modulation of microglial M1/M2 polarization in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. The voltage-gated proton channel, Hv1, is selectively expressed in microglia and is required for NOX-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain. ROS participate in microglial activation and polarization. However, the effect of Hv1 on microglial M1/M2 polarization state after

  17. The Role of Macrophage Phenotype in Vascularization of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Kara L.; Anfang, Rachel; Spiller, Krista J.; Ng, Johnathan; Nakazawa, Kenneth R.; Daulton, Jeffrey W.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is crucial for the success of most tissue engineering strategies. The natural inflammatory response is a major regulator of vascularization, through the activity of different types of macrophages and the cytokines they secrete. Macrophages exist on a spectrum of diverse phenotypes, from “classically activated” M1 to “alternatively activated” M2 macrophages. M2 macrophages, including the subsets M2a and M2c, are typically considered to promote angiogenesis and tissue regeneration, while M1 macrophages are considered to be anti-angiogenic, although these classifications are controversial. Here we show that in contrast to this traditional paradigm, primary human M1 macrophages secrete the highest levels of potent angiogenic stimulators including VEGF; M2a macrophages secrete the highest levels of PDGF-BB, a chemoattractant stabilizing pericytes, and also promote anastomosis of sprouting endothelial cells in vitro; and M2c macrophages secrete the highest levels of MMP9, an important protease involved in vascular remodeling. In a murine subcutaneous implantation model, porous collagen scaffolds were surrounded by a fibrous capsule, coincident with high expression of M2 macrophage markers, while scaffolds coated with the bacterial lipopolysaccharide were degraded by inflammatory macrophages, and glutaraldehyde-crosslinked scaffolds were infiltrated by substantial numbers of blood vessels accompanied by high levels of M1 and M2 macrophages. These results suggest that coordinated efforts by both M1 and M2 macrophages are required for angiogenesis and scaffold vascularization, which may explain some of the controversy over which phenotype is the angiogenic phenotype. PMID:24589361

  18. Progeny from irradiated colorectal cancer cells acquire an EMT-like phenotype and activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Lilian Gonçalves dos Reis; de Marcondes, Priscila Guimarães; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio Cesar Madureira; Leve, Fernanda; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza, Waldemir Fernandes; de Araujo, Wallace Martins; Tanaka, Marcelo Neves; Abdelhay, Eliana Saul Furquim Werneck; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés

    2014-12-01

    Radiotherapy remains a major approach to adjuvant therapy for patients with advanced colorectal cancer, however, the fractionation schedules frequently allow for the repopulation of surviving tumors cells, neoplastic progression, and subsequent metastasis. The aim of the present study was to analyze the transgenerational effects induced by radiation and evaluate whether it could increase the malignant features on the progeny derived from irradiated parental colorectal cancer cells, Caco-2, HT-29, and HCT-116. The progeny of these cells displayed a differential radioresistance as seen by clonogenic and caspase activation assay and had a direct correlation with survivin expression as observed by immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence showed that the most radioresistant progenies had an aberrant morphology, disturbance of the cell-cell adhesion contacts, disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, and vimentin filaments. Only the progeny derived from intermediary radioresistant cells, HT-29, reduced the E-cadherin expression and overexpressed β-catenin and vimentin with increased cell migration, invasion, and metalloprotease activation as seen by immunoblotting, wound healing, invasion, and metalloprotease activity assay. We also observed that this most aggressive progeny increased the Wnt/β-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF activity and underwent an upregulation of mesenchymal markers and downregulation of E-cadherin, as determined by qRT-PCR. Our results showed that the intermediate radioresistant cells can generate more aggressive cellular progeny with the EMT-like phenotype. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway may constitute an important target for new adjuvant treatment schedules with radiotherapy, with the goal of reducing the migratory and invasive potential of the remaining cells after treatment.

  19. [Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance phenotypes in clinical Staphylococcus isolates and investigation of telithromycin activity].

    PubMed

    Uzun, Berrin; Güngör, Serdar; Pektaş, Bayram; Aksoy Gökmen, Ayşegül; Yula, Erkan; Koçal, Funda; Kaya, Selçuk

    2014-07-01

    Staphylococci are one of the most common pathogens isolated from nosocomial and community acquired infections. Antibiotics such as clindamycin and erythromycin have been useful options for treating skin and soft-tissue infections caused by staphylococci. However, expression of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance (MLSB) can limit the effectiveness of these drugs. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence and phenotypes of MLSB resistance in staphylococcus strains isolated from clinical samples and to determine the telithromycin activity against these isolates. A total of 218 strains [92 Staphylococcus aureus and 126 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS)] isolated from different clinical samples (wound, abscess, blood, sterile body fluids, catheter, upper respiratory tract samples) between February 2011 to December 2012 were included in the study. The isolates were identified by using conventional methods and automated bacterial identification system (BD Phoenix 100™ System, Becton Dickinson, USA). Methicillin resistance of the isolates was determined with the use of cefoxitin (30 µg) disk and telithromycin (15 µg) activity was detected by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. MLSB resistance phenotypes were investigated by the D-test method using erythromycin (15 µg) and clindamycin (2 µg) disks. Of 92 S.aureus isolates, 23 were methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and 69 were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA), whereas 78 of 126 CNS isolates were methicillin-resistant (MRCNS) and 48 were methicillin-susceptible (MSCNS). Hundred and seventy-two (79%) isolates were found as erythromycin-resistant, and the rates of erythromycin resistance in MRSA, MSSA, MRCNS and MSCNS strains were 83%, 71%, 95% and 63%, respectively. Inducible type of MLSB resistance (iMLSB type) was observed in 26%, 6%, 51% and 33%; chromosomal resistance (cMLSB type) in 32%, 27%, 27% and 17% and efflux pump connected resistance (MSB type) in 42%, 67%, 22% and 50% of the MRSA

  20. ABJ(M) and fractional M2's with fractional M2 charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evslin, Jarah; Kuperstein, Stanislav

    2009-12-01

    Recently Aharony, Bergman and Jafferis (ABJ) have argued that a 3d U(N+M)k × U(N)-k Chern-Simons gauge theory may have a vacuum with Script N = 6 supersymmetry only if M<=k and if a certain period of the B-field in a IIA background is quantized. We use a braneology argument to argue that Script N = 3 supersymmetry may be preserved under the weaker condition that 2Nk>=M(M-k) with no restriction on the B-field. IIB brane cartoons and 11d supergravity solutions corresponding to Script N = 3 vacua that do not preserve Script N = 6 supersymmetry are argued to represent cascading gauge theories, generalizing the Script N = 2 Seiberg duality conjectured by Giveon and Kutasov. While as usual the M2-brane charge runs as a result of the twisted Bianchi identity for *G4, the M5-brane charge running relies on the fact that it wraps a torsion homology cycle.

  1. AHCC Activation and Selection of Human Lymphocytes via Genotypic and Phenotypic Changes to an Adherent Cell Type: A Possible Novel Mechanism of T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Olamigoke, Loretta; Mansoor, Elvedina; Mann, Vivek; Ellis, Ivory; Okoro, Elvis; Wakame, Koji; Fuji, Hajime; Kulkarni, Anil; Francoise Doursout, Marie; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2015-01-01

    Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) is a fermented mushroom extract and immune supplement that has been used to treat a wide range of health conditions. It helps in augmentation of the natural immune response and affects immune cell activation and outcomes. The goal of this project was to study and understand the role and mechanisms of AHCC supplementation in the prevention of immunosuppression through T cell activation. The method described here involves “in vitro” culturing of lymphocytes, exposing them to different concentrations of AHCC (0 μg/mL, 50 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL, 250 μg/mL, and 500 μg/mL) at 0 hours. Interestingly, clumping and aggregation of the cells were seen between 24 and 72 hours of incubation. The cells lay down extracellular matrix, which become adherent, and phenotypical changes from small rounded lymphocytes to large macrophage-like, spindle shaped, elongated, fibroblast-like cells even beyond 360 hours were observed. These are probably translated from genotypic changes in the cells since the cells propagate for at least 3 to 6 generations (present observations). RNA isolated was subjected to gene array analysis. We hypothesize that cell adhesion is an activation and survival pathway in lymphocytes and this could be the mechanism of AHCC activation in human lymphocytes. PMID:26788109

  2. Engagement of the Mannose Receptor by Tumoral Mucins Activates an Immune Suppressive Phenotype in Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Allavena, P.; Chieppa, M.; Bianchi, G.; Solinas, G.; Fabbri, M.; Laskarin, G.; Mantovani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs) are abundantly present in the stroma of solid tumors and modulate several important biological processes, such as neoangiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion, and suppression of adaptive immune responses. Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) constitute a large family of transmembrane carbohydrate-binding receptors that recognize pathogens as well as endogenous glycoproteins. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that some CLRs can inhibit the immune response. In this study we investigated TAM-associated molecules potentially involved in their immune suppressive activity. We found that TAMs isolated from human ovarian carcinoma samples predominantly express the CLRs Dectin-1, MDL-1, MGL, DCIR, and most abundantly the Mannose Receptor (MR). Components of carcinomatous ascites and purified tumoral mucins (CA125 and TAG-72) bound the MR and induced its internalization. MR engagement by tumoral mucins and by an agonist anti-MR antibody modulated cytokine production by TAM toward an immune-suppressive profile: increase of IL-10, absence of IL-12, and decrease of the Th1-attracting chemokine CCL3. This study highlights that tumoral mucin-mediated ligation of the MR on infiltrating TAM may contribute to their immune suppressive phenotype. PMID:21331365

  3. Ascaris lumbricoides pseudocoelomic body fluid induces a partially activated dendritic cell phenotype with Th2 promoting ability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dowling, David J; Noone, Cariosa M; Adams, Paul N; Vukman, Krisztina V; Molloy, Sile F; Forde, Jessica; Asaolu, Samuel; O'Neill, Sandra M

    2011-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) matured with helminth-derived molecules that promote Th2 immune responses do not follow conventional definitions of DC maturation processes. While a number of models of DC maturation by Th2 stimuli are postulated, further studies are required if we are to clearly define DC maturation processes that lead to Th2 immune responses. In this study, we examine the interaction of Th2-inducing molecules from the parasitic helminth Ascaris lumbricoides with the maturation processes and function of DCs. Here we show that murine bone marrow-derived DCs are partially matured by A. lumbricoides pseudocoelomic body fluid (ABF) as characterised by the production of IL-6, IL-12p40 and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) but no enhanced expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)-14, T-cell co-stimulatory markers CD80, CD86, CD40, OX40L and major histocompatibility complex class II was observed. Despite these phenotypic characteristics, ABF-stimulated DCs displayed the functional hallmarks of fully matured cells, enhancing DC phagocytosis and promoting Th2-type responses in skin-draining lymph node cells in vivo. ABF activated Th2-associated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and nuclear factor-kB intracellular signalling pathways independently of toll-like receptor 4. Taken together, we believe this is the first paper to demonstrate A. lumbricoides murine DC-Th cell-driven responses shedding further light on DC maturation processes by helminth antigens.

  4. Surface modification of nanoparticles enables selective evasion of phagocytic clearance by distinct macrophage phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qie, Yaqing; Yuan, Hengfeng; von Roemeling, Christina A.; Chen, Yuanxin; Liu, Xiujie; Shih, Kevin D.; Knight, Joshua A.; Tun, Han W.; Wharen, Robert E.; Jiang, Wen; Kim, Betty Y. S.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomedicine is a burgeoning industry but an understanding of the interaction of nanomaterials with the immune system is critical for clinical translation. Macrophages play a fundamental role in the immune system by engulfing foreign particulates such as nanoparticles. When activated, macrophages form distinct phenotypic populations with unique immune functions, however the mechanism by which these polarized macrophages react to nanoparticles is unclear. Furthermore, strategies to selectively evade activated macrophage subpopulations are lacking. Here we demonstrate that stimulated macrophages possess higher phagocytic activities and that classically activated (M1) macrophages exhibit greater phagocytic capacity than alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. We show that modification of nanoparticles with polyethylene-glycol results in decreased clearance by all macrophage phenotypes, but importantly, coating nanoparticles with CD47 preferentially lowers phagocytic activity by the M1 phenotype. These results suggest that bio-inspired nanoparticle surface design may enable evasion of specific components of the immune system and provide a rational approach for developing immune tolerant nanomedicines.

  5. Development of Phenotypic and Transcriptional Biomarkers to Evaluate Relative Activity of Potentially Estrogenic Chemicals in Ovariectomized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Pockette, Brianna; Kerns, Robnet T.; Foley, Julie F.; Flagler, Norris; Ney, Elizabeth; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Bushel, Pierre R.; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Concerns regarding potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have led to a need for methods to evaluate candidate estrogenic chemicals. Our previous evaluations of two such EDCs revealed a response similar to that of estradiol (E2) at 2 hr, but a less robust response at 24 hr, similar to the short-acting estrogen estriol (E3). Objectives: Microarray analysis using tools to recognize patterns of response have been utilized in the cancer field to develop biomarker panels of transcripts for diagnosis and selection of treatments most likely to be effective. Biological effects elicited by long- versus short-acting estrogens greatly affect the risks associated with exposures; therefore, we sought to develop tools to predict the ability of chemicals to maintain estrogenic responses. Methods: We used biological end points in uterine tissue and a signature pattern–recognizing tool that identified coexpressed transcripts to develop and test a panel of transcripts in order to classify potentially estrogenic compounds using an in vivo system. The end points used are relevant to uterine tissue, but the resulting classification of the compounds is important for other sensitive tissues and species. Results: We evaluated biological and transcriptional end points with proven short- and long-acting estrogens and verified the use of our approach using a phytoestrogen. With our model, we were able to classify the diarylheptanoid D3 as a short-acting estrogen. Conclusions: We have developed a panel of transcripts as biomarkers which, together with biological end points, might be used to screen and evaluate potentially estrogenic chemicals and infer mode of activity. Citation: Hewitt SC, Winuthayanon W, Pockette B, Kerns RT, Foley JF, Flagler N, Ney E, Suksamrarn A, Piyachaturawat P, Bushel PR, Korach KS. 2015. Development of phenotypic and transcriptional biomarkers to evaluate relative activity of potentially estrogenic chemicals in ovariectomized mice. Environ

  6. Activation of vasopressin neurons leads to phenotype progression in a mouse model for familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Hiroi, Maiko; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Hayashi, Masayuki; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Shiota, Akira; Oiso, Yutaka; Arima, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Familial neurohypophysial diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is a rare disease that is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. In a previous study, we made a mouse model for FNDI, which showed progressive polyuria accompanied by inclusion bodies in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) neurons formed by aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum. The present study was conducted to determine whether the activities of AVP neurons are related to the phenotype progression in the FNDI model. In the first experiment, female heterozygous mice were administered either desmopressin (dDAVP) or a vehicle (control) subcutaneously with osmotic minipumps for 30 days. The dDAVP treatment significantly decreased the urine volume, AVP mRNA expression, and inclusion bodies in the AVP neurons. Urine volume in the dDAVP group remained significantly less than the control for 14 days even after the minipumps were removed. In the second experiment, the males were fed either a 0.2% Na or 2.0% Na diet for 6 mo. Urine AVP excretion was significantly increased in the 2.0% Na group compared with the 0.2% Na group for the first 2 mo but gradually decreased thereafter. Throughout the experiments, urine volume increased progressively in the 2.0% Na group but not in the 0.2% Na group. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that inclusion bodies in the AVP cells had significantly increased in the 2.0% Na compared with the 0.2% Na group. These data demonstrated that activation of AVP neurons could accelerate the aggregate formation as well as the progression of the polyuria in the FNDI model mice.

  7. Phenotypic changes in colonocytes following acute stress or activation of mast cells in mice: implications for delayed epithelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Demaude, J; Salvador‐Cartier, C; Fioramonti, J; Ferrier, L; Bueno, L

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim Stressful life events are known to modulate the development or relapse of disease in both inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel disease patients but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Stress is known to effect mast cells, interferon γ (IFN‐γ), and myosin light chain phosphorylation to trigger colonic epithelial barrier dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute stress induced or chemical mast cell activation impaired expression and function of epithelial tight junctions, and altered colonocyte differentiation in mice. Methods Colonic paracellular permeability was assessed as the in vivo lumen to blood ratio of 51Cr‐EDTA in different groups of mice (controls, stressed, mast cell degranulator BrX‐537A treated), pretreated or not with the mast cell stabiliser doxantrazole. Involvement of mast cells and IFN‐γ was evaluated in wild‐type and IFN‐γ deficient mice. Tight junction alteration was assessed by histology, transmission electron microscopy, and real time reverse transcription‐polymerase chain reaction. Colonocyte differentiation was determined by protein kinase C ζ (PKCζ) immunofluorescence and western blotting, and alkaline phosphatase activity assay. Results Acute stress induced a three day delayed increase in colonic paracellular permeability which involved mast cell degranulation and overproduction of IFN‐γ. The colonic epithelial barrier was morphologically altered and expression of mRNA encoding tight junction proteins ZO‐2 and occludin was decreased. Moreover, three days after acute stress, colonocyte differentiation was reduced, as shown by decreased expression of both PKCζ isotype and alkaline phosphatase. Conclusion These data highlight new mechanisms whereby an acute stress acts on the gastrointestinal tract by inducing alterations in colonocyte differentiation and decreased expression of mRNA encoding tight junction proteins. Thus phenotypic changes in colonocytes could

  8. Increases of M2a macrophages and fibrosis in aging muscle are influenced by bone marrow aging and negatively regulated by muscle-derived nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle; Samengo, Giuseppina; Tidball, James G

    2015-08-01

    Muscle aging is associated with changes in myeloid cell phenotype that may influence age-related changes in muscle structure. We tested whether preventing age-related reductions in muscle neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) would obviate age-related changes in myeloid cells in muscle. Our findings show that muscle aging is associated with elevations of anti-inflammatory M2a macrophages that can increase muscle fibrosis. Expression of a muscle-specific nNOS transgene in mice prevented age-related increases in M2a macrophages. Transgene expression also reduced expression of collagens and decreased muscle fibrosis. The nNOS transgene prevented age-related increases in arginase-1 but did not influence TGFβ expression, indicating that the transgene may prevent age-related muscle fibrosis by inhibiting the arginase-dependent profibrotic pathway. Although aged satellite cells or fibro-adipogenic precursor (FAPs) cells also promote fibrosis, transgene expression had no effect on the expression of key signaling molecules that regulate fibrogenic activity of those cells. Finally, we tested whether increases in M2a macrophages and the associated increase in fibrosis were attributable to aging of myeloid lineage cells. Young bone marrow cells (BMCs) were transplanted into young or old mice, and muscles were collected 8 months later. Muscles of young mice receiving young BMCs showed no effect on M2a macrophage number or collagen accumulation compared to age-matched, nontransplanted controls. However, muscles of old mice receiving young BMCs showed fewer M2a macrophages and less accumulation of collagen. Thus, the age-related increase in M2a macrophages in aging muscle and the associated muscle fibrosis are determined in part by the age of bone marrow cells.

  9. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-2 - ACP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false ACP test. 1.401(m)-2 Section 1.401(m)-2 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(m)-2 ACP test. (a) Actual contribution percentage (ACP) test—(1) In general—(i) ACP test formula. A plan satisfies the ACP test for...

  10. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-2 - ACP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false ACP test. 1.401(m)-2 Section 1.401(m)-2 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(m)-2 ACP test. (a) Actual... under paragraph (a)(1) of this section either— (A) Pursuant to section 401(m)(5)(C), the ACP test...

  11. M2/M1 Ratio of Tumor Associated Macrophages and PPAR-gamma Expression in Uveal Melanomas with Class 1 and Class 2 Molecular Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Herwig, Martina C.; Bergstrom, Chris; Wells, Jill R.; Höller, Tobias; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages have been found to be negative predictors of outcome in patients with uveal melanoma. In particular, recent studies point towards a disease-progressing role of proangiogenic M2 macrophages in melanomas with monosomy 3. Although most studies implicate a protective effect of PPAR-gamma activation in tumors, PPAR-gamma has also been shown to promote the polarization of M1 macrophages towards the M2 phenotype. The purpose of this investigation was first, to characterize the phenotype of tumor infiltrating macrophages and second, to study PPAR-gamma expression in uveal melanomas with molecular gene expression profile as prognostic predictors for patients’ outcome. Twenty specimens from patients with uveal melanoma were analyzed for clinical and histologic tumor characteristics. The molecular RNA profile (class 1 or class 2) was commercially determined. Using immunohistochemical techniques, the specimens were dual labeled for CD68 and CD163. CD68+CD163− M1 macrophages and CD68+CD163+ M2 macrophages were analyzed in ten high power fields sparing macrophage-poor areas and a mean value was calculated for each tumor. The tumors were immunostained for von Willebrand factor and the mean vascular density (MVD) was analyzed according to Foss. To assess the proliferative rate of each tumor, Ki67 expression was evaluated in ten high power fields followed by calculation of a mean value. Expression of PPAR-gamma was evaluated using a score from 0 (no staining) to 3 (tumor entirely stained). Statistical analysis and a respective correlation was made between histologic characteristics, molecular profile, type of tumor infiltrating macrophages (M1 versus M2), MVD, proliferative rate, and PPAR-gamma expression. Our results showed a correlation between the ratio of M2/M1 macrophages and the molecular profile with a ratio of approximately 1 corresponding to molecular class 1 and a ratio of approximately 2 corresponding to molecular class 2 (p=0.01). The ratio of M2/M1

  12. Characterization of phenotype markers and neuronotoxic potential of polarised primary microglia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chhor, Vibol; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Lebon, Sophie; Oré, Marie-Virgine; Celador, Idoia Lara; Josserand, Julien; Degos, Vincent; Jacotot, Etienne; Hagberg, Henrik; Sävman, Karin; Mallard, Carina; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi

    2013-01-01

    Microglia mediate multiple facets of neuroinflammation, including cytotoxicity, repair, regeneration, and immunosuppression due to their ability to acquire diverse activation states, or phenotypes. Modulation of microglial phenotype is an appealing neurotherapeutic strategy but a comprehensive study of classical and more novel microglial phenotypic markers in vitro is lacking. The aim of this study was to outline the temporal expression of a battery of phenotype markers from polarised microglia to generate an in vitro tool for screening the immunomodulatory potential of novel compounds. We characterised expression of thirty-one macrophage/microglial phenotype markers in primary microglia over time (4, 12, 36, and 72 h), using RT-qPCR or multiplex protein assay. Firstly, we selected Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the strongest M1–M2 polarising stimuli, from six stimuli tested. At each time point, markers useful to identify that microglia were M1 included iNOS, Cox-2 and IL-6 and a loss of M2a markers. Markers useful for quantifying M2b-immunomodulatory microglia included, increased IL-1RA and SOCS3 and for M2a-repair and regeneration, included increased arginase-1, and a loss of the M1 and M2b markers were discriminatory. Additional markers were regulated at fewer time points, but are still likely important to monitor when assessing the immunomodulatory potential of novel therapies. Further, to facilitate identification of how novel immunomodulatory treatments alter the functional affects of microglia, we characterised how the soluble products from polarised microglia affected the type and rate of neuronal death; M1/2b induced increasing and M2a-induced decreasing neuronal loss. We also assessed any effects of prior activation state, to provide a way to identify how a novel compound may alter phenotype depending on the stage of injury/insult progression. We identified generally that a prior M1/2b reduced the ability of microglia to switch to

  13. Suppression by enhanced RpoE activity of the temperature-sensitive phenotype of a degP ssrA double mutant in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ono, Katsuhiko; Kutsukake, Kazuhiro; Abo, Tatsuhiko

    2009-02-01

    SsrA is a small RNA playing a crucial role in trans-translation, which leads to rescue of stalled ribosomes on or at the end of mRNA and addition of the degradation tag to a growing polypeptide. The lack of SsrA has been shown to enhance the temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype of an E. coli strain defective in the degP gene, which encodes one of the periplasmic proteases. This severe ts phenotype was relieved only partially by an SsrADD variant, which can lead to ribosome rescue but adds a protease-resistant tag instead of the degradation tag, suggesting that accumulation of polypeptides programmed by truncated mRNAs is responsible for growth defect of the ssrA degP mutant. Expression of an S210A-mutant DegP protein, which lacks the protease activity but retains the chaperone activity, could relieve the ts phenotype of the double mutant, suggesting that the chaperone activity but not the protease activity of DegP is required for growth of the ssrA-deficient cells at high temperature. Overexpression of the rpoE gene, which encodes sigmaE responsible for the expression of factors involved in extracellular stress response, also suppressed the ts phenotype of the ssrA degP mutant. This suggests that the stress-responsing pathway(s) may be involved in the enhancement of ts phenotype of degP mutant in the absence of SsrA.

  14. Dietary oleic acid increases m2 macrophages in the mesenteric adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Camell, Christina; Smith, C Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have implicated fatty-acids as inflammatory regulators, suggesting that there may be a direct role for common dietary fatty-acids in regulating innate immune cells. In humans, a single high-fat meal increases systemic cytokines and leukocytes. In mice, short term high-fat feeding increases adipose tissue (AT) leukocytes and alters the inflammatory profile of AT macrophages. We have seen that short term high fat feeding to C57BL/6J male mice increases palmitic and oleic acid within AT depots, but oleic acid increase is highest in the mesenteric AT (MAT). In vitro, oleic acid increases M2 macrophage markers (CD206, MGL1, and ARG1) in a murine macrophage cell line, while addition of palmitic acid is able to inhibit that increase. Three day supplementation of a chow diet, with oleic acid, induced an increase in M2 macrophage markers in the MAT, but not in the epididymal AT. We tested whether increases in M2 macrophages occur during short term ad lib feeding of a high fat diet, containing oleic acid. Experiments revealed two distinct populations of macrophages were altered by a three day high milk-fat diet. One population, phenotypically intermediate for F4/80, showed diet-induced increases in CD206, an anti-inflammatory marker characteristic of M2 macrophages intrinsic to the AT. Evidence for a second population, phenotypically F4/80(HI)CD11b(HI) macrophages, showed increased association with the MAT following short term feeding that is dependent on the adhesion molecule, ICAM-1. Collectively, we have shown that short term feeding of a high-fat diet changes two population of macrophages, and that dietary oleic acid is responsible for increases in M2 macrophage polarization.

  15. The metastasis inducer CCN1 (CYR61) activates the fatty acid synthase (FASN)-driven lipogenic phenotype in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Vellon, Luciano; Espinoza, Ingrid; Lupu, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic inducer CCN1 (Cysteine-rich 61, CYR61) is differentially activated in metastatic breast carcinomas. However, little is known about the precise mechanisms that underlie the pro-metastatic actions of CCN1. Here, we investigated the impact of CCN1 expression on fatty acid synthase (FASN), a metabolic oncogene thought to provide cancer cells with proliferative and survival advantages. Forced expression of CCN1 in MCF-7 cells robustly up-regulated FASN protein expression and also significantly increased FASN gene promoter activity 2- to 3-fold, whereas deletion of the sterol response element-binding protein (SREBP) binding site in the FASN promoter completely abrogated CCN1-driven transcriptional activation. Pharmacological blockade of MAPK or PI-3'K activation similarly prevented the ability of CCN1 to induce FASN gene activation. Pharmacological inhibition of FASN activity with the mycotoxin cerulenin or the small compound C75 reversed CCN1-induced acquisition of estrogen independence and resistance to hormone therapies such as tamoxifen and fulvestrant in anchorage-independent growth assays. This study uncovers FASNdependent endogenous lipogenesis as a new mechanism controlling the metastatic phenotype promoted by CCN1. Because estrogen independence and progression to a metastatic phenotype are hallmarks of therapeutic resistance and mortality in breast cancer, this previously unrecognized CCN1-driven lipogenic phenotype represents a novel metabolic target to clinically manage metastatic disease progression. PMID:27713913

  16. The metastasis inducer CCN1 (CYR61) activates the fatty acid synthase (FASN)-driven lipogenic phenotype in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Vellon, Luciano; Espinoza, Ingrid; Lupu, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic inducer CCN1 (Cysteine-rich 61, CYR61) is differentially activated in metastatic breast carcinomas. However, little is known about the precise mechanisms that underlie the pro-metastatic actions of CCN1. Here, we investigated the impact of CCN1 expression on fatty acid synthase (FASN), a metabolic oncogene thought to provide cancer cells with proliferative and survival advantages. Forced expression of CCN1 in MCF-7 cells robustly up-regulated FASN protein expression and also significantly increased FASN gene promoter activity 2- to 3-fold, whereas deletion of the sterol response element-binding protein (SREBP) binding site in the FASN promoter completely abrogated CCN1-driven transcriptional activation. Pharmacological blockade of MAPK or PI-3'K activation similarly prevented the ability of CCN1 to induce FASN gene activation. Pharmacological inhibition of FASN activity with the mycotoxin cerulenin or the small compound C75 reversed CCN1-induced acquisition of estrogen independence and resistance to hormone therapies such as tamoxifen and fulvestrant in anchorage-independent growth assays. This study uncovers FASNdependent endogenous lipogenesis as a new mechanism controlling the metastatic phenotype promoted by CCN1. Because estrogen independence and progression to a metastatic phenotype are hallmarks of therapeutic resistance and mortality in breast cancer, this previously unrecognized CCN1-driven lipogenic phenotype represents a novel metabolic target to clinically manage metastatic disease progression.

  17. Degradation of G(M1) and G(M2) by mammalian sialidases.

    PubMed Central

    Li, S C; Li, Y T; Moriya, S; Miyagi, T

    2001-01-01

    In mammalian tissues, the pathway known for the catabolism of G(M1) [Galbeta3GalNAcbeta4(Neu5Acalpha3)Galbeta4GlcCer; where Cer is ceramide] is the conversion of this ganglioside into G(M2) [GalNAcbeta4(Neu5Acalpha3)Galbeta4GlcbetaCer] by beta-galactosidase followed by the conversion of G(M2) into G(M3) (Neu5Acalpha3Galbeta4GlcbetaCer) by beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase A (Hex A). However, the question of whether or not G(M1) and G(M2) can also be respectively converted into asialo-G(M1) (Galbeta3GalNAcbeta4Galbeta4GlcCer; G(A1)) and asialo-G(M2) (GalNAcbeta4Galbeta4GlcbetaCer, G(A2)) by mammalian sialidases has not been resolved. This is due to the fact that sialidases purified from mammalian tissues always contained detergents that interfered with the in vitro hydrolysis of G(M1) and G(M2) in the presence of an activator protein. The mouse model of human type B Tay-Sachs disease created by the disruption of the Hexa gene showed no neurological abnormalities, with milder clinical symptoms than the human counterpart, and the accumulation of G(M2) in the brains of affected mice was only limited to certain regions [Sango, Yamanaka, Hoffmann, Okuda, Grinberg, Westphal, McDonald, Crawley, Sandhoff, Suzuki and Proia (1995) Nat. Genet. 11, 170-176]. These results suggest the possible presence of an alternative catabolic pathway (the G(A2) pathway) in mouse to convert G(M2) into G(A2) by sialidase. To show the existence of this pathway, we have used recombinant mammalian cytosolic sialidase and membrane-associated sialidase to study the desialylation of G(M1) and G(M2). We found that the mouse membrane-bound sialidase was able to convert G(M1) and G(M2) into their respective asialo-derivatives in the presence of human or mouse G(M2) activator protein. The cytosolic sialidase did not exhibit this activity. Our results suggest that, in vivo, the stable NeuAc of G(M1) and G(M2) may be removed by the mammalian membrane-associated sialidase in the presence of G(M2) activator

  18. EspM2 is a RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factor

    PubMed Central

    Arbeloa, Ana; Garnett, James; Lillington, James; Bulgin, Richard R; Berger, Cedric N; Lea, Susan M; Matthews, Steve; Frankel, Gad

    2010-01-01

    We investigated how the type III secretion system WxxxE effectors EspM2 of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which triggers stress fibre formation, and SifA of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, which is involved in intracellular survival, modulate Rho GTPases. We identified a direct interaction between EspM2 or SifA and nucleotide-free RhoA. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy revealed that EspM2 has a similar fold to SifA and the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) effector SopE. EspM2 induced nucleotide exchange in RhoA but not in Rac1 or H-Ras, while SifA induced nucleotide exchange in none of them. Mutating W70 of the WxxxE motif or L118 and I127 residues, which surround the catalytic loop, affected the stability of EspM2. Substitution of Q124, located within the catalytic loop of EspM2, with alanine, greatly attenuated the RhoA GEF activity in vitro and the ability of EspM2 to induce stress fibres upon ectopic expression. These results suggest that binding of SifA to RhoA does not trigger nucleotide exchange while EspM2 is a unique Rho GTPase GEF. PMID:20039879

  19. p-21 activated kinase 4 (PAK4) maintains stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells through activation of STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Bhardwaj, Arun; Deshmukh, Sachin K.; Srivastava, Sanjeev K.; Singh, Ajay P.; McClellan, Steven; Carter, James E.; Singh, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains a highly lethal malignancy due to its unusual chemoresistance and high aggressiveness. A subpopulation of pancreatic tumor cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), is considered responsible not only for tumor-maintenance, but also for its widespread metastasis and therapeutic failure. Here we investigated the role of p-21 activated kinase 4 (PAK4) in driving PC stemness properties. Our data demonstrate that triple-positive (CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+) subpopulation of pancreatic CSCs exhibits greater level of PAK4 as compared to triple-negative (CD24−/CD44−/EpCAM−) cells. Moreover, PAK4 silencing in PC cells leads to diminished fraction of CD24, CD44, and EpCAM positive cells. Furthermore, we show that PAK4-silenced PC cells exhibit decreased sphere-forming ability and increased chemo-sensitivity to gemcitabine toxicity. PAK4 expression is also associated with enhanced levels of stemness-associated transcription factors (Oct4/Nanog/Sox2 and KLF4). Furthermore, our data show decreased nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity of STAT3 in PAK4-silenced PC cells and restitution of its activity leads to restoration of stem cell phenotypes. Together, our findings deliver first experimental evidence for the involvement of PAK4 in PC stemness and support its clinical utility as a novel therapeutic target in PC. PMID:26546043

  20. Pyruvate kinase M2 is a phosphotyrosine-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Christofk, H.R.; Vander Heiden, M.G.; Wu, N.; Asara, J.M.; Cantley, L.C.

    2008-06-03

    Growth factors stimulate cells to take up excess nutrients and to use them for anabolic processes. The biochemical mechanism by which this is accomplished is not fully understood but it is initiated by phosphorylation of signalling proteins on tyrosine residues. Using a novel proteomic screen for phosphotyrosine-binding proteins, we have made the observation that an enzyme involved in glycolysis, the human M2 (fetal) isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2), binds directly and selectively to tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides. We show that binding of phosphotyrosine peptides to PKM2 results in release of the allosteric activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, leading to inhibition of PKM2 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that this regulation of PKM2 by phosphotyrosine signalling diverts glucose metabolites from energy production to anabolic processes when cells are stimulated by certain growth factors. Collectively, our results indicate that expression of this phosphotyrosine-binding form of pyruvate kinase is critical for rapid growth in cancer cells.

  1. Flavocoxid, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase, blunts pro-inflammatory phenotype activation in endotoxin-stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Altavilla, D; Squadrito, F; Bitto, A; Polito, F; Burnett, BP; Di Stefano, V; Minutoli, L

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The flavonoids, baicalin and catechin, from Scutellaria baicalensis and Acacia catechu, respectively, have been used for various clinical applications. Flavocoxid is a mixed extract containing baicalin and catechin, and acts as a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) enzymes. The anti-inflammatory activity, measured by protein and gene expression of inflammatory markers, of flavocoxid in rat peritoneal macrophages stimulated with Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. Experimental approach: LPS-stimulated (1 µg·mL−1) peritoneal rat macrophages were co-incubated with different concentrations of flavocoxid (32–128 µg·mL−1) or RPMI medium for different incubation times. Inducible COX-2, 5-LOX, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and inhibitory protein κB-α (IκB-α) levels were evaluated by Western blot analysis. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) binding activity was investigated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) gene and protein expression were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively. Finally, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrite levels in macrophage supernatants were evaluated. Key results: LPS stimulation induced a pro-inflammatory phenotype in rat peritoneal macrophages. Flavocoxid (128 µg·mL−1) significantly inhibited COX-2 (LPS = 18 ± 2.1; flavocoxid = 3.8 ± 0.9 integrated intensity), 5-LOX (LPS = 20 ± 3.8; flavocoxid = 3.1 ± 0.8 integrated intensity) and iNOS expression (LPS = 15 ± 1.1; flavocoxid = 4.1 ± 0.4 integrated intensity), but did not modify COX-1 expression. PGE2 and LTB4 levels in culture supernatants were consequently decreased. Flavocoxid also prevented the loss of IκB-α protein (LPS = 1.9 ± 0.2; flavocoxid = 7.2 ± 1.6 integrated intensity), blunted increased NF-κB binding activity (LPS = 9.2 ± 2; flavocoxid = 2.4 ± 0.7 integrated intensity) and the

  2. Secure Data Aggregation Protocol for M2M Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-24

    smart grid communications, which precisely meets the requirement of periodically collecting users’ electricity consumption while preserving privacy...address: rxlu@ntu.edu.sg - Institution: School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Nanyang Technological University - Mailing Address: 50...surveillance, smart metering, environmental monitoring, industrial automation and military scenarios [1][2]. Despite various M2M applications, the basic M2M

  3. Association of Selected Phenotypic Markers of Lymphocyte Activation and Differentiation with Perinatal Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission and Infant Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, John S.; Moye, Jack; Plaeger, Susan F.; Stiehm, E. Richard; Bethel, James; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Mathieson, Bonnie; Kagan, Jonathan; Rosenblatt, Howard; Paxton, Helene; Suter, Hildie; Landay, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This study of a subset of women and infants participating in National Institutes of Health Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185 evaluated lymphocyte phenotypic markers of immune activation and differentiation to determine their association with the likelihood of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission from the women to their infants and the potential for early identification and/or prognosis of infection in the infants. Lymphocytes from 215 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-infected women and 192 of their infants were analyzed by flow cytometry with an extended three-color panel of monoclonal antibodies. Women who did not transmit to their infants tended to have higher CD4+ T cells. Most notably, levels of total CD8+ T cells and CD8+ CD38+ cells made significant independent contributions to predicting the risk of mother-to-child transmission. Adjusting for HIV-1 RNA level at entry, a one percentage-point increase in these marker combinations was associated with a nine percent increase in the likelihood of maternal transmission. Total as well as naïve CD4+ T cells were significantly higher in uninfected than infected infants. Total CD8+ cells, as well as CD8+cells positive for HLA-DR+, CD45 RA+ HLA-DR+, and CD28+ HLA-DR+ were elevated in infected infants. Detailed immunophenotyping may be helpful in predicting which pregnant HIV-infected women are at increased risk of transmitting HIV to their infants. Increasing differences in lymphocyte subsets between infected and uninfected infants became apparent as early as six weeks of age. Detailed immunophenotyping may be useful in supporting the diagnosis of HIV infection in infants with perinatal HIV exposure. PMID:15879023

  4. EGFR-activating mutations correlate with a Fanconi anemia-like cellular phenotype that includes PARP inhibitor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pfäffle, Heike N; Wang, Meng; Gheorghiu, Liliana; Ferraiolo, Natalie; Greninger, Patricia; Borgmann, Kerstin; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril H; Sequist, Lecia V; Zou, Lee; Willers, Henning

    2013-10-15

    In patients with lung cancer whose tumors harbor activating mutations in the EGF receptor (EGFR), increased responses to platinum-based chemotherapies are seen compared with wild-type cancers. However, the mechanisms underlying this association have remained elusive. Here, we describe a cellular phenotype of cross-linker sensitivity in a subset of EGFR-mutant lung cancer cell lines that is reminiscent of the defects seen in cells impaired in the Fanconi anemia pathway, including a pronounced G2-M cell-cycle arrest and chromosomal radial formation. We identified a defect downstream of FANCD2 at the level of recruitment of FAN1 nuclease and DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) unhooking. The effect of EGFR mutation was epistatic with FANCD2. Consistent with the known role of FANCD2 in promoting RAD51 foci formation and homologous recombination repair (HRR), EGFR-mutant cells also exhibited an impaired RAD51 foci response to ICLs, but not to DNA double-strand breaks. EGFR kinase inhibition affected RAD51 foci formation neither in EGFR-mutant nor wild-type cells. In contrast, EGFR depletion or overexpression of mutant EGFR in wild-type cells suppressed RAD51 foci, suggesting an EGFR kinase-independent regulation of DNA repair. Interestingly, EGFR-mutant cells treated with the PARP inhibitor olaparib also displayed decreased FAN1 foci induction, coupled with a putative block in a late HRR step. As a result, EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells exhibited olaparib sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms of cisplatin and PARP inhibitor sensitivity of EGFR-mutant cells, yielding potential therapeutic opportunities for further treatment individualization in this genetically defined subset of lung cancer.

  5. Phenotyping studies to assess the effects of phytopharmaceuticals on in vivo activity of main human cytochrome p450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zadoyan, Gregor; Fuhr, Uwe

    2012-09-01

    The extensive use of herbal drugs and their multiple components and modes of action suggests that they may also cause drug interactions by changing the activity of human cytochrome P450 enzymes. The purpose of the present review is to present the available data for the top 14 herbal drug sales in the U. S. Studies describing the effects of herbal drugs on phenotyping substrates for individual CYPs were identified by a comprehensive MEDLINE search. Drugs included Allium sativum (Liliaceae), Echinacea purpurea (Asteraceae), Serenoa repens (Arecaceae), Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoaceae), Vaccinium macrocarpon (Ericaceae), Glycine max (Fabaceae), Panax ginseng (Araliaceae), Actea racemosa (Ranunculaceae), Hypericum perforatum (Hypericaceae), Silybum marianum (Asteraceae), Camellia sinensis (Theaceae), Valeriana officinalis (Valerianaceae), Piper methysticum (Piperaceae), and Hydrastis canadensis (Ranunculaceae) preparations. We identified 70 clinical studies in 69 publications. The majority of the herbal drugs appeared to have no clear effects on most of the CYPs examined. If there was an effect, there was mild inhibition in almost all cases, as seen with garlic or kava effects on CYP2E1 and with soybean components on CYP1A2. The most pronounced effects were induction of CYP3A and other CYPs by St. John's wort and the inhibitory effect of goldenseal on CYP3A and CYP2D6, both being borderline between mild and moderate in magnitude. With the exceptions of St.John's wort and goldenseal, the information currently available suggests that concomitant intake of the herbal drugs addressed here is not a major risk for drugs that are metabolized by CYPs.

  6. Phenotypic effects of maternal immune activation and early postnatal milieu in mice mutant for the schizophrenia risk gene neuregulin-1.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, C; Desbonnet, L; Clarke, N; Petit, E; Tighe, O; Lai, D; Harvey, R; Waddington, J L; O'Tuathaigh, C

    2014-09-26

    Risk of schizophrenia is likely to involve gene × environment (G × E) interactions. Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a schizophrenia risk gene, hence any interaction with environmental adversity, such as maternal infection, may provide further insights into the basis of the disease. This study examined the individual and combined effects of prenatal immune activation with polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (Poly I:C) and disruption of the schizophrenia risk gene NRG1 on the expression of behavioral phenotypes related to schizophrenia. NRG1 heterozygous (NRG1 HET) mutant breeding pairs were time-mated. Pregnant dams received a single injection (5mg/kg i.p.) of Poly I:C or vehicle on gestation day 9 (GD9). Offspring were then cross-fostered to vehicle-treated or Poly I:C-treated dams. Expression of schizophrenia-related behavioral endophenotypes was assessed at adolescence and in adulthood. Combining NRG1 disruption and prenatal environmental insult (Poly I:C) caused developmental stage-specific deficits in social behavior, spatial working memory and prepulse inhibition (PPI). However, combining Poly I:C and cross-fostering produced a number of behavioral deficits in the open field, social behavior and PPI. This became more complex by combining NRG1 deletion with both Poly I:C exposure and cross-fostering, which had a robust effect on PPI. These findings suggest that concepts of G × E interaction in risk of schizophrenia should be elaborated to multiple interactions that involve individual genes interacting with diverse biological and psychosocial environmental factors over early life, to differentially influence particular domains of psychopathology, sometimes over specific stages of development.

  7. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunopathogenesis in a Humanized Mouse Model: Induction of Human-Specific Liver Fibrosis and M2-Like Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bility, Moses T.; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Luan, Yan; Li, Feng; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo; Tu, Zhengkun; Gao, Yanhang; Fu, Yangxin; Niu, Junqi; Wang, Fusheng; Su, Lishan

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of chronic HBV infection and immunopathogenesis are poorly understood due to a lack of a robust small animal model. Here we report the development of a humanized mouse model with both human immune system and human liver cells by reconstituting the immunodeficient A2/NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice with human HLA-A2 transgene) with human hematopoietic stem cells and liver progenitor cells (A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mice). The A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse supported HBV infection and approximately 75% of HBV infected mice established persistent infection for at least 4 months. We detected human immune responses, albeit impaired in the liver, chronic liver inflammation and liver fibrosis in infected animals. An HBV neutralizing antibody efficiently inhibited HBV infection and associated liver diseases in humanized mice. In addition, we found that the HBV mediated liver disease was associated with high level of infiltrated human macrophages with M2-like activation phenotype. Importantly, similar M2-like macrophage accumulation was confirmed in chronic hepatitis B patients with liver diseases. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that induction of M2-like macrophage in the liver is associated with accelerated liver fibrosis and necrosis in patients with acute HBV-induced liver failure. Lastly, we demonstrate that HBV promotes M2-like activation in both M1 and M2 macrophages in cell culture studies. Our study demonstrates that the A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse model is valuable in studying HBV infection, human immune responses and associated liver diseases. Furthermore, results from this study suggest a critical role for macrophage polarization in hepatitis B virus-induced immune impairment and liver pathology. PMID:24651854

  8. Hepatitis B virus infection and immunopathogenesis in a humanized mouse model: induction of human-specific liver fibrosis and M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bility, Moses T; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Luan, Yan; Li, Feng; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo; Tu, Zhengkun; Gao, Yanhang; Fu, Yangxin; Niu, Junqi; Wang, Fusheng; Su, Lishan

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms of chronic HBV infection and immunopathogenesis are poorly understood due to a lack of a robust small animal model. Here we report the development of a humanized mouse model with both human immune system and human liver cells by reconstituting the immunodeficient A2/NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice with human HLA-A2 transgene) with human hematopoietic stem cells and liver progenitor cells (A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mice). The A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse supported HBV infection and approximately 75% of HBV infected mice established persistent infection for at least 4 months. We detected human immune responses, albeit impaired in the liver, chronic liver inflammation and liver fibrosis in infected animals. An HBV neutralizing antibody efficiently inhibited HBV infection and associated liver diseases in humanized mice. In addition, we found that the HBV mediated liver disease was associated with high level of infiltrated human macrophages with M2-like activation phenotype. Importantly, similar M2-like macrophage accumulation was confirmed in chronic hepatitis B patients with liver diseases. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that induction of M2-like macrophage in the liver is associated with accelerated liver fibrosis and necrosis in patients with acute HBV-induced liver failure. Lastly, we demonstrate that HBV promotes M2-like activation in both M1 and M2 macrophages in cell culture studies. Our study demonstrates that the A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse model is valuable in studying HBV infection, human immune responses and associated liver diseases. Furthermore, results from this study suggest a critical role for macrophage polarization in hepatitis B virus-induced immune impairment and liver pathology.

  9. Alcohol-Induced miR-27a Regulates Differentiation and M2 Macrophage Polarization of Normal Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Banishree; Bruneau, Johanna C.; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a leading cause of liver disease characterized by liver inflammation, fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, or liver cirrhosis. Immunomodulatory effects of alcohol on monocytes and macrophages contribute to alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol use, an independent risk factor for progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection–mediated liver disease, impairs host defense and alters cytokine production and monocyte/macrophage activation. We hypothesized that alcohol and HCV have synergistic effects on the phenotype and function of monocytes. Our data show that acute alcohol binge drinking in healthy volunteers results in increased frequency of CD16+ and CD68+ and M2-type (CD206+, dendritic cell [DC]-SIGN+–expressing and IL-10–secreting) circulating CD14+ monocytes. Expression of HCV-induced CD68 and M2 markers (CD206 and DC-SIGN) in normal monocytes was further enhanced in the presence of alcohol. The levels of microRNA (miR)-27a was significantly upregulated in monocytes cultured in the presence of alcohol or alcohol and HCV as compared with HCV alone. The functional role of miR-27a in macrophage polarization was demonstrated by transfecting monocytes with an miR-27a inhibitor that resulted in reduced alcohol- and HCV- mediated monocyte activation (CD14 and CD68 expression), polarization (CD206 and DC-SIGN expression), and IL-10 secretion. Over-expression of miR-27a in monocytes enhanced IL-10 secretion via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. We found that miR-27a promoted ERK phosphorylation by downregulating the expression of ERK inhibitor sprouty2 in monocytes. Thus, we identified that sprouty2 is a target of miR-27a in human monocytes. In summary, our study demonstrates the regulatory role of miR-27a in alcohol-induced monocyte activation and polarization. PMID:25716995

  10. Murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein induction of IRF4 via the NFAT pathway leads to IL-10 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Speck, Samuel H

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of the gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) from latently infected B cells has been linked to plasma cell differentiation. We have previously shown that the MHV68 M2 protein is important for virus reactivation from B cells and, when expressed alone in primary murine B cells, can drive B cell differentiation towards a pre-plasma cell phenotype. In addition, expression of M2 in primary murine B cells leads to secretion of high levels of IL-10 along with enhanced proliferation and survival. Furthermore, the absence of M2 in vivo leads to a defect in the appearance of MHV68 infected plasma cells in the spleen at the peak of MHV68 latency. Here, employing an inducible B cell expression system, we have determined that M2 activates the NFAT pathway in a Src kinase-dependent manner--leading to induction of the plasma cell-associated transcription factor, Interferon Regulatory Factor-4 (IRF4). Furthermore, we show that expression of IRF4 alone in a B cell line up-regulates IL-10 expression in culture supernatants, revealing a novel role for IRF4 in B cell induced IL-10. Consistent with the latter observation, we show that IRF4 can regulate the IL-10 promoter in B cells. In primary murine B cells, addition of cyclosporine (CsA) resulted in a significant decrease in M2-induced IL-10 levels as well as IRF4 expression, emphasizing the importance of the NFAT pathway in M2- -mediated induction of IL-10. Together, these studies argue in favor of a model wherein M2 activation of the NFAT pathway initiates events leading to increased levels of IRF4--a key player in plasma cell differentiation--which in turn triggers IL-10 expression. In the context of previous findings, the data presented here provides insights into how M2 facilitates plasma cell differentiation and subsequent virus reactivation.

  11. JMJD3 aids in reprogramming of bone marrow progenitor cells to hepatic phenotype through epigenetic activation of hepatic transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Kochat, Veena; Equbal, Zaffar; Baligar, Prakash; Kumar, Vikash; Srivastava, Madhulika; Mukhopadhyay, Asok

    2017-01-01

    The strictly regulated unidirectional differentiation program in some somatic stem/progenitor cells has been found to be modified in the ectopic site (tissue) undergoing regeneration. In these cases, the lineage barrier is crossed by either heterotypic cell fusion or direct differentiation. Though studies have shown the role of coordinated genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in cellular development and differentiation, how the lineage fate of adult bone marrow progenitor cells (BMPCs) is reprogrammed during liver regeneration and whether this lineage switch is stably maintained are not clearly understood. In the present study, we wanted to decipher genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that involve in lineage reprogramming of BMPCs into hepatocyte-like cells. Here we report dynamic transcriptional change during cellular reprogramming of BMPCs to hepatocytes and dissect the epigenetic switch mechanism of BM cell-mediated liver regeneration after acute injury. Genome-wide gene expression analysis in BM-derived hepatocytes, isolated after 1 month and 5 months of transplantation, showed induction of hepatic transcriptional program and diminishing of donor signatures over the time. The transcriptional reprogramming of BM-derived cells was found to be the result of enrichment of activating marks (H3K4me3 and H3K9Ac) and loss of repressive marks (H3K27me3 and H3K9me3) at the promoters of hepatic transcription factors (HTFs). Further analyses showed that BMPCs possess bivalent histone marks (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) at the promoters of crucial HTFs. H3K27 methylation dynamics at the HTFs was antagonistically regulated by EZH2 and JMJD3. Preliminary evidence suggests a role of JMJD3 in removal of H3K27me3 mark from promoters of HTFs, thus activating epigenetically poised hepatic genes in BMPCs prior to partial nuclear reprogramming. The importance of JMJD3 in reprogramming of BMPCs to hepatic phenotype was confirmed by inhibiting catalytic function of the enzyme using small molecule

  12. Inhibition of Ca2+-activated large-conductance K+ channel activity alters synaptic AMPA receptor phenotype in mouse cerebellar stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Savtchouk, Iaroslav; Acharjee, Shoana; Liu, Siqiong June

    2011-07-01

    Many fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons, including cerebellar stellate cells, fire brief action potentials and express α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPAR) that are permeable to Ca(2+) and do not contain the GluR2 subunit. In a recent study, we found that increasing action potential duration promotes GluR2 gene transcription in stellate cells. We have now tested the prediction that activation of potassium channels that control the duration of action potentials can suppress the expression of GluR2-containing AMPARs at stellate cell synapses. We find that large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels mediate a large proportion of the depolarization-evoked noninactivating potassium current in stellate cells. Pharmacological blockade of BK channels prolonged the action potential duration in postsynaptic stellate cells and altered synaptic AMPAR subtype from GluR2-lacking to GluR2-containing Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPARs. An L-type channel blocker abolished an increase in Ca(2+) entry that was associated with spike broadening and also prevented the BK channel blocker-induced switch in AMPAR phenotype. Thus blocking BK potassium channels prolongs the action potential duration and increases the expression of GluR2-containing receptors at the synapse by enhancing Ca(2+) entry in cerebellar stellate cells.

  13. Inhibition of Ca2+-activated large-conductance K+ channel activity alters synaptic AMPA receptor phenotype in mouse cerebellar stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Savtchouk, Iaroslav; Acharjee, Shoana

    2011-01-01

    Many fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons, including cerebellar stellate cells, fire brief action potentials and express α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPAR) that are permeable to Ca2+ and do not contain the GluR2 subunit. In a recent study, we found that increasing action potential duration promotes GluR2 gene transcription in stellate cells. We have now tested the prediction that activation of potassium channels that control the duration of action potentials can suppress the expression of GluR2-containing AMPARs at stellate cell synapses. We find that large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channels mediate a large proportion of the depolarization-evoked noninactivating potassium current in stellate cells. Pharmacological blockade of BK channels prolonged the action potential duration in postsynaptic stellate cells and altered synaptic AMPAR subtype from GluR2-lacking to GluR2-containing Ca2+-impermeable AMPARs. An L-type channel blocker abolished an increase in Ca2+ entry that was associated with spike broadening and also prevented the BK channel blocker-induced switch in AMPAR phenotype. Thus blocking BK potassium channels prolongs the action potential duration and increases the expression of GluR2-containing receptors at the synapse by enhancing Ca2+ entry in cerebellar stellate cells. PMID:21562198

  14. The chemotaxis of M1 and M2 macrophages is regulated by different chemokines.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Wenjuan; Qu, Qing; Zheng, Biao; Xiong, Sidong; Fan, Guo-Huang

    2015-01-01

    The homing of proinflammatory (M1) and the "alternatively activated" anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages plays a different role in the process of inflammation. Chemokines are the major mediators of macrophage chemotaxis, but how they differentially regulate M1 and M2 macrophages remains largely unclear. In the present study, we attempted to screen chemokines that differentially induce chemotaxis of M1 and M2 macrophages and to explore the underlying mechanism. Among the 41 chemokines that specifically bind to 20 chemokine receptors, CCL19, CCL21, CCL24, CCL25, CXCL8, CXCL10, and XCL2 specifically induced M1 macrophage chemotaxis, whereas CCL7 induced chemotaxis of both M1 and M2 macrophages. Whereas the differential effects of these chemokines on M1/M2 macrophage chemotaxis could be attributable to the predominant expression of their cognate receptors on the macrophage subsets, CCR7, the receptor for CCL19/CCL21, appeared to be an exception. Immunoblot analysis indicated an equivalent level of CCR7 in the whole cell lysate of M1 and M2 macrophages, but CCL19 and CCL21 only induced M1 macrophage chemotaxis. Both immunoblot and confocal microscopy analyses demonstrated that CCR7 was predominantly expressed on the cell surface of M1 but in the cytosol of M2 macrophages before ligand stimulation. As a result, CCL19 or CCL21 induced activation of both MEK1-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT cascades in M1 but not in M2 macrophages. Intriguingly, CCL19/CCL21-mediated M1 macrophage chemotaxis was blocked by specific inhibition of PI3K rather than MEK1. Together, these findings suggest that recruitment of M1 and M2 macrophages is fine tuned by different chemokines with the involvement of specific signaling pathways.

  15. STAT6−/− mice exhibit decreased cells with alternatively activated macrophage phenotypes and enhanced disease severity in murine neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Bibhuti B.; Gundra, Uma Mahesh; Teale, Judy M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, using a murine model for neurocysticercosis, macrophage phenotypes and their functions were examined. Mesocestoides corti infection in the central nervous system (CNS) induced expression of markers associated with alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) and a scarcity of iNOS, a classically activated macrophage marker. The infection in STAT6−/− mice resulted in significantly reduced accumulation of AAMs as well as enhanced susceptibility to infection coinciding with increased parasite burden and greater neuropathology. These results demonstrate that macrophages in the helminth infected CNS are largely of AAM phenotypes, particularly as the infection progresses, and that STAT6 dependent responses, possibly involving AAMs, are essential for controlling neurocysticercosis. PMID:21051093

  16. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitutive activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeste, K. E.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resulted in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a competitive inhibitor of ethylene binding. In contrast to the previously identified ran1-1 and ran1-2 alleles that are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, this ran1-3 allele results in a rosette-lethal phenotype. The predicted protein encoded by the RAN1 gene is similar to the Wilson and Menkes disease proteins and yeast Ccc2 protein, which are integral membrane cation-transporting P-type ATPases involved in copper trafficking. Genetic epistasis analysis indicated that RAN1 acts upstream of mutations in the ethylene receptor gene family. However, the rosette-lethal phenotype of ran1-3 was not suppressed by ethylene-insensitive mutants, suggesting that this mutation also affects a non-ethylene-dependent pathway regulating cell expansion. The phenotype of ran1-3 mutants is similar to loss-of-function ethylene receptor mutants, suggesting that RAN1 may be required to form functional ethylene receptors. Furthermore, these results suggest that copper is required not only for ethylene binding but also for the signaling function of the ethylene receptors.

  17. Embryonic stem cell-derived M2-like macrophages delay cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dreymueller, Daniela; Denecke, Bernd; Ludwig, Andreas; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2013-01-01

    In adults, repair of deeply injured skin wounds results in the formation of scar tissue, whereas in embryos wounds heal almost scar-free. Macrophages are important mediators of wound healing and secrete cytokines and tissue remodeling enzymes. In contrast to host defense mediated by inflammatory M1 macrophages, wound healing and tissue repair involve regulatory M2/M2-like macrophages. Embryonic/fetal macrophages are M2-like, and this may promote scar-free wound healing. In the present study, we asked whether atopical application of ex vivo generated, embryonic stem cell-derived macrophages (ESDM) improve wound healing in mice. ESDM were tested side by side with bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Compared to BMDM, ESDM resembled a less inflammatory and more M2-like macrophage subtype as indicated by their reduced responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide, reduced expression of Toll-like receptors, and reduced bacterial phagocytosis. Despite this anti-inflammatory phenotype in cell culture, ESDM prolonged the healing of deep skin wounds even more than BMDM. Healed wounds had more scar formation compared to wounds receiving BMDM or cell-free treatment. Our data indicate that atopical application of ex vivo generated macrophages is not a suitable cell therapy of dermal wounds.

  18. M2muscarinic receptors inhibit cell proliferation and migration in urothelial bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pacini, Luca; De Falco, Elena; Di Bari, Maria; Coccia, Andrea; Siciliano, Camilla; Ponti, Donatella; Pastore, Antonio Luigi; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Carbone, Antonio; Tata, Ada Maria; Calogero, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The role of muscarinic receptors in several diseases including cancer has recently emerged. To evaluate the hypothesis that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors may play a role in bladder cancer as well as in other tumor types, we investigated their expression in bladder tumor specimens. All examined samples expressed the M1, M2 and M3 receptor subtypes. We also found that the level of M2 transcripts, but not those of M1 or M3, significantly increased with the tumor histologic grade. In view of these results, we proceeded to investigate whether the M2 agonist Arecaidine had any effect on in vitro cell growth and migration of T24 cells, a bladder tumor cell line expressing the muscarinic receptors, including the M2 subtype. We observed that Arecaidine significantly reduced T24 and 5637 cell proliferation and migration in a concentration dependent manner. The silencing of M2 receptor by siRNA in T24 and 5637 cell lines showed the inability of Arecaidine (100 μM) to inhibit cell proliferation after 48 hours, whereas the use of M1 and M3 antagonists in T24 appeared not to counteract the Arecaidine effect, suggesting that the inhibition of cell proliferation was directly dependent on M2 receptor activation. These data suggest that M2 muscarinic receptors may play a relevant role in bladder cancer and represent a new attractive therapeutic target. PMID:25482946

  19. In silico functional dissection of saturation mutagenesis: Interpreting the relationship between phenotypes and changes in protein stability, interactions and activity

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Douglas E. V.; Chen, Jing; Blundell, Tom L.; Ascher, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite interest in associating polymorphisms with clinical or experimental phenotypes, functional interpretation of mutation data has lagged behind generation of data from modern high-throughput techniques and the accurate prediction of the molecular impact of a mutation remains a non-trivial task. We present here an integrated knowledge-driven computational workflow designed to evaluate the effects of experimental and disease missense mutations on protein structure and interactions. We exemplify its application with analyses of saturation mutagenesis of DBR1 and Gal4 and show that the experimental phenotypes for over 80% of the mutations correlate well with predicted effects of mutations on protein stability and RNA binding affinity. We also show that analysis of mutations in VHL using our workflow provides valuable insights into the effects of mutations, and their links to the risk of developing renal carcinoma. Taken together the analyses of the three examples demonstrate that structural bioinformatics tools, when applied in a systematic, integrated way, can rapidly analyse a given system to provide a powerful approach for predicting structural and functional effects of thousands of mutations in order to reveal molecular mechanisms leading to a phenotype. Missense or non-synonymous mutations are nucleotide substitutions that alter the amino acid sequence of a protein. Their effects can range from modifying transcription, translation, processing and splicing, localization, changing stability of the protein, altering its dynamics or interactions with other proteins, nucleic acids and ligands, including small molecules and metal ions. The advent of high-throughput techniques including sequencing and saturation mutagenesis has provided large amounts of phenotypic data linked to mutations. However, one of the hurdles has been understanding and quantifying the effects of a particular mutation, and how they translate into a given phenotype. One approach to overcome

  20. In silico functional dissection of saturation mutagenesis: Interpreting the relationship between phenotypes and changes in protein stability, interactions and activity.

    PubMed

    Pires, Douglas E V; Chen, Jing; Blundell, Tom L; Ascher, David B

    2016-01-22

    Despite interest in associating polymorphisms with clinical or experimental phenotypes, functional interpretation of mutation data has lagged behind generation of data from modern high-throughput techniques and the accurate prediction of the molecular impact of a mutation remains a non-trivial task. We present here an integrated knowledge-driven computational workflow designed to evaluate the effects of experimental and disease missense mutations on protein structure and interactions. We exemplify its application with analyses of saturation mutagenesis of DBR1 and Gal4 and show that the experimental phenotypes for over 80% of the mutations correlate well with predicted effects of mutations on protein stability and RNA binding affinity. We also show that analysis of mutations in VHL using our workflow provides valuable insights into the effects of mutations, and their links to the risk of developing renal carcinoma. Taken together the analyses of the three examples demonstrate that structural bioinformatics tools, when applied in a systematic, integrated way, can rapidly analyse a given system to provide a powerful approach for predicting structural and functional effects of thousands of mutations in order to reveal molecular mechanisms leading to a phenotype. Missense or non-synonymous mutations are nucleotide substitutions that alter the amino acid sequence of a protein. Their effects can range from modifying transcription, translation, processing and splicing, localization, changing stability of the protein, altering its dynamics or interactions with other proteins, nucleic acids and ligands, including small molecules and metal ions. The advent of high-throughput techniques including sequencing and saturation mutagenesis has provided large amounts of phenotypic data linked to mutations. However, one of the hurdles has been understanding and quantifying the effects of a particular mutation, and how they translate into a given phenotype. One approach to overcome

  1. Theoretical Assessment of 178m2Hf De-Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hartouni, E P; Chen, M; Descalle, M A; Escher, J E; Loshak, A; Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Pruet, J; Thompson, I J; Wang, T F

    2008-10-06

    This document contains a comprehensive literature review in support of the theoretical assessment of the {sup 178m2}Hf de-excitation, as well as a rigorous description of controlled energy release from an isomeric nuclear state.

  2. Identifying functional microRNAs in macrophages with polarized phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Graff, Joel W; Dickson, Anne M; Clay, Gwendolyn; McCaffrey, Anton P; Wilson, Mary E

    2012-06-22

    Macrophages respond to external stimuli with rapid changes in expression of many genes. Different combinations of external stimuli lead to distinct polarized activation patterns, resulting in a spectrum of possible macrophage activation phenotypes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that can repress the expression of many target genes. We hypothesized that miRNAs play a role in macrophage polarization. miRNA expression profiles were determined in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) incubated in conditions causing activation toward M1, M2a, M2b, or M2c phenotypes. One miRNA guide strand and seven miRNA passenger strands were significantly altered. Changes were confirmed in MDMs from six separate donors. The amplitude of miRNA expression changes in MDMs was smaller than described studies of monocytes responding to inflammatory stimuli. Further investigation revealed this correlated with higher basal miRNA expression in MDMs compared with monocytes. The regulation of M1- and M2b-responsive miRNAs (miR-27a, miR-29b, miR-125a, miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-222) was similar in differentiated THP-1 cells and primary MDMs. Studies in this model revealed cross-talk between IFNγ- and LPS-associated pathways regulating miRNA expression. Furthermore, expression of M1-associated transcripts was increased in THP-1 cells transfected with mimics of miR-29b, miR-125a-5p, or miR-155. The apparent inflammatory property of miR-29b and miR-125a-5p can be at least partially explained by repression of TNFAIP3, a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling. Overall, these data suggest miRNAs can contribute to changes in macrophage gene expression that occur in different exogenous activating conditions.

  3. Identifying Functional MicroRNAs in Macrophages with Polarized Phenotypes*

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Joel W.; Dickson, Anne M.; Clay, Gwendolyn; McCaffrey, Anton P.; Wilson, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages respond to external stimuli with rapid changes in expression of many genes. Different combinations of external stimuli lead to distinct polarized activation patterns, resulting in a spectrum of possible macrophage activation phenotypes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that can repress the expression of many target genes. We hypothesized that miRNAs play a role in macrophage polarization. miRNA expression profiles were determined in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) incubated in conditions causing activation toward M1, M2a, M2b, or M2c phenotypes. One miRNA guide strand and seven miRNA passenger strands were significantly altered. Changes were confirmed in MDMs from six separate donors. The amplitude of miRNA expression changes in MDMs was smaller than described studies of monocytes responding to inflammatory stimuli. Further investigation revealed this correlated with higher basal miRNA expression in MDMs compared with monocytes. The regulation of M1- and M2b-responsive miRNAs (miR-27a, miR-29b, miR-125a, miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-222) was similar in differentiated THP-1 cells and primary MDMs. Studies in this model revealed cross-talk between IFNγ- and LPS-associated pathways regulating miRNA expression. Furthermore, expression of M1-associated transcripts was increased in THP-1 cells transfected with mimics of miR-29b, miR-125a-5p, or miR-155. The apparent inflammatory property of miR-29b and miR-125a-5p can be at least partially explained by repression of TNFAIP3, a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling. Overall, these data suggest miRNAs can contribute to changes in macrophage gene expression that occur in different exogenous activating conditions. PMID:22549785

  4. Immune phenotypes of microglia in human neurodegenerative disease: challenges to detecting microglial polarization in human brains.

    PubMed

    Walker, Douglas G; Lue, Lih-Fen

    2015-08-19

    Inflammatory responses in the brain, which can be demonstrated by changes in properties of microglia, the brain-resident macrophages, are a common feature of human neurodegenerative diseases. Different monocyte/macrophage phenotypes have been defined by changes in expression of cytokines, receptors and other markers as a response to different classes of stimuli. Monocytes, macrophages and microglia can have a range of phenotypes with associated properties depending on their microenvironment. Macrophage/microglia polarization states have been defined as classical activation (M1), alternative activation (M2a), type II alternative activation (M2b) or acquired deactivation (M2c). Available markers for identifying microglial phenotypes in human brains are still limited; those available provide incomplete information on the functions or polarization states of microglia observed in tissues from diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. The most widely used marker to describe activated microglia in human brains, particularly diseased brains, has been HLA-DR, the major histocompatibility complex II protein. HLA-DR-positive microglia can have a wide range of activation morphologies that are affected not only by disease pathology, but also by their differentiation states and brain regions. Two other widely used markers to identify microglia in human brains are ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 and CD68. Although their expression changes in diseased brains, these markers do not show specificity for different phenotypes. Over the years there have been studies with additional markers that attempt to further define microglial properties, particularly in Alzheimer's disease brains. Most studies have employed immunohistochemical techniques to identify microglia in tissue sections, but recent advances in this field have allowed gene expression profiling of microglia upon immediate isolation from brains. We will review which markers

  5. Tailor-Made Zinc-Finger Transcription Factors Activate FLO11 Gene Expression with Phenotypic Consequences in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Jia-Ching; Cheng, Yu-Che; Su, Mao-Chang; Moore, Michael; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Cys2His2 zinc fingers are eukaryotic DNA-binding motifs, capable of distinguishing different DNA sequences, and are suitable for engineering artificial transcription factors. In this work, we used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the ability of tailor-made zinc finger proteins to activate the expression of the FLO11 gene, with phenotypic consequences. Two three-finger peptides were identified, recognizing sites from the 5′ UTR of the FLO11 gene with nanomolar DNA-binding affinity. The three-finger domains and their combined six-finger motif, recognizing an 18-bp site, were fused to the activation domain of VP16 or VP64. These transcription factor constructs retained their DNA-binding ability, with the six-finger ones being the highest in affinity. However, when expressed in haploid yeast cells, only one three-finger recombinant transcription factor was able to activate the expression of FLO11 efficiently. Unlike in the wild-type, cells with such transcriptional activation displayed invasive growth and biofilm formation, without any requirement for glucose depletion. The VP16 and VP64 domains appeared to act equally well in the activation of FLO11 expression, with comparable effects in phenotypic alteration. We conclude that the functional activity of tailor-made transcription factors in cells is not easily predicted by the in vitro DNA-binding activity. PMID:17710146

  6. Activation of Wnt/β-Catenin in Ewing Sarcoma Cells Antagonizes EWS/ETS Function and Promotes Phenotypic Transition to More Metastatic Cell States.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Elisabeth A; Menon, Rajasree; Bailey, Kelly M; Thomas, Dafydd G; Van Noord, Raelene A; Tran, Jenny; Wang, Hongwei; Qu, Ping Ping; Hoering, Antje; Fearon, Eric R; Chugh, Rashmi; Lawlor, Elizabeth R

    2016-09-01

    Ewing sarcomas are characterized by the presence of EWS/ETS fusion genes in the absence of other recurrent genetic alterations and mechanisms of tumor heterogeneity that contribute to disease progression remain unclear. Mutations in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway are rare in Ewing sarcoma but the Wnt pathway modulator LGR5 is often highly expressed, suggesting a potential role for the axis in tumor pathogenesis. We evaluated β-catenin and LGR5 expression in Ewing sarcoma cell lines and tumors and noted marked intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity. Tumors with evidence of active Wnt/β-catenin signaling were associated with increased incidence of tumor relapse and worse overall survival. Paradoxically, RNA sequencing revealed a marked antagonism of EWS/ETS transcriptional activity in Wnt/β-catenin-activated tumor cells. Consistent with this, Wnt/β-catenin-activated cells displayed a phenotype that was reminiscent of Ewing sarcoma cells with partial EWS/ETS loss of function. Specifically, activation of Wnt/β-catenin induced alterations to the actin cytoskeleton, acquisition of a migratory phenotype, and upregulation of EWS/ETS-repressed genes. Notably, activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling led to marked induction of tenascin C (TNC), an established promoter of cancer metastasis, and an EWS/ETS-repressed target gene. Loss of TNC function in Ewing sarcoma cells profoundly inhibited their migratory and metastatic potential. Our studies reveal that heterogeneous activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in subpopulations of tumor cells contributes to phenotypic heterogeneity and disease progression in Ewing sarcoma. Significantly, this is mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of EWS/ETS fusion protein function that results in derepression of metastasis-associated gene programs. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5040-53. ©2016 AACR.

  7. SRRM4 Expression and the Loss of REST Activity May Promote the Emergence of the Neuroendocrine Phenotype in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotun; Coleman, Ilsa M.; Brown, Lisha G.; True, Lawrence D.; Kollath, Lori; Lucas, Jared M.; Lam, Hung-Ming; Dumpit, Ruth; Corey, Eva; Chéry, Lisly; Lakely, Bryce; Higano, Celestia S.; Montgomery, Bruce; Roudier, Martine; Lange, Paul H.; Nelson, Peter S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Morrissey, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The neuroendocrine (NE) phenotype is associated with the development of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Our objective was to characterize the molecular features of the NE phenotype in CRPC. Experimental Design Expression of chromogranin A (CHGA), synaptophysin (SYP), androgen receptor (AR), and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 155 CRPC metastases from 50 patients and in 24 LuCaP prostate cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX). Seventy-one of 155 metastases and the 24 LuCaP xenograft lines were analyzed by whole genome microarrays. REST splicing was verified by PCR. Results Co-expression of CHGA and SYP in >30% of cells was observed in 22 of 155 metastases (9 patients); 11 of the 22 metastases were AR+/PSA+ (6 patients), 11/22 were AR−/PSA− (4 patients), and 4/24 LuCaP PDXs were AR−/PSA−. By IHC, of the 71 metastases analyzed by whole genome microarrays, 5 metastases were CHGA+/SYP+/AR− and 5 were CHGA+/SYP+/AR+. Only CHGA+/SYP+ metastases had a NE transcript signature. The neuronal transcriptional regulator SRRM4 transcript was associated with the NE signature in CHGA+/SYP+ metastases and all CHGA+/SYP+ LuCaP xenografts. Additionally, expression of SRRM4 in LuCaP NE xenografts correlated with a splice variant of REST that lacks the transcriptional repressor domain. Conclusions (a) metastatic NE status can be heterogeneous in the same patient, (b) the CRPC NE molecular phenotype can be defined by CHGA+/SYP+ dual positivity, (c) the NE phenotype is not necessarily associated with the loss of AR activity, and (d) the splicing of REST by SRRM4 could promote the NE phenotype in CRPC. PMID:26071481

  8. Influenza M2 envelope protein augments avian influenza hemagglutinin pseudotyping of lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    McKay, T; Patel, M; Pickles, R J; Johnson, L G; Olsen, J C

    2006-04-01

    Lentivirus-based gene transfer has the potential to efficiently deliver DNA-based therapies into non-dividing epithelial cells of the airway for the treatment of lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. However, significant barriers both to lung-specific gene transfer and to production of lentivirus vectors must be overcome before these vectors can be routinely used for applications to the lung. In this study, we investigated whether the ability to produce lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with fowl plague virus hemagglutinin (HA) could be improved by co-expression of influenza virus M2 in vector-producing cells. We found that M2 expression led to a 10-30-fold increase in production of HA-pseudotyped lentivirus vectors based upon equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Experiments using the M2 inhibitor amantadine and a drug-resistant mutant of M2 established that the ion channel activity of M2 was important for M2-dependent augmentation of vector production. Furthermore, the neuraminidase activity necessary for particle release from producer cells could also be incorporated into producer cells by co-expression of influenza NA cDNA. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with influenza envelope proteins were able to efficiently transduce via the apical membrane of polarized mouse tracheal cultures in vitro as well as mouse tracheal epithelia in vivo.

  9. Differential partial activation phenotype and production of tumour necrosis factor-α by conventional dendritic cells in response to lipopolysaccharide in HIV+ viraemic subjects and HIV+ controllers.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Sandoval, R; Del Río Estrada, P M; Rivero-Arrieta, A; Reyes-Terán, G; Bonifaz, L C

    2014-12-01

    HIV(+) subjects are reported to have increased soluble CD14 (sCD14) in plasma, an indicator of microbial translocation. We evaluated if microbial translocation has a differential impact on the activation and function of conventional dendritic cells (cDC) from viraemic HIV(+) subjects and HIV(+) controllers (CTs). The HIV(+) subjects were classified into two groups according to their plasma viral load (pVL): CT and viraemic. Subjects without HIV were included as controls (HIV(-) ). The frequencies and phenotypes of cDC from these subjects were evaluated by multi-parameter flow cytometry. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or single-stranded RNA40 (ssRNA40), the phenotype of the cDC and the intracellular production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α by the cDC were evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed a partial activation phenotype for the cDC in the viraemic subjects and CTs ex vivo and after LPS activation, which showed differences in the expression of CD40 and CD86. Furthermore, in response to LPS the cDC from the viraemic subjects produced more TNF-α compared to the cDC from CTs. Interestingly, the percentage of TNF-α(+) cDC was found to be correlated positively with the pVL. The partial activation of cDC and the over-production of TNF-α in response to LPS in viraemic HIV(+) subjects might be related to the increased chronic activation observed in these subjects. In contrast, cDC from CTs seem to have a regulated response to LPS, indicating that they respond differently to chronic immune activation. These results may have implications in the development of HIV therapies and vaccines using DC.

  10. Differential partial activation phenotype and production of tumour necrosis factor-α by conventional dendritic cells in response to lipopolysaccharide in HIV+ viraemic subjects and HIV+ controllers

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Sandoval, R; Del Río Estrada, P M; Rivero-Arrieta, A; Reyes-Terán, G; Bonifaz, L C

    2014-01-01

    HIV+ subjects are reported to have increased soluble CD14 (sCD14) in plasma, an indicator of microbial translocation. We evaluated if microbial translocation has a differential impact on the activation and function of conventional dendritic cells (cDC) from viraemic HIV+ subjects and HIV+ controllers (CTs). The HIV+ subjects were classified into two groups according to their plasma viral load (pVL): CT and viraemic. Subjects without HIV were included as controls (HIV–). The frequencies and phenotypes of cDC from these subjects were evaluated by multi-parameter flow cytometry. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or single-stranded RNA40 (ssRNA40), the phenotype of the cDC and the intracellular production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α by the cDC were evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed a partial activation phenotype for the cDC in the viraemic subjects and CTs ex vivo and after LPS activation, which showed differences in the expression of CD40 and CD86. Furthermore, in response to LPS the cDC from the viraemic subjects produced more TNF-α compared to the cDC from CTs. Interestingly, the percentage of TNF-α+ cDC was found to be correlated positively with the pVL. The partial activation of cDC and the over-production of TNF-α in response to LPS in viraemic HIV+ subjects might be related to the increased chronic activation observed in these subjects. In contrast, cDC from CTs seem to have a regulated response to LPS, indicating that they respond differently to chronic immune activation. These results may have implications in the development of HIV therapies and vaccines using DC. PMID:25130456

  11. Enhanced M1/M2 macrophage ratio promotes orthodontic root resorption.

    PubMed

    He, D; Kou, X; Luo, Q; Yang, R; Liu, D; Wang, X; Song, Y; Cao, H; Zeng, M; Gan, Y; Zhou, Y

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical force-induced orthodontic root resorption is a major clinical challenge in orthodontic treatment. Macrophages play an important role in orthodontic root resorption, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we examined the mechanism by which the ratio of M1 to M2 macrophage polarization affects root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement. Root resorption occurred when nickel-titanium coil springs were applied on the upper first molars of rats for 3 to 14 d. Positively stained odontoclasts or osteoclasts with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were found in resorption areas. Meanwhile, M1-like macrophages positive for CD68 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) persistently accumulated on the compression side of periodontal tissues. In addition, the expressions of the M1 activator interferon-γ and the M1-associated pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were upregulated on the compression side of periodontal tissues. When the coil springs were removed at the 14th day after orthodontic force application, root resorption was partially rescued. The number of CD68(+)CD163(+) M2-like macrophages gradually increased on the compression side of periodontal tissues. The levels of M2 activator interleukin (IL)-4 and the M2-associated anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 also increased. Systemic injection of the TNF-α inhibitor etanercept or IL-4 attenuated the severity of root resorption and decreased the ratio of M1 to M2 macrophages. These data imply that the balance between M1 and M2 macrophages affects orthodontic root resorption. Root resorption was aggravated by an enhanced M1/M2 ratio but was partially rescued by a reduced M1/M2 ratio.

  12. Activation of Natural Killer Cells in Patients with Chronic Bone and Joint Infection due to Staphylococci Expressing or Not the Small Colony Variant Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Viel, Sébastien; Rouzaire, Paul; Laurent, Frédéric; Walzer, Thierry; Bienvenu, Jacques; Valour, Florent; Chidiac, Christian; Ferry, Tristan; Group, The Lyon BJI Study

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bone and joint infections (BJI) are devastating diseases. Relapses are frequently observed, as some pathogens, especially staphylococci, can persist intracellularly by expressing a particular phenotype called small colony variant (SCV). As natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes specialized in the killing of host cells infected by intracellular pathogens, we studied NK cells of patients with chronic BJI due to staphylococci expressing or not SCVs (10 patients in both groups). Controls were patients infected with other bacteria without detectable expression of SCVs, and healthy volunteers. NK cell phenotype was evaluated from PBMCs by flow cytometry. Degranulation capacity was evaluated after stimulation with K562 cells in vitro. We found that NK cells were activated in terms of CD69 expression, loss of CD16 and perforin, in all infected patients in comparison with healthy volunteers, independently of the SCV phenotype. Peripheral NK cells in patients with chronic BJI display signs of recent activation and degranulation in vivo in response to CD16-mediated signals, regardless of the type of bacteria involved. This could involve a universal capacity of isolates responsible for chronic BJI to produce undetectable SCVs in vivo, which might be a target of future intervention. PMID:26464851

  13. The M2 macrophages induce autophagic vascular disorder and promote mouse sensitivity to urethane-related lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, G-G; Guo, Z-Z; Ma, X-F; Cao, N; Geng, S-N; Zheng, Y-Q; Meng, M-J; Lin, H-H; Han, G; Du, G-J

    2016-06-01

    Tumor vessels are known to be abnormal, with typically aberrant, leaky and disordered vessels. Here, we investigated whether polarized macrophage phenotypes are involved in tumor abnormal angiogenesis and what is its mechanism. We found that there was no difference in chemotaxis of polarized M1 and M2 macrophages to lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells and that either M1 or M2 macrophage-conditioned media had no effect on LLC cell proliferation. Unexpectedly, the M2 but not M1 macrophage-conditioned media promoted the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and simultaneously increased endothelial cell permeability in vitro and angiogenic index in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). The treatment with M2 but not M1 macrophage-conditioned media increased autophagosomes as well as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B (LC3-B) expression (a robust marker of autophagosomes) but decreased p62 protein expression (a selective autophagy substrate) in HUVECs, the treatment with chloroquine that blocked autophagy abrogated the abnormal angiogenic efficacy of M2 macrophage-conditioned media. These results were confirmed in urethane-induced lung carcinogenic progression. Urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis led to more M2 macrophage phenotype and increased abnormal angiogenesis concomitant with the upregulation of LC3-B and the downregulation of p62. Clodronate liposome-induced macrophage depletion, chloroquine-induced autophagic prevention or salvianolic acid B-induced vascular protection decreased abnormal angiogenesis and lung carcinogenesis. In addition, we found that the tendency of age-related M2 macrophage polarization also promoted vascular permeability and carcinogenesis in urethane carcinogenic progression. These findings indicate that the M2 macrophages induce autophagic vascular disorder to promote lung cancer progression, and the autophagy improvement represents an efficacious strategy for abnormal angiogenesis and cancer

  14. Call Off the Dog(ma): M1/M2 Polarization Is Concurrent following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Morganti, Josh M.; Riparip, Lara-Kirstie; Rosi, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Following the primary mechanical impact, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces the simultaneous production of a variety of pro- and anti-inflammatory molecular mediators. Given the variety of cell types and their requisite expression of cognate receptors this creates a highly complex inflammatory milieu. Increasingly in neurotrauma research there has been an effort to define injury-induced inflammatory responses within the context of in vitro defined macrophage polarization phenotypes, known as “M1” and “M2”. Herein, we expand upon our previous work in a rodent model of TBI to show that the categorization of inflammatory response cannot be so easily delineated using this nomenclature. Specifically, we show that TBI elicited a wide spectrum of concurrent expression responses within both pro- and anti-inflammatory arms. Moreover, we show that the cells principally responsible for the production of these inflammatory mediators, microglia/macrophages, simultaneously express both “M1” and “M2phenotypic markers. Overall, these data align with recent reports suggesting that microglia/macrophages cannot adequately switch to a polarized “M1-only” or “M2-only” phenotype, but display a mixed phenotype due to the complex signaling events surrounding them. PMID:26808663

  15. The Analysis of Physiological Variations in M2 Generation of Solanum melongena L. Mutagenized by Ethyl Methane Sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Xi-ou, Xiao; Wenqiu, Lin; Wei, Li; Xiaoming, Gao; Lingling, Lv; Feiyue, Ma; Yuge, Liu

    2017-01-01

    The eggplant was mutagenized with ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) to enhance its genetic variability in our previous paper. In this article, we further analyzed the phenotype of M2 generation of mutant eggplants. A total of 325 independent M2 families were investigated for phenotypic variation. In addition to the visible phenotypic variation, chlorogenic acid (CGA) concentrations were analyzed in 26 fruits of mutants with High Performance Liquid Chromatography assay. Seventeen fruits exhibited significantly higher concentrations of CGAs than those in wild-type. The anthocyanin concentration of S9-1, the purple black mutant, was higher than WT, meanwhile, the anthocyanin concentration of L6-4 and U36-1 was lower than WT. Furthermore, our RT-PCR result demonstrated that the expression levels of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, except for SmPAL, were increased in S9-1, and the regulator SmMYB1 was decreased in L6-4 and U36-1 mutants. Together, our data indicated that, M2 generation showed abundant phenotypic variations and the strong potential usage for next step of breeding and molecular genetic mechanisms in eggplant. PMID:28154575

  16. Increased intermediate M1-M2 macrophage polarization and improved cognition in mild cognitive impairment patients on ω-3 supplementation.

    PubMed

    Famenini, Sam; Rigali, Elizabeth A; Olivera-Perez, Henry M; Dang, Johnny; Chang, Michael To; Halder, Ramesh; Rao, Rammohan V; Pellegrini, Matteo; Porter, Verna; Bredesen, Dale; Fiala, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Monocyte/macrophages of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD) are defective in phagocytosis and degradation amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42), but are improved by ω-3 fatty acids (ω-3s). The hypothesis of this study was that active Aβ1-42 phagocytosis by macrophages prevents brain amyloidosis and thus maintains cognition. We studied the effects of self-supplementation with a drink with ω-3s, antioxidants, and resveratrol on Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores, macrophage M1M2 phenotype [the ratio of inflammatory cluster of differentiation (CD)54+CD80 and proresolution markers CD163+CD206], and Aβ1-42 phagocytosis in patients initially diagnosed as having MCI or subjective cognitive impairment (SCI). At baseline, the median MMSE score in patients in both the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε3/ε3 and ApoE ε3/ε4 groups was 26.0 and macrophage Aβ1-42 phagocytosis was defective. The MMSE rate of change increased in the ApoE ε3/ε3 group a median 2.2 points per year (P = 0.015 compared to 0) but did not change in the ApoE ε3/ε4 group (P = 0.014 between groups). In the ApoE ε3/ε3 group, all patients remained cognitively stable or improved; in the ApoE ε3/ε4 group, 1 recovered from dementia, but 3 lapsed into dementia. The macrophage phenotype polarized in patients bearing ApoE ε3/ε3 to an intermediate (green zone) M1-M2 type at the rate of 0.226 U/yr, whereas in patients bearing ApoE ε3/ε4, polarization was negative (P = 0.08 between groups). The baseline M1M2 type in the extreme M1 (red zone) or M2 (white zone) was unfavorable for cognitive outcome. Aβ1-42 phagocytosis increased in both ApoE groups (P = 0.03 in each groups). In vitro, the lipidic mediator resolvin D1 (RvD1) down regulated the M1 type in patients with ApoE ε3/ε3 but in some patients with ε3/ε4, paradoxically up-regulated the M1 type. Antioxidant/ω-3/resveratrol supplementation was associated with favorable immune and cognitive responses in ApoE ε3/ε3

  17. Increased intermediate M1-M2 macrophage polarization and improved cognition in mild cognitive impairment patients on ω-3 supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Famenini, Sam; Rigali, Elizabeth A.; Olivera-Perez, Henry M.; Dang, Johnny; Chang, Michael To; Halder, Ramesh; Rao, Rammohan V.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Porter, Verna; Bredesen, Dale; Fiala, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Monocyte/macrophages of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD) are defective in phagocytosis and degradation amyloid β1–42 (Aβ1–42), but are improved by ω-3 fatty acids (ω-3s). The hypothesis of this study was that active Aβ1–42 phagocytosis by macrophages prevents brain amyloidosis and thus maintains cognition. We studied the effects of self-supplementation with a drink with ω-3s, antioxidants, and resveratrol on Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores, macrophage M1M2 phenotype [the ratio of inflammatory cluster of differentiation (CD)54+CD80 and proresolution markers CD163+CD206], and Aβ1–42 phagocytosis in patients initially diagnosed as having MCI or subjective cognitive impairment (SCI). At baseline, the median MMSE score in patients in both the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε3/ε3 and ApoE ε3/ε4 groups was 26.0 and macrophage Aβ1–42 phagocytosis was defective. The MMSE rate of change increased in the ApoE ε3/ε3 group a median 2.2 points per year (P = 0.015 compared to 0) but did not change in the ApoE ε3/ε4 group (P = 0.014 between groups). In the ApoE ε3/ε3 group, all patients remained cognitively stable or improved; in the ApoE ε3/ε4 group, 1 recovered from dementia, but 3 lapsed into dementia. The macrophage phenotype polarized in patients bearing ApoE ε3/ε3 to an intermediate (green zone) M1-M2 type at the rate of 0.226 U/yr, whereas in patients bearing ApoE ε3/ε4, polarization was negative (P = 0.08 between groups). The baseline M1M2 type in the extreme M1 (red zone) or M2 (white zone) was unfavorable for cognitive outcome. Aβ1–42 phagocytosis increased in both ApoE groups (P = 0.03 in each groups). In vitro, the lipidic mediator resolvin D1 (RvD1) down regulated the M1 type in patients with ApoE ε3/ε3 but in some patients with ε3/ε4, paradoxically up-regulated the M1 type. Antioxidant/ω-3/resveratrol supplementation was associated with favorable immune and cognitive responses in

  18. Roles of the PVM M2-1, M2-2 and P gene ORF 2 (P-2) proteins in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Dibben, Oliver; Thorpe, Lindsay C; Easton, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    A plasmid-based reverse genetics system for pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) using a synthetic minigenome is described. The system was used to investigate the functions of several viral proteins. The M2-1 protein of PVM was shown to enhance reporter gene expression when present at low levels, similar to the situation for the equivalent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) M2-1 protein, but at high levels was shown to reduce gene expression from the minigenome activity, which differs significantly form the situation with RSV. Analysis of levels of nucleocapsid complex RNA showed that high levels of the PVM M2-1 protein inhibits RNA replication rather than transcription. In contrast, expression of the PVM M2-2 protein in conjunction with the polymerase proteins in a minigenome assay greatly reduced the levels of CAT reporter protein. This is similar to the situation with the RSV M2-2 protein although there is no significant sequence identity between the M2-2 proteins of the pneumoviruses. A significant difference between the genome organisations of RSV and PVM is that the P gene of PVM contains a second open reading frame, encoding the P-2 protein, which has no counterpart in the RSV P gene. Co-expression of the PVM P-2 protein with the minigenome inhibited virus gene expression. This resembles the situation seen with the accessory proteins expressed from alternate reading frames of the P gene of other paramyxoviruses. Analysis of levels of antigenome RNA and CAT mRNA produced by the minigenome in the presence of the P2 protein indicated that the protein inhibits viral transcription in a dose-dependent fashion.

  19. A base substitution in the promoter associated with the human haptoglobin 2-1 modified phenotype decreases transcriptional activity and responsiveness to interleukin-6 in human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D.J.; Maeda, N. )

    1993-05-01

    An A-to-C base substitution at nucleotide position -61 in the promoter region of the human haptoglobin gene (Hp) has been shown to be strongly associated with the haptoglobin 2-1 modified (Hp2-1mod) phenotype. In order to investigate whether this base substitution is the cause of reduced expression of the Hp[sup 2] allele relative to the Hp[sup 1] allele in individuals with the Hp2-1mod phenotype, the authors used the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) expression system to evaluate promoter function. In HepG2 cells, which normally express their endogenous haptoglobin genes, CAT plasmid constructs with the -61C base change in the promoter had about 10-fold-lower transcriptional activity after transfection than did the Hp control construct. The -61C substitution also rendered the construct unresponsive to treatment by interleukin-6 after transfection into Hep3B2 cells, which normally do not express haptoglobin but do so in response to stimulation by acute-phase reactants. In addition, two base substitutions, T to A and A to G, at positions -104 and -55G, respectively, in the promoter region of the Hp[sup 1] allele, are also associated with the Hp2-1mod phenotype. CAT constructs with both substitutions (-104A-55G) and with one substitution (-55G) showed activity similar to that in the Hp control when transfected into both HepG2 and Hep3B2 cells, although interleukin-6 induction was less than with the Hp control construct. These results further support the hypothesis that the Hp2-1mod phenotype results, in part, from the -61C mutation in the promoter region of the Hp[sup 2] gene.

  20. Anatomy of a Discovery: M1 and M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles Dudley

    2015-01-01

    M1 and M2 macrophage-type responses kill or repair in vivo. The unique ability of macrophages to make these polar opposite type of responses provides primary host protection and maintains tissue homeostasis throughout the animal kingdom. In humans and other higher animals, M1 and M2-type macrophage responses also initiate and direct T cells/adaptive immunity to provide additional protection such as Th1 (cytotoxic) or Th2 (antibody-mediated) type responses. Hence, macrophages were renamed M1 and M2 to indicate the central role of macrophages/innate immunity in immune systems. These findings indicate that the long held notion that adaptive immunity controls innate immunity was backward: a sea change in understanding how immune responses occur. The clinical impact of M1/kill and M2/repair responses is immense playing pivotal roles in curing (or causing) many diseases including infections, cancer, autoimmunity, and atherosclerosis. How M1/M2 came to be is an interesting story that, like life, involved Direction, Determination, Discouragement, and Discovery. PMID:25999950

  1. Computational discovery of stable M2A X phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Michael; Hennig, Richard G.; Broderick, Scott R.; Rajan, Krishna; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2016-08-01

    The family of layered Mn +1A Xn compounds provides a large class of materials with applications ranging from magnets to high-temperature coatings to nuclear cladding. In this work, we employ a density-functional-theory-based discovery approach to identify a large number of thermodynamically stable Mn +1A Xn compounds, where n =1 , M =Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Hf, Ta; A =Al, Si, P, S, Ga, Ge, As, Cd, In, Sn, Tl, Pb; and X =C, N. We calculate the formation energy for 216 pure M2A X compounds and 10 314 solid solutions, (MM') 2(A A') (X X') , relative to their competing phases. We find that the 49 experimentally known M2A X phases exhibit formation energies of less than 30 meV/atom. Among the 10 530 compositions considered, 3140 exhibit formation energies below 30 meV/atom, most of which have yet to be experimentally synthesized. A significant subset of 301 compositions exhibits strong exothermic stability in excess of 100 meV/atom, indicating favorable synthesis conditions. We identify empirical design rules for stable M2A X compounds. Among the metastable M2A X compounds are two Cr-based compounds with ferromagnetic ordering and expected Curie temperatures around 75 K. These results can serve as a map for the experimental design and synthesis of different M2A X compounds.

  2. Assessing the contribution of thrombospondin-4 induction and ATF6α activation to endoplasmic reticulum expansion and phenotypic modulation in bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Katarzyna K.; Ekman, Mari; Rippe, Catarina; Grossi, Mario; Nilsson, Bengt-Olof; Albinsson, Sebastian; Uvelius, Bengt; Swärd, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic modulation of smooth muscle cells is a hallmark of disease. The associated expansion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) volume remains unexplained. Thrombospondin-4 was recently found to promote ATF6α activation leading to ER expansion. Using bladder outlet obstruction as a paradigm for phenotypic modulation, we tested if thrombospondin-4 is induced in association with ATF6α activation and ER expansion. Thrombospondin-4 was induced and ATF6α was activated after outlet obstruction in rodents. Increased abundance of spliced of Xbp1, another ER-stress sensor, and induction of Atf4 and Creb3l2 was also seen. Downstream of ATF6α, Calr, Manf, Sdf2l1 and Pdi increased as did ER size, whereas contractile markers were reduced. Overexpression of ATF6α, but not of thrombospondin-4, increased Calr, Manf, Sdf2l1 and Pdi and caused ER expansion, but the contractile markers were inert. Knockout of thrombospondin-4 neither affected bladder growth nor expression of ATF6α target genes, and repression of contractile markers was the same, even if ATF6α activation was curtailed. Increases of Xbp1s, Atf4 and Creb3l2 were similar. Our findings demonstrate reciprocal regulation of the unfolded protein response, including ATF6α activation and ER expansion, and reduced contractile differentiation in bladder outlet obstruction occurring independently of thrombospondin-4, which however is a sensitive indicator of obstruction. PMID:27581066

  3. Inhibition of AGEs/RAGE/Rho/ROCK pathway suppresses non-specific neuroinflammation by regulating BV2 microglial M1/M2 polarization through the NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingkao; Sun, Zhaowei; Jin, Minghua; Tu, Yalin; Wang, Shengnan; Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Qiuhe; Zhang, Xiao; Han, Yifan; Pi, Rongbiao

    2017-04-15

    The microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs)/receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) or Rho/Rho kinase (ROCK) are both involved in the development of non-specific inflammation. However, there are few reports about their effects on neuroinflammation. Here, we explored the mechanism of AGEs/RAGE/Rho/ROCK pathway underlying the non-specific inflammation and microglial polarization in BV2 cells. AGEs could activate ROCK pathway in a concentration-dependent manner. ROCK inhibitor fasudil and RAGE-specific blocker FPS-ZM1 significantly inhibited AGEs-mediated activation of BV2 cells and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). FPS-ZM1 and fasudil exerted their anti-inflammatory effects by downregulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), NLRP3 and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65. In addition, AGEs induced both M1 (CD16/32, M1 marker) and M2 (CD206, M2 marker) phenotype in BV2 cells. Fasudil and FPS-ZM1 led to a decreased M1 and increased M2 phenotype. Together, these results indicate that the AGEs/RAGE/Rho/ROCK pathway in BV2 cells could intensify the non-specific inflammation of AD, which will provide novel strategies for the development of anti-AD drugs.

  4. M1 and M2 macrophage recruitment during tendon regeneration induced by amniotic epithelial cell allotransplantation in ovine.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Annunziata; Russo, Valentina; Di Marcantonio, Lisa; Berardinelli, Paolo; Martelli, Alessandra; Muttini, Aurelio; Mattioli, Mauro; Barboni, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that ovine amniotic epithelial cells (oAECs) allotransplanted into experimentally induced tendon lesions are able to stimulate tissue regeneration also by reducing leukocyte infiltration. Amongst leukocytes, macrophages (Mφ) M1 and M2 phenotype cells are known to mediate inflammatory and repairing processes, respectively. In this research it was investigated if, during tendon regeneration induced by AECs allotransplantation, M1Mφ and M2phenotype cells are recruited and differently distributed within the lesion site. Ovine AECs treated and untreated (Ctr) tendons were explanted at 7, 14, and 28 days and tissue microarchitecture was analyzed together with the distribution and quantification of leukocytes (CD45 positive), Mφ (CD68 pan positive), and M1Mφ (CD86, and IL12b) and M2Mφ (CD206, YM1 and IL10) phenotype related markers. In oAEC transplanted tendons CD45 and CD68 positive cells were always reduced in the lesion site. At day 14, oAEC treated tendons began to recover their microarchitecture, contextually a reduction of M1Mφ markers, mainly distributed close to oAECs, and an increase of M2Mφ markers was evidenced. CD206 positive cells were distributed near the regenerating areas. At day 28 oAECs treated tendons acquired a healthy-like structure with a reduction of M2Mφ. Differently, Ctr tendons maintained a disorganized morphology throughout the experimental time and constantly showed high values of M1Mφ markers. These findings indicate that M2Mφ recruitment could be correlated to tendon regeneration induced by oAECs allotransplantation. Moreover, these results demonstrate oAECs immunomodulatory role also in vivo and support novel insights into their allogeneic use underlying the resolution of tendon fibrosis.

  5. Macrophage activation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fernando Oneissi; Sica, Antonio; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed immune system cells that play an indispensable role in homeostasis and defense. They can be phenotypically polarized by the microenvironment to mount specific functional programs. Polarized macrophages can be broadly classified in two main groups: classically activated macrophages (or M1), whose prototypical activating stimuli are IFNgamma and LPS, and alternatively activated macrophages (or M2), further subdivided in M2a (after exposure to IL-4 or IL-13), M2b (immune complexes in combination with IL-1beta or LPS) and M2c (IL-10, TGFbeta or glucocorticoids). M1 exhibit potent microbicidal properties and promote strong IL-12-mediated Th1 responses, whilst M2 support Th2-associated effector functions. Beyond infection M2 polarized macrophages play a role in resolution of inflammation through high endocytic clearance capacities and trophic factor synthesis, accompanied by reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Similar functions are also exerted by tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), which also display an alternative-like activation phenotype and play a detrimental pro-tumoral role. Here we review the main functions of polarized macrophages and discuss the perspectives of this field.

  6. M2-F1 in flight on tow line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The wingless, lifting-body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Flight Research Center management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The M2-F1 project had limited goals. They were to show that a piloted lifting body could be built, that it could not only fly but be controlled in flight, and that it could make a successful landing. While the M2-F1 did prove the concept, with a wooden fuselage and fixed landing gear, it was far from an operational spacecraft. The next step in the lifting-body development was to build a heavyweight, rocket-powered vehicle that was more like an operational lifting body, albeit one without the thermal protection system that would be needed for reentry into the atmosphere from space at near-orbital speeds. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to

  7. Opposite Effects of M1 and M2 Macrophage Subtypes on Lung Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ang; Hsiao, Yi-Jing; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Huei-Wen; Ho, Chao-Chi; Chen, Yu-Yun; Liu, Yi-Chia; Hong, Tsai-Hsia; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chen, Jeremy J W; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2015-09-24

    Macrophages in a tumor microenvironment have been characterized as M1- and M2-polarized subtypes. Here, we discovered the different macrophages' impacts on lung cancer cell A549. The M2a/M2c subtypes promoted A549 invasion and xenograft tumor growth. The M1 subtype suppressed angiogenesis. M1 enhanced the sensitivity of A549 to cisplatin and decreased the tube formation activity and cell viability of A549 cells by inducing apoptosis and senescence. Different macrophage subtypes regulated genes involved in the immune response, cytoskeletal remodeling, coagulation, cell adhesion, and apoptosis pathways in A549 cells, which was a pattern that correlated with the altered behaviors of the A549 cells. Furthermore, we found that the identified M1/M2 gene signatures were significantly correlated with the extended overall survival of lung cancer patients. These results suggest that M1/M2 gene expression signature may be used as a prognostic indicator for lung cancer patients, and M1/M2 polarization may be a target of investigation of immune-modulating therapies for lung cancer in the future.

  8. M2-F1 on lakebed with pilot Milt Thompson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    NASA Flight Research Pilot Milt Thompson, shown here on the lakebed with the M2-F1 lifting body, was an early backer of R. Dale Reed's lifting-body proposal. He urged Flight Research Center director Paul Bikle to approve the M2-F1's construction. Thompson also made the first glide flights in both the M2-F1 and its successor, the heavyweight M2-F2. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, NASA Flight Research Center (later Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA) management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved

  9. Mini Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis; Winglee, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The M2P2 concept is based on the transfer of momentum from the solar wind to an artificial magnetic field structure like that naturally occurs at all magnetized planets in the Solar System, called the magnetosphere. The objectives of this program include the following: (1) Demonstrate artificial magnetospheric inflation through cold plasma filling in vacuum; (2) Demonstrate deflection of a surrogate solar wind by an artificial magnetosphere in the laboratory vacuum chamber; (3) Compare theoretical calculations for thrust forces with laboratory measurements; (4) Develop flight control algorithms for planning mission specific trajectories; and (5) Develop M2P2 system concept.

  10. Adipose stromal cells differentiation toward smooth muscle cell phenotype diminishes their vasculogenic activity due to induction of activin A secretion.

    PubMed

    Merfeld-Clauss, Stephanie; Lease, Benjamin R; Lu, Hongyan; March, Keith L; Traktuev, Dmitry O

    2016-09-16

    Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) support endothelial cell (EC) vasculogenesis through paracrine and cell-contact communications. In addition, ASCs differentiate towards the smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype under different stimuli, which prompted their use as a source of mural cells in fabricating small calibre vessels. How ASCs' SMC-lineage commitment affects their subsequent communication with ECs is unknown. The vasculogenic characteristics of human ASCs in progenitor stage and after differentiation towards SMC phenotype were analysed in the present study. Exposure to transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1 ) or activin A has induced expression of SMC markers in ASCs. Analysis performed after treatment withdrawal revealed that secretome of pre-differentiated ASCs had a reduced potency to support EC survival and these ASCs had diminished ability to support EC vasculogenesis in vitro. Vascularization of subcutaneous implants carrying a mixture of ECs and ASCs was 50% lower when, instead of control, pre-differentiated ASCs were used. Pre-differentiated ASCs had an inferior mitogenic response to EC-produced factors. Differentiation of ASCs was accompanied by upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and a decrease in hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) production; however, addition of HGF to the co-culture incubation media did not improve vasculogenesis. In parallel, ASC treatment with TGFβ1 induced secretion of activin A. Augmenting co-culture incubation media with anti-activin A IgG restored the ability of pre-differentiated ASCs to support vasculogenesis to the same degree as control ASCs. The present study suggests that TGFβ1 or activin A-induced ASC commitment to SMC phenotype negatively affects the ability of ASCs to support EC vasculogenesis in applications based on EC and ASC co-injection into target tissues. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. M2-F1 ejection seat test at South Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 was fitted with an ejection seat before the airtow flights began. The project selected the seat used in the T-37 as modified by the Weber Company to use a rocket rather than a ballistic charge for ejection. To test the ejection seat, the Flight Research Center's Dick Klein constructed a plywood mockup of the M2-F1's top deck and canopy. On the first firings, the test was unsuccessful, but on the final test the dummy in the seat landed safely. The M2-F1 ejection seat was later used in the two Lunar Landing Research Vehicles and the three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles. Three of them crashed, but in each case the pilot ejected from the vehicle successfully. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with

  12. Human mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted lactate induces M2-macrophage differentiation by metabolic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Civini, Sara; Pacelli, Consiglia; Dieng, Mame Massar; Lemieux, William; Jin, Ping; Bazin, Renée; Patey, Natacha; Marincola, Francesco M.; Moldovan, Florina; Zaouter, Charlotte; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Benabdhalla, Basma; Louis, Isabelle; Beauséjour, Christian; Stroncek, David; Le Deist, Françoise; Haddad, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to dampen immune response and promote tissue repair, but the underlying mechanisms are still under investigation. Herein, we demonstrate that umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) alter the phenotype and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) through lactate-mediated metabolic reprogramming. UC-MSC can secrete large quantities of lactate and, when present during monocyte-to-DC differentiation, induce instead the acquisition of M2-macrophage features in terms of morphology, surface markers, migratory properties and antigen presentation capacity. Microarray expression profiling indicates that UC-MSC modify the expression of metabolic-related genes and induce a M2-macrophage expression signature. Importantly, monocyte-derived DC obtained in presence of UC-MSC, polarize naïve allogeneic CD4+ T-cells into Th2 cells. Treatment of UC-MSC with an inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase strongly decreases lactate concentration in culture supernatant and abrogates the effect on monocyte-to-DC differentiation. Metabolic analysis further revealed that UC-MSC decrease oxidative phosphorylation in differentiating monocytes while strongly increasing the spare respiratory capacity proportional to the amount of secreted lactate. Because both MSC and monocytes are recruited in vivo at the site of tissue damage and inflammation, we propose the local increase of lactate concentration induced by UC-MSC and the consequent enrichment in M2-macrophage generation as a mechanism to achieve immunomodulation. PMID:27070086

  13. EHR Big Data Deep Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Lenert, L.; Lopez-Campos, G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Given the quickening speed of discovery of variant disease drivers from combined patient genotype and phenotype data, the objective is to provide methodology using big data technology to support the definition of deep phenotypes in medical records. Methods As the vast stores of genomic information increase with next generation sequencing, the importance of deep phenotyping increases. The growth of genomic data and adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHR) in medicine provides a unique opportunity to integrate phenotype and genotype data into medical records. The method by which collections of clinical findings and other health related data are leveraged to form meaningful phenotypes is an active area of research. Longitudinal data stored in EHRs provide a wealth of information that can be used to construct phenotypes of patients. We focus on a practical problem around data integration for deep phenotype identification within EHR data. The use of big data approaches are described that enable scalable markup of EHR events that can be used for semantic and temporal similarity analysis to support the identification of phenotype and genotype relationships. Conclusions Stead and colleagues’ 2005 concept of using light standards to increase the productivity of software systems by riding on the wave of hardware/processing power is described as a harbinger for designing future healthcare systems. The big data solution, using flexible markup, provides a route to improved utilization of processing power for organizing patient records in genotype and phenotype research. PMID:25123744

  14. M2FS: the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I.; Crane, Jeffrey; Shectman, Stephen; Thompson, Ian; Roederer, Ian; Bigelow, Bruce; Gunnels, Steve

    2012-09-01

    We describe the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) under construction for use on the Magellan/Clay telescope. M2FS consists of four primary components including: (1) A fiber-fed double spectrograph (MSPec) in which each spectrograph is fed by 128 fibers (for a total multiplexing factor of 256) and each is optimized in to operate from 370- 950 nm; (2) A fiber mounting system (MFib) that supports the fibers and fiber plug plates at the telescope f/11 Nasmyth focal surface and organizes the fibers into `shoes' that are used to place the fibers at the image surface of the MSpec spectrographs;, (3) A new wide-field corrector (WFC) that produces high-quality images over a 30 arcmin diameter field; (4) A unit (MCal) mounted near the telescope secondary that provides wavelength and continuum calibration and that supports a key component in a novel automated fiber identification system. We describe the opto-mechanical properties of M2FS, its modes of operation, and its anticipated performance, as well as potential upgrades including the development of a robotic fiber positioner and an atmospheric dispersion corrector. We describe how the M2FS design could serve as the basis of a powerful wide-field, massively multiplexed spectroscopic survey facility.

  15. PK-M2 Makes Cells Sweeter on HIF1.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Daniel A

    2011-05-27

    The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) facilitates the induction of enzymes necessary for anaerobic glycolysis. Luo et al. (2011) now identify pyruvate kinase (PK)-M2 as an intriguing new interacting partner for HIF1, revealing a potential mechanism for the Warburg effect, an elevation in aerobic glycolytic metabolism frequently observed in cancer.

  16. M2-F1 in hangar with Pontiac tow vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here in a hangar with its hotrod Pontiac convertible tow vehicle at the Flight Research Center (later the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The car was a 1963 Pontiac Catalina convertible, fitted with a 421-cubic-inch tripower engine like those being run at the Daytona 500 auto race. The vehicle also had a four-speed transmission and a heavy-duty suspension and cooling system. A roll bar was also added and the passenger seat turned around so an observer could watch the M2-F1 while it was being towed. The rear seat was removed and a second, side-facing seat installed. The lifting-body team used the Pontiac for all the ground-tow flights over the next three years. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey

  17. M2e-Based Universal Influenza A Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lei; Cho, Ki Joon; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-02-13

    The successful isolation of a human influenza virus in 1933 was soon followed by the first attempts to develop an influenza vaccine. Nowadays, vaccination is still the most effective method to prevent human influenza disease. However, licensed influenza vaccines offer protection against antigenically matching viruses, and the composition of these vaccines needs to be updated nearly every year. Vaccines that target conserved epitopes of influenza viruses would in principle not require such updating and would probably have a considerable positive impact on global human health in case of a pandemic outbreak. The extracellular domain of Matrix 2 (M2e) protein is an evolutionarily conserved region in influenza A viruses and a promising epitope for designing a universal influenza vaccine. Here we review the seminal and recent studies that focused on M2e as a vaccine antigen. We address the mechanism of action and the clinical development of M2e-vaccines. Finally, we try to foresee how M2e-based vaccines could be implemented clinically in the future.

  18. Progress On 58m2 Passive Resonant Ring Laser Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, G. L.; Rotge, J.; Simmons, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    An update of the large area (now 60m2) Passive Resonant Ring Laser Gyro (PRRLG) is given. Some aspects of last year's design have changed; but performance is still predicted to be in the 10-10 earth rate unit (ERU) range. This is of interest for a number of geophysical applications.

  19. M2e-Based Universal Influenza A Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lei; Cho, Ki Joon; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The successful isolation of a human influenza virus in 1933 was soon followed by the first attempts to develop an influenza vaccine. Nowadays, vaccination is still the most effective method to prevent human influenza disease. However, licensed influenza vaccines offer protection against antigenically matching viruses, and the composition of these vaccines needs to be updated nearly every year. Vaccines that target conserved epitopes of influenza viruses would in principle not require such updating and would probably have a considerable positive impact on global human health in case of a pandemic outbreak. The extracellular domain of Matrix 2 (M2e) protein is an evolutionarily conserved region in influenza A viruses and a promising epitope for designing a universal influenza vaccine. Here we review the seminal and recent studies that focused on M2e as a vaccine antigen. We address the mechanism of action and the clinical development of M2e-vaccines. Finally, we try to foresee how M2e-based vaccines could be implemented clinically in the future. PMID:26344949

  20. Shifts in macrophage phenotypes and macrophage competition for arginine metabolism affect the severity of muscle pathology in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Villalta, S Armando; Nguyen, Hal X; Deng, Bo; Gotoh, Tomomi; Tidball, James G

    2009-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common, lethal, muscle-wasting disease of childhood. Previous investigations have shown that muscle macrophages may play an important role in promoting the pathology in the mdx mouse model of DMD. In the present study, we investigate the mechanism through which macrophages promote mdx dystrophy and assess whether the phenotype of the macrophages changes between the stage of peak muscle necrosis (4 weeks of age) and muscle regeneration (12 weeks). We find that 4-week-old mdx muscles contain a population of pro-inflammatory, classically activated M1 macrophages that lyse muscle in vitro by NO-mediated mechanisms. Genetic ablation of the iNOS gene in mdx mice also significantly reduces muscle membrane lysis in 4-week-old mdx mice in vivo. However, 4-week mdx muscles also contain a population of alternatively activated, M2a macrophages that express arginase. In vitro assays show that M2a macrophages reduce lysis of muscle cells by M1 macrophages through the competition of arginase in M2a cells with iNOS in M1 cells for their common, enzymatic substrate, arginine. During the transition from the acute peak of mdx pathology to the regenerative stage, expression of IL-4 and IL-10 increases, either of which can deactivate the M1 phenotype and promote activation of a CD163+, M2c phenotype that can increase tissue repair. Our findings further show that IL-10 stimulation of macrophages activates their ability to promote satellite cell proliferation. Deactivation of the M1 phenotype is also associated with a reduced expression of iNOS, IL-6, MCP-1 and IP-10. Thus, these results show that distinct subpopulations of macrophages can promote muscle injury or repair in muscular dystrophy, and that therapeutic interventions that affect the balance between M1 and M2 macrophage populations may influence the course of muscular dystrophy.

  1. Internal steel structure of M2-F1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The internal steel structure for the M2-F1 was built at the Flight Research Center (predecessor of the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA) in a section of the calibration hangar dubbed 'Wright Bicycle Shop.' Visible are the stick, rudder pedals, and ejection seat. The external wooden shell was attached to the steel structure. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly

  2. Subcellular redistribution of m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in striatal interneurons in vivo after acute cholinergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bernard, V; Laribi, O; Levey, A I; Bloch, B

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of our work was to investigate how the cholinergic environment influences the targeting and the intracellular trafficking of the muscarinic receptor m2 (m2R) in vivo. To address this question, we have used immunohistochemical approaches at light and electron microscopic levels to detect the m2R in control rats and rats treated with muscarinic receptor agonists. In control animals, m2Rs were located mostly at postsynaptic sites at the plasma membrane of perikarya and dendrites of cholinergic and NPY-somatostatin interneurons as autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, respectively. Presynaptic receptors were also detected in boutons. The m2Rs were usually detected at extrasynaptic sites, but they could be found rarely in association with symmetrical synapses, suggesting that the cholinergic transmission mediated by m2R occurs via synaptic and nonsynaptic mechanisms. The stimulation of muscarinic receptors with oxotremorine provoked a dramatic alteration of m2R compartmentalization, including endocytosis with a decrease of the density of m2R at the membrane (-63%) and an increase of those associated with endosomes (+86%) in perikarya. The very strong increase of m2R associated with multivesicular bodies (+732%) suggests that oxotremorine activated degradation. The slight increase in the Golgi apparatus (+26%) suggests that the m2R stimulation had an effect on the maturation of m2R. The substance P receptor located at the membrane of the same neurons was unaffected by oxotremorine. Our data demonstrate that cholinergic stimulation dramatically influences the subcellular distribution of m2R in striatal interneurons in vivo. These events may have key roles in controlling abundance and availability of muscarinic receptors via regulation of receptor endocytosis, degradation, and/or neosynthesis. Further, the control of muscarinic receptor trafficking may influence the activity of striatal interneurons, including neurotransmitter release and/or electric activity.

  3. Heparanase-mediated Loss of Nuclear Syndecan-1 Enhances Histone Acetyltransferase (HAT) Activity to Promote Expression of Genes That Drive an Aggressive Tumor Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Hurst, Douglas R.; Pisano, Claudio; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2011-01-01

    Heparanase acts as a master regulator of the aggressive tumor phenotype in part by enhancing expression of proteins known to drive tumor progression (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and RANKL). However, the mechanism whereby this enzyme regulates gene expression remains unknown. We previously reported that elevation of heparanase levels in myeloma cells causes a dramatic reduction in the amount of syndecan-1 in the nucleus. Because syndecan-1 has heparan sulfate chains and because exogenous heparan sulfate has been shown to inhibit the activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes in vitro, we hypothesized that the reduction in nuclear syndecan-1 in cells expressing high levels of heparanase would result in increased HAT activity leading to stimulation of protein transcription. We found that myeloma cells or tumors expressing high levels of heparanase and low levels of nuclear syndecan-1 had significantly higher levels of HAT activity when compared with cells or tumors expressing low levels of heparanase. High levels of HAT activity in heparanase-high cells were blocked by SST0001, an inhibitor of heparanase. Restoration of high syndecan-1 levels in heparanase-high cells diminished nuclear HAT activity, establishing syndecan-1 as a potent inhibitor of HAT. Exposure of heparanase-high cells to anacardic acid, an inhibitor of HAT activity, significantly suppressed their expression of VEGF and MMP-9, two genes known to be up-regulated following elevation of heparanase. These results reveal a novel mechanistic pathway driven by heparanase expression, which leads to decreased nuclear syndecan-1, increased HAT activity, and up-regulation of transcription of multiple genes that drive an aggressive tumor phenotype. PMID:21757697

  4. Phenotypic and Functional Dysregulated Blood NK Cells in Colorectal Cancer Patients Can Be Activated by Cetuximab Plus IL-2 or IL-15

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Yamila Sol; Roberti, María Paula; Juliá, Estefanía Paula; Pampena, María Betina; Bruno, Luisina; Rivero, Sergio; Huertas, Eduardo; Sánchez Loria, Fernando; Pairola, Alejandro; Caignard, Anne; Mordoh, José; Levy, Estrella Mariel

    2016-01-01

    The clinical outcome of colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with the immune response; thus, these tumors could be responsive to different immune therapy approaches. Natural killer (NK) cells are key antitumor primary effectors that can eliminate CRC cells without prior immunization. We previously determined that NK cells from the local tumor environment of CRC tumors display a profoundly altered phenotype compared with circulating NK cells from healthy donors (HD). In this study, we evaluated peripheral blood NK cells from untreated patients and their possible role in metastasis progression. We observed profound deregulation in receptor expression even in early stages of disease compared with HD. CRC-NK cells displayed underexpression of CD16, NKG2D, DNAM-1, CD161, NKp46, and NKp30 activating receptors, while inhibitory receptors CD85j and NKG2A were overexpressed. This inhibited phenotype affected cytotoxic functionality against CRC cells and interferon-γ production. We also determined that NKp30 and NKp46 are the key receptors involved in detriment of CRC-NK cells’ antitumor activity. Moreover, NKp46 expression correlated with relapse-free survival of CRC patients with a maximum follow-up of 71 months. CRC-NK cells also exhibited altered antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity function responding poorly to cetuximab. IL-2 and IL-15 in combination with cetuximab stimulated NK cell, improving cytotoxicity. These results show potential strategies to enhance CRC-NK cell activity. PMID:27777574

  5. Stretch-activated calcium channel protein TRPC1 is correlated with the different degrees of the dystrophic phenotype in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Cíntia Yuri; Taniguti, Ana Paula Tiemi; Pertille, Adriana; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2011-12-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and in the mdx mouse model of DMD, the lack of dystrophin is related to enhanced calcium influx and muscle degeneration. Stretch-activated channels (SACs) might be directly involved in the pathology of DMD, and transient receptor potential cation channels have been proposed as likely candidates of SACs. We investigated the levels of transient receptor potential canonical channel 1 (TRPC1) and the effects of streptomycin, a SAC blocker, in muscles showing different degrees of the dystrophic phenotype. Mdx mice (18 days old, n = 16) received daily intraperitoneal injections of streptomycin (182 mg/kg body wt) for 18 days, followed by removal of the diaphragm, sternomastoid (STN), biceps brachii, and tibialis anterior muscles. Control mdx mice (n = 37) were injected with saline. Western blot analysis showed higher levels of TRPC1 in diaphragm muscle compared with STN and limb muscles. Streptomycin reduced creatine kinase and prevented exercise-induced increases of total calcium and Evans blue dye uptake in diaphragm and in STN muscles. It is suggested that different levels of the stretch-activated calcium channel protein TRPC1 may contribute to the different degrees of the dystrophic phenotype seen in mdx mice. Early treatment designed to regulate the activity of these channels may ameliorate the progression of dystrophy in the most affected muscle, the diaphragm.

  6. Phenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells during acute dengue illness demonstrates infection and increased activation of monocytes in severe cases compared to classic dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Anna P; Vargas, Maria José; Wanionek, Kimberli; Hammond, Samantha N; Gordon, Aubree; Rocha, Crisanta; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2008-07-05

    In vitro studies have attempted to identify dengue virus (DEN) target cells in peripheral blood; however, extensive phenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dengue patients has not been reported. PBMCs collected from hospitalized children suspected of acute dengue were analyzed for DEN prM, CD32, CD86, CD14, CD11c, CD16, CD209, CCR7, CD4, and CD8 by flow cytometry to detect DEN antigen in PBMCs and to phenotype DEN-positive cells. DEN prM was detected primarily in activated monocytes (CD14(+), CD32(+), CD86(+), CD11c(+)). A subset of samples analyzed for DEN nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) confirmed that approximately half of DEN antigen-positive cells contained replicating virus. A higher percentage of PBMCs from DHF patients expressed prM, CD86, CD32, and CD11c than did those from DF patients. Increased activation of monocytes and greater numbers of DEN-infected cells were associated with more severe dengue, implicating a role for monocyte activation in dengue immunopathogenesis.

  7. Macrophages in spinal cord injury: phenotypic and functional change from exposure to myelin debris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Cao, Kai; Sun, Xin; Chen, Yongxiong; Duan, Zhaoxia; Sun, Li; Guo, Lei; Bai, Paul; Sun, Dongming; Fan, Jianqing; He, Xijing; Young, Wise; Ren, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Macrophage activation and persistent inflammation contribute to the pathological process of spinal cord injury (SCI). It was reported that M2 macrophages were induced at 3-7 days after SCI but M2 markers were reduced or eliminated after 1 week. By contrast, M1 macrophage response is rapidly induced and then maintained at injured spinal cord. However, factors that modulate macrophage phenotype and function are poorly understood. We developed a model to distinguish bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) from residential microglia and explored how BMDMs change their phenotype and functions in response to the lesion-related factors in injured spinal cord. Infiltrating BMDMs expressing higher Mac-2 and lower CX3CR1 migrate to the epicenter of injury, while microglia expressing lower Mac-2 but higher CX3CR1 distribute to the edges of lesion. Myelin debris at the lesion site switches BMDMs from M2 phenotype towards M1-like phenotype. Myelin debris activates ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) for cholesterol efflux in response to myelin debris loading in vitro. However, this homeostatic mechanism in injured site is overwhelmed, leading to the development of foamy macrophages and lipid plaque in the lesion site. The persistence of these cells indicates a pro-inflammatory environment, associated with enhanced neurotoxicity and impaired wound healing. These foamy macrophages have poor capacity to phagocytose apoptotic neutrophils resulting in uningested neutrophils releasing their toxic contents and further tissue damage. In conclusion, these data demonstrate for the first time that myelin debris generated in injured spinal cord modulates macrophage activation. Lipid accumulation following macrophage phenotype switch contributes to SCI pathology.

  8. Macrophages in spinal cord injury: phenotypic and functional change from exposure to myelin debris

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Cao, Kai; Sun, Xin; Chen, Yongxiong; Duan, Zhaoxia; Sun, Li; Guo, Lei; Bai, Paul; Sun, Dongming; Fan, Jianqing; He, Xijing; Young, Wise; Ren, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation and persistent inflammation contribute to the pathological process of spinal cord injury (SCI). It was reported that M2 macrophages were induced at 3–7 days after SCI but M2 markers were reduced or eliminated after 1 week. By contrast, M1 macrophage response is rapidly induced and then maintained at injured spinal cord. However, factors that modulate macrophage phenotype and function are poorly understood. We developed a model to distinguished bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) from residential microglia and explored how BMDMs change their phenotype and functions in response to the lesion-related factors in injured spinal cord. Infiltrating BMDMs expressing higher Mac-2 and lower CX3CR1 migrate to the epicenter of injury, while microglia expressing lower Mac-2 but higher CX3CR1 distribute to the edges of lesion. Myelin debris at the lesion site switches BMDMs from M2 phenotype towards M1-like phenotype. Myelin debris activate ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) for cholesterol efflux in response to myelin debris loading in vitro. However, this homeostatic mechanism in injured site is overwhelmed, leading to the development of foamy macrophages and lipid plaque in the lesion site. The persistence of these cells indicates a pro-inflammatory environment, associated with enhanced neurotoxicity and impaired wound healing. These foamy macrophages have poor capacity to phagocytose apoptotic neutrophils resulting in uningested neutrophils releasing their toxic contents and further tissue damage. In conclusion, these data demonstrate for the first time that myelin debris generated in injured spinal cord modulates macrophage activation. Lipid accumulation following macrophage phenotype switch contributes to SCI pathology. PMID:25452166

  9. M2-F2 flight preparation and launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This movie clip runs about 27 seconds and shows the cockpit canopy close-out by the ground crew, the aircraft hanging from the NB-52B wing pylon, and the M2-F2 being dropped away from the mothership. A fleet of lifting bodies flown at the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC), Edwards, California, from 1963 to l975 demonstrated the ability of pilots to maneuver (in the atmosphere) and safely land a wingless vehicle. These lifting bodies were basically designed so they could fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an aircraft at a pre-determined site. They served as precursors of today's Space Shuttle, the X-33, and the X-38, providing technical and operational engineering data that shaped all three space vehicles. (In 1976 NASA renamed the FRC as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) in honor of Hugh L. Dryden.) In 1962, FRC Director Paul Bikle approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1. Built by Gus Briegleb, a sailplane builder from El Mirage, California, it featured a plywood shell, placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at the FRC. Construction was completed in 1963. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA Ames Research Center and NASA and Langley Research Center -- the M2-F2 and the HL-10, both built by the Northrop Corporation, Los Angeles, California. The 'M' refers to 'manned' and 'F' refers to 'flight' version. 'HL' comes from 'horizontal landing' and '10' is for the tenth lifting body model to be investigated by Langley. The first flight of the M2-F2 -- which looked much like the M2-F1 -- occurred on July 12, 1966. Thompson was the pilot. By then, the same B-52 used to air launch the famed X-15 rocket research aircraft had been modified to also carry the lifting bodies into the air and Thompson was

  10. PTEN inhibits macrophage polarization from M1 to M2 through CCL2 and VEGF-A reduction and NHERF-1 synergism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Qin, Junfang; Lan, Lan; Zhang, Hongyao; Liu, Fang; Wu, Zhaozhen; Ni, Hong; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    PTEN has been studied in several tumor models as a tumor suppressor. In this study, we explored the role of PTEN in the inhibition state of polarized M2 subtype of macrophage in tumor microenvironment (TME) and the underlying mechanisms. To elucidate the potential effect in TME, RAW 264.7 macrophages and 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells were co-cultured to reconstruct tumor microenvironment. After PTEN was down-regulated with shRNA, the expression of CCL2 and VEGF-A, which are definited to promote the formation of M2 macrophages, have a dramatically increase on the level of both gene and protein in co-cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages. And at the same time, NHERF-1 (Na+/H+ exchanger regulating factor-1), another tumor suppressor has a similar tendency to PTEN. Q-PCR and WB results suggested that PTEN and NHERF-1 were consistent with one another no matter at mRNA or protein level when exposed to the same stimulus. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence techniques confirmed that PTEN and NHERF-1 were coprecipitated, and NHERF-1 protein expression was properly reduced with rCCL2 effect. In addition, cell immunofluorescence images revealed a profound transferance, in co-cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages, an up-regulation of NHERF-1 could promote the PTEN marked expression on the cell membrane, and this form for the interaction was not negligible. These observations illustrate PTEN with a certain synergy of NHERF-1, as well as down-regulation of CCL2 suppressing M2 macrophage transformation pathway. The results suggest that the activation of PTEN and NHERF-1 may impede the evolution of macrophages beyond the M1 into M2 phenotype in tumor microenvironment. PMID:25756512

  11. Polarization of M2 macrophages requires Lamtor1 that integrates cytokine and amino-acid signals

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Nada, Shigeyuki; Takegahara, Noriko; Okuno, Tatsusada; Nojima, Satoshi; Kang, Sujin; Ito, Daisuke; Morimoto, Keiko; Hosokawa, Takashi; Hayama, Yoshitomo; Mitsui, Yuichi; Sakurai, Natsuki; Sarashina-Kida, Hana; Nishide, Masayuki; Maeda, Yohei; Takamatsu, Hyota; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Yamada, Masaki; Okada, Masato; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play crucial roles in host defence and tissue homoeostasis, processes in which both environmental stimuli and intracellularly generated metabolites influence activation of macrophages. Activated macrophages are classified into M1 and M2 macrophages. It remains unclear how intracellular nutrition sufficiency, especially for amino acid, influences on macrophage activation. Here we show that a lysosomal adaptor protein Lamtor1, which forms an amino-acid sensing complex with lysosomal vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase), and is the scaffold for amino acid-activated mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1), is critically required for M2 polarization. Lamtor1 deficiency, amino-acid starvation, or inhibition of v-ATPase and mTOR result in defective M2 polarization and enhanced M1 polarization. Furthermore, we identified liver X receptor (LXR) as the downstream target of Lamtor1 and mTORC1. Production of 25-hydroxycholesterol is dependent on Lamtor1 and mTORC1. Our findings demonstrate that Lamtor1 plays an essential role in M2 polarization, coupling immunity and metabolism. PMID:27731330

  12. Overexpression of SDF-1 activates the NF-κB pathway to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell-like phenotypes of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingxin; Guo, Sufen; Liu, Chunfeng; Zhao, Yiling; Feng, Chong; Liu, Yunshuang; Wang, Tao; Li, Caijuan

    2016-03-01

    The formation of EMT and EMT-induced CSC-like phenotype is crucial for the metastasis of tumor cells. The stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is upregulated in various human carcinomas, which is closely associated with proliferation, migration, invasion and prognosis of malignancies. However, limited attention has been directed towards the effect of SDF-1 on epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) or cancer stem cell (CSC)-like phenotype formation in breast cancer cells and the related mechanism. In the present study, we screened MCF-7 cells with low SDF-1 expression level for the purpose of evaluating whether SDF-1 is involved in EMT and CSC-like phenotype formation in MCF-7 cells. The pEGFP-N1-SDF-1 plasmid was transfected into MCF-7 cells, and the stably overexpressed SDF-1 in MCF-7 cells was confirmed by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Colony formation assay, MTT, wound healing assay and Transwell invasion assay demonstrated that overexpression of SDF-1 significantly boosted the proliferation, migration and invasion of MCF-7 cells compared with parental (P<0.05). Flow cytometry analysis revealed a notable increase of CD44+/CD24- subpopulation in SDF-1 overexpressing MCF-7 cells (P<0.001), accompanied by the apparently elevated ALDH activity and the upregulation of the stem cell markers OCT-4, Nanog, and SOX2 compared with parental (P<0.01). Besides, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay observed the significant decreased expression of E-cadherin and enhanced expression of slug, fibronectin and vimentin in SDF-1 overexpressed MCF-7 cells in comparison with parental (P<0.01). Further study found that overexpression of SDF-1 induced the activation of NF-κB pathway in MCF-7 cells. Conversely, suppressing or silencing p65 expression by antagonist or RNA interference could remarkably increase the expression of E-cadherin in SDF-1 overexpressed MCF-7 cells (P<0.001). Overall, the above results indicated that overexpression of SDF-1 enhanced

  13. Simple and robust determination of the activity signature of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes for physiological phenotyping in model and crop plants.

    PubMed

    Jammer, Alexandra; Gasperl, Anna; Luschin-Ebengreuth, Nora; Heyneke, Elmien; Chu, Hyosub; Cantero-Navarro, Elena; Großkinsky, Dominik K; Albacete, Alfonso A; Stabentheiner, Edith; Franzaring, Jürgen; Fangmeier, Andreas; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of physiological parameters is important to understand the link between plant phenotypes and their genetic bases, and therefore is needed as an important element in the analysis of model and crop plants. The activities of enzymes involved in primary carbohydrate metabolism have been shown to be strongly associated with growth performance, crop yield, and quality, as well as stress responses. A simple, fast, and cost-effective method to determine activities for 13 key enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism has been established, mainly based on coupled spectrophotometric kinetic assays. The comparison of extraction buffers and requirement for dialysis of crude protein extracts resulted in a universal protein extraction protocol, suitable for the preparation of protein extracts from different organs of various species. Individual published kinetic activity assays were optimized and adapted for a semi-high-throughput 96-well assay format. These assays proved to be robust and are thus suitable for physiological phenotyping, enabling the characterization and diagnosis of the physiological state. The potential of the determination of distinct enzyme activity signatures as part of a physiological fingerprint was shown for various organs and tissues from three monocot and five dicot model and crop species, including two case studies with external stimuli. Differential and specific enzyme activity signatures are apparent during inflorescence development and upon in vitro cold treatment of young inflorescences in the monocot ryegrass, related to conditions for doubled haploid formation. Likewise, treatment of dicot spring oilseed rape with elevated CO2 concentration resulted in distinct patterns of enzyme activity responses in leaves.

  14. Aberrant let7a/HMGA2 signaling activity with unique clinical phenotype in JAK2-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Cheng; You, Jie-Yu; Lung, Jrhau; Huang, Cih-En; Chen, Yi-Yang; Leu, Yu-Wei; Ho, Hsing-Ying; Li, Chian-Pei; Lu, Chang-Hsien; Lee, Kuan-Der; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Gau, Jyh-Pyng

    2017-03-01

    High mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) is an architectural transcription factor that is negatively regulated by let-7 microRNA through binding to it's 3'-untranslated region. Transgenic mice expressing Hmga2 with a truncation of its 3'-untranslated region has been shown to exhibit a myeloproliferative phenotype. To decipher the let-7-HMGA2 axis in myeloproliferative neoplasms, we employed an in vitro model supplemented with clinical correlation. Ba/F3 cells with inducible JAK2V617F expression (Ton.JAK2.V617F cells) showed upregulation of HMGA2 with concurrent let-7a repression. Ton.JAK2.V617F cells treated with a let-7a inhibitor exhibited further escalation of Hmga2 expression, while a let-7a mimic diminished the Hmga2 transcript level. Hmga2 overexpression conferred JAK2-mutated cells with a survival advantage through inhibited apoptosis. A pan-JAK inhibitor, INC424, increased the expression of let-7a, downregulated the level of Hmga2, and led to increased apoptosis in Ton.JAK2.V617F cells in a dose-dependent manner. In samples from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, there was a modest inverse correlation between the expression levels of let-7a and HMGA2 Overexpression of HMGA2 was detected in 29 (19.2%) of the cases, and it was more commonly seen in patients with essential thrombocythemia than in those with polycythemia vera (26.9% vs 12.7%, P=0.044). Patients with upregulated HMGA2 showed an increased propensity for developing major thrombotic events, and they were more likely to harbor one of the 3 driver myeloproliferative neoplasm mutations in JAK2, MPL and CALR Our findings suggest that, in a subset of myeloproliferative neoplasm patients, the let-7-HMGA2 axis plays a prominent role in the pathogenesis of the disease that leads to unique clinical phenotypes.

  15. Global phenotypic characterization of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, Barry R

    2009-01-01

    The measure of the quality of a systems biology model is how well it can reproduce and predict the behaviors of a biological system such as a microbial cell. In recent years, these models have been built up in layers, and each layer has been growing in sophistication and accuracy in parallel with a global data set to challenge and validate the models in predicting the content or activities of genes (genomics), proteins (proteomics), metabolites (metabolomics), and ultimately cell phenotypes (phenomics). This review focuses on the latter, the phenotypes of microbial cells. The development of Phenotype MicroArrays, which attempt to give a global view of cellular phenotypes, is described. In addition to their use in fleshing out and validating systems biology models, there are many other uses of this global phenotyping technology in basic and applied microbiology research, which are also described. PMID:19054113

  16. Distinct interneuron types express m2 muscarinic receptor immunoreactivity on their dendrites or axon terminals in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hájos, N; Papp, E C; Acsády, L; Levey, A I; Freund, T F

    1998-01-01

    hippocampal formation. Only calretinin and somatostatin showed an appreciable degree of co-localization with m2 (20% and 15%, respectively). Using retrograde tracing, some of the m2-positive cells in stratum oriens were shown to project to the medial septum, accouting for 38% of all projection neurons. The present results demonstrate that there is a differential distribution of m2 receptor immunoreactivity on the axonal vs the somadendritic membranes of distinct interneuron types and suggest that acetylcholine via m2 receptors may reduce GABA release presynaptically from the terminals of perisomatic inhibitory cells, while it may act to increase the activity of another class of interneuron, which innervates the dendritic region of pyramidal cells.

  17. IUE observations of the 'Butterfly' Nebula M2-9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    IUE observations of the peculiar 'Butterfy' nebula M2-9 indicate that it is not a normal planetary nebula. The ultraviolet spectrum is characterized by few emission lines and a weak continuum. Mg II 2800 A is the strongest emission line present and may be indicative of a binary nucleus. Lines of N v, Q I, N III, N IV, Si III, and C III are seen, but C IV and O III are conspicuous by their absence. T(e) = 10,250 + or - 400 K was determined for the core. Nitrogen in the core is found to be overabundant by about a factor of 5 over the solar value. M2-9 may be an object in the early stages of becoming a planetary nebula.

  18. Fractional power in the bucket, beam quality and M2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Santanu; Gutheinz, Lee M.

    2010-02-01

    This paper gives expressions to calculate the fraction of power, fPIB, from a given multimode gaussian laser beam that can be deposited within a bucket of radius, rT, on a target at a range, zT, using a focusing optic of diameter, Df. We relate the power in the bucket, fPIB, to the M2 parameter, both of which can be experimentally measured. In this paper, we have also presented relationships between these two parameters and BQ and Strehl, which have not been unambiguously defined for a multimode laser beam in the literature. We propose fPIB and M2 to be used as standard design parameters instead of BQ and Strehl for laser-target interaction tests with multimode laser beams from stable resonators.

  19. M2 world ocean tide from tide gauge measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, O.; Mazzega, P. )

    1991-06-01

    An empirical model of the M2 oceanic tide has been computed form the harmonic constants of a subset of deep sea and coastal tide gauge measurements. The optimal interpolation of these data based on inverse theory' uses a priori covariance functions deduced from a global hydrodynamical model. The inverse solution, produced with its associated error maps and samples of error spectra, is surprisingly good when compared to in situ data and to a hydrodynamical model.

  20. Hexa-D-arginine treatment increases 7B2•PC2 activity in hyp-mouse osteoblasts and rescues the HYP phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Baozhi; Feng, Jian Q; Bowman, Stephen; Liu, Ying; Blank, Robert D; Lindberg, Iris; Drezner, Marc K

    2013-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the "phosphate regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome" (PHEX/Phex) underlie disease in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) and the hyp-mouse, a murine homologue of the human disorder. Although increased serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) underlies the HYP phenotype, the mechanism(s) by which PHEX mutations inhibit FGF-23 degradation and/or enhance production remains unknown. Here we show that treatment of wild-type mice with the proprotein convertase (PC) inhibitor, decanoyl-Arg-Val-Lys-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (Dec), increases serum FGF-23 and produces the HYP phenotype. Because PC2 is uniquely colocalized with PHEX in osteoblasts/bone, we examined if PC2 regulates PHEX-dependent FGF-23 cleavage and production. Transfection of murine osteoblasts with PC2 and its chaperone protein 7B2 cleaved FGF-23, whereas Signe1 (7B2) RNA interference (RNAi) transfection, which limited 7B2 protein production, decreased FGF-23 degradation and increased Fgf-23 mRNA and protein. The mechanism by which decreased 7B2•PC2 activity influences Fgf-23 mRNA was linked to reduced conversion of the precursor to bone morphogenetic protein 1 (proBMP1) to active BMP1, which resulted in limited cleavage of dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1 (DMP1), and consequent increased Fgf-23 mRNA. The significance of decreased 7B2•PC2 activity in XLH was confirmed by studies of hyp-mouse bone, which revealed significantly decreased Sgne1 (7B2) mRNA and 7B2 protein, and limited cleavage of proPC2 to active PC2. The expected downstream effects of these changes included decreased FGF-23 cleavage and increased FGF-23 synthesis, secondary to decreased BMP1-mediated degradation of DMP1. Subsequent Hexa-D-Arginine treatment of hyp-mice enhanced bone 7B2•PC2 activity, normalized FGF-23 degradation and production, and rescued the HYP phenotype. These data suggest that decreased PHEX-dependent 7B2•PC2 activity is central to the

  1. State-of-the-art Model M-2 Maintenance System

    SciTech Connect

    Herndon, J.N.; Martin, H.L.; Satterlee, P.E. Jr.; Jelatis, D.G.; Jennrich, C.E.

    1984-04-01

    The Model M-2 Maintenance System is part of an ongoing program within the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to improve remote manipulation technology for future nuclear fuel reprocessing and other remote applications. Techniques, equipment, and guidelines which can improve the efficiency of remote maintenance are being developed. The Model M-2 Maintenance System, installed in the Integrated Equipment Test (IET) Facility at ORNL, provides a complete, integrated remote maintenance system for the demonstration and development of remote maintenance techniques. The system comprises a pair of force-reflecting servomanipulator arms, television viewing, lighting, and auxiliary lifting capabilities, thereby allowing manlike maintenance operations to be executed remotely within the remote cell mockup area in the IET. The Model M-2 Maintenance System incorporates an upgraded version of the proven Central Research Laboratories' Model M servomanipulator. Included are state-of-the-art brushless dc servomotors for improved performance, remotely removable wrist assemblies, geared azimuth drive, and a distributed microprocessor-based digital control system. 5 references, 8 figures.

  2. Flux-driven algebraic damping of m=2 diocotron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, C. Y.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2016-10-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 2 diocotron modes. Due to small field asymmetries a low density halo of electrons is transported radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius rres, where f = mfE × B (rres) . The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from the exponential spatial Landau damping in a linear wave-particle resonance. This poster uses analytic theory and simulations to explain the new flux-driven algebraic damping of the mode. As electrons are swept around the nonlinear ``cat's eye'' orbits of the resonant wave-particle interaction, they form a quadrupole (m = 2) density distribution, which sets up an electric field that acts back on the plasma core. The field causes an E × B drift motion that symmetrizes the core, i.e. damps the m = 2 mode. Supported by NSF Grant PHY-1414570, and DOE Grants DE-SC0002451.

  3. The stay-green phenotype of TaNAM-RNAi wheat plants is associated with maintenance of chloroplast structure and high enzymatic antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Checovich, Mariana L; Galatro, Andrea; Moriconi, Jorge I; Simontacchi, Marcela; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Santa-María, Guillermo E

    2016-07-01

    TaNAM transcription factors play an important role in controlling senescence, which in turn, influences the delivery of nitrogen, iron and other elements to the grain of wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants, thus contributing to grain nutritional value. While lack or diminished expression of TaNAMs determines a stay-green phenotype, the precise effect of these factors on chloroplast structure has not been studied. In this work we focused on the events undergone by chloroplasts in two wheat lines having either control or diminished TaNAM expression due to RNA interference (RNAi). It was found that in RNAi plants maintenance of chlorophyll levels and maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II were associated with lack of chloroplast dismantling. Flow cytometer studies and electron microscope analysis showed that RNAi plants conserved organelle ultrastructure and complexity. It was also found that senescence in control plants was accompanied by a low leaf enzymatic antioxidant activity. Lack of chloroplast dismantling in RNAi plants was associated with maintenance of protein and iron concentration in the flag leaf, the opposite being observed in control plants. These data provide a structural basis for the observation that down regulation of TaNAMs confers a functional stay-green phenotype and indicate that the low export of iron and nitrogen from the flag leaf of these plants is concomitant, within the developmental window studied, with lack of chloroplast degradation and high enzymatic antioxidant activity.

  4. Alterations in grooming activity and syntax in heterozygous SERT and BDNF knockout mice: the utility of behavior-recognition tools to characterize mutant mouse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pham, Mimi; Roth, Andrew; Cachat, Jonathan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are key modulators of molecular signaling, cognition and behavior. Although SERT and BDNF mutant mouse phenotypes have been extensively characterized, little is known about their self-grooming behavior. Grooming represents an important behavioral domain sensitive to environmental stimuli and is increasingly used as a model for repetitive behavioral syndromes, such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The present study used heterozygous ((+/-)) SERT and BDNF male mutant mice on a C57BL/6J background and assessed their spontaneous self-grooming behavior applying both manual and automated techniques. Overall, SERT(+/-) mice displayed a general increase in grooming behavior, as indicated by more grooming bouts and more transitions between specific grooming stages. SERT(+/-) mice also aborted more grooming bouts, but showed generally unaltered activity levels in the observation chamber. In contrast, BDNF(+/-) mice displayed a global reduction in grooming activity, with fewer bouts and transitions between specific grooming stages, altered grooming syntax, as well as hypolocomotion and increased turning behavior. Finally, grooming data collected by manual and automated methods (HomeCageScan) significantly correlated in our experiments, confirming the utility of automated high-throughput quantification of grooming behaviors in various genetic mouse models with increased or decreased grooming phenotypes. Taken together, these findings indicate that mouse self-grooming behavior is a reliable behavioral biomarker of genetic deficits in SERT and BDNF pathways, and can be reliably measured using automated behavior-recognition technology.

  5. CuII(atsm) improves the neurological phenotype and survival of SOD1G93A mice and selectively increases enzymatically active SOD1 in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, James B.; Mercer, Stephen W.; Lim, Nastasia K. H.; Faux, Noel G.; Buncic, Gojko; Beckman, Joseph S.; Roberts, Blaine R.; Donnelly, Paul S.; White, Anthony R.; Crouch, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitous expression of mutant Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) selectively affects motor neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), causing the adult-onset degenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The CNS-specific impact of ubiquitous mutant SOD1 expression is recapitulated in transgenic mouse models of the disease. Here we present outcomes for the metallo-complex CuII(atsm) tested for therapeutic efficacy in mice expressing SOD1G93A on a mixed genetic background. Oral administration of CuII(atsm) delayed the onset of neurological symptoms, improved locomotive capacity and extended overall survival. Although the ALS-like phenotype of SOD1G93A mice is instigated by expression of the mutant SOD1, we show the improved phenotype of the CuII(atsm)-treated animals involves an increase in mature mutant SOD1 protein in the disease-affected spinal cord, where concomitant increases in copper and SOD1 activity are also evident. In contrast to these effects in the spinal cord, treating with CuII(atsm) had no effect in liver on either mutant SOD1 protein levels or its activity, indicating a CNS-selective SOD1 response to the drug. These data provide support for CuII(atsm) as a treatment option for ALS as well as insight to the CNS-selective effects of mutant SOD1. PMID:28205575

  6. Accumulation and activation of epidermal γδ T cells in a mouse model of chronic dermatitis is not required for the inflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sulcova, Jitka; Maddaluno, Luigi; Meyer, Michael; Werner, Sabine

    2015-09-01

    Chronic skin inflammation resulting from a defective epidermal barrier is a hallmark of atopic dermatitis (AD). We previously demonstrated that mice lacking FGF receptors 1 and 2 in keratinocytes (K5-R1/R2 mice) develop an AD-like chronic dermatitis as a result of an impaired epidermal barrier. Here, we show that γδ T cells, which rapidly respond to various insults, accumulate in the epidermis of K5-R1/R2 mice before the development of histological abnormalities. Their number and activation further increase as the phenotype progresses, most likely as a consequence of increased expression of Il-2 and Il-7 and the stress-induced proteins Rae-1, H60c, Mult1, PlexinB2, and Skint1. To determine the role of γδ T cells in the skin phenotype, we generated quadruple mutant K5-R1/-R2 mice lacking γδ T cells. Surprisingly, loss of γδ T cells did not or only marginally affect keratinocyte proliferation, epidermal thickness, epidermal barrier function, and accumulation and activation of different immune cells in the skin of K5-R1/R2 mice, possibly due to partial compensation by αβ T cells. These results demonstrate that γδ T cells do not contribute to the development or maintenance of chronic inflammation in response to a defect in the epidermal barrier.

  7. [[sup 3]H]QNB displays in vivo selectivity for the m2 subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Gitler, M.S.; De La Cruz, R.; Zeeberg, B.R. ); Reba, R.C. Univ. of Chicago Hospital, Chicago, IL )

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of muscarinic m2, but not m1, subtype neuroreceptors in the posterior parietal cortex of the human brain. Emission tomographic study of the loss of m2 receptors in AD is limited by the fact that there is currently no available m2-selective radioligand which can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. [[sup 3]H](R)-3-quinuclidinylbenzilate ([[sup 3]H]QNB) is commonly used for performing in vitro studies of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), either with membrane homogenates or with autoradiographic slices, in which [[sup 3]H]QNB is nonsubtype-selective. We report here the results of in vivo studies, using both carrier-free and low specific activity [[sup 3]H]QNB, which show that [[sup 3]H]QNB exhibits a substantial in vivo m2-selectivity. Previously reported in vivo (R)-3-quinuclidinyl (R)-4-iodobenzilate ((R,R)-[[sup 125]I]lQNB) binding appears to be nonsubtype-selective. Apparently the bulky iodine substitution in the 4 position reduces the subtype selectivity of QNB. It is possible that a less bulky fluorine substitution might permit retention of the selectivity exhibited by QNB itself. We conclude that a suitably radiolabeled derivative of QNB, possibly labeled with [sup 18]F, may be of potential use in positron emission tomographic (PET) study of the loss of m2 receptors in AD. 39 refs., 8 figs., 2 tab.

  8. ICAM-1 suppresses tumor metastasis by inhibiting macrophage M2 polarization through blockade of efferocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, M; Liu, J; Piao, C; Shao, J; Du, J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) can profoundly influence tumor-specific immunity. Tumor-associated macrophages are M2-polarized macrophages that promote key processes in tumor progression. Efferocytosis stimulates M2 macrophage polarization and contributes to cancer metastasis, but the signaling mechanism underlying this process is unclear. Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which has been implicated in mediating cell–cell interaction and outside-in cell signaling during the immune response. We report that ICAM-1 expression is inversely associated with macrophage infiltration and the metastasis index in human colon tumors by combining Oncomine database analysis and immunohistochemistry for ICAM-1. Using a colon cancer liver metastasis model in ICAM-1-deficient (ICAM-1−/−) mice and their wild-type littermates, we found that loss of ICAM-1 accelerated liver metastasis of colon carcinoma cells. Moreover, ICAM-1 deficiency increased M2 macrophage polarization during tumor progression. We further demonstrated that ICAM-1 deficiency in macrophages led to promotion of efferocytosis of apoptotic tumor cells through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway. More importantly, coculture of ICAM-1−/− macrophages with apoptotic cancer cells resulted in an increase of M2-like macrophages, which was blocked by an efferocytosis inhibitor. Our findings demonstrate a novel role for ICAM-1 in suppressing M2 macrophage polarization via downregulation of efferocytosis in the tumor microenvironment, thereby inhibiting metastatic tumor progression. PMID:26068788

  9. Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Facilitate Heart Repair by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization and Neutrophil Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Luo, Lan; Yan, Chen; Zhang, Tian-Xia; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Mangoura, Safwat A.; Abdel-Raheem, Mahmoud H.; Zhang, Shouhua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs), one of the promising stem cell sources for myocardial repair, have been tested in clinical trials and resulted in beneficial effects; however, the relevant mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that CDCs favor heart repair by switching the macrophages from a pro-inflammatory phenotype (M1) into a regulatory anti-inflammatory phenotype (M2). Macrophages from mice were cultured with CDCs-conditioned medium or with fibroblasts-conditioned medium as a control. Immunostaining showed that CDCs-conditioned medium significantly enhanced the expression of CD206 (a marker for M2 macrophages), but decreased the expression of CD86 (a marker for M1 macrophages) 3 days after culture. For animal studies, we used an acute myocardial infarction model of mice. We injected CDCs, fibroblasts, or saline only into the border zone of infarction. Then we collected the heart tissues for histological analysis 5 and 14 days after treatment. Compared with control animals, CDCs treatment significantly decreased M1 macrophages and neutrophils but increased M2 macrophages in the infarcted heart. Furthermore, CDCs-treated mice had reduced infarct size and fewer apoptotic cells compared to the controls. Our data suggest that CDCs facilitate heart repair by modulating M1/M2 macrophage polarization and neutrophil recruitment, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms of stem cell-based myocardial repair. PMID:27764217

  10. Differential signalling by muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle: m2-mediated inactivation of myosin light chain kinase via Gi3, Cdc42/Rac1 and p21-activated kinase 1 pathway, and m3-mediated MLC20 (20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II) phosphorylation via Rho-associated kinase/myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and protein kinase C/CPI-17 pathway.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Karnam S; Zhou, Huiping; Grider, John R; Brautigan, David L; Eto, Masumi; Makhlouf, Gabriel M

    2003-08-15

    Signalling via m3 and m2 receptors in smooth muscles involved activation of two G-protein-dependent pathways by each receptor. m2 receptors were coupled via Gbetagammai3 with activation of phospholipase C-beta3, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Cdc42/Rac1 (where Cdc stands for cell division cycle) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Each step was inhibited by methoctramine and pertussis toxin. PAK1 activity was abolished in cells expressing both Cdc42-DN (where DN stands for dominant negative) and Rac1-DN. MLCK phosphorylation was inhibited by PAK1 antibody, and in cells expressing Cdc42-DN and Rac1-DN. m3 receptors were coupled via Galpha(q/11) with activation of phospholipase C-beta1 and via RhoA with activation of Rho-associated kinase (Rho kinase), phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC). Rho kinase and phospholipase D activities were inhibited by C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. PKC activity was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide, and in cells expressing RhoA-DN; PKC activity was also inhibited partly by Y27632 (44+/-5%). PKC-induced phosphorylation of PKC-activated 17 kDa inhibitor protein of type 1 phosphatase (CPI-17) at Thr38 was abolished by bisindolylmaleimide and inhibited partly by Y27632 (28+/-3%). Rho-kinase-induced phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and was abolished by Y27632. Sustained phosphorylation of 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II (MLC20) and contraction were abolished by bisindolylmaleimide Y27632 and C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. The results suggest that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and PKC-dependent phosphorylation and enhancement of CPI-17 binding to the catalytic subunit of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) act co-operatively to inhibit MLCP activity, leading to sustained stimulation of MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. Because Y27632 inhibited both Rho kinase and PKC activities

  11. Differential signalling by muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle: m2-mediated inactivation of myosin light chain kinase via Gi3, Cdc42/Rac1 and p21-activated kinase 1 pathway, and m3-mediated MLC20 (20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II) phosphorylation via Rho-associated kinase/myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and protein kinase C/CPI-17 pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Karnam S; Zhou, Huiping; Grider, John R; Brautigan, David L; Eto, Masumi; Makhlouf, Gabriel M

    2003-01-01

    Signalling via m3 and m2 receptors in smooth muscles involved activation of two G-protein-dependent pathways by each receptor. m2 receptors were coupled via Gbetagammai3 with activation of phospholipase C-beta3, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Cdc42/Rac1 (where Cdc stands for cell division cycle) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Each step was inhibited by methoctramine and pertussis toxin. PAK1 activity was abolished in cells expressing both Cdc42-DN (where DN stands for dominant negative) and Rac1-DN. MLCK phosphorylation was inhibited by PAK1 antibody, and in cells expressing Cdc42-DN and Rac1-DN. m3 receptors were coupled via Galpha(q/11) with activation of phospholipase C-beta1 and via RhoA with activation of Rho-associated kinase (Rho kinase), phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC). Rho kinase and phospholipase D activities were inhibited by C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. PKC activity was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide, and in cells expressing RhoA-DN; PKC activity was also inhibited partly by Y27632 (44+/-5%). PKC-induced phosphorylation of PKC-activated 17 kDa inhibitor protein of type 1 phosphatase (CPI-17) at Thr38 was abolished by bisindolylmaleimide and inhibited partly by Y27632 (28+/-3%). Rho-kinase-induced phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and was abolished by Y27632. Sustained phosphorylation of 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II (MLC20) and contraction were abolished by bisindolylmaleimide Y27632 and C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. The results suggest that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and PKC-dependent phosphorylation and enhancement of CPI-17 binding to the catalytic subunit of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) act co-operatively to inhibit MLCP activity, leading to sustained stimulation of MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. Because Y27632 inhibited both Rho kinase and PKC activities

  12. Mechanism of the Pseudoirreversible Binding of Amantadine to the M2 Proton Channel.

    PubMed

    Llabrés, Salomé; Juárez-Jiménez, Jordi; Masetti, Matteo; Leiva, Rosana; Vázquez, Santiago; Gazzarrini, Sabrina; Moroni, Anna; Cavalli, Andrea; Luque, F Javier

    2016-11-30

    The M2 proton channel of influenza A virus is an integral membrane protein involved in the acidification of the viral interior, a step necessary for the release of the viral genetic material and replication of new virions. The aim of this study is to explore the mechanism of drug (un)binding to the M2 channel in order to gain insight into the structural and energetic features relevant for the development of novel inhibitors. To this end, we have investigated the binding of amantadine (Amt) to the wild type (wt) M2 channel and its V27A variant using multiple independent molecular dynamics simulations, exploratory conventional metadynamics, and multiple-walkers well-tempered metadynamics calculations. The results allow us to propose a sequential mechanism for the (un)binding of Amt to the wt M2 channel, which involves the adoption of a transiently populated intermediate (up state) leading to the thermodynamically favored down binding mode in the channel pore. Furthermore, they suggest that chloride anions play a relevant role in stabilizing the down binding mode of Amt to the wt channel, giving rise to a kinetic trapping that explains the experimentally observed pseudoirreversible inhibition of the wt channel by Amt. We propose that this trapping mechanism underlies the inhibitory activity of potent M2 channel blockers, as supported by the experimental confirmation of the irreversible binding of a pyrrolidine analogue from electrophysiological current assays. Finally, the results reveal that the thermodynamics and kinetics of Amt (un)binding is very sensitive to the V27A mutation, providing a quantitative rationale to the drastic decrease in inhibitory potency against the V27A variant. Overall, these findings pave the way to explore the inhibitory activity of Amt-related analogues in mutated M2 channel variants, providing guidelines for the design of novel inhibitors against resistant virus strains.

  13. Desensitization and internalization of the m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor are directed by independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pals-Rylaarsdam, R; Xu, Y; Witt-Enderby, P; Benovic, J L; Hosey, M M

    1995-12-01

    The phenomenon of acute desensitization of G-protein-coupled receptors has been associated with several events, including receptor phosphorylation, loss of high affinity agonist binding, receptor:G-protein uncoupling, and receptor internalization. However, the biochemical events underlying these processes are not fully understood, and their contributions to the loss of signaling remain correlative. In addition, the nature of the kinases and the receptor domains which are involved in modulation of activity have only begun to be investigated. In order to directly measure the role of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in the desensitization of the m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m2 mAChR), a dominant-negative allele of GRK2 was used to inhibit receptor phosphorylation by endogenous GRK activity in a human embryonic kidney cell line. The dominant-negative GRK2K220R reduced agonist-dependent phosphorylation of the m2 mAChR by approximately 50% and prevented acute desensitization of the receptor as measured by the ability of the m2 mAChR to attenuate adenylyl cyclase activity. In contrast, the agonist-induced internalization of the m2 mAChR was unaffected by the GRK2K220R construct. Further evidence linking receptor phosphorylation to acute receptor desensitization was obtained when two deletions of the third intracellular loop were made which created m2 mAChRs that did not become phosphorylated in an agonist-dependent manner and did not desensitize. However, the mutant mAChRs retained the ability to internalize. These data provide the first direct evidence that GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation is necessary for m2 mAChR desensitization; the likely sites of in vivo phosphorylation are in the central portion of the third intracellular loop (amino acids 282-323). These results also indicate that internalization of the m2 receptor is not a key event in desensitization and is mediated by mechanisms distinct from GRK phosphorylation of the receptor.

  14. M2-F1 under tow across lakebed by car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This 20-second clip shows the M2-F1 being towed by the Pontiac across Rogers Dry Lakebed. The M2-F1 lifting body, dubbed the 'flying bathtub' by the media, was the precursor of a remarkable series of wingless flying vehicles that contributed data used in the Space Shuttles, the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator for the next century's Reusable Launch Vehicle, and the X-38 Technology Demonstrator for crew return from the International Space Station. Based on the ideas and basic design of Alfred J. Eggers and others at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (now the Ames Research Center), Mountain View, California, in the mid-1950's, the M2-F1 was built in 1962-63 over a four-month period for a cost of only about $30,000, plus an additional $8,000-$10,000 for an ejection seat. Engineers and technicians at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden) kept costs low by designing and fabricating it partly in-house, with the plywood shell constructed by a local sailplane builder. Someone at the time estimated that it would have cost a major aircraft company $150,000 to build the same vehicle. Unlike the later lifting bodies, the M2-F1 was unpowered and was initially towed by a souped-up Pontiac convertible until it was airborne. Later a C-47 took over the towing duties. Flown by such famous research pilots as Milt Thompson, Bruce Peterson, Chuck Yeager, and Bill Dana, the lightweight flying bathtub demonstrated that a wingless vehicle shaped for reentry into the Earth's atmosphere from space could be flown and landed safely. Flown from 1963 to 1966, the lightweight M2-F1 paved the way for the heavyweight M2-F2, M2`F3, HL-10, X-24A, and X-24B lifting bodies that flew under rocket power after launch from a B-52 mothership. The heavyweights flew from 1966 to 1975, demonstrating the viability and versatility of the wingless configuration and the ability of a vehicle with low lift-over-drag characteristics to fly to high altitudes and then to land precisely with their

  15. Update on the role of alternatively activated macrophages in asthma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Lung macrophages link innate and adaptive immune responses during allergic airway inflammatory responses. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) and interstitial macrophages are two different phenotypes that differentially exert immunological function under physiological and pathological conditions. Exposure to pathogen induces polarization of AM cells into classically activated macrophages (M1 cells) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2 cells). M1 cells dominantly express proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1 β and induce lung inflammation and tissue damage. M2 cells are further divided into M2a and M2c subsets. M2a cells dominantly produce allergic cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, but M2c cells dominantly produce anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. M2a and M2c cells are differently involved in initiation, inflammation resolution, and tissue remodeling in the different stages of asthma. Microenvironment dynamically influences polarization of AM cells. Cytokines, chemokines, and immune-regulatory cells interplay and affect the balance between the polarization of M1 and M2 cells, subsequently influencing disease progression. Thus, modulation of AM phenotypes through molecular intervention has therapeutic potential in the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory diseases. This review updated recent advances in polarization and functional specialization of these macrophage subtypes with emphasis on modulation of polarization of M2 cells in asthma of human subjects and animal models.

  16. Update on the role of alternatively activated macrophages in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Lung macrophages link innate and adaptive immune responses during allergic airway inflammatory responses. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) and interstitial macrophages are two different phenotypes that differentially exert immunological function under physiological and pathological conditions. Exposure to pathogen induces polarization of AM cells into classically activated macrophages (M1 cells) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2 cells). M1 cells dominantly express proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1 β and induce lung inflammation and tissue damage. M2 cells are further divided into M2a and M2c subsets. M2a cells dominantly produce allergic cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, but M2c cells dominantly produce anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. M2a and M2c cells are differently involved in initiation, inflammation resolution, and tissue remodeling in the different stages of asthma. Microenvironment dynamically influences polarization of AM cells. Cytokines, chemokines, and immune-regulatory cells interplay and affect the balance between the polarization of M1 and M2 cells, subsequently influencing disease progression. Thus, modulation of AM phenotypes through molecular intervention has therapeutic potential in the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory diseases. This review updated recent advances in polarization and functional specialization of these macrophage subtypes with emphasis on modulation of polarization of M2 cells in asthma of human subjects and animal models. PMID:27350756

  17. Fibroblasts from phenotypically normal palmar fascia exhibit molecular profiles highly similar to fibroblasts from active disease in Dupuytren's Contracture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's contracture (DC) is a fibroproliferative disorder characterized by the progressive development of a scar-like collagen-rich cord that affects the palmar fascia of the hand and leads to digital flexion contractures. DC is most commonly treated by surgical resection of the diseased tissue, but has a high reported recurrence rate ranging from 27% to 80%. We sought to determine if the transcriptomic profiles of fibroblasts derived from DC-affected palmar fascia, adjacent phenotypically normal palmar fascia, and non-DC palmar fascial tissues might provide mechanistic clues to understanding the puzzle of disease predisposition and recurrence in DC. Methods To achieve this, total RNA was obtained from fibroblasts derived from primary DC-affected palmar fascia, patient-matched unaffected palmar fascia, and palmar fascia from non-DC patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (6 patients in each group). These cells were grown on a type-1 collagen substrate (to better mimic their in vivo environments). Microarray analyses were subsequently performed using Illumina BeadChip arrays to compare the transcriptomic profiles of these three cell populations. Data were analyzed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM v3.02), hierarchical clustering, concordance mapping and Venn diagram. Results We found that the transcriptomic profiles of DC-disease fibroblasts and fibroblasts from unaffected fascia of DC patients exhibited a much greater overlap than fibroblasts derived from the palmar fascia of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release. Quantitative real time RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of select genes validating the microarray data analyses. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that predisposition and recurrence in DC may stem, at least in part, from intrinsic similarities in the basal gene expression of diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia fibroblasts. These data also demonstrate that a collagen

  18. Lifestyle Advice Combined with Personalized Estimates of Genetic or Phenotypic Risk of Type 2 Diabetes, and Objectively Measured Physical Activity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van Sluijs, Esther M. F.; Marteau, Theresa M.; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Information about genetic and phenotypic risk of type 2 diabetes is now widely available and is being incorporated into disease prevention programs. Whether such information motivates behavior change or has adverse effects is uncertain. We examined the effect of communicating an estimate of genetic or phenotypic risk of type 2 diabetes in a parallel group, open, randomized controlled trial. Methods and Findings We recruited 569 healthy middle-aged adults from the Fenland Study, an ongoing population-based, observational study in the east of England (Cambridgeshire, UK). We used a computer-generated random list to assign participants in blocks of six to receive either standard lifestyle advice alone (control group, n = 190) or in combination with a genetic (n = 189) or a phenotypic (n = 190) risk estimate for type 2 diabetes (intervention groups). After 8 wk, we measured the primary outcome, objectively measured physical activity (kJ/kg/day), and also measured several secondary outcomes (including self-reported diet, self-reported weight, worry, anxiety, and perceived risk). The study was powered to detect a between-group difference of 4.1 kJ/kg/d at follow-up. 557 (98%) participants completed the trial. There were no significant intervention effects on physical activity (difference in adjusted mean change from baseline: genetic risk group versus control group 0.85 kJ/kg/d (95% CI −2.07 to 3.77, p = 0.57); phenotypic risk group versus control group 1.32 (95% CI −1.61 to 4.25, p = 0.38); and genetic risk group versus phenotypic risk group −0.47 (95% CI −3.40 to 2.46, p = 0.75). No significant differences in self-reported diet, self-reported weight, worry, and anxiety were observed between trial groups. Estimates of perceived risk were significantly more accurate among those who received risk information than among those who did not. Key limitations include the recruitment of a sample that may not be representative of the UK population, use of self

  19. The insulin secretory action of novel polycyclic guanidines: discovery through open innovation phenotypic screening, and exploration of structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Shaghafi, Michael B; Barrett, David G; Willard, Francis S; Overman, Larry E

    2014-02-15

    We report the discovery of the glucose-dependent insulin secretogogue activity of a novel class of polycyclic guanidines through phenotypic screening as part of the Lilly Open Innovation Drug Discovery platform. Three compounds from the University of California, Irvine, 1-3, having the 3-arylhexahydropyrrolo[1,2-c]pyrimidin-1-amine scaffold acted as insulin secretagogues under high, but not low, glucose conditions. Exploration of the structure-activity relationship around the scaffold demonstrated the key role of the guanidine moiety, as well as the importance of two lipophilic regions, and led to the identification of 9h, which stimulated insulin secretion in isolated rat pancreatic islets in a glucose-dependent manner.

  20. Viral M2 ion channel protein: a promising target for anti-influenza drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, N S Hari Narayana; Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Pratheepa, V

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus is an important RNA virus causing pandemics (Spanish Flu (1918), Asian Flu (1957), Hong Kong Flu (1968) and Swine Flu (2009)) over the last decades. Due to the spontaneous mutations of these viral proteins, currently available antiviral and anti-influenza drugs quickly develop resistance. To account this, only limited antiinfluenza drugs have been approved for the therapeutic use. These include amantadine and rimantadine (M2 proton channel blockers), zanamivir, oseltamivir and peramivir (neuraminidase inhibitors), favipravir (polymerase inhibitor) and laninamivir. This review provides an outline on the strategies to develop novel, potent chemotherapeutic agents against M2 proton channel. Primarily, the M2 proton channel blockers elicit pharmacological activity through destabilizing the helices by blocking the proton transport across the transmembrane. The biologically important compounds discovered using the scaffolds such as bisnoradmantane, noradamantane, triazine, spiroadamantane, isoxazole, amino alcohol, azaspiro, spirene, pinanamine, etc are reported to exhibit anti-influenza activity against wild or mutant type (S31N and V27A) of M2 proton channel protein. The reported studies explained that the adamantane based compounds (amantadine and rimantadine) strongly interact with His37 (through hydrogen bonding) and Ala30, Ile33 and Gly34 residues (hydrophobic interactions). The adamantane and the non-adamantane scaffolds fit perfectly in the active site pocket present in the wild type and the charged amino groups (ammonium) create positive electrostatic potential, which blocks the transport of protons across the pore. In the mutated proteins, larger or smaller binding pocket are created by small or large mutant residues, which do not allow the molecules fit in the active site. This causes the channel to be unblocked and the protons are allowed to transfer inside the pore. The structural analysis of the M2 proton channel blockers illustrated that

  1. The phenotype and activation status of T and NK cells in porcine colostrum suggest these are central/effector memory cells.

    PubMed

    Hlavova, Karolina; Stepanova, Hana; Faldyna, Martin

    2014-12-01

    In pigs, the epitheliochorial placenta does not allow transfer of maternally derived antibodies or immune cells to the fetus. Thus, piglets are dependent on intake of colostrum for acquisition of passive immunity during the neonatal period. As well as immunoglobulin G (IgG), cellular components of colostrum, mainly lymphocytes, can enter the systemic circulation and secondary lymphoid organs of the neonate. In order to understand the function and immunological role of these cells, a flow cytometric study was undertaken to characterise the cellular profile and phenotype of T cells and NK cells present in porcine colostrum. The results indicated that the greatest numbers of lymphocytes were found on the first day of lactation. The predominant cell types in colostrum were CD8(+) single positive T cells (53.6%), followed by CD4(+)CD8(+) double positive T cells (21.1%), CD2(+)CD8(+) γδ T cells (15.0%) and NK cells (13.5%). CD4(+) single positive T cells (4.4%) and other γδ T cell subpopulations (1.8% CD2(-)CD8(-) and 0.4% CD2(+)CD8(-)) were present in colostrum at low levels. Although the profile of the T cell subpopulations during the first 3 days of lactation remained constant, the absolute numbers of T and NK cells decreased significantly in the first few hours of lactation. Expression of CCR7, CD11b, CD25, CD45RA and MHC class II was used to assess the activation status of T and NK cells in colostrum. T cell subpopulations expressed markers consistent with an effector memory phenotype, indicating that these were antigen-experienced cells. The phenotype of colostral T and NK cells suggests a role in mucosal immunity and potentially in transfer of passive immunity from sow to piglet.