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Sample records for activated macrophages m1

  1. NMAAP1 Expressed in BCG-Activated Macrophage Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qihui; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Jing, Haifeng; Xie, Qi; Li, Peng; Li, Dong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are divided into two subpopulations: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). BCG (Bacilli Calmette-Guérin) activates disabled naïve macrophages to M1 macrophages, which act as inflammatory, microbicidal and tumoricidal cells through cell-cell contact and/or the release of soluble factors. Various transcription factors and signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of macrophage activation and polarization. We discovered that BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) expressed a new molecule, and we named it Novel Macrophage Activated Associated Protein 1 (NMAAP1). The current study found that the overexpression of NMAAP1 in macrophages results in M1 polarization with increased expression levels of M1 genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Interleukin 12 (IL-12), Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and decreased expression of some M2 genes, such as Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), but not other M2 genes, including arginase-1 (Arg-1), Interleukin (IL-10), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1). Moreover, NMAAP1 overexpression in the RAW264.7 cell line increased cytotoxicity against MCA207 tumor cells, which depends on increased inflammatory cytokines rather than cell-cell contact. NMAAP1 also substantially enhanced the phagocytic ability of macrophages, which implies that NMAAP1 promoted macrophage adhesive and clearance activities. Our results indicate that NMAAP1 is an essential molecule that modulates macrophages phenotype and plays an important role in macrophage tumoricidal functions. PMID:26429502

  2. Carbon Nanotube-Induced Pulmonary Granulomatous Disease: Twist1 and Alveolar Macrophage M1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Barna, Barbara P.; Huizar, Isham; Malur, Anagha; McPeek, Matthew; Marshall, Irene; Jacob, Mark; Dobbs, Larry; Kavuru, Mani S.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis, a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown cause, has been linked to several environmental risk factors, among which are some that may favor carbon nanotube formation. Using gene array data, we initially observed that bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from sarcoidosis patients displayed elevated mRNA of the transcription factor, Twist1, among many M1-associated genes compared to healthy controls. Based on this observation we hypothesized that Twist1 mRNA and protein expression might become elevated in alveolar macrophages from animals bearing granulomas induced by carbon nanotube instillation. To address this hypothesis, wild-type and macrophage-specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) knock out mice were given oropharyngeal instillation of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). BAL cells obtained 60 days later exhibited significantly elevated Twist1 mRNA expression in granuloma-bearing wild-type or PPARγ knock out alveolar macrophages compared to sham controls. Overall, Twist1 expression levels in PPARγ knock out mice were higher than those of wild-type. Concurrently, BAL cells obtained from sarcoidosis patients and healthy controls validated gene array data: qPCR and protein analysis showed significantly elevated Twist1 in sarcoidosis compared to healthy controls. In vitro studies of alveolar macrophages from healthy controls indicated that Twist1 was inducible by classical (M1) macrophage activation stimuli (LPS, TNFα) but not by IL-4, an inducer of alternative (M2) macrophage activation. Findings suggest that Twist1 represents a PPARγ-sensitive alveolar macrophage M1 biomarker which is induced by inflammatory granulomatous disease in the MWCNT model and in human sarcoidosis. PMID:24322444

  3. PPAR activation induces M1 macrophage polarization via cPLA₂-COX-2 inhibition, activating ROS production against Leishmania mexicana.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Gandarilla, J A; Osorio-Trujillo, C; Hernández-Ramírez, V I; Talamás-Rohana, P

    2013-01-01

    Defence against Leishmania depends upon Th1 inflammatory response and, a major problem in susceptible models, is the turnoff of the leishmanicidal activity of macrophages with IL-10, IL-4, and COX-2 upregulation, as well as immunosuppressive PGE2, all together inhibiting the respiratory burst. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) activation is responsible for macrophages polarization on Leishmania susceptible models where microbicide functions are deactivated. In this paper, we demonstrated that, at least for L. mexicana, PPAR activation, mainly PPAR γ , induced macrophage activation through their polarization towards M1 profile with the increase of microbicide activity against intracellular pathogen L. mexicana. PPAR activation induced IL-10 downregulation, whereas the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF- α , IL-1 β , and IL-6 remained high. Moreover, PPAR agonists treatment induced the deactivation of cPLA2-COX-2-prostaglandins pathway together with an increase in TLR4 expression, all of whose criteria meet the M1 macrophage profile. Finally, parasite burden, in treated macrophages, was lower than that in infected nontreated macrophages, most probably associated with the increase of respiratory burst in these treated cells. Based on the above data, we conclude that PPAR agonists used in this work induces M1 macrophages polarization via inhibition of cPLA2 and the increase of aggressive microbicidal activity via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. PMID:23555077

  4. Vibrio cholerae porin OmpU mediates M1-polarization of macrophages/monocytes via TLR1/TLR2 activation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Junaid; Sharma, Praveen K; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-11-01

    Polarization of the monocytes and macrophages toward the M1 and M2 states is important for hosts' defense against the pathogens. Moreover, it plays a crucial role to resolve the overwhelming inflammatory responses that can be harmful to the host. Polarization of macrophages/monocytes can be induced by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). PAMP-mediated monocyte/macrophage polarization is important during the infection, as pathogen can suppress host immune system by altering the polarization status of the macrophages/monocytes. OmpU, an outer membrane porin protein of Vibrio cholerae, possesses the ability to induce pro-inflammatory responses in monocytes/macrophages. It is also able to down-regulate the LPS-mediated activation of the monocytes/macrophages. Such observation leads us to believe that OmpU may induce a state that can be called as M1/M2-intermediate state. In the present study, we evaluated a set of M1 and M2 markers in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line, and THP-1 human monocytic cell line, in response to the purified OmpU protein. We observed that OmpU, as a PAMP, induced M1-polarization by activating the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway. OmpU induced formation of TLR1/TLR2-heterodimers. OmpU-mediated TLR-activation led to the MyD88 recruitment to the TLR1/TLR2 complex. MyD88, in turn, recruited IRAK1. Ultimately, OmpU-mediated signaling led to the activation and subsequent nuclear translocation of the NFκB p65 subunit. We also observed that blocking of the TLR1, TLR2, IRAK1, and NFκB affected OmpU-mediated production of M1-associated pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IL-6. PMID:26093918

  5. Glycyrrhizic Acid Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization in Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages Associated with the Activation of JNK and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yulong; Wang, Baikui; Xu, Xin; Du, Wei; Li, Weifen; Wang, Youming

    2015-01-01

    The roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza species (licorice) have been widely used as natural sweeteners and herbal medicines. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) from licorice on macrophage polarization. Both phenotypic and functional activities of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) treated by GA were assessed. Our results showed that GA obviously increased the cell surface expression of CD80, CD86, and MHCII molecules. Meanwhile, GA upregulated the expression of CCR7 and the production of TNF-α, IL-12, IL-6, and NO (the markers of classically activated (M1) macrophages), whereas it downregulated the expression of MR, Ym1, and Arg1 (the markers of alternatively activated (M2) macrophage). The functional tests showed that GA dramatically enhanced the uptake of FITC-dextran and E. coli K88 by BMDMs and decreased the intracellular survival of E. coli K88 and S. typhimurium. Moreover, we demonstrated that JNK and NF-κB activation are required for GA-induced NO and M1-related cytokines production, while ERK1/2 pathway exhibits a regulatory effect via induction of IL-10. Together, these findings indicated that GA promoted polarization of M1 macrophages and enhanced its phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity. The results expanded our knowledge about the role of GA in macrophage polarization. PMID:26664149

  6. Ras regulates alveolar macrophage formation of CXC chemokines and neutrophil activation in streptococcal M1 protein-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songen; Hwaiz, Rundk; Rahman, Milladur; Herwald, Heiko; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-06-15

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is associated with a high mortality rate. The M1 serotype of Streptococcus pyogenes is most frequently associated with STSS. Herein, we examined the role of Ras signaling in M1 protein-induced lung injury. Male C57BL/6 mice received the Ras inhibitor (farnesylthiosalicylic acid, FTS) prior to M1 protein challenge. Bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue were harvested for quantification of neutrophil recruitment, edema and CXC chemokine formation. Neutrophil expression of Mac-1 was quantified by use of flow cytometry. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Administration of FTS reduced M1 protein-induced neutrophil recruitment, edema formation and tissue damage in the lung. M1 protein challenge increased Mac-1 expression on neutrophils and CXC chemokine levels in the lung. Inhibition of Ras activity decreased M1 protein-induced expression of Mac-1 on neutrophils and secretion of CXC chemokines in the lung. Moreover, FTS abolished M1 protein-provoked gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Ras inhibition decreased chemokine-mediated neutrophil migration in vitro. Taken together, our novel findings indicate that Ras signaling is a potent regulator of CXC chemokine formation and neutrophil infiltration in the lung. Thus, inhibition of Ras activity might be a useful way to antagonize streptococcal M1 protein-triggered acute lung injury. PMID:24704370

  7. PPAR Activation Induces M1 Macrophage Polarization via cPLA2-COX-2 Inhibition, Activating ROS Production against Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Gandarilla, J. A.; Osorio-Trujillo, C.; Hernández-Ramírez, V. I.; Talamás-Rohana, P.

    2013-01-01

    Defence against Leishmania depends upon Th1 inflammatory response and, a major problem in susceptible models, is the turnoff of the leishmanicidal activity of macrophages with IL-10, IL-4, and COX-2 upregulation, as well as immunosuppressive PGE2, all together inhibiting the respiratory burst. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) activation is responsible for macrophages polarization on Leishmania susceptible models where microbicide functions are deactivated. In this paper, we demonstrated that, at least for L. mexicana, PPAR activation, mainly PPARγ, induced macrophage activation through their polarization towards M1 profile with the increase of microbicide activity against intracellular pathogen L. mexicana. PPAR activation induced IL-10 downregulation, whereas the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 remained high. Moreover, PPAR agonists treatment induced the deactivation of cPLA2-COX-2-prostaglandins pathway together with an increase in TLR4 expression, all of whose criteria meet the M1 macrophage profile. Finally, parasite burden, in treated macrophages, was lower than that in infected nontreated macrophages, most probably associated with the increase of respiratory burst in these treated cells. Based on the above data, we conclude that PPAR agonists used in this work induces M1 macrophages polarization via inhibition of cPLA2 and the increase of aggressive microbicidal activity via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. PMID:23555077

  8. Dectin-1 Activation by a Natural Product β-Glucan Converts Immunosuppressive Macrophages into an M1-like Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Luo, Fengling; Ding, Chuanlin; Albeituni, Sabrin; Hu, Xiaoling; Ma, Yunfeng; Cai, Yihua; McNally, Lacey; Sanders, Mary Ann; Jain, Dharamvir; Kloecker, Goetz; Bousamra, Michael; Zhang, Huang-ge; Higashi, Richard M; Lane, Andrew N; Fan, Teresa W-M; Yan, Jun

    2015-11-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) with an alternatively activated phenotype have been linked to tumor-elicited inflammation, immunosuppression, and resistance to chemotherapies in cancer, thus representing an attractive target for an effective cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we demonstrate that particulate yeast-derived β-glucan, a natural polysaccharide compound, converts polarized alternatively activated macrophages or immunosuppressive TAM into a classically activated phenotype with potent immunostimulating activity. This process is associated with macrophage metabolic reprograming with enhanced glycolysis, Krebs cycle, and glutamine utilization. In addition, particulate β-glucan converts immunosuppressive TAM via the C-type lectin receptor dectin-1-induced spleen tyrosine kinase-Card9-Erk pathway. Further in vivo studies show that oral particulate β-glucan treatment significantly delays tumor growth, which is associated with in vivo TAM phenotype conversion and enhanced effector T cell activation. Mice injected with particulate β-glucan-treated TAM mixed with tumor cells have significantly reduced tumor burden with less blood vascular vessels compared with those with TAM plus tumor cell injection. In addition, macrophage depletion significantly reduced the therapeutic efficacy of particulate β-glucan in tumor-bearing mice. These findings have established a new paradigm for macrophage polarization and immunosuppressive TAM conversion and shed light on the action mode of β-glucan treatment in cancer. PMID:26453753

  9. Photobiomodulation with 660-nm and 780-nm laser on activated J774 macrophage-like cells: Effect on M1 inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Souza, Nadhia Helena Costa; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Silva, Daniela de Fatima Teixeira da; Rocha, Lilia Alves; Alves, Agnelo Neves; Sousa, Kaline de Brito; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Hamblin, Michael R; Nunes, Fábio Daumas

    2015-12-01

    M1 profile macrophages exert a major influence on initial tissue repair process. Few days after the occurrence of injury, macrophages in the injured region exhibit a M2 profile, attenuate the effects of the M1 population, and stimulate the reconstruction of the damaged tissue. The different effects of macrophages in the healing process suggest that these cells could be the target of therapeutic interventions. Photobiomodulation has been used to accelerate tissue repair, but little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. In the present study, J774 macrophages were activated to simulate the M1 profile and irradiated with two different sets of laser parameters (780 nm, 70 mW, 2.6J/cm(2), 1.5s and 660 nm, 15 mW, 7.5 J/cm(2), 20s). IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS and COX-2 gene and protein expression were analyzed by RT-qPCR and ELISA. Both lasers were able to reduce TNF-α and iNOS expression, and TNF-α and COX-2 production, although the parameters used for 780 nm laser provided an additional decrease. 660 nm laser parameters resulted in an up-regulation of IL-6 expression and production. These findings imply a distinct, time-dependent modulation by the two different sets of laser parameters, suggesting that the best modulation may involve more than one combination of parameters. PMID:26519828

  10. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Díaz, José Manuel; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages. PMID:25309919

  11. Unprimed, M1 and M2 Macrophages Differentially Interact with Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Lenzo, Jason C.; Fong, Shao B.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis. Tissue macrophages are amongst the first immune cells to respond to bacteria and depending on the cytokine profile at the infection site, macrophages are primed to react to infection in different ways. Priming of naive macrophages with IFN-γ produces a classical pro-inflammatory, antibacterial M1 macrophage after TLR ligation, whereas priming with IL-4 induces an anti-inflammatory tissue-repair M2 phenotype. Previous work has shown that M1 are preferentially generated in gingival tissue following infection with P. gingivalis. However, few studies have investigated the interactions of macrophage subsets with P. gingivalis cells. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of naive, M1 and M2 macrophages to phagocytose P. gingivalis and investigate how this interaction affects both the bacterial cell and the macrophage. M1 and M2 macrophages were both found to have enhanced phagocytic capacity compared with that of naive macrophages, however only the naive and M1 macrophages were able to produce a respiratory burst in order to clear the bacteria from the phagosome. P. gingivalis was found to persist in naive and M2, but not M1 macrophages for 24 hours. Phagocytosis of P. gingivalis also induced high levels of TNF-α, IL-12 and iNOS in M1 macrophages, but not in naive or M2 macrophages. Furthermore, infection of macrophages with P. gingivalis at high bacteria to macrophage ratios, while inducing an inflammatory response, was also found to be deleterious to macrophage longevity, with high levels of apoptotic cell death found in macrophages after infection. The activation of M1 macrophages observed in this study may contribute to the initiation and maintenance of a pro-inflammatory state during chronic periodontitis. PMID:27383471

  12. Novel Markers to Delineate Murine M1 and M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Kyle A.; Amici, Stephanie A.; Webb, Lindsay M.; Ruiz-Rosado, Juan de Dios; Popovich, Phillip G.; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia

    2015-01-01

    Classically (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages exhibit distinct phenotypes and functions. It has been difficult to dissect macrophage phenotypes in vivo, where a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes exists, and also in vitro, where low or non-selective M2 marker protein expression is observed. To provide a foundation for the complexity of in vivo macrophage phenotypes, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional signature of murine M0, M1 and M2 macrophages and identified genes common or exclusive to either subset. We validated by real-time PCR an M1-exclusive pattern of expression for CD38, G-protein coupled receptor 18 (Gpr18) and Formyl peptide receptor 2 (Fpr2) whereas Early growth response protein 2 (Egr2) and c-Myc were M2-exclusive. We further confirmed these data by flow cytometry and show that M1 and M2 macrophages can be distinguished by their relative expression of CD38 and Egr2. Egr2 labeled more M2 macrophages (~70%) than the canonical M2 macrophage marker Arginase-1, which labels 24% of M2 macrophages. Conversely, CD38 labeled most (71%) in vitro M1 macrophages. In vivo, a similar CD38+ population greatly increased after LPS exposure. Overall, this work defines exclusive and common M1 and M2 signatures and provides novel and improved tools to distinguish M1 and M2 murine macrophages. PMID:26699615

  13. M1-like Macrophage Polarization Promotes Orthodontic Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    He, D; Kou, X; Yang, R; Liu, D; Wang, X; Luo, Q; Song, Y; Liu, F; Yan, Y; Gan, Y; Zhou, Y

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in inflammatory-mediated bone loss. Orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) is associated with inflammatory bone remodeling. However, whether and how macrophages contribute to mechanical force-induced OTM remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that polarization of M1-like macrophages may contribute to the OTM. Orthodontic nickel-titanium springs were applied to the upper first molars of rats or mice to induce OTM. The distance of OTM gradually increased after mechanical force was applied to the rats for 5 and 10 d. M1-like macrophage polarization and expression of M1 cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α also increased after force application. More importantly, monocyte/macrophage depletion in mice by injection of clodronate liposomes decreased the distance of OTM and the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts and CD68(+) macrophages, accompanied by reduced expressions of M1 markers TNF-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), whereas systemic transfusion of M1 macrophages in mice increased them. Further experiments showed that injection of recombinant TNF-α increased the distance of OTM and the number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and CD68(+) macrophages, as well as upregulated the expression of TNF-α and iNOS. Blockage of TNF-α by etanercept injection reduced the distance of OTM and the number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and CD68(+) macrophages, as well as decreased the levels of TNF-α and iNOS. These data suggest that M1-like macrophage polarization promotes alveolar bone resorption and consequent OTM after mechanical force application. PMID:26124217

  14. Anatomy of a Discovery: M1 and M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles Dudley

    2015-01-01

    M1 and M2 macrophage-type responses kill or repair in vivo. The unique ability of macrophages to make these polar opposite type of responses provides primary host protection and maintains tissue homeostasis throughout the animal kingdom. In humans and other higher animals, M1 and M2-type macrophage responses also initiate and direct T cells/adaptive immunity to provide additional protection such as Th1 (cytotoxic) or Th2 (antibody-mediated) type responses. Hence, macrophages were renamed M1 and M2 to indicate the central role of macrophages/innate immunity in immune systems. These findings indicate that the long held notion that adaptive immunity controls innate immunity was backward: a sea change in understanding how immune responses occur. The clinical impact of M1/kill and M2/repair responses is immense playing pivotal roles in curing (or causing) many diseases including infections, cancer, autoimmunity, and atherosclerosis. How M1/M2 came to be is an interesting story that, like life, involved Direction, Determination, Discouragement, and Discovery. PMID:25999950

  15. Molecular Mechanisms That Influence the Macrophage M1–M2 Polarization Balance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Zen, Ke

    2014-01-01

    As an essential component of innate immunity, macrophages have multiple functions in both inhibiting or promoting cell proliferation and tissue repair. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of macrophages. Classical M1 and alternative M2 activation of macrophages, mirroring the Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells, represent two extremes of a dynamic changing state of macrophage activation. M1-type macrophages release cytokines that inhibit the proliferation of surrounding cells and damage contiguous tissue, and M2-type macrophages release cytokines that promote the proliferation of contiguous cells and tissue repair. M1–M2 polarization of macrophage is a tightly controlled process entailing a set of signaling pathways, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory networks. An imbalance of macrophage M1–M2 polarization is often associated with various diseases or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, identification of the molecules associated with the dynamic changes of macrophage polarization and understanding their interactions is crucial for elucidating the molecular basis of disease progression and designing novel macrophage-mediated therapeutic strategies. PMID:25506346

  16. Salmonella typhimurium-induced M1 macrophage polarization is dependent on the bacterial O antigen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fengling; Sun, Xiaoming; Qu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaolian

    2016-02-01

    Recently, macrophages were shown to be capable of differentiating toward two phenotypes after antigen stimulation: a classically activated (M1) or an alternatively activated phenotype (M2). To investigate the effect of Salmonella enteric serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) on macrophage differentiation, we compared macrophage phenotypes after infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with wild-type S. typhimurium and its isogenic rfc mutant. S. typhimurium C5 induced M1 macrophage polarization and enhanced inducible nitric oxide synthase expression by macrophages; this induction was dependent on Toll-like receptor 4. In contrast, the Δrfc mutant (S. typhimurium C5 rfc::Km(r)) lost this function and induced an M2 response in the macrophages. Here, we propose that S. typhimurium C5 is capable of polarizing macrophages towards the M1 phenotype and that this polarization is dependent on the O antigen encoded by rfc. Our finding indicates that M1 macrophage polarization induced by S. typhimurium may be related to the ability of this intracellular bacterium to survive and replicate within macrophages, which is essential for systemic disease. PMID:26745982

  17. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Suppresses Autoimmune Central Nervous System Disease by Regulating M1-Type Macrophage-Th17 Axis.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Rattan, Ramandeep; Suhail, Hamid; Singh, Jaspreet; Hoda, Md Nasrul; Deshpande, Mandar; Fulzele, Sadanand; Denic, Alexander; Shridhar, Viji; Kumar, Ashok; Viollet, Benoit; Rodriguez, Moses; Giri, Shailendra

    2016-08-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK, is an energy-sensing, metabolic switch implicated in various metabolic disorders; however, its role in inflammation is not well defined. We have previously shown that loss of AMPK exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) disease severity. In this study, we investigated the mechanism through which AMPK modulates inflammatory disease like EAE. AMPKα1 knockout (α1KO) mice with EAE showed severe demyelination and inflammation in the brain and spinal cord compared with wild-type due to higher expression of proinflammatory Th17 cytokines, including IL-17, IL-23, and IL-1β, impaired blood-brain barrier integrity, and increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the CNS. Infiltrated CD4 cells in the brains and spinal cords of α1KO with EAE were significantly higher compared with wild-type EAE and were characterized as IL-17 (IL-17 and GM-CSF double-positive) CD4 cells. Increased inflammatory response in α1KO mice was due to polarization of macrophages (Mϕ) to proinflammatory M1 type phenotype (IL-10(low)IL-23/IL-1β/IL-6(high)), and these M1 Mϕ showed stronger capacity to induce allogenic as well as Ag-specific (myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein [MOG]35-55) T cell response. Mϕ from α1KO mice also enhanced the encephalitogenic property of MOG35-55-primed CD4 T cells in B6 mice. The increased encephalitogenic MOG-restricted CD4(+) T cells were due to an autocrine effect of IL-1β/IL-23-mediated induction of IL-6 production in α1KO Mϕ, which in turn induce IL-17 and GM-CSF production in CD4 cells. Collectively, our data indicate that AMPK controls the inflammatory disease by regulating the M1 phenotype-Th17 axis in an animal model of multiple sclerosis. PMID:27354217

  18. Much More than M1 and M2 Macrophages, There are also CD169+ and TCR+ Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Olleros, Maria L.; Vesin, Dominique; Garcia, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes are considered to be precursor cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system, and macrophages are one of the leading members of this cellular system. Macrophages play highly diverse roles in maintaining an organism’s integrity by either directly participating in pathogen elimination or repairing tissue under sterile inflammatory conditions. There are different subpopulations of macrophages and each one has its own characteristics and functions. In this review, we summarize present knowledge on the polarization of macrophages that allows the generation of subpopulations called classically activated macrophages or M1 and alternative activated macrophages or M2. Furthermore, there are macrophages that their origin and characterization still remain unclear but have been involved as main players in some human pathologies. Thus, we also review three other categories of macrophages: tumor-associated macrophages, CD169+ macrophages, and the recently named TCR+ macrophages. Based on the literature, we provide information on the molecular characterization of these macrophage subpopulations and their specific involvement in several human pathologies such as cancer, infectious diseases, obesity, and asthma. The refined characterization of the macrophage subpopulations can be useful in designing new strategies, supplementing those already established for the treatment of diseases using macrophages as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074923

  19. Effect of rTsP53 on the M1/M2 activation of bone-marrow derived macrophage in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhibin; Li, Fan; Yang, Wen; Liang, Yanbing; Tang, Hao; Li, Zhenyu; Wu, Jingguo; Liang, Huaping; Ma, Zhongfu

    2015-01-01

    We investigated that if rTsP53 could be used to activate bone-marrow derived macrophage (BMDM) into M2 macrophage and stop M1 macrophage activation. After 72 h incubation in blank culture medium, cells with PE-CCR7 (-) and FITC-CD206 (-) was extracted and its mean proportion was 92.30 ± 0.22%. With the stimulation of 20 μg/ml IFN-γ for 72 h, cells with PE-CCR7 (+) was extracted and its mean proportion was 16.24 ± 0.82%. With the stimulation of IL-3/IL-14 (both 10 μg/ml) for 72 h, cells with FICT-CD206 (+) was extracted and its mean proportion was 87.32 ± 4.29%. Co-incubation with different dose of rTsP53 (0.001 μg/ml, 0.01 μg/ml, 0.1 μg/ml, 1 μg/ml, 2 μg/ml, 5 μg/ml, 10 μg/ml, respectively) for 72 h, FITC-CD206 (+) macrophage was extracted. The mean proportion in each group was 1.09 ± 0.22%, 2.13 ± 0.13%, 4.91 ± 0.07%, 5.48 ± 0.29%, 9.81 ± 0.06%, 12.83 ± 0.55%, 17.87 ± 0.02%, respectively. The dose of rTsP53 was significantly positive correlated to the proportion of FITC-CD206 (+) macrophage. Co-incubation with 20 μg/ml IFN-γ and 5 μg/ml rTsP53 for 72 h, cells with PE-CCR7 (+) was extracted and its mean proportion was 10.60 ± 0.19%. Compared to that of mere co-incubation with IFN-γ, there was significant difference between the two groups. ELISA showed that Th1 cytokines’ (IFN-γ, IL-6 and TNF-α) level decreased in the culture medium supernatant of BMDM co-incubated with rTsP53. There was negative correlation between the Th1 cytokines’ level and the dose of rTsP53. Both Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-13) and regulatory cytokines in the culture medium increased. There was positive correlation between the Th2 cytokines’ level and the dose of rTsP53. There was also positive correlation between the regulatory cytokines’ level and the dose of rTsP53. Compared to that of BMDM co-incubated with IFN-γ, levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were significant lower than that of BMDM co-incubated with both IFN-γ and rTsP53 (both P < 0.05), while the levels

  20. [Adipose-derived stem cells promote the polarization from M1 macrophages to M2 macrophages].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuehong; Pang, Chunyan; Bai, Li; Zhang, Ying; Geng, Lixia

    2016-03-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on M1/M2 macrophages and whether ADSCs are able to promote the polarization from M1 macrophages to M2 macrophages. Methods M1 macrophages were induced from J774.1 macrophages by 24-hour stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon γ (IFN-γ), and M2 macrophages were induced from J774.1 macrophages by interleukin 4 (IL-4) for another 24 hours. Then M1/M2 macrophages were separately cultured in the presence of ADSCs for 24 hours. The M1/M2 macrophages and their corresponding supernatants were collected for further analysis. The expressions of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), CD86, arginase 1 (Arg1), mannose receptors/CD206 (MR/CD206), IL-10, found in inflammatory zone 1 (FIZZ1), chitinase 3-like 3 (Ym-1) were detected by real-time PCR and ELISA. Results ADSCs significantly decreased the levels of IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS, CCL2 and CD86, and increased the levels of Arg1, CD206 and IL-10 in M1 macrophages. In the supernatant of M1 macrophages, the expressions of IL-6 and TNF-α were reduced, while those of CD206 were enhanced. In M2 macrophages, ADSCs resulted in down-regulation of IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS, CD86 and up-regulation of Arg1, CD206, FIZZ-1, Ym-1 and IL-10. In the supernatant of M2 macrophages, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were down-regulated and those of CD206 were up-regulated. Conclusion ADSCs can inhibit the gene expression of M1 macrophages and promote the gene expression of M2 macrophages, as well as mediate the polarization from M1 macrophages to M2 macrophages. PMID:26927552

  1. M1 and M2 Macrophages: The Chicken and the Egg of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this perspective is to describe a critical advance in understanding how immune responses work. Macrophages are required for all animal life: ‘Inhibit’ type macrophages in all animals (called M1) can rapidly kill pathogens, and are thus the primary host defense, and ‘Heal’ type macrophages (M2) routinely repair and maintain tissue integrity. Macrophages perform these activities in all animals without T cells, and also in T cell-deficient vertebrates. Although adaptive immunity can amplify macrophage polarization, the long-held notion that macrophages need to be ‘activated’ or ‘alternatively activated’ by T cells is incorrect; indeed, immunology has had it backward. M1/M2-type macrophages necessarily direct T cells toward Th1- or Th2-like activities, respectively. That such macrophage-innate activities are the central directing element in immune responses is a dramatic change in understanding how immune systems operate. Most important, this revelation is opening up whole new approaches to immunotherapy. For example, many modern diseases, such as cancer and atherosclerosis, may not display ‘foreign’ antigens. However, there are clear imbalances in M1/M2-type responses. Correcting such innate imbalances can result in better health. Macrophages are the chicken and the egg of immunity. PMID:25138714

  2. β-Adrenergic-stimulated macrophages: Comprehensive localization in the M1-M2 spectrum.

    PubMed

    Lamkin, Donald M; Ho, Hsin-Yun; Ong, Tiffany H; Kawanishi, Carly K; Stoffers, Victoria L; Ahlawat, Nivedita; Ma, Jeffrey C Y; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Cole, Steve W; Sloan, Erica K

    2016-10-01

    β-Adrenergic signaling can regulate macrophage involvement in several diseases and often produces anti-inflammatory properties in macrophages, which are similar to M2 properties in a dichotomous M1 vs. M2 macrophage taxonomy. However, it is not clear that β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages may be classified strictly as M2. In this in vitro study, we utilized recently published criteria and transcriptome-wide bioinformatics methods to map the relative polarity of murine β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages within a wider M1-M2 spectrum. Results show that β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages did not fit entirely into any one pre-defined category of the M1-M2 spectrum but did express genes that are representative of some M2 side categories. Moreover, transcript origin analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiles located β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages firmly on the M2 side of the M1-M2 spectrum and found active suppression of M1 side gene transcripts. The signal transduction pathways involved were mapped through blocking experiments and bioinformatics analysis of transcription factor binding motifs. M2-promoting effects were mediated specifically through β2-adrenergic receptors and were associated with CREB, C/EBPβ, and ATF transcription factor pathways but not with established M1-M2 STAT pathways. Thus, β-adrenergic-signaling induces a macrophage transcriptome that locates on the M2 side of the M1-M2 spectrum but likely accomplishes this effect through a signaling pathway that is atypical for M2-spectrum macrophages. PMID:27485040

  3. From Monocytes to M1/M2 Macrophages: Phenotypical vs. Functional Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Italiani, Paola; Boraschi, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Studies on monocyte and macrophage biology and differentiation have revealed the pleiotropic activities of these cells. Macrophages are tissue sentinels that maintain tissue integrity by eliminating/repairing damaged cells and matrices. In this M2-like mode, they can also promote tumor growth. Conversely, M1-like macrophages are key effector cells for the elimination of pathogens, virally infected, and cancer cells. Macrophage differentiation from monocytes occurs in the tissue in concomitance with the acquisition of a functional phenotype that depends on microenvironmental signals, thereby accounting for the many and apparently opposed macrophage functions. Many questions arise. When monocytes differentiate into macrophages in a tissue (concomitantly adopting a specific functional program, M1 or M2), do they all die during the inflammatory reaction, or do some of them survive? Do those that survive become quiescent tissue macrophages, able to react as naïve cells to a new challenge? Or, do monocyte-derived tissue macrophages conserve a “memory” of their past inflammatory activation? This review will address some of these important questions under the general framework of the role of monocytes and macrophages in the initiation, development, resolution, and chronicization of inflammation. PMID:25368618

  4. HMGB1 Facilitated Macrophage Reprogramming towards a Proinflammatory M1-like Phenotype in Experimental Autoimmune Myocarditis Development

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhaoliang; Zhang, Pan; Yu, Ying; Lu, Hongxiang; Liu, Yanfang; Ni, Ping; Su, Xiaolian; Wang, Dan; Liu, Yueqin; Wang, Jia; Shen, Huiling; Xu, Wenlin; Xu, Huaxi

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages can be reprogramming, such as the classical activated macrophage, M1 or alternative activated macrophages, M2 phenotype following the milieu danger signals, especially inflammatory factors. Macrophage reprogramming is now considered as a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is characterized by monocytes/macrophage infiltration, Th17 cells activation and inflammatory factors producing such as high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). Whether infiltrated macrophages could be reprogramming in EAM? HMGB1 was associated with macrophage reprogramming? Our results clearly demonstrated that infiltrated macrophage was reprogrammed towards a proinflammatory M1-like phenotype and cardiac protection by monocytes/macrophages depletion or HMGB1 blockade in EAM; in vitro, HMGB1 facilitated macrophage reprogramming towards M1-like phenotype dependent on TLR4-PI3Kγ-Erk1/2 pathway; furthermore, the reprogramming M1-like macrophage promoted Th17 expansion. Therefore, we speculated that HMGB1 contributed EAM development via facilitating macrophage reprogramming towards M1-like phenotype except for directly modulating Th17 cells expansion. PMID:26899795

  5. Rac2 Controls Tumor Growth, Metastasis and M1-M2 Macrophage Differentiation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shweta; Singh, Alok R.; Zulcic, Muamera; Bao, Lei; Messer, Karen; Ideker, Trey; Dutkowski, Janusz; Durden, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well-established that the macrophage M1 to M2 transition plays a role in tumor progression, the molecular basis for this process remains incompletely understood. Herein, we demonstrate that the small GTPase, Rac2 controls macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and the metastatic phenotype in vivo. Using a genetic approach, combined with syngeneic and orthotopic tumor models we demonstrate that Rac2-/- mice display a marked defect in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Microarray, RT-PCR and metabolomic analysis on bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from the Rac2-/- mice identify an important role for Rac2 in M2 macrophage differentiation. Furthermore, we define a novel molecular mechanism by which signals transmitted from the extracellular matrix via the α4β1 integrin and MCSF receptor lead to the activation of Rac2 and potentially regulate macrophage M2 differentiation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a macrophage autonomous process by which the Rac2 GTPase is activated downstream of the α4β1 integrin and the MCSF receptor to control tumor growth, metastasis and macrophage differentiation into the M2 phenotype. Finally, using gene expression and metabolomic data from our Rac2-/- model, and information related to M1-M2 macrophage differentiation curated from the literature we executed a systems biologic analysis of hierarchical protein-protein interaction networks in an effort to develop an iterative interactome map which will predict additional mechanisms by which Rac2 may coordinately control macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and metastasis. PMID:24770346

  6. Macrophages of M1 phenotype have properties that influence lung cancer cell progression.

    PubMed

    Hedbrant, Alexander; Wijkander, Jonny; Seidal, Tomas; Delbro, Dick; Erlandsson, Ann

    2015-11-01

    Stromal macrophages of different phenotypes can contribute to the expression of proteins that affects metastasis such as urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), its receptor uPAR, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), but knowledge of how essential their contribution is in comparison to the cancer cells in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is lacking. The expression of uPA, uPAR, and PAI-1 and of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were studied in human macrophages of M1 and M2 phenotype and compared to a lung SCC (NCI-H520) and a SCLC (NCI-H69) cell line. Effects of treatment with conditioned media (CM) from M1 and M2 macrophages on the expression of these genes in H520 and H69 cells as well as effects on the cell growth were investigated. In addition, data on the stromal macrophages immunoreactivity of uPAR, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in a few SCC and SCLC biopsies was included. uPAR, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were confirmed in stromal cells including macrophages in the SCC and SCLC biopsies. In vitro, both macrophage phenotypes expressed considerably higher mRNA levels of uPA, uPAR, PAI-1, and MMP-9 compared to the cancer cell lines, and regarding uPAR, the highest level was found in the M1 macrophage phenotype. Furthermore, M1 CM treatment not only induced an upregulation of PAI-1 in both H520 and H69 cells but also inhibited cell growth in both cell lines, giving M1 macrophages both tumor-promoting and tumor-killing potential. PMID:26050228

  7. Aldosterone Induces Renal Fibrosis and Inflammatory M1-Macrophage Subtype via Mineralocorticoid Receptor in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Cortegano, Isabel; Ballesteros, Sandra; Alía, Mario; Cannata-Ortiz, Pablo; Olivares-Álvaro, Elena; Egido, Jesús; de Andrés, Belén; Gaspar, María Luisa; de las Heras, Natalia; Lahera, Vicente; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate macrophages heterogeneity and structural, functional and inflammatory alterations in rat kidney by aldosterone + salt administration. The effects of treatment with spironolactone on above parameters were also analyzed. Male Wistar rats received aldosterone (1 mgkg-1d-1) + 1% NaCl for 3 weeks. Half of the animals were treated with spironolactone (200 mg kg-1d-1). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were elevated (p<0.05) in aldosterone + salt–treated rats. Relative kidney weight, collagen content, fibronectin, macrophage infiltrate, CTGF, Col I, MMP2, TNF-α, CD68, Arg2, and SGK-1 were increased (p<0.05) in aldosterone + salt–treated rats, being reduced by spironolactone (p<0.05). Increased iNOS and IFN-γ mRNA gene expression (M1 macrophage markers) was observed in aldosterone + salt rats, whereas no significant differences were observed in IL-10 and gene ArgI mRNA expression or ED2 protein content (M2 macrophage markers). All the observed changes were blocked with spironolactone treatment. Macrophage depletion with liposomal clodronate reduced macrophage influx and inflammatory M1 markers (INF-γ or iNOS), whereas interstitial fibrosis was only partially reduced after this intervention, in aldosterone plus salt-treated rats. In conclusion, aldosterone + salt administration mediates inflammatory M1 macrophage phenotype and increased fibrosis throughout mineralocorticoid receptors activation. PMID:26730742

  8. Anti-CD47 Treatment Stimulates Phagocytosis of Glioblastoma by M1 and M2 Polarized Macrophages and Promotes M1 Polarized Macrophages In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Michael; Hutter, Gregor; Kahn, Suzana A; Azad, Tej D; Gholamin, Sharareh; Xu, Chelsea Y; Liu, Jie; Achrol, Achal S; Richard, Chase; Sommerkamp, Pia; Schoen, Matthew Kenneth; McCracken, Melissa N; Majeti, Ravi; Weissman, Irving; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Cheshier, Samuel H

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent an important cellular subset within the glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) microenvironment and are a potential therapeutic target. TAMs display a continuum of different polarization states between antitumorigenic M1 and protumorigenic M2 phenotypes, with a lower M1/M2 ratio correlating with worse prognosis. Here, we investigated the effect of macrophage polarization on anti-CD47 antibody-mediated phagocytosis of human glioblastoma cells in vitro, as well as the effect of anti-CD47 on the distribution of M1 versus M2 macrophages within human glioblastoma cells grown in mouse xenografts. Bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and peripheral blood-derived human macrophages were polarized in vitro toward M1 or M2 phenotypes and verified by flow cytometry. Primary human glioblastoma cell lines were offered as targets to mouse and human M1 or M2 polarized macrophages in vitro. The addition of an anti-CD47 monoclonal antibody led to enhanced tumor-cell phagocytosis by mouse and human M1 and M2 macrophages. In both cases, the anti-CD47-induced phagocytosis by M1 was more prominent than that for M2. Dissected tumors from human glioblastoma xenografted within NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice and treated with anti-CD47 showed a significant increase of M1 macrophages within the tumor. These data show that anti-CD47 treatment leads to enhanced tumor cell phagocytosis by both M1 and M2 macrophage subtypes with a higher phagocytosis rate by M1 macrophages. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that anti-CD47 treatment alone can shift the phenotype of macrophages toward the M1 subtype in vivo. PMID:27092773

  9. Anti-CD47 Treatment Stimulates Phagocytosis of Glioblastoma by M1 and M2 Polarized Macrophages and Promotes M1 Polarized Macrophages In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Suzana A.; Azad, Tej D.; Gholamin, Sharareh; Xu, Chelsea Y.; Liu, Jie; Achrol, Achal S.; Richard, Chase; Sommerkamp, Pia; Schoen, Matthew Kenneth; McCracken, Melissa N.; Majeti, Ravi; Weissman, Irving; Mitra, Siddhartha S.; Cheshier, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent an important cellular subset within the glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) microenvironment and are a potential therapeutic target. TAMs display a continuum of different polarization states between antitumorigenic M1 and protumorigenic M2 phenotypes, with a lower M1/M2 ratio correlating with worse prognosis. Here, we investigated the effect of macrophage polarization on anti-CD47 antibody-mediated phagocytosis of human glioblastoma cells in vitro, as well as the effect of anti-CD47 on the distribution of M1 versus M2 macrophages within human glioblastoma cells grown in mouse xenografts. Bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and peripheral blood-derived human macrophages were polarized in vitro toward M1 or M2 phenotypes and verified by flow cytometry. Primary human glioblastoma cell lines were offered as targets to mouse and human M1 or M2 polarized macrophages in vitro. The addition of an anti-CD47 monoclonal antibody led to enhanced tumor-cell phagocytosis by mouse and human M1 and M2 macrophages. In both cases, the anti-CD47-induced phagocytosis by M1 was more prominent than that for M2. Dissected tumors from human glioblastoma xenografted within NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice and treated with anti-CD47 showed a significant increase of M1 macrophages within the tumor. These data show that anti-CD47 treatment leads to enhanced tumor cell phagocytosis by both M1 and M2 macrophage subtypes with a higher phagocytosis rate by M1 macrophages. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that anti-CD47 treatment alone can shift the phenotype of macrophages toward the M1 subtype in vivo. PMID:27092773

  10. An M1-like Macrophage Polarization in Decidual Tissue during Spontaneous Preterm Labor That Is Attenuated by Rosiglitazone Treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Romero, Roberto; Miller, Derek; Kadam, Leena; Mial, Tara N; Plazyo, Olesya; Garcia-Flores, Valeria; Hassan, Sonia S; Xu, Zhonghui; Tarca, Adi L; Drewlo, Sascha; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy

    2016-03-15

    Decidual macrophages are implicated in the local inflammatory response that accompanies spontaneous preterm labor/birth; however, their role is poorly understood. We hypothesized that decidual macrophages undergo a proinflammatory (M1) polarization during spontaneous preterm labor and that PPARγ activation via rosiglitazone (RSG) would attenuate the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response, preventing preterm birth. In this study, we show that: 1) decidual macrophages undergo an M1-like polarization during spontaneous term and preterm labor; 2) anti-inflammatory (M2)-like macrophages are more abundant than M1-like macrophages in decidual tissue; 3) decidual M2-like macrophages are reduced in preterm pregnancies compared with term pregnancies, regardless of the presence of labor; 4) decidual macrophages express high levels of TNF and IL-12 but low levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) during spontaneous preterm labor; 5) decidual macrophages from women who underwent spontaneous preterm labor display plasticity by M1↔M2 polarization in vitro; 6) incubation with RSG reduces the expression of TNF and IL-12 in decidual macrophages from women who underwent spontaneous preterm labor; and 7) treatment with RSG reduces the rate of LPS-induced preterm birth and improves neonatal outcomes by reducing the systemic proinflammatory response and downregulating mRNA and protein expression of NF-κB, TNF, and IL-10 in decidual and myometrial macrophages in C57BL/6J mice. In summary, we demonstrated that decidual M1-like macrophages are associated with spontaneous preterm labor and that PPARγ activation via RSG can attenuate the macrophage-mediated proinflammatory response, preventing preterm birth and improving neonatal outcomes. These findings suggest that the PPARγ pathway is a new molecular target for future preventative strategies for spontaneous preterm labor/birth. PMID:26889045

  11. Paracoccin Induces M1 Polarization of Macrophages via Interaction with TLR4.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Mateus S; Oliveira, Aline F; da Silva, Thiago A; Fernandes, Fabrício F; Gonçales, Relber A; Almeida, Fausto; Roque-Barreira, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    The fungal human pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis contains paracoccin (PCN), a multi-domain protein that has lectin and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activities, which account for its effects on the growth and morphogenesis of the fungus and on the activation of host macrophages through its interaction with TLR N-glycans. With the purpose of detailing the knowledge on the effects of PCN on macrophages, we used recombinant PCN expressed in Pichia pastoris (p-rPCN) to stimulate isolated murine peritoneal macrophages. The activation of these cells manifested through the release of high levels of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-12p40, and IL-6. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages stimulated with p-rPCN increased the relative expression of STAT1, SOCS3, and iNOS2 mRNA (M1 polarization markers). However, the expression of Arginase-1, Ym-1, and FIZZ1 (M2 polarization markers) remained at basal levels. Interestingly, the observed M1 macrophages' polarization triggered by p-rPCN was abolished in cells obtained from knockout Toll-like receptor-4 mice. In this case, the p-rPCN-induced production of pro-inflammatory mediators was blocked too. These results demonstrate that the classical activation of macrophages induced by paracoccin depends on TLR4. Taken together, the results of our study indicate that paracoccin acts as a TLR agonist able to modulate immunity and exerts biological activities that favor its applicability as an immunotherapeutic agent to combat systemic fungal infections. PMID:27458431

  12. Elastin-Derived Peptides Promote Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Dale, Matthew A; Xiong, Wanfen; Carson, Jeffrey S; Suh, Melissa K; Karpisek, Andrew D; Meisinger, Trevor M; Casale, George P; Baxter, B Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a dynamic vascular disease characterized by inflammatory cell invasion and extracellular matrix degradation. Damage to elastin in the extracellular matrix results in release of elastin-derived peptides (EDPs), which are chemotactic for inflammatory cells such as monocytes. Their effect on macrophage polarization is less well known. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages initially are recruited to sites of injury, but, if their effects are prolonged, they can lead to chronic inflammation that prevents normal tissue repair. Conversely, anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages reduce inflammation and aid in wound healing. Thus, a proper M1/M2 ratio is vital for tissue homeostasis. Abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue reveals a high M1/M2 ratio in which proinflammatory cells and their associated markers dominate. In the current study, in vitro treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with EDPs induced M1 macrophage polarization. By using C57BL/6 mice, Ab-mediated neutralization of EDPs reduced aortic dilation, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and proinflammatory cytokine expression at early and late time points after aneurysm induction. Furthermore, direct manipulation of the M1/M2 balance altered aortic dilation. Injection of M2-polarized macrophages reduced aortic dilation after aneurysm induction. EDPs promoted a proinflammatory environment in aortic tissue by inducing M1 polarization, and neutralization of EDPs attenuated aortic dilation. The M1/M2 imbalance is vital to aneurysm formation. PMID:27183603

  13. Paracoccin Induces M1 Polarization of Macrophages via Interaction with TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Mateus S.; Oliveira, Aline F.; da Silva, Thiago A.; Fernandes, Fabrício F.; Gonçales, Relber A.; Almeida, Fausto; Roque-Barreira, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    The fungal human pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis contains paracoccin (PCN), a multi-domain protein that has lectin and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activities, which account for its effects on the growth and morphogenesis of the fungus and on the activation of host macrophages through its interaction with TLR N-glycans. With the purpose of detailing the knowledge on the effects of PCN on macrophages, we used recombinant PCN expressed in Pichia pastoris (p-rPCN) to stimulate isolated murine peritoneal macrophages. The activation of these cells manifested through the release of high levels of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-12p40, and IL-6. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages stimulated with p-rPCN increased the relative expression of STAT1, SOCS3, and iNOS2 mRNA (M1 polarization markers). However, the expression of Arginase-1, Ym-1, and FIZZ1 (M2 polarization markers) remained at basal levels. Interestingly, the observed M1 macrophages’ polarization triggered by p-rPCN was abolished in cells obtained from knockout Toll-like receptor-4 mice. In this case, the p-rPCN-induced production of pro-inflammatory mediators was blocked too. These results demonstrate that the classical activation of macrophages induced by paracoccin depends on TLR4. Taken together, the results of our study indicate that paracoccin acts as a TLR agonist able to modulate immunity and exerts biological activities that favor its applicability as an immunotherapeutic agent to combat systemic fungal infections. PMID:27458431

  14. Maslinic Acid Enhances Signals for the Recruitment of Macrophages and Their Differentiation to M1 State

    PubMed Central

    Gaforio, José J.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory process is involved in the genesis and evolution of different diseases like obesity, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Macrophages play a central role in inflammation. In addition, they can regulate some stages of cancer development. Macrophages can polarize into M1 or M2 functional phenotype depending on the cytokines present in the tissue microenvironment. On the other hand, triterpenes found in virgin olive oil are described to present different properties, such as antitumoral and anti-inflammatory activity. The present study was designed to elucidate if the four major triterpenes found in virgin olive oil (oleanolic acid, maslinic acid, uvaol, and erythrodiol) are able to enhance M1 macrophage response which represents an important defense mechanism against cancer. Our results indicated that maslinic acid modulated the inflammatory response by enhancing the production of IL-8, IL-1α, and IL-1β; it promoted M1 response through the synthesis of IFN-γ; and finally it did not modify significantly the levels of NFκβ or NO. Overall, our results showed that maslinic acid could prevent chronic inflammation, which represents a crucial step in the development of some cancers. PMID:25821495

  15. Maslinic Acid enhances signals for the recruitment of macrophages and their differentiation to m1 state.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quesada, Cristina; López-Biedma, Alicia; Gaforio, José J

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory process is involved in the genesis and evolution of different diseases like obesity, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Macrophages play a central role in inflammation. In addition, they can regulate some stages of cancer development. Macrophages can polarize into M1 or M2 functional phenotype depending on the cytokines present in the tissue microenvironment. On the other hand, triterpenes found in virgin olive oil are described to present different properties, such as antitumoral and anti-inflammatory activity. The present study was designed to elucidate if the four major triterpenes found in virgin olive oil (oleanolic acid, maslinic acid, uvaol, and erythrodiol) are able to enhance M1 macrophage response which represents an important defense mechanism against cancer. Our results indicated that maslinic acid modulated the inflammatory response by enhancing the production of IL-8, IL-1α, and IL-1β; it promoted M1 response through the synthesis of IFN-γ; and finally it did not modify significantly the levels of NFκβ or NO. Overall, our results showed that maslinic acid could prevent chronic inflammation, which represents a crucial step in the development of some cancers. PMID:25821495

  16. The MSHA strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA) inhibits gastric carcinoma progression by inducing M1 macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changming; Hu, Zunqi; Zhu, Zhenxin; Zhang, Xin; Wei, Ziran; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Dali; Cai, Qingping

    2016-05-01

    Macrophages play crucial roles in promoting tumor development and progression. In the present study, we found that the mannose-sensitive hemagglutination pilus strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA) was efficient in inducing M1 macrophage polarization. PA-MSHA treatment increases expression of M1-related cytokines and promotes activation of murine peritoneal macrophages (MPM). Interestingly, PA-MSHA inhibits cell proliferation and migration and induces the apoptosis of gastric carcinoma cells. These effects of PA-MSHA on M1 polarization were associated with activation of NF-κB expression. Thus, inducing polarization of M1 by PA-MSHA may be one potential strategy for inhibiting gastric carcinoma progression in mice. PMID:26662800

  17. Reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis and impaired unfolded protein response in TRPC3-deficient M1 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Sumeet; Dube, Prabhatchandra R.; Tano, Jean-Yves; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a prominent mechanism of macrophage apoptosis in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Recent studies from our laboratory showed that advanced atherosclerotic plaques in Apoe−/− mice with bone marrow deficiency of the calcium-permeable channel Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 3 (TRPC3) are characterized by reduced areas of necrosis and fewer apoptotic macrophages than animals transplanted with Trpc3+/+ bone marrow. In vitro, proinflammatory M1 but not anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages derived from Trpc3−/−Apoe−/− animals exhibited reduced ER stress-induced apoptosis. However, whether this was due to a specific effect of TRPC3 deficiency on macrophage ER stress signaling remained to be determined. In the present work we used polarized macrophages derived from mice with macrophage-specific deficiency of TRPC3 to examine the expression level of ER stress markers and the activation status of some typical mediators of macrophage apoptosis. We found that the reduced susceptibility of TRPC3-deficient M1 macrophages to ER stress-induced apoptosis correlates with an impaired unfolded protein response (UPR), reduced mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis, and reduced activation of the proapoptotic molecules calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Notably, none of these pathways was altered in TRPC3-deficient M2 macrophages. These findings show for the first time an obligatory requirement for a member of the TRPC family of cation channels in ER stress-induced apoptosis in macrophages, underscoring a rather selective role of the TRPC3 channel on mechanisms related to the UPR signaling in M1 macrophages. PMID:25031020

  18. Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Halaney, David L; Zahedivash, Aydin; Phipps, Jennifer E; Wang, Tianyi; Dwelle, Jordan; Saux, Claude Jourdan Le; Asmis, Reto; Milner, Thomas E; Feldman, Marc D

    2015-11-01

    The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture. PMID:26538329

  19. Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halaney, David L.; Zahedivash, Aydin; Phipps, Jennifer E.; Wang, Tianyi; Dwelle, Jordan; Saux, Claude Jourdan Le; Asmis, Reto; Milner, Thomas E.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2015-11-01

    The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture.

  20. Effects of IRF1 and IFN-β interaction on the M1 polarization of macrophages and its antitumor function

    PubMed Central

    XIE, CHANGLI; LIU, CUIYING; WU, BITAO; LIN, YAN; MA, TINGTING; XIONG, HAIYU; WANG, QIN; LI, ZIWEI; MA, CHENYU; TU, ZHIGUANG

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages that differentiate from precursor monocytes can be polarized into a classically activated (M1) or alternatively activated (M2) status depending on different stimuli. Generally, interferon (IFN)-γ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are considered the classical stimuli with which to establish M1 polarization. IFN regulatory factor (IRF)1 and IFN-β are two crucial molecules involved in IFN-γ- and LPS-initialed signaling. However, the association between IRF1 and IFN-β in the context of the M1 polarization of macrophages is not yet fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that U937-derived macrophages, in response to IFN-γ and LPS stimulation, readily acquire an M1 status, indicated by the increased expression of interleukin (IL)-12, IL-6, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the M1-specific cell surface antigen, CD86, and the decreased expression of the M2-specific mannose receptor, CD206. However, the knockdown of IRF1 in U937-derived macrophages led to an impaired M1 status, as indicated by the decreased expression of the above-mentioned M1 markers, and the increased expression of the M2 markers, CD206 and IL-10. A similar phenomenon was observed in the M1 macrophages in which IFN-β was inhibited. Furthermore, we demonstrated that IRF1 and IFN-β may interact with each other in the IFN-γ- and LPS-initiated signaling pathway, and contribute to the IRF5 regulation of M1 macrophages. In addition, the conditioned medium collected from the M1 macrophages in which IRF1 or IFN-β were inhibited, exerted pro-tumor effects on the HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells, as indicated by an increase in proliferation, the inhibition of apoptosis and an enhanced invasion capability. The findings of our study suggest that the interactions of IRF1, IFN-β and IRF5 are involved in the M1 polarization of macro phages and have antitumor functions. These data may provide a novel antitumor strategy for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27176664

  1. Accumulation of M1-like macrophages in type 2 diabetic islets is followed by a systemic shift in macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Cucak, Helena; Grunnet, Lars Groth; Rosendahl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Human T2D is characterized by a low-grade systemic inflammation, loss of β-cells, and diminished insulin production. Local islet immunity is still poorly understood, and hence, we evaluated macrophage subpopulations in pancreatic islets in the well-established murine model of T2D, the db/db mouse. Already at 8 weeks of disease, on average, 12 macrophages were observed in the diabetic islets, whereas only two were recorded in the nondiabetic littermates. On a detailed level, the islet resident macrophages increased fourfold compared with nondiabetic littermates, whereas a pronounced recruitment (eightfold) of a novel subset of macrophages (CD68+F4/80-) was observed. The majority of the CD68+F4/80+ but only 40% of the CD68+F4/80- islet macrophages expressed CD11b. Both islet-derived macrophage subsets expressed moderate MHC-II, high galectin-3, and low CD80/CD86 levels, suggesting the cells to be macrophages rather than DCs. On a functional level, the vast majority of the macrophages in the diabetic islets was of the proinflammatory, M1-like phenotype. The systemic immunity in diabetic animals was characterized by a low-grade inflammation with elevated cytokine levels and increase of splenic cytokine, producing CD68+F4/80- macrophages. In late-stage diabetes, the cytokine signature changed toward a TGF-β-dominated profile, coinciding with a significant increase of galectin-3-positive macrophages in the spleen. In summary, our results show that proinflammatory M1-like galectin-3+ CD80/CD86(low) macrophages invade diabetic islets. Moreover, the innate immunity matures in a diabetes-dependent manner from an initial proinflammatory toward a profibrotic phenotype, supporting the concept that T2D is an inflammatory disease. PMID:24009176

  2. Human monocytes and macrophages undergo M1-type inflammatory polarization in response to high levels of glucose.

    PubMed

    Torres-Castro, Israel; Arroyo-Camarena, Úrsula D; Martínez-Reyes, Camilo P; Gómez-Arauz, Angélica Y; Dueñas-Andrade, Yareth; Hernández-Ruiz, Joselín; Béjar, Yadira L; Zaga-Clavellina, Verónica; Morales-Montor, Jorge; Terrazas, Luis I; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Escobedo, Galileo

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data suggest that elevated glucose may promote inflammatory activation of monocytic lineage cells with the ability to injure vascular endothelial tissue of diabetic patients, however evidence in primary human monocytes and macrophages is still insufficient. We investigated the effect of high glucose concentration on the inflammatory capacity of human macrophages in vitro and examined whether similar responses were detectable in circulating monocytes from prediabetic patients. Primary monocytes were isolated from healthy blood donors and differentiated into macrophages. Differentiated macrophages were exposed to normal levels of glucose (NG), high glucose (HG) or high mannitol as osmotic pressure control (OP) for three days. Using PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry, we found that HG macrophages showed overexpression of CD11c and inducible nitric oxide synthase as well as down-regulation of arginase-1 and interleukin (IL)-10 with respect to NG and OP macrophages. Consistent with in vitro results, circulating monocytes from hyperglycemic patients exhibited higher levels of CD11c and lower expression of CD206 than monocytes from normoglycemic controls. In subjects with hyperglycemia, elevation in CD11c(+) monocytes was associated with increased obesity, insulin resistance, and triglyceridemia as well as low serum IL-10. Our data suggest that human monocytes and macrophages undergo M1-like inflammatory polarization when exposed to high levels of glucose on in vitro culture conditions and in patients with hyperglycemia. These results demonstrate that excess glucose has direct effects on macrophage activation though the molecular mechanisms mediating such a response remain to be elucidated. PMID:27269375

  3. Bioinformatics approach to evaluate differential gene expression of M1/M2 macrophage phenotypes and antioxidant genes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Ricardo Fagundes; De Bastiani, Marco Antônio; Klamt, Fábio

    2014-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is a pro-inflammatory process intrinsically related to systemic redox impairments. Macrophages play a major role on disease development. The specific involvement of classically activated, M1 (pro-inflammatory), or the alternatively activated, M2 (anti-inflammatory), on plaque formation and disease progression are still not established. Thus, based on meta-data analysis of public micro-array datasets, we compared differential gene expression levels of the human antioxidant genes (HAG) and M1/M2 genes between early and advanced human atherosclerotic plaques, and among peripheric macrophages (with or without foam cells induction by oxidized low density lipoprotein, oxLDL) from healthy and atherosclerotic subjects. Two independent datasets, GSE28829 and GSE9874, were selected from gene expression omnibus (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) repository. Functional interactions were obtained with STRING (http://string-db.org/) and Medusa (http://coot.embl.de/medusa/). Statistical analysis was performed with ViaComplex(®) (http://lief.if.ufrgs.br/pub/biosoftwares/viacomplex/) and gene score enrichment analysis (http://www.broadinstitute.org/gsea/index.jsp). Bootstrap analysis demonstrated that the activity (expression) of HAG and M1 gene sets were significantly increased in advance compared to early atherosclerotic plaque. Increased expressions of HAG, M1, and M2 gene sets were found in peripheric macrophages from atherosclerotic subjects compared to peripheric macrophages from healthy subjects, while only M1 gene set was increased in foam cells from atherosclerotic subjects compared to foam cells from healthy subjects. However, M1 gene set was decreased in foam cells from healthy subjects compared to peripheric macrophages from healthy subjects, while no differences were found in foam cells from atherosclerotic subjects compared to peripheric macrophages from atherosclerotic subjects. Our data suggest that, different to cancer, in atherosclerosis there is

  4. M1 and M2 macrophage proteolytic and angiogenic profile analysis in atherosclerotic patients reveals a distinctive profile in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Roma-Lavisse, Charlotte; Tagzirt, Madjid; Zawadzki, Christophe; Lorenzi, Rodrigo; Vincentelli, André; Haulon, Stephan; Juthier, Francis; Rauch, Antoine; Corseaux, Delphine; Staels, Bart; Jude, Brigitte; Van Belle, Eric; Susen, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Dupont, Annabelle

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate atherosclerotic mediators' expression levels in M1 and M2 macrophages and to focus on the influence of diabetes on M1/M2 profiles. Macrophages from 36 atherosclerotic patients (19 diabetics and 17 non-diabetics) were cultured with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or IL-4 to induce M1 or M2 phenotype, respectively. The atherosclerotic mediators' expression was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that M1 and M2 macrophages differentially expressed mediators involved in proteolysis and angiogenesis processes. The proteolytic balance (matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), MMP-9/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and MMP-9/tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) ratios) was higher in M1 versus M2, whereas M2 macrophages presented higher angiogenesis properties (increased vascular endothelial growth factor/TFPI-2 and tissue factor/TFPI-2 ratios). Moreover, M1 macrophages from diabetics displayed more important proangiogenic and proteolytic activities than non-diabetics. This study reveals that M1 and M2 macrophages could differentially modulate major atherosclerosis-related pathological processes. Moreover, M1 macrophages from diabetics display a deleterious phenotype that could explain the higher plaque vulnerability observed in these subjects. PMID:25966737

  5. Curcumin retunes cholesterol transport homeostasis and inflammation response in M1 macrophage to prevent atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang-Yuan; Zhou, Juan; Guo, Ning; Ma, Wang-Ge; Huang, Xin; Wang, Huan; Yuan, Zu-Yi

    2015-11-27

    Lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism dysfunction in the arterial wall is a major contributor to atherosclerosis, and excessive lipid intake and failed cholesterol homeostasis may accelerate the atherogenic process. Curcumin exerts multiple effects by alleviating inflammation, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis; however, its role in cholesterol transport homeostasis and its underlying impact on inflammatory M1 macrophages are poorly understood. This work aimed to investigate the effect of curcumin on cholesterol transport, the inflammatory response and cell apoptosis in M1 macrophages. RAW264.7 macrophages (M0) were induced with LPS plus IFN-γ for 12 h to develop a M1 subtype and were then incubated with curcumin at different concentrations (6.25 and 12.5 μmol/L) in the presence or absence of oxLDL. Then, cholesterol influx/efflux and foam cell formation as well as inflammation and apoptosis were evaluated. It was found that curcumin increased cholesterol uptake measured by the Dil-oxLDL binding assay, and simultaneously increased cholesterol efflux carried out by Apo-A1 and HDL in M1 cells. Curcumin further reinforced ox-LDL-induced cholesterol esterification and foam cell formation as determined by Oil Red O and BODIPY staining. Moreover, curcumin dramatically reduced ox-LDL-induced cytokine production such as IL-1β, IL-6 as well as TNF-α and M1 cell apoptosis. We also found that curcumin upregulated CD36 and ABCA1 in M1 macrophages. Curcumin increased PPARγ expression, which in turn promoted CD36 and ABCA1 expression. In conclusion, curcumin may increase the ability of M1 macrophages to handle harmful lipids, thus promoting lipid processing, disposal and removal, which may support cholesterol homeostasis and exert an anti-atherosclerotic effect. PMID:26471308

  6. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Promotes High Glucose-Induced M1 Macrophage Switching to M2 via the VDR-PPARγ Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Zhou, Min; Guo, Yinfeng; Song, Zhixia; Liu, Bicheng

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages, especially their activation state, are closely related to the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Classically activated macrophages (M1) are proinflammatory effectors, while alternatively activated macrophages (M2) exhibit anti-inflammatory properties. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 has renoprotective roles that extend beyond the regulation of mineral metabolism, and PPARγ, a nuclear receptor, is essential for macrophage polarization. The present study investigates the effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on macrophage activation state and its underlying mechanism in RAW264.7 cells. We find that, under high glucose conditions, RAW264.7 macrophages tend to switch to the M1 phenotype, expressing higher iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines, including TNFα and IL-12. While 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 significantly inhibited M1 activation, it enhanced M2 macrophage activation; namely, it upregulated the expression of MR, Arg-1, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 but downregulated the M1 markers. However, the above effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 were abolished when the expression of VDR and PPARγ was inhibited by VDR siRNA and a PPARγ antagonist. In addition, PPARγ was also decreased upon treatment with VDR siRNA. The above results demonstrate that active vitamin D promoted M1 phenotype switching to M2 via the VDR-PPARγ pathway. PMID:25961000

  7. A novel strain of Bacteroides fragilis enhances phagocytosis and polarises M1 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huimin; Li, Zhengchao; Tan, Yafang; Guo, Zhaobiao; Liu, Yangyang; Wang, Ye; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Ruifu; Bi, Yujing; Bai, Yang; Zhi, Fachao

    2016-01-01

    Commensal Bacteroides fragilis possesses immune-regulatory characteristics. Consequently, it has been proposed as a potential novel probiotic because of its therapeutic effects on immune imbalance, mental disorders and inflammatory diseases. Macrophages play a central role in the immune response, developing either a classical-M1 or an alternative-M2 phenotype after stimulation with various signals. The interactions between macrophages and B. fragilis, however, remain to be defined. Here, a new isolate of B. fragilis, ZY-312, was shown to possess admirable properties, including tolerance to simulated gastric fluid, intestinal fluid and ox bile, and good safety (MOI = 100, 200) and adherent ability (MOI = 100) to LoVo cells. Isolate ZY-312 cell lysate promoted phagocytosis of fluorescent microspheres and pathogenic bacteria in bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMDM) cells. Gene expression of IL-12, iNOS and IL-1β in BMDM cells was increased after treatment with ZY-312, indicating the induction of M1 macrophages, consistent with enhanced secretion of NO. Cell surface expression of CD80 and CD86 was also increased. This study is the first to demonstrate that B. fragilis enhances the phagocytic functions of macrophages, polarising them to an M1 phenotype. Our findings provide insight into the close relationship between B. fragilis and the innate immune system. PMID:27381366

  8. A novel strain of Bacteroides fragilis enhances phagocytosis and polarises M1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huimin; Li, Zhengchao; Tan, Yafang; Guo, Zhaobiao; Liu, Yangyang; Wang, Ye; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Ruifu; Bi, Yujing; Bai, Yang; Zhi, Fachao

    2016-01-01

    Commensal Bacteroides fragilis possesses immune-regulatory characteristics. Consequently, it has been proposed as a potential novel probiotic because of its therapeutic effects on immune imbalance, mental disorders and inflammatory diseases. Macrophages play a central role in the immune response, developing either a classical-M1 or an alternative-M2 phenotype after stimulation with various signals. The interactions between macrophages and B. fragilis, however, remain to be defined. Here, a new isolate of B. fragilis, ZY-312, was shown to possess admirable properties, including tolerance to simulated gastric fluid, intestinal fluid and ox bile, and good safety (MOI = 100, 200) and adherent ability (MOI = 100) to LoVo cells. Isolate ZY-312 cell lysate promoted phagocytosis of fluorescent microspheres and pathogenic bacteria in bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMDM) cells. Gene expression of IL-12, iNOS and IL-1β in BMDM cells was increased after treatment with ZY-312, indicating the induction of M1 macrophages, consistent with enhanced secretion of NO. Cell surface expression of CD80 and CD86 was also increased. This study is the first to demonstrate that B. fragilis enhances the phagocytic functions of macrophages, polarising them to an M1 phenotype. Our findings provide insight into the close relationship between B. fragilis and the innate immune system. PMID:27381366

  9. Data on sulforaphane treatment mediated suppression of autoreactive, inflammatory M1 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sanjima; Konkimalla, V. Badireenath

    2016-01-01

    Any chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease (e.g. arthritis) associated pathogenesis directs uncontrolled accumulation of both soluble forms of collagens in the synovial fluids and M1 macrophages around inflamed tissues. Despite of few studies demonstrating efficiency of Sulforaphane (SFN) in suppressing arthritis associated collagen restricted T cells or fibroblasts, its effects on macrophage polarity and plasticity are less understood. Recently, we reported regulation of phenotypic and functional switching by SFN in induced and spontaneously differentiating human monocytes [1]. Here, flow cytometry, western blot and ELISA derived data demonstrated that SFN inhibited in vitro inflammatory responses developed by soluble human collagens (I–IV) induced auto-reactive M1 type monocyte/macrophage model. PMID:27222853

  10. Data on sulforaphane treatment mediated suppression of autoreactive, inflammatory M1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sanjima; Konkimalla, V Badireenath

    2016-06-01

    Any chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease (e.g. arthritis) associated pathogenesis directs uncontrolled accumulation of both soluble forms of collagens in the synovial fluids and M1 macrophages around inflamed tissues. Despite of few studies demonstrating efficiency of Sulforaphane (SFN) in suppressing arthritis associated collagen restricted T cells or fibroblasts, its effects on macrophage polarity and plasticity are less understood. Recently, we reported regulation of phenotypic and functional switching by SFN in induced and spontaneously differentiating human monocytes [1]. Here, flow cytometry, western blot and ELISA derived data demonstrated that SFN inhibited in vitro inflammatory responses developed by soluble human collagens (I-IV) induced auto-reactive M1 type monocyte/macrophage model. PMID:27222853

  11. Arctigenin ameliorates inflammation in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting the PI3K/AKT pathway and polarizing M1 macrophages to M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hyam, Supriya R; Lee, In-Ah; Gu, Wan; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Jang, Se-Eun; Han, Myung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2013-05-15

    Seeds of Arctium lappa, containing arctigenin and its glycoside arctiin as main constituents, have been used as a diuretic, anti-inflammatory and detoxifying agent in Chinese traditional medicine. In our preliminary study, arctigenin inhibited IKKβ and NF-κB activation in peptidoglycan (PGN)- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced peritoneal macrophages. To understand the anti-inflammatory effect of arctigenin, we investigated its anti-inflammatory effect in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages and on LPS-induced systemic inflammation as well as 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in mice. Arctigenin inhibited LPS-increased IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α expression in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages, but increased LPS-reduced IL-10 and CD204 expression. Arctigenin inhibited LPS-induced PI3K, AKT and IKKβ phosphorylation, but did not suppress LPS-induced IRAK-1 phosphorylation. However, arctigenin did not inhibit NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated PI3K siRNA-treated peritoneal macrophages. Arctigenin suppressed the binding of p-PI3K antibody and the nucleus translocation of NF-κB p65 in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. Arctigenin suppressed blood IL-1β and TNF-α level in mice systemically inflamed by intraperitoneal injection of LPS. Arctigenin also inhibited colon shortening, macroscopic scores and myeloperoxidase activity in TNBS-induced colitic mice. Arctigenin inhibited TNBS-induced IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 expression, as well as PI3K, AKT and IKKβ phosphorylation and NF-κB activation in mice, but increased IL-10 and CD204 expression. However, it did not affect IRAK-1 phosphorylation. Based on these findings, arctigenin may ameliorate inflammatory diseases, such as colitis, by inhibiting PI3K and polarizing M1 macrophages to M2-like macrophages. PMID:23375938

  12. Geraniin Inhibits LPS-Induced THP-1 Macrophages Switching to M1 Phenotype via SOCS1/NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinxin; Li, Ji; Peng, Xiaohong; Lv, Bo; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Xiaoming; Yu, Bo

    2016-08-01

    M1 macrophage polarization is proved to promote inflammation in atherosclerosis process. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of geraniin, a bioactive polyphenolic compound, on the LPS-induced switch of THP-1 macrophages to M1 phenotype, and we propose a molecular basis for its action. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that geraniin significantly inhibited LPS-induced M1 macrophage polarization. Geraniin downregulated the protein and the mRNA level of typical cytokines of M1 macrophage, including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), indicating that geraniin can suppress typical mediators of M1 macrophage at the transcriptional level. Moreover, geraniin inhibited LPS-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, in THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, western blot analysis indicated that geraniin decreased both LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 and NF-κB-p65 expression without affecting the level of IκB-α. This suggested that geraniin inhibited NF-κB, a transcription factor pivotal in the LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes and an important player in M1 macrophage polarization. Moreover, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that geraniin blocked the LPS-induced translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus. Moreover, we found that geraniin up-regulated the expression of SOCS1, an upstream regulator of NF-κB activation that can directly bind to NF-κB-p65 and downregulate it, thus inhibiting NF-κB activation. In conclusion, geraniin inhibits LPS-induced THP-1 macrophages switching to M1 phenotype through SOCS1/NF-κB pathway. PMID:27290719

  13. Monocyte Differentiation towards Protumor Activity Does Not Correlate with M1 or M2 Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chimal-Ramírez, G. Karina; Espinoza-Sánchez, Nancy Adriana; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages facilitate breast cancer progression. Macrophages were initially classified as M1 or M2 based on their distinct metabolic programs and then expanded to include antitumoral (M1) and protumoral (M2) activities. However, it is still uncertain what markers define the pro- and antitumoral phenotypes and what conditions lead to their formation. In this study, monocytic cell lines and primary monocytes were subjected to commonly reported protocols of M1/M2 polarization and conditions known to engage monocytes into protumoral functions. The results showed that only IDO enzyme and CD86 M1 markers were upregulated correlating with M1 polarization. TNF-α, CCR7, IL-10, arginase I, CD36, and CD163 were expressed indistinguishably from M1 or M2 polarization. Similarly, protumoral engaging resulted in upregulation of both M1 and M2 markers, with conditioned media from the most aggressive breast cancer cell line promoting the greatest changes. In spite of the mixed phenotype, M1-polarized macrophages exhibited the highest expression/secretion of inflammatory mediators, many of which have previously been associated with breast cancer aggressiveness. These data argue that although the existence of protumoral macrophages is unquestionable, their associated phenotypes and the precise conditions driving their formation are still unclear, and those conditions may need both M1 and M2 stimuli. PMID:27376091

  14. Triggering TLR2, -3, -4, -5, and -8 Reinforces the Restrictive Nature of M1- and M2-Polarized Macrophages to HIV

    PubMed Central

    Schlaepfer, Erika; Rochat, Mary-Aude; Duo, Li

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macrophages must react to a large number of pathogens and their effects. In chronic HIV infection, the microenvironment changes with an influx of microbial products that trigger Toll-like receptors (TLRs). That dynamic nature can be replicated ex vivo by the proinflammatory (M1-polarized) and alternatively activated (M2-polarized) macrophages. Thus, we determined how polarized macrophages primed by various TLR agonists support HIV replication. Triggering of TLR2, -3, -4, -5, and -8 reinforced the low level of permissiveness in polarized macrophages. HIV was inhibited even more in M1-polarized macrophages than in macrophages activated only by TLR agonists. HIV was inhibited before its integration into the host chromosome. Polarization and triggering by various TLR agonists resulted in distinct cytokine profiles, endocytic activity, and distinct upregulation of restriction factors of HIV. Thus, different mechanisms likely contribute to the HIV-inhibitory effects. In chronic HIV infection, macrophages might become less permissive to HIV due to changes in the microenvironment. The high level of reactivity of polarized macrophages to TLR triggering may be exploited for immunotherapeutic strategies. IMPORTANCE Macrophages are a major target of HIV-1 infection. Different cell types in this very heterogeneous cell population respond differently to stimuli. In vitro, the heterogeneity is mimicked by their polarization into proinflammatory and alternatively activated macrophages. Here we explored the extent to which agonists triggering the TLR family affect HIV replication in polarized macrophages. We found that a number of TLR agonists blocked HIV replication substantially when given before infection. We also report the mechanisms of how TLR agonists exert their inhibitory action. Our findings may advance our understanding of which and how TLR agonists block HIV infection in polarized macrophages and may facilitate the design of novel immunotherapeutic approaches

  15. Polarization of macrophages towards M1 phenotype by a combination of 2-deoxy-d-glucose and radiation: Implications for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Farooque, Abdullah; Afrin, Farhat; Adhikari, Jawahar Singh; Dwarakanath, Bilikere Srinivasa Rao

    2016-02-01

    2-Deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) has been found to enhance the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs in several tumor cell lines in vitro. Systemic administration of 2-DG together with localized irradiation of the tumor leads to tumor regression and cure (disease free survival), which correlate with the differential levels of anti-tumor immunity observed in Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) bearing mice. Macrophages being a major player of the innate immune system, we investigated the activation status of splenic macrophages during radio-sensitization of EAT in mice as well as in peritoneal macrophages ex vivo and macrophagic cell line (Raw 264.7) in vitro. Results suggest that under in vivo conditions, the combined treatment (2-DG+radiation) restores the M1 phenotype in spleen that correlated with the tumor response. However, 2-DG neither induced significant cytotoxicity nor enhanced radiation-induced cell death in peritoneal macrophages and the macrophage cell line (Raw 264.7). Further, increased arborization and enhanced functional status (expression of MHC class II, CD80, CD86 and phagocytosis) were observed after the combined treatment. Besides this activation, the combined treatment also skewed the macrophages towards M1 phenotype as evidenced by the enhanced secretion of IL-12, IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ. These observations suggest that 2-DG not only preserves the survival of normal macrophages during irradiation, but also activates macrophages by polarizing towards M1 phenotype, which is known to be tumoricidal in nature. This study for the first time sheds light on a potential antitumor immune activation by 2-DG involving macrophagic stimulation during in vivo radio-sensitization of tumors, besides the other known antitumor effects of this glucose analogue. PMID:26597503

  16. Interleukin-17A neutralization alleviated ocular neovascularization by promoting M2 and mitigating M1 macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanji; Tan, Wei; Demetriades, Anna M; Cai, Yujuan; Gao, Yushuo; Sui, Ailing; Lu, Qing; Shen, Xi; Jiang, Chunhui; Xie, Bing; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-04-01

    Neovascularization (NV), as a cardinal complication of several ocular diseases, has been intensively studied, and research has shown its close association with inflammation and immune cells. In the present study, the role of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) in angiogenesis in the process of ocular NV both in vivo and in vitro was investigated. Also, a paracrine role of IL-17A was demonstrated in the crosstalk between endothelial cells and macrophages in angiogenesis. In the retinas of mice with retinopathy of prematurity, the IL-17A expression increased significantly at postnatal day 15 (P15) and P18 during retinal NV. Mice given IL-17A neutralizing antibody (NAb) developed significantly reduced choroidal NV and retinal NV. Studies on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) over-expressing mice suggested that IL-17A modulated NV through the VEGF pathway. Furthermore, IL-17A deficiency shifted macrophage polarization toward an M2 phenotype during retinal NV with significantly reduced M1 cytokine expression compared with wild-type controls. In vitro assays revealed that IL-17A treated macrophage supernatant gave rise to elevated human umbilical vascular endothelial cell proliferation, tube formation and VEGF receptor 1 and receptor 2 expression. Therefore, IL-17A could potentially serve as a novel target for treating ocular NV diseases. The limitation of this study involved the potential mechanisms, such as which transcription accounted for macrophage polarization and how the subsequent cytokines were modulated when macrophages were polarized. Further studies need to be undertaken to definitively determine the extent to which IL-17A neutralizing anti-angiogenic activity depends on macrophage modulation compared with anti-VEGF treatment. PMID:26694999

  17. Isomeranzin suppresses inflammation by inhibiting M1 macrophage polarization through the NF-κB and ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ge; Feng, Lili; Song, Pingping; Xu, Fang; Li, Ang; Wang, Yubin; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xuefeng; Luo, Qiong; Wu, Xingxin; Sun, Yang; Wu, Xudong; Xu, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Macrophage polarization plays an important role in inflammation. Regulation of the polarization has been reported to be effective therapeutics for various kinds of inflammatory diseases. The aims of the present study were to investigate the anti-inflammatory property of isomeranzin isolating from Murraya exotica as well as potential molecular mechanisms. Results showed that isomeranzin specifically reduced the M1 macrophage-associated pro-inflammatory cytokines through down-regulation of NF-κB and ERK signals. Immunoprecipitation and RNA silencing indicated suppression of isomeranzin in NF-κB activation was relying on the decreasing of TRAF6 ubiquitination. In vivo studies showed isomeranzin evidently inhibited LPS-induced sepsis for rising survival rate, improving tissue damage and lessening inflammatory cytokines. In accordance with in vitro studies, isomeranzin significantly blocked expression of p-p65 and p-ERK in lung and liver tissues. Moreover, isomeranzin ameliorated DSS and TNBS-induced colitis due to its anti-inflammatory effects. Taken together, isomeranzin suppressed inflammatory diseases by controlling M1 macrophage polarization through the NF-κB and ERK pathway. PMID:27285671

  18. Modulation of Osteoclastogenesis with Macrophage M1- and M2-Inducing Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Jeganathan, Sujeeve; Fiorino, Cara; Naik, Urja; Sun, He song; Harrison, Rene E.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are generated through the differentiation of monocytes in tissues and they have important functions in innate and adaptive immunity. In addition to their roles as phagocytes, macrophages can be further differentiated, in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), into osteoclasts (multinucleated giant cells that are responsible for bone resorption). In this work, we set out to characterize whether various inflammatory stimuli, known to induce macrophage polarization, can alter the type of multinucleated giant cell obtained from RANKL differentiation. Following a four-day differentiation protocol, along with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon gamma (IFNγ) as one stimulus, and interleukin-4 (IL-4) as the other, three types of multinucleated cells were generated. Using various microscopy techniques (bright field, epifluorescence and scanning electron), functional assays, and western blotting for osteoclast markers, we found that, as expected, RANKL treatment alone resulted in osteoclasts, whereas the addition of LPS/IFNγ to RANKL pre-treated macrophages generated Langhans-type giant cells, while IL-4 led to giant cells resembling foreign body giant cells with osteoclast-like characteristics. Finally, to gain insight into the modulation of osteoclastogenesis, we characterized the formation and morphology of RANKL and LPS/IFNγ-induced multinucleated giant cells. PMID:25101660

  19. M1- and M2-Type Macrophage Responses Are Predictive of Adverse Outcomes in Human Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    de Gaetano, Monica; Crean, Daniel; Barry, Mary; Belton, Orina

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease caused by endothelial injury, lipid deposition, and oxidative stress. This progressive disease can be converted into an acute clinical event by plaque rupture and thrombosis. In the context of atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, macrophages uniquely possess a dual functionality, regulating lipid accumulation and metabolism and sustaining the chronic inflammatory response, two of the most well-documented pathways associated with the pathogenesis of the disease. Macrophages are heterogeneous cell populations and it is hypothesized that, during the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, macrophages in the developing plaque can switch from a pro-inflammatory (MΦ1) to an anti-inflammatory (MΦ2) phenotype and vice versa, depending on the microenvironment. The aim of this study was to identify changes in macrophage subpopulations in the progression of human atherosclerotic disease. Established atherosclerotic plaques from symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with existing coronary artery disease undergoing carotid endarterectomy were recruited to the study. Comprehensive histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to quantify the cellular content and macrophage subsets of atherosclerotic lesion. In parallel, expression of MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophage markers were analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Gross analysis and histological staining demonstrated that symptomatic plaques presented greater hemorrhagic activity and the internal carotid was the most diseased segment, based on the predominant prevalence of fibrotic and necrotic tissue, calcifications, and hemorrhagic events. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that both MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophages are present in human plaques. However, MΦ2 macrophages are localized to more stable locations within the lesion. Importantly, gene and protein expression analysis of MΦ1/MΦ2 markers evidenced that MΦ1 markers and Th1

  20. M2/M1 ratio of tumor associated macrophages and PPAR-gamma expression in uveal melanomas with class 1 and class 2 molecular profiles.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Martina C; Bergstrom, Chris; Wells, Jill R; Höller, Tobias; Grossniklaus, Hans E

    2013-02-01

    Macrophages have been found to be negative predictors of outcome in patients with uveal melanoma. In particular, recent studies point toward a disease-progressing role of proangiogenic M2 macrophages in melanomas with monosomy 3. Although most studies implicate a protective effect of PPAR-gamma activation in tumors, PPAR-gamma has also been shown to promote the polarization of M1 macrophages toward the M2 phenotype. The purpose of this investigation was first, to characterize the phenotype of tumor infiltrating macrophages and second, to study PPAR-gamma expression in uveal melanomas with molecular gene expression profile as prognostic predictors for patients' outcome. Twenty specimens from patients with uveal melanoma were analyzed for clinical and histologic tumor characteristics. The molecular RNA profile (class 1 or class 2) was commercially determined. Using immunohistochemical techniques, the specimens were dual labeled for CD68 and CD163. CD68 + CD163- M1 macrophages and CD68 + CD163+ M2 macrophages were analyzed in ten high power fields sparing macrophage-poor areas and a mean value was calculated for each tumor. The tumors were immunostained for von Willebrand factor and the micro vascular density (MVD) was analyzed according to Foss. To assess the proliferative rate of each tumor, Ki67 expression was evaluated in ten high power fields followed by calculation of a mean value. Expression of PPAR-gamma was evaluated using a score from 0 (no staining) to 3 (tumor entirely stained). Statistical analysis and a respective correlation were made between histologic characteristics, molecular profile, type of tumor infiltrating macrophages (M1 vs. M2), MVD, proliferative rate, and PPAR-gamma expression. Our results showed a correlation between the ratio of M2/M1 macrophages and the molecular profile with a ratio of approximately 1 corresponding to molecular class 1 and a ratio of approximately 2 corresponding to molecular class 2 (p = 0.01). The ratio of M2/M1

  1. Carboxyl- and amino-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticles differentially affect the polarization profile of M1 and M2 macrophage subsets.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ann-Kathrin; Syrovets, Tatiana; Haas, Karina A; Loos, Cornelia; Musyanovych, Anna; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Simmet, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Exposure to microenvironmental stimuli determines their polarization into proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. M1 exhibit high expression of proinflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β, and M2 promote tissue repair, but likewise support tumor growth and cause immune suppression by expressing IL-10. Thus, the M1/M2 balance critically determines tissue homeostasis. By using carboxyl- (PS-COOH) and amino-functionalized (PS-NH2) polystyrene nanoparticles, the effects of surface decoration on the polarization of human macrophages were investigated. The nanoparticles did not compromise macrophage viability nor did they affect the expression of the M1 markers CD86, NOS2, TNF-α, and IL-1β. By contrast, in M2, both nanoparticles impaired expression of scavenger receptor CD163 and CD200R, and the release of IL-10. PS-NH2 also inhibited phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by both, M1 and M2. PS-COOH did not impair phagocytosis by M2, but increased protein mass in M1 and M2, TGF-β1 release by M1, and ATP levels in M2. Thus, nanoparticles skew the M2 macrophage polarization without affecting M1 markers. Given the critical role of the M1 and M2 polarization for the immunological balance in patients with cancer or chronic inflammation, functionalized nanoparticles might serve as tools for reprogramming the M1/M2 polarization. PMID:26854393

  2. Lipocalin-2 promotes m1 macrophages polarization in a mouse cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion injury model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Xing, H; Mao, X; Li, L; Li, X; Li, Q

    2015-01-01

    Ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a major issue in cardiac transplantation. Inflammatory processes play a major role in myocardial IR injury. Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2), which is also known as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, has multiple functions that include the regulation of cell death/survival, cell migration/invasion, cell differentiation and iron delivery. In our study, the hearts of C57BL/6 mice were flushed with and stored in cold Bretschneider solution for 8 h and then transplanted into a syngeneic recipient. We found that Lcn2 neutralization decreased the recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages. Troponin T (TnT) production, 24 h after myocardial IR injury, was reduced through anti-Lcn2 antibody administration. The cardiac output at 60 mmHg of afterload pressure was significantly increased in hearts administrated with anti-Lcn2 antibody administration (anti-Lcn-2: 58.9 ± 5.62 ml/min; control: 25.8 ± 4.1 ml/min; P < 0.05). Anti-Lcn2 antibody treatment suppressed M1 marker (IL-12, IL-23 and iNOS) expression but increased M2 marker (IL-10, Arg1 and Mrc1) expression. Furthermore, in our vitro and vivo experiments, we found that anti-Lcn2 antibody treatment failed to induce M1-related gene expression in response to LPS and that Lcn2 neutralization enhanced the expression of M2-related genes following IL-4 treatment. In conclusion, Lcn2 promotes M1 polarization, and Lcn2 neutralization attenuates cardiac IR injury. PMID:25359467

  3. Macrophage activation and polarization: nomenclature and experimental guidelines.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J; Allen, Judith E; Biswas, Subhra K; Fisher, Edward A; Gilroy, Derek W; Goerdt, Sergij; Gordon, Siamon; Hamilton, John A; Ivashkiv, Lionel B; Lawrence, Toby; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Martinez, Fernando O; Mege, Jean-Louis; Mosser, David M; Natoli, Gioacchino; Saeij, Jeroen P; Schultze, Joachim L; Shirey, Kari Ann; Sica, Antonio; Suttles, Jill; Udalova, Irina; van Ginderachter, Jo A; Vogel, Stefanie N; Wynn, Thomas A

    2014-07-17

    Description of macrophage activation is currently contentious and confusing. Like the biblical Tower of Babel, macrophage activation encompasses a panoply of descriptors used in different ways. The lack of consensus on how to define macrophage activation in experiments in vitro and in vivo impedes progress in multiple ways, including the fact that many researchers still consider there to be only two types of activated macrophages, often termed M1 and M2. Here, we describe a set of standards encompassing three principles-the source of macrophages, definition of the activators, and a consensus collection of markers to describe macrophage activation-with the goal of unifying experimental standards for diverse experimental scenarios. Collectively, we propose a common framework for macrophage-activation nomenclature. PMID:25035950

  4. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce "activated macrophages" that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as "classical" and "alternative" or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases that provide

  5. Different pathways of macrophage activation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Ulana; Ryba-Stanisławowska, Monika; Szargiej, Patryk; Myśliwska, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes are short-lived cells and undergo spontaneous apoptosis every day. Inflammatory responses may induce dramatic up-regulation of monocyte survival and differentiation. When monocytes are recruited to an area of infection they may differentiate into macrophages. In different microenvironments macrophages polarize into two types. The M1 or classically activated macrophages are characterized by the high ability to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and the production of NO through the induced synthesis of iNOS. The M2 or alternatively activated macrophages are divided into 3 subtypes, M2 a, b and c, and they have anti-inflammatory properties. Mediators of M1 macrophage TLR-dependent polarization include transcription factors such as NF-κB, AP-1, PU.1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBP-α), STAT1 as well as interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), while the transcription factors which promote M2 activation include IRF4, C/EBP-β, Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), STAT6 and PPARγ receptor. PMID:25983288

  6. Phosphatase regulation of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Kozicky, Lisa K; Sly, Laura M

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play critical roles in tissue homeostasis and the immune response to invading pathogens or tumor cells. A hallmark of macrophages is their "plasticity," that is, their ability to respond to cues in their local microenvironment and adapt their activation state or phenotype to mount an appropriate response. During the inflammatory response, macrophages may be required to mount a profound anti-bacterial or anti-tumor response, an anti-inflammatory response, an anti-parasitic response, or a wound healing response. To do so, macrophages express cell surface receptors for growth factors, chemokines and cytokines, as well pathogen and danger associated molecular patterns. Downstream of these cell surface receptors, cell signalling cascades are activated and deactivated by reversible and competing activities of lipid and protein kinases and phosphatases. While kinases drive the activation of cell signalling pathways critical for macrophage activation, the strength and duration of the signalling is regulated by phosphatases. Hence, gene knockout mouse models have revealed critical roles for lipid and protein phosphatases in macrophage activation. Herein, we describe our current understanding and the key roles of specific cellular phosphatases in the regulation of the quality of macrophage polarization as well as the quantity of cytokines produced by activated macrophages. PMID:26216598

  7. Pyropia yezoensis glycoprotein promotes the M1 to M2 macrophage phenotypic switch via the STAT3 and STAT6 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Wook; Kwon, Mi-Jin; Kim, In-Hye; Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Min-Kyeong; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage polarization has been well documented. Macrophages can aquire two phenotypes, the pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype, and the anti-inflammatory and wound healing M2 phenotype. The M1 macrophage phenotype has been linked to metabolic disease and is also associated with cancer-related inflammation. Of note, macrophage polarization can be influenced by the extracellular environment. In the current study, we examined the effects of Pyropia yezoensis glycoprotein (PYGP) on M1 to M2 macrophage polarization in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with LPS exhibited an upregulated expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, namely of the M1 markers, nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and nitric oxide synthase‑2 (NOS-2). Treatment with PYGP inhibited the production of M1 markers and increased arginase 1 (ARG1), chitinase-like 3 (Chil3; also known as Ym1), resistin like beta (RETNLB; also known as FIZZ1), IL-10, CD163, CD206, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) M2 marker gene expression. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 and STAT6 transcription factors were phosphorylated following treatment with PYGP. However, the silencing of STAT3 and STAT6 using siRNA in the macrophages decreased ARG1, Ym1 and FIZZ1 M2 marker gene expression in spite of treatment of PYGP. These findings suggest that PYGP exerts anti-inflammatory effects by regulating the M1 to M2 phenotypic switch through STAT3 and STAT6. Thus, PYGP may have potential for use as a natural remedy for inflammatory diseases. PMID:27353313

  8. CD200+ and CD200- macrophages accumulated in ischemic lesions of rat brain: the two populations cannot be classified as either M1 or M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shirabe; Tanaka, Junya; Yano, Hajime; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Sugimoto, Kana; Ohue, Shiro; Inoue, Akihiro; Aono, Hitomi; Kusakawa, Akari; Watanabe, Hideaki; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Ohnishi, Takanori

    2015-05-15

    Two types of macrophages in lesion core of rat stroke model were identified according to NG2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (NG2) and CD200 expression. NG2(+) macrophages were CD200(-), and vice versa. NG2(-) macrophages expressed two splice variants of CD200 that are CD200L and CD200S. CD200(+) macrophages expressed CD8, CD68, CD163, CCL2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-1β, Toll-like receptor 4 and transforming growth factor β, whilst NG2(+) cells expressed a costimulatory factor CD86. Both cell types expressed insulin-like growth factor 1 and CD200R. These results demonstrate that the two macrophage types cannot be classified as either M1 or M2. PMID:25903723

  9. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  10. Glioma-Associated Microglia/Macrophages Display an Expression Profile Different from M1 and M2 Polarization and Highly Express Gpnmb and Spp1

    PubMed Central

    Szulzewsky, Frank; Pelz, Andreas; Feng, Xi; Synowitz, Michael; Markovic, Darko; Langmann, Thomas; Holtman, Inge R.; Wang, Xi; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Wolf, Susanne A.; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma belong to the most aggressive neoplasms in humans with no successful treatment available. Patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the highest-grade glioma, have an average survival time of only around one year after diagnosis. Both microglia and peripheral macrophages/monocytes accumulate within and around glioma, but fail to exert effective anti-tumor activity and even support tumor growth. Here we use microarray analysis to compare the expression profiles of glioma-associated microglia/macrophages and naive control cells. Samples were generated from CD11b+ MACS-isolated cells from naïve and GL261-implanted C57BL/6 mouse brains. Around 1000 genes were more than 2-fold up- or downregulated in glioma-associated microglia/macrophages when compared to control cells. A comparison with published data sets of M1, M2a,b,c-polarized macrophages revealed a gene expression pattern that has only partial overlap with any of the M1 or M2 gene expression patterns. Samples for the qRT-PCR validation of selected M1 and M2a,b,c-specific genes were generated from two different glioma mouse models and isolated by flow cytometry to distinguish between resident microglia and invading macrophages. We confirmed in both models the unique glioma-associated microglia/macrophage phenotype including a mixture of M1 and M2a,b,c-specific genes. To validate the expression of these genes in human we MACS-isolated CD11b+ microglia/macrophages from GBM, lower grade brain tumors and control specimens. Apart from the M1/M2 gene analysis, we demonstrate that the expression of Gpnmb and Spp1 is highly upregulated in both murine and human glioma-associated microglia/macrophages. High expression of these genes has been associated with poor prognosis in human GBM, as indicated by patient survival data linked to gene expression data. We also show that microglia/macrophages are the predominant source of these transcripts in murine and human GBM. Our findings provide new

  11. ABCG1 regulates mouse adipose tissue macrophage cholesterol levels and ratio of M1 to M2 cells in obesity and caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hao; Tarling, Elizabeth J; McMillen, Timothy S; Tang, Chongren; LeBoeuf, Renée C

    2015-12-01

    In addition to triacylglycerols, adipocytes contain a large reserve of unesterified cholesterol. During adipocyte lipolysis and cell death seen during severe obesity and weight loss, free fatty acids and cholesterol become available for uptake and processing by adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). We hypothesize that ATMs become cholesterol enriched and participate in cholesterol clearance from adipose tissue. We previously showed that ABCG1 is robustly upregulated in ATMs taken from obese mice and further enhanced by caloric restriction. Here, we found that ATMs taken from obese and calorie-restricted mice derived from transplantation of WT or Abcg1-deficient bone marrow are cholesterol enriched. ABCG1 levels regulate the ratio of classically activated (M1) to alternatively activated (M2) ATMs and their cellular cholesterol content. Using WT and Abcg1(-/-) cultured macrophages, we found that Abcg1 is most highly expressed by M2 macrophages and that ABCG1 deficiency is sufficient to retard macrophage chemotaxis. However, changes in myeloid expression of Abcg1 did not protect mice from obesity or impaired glucose homeostasis. Overall, ABCG1 modulates ATM cholesterol content in obesity and weight loss regimes leading to an alteration in M1 to M2 ratio that we suggest is due to the extent of macrophage egress from adipose tissue. PMID:26489644

  12. PICK1 confers anti-inflammatory effects in acute liver injury via suppressing M1 macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Xie, Juan; Wu, Xiaoqin; Zhou, Qun; Yang, Yang; Tian, Yuanyao; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiaoming; Li, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) is a scaffolding protein mainly implicated in neurological diseases, however, the function of PICK1 in acute liver injury (ALI) remains unknown. Our study found a dramatical decrease in mRNA and protein levels of PICK1 in liver tissues and isolated Kupffer cells (KCs) from the liver in mice with ALI. Furthermore, pretreatment the mice with ALI with FSC-231, a pharmacological inhibitor of PICK1, could significantly augment inflammatory response. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that both lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) significantly reduced the expression of PICK1, while IL-4 elevated its expression in RAW 264.7 cells. Additionally, over-expression of PICK1 inhibited the expression of M1 biomarkers by suppressing NF-κB activity, and enhanced the expression of M2 biomarkers by promoting STAT6 activity. In contrast, knockdown of PICK1 or FSC-231 pretreatment promoted M1 polarization and suppressed M2 polarization. Besides, caveolin-1 was identified as a potential target gene controlled by PICK1 in RAW 264.7 cells. Mechanistic investigation revealed a dual role of PICK1 in regulating macrophage polarization and implied PICK1 as a potential therapeutic target in ALI. PMID:27157267

  13. Plaque Size Is Decreased but M1 Macrophage Polarization and Rupture Related Metalloproteinase Expression Are Maintained after Deleting T-Bet in ApoE Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsaousi, Aikaterini; Hayes, Elaine M.; Di Gregoli, Karina; Bond, Andrew R.; Bevan, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background Thelper1 (Th1) lymphocytes have been previously implicated in atherosclerotic plaque growth but their role in plaque vulnerability to rupture is less clear. We investigated whether T-bet knockout that prevents Th1 lymphocyte differentiation modulates classical (M1) macrophage activation or production of matrix degrading metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors, TIMPs. Methods & Results We studied the effect of T-bet deletion in apolipoproteinE (ApoE) knockout mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) or normal chow diet (ND). Transcript levels of M1/M2 macrophage polarization markers, selected MMPs and TIMPs were measured by RT-qPCR in macrophages isolated from subcutaneous granulomas or in whole aortae. Immunohistochemistry of aortic sinus (AS) and brachiocephalic artery (BCA) plaques was conducted to quantify protein expression of the same factors. Deletion of T-bet decreased mRNA for the M1 marker NOS-2 in granuloma macrophages but levels of M2 markers (CD206, arginase-1 and Ym-1), MMPs-2, -9, -12, -13, -14 and -19 or TIMPs-1 to -3 were unchanged. No mRNA differences were observed in aortic extracts from mice fed a HFD for 12 weeks. Moreover, AS and BCA plaques were similarly sized between genotypes, and had similar areas stained for NOS-2, COX-2, MMP-12 and MMP-14 proteins. T-bet deletion increased MMP-13, MMP-14 and arginase-1 in AS plaques. After 35 weeks of ND, T-bet deletion reduced the size of AS and BCA plaques but there were no differences in the percentage areas stained for M1 or M2 markers, MMPs-12, -13, -14, or TIMP-3. Conclusions Absence of Th1 lymphocytes is associated with reduced plaque size in ApoE knockout mice fed a normal but not high fat diet. In either case, M1 macrophage polarization and expression of several MMPs related to plaque instability are either maintained or increased. PMID:26886778

  14. Treatment with Recombinant Trichinella spiralis Cathepsin B-like Protein Ameliorates Intestinal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Mice by Promoting a Switch from M1 to M2 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Feng; Wen, Shi-Hong; Zhan, Jian-Hua; Li, Yun-Sheng; Shen, Jian-Tong; Yang, Wen-Jing; Zhou, Xing-Wang; Liu, Ke-Xuan

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, in which macrophages play a key role, can cause high morbidity and mortality. The switch from classically (M1) to alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, which is dependent on the activation of STAT6 signaling, has been shown to protect organs from I/R injuries. In the current study, the effects of recombinant Trichinella spiralis cathepsin B-like protein (rTsCPB) on intestinal I/R injury and the potential mechanism related to macrophage phenotypes switch were investigated. In a mouse I/R model undergoing 60-min intestinal ischemia followed by 2-h or 7-d reperfusion, we demonstrated that intestinal I/R caused significant intestinal injury and induced a switch from M2 to M1 macrophages, evidenced by a decrease in levels of M2 markers (arginase-1 and found in inflammatory zone protein), an increase in levels of M1 markers (inducible NO synthase and CCR7), and a decrease in the ratio of M2/M1 macrophages. RTsCPB reversed intestinal I/R-induced M2-M1 transition and promoted M1-M2 phenotype switch evidenced by a significant decrease in M1 markers, an increase in M2 markers, and the ratio of M2/M1 macrophages. Meanwhile, rTsCPB significantly ameliorated intestinal injury and improved intestinal function and survival rate of animals, accompanied by a decrease in neutrophil infiltration and an increase in cell proliferation in the intestine. However, a selective STAT6 inhibitor, AS1517499, reversed the protective effects of rTsCPB by inhibiting M1 to M2 transition. These findings suggest that intestinal I/R injury causes a switch from M2 to M1 macrophages and that rTsCPB ameliorates intestinal injury by promoting STAT6-dependent M1 to M2 transition. PMID:25987744

  15. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine facilitates age-related cardiac inflammation and macrophage M1 polarization

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Hiroe; de Castro Brás, Lisandra E.; Baicu, Catalin F.; Zile, Michael R.; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) in age-related cardiac inflammation, we studied six groups of mice: young (3–5 mo old), middle-aged (10–12 mo old), and old (18–29 mo old) C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and SPARC-null (Null) mice (n = 7–10/group). Cardiac function and structure were determined by echocardiography. The left ventricle was used for cytokine gene array and macrophage quantification by immunohistochemistry. Macrophage infiltration increased with age in WT (n = 5–6/group, P < 0.05 for young vs. old), but not in Null. Proinflammatory markers (Ccl5, Cx3cl1, Ccr2, and Cxcr3) increased in middle-aged and old WT, whereas they were increased only in old Null compared with respective young (n = 5–6/group, P < 0.05 for all). These results suggest that SPARC deletion delayed age-related cardiac inflammation. To further assess how SPARC affects inflammation, we stimulated peritoneal macrophages with SPARC (n = 4). SPARC treatment increased expression of proinflammatory macrophage M1 markers and decreased anti-inflammatory M2 markers. Echocardiography (n = 7–10/group) revealed an age-related increase in wall thickness of the left ventricle in WT (0.76 ± 0.02 mm in young vs. 0.91 ± 0.03 mm in old; P < 0.05) but not in Null (0.78 ± 0.01 mm in young vs. 0.84 ± 0.02 mm in old). In conclusion, SPARC deletion delayed age-related increases in macrophage infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression in vivo and in vitro. SPARC acts as an important mediator of age-related cardiac inflammation by increasing the expression of macrophage M1 markers and decreasing M2 markers. PMID:25877699

  16. Conditioned media from macrophages of M1, but not M2 phenotype, inhibit the proliferation of the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and CACO-2

    PubMed Central

    ENGSTRÖM, ALEXANDER; ERLANDSSON, ANN; DELBRO, DICK; WIJKANDER, JONNY

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors are infiltrated by stroma cells including macrophages and these cells can affect tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. We have investigated the effects of conditioned media (CM) from different macrophages on the proliferation of the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and CACO-2. CM from THP-1 macrophages and monocyte-derived human macrophages of the M1 phenotype, but not the M2 phenotype, inhibited proliferation of the tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner. Lipopolysaccaharide and interferon γ was used for differentiation of macrophages towards the M1 phenotype and CM were generated both during differentiation (M1DIFF) and after differentiation (M1). M1 and M1DIFF CM as well as THP-1 macrophage CM resulted in cell cycle arrest in HT-29 cells with a decrease of cells in S phase and an increase in G2/M phase. Treatment of HT-29 cells with M1DIFF, but not M1 or THP-1 macrophage CM, resulted in apoptosis of about 20% of the tumor cells and this was accompanied by lack of recovery of cell growth after removal of CM and subsequent culture in fresh media. A protein array was used to identify cytokines released from M1 and M2 macrophages. Among the cytokines released by M1 macrophages, tumor necrosis factor α and CXCL9 were tested by direct addition to HT-29 cells, but neither affected proliferation. Our results indicate that M1 macrophages inhibit colon cancer cell growth and have the potential of contributing to reducing tumor growth in vivo. PMID:24296981

  17. Attenuation of the programmed cell death-1 pathway increases the M1 polarization of macrophages induced by zymosan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Wang, J; Jia, L; Liu, J; Tian, Y

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is a member of the CD28 superfamily that delivers negative signals on interaction with its 2 ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. We assessed the contribution of the PD-1 pathway to regulating the polarization of macrophages that promote inflammation induced by zymosan. We found that PD-1−/− mice developed robust peritonitis with more abundant infiltration of M1 macrophages, accompanied by higher levels of pro-inflammation factors, especially monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) compared with wild-type controls ex vivo and in vitro. Our results indicated that PD-1 deficiency promotes M1 rather than M2 polarization of macrophages by enhancing the expression of p-STAT1/p-NF-κB p65 and downregulating p-STAT6. We found that PD-1 engagement followed by zymosan stimulation might primarily attenuate the phosphorylation of tyrosine residue in PD-1 receptor/ligand and the recruitment of SHP-2 to PD-1 receptor/ligand, leading to the reduction of M1 type cytokine production. PMID:26913605

  18. PTEN inhibits macrophage polarization from M1 to M2 through CCL2 and VEGF-A reduction and NHERF-1 synergism.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Qin, Junfang; Lan, Lan; Zhang, Hongyao; Liu, Fang; Wu, Zhaozhen; Ni, Hong; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    PTEN has been studied in several tumor models as a tumor suppressor. In this study, we explored the role of PTEN in the inhibition state of polarized M2 subtype of macrophage in tumor microenvironment (TME) and the underlying mechanisms. To elucidate the potential effect in TME, RAW 264.7 macrophages and 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells were co-cultured to reconstruct tumor microenvironment. After PTEN was down-regulated with shRNA, the expression of CCL2 and VEGF-A, which are definited to promote the formation of M2 macrophages, have a dramatically increase on the level of both gene and protein in co-cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages. And at the same time, NHERF-1 (Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulating factor-1), another tumor suppressor has a similar tendency to PTEN. Q-PCR and WB results suggested that PTEN and NHERF-1 were consistent with one another no matter at mRNA or protein level when exposed to the same stimulus. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence techniques confirmed that PTEN and NHERF-1 were coprecipitated, and NHERF-1 protein expression was properly reduced with rCCL2 effect. In addition, cell immunofluorescence images revealed a profound transferance, in co-cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages, an up-regulation of NHERF-1 could promote the PTEN marked expression on the cell membrane, and this form for the interaction was not negligible. These observations illustrate PTEN with a certain synergy of NHERF-1, as well as down-regulation of CCL2 suppressing M2 macrophage transformation pathway. The results suggest that the activation of PTEN and NHERF-1 may impede the evolution of macrophages beyond the M1 into M2 phenotype in tumor microenvironment. PMID:25756512

  19. Macrophages migrate in an activation-dependent manner to chemokines involved in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In neuroinflammatory diseases, macrophages can play a dual role in the process of tissue damage, depending on their activation status (M1 / M2). M1 macrophages are considered to exert damaging effects to neurons, whereas M2 macrophages are reported to aid regeneration and repair of neurons. Their migration within the central nervous system may be of critical importance in the final outcome of neurodegeneration in neuroinflammatory diseases e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS). To provide insight into this process, we examined the migratory capacity of human monocyte-derived M1 and M2 polarised macrophages towards chemoattractants, relevant for neuroinflammatory diseases like MS. Methods Primary cultures of human monocyte-derived macrophages were exposed to interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to evoke proinflammatory (M1) activation or IL-4 to evoke anti-inflammatory (M2) activation. In a TAXIScan assay, migration of M0, M1 and M2 towards chemoattractants was measured and quantified. Furthermore the adhesion capacity and the expression levels of integrins as well as chemokine receptors of M0, M1 and M2 were assessed. Alterations in cell morphology were analysed using fluorescent labelling of the cytoskeleton. Results Significant differences were observed between M1 and M2 macrophages in the migration towards chemoattractants. We show that M2 macrophages migrated over longer distances towards CCL2, CCL5, CXCL10, CXCL12 and C1q compared to non-activated (M0) and M1 macrophages. No differences were observed in the adhesion of M0, M1 and M2 macrophages to multiple matrix components, nor in the expression of integrins and chemokine receptors. Significant changes were observed in the cytoskeleton organization upon stimulation with CCL2, M0, M1 and M2 macrophages adopt a spherical morphology and the cytoskeleton is rapidly rearranged. M0 and M2 macrophages are able to form filopodia, whereas M1 macrophages only adapt a spherical morphology. Conclusions

  20. Monocyte/macrophage-specific monoclonal antibody Ki-M1 recognizes interdigitating reticulum cells.

    PubMed Central

    Radzun, H. J.; Parwaresch, M. R.; Feller, A. C.; Hansmann, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, Ki-M1, was produced, and its immunoreactivity was tested by light and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry. Ki-M1 was found to react with monocytes, cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), interdigitating reticulum cells (IDC), and the so-called indeterminate dendritic cells of lymphoid tissue. No reactivity was seen in other human tissues or other hematopoietic cells, including granulocytes and cells of the unstimulated promyelocyte cell line HL-60. Thus, Ki-M1 is the first of the monoclonal antibodies to MPS cells to react with both human IDC and MPS cells. This suggests that IDC and MPS cells may have a common cytogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6391190

  1. Update on the role of alternatively activated macrophages in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Lung macrophages link innate and adaptive immune responses during allergic airway inflammatory responses. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) and interstitial macrophages are two different phenotypes that differentially exert immunological function under physiological and pathological conditions. Exposure to pathogen induces polarization of AM cells into classically activated macrophages (M1 cells) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2 cells). M1 cells dominantly express proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1 β and induce lung inflammation and tissue damage. M2 cells are further divided into M2a and M2c subsets. M2a cells dominantly produce allergic cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, but M2c cells dominantly produce anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. M2a and M2c cells are differently involved in initiation, inflammation resolution, and tissue remodeling in the different stages of asthma. Microenvironment dynamically influences polarization of AM cells. Cytokines, chemokines, and immune-regulatory cells interplay and affect the balance between the polarization of M1 and M2 cells, subsequently influencing disease progression. Thus, modulation of AM phenotypes through molecular intervention has therapeutic potential in the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory diseases. This review updated recent advances in polarization and functional specialization of these macrophage subtypes with emphasis on modulation of polarization of M2 cells in asthma of human subjects and animal models. PMID:27350756

  2. MACROPHAGE FUNCTIONAL POLARIZATION (M1/M2) IN RESPONSE TO VARYING FIBER AND PORE DIMENSIONS OF ELECTROSPUN SCAFFOLDS

    PubMed Central

    Garg, K.; Pullen, N.A.; Oskeritzian, C.A.; Ryan, J.J.; Bowlin, G.L.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of fiber and pore size of an electrospun scaffold on the polarization of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMΦs) towards regenerative (M2) or inflammatory (M1) phenotypes. BMMΦs were seeded on Polydioxanone (PDO) scaffolds electrospun from varying polymer concentrations (60, 100, and 140 mg/ml). Higher polymer concentrations yielded larger diameter fibers with larger pore sizes and porosity. BMMΦ cultured on these scaffolds showed a correlation between increasing fiber/pore size and increased expression of the M2 marker Arginase 1 (Arg1), along with decreased expression of the M1 marker inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Secretion of the angiogenic cytokines VEGF, TGF-β1 and bFGF was higher among cultures employing larger fiber/pore size scaffolds (140 mg/ml). Using a 3D in vitro angiogenesis bead assay, we have demonstrated that the M2-like profile of BMMΦ induced by the 140 mg/ml is functional. Furthermore, our results show that the pore size of a scaffold is a more critical regulator of the BMMΦ polarization compared to the fiber diameter. The study also shows a potential role for MyD88 in regulating M1 BMMΦ signaling on the large vs. small fiber/pore size PDO scaffold. These data are instructive for the rationale design of implantable prosthetics designed to promote in situ regeneration. PMID:23515178

  3. Storage xyloglucans: potent macrophages activators.

    PubMed

    do Rosário, Marianna Maia Taulois; Kangussu-Marcolino, Mônica Mendes; do Amaral, Alex Evangelista; Noleto, Guilhermina Rodrigues; Petkowicz, Carmen Lúcia de Oliveira

    2011-01-15

    Storage xyloglucans from the seeds of Copaifera langsdorffii, Hymenaea courbaril and Tamarindus indica were obtained by aqueous extraction from the milled and defatted cotyledons, XGC, XGJ and XGT, respectively. The resulting fractions showed similar monosaccharide composition with Glc:Xyl:Gal molar ratios of 2.4:1.5:1.0, 3.8:1.5:1,0 and 3.6:2.4:1.0 for XGC, XGJ and XGT, respectively. High-performance size-exclusion chromatography of the polysaccharides showed unimodal profiles, and the average molar mass (M(w)) was obtained for XGC (9.6 × 10⁵ g/mol), XGJ (9.1 × 10⁵ g/mol) and XGT (7.3 × 10⁵ g/mol). The immunomodulatory effects of the xyloglucans on peritoneal macrophages were evaluated. Phagocytic activity was observed in macrophages treated with XGT. The effect of XGT was tested on the production of O₂(.-) and NO. At 25 μg/ml XGT caused a 100% increase in NO production when compared to the control group; however, it did not affect O₂(.-) production in the absence of PMA. The production of TNF-α, interleukins 1β and 6 by macrophages in the presence of the xyloglucans was evaluated. The polysaccharides affected the production of the cytokines by macrophages to different degrees. XGC caused an enhancement of IL-1β and TNF-α production, compared to the other xyloglucans. For IL-6 production, XGT gave greater stimulation than XGC and XGJ, reaching 87% at 50 μg/ml. XGJ promoted a statistically significant effect on all cytokine productions tested. The results indicate that the xyloglucans from C. langsdorffii, H. courbaril and T. indica can be classified as biological response modifiers (BRM). PMID:20888807

  4. A double feedback loop mediated by microRNA-23a/27a/24-2 regulates M1 versus M2 macrophage polarization and thus regulates cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Sisi; Liu, Min; Xu, Zhenbiao; Li, Yanshuang; Guo, Hui; Ge, Yehua; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Dexian; Shi, Juan

    2016-01-01

    In response to microenvironmental signals, macrophages undergo different types of activation, including the “classic” pro-inflammatory phenotype (also called M1) and the “alternative” anti-inflammatory phenotype (also called M2). Macrophage polarized activation has profound effects on immune and inflammatory responses, but mechanisms underlying the various types of macrophage is still in its infancy. In this study, we reported that M1-type stimulation could down-regulate miR-23a/27a/24-2 cluster transcription through the binding of NF-κB to this cluster's promoter and that miR-23a in turn activated the NF-κB pathway by targeting A20 and thus promoted the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, STAT6 occupied the miR-23a/27a/24-2 cluster promoter and activated their transcription in IL-4-stimulated macrophages. In addition, miR-23a in turn suppressed the JAK1/STAT-6 pathway and reduced the production of M2 type cytokines by targeting JAK1 and STAT-6 directly, while miR-27a showed the same phenotype by targeting IRF4 and PPAR-γ. The miR-23a/27a/24-2 cluster was shown to be significantly decreased in TAMs of breast cancer patients, and macrophages overexpressing the miR-23a/27a/24-2 cluster inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Taken together, these data integrated microRNA expression and function into macrophage polarization networks and identified a double feedback loop consisting of the miR-23a/27a/24-2 cluster and the key regulators of the M1 and M2 macrophage polarization pathway. Moreover, miR-23a/27a/24-2 regulates the polarization of tumor-associated macrophages and thus promotes cancer progression. PMID:26540574

  5. A double feedback loop mediated by microRNA-23a/27a/24-2 regulates M1 versus M2 macrophage polarization and thus regulates cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sisi; Liu, Min; Xu, Zhenbiao; Li, Yanshuang; Guo, Hui; Ge, Yehua; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Dexian; Shi, Juan

    2016-03-22

    In response to microenvironmental signals, macrophages undergo different types of activation, including the "classic" pro-inflammatory phenotype (also called M1) and the "alternative" anti-inflammatory phenotype (also called M2). Macrophage polarized activation has profound effects on immune and inflammatory responses, but mechanisms underlying the various types of macrophage is still in its infancy. In this study, we reported that M1-type stimulation could down-regulate miR-23a/27a/24-2 cluster transcription through the binding of NF-κB to this cluster's promoter and that miR-23a in turn activated the NF-κB pathway by targeting A20 and thus promoted the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, STAT6 occupied the miR-23a/27a/24-2 cluster promoter and activated their transcription in IL-4-stimulated macrophages. In addition, miR-23a in turn suppressed the JAK1/STAT-6 pathway and reduced the production of M2 type cytokines by targeting JAK1 and STAT-6 directly, while miR-27a showed the same phenotype by targeting IRF4 and PPAR-γ. The miR-23a/27a/24-2 cluster was shown to be significantly decreased in TAMs of breast cancer patients, and macrophages overexpressing the miR-23a/27a/24-2 cluster inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Taken together, these data integrated microRNA expression and function into macrophage polarization networks and identified a double feedback loop consisting of the miR-23a/27a/24-2 cluster and the key regulators of the M1 and M2 macrophage polarization pathway. Moreover, miR-23a/27a/24-2 regulates the polarization of tumor-associated macrophages and thus promotes cancer progression. PMID:26540574

  6. PG-M1: A New Monoclonal Antibody Directed against a Fixative-Resistant Epitope on the Macrophage-Restricted Form of the CD68 Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Falini, Brunangelo; Flenghi, Leonardo; Pileri, Stefano; Gambacorta, Marcello; Bigerna, Barbara; Durkop, Horst; Eitelbach, Florian; Thiele, Juergen; Pacini, Roberta; Cavaliere, Antonio; Martelli, Massimo; Cardarelli, Nadia; Sabattini, Elena; Poggi, Simonetta; Stein, Harald

    1993-01-01

    A new anti-macrophage monoclonal antibody (PG-M1) was produced by immunizing BALB/c mice with fresh spleen cells from a patient with Gaucher's disease. PG-M1 reacts strongly with a fixative-resistant epitope of an intracytoplasmic molecule, selectively expressed by virtually all macrophages of the human body. Although attempts to immunoprecipitate the molecule recognized by PG-M1 have failed so far, the reactivity of the antibody with COS-1 and WOP cells transfected with a human complementary DNA clone encoding for the CD68 antigen suggests that PG-M1 is a new member of the CD68 cluster. However, unlike other CD68 antibodies (KP1, EBM11, etc.), which react with both macrophages and myeloid cells, PG-M1 detects a fixative-resistant epitope on the macrophage-restricted form of the CD68 antigen. In 957 routinely fixed, paraffin-embedded samples, PG-M1 showed a more restricted reactivity with elements of the monocyte/macrophage lineage than the previously described monoclonal antibodies MAC-387 (anti-calgranulins), KP1 (CD68) and Ki-M1P. Among hematological malignancies, PG-M1 only labels acute leukemias of M4 and M5 type and rare examples of malignant histiocytosis/true histiocytic sarcoma. In contrast, acute leukemias of the M1, M2, M3, M6, M7, and L1-L3 types, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of Hodgkin's disease are consistently PG-M1-negative. In the daily diagnostic practice, PG-M1 seems to be particularly valuable for the diagnosis of myelomonocytic or monocytic leukemia and neoplasms of true histiocytic origin in routine paraffin sections. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 1Figure 2 PMID:7684194

  7. Differentiation of M1 Myeloid Precursor Cells into Macrophages Results in Binding and Infection by Theiler’s Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jelachich, M. L.; Bramlage, C.; Lipton, H. L.

    1999-01-01

    Infection of susceptible mouse strains with BeAn, a less virulent strain of Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), results in immune system-mediated demyelinating lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) similar to those in multiple sclerosis. Since macrophages appear to carry the major detectable antigen burden in vivo, and purification of sufficient cell numbers from the CNS for detailed analysis is difficult, macrophage-like cell lines provide an accessible system with which to study virus-macrophage interactions. The myeloid precursor cell line M1 differentiates in response to cytokines and expresses many characteristics of tissue macrophages. Incubation of TMEV with undifferentiated M1 cells produced neither infection nor apoptosis, whereas differentiated M1 (M1-D) cells developed a restricted virus infection and changes indicative of apoptosis. Virus binding and RNA replication as well as cellular production of alpha/beta interferons increased with differentiation. Although the amount of infectious virus was highly restricted, BeAn-infected M1-D cells synthesized and appropriately processed virus capsid proteins at levels comparable to those for permissive BHK-21 cells. Analysis of Bcl-2 protein family expression in undifferentiated and differentiated cells suggests that susceptibility of M1-D cells to apoptosis may be controlled, in part, by expression of the proapoptotic α isoform of Bax and Bak. These data suggest that macrophage differentiation plays a role in susceptibility to TMEV infection and apoptosis. PMID:10074176

  8. STAT1 signaling within macrophages is required for antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Hole, Camaron R; Wozniak, Karen L; Olszewski, Michal A; Mueller, Mathias; Wormley, Floyd L

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, the predominant etiological agent of cryptococcosis, is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that primarily affects AIDS patients and patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. In immunocompromised individuals, C. neoformans can lead to life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Studies using a virulent strain of C. neoformans engineered to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ), denoted H99γ, demonstrated that protection against pulmonary C. neoformans infection is associated with the generation of a T helper 1 (Th1)-type immune response and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-mediated classical (M1) macrophage activation. However, the critical mechanism by which M1 macrophages mediate their anti-C. neoformans activity remains unknown. The current studies demonstrate that infection with C. neoformans strain H99γ in mice with macrophage-specific STAT1 ablation resulted in severely increased inflammation of the pulmonary tissue, a dysregulated Th1/Th2-type immune response, increased fungal burden, deficient M1 macrophage activation, and loss of protection. STAT1-deficient macrophages produced significantly less nitric oxide (NO) than STAT1-sufficient macrophages, correlating with an inability to control intracellular cryptococcal proliferation, even in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, macrophages from inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, which had intact ROS production, were deficient in anticryptococcal activity. These data indicate that STAT1 activation within macrophages is required for M1 macrophage activation and anti-C. neoformans activity via the production of NO. PMID:26351277

  9. Angiogenic capacity of M1- and M2-polarized macrophages is determined by the levels of TIMP-1 complexed with their secreted proMMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Ewa; Schweighofer, Bernhard; Kupriyanova, Tatyana A.; Juncker-Jensen, Anna; Minder, Petra

    2013-01-01

    A proangiogenic function of tissue-infiltrating monocytes/macrophages has long been attributed to their matrix metalloproteinase-9 zymogen (proMMP-9). Herein, we evaluated the capacity of human monocytes, mature M0 macrophages, and M1- and M2-polarized macrophages to induce proMMP-9-mediated angiogenesis. Only M2 macrophages induced angiogenesis at levels comparable with highly angiogenic neutrophils previously shown to release their proMMP-9 in a unique form, free of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Macrophage differentiation was accompanied by induction of low-angiogenic, TIMP-1–encumbered proMMP-9. However, polarization toward the M2, but not the M1 phenotype, caused a substantial downregulation of TIMP-1 expression, resulting in production of angiogenic, TIMP-deficient proMMP-9. Correspondingly, the angiogenic potency of M2 proMMP-9 was lost after its complexing with TIMP-1, whereas TIMP-1 silencing in M0/M1 macrophages rendered them both angiogenic. Similar to human cells, murine bone marrow–derived M2 macrophages also shut down their TIMP-1 expression and produced proMMP-9 unencumbered by TIMP-1. Providing proof that angiogenic capacity of murine M2 macrophages depended on their TIMP-free proMMP-9, Mmp9-null M2 macrophages were nonangiogenic, although their TIMP-1 was severely downregulated. Our study provides a unifying molecular mechanism for high angiogenic capacity of TIMP-free proMMP-9 that would be uniquely produced in a pathophysiological microenvironment by influxing neutrophils and/or M2 polarized macrophages. PMID:24174628

  10. Targeting macrophage activation for the prevention and treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections†

    PubMed Central

    Hanke, Mark L.; Heim, Cortney E.; Angle, Amanda; Sanderson, Sam D.; Kielian, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm infections often lead to significant morbidity due to their chronicity and recalcitrance to antibiotics. We have demonstrated that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilms can evade macrophage antibacterial effector mechanisms by skewing macrophages towards an alternatively activated M2 phenotype. To overcome this immune evasion, we have utilized two complementary approaches. In the first, a proinflammatory milieu was elicited by local administration of classically-activated M1 macrophages and second, by treatment with the C5a receptor (CD88) agonist EP67, which invokes macrophage proinflammatory activity. Early administration of M1-activated macrophages or EP67 significantly attenuated biofilm formation in a mouse model of MRSA catheter-associated infection. Several proinflammatory mediators were significantly elevated in biofilm infected tissues from macrophage- and EP67-treated animals, revealing effective reprogramming of the biofilm environment to a proinflammatory milieu. A requirement for macrophage proinflammatory activity was demonstrated by the fact that transfer of MyD88-deficient macrophages had minimal impact on biofilm growth. Likewise, neutrophil administration had no effect on biofilm formation. Treatment of established biofilm infections with M1-activated macrophages also significantly reduced catheter-associated biofilm burdens compared to antibiotic treatment. Collectively, these results demonstrate that targeting macrophage proinflammatory activity can overcome the local immune inhibitory environment created during biofilm infections and represents a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:23365077

  11. IL-35 Decelerates the Inflammatory Process by Regulating Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion and M1/M2 Macrophage Ratio in Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng; Lin, Yi; Li, Chunlei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Cheng, Lin; Dai, Lei; Wang, Youcui; Wang, Fangfang; Shi, Gang; Li, Yiming; Yang, Qianmei; Cui, Xueliang; Liu, Yi; Wang, Huiling; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Yang; Xiang, Rong; Li, Jiong; Yu, Dechao; Wei, Yuquan; Deng, Hongxin

    2016-09-15

    IL-35 downregulates Th17 cell development and suppresses certain types of autoimmune inflammation such as collagen-induced arthritis and experimental autoimmune uveitis. Psoriasis is thought to be initiated by abnormal interactions between cutaneous keratinocytes and systemic immune cells. However, the role of IL-35 in psoriasis remains unclear. In this study, we assessed IL-35 in three well-known psoriasis models: a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), a keratin 14 (K14)-vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A)-transgenic (Tg) mouse model, and an imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model. First, we found that IL-35 suppressed the expression of IL-6, CXCL8, and S100A7, which are highly upregulated by a mixture of five proinflammatory cytokines in HaCaT. Second, a plasmid coding for the human IL-35 sequence coated with cationic liposomes showed potent immunosuppressive effects on K14-VEGF-A-Tg and imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse models. In the K14-VEGF-A-Tg model, our results showed that several types of proinflammatory cytokines were significantly reduced, whereas IL-10 was remarkably induced by IL-35. Compared with pcDNA3.1, there was a small number of CD4(+)IL-17(+) T cells and a large number of CD4(+)IL-10(+) and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells in the IL-35 group. Most importantly, we found that IL-35 decreased the total number of macrophages and ratio of M1/M2 macrophages, which has not been reported previously. In addition, compared with dexamethasone, IL-35 showed long-term therapeutic efficacy. In summary, our results strongly indicate that IL-35 plays a potent immunosuppressive role in psoriasis. Thus, IL-35 has potential for development as a new therapeutic strategy for patients with chronic psoriasis and other cutaneous inflammatory diseases. PMID:27527600

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ɣ activation induces 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Copin, Corinne; Duhem, Christian; Derudas, Bruno; Neve, Bernardette; Noel, Benoit; Eeckhoute, Jerome; Lefebvre, Philippe; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Staels, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Objectives 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) catalyses the intracellular reduction of inactive cortisone to active cortisol, the natural ligand activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor controlling inflammation, lipid metabolism and the macrophage polarization state. In this study, we investigated the impact of macrophage polarization on the expression and activity of 11β-HSD1 and the role of PPAR therein. Methods and Results 11β-HSD1 gene expression is higher in pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages than in resting macrophages (RM), whereas its activity is highest in M2 macrophages. Interestingly, PPARγ activation induces 11β-HSD1 enzyme activity in M2 macrophages, but not in RM or M1 macrophages. Consequently, human M2 macrophages displayed enhanced responsiveness to the 11β-HSD1 substrate cortisone, an effect amplified by PPAR -induction of 11β-HSD1 activity, as illustrated by an increased expression of GR target genes. Conclusions Our data identify a positive cross-talk between PPARγ and GR in human M2 macrophages via the induction of 11β-HSD1 expression and activity. PMID:22207732

  13. M1-/M2-macrophages contribute to the development of GST-P-positive preneoplastic lesions in chemically-induced rat cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Wijesundera, Kavindra Kumara; Izawa, Takeshi; Tennakoon, Anusha Hemamali; Golbar, Hossain M; Tanaka, Miyuu; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) expression in hepatocyte foci is regarded as a preneoplastic change in rats. We aimed to reveal the contribution of polarized macrophages in development of GST-P-positive pseudolobules (PLs) in chemically-induced rat cirrhosis. F344 rats were injected with thioacetamide (100mg/kg BW, twice a week, intraperitoneally). Macrophage immunophenotypes and expression of M1-/M2-related factors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, real-time RT-PCR and laser microdissection. GST-P-positive foci/clusters were clearly observed at post-first injection week 15. GST-P-positive PLs were distinguishable at weeks 20-32. Microarray analysis revealed upregulation of preneoplastic genes in GST-P-positive PLs at week 32. M1 (CD68(+), Iba1(+))-and M2 (CD163(+), CD204(+), Gal-3(+))-macrophages were greater in number in the GST-P-positive PLs, whereas MHC class II-positive (M1) macrophage number was fewer in the GST-P-positive PLs. Expression of both M1 (IFN-γ, IL-1β, TNF-α, Iba1)- and M2 (IL-4, TGF-β1, IL-10)-related factors were higher in GST-P-positive PLs. Our results showed that both M1- and M2-macrophage populations contribute to the development of hepatic preneoplastic lesions. MHC class II-positive macrophages may be related to anti-tumor progression, since their kinetics showed reverse pattern to other macrophage phenotypes. PMID:26205097

  14. Stromelysin-2 (MMP10) Moderates Inflammation by Controlling Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Ryan S; Birkland, Timothy P; Smigiel, Kate S; Vandivort, Tyler C; Rohani, Maryam G; Manicone, Anne M; McGuire, John K; Gharib, Sina A; Parks, William C

    2016-08-01

    Several members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family control a range of immune processes, such as leukocyte influx and chemokine activity. Stromelysin-2 (MMP10) is expressed by macrophages in numerous tissues after injury; however, little is known of its function. In this study, we report that MMP10 is expressed by macrophages in human lungs from patients with cystic fibrosis and induced in mouse macrophages in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection both in vivo and by isolated resident alveolar and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Our data indicates that macrophage MMP10 serves a beneficial function in response to acute infection. Whereas wild-type mice survived infection with minimal morbidity, 50% of Mmp10(-/-) mice died and all showed sustained weight loss (morbidity). Although bacterial clearance and neutrophil influx did not differ between genotypes, macrophage numbers were ∼3-fold greater in infected Mmp10(-/-) lungs than in wild-types. Adoptive transfer of wild-type BMDM normalized infection-induced morbidity in Mmp10(-/-) recipients to wild-type levels, demonstrating that the protective effect of MMP10 was due to its production by macrophages. Both in vivo and in cultured alveolar macrophages and BMDM, expression of several M1 macrophage markers was elevated, whereas M2 markers were reduced in Mmp10(-/-) tissue and cells. Global gene expression analysis revealed that infection-mediated transcriptional changes persisted in Mmp10(-/-) BMDM long after they were downregulated in wild-type cells. These results indicate that MMP10 serves a beneficial role in response to acute infection by moderating the proinflammatory response of resident and infiltrating macrophages. PMID:27316687

  15. ROS play a critical role in the differentiation of alternatively activated macrophages and the occurrence of tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Choksi, Swati; Chen, Kun; Pobezinskaya, Yelena; Linnoila, Ilona; Liu, Zheng-Gang

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation to different types of macrophages determines their distinct functions. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis owing to their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions similar to those of alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. We report that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is critical for macrophage differentiation and that inhibition of superoxide (O2−) production specifically blocks the differentiation of M2 macrophages. We found that when monocytes are triggered to differentiate, O2− is generated and is needed for the biphasic ERK activation, which is critical for macrophage differentiation. We demonstrated that ROS elimination by butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and other ROS inhibitors blocks macrophage differentiation. However, the inhibitory effect of ROS elimination on macrophage differentiation is overcome when cells are polarized to classically activated (M1), but not M2, macrophages. More importantly, the continuous administration of the ROS inhibitor BHA efficiently blocked the occurrence of TAMs and markedly suppressed tumorigenesis in mouse cancer models. Targeting TAMs by blocking ROS can be a potentially effective method for cancer treatment. PMID:23752925

  16. Obesity Contributes to Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Success through Increased Lipogenesis, Enhanced Vascularity, and Decreased Infiltration of M1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yueying; Metzinger, Matthew N; Lewellen, Kyle A; Cripps, Stephanie N; Carey, Kyle D; Harper, Elizabeth I; Shi, Zonggao; Tarwater, Laura; Grisoli, Annie; Lee, Eric; Slusarz, Ania; Yang, Jing; Loughran, Elizabeth A; Conley, Kaitlyn; Johnson, Jeff J; Klymenko, Yuliya; Bruney, Lana; Liang, Zhong; Dovichi, Norman J; Cheatham, Bentley; Leevy, W Matthew; Stack, M Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy, with high mortality attributable to widespread intraperitoneal metastases. Recent meta-analyses report an association between obesity, ovarian cancer incidence, and ovarian cancer survival, but the effect of obesity on metastasis has not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to use an integrative approach combining in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo studies to test the hypothesis that obesity contributes to ovarian cancer metastatic success. Initial in vitro studies using three-dimensional mesomimetic cultures showed enhanced cell-cell adhesion to the lipid-loaded mesothelium. Furthermore, in an ex vivo colonization assay, ovarian cancer cells exhibited increased adhesion to mesothelial explants excised from mice modeling diet-induced obesity (DIO), in which they were fed a "Western" diet. Examination of mesothelial ultrastructure revealed a substantial increase in the density of microvilli in DIO mice. Moreover, enhanced intraperitoneal tumor burden was observed in overweight or obese animals in three distinct in vivo models. Further histologic analyses suggested that alterations in lipid regulatory factors, enhanced vascularity, and decreased M1/M2 macrophage ratios may account for the enhanced tumorigenicity. Together, these findings show that obesity potently affects ovarian cancer metastatic success, which likely contributes to the negative correlation between obesity and ovarian cancer survival. PMID:26573796

  17. Effect of hydroxyapatite microcrystals on macrophage activity.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, N; Akao, M; Sato, A

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) microcrystals were synthesized by a neutralization reaction of Ca(OH)2 suspension and H3PO4 solution using an ultrasonic homogenizer. The in vitro interaction of HAp microcrystals with rat peritoneal macrophages was investigated by measuring the viability, acid phosphatase (ACP) activity, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and intracellular calcium content. HAp calcined at 800 degrees C and alpha-alumina particles (alumina) were used as comparative materials. Macrophages actively phagocytosed HAp microcrystals by dissolving them. However, no damage in macrophages exposed to HAp microcrystals was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Macrophages in the presence of HAp microcrystals showed less ACP and LDH activity and higher intracellular calcium content than those in the presence of calcined HAp and alumina. HAp microcrystals had excellent biocompatibility to macrophages as well as sintered HAp. PMID:8785507

  18. Macrophage activation by OM-85 BV.

    PubMed

    Mauël, J

    1992-01-01

    Peritoneal or bone-marrow-derived murine macrophages were exposed for 24 h in vitro to dilutions of the bacterial extract OM-85 BV, in the presence or absence of other added compounds [macrophage-activating factor (MAF), recombinant murine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)]. Various metabolic responses and functional activities were then measured. Glucose oxidation through the hexose monophosphate shunt pathway was markedly stimulated in OM-85 BV-treated macrophages compared to control macrophages. Similarly, OM-85 BV primed macrophages for superoxide production upon triggering by phorbol myristate acetate. Both effects were further enhanced by simultaneous treatment of the cells with MAF with OM-85 BV. The bacterial extract also induced macrophages to release large amounts of nitrite (a marker of the activated state). As regards functional responses, coincubation with MAF and OM-85 BV activated macrophages to destroy target cells as well as intracellular microorganisms; in the latter case, similar results were obtained when MAF was replaced by IFN-gamma. In all these tests, the possibility that the observed effects were due to contamination of the bacterial extracts by endotoxin could be excluded. The above results indicate that OM-85 BV induces metabolic and functional properties in macrophages that are characteristic of the activated state and are important for host defence. PMID:1332156

  19. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Michael S.; Shipman, Emilie P.; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T.; Pioli, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  20. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ball, Michael S; Shipman, Emilie P; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T; Pioli, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  1. Interleukin-12 inhibits the hepatocellular carcinoma growth by inducing macrophage polarization to the M1-like phenotype through downregulation of Stat-3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Cheng, Feng; Ma, Ting-Ting; Xiong, Hai-Yu; Li, Zi-Wei; Xie, Chang-Li; Liu, Cui-Ying; Tu, Zhi-Guang

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Novel early detection biomarkers and efficacious therapy strategies are needed. Macrophages recruited from circulation monocytes are the major component of solid cancer and play an important role in the carcinogenesis. Whether overexpression of L-12 in monocytes could induce the phenotype directional differentiation into tumoricidal M1 macrophages and inhibit HCC growth in tumor microenvironment was investigated in this study. For the establishment of the monocyte/IL-12 and polarization of M1-like macrophage, the IL-12 overexpressing recombinant monocyte/IL-12 cells were established by infecting with pAd5F35-CMV/IL-12 adenovirus and co-cultured with HCC SMMC-7721 and Hep3B cells. It was found that the phenotype of monocyte/IL-12 polarized to M1-like macrophages with CD197high IL-12high CD206low IL-10low, and decreased expression of TGF-β, VEGF-A, and MMP-9. In order to explore the mechanism underlying the macrophages polarization, we detected the Stat-3 pathway and its downstream transcription factor c-myc, and found that the p-Stat-3 and c-myc were down-regulated. To evaluate the effects of monocyte/IL-12 on inhibiting HCC growth, various assays including CCK8, flow cytometry, colony-forming and Transwell assays in vitro, and xenograft mouse models and immunohistochemical analyses in vivo were used to detect the HCC growth and relative markers. Treated with IL-12 overexpressing monocytes, the xenograft tumor growth was significantly inhibited in vivo. These results have proven that IL-12-overexpressed monocytes could directionally differentiate to M1-like macrophages through downregulation of Stat-3 and result in the inhibition of HCC growth. PMID:27003285

  2. The mannose-sensitive hemagglutination pilus strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa shift peritoneal milky spot macrophages towards an M1 phenotype to dampen peritoneal dissemination.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhi-Feng; Zhao, Ting-Ting; Miao, Feng; Wang, Zhen-Ning; Xu, Ying-Ying; Mao, Xiao-Yun; Gao, Jian; Wu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xing-Yu; You, Yi; Xu, Hao; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2014-05-01

    Peritoneal dissemination (PD) of tumor cells is the most frequent pattern of gastric cancer recurrence and the leading cause of death. Peritoneal milky spots are deemed as the site of origin of gastric cancer PD wherein the main cellular components are macrophages. A vaccine derived from the mannose-sensitive hemagglutination pilus strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA) has exhibit strong immune modulatory properties. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis whether the PA-MSHA vaccine activated peritoneal milky spot macrophages (PMSM) in a manner that would attenuate PD. It was observed that PA-MSHA activated PMSM towards a classical activation phenotype via a toll-like receptor4/9-dependent mechanism, which increased interleukin-12 levels and promoted the expression of co-stimulatory and antigen-presenting molecules like CD80, CD86, and MHC-II (P < 0.05). In addition, PA-MSHA-treated PMSM exhibited strong nonspecific antitumor effects in both contact-dependent and contact-independent modes of action (P < 0.05). In mice treated with PA-MSHA before inoculating gastric cancer cells, we noted alleviated PD toward the untreated mice. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that PA-MSHA can stimulate PMSM towards an M1 phenotype and that activated PMSM inhibit gastric cancer growth and PD both in vitro and in vivo. The results of the current study provide a mechanistic insight that is relevant to the potential application of PA-MSHA in the treatment of gastric cancer-mediated PD. PMID:24385384

  3. Purinergic signaling during macrophage differentiation results in M2 alternative activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages represent a highly heterogenic cell population of the innate immune system, with important roles in the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response. Purinergic signaling regulates both M1 and M2 macrophage function at different levels by controlling the secretion of cytokines, phagocytosis, and the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that extracellular nucleotides arrest macrophage differentiation from bone marrow precursors via adenosine and P2 receptors. This results in a mature macrophage with increased expression of M2, but not M1, genes. Similar to adenosine and ATP, macrophage growth arrested with LPS treatment resulted in an increase of the M2-related marker Ym1. Recombinant Ym1 was able to affect macrophage proliferation and could, potentially, be involved in the arrest of macrophage growth during hematopoiesis. PMID:26382298

  4. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated). PMID:26287131

  5. Mesenchymal stroma cells trigger early attraction of M1 macrophages and endothelial cells into fibrin hydrogels, stimulating long bone healing without long-term engraftment.

    PubMed

    Seebach, Elisabeth; Freischmidt, Holger; Holschbach, Jeannine; Fellenberg, Jörg; Richter, Wiltrud

    2014-11-01

    Implantation of mesenchymal stroma cells (MSCs) is an attractive approach to stimulate closure of large bone defects but an optimal carrier has yet to be defined. MSCs may display trophic and/or immunomodulatory features or stimulate bone healing by their osteogenic activity. The aim of this study was to unravel whether fibrin hydrogel supports early actions of implanted MSCs, such as host cell recruitment, immunomodulation and tissue regeneration, in long bone defects. Female rats received cell-free fibrin or male MSCs embedded in a fibrin carrier into plate-stabilized femoral bone defects. Removed callus was analyzed for host cell invasion (day 6), local cytokine expression (days 3 and 6) and persistence of male MSCs (days 3, 6, 14 and 28). Fibrin-MSC composites triggered fast attraction of host cells into the hydrogel while cell-free fibrin implants were not invaded. A migration front dominated by M1 macrophages and endothelial progenitor cells formed while M2 macrophages remained sparse. Only MSC-seeded fibrin hydrogel stimulated early tissue maturation and primitive vessel formation at day 6 in line with significantly higher VEGF mRNA levels recorded at day 3. Local TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-10 expression indicated a balanced immune cell activity independent of MSC implantation. Implanted MSCs persisted until day 14 but not day 28. Our results demonstrate that fibrin hydrogel is an attractive carrier for MSC implantation into long bone defects, supporting host cell attraction and pro-angiogenic activity. By this angiogenesis, implant integration and tissue maturation was stimulated in long bone healing independent of long-term engraftment of implanted MSCs. PMID:25058402

  6. Melanoma exosome induction of endothelial cell GM-CSF in pre-metastatic lymph nodes may result in different M1 and M2 macrophage mediated angiogenic processes.

    PubMed

    Hood, Joshua L

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in the preparation of lymph nodes for melanoma metastasis. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) in M1 or HIF-2α in M2 polarized macrophages. HIF-1α promotes neoangiogenesis while HIF-2α facilitates morphogenic normalization of neovasculature. Melanoma exosomes induce GM-CSF expression by endothelial cells in vitro and HIF-1α expression in pre-metastatic lymph nodes in vivo. This suggest a relationship between melanoma exosome induced endothelial GM-CSF and macrophage mediated angiogenesis in lymph nodes. Theoretically, induction of endothelial cell derived GM-CSF by melanoma exosomes mediates different angiogenic functions in pre-metastatic lymph nodes depending on subcapsular sinus (SCS) macrophage polarity. To explore this hypothesis, experiments utilizing melanoma exosomes in a lymph node model are outlined. Despite their opposing immune functions, indirect melanoma exosome stimulation of M1 or M2 SCS macrophages via endothelial derived GM-CSF in lymph nodes may induce different although complementary pro-tumor angiogenic processes. PMID:27515216

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone attenuates postincisional pain by regulating macrophage polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; Ohnou, Tetsuya; Godai, Kohei; Kurimoto, Tae; Nakama, Mayo; Kanmura, Yuichi

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone attenuated postincisional pain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone alters macrophage polarization to F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages at the incisional sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated macrophages produced analgesic effects. -- Abstract: Acute inflammation triggered by macrophage infiltration to injured tissue promotes wound repair and may induce pain hypersensitivity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR){gamma} signaling is known to regulate heterogeneity of macrophages, which are often referred to as classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages have considerable antimicrobial activity and produce a wide variety of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, M2 macrophages are involved in anti-inflammatory and homeostatic functions linked to wound healing and tissue repair. Although it has been suggested that PPAR{gamma} agonists attenuate pain hypersensitivity, the molecular mechanism of macrophage-mediated effects of PPAR{gamma} signaling on pain development has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the link between the phenotype switching of macrophage polarization induced by PPAR{gamma} signaling and the development of acute pain hypersensitivity. Local administration of rosiglitazone significantly ameliorated hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical stimuli, and paw swelling. Consistent with the down-regulation of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) phosphorylation by rosiglitazone at the incisional sites, the number of F4/80{sup +}iNOS{sup +} M1 macrophages was decreased whereas numbers of F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages were increased in rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites 24 h after the procedure. In addition, gene induction of anti-inflammatory M2-macrophage-associated markers such as arginase1, FIZZ1 and interleukin (IL)-10 were significantly increased, whereas

  8. High salt reduces the activation of IL-4- and IL-13-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Binger, Katrina J; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Rintisch, Carola; Schroeder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Hilgers, Karl; Manzel, Arndt; Schwartz, Christian; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Voelkl, Jakob; Schatz, Valentin; Linker, Ralf A; Lang, Florian; Voehringer, David; Wright, Mark D; Hubner, Norbert; Dechend, Ralf; Jantsch, Jonathan; Titze, Jens; Müller, Dominik N

    2015-11-01

    A high intake of dietary salt (NaCl) has been implicated in the development of hypertension, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. We have recently shown that salt has a proinflammatory effect and boosts the activation of Th17 cells and the activation of classical, LPS-induced macrophages (M1). Here, we examined how the activation of alternative (M2) macrophages is affected by salt. In stark contrast to Th17 cells and M1 macrophages, high salt blunted the alternative activation of BM-derived mouse macrophages stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13, M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages. Salt-induced reduction of M(IL-4+IL-13) activation was not associated with increased polarization toward a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In vitro, high salt decreased the ability of M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages to suppress effector T cell proliferation. Moreover, mice fed a high salt diet exhibited reduced M2 activation following chitin injection and delayed wound healing compared with control animals. We further identified a high salt-induced reduction in glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolic output, coupled with blunted AKT and mTOR signaling, which indicates a mechanism by which NaCl inhibits full M2 macrophage activation. Collectively, this study provides evidence that high salt reduces noninflammatory innate immune cell activation and may thus lead to an overall imbalance in immune homeostasis. PMID:26485286

  9. High salt reduces the activation of IL-4– and IL-13–stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Binger, Katrina J.; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Rintisch, Carola; Schroeder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Hilgers, Karl; Manzel, Arndt; Schwartz, Christian; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Voelkl, Jakob; Schatz, Valentin; Linker, Ralf A.; Lang, Florian; Voehringer, David; Wright, Mark D.; Hubner, Norbert; Dechend, Ralf; Jantsch, Jonathan; Titze, Jens; Müller, Dominik N.

    2015-01-01

    A high intake of dietary salt (NaCl) has been implicated in the development of hypertension, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. We have recently shown that salt has a proinflammatory effect and boosts the activation of Th17 cells and the activation of classical, LPS-induced macrophages (M1). Here, we examined how the activation of alternative (M2) macrophages is affected by salt. In stark contrast to Th17 cells and M1 macrophages, high salt blunted the alternative activation of BM-derived mouse macrophages stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13, M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages. Salt-induced reduction of M(IL-4+IL-13) activation was not associated with increased polarization toward a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In vitro, high salt decreased the ability of M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages to suppress effector T cell proliferation. Moreover, mice fed a high salt diet exhibited reduced M2 activation following chitin injection and delayed wound healing compared with control animals. We further identified a high salt–induced reduction in glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolic output, coupled with blunted AKT and mTOR signaling, which indicates a mechanism by which NaCl inhibits full M2 macrophage activation. Collectively, this study provides evidence that high salt reduces noninflammatory innate immune cell activation and may thus lead to an overall imbalance in immune homeostasis. PMID:26485286

  10. Free fatty acid G-protein coupled receptor signaling in M1 skewed white adipose tissue macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Warren Antonio; Sadie-Van Gijsen, Hanél; Ferris, William Frank

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is associated with the establishment and maintenance of a low grade, chronically inflamed state in the white adipose tissue (WAT) of the body. The WAT macrophage population is a major cellular participant in this inflammatory process that significantly contributes to the pathophysiology of the disease, with the adipose depots of obese individuals, relative to lean counterparts, having an elevated number of macrophages that are skewed towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Alterations in the WAT lipid micro-environment, and specifically the availability of free fatty acids, are believed to contribute towards the obesity-related quantitative and functional changes observed in these cells. This review specifically addresses the involvement of the five G-protein coupled free fatty acid receptors which bind exogenous FFAs and signal in macrophages. Particular focus is placed on the involvement of these receptors in macrophage migration and cytokine production, two important aspects that modulate inflammation. PMID:27173059

  11. Noble metal nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress modulates tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) from an M2 to M1 phenotype: An in vitro approach.

    PubMed

    Pal, Ramkrishna; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Nath, Anupam; Singh, Leichombam Mohindro; Ali, Mohammed; Rahman, Dewan Shahidur; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar; Basu, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Baral, Rathindranath; Sengupta, Mahuya

    2016-09-01

    Diagnosis of cancer and photothermal therapy using optoelectronic properties of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has established a new therapeutic approach for treating cancer. Here we address the intrinsic properties of noble metal NPs (gold and silver) as well as the mechanism of their potential antitumor activity. For this, the study addresses the functional characterization of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) isolated from murine fibrosarcoma induced by a chemical carcinogen, 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). We have previously shown antitumor activity of both gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) in vivo in a murine fibrosarcoma model. In the present study, it has been seen that AuNPs and AgNPs modulate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) production, suppressing the antioxidant system of cells (TAMs). Moreover, the antioxidant-mimetic action of these NPs maintain the ROS and RNS levels in TAMs which act as second messengers to activate the proinflammatory signaling cascades. Thus, while there is a downregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and Interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the TAMs, the proinflammatory cytokine Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is upregulated resulting in a polarization of TAMs from M2 (anti-inflammatory) to M1 (pro-inflammatory) nature. PMID:27344639

  12. Phenotypic, functional, and plasticity features of classical and alternatively activated human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tarique, Abdullah A; Logan, Jayden; Thomas, Emma; Holt, Patrick G; Sly, Peter D; Fantino, Emmanuelle

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are dynamic cells that mature under the influence of signals from the local microenvironment into either classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated macrophages with specific functional and phenotypic properties. Although the phenotypic identification of M1 and M2 macrophages is well established in mice, this is less clear for human macrophages. In addition, the persistence and reversibility of polarized human phenotypes is not well established. Human peripheral blood monocytes were differentiated into uncommitted macrophages (M0) and then polarized to M1 and M2 phenotypes using LPS/IFN-γ and IL-4/IL-13, respectively. M1 and M2 were identified as CD64(+)CD80(+) and CD11b(+)CD209(+), respectively, by flow cytometry. Polarized M1 cells secreted IP-10, IFN-γ, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, and RANTES, whereas M2 cells secreted IL-13, CCL17, and CCL18. Functionally, M2 cells were highly endocytic. In cytokine-deficient medium, the polarized macrophages reverted back to the M0 state within 12 days. If previously polarized macrophages were given the alternative polarizing stimulus after 6 days of resting in cytokine-deficient medium, a switch in polarization was seen (i.e., M1 macrophages switched to M2 and expressed CD11b(+)CD209(+) and vice versa). In summary, we report phenotypic identification of human M1 and M2 macrophages, their functional characteristics, and their ability to be reprogrammed given the appropriate stimuli. PMID:25870903

  13. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  14. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pre-treatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pre-treatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pre-treatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from a M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia, and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Nanotoxicology screening strategies

  15. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Göran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-06-10

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the "pro-tumourigenic" effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation.Macrophages promote "pro-tumourigenic" cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the "pro-tumourigenic" characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  16. Alternative activation of macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis are modulated by scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Shubha; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Ryan, Alan J; He, Chao; Kobzik, Lester; Carter, A Brent

    2015-08-01

    Alternative activation of alveolar macrophages is linked to fibrosis following exposure to asbestos. The scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), provides innate immune defense against inhaled particles and pathogens; however, a receptor for asbestos has not been identified. We hypothesized that MARCO acts as an initial signaling receptor for asbestos, polarizes macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, and is required for the development of asbestos-induced fibrosis. Compared with normal subjects, alveolar macrophages isolated from patients with asbestosis express higher amounts of MARCO and have greater profibrotic polarization. Arginase 1 (40-fold) and IL-10 (265-fold) were higher in patients. In vivo, the genetic deletion of MARCO attenuated the profibrotic environment and pulmonary fibrosis in mice exposed to chrysotile. Moreover, alveolar macrophages from MARCO(-/-) mice polarize to an M1 phenotype, whereas wild-type mice have higher Ym1 (>3.0-fold) and nearly 7-fold more active TGF-β1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF). Arg(432) and Arg(434) in domain V of MARCO are required for the polarization of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype as mutation of these residues reduced FIZZ1 expression (17-fold) compared with cells expressing MARCO. These observations demonstrate that a macrophage membrane protein regulates the fibrotic response to lung injury and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25953850

  17. Activation of Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Pasqui, Francesca; Colvin, Ellen M.; Sanger, Helen; Mogg, Adrian J.; Felder, Christian C.; Broad, Lisa M.; Fitzjohn, Steve M.; Isaac, John T.R.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors (M1Rs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and their inhibition or ablation disrupts the encoding of spatial memory. It has been hypothesized that the principal mechanism by which M1Rs influence spatial memory is by the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here, we use a combination of recently developed, well characterized, selective M1R agonists and M1R knock-out mice to define the roles of M1Rs in the regulation of hippocampal neuronal and synaptic function. We confirm that M1R activation increases input resistance and depolarizes hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and show that this profoundly increases excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling. Consistent with a critical role for M1Rs in synaptic plasticity, we now show that M1R activation produces a robust potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal neurons that has all the hallmarks of long-term potentiation (LTP): The potentiation requires NMDA receptor activity and bi-directionally occludes with synaptically induced LTP. Thus, we describe synergistic mechanisms by which acetylcholine acting through M1Rs excites CA1 pyramidal neurons and induces LTP, to profoundly increase activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These features are predicted to make a major contribution to the pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic transmission in rodents and humans. PMID:26472558

  18. Activation of Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Siobhan H; Pasqui, Francesca; Colvin, Ellen M; Sanger, Helen; Mogg, Adrian J; Felder, Christian C; Broad, Lisa M; Fitzjohn, Steve M; Isaac, John T R; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors (M1Rs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and their inhibition or ablation disrupts the encoding of spatial memory. It has been hypothesized that the principal mechanism by which M1Rs influence spatial memory is by the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here, we use a combination of recently developed, well characterized, selective M1R agonists and M1R knock-out mice to define the roles of M1Rs in the regulation of hippocampal neuronal and synaptic function. We confirm that M1R activation increases input resistance and depolarizes hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and show that this profoundly increases excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling. Consistent with a critical role for M1Rs in synaptic plasticity, we now show that M1R activation produces a robust potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal neurons that has all the hallmarks of long-term potentiation (LTP): The potentiation requires NMDA receptor activity and bi-directionally occludes with synaptically induced LTP. Thus, we describe synergistic mechanisms by which acetylcholine acting through M1Rs excites CA1 pyramidal neurons and induces LTP, to profoundly increase activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These features are predicted to make a major contribution to the pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic transmission in rodents and humans. PMID:26472558

  19. Curcumin alleviates renal dysfunction and suppresses inflammation by shifting from M1 to M2 macrophage polarization in daunorubicin induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Sreedhar, Remya; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Afrin, Rejina; Harima, Meilei; Miyashita, Shizuki; Hara, Masanori; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Masahiko; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2016-08-01

    The molecular mechanism of curcumin in macrophage polarization remains unknown in renal failure. We examined, whether curcumin treatment is associated with the modulation of renal function and macrophage phenotype switch in daunorubicin (DNR) induced nephrotoxicity model. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with a cumulative dose of 9mg/kg DNR (i.v). Followed by curcumin (100mg/kg) administration orally every day for 6weeks. DNR treated rats showed nephrotoxicity as evidenced by worsening renal function, which was assessed by measuring creatinine and blood urea nitrogen in serum. These changes were reversed by treatment with curcumin, which resulted in significant improvement in renal function. Furthermore, curcumin increased cluster of differentiation (CD)163 expression, and down-regulated renal expression of antigen II type I receptor (AT1R), endothelin (ET)1, ET receptor type A and B (ETAR and ETBR), CD68 and CD80. Renal protein expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and nuclear factor (NF)κB p65 were increased in DNR treated rats, and treatment with curcumin attenuated these increased expression. Curcumin mediated a further increase in the levels of interleukin (IL)-10. In addition, the expression of M1 phenotype was increased in DNR treated rats, which were attenuated by curcumin. Taken together, our results demonstrated that polyphenol curcumin has an ability to improve renal function and might induce the phenotypic switching from M1 to M2 macrophage polarization in DNR induced nephrotoxicity in rats. PMID:27203664

  20. Model-Based Characterization of Inflammatory Gene Expression Patterns of Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ehlting, Christian; Thomas, Maria; Zanger, Ulrich M.; Sawodny, Oliver; Häussinger, Dieter; Bode, Johannes G.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are cells with remarkable plasticity. They integrate signals from their microenvironment leading to context-dependent polarization into classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, representing two extremes of a broad spectrum of divergent phenotypes. Thereby, macrophages deliver protective and pro-regenerative signals towards injured tissue but, depending on the eliciting damage, may also be responsible for the generation and aggravation of tissue injury. Although incompletely understood, there is emerging evidence that macrophage polarization is critical for these antagonistic roles. To identify activation-specific expression patterns of chemokines and cytokines that may confer these distinct effects a systems biology approach was applied. A comprehensive literature-based Boolean model was developed to describe the M1 (LPS-activated) and M2 (IL-4/13-activated) polarization types. The model was validated using high-throughput transcript expression data from murine bone marrow derived macrophages. By dynamic modeling of gene expression, the chronology of pathway activation and autocrine signaling was estimated. Our results provide a deepened understanding of the physiological balance leading to M1/M2 activation, indicating the relevance of co-regulatory signals at the level of Akt1 or Akt2 that may be important for directing macrophage polarization. PMID:27464342

  1. Model-Based Characterization of Inflammatory Gene Expression Patterns of Activated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rex, Julia; Albrecht, Ute; Ehlting, Christian; Thomas, Maria; Zanger, Ulrich M; Sawodny, Oliver; Häussinger, Dieter; Ederer, Michael; Feuer, Ronny; Bode, Johannes G

    2016-07-01

    Macrophages are cells with remarkable plasticity. They integrate signals from their microenvironment leading to context-dependent polarization into classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, representing two extremes of a broad spectrum of divergent phenotypes. Thereby, macrophages deliver protective and pro-regenerative signals towards injured tissue but, depending on the eliciting damage, may also be responsible for the generation and aggravation of tissue injury. Although incompletely understood, there is emerging evidence that macrophage polarization is critical for these antagonistic roles. To identify activation-specific expression patterns of chemokines and cytokines that may confer these distinct effects a systems biology approach was applied. A comprehensive literature-based Boolean model was developed to describe the M1 (LPS-activated) and M2 (IL-4/13-activated) polarization types. The model was validated using high-throughput transcript expression data from murine bone marrow derived macrophages. By dynamic modeling of gene expression, the chronology of pathway activation and autocrine signaling was estimated. Our results provide a deepened understanding of the physiological balance leading to M1/M2 activation, indicating the relevance of co-regulatory signals at the level of Akt1 or Akt2 that may be important for directing macrophage polarization. PMID:27464342

  2. Crocodylus siamensis serum and macrophage phagocytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aree, Kalaya; Siruntawineti, Jindawan; Chaeychomsri, Win

    2011-12-01

    Antimicrobial activity of sera from many crocodilian species has been recognized. This activity was proposed to be mediated, at least in part, by complement. Due to the fact that complement proteins have different functions in the immune system, they may be involved in phagocytic process of phagocytes. In the present study, the effects of Siamese crocodile serum on phagocytic activity of macrophages as well as the possible involvement of complement in this process were examined. The results showed increases in the phagocytosis of both Escherichia coli and to a lesser extent, Staphylococcus aureus upon incubation of murine macrophage cell line with fresh crocodile serum (FS). Similar to FS, other crocodile blood products, including freeze dried serum (DS) and freeze dried whole blood (DWB) exhibited phagocytosis-enhancing property. However the ability of DWB to enhance phagocytosis was less efficient than that of FS and DS, suggesting that serum factors were involved in this process. Treatment of FS with heat at 56 degrees C for 30 min deteriorated the effect of FS on bacterial uptake of macrophages, suggesting that complement proteins play a role in the modulation of the phagocytic process. Collectively, the results of the present study suggested that crocodile serum enhances the macrophage phagocytic activity through complement activity and, therefore, may be taken as an alternative medicine for supporting the human immune responses. PMID:22619919

  3. Endostatin inhibits the growth and migration of 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells by skewing macrophage polarity toward the M1 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hua; Liu, Yanan; Gu, Junlian; Wang, Yue; Liu, Lianqin; Zhang, Ping; Li, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The phenotypic diversity of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) increases with tumor development. One of the hallmarks of malignancy is the polarization of TAMs from a pro-immune (M1) phenotype to an immunosuppressive (M2) phenotype. However, the molecular basis of this process is still unclear. Endostatin is a powerful inhibitor of angiogenesis capable of suppressing tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that endostatin induces RAW264.7 cell polarization toward the M1 phenotype in vitro. Endostatin has no effect on TAM numbers in vivo, but results in an increased proportion of F4/80(+)Nos2(+) cells and a decreased proportion of F4/80(+)CD206(+) cells. Overexpression of endostatin in RAW264.7 cells resulted in a decrease in the phosphorylation of STAT3, an increase in expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A and placental growth factor, and an increase in the phosphorylation of STAT1, IκBα and p65 proteins compared with controls. These results indicate that endostatin regulates macrophage polarization, promoting the M1 phenotype by targeting NF-κB and STAT signaling. PMID:27034233

  4. Co-existence of classical and alternative activation programs in macrophages responding to Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Zhao, Yanlin; Shah, Suhagi; Fox, Barbara A.; Rommereim, Leah M.; Bzik, David J.; Yap, George S.

    2013-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages are critical for defense against intracellular pathogens while alternatively-activated M2 macrophages mediate tissue homeostasis and repair. Whether these distinct activation programs are mutually exclusive or can co-exist within the same cell is unclear. Here, we report the co-existence of these programs in Toxoplasma gondii-elicited inflammatory macrophages. This is independent of parasite expression of the virulence factor ROP16 and host cell expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Furthermore, this observation was recapitulated by IFN-γ and IL-4 treated bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These results highlight the multi-functionality of macrophages as they respond to diverse microbial and endogenous stimuli. PMID:24083945

  5. Co-existence of classical and alternative activation programs in macrophages responding to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Zhao, Yanlin; Shah, Suhagi; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Yap, George S

    2014-02-01

    Pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages are critical for defense against intracellular pathogens while alternatively-activated M2 macrophages mediate tissue homeostasis and repair. Whether these distinct activation programs are mutually exclusive or can co-exist within the same cell is unclear. Here, we report the co-existence of these programs in Toxoplasma gondii-elicited inflammatory macrophages. This is independent of parasite expression of the virulence factor ROP16 and host cell expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Furthermore, this observation was recapitulated by IFN-γ and IL-4 treated bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These results highlight the multi-functionality of macrophages as they respond to diverse microbial and endogenous stimuli. PMID:24083945

  6. PROTEASOME ACTIVITY DECLINES IN AGED MACROPHAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in regulation of a variety of biologically important processes including antigen presentation by macrophages. Age-related decrease in proteasome activity has been reported in other tissues. However, the effect of aging on the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway ...

  7. PROTEASOME ACTIVITY DECLINES IN AGED MACROPHAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in regulation of a variety of biologically important processes including antigen presentation by macrophages (Mf). Age-related decrease in proteasome activity has been reported in other tissues. However, the effect of aging on the ubiquitin-proteasome pat...

  8. The chemokine system in diverse forms of macrophage activation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alberto; Sica, Antonio; Sozzani, Silvano; Allavena, Paola; Vecchi, Annunciata; Locati, Massimo

    2004-12-01

    Plasticity and functional polarization are hallmarks of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Here we review emerging key properties of different forms of macrophage activation and polarization (M1, M2a, M2b, M2c), which represent extremes of a continuum. In particular, recent evidence suggests that differential modulation of the chemokine system integrates polarized macrophages in pathways of resistance to, or promotion of, microbial pathogens and tumors, or immunoregulation, tissue repair and remodeling. PMID:15530839

  9. Multimodality PET/MRI agents targeted to activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chuqiao; Ng, Thomas S C; Jacobs, Russell E; Louie, Angelique Y

    2014-02-01

    The recent emergence of multimodality imaging, particularly the combination of PET and MRI, has led to excitement over the prospect of improving detection of disease. Iron oxide nanoparticles have become a popular platform for the fabrication of PET/MRI probes owing to their advantages of high MRI detection sensitivity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. In this article, we report the synthesis of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (DIO) labeled with the positron emitter (64)Cu to generate a PET/MRI probe, and modified with maleic anhydride to increase the negative surface charge. The modified nanoparticulate PET/MRI probe (MDIO-(64)Cu-DOTA) bears repetitive anionic charges on the surface that facilitate recognition by scavenger receptor type A (SR-A), a ligand receptor found on activated macrophages but not on normal vessel walls. MDIO-(64)Cu-DOTA has an average iron oxide core size of 7-8 nm, an average hydrodynamic diameter of 62.7 nm, an r1 relaxivity of 16.8 mM(-1) s(-1), and an r 2 relaxivity of 83.9 mM(-1) s(-1) (37 °C, 1.4 T). Cell studies confirmed that the probe was nontoxic and was specifically taken up by macrophages via SR-A. In comparison with the nonmodified analog, the accumulation of MDIO in macrophages was substantially improved. These characteristics demonstrate the promise of MDIO-(64)Cu-DOTA for identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques via the targeting of macrophages. PMID:24166283

  10. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-08-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP‑1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP‑1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12‑myristate 13‑acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon‑γ (IFN‑γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co‑localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN‑γ stimulation‑induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  11. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP-1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co-localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN-γ stimulation-induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  12. Activated FoxM1 Attenuates Streptozotocin-Mediated β-Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Golson, Maria L.; Maulis, Matthew F.; Dunn, Jennifer C.; Poffenberger, Greg; Schug, Jonathan; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2014-01-01

    The forkhead box transcription factor FoxM1, a positive regulator of the cell cycle, is required for β-cell mass expansion postnatally, during pregnancy, and after partial pancreatectomy. Up-regulation of full-length FoxM1, however, is unable to stimulate increases in β-cell mass in unstressed mice or after partial pancreatectomy, probably due to the lack of posttranslational activation. We hypothesized that expression of an activated form of FoxM1 could aid in recovery after β-cell injury. We therefore derived transgenic mice that inducibly express an activated version of FoxM1 in β-cells (RIP-rtTA;TetO-hemagglutinin (HA)-Foxm1ΔNRD mice). This N-terminally truncated form of FoxM1 bypasses 2 posttranslational controls: exposure of the forkhead DNA binding domain and targeted proteasomal degradation. Transgenic mice were subjected to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced β-cell ablation to test whether activated FoxM1 can promote β-cell regeneration. Mice expressing HA-FoxM1ΔNRD displayed decreased ad libitum–fed blood glucose and increased β-cell mass. β-Cell proliferation was actually decreased in RIP-rtTA:TetO-HA-Foxm1NRD mice compared with that in RIP-rtTA mice 7 days after STZ treatment. Unexpectedly, β-cell death was decreased 2 days after STZ treatment. RNA sequencing analysis indicated that activated FoxM1 alters the expression of extracellular matrix and immune cell gene profiles, which may protect against STZ-mediated death. These studies highlight a previously underappreciated role for FoxM1 in promoting β-cell survival. PMID:25073103

  13. Macrophage activation and its role in repair and pathology after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gensel, John C; Zhang, Bei

    2015-09-01

    The injured spinal cord does not heal properly. In contrast, tissue repair and functional recovery occur after skin or muscle injuries. The reason for this dichotomy in wound repair is unclear but inflammation, and specifically macrophage activation, likely plays a key role. Macrophages have the ability to promote the repair of injured tissue by regulating transitions through different phase of the healing response. In the current review we compare and contrast the healing and inflammatory responses between spinal cord injuries and tissues that undergo complete wound resolution. Through this comparison, we identify key macrophage phenotypes that are inaptly triggered or absent after spinal cord injury and discuss spinal cord stimuli that contribute to this maladaptive response. Sequential activation of classic, pro-inflammatory, M1 macrophages and alternatively activated, M2a, M2b, and M2c macrophages occurs during normal healing and facilitates transitions through the inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases of repair. In contrast, in the injured spinal cord, pro-inflammatory macrophages potentiate a prolonged inflammatory phase and remodeling is not properly initiated. The desynchronized macrophage activation after spinal cord injury is reminiscent of the inflammation present in chronic, non-healing wounds. By refining the role macrophages play in spinal cord injury repair we bring to light important areas for future neuroinflammation and neurotrauma research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury. PMID:25578260

  14. MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION SYNDROME AND CYTOKINE DIRECTED THERAPIES

    PubMed Central

    Grom, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is an episode of overwhelming inflammation that occurs most commonly in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is characterized by expansion and activation of T lymphocytes and hemophagocytic macrophages, and bears great similarity to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). This disorder has substantial morbidity and mortality, and there is frequently a delay in recognition and initiation of treatment. Here, we will review what is known about the pathogenesis of MAS and in particular its similarities to HLH. The development of MAS is characterized by a cytokine storm, with the elaboration of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. We will examine the evidence for various cytokines in the initiation and pathogenesis of MAS, and discuss how new biologic therapies may alter the risk of MAS. Finally we will review current treatment options for MAS, and examine how cytokine-directed therapy could serve as novel treatment modalities. PMID:24974063

  15. Macrophage activation syndrome in autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Deane, Sean; Selmi, Carlo; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a phenomenon characterized by cytopenia, organ dysfunction, and coagulopathy associated with an inappropriate activation of macrophages. Current diagnostic criteria are imprecise, but the syndrome is now recognized as a form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis that is characteristically associated with autoimmune diatheses. The diagnosis of incipient MAS in patients with autoimmune disease requires a high index of suspicion, as several characteristics of the disorder may be present in the underlying condition or infectious complications associated with the treatment thereof. Proposed treatment regimens include aggressive approaches that require validation in future controlled studies. This review discusses the major aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of MAS with a focus on the association with autoimmune disease. PMID:20407267

  16. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sugata; Schmeier, Sebastian; Arner, Erik; Alam, Tanvir; Parihar, Suraj P.; Ozturk, Mumin; Tamgue, Ousman; Kawaji, Hideya; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Guler, Reto; Consortium, FANTOM; Brombacher, Frank; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2015-01-01

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics are poorly understood. Using promoter-level expression profiling by non-biased deepCAGE we have studied the transcriptional dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Transcription factor (TF) binding motif activity analysis revealed four motifs, NFKB1_REL_RELA, IRF1,2, IRF7 and TBP that are commonly activated but have distinct activity dynamics in M1 and M2 activation. We observe matching changes in the expression profiles of the corresponding TFs and show that only a restricted set of TFs change expression. There is an overall drastic and transient up-regulation in M1 and a weaker and more sustainable up-regulation in M2. Novel TFs, such as Thap6, Maff, (M1) and Hivep1, Nfil3, Prdm1, (M2) among others, were suggested to be involved in the activation processes. Additionally, 52 (M1) and 67 (M2) novel differentially expressed genes and, for the first time, several differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome markers were identified. In conclusion, the finding of novel motifs, TFs and protein-coding and lncRNA genes is an important step forward to fully understand the transcriptional machinery of macrophage activation. PMID:26117544

  17. Selective activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor achieved by allosteric potentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lei; Seager, Matthew A; Seager, Matthew; Wittmann, Marion; Jacobson, Marlene; Bickel, Denise; Burno, Maryann; Jones, Keith; Graufelds, Valerie Kuzmick; Xu, Guangping; Pearson, Michelle; McCampbell, Alexander; Gaspar, Renee; Shughrue, Paul; Danziger, Andrew; Regan, Christopher; Flick, Rose; Pascarella, Danette; Garson, Susan; Doran, Scott; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Veng, Lone; Lindsley, Craig W; Shipe, William; Kuduk, Scott; Sur, Cyrille; Kinney, Gene; Seabrook, Guy R; Ray, William J

    2009-09-15

    The forebrain cholinergic system promotes higher brain function in part by signaling through the M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). During Alzheimer's disease (AD), these cholinergic neurons degenerate, therefore selectively activating M(1) receptors could improve cognitive function in these patients while avoiding unwanted peripheral responses associated with non-selective muscarinic agonists. We describe here benzyl quinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA), a highly selective allosteric potentiator of the M(1) mAChR. BQCA reduces the concentration of ACh required to activate M(1) up to 129-fold with an inflection point value of 845 nM. No potentiation, agonism, or antagonism activity on other mAChRs is observed up to 100 microM. Furthermore studies in M(1)(-/-) mice demonstrates that BQCA requires M(1) to promote inositol phosphate turnover in primary neurons and to increase c-fos and arc RNA expression and ERK phosphorylation in the brain. Radioligand-binding assays, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicate that BQCA acts at an allosteric site involving residues Y179 and W400. BQCA reverses scopolamine-induced memory deficits in contextual fear conditioning, increases blood flow to the cerebral cortex, and increases wakefulness while reducing delta sleep. In contrast to M(1) allosteric agonists, which do not improve memory in scopolamine-challenged mice in contextual fear conditioning, BQCA induces beta-arrestin recruitment to M(1), suggesting a role for this signal transduction mechanism in the cholinergic modulation of memory. In summary, BQCA exploits an allosteric potentiation mechanism to provide selectivity for the M(1) receptor and represents a promising therapeutic strategy for cognitive disorders. PMID:19717450

  18. Selective activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor achieved by allosteric potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei; Seager, Matthew A.; Wittmann, Marion; Jacobson, Marlene; Bickel, Denise; Burno, Maryann; Jones, Keith; Graufelds, Valerie Kuzmick; Xu, Guangping; Pearson, Michelle; McCampbell, Alexander; Gaspar, Renee; Shughrue, Paul; Danziger, Andrew; Regan, Christopher; Flick, Rose; Pascarella, Danette; Garson, Susan; Doran, Scott; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Veng, Lone; Lindsley, Craig W.; Shipe, William; Kuduk, Scott; Sur, Cyrille; Kinney, Gene; Seabrook, Guy R.; Ray, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The forebrain cholinergic system promotes higher brain function in part by signaling through the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). During Alzheimer's disease (AD), these cholinergic neurons degenerate, therefore selectively activating M1 receptors could improve cognitive function in these patients while avoiding unwanted peripheral responses associated with non-selective muscarinic agonists. We describe here benzyl quinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA), a highly selective allosteric potentiator of the M1 mAChR. BQCA reduces the concentration of ACh required to activate M1 up to 129-fold with an inflection point value of 845 nM. No potentiation, agonism, or antagonism activity on other mAChRs is observed up to 100 μM. Furthermore studies in M1−/− mice demonstrates that BQCA requires M1 to promote inositol phosphate turnover in primary neurons and to increase c-fos and arc RNA expression and ERK phosphorylation in the brain. Radioligand-binding assays, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicate that BQCA acts at an allosteric site involving residues Y179 and W400. BQCA reverses scopolamine-induced memory deficits in contextual fear conditioning, increases blood flow to the cerebral cortex, and increases wakefulness while reducing delta sleep. In contrast to M1 allosteric agonists, which do not improve memory in scopolamine-challenged mice in contextual fear conditioning, BQCA induces β-arrestin recruitment to M1, suggesting a role for this signal transduction mechanism in the cholinergic modulation of memory. In summary, BQCA exploits an allosteric potentiation mechanism to provide selectivity for the M1 receptor and represents a promising therapeutic strategy for cognitive disorders. PMID:19717450

  19. Epigenetic Control of Macrophage Shape Transition towards an Atypical Elongated Phenotype by Histone Deacetylase Activity.

    PubMed

    Cabanel, Mariana; Brand, Camila; Oliveira-Nunes, Maria Cecilia; Cabral-Piccin, Mariela Pires; Lopes, Marcela Freitas; Brito, Jose Marques; de Oliveira, Felipe Leite; El-Cheikh, Marcia Cury; Carneiro, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory chronic pathologies are complex processes characterized by an imbalance between the resolution of the inflammatory phase and the establishment of tissue repair. The main players in these inflammatory pathologies are bone marrow derived monocytes (BMDMs). However, how monocyte differentiation is modulated to give rise to specific macrophage subpopulations (M1 or M2) that may either maintain the chronic inflammatory process or lead to wound healing is still unclear. Considering that inhibitors of Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) have an anti-inflammatory activity, we asked whether this enzyme would play a role on monocyte differentiation into M1 or M2 phenotype and in the cell shape transition that follows. We then induced murine bone marrow progenitors into monocyte/macrophage differentiation pathway using media containing GM-CSF and the HDAC blocker, Trichostatin A (TSA). We found that the pharmacological inhibition of HDAC activity led to a shape transition from the typical macrophage pancake-like shape into an elongated morphology, which was correlated to a mixed M1/M2 profile of cytokine and chemokine secretion. Our results present, for the first time, that HDAC activity acts as a regulator of macrophage differentiation in the absence of lymphocyte stimuli. We propose that HDAC activity down regulates macrophage plasticity favoring the pro-inflammatory phenotype. PMID:26196676

  20. Evidence for Classical Cholinergic Toxicity Associated with Selective Activation of M1 Muscarinic Receptors.

    PubMed

    Alt, Andrew; Pendri, Annapurna; Bertekap, Robert L; Li, Guo; Benitex, Yulia; Nophsker, Michelle; Rockwell, Kristin L; Burford, Neil T; Sum, Chi Shing; Chen, Jing; Herbst, John J; Ferrante, Meredith; Hendricson, Adam; Cvijic, Mary Ellen; Westphal, Ryan S; O'Connell, Jonathan; Banks, Martyn; Zhang, Litao; Gentles, Robert G; Jenkins, Susan; Loy, James; Macor, John E

    2016-02-01

    The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 1 (M1) receptors play an important role in cognition and memory, and are considered to be attractive targets for the development of novel medications to treat cognitive impairments seen in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Indeed, the M1 agonist xanomeline has been shown to produce beneficial cognitive effects in both Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia patients. Unfortunately, the therapeutic utility of xanomeline was limited by cholinergic side effects (sweating, salivation, gastrointestinal distress), which are believed to result from nonselective activation of other muscarinic receptor subtypes such as M2 and M3. Therefore, drug discovery efforts targeting the M1 receptor have focused on the discovery of compounds with improved selectivity profiles. Recently, allosteric M1 receptor ligands have been described, which exhibit excellent selectivity for M1 over other muscarinic receptor subtypes. In the current study, the following three compounds with mixed agonist/positive allosteric modulator activities that are highly functionally selective for the M1 receptor were tested in rats, dogs, and cynomologous monkeys: (3-((1S,2S)-2-hydrocyclohexyl)-6-((6-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methyl)benzo[h]quinazolin-4(3H)-one; 1-((4-cyano-4-(pyridin-2-yl)piperidin-1-yl)methyl)-4-oxo-4H-quinolizine-3-carboxylic acid; and (R)-ethyl 3-(2-methylbenzamido)-[1,4'-bipiperidine]-1'-carboxylate). Despite their selectivity for the M1 receptor, all three compounds elicited cholinergic side effects such as salivation, diarrhea, and emesis. These effects could not be explained by activity at other muscarinic receptor subtypes, or by activity at other receptors tested. Together, these results suggest that activation of M1 receptors alone is sufficient to produce unwanted cholinergic side effects such as those seen with xanomeline. This has important implications for the development of M1 receptor-targeted therapeutics since it

  1. Transcriptomic Analysis of Human Polarized Macrophages: More than One Role of Alternative Activation?

    PubMed Central

    Derlindati, Eleonora; Dei Cas, Alessandra; Montanini, Barbara; Spigoni, Valentina; Curella, Valentina; Aldigeri, Raffaella; Ardigò, Diego; Zavaroni, Ivana; Bonadonna, Riccardo C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population which in response to the cytokine milieu polarize in either classically activated macrophages (M1) or alternatively activated macrophages (M2). This plasticity makes macrophages essential in regulating inflammation, immune response and tissue remodeling and a novel therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The aim of the study was to describe the transcriptomic profiles of differently polarized human macrophages to generate new hypotheses on the biological function of the different macrophage subtypes. Methods and Results Polarization of circulating monocytes/macrophages of blood donors was induced in vitro by IFN-γ and LPS (M1), by IL-4 (M2a), and by IL-10 (M2c). Unstimulated cells (RM) served as time controls. Gene expression profile of M1, M2a, M2c and RM was assessed at 6, 12 and 24h after polarization with Whole Human Genome Agilent Microarray technique. When compared to RM, M1 significantly upregulated pathways involved in immunity and inflammation, whereas M2a did the opposite. Conversely, decreased and increased expression of mitochondrial metabolism, consistent with insulin resistant and insulin sensitive patterns, was seen in M1 and M2a, respectively. The time sequence in the expression of some pathways appeared to have some specific bearing on M1 function. Finally, canonical and non-canonical Wnt genes and gene groups, promoting inflammation and tissue remodeling, were upregulated in M2a compared to RM. Conclusion Our data in in vitro polarized human macrophages: 1. confirm and extend known inflammatory and anti-inflammatory gene expression patterns; 2. demonstrate changes in mitochondrial metabolism associated to insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in M1 and M2a, respectively; 3. highlight the potential relevance of gene expression timing in M1 function; 4. unveil enhanced expression of Wnt pathways in M2a suggesting a potential dual (pro-inflammatory and anti

  2. Mouse macrophage polarity and ROCK1 activity depend on RhoA and non-apoptotic Caspase 3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yianzhu; Minze, Laurie J; Mumma, Lindsay; Li, Xian C; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2016-02-15

    The macrophages have different subtypes with different functions in immune response and disease. It has been generally accepted that M1 macrophages are responsible for stimulation of immune system and inflammation while M2 macrophages play a role in tissue repair. Irrespective of the type, macrophage functions depend on actin cytoskeleton, which is under the control of small GTPase RhoA pathway and its downstream effector ROCK1. We generated RhoA-deleted macrophages and compared the effect of RhoA deletion on M0, M1 and M2 macrophage phenotype. Our studies showed that, unexpectedly, the RhoA deletion did not eliminate macrophage ROCK1 expression and increased ROCK1 activity. The RhoA deletion effect on macrophage phenotype, structure and polarity was different for each subtype. Moreover, our study indicates that the up-regulation of ROCK1 activity in RhoA-deleted macrophages and macrophage phenotype/polarity are dependent on non-apoptotic Caspase-3 and are sensitive to Caspase-3 inhibition. These novel findings will revise/complement our understanding of RhoA pathway regulation of cell structure and polarity. PMID:26875770

  3. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  4. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  5. Activation of mesenchymal stem cells by macrophages promotes tumor progression through immune suppressive effects

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiao-hua; Feng, Guo-wei; Wang, Zhong-liang; Du, Yang; Shen, Chen; Hui, Hui; Peng, Dong; Li, Zong-jin; Kong, De-ling; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer development and progression is linked to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Distinct TAMs subsets perform either protective or pathogenic effects in cancer. A protective role in carcinogenesis has been described for M1 macrophages, which activate antitumor mechanisms. By comparison, TAMs isolated from solid and metastatic tumors have a suppressive M2-like phenotype, which could support multiple aspects of tumor progression. Currently, it has not been clearly understood how macrophages in tumor-associated stroma could be hijacked to support tumor growth. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) actively interact with components of the innate immune system and display both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory effects. Here, we tested whether MSCs could favor the tumor to escape from immunologic surveillance in the presence of M1 macrophages. We found that MSCs educated by M1 condition medium (cMSCs) possessed a greatly enhanced ability in promoting tumor growth in vivo. Examination of cytokines/chemokines showed that the cMSCs acquired a regulatory profile, which expressed high levels of iNOS and MCP1. Consistent with an elevated MCP1 expression in cMSCs, the tumor-promoting effect of the cMSCs depended on MCP1 mediated macrophage recruitment to tumor sites. Furthermore, IL-6 secreted by the cMSCs could polarize infiltrated TAMs into M2-like macrophages. Therefore, when macrophages changed into M1 pro-inflammation type in tumor microenvironment, the MSCs would act as poor sensors and switchers to accelerate tumor growth. PMID:26988913

  6. Macrophage activation and induction of macrophage cytotoxicity by purified polysaccharide fractions from the plant Echinacea purpurea.

    PubMed Central

    Stimpel, M; Proksch, A; Wagner, H; Lohmann-Matthes, M L

    1984-01-01

    Purified polysaccharides (EPS) prepared from the plant Echinacea purpurea are shown to strongly activate macrophages. Macrophages activated with these substances develop pronounced extracellular cytotoxicity against tumor targets. The activation is brought about by EPS alone and is independent of any cooperative effect with lymphocytes. Also the production and secretion of oxygen radicals and interleukin 1 by macrophages is increased after activation with EPS. Cells of the macrophages lineage seem to be the main target for the action of these polysaccharides. EPS has no effect on T lymphocytes. B lymphocytes show a comparatively modest proliferation after incubation with E. purpurea EPS. Thus, these compounds, which are at least in tissue culture completely nontoxic, may be suited to activate in vivo cells of the macrophage system to cytotoxicity. They may therefore be of relevance in tumor and infectious systems. PMID:6389368

  7. Conditioned media from human macrophages of M1 phenotype attenuate the cytotoxic effect of 5‑fluorouracil on the HT‑29 colon cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Hedbrant, Alexander; Erlandsson, Ann; Delbro, Dick; Wijkander, Jonny

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapy, such as 5‑fluorouracil (5‑FU), is an obstacle for successful treatment of cancer. As a follow‑up of a previous study we have investigated the effect of conditioned media (CM) from macrophages of M1 or M2 phenotypes on 5‑FU cytotoxicity on the colon cancer cell lines HT‑29 and CACO‑2. HT‑29 cells, but not CACO‑2 cells, having been treated with a combination of M1 CM and 5‑FU recovered their cell growth to a much larger extent compared to cells having been treated with 5‑FU alone when further cultured for 7 days in fresh media. M1 CM treatment of HT‑29, but not CACO‑2 cells, induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 and G2/M phases. 5‑FU treatment induced accumulation of cells in S‑phase in both HT‑29 and CACO‑2 cells. This accumulation of cells in S‑phase was attenuated by combined M1 CM and 5‑FU treatment in HT‑29 cells, but not in CACO‑2 cells. The mRNA expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and 5‑FU metabolic enzymes were analyzed in an attempt to find possible mechanisms for the M1 CM induced attenuation of 5‑FU cytotoxicity in HT‑29. Thymidylate synthetase (TS) and thymidine phosphorylase (TP) were found to be substantially downregulated and upregulated, respectively, in HT‑29 cells treated with M1 CM, making them unlikely as mediators of reduced 5‑FU cytotoxicity. Among cell cycle regulating proteins, p21 was induced in HT‑29 cells, but not in CACO‑2 cells, in response to M1 CM treatment. However, small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of p21 had no effect on the M1 CM induced cell cycle arrest seen in HT‑29 and neither did it change the growth recovery after combined treatment of HT‑29 cells with M1 CM and 5‑FU. In conclusion, treatment of HT‑29 cells with M1 CM reduces the cytotoxic effect of 5‑FU and this is mediated by a M1 CM induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 and G2/M phases. So far, we lack an explanation why this action is

  8. [The biological activity of macrophages in health and disease].

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in immune response as phagocytes, antigen presenting cells and as effector cells of delayed-type hypersensitivity. Moreover, the activity of macrophages is associated with modulation of many biological processes during the whole life and depends on the actual macrophage phenotype induced under the influence of various microenvironmental stimuli. In pregnancy, placental macrophages induce the development of maternal tolerance to fetal antigens, while fetal macrophages are responsible for proper formation of tissues and organs. Residual macrophages play a very important role in tissue homeostasis, apoptotic cell clearance to prevent autoimmunization and first defense in infections. The inflammatory response of macrophages may be modulated by pathogens. Their suppressive activity is observed in immunologically privileged organs such as testes. In pathologies, macrophages are responsible for tissue damage in a case of nonspecific activation followed by overproduction of proinflammatory factors. Suppression of a specific immune response against tumors is mainly the effect of tumor associated macrophage (TAM) action. On the other hand, presentation of allergens or self-antigens by macrophages and their nonspecific activation by necrotic adipocytes leads to the induction of a chronic inflammatory response and impairment of immunity. Therefore, modulation of macrophage functions may be the key for improvement of therapy of cancer and allergic, autoimmune, metabolic, cardiovascular and Alzheimer's diseases. PMID:22922151

  9. Cytolytic activity against tumor cells by macrophage cell lines and augmentation by macrophage stimulants.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, T; Holden, H T

    1980-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that macrophage cell lines retained the ability to phagocytize, to secrete lysosomal enzymes, and to function as effector cells in antibody-dependent cellular cytoxicity. In this paper, the cytolytic activity of murine macrophage cell lines against tumor target cells was assessed using an 18-h 51Cr release assay. Of the macrophage cell lines tested, RAW 264, PU5-1.8 and IC-21 had intermediate to high levels of spontaneous cytolytic activity, P388D, and J774 had low to intermediate levels, while /WEHI-3 showed little or no cytolytic activity against RBL-5, MBL-2 and TU-5 target cells. Tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines could be augmented by the addition of macrophage stimulants, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide and poly I:C, indicating that the activation of macrophages by these stimulants does not require the participation of other cell types. Treatment with interferon also augmented the tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines. Although the mechanism by which these cell lines exert their spontaneous or boosted cytotoxic activity is not clear, it does not appear to be due to depletion of nutrients since cell lines with high metabolic and proliferative activities, such as WEHI-3 and RBL-5, showed little or no cytotoxicity and supernatants from the macrophage cell lines did not exert any cytotoxic effects in their essay. Thus, it appears that the different macrophage cell lines represent different levels of activation and/or differentiation and may be useful for studying the development of these processes as well as providing a useful tool for analyzing the mechanisms of macrophage-mediated cytolysis. PMID:6165690

  10. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, Esam E; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-07-01

    We mutated key amino acids of the human variant of the M1 muscarinic receptor that target ligand binding, receptor activation, and receptor-G protein interaction. We compared the effects of these mutations on the action of two atypical M1 functionally preferring agonists (N-desmethylclozapine and xanomeline) and two classical non-selective orthosteric agonists (carbachol and oxotremorine). Mutations of D105 in the orthosteric binding site and mutation of D99 located out of the orthosteric binding site decreased affinity of all tested agonists that was translated as a decrease in potency in accumulation of inositol phosphates and intracellular calcium mobilization. Mutation of D105 decreased the potency of the atypical agonist xanomeline more than that of the classical agonists carbachol and oxotremorine. Mutation of the residues involved in receptor activation (D71) and coupling to G-proteins (R123) completely abolished the functional responses to both classical and atypical agonists. Our data show that both classical and atypical agonists activate hM1 receptors by the same molecular switch that involves D71 in the second transmembrane helix. The principal difference among the studied agonists is rather in the way they interact with D105 in the orthosteric binding site. Furthermore, our data demonstrate a key role of D105 in xanomeline wash-resistant binding and persistent activation of hM1 by wash-resistant xanomeline. PMID:25882246

  11. High MUC2 expression in ovarian cancer is inversely associated with the M1/M2 ratio of tumor-associated macrophages and patient survival time.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-feng; Zhang, Mei-ying; Wu, Xin; Sun, Xiang-jun; Xu, Ting; He, Qi-zhi; Di, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Mucin 2 (MUC2) is a mucin molecule aberrantly expressed by ovarian cancer cells. Previous in vitro studies have indicated that MUC2 promotes cancer growth and metastasis through a tumor-associated macrophage (TAM)-dependent mechanism. However, this mechanism has never been linked to clinical oncology, and its prognostic significance needed to be clarified. Here, we collected 102 consecutive ovarian cancer specimens and used the multiple immuno-histo-chemical/-fluorescent technique to determine the correlations between the MUC2 expression status, the ratio of M1/M2 TAMs and the densities of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)(+) TAMs and COX-2(+) cancer cells. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and multivariate Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the prognostic influences of these parameters. As a result, we found that the MUC2 overexpression (immunostaining ++/+++) was significantly correlated with a reduced ratio of M1/M2 TAMs (p<0.001), an increased density of COX-2(+) TAMs (p<0.001) and an increased density of COX-2(+) cancer cells (p=0.017). Moreover, most of the M2 TAMs (93%-100%) and COX-2(+) TAMs (63%-89%) overlapped; and the COX-2(+) cancer cells were frequently observed near the COX-2(+) TAMs. In the Cox regression analysis, MUC2 overexpression was found to be an independent prognostic factor for ovarian cancer patients, of which the hazard ratio (HR) was 2.354 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.031-10.707, p=0.005). Also, the reduced ratio of M1/M2 TAMs and the increased densities of COX-2(+) TAMs and COX-2(+) cancer cells were demonstrated to be the predictors of poor prognosis, among which the reduced M1/M2 ratio possessed the highest HR (1.767, 95% CI: 1.061-6.957, p=0.019). All these findings revealed that MUC2 can concurrently exert M2-polarizing and COX-2-inducing effects on TAMs, by which it causes an imbalanced TAM M1-/M2-polarization pattern and induces local PGE2 synthesis (in both TAMs and cancer cells). The positive feedback between local PGE2

  12. Myelin alters the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages by activating PPARs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Foamy macrophages, containing myelin degradation products, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. Recent studies have described an altered phenotype of macrophages after myelin internalization. However, mechanisms by which myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype influences lesion progression remain unclear. Results We demonstrate that myelin as well as phosphatidylserine (PS), a phospholipid found in myelin, reduce nitric oxide production by macrophages through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ). Furthermore, uptake of PS by macrophages, after intravenous injection of PS-containing liposomes (PSLs), suppresses the production of inflammatory mediators and ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. The protective effect of PSLs in EAE animals is associated with a reduced immune cell infiltration into the central nervous system and decreased splenic cognate antigen specific proliferation. Interestingly, PPARβ/δ is activated in foamy macrophages in active MS lesions, indicating that myelin also activates PPARβ/δ in macrophages in the human brain. Conclusion Our data show that myelin modulates the phenotype of macrophages by PPAR activation, which may subsequently dampen MS lesion progression. Moreover, our results suggest that myelin-derived PS mediates PPARβ/δ activation in macrophages after myelin uptake. The immunoregulatory impact of naturally-occurring myelin lipids may hold promise for future MS therapeutics. PMID:24252308

  13. Hyperuricemia-induced NLRP3 activation of macrophages contributes to the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Mi; Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Kim, Se-Yun; Seo, Jung-Woo; Choi, Young-Wook; Kim, Dong-Jin; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Tae-Won; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo; Won, Kyu-Yeoun; Moon, Ju-Young

    2015-05-01

    IL-1β-secreting nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes play a pivotal role in triggering innate immune responses in metabolic disease. We investigated the role of soluble uric acid in NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages to demonstrate the effect of systemic hyperuricemia on progressive kidney damage in type 2 diabetes. THP-1 cells, human acute monocytic leukemia cells, were cultured to obtain macrophages, and HK-2 cells, human renal proximal tubule cells, were cultured and stimulated with uric acid. In vivo, we designed four rat groups as follows: 1) Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO); 2) Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF); 3) OLETF+high-fructose diet (HFD) for 16 wk; and 4) OLETF+HFD+allopurinol (10 mg/dl administered in the drinking water). Soluble uric acid stimulated NLRP3 inflammasomes to produce IL-1β in macrophages. Uric acid-induced MitoSOX mediates NLRP3 activation and IL-1β secretion. IL-1β from macrophages activates NF-κB in cocultured proximal tubular cells. In vivo, intrarenal IL-1β expression and macrophage infiltration increased in HFD-fed OLETF rats. Lowering the serum uric acid level resulted in improving the albuminuria, tubular injury, macrophage infiltration, and renal IL-1β (60% of HFD-fed OLETF) independently of glycemic control. Direct activation of proximal tubular cells by uric acid resulted in (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 and high mobility group box-1 release and accelerated macrophage recruitment and the M1 phenotype. Taken together, these data support direct roles of hyperuricemia in activating NLRP3 inflammasomes in macrophages, promoting chemokine signaling in the proximal tubule and contributing to the progression of diabetic nephropathy through cross talk between macrophages and proximal tubular cells. PMID:25651569

  14. The age-related neuroinflammatory environment promotes macrophage activation, which negatively impacts synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Costello, Derek A; Keenan, Kathryn; McManus, Róisín M; Falvey, Aidan; Lynch, Marina A

    2016-07-01

    The impact of infiltration of macrophages into the brain is debatable with evidence of both beneficial and detrimental effects. Recent work suggests that inflammatory macrophages, with an inflammatory phenotype that resembles the M1 activation state, may be detrimental, whereas anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophages may be beneficial. We set up a model to examine the response of bone marrow-derived macrophages to the inflammatory milieu that occurs in the aged brain. Expression of MHCII and CD40 was increased in macrophages incubated with soluble brain extract prepared from aged, compared with young, mice and this was accompanied by increased production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. Analysis of soluble brain extract indicated that it contained increased concentrations of several inflammatory mediators and, importantly, when bone marrow-derived macrophages were incubated in the inflammatory cytokines that were increased and applied to hippocampal slices, long-term potentiation was inhibited. The data suggest that infiltrating macrophages respond to local conditions and, in the case of aging, adopt an inflammatory phenotype that ultimately has a neurodetrimental effect. PMID:27255823

  15. Whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS: a new tool to assess the multifaceted activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, Richard; Daumas, Aurélie; Ghigo, Eric; Capo, Christian; Mege, Jean-Louis; Textoris, Julien

    2012-10-22

    Whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS is routinely used to identify bacterial species in clinical samples. This technique has also proven to allow identification of intact mammalian cells, including macrophages. Here, we wondered whether this approach enabled the assessment human macrophages plasticity. The whole-cell MALDI-TOF spectra of macrophages stimulated with IFN-γ and IL-4, two inducers of M1 and M2 macrophage polarisation, consisted of peaks ranging from 2 to 12 kDa. The spectra of unstimulated and stimulated macrophages were clearly different. The fingerprints induced by the M1 agonists, IFN-γ, TNF, LPS and LPS+IFN-γ, and the M2 agonists, IL-4, TGF-β1 and IL-10, were specific and readily identifiable. Thus, whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS was able to characterise M1 and M2 macrophage subtypes. In addition, the fingerprints induced by extracellular (group B Streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus) or intracellular (BCG, Orientia tsutsugamushi, Coxiella burnetii) bacteria were bacterium-specific. The whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS fingerprints therefore revealed the multifaceted activation of human macrophages. This approach opened a new avenue of studies to assess the immune response in the clinical setting, by monitoring the various activation patterns of immune cells in pathological conditions. PMID:22967923

  16. Lysophosphatidylcholine perpetuates macrophage polarization toward classically activated phenotype in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofei; Qiu, Chunguang; Zhao, Luosha

    2014-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory macrophages are involved in vascular inflammation and serve as the major effector cells in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major phospholipid moiety affixed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and thought to play important roles in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study we described that a bioactive lipid derivative, lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), generated from hydrolysis of the PC moiety of oxidized LDL, promoted and stabilized a strong M1 phenotype in macrophage polarization. Another derivative, 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE), did not show the similar biological function. Blockade of G protein coupled receptor, G2A, which mediates the signal transduction of lysoPC, diminished the effects of lysoPC on the macrophage polarization toward M1 phenotype. The results provide insights into the new mechanism on how oxidized LDL participates in tissue inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:24841857

  17. Alpha-D-galactosylation of surface fucoglycoconjugate(s) upon stimulation/activation of murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Petryniak, J

    1992-04-01

    Murine resident macrophages express, on their surface, carbohydrate epitopes which undergo changes during their stimulation/activation as monitored by binding of 125I labelled Evonymus europaea and Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 lectins. Treatment of the stimulated macrophages with coffee bean alpha-galactosidase abolished binding of the GS I-B4 isolectin and changed the binding pattern of the Evonymus lectin. The affinity (Ka) of Evonymus lectin for alpha-galactosidase-treated macrophages decreased approximately 23-fold, from 1.25 x 10(8) M-1 to 5.5 x 10(6) M-1. Subsequent digestion of alpha-galactosidase-treated macrophages with alpha-L-fucosidase from Trichomonas foetus, further reduced binding of Evonymus lectin. Resident macrophages showed the same pattern of Evonymus lectin binding, with the same affinity, as alpha-galactosidase-treated, stimulated macrophages. These results, together with a consideration of the carbohydrate binding specificity of the Evonymus lectin which, in the absence of alpha-D-galactosyl groups, requires alpha-L-fucosyl groups for binding, indicate the presence, on resident macrophages, of glycoconjugates with terminal alpha-L-fucosyl residues. It is also concluded that during macrophage stimulation/activation alpha-D-galactosyl residues are added to this glycoconjugate and that they form part of the receptor for Evonymus lectin. The same glycoconjugate(s) is/are also expressed on the activated macrophage IC-21 cell line which exhibits the same characteristics as that of stimulated peritoneal macrophages, i.e., it contains alpha-D-galactosyl end groups and is resistant to the action of trypsin. Both lectins were also specifically bound to Corynaebacterium parvum activated macrophages. PMID:1344714

  18. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  19. Suppression of microRNA activity amplifies IFN-γ-induced macrophage activation and promotes anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Baer, Caroline; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Laoui, Damya; Thompson, Danielle; Hansen, Sarah K; Kiialainen, Anna; Hoves, Sabine; Ries, Carola H; Ooi, Chia-Huey; De Palma, Michele

    2016-07-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) largely express an alternatively activated (or M2) phenotype, which entails immunosuppressive and tumour-promoting capabilities. Reprogramming TAMs towards a classically activated (M1) phenotype may thwart tumour-associated immunosuppression and unleash anti-tumour immunity. Here we show that conditional deletion of the microRNA (miRNA)-processing enzyme DICER in macrophages prompts M1-like TAM programming, characterized by hyperactive IFN-γ/STAT1 signalling. This rewiring abated the immunosuppressive capacity of TAMs and fostered the recruitment of activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) to the tumours. CTL-derived IFN-γ exacerbated M1 polarization of Dicer1-deficient TAMs and inhibited tumour growth. Remarkably, DICER deficiency in TAMs negated the anti-tumoral effects of macrophage depletion by anti-CSF1R antibodies, and enabled complete tumour eradication by PD1 checkpoint blockade or CD40 agonistic antibodies. Finally, genetic rescue of Let-7 miRNA activity in Dicer1-deficient TAMs partly restored their M2-like phenotype and decreased tumour-infiltrating CTLs. These findings suggest that DICER/Let-7 activity opposes IFN-γ-induced, immunostimulatory M1-like TAM activation, with potential therapeutic implications. PMID:27295554

  20. CCL2 Mediates Neuron-Macrophage Interactions to Drive Proregenerative Macrophage Activation Following Preconditioning Injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Shin, Hae Young; Cui, Yuexian; Kim, Hyosil; Thi, Anh Hong Le; Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Byung Gon

    2015-12-01

    CNS neurons in adult mammals do not spontaneously regenerate axons after spinal cord injury. Preconditioning peripheral nerve injury allows the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory axons to regenerate beyond the injury site by promoting expression of regeneration-associated genes. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury increases the number of macrophages in the DRGs and that the activated macrophages are critical to the enhancement of intrinsic regeneration capacity. The present study identifies a novel chemokine signal mediated by CCL2 that links regenerating neurons with proregenerative macrophage activation. Neutralization of CCL2 abolished the neurite outgrowth activity of conditioned medium obtained from neuron-macrophage cocultures treated with cAMP. The neuron-macrophage interactions that produced outgrowth-promoting conditioned medium required CCL2 in neurons and CCR2/CCR4 in macrophages. The conditioning effects were abolished in CCL2-deficient mice at 3 and 7 d after sciatic nerve injury, but CCL2 was dispensable for the initial growth response and upregulation of GAP-43 at the 1 d time point. Intraganglionic injection of CCL2 mimicked conditioning injury by mobilizing M2-like macrophages. Finally, overexpression of CCL2 in DRGs promoted sensory axon regeneration in a rat spinal cord injury model without harmful side effects. Our data suggest that CCL2-mediated neuron-macrophage interaction plays a critical role for amplification and maintenance of enhanced regenerative capacity by preconditioning peripheral nerve injury. Manipulation of chemokine signaling mediating neuron-macrophage interactions may represent a novel therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury. PMID:26631474

  1. Exopolysaccharide from Trichoderma pseudokoningii induces macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Jun; Qin, Guozheng; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Huixia; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-09-20

    In this study, we evaluated the immunomodulatory activity of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from Trichoderma pseudokoningii and investigated the molecular mechanism of EPS-mediated activation of macrophages. Results revealed that EPS could significantly induce the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and enhance phagocytic activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that EPS promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 subunit. Western blot analysis showed that EPS increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein, the degradation of IκB-α and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, pretreatment of RAW 264.7 cells with specific inhibitors of NF-κB and MAPKs significantly attenuated EPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1β production. EPS also induced the inhibition of cytokine secretion by special antibodies against Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and Dectin-1. These data suggest that EPS from Trichoderma pseudokoningii activates RAW 264.7 cells through NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways via TLR4 and Dectin-1. PMID:27261736

  2. TGFβ signaling plays a critical role in promoting alternative macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Upon stimulation with different cytokines, macrophages can undergo classical or alternative activation to become M1 or M2 macrophages. Alternatively activated (or M2) macrophages are defined by their expression of specific gene products and play an important role in containing inflammation, removing apoptotic cells and repairing tissue damage. Whereas it is well-established that IL-4 can drive alternative activation, if lack of TGFβ signaling at physiological levels affects M2 polarization has not been addressed. Results Vav1-Cre x TβRIIfx/fx mice, lacking TβRII function in hematopoietic cells, exhibited uncontrolled pulmonary inflammation and developed a lethal autoimmune syndrome at young age. This was accompanied by significantly increased numbers of splenic neutrophils and T cells as well as elevated hepatic macrophage infiltration and bone marrow monocyte counts. TβRII-/- CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in the lymph nodes and spleen expressed increased cell surface CD44, and CD69 was also higher on CD4+ lymph node T-cells. Loss of TβRII in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) did not affect the ability of these cells to perform efferocytosis. However, these cells were defective in basal and IL-4-induced arg1 mRNA and Arginase-1 protein production. Moreover, the transcription of genes that are typically upregulated in M2-polarized macrophages, such as ym1, mcr2 and mgl2, was also decreased in peritoneal macrophages and IL-4-stimulated TβRII-/- BMDMs. We found that cell surface and mRNA expression of Galectin-3, which also regulates M2 macrophage polarization, was lower in TβRII-/- BMDMs. Very interestingly, the impaired ability of these null mutant BMDMs to differentiate into IL-4 polarized macrophages was Stat6- and Smad3-independent, but correlated with reduced levels of phospho-Akt and β-catenin. Conclusions Our results establish a novel biological role for TGFβ signaling in controlling expression of genes characteristic for alternatively

  3. Forced Activation of Notch in Macrophages Represses Tumor Growth by Upregulating miR-125a and Disabling Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Long; Huang, Fei; He, Fei; Gao, Chun-Chen; Liang, Shi-Qian; Ma, Peng-Fei; Dong, Guang-Ying; Han, Hua; Qin, Hong-Yan

    2016-03-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) contribute greatly to hallmarks of cancer. Notch blockade was shown to arrest TAM differentiation, but the precise role and underlying mechanisms require elucidation. In this study, we employed a transgenic mouse model in which the Notch1 intracellular domain (NIC) is activated conditionally to define the effects of active Notch1 signaling in macrophages. NIC overexpression had no effect on TAM differentiation, but it abrogated TAM function, leading to repressed growth of transplanted tumors. Macrophage miRNA profiling identified a novel downstream mediator of Notch signaling, miR-125a, which was upregulated through an RBP-J-binding site at the first intronic enhancer of the host gene Spaca6A. miR-125a functioned downstream of Notch signaling to reciprocally influence polarization of M1 and M2 macrophages by regulating factor inhibiting hypoxia inducible factor-1α and IRF4, respectively. Notably, macrophages transfected with miR-125a mimetics increased phagocytic activity and repressed tumor growth by remodeling the immune microenvironment. We also identified a positive feedback loop for miR-125a expression mediated by RYBP and YY1. Taken together, our results showed that Notch signaling not only supported the differentiation of TAM but also antagonized their protumorigenic function through miR-125a. Targeting this miRNA may reprogram macrophages in the tumor microenvironment and restore their antitumor potential. PMID:26759236

  4. Acquisition of regulators of complement activation by Streptococcus pyogenes serotype M1.

    PubMed

    Pandiripally, Vinod; Gregory, Eugene; Cue, David

    2002-11-01

    Opsonization of bacteria by complement proteins is an important component of the immune response. The pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes has evolved multiple mechanisms for the evasion of complement-mediated opsonization. One mechanism involves the binding of human regulators of complement activation such as factor H (FH) and FH-like protein 1 (FHL-1). Acquisition of these regulatory proteins can limit deposition of the opsonin C3b on bacteria, thus decreasing the pathogen's susceptibility to phagocytosis. Binding of complement regulatory proteins by S. pyogenes has previously been attributed to the streptococcal M and M-like proteins. Here, we report that the S. pyogenes cell surface protein Fba can mediate binding of FH and FHL-1. We constructed mutant derivatives of S. pyogenes that lack Fba, M1 protein, or both proteins and assayed the strains for FH binding, susceptibility to phagocytosis, and C3 deposition. Fba expression was found to be sufficient for binding of purified FH as well as for binding of FH and FHL-1 from human plasma. Plasma adsorption experiments also revealed that M1(+) Fba(+) streptococci preferentially bind FHL-1, whereas M1(-) Fba(+) streptococci have similar affinities for FH and FHL-1. Fba was found to contribute to the survival of streptococci incubated with human blood and to inhibit C3 deposition on bacterial cells. Streptococci harvested from log-phase cultures readily bound FH, but binding was greatly reduced for bacteria obtained from stationary-phase cultures. Bacteria cultured in the presence of the protease inhibitor E64 maintained FH binding activity in stationary phase, suggesting that Fba is removed from the cell surface via proteolysis. Western analyses confirmed that E64 stabilizes cell surface expression of Fba. These data indicate that Fba is an antiopsonic, antiphagocytic protein that may be regulated by cell surface proteolysis. PMID:12379699

  5. Acquisition of Regulators of Complement Activation by Streptococcus pyogenes Serotype M1

    PubMed Central

    Pandiripally, Vinod; Gregory, Eugene; Cue, David

    2002-01-01

    Opsonization of bacteria by complement proteins is an important component of the immune response. The pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes has evolved multiple mechanisms for the evasion of complement-mediated opsonization. One mechanism involves the binding of human regulators of complement activation such as factor H (FH) and FH-like protein 1 (FHL-1). Acquisition of these regulatory proteins can limit deposition of the opsonin C3b on bacteria, thus decreasing the pathogen's susceptibility to phagocytosis. Binding of complement regulatory proteins by S. pyogenes has previously been attributed to the streptococcal M and M-like proteins. Here, we report that the S. pyogenes cell surface protein Fba can mediate binding of FH and FHL-1. We constructed mutant derivatives of S. pyogenes that lack Fba, M1 protein, or both proteins and assayed the strains for FH binding, susceptibility to phagocytosis, and C3 deposition. Fba expression was found to be sufficient for binding of purified FH as well as for binding of FH and FHL-1 from human plasma. Plasma adsorption experiments also revealed that M1+ Fba+ streptococci preferentially bind FHL-1, whereas M1− Fba+ streptococci have similar affinities for FH and FHL-1. Fba was found to contribute to the survival of streptococci incubated with human blood and to inhibit C3 deposition on bacterial cells. Streptococci harvested from log-phase cultures readily bound FH, but binding was greatly reduced for bacteria obtained from stationary-phase cultures. Bacteria cultured in the presence of the protease inhibitor E64 maintained FH binding activity in stationary phase, suggesting that Fba is removed from the cell surface via proteolysis. Western analyses confirmed that E64 stabilizes cell surface expression of Fba. These data indicate that Fba is an antiopsonic, antiphagocytic protein that may be regulated by cell surface proteolysis. PMID:12379699

  6. Effect of lectins on mouse peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activity.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, G; Porras, F; Fernández, L; Vázquez, L; Zenteno, E

    1994-11-01

    We studied the in vitro ability of lectin-treated murine peritoneal macrophages to attach and phagocytize particulate antigens. Glucose and mannose specific lectins such as Con-A and lentil lectin, as well as complex lactosamine residues specific lectins, such as Phaseolus vulgaris var. cacahuate and Phaseolus coccineus var. alubia, increased the macrophage phagocytic activity towards heterologous erythrocytes, whereas peanut agglutinin, a galactose-specific lectin, diminished the macrophage phagocytic activity. These results suggest that a galactose-N-acetyl-D galactosamine-containing structure could participate as negative modulator of the phagocytic activity. PMID:7851961

  7. Macrophages inhibit human osteosarcoma cell growth after activation with the bacterial cell wall derivative liposomal muramyl tripeptide in combination with interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In osteosarcoma, the presence of tumor-infiltrating macrophages positively correlates with patient survival in contrast to the negative effect of tumor-associated macrophages in patients with other tumors. Liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) has been introduced in the treatment of osteosarcoma patients, which may enhance the potential anti-tumor activity of macrophages. Direct anti-tumor activity of human macrophages against human osteosarcoma cells has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed osteosarcoma cell growth after co-culture with human macrophages. Methods Monocyte-derived M1-like and M2-like macrophages were polarized with LPS + IFN-γ, L-MTP-PE +/− IFN-γ or IL-10 and incubated with osteosarcoma cells. Two days later, viable tumor cell numbers were analyzed. Antibody-dependent effects were investigated using the therapeutic anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab. Results M1-like macrophages inhibited osteosarcoma cell growth when activated with LPS + IFN-γ. Likewise, stimulation of M1-like macrophages with liposomal muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) inhibited tumor growth, but only when combined with IFN-γ. Addition of the tumor-reactive anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab did not further improve the anti-tumor activity of activated M1-like macrophages. The inhibition was mediated by supernatants of activated M1-like macrophages, containing TNF-α and IL-1β. However, specific blockage of these cytokines, nitric oxide or reactive oxygen species did not inhibit the anti-tumor effect, suggesting the involvement of other soluble factors released upon macrophage activation. While LPS + IFN-γ–activated M2-like macrophages had low anti-tumor activity, IL-10–polarized M2-like macrophages were able to reduce osteosarcoma cell growth in the presence of the anti-EGFR cetuximab involving antibody-dependent tumor cell phagocytosis. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human macrophages can be induced to exert direct anti

  8. Brazilian Red Propolis Attenuates Inflammatory Signaling Cascade in LPS-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Alencar, Severino M.; Rosalen, Pedro L.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies suggested an anti-inflammatory property of Brazilian red propolis (BRP), the mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of BRP and its activity on macrophages were still not elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate whether BRP attenuates the inflammatory effect of LPS on macrophages and to investigate its underlying mechanisms. BRP was added to RAW 264.7 murine macrophages after activation with LPS. NO production, cell viability, cytokines profile were evaluated. Activation of inflammatory signaling pathways and macrophage polarization were determined by RT-qPCR and Western blot. BRP at 50 μg/ml inhibited NO production by 78% without affecting cell viability. Cd80 and Cd86 were upregulated whereas mrc1 was down regulated by BRP indicating macrophage polarization at M1. BRP attenuated the production of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-12, GM-CSF, IFN-Ɣ, IL-1β in cell supernatants although levels of TNF- α and IL-6 were slightly increased after BRP treatment. Levels of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β were also reduced by BRP. BRP significantly reduced the up-regulation promoted by LPS of transcription of genes in inflammatory signaling (Pdk1, Pak1, Nfkb1, Mtcp1, Gsk3b, Fos and Elk1) and of Il1β and Il1f9 (fold-change rate > 5), which were further confirmed by the inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Furthermore, the upstream adaptor MyD88 adaptor-like (Mal), also known as TIRAP, involved in TLR2 and TLR4 signaling, was down- regulated in BRP treated LPS-activated macrophages. Given that BRP inhibited multiple signaling pathways in macrophages involved in the inflammatory process activated by LPS, our data indicated that BRP is a noteworthy food-source for the discovery of new bioactive compounds and a potential candidate to attenuate exhacerbated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26660901

  9. The ventral tegmental area modulates intracortical microstimulation (ICMS)-evoked M1 activity in a time-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kunori, Nobuo; Kajiwara, Riichi; Takashima, Ichiro

    2016-03-11

    Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS)-evoked neural activity combined with ventral tegmental area (VTA) stimulation was studied in rat primary motor cortex (M1). We used voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging to analyze the spatiotemporal dynamics of M1 activity following VTA-M1 paired stimulation. VTA stimulation was preceded by M1 ICMS at inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs) of 15-350ms. VSD imaging showed an excitatory-inhibitory sequence of neural activity after composing VTA stimulus- and ICMS-induced M1 neural activity. To evaluate the net ICMS M1 response, the optical response to unpaired VTA stimulation was subtracted from the VTA-M1 paired response. This revealed that the net ICMS-evoked M1 neural activity was inhibited when the ISI was 30-50ms, but highly facilitated when the ISI was 100-350ms. These results suggest that VTA modulates M1 excitability in the order of tens to hundreds of milliseconds and might directly affect the motor command generation process in the M1. PMID:26827719

  10. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  11. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  12. Salicylate improves macrophage cholesterol homeostasis via activation of Ampk.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Morgan D; Ford, Rebecca J; McGregor, Chelsea P; LeBlond, Nicholas D; Snider, Shayne A; Stypa, Stephanie A; Day, Emily A; Lhoták, Šárka; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Austin, Richard C; Kemp, Bruce E; Steinberg, Gregory R

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis stems from imbalances in lipid metabolism and leads to maladaptive inflammatory responses. The AMP-activated protein kinase (Ampk) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates many aspects of lipid and energy metabolism, although its specific role in controlling macrophage cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We sought to address this question by testing the effects of direct Ampk activators in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from Ampk β1-deficient (β1(-/-)) mice. Macrophages from Ampk β1(-/-) mice had enhanced lipogenic capacity and diminished cholesterol efflux, although cholesterol uptake was unaffected. Direct activation of Ampk β1 via salicylate (the unacetylated form of aspirin) or A-769662 (a small molecule activator), decreased the synthesis of FAs and sterols in WT but not Ampk β1(-/-) macrophages. In lipid-laden macrophages, Ampk activation decreased cholesterol content (foam cell formation) and increased cholesterol efflux to HDL and apoA-I, effects that occurred in an Ampk β1-dependent manner. Increased cholesterol efflux was also associated with increased gene expression of the ATP binding cassette transporters, Abcg1 and Abca1. Moreover, in vivo reverse cholesterol transport was suppressed in mice that received Ampk β1(-/-) macrophages compared with the WT control. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting macrophage Ampk with new or existing drugs for the possible reduction in foam cell formation during the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:25773887

  13. Toxoplasma gondii Chitinase Induces Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Sardinha-Silva, Aline; da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Pessoni, André Moreira; Pinzan, Camila Figueiredo; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Cecílio, Nerry Tatiana; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Damásio, André Ricardo Lima; Pedersoli, Wellington Ramos; Mineo, José Roberto; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite found worldwide that is able to chronically infect almost all vertebrate species, especially birds and mammalians. Chitinases are essential to various biological processes, and some pathogens rely on chitinases for successful parasitization. Here, we purified and characterized a chitinase from T. gondii. The enzyme, provisionally named Tg_chitinase, has a molecular mass of 13.7 kDa and exhibits a Km of 0.34 mM and a Vmax of 2.64. The optimal environmental conditions for enzymatic function were at pH 4.0 and 50°C. Tg_chitinase was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of highly virulent T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites, mainly at the apical extremity. Tg_chitinase induced macrophage activation as manifested by the production of high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, a pathogenic hallmark of T. gondii infection. In conclusion, to our knowledge, we describe for the first time a chitinase of T. gondii tachyzoites and provide evidence that this enzyme might influence the pathogenesis of T. gondii infection. PMID:26659253

  14. Reactive oxygen species in the tumor niche triggers altered activation of macrophages and immunosuppression: Role of fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sayan; Mukherjee, Sudeshna; Choudhury, Sreetama; Gupta, Payal; Adhikary, Arghya; Baral, Rathindranath; Chattopadhyay, Sreya

    2015-07-01

    Macrophages are projected as one of the key players responsible for the progression of cancer. Classically activated (M1) macrophages are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense, while alternatively activated (M2) macrophages are associated with immunosuppression. Macrophages residing at the site of neoplastic growth are alternately activated and are referred to as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). These "cooperate" with tumor tissue, promoting increased proliferation and immune escape. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors like fluoxetine have recently been reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. We used fluoxetine to target tumor-associated inflammation and consequent alternate polarization of macrophages. We established that murine peritoneal macrophages progressed towards an altered activation state when exposed to cell-free tumor fluid, as evidenced by increased IL-6, IL-4 and IL-10 levels. These polarized macrophages showed significant pro-oxidant bias and increased p65 nuclear localization. It was further observed that these altered macrophages could induce oxidative insult and apoptosis in cultured mouse CD3(+) T cells. To validate these findings, we replicated key experiments in vivo, and observed that there was increased serum IL-6, IL-4 and IL-10 in tumor-bearing animals, with increased % CD206(+) cells within the tumor niche. TAMs showed increased nuclear localization of p65 with decreased Nrf2 expression in the nucleus. These results were associated with increase in apoptosis of CD3(+) T cells co-cultured with TAM-spent media. We could establish that fluoxetine treatment could specifically re-educate the macrophages both in vitro and in vivo by skewing their phenotype such that immune suppression mediated by tumor-dictated macrophages was successfully mitigated. PMID:25819340

  15. Macrophage Polarization in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Zou, Xian-Biao; Chai, Yan-Fen; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are two hallmarks of macrophages. M1 macrophages (classically activated macrophages) are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense against infection, while M2 macrophages (alternatively activated macrophages) are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions and tissue remodeling, and they represent two terminals of the full spectrum of macrophage activation. Transformation of different phenotypes of macrophages regulates the initiation, development, and cessation of inflammatory diseases. Here we reviewed the characters and functions of macrophage polarization in infection, atherosclerosis, obesity, tumor, asthma, and sepsis, and proposed that targeting macrophage polarization and skewing their phenotype to adapt to the microenvironment might hold great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24910531

  16. Macrophage activation and polarization modify P2X7 receptor secretome influencing the inflammatory process

    PubMed Central

    de Torre-Minguela, Carlos; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Gómez, Ana I.; Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) on M1 polarized macrophages induces the assembly of the NLRP3 inflammasome leading to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the establishment of the inflammatory response. However, P2X7R signaling to the NLRP3 inflammasome is uncoupled on M2 macrophages without changes on receptor activation. In this study, we analyzed P2X7R secretome in wild-type and P2X7R-deficient macrophages polarized either to M1 or M2 and proved that proteins released after P2X7R stimulation goes beyond caspase-1 secretome. The characterization of P2X7R-secretome reveals a new function of this receptor through a fine-tuning of protein release. We found that P2X7R stimulation in macrophages is able to release potent anti-inflammatory proteins, such as Annexin A1, independently of their polarization state suggesting for first time a potential role for P2X7R during resolution of the inflammation and not linked to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results are of prime importance for the development of therapeutics targeting P2X7R. PMID:26935289

  17. Molecular cloning and function characterization of a new macrophage-activating protein from Tremella fuciformis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chih-Liang; Chang, An-Ju; Kuo, Xhao-Kai; Sheu, Fuu

    2014-02-19

    Silver ear mushroom ( Tremella fuciformis ) is an edible fungus with health benefits. In this study, we purified a new T. fuciformis protein (TFP) and demonstrated its ability to activate primary murine macrophages. The isolation procedure involved ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion exchange chromatography. TFP naturally formed a 24 kDa homodimeric protein and did not contain glycan residues. The TFP gene was cloned using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method, and the cDNA sequence of TFP was composed of 408 nucleotides with a 336 nucleotide open reading frame encoding a 112 amino acid protein. TFP was capable of stimulating TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-1ra, and IL-12 production in addition to CD86/MHC class II expression, mRNA expression of M1-type chemokines, and nuclear NF-κB accumulation in murine peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, TFP failed to stimulate TLR4-neutralized and TLR4-knockout macrophages, suggesting that TLR4 is a required receptor for TFP signaling on macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that TFP may be an important bioactive compound from T. fuciformis that induces M1-polarized activation through a TLR4-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:24400969

  18. Activation of M1/4 receptors phase advances the hamster circadian clock during the day.

    PubMed

    Basu, Priyoneel; Wensel, Adrienne L; McKibbon, Reid; Lefebvre, Nicole; Antle, Michael C

    2016-05-16

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) can be reset by the cholinergic agonist carbachol. In hamsters, intraSCN carbachol produces phase advances during the day. This phenomenon has previously been attributed to the muscarinic receptors, as carbachol-induced phase shifts are blocked by pretreatment with the muscarinic antagonist atropine. The SCN contains all five muscarinic receptors, leaving open the question as to which muscarinic receptors mediate these shifts. Here we test two selective muscarinic agonists, the M1/4 agonist McN-A-343 and the M2/3 agonist bethanechol, in addition to the non-selective cholinergic agonist carbachol. Consistent with previous reports, carbachol produced significant phase advances when injected to the SCN during the mid-subjective day. At the doses used here, McN-A-343, but not bethanechol, also produced significant phase shifts when injected to the SCN during the mid-subjective day. Phase shifts to McN-A-343 were as large as those produced by carbachol, suggesting that activation of the M1/4 receptors alone can fully account for the daytime phase advances produced by cholinergic agonists. Given acetylcholine's role in arousal, and the similarity between phase advances to carbachol/McN-A-343 and to exercise and arousal manipulations, it is possible that acetylcholine may contribute to non-photic resetting of the circadian clock. PMID:27063283

  19. Jacalin-Activated Macrophages Exhibit an Antitumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Pereira Ruas, Luciana; Chain Veronez, Luciana; Herrero Geraldino, Thais; Rossetto de Morais, Fabiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an ambiguous and complex role in the carcinogenic process, since these cells can be polarized into different phenotypes (proinflammatory, antitumor cells or anti-inflammatory, protumor cells) by the tumor microenvironment. Given that the interactions between tumor cells and TAMs involve several players, a better understanding of the function and regulation of TAMs is crucial to interfere with their differentiation in attempts to skew TAM polarization into cells with a proinflammatory antitumor phenotype. In this study, we investigated the modulation of macrophage tumoricidal activities by the lectin jacalin. Jacalin bound to macrophage surface and induced the expression and/or release of mainly proinflammatory cytokines via NF-κB signaling, as well as increased iNOS mRNA expression, suggesting that the lectin polarizes macrophages toward the antitumor phenotype. Therefore, tumoricidal activities of jacalin-stimulated macrophages were evaluated. High rates of tumor cell (human colon, HT-29, and breast, MCF-7, cells) apoptosis were observed upon incubation with supernatants from jacalin-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that jacalin, by exerting a proinflammatory activity, can direct macrophages to an antitumor phenotype. Deep knowledge of the regulation of TAM functions is essential for the development of innovative anticancer strategies. PMID:27119077

  20. Jacalin-Activated Macrophages Exhibit an Antitumor Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Pereira Ruas, Luciana; Chain Veronez, Luciana; Herrero Geraldino, Thais; Rossetto de Morais, Fabiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an ambiguous and complex role in the carcinogenic process, since these cells can be polarized into different phenotypes (proinflammatory, antitumor cells or anti-inflammatory, protumor cells) by the tumor microenvironment. Given that the interactions between tumor cells and TAMs involve several players, a better understanding of the function and regulation of TAMs is crucial to interfere with their differentiation in attempts to skew TAM polarization into cells with a proinflammatory antitumor phenotype. In this study, we investigated the modulation of macrophage tumoricidal activities by the lectin jacalin. Jacalin bound to macrophage surface and induced the expression and/or release of mainly proinflammatory cytokines via NF-κB signaling, as well as increased iNOS mRNA expression, suggesting that the lectin polarizes macrophages toward the antitumor phenotype. Therefore, tumoricidal activities of jacalin-stimulated macrophages were evaluated. High rates of tumor cell (human colon, HT-29, and breast, MCF-7, cells) apoptosis were observed upon incubation with supernatants from jacalin-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that jacalin, by exerting a proinflammatory activity, can direct macrophages to an antitumor phenotype. Deep knowledge of the regulation of TAM functions is essential for the development of innovative anticancer strategies. PMID:27119077

  1. Ginger extract inhibits LPS induced macrophage activation and function

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Macrophages play a dual role in host defence. They act as the first line of defence by mounting an inflammatory response to antigen exposure and also act as antigen presenting cells and initiate the adaptive immune response. They are also the primary infiltrating cells at the site of inflammation. Inhibition of macrophage activation is one of the possible approaches towards modulating inflammation. Both conventional and alternative approaches are being studied in this regard. Ginger, an herbal product with broad anti inflammatory actions, is used as an alternative medicine in a number of inflammatory conditions like rheumatic disorders. In the present study we examined the effect of ginger extract on macrophage activation in the presence of LPS stimulation. Methods Murine peritoneal macrophages were stimulated by LPS in presence or absence of ginger extract and production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed. We also studied the effect of ginger extract on the LPS induced expression of MHC II, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 molecules. We also studied the antigen presenting function of ginger extract treated macrophages by primary mixed lymphocyte reaction. Results We observed that ginger extract inhibited IL-12, TNF-α, IL-1β (pro inflammatory cytokines) and RANTES, MCP-1 (pro inflammatory chemokines) production in LPS stimulated macrophages. Ginger extract also down regulated the expression of B7.1, B7.2 and MHC class II molecules. In addition ginger extract negatively affected the antigen presenting function of macrophages and we observed a significant reduction in T cell proliferation in response to allostimulation, when ginger extract treated macrophages were used as APCs. A significant decrease in IFN-γ and IL-2 production by T cells in response to allostimulation was also observed. Conclusion In conclusion ginger extract inhibits macrophage activation and APC function and indirectly inhibits T cell activation. PMID:18173849

  2. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laria, Antonella; Lurati, Alfredomaria; Marrazza, Mariagrazia; Mazzocchi, Daniela; Re, Katia Angela; Scarpellini, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. PMID:26929657

  3. Loss of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 alters macrophage polarization and reduces NFκB activation in the foreign body response.

    PubMed

    Moore, Laura Beth; Sawyer, Andrew J; Charokopos, Antonios; Skokos, Eleni A; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of biomaterials elicits a foreign body response characterized by fusion of macrophages to form foreign body giant cells and fibrotic encapsulation. Studies of the macrophage polarization involved in this response have suggested that alternative (M2) activation is associated with more favorable outcomes. Here we investigated this process in vivo by implanting mixed cellulose ester filters or polydimethylsiloxane disks in the peritoneal cavity of wild-type (WT) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) knockout mice. We analyzed classical (M1) and alternative (M2) gene expression via quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in both non-adherent cells isolated by lavage and implant-adherent cells. Our results show that macrophages undergo unique activation that displays features of both M1 and M2 polarization including induction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF), which induces the expression and nuclear translocation of p50 and RelA determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Both processes were compromised in fusion-deficient MCP-1 KO macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, inclusion of BAY 11-7028, an inhibitor of NFκB activation, reduced nuclear translocation of RelA and fusion in WT macrophages. Our studies suggest that peritoneal implants elicit a unique macrophage polarization phenotype leading to induction of TNF and activation of the NFκB pathway. PMID:25242651

  4. Loss of MCP-1 alters macrophage polarization and reduces NFκB activation in the foreign body response

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Laura Beth; Sawyer, Andrew J.; Charokopos, Antonios; Skokos, Eleni A.; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2014-01-01

    Implantation of biomaterials elicits a foreign body response characterized by fusion of macrophages to form foreign body giant cells and fibrotic encapsulation. Studies of macrophage polarization in this response have suggested that alternative (M2) activation is associated with more favorable outcomes. Here we investigated this process in vivo by implanting mixed cellulose ester filters or PDMS disks in the peritoneal cavity of WT and MCP-1 KO mice. We analyzed classical (M1) and alternative (M2) gene expression via Q-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA in both non-adherent cells isolated by lavage and implant-adherent cells. Our results show that macrophages undergo unique activation that displays features of both M1 and M2 polarization including induction of TNF, which induces the expression and nuclear translocation of p50 and RelA determined by immunofluorescence and western blot. Both processes were compromised in fusion-deficient MCP-1 KO macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, inclusion of BAY 11-7028, an inhibitor of NFκB activation, reduced nuclear translocation of RelA and fusion in WT macrophages. Our studies suggest that peritoneal implants elicit a unique macrophage polarization phenotype leading to induction of TNF and activation of the NFκB pathway. PMID:25242651

  5. Elimination of Leishmania donovani amastigotes by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Haidaris, C G; Bonventre, P F

    1981-01-01

    Tissue macrophages are the obligatory host cells for Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis. In this study we sought to determine whether activated macrophages, as defined by the functional criterion of tumor cell cytotoxicity, were also able to exert a microbicidal effect on ingested L. donovani amastigotes. We found that mouse peritoneal macrophages activated by a variety of means exerted a cytotoxic effect on tumor cell targets but were not able to kill L. donovani amastigotes unless the infected macrophages were exposed continually to an activating stimulus. Corynebacterium parvum, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra, and lymphokine-activated peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6J mice were cytotoxic for EMT6 tumor cell targets. However, L. donovani Sudan strain 1S amastigotes were not killed by these macrophages unless the activated state was maintained by daily addition of lymphokine to the infected monolayers for several days postinfection. The killing of amastigotes was dependent on the time of exposure to lymphokine, as well as on the concentration of lymphokine added to the culture. Images PMID:7287190

  6. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype. PMID:25319333

  7. Evaluation of macrophage antiviral activity in patients affected by neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Merendino, R A; Iannello, D; Arena, A; Bonina, L; Greco, V; Mesiti, M; Chillemi, S; Mastroeni, P

    1988-01-01

    The intrinsic antiviral activity of macrophages has been studied in healthy donors and in patients affected by breast cancer and melanoma. In vitro differentiated macrophages from blood-derived monocytes were infected with measles virus, herpes simplex virus type 2 and adenovirus 17. The challenge was carried out with different multiplicities of infection and the synthesis of virus was tested by evaluating the single cycle growth curve in 24 h. The results obtained show that the restriction of virus infectivity by macrophages is strongly influenced by the multiplicity of infection. This was particularly evident with the adenovirus 17. Moreover, macrophages from patients with melanoma and breast cancer showed an impairment of the intrinsic antiviral activity in comparison with normal subjects. PMID:2842553

  8. Macrophages require different nucleoside transport systems for proliferation and activation.

    PubMed

    Soler, C; García-Manteiga, J; Valdés, R; Xaus, J; Comalada, M; Casado, F J; Pastor-Anglada, M; Celada, A; Felipe, A

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the mechanisms involved in macrophage proliferation and activation, we studied the regulation of the nucleoside transport systems. In murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, the nucleosides required for DNA and RNA synthesis are recruited from the extracellular medium. M-CSF induced macrophage proliferation and DNA and RNA synthesis, whereas interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) led to activation, blocked proliferation, and induced only RNA synthesis. Macrophages express at least the concentrative systems N1 and N2 (CNT2 and CNT1 genes, respectively) and the equilibrative systems es and ei (ENT1 and ENT2 genes, respectively). Incubation with M-CSF only up-regulated the equilibrative system es. Inhibition of this transport system blocked M-CSF-dependent proliferation. Treatment with IFN-gamma only induced the concentrative N1 and N2 systems. IFN-gamma also down-regulated the increased expression of the es equilibrative system induced by M-CSF. Thus, macrophage proliferation and activation require selective regulation of nucleoside transporters and may respond to specific requirements for DNA and RNA synthesis. This report also shows that the nucleoside transporters are critical for macrophage proliferation and activation. PMID:11532978

  9. The synergistic interaction between the calcineurin B subunit and IFN-γ enhances macrophage antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Z; Yang, R; Zhang, W; Xu, L; Zhong, Y; Yin, Y; Cen, J; DeWitt, J P; Wei, Q

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in tumor growth and progression. They infiltrate into tumors and cause inflammation, which creates a microenvironment favoring tumor growth and metastasis. However, certain stimuli may induce macrophages to act as tumor terminators. Here we report that the calcineurin B subunit (CnB) synergizes with IFN-γ to make macrophages highly cytotoxic to cancer cells. Furthermore, CnB and IFN-γ act synergistically to polarize mouse tumor-associated macrophages, as well as human monocyte-derived macrophages to an M1-like phenotype. This synergy is mediated by the crosstalk between CnB-engaged integrin αM-p38 MAPK signaling and IFN-γ-initiated p38/PKC-δ/Jak2 signaling. Interestingly, the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) is a key factor that orchestrates the synergy of CnB and IFN-γ, and the phosphorylation status at Ser727 and Tyr701 of STAT1 is directly regulated by CnB and IFN-γ. PMID:25950470

  10. Secretion of macrophage urokinase plasminogen activator is dependent on proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pejler, Gunnar; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Vuong, Tram T; Henningsson, Frida; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Kimata, Koji; Kolset, Svein O

    2003-10-01

    The importance of proteoglycans for secretion of proteolytic enzymes was studied in the murine macrophage cell line J774. Untreated or 4beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated macrophages were treated with hexyl-beta-d-thioxyloside to interfere with the attachment of glycosaminoglycan chains to their respective protein cores. Activation of the J774 macrophages with PMA resulted in increased secretion of trypsin-like serine proteinase activity. This activity was completely inhibited by plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and by amiloride, identifying the activity as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Treatment of both the unstimulated or PMA-stimulated macrophages with xyloside resulted in decreased uPA activity and Western blotting analysis revealed an almost complete absence of secreted uPA protein after xyloside treatment of either control- or PMA-treated cells. Zymography analyses with gels containing both gelatin and plasminogen confirmed these findings. The xyloside treatment did not reduce the mRNA levels for uPA, indicating that the effect was at the post-translational level. Treatment of the macrophages with xylosides did also reduce the levels of secreted matrix metalloproteinase 9. Taken together, these findings indicate a role for proteoglycans in the secretion of uPA and MMP-9. PMID:14511379

  11. Tumoricidal Effects of Macrophage-activating Immunotherapy in a Murine Model of Relapsed/ Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Rakhmilevich, Alexander; Heninger, Erika; Broman, Aimee Teo; Hope, Chelsea; Phan, Funita; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Maroulakou, Ioanna; Callander, Natalie; Hematti, Peiman; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Sondel, Paul; Asimakopoulos, Fotis

    2015-01-01

    Myeloma remains a virtually incurable malignancy. The inevitable evolution of multi-drug resistant clones and widespread clonal heterogeneity limit the potential of traditional and novel therapies to eliminate minimal residual disease, a reliable harbinger of relapse. Here we show potent anti-myeloma activity of macrophage-activating immunotherapy (αCD40+CpG) that resulted in prolongation of progression-free and overall survival in an immunocompetent, preclinically validated, transplant-based model of multi-drug resistant, relapsed/refractory myeloma (t-Vκ*MYC). αCD40+CpG was effective in vivo in the absence of cytolytic NK, T or B cells and resulted in expansion of M1-polarized (cytolytic/tumoricidal) macrophages in the bone marrow. Moreover, we show that concurrent loss/inhibition of TPL2 (Cot, MAP3K8), a MAP3K that is recruited to activated CD40 complex and regulates macrophage activation/cytokine production, potentiated direct, ex vivo anti-myeloma tumoricidal activity of αCD40+CpG-activated macrophages, promoted production of antitumor cytokine IL12 in vitro and in vivo and synergized with αCD40+CpG to further prolong progression-free and overall survival in vivo. Our results support the combination of αCD40-based macrophage activation and TPL2 inhibition for myeloma immunotherapy. We propose that αCD40-mediated activation of innate antitumor immunity may be a promising approach to control/eradicate minimal residual disease following cytoreduction with traditional or novel anti-myeloma therapies. PMID:25941352

  12. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  13. Proatherogenic macrophage activities are targeted by the flavonoid quercetin.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guzman, Oscar J; Tabares-Guevara, Jorge H; Leon-Varela, Yudy M; Álvarez, Rafael M; Roldan, Miguel; Sierra, Jelver A; Londoño-Londoño, Julian A; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2012-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the flavonoid quercetin protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related risk factors. Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of CVD, is also attenuated by oral quercetin administration in animal models. Although macrophages are key players during fatty streak formation and plaque progression and aggravation, little is known about the effects of quercetin on atherogenic macrophages. Here, we report that primary bone marrow-derived macrophages internalized less oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and accumulated less intracellular cholesterol in the presence of quercetin. This reduction of foam cell formation correlated with reduced surface expression of the oxLDL receptor CD36. Quercetin also targeted the lipopolysaccharide-dependent, oxLDL-independent pathway of lipid droplet formation in macrophages. In oxLDL-stimulated macrophages, quercetin inhibited reactive oxygen species production and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In a system that evaluated cholesterol crystal-induced IL-1β secretion via nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing protein 3 inflammasome activation, quercetin also exhibited an inhibitory effect. Dyslipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice chronically treated with intraperitoneal quercetin injections had smaller atheromatous lesions, reduced lipid deposition, and less macrophage and T cell inflammatory infiltrate in the aortic roots than vehicle-treated animals. Serum levels of total cholesterol and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde were also reduced in these mice. Our results demonstrate that quercetin interferes with both key proatherogenic activities of macrophages, namely foam cell formation and pro-oxidant/proinflammatory responses, and these effects may explain the atheroprotective properties of this common flavonoid. PMID:22869926

  14. Enforced Expression of Hoxa3 Inhibits Classical and Promotes Alternative Activation of Macrophages In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Al Sadoun, Hadeel; Burgess, Matthew; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    The regulated differentiation of macrophages (mφs) and their subsequent activation into proinflammatory or prohealing subtypes is critical for efficient wound healing. Chronic wounds such as diabetic (db) ulcers are associated with dysregulation of macrophage function. Whereas non-db mφs polarize to an M2-like, prohealing phenotype during the late stages of healing, db-derived mφs continue to display an M1-like, proinflammatory, or a mixed M1-like/M2-like phenotype. We have previously shown that sustained expression of Hoxa3 reduces the excessive number of leukocytes within the db wound; however, the effect of Hoxa3 on mφ polarization was unknown. In this study, we show that Hoxa3 protein transduction of mφs in vitro enhances macrophage maturation, inhibits M1 polarization, and promotes M2 polarization, in part via regulation of Pu.1/Spi1 and Stat6. Sustained expression of Hoxa3 in vivo in db wounds reduces the number of Nos2+ (M1-like) mφs, increases the number of Arg1+ and VEGF+ (M2-like) mφs, and accelerates healing in a DNA-binding independent manner. Our findings suggest a role for Hox protein activity in promoting M1-to-M2-like phenotypic switching via interactions with myeloid transcription factors and provide insight into mechanisms regulating this process in db wound healing. PMID:27342843

  15. Enforced Expression of Hoxa3 Inhibits Classical and Promotes Alternative Activation of Macrophages In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Al Sadoun, Hadeel; Burgess, Matthew; Hentges, Kathryn E; Mace, Kimberly A

    2016-08-01

    The regulated differentiation of macrophages (mφs) and their subsequent activation into proinflammatory or prohealing subtypes is critical for efficient wound healing. Chronic wounds such as diabetic (db) ulcers are associated with dysregulation of macrophage function. Whereas non-db mφs polarize to an M2-like, prohealing phenotype during the late stages of healing, db-derived mφs continue to display an M1-like, proinflammatory, or a mixed M1-like/M2-like phenotype. We have previously shown that sustained expression of Hoxa3 reduces the excessive number of leukocytes within the db wound; however, the effect of Hoxa3 on mφ polarization was unknown. In this study, we show that Hoxa3 protein transduction of mφs in vitro enhances macrophage maturation, inhibits M1 polarization, and promotes M2 polarization, in part via regulation of Pu.1/Spi1 and Stat6. Sustained expression of Hoxa3 in vivo in db wounds reduces the number of Nos2(+) (M1-like) mφs, increases the number of Arg1(+) and VEGF(+) (M2-like) mφs, and accelerates healing in a DNA-binding independent manner. Our findings suggest a role for Hox protein activity in promoting M1-to-M2-like phenotypic switching via interactions with myeloid transcription factors and provide insight into mechanisms regulating this process in db wound healing. PMID:27342843

  16. Innate immunity and monocyte-macrophage activation in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Innate inflammation is a hallmark of both experimental and human atherosclerosis. The predominant innate immune cell in the atherosclerotic plaque is the monocyte-macrophage. The behaviour of this cell type within the plaque is heterogeneous and depends on the recruitment of diverse monocyte subsets. Furthermore, the plaque microenvironment offers polarisation and activation signals which impact on phenotype. Microenvironmental signals are sensed through pattern recognition receptors, including toll-like and NOD-like receptors - the latter of which are components of the inflammasome - thus dictating macrophage behaviour and outcome in atherosclerosis. Recently cholesterol crystals and modified lipoproteins have been recognised as able to directly engage these pattern recognition receptors. The convergent role of such pathways in terms of macrophage activation is discussed in this review. PMID:21526997

  17. Fine-tuning of macrophage activation using synthetic rocaglate derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Bidisha; Chatterjee, Sujoy; Devine, William G.; Kobzik, Lester; Beeler, Aaron B.; Porco, John A.; Kramnik, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant bacteria represent a significant global threat. Given the dearth of new antibiotics, host-directed therapies (HDTs) are especially desirable. As IFN-gamma (IFNγ) plays a central role in host resistance to intracellular bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we searched for small molecules to augment the IFNγ response in macrophages. Using an interferon-inducible nuclear protein Ipr1 as a biomarker of macrophage activation, we performed a high-throughput screen and identified molecules that synergized with low concentration of IFNγ. Several active compounds belonged to the flavagline (rocaglate) family. In primary macrophages a subset of rocaglates 1) synergized with low concentrations of IFNγ in stimulating expression of a subset of IFN-inducible genes, including a key regulator of the IFNγ network, Irf1; 2) suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and type I IFN and 3) induced autophagy. These compounds may represent a basis for macrophage-directed therapies that fine-tune macrophage effector functions to combat intracellular pathogens and reduce inflammatory tissue damage. These therapies would be especially relevant to fighting drug-resistant pathogens, where improving host immunity may prove to be the ultimate resource. PMID:27086720

  18. Opposite cross-talk by oleate and palmitate on insulin signaling in hepatocytes through macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Guijas, Carlos; Balsinde, Jesús; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-05-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation in adipose tissue during obesity is associated with an impairment of the insulin signaling cascade. In this study, we have evaluated the impact of palmitate or oleate overload of macrophage/Kupffer cells in triggering stress-mediated signaling pathways, in lipoapoptosis, and in the cross-talk with insulin signaling in hepatocytes. RAW 264.7 macrophages or Kupffer cells were stimulated with oleate or palmitate, and levels of M1/M2 polarization markers and the lipidomic profile of eicosanoids were analyzed. Whereas proinflammatory cytokines and total eicosanoids were elevated in macrophages/Kupffer cells stimulated with palmitate, enhanced arginase 1 and lower leukotriene B4 (LTB4) levels were detected in macrophages stimulated with oleate. When hepatocytes were pretreated with conditioned medium (CM) from RAW 264.7 or Kupffer cells loaded with palmitate (CM-P), phosphorylation of stress kinases and endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling was increased, insulin signaling was impaired, and lipoapoptosis was detected. Conversely, enhanced insulin receptor-mediated signaling and reduced levels of the phosphatases protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were found in hepatocytes treated with CM from macrophages stimulated with oleate (CM-O). Supplementation of CM-O with LTB4 suppressed insulin sensitization and increased PTP1B and PTEN. Furthermore, LTB4 decreased insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in hepatocytes, activated the NFκB pathway, and up-regulated PTP1B and PTEN, these effects being mediated by LTB4 receptor BTL1. In conclusion, oleate and palmitate elicit an opposite cross-talk between macrophages/Kupffer cells and hepatocytes. Whereas CM-P interferes at the early steps of insulin signaling, CM-O increases insulin sensitization, possibly by reducing LTB4. PMID:25792746

  19. Regulation of Thrombospondin-1 expression in alternatively activated macrophages and adipocytes: role of cellular crosstalk and omega-3 fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Finlin, Brian S.; Zhu, Beibei; Starnes, Catherine P.; McGehee, Robert E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.; Kern, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) expression in human adipose positively correlates with body mass index and may contribute to adipose dysfunction by activating TGF-β and/or inhibiting angiogenesis. Our objective was to determine how TSP-1 is regulated in adipocytes and polarized macrophages using a coculture system and to determine whether fatty acids, including the ω-3 fatty acid DHA, regulate TSP-1 expression. Coculture of M1, M2a, or M2c macrophages with adipocytes induced TSP-1 gene expression in adipocytes (from 2.4 to 4.2-fold, P<0.05), and adipocyte coculture induced TSP-1 gene expression in M1 and M2c macrophages (M1:8.6-fold; M2c 26-fold, P<0.05). TSP-1 protein levels in the shared media of adipocytes and M2c cells was also strongly induced by coculture (>10 fold, P<0.05). DHA treatment during the coculture of adipocytes and M2c macrophages potently inhibited theM2c macrophage TSP-1 mRNA level (97% inhibition, P<0.05). Adipocyte coculture induced IL-10 expression in M2c macrophages (10.1-fold, P<0.05), and this increase in IL-10 mRNA expression was almost completely blocked with DHA treatment (96% inhibition, P<0.05); thus, IL-10 expression closely paralleled TSP-1 expression. Since IL-10 has been shown to regulate TSP-1 in other cell types, we reduced IL-10 expression with siRNA in the M2c cells and found that this caused TSP-1 to be reduced in response to adipocyte coculture by 60% (P<0.05), suggesting that IL-10 regulates TSP-1 expression in M2c macrophages. These results suggest that supplementation with dietary ω-3 fatty acids could potentially be beneficial to adipose tissue in obesity by reducing TSP-1 and fibrosis. PMID:23528972

  20. Bion M1. Peculiarities of life activities of microbes in 30-day spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Korshunov, Denis; Morozova, Julia; Voeikova, Tatiana; Tyaglov, Boris; Novikova, Liudmila; Krestyanova, Irina; Emelyanova, Lydia

    The aim of this work was to analyze the influence of space flight factors ( SFF) to microorganism strains , exposed inside unmanned spacecraft Bion M-1 during the 30- day space flight. Objectives of the work - the study of the influence of the SFF exchange chromosomal DNA in crosses microorganisms of the genus Streptomyces; the level of spontaneous phage induction of lysogenic strains fS31 from Streptomyces lividans 66 and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) on the biosynthesis of the antibiotic tylosin strain of Streptomyces fradiae; survival electrogenic bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR- 1 is used in the microbial fuel cell As a result of this work it was found that the SFF affect the exchange of chromosomal DNA by crossing strains of Streptomyces. Was detected polarity crossing , expressed in an advantageous contribution chromosome fragment of one of the parent strains in recombinant offspring. This fact may indicate a more prolonged exposure of cells in microgravity and , as a consequence, the transfer of longer fragments of chromosomal DNA This feature is the transfer of genetic material in microgravity could lead to wider dissemination and horizontal transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA of symbiotic microflora astronauts and other strains present in the spacecraft. It was shown no effect on the frequency of recombination PCF and the level of mutation model reversion of auxotrophic markers to prototrophy It was demonstrated that PCF increase the level of induction of cell actinophage fS31 lysogenic strain of S. lividans 66, but did not affect the level of induction of this phage cells S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). It is shown that the lower the level of synthesis PCF antibiotic aktinorodina (actinorhodin) in lysogenic strain S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). 66 Strains of S. lividans and S. coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) can be used as a biosensor for studying the effect on microorganisms PCF It is shown that the effect of the PCF reduces synthesis of tylosin and desmicosyn S. fradiae at

  1. IL-4Rα-Dependent Alternative Activation of Macrophages Is Not Decisive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pathology and Bacterial Burden in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Savvi, Suzana; Logan, Erin; Schwegmann, Anita; Roy, Sugata; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E.; Ozturk, Mumin; Schmeier, Sebastian; Suzuki, Harukazu; Brombacher, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Classical activation of macrophages (caMph or M1) is crucial for host protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Evidence suggests that IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated macrophages (aaMph or M2) are exploited by Mtb to divert microbicidal functions of caMph. To define the functions of M2 macrophages during tuberculosis (TB), we infected mice deficient for IL-4 receptor α on macrophages (LysMcreIL-4Rα-/lox) with Mtb. We show that absence of IL-4Rα on macrophages does not play a major role during infection with Mtb H37Rv, or the clinical Beijing strain HN878. This was demonstrated by similar mortality, bacterial burden, histopathology and T cell proliferation between infected wild-type (WT) and LysMcreIL-4Rα-/lox mice. Interestingly, we observed no differences in the lung expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and Arginase 1 (Arg1), well-established markers for M1/M2 macrophages among the Mtb-infected groups. Kinetic expression studies of IL-4/IL-13 activated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) infected with HN878, followed by gene set enrichment analysis, revealed that the MyD88 and IL-6, IL-10, G-CSF pathways are significantly enriched, but not the IL-4Rα driven pathway. Together, these results suggest that IL-4Rα-macrophages do not play a central role in TB disease progression. PMID:25790379

  2. Casticin induces ovarian cancer cell apoptosis by repressing FoxM1 through the activation of FOXO3a

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, LING; CAO, XIAO-CHENG; CAO, JIAN-GUO; LIU, FEI; QUAN, MEI-FANG; SHENG, XI-FENG; REN, KAI-QUN

    2013-01-01

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone, is reported to have anticancer activities. The aim of the present study was to examine the molecular mechanisms by which casticin induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. The human ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and A2780 were cultured in vitro. Various molecular techniques, including histone/DNA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot analysis and gene transfection, were used to assess the expression of FOXO3a and forkhead box protein M1 (FoxM1) in casticin-treated ovarian cancer cell lines. Casticin-induced apoptotic cell death was accompanied by the activation of transcription factor FOXO3a, with a concomitant decrease in the expression levels of FoxM1 and its downstream target factors, namely survivin and polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), and an increase in p27KIP1. A small inhibitory RNA (siRNA) knockout of FoxM1 potentiated casticin-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. Silencing FOXO3a expression using siRNA increased FoxM1 expression levels and clearly attenuated the induction of apoptosis by casticin treatment. These results show that casticin-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer may be caused by the activation of FOXO3a, leading to FoxM1 inhibition. PMID:23761826

  3. An Antibody Biosensor Establishes the Activation of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor during Learning and Memory*♦

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Adrian J.; Bradley, Sophie J.; Prihandoko, Rudi; Brooke, Simon M.; Mogg, Adrian; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer M.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Challiss, R. A. John; Broad, Lisa M.; Felder, Christian C.; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the in vivo activation status of G protein-coupled receptors would not only indicate physiological roles of G protein-coupled receptors but would also aid drug discovery by establishing drug/receptor engagement. Here, we develop a phospho-specific antibody-based biosensor to detect activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) in vitro and in vivo. Mass spectrometry phosphoproteomics identified 14 sites of phosphorylation on the M1 mAChR. Phospho-specific antibodies to four of these sites established that serine at position 228 (Ser228) on the M1 mAChR showed extremely low levels of basal phosphorylation that were significantly up-regulated by orthosteric agonist stimulation. In addition, the M1 mAChR-positive allosteric modulator, 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid, enhanced acetylcholine-mediated phosphorylation at Ser228. These data supported the hypothesis that phosphorylation at Ser228 was an indicator of M1 mAChR activation. This was further supported in vivo by the identification of phosphorylated Ser228 on the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus of mice following administration of the muscarinic ligands xanomeline and 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid. Finally, Ser228 phosphorylation was seen to increase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following memory acquisition, a response that correlated closely with up-regulation of CA1 neuronal activity. Thus, determining the phosphorylation status of the M1 mAChR at Ser228 not only provides a means of establishing receptor activation following drug treatment both in vitro and in vivo but also allows for the mapping of the activation status of the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus following memory acquisition thereby establishing a link between M1 mAChR activation and hippocampus-based memory and learning. PMID:26826123

  4. An Antibody Biosensor Establishes the Activation of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor during Learning and Memory.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Adrian J; Bradley, Sophie J; Prihandoko, Rudi; Brooke, Simon M; Mogg, Adrian; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer M; Bottrill, Andrew R; Challiss, R A John; Broad, Lisa M; Felder, Christian C; Tobin, Andrew B

    2016-04-22

    Establishing the in vivo activation status of G protein-coupled receptors would not only indicate physiological roles of G protein-coupled receptors but would also aid drug discovery by establishing drug/receptor engagement. Here, we develop a phospho-specific antibody-based biosensor to detect activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) in vitro and in vivo Mass spectrometry phosphoproteomics identified 14 sites of phosphorylation on the M1 mAChR. Phospho-specific antibodies to four of these sites established that serine at position 228 (Ser(228)) on the M1 mAChR showed extremely low levels of basal phosphorylation that were significantly up-regulated by orthosteric agonist stimulation. In addition, the M1 mAChR-positive allosteric modulator, 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid, enhanced acetylcholine-mediated phosphorylation at Ser(228) These data supported the hypothesis that phosphorylation at Ser(228) was an indicator of M1 mAChR activation. This was further supported in vivo by the identification of phosphorylated Ser(228) on the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus of mice following administration of the muscarinic ligands xanomeline and 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid. Finally, Ser(228) phosphorylation was seen to increase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following memory acquisition, a response that correlated closely with up-regulation of CA1 neuronal activity. Thus, determining the phosphorylation status of the M1 mAChR at Ser(228) not only provides a means of establishing receptor activation following drug treatment both in vitro and in vivo but also allows for the mapping of the activation status of the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus following memory acquisition thereby establishing a link between M1 mAChR activation and hippocampus-based memory and learning. PMID:26826123

  5. Genome-wide analysis of antiviral signature genes in porcine macrophages at different activation statuses.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yongming; Brichalli, Wyatt; Rowland, Raymond R R; Blecha, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages (MФs) can be polarized to various activation statuses, including classical (M1), alternative (M2), and antiviral states. To study the antiviral activation status of porcine MФs during porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection, we used RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) for transcriptomic analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Sequencing assessment and quality evaluation showed that our RNA-Seq data met the criteria for genome-wide transcriptomic analysis. Comparisons of any two activation statuses revealed more than 20,000 DEGs that were normalized to filter out 153-5,303 significant DEGs [false discovery rate (FDR) ≤0.001, fold change ≥2] in each comparison. The highest 5,303 significant DEGs were found between lipopolysaccharide- (LPS) and interferon (IFN)γ-stimulated M1 cells, whereas only 153 significant DEGs were detected between interleukin (IL)-10-polarized M2 cells and control mock-activated cells. To identify signature genes for antiviral regulation pertaining to each activation status, we identified a set of DEGs that showed significant up-regulation in only one activation state. In addition, pathway analyses defined the top 20-50 significantly regulated pathways at each activation status, and we further analyzed DEGs pertinent to pathways mediated by AMP kinase (AMPK) and epigenetic mechanisms. For the first time in porcine macrophages, our transcriptomic analyses not only compared family-wide differential expression of most known immune genes at different activation statuses, but also revealed transcription evidence of multiple gene families. These findings show that using RNA-Seq transcriptomic analyses in virus-infected and status-synchronized macrophages effectively profiled signature genes and gene response pathways for antiviral regulation, which may provide a framework for optimizing antiviral immunity and immune homeostasis. PMID:24505295

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of Antiviral Signature Genes in Porcine Macrophages at Different Activation Statuses

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Brichalli, Wyatt; Rowland, Raymond R. R.; Blecha, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages (MФs) can be polarized to various activation statuses, including classical (M1), alternative (M2), and antiviral states. To study the antiviral activation status of porcine MФs during porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection, we used RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) for transcriptomic analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Sequencing assessment and quality evaluation showed that our RNA-Seq data met the criteria for genome-wide transcriptomic analysis. Comparisons of any two activation statuses revealed more than 20,000 DEGs that were normalized to filter out 153–5,303 significant DEGs [false discovery rate (FDR) ≤0.001, fold change ≥2] in each comparison. The highest 5,303 significant DEGs were found between lipopolysaccharide- (LPS) and interferon (IFN)γ-stimulated M1 cells, whereas only 153 significant DEGs were detected between interleukin (IL)-10-polarized M2 cells and control mock-activated cells. To identify signature genes for antiviral regulation pertaining to each activation status, we identified a set of DEGs that showed significant up-regulation in only one activation state. In addition, pathway analyses defined the top 20–50 significantly regulated pathways at each activation status, and we further analyzed DEGs pertinent to pathways mediated by AMP kinase (AMPK) and epigenetic mechanisms. For the first time in porcine macrophages, our transcriptomic analyses not only compared family-wide differential expression of most known immune genes at different activation statuses, but also revealed transcription evidence of multiple gene families. These findings show that using RNA-Seq transcriptomic analyses in virus-infected and status-synchronized macrophages effectively profiled signature genes and gene response pathways for antiviral regulation, which may provide a framework for optimizing antiviral immunity and immune homeostasis. PMID:24505295

  7. Oxygen tension limits nitric oxide synthesis by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, C C; Li, W P; Calero, M

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have established that constitutive calcium-dependent ('low-output') nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is regulated by oxygen tension. We have investigated the role of oxygen tension in the synthesis of NO by the 'high-output' calcium-independent NOS in activated macrophages. Hypoxia increased macrophage NOS gene expression in the presence of one additional activator, such as lipopolysaccharide or interferon-gamma, but not in the presence of both. Hypoxia markedly reduced the synthesis of NO by activated macrophages (as measured by accumulation of nitrite and citrulline), such that, at 1% oxygen tension, NO accumulation was reduced by 80-90%. The apparent K(m) for oxygen calculated from cells exposed to a range of oxygen tensions was found to be 10.8%, or 137 microM, O(2) This value is considerably higher than the oxygen tension in tissues, and is virtually identical to that reported recently for purified recombinant macrophage NOS. The decrease in NO synthesis did not appear to be due to diminished arginine or cofactor availability, since arginine transport and NO synthesis during recovery in normoxia were normal. Analysis of NO synthesis during hypoxia as a function of extracellular arginine indicated that an altered V(max), but not K(m)(Arg), accounted for the observed decrease in NO synthesis. We conclude that oxygen tension regulates the synthesis of NO in macrophages by a mechanism similar to that described previously for the calcium-dependent low-output NOS. Our data suggest that oxygen tension may be an important physiological regulator of macrophage NO synthesis in vivo. PMID:10970783

  8. Tumor-Cell Co-Culture Induced Alternative Activation of Macrophages Is Modulated by Interferons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Quernheim, Ulrike Carolin; Potthast, Lars; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages infiltrate tumors and facilitate tumor growth. Here, we analyzed M1 and M2 marker expression in the course of co-culture-driven macrophage differentiation and investigated the influence of interferons (IFNs) on this differentiation. To generate monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) 1×106 monocytes of healthy volunteers were cultivated either with 25×103 adherent A549/mL or in medium containing 50% A549 conditioned medium (CM) for 72 h in the presence or absence of IFN-α, β or γ, respectively. Supernatants were tested for CCL18 (M2 marker) and CXCL10 (M1 marker) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CCL18 and CXCL10 release by MDM is increased by the presence of A549 cells, but also when cultured in A549 CM. On stimulation with IFN-γ, we observe an increased release of the M1 marker CXCL10 and a decreased release of CCL18. Type I IFNs also increases CXCL10 release. Thus, A549 releases a soluble factor which enhances CCL18 production and M2 polarization, indicating that a localized specific cytokine milieu, as found in the environment of a tumor or in fibrotic lung tissue, favors alternative activation of macrophages. In the presence of IFN-γ, M2 differentiation is attenuated as shown by the decrease of the M2 chemokine CCL18 and by the increase of the M1 chemokine CXCL10. However, CXCL10 levels were also increased by the co-culture, which indicates a simultaneous classical activation (M1) or the formation of a M1/M2 hybrid. PMID:22280057

  9. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  10. Hydroxycinnamic acid amides from Scopolia tangutica inhibit the activity of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Long, Zhen; Guo, Zhimou; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Xiuli; Ye, Richard D; Liang, Xinmiao; Civelli, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Scopolia tangutica Maxim (S. tangutica) extracts have been traditionally used as antispasmodic, sedative, and analgesic agents in Tibet and in the Qinghai province of China. Their active compositions are however poorly understood. We have recently isolated five new hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) amides along with two known HCA amides, one cinnamic acid amide from these extracts. In this study, we evaluate their abilities to inhibit carbacol-induced activity of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor along with the crude extracts. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the recombinant human M1 receptor (CHO-M1 cells) were employed to evaluate the anticholinergic potentials. Intracellular Ca(2+) changes were monitored using the FLIPR system. Five HCA amides as well as the crude S. tangutica extract displayed dose-dependent inhibitory effects against M1 receptor. These findings demonstrate that HCA amides are part of the M1 receptor-inhibiting principles of S. tangutica. Since blockade of parasympathetic nerve impulse transmission through the inhibition of the M1 receptor lessens smooth muscle spasms, our findings provided a molecular explanation for the traditional use of S. tangutica against spasm. PMID:26586621

  11. In vitro evaluation of inhibitory effect of nuclear factor-kappaB activity by small interfering RNA on pro-tumor characteristics of M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yusuke; Kawakami, Shigeru; Higuchi, Yuriko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an alternatively activated macrophage phenotype (M2) and promote cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) is one of the master regulators of macrophage polarization. Here, we investigated the effect of inhibition of NF-κB activity by small interfering RNA (siRNA) on the pro-tumor response of macrophages located in the tumor microenvironment in vitro. We used mouse peritoneal macrophages cultured in conditioned medium from colon-26 cancer cells as an in vitro TAM model (M2-like macrophages). Transfection of NF-κB (p50) siRNA into M2-like macrophages resulted in a significant decrease in the secretion of interleukin (IL)-10 (a T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine) and a significant increase of T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine production (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-6). Furthermore, vascular endothelial growth factor production and matrix metalloproteinase-9 mRNA expression in M2-like macrophages were suppressed by inhibition of NF-κB expression with NF-κB (p50) siRNA. In addition, there was a reduction of arginase mRNA expression and increase in nitric oxide production. The cytokine secretion profiles of macrophages cultured in conditioned medium from either B16BL6 or PAN-02 cancer cells were also converted from M2 to classically activated (M1) macrophages by transfection of NF-κB (p50) siRNA. These results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB activity in M2-like macrophages alters their phenotype toward M1. PMID:24141263

  12. Autocrine regulation of macrophage activation via exocytosis of ATP and activation of P2Y11 receptor.

    PubMed

    Sakaki, Hayato; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Harada, Hitoshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Kojima, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand the mechanisms that regulate macrophage activation to establish novel therapies for inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis; a systemic inflammatory response syndrome generally caused by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, we investigated the involvement of extracellular ATP-mediated autocrine signaling in LPS-induced macrophage activation. We show here that ATP release via exocytosis, followed by activation of P2Y11 receptor, is a major pathway of the macrophage activation, leading to release of cytokines. Treatment of human monocyte THP-1 cells with LPS induced rapid ATP release from cells, and this release was blocked by knockdown of SLC17A9 (vesicular nucleotide transporter, VNUT), which is responsible for exocytosis of ATP. ATP-enriched vesicles were found in cytosol of THP-1 cells. These data suggest the involvement of vesicular exocytosis in the release of ATP. Knockdown of SLC17A9, the P2Y11 antagonist NF157 or knockdown of P2Y11 receptor significantly suppressed both M1-type polarization and IL-6 production in THP-1 cells, indicating an important role of activation of P2Y11 receptor by released ATP in macrophage activation. Next, the effect of NF157 on LPS-induced immune activation was examined in vivo. Administration of LPS to mice caused increase of serum IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-alpha levels at 3-24 h after the administration. Pre-treatment of LPS-treated mice with NF157 suppressed both elevation of proinflammatory cytokines in serum and M1 polarization of peritoneal/spleen macrophages. Moreover, post-treatment with NF157 at 30 min after administration of LPS also suppressed the elevation of serum cytokines levels. We conclude that vesicular exocytosis of ATP and autocrine, positive feedback through P2Y11 receptors is required for the effective activation of macrophages. Consequently, P2Y11 receptor antagonists may be drug candidates for treatment of inflammatory diseases such as sepsis. PMID:23577075

  13. Carbon nanohorns allow acceleration of osteoblast differentiation via macrophage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Eri; Miyako, Eijiro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ushijima, Natsumi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Russier, Julie; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the proof-of-concept on the osteoblast differentiation capacity by CNHs will allow future studies focused on CNHs as ideal therapeutic materials for bone regeneration.Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the

  14. Diet Modifies the Neuroimmune System by Influencing Macrophage Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Christina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that adequate nutrition is required for proper immune function and it is now recognized that dietary components contribute to modulation of immune cells, subsequently impacting the whole body's response during an immune challenge. Macrophage activation plays a critical role in the immune system and directs the…

  15. Proteomic analysis of macrophage activated with salmonella lipopolysaccharide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages play pivotal role in immunity. They are activated by many pathogen derived molecules such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) which trigger the production of various proteins and peptides that drive and resolve inflammation. There are numerous studies on the effect of LPS at the genome level bu...

  16. Dynamics of lung macrophage activation in response to helminth infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of our understanding of the development and phenotype of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) has been obtained from studies investigating the response of bone marrow- and peritoneal-derived cells to IL-4 or IL-13 stimulation. Comparatively little is known about the development of the AAM...

  17. Activation Biosensor for G Protein-Coupled Receptors: A FRET-Based m1 Muscarinic Activation Sensor That Regulates Gq

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Seungwoo; Ross, Elliott M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design, construction and validation of a fluorescence sensor to measure activation by agonist of the m1 muscarinic cholinergic receptor, a prototypical class I Gq-coupled receptor. The sensor uses an established general design in which Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a circularly permuted CFP mutant to FlAsH, a selectively reactive fluorescein, is decreased 15–20% upon binding of a full agonist. Notably, the sensor displays essentially wild-type capacity to catalyze activation of Gαq, and the purified and reconstituted sensor displays appropriate regulation of affinity for agonists by Gq. We describe the strategies used to increase the agonist-driven change in FRET while simultaneously maintaining regulatory interactions with Gαq, in the context of the known structures of Class I G protein-coupled receptors. The approach should be generally applicable to other Class I receptors which include numerous important drug targets. PMID:23029161

  18. The Metabolic Prospective and Redox Regulation of Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao; Carter, A Brent

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage plasticity is an important feature of these innate immune cells. Macrophage phenotypes are divided into two categories, the classically activated macrophages (CAM, M1 phenotype) and the alternatively activated macrophages (AAM, M2 phenotype). M1 macrophages are commonly associated with the generation of proinflammatory cytokines, whereas M2 macrophages are anti-inflammatory and often associated with tumor progression and fibrosis development. Macrophages produce high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent evidence suggests ROS can potentially regulate macrophage phenotype. In addition, macrophages phenotypes are closely related to their metabolic patterns, particularly fatty acid/cholesterol metabolism. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in macrophage polarization with special attention to their relevance to specific disease conditions and metabolic regulation of polarization. Understanding these metabolic switches can facilitate the development of targeted therapies for various diseases. PMID:26962470

  19. M1 macrophage infiltrations and histological changes in the liver after portal vein embolization using fibrinogen and OK432 in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tetsu; Marubashi, Shigeru; Kenjo, Akira; Tsuchiya, Takao; Kimura, Takashi; Sato, Naoya; Watanabe, Junichiro; Tasaki, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Yuko; Wada, Ikuo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism of anti-tumor effect of transarterial Immuno-Embolization (TIE) using OK-432 has not been well elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the tissue injury and immune response after portal venous embolization (PVE) with/without OK-432. Embolic materials (L group: lipiodol, LF group: lipiodol+fibrinogen, LO group: lipiodol+OK-432, LFO group: lipiodol+fibrinogen+OK-432) were administered via the right portal vein in Wistar rats. The histological findings in LFO group demonstrated liver damage with severe architectural changes. The concentrations of CD68(+) cells were observed in a time-dependent manner; it was significantly increased in the LO group on day 1 and in the LFO group on day 3. CD68(+)CD163(-) macrophages significantly increased in the LFO group on day 7 (P<0.05). In conclusion, PVE with fibrinogen and OK-432 markedly increased the CD68(+)CD163(-) infiltrating macrophages around the peri-portal area in the liver. This novel technique could be applied as immune-enhanced chemo-embolization of liver tumors. PMID:27062693

  20. Nitro-oleic acid modulates classical and regulatory activation of macrophages and their involvement in pro-fibrotic responses.

    PubMed

    Ambrozova, Gabriela; Martiskova, Hana; Koudelka, Adolf; Ravekes, Thorben; Rudolph, Tanja K; Klinke, Anna; Rudolph, Volker; Freeman, Bruce A; Woodcock, Steven R; Kubala, Lukas; Pekarova, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an immune response triggered by microbial invasion and/or tissue injury. While acute inflammation is directed toward invading pathogens and injured cells, thus enabling tissue regeneration, chronic inflammation can lead to severe pathologies and tissue dysfunction. These processes are linked with macrophage polarization into specific inflammatory "M1-like" or regulatory "M2-like" subsets. Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs), produced endogenously as byproducts of metabolism and oxidative inflammatory conditions, may be useful for treating diseases associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis. The goal of this study was to characterize the role of nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) in regulating the functional specialization of macrophages induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-4, and to reveal specific signaling mechanisms which can account for OA-NO2-dependent modulation of inflammation and fibrotic responses. Our results show that OA-NO2 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of both pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines (including transforming growth factor-β) and inhibits nitric oxide and superoxide anion production. OA-NO2 also decreases interleukin-4-induced macrophage responses by inhibiting arginase-I expression and transforming growth factor-β production. These effects are mediated via downregulation of signal transducers and activators of transcription, mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-кB signaling responses. Finally, OA-NO2 inhibits fibrotic processes in an in vivo model of angiotensin II-induced myocardial fibrosis by attenuating expression of α-smooth muscle actin, systemic transforming growth factor-β levels and infiltration of both "M1-" and "M2-like" macrophage subsets into afflicted tissue. Overall, the electrophilic fatty acid derivative OA-NO2 modulates a broad range of "M1-" and "M2-like" macrophage functions and represents a potential therapeutic approach to target diseases

  1. Modulation of nitric oxide synthase activity in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jorens, P. G.; Matthys, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    L-Arginine is converted to the highly reactive and unstable nitric oxide (NO) and L-citrulline by an enzyme named nitric oxide synthase (NOS). NO decomposes into other nitrogen oxides such as nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO2-), and in the presence of superoxide anion to the potent oxidizing agent peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Activated rodent macrophages are capable of expressing an inducible form of this enzyme (iNOS) in response to appropriate stimuli, i.e., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFNγ). Other cytokines can modulate the induction of NO biosynthesis in macrophages. NO is a major effector molecule of the anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity of rodent macrophages against certain micro-organisms and tumour cells, respectively. The NO synthesizing pathway has been demonstrated in human monocytes and other cells, but its role in host defence seems to be accessory. A delicate functional balance between microbial stimuli, host-derived cytokines and hormones in the microenvironment regulates iNOS expression. This review will focus mainly on the known and proposed mechanisms of the regulation of iNOS induction, and on agents that can modulate NO release once the active enzyme has been expressed in the macrophage. PMID:18475620

  2. Carbon nanohorns allow acceleration of osteoblast differentiation via macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Eri; Miyako, Eijiro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ushijima, Natsumi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Russier, Julie; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-08-14

    Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), formed by a rolled graphene structure and terminating in a cone, are promising nanomaterials for the development of a variety of biological applications. Here we demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase activity is dramatically increased by coculture of human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in the presence of CNHs. CNHs were mainly localized in the lysosome of macrophages more than in hMSCs during coculturing. At the same time, the amount of Oncostatin M (OSM) in the supernatant was also increased during incubation with CNHs. Oncostatin M (OSM) from activated macrophage has been reported to induce osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization through STAT3. These results suggest that the macrophages engulfed CNHs and accelerated the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast via OSM release. We expect that the proof-of-concept on the osteoblast differentiation capacity by CNHs will allow future studies focused on CNHs as ideal therapeutic materials for bone regeneration. PMID:27412794

  3. Autophagy-induced RelB/p52 activation mediates tumour-associated macrophage repolarisation and suppression of hepatocellular carcinoma by natural compound baicalin.

    PubMed

    Tan, H-Y; Wang, N; Man, K; Tsao, S-W; Che, C-M; Feng, Y

    2015-01-01

    The plasticity of tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) has implicated an influential role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Repolarisation of TAM towards M1 phenotype characterises an immune-competent microenvironment that favours tumour regression. To investigate the role and mechanism of TAM repolarisation in suppression of HCC by a natural compound baicalin, Orthotopic HCC implantation model was used to investigate the effect of baicalin on HCC; liposome-clodronate was introduced to suppress macrophage populations in mice; bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMDMs) were induced to unpolarised, M1-like, M2-like macrophages and TAM using different conditioned medium. We observed that oral administration of baicalin (50 mg/kg) completely blocked orthotopic growth of implanted HCC. Suppression of HCC by baicalin was diminished when mice macrophage was removed by clodronate treatment. Baicalin induced repolarisation of TAM to M1-like phenotype without specific toxicity to either phenotype of macrophages. Baicalin initiated TAM reprogramming to M1-like macrophage, and promoted pro-inflammatory cytokines production. Co-culturing of HCC cells with baicalin-treated TAMs resulted in reduced proliferation and motility in HCC. Baicalin had minimal effect on derivation of macrophage polarisation factors by HCC cells, while directly induced repolarisation of TAM and M2-like macrophage. This effect was associated with elevated autophagy, and transcriptional activation of RelB/p52 pathway. Suppression of autophagy or RelB abolished skewing of baicalin-treated TAM. Autophagic degradation of TRAF2 in baicalin-treated TAM might be responsible for RelB/p52 activation. Our findings unveil the essential role of TAM repolarisation in suppressive effect of baicalin on HCC, which requires autophagy-associated activation of RelB/p52. PMID:26492375

  4. Autophagy-induced RelB/p52 activation mediates tumour-associated macrophage repolarisation and suppression of hepatocellular carcinoma by natural compound baicalin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, H-Y; Wang, N; Man, K; Tsao, S-W; Che, C-M; Feng, Y

    2015-01-01

    The plasticity of tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) has implicated an influential role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Repolarisation of TAM towards M1 phenotype characterises an immune-competent microenvironment that favours tumour regression. To investigate the role and mechanism of TAM repolarisation in suppression of HCC by a natural compound baicalin, Orthotopic HCC implantation model was used to investigate the effect of baicalin on HCC; liposome-clodronate was introduced to suppress macrophage populations in mice; bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMDMs) were induced to unpolarised, M1-like, M2-like macrophages and TAM using different conditioned medium. We observed that oral administration of baicalin (50 mg/kg) completely blocked orthotopic growth of implanted HCC. Suppression of HCC by baicalin was diminished when mice macrophage was removed by clodronate treatment. Baicalin induced repolarisation of TAM to M1-like phenotype without specific toxicity to either phenotype of macrophages. Baicalin initiated TAM reprogramming to M1-like macrophage, and promoted pro-inflammatory cytokines production. Co-culturing of HCC cells with baicalin-treated TAMs resulted in reduced proliferation and motility in HCC. Baicalin had minimal effect on derivation of macrophage polarisation factors by HCC cells, while directly induced repolarisation of TAM and M2-like macrophage. This effect was associated with elevated autophagy, and transcriptional activation of RelB/p52 pathway. Suppression of autophagy or RelB abolished skewing of baicalin-treated TAM. Autophagic degradation of TRAF2 in baicalin-treated TAM might be responsible for RelB/p52 activation. Our findings unveil the essential role of TAM repolarisation in suppressive effect of baicalin on HCC, which requires autophagy-associated activation of RelB/p52. PMID:26492375

  5. Activation of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Pathway Increases the Sensitivity of Cancer Cells to the Oncolytic Virus M1.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Zhang, Haipeng; Qiu, Jianguang; Lin, Yuan; Liang, Jiankai; Xiao, Xiao; Fu, Liwu; Wang, Fang; Cai, Jing; Tan, Yaqian; Zhu, Wenbo; Yin, Wei; Lu, Bingzheng; Xing, Fan; Tang, Lipeng; Yan, Min; Mai, Jialuo; Li, Yuan; Chen, Wenli; Qiu, Pengxin; Su, Xingwen; Gao, Guangping; Tai, Phillip W L; Hu, Jun; Yan, Guangmei

    2016-02-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a novel and emerging treatment modality that uses replication-competent viruses to destroy cancer cells. Although diverse cancer cell types are sensitive to oncolytic viruses, one of the major challenges of oncolytic virotherapy is that the sensitivity to oncolysis ranges among different cancer cell types. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism of action is not fully understood. Here, we report that activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling significantly sensitizes refractory cancer cells to alphavirus M1 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. We find that activation of the cAMP signaling pathway inhibits M1-induced expression of antiviral factors in refractory cancer cells, leading to prolonged and severe endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and cell apoptosis. We also demonstrate that M1-mediated oncolysis, which is enhanced by cAMP signaling, involves the factor, exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), but not the classical cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). Taken together, cAMP/Epac1 signaling pathway activation inhibits antiviral factors and improves responsiveness of refractory cancer cells to M1-mediated virotherapy. PMID:26373347

  6. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 stimulates macrophage activation through Toll-like Receptor-4.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kamlesh K; Xu, Zhi; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2016-08-26

    While inflammation is often associated with increased Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), the functional consequences of PAI-1 in inflammation have yet to be fully determined. The aim of this study was to establish the in vivo relevance of PAI-1 in inflammation. A mouse model of systemic inflammation was employed in wild-type (WT) and PAI-1 deficient (PAI-1(-/-)) mice. Mice survival, macrophage infiltration into the lungs, and plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were assessed after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion. In vitro experiments were conducted to examine changes in LPS-induced inflammatory responses after PAI-1 exposure. PAI-1 was shown to regulate inflammation, in vivo, and affect macrophage infiltration into lungs. Further, PAI-1 activated macrophages, and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines at both the mRNA and protein levels in these cells. The effect of PAI-1 on macrophage activation was dose-dependent and LPS-independent. Proteolytic inhibitory activity and Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP) and vitronectin (VN) binding functions, were not involved in PAI-1-mediated activation of macrophages. However, the effect of PAI-1 on macrophage activation was partially blocked by a TLR4 neutralizing antibody. Furthermore, PAI-1-induced Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-2 (MIP-2) expression was reduced in TLR4(-/-) macrophages compared to WT macrophages. These results demonstrate that PAI-1 is involved in the regulation of host inflammatory responses through Toll-like Receptor-4 (TLR4)-mediated macrophage activation. PMID:27317488

  7. Alternatively activated macrophages derived from monocytes and tissue macrophages are phenotypically and functionally distinct

    PubMed Central

    Gundra, Uma Mahesh; Girgis, Natasha M.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Jenkins, Stephen; Ward, Lauren N.; Kurtz, Zachary D.; Wiens, Kirsten E.; Tang, Mei San; Basu-Roy, Upal; Mansukhani, Alka; Allen, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages adopt an alternatively activated phenotype (AAMs) when activated by the interleukin-4receptor(R)α. AAMs can be derived either from proliferation of tissue resident macrophages or recruited inflammatory monocytes, but it is not known whether these different sources generate AAMs that are phenotypically and functionally distinct. By transcriptional profiling analysis, we show here that, although both monocyte and tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of Arg1, Chi3l3, and Retnla, only monocyte-derived AAMs up-regulated Raldh2 and PD-L2. Monocyte-derived AAMs were also CX3CR1-green fluorescent protein (GFP)high and expressed CD206, whereas tissue-derived AAMs were CX3CR1-GFP and CD206 negative. Monocyte-derived AAMs had high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and promoted the differentiation of FoxP3+ cells from naïve CD4+ cells via production of retinoic acid. In contrast, tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of uncoupling protein 1. Hence monocyte-derived AAM have properties associated with immune regulation, and the different physiological properties associated with AAM function may depend on the distinct lineage of these cells. PMID:24695852

  8. Rickettsia australis Activates Inflammasome in Human and Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, Claire; Bechelli, Jeremy; Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Saito, Tais; Azar, Sasha R.; Ismail, Nahed; Walker, David H.; Fang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsiae actively escape from vacuoles and replicate free in the cytoplasm of host cells, where inflammasomes survey the invading pathogens. In the present study, we investigated the interactions of Rickettsia australis with the inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages. R. australis induced a significant level of IL-1β secretion by human macrophages, which was significantly reduced upon treatment with an inhibitor of caspase-1 compared to untreated controls, suggesting caspase-1-dependent inflammasome activation. Rickettsia induced significant secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 in vitro by infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) as early as 8–12 h post infection (p.i.) in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of these cytokines was accompanied by cleavage of caspase-1 and was completely abrogated in BMMs deficient in caspase-1/caspase-11 or apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC), suggesting that R. australis activate the ASC-dependent inflammasome. Interestingly, in response to the same quantity of rickettsiae, NLRP3-/- BMMs significantly reduced the secretion level of IL-1β compared to wild type (WT) controls, suggesting that NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to cytosolic recognition of R. australis in vitro. Rickettsial load in spleen, but not liver and lung, of R. australis-infected NLRP3-/- mice was significantly greater compared to WT mice. These data suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome plays a role in host control of bacteria in vivo in a tissue-specific manner. Taken together, our data, for the first time, illustrate the activation of ASC-dependent inflammasome by R. australis in macrophages in which NLRP3 is involved. PMID:27362650

  9. Ceramic modifications of porous titanium: effects on macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Scislowska-Czarnecka, A; Menaszek, E; Szaraniec, B; Kolaczkowska, E

    2012-12-01

    Porous titanium is one of the most widely used implant materials because of its mechanical properties, however, it is also characterised by low bioactivity. To improve the above parameter we prepared three modifications of the porous (30 wt%) titanium (Ti) surface by covering it with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA), bioglass (BG) and calcium silicate (CS). Subsequently we tested the impact of the modifications on macrophages directing the inflammatory response that might compromise the implant bioactivity. In the study we investigated the in vitro effects of the materials on murine cell line RAW 264.7 macrophage adherence, morphology and activation (production/release of metalloproteinase MMP-9 and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines). CS Ti decreased the macrophage adherence and up-regulated the release of several pro-inflammatory mediators, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12. Also HA Ti reduced the cell adherence but other parameters were generally not increased, except of TNF-α. In contrast, BG Ti improved macrophage adherence and either decreased production of multiple mediators (MMP-9, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1) or did not change it in comparison to the porous titanium. We can conclude that analyzing the effects on the inflammatory response initiated by macrophages in vitro, calcium silicate did not improve the biological properties of the porous titanium. The improved bioactivity of titanium was, however, achieved by the application of the hydroxyapatite and bioglass layers. The present in vitro results suggest that these materials, HA Ti and especially BG Ti, may be suitable for in vivo application and thus justify their further investigation. PMID:22939219

  10. A Distinctive Alveolar Macrophage Activation State Induced by Cigarette Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Prescott G.; Koth, Laura L.; Yang, Yee Hwa; Rodriguez, Madeleine W.; Favoreto, Silvio; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Paquet, Agnes C.; Erle, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Macrophages are believed to play a central role in emphysema based largely on data from mouse models. However, the relevance of these models to smoking-related lung disease in humans is uncertain. Objectives: We sought to comprehensively characterize the effects of smoking on gene expression in human alveolar macrophages and to compare these with effects seen in transgenic mouse models of emphysema. Methods: We used DNA microarrays with genomewide coverage to analyze alveolar macrophages from 15 smokers, 15 nonsmokers, and 15 subjects with asthma (disease control). Selected gene expression changes were validated by polymerase chain reaction and ELISA. Expression changes were compared with those identified by microarray analysis of interleukin-13–overexpressing and integrin-β6–deficient mice, which both develop emphysema. Measurements and Main Results: All 15 smokers shared a common pattern of macrophage gene expression that distinguished them from nonsmokers, a finding not observed in subjects with asthma. We identified 110 genes as differentially expressed in smokers despite using conservative statistical methods. Matrix metalloproteinase 12, a proteinase that plays a critical role in mouse models, was the third most highly induced gene in smokers (ninefold, p < 0.0001). However, most changes in smokers were not reflected in mouse models. One such finding was increased osteopontin expression in smokers (fourfold, p = 0.006), which was confirmed at the protein level and correlated with the degree of airway obstruction. Conclusions: Smoking induces a remarkably consistent and distinctive pattern of alveolar macrophage activation. These studies identify aspects of mouse models that are directly relevant to human smokers and also reveal novel potential mediators of smoking-related diseases. PMID:16166618

  11. [Macrophage activation syndrome associated with adult-onset Still's disease].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2007-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially lethal disease, resulting from uncontrolled activation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and macrophages. Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory disease. AOSD resemble reactive MAS in its symptoms and laboratory data. Moreover, AOSD per se induces MAS. It is, therefore, quite difficult to differentiate these syndrome and disease. The immunodeficiency state induced by treatment in AOSD could reactivate latent viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus, which could potentially lead to MAS. The therapeutic agents for AOSD, such as sulfasalazine, also could provoke reactive MAS. Because multiple factors are involved in inducing MAS to a different degree, the main cause should be searched for and targeted for the therapy. PMID:18174671

  12. Myelin-Derived Lipids Modulate Macrophage Activity by Liver X Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Thu, Vân Anh; Irrthum, Alexandre; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R.; Mulder, Monique; Stinissen, Piet; Hellings, Niels; Hendriks, Jerome J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which macrophages and microglia play a central role. Foamy macrophages and microglia, containing degenerated myelin, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis lesions. Recent studies have described an altered macrophage phenotype after myelin internalization. However, it is unclear by which mechanisms myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype can influence lesion progression. Here we demonstrate, by using genome wide gene expression analysis, that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages have an enhanced expression of genes involved in migration, phagocytosis and inflammation. Interestingly, myelin internalization also induced the expression of genes involved in liver-X-receptor signaling and cholesterol efflux. In vitro validation shows that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages indeed have an increased capacity to dispose intracellular cholesterol. In addition, myelin suppresses the secretion of the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-6 by macrophages, which was mediated by activation of liver-X-receptor β. Our data show that myelin modulates the phenotype of macrophages by nuclear receptor activation, which may subsequently affect lesion progression in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:22984598

  13. Myelin-derived lipids modulate macrophage activity by liver X receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Jeroen F J; Timmermans, Silke; Huynh-Thu, Vân Anh; Irrthum, Alexandre; Smeets, Hubert J M; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R; Mulder, Monique; Stinissen, Piet; Hellings, Niels; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which macrophages and microglia play a central role. Foamy macrophages and microglia, containing degenerated myelin, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis lesions. Recent studies have described an altered macrophage phenotype after myelin internalization. However, it is unclear by which mechanisms myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype can influence lesion progression. Here we demonstrate, by using genome wide gene expression analysis, that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages have an enhanced expression of genes involved in migration, phagocytosis and inflammation. Interestingly, myelin internalization also induced the expression of genes involved in liver-X-receptor signaling and cholesterol efflux. In vitro validation shows that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages indeed have an increased capacity to dispose intracellular cholesterol. In addition, myelin suppresses the secretion of the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-6 by macrophages, which was mediated by activation of liver-X-receptor β. Our data show that myelin modulates the phenotype of macrophages by nuclear receptor activation, which may subsequently affect lesion progression in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:22984598

  14. Intratumoral Delivery of IL-21 Overcomes Anti-Her2/Neu Resistance through Shifting Tumor-Associated Macrophages from M2 to M1 Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Liu, Mingyue; Du, Xuexiang; Li, Sirui; Li, Hang; Li, Xiaozhu; Li, Ying; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhihai; Fu, Yang-Xin; Wang, Shengdian

    2015-05-15

    Tumor resistance is a major hurdle to anti-Her2/neu Ab-based cancer therapy. Current strategies to overcome tumor resistance focus on tumor cell-intrinsic resistance. However, the extrinsic mechanisms, especially the tumor microenvironment, also play important roles in modulating the therapeutic response and resistance of the Ab. In this study, we demonstrate that tumor progression is highly associated with TAMs with immune-suppressive M2 phenotypes, and deletion of TAMs markedly enhanced the therapeutic effects of anti-Her2/neu Ab in a HER2/neu-dependent breast cancer cell TUBO model. Tumor local delivery of IL-21 can skew TAM polarization away from the M2 phenotype to a tumor-inhibiting M1 phenotype, which rapidly stimulates T cell responses against tumor and dramatically promotes the therapeutic effect of anti-Her2 Ab. Skewing of TAM polarization by IL-21 relies substantially on direct action of IL-21 on TAMs rather than stimulation of T and NK cells. Thus, our findings identify the abundant TAMs as a major extrinsic barrier for anti-Her2/neu Ab therapy and present a novel approach to combat this extrinsic resistance by tumor local delivery of IL-21 to skew TAM polarization. This study offers a therapeutic strategy to modulate the tumor microenvironment to overcome tumor-extrinsic resistance. PMID:25876763

  15. Inhibition of tristetraprolin expression by dexamethasone in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jalonen, Ulla; Lahti, Aleksi; Korhonen, Riku; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Moilanen, Eeva

    2005-03-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a factor that regulates mRNA stability and the expression of certain inflammatory genes. In the present study, we found that TTP expression was increased in macrophages exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Dexamethasone and dissociated steroid RU24858 inhibited LPS-induced TTP protein and mRNA expression and the inhibitory effect was reversed by a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. Histone deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A (TSA) and apicidin reduced the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone and RU24858 on TTP expression, but the glucocorticoids did not alter TTP mRNA half-life. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory steroids reduce TTP expression in activated macrophages by a glucocorticoid response element (GRE)-independent mechanism, possibly through histone deacetylation and transcriptional silencing. PMID:15710351

  16. Delineation of Diverse Macrophage Activation Programs in Response to Intracellular Parasites and Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Kim, Charles C.; Batra, Sajeev; McKerrow, James H.; Loke, P'ng

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability to reside and proliferate in macrophages is characteristic of several infectious agents that are of major importance to public health, including the intracellular parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (the etiological agent of Chagas disease) and Leishmania species (etiological agents of Kala-Azar and cutaneous leishmaniasis). Although recent studies have elucidated some of the ways macrophages respond to these pathogens, the relationships between activation programs elicited by these pathogens and the macrophage activation programs elicited by bacterial pathogens and cytokines have not been delineated. Methodology/Principal Findings To provide a global perspective on the relationships between macrophage activation programs and to understand how certain pathogens circumvent them, we used transcriptional profiling by genome-wide microarray analysis to compare the responses of mouse macrophages following exposure to the intracellular parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania mexicana, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the cytokines IFNG, TNF, IFNB, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17. We found that LPS induced a classical activation state that resembled macrophage stimulation by the Th1 cytokines IFNG and TNF. However, infection by the protozoan pathogen L. mexicana produced so few transcriptional changes that the infected macrophages were almost indistinguishable from uninfected cells. T. cruzi activated macrophages produced a transcriptional signature characterized by the induction of interferon-stimulated genes by 24 h post-infection. Despite this delayed IFN response by T. cruzi, the transcriptional response of macrophages infected by the kinetoplastid pathogens more closely resembled the transcriptional response of macrophages stimulated by the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17 than macrophages stimulated by Th1 cytokines. Conclusions/Significance This study provides global gene expression data for a diverse set of biologically significant pathogens and

  17. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-12-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  18. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-01-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  19. Modified Low Density Lipoprotein Stimulates Complement C3 Expression and Secretion via Liver X Receptor and Toll-like Receptor 4 Activation in Human Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Mogilenko, Denis A.; Kudriavtsev, Igor V.; Trulioff, Andrey S.; Shavva, Vladimir S.; Dizhe, Ella B.; Missyul, Boris V.; Zhakhov, Alexander V.; Ischenko, Alexander M.; Perevozchikov, Andrej P.; Orlov, Sergey V.

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 is a pivotal component of three cascades of complement activation. C3 is expressed in human atherosclerotic lesions and is involved in atherogenesis. However, the mechanism of C3 accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions is not well elucidated. We show that acetylated low density lipoprotein and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) increase C3 gene expression and protein secretion by human macrophages. Modified LDL (mLDL)-mediated activation of C3 expression mainly depends on liver X receptor (LXR) and partly on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), whereas C3 secretion is increased due to TLR4 activation by mLDL. LXR agonist TO901317 stimulates C3 gene expression in human monocyte-macrophage cells but not in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. We find LXR-responsive element inside of the promoter region of the human C3 gene, which binds to LXRβ in macrophages but not in HepG2 cells. We show that C3 expression and secretion is decreased in IL-4-treated (M2) and increased in IFNγ/LPS-stimulated (M1) human macrophages as compared with resting macrophages. LXR agonist TO901317 potentiates LPS-induced C3 gene expression and protein secretion in macrophages, whereas oxLDL differently modulates LPS-mediated regulation of C3 in M1 or M2 macrophages. Treatment of human macrophages with anaphylatoxin C3a results in stimulation of C3 transcription and secretion as well as increased oxLDL accumulation and augmented oxLDL-mediated up-regulation of the C3 gene. These data provide a novel mechanism of C3 gene regulation in macrophages and suggest new aspects of cross-talk between mLDL, C3, C3a, and TLR4 during development of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:22194611

  20. Blockade of MMP14 Activity in Murine Breast Carcinomas: Implications for Macrophages, Vessels, and Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ager, Eleanor I.; Kozin, Sergey V.; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Seano, Giorgio; Kodack, David P.; Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Huang, Yuhui; Goel, Shom; Snuderl, Matija; Muzikansky, Alona; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Dransfield, Daniel T.; Devy, Laetitia; Boucher, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Background: Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 14 may mediate tumor progression through vascular and immune-modulatory effects. Methods: Orthotopic murine breast tumors (4T1 and E0771 with high and low MMP14 expression, respectively; n = 5–10 per group) were treated with an anti-MMP14 inhibitory antibody (DX-2400), IgG control, fractionated radiation therapy, or their combination. We assessed primary tumor growth, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, macrophage phenotype, and vascular parameters. A linear mixed model with repeated observations, with Mann-Whitney or analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc adjustment, was used to determine statistical significance. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: DX-2400 inhibited tumor growth compared with IgG control treatment, increased macrophage numbers, and shifted the macrophage phenotype towards antitumor M1-like. These effects were associated with a reduction in active TGFβ and SMAD2/3 signaling. DX-2400 also transiently increased iNOS expression and tumor perfusion, reduced tissue hypoxia (median % area: control, 20.2%, interquartile range (IQR) = 6.4%-38.9%; DX-2400: 1.2%, IQR = 0.2%-3.2%, P = .044), and synergistically enhanced radiation therapy (days to grow to 800mm3: control, 12 days, IQR = 9–13 days; DX-2400 plus radiation, 29 days, IQR = 26–30 days, P < .001) in the 4T1 model. The selective iNOS inhibitor, 1400W, abolished the effects of DX-2400 on vessel perfusion and radiotherapy. On the other hand, DX-2400 was not capable of inducing iNOS expression or synergizing with radiation in E0771 tumors. Conclusion: MMP14 blockade decreased immunosuppressive TGFβ, polarized macrophages to an antitumor phenotype, increased iNOS, and improved tumor perfusion, resulting in reduced primary tumor growth and enhanced response to radiation therapy, especially in high MMP14-expressing tumors. PMID:25710962

  1. New insights into the multidimensional concept of macrophage ontogeny, activation and function.

    PubMed

    Ginhoux, Florent; Schultze, Joachim L; Murray, Peter J; Ochando, Jordi; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have protective roles in immunity to pathogens, tissue development, homeostasis and repair following damage. Maladaptive immunity and inflammation provoke changes in macrophage function that are causative of disease. Despite a historical wealth of knowledge about macrophages, recent advances have revealed unknown aspects of their development and function. Following development, macrophages are activated by diverse signals. Such tissue microenvironmental signals together with epigenetic changes influence macrophage development, activation and functional diversity, with consequences in disease and homeostasis. We discuss here how recent discoveries in these areas have led to a multidimensional concept of macrophage ontogeny, activation and function. In connection with this, we also discuss how technical advances facilitate a new roadmap for the isolation and analysis of macrophages at high resolution. PMID:26681460

  2. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induce Peculiar Alternatively Activated Macrophages Capable of Dampening Both Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Chiossone, Laura; Conte, Romana; Spaggiari, Grazia Maria; Serra, Martina; Romei, Cristina; Bellora, Francesca; Becchetti, Flavio; Andaloro, Antonio; Moretta, Lorenzo; Bottino, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) support hematopoiesis and exert immunoregulatory activities. Here, we analyzed the functional outcome of the interactions between MSCs and monocytes/macrophages. We showed that MSCs supported the survival of monocytes that underwent differentiation into macrophages, in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. However, MSCs skewed their polarization toward a peculiar M2-like functional phenotype (M(MSC) ), through a prostaglandin E2-dependent mechanism. M(MSC) were characterized by high expression of scavenger receptors, increased phagocytic capacity, and high production of interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor-β. These cytokines contributed to the immunoregulatory properties of M(MSC) , which differed from those of typical IL-4-induced macrophages (M2). In particular, interacting with activated natural killer (NK) cells, M(MSC) inhibited both the expression of activating molecules such as NKp44, CD69, and CD25 and the production of IFNγ, while M2 affected only IFNγ production. Moreover, M(MSC) inhibited the proliferation of CD8(+) T cells in response to allogeneic stimuli and induced the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Toll-like receptor engagement reverted the phenotypic and functional features of M(MSC) to those of M1 immunostimulatory/proinflammatory macrophages. Overall our data show that MSCs induce the generation of a novel type of alternatively activated macrophages capable of suppressing both innate and adaptive immune responses. These findings may help to better understand the role of MSCs in healthy tissues and inflammatory diseases including cancer, and provide clues for novel therapeutic approaches. Stem Cells 2016;34:1909-1921. PMID:27015881

  3. GM-CSF Promotes Macrophage Alternative Activation after Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Larry; Marlier, Arnaud; Lee, Yashang; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Cantley, Lloyd G.

    2015-01-01

    After kidney ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, monocytes home to the kidney and differentiate into activated macrophages. Whereas proinflammatory macrophages contribute to the initial kidney damage, an alternatively activated phenotype can promote normal renal repair. The microenvironment of the kidney during the repair phase mediates the transition of macrophage activation from a proinflammatory to a reparative phenotype. In this study, we show that macrophages isolated from murine kidneys during the tubular repair phase after I/R exhibit an alternative activation gene profile that differs from the canonical alternative activation induced by IL-4–stimulated STAT6 signaling. This unique activation profile can be reproduced in vitro by stimulation of bone marrow-derived macrophages with conditioned media from serum-starved mouse proximal tubule cells. Secreted tubular factors were found to activate macrophage STAT3 and STAT5 but not STAT6, leading to induction of the unique alternative activation pattern. Using STAT3-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages and pharmacologic inhibition of STAT5, we found that tubular cell-mediated macrophage alternative activation is regulated by STAT5 activation. Both in vitro and after renal I/R, tubular cells expressed GM-CSF, a known STAT5 activator, and this pathway was required for in vitro alternative activation of macrophages by tubular cells. Furthermore, administration of a neutralizing antibody against GM-CSF after renal I/R attenuated kidney macrophage alternative activation and suppressed tubular proliferation. Taken together, these data show that tubular cells can instruct macrophage activation by secreting GM-CSF, leading to a unique macrophage reparative phenotype that supports tubular proliferation after sterile ischemic injury. PMID:25388222

  4. Pyrimidinergic Receptor Activation Controls Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Souza, Aline Cristina Abreu; Marinho, Ygor; Correa, Gladys; Santoro, Giani França; Coutinho, Claudia Mara Lara Melo; Vommaro, Rossiane Claudia; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent worldwide and may have serious clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects almost any cell type in mammalian hosts, including immune cells. The immune cells express purinergic P2 receptors in their membrane – subdivided into P2Y and P2X subfamilies - whose activation is important for infection control. Here, we examined the effect of treatment with UTP and UDP in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with T. gondii tachyzoites. Treatment with these nucleotides reduced parasitic load by 90%, but did not increase the levels of the inflammatory mediators NO and ROS, nor did it modulate host cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. On the other hand, UTP and UDP treatments induced early egress of tachyzoites from infected macrophages, in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as shown by scanning electron microscopy analysis, and videomicroscopy. In subsequent infections, prematurely egressed parasites had reduced infectivity, and could neither replicate nor inhibit the fusion of lysosomes to the parasitophorous vacuole. The use of selective agonists and antagonists of the receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2Y4 and P2Y6 showed that premature parasite egress may be mediated by the activation of these receptor subtypes. Our results suggest that the activity of P2Y host cell receptors controls T. gondii infection in macrophages, highlighting the importance of pyrimidinergic signaling for innate immune system response against infection. Finally the P2Y receptors should be considered as new target for the development of drugs against T. gondii infection. PMID:26192447

  5. Successful therapy of macrophage activation syndrome with dexamethasone palmitate.

    PubMed

    Nakagishi, Yasuo; Shimizu, Masaki; Kasai, Kazuko; Miyoshi, Mari; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a severe and potential life-threatening complication of childhood systemic inflammatory disorders. Corticosteroids are commonly used as the first-line therapy for MAS. We report four patients with MAS who were successfully treated with dexamethasone palmitate (DexP), a liposome-incorporated dexamethasone, much more efficient than free corticosteroids. DexP effectively inhibited inflammation in MAS patients in whom the response to pulse methylprednisolone was not sufficient to manage their diseases. DexP was also effective as the first-line therapy for MAS. Based on these findings, DexP is an effective therapy in treating MAS patients. PMID:24754272

  6. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J.; Aksoylar, H. Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26360589

  7. Unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not promote human monocyte differentiation toward alternative macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Brozek, John; Derudas, Bruno; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2009-08-28

    Macrophages adapt their response to micro-environmental signals. While Th1 cytokines promote pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, Th2 cytokines promote an 'alternative' anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in macrophages where they control the inflammatory response. It has been shown that PPAR{gamma} promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in humans and mice, while a role for PPAR{beta}/{delta} in this process has been reported only in mice and no data are available for PPAR{alpha}. Here, we show that in contrast to PPAR{gamma}, expression of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} overall does not correlate with the expression of M2 markers in human atherosclerotic lesions, whereas a positive correlation with genes of lipid metabolism exists. Moreover, unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not influence human monocyte differentiation into M2 macrophages in vitro. Thus, PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} do not appear to modulate the alternative differentiation of human macrophages.

  8. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  9. LL-37 immunomodulatory activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Hancock, Robert E W; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  10. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  11. Posttranscriptional control of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in colonic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Filardy, A A; He, J; Bennink, J; Yewdell, J; Kelsall, B L

    2016-07-01

    Colonic macrophages (cMPs) are important for intestinal homeostasis as they kill microbes and yet produce regulatory cytokines. Activity of the NLRP3 (nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat-containing pyrin receptor 3) inflammasome, a major sensor of stress and microorganisms that results in pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cell death, must be tightly controlled in the intestine. We demonstrate that resident cMPs are hyporesponsive to NLRP3 inflammasome activation owing to a remarkable level of posttranscriptional control of NLRP3 and pro-interleukin-1β (proIL-1β) protein expression, which was also seen for tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6, but lost during experimental colitis. Resident cMPs rapidly degraded NLRP3 and proIL-1β proteins by the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Finally, blocking IL-10R-signaling in vivo enhanced NLRP3 and proIL-1β protein but not mRNA levels in resident cMPs, implicating a role for IL-10 in environmental conditioning of cMPs. These data are the first to show dramatic posttranscriptional control of inflammatory cytokine production by a relevant tissue-derived macrophage population and proteasomal degradation of proIL-1β and NLRP3 as a mechanism to control inflammasome activation, findings which have broad implications for our understanding of intestinal and systemic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26627461

  12. FoxM1 promotes breast tumorigenesis by activating PDGF-A and forming a positive feedback loop with the PDGF/AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guanzhen; Zhou, Aidong; Xue, Jianfei; Huang, Chen; Zhang, Xia; Kang, Shin-Hyuk; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Tan, Christina; Xie, Keping; Wang, Jiejun; Huang, Suyun

    2015-05-10

    The autocrine platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)/PDGF receptor (PDGFR) signaling pathway promotes breast cancer tumorigenesis, but the mechanisms for its dysregulation in breast cancer are largely unknown. In the study, we identified PDGF-A as a novel transcriptional target of FoxM1. FoxM1 directly binds to two sites in the promoter of PDGF-A and activates its transcription. Mutation of these FoxM1-binding sites diminished PDGF-A promoter activity. Increased FoxM1 resulted in the upregulation of PDGF-A, which led to activation of the AKT pathway and increased breast cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, whereas knockdown of FoxM1 does the opposite. Blocking AKT activation with a phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT inhibitor decreased FoxM1-induced cell proliferation. Moreover, PDGF/AKT pathway upregulates the expression of FoxM1 in breast cancer cells. Knockdown of PDGF-A or blockade of AKT activation inhibited the expression of FoxM1 in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, expression of FoxM1 significantly correlated with the expression of PDGF-A and the activated AKT signaling pathway in human breast cancer specimens. Our study demonstrates a novel positive regulatory feedback loop between FoxM1 and the PDGF/AKT signaling pathway; this loop contributes to breast cancer cell growth and tumorigenesis. PMID:25869208

  13. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  14. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine. PMID:26869018

  15. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells' resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine. PMID:26869018

  16. Pyruvate kinase M2 regulates Hif-1α activity and IL-1β induction and is a critical determinant of the warburg effect in LPS-activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Palsson-McDermott, Eva M; Curtis, Anne M; Goel, Gautam; Lauterbach, Mario A R; Sheedy, Frederick J; Gleeson, Laura E; van den Bosch, Mirjam W M; Quinn, Susan R; Domingo-Fernandez, Raquel; Johnston, Daniel G W; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Jiang, Jain-Kang; Israelsen, William J; Keane, Joseph; Thomas, Craig; Clish, Clary; Vander Heiden, Matthew; Vanden Heiden, Matthew; Xavier, Ramnik J; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages activated by the TLR4 agonist LPS undergo dramatic changes in their metabolic activity. We here show that LPS induces expression of the key metabolic regulator Pyruvate Kinase M2 (PKM2). Activation of PKM2 using two well-characterized small molecules, DASA-58 and TEPP-46, inhibited LPS-induced Hif-1α and IL-1β, as well as the expression of a range of other Hif-1α-dependent genes. Activation of PKM2 attenuated an LPS-induced proinflammatory M1 macrophage phenotype while promoting traits typical of an M2 macrophage. We show that LPS-induced PKM2 enters into a complex with Hif-1α, which can directly bind to the IL-1β promoter, an event that is inhibited by activation of PKM2. Both compounds inhibited LPS-induced glycolytic reprogramming and succinate production. Finally, activation of PKM2 by TEPP-46 in vivo inhibited LPS and Salmonella typhimurium-induced IL-1β production, while boosting production of IL-10. PKM2 is therefore a critical determinant of macrophage activation by LPS, promoting the inflammatory response. PMID:25565206

  17. Macrophage activation syndrome in the course of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Emmi, Giacomo; Fastiggi, Michele; Silvestri, Elena; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-08-01

    An overwhelming activation of cytotoxic T cells and well-differentiated macrophages leading to systemic overload of inflammatory mediators characterizes the so-called macrophage activation syndrome (MAS); this potentially life-threatening clinical entity may derive from several genetic defects involved in granule-mediated cytotoxicity but has been largely observed in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, many rheumatologic diseases, infections, and malignancies. The occurrence of MAS in the natural history or as the revealing clue of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders (AIDs), rare conditions caused by disrupted innate immunity pathways with overblown release of proinflammatory cytokines, has been only reported in few isolated patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, familial Mediterranean fever, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome since 2001. All these patients displayed various clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic features of MAS and have often required intensive care support. Only one patient has died due to MAS. Defective cytotoxic cell function was documented in a minority of patients. Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment, but anakinra was clinically effective in three refractory cases. Even if MAS and AIDs share multiple clinical features as well as heterogeneous pathogenetic scenes and a potential response to anti-interleukin-1 targeted therapies, MAS requires a prompt specific recognition in the course of AIDs due to its profound severity and high mortality rate. PMID:25846831

  18. Macrophage immunomodulatory activity of polysaccharides isolated from Opuntia polyacantha

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Xie, Gang; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Klein, Robyn A.; Jutila, Mark A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Opuntia polyacantha (prickly pear cactus) has been used extensively for its nutritional properties; however, less is known regarding medicinal properties of Opuntia tissues. In the present study, we extracted polysaccharides from O. polyacantha and used size-exclusion chromatography to fractionate the crude polysaccharides into four polysaccharide fractions (designated as Opuntia polysaccharides C-I to C-IV). The average Mr of fractions C-I through C-IV was estimated to be 733, 550, 310, and 168 kDa, respectively, and sugar composition analysis revealed that Opuntia polysaccharides consisted primarily of galactose, galacturonic acid, xylose, arabinose, and rhamnose. Analysis of the effects of Opuntia polysaccharides on human and murine macrophages demonstrated that all four fractions had potent immunomodulatory activity, inducing production of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6. Furthermore, modulation of macrophage function by Opuntia polysaccharides was mediated, at least in part, through activation of nuclear factor κB. Together, our results provide a molecular basis to explain a portion of the beneficial therapeutic properties of extracts from O. polyacantha and support the concept of using Opuntia polysaccharides as an immunotherapeutic adjuvant. PMID:18597716

  19. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue.

    PubMed

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. The population of circulating CD163 (mCD163) monocytes was determined using flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was plotted to determine the predictive validity of the biomarkers. Serum ferritin and sCD163 were found significantly increased in severe dengue patients compared to dengue fever patients (P = 0.003). A fair area under ROC curves (AUC) at 0.72 with a significant P value of 0.004 was observed for sCD163. sCD25 and mCD163 levels were not significantly different between severe dengue and dengue fever patients. Our findings suggest that in addition to serum ferritin, sCD163 can differentiate severe dengue from that of dengue fever patients. Hence, sCD163 level can be considered for use as a predictive marker for impending severe dengue. PMID:26941578

  20. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. The population of circulating CD163 (mCD163) monocytes was determined using flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was plotted to determine the predictive validity of the biomarkers. Serum ferritin and sCD163 were found significantly increased in severe dengue patients compared to dengue fever patients (P = 0.003). A fair area under ROC curves (AUC) at 0.72 with a significant P value of 0.004 was observed for sCD163. sCD25 and mCD163 levels were not significantly different between severe dengue and dengue fever patients. Our findings suggest that in addition to serum ferritin, sCD163 can differentiate severe dengue from that of dengue fever patients. Hence, sCD163 level can be considered for use as a predictive marker for impending severe dengue. PMID:26941578

  1. A defect in the inflammation-primed macrophage-activation cascade in osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Lindsay, D D; Naraparaju, V R; Ireland, R A; Popoff, S N

    1994-05-15

    Macrophages were activated by administration of lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc) or dodecylglycerol (DDG) to wild-type rats but not in osteopetrotic (op) mutant rats. In vitro treatment of wild-type rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG efficiently activated macrophages whereas treatment of op mutant rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG did not activate macrophages. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation cascade in rats requires participation of B lymphocytes and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of wild-type rat B lymphocytes can convert DBP to the macrophage-activating factor (MAF), whereas B lymphocytes of the op mutant rats were shown to be deficient in lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase. DBP is conserved among mammalian species. Treatment of human DBP (Gc1 protein) with commercial glycosidases yields an extremely high titrated MAF as assayed on mouse and rat macrophages. Because the enzymatically generated MAF (GcMAF) bypasses the role of lymphocytes in macrophage activation, the op mutant rat macrophages were efficiently activated by administration of a small quantity (100 pg/rat) of GcMAF. Likewise, in vitro treatment of op rat peritoneal cells with as little as 40 pg GcMAF/ml activated macrophages. PMID:8176226

  2. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong

    2013-11-15

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC.

  3. Prostaglandin D2-loaded microspheres effectively activate macrophage effector functions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Nicolete, Roberto; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-10-12

    Biodegradable lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres (MS) improve the stability of biomolecules stability and allow enable their sustained release. Lipid mediators represent a strategy for improving host defense; however, most of these mediators, such as prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), have low water solubility and are unstable. The present study aimed to develop and characterize MS loaded with PGD2 (PGD2-MS) to obtain an innovative tool to activate macrophages. PGD2-MS were prepared using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent extraction-evaporation process, and the size, zeta potential, surface morphology and encapsulation efficiency were determined. It was also evaluated in vitro the phagocytic index, NF-κB activation, as well as nitric oxide and cytokine production by alveolar macrophages (AMs) in response to PGD2-MS. PGD2-MS were spherical with a diameter of 5.0±3.3 μm and regular surface, zeta potential of -13.4±5.6 mV, and 36% of encapsulation efficiency, with 16-26% release of entrapped PGD2 at 4 and 48 h, respectively. PGD2-MS were more efficiently internalized by AMs than unloaded-MS, and activated NF-κB more than free PGD2. Moreover, PGD2-MS stimulated the production of nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-1β, and TGF-β, more than free PGD2, indicating that microencapsulation increased the activating effect of PGD2 on cells. In LPS-pre-treated AMs, PGD2-MS decreased the release of IL-6 but increased the production of nitric oxide and IL-1β. These results show that the morphological characteristics of PGD2-MS facilitated interaction with, and activation of phagocytic cells; moreover, PGD2-MS retained the biological activities of PGD2 to trigger effector mechanisms in AMs. It is suggested that PGD2-MS represent a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the lungs of immunocompromised subjects. PMID:26143263

  4. Macrophage-oriented cytotoxic activity of novel triterpene saponins extracted from roots of Securidaca inappendiculata.

    PubMed

    Yui, S; Ubukata, K; Hodono, K; Kitahara, M; Mimaki, Y; Kuroda, M; Sashida, Y; Yamazaki, M

    2001-10-01

    It is recognized that macrophages in peripheral tissues often proliferate under pathological conditions such as tumors, inflammation and atherosclerosis. Because the growth state of macrophages is believed to be a factor regulating the pathological process of the diseases, substances that regulate macrophage growth or survival may be useful for disease control. In this paper, we identified the activity inhibiting macrophage growth in a hot water extract of roots of Securidaca inappendiculata. The extract markedly inhibited macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF/CSF-1)-induced growth of macrophages, whereas it exerted a less potent effect on growth of Concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated thymocytes or M-CSF-stimulated bone marrow cells. The inhibition of macrophage growth was caused by a cytotoxic effect rather than a cytostatic effect. Cell death was due to the induction of apoptosis, as judged by staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated d-UTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). The cytotoxic activity seemed to be specific to peripheral macrophages; it showed a weak effect on the growth and survival of tumor cell lines including a macrophage-like cell line, J-774.1. Moreover, the saponin fraction induced apoptotic cell death of macrophages only when they were stimulated by M-CSF; it did not affect the viability of macrophages cultured without M-CSF or with granulocyte/macrophage-CSF. We determined the structures of the two active triterpene saponin compounds in the fraction, named securioside A and securioside B having a 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic group which is essential for the cell death-inducing activity. They are believed to be the primary compounds of new drugs for the treatment of pathological states in which macrophage proliferation occurs. PMID:11606030

  5. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  6. Extracellular magnesium and calcium blockers modulate macrophage activity.

    PubMed

    Libako, Patrycja; Nowacki, Wojciech; Castiglioni, Sara; Mazur, Andrzej; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) possesses anti-inflammatory properties, partly because it antagonizes calcium (Ca) and inhibits L-type Ca channels. Our aim was to determine the effects of different concentrations of extracellular Mg, with or without Ca-channel blockers, in macrophages. A macrophage-like cell line J774.E was cultured in different concentrations of extracellular Mg and exposed to i) the phorbol ester PMA to induce the production of reactive oxygen species ii) lipopolysaccharide to induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, or iii) ovalbumin to study endocytosis. The Ca antagonists verapamil and/or TMB-8 were used to interfere with Ca homeostasis. Different concentrations of extracellular Mg did not impact on endocytosis, while Ca antagonists markedly decreased it. Low extracellular Mg exacerbated, whereas Ca antagonists inhibited, PMA-induced production of free radicals. Ca blockers prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription and release of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, while extracellular Mg had only a marginal effect. Ca channel inhibitors markedly reduced the activity of J774.E cells, thus underscoring the critical role of Ca in the non-specific immune response, a role which was, in some instances, also modulated by extracellular Mg. PMID:27160489

  7. Evidence that M1 muscarinic receptors enhance noradrenaline release in mouse atria by activating protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, M.; Barrington, M.; Majewski, H.

    1993-01-01

    1. The M1 selective muscarinic agonist, McNeil A 343, enhanced the electrically evoked release of noradrenaline from postganglionic sympathetic nerves in mouse atria. This has been found previously to be due to activation of muscarinic receptors of the M1 subtype, probably located on sympathetic nerve terminals. The present study investigated the signal transduction mechanisms involved in the release-enhancing effects of McNeil A 343. The release of noradrenaline from mouse atria was assessed by measuring the electrically-induced (3 Hz, 60 s) outflow of radioactivity from atria which had been pre-incubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. 2. 8-Bromo cyclic AMP in the presence of IBMX was used to enhance maximally S-I noradrenaline release through cyclic AMP-dependent mechanisms. However, the facilitatory effect of McNeil A 343 (10 microM) was not different from the effect in the absence of these drugs, suggesting that McNeil A 343 enhances noradrenaline release independently of the cyclic AMP system. Furthermore, the release-enhancing effect of McNeil A 343 (10 microM) on noradrenaline release was also not altered by the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, BW A4C. 3. The facilitatory effect of McNeil A 343 was not altered in the presence of drugs (trifluoperazine, W7, and calmidazolium) which inhibit calmodulin-dependent processes, suggesting that the mechanisms of action of McNeil A 343 does not depend on calmodulin. 4. It was considered likely that the facilitatory effect of McNeil A 343 on noradrenaline release may be due to activation of protein kinase C, since activators of protein kinase C enhance noradrenaline release.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7694761

  8. AMPK-Activated Protein Kinase Suppresses Ccr2 Expression by Inhibiting the NF-κB Pathway in RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kumase, Fumiaki; Takeuchi, Kimio; Morizane, Yuki; Suzuki, Jun; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Kataoka, Keiko; Al-Moujahed, Ahmad; Maidana, Daniel E.; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) is a key pro-inflammatory marker of classic (M1) macrophage activation. Although Ccr2 is known to be expressed both constitutively and inductively, the full regulatory mechanism of its expression remains unclear. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is not only a master regulator of energy homeostasis but also a central regulator of inflammation. In this study, we sought to assess AMPK’s role in regulating RAW264.7 macrophage Ccr2 protein levels in resting (M0) or LPS-induced M1 states. In both M0 and M1 RAW264.7 macrophages, knockdown of the AMPKα1 subunit by siRNA led to increased Ccr2 levels whereas pharmacologic (A769662) activation of AMPK, attenuated LPS-induced increases in Ccr2 expression in an AMPK dependent fashion. The increases in Ccr2 levels by AMPK downregulation were partially reversed by NF-κB inhibition whereas TNF-a inhibition had minimal effects. Our results indicate that AMPK is a negative regulator of Ccr2 expression in RAW264.7 macrophages, and that the mechanism of action of AMPK inhibition of Ccr2 is mediated, in part, through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:26799633

  9. Biosynthesis of nitric oxide activates iron regulatory factor in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Drapier, J C; Hirling, H; Wietzerbin, J; Kaldy, P; Kühn, L C

    1993-01-01

    Biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine modulates activity of iron-dependent enzymes, including mitochondrial acontiase, an [Fe-S] protein. We examined the effect of NO on the activity of iron regulatory factor (IRF), a cytoplasmic protein which modulates both ferritin mRNA translation and transferrin receptor mRNA stability by binding to specific mRNA sequences called iron responsive elements (IREs). Murine macrophages were activated with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide to induce NO synthase activity and cultured in the presence or absence of NG-substituted analogues of L-arginine which served as selective inhibitors of NO synthesis. Measurement of the nitrite concentration in the culture medium was taken as an index of NO production. Mitochondria-free cytosols were then prepared and aconitase activity as well as IRE binding activity and induction of IRE binding activity were correlated and depended on NO synthesis after IFN-gamma and/or LPS stimulation. Authentic NO gas as well as the NO-generating compound 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) also conversely modulated aconitase and IRE binding activities of purified recombinant IRF. These results provide evidence that endogenously produced NO may modulate the post-transcriptional regulation of genes involved in iron homeostasis and support the hypothesis that the [Fe-S] cluster of IRF mediates iron-dependent regulation. Images PMID:7504626

  10. Tumor hypoxia enhances non-small cell lung cancer metastasis by selectively promoting macrophage M2 polarization through the activation of ERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shenglin; Dong, Rong; Meng, Wen; Ying, Meidan; Weng, Qinjie; Chen, Zibo; Ma, Jian; Fang, Qingxia; He, Qiaojun; Yang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common phenomenon occurring in the majority of human tumors and has been proved to play an important role in tumor progression. However, it remains unclear that whether the action of hypoxia on macrophages is a main driving force of hypoxia-mediated aggressive tumor behaviors. In the present study, we observe that high density of M2 macrophages is associated with metastasis in adenocarcinoma Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) patients. By applying the in vivo hypoxia model, the results suggest that intermittent hypoxia significantly promotes the metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC), accompanied with more CD209+ macrophages infiltrated in primary tumor tissue. More intriguingly, by skewing macrophages polarization away from the M1- to a tumor-promoting M2-like phenotype, hypoxia and IL-6 cooperate to enhance the LLC metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we also demonstrate that skewing of macrophage M2 polarization by hypoxia relies substantially on activation of ERK signaling. Collectively, these observations unveil a novel tumor hypoxia concept involving the macrophage phenotype shift and provide direct evidence for lung cancer intervention through modulating the phenotype of macrophages. PMID:25313135

  11. Activation of α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor reduces ischemic stroke injury through reduction of pro-inflammatory macrophages and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenying; Shen, Fanxia; He, Yue; Degos, Vincent; Camus, Marine; Maze, Mervyn; Young, William L; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Activation of α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α-7 nAchR) has a neuro-protective effect on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. However, the underlying mechanism is not completely understood. We hypothesized that α-7 nAchR agonist protects brain injury after ischemic stroke through reduction of pro-inflammatory macrophages (M1) and oxidative stress. C57BL/6 mice were treated with PHA568487 (PHA, α-7 nAchR agonist), methyllycaconitine (MLA, nAchR antagonist), or saline immediately and 24 hours after permanent occlusion of the distal middle cerebral artery (pMCAO). Behavior test, lesion volume, CD68(+), M1 (CD11b(+)/Iba1(+)) and M2 (CD206/Iba1+) microglia/macrophages, and phosphorylated p65 component of NF-kB in microglia/macrophages were quantified using histological stained sections. The expression of M1 and M2 marker genes, anti-oxidant genes and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase were quantified using real-time RT-PCR. Compared to the saline-treated mice, PHA mice had fewer behavior deficits 3 and 7 days after pMCAO, and smaller lesion volume, fewer CD68(+) and M1 macrophages, and more M2 macrophages 3 and 14 days after pMCAO, whereas MLA's effects were mostly the opposite in several analyses. PHA increased anti-oxidant genes and NADPH oxidase expression associated with decreased phosphorylation of NF-kB p65 in microglia/macrophages. Thus, reduction of inflammatory response and oxidative stress play roles in α-7 nAchR neuro-protective effect. PMID:25157794

  12. Phospholipid Ozonation Products Activate the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zemski Berry, Karin A; Murphy, Robert C

    2016-08-15

    Ozone is a highly reactive environmental toxicant that can react with the double bonds of lipids in pulmonary surfactant. This study was undertaken to investigate the proinflammatory properties of the major lipid-ozone product in pulmonary surfactant, 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-glycerophosphocholine (16:0/9al-PC), with respect to eicosanoid production. A dose-dependent increase in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products was observed in murine resident peritoneal macrophages (RPM) and alveolar macrophages (AM) upon treatment with 16:0/9al-PC. In contrast, the production of cyclooxygenase (COX) derived eicosanoids did not change from basal levels in the presence of 16:0/9al-PC. When 16:0/9al-PC and the TLR2 ligand, zymosan, were added to RPM or AM, an enhancement of 5-LO product formation along with a concomitant decrease in COX product formation was observed. Neither intracellular calcium levels nor arachidonic acid release was influenced by the addition of 16:0/9al-PC to RPM. Results from mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor studies and direct measurement of phosphorylation of MAPKs revealed that 16:0/9al-PC activates the p38 MAPK pathway in RPM, which results in the activation of 5-LO. Our results indicate that 16:0/9al-PC has a profound effect on the eicosanoid pathway, which may have implications in inflammatory pulmonary disease states where eicosanoids have been shown to play a role. PMID:27448436

  13. Biological markers of macrophage activation: applications for fish phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Enane, N A; Frenkel, K; O'Connor, J M; Squibb, K S; Zelikoff, J T

    1993-01-01

    The immune defence mechanisms of fish seem to be related and similarly competent to those of mammals. Because of this, there is an increased interest in the immune responses of fish as models for higher vertebrates in immunological/immunotoxicological studies. Macrophages (M phi), phagocytic cells of the mammalian and teleost immune system which reside in tissues, represent a quiescent population of cells. However, upon stimulation, alterations in the physiology of these resident M phi occur which can be defined in terms of activation. This study was undertaken to determine whether biological markers used to assess mammalian M phi activation are applicable for use with fish M phi. Cells were recovered from the peritoneal cavity of non-injected and Aeromonas salmonicida-injected fish, and differences between resident and elicited M phi were evaluated with respect to protein content, phagocytic competence, enzyme activities and hydrogen peroxide production. Results demonstrate that biological markers used to assess mammalian M phi activation, with the exception of acid phosphatase activity, can be used to characterize the activation state of trout M phi, and that the activation process in both fish and mammals may occur by similar mechanism(s). PMID:8244466

  14. Secretion of monocyte chemotactic activity by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Denholm, E. M.; Wolber, F. M.; Phan, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if alveolar macrophages (AMs) are a source of monocyte chemoattractants and the role bleomycin interaction with AMs may play in the recruitment of monocytes to the lung in a rodent model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. AMs isolated from rats with bleomycin-induced fibrosis secreted significantly greater amounts of monocyte chemoattractants than those isolated from normal rats. When AMs from normal rats were stimulated with bleomycin in vitro, monocyte chemotactic activity was secreted into the medium. Chemotactic activity secretion by AM stimulated with 0.01 to 0.1 micrograms/ml bleomycin was significantly higher than that of cells incubated in medium alone. This activity was truly chemotactic for monocytes, but caused only minimal migration of normal AMs. Bleomycin itself at concentrations of 1 pg/ml to 10 micrograms/ml had no monocyte chemoattractant activity. Characterization of the chemotactic activity in conditioned media (CM) from bleomycin-stimulated AM demonstrated that the major portion of the activity bound to gelatin, was heterogeneous, with estimated molecular weights of 20 to 60 kd, and was inactivated by specific antifibronectin antibody. These findings suggest that fibronectin fragments are primarily responsible for the monocyte chemotactic activity secreted by AMs. Through increased secretion of such chemotactic substances, AMs could play a key role in the recruitment of peripheral blood monocytes into the lung in inflammatory lung disease and fibrosis. PMID:2476935

  15. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena; Pattou, Francois; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  16. Liver X receptor activation stimulates iron export in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bories, Gael; Colin, Sophie; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Copin, Corinne; Fanchon, Melanie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Belloy, Loic; Haulon, Stephan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In atherosclerotic plaques, iron preferentially accumulates in macrophages where it can exert pro-oxidant activities. Objective The objective of this study is, first, to better characterize the iron distribution and metabolism in macrophage sub-populations in human atherosclerotic plaques and, second, to determine whether iron homeostasis is under the control of nuclear receptors, such as the Liver X Receptors (LXR). Methods and Results Here we report that iron depots accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaque areas enriched in CD68 and Mannose Receptor (MR) positive (CD68+MR+) alternative M2 macrophages. In vitro IL-4 polarization of human monocytes into M2 macrophages also resulted in a gene expression profile and phenotype favouring iron accumulation. However, upon iron exposure, M2 macrophages acquire a phenotype favouring iron release, through a strong increase in ferroportin expression, illustrated by a more avid oxidation of extra-cellular LDL by iron-loaded M2 macrophages. In line, in human atherosclerotic plaques, CD68+MR+ macrophages accumulate oxidized lipids, which activate Liver X Receptors (LXRα and LXRβ), resulting in the induction of ABCA1, ABCG1 and ApoE expression. Moreover, in iron-loaded M2 macrophages, LXR activation induces nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NRF2) expression, hence increasing ferroportin expression, which, together with a decrease of hepcidin mRNA levels, promotes iron export. Conclusions These data identify a role for M2 macrophages in iron handling, a process which is regulated by LXR activation. PMID:24036496

  17. Proinflammatory-activated glioma cells induce a switch in microglial polarization and activation status, from a predominant M2b phenotype to a mixture of M1 and M2a/B polarized cells

    PubMed Central

    Lisi, Lucia; Stigliano, Egidio; Lauriola, Libero; Navarra, Pierluigi; Russo, Cinzia Dello

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are primary brain tumors characterized by morphological and genetic complexities, as well as diffuse infiltration into normal brain parenchyma. Within gliomas, microglia/macrophages represent the largest tumor-infiltrating cell population, contributing by at least one-third to the total tumor mass. Bi-directional interactions between glioma cells and microglia may therefore play an important role on tumor growth and biology. In the present study, we have characterized the influence of glioma-soluble factors on microglial function, comparing the effects of media harvested under basal conditions with those of media obtained after inducing a pro-inflammatory activation state in glioma cells. We found that microglial cells undergo a different pattern of activation depending on the stimulus; in the presence of activated glioma-derived factors, i.e. a condition mimicking the late stage of pathology, microglia presents as a mixture of polarization phenotypes (M1 and M2a/b), with up-regulation of iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase), ARG (arginase) and IL (interleukine)-10. At variance, microglia exposed to basal glioma-derived factors, i.e. a condition resembling the early stage of pathology, shows a more specific pattern of activation, with increased M2b polarization status and up-regulation of IL-10 only. As far as viability and cell proliferation are concerned, both LI-CM [LPS (lipopolysaccharide)–IFNγ (interferon γ) conditioned media] and C-CM (control-conditioned media) induce similar effects on microglial morphology. Finally, in human glioma tissue obtained from surgical resection of patients with IV grade glioblastoma, we detected a significant amount of CD68 positive cells, which is a marker of macrophage/microglial phagocytic activity, suggesting that in vitro findings presented here might have a relevance in the human pathology as well. PMID:24689533

  18. Macrophage activation syndrome in the era of biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Grom, Alexei A; Horne, AnnaCarin; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) refers to acute overwhelming inflammation caused by a 'cytokine storm'. Although increasingly recognized as a life-threatening complication of various rheumatic diseases, clinically, MAS is strikingly similar to primary and secondary forms of haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Not surprisingly, many rheumatologists prefer the term secondary HLH rather than MAS to describe this condition, and efforts to change the nomenclature are in progress. The pathophysiology of MAS remains elusive, but observations in animal models, as well as data on the effects of new anticytokine therapies on rates and clinical presentations of MAS in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), provide clues to the understanding of this perplexing clinical phenomenon. In this Review, we explore the latest available evidence and discuss potential diagnostic challenges in the era of increasing use of biologic therapies. PMID:27009539

  19. Activation effect of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes on murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenguang; Xing, Jie; Huang, Yee; Bo, Ruonan; Zheng, Sisi; Luo, Li; Niu, Yale; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun

    2016-01-01

    The activation of murine peritoneal macrophages by Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes (GLPL) was investigated in vitro. After treatment with GLPL, the changes of the nitric oxide (NO) secretion and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) activity were evaluated. The results showed that NO production and iNOS activity of macrophages were enhanced compared to GLP and BL group. In addition, both the phagocytic activity and levels of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ were enhanced in the peritoneal macrophages of mice by stimulation of GLPL. The expression of the major histocompatibility complex class II molecule (MHC II) on the surface of peritoneal macrophages significantly increased. These indicated that GLPL could enhance the activation of peritoneal macrophages and their potential for use as a delivery system of GLP. PMID:26529190

  20. Cell swelling activates ATP-dependent voltage-gated chloride channels in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K; Korbmacher, C

    1996-09-01

    In the present study we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to investigate swelling-activated Cl-currents (ICl-swell) in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells. Hypotonic cell swelling reversibly increased the whole-cell Cl- conductance by about 30-fold. The I-V relationship was outwardly-rectifying and ICl-swell displayed a characteristic voltage-dependence with relatively fast inactivation upon large depolarizing and slow activation upon hyperpolarizing voltage steps. Reversal potential measurements revealed a selectivity sequence SCN- > I- > Br- > Cl- > > gluconate. ICl-swell was inhibited by tamoxifen, NPPB (5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate), DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid), flufenamic acid, niflumic acid, and glibenclamide, in descending order of potency. Extracellular cAMP had no significant effect. ICl-swell was Ca2+ independent, but current activation depended on the presence of a high-energy gamma-phosphate group from intracellular ATP or ATP gamma S. Moreover, it depended on the presence of intracellular Mg2+ and was inhibited by staurosporine, which indicates that a phosphorylation step is involved in channel activation. Increasing the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration by using ionomycin stimulated Cl- currents with a voltage dependence different from that of ICl-swell. Analysis of whole-cell current records during early onset of ICl-swell and during final recovery revealed discontinuous step-like changes of the whole-cell current level which were not observed under nonswelling conditions. A single-channel I-V curve constructed using the smallest resolvable current transitions detected at various holding potentials and revealed a slope conductance of 55, 15, and 8 pS at +120, 0, and -120 mV, respectively. The larger current steps observed in these recordings had about 2, 3, or 4 times the size of the putative single-channel current amplitude, suggesting a coordinated gating of several individual channels or channel

  1. Surface modification of nanoparticles enables selective evasion of phagocytic clearance by distinct macrophage phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qie, Yaqing; Yuan, Hengfeng; von Roemeling, Christina A.; Chen, Yuanxin; Liu, Xiujie; Shih, Kevin D.; Knight, Joshua A.; Tun, Han W.; Wharen, Robert E.; Jiang, Wen; Kim, Betty Y. S.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomedicine is a burgeoning industry but an understanding of the interaction of nanomaterials with the immune system is critical for clinical translation. Macrophages play a fundamental role in the immune system by engulfing foreign particulates such as nanoparticles. When activated, macrophages form distinct phenotypic populations with unique immune functions, however the mechanism by which these polarized macrophages react to nanoparticles is unclear. Furthermore, strategies to selectively evade activated macrophage subpopulations are lacking. Here we demonstrate that stimulated macrophages possess higher phagocytic activities and that classically activated (M1) macrophages exhibit greater phagocytic capacity than alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. We show that modification of nanoparticles with polyethylene-glycol results in decreased clearance by all macrophage phenotypes, but importantly, coating nanoparticles with CD47 preferentially lowers phagocytic activity by the M1 phenotype. These results suggest that bio-inspired nanoparticle surface design may enable evasion of specific components of the immune system and provide a rational approach for developing immune tolerant nanomedicines.

  2. Activated prostaglandin D2 receptors on macrophages enhance neutrophil recruitment into the lung

    PubMed Central

    Jandl, Katharina; Stacher, Elvira; Bálint, Zoltán; Sturm, Eva Maria; Maric, Jovana; Peinhaupt, Miriam; Luschnig, Petra; Aringer, Ida; Fauland, Alexander; Konya, Viktoria; Dahlen, Sven-Erik; Wheelock, Craig E.; Kratky, Dagmar; Olschewski, Andrea; Marsche, Gunther; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is an early-phase mediator in inflammation, but its action and the roles of the 2 D-type prostanoid receptors (DPs) DP1 and DP2 (also called chemoattractant receptor–homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells) in regulating macrophages have not been elucidated to date. Objective We investigated the role of PGD2 receptors on primary human macrophages, as well as primary murine lung macrophages, and their ability to influence neutrophil action in vitro and in vivo. Methods In vitro studies, including migration, Ca2+ flux, and cytokine secretion, were conducted with primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils and freshly isolated murine alveolar and pulmonary interstitial macrophages. In vivo pulmonary inflammation was assessed in male BALB/c mice. Results Activation of DP1, DP2, or both receptors on human macrophages induced strong intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytokine release, and migration of macrophages. In a murine model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, activation of each PGD2 receptor resulted in aggravated airway neutrophilia, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine contents, and decreased lung compliance. Selective depletion of alveolar macrophages abolished the PGD2-enhanced inflammatory response. Activation of PGD2 receptors on human macrophages enhanced the migratory capacity and prolonged the survival of neutrophils in vitro. In human lung tissue specimens both DP1 and DP2 receptors were located on alveolar macrophages along with hematopoietic PGD synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme of PGD2 synthesis. Conclusion For the first time, our results show that PGD2 markedly augments disease activity through its ability to enhance the proinflammatory actions of macrophages and subsequent neutrophil activation. PMID:26792210

  3. Macrophage Infiltration and Alternative Activation during Wound Healing Promote MEK1-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christine; Telerman, Stephanie B; Reimer, Andreas S; Sequeira, Ines; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Arwert, Esther N; Watt, Fiona M

    2016-02-15

    Macrophages are essential for the progression and maintenance of many cancers, but their role during the earliest stages of tumor formation is unclear. To test this, we used a previously described transgenic mouse model of wound-induced skin tumorigenesis, in which expression of constitutively active MEK1 in differentiating epidermal cells results in chronic inflammation (InvEE mice). Upon wounding, the number of epidermal and dermal monocytes and macrophages increased in wild-type and InvEE skin, but the increase was greater, more rapid, and more sustained in InvEE skin. Macrophage ablation reduced tumor incidence. Furthermore, bioluminescent imaging in live mice to monitor macrophage flux at wound sites revealed that macrophage accumulation was predictive of tumor formation; wounds with the greatest number of macrophages at day 5 went on to develop tumors. Gene expression profiling of flow-sorted monocytes, macrophages, and T cells from InvEE and wild-type skin showed that as wound healing progressed, InvEE macrophages altered their phenotype. Throughout wound healing and after wound closure, InvEE macrophages demonstrated sustained upregulation of several markers implicated in alternative macrophage activation including arginase-1 (ARG1) and mannose receptor (CD206). Notably, inhibition of ARG1 activity significantly reduced tumor formation and epidermal proliferation in vivo, whereas addition of L-arginase to cultured keratinocytes stimulated proliferation. We conclude that macrophages play a key role in early, inflammation-mediated skin tumorigenesis, with mechanistic evidence suggesting that ARG1 secretion drives tumor development by stimulating epidermal cell proliferation. These findings highlight the importance of cancer immunotherapies aiming to polarize tumor-associated macrophages toward an antitumor phenotype. PMID:26754935

  4. Hypoxia and classical activation limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival by Akt-dependent glycolytic shift in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Matta, S K; Kumar, D

    2016-01-01

    Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major antibacterial defense mechanism used by macrophages upon activation. Exposure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected macrophages to hypoxia is known to compromise the survival of the pathogen. Here we report that the hypoxia-induced control of intracellular Mtb load in RAW 264.7 macrophages was mediated by regulating the cellular ROS levels. We show that similar to classical activation, hypoxia incubation of macrophages resulted in decreased mitochondrial outer membrane potential (MOMP) and a concomitant increase in the cellular ROS levels. Mitochondrial depolarization and consequently higher ROS could be blocked by knocking down Akt using siRNAs, which acted by inhibiting the switch to glycolytic mode of metabolism, an essential adaptive response upon classical activation or hypoxic incubation of macrophages. Moreover, in the classically activated macrophages or in the macrophages under hypoxia incubation, supplementation with additional glucose had similar effects as Akt knockdown. Interestingly, in both the cases, the reversal of phenotype was linked with the ability of the mitochondrial F0–F1 ATP synthase activity to maintain the MOMP in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. Both Akt knockdown and glucose supplementation were also able to rescue Mtb survival in these macrophages upon classical activation or hypoxia incubation. These results provide a framework for better understanding of how the interplay between oxygen supply, which is limiting in the human tubercular granulomas, and nutrient availability could together direct the outcome of infections in vivo. PMID:27551515

  5. Modulation of pulmonary macrophage superoxide release and tumoricidal activity following activation by biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B

    1986-10-01

    Following immunologic activation, pulmonary macrophages may prevent or cause regression of lung metastases by mechanisms which remain largely unknown. The studies described here were designed to determine if enhanced oxygen metabolite release was related to postactivation tumoricidal activity. We have shown that in vitro activation of Fischer 344 rat pulmonary macrophages by either free or liposome-encapsulated muramyl dipeptide leads to both enhanced release of superoxide anions and marked tumoricidal activity against syngenic (Fischer 13762), allogeneic (Schmidt-Ruppin RR 1022) and xenogeneic (Fibrosarcoma MCA-F) 125I-deoxyuridine-labeled target cells. This immune modulator did not, however, metabolically activate pulmonary macrophages as effectively as liposome-encapsulated lipopolysaccharide. A 24-h in vitro incubation with either 150 U or 300 U of interferon-gamma (3 X 10(6) U/mg) or 30 U, 150 U or 300 U of interferon-alpha (6 X 10(5) U/mg) caused a significant elevation in superoxide release above controls, whereas short-term exposure (2 or 4 h) had little or no effect. Free or encapsulated 6-O-stearoyl muramyl dipeptide, on the other hand, did increase superoxide levels at all 3 time periods. When either interferon-gamma or free or encapsulated muramyl dipeptide derivative were administered to intact rats by either i.v. injection, intratracheal instillation or osmotic minipump infusion, pulmonary macrophage tumoricidal activity was observed 96 h after cell harvesting. Zymosan-stimulated superoxide release, however, was not consistently elevated above control or empty liposome treatment following this course of in vivo activation. The data collectively suggest that in vivo pulmonary macrophage activation to a tumoricidal state and metabolic activation resulting in enhanced superoxide may be separable events. PMID:3021650

  6. Macrophages contribute to the cyclic activation of adult hair follicle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-12-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in number because of apoptosis before the onset of epithelial hair follicle stem cell activation during the murine hair cycle. This process is linked to distinct gene expression, including Wnt transcription. Interestingly, by mimicking this event through the selective induction of macrophage apoptosis in early telogen, we identify a novel involvement of macrophages in stem cell activation in vivo. Importantly, the macrophage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Wnt production delays hair follicle growth. Thus, perifollicular macrophages contribute to the activation of skin epithelial stem cells as a novel, additional cue that regulates their regenerative activity. This finding may have translational implications for skin repair, inflammatory skin diseases and cancer. PMID:25536657

  7. Macrophages Contribute to the Cyclic Activation of Adult Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in number because of apoptosis before the onset of epithelial hair follicle stem cell activation during the murine hair cycle. This process is linked to distinct gene expression, including Wnt transcription. Interestingly, by mimicking this event through the selective induction of macrophage apoptosis in early telogen, we identify a novel involvement of macrophages in stem cell activation in vivo. Importantly, the macrophage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Wnt production delays hair follicle growth. Thus, perifollicular macrophages contribute to the activation of skin epithelial stem cells as a novel, additional cue that regulates their regenerative activity. This finding may have translational implications for skin repair, inflammatory skin diseases and cancer. PMID:25536657

  8. Cell Motility Is Decreased in Macrophages Activated by Cancer Cell-Conditioned Medium

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ahreum; Ryu, Yun-Kyoung; Lee, Jae-Wook; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a role in innate immune responses to various foreign antigens. Many products from primary tumors influence the activation and transmigration of macrophages. Here, we investigated a migration of macrophages stimulated with cancer cell culture-conditioned medium (CM). Macrophage activation by treatment with CM of B16F10 cells were judged by the increase in protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). The location where macrophages were at 4 h-incubation with control medium or CM was different from where they were at 5 h-incubation in culture dish. Percentage of superimposed macrophages at every 1 h interval was gradually increased by CM treatment as compared to control. Total coverage of migrated track expressed in coordinates was smaller and total distance of migration was shorter in CM-treated macrophages than that in control. Rac1 activity in CM-treated macrophages was also decreased as compared to that in control. When macrophages were treated with CM in the presence of dexamethasone (Dex), an increase in COX2 protein levels, and a decrease in Rac1 activity and total coverage of migration were reversed. In the meanwhile, biphasic changes were detected by Dex treatment in section distance of migration at each time interval, which was more decreased at early time and then increased at later time. Taken together, data demonstrate that macrophage motility could be reduced in accordance with activation in response to cancer cell products. It suggests that macrophage motility could be a novel marker to monitor cancer-associated inflammatory diseases and the efficacy of anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:24404340

  9. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) Enzymatic Activity and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mawhinney, Leona; Armstrong, Michelle E; O’ Reilly, Ciaran; Bucala, Richard; Leng, Lin; Fingerle-Rowson, Gunter; Fayne, Darren; Keane, Michael P; Tynan, Aisling; Maher, Lewena; Cooke, Gordon; Lloyd, David; Conroy, Helen; Donnelly, Seamas C

    2014-01-01

    The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) possesses unique tautomerase enzymatic activity, which contributes to the biological functional activity of MIF. In this study, we investigated the effects of blocking the hydrophobic active site of the tautomerase activity of MIF in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. To address this, we initially established a Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) murine model in Mif-KO and wild-type (WT) mice and compared tumor growth in a knock-in mouse model expressing a mutant MIF lacking enzymatic activity (Mif P1G). Primary tumor growth was significantly attenuated in both Mif-KO and Mif P1G mice compared with WT mice. We subsequently undertook a structure-based, virtual screen to identify putative small molecular weight inhibitors specific for the tautomerase enzymatic active site of MIF. From primary and secondary screens, the inhibitor SCD-19 was identified, which significantly attenuated the tautomerase enzymatic activity of MIF in vitro and in biological functional screens. In the LLC murine model, SCD-19, given intraperitoneally at the time of tumor inoculation, was found to significantly reduce primary tumor volume by 90% (p < 0.001) compared with the control treatment. To better replicate the human disease scenario, SCD-19 was given when the tumor was palpable (at d 7 after tumor inoculation) and, again, treatment was found to significantly reduce tumor volume by 81% (p < 0.001) compared with the control treatment. In this report, we identify a novel inhibitor that blocks the hydrophobic pocket of MIF, which houses its specific tautomerase enzymatic activity, and demonstrate that targeting this unique active site significantly attenuates lung cancer growth in in vitro and in vivo systems. PMID:25826675

  10. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  11. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  12. Adipogenic role of alternatively activated macrophages in β-adrenergic remodeling of white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Granneman, James G

    2016-01-01

    De novo brown adipogenesis involves the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors, yet the mechanisms that guide these events in vivo are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that treatment with a β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) agonist triggers brown/beige adipogenesis in gonadal white adipose tissue following adipocyte death and clearance by tissue macrophages. The close physical relationship between adipocyte progenitors and tissue macrophages suggested that the macrophages that clear dying adipocytes might generate proadipogenic factors. Flow cytometric analysis of macrophages from mice treated with CL 316,243 identified a subpopulation that contained elevated lipid and expressed CD44. Lipidomic analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting-isolated macrophages demonstrated that CD44+ macrophages contained four- to five-fold higher levels of the endogenous peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) ligands 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), and 13-HODE compared with CD44- macrophages. Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that ADRB3 agonist treatment upregulated expression of ALOX15, the lipoxygenase responsible for generating 9-HODE and 13-HODE. Using an in vitro model of adipocyte efferocytosis, we found that IL-4-primed tissue macrophages accumulated lipid from dying fat cells and upregulated expression of Alox15. Furthermore, treatment of differentiating adipocytes with 9-HODE and 13-HODE potentiated brown/beige adipogenesis. Collectively, these data indicate that noninflammatory removal of adipocyte remnants and coordinated generation of PPARγ ligands by M2 macrophages provides localized adipogenic signals to support de novo brown/beige adipogenesis. PMID:26538237

  13. Peroxidatic activity distinct from myeloperoxidase in human monocytes cultured in vitro and in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Breton-Gorius, J; Vildé, J L; Guichard, J; Vainchenker, W; Basset, F

    1982-01-01

    Human monocytes develop a peroxidatic activity (PA) in rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) after adherence or after culture in semi-solid medium. This enzyme activity disappears after three days of culture in the majority of macrophages derived from adult monocytes but persists for one week in macrophages derived from neonatal monocytes. The PA is due to an enzyme distinct from myeloperoxidase (MPO), since monocytes from a patient with MPO deficiency develop the same PA as that of normal monocytes after adherence. By its localization and other characteristics, PA of adherent monocytes resembles that of rodent macrophages. We therefore investigated whether human alveolar macrophages exhibit PA, using a sensitive cytochemical method which prevents inhibition by aldehyde in adherent monocytes. In various pathological cases, four types of macrophages could be identified: the majority were peroxidase-negative, a small percentage was of exudate type exhibiting a PA in granules as blood monocytes, while few macrophages were intermediate, possessing only PA in RER i.e. of type resident and a smaller proportion had PA in RER and in granules i.e. exudate-resident macrophages. These findings demonstrate that human macrophages and adherent monocytes may exhibit PA in RER as has been reported for rodent macrophages. The true nature and function of the enzyme responsible for this PA, which is distinct from MPO, remains unknown, but some arguments seem to suggest its role in prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:6283838

  14. Puerarin Inhibits oxLDL-Induced Macrophage Activation and Foam Cell Formation in Human THP1 Macrophage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Zhai, Zhenhua; Zhou, Hongyu; Li, Yao; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Yuhan; Li, Weihong; Shi, Yueping; Zhou, Ming-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone derived from Kudzu roots, has been widely used for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China and other Asian countries. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study investigated whether puerarin inhibited atherogenic lipid oxLDL-mediated macrophage activation and foam cell formation in human THP1 macrophage. Treatment with oxLDL significantly increased the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, 160%) and interleukin (IL) 1β (13 fold) accompanied by upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, 165%) and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα in THP1 macrophage. Puerarin dose-dependently prevented an increase in oxLDL-induced proinflammatory gene expression with downregulation of TLR4 and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα. Furthermore, puerarin prevented oxLDL-mediated lipid deposition and foam cell formation associated with downregulation of scavenger receptor CD36. Flow cytometry analysis showed that puerarin reduced the number of early apoptotic cells of macrophages induced by oxLDL. Our results show that puerarin has anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects in vitro; the underlying mechanisms may involve the inhibition of TLR4/NFκB pathway and downregulation of CD36 expression. The results from the present study provide scientific evidence and may expand our armamentarium to use puerarin for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:26576421

  15. Differences in angiogenic potential of classically vs alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kodelja, V; Müller, C; Tenorio, S; Schebesch, C; Orfanos, C E; Goerdt, S

    1997-11-01

    Macrophages (M phi) are important for angiogenesis during inflammation, wound repair, and tumor growth. However, well-characterized M phi subsets such as IFN-gamma-induced, classically activated (ca) M phi or IL-4/glucocorticoid-induced, alternatively activated (aa) M phi have not been thoroughly examined for a positive or negative association with angiogenesis. While caM phi populate early inflammatory reactions and high-turnover granulomas, aaM phi occur in healing wounds and chronic inflammation. In contrast to caM phi-dominated lesions, aaM phi-rich lesions are highly vascularized. In order to determine their angiogenic potential in vitro, these M phi subsets as well as unstimulated control macrophages (coM phi) were analyzed by RT-PCR for mRNA expression of 10 angiogenic factors after 3 and 6 days of culture. Early during activation, caM phi and coM phi expressed equal levels of 8 of 10 angiogenic factors (PDGF-A, MK, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta 1, PDGF-B, HGF, TGF-alpha, IGF-1), while aaM phi showed expression of only 4 of these factors (TGF-beta 1, PDGF-B, HGF, GF-1). After maturation, TGF-alpha and IGF-1 showed a shift in mRNA expression from caM phi to aaM phi resulting in a considerably enhanced expression of these factors in day-6 aaM phi as compared to day-6 caM phi and coM phi while PDGF-A, MK, and TNF-alpha remained suppressed in day 6 aaM phi. In all M phi subsets including controls, mRNA expression of aFGF and bFGF was minimal or absent while TGFG-beta 1, HGF, and ODGF-B were constitutively expressed. In order to functionally integrate angiogenic factor mRNA expression profiles, mitogenic activity of M phi subsets towards microvascular endothelium was assessed by cocultivation. Coculture experiments revealed that endothelial proliferation induced by aaM phi was 3.0-3.5x higher than induced by caM phi. In conclusion, mature aaM phi are well equipped to play an important role in protracted M phi-associated angiogenic processes. Presumably due to expression of

  16. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  17. IL-33 Priming Enhances Peritoneal Macrophage Activity in Response to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vuvi G; Cho, Hong R; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2014-08-01

    IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 cytokine family and plays a role in the host defense against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. In this study, we investigated the function of IL-33 and its receptor in in vitro macrophage responses to Candida albicans. Our results demonstrate that pre-sensitization of isolated peritoneal macrophages with IL-33 enhanced their pro-inflammatory cytokine production and phagocytic activity in response to C. albicans. These macrophage activities were entirely dependent on the ST2-MyD88 signaling pathway. In addition, pre-sensitization with IL-33 also increased ROS production and the subsequent killing ability of macrophages following C. albicans challenge. These results indicate that IL-33 may increase anti-fungal activity against Candida through macrophage-mediated resistance mechanisms. PMID:25177252

  18. Troglitazone regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and inducible nitric oxide synthase in murine ovarian macrophages.

    PubMed

    Minge, Cadence E; Ryan, Natalie K; Van Der Hoek, Kylie H; Robker, Rebecca L; Norman, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARG) and PPAR-alpha (PPARA) control metabolic processes in many cell types and act as anti-inflammatory regulators in macrophages. PPAR-activating ligands include thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as troglitazone, once frequently used to treat insulin resistance as well as symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Since macrophages within the ovary mediate optimal follicle development, TZD actions to improve PCOS symptoms are likely to be partly mediated through these specifically localized immune cells. In mouse ovary, PPARG protein was expressed in granulosa cells and in isolated cells localized to theca, stroma, and corpora lutea, consistent with EMR1+ macrophages. Isolation of immune cells (EMR1+ or H2+) showed that Pparg and Ppara were expressed in ovarian macrophages at much higher levels than in peritoneal macrophages. Ovulatory human chorionic gonadotropin downregulated expression of Pparg and Ppara in EMR1+ ovarian macrophages, but no hormonal responsiveness was observed in H2+ cells. Downstream anti-inflammatory effects of PPARG activation were analyzed by in vitro treatment of isolated macrophages with troglitazone. Interleukin-1 beta (Il1b) expression was not altered, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (Tnf) expression was affected in peritoneal macrophages only. In ovarian macrophages, inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos2), an important proinflammatory enzyme that regulates ovulation, was significantly reduced by troglitazone treatment, an effect that was restricted to cells from the preovulatory ovary. Thus, expression of PPARs within ovarian macrophages is hormonally regulated, reflecting the changing roles of these cells during the ovulatory cycle. Additionally, ovarian macrophages respond directly to troglitazone to downregulate expression of proinflammatory Nos2, providing mechanistic information about ovarian effects of TZD treatment. PMID:16192401

  19. The human tissue-biomaterial interface: a role for PPARγ-dependent glucocorticoid receptor activation in regulating the CD163+ M2 macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bullers, Samuel J; Baker, Simon C; Ingham, Eileen; Southgate, Jennifer

    2014-09-01

    In vivo studies of implanted acellular biological scaffolds in experimental animals have shown constructive remodeling mediated by anti-inflammatory macrophages. Little is known about the human macrophage response to such biomaterials, or the nature of the signaling mechanisms that govern the macrophage phenotype in this environment. The cellular events at the interface of a tissue and implanted decellularized biomaterial were examined by establishing a novel ex vivo tissue culture model in which surgically excised human urinary tract tissue was combined with porcine acellular bladder matrix (PABM). Evaluation of the tissue-biomaterial interface showed a time-dependent infiltration of the biomaterial by CD68(+) CD80(-) macrophages. The migration of CD68(+) cells from the tissue to the interface was accompanied by maturation to a CD163(hi) phenotype, suggesting that factor(s) associated with the biomaterial or the wound edge was/were responsible for the active recruitment and polarization of local macrophages. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) signaling was investigated as candidate pathways for integrating inflammatory responses; both showed intense nuclear labeling in interface macrophages. GR and PPARγ activation polarized peripheral blood-derived macrophages from a default M1 (CD80(+)) toward an M2 (CD163(+)) phenotype, but PPARγ signaling predominated, as its antagonism blocked any GR-mediated effect. Seeding on PABM was effective at polarizing peripheral blood-derived macrophages from a default CD80(+) phenotype on glass to a CD80(-) phenotype, with intense nuclear localization of PPARγ. These results endorse in vivo observations that the infiltration of decellularized biological scaffolds, exemplified here by PABM, is pioneered by macrophages. Thus, it appears that natural factors present in PABM are involved in the active recruitment and polarization of macrophages to a CD163(+) phenotype, with

  20. The Human Tissue–Biomaterial Interface: A Role for PPARγ-Dependent Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation in Regulating the CD163+ M2 Macrophage Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bullers, Samuel J.; Baker, Simon C.; Ingham, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    In vivo studies of implanted acellular biological scaffolds in experimental animals have shown constructive remodeling mediated by anti-inflammatory macrophages. Little is known about the human macrophage response to such biomaterials, or the nature of the signaling mechanisms that govern the macrophage phenotype in this environment. The cellular events at the interface of a tissue and implanted decellularized biomaterial were examined by establishing a novel ex vivo tissue culture model in which surgically excised human urinary tract tissue was combined with porcine acellular bladder matrix (PABM). Evaluation of the tissue–biomaterial interface showed a time-dependent infiltration of the biomaterial by CD68+ CD80− macrophages. The migration of CD68+ cells from the tissue to the interface was accompanied by maturation to a CD163hi phenotype, suggesting that factor(s) associated with the biomaterial or the wound edge was/were responsible for the active recruitment and polarization of local macrophages. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) signaling was investigated as candidate pathways for integrating inflammatory responses; both showed intense nuclear labeling in interface macrophages. GR and PPARγ activation polarized peripheral blood-derived macrophages from a default M1 (CD80+) toward an M2 (CD163+) phenotype, but PPARγ signaling predominated, as its antagonism blocked any GR-mediated effect. Seeding on PABM was effective at polarizing peripheral blood-derived macrophages from a default CD80+ phenotype on glass to a CD80− phenotype, with intense nuclear localization of PPARγ. These results endorse in vivo observations that the infiltration of decellularized biological scaffolds, exemplified here by PABM, is pioneered by macrophages. Thus, it appears that natural factors present in PABM are involved in the active recruitment and polarization of macrophages to a CD163+ phenotype, with activation of

  1. Macrophage activation by factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes: Potential role of HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-06-15

    Toxic doses of acetaminophen (AA) cause hepatocellular necrosis. Evidence suggests that activated macrophages contribute to the pathogenic process; however, the factors that activate these cells are unknown. In these studies, we assessed the role of mediators released from AA-injured hepatocytes in macrophage activation. Treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium (CM) collected 24 hr after treatment of mouse hepatocytes with 5 mM AA (CM-AA) resulted in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Macrophage expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase mRNA was also upregulated by CM-AA, as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX). CM-AA also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory chemokines, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2. The effects of CM-AA on expression of COX-2, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2 were inhibited by blockade of p44/42 MAP kinase, suggesting a biochemical mechanism mediating macrophage activation. Hepatocytes injured by AA were found to release HMGB1, a potent macrophage activator. This was inhibited by pretreatment of hepatocytes with ethyl pyruvate (EP), which blocks HMGB1 release. EP also blocked CM-AA induced ROS production and antioxidant expression, and reduced expression of COX-2, but not MIP-1{alpha} or MIP-2. These findings suggest that HMGB1 released by AA-injured hepatocytes contributes to macrophage activation. This is supported by our observation that expression of the HMGB1 receptor RAGE is upregulated in macrophages in response to CM-AA. These data indicate that AA-injured hepatocytes contribute to the inflammatory environment in the liver through the release of mediators such as HMGB1. Blocking HMGB1/RAGE may be a useful approach to limiting classical macrophage activation and AA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Research Highlights: > These studies analyze macrophage activation by mediators released from acetaminophen-damaged hepatocytes. > Factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes induce

  2. β-glucans from Coriolus versicolor protect mice against S. typhimurium challenge by activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shao-Hua; Yang, Wen-Tao; Huang, Ke-Yan; Jiang, Yan-Long; Yang, Gui-Lian; Wang, Chun-Feng; Li, Yu

    2016-05-01

    The effects of β-glucans from Coriolus versicolor (CVP), which are extracted from a well-known immune stimulator C. versicolor, have been demonstrated extensively in vitro and in vivo. However, until now, the phagocytic activity has not been elucidated. Hence, the objective of the present study was to identify the antibacterial activity of CVP or CVP-treated macrophages by an analysis of cell cytotoxicity, phagocytic activity, intracellular bacterial survival, macrophage activation, production of nitric oxide (NO) and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in CVP-treated macrophages using flow cytometry, RT-PCR, a gentamicin protection assay, a Nitric oxide assay and an iNOS enzymatic activity assay. The results indicate that CVP-treated macrophages can phagocytize and kill bacteria, probably due to the production of NO and iNOS. More importantly, CVP-treated macrophages are effective at protecting mice against the challenge of Salmonella typhimurium. The results of this study suggest that the antibacterial effects of CVP are probably caused by the activation of innate immune cells, especially macrophages, because the activated macrophage produces NO, which kills bacteria. These phenomena indicate the possibility of CVP as a potential alternative for antibiotics against resistant bacteria. PMID:26802244

  3. Activator of G-Protein Signaling 3-Induced Lysosomal Biogenesis Limits Macrophage Intracellular Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Vural, Ali; Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Shi, Chong-Shan; Srinivasan, Lalitha; McQuiston, Travis J; Hwang, Il-Young; Yeh, Anthony J; Blumer, Joe B; Briken, Volker; Williamson, Peter R; Otto, Michael; Fraser, Iain D C; Kehrl, John H

    2016-01-15

    Many intracellular pathogens cause disease by subverting macrophage innate immune defense mechanisms. Intracellular pathogens actively avoid delivery to or directly target lysosomes, the major intracellular degradative organelle. In this article, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an LPS-inducible protein in macrophages, affects both lysosomal biogenesis and activity. AGS3 binds the Gi family of G proteins via its G-protein regulatory (GoLoco) motif, stabilizing the Gα subunit in its GDP-bound conformation. Elevated AGS3 levels in macrophages limited the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a sensor of cellular nutritional status. This triggered the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB, a known activator of lysosomal gene transcription. In contrast, AGS3-deficient macrophages had increased mammalian target of rapamycin activity, reduced transcription factor EB activity, and a lower lysosomal mass. High levels of AGS3 in macrophages enhanced their resistance to infection by Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, whereas AGS3-deficient macrophages were more susceptible. We conclude that LPS priming increases AGS3 levels, which enhances lysosomal function and increases the capacity of macrophages to eliminate intracellular pathogens. PMID:26667172

  4. Genetically Modified Live Attenuated Leishmania donovani Parasites Induce Innate Immunity through Classical Activation of Macrophages That Direct the Th1 Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Parna; Dey, Ranadhir; Dagur, Pradeep K.; Kruhlak, Michael; Ismail, Nevien; Debrabant, Alain; Joshi, Amritanshu B.; Akue, Adovi; Kukuruga, Mark; Takeda, Kazuyo; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; McCoy, John Philip

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) causes significant mortality and there is no effective vaccine. Previously, we have shown that genetically modified Leishmania donovani parasites, here described as live attenuated parasites, induce a host protective adaptive immune response in various animal models. In this study, we demonstrate an innate immune response upon infection with live attenuated parasites in macrophages from BALB/c mice both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro infection of macrophages with live attenuated parasites (compared to that with wild-type [WT] L. donovani parasites) induced significantly higher production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-12 [IL-12], gamma interferon [IFN-γ], and IL-6), chemokines (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1/CCL-2, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α/CCL-3, and IP-10), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and nitric oxide, while concomitantly reducing anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and arginase-1 activities, suggesting a dominant classically activated/M1 macrophage response. The classically activated response in turn helps in presenting antigen to T cells, as observed with robust CD4+ T cell activation in vitro. Similarly, parasitized splenic macrophages from live attenuated parasite-infected mice also demonstrated induction of an M1 macrophage phenotype, indicated by upregulation of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-12, and inducible nitric oxide synthase 2 and downregulation of genes associated with the M2 phenotype, i.e., the IL-10, YM1, Arg-1, and MRC-1 genes, compared to WT L. donovani-infected mice. Furthermore, an ex vivo antigen presentation assay showed macrophages from live attenuated parasite-infected mice induced higher IFN-γ and IL-2 but significantly less IL-10 production by ovalbumin-specific CD4+ T cells, resulting in proliferation of Th1 cells. These data suggest that infection with live attenuated parasites promotes a state of classical activation (M1 dominant) in macrophages that

  5. Genetically Modified Live Attenuated Leishmania donovani Parasites Induce Innate Immunity through Classical Activation of Macrophages That Direct the Th1 Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Parna; Dey, Ranadhir; Dagur, Pradeep K; Kruhlak, Michael; Ismail, Nevien; Debrabant, Alain; Joshi, Amritanshu B; Akue, Adovi; Kukuruga, Mark; Takeda, Kazuyo; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; McCoy, John Philip; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2015-10-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) causes significant mortality and there is no effective vaccine. Previously, we have shown that genetically modified Leishmania donovani parasites, here described as live attenuated parasites, induce a host protective adaptive immune response in various animal models. In this study, we demonstrate an innate immune response upon infection with live attenuated parasites in macrophages from BALB/c mice both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro infection of macrophages with live attenuated parasites (compared to that with wild-type [WT] L. donovani parasites) induced significantly higher production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-12 [IL-12], gamma interferon [IFN-γ], and IL-6), chemokines (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1/CCL-2, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α/CCL-3, and IP-10), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and nitric oxide, while concomitantly reducing anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and arginase-1 activities, suggesting a dominant classically activated/M1 macrophage response. The classically activated response in turn helps in presenting antigen to T cells, as observed with robust CD4(+) T cell activation in vitro. Similarly, parasitized splenic macrophages from live attenuated parasite-infected mice also demonstrated induction of an M1 macrophage phenotype, indicated by upregulation of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-12, and inducible nitric oxide synthase 2 and downregulation of genes associated with the M2 phenotype, i.e., the IL-10, YM1, Arg-1, and MRC-1 genes, compared to WT L. donovani-infected mice. Furthermore, an ex vivo antigen presentation assay showed macrophages from live attenuated parasite-infected mice induced higher IFN-γ and IL-2 but significantly less IL-10 production by ovalbumin-specific CD4(+) T cells, resulting in proliferation of Th1 cells. These data suggest that infection with live attenuated parasites promotes a state of classical activation (M1 dominant) in macrophages that

  6. Ultrastructural studies of the killing of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni by activated macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    McLaren, D J; James, S L

    1985-05-01

    Immunologically activated murine macrophages have been shown elsewhere to kill skin stage schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni in vitro, in a manner analogous to the extracellular killing of tumour cell targets. In this study, the kinetics of the interaction between activated macrophages and larval targets and the resultant ultrastructural changes in parasite morphology that culminated in death have been analysed in detail. Unlike granulocyte-mediated schistosomular killing, macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity did not appear to be directed against the surface tissues of the parasite. Macrophages adhered only transiently following initiation of the cultures, yet changes in the subtegumental mitochondria and muscle cells of the larva were detected within the first hour of incubation. Progressive internal disorganisation followed rapidly, but the tegument and tegumental outer membrane remained intact, to form a 'shell' that maintained the general shape of the parasite. Such changes were recognised irrespective of whether the effector cell population comprised peritoneal macrophages activated by lymphokine treatment in vitro, or by infection with Mycobacterium bovis (strain BCG), or S. mansoni in vivo. That macrophages rather than contaminating granulocytes or lymphocytes, had mediated the observed damage was demonstrated by the use of a lymphokine treated macrophage cell line, IC-21. The observation that macrophage cytotoxicity is directed against internal organelles rather than the tegumental outer membrane of this multicellular target, may help to elucidate the general mechanism of extracellular killing by these cells. PMID:3892433

  7. Substrate Stiffness Regulates Proinflammatory Mediator Production through TLR4 Activity in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Previtera, Michelle L; Sengupta, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data show that disease adversely affects tissue elasticity or stiffness. While macrophage activity plays a critical role in driving disease pathology, there are limited data available on the effects of tissue stiffness on macrophage activity. In this study, the effects of substrate stiffness on inflammatory mediator production by macrophages were investigated. Bone marrow-derived macrophages were grown on polyacrylamide gels that mimicked the stiffness of a variety of soft biological tissues. Overall, macrophages grown on soft substrates produced less proinflammatory mediators than macrophages grown on stiff substrates when the endotoxin LPS was added to media. In addition, the pathways involved in stiffness-regulated proinflammation were investigated. The TLR4 signaling pathway was examined by evaluating TLR4, p-NF-κB p65, MyD88, and p-IκBα expression as well as p-NF-κB p65 translocation. Expression and translocation of the various signaling molecules were higher in macrophages grown on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Furthermore, TLR4 knockout experiments showed that TLR4 activity enhanced proinflammation on stiff substrates. In conclusion, these results suggest that proinflammatory mediator production initiated by TLR4 is mechanically regulated in macrophages. PMID:26710072

  8. Substrate Stiffness Regulates Proinflammatory Mediator Production through TLR4 Activity in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Previtera, Michelle L.; Sengupta, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data show that disease adversely affects tissue elasticity or stiffness. While macrophage activity plays a critical role in driving disease pathology, there are limited data available on the effects of tissue stiffness on macrophage activity. In this study, the effects of substrate stiffness on inflammatory mediator production by macrophages were investigated. Bone marrow–derived macrophages were grown on polyacrylamide gels that mimicked the stiffness of a variety of soft biological tissues. Overall, macrophages grown on soft substrates produced less proinflammatory mediators than macrophages grown on stiff substrates when the endotoxin LPS was added to media. In addition, the pathways involved in stiffness–regulated proinflammation were investigated. The TLR4 signaling pathway was examined by evaluating TLR4, p–NF–κB p65, MyD88, and p–IκBα expression as well as p–NF–κB p65 translocation. Expression and translocation of the various signaling molecules were higher in macrophages grown on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Furthermore, TLR4 knockout experiments showed that TLR4 activity enhanced proinflammation on stiff substrates. In conclusion, these results suggest that proinflammatory mediator production initiated by TLR4 is mechanically regulated in macrophages. PMID:26710072

  9. Cathepsin Activity-Based Probes and Inhibitor for Preclinical Atherosclerosis Imaging and Macrophage Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elrahman, Ihab; Kosuge, Hisanori; Wises Sadan, Tommy; Ben-Nun, Yael; Meir, Karen; Rubinstein, Chen; Bogyo, Matthew; McConnell, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, mainly due to an increasing prevalence of atherosclerosis characterized by inflammatory plaques. Plaques with high levels of macrophage infiltration are considered “vulnerable” while those that do not have significant inflammation are considered stable; cathepsin protease activity is highly elevated in macrophages of vulnerable plaques and contributes to plaque instability. Establishing novel tools for non-invasive molecular imaging of macrophages in plaques could aid in preclinical studies and evaluation of therapeutics. Furthermore, compounds that reduce the macrophage content within plaques should ultimately impact care for this disease. Methods We have applied quenched fluorescent cathepsin activity-based probes (ABPs) to a murine atherosclerosis model and evaluated their use for in vivo imaging using fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT), as well as ex vivo fluorescence imaging and fluorescent microscopy. Additionally, freshly dissected human carotid plaques were treated with our potent cathepsin inhibitor and macrophage apoptosis was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy. Results We demonstrate that our ABPs accurately detect murine atherosclerotic plaques non-invasively, identifying cathepsin activity within plaque macrophages. In addition, our cathepsin inhibitor selectively induced cell apoptosis of 55%±10% of the macrophage within excised human atherosclerotic plaques. Conclusions Cathepsin ABPs present a rapid diagnostic tool for macrophage detection in atherosclerotic plaque. Our inhibitor confirms cathepsin-targeting as a promising approach to treat atherosclerotic plaque inflammation. PMID:27532109

  10. Interferon-γ regulates cellular metabolism and mRNA translation to potentiate macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaodi; Yu, Yingpu; Zhong, Yi; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G; Hu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hui; Cross, Justin R; Rätsch, Gunnar; Rice, Charles M; Ivashkiv, Lionel B

    2015-08-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) primes macrophages for enhanced microbial killing and inflammatory activation by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), but little is known about the regulation of cell metabolism or mRNA translation during this priming. We found that IFN-γ regulated the metabolism and mRNA translation of human macrophages by targeting the kinases mTORC1 and MNK, both of which converge on the selective regulator of translation initiation eIF4E. Physiological downregulation of mTORC1 by IFN-γ was associated with autophagy and translational suppression of repressors of inflammation such as HES1. Genome-wide ribosome profiling in TLR2-stimulated macrophages showed that IFN-γ selectively modulated the macrophage translatome to promote inflammation, further reprogram metabolic pathways and modulate protein synthesis. These results show that IFN-γ-mediated metabolic reprogramming and translational regulation are key components of classical inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:26147685

  11. MicroRNAs Control Macrophage Formation and Activation: The Inflammatory Link between Obesity and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Richard Cheng-An; Ying, Wei; Bazer, Fuller W.; Zhou, Beiyan

    2014-01-01

    Activation and recruitment of resident macrophages in tissues in response to physiological stress are crucial regulatory processes in promoting the development of obesity-associated metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that microRNAs play important roles in modulating monocyte formation, macrophage maturation, infiltration into tissues and activation. Macrophage-dependent systemic physiological and tissue-specific responses also involve cell-cell interactions between macrophages and host tissue niche cell components, including other tissue-resident immune cell lineages, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle and others. In this review, we highlight the roles of microRNAs in regulating the development and function of macrophages in the context of obesity, which could provide insights into the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25014161

  12. Evidence of drug metabolism by macrophages: possible role of macrophages in the pathogenesis of drug-induced tissue damage and in the activation of environmental procarcinogens.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, S N

    1987-01-01

    After interaction with human macrophages derived from blood, bone marrow or spleen, solutions of sodium phenobarbitone, phenytoin sodium and chlorpromazine hydrochloride showed reduced cytotoxicity towards K562 cells. The reduction in cytotoxicity was partially suppressed in the presence of tetrahydrofurane, an inhibitor of cytochrome P450. These data suggest that macrophages are capable of metabolizing certain drugs, probably via a cytochrome P450-dependent mechanism. The present findings raise the possibility that some drug-induced blood dyscrasias are caused by metabolism of the drug by bone marrow macrophages and the consequent release of relatively short-lived molecules which are toxic to adjacent haemopoietic cells. The generation of cytotoxic molecules during drug metabolism by macrophages may also be responsible for drug-induced damage to other macrophage-rich tissues. In addition, since cytochrome P450-dependent reactions seem to occur within macrophages, these cells may activate environmental procarcinogens and thus plays a role in carcinogenesis and leukaemogenesis. PMID:3652639

  13. Further characterization of macrophage adsorption of suppressor cell activity from tumor-allosensitized spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Zografos-Miller, L.E.; Argyris, B.F.

    1983-06-01

    Suppressor cell activity from P815-allosensitized C57BL/6 spleen can be decreased by incubating the tumor-allosensitized spleen cells on monolayers of thioglycollate-stimulated BDF1 peritoneal macrophages for 2 or 4 hr. The adsorption response appears to be specific for macrophages, because adsorption of suppressor cell activity does not occur following incubation of P815-allosensitized spleen cells on confluent monolayers of mouse spleen cells or mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Pretreatment of macrophage monolayers with X irradiation (2,000 rads) or anti-Thy 1.2 serum (and complement) does not affect their ability to bind suppressor cell activity. Adsorption of suppressor cell activity from P815-allosensitized spleen can also be carried out by proteose peptone-stimulated or Corynebacterium parvum-stimulated macrophages. Blockage of macrophage Fc receptors decreases the ability of thioglycollate-stimulated macrophages to adsorb suppressor cell activity. Monolayers of P815 or P388 cells, two cell types positive for Fc receptors, are unable to adsorb suppressor cell activity from the tumor-allosensitized spleen. The significance of our findings is discussed in terms of the relationship between macrophages and suppressor cells in the immune response to normal or tumor allografts.

  14. Atomic-Scale Determination of Active Facets on the MoVTeNb Oxide M1 Phase and Their Intrinsic Catalytic Activity for Ethane Oxidative Dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Daniel; Xu, Pinghong; Hartmann, Daniela; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Browning, Nigel D; Sanchez-Sanchez, Maricruz; Lercher, Johannes A

    2016-07-25

    Aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) has been used to image the basal {001} plane of the catalytically relevant M1 phase in MoVTeNb complex oxides. Facets {010}, {120}, and {210} are identified as the most frequent lateral termination planes of the crystals. Combination of STEM with He ion microscopy (HIM) images, Rietveld analysis, and kinetic tests reveals that the activation of ethane is correlated to the availability of facets {001}, {120}, and {210} at the surface of M1 crystals. The lateral facets {120} and {210} expose crystalline positions related to the typical active centers described for propane oxidation. Conversely, the low activity of the facet {010} is attributed to its configuration, consisting of only stable M6 O21 units connected by a single octahedron. Thus, we quantitatively demonstrated that differences in catalytic activity among M1 samples of equal chemical composition depend primarily on the morphology of the particles, which determines the predominant terminating facets. PMID:26990594

  15. Quantitative proteomics analyses of activation states of human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Kees; Weening, Desiree; de Vries, Marcel P; Priebe, Marion G; Vonk, Roel J; Roelofsen, Han

    2015-10-14

    Macrophages display large functional and phenotypical plasticity. They can adopt a broad range of activation states depending on their microenvironment. Various surface markers are used to characterize these differentially polarized macrophages. However, this is not informative for the functions of the macrophage. In order to have a better understanding of the functional changes of macrophages upon differential polarization, we studied differences in LPS- and IL4-stimulated macrophages. The THP-1 human monocytic cell line, was used as a model system. Cells were labeled, differentiated and stimulated with either LPS or IL-4 in a quantitative SILAC proteomics set-up. The resulting sets of proteins were functionally clustered. LPS-stimulated macrophages show increased secretion of proinflammatory peptides, leading to increased pressure on protein biosynthesis and processing. IL4-stimulated macrophages show upregulation of cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodeling. Our approach provides an integrated view of polarization-induced functional changes and proves useful for studying functional differences between subsets of macrophages. Moreover, the identified polarization specific proteins may contribute to a better characterization of different activation states in situ and their role in various inflammatory processes. PMID:26200757

  16. Murine Macrophages Secrete Interferon γ upon Combined Stimulation with Interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18: A Novel Pathway of Autocrine Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Munder, Markus; Mallo, Moisés; Eichmann, Klaus; Modolell, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ, a key immunoregulatory cytokine, has been thought to be produced solely by activated T cells and natural killer cells. In this study, we show that murine bone marrow– derived macrophages (BMMΦ) secrete large amounts of IFN-γ upon appropriate stimulation. Although interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18 alone induce low levels of IFN-γ mRNA transcripts, the combined stimulation of BMMΦ with both cytokines leads to the efficient production of IFN-γ protein. The macrophage-derived IFN-γ is biologically active as shown by induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase as well as upregulation of CD40 in macrophages. Our findings uncover a novel pathway of autocrine macrophage activation by demonstrating that the macrophage is not only a key cell type responding to IFN-γ but also a potent IFN-γ–producing cell. PMID:9625771

  17. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on thymidine salvage as related to macrophage activation.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Y; Nagao, S; Nakamura, M; Okada, F; Tanigawa, Y

    1995-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), known as one of the potent activators of macrophages, has inhibitory effects on the proliferation of normal macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines. We report here that LPS dose- and time-dependently suppressed the tritiated thymidine ([3H]TdR) incorporation into the acid-insoluble fraction with a significant inverse correlation to the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) production in the J774.1 macrophage cell line. Among the three tested enzymes involved in DNA synthesis, only thymidine kinase (TK) activity decreased progressively in parallel with the decline in [3H]TdR incorporation, reaching 97% inhibition within 12 hr of LPS treatment, while changes in the activities of other two enzymes, DNA polymerase alpha and thymidylate synthase (TS), were less significant. On the other hand, LPS inhibited the cell proliferation only incompletely, as judged by 62% inhibition of cell growth at 36 hr. Even in the experiments done in a TdR-free medium, cell growth was inhibited by LPS to the same extent, suggesting that TK was not directly involved in the proliferation of J774 cells. LPS also inhibited the conversion of TdR to thymidine monophosphate (TMP) in murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEM). Thus LPS-induced suppression of TdR salvage related to TNF production is common in both normal and neoplastic macrophages, and therefore may be of potential importance in the process of macrophage activation. PMID:7751001

  18. Hepatic Localization of Macrophage Phenotypes during Fibrogenesis and Resolution of Fibrosis in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Beljaars, Leonie; Schippers, Marlies; Reker-Smit, Catharina; Martinez, Fernando O.; Helming, Laura; Poelstra, Klaas; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages have been found to both promote liver fibrosis and contribute to its resolution by acquiring different phenotypes based on signals from the micro-environment. The best-characterized phenotypes in the macrophage spectrum are labeled M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Until now the in situ localization of these phenotypes in diseased livers is poorly described. In this study, we therefore aimed to localize and quantify M1- and M2-dominant macrophages in diseased mouse and human livers. The scarred collagen-rich areas in cirrhotic human livers and in CCl4-damaged mouse livers contained many macrophages. Though total numbers of macrophages were higher in fibrotic livers, the number of parenchymal CD68-positive macrophages was significantly lower as compared to normal. Scar-associated macrophages were further characterized as either M1-dominant (IRF-5 and interleukin-12) or M2-dominant (CD206, transglutaminase-2, and YM-1) and significantly higher numbers of both of these were detected in diseased livers as compared to healthy human and mouse livers. Interestingly, in mouse, livers undergoing resolution of fibrosis, the total number of CD68+ macrophages was significantly lower compared to their fibrotic counterparts. M2-dominant (YM-1) macrophages were almost completely gone in livers undergoing resolution, while numbers of M1-dominant (IRF-5) macrophages were almost unchanged and the proteolytic activity (MMP9) increased. In conclusion, this study shows the distribution of macrophage subsets in livers of both human and murine origin. The presence of M1- and M2-dominant macrophages side by side in fibrotic lesions suggests that both are involved in fibrotic responses, while the persistence of M1-dominant macrophages during resolution may indicate their importance in regression of fibrosis. This study emphasizes that immunohistochemical detection of M1/M2-dominant macrophages provides valuable information in addition to widely used

  19. Macrophage polarization in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Porta, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immunity constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system and endowed with remarkable different roles essential for defense mechanisms, development of tissues, and homeostasis. They derive from hematopoietic precursors and since the early steps of fetal life populate peripheral tissues, a process continuing throughout adult life. Although present essentially in every organ/tissue, macrophages are more abundant in the gastro-intestinal tract, liver, spleen, upper airways, and brain. They have phagocytic and bactericidal activity and produce inflammatory cytokines that are important to drive adaptive immune responses. Macrophage functions are settled in response to microenvironmental signals, which drive the acquisition of polarized programs, whose extremes are simplified in the M1 and M2 dichotomy. Functional skewing of monocyte/macrophage polarization occurs in physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy), as well as in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer) and is now considered a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Here, we will review evidence supporting a dynamic skewing of macrophage functions in disease, which may provide a basis for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies. PMID:26210152

  20. Genetic programs expressed in resting and IL-4 alternatively activated mouse and human macrophages: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fernando O; Helming, Laura; Milde, Ronny; Varin, Audrey; Melgert, Barbro N; Draijer, Christina; Thomas, Benjamin; Fabbri, Marco; Crawshaw, Anjali; Ho, Ling Pei; Ten Hacken, Nick H; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Hamann, Jörg; Greaves, David R; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Gordon, Siamon

    2013-02-28

    The molecular repertoire of macrophages in health and disease can provide novel biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Th2-IL-4–activated macrophages (M2) have been associated with important diseases in mice, yet no specific markers are available for their detection in human tissues. Although mouse models are widely used for macrophage research, translation to the human can be problematic and the human macrophage system remains poorly described. In the present study, we analyzed and compared the transcriptome and proteome of human and murine macrophages under resting conditions (M0) and after IL-4 activation (M2). We provide a resource for tools enabling macrophage detection in human tissues by identifying a set of 87 macrophage-related genes. Furthermore, we extend current understanding of M2 activation in different species and identify Transglutaminase 2 as a conserved M2 marker that is highly expressed by human macrophages and monocytes in the prototypic Th2 pathology asthma. PMID:23293084

  1. Induction of classical activation of macrophage in vitro by water soluble chitin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Dong-Won; Ahn, Woong Shick; You, Su Jung; Chae, Gue Tae; Shim, Young Bock; Chun, Heung Jae

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of chitin on macrophage mediated immunity, which is a significant factor to wound healing and tissue regeneration. In this work, water soluble chitin (WSC) was prepared by re-acetylation of chitosan and was treated with the murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cell lines (ATCC TIB-71). WSC induced classical activation in the RAW 264.7 cells, accompanied by the induction of associated genes. The results suggest that WSC is one of the functional chitin molecules that are responsible for the immune response, especially present in macrophage classical activation.

  2. Distinctive role of activated tumor-associated macrophages in photosensitizer accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-05-01

    Cells dissociated from tumors (carcinomas and sarcomas) growing subcutaneously in mice that have been administered Photofrin or other photosensitizers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Monoclonal antibodies were used for identification of major cellular populations contained in these tumors. The results demonstrate that a subpopulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is unique among tumor cell populations in that it excels in the accumulation of very high levels of photosensitizers. These macrophages showed an increased expression of interleukin 2 receptor, which is indicative of their activated state. since macrophages were reported to concentrate in the periphery of human neoplasms, it is suggested that activates TAMs are the determinants of tumor-localized photosensitizer fluorescence.

  3. Polysaccharide of Dendrobium huoshanense activates macrophages via toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xie, Song-Zi; Hao, Ran; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Pan, Li-Hua; Liu, Jian; Luo, Jian-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The present work aimed at investigating the pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and immunostimulatory mechanism of a purified Dendrobium huoshanense polysaccharide (DHP). We found that DHP could bind to the surface of macrophages and stimulate macrophages to secrete NO, TNF-α and IL-1β. To unravel the mechanism for the binding of DHP to macrophages, flow cytometry, confocal laser-scanning microscopy, affinity electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE and western blotting were employed to verify the type of PRR responsible for the recognition of DHP by RAW264.7 macrophages and peritoneal macrophages of C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ macrophages. Results showed that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was an essential receptor for macrophages to directly bind DHP. Further, the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, Akt and p38 were observed to be time-dependently promoted by DHP, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. These results suggest that DHP activates macrophages via its direct binding to TLR4 to trigger TLR4 signaling pathways. PMID:27112877

  4. C/EBPβ-Thr217 Phosphorylation Stimulates Macrophage Inflammasome Activation and Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Martina; Solis-Herruzo, Jose; Chojkier, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of liver injury is mediated by macrophages but the signaling by which the macrophage inflammasome enhances liver injury is not completely understood. The CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein-β (C/EBPβ) is a critical signaling molecule for macrophages because expression of a dominant inhibitor of C/EBPβ DNA-binding sites or a targeted deletion of C/EBPβ results in impaired macrophage differentiation. We reported that expression of the phosphorylation-mutant C/EBPβ-Glu217, which mimics phosphorylated C/EBPβ-Thr217, was sufficient to confer macrophage survival to Anthrax lethal toxin. Here, using primary hepatocytes, primary liver macrophages, dominant positive and negative transgenic mice of the C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphoacceptor, macrophage ablation, and an inhibitory peptide of C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphorylation, we determined that this phosphorylation is essential for the activation of the inflammasome in liver macrophages and for the hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hepatotoxins that results in liver injury. Similar findings were observed in the livers of patients with acute injury induced by Toxic Oil Syndrome. PMID:27067260

  5. C/EBPβ-Thr217 Phosphorylation Stimulates Macrophage Inflammasome Activation and Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Buck, Martina; Solis-Herruzo, Jose; Chojkier, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of liver injury is mediated by macrophages but the signaling by which the macrophage inflammasome enhances liver injury is not completely understood. The CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein-β (C/EBPβ) is a critical signaling molecule for macrophages because expression of a dominant inhibitor of C/EBPβ DNA-binding sites or a targeted deletion of C/EBPβ results in impaired macrophage differentiation. We reported that expression of the phosphorylation-mutant C/EBPβ-Glu217, which mimics phosphorylated C/EBPβ-Thr217, was sufficient to confer macrophage survival to Anthrax lethal toxin. Here, using primary hepatocytes, primary liver macrophages, dominant positive and negative transgenic mice of the C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphoacceptor, macrophage ablation, and an inhibitory peptide of C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphorylation, we determined that this phosphorylation is essential for the activation of the inflammasome in liver macrophages and for the hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hepatotoxins that results in liver injury. Similar findings were observed in the livers of patients with acute injury induced by Toxic Oil Syndrome. PMID:27067260

  6. Cot/tpl2 participates in the activation of macrophages by adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Garcia, Carlos; Nagy, Laura E.; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Fernandez, Margarita; Alemany, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the main function of APN is to enhance insulin activity, it is also involved in modulating the macrophage phenotype. Here, we demonstrate that at physiological concentrations, APN activates Erk1/2 via the IKKβ-p105/NF-κΒ1-Cot/tpl2 intracellular signal transduction cassette in macrophages. In peritoneal macrophages stimulated with APN, Cot/tpl2 influences the ability to phagocytose beads. However, Cot/tpl2 did not modulate the known capacity of APN to decrease lipid content in peritoneal macrophages in response to treatment with oxLDL or acLDL. A microarray analysis of gene-expression profiles in BMDMs exposed to APN revealed that APN modulated the expression of ∼3300 genes; the most significantly affected biological functions were the inflammatory and the infectious disease responses. qRT-PCR analysis of WT and Cot/tpl2 KO macrophages stimulated with APN for 0, 3, and 18 h revealed that Cot/tpl2 participated in the up-regulation of APN target inflammatory mediators included in the cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction pathway (KEGG ID 4060). In accordance with these data, macrophages stimulated with APN increased secretion of cytokines and chemokines, including IL-1β, IL-1α, TNF-α, IL-10, IL-12, IL-6, and CCL2. Moreover, Cot/tpl2 also played an important role in the production of these inflammatory mediators upon stimulation of macrophages with APN. It has been reported that different types of signals that stimulate TLRs, IL-1R, TNFR, FcγR, and proteinase-activated receptor-1 activate Cot/tpl2. Here, we demonstrate that APN is a new signal that activates the IKKβ-p105/NF-κΒ1-Cot/tpl2-MKK1/2-Erk1/2 axis in macrophages. Furthermore, this signaling cassette modulates the biological functions triggered by APN in macrophages. PMID:24532642

  7. Macrophage Inflammatory Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ylostalo, Joni H.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent a widely distributed and functionally diverse population of innate myeloid cells involved in inflammatory response to pathogens, tissue homeostasis and tissue repair (Murray and Wynn, 2011). Macrophages can be broadly grouped into two subpopulations with opposing activites: M1 or pro-inflammatory macrophages that promote T-helper type 1 (Th1) cell immunity and tissue damage, and M2 or anti-inflammatory/alternatively activated macrophages implicated in Th2 response and resolution of inflammation. Here we describe a rapid assay we used previously to monitor changes in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages in response to therapeutic paracrine factors produced by adult stem cells (Bartosh et al., 2010; Ylostalo et al., 2012; Bartosh et al., 2013). The assay can be adapted appropriately to test macrophage response to other agents as well that will be referred to herein as ‘test reagents’ or ‘test compounds’. In this protocol, the mouse macrophage cell line J774A.1 is expanded as an adherent monolayer on petri dishes allowing for the cells to be harvested easily without enzymes or cell scrapers that can damage the cells. The macropahges are then stimulated in suspension with LPS and seeded into 12-well cell culture plates containing the test reagents. After 16–18 h, the medium conditioned by the macrophages is harvested and the cytokine profile in the medium determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). We routinely measure levels of the pro-inflammtory cytokine TNF-alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10).

  8. Macrophages sense and kill bacteria through carbon monoxide–dependent inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Barbara; Larsen, Rasmus; Gallo, David; Chin, Beek Yoke; Harris, Clair; Mannam, Praveen; Kaczmarek, Elzbieta; Lee, Patty J.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Flavell, Richard; Soares, Miguel P.; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial clearance by eukaryotes relies on complex and coordinated processes that remain poorly understood. The gasotransmitter carbon monoxide (CO) is generated by the stress-responsive enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1), which is highly induced in macrophages in response to bacterial infection. HO-1 deficiency results in inadequate pathogen clearance, exaggerated tissue damage, and increased mortality. Here, we determined that macrophage-generated CO promotes ATP production and release by bacteria, which then activates the Nacht, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NALP3) inflammasome, intensifying bacterial killing. Bacterial killing defects in HO-1–deficient murine macrophages were restored by administration of CO. Moreover, increased CO levels enhanced the bacterial clearance capacity of human macrophages and WT murine macrophages. CO-dependent bacterial clearance required the NALP3 inflammasome, as CO did not increase bacterial killing in macrophages isolated from NALP3-deficient or caspase-1–deficient mice. IL-1β cleavage and secretion were impaired in HO-1–deficient macrophages, and CO-dependent processing of IL-1β required the presence of bacteria-derived ATP. We found that bacteria remained viable to generate and release ATP in response to CO. The ATP then bound to macrophage nucleotide P2 receptors, resulting in activation of the NALP3/IL-1β inflammasome to amplify bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that macrophage-derived CO permits efficient and coordinated regulation of the host innate response to invading microbes. PMID:25295542

  9. The response of macrophages to titanium particles is determined by macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Pajarinen, Jukka; Kouri, Vesa-Petteri; Jämsen, Eemeli; Li, Tian-Fang; Mandelin, Jami; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2013-11-01

    Aseptic loosening of total joint replacements is driven by the reaction of macrophages to foreign body particles released from the implant. It was hypothesized that the macrophages' response to these particles is dependent, in addition to particle characteristics and contaminating biomolecules, on the state of macrophage polarization as determined by the local cytokine microenvironment. To test this hypothesis we differentiated M1 and M2 macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes and compared their responses to titanium particles using genome-wide microarray analysis and a multiplex cytokine assay. In comparison to non-activated M0 macrophages, the overall chemotactic and inflammatory responses to titanium particles were greatly enhanced in M1 macrophages and effectively suppressed in M2 macrophages. In addition, the genome-wide approach revealed several novel, potentially osteolytic, particle-induced mediators, and signaling pathway analysis suggested the involvement of toll-like and nod-like receptor signaling in particle recognition. It is concluded that the magnitude of foreign body reaction caused by titanium particles is dependent on the state of macrophage polarization. Thus, by limiting the action of M1 polarizing factors, e.g. bacterial biofilm formation, in peri-implant tissues and promoting M2 macrophage polarization by biomaterial solutions or pharmacologically, it might be possible to restrict wear-particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis. PMID:23827094

  10. GADD34 inhibits activation-induced apoptosis of macrophages through enhancement of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Sachiko; Tanaka, Yuriko; Oshino, Reina; Aiba, Keiko; Thanasegaran, Suganya; Nishio, Naomi; Isobe, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a common physiological function in all eukaryotes. The process is induced by depletion of nutrients including amino acids. GADD34 is expressed following DNA damage, ER stresses and amino acid deprivation. Here, we investigated the effects of GADD34 on autophagy and cell activation in macrophages. The deprivation of tyrosine and cysteine markedly induced the expression of GADD34 in macrophages. LPS stimulation combined with tyrosine/cysteine-deprivation initially activated macrophages, but then shifted to cell death in late phase of stimulation. When LPS stimulation was combined with tyrosine/cysteine-deprivation, a deficiency of GADD34 enhanced cell activation signaling such as Src-family, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK and Akt. In the late phase of stimulation, a deficiency of GADD34 increased apoptosis more than that in wild-type macrophages. Further we found that mTOR-S6K signaling was highly enhanced in GADD34-deficient macrophages compared with wild-type cells when cells were treated by LPS combined with tyrosine/cysteine-deprivation. LC3-II was increased by LPS stimulation combined with tyrosine/cysteine-deprivation. Defective GADD34 reduced LC3-II and autophagosome formation induced by LPS-stimulation and tyrosine/cysteine-deprivation compared with that seen in wild-type macrophages. These results indicates that GADD34 enhances autophagy and suppresses apoptosis stimulated by LPS combined with amino acid deprivation through regulation of mTOR signaling pathway in macrophages. PMID:25659802

  11. Impairing autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium leads to inflammasome activation and enhanced macrophage-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Copland, David A.; Theodoropoulou, Sofia; Chiu, Hsi An Amy; Barba, Miriam Durazo; Mak, Ka Wang; Mack, Matthias; Nicholson, Lindsay B.; Dick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related decreases in autophagy contribute to the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We have now studied the interaction between autophagy impaired in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the responses of macrophages. We find that dying RPE cells can activate the macrophage inflammasome and promote angiogenesis. In vitro, inhibiting rotenone-induced autophagy in RPE cells elicits caspase-3 mediated cell death. Co-culture of damaged RPE with macrophages leads to the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and nitrite oxide. Exogenous IL-6 protects the dysfunctional RPE but IL-1β causes enhanced cell death. Furthermore, IL-1β toxicity is more pronounced in dysfunctional RPE cells showing reduced IRAK3 gene expression. Co-culture of macrophages with damaged RPE also elicits elevated levels of pro-angiogenic proteins that promote ex vivo choroidal vessel sprouting. In vivo, impaired autophagy in the eye promotes photoreceptor and RPE degeneration and recruitment of inflammasome-activated macrophages. The degenerative tissue environment drives an enhanced pro-angiogenic response, demonstrated by increased size of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions. The contribution of macrophages was confirmed by depletion of CCR2+ monocytes, which attenuates CNV in the presence of RPE degeneration. Our results suggest that the interplay between perturbed RPE homeostasis and activated macrophages influences key features of AMD development. PMID:26847702

  12. Protease activated receptor-1 regulates macrophage-mediated cellular senescence: a risk for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cong; Rezaee, Farhad; Waasdorp, Maaike; Shi, Kun; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a destructive disease in part resulting from premature or mature cellular aging. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) recently emerged as a critical component in the context of fibrotic lung diseases. Therefore, we aimed to study the role of macrophages in PAR-1-mediated idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The number of macrophages were significantly reduced in lungs of PAR-1 antagonist (P1pal-12) treated animals upon bleomycin instillation. In line with these data, PAR-1 stimulation increased monocyte/macrophage recruitment in response to epithelium injury in in vitro trans-well assays. Moreover, macrophages induced fibroblasts migration, differentiation and secretion of collagen, which were inhibited in the presence of TGF-β receptor inhibitors. Interestingly, these profibrotic effects were partially inhibited by treatment with the PAR-1 inhibitor P1pal-12. Using shRNA mediated PAR-1 knock down in fibroblasts, we demonstrate that fibroblast PAR-1 contributes to TGF-β activation and production. Finally, we show that the macrophage-dependent induction of PAR-1 driven TGF-β activation was mediated by FXa. Our data identify novel mechanisms by which PAR-1 stimulation on different cell types can contribute to IPF and identify macrophages as key players in PAR-1 dependent development of this devastating disease. IPF may result from cellular senescence mediated by macrophages in the lung. PMID:26474459

  13. Estrogen receptor-alpha promotes alternative macrophage activation during cutaneous repair.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Laura; Emmerson, Elaine; Williams, Helen; Saville, Charis R; Krust, Andrée; Chambon, Pierre; Mace, Kimberly A; Hardman, Matthew J

    2014-09-01

    Efficient local monocyte/macrophage recruitment is critical for tissue repair. Recruited macrophages are polarized toward classical (proinflammatory) or alternative (prohealing) activation in response to cytokines, with tight temporal regulation crucial for efficient wound repair. Estrogen acts as a potent anti-inflammatory regulator of cutaneous healing. However, an understanding of estrogen/estrogen receptor (ER) contribution to macrophage polarization and subsequent local effects on wound healing is lacking. Here we identify, to our knowledge previously unreported, a role whereby estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling preferentially polarizes macrophages from a range of sources to an alternative phenotype. Cell-specific ER ablation studies confirm an in vivo role for inflammatory cell ERα, but not ERβ, in poor healing associated with an altered cytokine profile and fewer alternatively activated macrophages. Furthermore, we reveal intrinsic changes in ERα-deficient macrophages, which are unable to respond to alternative activation signals in vitro. Collectively, our data reveal that inflammatory cell-expressed ERα promotes alternative macrophage polarization, which is beneficial for timely healing. Given the diverse physiological roles of ERs, these findings will likely be of relevance to many pathologies involving excessive inflammation. PMID:24769859

  14. Impaired activation of Stat1 and c-Jun as a possible defect in macrophages of patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Solís, H; Quiñones-Falconi, F; Zarain-Herzberg, A; Amieva-Fernández, R I; López-Vidal, Y

    2009-10-01

    Studies of patients with active tuberculosis (TB) and infected healthy individuals have shown that interferon (IFN)-gamma is present in sites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in comparable levels. This suggests that there is a deficiency in the macrophage response to IFN-gamma in TB patients. We used recombinant human IFN-gamma to stimulate adherent monocyte-derived macrophages from three groups of people: patients with active tuberculosis (TBP), their healthy household contacts (HHC) and healthy uninfected controls from the community (CC). We then evaluated the ability of the macrophages to inhibit the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv as well as their cytokine profile at early in infection (48 h). After IFN-gamma treatment, macrophages of healthy individuals (HHC and CC) controlled M. tuberculosis growth and produced mainly nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin (IL)-12p70, whereas TBP macrophages did not kill M. tuberculosis. Additionally, TBP macrophages produced low levels of NO and IL-12p70 and high levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-10. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta levels were similar among all three groups. M. tuberculosis infection had little effect on the cytokine response after IFN-gamma stimulus, but infection alone induced more IL-10 and TGF-beta in TBP macrophages. There were no differences in Stat1 nuclear translocation and DNA binding between the groups. However, the phosphorylated Stat1 and c-Jun (AP-1) in nuclear protein extracts was diminished in TBP macrophages compared to macrophages of healthy individuals. These results indicate an impairment of Stat1-dependent and Stat1-independent IFN-gamma signalling in macrophages of people with active tuberculosis, suggesting a different molecular regulation that could impact macrophage functionality and disease outcome. PMID:19737230

  15. Antidepressant therapies inhibit inflammation and microglial M1-polarization.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Hans O; Feuerbach, Dominik

    2016-07-01

    Macrophages and their counterparts in the central nervous system, the microglia, detect and subsequently clear microbial pathogens and injured tissue. These phagocytic cells alter and adapt their phenotype depending on their prime activity, i.e., whether they participate in acute defence against pathogenic organisms ('M1'-phenotype) or in clearing damaged tissues and performing repair activities ('M2'-phenotype). Stimulation of pattern recognition receptors by viruses (vaccines), bacterial membrane components (e.g., LPS), alcohol, or long-chain saturated fatty acids promotes M1-polarization. Vaccine or LPS administration to healthy human subjects can result in sickness symptoms and low mood. Alcohol abuse and abdominal obesity are recognized as risk factors for depression. In the M1-polarized form, microglia and macrophages generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen radicals to eradicate microbial pathogens. Inadvertently, also tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) may become oxidized. This is an irreversible reaction that generates neopterin, a recognized biomarker for depression. BH4 is a critical cofactor for the synthesis of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin, and its loss could explain some of the symptoms of depression. Based on these aspects, the suppression of M1-polarization would limit the inadvertent catabolism of BH4. In the current review, we evaluate the evidence that antidepressant treatments (monoamine reuptake inhibitors, PDE4 inhibitors, lithium, valproate, agomelatine, tianeptine, electroconvulsive shock, and vagus nerve stimulation) inhibit LPS-induced microglia/macrophage M1-polarization. Consequently, we propose that supplementation with BH4 could limit the reduction in central monoamine synthesis and might represent an effective treatment for depressed mood. PMID:27101921

  16. Dissociation of bactericidal activity from other functions of activated macrophages in exudates induced by thioglycolate medium.

    PubMed Central

    Spitalny, G L

    1981-01-01

    Macrophages displayed increased spreading, increased Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis, and increased secretion of plasminogen activator when collected from the peritoneal cavities of either Listeria-immune mice challenged intraperitoneally 3 days earlier with Listeria or nonimmune mice injected intraperitoneally 3 days earlier with fluid thioglycolate medium. In contrast, macrophages from the thioglycolate-induced peritoneal exudates were severely impaired in vitro in their ability to destroy Listeria. Injection of thioglycolate markedly interfered with the destruction of sublethal intraperitoneal challenge of Listeria, which resulted in nonimmune animals dying of an overwhelming systemic infection. In animals immune to Listeria, injection of thioglycolate delayed the onset of the expression of immunity to an intraperitoneal challenge of bacteria. The thioglycolate-induced suppression of bactericidal activity was determined to be confined to the site of injection. Results of experiments indicated that the colloidal agar in thioglycolate medium was the cause of the impairment of macrophage bactericidal activity. In addition to the impairment of bactericidal activity induced by agar, additional studies showed that an intraperitoneal injection of colloidal agar (0.075% wt/vol) by itself was a sufficient inflammatory stimulus for the accumulation of a large number of host phagocytic cells. Images PMID:6795125

  17. High salt primes a specific activation state of macrophages, M(Na).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu-Chang; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Du, Lin-Juan; Sun, Jian-Yong; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Shi, Chaoji; Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Tao, Jun; Jia, Lijun; Fan, Heng-Yu; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Ying, Hao; Hui, Lijian; Liu, Xiaolong; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lanjing; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2015-08-01

    High salt is positively associated with the risk of many diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms. Here we showed that high salt increased proinflammatory molecules, while decreased anti-inflammatory and proendocytic molecules in both human and mouse macrophages. High salt also potentiated lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation and suppressed interleukin 4-induced macrophage activation. High salt induced the proinflammatory aspects by activating p38/cFos and/or Erk1/2/cFos pathways, while inhibited the anti-inflammatory and proendocytic aspects by Erk1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 pathway. Consistent with the in vitro results, high-salt diet increased proinflammatory gene expression of mouse alveolar macrophages. In mouse models of acute lung injury, high-salt diet aggravated lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary macrophage activation and inflammation in lungs. These results identify a novel macrophage activation state, M(Na), and high salt as a potential environmental risk factor for lung inflammation through the induction of M(Na). PMID:26206316

  18. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol inhibits the cell surface expression of activation markers in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Waché, Yann J; Hbabi-Haddioui, Laila; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Belkhelfa, Haouaria; Roques, Christine; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2009-08-21

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most prevalent trichothecene mycotoxin in crops in Europe and North America. It exhibits several toxic effects including impaired growth and immune dysregulation. Macrophages play pivotal role in the host defense; upon activation, they express several specific cell surface receptors that are important in adhesion and cell signaling. Several studies have demonstrated that DON can affect macrophages, however, very few data are available concerning the effect of DON on human macrophages, and the effect on macrophage cell surface receptors is unknown. In the present study, human blood monocytes, differentiated in vitro into macrophages, were activated with IFN-gamma, in the presence or absence of low concentrations of DON. The expression of CD11c, CD13, CD14, CD18, CD33, CD35, CD54, CD119 and HLA-DP/DQ/DR was analyzed by flow cytometry. As expected, macrophage activation by IFN-gamma upregulated the expression of CD54, CD14, CD119 and HLA-DP/DQ/DR. Incubation with DON decrease the cell surface expression of these activation markers in a dose-dependent manner. When cells were treated with 5muM DON, the mean fluorescence intensity measured for the expression of these receptors was the same as that observed in non-activated macrophages. This inhibitory effect of DON was only observed when the mycotoxin was applied before the activation signal. Taken together, our results suggest that low concentration of DON alter macrophage activation as measured by the expression of cell surface markers. This may have implications for human health when consuming DON contaminated feed. PMID:19549553

  19. Enhanced resistance against Listeria monocytogenes at an early phase of primary infection in pregnant mice: activation of macrophages during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Y; Mitsuyama, M; Sano, M; Nakano, H; Nomoto, K

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the pregnancy-induced changes in macrophage activity which are important in the expression of host defense against infections. Several macrophage functions were examined by using Listeria monocytogenes. In pregnant mice, prolonged survival and enhanced in vivo elimination of bacteria were observed in the early phase of primary infection. Functions of peritoneal macrophages, including in vitro phagocytosis intracellular killing, glucose consumption, generation of superoxide anion, and intracellular beta-glucuronidase activity were shown to be enhanced in pregnant mice. These findings indicate that pregnancy enhances macrophage functions qualitatively. Possible mechanisms for this enhancement and the significance of macrophage activation for pregnant hosts are discussed. PMID:3011673

  20. Unfolding the relationship between secreted molecular chaperones and macrophage activation states

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, it has emerged that many molecular chaperones and protein-folding catalysts are secreted from cells and function, somewhat in the manner of cytokines, as pleiotropic signals for a variety of cells, with much attention being focused on the macrophage. During the last decade, it has become clear that macrophages respond to bacterial, protozoal, parasitic and host signals to generate phenotypically distinct states of activation. These activation states have been termed ‘classical’ and ‘alternative’ and represent not a simple bifurcation in response to external signals but a range of cellular phenotypes. From an examination of the literature, the hypothesis is propounded that mammalian molecular chaperones are able to induce a wide variety of alternative macrophage activation states, and this may be a system for relating cellular or tissue stress to appropriate macrophage responses to restore homeostatic equilibrium. PMID:18958583

  1. Clinical utility of the liposteroid therapy: Potential effects on the macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Wakiguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohga, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

      Liposteroid, a lipid emulsion containing dexamethasone, was developed in Japan. This drug is effective against rheumatoid arthritis, and has fewer side effects than dexamethasone. Moreover, at high dosage, liposteroid has been effectively used for the treatment of macrophage activation syndrome, because the lipid emulsions are easily taken up by phagocytes, and are retained in macrophages. Its anti-inflammatory effect was found to be 2-5 times higher than that of dexamethasone in arthritis and granuloma rat models. Japanese researchers have reported the clinical efficacy and utility of liposteroid in the treatment of diseases with macrophage activation. These include hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, graft-versus-host disease, and pulmonary hemosiderosis. Here, we describe the clinical effects of liposteroid on macrophage activation syndrome and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients. PMID:27320934

  2. Human lung tissue macrophages, but not alveolar macrophages, express matrix metalloproteinases after direct contact with activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Lacraz, S; Nicod, L P; Chicheportiche, R; Welgus, H G; Dayer, J M

    2001-04-01

    Human alveolar macrophages (AM) and lung tissue macrophages (LTM) have a distinct localization in the cellular environment. We studied their response to direct contact with activated T lymphocytes in terms of the production of interstitial collagenase (MMP-1), 92-kD gelatinase (MMP-9), and of TIMP-1, one of the counter-regulatory tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. Either AM obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage or LTM obtained by mincing and digestion of lung tissue were exposed for 48 h to plasma membranes of T lymphocytes previously activated with phorbol myristate acetate and phytohemagglutinin for 24 h. Membranes of activated T cells strongly induced the production of MMP-1, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 exclusively in LTM but not in AM, whereas membranes from unstimulated T cells failed to induce the release of MMPs. Both populations of mononuclear phagocytes spontaneously released only small amounts of MMPs and TIMP-1. Similar results were obtained when MMP and TIMP-1 expression was analyzed at pretranslational and biosynthetic levels, respectively. Blockade experiments with cytokine antagonists revealed the involvement of T-cell membrane-associated interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in MMP production by LTM upon contact with T cells. These data suggest that the ability of lung macrophages to produce MMPs after direct contact with activated T cells is related to the difference in phenotype of mononuclear phagocytes and cell localization. In addition, these observations indicate that cell-cell contact represents an important biological mechanism in potentiating the inflammatory response of mononuclear phagocytes in the lungs. PMID:11306438

  3. The contribution of macrophages to normal and pathological pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Schust, Danny J

    2010-06-01

    Macrophages represent one of the major leukocyte subsets in the uterine decidua. Owing to their remarkable phenotypic plasticity, decidual macrophages can participate in diverse activities during pregnancy. At baseline, decidual macrophages are characterized by an immunosuppressive phenotype and M2 polarization, supporting feto-maternal immune tolerance. In early pregnancy, macrophage-derived pro-angiogenic factors prompt vascular remodeling within the uterine wall to ensure appropriate utero-placental circulation. Upon invasion by pathogens, pattern recognition receptors on decidual macrophages help to alter the characteristics of these malleable cells toward an M1, inflammatory phenotype. Similar inflammatory characteristics are seen in those macrophages that accumulate in the lower segment of the uterus to drive cervical ripening. Disturbances in the tight control that balances macrophage function during pregnancy can trigger the development of pregnancy complications. Here, we discuss the physiologic role of uterine macrophages at different stages of pregnancy and describe their relevance in selected pregnancy disorders. PMID:20163399

  4. Tumor cell-activated CARD9 signaling contributes to metastasis-associated macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Shao, J-H; Miao, Y-J; Cui, W; Qi, Y-F; Han, J-H; Lin, X; Du, J

    2014-08-01

    Macrophages are critical immune effector cells of the tumor microenvironment that promote seeding, extravasation and persistent growth of tumor cells in primary tumors and metastatic sites. Tumor progression and metastasis are affected by dynamic changes in the specific phenotypes of macrophage subpopulations; however, the mechanisms by which tumor cells modulate macrophage polarization remain incompletely understood. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is a central adaptor protein of innate immune responses to extracellular pathogens. We report that increased CARD9 expression is primarily localized in infiltrated macrophages and significantly associated with advanced histopathologic stage and the presence of metastasis. Using CARD9-deficient (CARD9(-/-)) mice, we show that bone marrow-derived CARD9 promotes liver metastasis of colon carcinoma cells. Mechanistic studies reveal that CARD9 contributes to tumor metastasis by promoting metastasis-associated macrophage polarization through activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that tumor cell-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor facilitates spleen tyrosine kinase activation in macrophages, which is necessary for formation of the CARD9-B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10-mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 complex. Taken together, our results indicating that CARD9 is a regulator of metastasis-associated macrophages will lead to new insights into evolution of the microenvironments supporting tumor metastasis, thereby providing targets for anticancer therapies. PMID:24722209

  5. Macrophage activation and migration in interface tissue around loosening total hip arthroplasty components.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, N; Kojima, T; Ito, T; Saga, S; Anma, H; Kurokouchi, K; Iwahori, Y; Iwase, T; Iwata, H

    1997-06-01

    The bone-cement interface tissue of failed total hip arthroplasty (THA) has inflammatory characteristics, such as the presence of prostaglandin E2 and interleukin 1 (IL-1). We considered that the bone-cement interface tissue could be the site of granulomatous inflammation caused by a foreign-body reaction. It has been demonstrated that inflammatory cytokines and chemokines have an important role in granulomatous inflammation. Bone-cement interface tissue was obtained at revision from nine patients with failed cemented THA, and the role of macrophages was assessed by immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and molecular biological techniques. We used the reverse-transcriptional polymerase chain reaction to examine the expression of mRNA for IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein. Polyethylene debris surrounded by macrophages and phagocytosis of debris by macrophages was frequently observed in the interface tissue. Macrophage activation and the production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 and TNF alpha might induce the development of interface tissue. Expression of chemokine mRNAs was also commonly seen, suggesting that this led to recruitment of macrophages into the bone-cement interface tissue. Debris released from implants appears to cause activation of macrophages and the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that induce cellular recruitment into interface tissue. This mechanism might form a vicious cycle that aggravates THA loosening. PMID:9138074

  6. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji; Kang, Yu-Xia; Pan, Wen; Lei, Wan; Feng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%–8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:27331813

  7. Activation of TLR3/interferon signaling pathway by bluetongue virus results in HIV inhibition in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ming; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Sang, Ming; Liu, Jin-Biao; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), a nonenveloped double-stranded RNA virus, is a potent inducer of type Ι interferons in multiple cell systems. In this study, we report that BTV16 treatment of primary human macrophages induced both type I and III IFN expression, resulting in the production of multiple antiviral factors, including myxovirus resistance protein A, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, and the IFN-stimulated gene 56. Additionally, BTV-treated macrophages expressed increased HIV restriction factors (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 G/F/H) and CC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1-β, regulated on activation of normal T cell expressed and secreted), the ligands for HIV entry coreceptor CC chemokine receptor type 5. BTV16 also induced the expression of tetherin, which restricts HIV release from infected cells. Furthermore, TLR3 signaling of macrophages by BTV16 resulted in the induction of several anti-HIV microRNAs (miRNA-28, -29a, -125b, -150, -223, and -382). More importantly, the induction of antiviral responses by BTV resulted in significant suppression of HIV in macrophages. These findings demonstrate the potential of BTV-mediated TLR3 activation in macrophage innate immunity against HIV. PMID:26296370

  8. Macrophage Plasticity in Skeletal Muscle Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rigamonti, Elena; Sciorati, Clara; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are one of the first barriers of host defence against pathogens. Beyond their role in innate immunity, macrophages play increasingly defined roles in orchestrating the healing of various injured tissues. Perturbations of macrophage function and/or activation may result in impaired regeneration and fibrosis deposition as described in several chronic pathological diseases. Heterogeneity and plasticity have been demonstrated to be hallmarks of macrophages. In response to environmental cues they display a proinflammatory (M1) or an alternative anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. A lot of evidence demonstrated that after acute injury M1 macrophages infiltrate early to promote the clearance of necrotic debris, whereas M2 macrophages appear later to sustain tissue healing. Whether the sequential presence of two different macrophage populations results from a dynamic shift in macrophage polarization or from the recruitment of new circulating monocytes is a subject of ongoing debate. In this paper, we discuss the current available information about the role that different phenotypes of macrophages plays after injury and during the remodelling phase in different tissue types, with particular attention to the skeletal muscle. PMID:24860823

  9. Schistosoma mansoni Hemozoin Modulates Alternative Activation of Macrophages via Specific Suppression of Retnla Expression and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, Martha; Evans, D. Andrew; Gunn, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The trematode Schistosoma mansoni is one of the etiological agents of schistosomiasis, a key neglected tropical disease responsible for an estimated annual loss of 70 million disability-adjusted life years. Hematophagy represents the primary nutrient acquisition pathway of this parasite, but digestion of hemoglobin also liberates toxic heme. Schistosomes detoxify heme via crystallization into hemozoin, which is subsequently regurgitated into the host's circulation. Here we demonstrate that during experimental schistosomiasis, hemozoin accumulating in the mouse liver is taken up by phagocytes at a time coincident with the development of the egg-induced T-helper 2 (Th2) granulomatous immune response. Furthermore, the uptake of hemozoin also coincides with the hepatic expression of markers of alternative macrophage activation. Alternatively activated macrophages are a key effector cell population associated with protection against schistosomiasis, making hemozoin well placed to play an important immunomodulatory role in this disease. To systematically explore this hypothesis, S. mansoni hemozoin was purified and added to in vitro bone marrow-derived macrophage cultures concurrently exposed to cytokines chosen to reflect the shifting state of macrophage activation in vivo. Macrophages undergoing interleukin-4 (IL-4)-induced alternative activation in the presence of hemozoin developed a phenotype specifically lacking in Retnla, a characteristic alternatively activated macrophage product associated with regulation of Th2 inflammatory responses. As such, in addition to its important detoxification role during hematophagy, we propose that schistosome hemozoin also provides a potent immunomodulatory function in the coevolved network of host-parasite relationships during schistosomiasis. PMID:23090958

  10. Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor-mediated macrophage differentiation in myeloid cells: a role for tyrosine 559-dependent protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, K A; Wilson, N J; Marks, D C; Beecroft, T L; Whitty, G A; Hamilton, J A; Csar, X F

    2001-01-01

    M1 myeloid cells transfected with the wild-type (WT) colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor (CSF-1R; M1/WT cells) undergo CSF-1-dependent macrophage differentiation. By mutation studies, we have provided prior evidence that tyrosine 559 in the CSF-1R cytoplasmic domain governs the Src-dependent differentiation pathway. Further components of this pathway were then sought. We report that the extent of CSF-1-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), and the associated loss of its activity were reduced in M1 cells transfected with the CSF-1R with a tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutation at position 559 (M1/559 cells), compared with the corresponding responses in CSF-1-treated M1/WT cells. This evidence for an involvement of a reduction in PP2A activity in the differentiation process was supported by the restoration of the defect in the CSF-1-mediated differentiation of M1/559 cells by the addition of the PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid. It was also found that the degree of activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activities by CSF-1 was reduced in M1/559 cells, suggesting their involvement in the differentiation process. These data suggest that PP2A and ERK form part of the Src-dependent signal-transduction cascade governing CSF-1-mediated macrophage differentiation in M1 cells. PMID:11513742

  11. The Alternative Faces of Macrophage Generate Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Lampiasi, N; Russo, R; Zito, F

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of how osteoclasts are generated and whether they can be altered by inflammatory stimuli is a topic of particular interest for osteoclastogenesis. It is known that the monocyte/macrophage lineage gives rise to osteoclasts (OCs) by the action of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL), which induce cell differentiation through their receptors, c-fms and RANK, respectively. The multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) generated by the engagement of RANK/RANKL are typical OCs. Nevertheless, very few studies have addressed the question of which subset of macrophages generates OCs. Indeed, two main subsets of macrophages are postulated, the inflammatory or classically activated type (M1) and the anti-inflammatory or alternatively activated type (M2). It has been proposed that macrophages can be polarized in vitro towards a predominantly M1 or M2 phenotype with the addition of granulocyte macrophage- (GM-) CSF or M-CSF, respectively. Various inflammatory stimuli known to induce macrophage polarization, such as LPS or TNF-α, can alter the type of MGC obtained from RANKL-induced differentiation. This review aims to highlight the role of immune-related stimuli and factors in inducing macrophages towards the osteoclastogenesis choice. PMID:26977415

  12. The macrophage chemotactic activity of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemoattractant capabilities of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products (ECP) were investigated from two isolates, the virulent FL6-60 parent and less virulent RET-04 mutant. Chemotaxis and chemokinesis were assayed in vitro using blind well chambers with peritoneal macrophages obtained from ...

  13. Immunologic activity of lipopolysaccharides released from macrophages after the uptake of intact E coli in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, R.L. Jr.; Hoffman, J.; Tesh, V.L.; Morrison, D.C.

    1986-04-15

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) have been isolated from culture supernatants and from cell lysates after the in vitro phagocytosis of E. coli by murine macrophages. By using E. coli radiolabeled specifically in the LPS component with (/sup 3/H)galactose, the authors studies have shown that the macrophage-processed LPS is enhanced with respect to its immunostimulatory activity in comparison with control phenol-water-extracted LPS. As assessed by its ability to induce interluekin 1 production in naive macrophages or proliferation in cultures of murine splenocytes, the macrophage-processed LPS is between 10- and 100-fold greater in specific activity. Evidence is presented for both structural and chemical alterations in the LPS macromolecule.

  14. METEORIN-LIKE is a cytokine associated with barrier tissues and alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ushach, Irina; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Martinez, Cynthia; Hevezi, Peter A.; Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Valle-Rios, Ricardo; Vazquez, Monica I.; Homey, Bernhard; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are involved in many functions of the immune system including initiating, amplifying and resolving immune responses. Through bioinformatics analyses of a comprehensive database of gene expression (BIGE: Body Index of Gene Expression) we observed that a small secreted protein encoded by a poorly characterized gene called meteorin-like (METRNL), is highly expressed in mucosal tissues, skin and activated macrophages. Further studies indicate that Metrnl is produced by Alternatively Activated Macrophages (AAM) and M-CSF cultured bone marrow macrophages (M2-like macrophages). In the skin, METRNL is expressed by resting fibroblasts and IFNγ-treated keratinocytes. A screen of human skin-associated diseases showed significant over-expression of METRNL in psoriasis, prurigo nodularis, actinic keratosis and atopic dermatitis. METRNL is also up-regulated in synovial membranes of human rheumatoid arthritis. Taken together, these results indicate that Metrnl represents a novel cytokine, which is likely involved in both innate and acquired immune responses. PMID:25486603

  15. Understanding the Mysterious M2 Macrophage through Activation Markers and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rőszer, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    The alternatively activated or M2 macrophages are immune cells with high phenotypic heterogeneity and are governing functions at the interface of immunity, tissue homeostasis, metabolism, and endocrine signaling. Today the M2 macrophages are identified based on the expression pattern of a set of M2 markers. These markers are transmembrane glycoproteins, scavenger receptors, enzymes, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and cytokine receptors with diverse and often yet unexplored functions. This review discusses whether these M2 markers can be reliably used to identify M2 macrophages and define their functional subdivisions. Also, it provides an update on the novel signals of the tissue environment and the neuroendocrine system which shape the M2 activation. The possible evolutionary roots of the M2 macrophage functions are also discussed. PMID:26089604

  16. ROS-Responsive Activatable Photosensitizing Agent for Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy of Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Youngmi; Kim, In-Hoo; Kim, Kyungtae; Choi, Yongdoo

    2014-01-01

    The optical properties of macrophage-targeted theranostic nanoparticles (MacTNP) prepared from a Chlorin e6 (Ce6)-hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugate can be activated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in macrophage cells. MacTNP are nonfluorescent and nonphototoxic in their native state. However, when treated with ROS, especially peroxynitrite, they become highly fluorescent and phototoxic. In vitro cell studies show that MacTNP emit near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence inside activated macrophages. The NIR fluorescence is quenched in the extracellular environment. MacTNP are nontoxic in macrophages up to a Ce6 concentration of 10 μM in the absence of light. However, MacTNP become phototoxic upon illumination in a light dose-dependent manner. In particular, significantly higher phototoxic effect is observed in the activated macrophage cells compared to human dermal fibroblasts and non-activated macrophages. The ROS-responsive MacTNP, with their high target-to-background ratio, may have a significant potential in selective NIR fluorescence imaging and in subsequent photodynamic therapy of atherosclerosis with minimum side effects. PMID:24396511

  17. Role of activation in alveolar macrophage-mediated suppression of the plaque-forming cell response.

    PubMed Central

    Mbawuike, I N; Herscowitz, H B

    1988-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are highly suppressive of the in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) response of spleen cells obtained from mice primed with sheep erythrocytes. Comparison of macrophage populations obtained from disparate anatomical sites revealed that although in both cases there was a cell-concentration-dependent suppression of the PFC response, resident AM or AM activated as a result of intravenous injection of Mycobacterium bovis BCG were equally suppressive at the doses examined. Although there was a similar dose-dependent suppression with peritoneal macrophages, BCG-activated cells were more suppressive of the PFC response than were resident cells. In contrast, splenic macrophages at comparable concentrations were not at all suppressive. Resident AM exhibited significantly lower levels of 5'-nucleotidase activity than did resident peritoneal macrophages. Macrophage-mediated suppression of the in vitro PFC response could not be attributed to the release of toxic oxygen metabolites (H2O2, O2- ,and .OH) or prostaglandins, since the addition of catalase, superoxide dismutase, 2-mercaptoethanol, or indomethacin did not completely reverse suppression. These results suggest that the lung microenvironment may maintain AM in an activated state which contributes to their potential immunoregulatory functions. PMID:2830191

  18. Effect of cinnamon water extract on monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and scavenger receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Water soluble cinnamon extract has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity and modulate macrophage activation, a desirable trait for the management of obesity or atherosclerosis. Our present study investigated whether cinnamon water extract (CWE) may influence the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages and the activity of macrophage scavenger receptors, commonly observed in atherosclerotic lesions. Methods We investigated the effect of CWE on the expression of various surface markers and the uptake of acetylated low density lipoprotein (LDL) in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated THP-1 cells. The protein levels of PMA or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF)-stimulated type 1 macrophage scavenger receptor (SRA) were analyzed. Finally, the role of extracellar signal-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 in SRA synthesis and the effect of CWE on PMA-stimulated ERK1/2 were determined. Results CWE inhibited the differentiation of monocyte by decreasing the expression of CD11b, CD36 and SRA and the uptake of acetyl LDL. CWE suppressed the upregulation of SRA by M-CSF and modulated ERK1/2 activity, which was required for PMA-induced SRA synthesis. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that CWE was able to interfere with monocyte differentiation and macrophage scavenger activity, indicating its potential in preventing the development of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:24602512

  19. Btk Regulates Macrophage Polarization in Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Ní Gabhann, Joan; Hams, Emily; Smith, Siobhán; Wynne, Claire; Byrne, Jennifer C.; Brennan, Kiva; Spence, Shaun; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Johnston, James A.; Fallon, Padraic G.; Jefferies, Caroline A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a strong inducer of inflammation and does so by inducing polarization of macrophages to the classic inflammatory M1 population. Given the role of Btk as a critical signal transducer downstream of TLR4, we investigated its role in M1/M2 induction. In Btk deficient (Btk−\\−) mice we observed markedly reduced recruitment of M1 macrophages following intraperitoneal administration of LPS. Ex vivo analysis demonstrated an impaired ability of Btk−/− macrophages to polarize into M1 macrophages, instead showing enhanced induction of immunosuppressive M2-associated markers in response to M1 polarizing stimuli, a finding accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of STAT1 and enhanced STAT6 phosphorylation. In addition to STAT activation, M1 and M2 polarizing signals modulate the expression of inflammatory genes via differential activation of transcription factors and regulatory proteins, including NF-κB and SHIP1. In keeping with a critical role for Btk in macrophage polarization, we observed reduced levels of NF-κB p65 and Akt phosphorylation, as well as reduced induction of the M1 associated marker iNOS in Btk−/− macrophages in response to M1 polarizing stimuli. Additionally enhanced expression of SHIP1, a key negative regulator of macrophage polarisation, was observed in Btk−/− macrophages in response to M2 polarizing stimuli. Employing classic models of allergic M2 inflammation, treatment of Btk−/− mice with either Schistosoma mansoni eggs or chitin resulted in increased recruitment of M2 macrophages and induction of M2-associated genes. This demonstrates an enhanced M2 skew in the absence of Btk, thus promoting the development of allergic inflammation. PMID:24465735

  20. Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particle Extracts (DEPe) Impairs Some Polarization Markers and Functions of Human Macrophages through Activation of AhR and Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Jaguin, Marie; Fardel, Olivier; Lecureur, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦ), well-known to play an important role in immune response, also respond to environmental toxic chemicals such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Potential effects of DEPs towards MΦ polarization, a key hall-mark of MΦ physiology, remain however poorly documented. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the effects of a reference DEP extract (DEPe) on human MΦ polarization. Human blood monocytes-derived MΦ were incubated with IFNγ+LPS or IL-4 to obtain M1 and M2 subtypes, respectively; a 24 h exposure of polarizing MΦ to 10 μg/ml DEPe was found to impair expression of some macrophagic M1 and M2 markers, without however overall inhibition of M1 and M2 polarization processes. Notably, DEPe treatment increased the secretion of the M1 marker IL-8 and the M2 marker IL-10 in both MΦ subtypes, whereas it reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-6 and IL-12p40 secretion in M1 MΦ. In M2 MΦ, DEPe exposure led to a reduction of CD200R expression and of CCL17, CCL18 and CCL22 secretion, associated with a lower chemotaxis of CCR4-positive cells. DEPe activated the Nrf2 and AhR pathways and induced expression of their reference target genes such as Hmox-1 and cytochrome P-4501B1 in M1 and M2 MΦ. Nrf2 or AhR silencing through RNA interference prevented DEPe-related down-regulation of IL-6. AhR silencing also inhibited the down-secretion of IL-12p40 and CCL18 in M1- and M2-DEPe-exposed MΦ, respectively. DEPs are therefore likely to alter expression of some M1 and M2 markers in an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent manner; such regulations may contribute to deleterious immune effects of atmospheric DEP. PMID:25710172

  1. Structure-activity relationships of new analogues of arecaidine propargyl ester at muscarinic M1 and M2 receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, U.; Lambrecht, G.; Wagner, M.; Wess, J.; Mutschler, E.

    1989-01-01

    1. The potency of arecaidine propargyl ester (APE) and of several analogues containing a modified ester side chain has been assessed at M1 and M2 muscarinic receptor subtypes. APE was shown to act as a potent agonist at ganglionic M1 receptors in the pithed rat, at M2 receptors in guinea-pig isolated atria (-log EC50 = 8.22) and ileum (-log EC50 = 7.77). 2. The arecaidine 2-butynyl and 2-pentynyl esters were approximately equipotent with APE at M1 and M2 receptors, whereas the 2-hexynyl derivative was found to be less potent than APE in atria (-log EC50 = 6.80) and ileum (-log EC50 = 6.70) by about one order of magnitude. The 2-heptynyl and 3-phenyl propargyl esters exhibited no agonist actions in atria and ileum. 3. Shifting the triple bond from the 2 to the 3 position and introducing a bulky group at position 1 of the ester side chain of APE and analogues resulted in competitive antagonists (pA2 ranging from 4.9 to 7.3). 4. APE and its 2-butynyl analogue showed some agonistic selectivity for cardiac M2 receptors (potency ratio, ileum/atria = 2.8 and 4.6 respectively). All antagonists in this series of compounds were not selective in terms of affinity since their pA2 values at cardiac and ileal M2 receptors were similar (potency ratios, ileum/atria = 0.4 to 1.2). PMID:2924082

  2. Hypoxia Potentiates Palmitate-induced Pro-inflammatory Activation of Primary Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Ryan G; Boß, Marcel; Zezina, Ekaterina; Weigert, Andreas; Dehne, Nathalie; Fleming, Ingrid; Brüne, Bernhard; Namgaladze, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines secreted by adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) contribute to chronic low-grade inflammation and obesity-induced insulin resistance. Recent studies have shown that adipose tissue hypoxia promotes an inflammatory phenotype in ATMs. However, our understanding of how hypoxia modulates the response of ATMs to free fatty acids within obese adipose tissue is limited. We examined the effects of hypoxia (1% O2) on the pro-inflammatory responses of human monocyte-derived macrophages to the saturated fatty acid palmitate. Compared with normoxia, hypoxia significantly increased palmitate-induced mRNA expression and protein secretion of IL-6 and IL-1β. Although palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and nuclear factor κB pathway activation were not enhanced by hypoxia, hypoxia increased the activation of JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in palmitate-treated cells. Inhibition of JNK blocked the hypoxic induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, whereas knockdown of hypoxia-induced transcription factors HIF-1α and HIF-2α alone or in combination failed to reduce IL-6 and only modestly reduced IL-1β gene expression in palmitate-treated hypoxic macrophages. Enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and JNK activity under hypoxia were prevented by inhibiting reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, silencing of dual-specificity phosphatase 16 increased normoxic levels of IL-6 and IL-1β and reduced the hypoxic potentiation in palmitate-treated macrophages. The secretome of hypoxic palmitate-treated macrophages promoted IL-6 and macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 expression in primary human adipocytes, which was sensitive to macrophage JNK inhibition. Our results reveal that the coexistence of hypoxia along with free fatty acids exacerbates macrophage-mediated inflammation. PMID:26578520

  3. High and low molecular weight hyaluronic acid differentially influence macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Rayahin, Jamie E.; Buhrman, Jason S.; Zhang, Yu; Koh, Timothy J.; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit phenotypic diversity permitting wide-ranging roles in maintaining physiologic homeostasis. Hyaluronic acid, a major glycosaminoglycan of the extracellular matrix, has been shown to have differential signaling based on its molecular weight. With this in mind, the main objective of this study was to elucidate the role of hyaluronic acid molecular weight on macrophage activation and reprogramming. Changes in macrophage activation were assessed by activation state selective marker measurement, specifically quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction, and cytokine enzyme-linked immunoassays, after macrophage treatment with differing molecular weights of hyaluronic acid under four conditions: the resting state, concurrent with classical activation, and following inflammation involving either classically or alternatively activated macrophages. Regardless of initial polarization state, low molecular weight hyaluronic acid induced a classically activated-like state, confirmed by up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes, including nos2, tnf, il12b, and cd80, and enhanced secretion of nitric oxide and TNF-α. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid promoted an alternatively activated-like state, confirmed by up regulation of pro-resolving gene transcription, including arg1, il10, and mrc1, and enhanced arginase activity. Overall, our observations suggest that macrophages undergo phenotypic changes dependent on molecular weight of hyaluronan that correspond to either (1) pro-inflammatory response for low molecular weight HA or (2) pro-resolving response for high molecular weight HA. These observations bring significant further understanding of the influence of extracellular matrix polymers, hyaluronic acid in particular, on regulating the inflammatory response of macrophages. This knowledge can be used to guide the design of HA-containing biomaterials to better utilize the natural response to HAs. PMID:26280020

  4. E-NTPDase (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) of Leishmania amazonensis inhibits macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rodrigo Saar; de Carvalho, Luana Cristina Faria; de Souza Vasconcellos, Raphael; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2015-04-01

    Leishmania amazonensis, the causal agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, is known for its ability to modulate the host immune response. Because a relationship between ectonucleotidase activity and the ability of Leishmania to generate injury in C57BL/6 mice has been demonstrated, in this study we evaluated the involvement of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) activity of L. amazonensis in the process of infection of J774-macrophages. Our results show that high-activity parasites show increased survival rate in LPS/IFN-γ-activated cells, by inhibiting the host-cell NO production. Conversely, inhibition of E-NTPDase activity reduces the parasite survival rates, an effect associated with increased macrophage NO production. E-NTPDase activity generates substrate for the production of extracellular adenosine, which binds to A2B receptors and reduces IL-12 and TNF-α produced by activated macrophages, thus inhibiting NO production. These results indicate that E-NTPDase activity is important for survival of L. amazonensis within macrophages, showing the role of the enzyme in modulating macrophage response and lower NO production, which ultimately favors infection. Our results point to a new mechanism of L. amazonensis infection that may pave the way for the development of new treatments for this neglected disease. PMID:25554487

  5. Methamphetamine inhibits Toll-like receptor 9-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cen, Ping; Ye, Li; Su, Qi-Jian; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Lin, Xin-Qin; Liang, Hao; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2013-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is one of the key sensors that recognize viral infection/replication in the host cells. Studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine (METH) dysregulated host cell innate immunity and facilitated HIV infection of macrophages. In this study, we present new evidence that METH suppressed TLR9-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages. Activation of TLR9 by its agonist CpG-ODN 2216 inhibits HIV replication, which was demonstrated by increased expression of TLR9, interferon (IFN)-α, IFN regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and myxovirus resistance gene A (MxA) in macrophages. However, METH treatment of macrophages greatly compromised the TLR9 signaling-mediated anti-HIV effect and inhibited the expression of TLR9 downstream signaling factors. Dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonists (SCH23390) could block METH-mediated inhibition of anti-HIV activity of TLR9 signaling. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of the METH action showed that METH treatment selectively down-regulated the expression of TLR9 on macrophages, whereas it had little effect on the expression of other TLRs. Collectively, our results provide further evidence that METH suppresses host cell innate immunity against HIV infection by down-regulating TLR9 expression and its signaling-mediated antiviral effect in macrophages. PMID:23751096

  6. Attenuated expression of interferon-β and interferon-λ1 by human alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    El Fiky, Ashraf; Perreault, Roger; McGinnis, Gwendolyn J; Rabin, Ronald L

    2013-12-01

    Macrophages can be polarized into classically (CAM) or alternatively (AAM) activated macrophages with IFN-γ or IL-4, respectively. CAM are associated with type 1 immune responses and are implicated in autoimmunity; AAM are associated with type 2 responses and are implicated in allergic diseases. An impediment in investigating macrophage biology using primary human monocyte derived macrophages is the wide inter-donor heterogeneity and the limited quantity of cells that survive in vitro polarization. To overcome this impediment, we established a protocol to generate CAM and AAM cultures derived from the THP-1 human promonocytic cell line. In this report, we demonstrate that THP-CAM and -AAM express gene and protein markers that define their primary human monocyte derived counterparts, such as IL-1β, CXCL10, and CXCL11 for CAM, and MRC1, IL-4 and CCL22 for AAM. In addition, we demonstrate that STAT6 is selectively activated in THP-AAM which, upon LPS stimulation, have an attenuated or delayed expression of IFN-β, IFN-λ1, and IFN α/β pathway genes compared to their CAM counterparts. Taken together, these findings may help further investigate human diseases associated with the alternatively activated macrophage phenotype using this reproducible in vitro macrophage model. PMID:23993990

  7. Development of ostrich thrombocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in culture and the control of Toxoplasma gondii reproduction after macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Farlen J B; Damasceno-Sá, João Cláudio; DaMatta, Renato A

    2016-01-01

    Raising ostriches became an important economic activity after their products became commodities. The health of farm animals is of paramount importance, so assessing basic immunological responses is necessary to better understand health problems. We developed a method to obtain ostrich thrombocytes and macrophages. The thrombocytes died by apoptosis after 48 h in culture, and the macrophages expanded in size and increased the number of acidic compartments. Macrophages were activated by chicken interferon-γ, producing high levels of nitric oxide. Toxoplasma gondii was able to infect these macrophages, and activation controlled parasitic reproduction. T. gondii, however, persisted in these cells, and infection reduced the production of nitric oxide. These results are important for the future assessment of the basic cellular and immunobiology of ostriches and demonstrate T. gondii suppression of nitric oxide production. PMID:26794839

  8. Interleukin-6 signaling promotes alternative macrophage activation to limit obesity-associated insulin resistance and endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Mauer, Jan; Chaurasia, Bhagirath; Goldau, Julia; Vogt, Merly C.; Ruud, Johan; Nguyen, Khoa D.; Theurich, Sebastian; Hausen, A. Christine; Schmitz, Joel; Brönneke, Hella S.; Estevez, Emma; Allen, Tamara L.; Mesaros, Andrea; Partridge, Linda; Febbraio, Mark A.; Chawla, Ajay; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Brüning, Jens C.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are closely associated with the development of low-grade inflammation. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is linked to obesity-associated inflammation, however its role in this context remains controversial. Here, we show that mice with inactivated Il6ra gene in myeloid cells (Il6raΔmyel) displayed exaggerated deterioration of glucose homeostasis upon diet-induced obesity due to enhanced insulin resistance. Insulin target tissues showed increased inflammation and a shift in macrophage polarization. IL-6 induced IL-4-receptor expression and augmented the response to IL-4 in macrophages in a cell-autonomous manner. Il6raΔmyel mice were resistant to IL-4-mediated alternative macrophage polarization and exhibited increased susceptibility to LPS-induced endotoxemia. These results reveal IL-6 signaling as an important determinant for alternative macrophage-activation and assign IL-6 an unexpected homeostatic role to limit inflammation. PMID:24681566

  9. Regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and urokinase by hyaluronan fragments in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Horton, M R; Olman, M A; Bao, C; White, K E; Choi, A M; Chin, B Y; Noble, P W; Lowenstein, C J

    2000-10-01

    Pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis are characterized by increased turnover and production of the extracellular matrix as well as an impairment of lung fibrinolytic activity. Although fragments of the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan induce macrophage production of inflammatory mediators, the effect of hyaluronan on the fibrinolytic mediators plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is unknown. This study demonstrates that hyaluronan fragments augment steady-state mRNA, protein, and inhibitory activity of PAI-1 as well as diminish the baseline levels of uPA mRNA and inhibit uPA activity in an alveolar macrophage cell line. Hyaluronan fragments alter macrophage expression of PAI-1 and uPA at the level of gene transcription. Similarly, hyaluronan fragments augment PAI-1 and diminish uPA mRNA levels in freshly isolated inflammatory alveolar macrophages from bleomycin-treated rats. These data suggest that hyaluronan fragments influence alveolar macrophage expression of PAI-1 and uPA and may be a mechanism for regulating fibrinolytic activity during lung inflammation. PMID:11000131

  10. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activation Decreases Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T.; Strand, Matthew J.; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R.; Kinney, William H.; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ordway, Diane J.; Chan, Edward D.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  11. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Feldman, Nicole E; Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T; Strand, Matthew J; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R; Kinney, William H; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Voelker, Dennis R; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  12. IFN-γ Prevents Adenosine Receptor (A2bR) Upregulation To Sustain the Macrophage Activation Response.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Heather B; Ward, Amanda; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ravid, Katya; Mosser, David M

    2015-10-15

    The priming of macrophages with IFN-γ prior to TLR stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged inflammatory cytokine production. In this study, we demonstrate that, following TLR stimulation, macrophages upregulate the adenosine 2b receptor (A2bR) to enhance their sensitivity to immunosuppressive extracellular adenosine. This upregulation of A2bR leads to the induction of macrophages with an immunoregulatory phenotype and the downregulation of inflammation. IFN-γ priming of macrophages selectively prevents the induction of the A2bR in macrophages to mitigate sensitivity to adenosine and to prevent this regulatory transition. IFN-γ-mediated A2bR blockade leads to a prolonged production of TNF-α and IL-12 in response to TLR ligation. The pharmacologic inhibition or the genetic deletion of the A2bR results in a hyperinflammatory response to TLR ligation, similar to IFN-γ treatment of macrophages. Conversely, the overexpression of A2bR on macrophages blunts the IFN-γ effects and promotes the development of immunoregulatory macrophages. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism whereby IFN-γ contributes to host defense by desensitizing macrophages to the immunoregulatory effects of adenosine. This mechanism overcomes the transient nature of TLR activation, and prolongs the antimicrobial state of the classically activated macrophage. This study may offer promising new targets to improve the clinical outcome of inflammatory diseases in which macrophage activation is dysregulated. PMID:26355158

  13. Effect of age on proteasomal activity of T cells and macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    T cell function is impaired with aging. Proteasome activity in T cells is important for T cell activation and its activity in macrophages is required for processing antigens in order to be presented via class I major histocompatibility complex to CD8+ T cells. Since studies have demonstrated that pr...

  14. Alternatively activated macrophages determine repair of the infarcted adult murine heart

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Shintani, Yasunori; Shintani, Yusuke; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Yashiro, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Alternatively activated (also known as M2) macrophages are involved in the repair of various types of organs. However, the contribution of M2 macrophages to cardiac repair after myocardial infarction (MI) remains to be fully characterized. Here, we identified CD206+F4/80+CD11b+ M2-like macrophages in the murine heart and demonstrated that this cell population predominantly increases in the infarct area and exhibits strengthened reparative abilities after MI. We evaluated mice lacking the kinase TRIB1 (Trib1–/–), which exhibit a selective depletion of M2 macrophages after MI. Compared with control animals, Trib1–/– mice had a catastrophic prognosis, with frequent cardiac rupture, as the result of markedly reduced collagen fibril formation in the infarct area due to impaired fibroblast activation. The decreased tissue repair observed in Trib1–/– mice was entirely rescued by an external supply of M2-like macrophages. Furthermore, IL-1α and osteopontin were suggested to be mediators of M2-like macrophage–induced fibroblast activation. In addition, IL-4 administration achieved a targeted increase in the number of M2-like macrophages and enhanced the post-MI prognosis of WT mice, corresponding with amplified fibroblast activation and formation of more supportive fibrous tissues in the infarcts. Together, these data demonstrate that M2-like macrophages critically determine the repair of infarcted adult murine heart by regulating fibroblast activation and suggest that IL-4 is a potential biological drug for treating MI. PMID:27140396

  15. Macrophages and inflammatory mediators in chemical toxicity: a battle of forces.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Debra L

    2009-08-01

    Macrophages function as control switches of the immune system, providing a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses. To accomplish this, they develop into different subsets: classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated macrophages. Whereas M1 macrophages display a cytotoxic, proinflammatory phenotype, much like the soldiers of The Dark Side of The Force in the Star Wars movies, M2 macrophages, like Jedi fighters, suppress immune and inflammatory responses and participate in wound repair and angiogenesis. Critical to the actions of these divergent or polarized macrophage subpopulations is the regulated release of inflammatory mediators. When properly controlled, M1 macrophages effectively destroy invading pathogens, tumor cells, and foreign materials. However, when M1 activation becomes excessive or uncontrolled, these cells can succumb to The Dark Side, releasing copious amounts of cytotoxic mediators that contribute to disease pathogenesis. The activity of M1 macrophages is countered by The Force of alternatively activated M2 macrophages, which release anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and mediators involved in extracellular matrix turnover and tissue repair. It is the balance in the production of mediators by these two macrophage subpopulations that ultimately determines the outcome of the tissue response to chemical toxicants. PMID:19645497

  16. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S.; Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J.; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation

  17. Observation and modelling of main-sequence star chromospheres - XII. Two-component model chromospheres for five active dM1e stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdebine, E. R.

    2009-08-01

    We aim to constrain the Hα, CaII H and CaII K profiles from quiescent and active regions on active dM1e stars. A preliminary analysis of all the data available for dM1e stars shows that the Hα/CaII equivalent width (EW) ratio varies by up to a factor of 7 for different stars in our sample. We find that spectroscopic binaries have a significantly smaller ratio than single dM1e stars. We also find that the pre-main-sequence stars Gl 616.2, GJ 1264 and Gl 803 have a ratio lower than main-sequence single dM1e stars. These differences imply that different chromospheric structures are present on different stars, notably the temperature minimum must decrease with an increasing Hα/CaII EW ratio. For these reasons, it is impossible to reproduce all observations with only one grid of model chromospheres. We show that the grid of model chromospheres of Paper VI is adequate to describe the physical conditions that prevail in the chromospheres of spectroscopic binaries and pre-main-sequence M1e stars, but not for the conditions in single dM1e stars. One or more additional grids of model chromospheres will be necessary to reproduce all observations. We use the method developed in Paper XI in this series, in order to build two-component model chromospheres for five M1e field stars: FF And A, FF And B, GJ 1264, AU Mic and Gl 815A. Our solutions provide an exact match of the Hα and the mean CaII H & K EWs within measurement uncertainties. We compare the theoretical profiles and the observed profiles of Hα and the CaII H & K resonance lines. On the one hand, our fits to the CaII lines are reasonably good. On the other hand, our models tend to produce Hα profiles with a central absorption that is too deep. This suggests that the column mass at the transition region for plages is underestimated, but this would imply that the contrast factor between quiescent and active regions in the CaII lines is larger than 5. We find that, except in the cases of FF And A and AU Mic, the total

  18. Macrophages in Tumor Microenvironments and the Progression of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ning-Bo; Lü, Mu-Han; Fan, Ya-Han; Cao, Ya-Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed innate immune cells that play indispensable roles in the innate and adaptive immune response to pathogens and in-tissue homeostasis. Macrophages can be activated by a variety of stimuli and polarized to functionally different phenotypes. Two distinct subsets of macrophages have been proposed, including classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages express a series of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and effector molecules, such as IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, iNOS and MHCI/II. In contrast, M2 macrophages express a wide array of anti-inflammatory molecules, such as IL-10, TGF-β, and arginase1. In most tumors, the infiltrated macrophages are considered to be of the M2 phenotype, which provides an immunosuppressive microenvironment for tumor growth. Furthermore, tumor-associated macrophages secrete many cytokines, chemokines, and proteases, which promote tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression. Recently, it was also found that tumor-associated macrophages interact with cancer stem cells. This interaction leads to tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. So mediating macrophage to resist tumors is considered to be potential therapy. PMID:22778768

  19. Polyphenols from Chilean Propolis and Pinocembrin Reduce MMP-9 Gene Expression and Activity in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Nicolás; Cuevas, Alejandro; Cavalcante, Marcela F.; Dörr, Felipe A.; Saavedra, Kathleen; Zambrano, Tomás; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols from diverse sources have shown anti-inflammatory activity. In the context of atherosclerosis, macrophages play important roles including matrix metalloproteinases synthesis involved in degradation of matrix extracellular components affecting the atherosclerotic plaque stability. We prepared a propolis extract and pinocembrin in ethanol solution. Propolis extract was chemically characterized using LC-MS. The effect of treatments on gene expression and proteolytic activity was measured in vitro using murine macrophages activated with LPS. Cellular toxicity associated with both treatments and the vehicle was determined using MTT and apoptosis/necrosis detection assays. MMP-9 gene expression and proteolytic activity were measured using qPCR and zymography, respectively. Thirty-two compounds were identified in the propolis extract, including pinocembrin among its major components. Treatment with either ethanolic extract of propolis or pinocembrin inhibits MMP-9 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, an inhibitory effect was observed in proteolytic activity. However, the effect showed by ethanolic extract of propolis was higher than the effect of pinocembrin, suggesting that MMP-9 inhibition results from a joint contribution between the components of the extract. These data suggest a potential role of polyphenols from Chilean propolis in the control of extracellular matrix degradation in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27119082

  20. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) as a mediator of macrophage helminthotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J; Goldenberg, S; Meltzer, M S; Pearce, E

    1990-01-01

    Lymphokine-activated macrophages are cytotoxic for larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. That soluble secreted factors may mediate this cytotoxicity was suggested by the observation that culture supernatant fluids from stimulated macrophages also exhibited larvacidal activity. These fluids contain the monokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Several observations indicated that TNF is directly toxic to schistosome larvae. Cytotoxic sera taken from BCG- or S. mansoni-immunized mice after endotoxin challenge killed schistosomula in vitro, and upon gel filtration the larvacidal factor(s) in the sera co-eluted with the tumoricidal activity defined as TNF. Recombinant-derived TNF exhibited direct toxicity to schistosomula at high concentrations, or at lower concentrations in the presence of IFN gamma. The larvacidal activity of macrophage supernatant fluids was abrogated by addition of either anti-TNF antisera or Zn+2, which has been shown to inhibit TNF-induced damage of tumour cells. Anti-TNF and Zn+2 likewise suppressed schistosomulum killing by lymphokine-activated peritoneal macrophages or the IC-21 macrophage line, indicating that TNF also plays a role in the effector mechanism of larval killing by whole cells. PMID:2314921

  1. Activation of a distinct subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages following exposure to biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Do, C; Burd, T; Hong, L L

    1994-03-01

    A distinct subpopulation of tissue-associated pulmonary macrophages (TAPM) displayed tumoricidal activity towards syngeneic and xenogeneic targets following in vitro incubation with N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP). This subpopulation, as well as, the predominant population of freely lavagable alveolar macrophages destroyed allogeneic targets following a similar incubation with either 6-0-stearoyl MDP (S-MDP) or recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). IFN-gamma-induced in vivo tumoricidal activation of both populations of pulmonary macrophage was most effective when delivered either intravenously or via osmotic minipump infusion and least effective when administered by direct intratracheal instillation. The separate populations also displayed in vivo activation in response to liposome-encapsulated i.v. administered S-MDP. Under comparable conditions, IFN-alpha was not nearly as effective. Metabolic activation of TAPM, assessed by the release of increased levels of superoxide free radicals during phagocytosis, occurred following 24 hr exposure to S-MDP or lipopolysaccharide. Incorporation of these agents into multilamellar vesicle liposomes further augmented the release of superoxide observed at 24 hrs. Our results collectively demonstrated that a subpopulation of lung macrophage, a tissue-associated pulmonary macrophage, may be activated to a tumoricidal state and to release pronounced levels of oxygen free radicals following either in vitro or in situ treatment with several biological response modifiers. PMID:8194852

  2. Telomerase Activation in Atherosclerosis and Induction of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Expression by Inflammatory Stimuli in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gizard, Florence; Heywood, Elizabeth B.; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Zhao, Yue; Jones, Karrie L.; Cudejko, Cèline; Post, Ginell R.; Staels, Bart; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Objective Telomerase serves as a critical regulator of tissue renewal. Although telomerase activity is inducible in response to various environmental cues, it remains unknown whether telomerase is activated during the inflammatory remodeling underlying atherosclerosis formation. To address this question, we investigated in the present study the regulation of telomerase in macrophages and during atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor-deficient mice. Methods and Results We demonstrate that inflammatory stimuli activate telomerase in macrophages by inducing the expression of the catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified a previously unrecognized NF-κB response element in the TERT promoter, to which NF-κB is recruited during inflammation. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling completely abolished the induction of TERT expression, characterizing TERT as a bona fide NF-κB target gene. Furthermore, functional experiments revealed that TERT-deficiency results in a senescent cell phenotype. Finally, we demonstrate high levels of TERT expression in macrophages of human atherosclerotic lesions and establish that telomerase is activated during atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor-deficient mice. Conclusion These results characterize TERT as a previously unrecognized NF-κB target gene in macrophages and demonstrate that telomerase is activated during atherosclerosis. This induction of TERT expression prevents macrophage senescence and may have important implications for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:21106948

  3. Immunocytochemical Localization of Latent Transforming Growth Factor-B1 Activation by Stimulated Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Hyonkyong; Vodovotz, Yoram; Cox, G.W.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    1998-09-22

    Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}) is secreted in a latent form consisting of mature TGF-{beta} noncovalently associated with its amino-terminal propeptide, which is called latency associated peptide (LAP). Biological activity depends upon the release of TGF-{beta} from the latent complex following extracellular activation, which appears to be the key regulatory mechanism controlling TGF-{beta} action. We have identified two events associated with latent TGF-{beta} (LTGF-{beta}) activation in vivo: increased immunoreactivity of certain antibodies that specifically detect TGF-{beta} concomitant with decreased immunoreactivity of antibodies to LAP. Macrophages stimulated in vitro with interferon-{gamma} and lipopolysaccharide reportedly activate LTGF-{beta} via cell membrane-bound protease activity. We show through dual immunostaining of paraformaldehyde-fixed macrophages that such physiological TGF-{beta} activation is accompanied by a loss of LAP immunoreactivity with concomitant revelation of TGF-{beta} epitopes. The induction of TGF-{beta} immunoreactivity colocalized with immunoreactive betaglycan/RIII in activated macrophages, suggesting that LTGF-{beta} activation occurs on the cell surface. Confocal microscopy of metabolically active macrophages incubated with antibodies to TGF-{beta} and betaglycan/RIII prior to fixation supported the localization of activation to the cell surface. The ability to specifically detect and localize LTGF-{beta} activation provides an important tool for studies of its regulation.

  4. Immunocytochemical localization of latent transforming growth factor-beta1 activation by stimulated macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, H.; Vodovotz, Y.; Cox, G. W.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta) is secreted in a latent form consisting of mature TGF-beta noncovalently associated with its amino-terminal propeptide, which is called latency associated peptide (LAP). Biological activity depends upon the release of TGF-beta from the latent complex following extracellular activation, which appears to be the key regulatory mechanism controlling TGF-beta action. We have identified two events associated with latent TGF-beta (LTGF-beta) activation in vivo: increased immunoreactivity of certain antibodies that specifically detect TGF-beta concomitant with decreased immunoreactivity of antibodies to LAP. Macrophages stimulated in vitro with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide reportedly activate LTGF-beta via cell membrane-bound protease activity. We show through dual immunostaining of paraformaldehyde-fixed macrophages that such physiological TGF-beta activation is accompanied by a loss of LAP immunoreactivity with concomitant revelation of TGF-beta epitopes. The induction of TGF-beta immunoreactivity colocalized with immunoreactive betaglycan/RIII in activated macrophages, suggesting that LTGF-beta activation occurs on the cell surface. Confocal microscopy of metabolically active macrophages incubated with antibodies to TGF-beta and betaglycan/RIII prior to fixation supported the localization of activation to the cell surface. The ability to specifically detect and localize LTGF-beta activation provides an important tool for studies of its regulation.

  5. IRAK-M promotes alternative macrophage activation and fibroproliferation in bleomycin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Megan N; Newstead, Michael W; Zeng, Xianying; Bhan, Urvashi; Mo, Xiaokui M; Kunkel, Steven L; Moore, Bethany B; Flavell, Richard; Christman, John W; Standiford, Theodore J

    2015-02-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a devastating lung disease characterized by inflammation and the development of excessive extracellular matrix deposition. Currently, there are only limited therapeutic intervenes to offer patients diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis. Although previous studies focused on structural cells in promoting fibrosis, our study assessed the contribution of macrophages. Recently, TLR signaling has been identified as a regulator of pulmonary fibrosis. IL-1R-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a MyD88-dependent inhibitor of TLR signaling, suppresses deleterious inflammation, but may paradoxically promote fibrogenesis. Mice deficient in IRAK-M (IRAK-M(-/-)) were protected against bleomycin-induced fibrosis and displayed diminished collagen deposition in association with reduced production of IL-13 compared with wild-type (WT) control mice. Bone marrow chimera experiments indicated that IRAK-M expression by bone marrow-derived cells, rather than structural cells, promoted fibrosis. After bleomycin, WT macrophages displayed an alternatively activated phenotype, whereas IRAK-M(-/-) macrophages displayed higher expression of classically activated macrophage markers. Using an in vitro coculture system, macrophages isolated from in vivo bleomycin-challenged WT, but not IRAK-M(-/-), mice promoted increased collagen and α-smooth muscle actin expression from lung fibroblasts in an IL-13-dependent fashion. Finally, IRAK-M expression is upregulated in peripheral blood cells from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients and correlated with markers of alternative macrophage activation. These data indicate expression of IRAK-M skews lung macrophages toward an alternatively activated profibrotic phenotype, which promotes collagen production, leading to the progression of experimental pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25595781

  6. Polyoxygenated Cholesterol Ester Hydroperoxide Activates TLR4 and SYK Dependent Signaling in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Yin, Huiyong; Ravandi, Amir; Armando, Aaron; Dumlao, Darren; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Taylor, Angela M.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs) were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE) as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:24376657

  7. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG improves glucose tolerance through alleviating ER stress and suppressing macrophage activation in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Kun-Young; Kim, Bobae; Hyun, Chang-Kee

    2015-05-01

    Although recent studies have reported that Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), the most extensively studied probiotic strain, exerts an anti-hyperglycemic effect on several rodent models, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, twenty male C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db/db) mice were divided into 2 groups, LGG-treated and control group, which received a daily dose of LGG (1 × 10(8) CFU per mouse) and PBS orally for 4 weeks, respectively. We observed that glucose tolerance was significantly improved in LGG-treated db/db mice. Insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and GLUT4 translocation were higher in skeletal muscle of LGG-treated mice relative to their controls. It was also observed that LGG treatment caused significant reductions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in skeletal muscle and M1-like macrophage activation in white adipose tissues. Our results indicate that the anti-diabetic effect of LGG in db/db mice is associated with alleviated ER stress and suppressed macrophage activation, resulting in enhanced insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of probiotics for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26060355

  8. Activation of RAW264.7 macrophages by the polysaccharide from the roots of Actinidia eriantha and its molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongxiang; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Fengyang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Zhou, Zhihua; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The polysaccharide from the roots of Actinidia eriantha (AEPS), a potent antitumor agent and immunological adjuvant, was investigated for the immunomodulatory effects on RAW264.7 macrophages and its molecular mechanisms. AEPS could significantly enhance the pinocytic and phagocytic activity, induce the production of NO, TNF-α, IL-10, IL-1β and IL-6, and promote the expression of accessory and costimulatory molecules in RAW264.7 cells. PCR array assay revealed that AEPS up-regulated 28 genes including TLRs (TLR2, TLR8, TLR9), proinflammatory factors (IL-1β, G-CSF, IL-1α, GM-CSF, IL-6, COX-2, TNF-α, IFN-β, CXCL10, CCL2, TNF-β, IL-10), and the genes involved in NF-κB signaling pathway, and down-regulated 6 genes such as TLR3, TLR4, PGLYRP1, EIF2αK2, MAP3K1 and IRF1. AEPS was further showed to promote cytoplasmic IκB-α degradation and increase nuclear NF-κB p65 levels in RAW264.7 cells. These results suggested that AEPS activated RAW264.7 macrophages and elicited a M1 and M2 response through TLRs/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25659714

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG improves glucose tolerance through alleviating ER stress and suppressing macrophage activation in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kun-Young; Kim, Bobae; Hyun, Chang-Kee

    2015-01-01

    Although recent studies have reported that Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), the most extensively studied probiotic strain, exerts an anti-hyperglycemic effect on several rodent models, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, twenty male C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db/db) mice were divided into 2 groups, LGG-treated and control group, which received a daily dose of LGG (1 × 108 CFU per mouse) and PBS orally for 4 weeks, respectively. We observed that glucose tolerance was significantly improved in LGG-treated db/db mice. Insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and GLUT4 translocation were higher in skeletal muscle of LGG-treated mice relative to their controls. It was also observed that LGG treatment caused significant reductions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in skeletal muscle and M1-like macrophage activation in white adipose tissues. Our results indicate that the anti-diabetic effect of LGG in db/db mice is associated with alleviated ER stress and suppressed macrophage activation, resulting in enhanced insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of probiotics for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26060355

  10. Enhancement of carrier-mediated transport after immunologic activation of peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bonventre, P F; Straus, D; Baughn, R E; Imhoff, J

    1977-05-01

    Immunologically activated peritoneal macrophages from inbred mice and Hartley strain guinea pigs demonstrate a markedly greater than normal transport of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and L-leucine. The degree of nutrilite transport enhancement was greatest when animals were injected with the appropriate eliciting antigens before harvesting and also, if antigen was included in the tissue culture medium during the initial hours of in vitro culture. Enhanced hexose and amino acid uptake could also be achieved by exposure of macrophages from nonimmunized animals for 48 hr to supernatants of sensitized splenic lymphocyte cultures incubated with specific antigens. The animal systems in which this phenomenon was observed included CBA/J and C57BL/6J mice immunized with Staphylococcus aureus or sub-lethal doses of Listeria monocytogens, and the Hartley strain, albino guinea pig immunized with S. aureus or BCG. In all cases, immunization resulted in a state of delayed hypersensitivity as measured by skin testing or footpad swelling. Splenic cell supernatants contained lymphokines as detected by the presence of macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF), and by the supernatants' capacity to stimulate incorporation of 14C-glucosamine by macrophages in vitro. No increase of glucose or leucine transport by macrophages was observed in the absence of appropriate antigen stimulation in vivo or in vitro. We previously showed that a phagocytic stimulus results in a significant increase in hexose transport by normal macrophages; leucine transport by these same cells was unaltered after phagocytosis. In contrast, immunologically activated macrophages do not transport measurably more 2-deoxy-C-glucose after particle ingestion; activation or the phagocytic stimulus enhance 2-deoxy-C-glucose uptake to approximately the same extent. Analysis of nutrilite transport kinetics revealed that immunologic activation of macrophages increases the initial velocity (V1) and Vmax but does not change the Km values of

  11. Identification of Caspase-6 as a New Regulator of Alternatively Activated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongfang; Shi, Qian; Chen, Bing; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Xinda; Li, Long; Huang, Yahong; Ji, Jianguo; Shen, Pingping

    2016-08-12

    Alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) play essential roles in the promotion of tissue remodeling, vasculogenesis, and tumor progression; however, the detailed mechanisms underlying the activation of AAMs remain largely unknown. Here, by using quantitative proteomic analysis, we identified 62 proteins that were up-regulated in IL-4-induced macrophages. Among these, Caspase-6 was increased significantly. Caspase-6 is important in the apoptotic signaling pathway; however, its role in non-apoptosis is also reported. Here, we first examined the non-apoptotic role of Caspase-6 in the alternative activation of macrophages after administration of IL-4, 4T1 tumor conditional medium, or co-culture with 4T1 cells. Both treatments promoted alternative activation of RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages, whereas disruption of caspase-6 expression and activity could markedly suppress the biomarker levels of AAMs. Overexpression of Caspase-6 could significantly promote the activation of AAMs. Importantly, we further present evidence that caspase-6 could regulate breast cancer cell invasion by modulating MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in 4T1 tumor-associated macrophages, as ablation of protein levels or activity of caspase-6 suppressed tumor cell invasion in vitro In conclusion, the observed results markedly expanded our views of the dynamic changes in protein composition during alternative activation of macrophages, and they revealed a critical new role of caspase-6 in regulating this cellular biological process, which suggested that caspase-6 might be a key nod molecule to regulate immunological steady-state and be a therapeutic candidate for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:27325699

  12. Binding and activation of major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient macrophages by staphylococcal exotoxins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Macrophages from C2D transgenic mice deficient in the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II proteins were used to identify binding sites for superantigens distinct from the MHC class II molecule. Iodinated staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB) and exfoliative toxins A and B (ETA and ETB) bound to C2D macrophages in a concentration-dependent and competitive manner. All four toxins increased F-actin concentration within 30 s of their addition to C2D macrophages, indicating that signal transduction occurred in response to toxin in the absence of class II MHC. Furthermore, ETA, ETB, SEA, and, to a lesser extent, SEB induced C2D macrophages to produce interleukin 6. Several molecular species on C2D macrophages with molecular masses of 140, 97, 61, 52, 43, and 37 kDa bound SEA in immunoprecipitation experiments. These data indicate the presence of novel, functionally active toxin binding sites on murine macrophages distinct from MHC class II molecules.

  13. Enhancement of phagocytotic activity by prion protein in PrP-deficient macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Uraki, Ryuta; Sakudo, Akikazu; Ando, Saeko; Kitani, Hiroshi; Onodera, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    Macrophages, especially follicular dendritic cells, contribute to the pathogenesis of prion diseases by accumulating an abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrPSc), which is converted from the cellular isoform of prion protein (PrPC). As information on the function of PrPC in macrophages is limited, we have established a prion protein (PrP) gene (Prnp)-deficient macrophage cell line from the bone marrow of ZrchI Prnp-/- mice. These cells expressed macrophage specific proteins (F4/80 and MOMA-2) and displayed phagocytotic properties. The Prnp-/- macrophage cell line (MplZ) showed shorter pseudopodium extension and less phagocytotic activity than a Prnp+/+ macrophage cell line (MWF). In addition, the MplZ cells were more sensitive to serum deprivation than the MWF cells and underwent apoptotic cell death in these conditions. These findings suggest that PrPC enhances the incorporation of materials possibly including PrPSc and decreases the sensitivity of cells to oxidative stress, which may be induced by PrPSc accumulation. PMID:20818492

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Triggers Macrophage Autophagy To Escape Intracellular Killing by Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qiuchan; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Yuanqing; Li, Meiyu; Li, Dandan; Huang, Xi; Wu, Yongjian; Pu, Jieying

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of the inflammasome has recently been identified to be a critical event in the initiation of inflammation. However, its role in bacterial killing remains unclear. Our study demonstrates that Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection induces the assembly of the NLRP3 inflammasome and the sequential secretion of caspase1 and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in human macrophages. More importantly, activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome reduces the killing of P. aeruginosa in human macrophages, without affecting the generation of antimicrobial peptides, reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide. In addition, our results demonstrate that P. aeruginosa infection increases the amount of the LC3-II protein and triggers the formation of autophagosomes in human macrophages. The P. aeruginosa-induced autophagy was enhanced by overexpression of NLRP3, ASC, or caspase1 but was reduced by knockdown of these core molecules of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Treatment with IL-1β enhanced autophagy in human macrophages. More importantly, IL-1β decreased the macrophage-mediated killing of P. aeruginosa, whereas knockdown of ATG7 or Beclin1 restored the IL-1β-mediated suppression of bacterial killing. Collectively, our study explores a novel mechanism employed by P. aeruginosa to escape from phagocyte killing and may provide a better understanding of the interaction between P. aeruginosa and host immune cells, including macrophages. PMID:26467446

  15. Immunostimulatory activity of polysaccharides isolated from Caulerpa lentillifera on macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Reiko; Ida, Tomoaki; Ihara, Hideshi; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    2012-01-01

    Polysaccharides were extracted from Caulerpa lentillifera by treating with water and then purified by size-exclusion chromatography. The purified polysaccharides, termed SP1, were found to be sulfated xylogalactans with a molecular mass of more than 100 kDa. Adding SP1 to murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells increased the production of nitric oxide (NO) in a dose-dependent manner. NO was found by immunoblotting and RT-PCR analyses to be synthesized by an inducible NO synthase. SP1 caused the degradation of IκB-α and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB subunit p65 in macrophage cells. SP1 also increased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). These results demonstrate that SP1 activated macrophage cells via both the NF-κB and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. Moreover, SP1 increased the expression of various genes encoding cytokines, and the phagocytic activity of macrophage cells. These combined results show that SP1 immunostimulated the activity of macrophage cells. PMID:22451391

  16. Classically Activated Macrophages Use Stable Microtubules for Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Hanania, Raed; Song Sun, He; Xu, Kewei; Pustylnik, Sofia; Jeganathan, Sujeeve; Harrison, Rene E.

    2012-01-01

    As major effector cells of the innate immune response, macrophages must adeptly migrate from blood to infected tissues. Endothelial transmigration is accomplished by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-induced degradation of basement membrane and extracellular matrix components. The classical activation of macrophages with LPS and IFN-γ causes enhanced microtubule (MT) stabilization and secretion of MMPs. Macrophages up-regulate MMP-9 expression and secretion upon immunological challenge and require its activity for migration during the inflammatory response. However, the dynamics of MMP-9 production and intracellular distribution as well as the mechanisms responsible for its trafficking are unknown. Using immunofluorescent imaging, we localized intracellular MMP-9 to small Golgi-derived cytoplasmic vesicles that contained calreticulin and protein-disulfide isomerase in activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. We demonstrated vesicular organelles of MMP-9 aligned along stable subsets of MTs and showed that selective modulation of MT dynamics contributes to the enhanced trafficking of MMP-9 extracellularly. We found a Rab3D-dependent association of MMP-9 vesicles with the molecular motor kinesin, whose association with the MT network was greatly enhanced after macrophage activation. Finally, we implicated kinesin 5B and 3B isoforms in the effective trafficking of MMP-9 extracellularly. PMID:22270361

  17. IL-1β production is dependent on the activation of purinergic receptors and NLRP3 pathway in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, Thomas; Robert, Sacha; Loyer, Pascal; Victoni, Tatiana; Bodin, Aude; Ribault, Catherine; Gleonnec, Florence; Couillin, Isabelle; Boichot, Elisabeth; Lagente, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    The Nod-like receptor family protein 3 (NLRP3)-inflammasome pathway is known to be activated by danger signals such as monosodium urate (MSU). We investigated the role of P2 purinergic receptors in the activation of NLRP3-inflammasome pathway after MSU treatment of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). After initial stimulation with a low concentration of LPS (0.1 µg/ml), a 6 h treatment with MSU crystals (250, 500, and 1000 µg/ml) induced the MDMs to release IL-1β, IL-1α, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the caspase 1 inhibitor Z-YVAD-FMK and the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074Me reduced production of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner after LPS + MSU treatment. We used real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR to show that treatment with LPS and MSU (500 µg/ml) induced significantly greater expression of NLRP3 and IL-1β than after treatment with LPS. We also found that MSU treatment induced P2X purinergic receptor 7 (P2X7R) mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, addition of the P2X7 purinergic receptor antagonist A-740003 significantly impeded IL-1β production and pro-IL-1β cleavage after treatment with LPS + MSU. Remarkably, RNA silencing of P2X7R (but not P2X4R) inhibited the release of IL-1β and other M1 macrophage cytokines (such as IL-1α, IL-6, and TNF-α) from MDMs stimulated with LPS + MSU. Taken as a whole, our results show that P2 purinergic receptors and the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway are involved in the secretion of IL-1β from MSU-stimulated human macrophages. This pathway may constitute a novel therapeutic target for controlling the inflammatory process in several associated pathologies. PMID:26116704

  18. Cripto-1 modulates macrophage cytokine secretion and phagocytic activity via NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-mei; Bao, Yong-Li; Yu, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-meng; Song, Zhen-Bo

    2016-02-01

    Cripto-1 is an oncogenic protein belonging to the epidermal growth factor–Cripto-1/FRL-1/Cryptic family. It has important roles in tumor formation and metastasis, but its effects on the immune system are unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Cripto-1 overexpression on macrophage activities and examined the underlying mechanisms. A cell line stably overexpressing Cripto-1 was developed. The culture supernatant from this cell line was collected and used to condition macrophages (RAW264.7, THP-1, and primary mouse macrophages) for various times. Exposure to this supernatant significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 and of three pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, and IL-1β), but did not affect the expression of transforming growth factor-β, another anti-inflammatory cytokine. Exposure to this supernatant also enhanced macrophage phagocytosis of chicken erythrocytes and yeast cells. Similar effects were observed in macrophages stimulated with purified Cripto-1 protein. Mechanistic experiments revealed that Cripto-1 activated nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling by inducing IκB kinase phosphorylation and p65 nuclear translocation. Pretreatment with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a specific NF-κB inhibitor, inhibited Cripto-1-induced cytokine secretion and phagocytosis of macrophages. Taken together, our present findings suggest that Cripto-1 enhances macrophage phagocytic activity and upregulates the production of anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines via the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26476731

  19. Full Spectrum of LPS Activation in Alveolar Macrophages of Healthy Volunteers by Whole Transcriptomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yutong; Zhao, Jing; Donahoe, Michael P.; Barge, Suchitra; Horne, William T.; Kolls, Jay K.; McVerry, Bryan J.; Birukova, Anastasiya; Tighe, Robert M.; Foster, W. Michael; Hollingsworth, John; Ray, Anuradha; Mallampalli, Rama; Ray, Prabir; Lee, Janet S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding macrophage activation, little is known regarding how human alveolar macrophages in health calibrate its transcriptional response to canonical TLR4 activation. In this study, we examined the full spectrum of LPS activation and determined whether the transcriptomic profile of human alveolar macrophages is distinguished by a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF)-dominant type I interferon signature. Bronchoalveolar lavage macrophages were obtained from healthy volunteers, stimulated in the presence or absence of ultrapure LPS in vitro, and whole transcriptomic profiling was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). LPS induced a robust type I interferon transcriptional response and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted interferon regulatory factor (IRF)7 as the top upstream regulator of 89 known gene targets. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase (USP)-18, a negative regulator of interferon α/β responses, was among the top up-regulated genes in addition to IL10 and USP41, a novel gene with no known biological function but with high sequence homology to USP18. We determined whether IRF-7 and USP-18 can influence downstream macrophage effector cytokine production such as IL-10. We show that IRF-7 siRNA knockdown enhanced LPS-induced IL-10 production in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and USP-18 overexpression attenuated LPS-induced production of IL-10 in RAW264.7 cells. Quantitative PCR confirmed upregulation of USP18, USP41, IL10, and IRF7. An independent cohort confirmed LPS induction of USP41 and IL10 genes. These results suggest that IRF-7 and predicted downstream target USP18, both elements of a type I interferon gene signature identified by RNA-Seq, may serve to fine-tune early cytokine response by calibrating IL-10 production in human alveolar macrophages. PMID:27434537

  20. Full Spectrum of LPS Activation in Alveolar Macrophages of Healthy Volunteers by Whole Transcriptomic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Pinilla-Vera, Miguel; Xiong, Zeyu; Zhao, Yutong; Zhao, Jing; Donahoe, Michael P; Barge, Suchitra; Horne, William T; Kolls, Jay K; McVerry, Bryan J; Birukova, Anastasiya; Tighe, Robert M; Foster, W Michael; Hollingsworth, John; Ray, Anuradha; Mallampalli, Rama; Ray, Prabir; Lee, Janet S

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding macrophage activation, little is known regarding how human alveolar macrophages in health calibrate its transcriptional response to canonical TLR4 activation. In this study, we examined the full spectrum of LPS activation and determined whether the transcriptomic profile of human alveolar macrophages is distinguished by a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF)-dominant type I interferon signature. Bronchoalveolar lavage macrophages were obtained from healthy volunteers, stimulated in the presence or absence of ultrapure LPS in vitro, and whole transcriptomic profiling was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). LPS induced a robust type I interferon transcriptional response and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted interferon regulatory factor (IRF)7 as the top upstream regulator of 89 known gene targets. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase (USP)-18, a negative regulator of interferon α/β responses, was among the top up-regulated genes in addition to IL10 and USP41, a novel gene with no known biological function but with high sequence homology to USP18. We determined whether IRF-7 and USP-18 can influence downstream macrophage effector cytokine production such as IL-10. We show that IRF-7 siRNA knockdown enhanced LPS-induced IL-10 production in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and USP-18 overexpression attenuated LPS-induced production of IL-10 in RAW264.7 cells. Quantitative PCR confirmed upregulation of USP18, USP41, IL10, and IRF7. An independent cohort confirmed LPS induction of USP41 and IL10 genes. These results suggest that IRF-7 and predicted downstream target USP18, both elements of a type I interferon gene signature identified by RNA-Seq, may serve to fine-tune early cytokine response by calibrating IL-10 production in human alveolar macrophages. PMID:27434537

  1. Cathepsin L maturation and activity is impaired in macrophages harboring M. avium and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Rajeev M; Mampe, Stephanie; Shaffer, Brian; Erickson, Ann H; Bryant, Paula

    2006-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages demonstrate diminished capacity to present antigens via class II MHC molecules. Since successful class II MHC-restricted antigen presentation relies on the actions of endocytic proteases, we asked whether the activities of cathepsins (Cat) B, S and L-three major lysosomal cysteine proteases-are modulated in macrophages infected with pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. Infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with either Mycobacterium avium or M. tuberculosis had no obvious effect on Cat B or Cat S activity. In contrast, the activity of Cat L was altered in infected cells. Specifically, whereas the 24-kDa two-chain mature form of active Cat L predominated in uninfected cells, we observed an increase in the steady-state activity of the precursor single-chain (30 kDa) and 25-kDa two-chain forms of the enzyme in cells infected with either M. avium or M. tuberculosis. Pulse-chase analyses revealed that maturation of nascent, single-chain Cat L into the 25-kDa two-chain form was impaired in infected macrophages, and that maturation into the 24-kDa two-chain form did not occur. Consistent with these data, M. avium infection inhibited the IFNgamma-induced secretion of active two-chain Cat L by macrophages. Viable bacilli were not required to disrupt Cat L maturation, suggesting that a constitutively expressed mycobacterial component was responsible. The absence of the major active form of lysosomal Cat L in M. avium- and M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages may influence the types of T cell epitopes generated in these antigen-presenting cells, and/or the rate of class II MHC peptide loading. PMID:16636015

  2. INTERLEUKIN-4- AND INTERLEUKIN-13-MEDIATED ALTERNATIVELY ACTIVATED MACROPHAGES: ROLES IN HOMEOSTASIS AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyken, Steven J.; Locksley, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    The macrophage, a versatile cell type prominently involved in host defense and immunity, assumes a distinct state of alternative activation in the context of polarized type 2 immune responses such as allergic inflammation and helminth infection. This alternatively activated phenotype is induced by the canonical type 2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, which mediate expression of several characteristic markers along with a dramatic shift in macrophage metabolic pathways that influence surrounding cells and tissues. We discuss recent advances in the understanding of IL-4- and IL-13-mediated alternatively activated macrophages and type 2 immune responses; such advances have led to an expanded appreciation for functions of these cells beyond immunity, including maintenance of physiologic homeostasis and tissue repair. PMID:23298208

  3. Activation of macrophages by the ophiopogon polysaccharide liposome from the root tuber of Ophiopogon japonicus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjing; Hu, Wenjie; Meng, Kai; Yang, Lumiao; Zhang, Weimin; Song, Xiaoping; Qu, Xiaohao; Zhang, Yueyang; Ma, Lin; Fan, Yunpeng

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the immunomodulatory effects of ophiopogon polysaccharide liposome (OPL) on macrophages in vitro. The phagocytic activity, the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the level of cytokines, chemokines and the expression of CD14 and MHC-II costimulatory molecules were measured. Results showed that OPL could significantly improve the phagocytic activity and the level of IL-1β, TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP-1β, promote the secretion of NO and iNOS, and enhance the expression of CD14 and MHC-II costimulatory molecules in the peritoneal macrophages of mice compared with ophiopogon polysaccharide (OP). Altogether, these results suggested that OPL could activate macrophages, and the efficacy was significantly superior to OP. Therefore, OPL would be exploited in a potent immunomodulators. Moreover, it also provided the theoretical basis for further studying the mechanism of OPL on improving the immune response. PMID:27311507

  4. Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Upregulating Classical Activation Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-07

    Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection are central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3–4 months) and aged (14–15 months) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in the extent of recruitment of macrophages into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in levels of proteins linked to immune cell pathways under basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways upregulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to the formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins is dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases the levels of many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice

  5. Neotuberostemonine attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by suppressing the recruitment and activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Juan; Cheng, Si; Feng, Tianlong; Wu, Yan; Xie, Weina; Zhang, Mian; Xu, Xianghong; Zhang, Chaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Neotuberostemonine (NTS) is one of the main antitussive alkaloids in the root of Stemona tuberosa Lour. This study aimed to investigate the effects of NTS on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice and the underlying mechanism. After BLM administration, NTS were orally administered to mice at 20 and 40mg/kg per day from days 8 to 21, with nintedanib as a positive control. The effect of NTS on BLM-induced mice was assessed via histopathological examination by HE and Masson's trichrome staining, TGF-β1 level and macrophage recruitment by immunohistochemical staining, expression of profibrotic media and M1/M2 polarization by western blot. RAW 264.7 cells were used to evaluate whether NTS (1, 10, 100μM) directly affected macrophages. The results revealed that NTS treatment significantly ameliorated lung histopathological changes and decreased inflammatory cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The over-expression of collagen, α-SMA and TGF-β1 was reduced by NTS. Furthermore, NTS markedly lowered the expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 while raised the expression of MMP-9. A further analysis showed that NTS was able to decrease the recruitment of macrophages and to inhibit the M2 polarization in mice lung tissues. The experiment in vitro showed that NTS significantly reduced the arginase-1 (marker for M2) expression in a dose-dependent manner but down-regulated the iNOS (marker for M1) expression only at 100μM. In conclusion, our study demonstrated for the first time that NTS has a significant protective effect on BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis through suppressing the recruitment and M2 polarization of macrophages. PMID:27144994

  6. The Histone Methyltransferase Smyd2 Is a Negative Regulator of Macrophage Activation by Suppressing Interleukin 6 (IL-6) and Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNF-α) Production

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guiliang; Liu, Guilin; Xiong, Sidong; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Xi; Zheng, Biao

    2015-01-01

    SET and MYND domain-containing 2 (Smyd2), a histone 3 lysine 4- and histone 3 lysine 36 (H3K36)-specific methyltransferase, plays critical roles in cardiac development and tumorigenesis. However, the role of Smyd2 in immunity and inflammation remains poorly understood. In this study, we report that Smyd2 is a novel negative regulator for macrophage activation and M1 polarization. Elevated Smyd2 expression suppresses the production of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-6 and TNF, and inhibits the expression of important cell surface molecules, including major MHC-II and costimulatory molecules. Furthermore, macrophages with high Smyd2 expression inhibit Th-17 cell differentiation but promote regulatory T cell differentiation as a result of increased TGF-β production and decreased IL-6 secretion. In macrophages, Smyd2 specifically facilitates H3K36 dimethylation at Tnf and Il6 promoters to suppress their transcription and inhibits NF-κB and ERK signaling. Therefore, our data demonstrate that epigenetic modification by Smyd2-mediated H3K36 dimethylation at Tnf and Il6 promoters plays an important role in the regulation of macrophage activation during inflammation. PMID:25583990

  7. TIGIT negatively regulates inflammation by altering macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Lu, Pu-Han; Liu, Lei; Fang, Ze-Min; Duan, Wu; Liu, Zhe-Long; Wang, Cong-Yi; Zhou, Ping; Yu, Xue-Feng; He, Wen-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages function as an essential component of innate immune system, contributing to both the initiation and appropriate resolution of inflammation. The exposure of macrophages to the microbial products, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), can strongly shift the balance between tissue homeostasis and inflammation in favor of causing systemic damage, in which macrophage M1 polarization play important roles. Strategies aiming at restoring the balance of macrophage polarization remain to be further explored. Herein, we have demonstrated that poliovirus receptor (PVR), the receptor of TIGIT, was dramatically upregulated on the surface of mouse peritoneal macrophages when exposed to LPS. TIGIT-Fc fusion protein not only inhibited the macrophage activation, but also skewed M1/M2 balance toward an anti-inflammatory profile, especially enhanced the secretion of IL-10. The activation of TIGIT/PVR pathway in macrophages correlated with increased nuclear translocation of c-Maf, which promotes IL-10 transcription. Treatment with fibroblasts stably secreting TIGIT-Fc fusion protein significantly reversed the lethal and sublethal endotoxic shock, which facilitated peritoneal