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Sample records for activated mammalian target

  1. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Activation Increases Axonal Growth Capacity of Injured Peripheral Nerves*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Namiko; Borson, Steven H.; Gambello, Michael J.; Wang, Fan; Cavalli, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    Unlike neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), injured neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) can regenerate their axons and reinnervate their targets. However, functional recovery in the PNS often remains suboptimal, especially in cases of severe damage. The lack of regenerative ability of CNS neurons has been linked to down-regulation of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. We report here that PNS dorsal root ganglial neurons (DRGs) activate mTOR following damage and that this activity enhances axonal growth capacity. Furthermore, genetic up-regulation of mTOR activity by deletion of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) in DRGs is sufficient to enhance axonal growth capacity in vitro and in vivo. We further show that mTOR activity is linked to the expression of GAP-43, a crucial component of axonal outgrowth. However, although TSC2 deletion in DRGs facilitates axonal regrowth, it leads to defects in target innervation. Thus, whereas manipulation of mTOR activity could provide new strategies to stimulate nerve regeneration in the PNS, fine control of mTOR activity is required for proper target innervation. PMID:20615870

  2. Mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is required for cartilage development

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yingjie; Yang, Xu; Yang, Wentian; Charbonneau, Cherie; Chen, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stress regulates development by modulating cell signaling and gene expression. However, the cytoplasmic components mediating mechanotransduction remain unclear. In this study, elimination of muscle contraction during chicken embryonic development resulted in a reduction in the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the cartilaginous growth plate. Inhibition of mTOR activity led to significant inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation, cartilage tissue growth, and expression of chondrogenic genes, including Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a critical mediator of mechanotransduction. Conversely, cyclic loading (1 Hz, 5% matrix deformation) of embryonic chicken growth plate chondrocytes in 3-dimensional (3D) collagen scaffolding induced sustained activation of mTOR. Mechanical activation of mTOR occurred in serum-free medium, indicating that it is independent of growth factor or nutrients. Treatment of chondrocytes with Rapa abolished mechanical activation of cell proliferation and Ihh gene expression. Cyclic loading of chondroprogenitor cells deficient in SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp2) further enhanced mechanical activation of mTOR, cell proliferation, and chondrogenic gene expression. This result suggests that Shp2 is an antagonist of mechanotransduction through inhibition of mTOR activity. Our data demonstrate that mechanical activation of mTOR is necessary for cell proliferation, chondrogenesis, and cartilage growth during bone development, and that mTOR is an essential mechanotransduction component modulated by Shp2 in the cytoplasm.—Guan, Y., Yang, X., Yang, W., Charbonneau, C., Chen, Q. Mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is required for cartilage development. PMID:25002119

  3. A spectrophotometric assay for routine measurement of mammalian target of rapamycin activity in cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Dekter, Hinke E; Romijn, Fred P H T M; Temmink, Wouter P M; van Pelt, Johannes; de Fijter, Johan W; Smit, Nico P M

    2010-08-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important mediator in the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. mTOR is the target of immunosuppressive drugs, such as rapamycin and everolimus, that are used in transplant patients but also for the treatment of various cancers. We have developed a method for mTOR activity measurement in cell lysates that measures the phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) protocol. Using an optimized lysis composition, activity could be measured in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from blood. For the PBMCs, intra- and interassay variations of 7 and 10%, respectively, were found using one lot number of the kit. With different lot numbers, the interassay variation increased up to 21%. Activity remained constant for PBMC pool samples on storage for a period of more than 7 months. Activity could also be measured in CD3+ T-cells isolated from blood. In vitro experiments revealed maximum mTOR inhibition of 30% in PBMCs and 44% in T-cells. The in vitro inhibition in PBMCs could also be demonstrated by Western blotting. The mTOR activity measurements may be used to show in vivo inhibition in renal allograft patients during everolimus treatment and to study mTOR activity in various (tumor) cell types.

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury Stimulates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation via Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Seekaew, Pich

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neural stem cells in the adult brain possess the ability to remain quiescent until needed in tissue homeostasis or repair. It was previously shown that traumatic brain injury (TBI) stimulated neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in the adult hippocampus, indicating an innate repair mechanism, but it is unknown how TBI promotes NSC proliferation. In the present study, we observed dramatic activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the hippocampus of mice with TBI from controlled cortical impact (CCI). The peak of mTORC1 activation in the hippocampal subgranular zone, where NSCs reside, is 24–48 h after trauma, correlating with the peak of TBI-enhanced NSC proliferation. By use of a Nestin-GFP transgenic mouse, in which GFP is ectopically expressed in the NSCs, we found that TBI activated mTORC1 in NSCs. With 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine labeling, we observed that TBI increased mTORC1 activation in proliferating NSCs. Furthermore, administration of rapamycin abolished TBI-promoted NSC proliferation. Taken together, these data indicate that mTORC1 activation is required for NSC proliferation postinjury, and thus might serve as a therapeutic target for interventions to augment neurogenesis for brain repair after TBI. PMID:27822507

  5. P-Rex1 links mammalian target of rapamycin signaling to Rac activation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Negrete, Ivette; Carretero-Ortega, Jorge; Rosenfeldt, Hans; Hernández-García, Ricardo; Calderón-Salinas, J Victor; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Gutkind, J Silvio; Vázquez-Prado, José

    2007-08-10

    Polarized cell migration results from the transduction of extra-cellular cues promoting the activation of Rho GTPases with the intervention of multidomain proteins, including guanine exchange factors. P-Rex1 and P-Rex2 are Rac GEFs connecting Gbetagamma and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling to Rac activation. Their complex architecture suggests their regulation by protein-protein interactions. Novel mechanisms of activation of Rho GTPases are associated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine/threonine kinase known as a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation. Recently, two independent multiprotein complexes containing mTOR have been described. mTORC1 links to the classical rapamycin-sensitive pathways relevant for protein synthesis; mTORC2 links to the activation of Rho GTPases and cytoskeletal events via undefined mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that P-Rex1 and P-Rex2 establish, through their tandem DEP domains, interactions with mTOR, suggesting their potential as effectors in the signaling of mTOR to Rac activation and cell migration. This possibility was consistent with the effect of dominant-negative constructs and short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of P-Rex1, which decreased mTOR-dependent leucine-induced activation of Rac and cell migration. Rapamycin, a widely used inhibitor of mTOR signaling, did not inhibit Rac activity and cell migration induced by leucine, indicating that P-Rex1, which we found associated to both mTOR complexes, is only active when in the mTORC2 complex. mTORC2 has been described as the catalytic complex that phosphorylates AKT/PKB at Ser-473 and elicits activation of Rho GTPases and cytoskeletal reorganization. Thus, P-Rex1 links mTOR signaling to Rac activation and cell migration.

  6. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks: effects of dietary leucine and age.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huiling; Zheng, Aijuan; Liu, Guohua; Chang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is necessary for cellular protein synthesis regulation. Leucine was reported to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in mammalian embryos and neonates, but in higher animals (chickens) the effect of dietary leucine on mTOR signaling is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effects of dietary leucine and age on mRNA expression and phosphorylation of mTOR as well as its downstream targets, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) in chick pectoral muscles. One hundred eighty newly hatched male chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary leucine treatment groups (1.43, 1.73, and 2.03% leucine) for 14 d, respectively. Each treatment group consisted of 6 cages with 10 chicks each. On d 3, 7, and 14, plasma insulin and leucine were measured and target gene expression and phosphorylation was assessed. Dietary leucine influenced plasma leucine but not insulin, and plasma leucine and insulin declined with chick age. The mTOR, S6K1, and 4E-BP1 mRNA expression and phosphorylation within chick pectoral muscles were upregulated with increased dietary leucine but downregulated with increased chick age. Thus, high dietary leucine activates target of rapamycin signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks to stimulate muscle protein synthesis, and this pathway is attenuated with aging.

  7. Temsirolimus in advanced leiomyosarcomas: patterns of response and correlation with the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine; Kind, Michèle; Stoeckle, Eberhard; Jones, Natalie; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Bui, Binh

    2011-06-01

    Preclinical data have indicated that alteration of PTEN and activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway play a crucial role in the oncogenesis of leiomyosarcoma. The objective of this exploratory study was to assess the clinical role of mTOR inhibition in patients with advanced leiomyosarcoma refractory to standard chemotherapy. Patients with advanced leiomyosarcoma were treated with temsirolimus and consented to retrospective collection of data from their medical records and analysis of archival tumor specimens. Tumor response was determined according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumor (RECIST) and Choi criteria. Tumors were assessed for immunohistochemical evidence of PTEN loss of expression and mTOR activation. Six patients participated in the study. According to the RECIST, three patients had stable disease and three patients had progressive disease. The three patients with RECIST stable disease had partial response according to the Choi criteria. Partial response according to the Choi criteria was associated with clinical improvement and biological signs of temsirolimus antitumor activity. The immunohistochemical status of PTEN and phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein was not predictive of the outcome. This exploratory study indicates antitumor activity of temsirolimus in leiomyosarcoma, possibly through a mechanism involving aberration of the PTEN gene. Further investigations of the phosphoinositide 3-kinases/PTEN/Akt/mTOR pathway are needed to explore the role of mTOR inhibitors, either alone or in combination, in patients with advanced sarcoma.

  8. Clustering of mammalian Hox genes with other H3K27me3 targets within an active nuclear domain.

    PubMed

    Vieux-Rochas, Maxence; Fabre, Pierre J; Leleu, Marion; Duboule, Denis; Noordermeer, Daan

    2015-04-14

    Embryogenesis requires the precise activation and repression of many transcriptional regulators. The Polycomb group proteins and the associated H3K27me3 histone mark are essential to maintain the inactive state of many of these genes. Mammalian Hox genes are targets of Polycomb proteins and form local 3D clusters centered on the H3K27me3 mark. More distal contacts have also been described, yet their selectivity, dynamics, and relation to other layers of chromatin organization remained elusive. We report that repressed Hox genes form mutual intra- and interchromosomal interactions with other genes located in strong domains labeled by H3K27me3. These interactions occur in a central and active nuclear environment that consists of the HiC compartment A, away from peripheral lamina-associated domains. Interactions are independent of nearby H3K27me3-marked loci and determined by chromosomal distance and cell-type-specific scaling factors, thus inducing a moderate reorganization during embryogenesis. These results provide a simplified view of nuclear organization whereby Polycomb proteins may have evolved to repress genes located in gene-dense regions whose position is restricted to central, active, nuclear environments.

  9. Anticancer peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) inhibitors regulate the autophagy flux and the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuji; Li, Pingxin; Wang, Shu; Hu, Jing; Chen, Xiangyun Amy; Wu, Jianhui; Fisher, Megan; Oshaben, Kira; Zhao, Na; Gu, Ying; Wang, Dong; Chen, Gong; Wang, Yanming

    2012-07-27

    Tumor suppressor genes are frequently silenced in cancer cells by enzymes catalyzing epigenetic histone modifications. The peptidylarginine deiminase family member PAD4 (also called PADI4) is markedly overexpressed in a majority of human cancers, suggesting that PAD4 is a putative target for cancer treatment. Here, we have generated novel PAD inhibitors with low micromolar IC(50) in PAD activity and cancer cell growth inhibition. The lead compound YW3-56 alters the expression of genes controlling the cell cycle and cell death, including SESN2 that encodes an upstream inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway. Guided by the gene expression profile analyses with YW3-56, we found that PAD4 functions as a corepressor of p53 to regulate SESN2 expression by histone citrullination in cancer cells. Consistent with the mTORC1 inhibition by SESN2, the phosphorylation of its substrates including p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and 4E-BP1 was decreased. Furthermore, macroautophagy is perturbed after YW3-56 treatment in cancer cells. In a mouse xenograft model, YW3-56 demonstrates cancer growth inhibition activity with little if any detectable adverse effect to vital organs, whereas a combination of PAD4 and histone deacetylase inhibitors further decreases tumor growth. Taken together, our work found that PAD4 regulates the mTORC1 signaling pathway and that PAD inhibitors are potential anticancer reagents that activate tumor suppressor gene expression alone or in combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  10. Neuroprotective role of Sirt1 in mammalian models of Huntington's disease through activation of multiple Sirt1 targets.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mali; Wang, Jiawei; Fu, Jinrong; Du, Lin; Jeong, Hyunkyung; West, Tim; Xiang, Lan; Peng, Qi; Hou, Zhipeng; Cai, Huan; Seredenina, Tamara; Arbez, Nicolas; Zhu, Shanshan; Sommers, Katherine; Qian, Jennifer; Zhang, Jiangyang; Mori, Susumu; Yang, X William; Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Aja, Susan; Moran, Timothy H; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Mattson, Mark P; Cichewicz, Robert H; Ross, Christopher A; Holtzman, David M; Krainc, Dimitri; Duan, Wenzhen

    2011-12-18

    Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat in huntingtin (HTT) protein. We previously showed that calorie restriction ameliorated Huntington's disease pathogenesis and slowed disease progression in mice that model Huntington's disease (Huntington's disease mice). We now report that overexpression of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), a mediator of the beneficial metabolic effects of calorie restriction, protects neurons against mutant HTT toxicity, whereas reduction of Sirt1 exacerbates mutant HTT toxicity. Overexpression of Sirt1 improves motor function, reduces brain atrophy and attenuates mutant-HTT-mediated metabolic abnormalities in Huntington's disease mice. Further mechanistic studies suggested that Sirt1 prevents the mutant-HTT-induced decline in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations and the signaling of its receptor, TrkB, and restores dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, 32 kDa (DARPP32) concentrations in the striatum. Sirt1 deacetylase activity is required for Sirt1-mediated neuroprotection in Huntington's disease cell models. Notably, we show that mutant HTT interacts with Sirt1 and inhibits Sirt1 deacetylase activity, which results in hyperacetylation of Sirt1 substrates such as forkhead box O3A (Foxo3a), thereby inhibiting its pro-survival function. Overexpression of Sirt1 counteracts the mutant-HTT-induced deacetylase deficit, enhances the deacetylation of Foxo3a and facilitates cell survival. These findings show a neuroprotective role for Sirt1 in mammalian Huntington's disease models and open new avenues for the development of neuroprotective strategies in Huntington's disease.

  11. Loss of the repressor REST in uterine fibroids promotes aberrant G protein-coupled receptor 10 expression and activates mammalian target of rapamycin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Binny V.; Koohestani, Faezeh; McWilliams, Michelle; Colvin, Arlene; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Kinsey, William H.; Nowak, Romana A.; Nothnick, Warren B.; Chennathukuzhi, Vargheese M.

    2013-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are the most common tumors of the female reproductive tract, occurring in up to 77% of reproductive-aged women, yet molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. A role for atypically activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids has been suggested in several studies. We identified that G protein-coupled receptor 10 [GPR10, a putative signaling protein upstream of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase–protein kinase B/AKT–mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT–mTOR) pathway] is aberrantly expressed in uterine fibroids. The activation of GPR10 by its cognate ligand, prolactin releasing peptide, promotes PI3K–AKT–mTOR pathways and cell proliferation specifically in cultured primary leiomyoma cells. Additionally, we report that RE1 suppressing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor (REST/NRSF), a known tumor suppressor, transcriptionally represses GPR10 in the normal myometrium, and that the loss of REST in fibroids permits GPR10 expression. Importantly, mice overexpressing human GPR10 in the myometrium develop myometrial hyperplasia with excessive extracellular matrix deposition, a hallmark of uterine fibroids. We demonstrate previously unrecognized roles for GPR10 and its upstream regulator REST in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids. Importantly, we report a unique genetically modified mouse model for a gene that is misexpressed in uterine fibroids. PMID:23284171

  12. Recent advances in targeted genome engineering in mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin

    2012-09-01

    Targeted genome engineering enables researchers to disrupt, insert, or replace a genomic sequence precisely at a predetermined locus. One well-established technology to edit a mammalian genome is known as gene targeting, which is based on the homologous recombination (HR) mechanism. However, the low HR frequency in mammalian cells (except for mice) prevents its wide application. To address this limitation, a custom-designed nuclease is used to introduce a site-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) on the chromosome and the subsequent repair of the DSB by the HR mechanism or the non-homologous end joining mechanism results in efficient targeted genome modifications. Engineered homing endonucleases (also called meganucleases), zinc finger nucleases, and transcription activator-like effector nucleases represent the three major classes of custom-designed nucleases that have been successfully applied in many different organisms for targeted genome engineering. This article reviews the recent developments of these genome engineering tools and highlights a few representative applications in mammalian systems. Recent advances in gene delivery strategies of these custom-designed nucleases are also briefly discussed.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and has a protective effect in a rat model of status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    SAN, YONG-ZHI; LIU, YU; ZHANG, YU; SHI, PING-PING; ZHU, YU-LAN

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) has a protective role in several neurological diseases. The present study investigated the effect of the PPAR-γ agonist, pioglitazone, on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in a rat model of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced status epilepticus (SE). The investigation proceeded in two stages. First, the course of activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in PTZ-induced SE was examined to determine the time-point of peak activity, as reflected by phopshorylated (p)-mTOR/mTOR and p-S6/S6 ratios. Subsequently, pioglitazone was administrated intragastrically to investigate its effect on the mTOR signaling pathway, through western blot and immunochemical analyses. The levels of the interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 inflammatory cytokines were detected using ELISA, and neuronal loss was observed via Nissl staining. In the first stage of experimentation, the mTOR signaling pathway was activated, and the p-mTOR/mTOR and p-S6/S6 ratios peaked on the third day. Compared with the vehicle treated-SE group, pretreatment with pioglitazone was associated with the loss of fewer neurons, lower levels of IL-1β and IL-6, and inhibition of the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, the mTOR signaling pathway was activated in the PTZ-induced SE rat model, and the PPAR-γ agonist, pioglitazone, had a neuroprotective effect, by inhibiting activation of the mTOR pathway and preventing the increase in the levels of IL-1β and IL-6. PMID:25891824

  14. The role of diacylglycerol kinase ζ and phosphatidic acid in the mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    You, Jae-Sung; Lincoln, Hannah C; Kim, Chan-Ran; Frey, John W; Goodman, Craig A; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-01-17

    The activation of mTOR signaling is essential for mechanically induced changes in skeletal muscle mass, and previous studies have suggested that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling through a phospholipase D (PLD)-dependent increase in the concentration of phosphatidic acid (PA). Consistent with this conclusion, we obtained evidence which further suggests that mechanical stimuli utilize PA as a direct upstream activator of mTOR signaling. Unexpectedly though, we found that the activation of PLD is not necessary for the mechanically induced increases in PA or mTOR signaling. Motivated by this observation, we performed experiments that were aimed at identifying the enzyme(s) that promotes the increase in PA. These experiments revealed that mechanical stimulation increases the concentration of diacylglycerol (DAG) and the activity of DAG kinases (DGKs) in membranous structures. Furthermore, using knock-out mice, we determined that the ζ isoform of DGK (DGKζ) is necessary for the mechanically induced increase in PA. We also determined that DGKζ significantly contributes to the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling, and this is likely driven by an enhanced binding of PA to mTOR. Last, we found that the overexpression of DGKζ is sufficient to induce muscle fiber hypertrophy through an mTOR-dependent mechanism, and this event requires DGKζ kinase activity (i.e. the synthesis of PA). Combined, these results indicate that DGKζ, but not PLD, plays an important role in mechanically induced increases in PA and mTOR signaling. Furthermore, this study suggests that DGKζ could be a fundamental component of the mechanism(s) through which mechanical stimuli regulate skeletal muscle mass.

  15. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin contributes to pain nociception induced in rats by BmK I, a sodium channel-specific modulator.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Hua, Li-Ming; Jiao, Yun-Lu; Ye, Pin; Fu, Jin; Cheng, Zhi-Jun; Ding, Gang; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2014-02-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is essential for maintenance of the sensitivity of certain adult sensory neurons. Here, we investigated whether the mTOR cascade is involved in scorpion envenomation-induced pain hypersensitivity in rats. The results showed that intraplantar injection of a neurotoxin from Buthus martensii Karsch, BmK I (10 μg), induced the activation of mTOR, as well as its downstream molecules p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70 S6K) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), in lumbar 5-6 dorsal root ganglia neurons on both sides in rats. The activation peaked at 2 h and recovered 1 day after injection. Compared with the control group, the ratios of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4EBP1 in three types of neurons changed significantly. The cell typology of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4E-BP1 immuno-reactive neurons also changed. Intrathecal administration of deforolimus, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, attenuated BmK I-induced pain responses (spontaneous flinching, paroxysmal pain-like behavior, and mechanical hypersensitivity). Together, these results imply that the mTOR signaling pathway is mobilized by and contributes to experimental scorpion sting-induced pain.

  16. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activation is required for the stimulation of human skeletal muscle protein synthesis by essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Jared M; Fry, Christopher S; Drummond, Micah J; Gundermann, David M; Walker, Dillon K; Glynn, Erin L; Timmerman, Kyle L; Dhanani, Shaheen; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and muscle protein synthesis during instances of amino acid surplus in humans is based solely on correlational data. Therefore, the goal of this study was to use a mechanistic approach specifically designed to determine whether increased mTORC1 activation is requisite for the stimulation of muscle protein synthesis following L-essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion in humans. Examination of muscle protein synthesis and signaling were performed on vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained from 8 young (25 ± 2 y) individuals who were studied prior to and following ingestion of 10 g of EAA during 2 separate trials in a randomized, counterbalanced design. The trials were identical except during 1 trial, participants were administered a single oral dose of a potent mTORC1 inhibitor (rapamycin) prior to EAA ingestion. In response to EAA ingestion, an ~60% increase in muscle protein synthesis was observed during the control trial, concomitant with increased phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser(2448)), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (Thr(389)), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (Thr(37/46)). In contrast, prior administration of rapamycin completely blocked the increase in muscle protein synthesis and blocked or attenuated activation of mTORC1-signaling proteins. The inhibition of muscle protein synthesis and signaling was not due to differences in either extracellular or intracellular amino acid availability, because these variables were similar between trials. These data support a fundamental role for mTORC1 activation as a key regulator of human muscle protein synthesis in response to increased EAA availability. This information will be useful in the development of evidence-based nutritional therapies targeting mTORC1 to counteract muscle wasting associated with numerous clinical conditions.

  17. Structure-Activity Analysis of Niclosamide Reveals Potential Role for Cytoplasmic pH in Control of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Bruno D.; Diering, Graham H.; Bidinosti, Michael A.; Dalal, Kush; Alain, Tommy; Balgi, Aruna D.; Forestieri, Roberto; Nodwell, Matt; Rajadurai, Charles V.; Gunaratnam, Cynthia; Tee, Andrew R.; Duong, Franck; Andersen, Raymond J.; Orlowski, John; Numata, Masayuki; Sonenberg, Nahum; Roberge, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is frequently dysregulated in cancer. Inhibition of mTORC1 is thus regarded as a promising strategy in the treatment of tumors with elevated mTORC1 activity. We have recently identified niclosamide (a Food and Drug Administration-approved antihelminthic drug) as an inhibitor of mTORC1 signaling. In the present study, we explored possible mechanisms by which niclosamide may inhibit mTORC1 signaling. We tested whether niclosamide interferes with signaling cascades upstream of mTORC1, the catalytic activity of mTOR, or mTORC1 assembly. We found that niclosamide does not impair PI3K/Akt signaling, nor does it inhibit mTORC1 kinase activity. We also found that niclosamide does not interfere with mTORC1 assembly. Previous studies in helminths suggest that niclosamide disrupts pH homeostasis of the parasite. This prompted us to investigate whether niclosamide affects the pH balance of cancer cells. Experiments in both breast cancer cells and cell-free systems demonstrated that niclosamide possesses protonophoric activity in cells and in vitro. In cells, niclosamide dissipated protons (down their concentration gradient) from lysosomes to the cytosol, effectively lowering cytoplasmic pH. Notably, analysis of five niclosamide analogs revealed that the structural features of niclosamide required for protonophoric activity are also essential for mTORC1 inhibition. Furthermore, lowering cytoplasmic pH by means other than niclosamide treatment (e.g. incubation with propionic acid or bicarbonate withdrawal) recapitulated the inhibitory effects of niclosamide on mTORC1 signaling, lending support to a possible role for cytoplasmic pH in the control of mTORC1. Our data illustrate a potential mechanism for chemical inhibition of mTORC1 signaling involving modulation of cytoplasmic pH. PMID:22474287

  18. Quercetin Inhibits Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis Involving the Suppression of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and β-catenin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Liu, Xin; Feng, Ye; Gui, Yuan; Yang, Junwei; He, Weichun; Dai, Chunsun

    2016-04-07

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in a wide variety of plants and presented in human diet, displays promising potential in preventing kidney fibroblast activation. However, whether quercetin can ameliorate kidney fibrosis in mice with obstructive nephropathy and the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. In this study, we found that administration of quercetin could largely ameliorate kidney interstitial fibrosis and macrophage accumulation in the kidneys with obstructive nephropathy. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin as well as Smad signaling were activated in the obstructive kidneys, whereas quercetin could markedly reduce their abundance except Smad3 phosphorylation. In cultured NRK-49F cells, quercetin could inhibit α-SMA and fibronectin (FN) expression induced by TGFβ1 treatment. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin and Smad signaling pathways were stimulated by TGFβ1 at a time dependent manner. Similar to those findings in the obstructive kidneys, mTORC1, mTORC2 and β-catenin, but not Smad signaling pathways were remarkably blocked by quercetin treatment. Together, these results suggest that quercetin inhibits fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis involving a combined inhibition of mTOR and β-catenin signaling transduction, which may act as a therapeutic candidate for patients with chronic kidney diseases.

  19. Quercetin Inhibits Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis Involving the Suppression of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and β-catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Liu, Xin; Feng, Ye; Gui, Yuan; Yang, Junwei; He, Weichun; Dai, Chunsun

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in a wide variety of plants and presented in human diet, displays promising potential in preventing kidney fibroblast activation. However, whether quercetin can ameliorate kidney fibrosis in mice with obstructive nephropathy and the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. In this study, we found that administration of quercetin could largely ameliorate kidney interstitial fibrosis and macrophage accumulation in the kidneys with obstructive nephropathy. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin as well as Smad signaling were activated in the obstructive kidneys, whereas quercetin could markedly reduce their abundance except Smad3 phosphorylation. In cultured NRK-49F cells, quercetin could inhibit α-SMA and fibronectin (FN) expression induced by TGFβ1 treatment. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin and Smad signaling pathways were stimulated by TGFβ1 at a time dependent manner. Similar to those findings in the obstructive kidneys, mTORC1, mTORC2 and β-catenin, but not Smad signaling pathways were remarkably blocked by quercetin treatment. Together, these results suggest that quercetin inhibits fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis involving a combined inhibition of mTOR and β-catenin signaling transduction, which may act as a therapeutic candidate for patients with chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27052477

  20. FLZ protects dopaminergic neuron through activating protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and inhibiting RTP801 expression in Parkinson's disease models.

    PubMed

    Bao, X-Q; Kong, X-C; Qian, C; Zhang, D

    2012-01-27

    The pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra (SNpc). FLZ, a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative from a Chinese herb, has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) models. However, it is still unclear whether FLZ protects against PD through regulating the function of dopaminergic system. In this study, we carried out a set of in vitro and in vivo experiments to address these questions. Oral administration of FLZ significantly improved motor dysfunction of mice challenged by MPTP. The beneficial effects of FLZ on motor behavior attributed to the elevation of dopamine level in striatum, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells, and TH activity in the middle brain of mouse. Mechanism study showed that treatment of FLZ increased the phosphorylation of activating protein kinase B (Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Using LY294002 to block phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway prevented the phosphorylation of mTOR and attenuated the neuroprotection of FLZ in MN9D cells challenged by MPP(+). In addition, FLZ reduced the expression of RTP801, an important protein in PD, in mice and cells intoxicated by MPTP/MPP(+). Taken together, these results revealed a novel role that FLZ elevated TH expression and activity in dopaminergic neuron through activation of Akt/mTOR survival pathway and inhibition of RTP801 in MPTP/MPP(+)-induced PD models. The data also provided evidence that FLZ had potent neuroprotecive effects and might become a new promising anti-PD drug.

  1. Ciliary transport regulates PDGF-AA/αα signaling via elevated mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and diminished PP2A activity.

    PubMed

    Umberger, Nicole L; Caspary, Tamara

    2015-01-15

    Primary cilia are built and maintained by intraflagellar transport (IFT), whereby the two IFT complexes, IFTA and IFTB, carry cargo via kinesin and dynein motors for anterograde and retrograde transport, respectively. Many signaling pathways, including platelet- derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA/αα, are linked to primary cilia. Active PDGF-AA/αα signaling results in phosphorylation of Akt at two residues: P-Akt(T308) and P-Akt(S473), and previous work showed decreased P-Akt(S473) in response to PDGF-AA upon anterograde transport disruption. In this study, we investigated PDGF-AA/αα signaling via P-Akt(T308) and P-Akt(S473) in distinct ciliary transport mutants. We found increased Akt phosphorylation in the absence of PDGF-AA stimulation, which we show is due to impaired dephosphorylation resulting from diminished PP2A activity toward P-Akt(T308). Anterograde transport mutants display low platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)α levels, whereas retrograde mutants exhibit normal PDGFRα levels. Despite this, neither shows an increase in P-Akt(S473) or P-Akt(T308) upon PDGF-AA stimulation. Because mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is increased in ciliary transport mutant cells and mTOR signaling inhibits PDGFRα levels, we demonstrate that inhibition of mTORC1 rescues PDGFRα levels as well as PDGF-AA-dependent phosphorylation of Akt(S473) and Akt(T308) in ciliary transport mutant MEFs. Taken together, our data indicate that the regulation of mTORC1 signaling and PP2A activity by ciliary transport plays key roles in PDGF-AA/αα signaling.

  2. Activation of Autophagic Flux against Xenoestrogen Bisphenol-A-induced Hippocampal Neurodegeneration via AMP kinase (AMPK)/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Swati; Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Seth, Brashket; Yadav, Anuradha; Singh, Anshuman; Mudawal, Anubha; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Gupta, Shailendra Kumar; Choubey, Vinay; Tripathi, Anurag; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Ratan Singh; Shukla, Shubha; Parmar, Devendra; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The human health hazards related to persisting use of bisphenol-A (BPA) are well documented. BPA-induced neurotoxicity occurs with the generation of oxidative stress, neurodegeneration, and cognitive dysfunctions. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) of the effects of BPA on autophagy and association with oxidative stress and apoptosis are still elusive. We observed that BPA exposure during the early postnatal period enhanced the expression and the levels of autophagy genes/proteins. BPA treatment in the presence of bafilomycin A1 increased the levels of LC3-II and SQSTM1 and also potentiated GFP-LC3 puncta index in GFP-LC3-transfected hippocampal neural stem cell-derived neurons. BPA-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis were mitigated by a pharmacological activator of autophagy (rapamycin). Pharmacological (wortmannin and bafilomycin A1) and genetic (beclin siRNA) inhibition of autophagy aggravated BPA neurotoxicity. Activation of autophagy against BPA resulted in intracellular energy sensor AMP kinase (AMPK) activation, increased phosphorylation of raptor and acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and decreased phosphorylation of ULK1 (Ser-757), and silencing of AMPK exacerbated BPA neurotoxicity. Conversely, BPA exposure down-regulated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway by phosphorylation of raptor as a transient cell's compensatory mechanism to preserve cellular energy pool. Moreover, silencing of mTOR enhanced autophagy, which further alleviated BPA-induced reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis. BPA-mediated neurotoxicity also resulted in mitochondrial loss, bioenergetic deficits, and increased PARKIN mitochondrial translocation, suggesting enhanced mitophagy. These results suggest implication of autophagy against BPA-mediated neurodegeneration through involvement of AMPK and mTOR pathways. Hence, autophagy, which arbitrates cell survival and demise during stress conditions, requires further assessment to be

  3. Mammalian circadian signaling networks and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Andrew C; Lewis, Warren G; Kay, Steve A

    2007-10-01

    Virtually all cells in the body have an intracellular clockwork based on a negative feedback mechanism. The circadian timekeeping system in mammals is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) acting as the central pacemaker. The SCN synchronizes to daily light-dark cycles and coordinates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Synchronization in the SCN and at the organismal level is a key feature of the circadian clock system. In particular, intercellular coupling in the SCN synchronizes neuron oscillators and confers robustness against perturbations. Recent advances in our knowledge of and ability to manipulate circadian rhythms make available cell-based clock models, which lack strong coupling and are ideal for target discovery and chemical biology.

  4. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, René E; Wu, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. It is associated with a poor prognosis and has limited treatment options. Sorafenib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the only available systemic agent for treatment of HCC that improves overall survival for patients with advanced stage disease; unfortunately, an effective second-line agent for the treatment of progressive or sorafenib-resistant HCC has yet to be identified. This review focuses on components of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, its role in HCC pathogenesis, and dual mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic option with potential efficacy in advanced HCC. There are several important upstream and downstream signals in the mTOR pathway, and alternative tumor-promoting pathways are known to exist beyond mTORC1 inhibition in HCC. This review analyzes the relationships of the upstream and downstream regulators of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling; it also provides a comprehensive global picture of the interaction between mTORC1 and mTORC2 which demonstrates the pre-clinical relevance of the mTOR pathway in HCC pathogenesis and progression. Finally, it provides scientific rationale for dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibition in the treatment of HCC. Clinical trials utilizing mTORC1 inhibitors and dual mTOR inhibitors in HCC are discussed as well. The mTOR pathway is comprised of two main components, mTORC1 and mTORC2; each has a unique role in the pathogenesis and progression of HCC. In phase III studies, mTORC1 inhibitors demonstrate anti-tumor activity in advanced HCC, but dual mTOR (mTORC1 and mTORC2) inhibition has greater therapeutic potential in HCC treatment which warrants further clinical investigation. PMID:25429315

  5. Autophagy activation: a novel mechanism of atorvastatin to protect mesenchymal stem cells from hypoxia and serum deprivation via AMP-activated protein kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Yue-Jin; Wang, Hong; Dong, Qiu-Ting; Wang, Tian-Jie; Qian, Hai-Yan; Xu, Hui

    2012-05-20

    Autophagy is a complex "self-eating" process and could be utilized for cell survival under stresses. Statins, which could reduce apoptosis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during both ischemia and hypoxia/serum deprivation (H/SD), have been proved to induce autophagy in some cell lines. We have previously shown that atorvastatin (ATV) could regulate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a positive modulator of autophagy, in MSCs. Thus, we hypothesized that autophagy activation through AMPK and its downstream molecule mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) may be a novel mechanism of ATV to protect MSCs from apoptosis during H/SD. Here, we demonstrated that H/SD induced autophagy in MSCs significantly as identified by increasing acidic vesicular organelle-positive cells, type II of light chain 3 (LC3-II) expression, and autophagosome formation. The levels of H/SD-induced apoptosis were increased by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) while decreased by rapamycin, an autophagic inducer. ATV further enhanced the autophagic activity observed in MSCs exposed to H/SD. Treatment with 3-MA attenuated ATV-induced autophagy and abrogated the protective effects of ATV on MSC apoptosis, while rapamycin failed to cause additional effects on either autophagy or apoptosis compared with ATV alone. The phosphorylation of AMPK was upregulated whereas the phosphorylation of mTOR was downregulated in ATV-treated MSCs, which were both attenuated by AMPK inhibitor compound C. Further, treatment with compound C reduced the ATV-induced autophagy in MSCs under H/SD. These data suggest that autophagy plays a protective role in H/SD-induced apoptosis of MSCs, and ATV could effectively activate autophagy via AMPK/mTOR pathway to enhance MSC survival during H/SD.

  6. [Thiamine triphosphatase activity in mammalian mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Rusina, I M; Makarchikov, A F

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial preparations isolated from bovine kidney and brain as well as the liver and the brain of rat show thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase) activity. The activity was determined from the particles by freezing-thawing suggesting that a soluble enzyme is involved. The liberation patterns of ThTPase and marker enzyme activities from mitochondria under osmotic shock or treatment with increasing Triton X-100 concentrations indicate the presence of ThTPase both in the matrix and intermembrane space. It was found, basing on gel filtration behavior, that the mitochondrial ThTPase has the same molecular mass as specific cytosolic ThTPase (EC 3.6.1.28). The enzymes, however, were clearly distinguishable in Km values, the mitochondrial one showing a higher apparent affinity for substrate. These results imply the existence of ThTPase multiple forms in mammalian cells.

  7. Mammalian target of rapamycin activator RHEB is frequently overexpressed in human carcinomas and is critical and sufficient for skin epithelial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Shvartsman, Mark B; Lee, Andrew Y; Shao, Jenny M; Murray, Mollianne M; Kladney, Raleigh D; Fan, Dong; Krajewski, Stan; Chiang, Gary G; Mills, Gordon B; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2010-04-15

    Small GTPase Ras homologue enriched in brain (RHEB) binds and activates the key metabolic regulator mTORC1, which has an important role in cancer cells, but the role of RHEB in cancer pathogenesis has not been shown. By performing a meta-analysis of published cancer cytogenetic and transcriptome databases, we defined a gain of chromosome 7q36.1-q36.3 containing the RHEB locus, an overexpression of RHEB mRNA in several different carcinoma histotypes, and an association between RHEB upregulation and poor prognosis in breast and head and neck cancers. To model gain of function in epithelial malignancy, we targeted Rheb expression to murine basal keratinocytes of transgenic mice at levels similar to those that occur in human squamous cancer cell lines. Juvenile transgenic epidermis displayed constitutive mTORC1 pathway activation, elevated cyclin D1 protein, and diffuse skin hyperplasia. Skin tumors subsequently developed with concomitant stromal angio-inflammatory foci, evidencing induction of an epidermal hypoxia-inducible factor-1 transcriptional program, and paracrine feed-forward activation of the interleukin-6-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway. Rheb-induced tumor persistence and neoplastic molecular alterations were mTORC1 dependent. Rheb markedly sensitized transgenic epidermis to squamous carcinoma induction following a single dose of Ras-activating carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene. Our findings offer direct evidence that RHEB facilitates multistage carcinogenesis through induction of multiple oncogenic mechanisms, perhaps contributing to the poor prognosis of patients with cancers overexpressing RHEB.

  8. Activation of mammalian tyrosinase by ferrous ions.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, A; d'Ischia, M; Misuraca, G; Carratú, L; Prota, G

    1990-03-26

    Kinetic experiments are reported showing that mammalian tyrosinase from B16 mouse melanoma is significantly activated by catalytic amounts of ferrous ions. Monitoring of tyrosine oxidation by both dopachrome formation and oxygen consumption showed that ferrous ions at micromolar concentrations induce a marked enzymatic activity with 0.01 U/ml of highly purified tyrosinase, whereas no detectable reaction occurs in the absence of metal over a sufficiently prolonged period of time. The extent of the activating effect, which is specific for the reduced form of iron, is proportional to the concentration of the added metal with a typical saturation profile, no further effect being observed beyond a threshold value. Changing the buffer system from phosphate to hepes or tris results in a marked decrease of the Fe2(+)-induced activation. Scavengers of active oxygen species, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, formate and mannitol have no detectable effect on the tyrosinase activity. These results are accounted for in terms of an activation mechanism involving reduction of the cupric ions at the active site of the resting enzyme.

  9. Mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in diabetic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zhao Zhong; Maiese, Kenneth

    2012-07-16

    Diabetes mellitus currently affects more than 170 million individuals worldwide and is expected to afflict another 200 million individuals in the next 30 years. Complications of diabetes as a result of oxidant stress affect multiple systems throughout the body, but involvement of the cardiovascular system may be one of the most severe in light of the impact upon cardiac and vascular function that can result in rapid morbidity and mortality for individuals. Given these concerns, the signaling pathways of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) offer exciting prospects for the development of novel therapies for the cardiovascular complications of diabetes. In the cardiovascular and metabolic systems, mTOR and its multi-protein complexes of TORC1 and TORC2 regulate insulin release and signaling, endothelial cell survival and growth, cardiomyocyte proliferation, resistance to β-cell injury, and cell longevity. Yet, mTOR can, at times, alter insulin signaling and lead to insulin resistance in the cardiovascular system during diabetes mellitus. It is therefore vital to understand the complex relationship mTOR and its downstream pathways hold during metabolic disease in order to develop novel strategies for the complications of diabetes mellitus in the cardiovascular system.

  10. Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt-mammalian target of Rapamycin signaling pathway in the hippocampus is essential for the acquisition of morphine-induced place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue; Zhang, X Q; Cui, Y; Xin, W J; Jing, J; Liu, X G

    2010-11-24

    Hippocampus is a critical structure for the acquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), which is a usual learning paradigm for assessing drug reward. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets, including Akt, mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) and 70-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), are critical molecules implicated in learning and memory. Here, we tested the role of PI3K/Akt-mTOR-p70S6K signaling pathway in morphine-induced CPP in the hippocampus. Our results showed that the acquisition of morphine CPP increased phosphorylation of Akt in the hippocampal CA3, but not in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), the ventral tegmental area (VTA) or the CA1. Moreover, the phosphorylated Akt exclusively expressed in the CA3 neurons. Likewise, levels of phosphorylated mTOR and p70S6K were significantly enhanced in the CA3 following morphine CPP. The alterations of these phosphorylated proteins are positively correlated with the acquisition of morphine CPP. More importantly, microinjection of PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) or mTOR inhibitor (Rapamycin) into the CA3 prevented the acquisition of CPP and inhibited the activation of PI3K-Akt signaling pathway. In addition, pre-infusion of β-FNA (β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride), a selective irreversible μ opioid receptor antagonist, into CA3 significantly prevented the acquisition of CPP and impaired Akt phosphorylation. All these results strongly implied that the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway activated by μ opioid receptor in hippocampal CA3 plays an important role in acquisition of morphine-induced CPP.

  11. Chemical-biological characterization of a cruzain inhibitor reveals a second target and a mammalian off-target.

    PubMed

    Choy, Jonathan W; Bryant, Clifford; Calvet, Claudia M; Doyle, Patricia S; Gunatilleke, Shamila S; Leung, Siegfried S F; Ang, Kenny K H; Chen, Steven; Gut, Jiri; Oses-Prieto, Juan A; Johnston, Jonathan B; Arkin, Michelle R; Burlingame, Alma L; Taunton, Jack; Jacobson, Matthew P; McKerrow, James M; Podust, Larissa M; Renslo, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of the Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine protease cruzain has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of Chagas' disease. Among the best-studied cruzain inhibitors to date is the vinylsulfone K777 (1), which has proven effective in animal models of Chagas' disease. Recent structure-activity studies aimed at addressing potential liabilities of 1 have now produced analogues such as N-[(2S)-1-[[(E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]amino]-3-(4-methylphenyl)-1-oxopropan-2-yl]pyridine-4-carboxamide (4), which is trypanocidal at ten-fold lower concentrations than for 1. We now find that the trypanocidal activity of 4 derives primarily from the inhibition of T. cruzi 14-α-demethylase (TcCYP51), a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in the parasite. Compound 4 also inhibits mammalian CYP isoforms but is trypanocidal at concentrations below those required to significantly inhibit mammalian CYPs in vitro. A chemical-proteomics approach employing an activity-based probe derived from 1 was used to identify mammalian cathepsin B as a potentially important off-target of 1 and 4. Computational docking studies and the evaluation of truncated analogues of 4 reveal structural determinants for TcCYP51 binding, information that will be useful in further optimization of this new class of inhibitors.

  12. Isoflurane Promotes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Malignancy by Activating the Akt-Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhua; Shao, Xueqian

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortalities worldwide, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of all lung cancer cases. Surgery remains one of the front-line treatment options for NSCLC, but events within the perioperative period were found to affect cancer prognosis, such as anesthesia procedures. Isoflurane, a commonly used volatile anesthetic, enhances the malignant potential of renal, prostate, and ovarian cancer cells, but its effects on NSCLC development have not been previously reported. Material/Methods CCK-8 and MTT cell proliferation assays were used to analyze NSCLC cell proliferation. Metastatic ability was examined by wound healing and transwell assays. We used Western blot analysis to study the mechanism of effect of Isoflurane in NSCLC development. Results We demonstrated that isoflurane promotes proliferation, migration and invasiveness of NSCLC cells, as well as upregulation of the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway in NSCLC cells. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt-mTOR signaling abolished the ability of isoflurane to promote proliferation, migration, and invasion of NSCLC cells, indicating that isoflurane promotes NSCLC cell malignancy by activating the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. Conclusions Isoflurane promotes NSCLC proliferation, migration and invasion by activating the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27897153

  13. A hexane fraction of guava Leaves (Psidium guajava L.) induces anticancer activity by suppressing AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin/ribosomal p70 S6 kinase in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Nae Hyung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Sung-Moo; Yun, Hyung-Mun; Nam, Dongwoo; Lee, Seok-Geun; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Ahn, Kyoo Seok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Shim, Bum Sang; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Mosaddik, Ashik; Cho, Somi K; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2012-03-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the anticancer effects of guava leaf extracts and its fractions. The chemical compositions of the active extracts were also determined. In the present study, we set out to determine whether the anticancer effects of guava leaves are linked with their ability to suppress constitutive AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/ribosomal p70 S6 kinase (S6K1) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation pathways in human prostate cancer cells. We found that guava leaf hexane fraction (GHF) was the most potent inducer of cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in PC-3 cells. The molecular mechanism or mechanisms of GHF apoptotic potential were correlated with the suppression of AKT/mTOR/S6K1 and MAPK signaling pathways. This effect of GHF correlated with down-regulation of various proteins that mediate cell proliferation, cell survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Analysis of GHF by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry tentatively identified 60 compounds, including β-eudesmol (11.98%), α-copaene (7.97%), phytol (7.95%), α-patchoulene (3.76%), β-caryophyllene oxide (CPO) (3.63%), caryophylla-3(15),7(14)-dien-6-ol (2.68%), (E)-methyl isoeugenol (1.90%), α-terpineol (1.76%), and octadecane (1.23%). Besides GHF, CPO, but not phytol, also inhibited the AKT/mTOR/S6K1 signaling pathway and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Overall, these findings suggest that guava leaves can interfere with multiple signaling cascades linked with tumorigenesis and provide a source of potential therapeutic compounds for both the prevention and treatment of cancer.

  14. The ketogenic diet inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Sharon S; Rensing, Nicholas R; Thio, Liu Lin; Yamada, Kelvin A; Wong, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for epilepsy, but its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We investigated the hypothesis that the KD inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway signaling. The expression of pS6 and pAkt, markers of mTOR pathway activation, was reduced in hippocampus and liver of rats fed KD. In the kainate model of epilepsy, KD blocked the hippocampal pS6 elevation that occurs after status epilepticus. Because mTOR signaling has been implicated in epileptogenesis, these results suggest that the KD may have anticonvulsant or antiepileptogenic actions via mTOR pathway inhibition.

  15. Recent advances in developing molecular tools for targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang-il

    2015-01-01

    Various biological molecules naturally existing in diversified species including fungi, bacteria, and bacteriophage have functionalities for DNA binding and processing. The biological molecules have been recently actively engineered for use in customized genome editing of mammalian cells as the molecule-encoding DNA sequence information and the underlying mechanisms how the molecules work are unveiled. Excitingly, multiple novel methods based on the newly constructed artificial molecular tools have enabled modifications of specific endogenous genetic elements in the genome context at efficiencies that are much higher than that of the conventional homologous recombination based methods. This minireview introduces the most recently spotlighted molecular genome engineering tools with their key features and ongoing modifications for better performance. Such ongoing efforts have mainly focused on the removal of the inherent DNA sequence recognition rigidity from the original molecular platforms, the addition of newly tailored targeting functions into the engineered molecules, and the enhancement of their targeting specificity. Effective targeted genome engineering of mammalian cells will enable not only sophisticated genetic studies in the context of the genome, but also widely-applicable universal therapeutics based on the pinpointing and correction of the disease-causing genetic elements within the genome in the near future.

  16. Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang induces autophagy in HepG2 cells via regulation of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wan-Ling; Su, Chin-Cheng; Lin, Ping-Yi; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chen, Yao-Li

    2015-08-01

    Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang (SJKJT), a traditional Chinese medicine, was previously reported to induce autophagy and inhibit the proliferation of the human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cell line via an extrinsic pathway. In the present study, the effects of SJKJT-induced autophagy and the cytotoxic mechanisms mediating these effects were investigated in HepG2 cells. The cytotoxicity of SJKJT in the HepG2 cells was evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The results demonstrated that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration of SJKJT was 2.91 mg/ml at 24 h, 1.64 mg/ml at 48 h and 1.26 mg/ml at 72 h. The results of confocal fluorescence microscopy indicated that SJKJT resulted in the accumulation of green fluorescent protein-LC3 and vacuolation of the cytoplasm. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles. Furthermore, western blot analysis, used to determine the expression levels of autophagy-associated proteins, demonstrated that the HepG2 cells treated with SJKJT exhibited LC3B-I/LC3B-II conversion, increased expression levels of Beclin, Atg-3 and Atg-5 and reduced expression levels of p62 and decreased signaling of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Taken together, these findings may assist in the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of malignant types of liver cancer.

  17. Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang induces autophagy in HepG2 cells via regulation of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    CHUANG, WAN-LING; SU, CHIN-CHENG; LIN, PING-YI; LIN, CHI-CHEN; CHEN, YAO-LI

    2015-01-01

    Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang (SJKJT), a traditional Chinese medicine, was previously reported to induce autophagy and inhibit the proliferation of the human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cell line via an extrinsic pathway. In the present study, the effects of SJKJT-induced autophagy and the cytotoxic mechanisms mediating these effects were investigated in HepG2 cells. The cytotoxicity of SJKJT in the HepG2 cells was evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The results demonstrated that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration of SJKJT was 2.91 mg/ml at 24 h, 1.64 mg/ml at 48 h and 1.26 mg/ml at 72 h. The results of confocal fluorescence microscopy indicated that SJKJT resulted in the accumulation of green fluorescent protein-LC3 and vacuolation of the cytoplasm. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles. Furthermore, western blot analysis, used to determine the expression levels of autophagy-associated proteins, demonstrated that the HepG2 cells treated with SJKJT exhibited LC3B-I/LC3B-II conversion, increased expression levels of Beclin, Atg-3 and Atg-5 and reduced expression levels of p62 and decreased signaling of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Taken together, these findings may assist in the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of malignant types of liver cancer. PMID:25847489

  18. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during osmotic stress responses by the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Ortells, M Carmen; Morancho, Beatriz; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Viollet, Benoit; Laderoute, Keith R; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2012-05-01

    Although stress can suppress growth and proliferation, cells can induce adaptive responses that allow them to maintain these functions under stress. While numerous studies have focused on the inhibitory effects of stress on cell growth, less is known on how growth-promoting pathways influence stress responses. We have approached this question by analyzing the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central growth controller, on the osmotic stress response. Our results showed that mammalian cells exposed to moderate hypertonicity maintained active mTOR, which was required to sustain their cell size and proliferative capacity. Moreover, mTOR regulated the induction of diverse osmostress response genes, including targets of the tonicity-responsive transcription factor NFAT5 as well as NFAT5-independent genes. Genes sensitive to mTOR-included regulators of stress responses, growth and proliferation. Among them, we identified REDD1 and REDD2, which had been previously characterized as mTOR inhibitors in other stress contexts. We observed that mTOR facilitated transcription-permissive conditions for several osmoresponsive genes by enhancing histone H4 acetylation and the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Altogether, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of mTOR in regulating transcriptional mechanisms that control gene expression during cellular stress responses.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression during osmotic stress responses by the mammalian target of rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Ortells, M. Carmen; Morancho, Beatriz; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Viollet, Benoit; Laderoute, Keith R.; López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Although stress can suppress growth and proliferation, cells can induce adaptive responses that allow them to maintain these functions under stress. While numerous studies have focused on the inhibitory effects of stress on cell growth, less is known on how growth-promoting pathways influence stress responses. We have approached this question by analyzing the effect of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central growth controller, on the osmotic stress response. Our results showed that mammalian cells exposed to moderate hypertonicity maintained active mTOR, which was required to sustain their cell size and proliferative capacity. Moreover, mTOR regulated the induction of diverse osmostress response genes, including targets of the tonicity-responsive transcription factor NFAT5 as well as NFAT5-independent genes. Genes sensitive to mTOR-included regulators of stress responses, growth and proliferation. Among them, we identified REDD1 and REDD2, which had been previously characterized as mTOR inhibitors in other stress contexts. We observed that mTOR facilitated transcription-permissive conditions for several osmoresponsive genes by enhancing histone H4 acetylation and the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Altogether, these results reveal a previously unappreciated role of mTOR in regulating transcriptional mechanisms that control gene expression during cellular stress responses. PMID:22287635

  20. The effect of hydroxyurea and trichostatin a on targeted nucleotide exchange in yeast and Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Parekh-Olmedo, Hetal; Engstrom, Julia U; Kmiec, Eric B

    2003-12-01

    Targeted nucleotide exchange (TNE) is a process by which a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide, partially complementary to a site in a chromosomal or an episomal gene directs the reversal of a single nucleotide at a specific site. To protect against nuclease digestion, the oligonucleotide is modified with derivative linkages among the terminal bases. We have termed these molecules modified single-stranded oligonucleotides (MSOs). Current models suggest that the reaction occurs in two steps. The first, DNA pairing, involves the alignment of the MSO with the target site and its assimilation into the target helix forming a D-loop. The second phase centers around the repair of a single base mismatch formed between the MSO and its complementary strand in the D-loop. Nucleotide exchange is promoted in all likelihood by the mismatch repair system. A critical feature of successful TNE is the accessibility of the target site for the MSO and the factors that increase the dynamic nature of the chromatin that will likely increase the frequency. Here, we report that two factors, trichostatin A and hydroxyurea, elevate gene repair of a mutant hygromycin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a mutant eGFP gene in a mammalian cell line, MCF-10AT1 cells. Trichostatin A (TSA) acts by preventing the deacetylation of histones while hydroxyurea (HU) reduces the rate of replication. Both of these activities, by their very nature, create a more open configuration of the MSO into the target site.

  1. Novel withanolides target medullary thyroid cancer through inhibition of both RET phosphorylation and the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Abbas K.; Bazzill, Joseph; Zhang, Xuan; Gallagher, Rob; Zhang, Hauping; Gollapudi, Rao; Kindscher, Kelly; Timmermann, Barbara; Cohen, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite development of current targeted therapies for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), long-term survival remains unchanged. Recently isolated novel withanolide compounds from Solanaceae physalis are highly potent against MTCs. We hypothesize that these withanolides uniquely inhibit RET phosphorylation and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in MTC cells as a mechanism of antiproliferation and apoptosis. Methods MTC cells were treated with novel withanolides and MTC-targeted drugs. In vitro studies assessed cell viability and proliferation (MTS; trypan blue assays), apoptosis (flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI staining; confirmed by Western blot analysis), long-term cytotoxic effects (clonogenic assay), and suppression of key regulatory proteins such as RET, Akt, and mTOR (by Western blot analysis). Results The novel withanolides potently reduced MTC cell viability (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50], 270–2,850 nmol/L; 250–1,380 nmol/L for vandetanib; 360–1,640 nmol/L for cabozantinib) with induction of apoptosis at <1,000 nmol/L of drug. Unique from other targeted therapies, withanolides suppressed RET and Akt phosphorylation and protein expression (in a concentration- and time-dependent manner) as well as mTOR activity and translational activity of 4E-BP1 and protein synthesis mediated by p70S6kinase activation at IC50 concentrations. Conclusion Novel withanolides from Physalis selectively and potently inhibit MTC cells in vitro. Unlike other MTC-targeted therapies, these compounds uniquely inhibit both RET kinase activity and the Akt/mTOR prosurvival pathway. Further translational studies are warranted to evaluate their clinical potential. PMID:23158190

  2. SRY: A transcriptional activator of mammalian testis determination.

    PubMed

    Sekido, Ryohei

    2010-03-01

    Sry (sex-determining region Y) is the sex-determining gene on the mammalian Y chromosome, which encodes a transcription factor containing a DNA-binding domain characteristic of some high mobility group proteins (HMG box). It is the founder member of the Sox (Sry-related HMG box) gene family and is therefore classified in the Sox A group. In mice, the transient expression of Sry between 10.5 and 12.5 dpc triggers the differentiation of Sertoli cells from the supporting cell precursor lineage, which would otherwise give rise to granulosa cells in ovaries. However, little was known about the target genes of SRY and molecular mechanisms how SRY leads to testis development. Recent work has provided evidence that SRY binds directly to a testis-specific enhancer of Sox9 (TES) and activates Sox9 expression in co-operation with steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1). Furthermore, this SRY action is limited to a certain time period during embryogenesis.

  3. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin alleviates bladder hyperactivity and pain in rats with cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Gou, Xin; Chen, Daihui

    2016-01-01

    Background Bladder disorders associated with interstitial cystitis are frequently characterized by increased contractility and pain. The purposes of this study were to examine (1) the effects of blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) on the exaggerated bladder activity and pain evoked by cystitis and (2) the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of mTOR in regulating cystic sensory activity. Results The expression of p-mTOR, mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (p-S6K1), 4 E–binding protein 4 (p-4 E-BP1), as well as phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathway were amplified in cyclophosphamide rats as compared with control rats. Blocking mTOR by intrathecal infusion of rapamycin attenuated bladder hyperactivity and pain. In addition, blocking PI3K signal pathway attenuated activities of mTOR, which was accompanied with decreasing bladder hyperactivity and pain. Inhibition of either mTOR or PI3K blunted the enhanced spinal substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in cyclophosphamide rats. Conclusions The data for the first time revealed specific signaling pathways leading to cyclophosphamide-induced bladder hyperactivity and pain, including the activation of mTOR and PI3K. Inhibition of these pathways alleviates cystic pain. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of overactive bladder and pain often observed in cystitis. PMID:27780878

  4. Targeted Myostatin Gene Editing in Multiple Mammalian Species Directed by a Single Pair of TALE Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Zhao, Piming; Mariano, Andrew; Han, Renzhi

    2013-07-30

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Strategies to block myostatin signaling pathway have been extensively pursued to increase muscle mass in various disease settings including muscular dystrophy. Here, we report a new class of reagents based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to disrupt myostatin expression at the genome level. We designed a pair of MSTN TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the myostatin gene. We demonstrate that codelivery of these MSTN TALENs induce highly specific and efficient gene disruption in a variety of human, cattle, and mouse cells. Based upon sequence analysis, this pair of TALENs is expected to be functional in many other mammalian species. Moreover, we demonstrate that these MSTN TALENs can facilitate targeted integration of a mCherry expression cassette or a larger muscular dystrophy gene (dysferlin) expression cassette into the MSTN locus in mouse or human cells. Therefore, targeted editing of the myostatin gene using our highly specific and efficient TALEN pair would facilitate cell engineering, allowing potential use in translational research for cell-based therapy.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e112; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.39; published online 30 July 2013.

  5. The mammalian target of rapamycin modulates the immunoproteasome system in the heart.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Fu, Jianliang; Hamilton, Ryan; Diaz, Vivian; Zhang, Yiqiang

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an important role in cardiac development and function. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin has been shown to attenuate pathological cardiac hypertrophy and improve the function of aging heart, accompanied by an inhibition of the cardiac proteasome activity. The current study aimed to determine the potential mechanism(s) by which mTOR inhibition modulates cardiac proteasome. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin was found to reduce primarily the immunoproteasome in both H9c2 cells in vitro and mouse heart in vivo, without significant effect on the constitutive proteasome and protein ubiquitination. Concurrent with the reduction of the immunoproteasome, rapamycin reduced two important inflammatory response pathways, the NF-κB and Stat3 signaling. In addition, rapamycin attenuated the induction of the immunoproteasome in H9c2 cells by inflammatory cytokines, including INFγ and TNFα, by suppressing NF-κB signaling. These data indicate that rapamycin indirectly modulated immunoproteasome through the suppression of inflammatory response pathways. Lastly, the role of the immunoproteasome during the development of cardiac hypertrophy was investigated. Administration of a specific inhibitor of the immunoproteasome ONX 0914 attenuated isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that the immunoproteasome may be involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and therefore could be a therapeutic target. In conclusion, rapamycin inhibits the immunoproteasome through its effect on the inflammatory signaling pathways and the immunoproteasome could be a potential therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

  6. Passive versus active local microrheology in mammalian cells and amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, C.; Gazeau, F.; Marion, S.; Bacri, J.-C.; Wilhelm, C.

    2004-12-01

    We compare in this paper the rotational magnetic microrheology detailed by Marion et al [18] and Wilhelm et al [19] to the passive tracking microrheology. The rotational microrheology has been designed to explore, using magnetic rotating probes, the local intracellular microenvironment of living cells in terms of viscoelasticity. Passive microrheology techniques is based on the analysis of spontaneous diffusive motions of Brownian probes. The dependence of mean square displacement (MSD) with the time then directly reflects the type of movement (sub-, hyper- or diffusive motions). Using the same intracellular probes, we performed two types of measurements (active and passive). Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, one should obtain the same information from the both techniques in a thermally equilibrium system. Interestingly, our measurements differ, and the discordances directly inform on active biological processes, which add to thermally activated fluctuations in our out-of equilibrium systems. In both cell models used, mammalian Hela cells and amoebae Entamoeba Histolytica, a hyper-diffusive regime at a short time is observed, which highlights the presence of an active non-thermal driving force, acting on the probe. However, the nature of this active force in mammalian cells and amoebae is different, according to their different phenotypes. In mammalian cells active processes are governed by the transport, via molecular motors, on the microtubule network. In amoebae, which are highly motile cells free of microtubule network, the active processes are dominated by strong fluxes of cytoplasm driven by extension of pseudopodia, in random directions, leading to an amplitude of motion one order of magnitude higher than for mammalian cells. Figs 7, Refs 32.

  7. Phospholipase D Mediates Nutrient Input to Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1)*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Limei; Salloum, Darin; Medlin, Phil S.; Saqcena, Mahesh; Yellen, Paige; Perrella, Benjamin; Foster, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical sensor of nutritional sufficiency. Although much is known about the regulation of mTOR in response to growth factors, much less is known about the regulation of mTOR in response to nutrients. Amino acids have no impact on the signals that regulate Rheb, a GTPase required for the activation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). Phospholipase D (PLD) generates a metabolite, phosphatidic acid, that facilitates association between mTOR and the mTORC1 co-factor Raptor. We report here that elevated PLD activity in human cancer cells is dependent on both amino acids and glucose and that amino acid- and glucose-induced increases in mTORC1 activity are dependent on PLD. Amino acid- and glucose-induced PLD and mTORC1 activity were also dependent on the GTPases RalA and ARF6 and the type III phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase hVps34. Thus, a key stimulatory event for mTORC1 activation in response to nutrients is the generation of phosphatidic acid by PLD. PMID:21622984

  8. Targeting mammalian organelles with internalizing phage (iPhage) libraries

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Roberto; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Techniques largely used for protein interaction studies and discovery of intracellular receptors, such as affinity capture complex purification and yeast two-hybrid, may produce inaccurate datasets due to protein insolubility, transient or weak protein interactions, or irrelevant intracellular context. A versatile tool to overcome these limitations as well as to potentially create vaccines and engineer peptides and antibodies as targeted diagnostic and therapeutic agents, is the phage display technique. We have recently developed a new technology for screening internalizing phage (iPhage) vectors and libraries utilizing a ligand/receptor-independent mechanism to penetrate eukaryotic cells. iPhage particles provide a unique discovery platform for combinatorial intracellular targeting of organelle ligands along with their corresponding receptors and to fingerprint functional protein domains in living cells. Here we explain the design, cloning, construction, and production of iPhage-based vectors and libraries, along with basic ligand-receptor identification and validation methodologies for organelle receptors. An iPhage library screening can be performed in ~8 weeks. PMID:24030441

  9. Mammalian target of rapamycin signaling modulates photic entrainment of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ruifeng; Li, Aiqing; Cho, Hee-yeon; Lee, Boyoung; Obrietan, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Inducible gene expression appears to be an essential event that couples light to entrainment of the master mammalian circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Recently, we reported that light triggers phase-dependent activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, a major regulator of protein synthesis, in the SCN, thus raising the possibility that mTOR-evoked mRNA translation contributes to clock entrainment. Here, we employed a combination of cellular, molecular and behavioral assays to address this question. To this end, we show that the in vivo infusion of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin led to a significant attenuation of the phase-delaying effect of early night light. Conversely, disruption of mTOR during the late night augmented the phase-advancing effect of light. To assess the role of mTOR signaling within the context of molecular entrainment, the effects of rapamycin on light-induced expression of PERIOD1 and PERIOD2 were examined. At both the early and late night time points, abrogation of mTOR signaling led to a significant attenuation of light-evoked PERIOD protein expression. Our results also reveal that light-induced mTOR activation leads to translation of mRNAs with a 5′-terminal oligopyrimidine tract such as eukaryotic elongation factor 1 A (eEF1A) and the immediate early gene JunB. Together, these data indicate that the mTOR pathway functions as potent and selective regulator of light-evoked protein translation and SCN clock entrainment. PMID:20445056

  10. Mammalian target of rapamycin signaling modulates photic entrainment of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruifeng; Li, Aiqing; Cho, Hee-yeon; Lee, Boyoung; Obrietan, Karl

    2010-05-05

    Inducible gene expression appears to be an essential event that couples light to entrainment of the master mammalian circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Recently, we reported that light triggers phase-dependent activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, a major regulator of protein synthesis, in the SCN, thus raising the possibility that mTOR-evoked mRNA translation contributes to clock entrainment. Here, we used a combination of cellular, molecular, and behavioral assays to address this question. To this end, we show that the in vivo infusion of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin led to a significant attenuation of the phase-delaying effect of early-night light. Conversely, disruption of mTOR during the late night augmented the phase-advancing effect of light. To assess the role of mTOR signaling within the context of molecular entrainment, the effects of rapamycin on light-induced expression of PERIOD1 and PERIOD2 were examined. At both the early- and late-night time points, abrogation of mTOR signaling led to a significant attenuation of light-evoked PERIOD protein expression. Our results also reveal that light-induced mTOR activation leads to the translation of mRNAs with a 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract such as eukaryotic elongation factor 1A and the immediate early gene JunB. Together, these data indicate that the mTOR pathway functions as potent and selective regulator of light-evoked protein translation and SCN clock entrainment.

  11. Circadian regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cao, R; Anderson, F E; Jung, Y-J; Dziema, H; Obrietan, K

    2011-05-05

    Circadian (24-h) rhythms influence virtually every aspect of mammalian physiology. The main rhythm generation center is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, and work over the past several years has revealed that rhythmic gene transcription and post-translational processes are central to clock timing. In addition, rhythmic translation control has also been implicated in clock timing; however the precise cell signaling pathways that drive this process are not well known. Here we report that a key translation activation cascade, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, is under control of the circadian clock in the SCN. Using phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein (pS6) as a marker of mTOR activity, we show that the mTOR cascade exhibits maximal activity during the subjective day, and minimal activity during the late subjective night. Importantly, expression of S6 was not altered as a function of circadian time. Rhythmic S6 phosphorylation was detected throughout the dorsoventral axis of the SCN, thus suggesting that rhythmic mTOR activity was not restricted to a subset of SCN neurons. Rather, rhythmic pS6 expression appeared to parallel the expression pattern of the clock gene period1 (per1). Using a transgenic per1 reporter gene mouse strain, we found a statistically significant cellular level correlation between pS6 and per1 gene expression over the circadian cycle. Further, photic stimulation triggered a coordinate upregulation of per1 and mTOR activation in a subset of SCN cells. Interestingly, this cellular level correlation between mTOR activity and per1 expression appears to be specific, since a similar expression profile for pS6 and per2 or c-FOS was not detected. Finally, we show that mTOR activity is downstream of the ERK/MAPK signal transduction pathway. Together these data reveal that mTOR pathway activity is under the control of the SCN clock, and suggests that mTOR signaling may contribute to distinct aspects of the

  12. The Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in breast cancer: current evidence and future directions.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Paola; Vari, Sabrina; Cognetti, Francesco; Fabi, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a crucial mediator of tumor progression and may be a promising target in a significant proportion of patients with breast cancer. More specifically, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mTOR pathway plays a critical role in multiple cellular functions including metabolism, proliferation, growth and survival. This pathway is higly active in many types of cancer and is linked to resistance to many types of therapy. Direct blockade of the mTOR pathway is a new area in breast cancer therapy, with the potential to modulate growth factor- and estrogen-dependent and estrogen-independent pathways, which contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of tumors. Thus, inhibitors of mTOR are of interest as potential therapeutic agents for patients with breast cancer, everolimus and temsirolimus being the main representatives of this category. This review of the literature analyzes the available data emerging from trials and evaluates the efficacy and safety of mTOR inhibitors in all subtypes of breast cancer.

  13. Prdm9 controls activation of mammalian recombination hotspots.

    PubMed

    Parvanov, Emil D; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2010-02-12

    Mammalian meiotic recombination, which preferentially occurs at specialized sites called hotspots, ensures the orderly segregation of meiotic chromosomes and creates genetic variation among offspring. A locus on mouse chromosome 17, which controls activation of recombination at multiple distant hotspots, has been mapped within a 181-kilobase interval, three of whose genes can be eliminated as candidates. The remaining gene, Prdm9, codes for a zinc finger containing histone H3K4 trimethylase that is expressed in early meiosis and whose deficiency results in sterility in both sexes. Mus musculus exhibits five alleles of Prdm9; human populations exhibit two predominant alleles and multiple minor alleles. The identification of Prdm9 as a protein regulating mammalian recombination hotspots initiates molecular studies of this important biological control system.

  14. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) mediates tau protein dyshomeostasis: implication for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhi; Bereczki, Erika; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Shan; Li, Chunxia; Ji, Xinying; Branca, Rui M; Lehtiö, Janne; Guan, Zhizhong; Filipcik, Peter; Xu, Shaohua; Winblad, Bengt; Pei, Jin-Jing

    2013-05-31

    Previous evidence from post-mortem Alzheimer disease (AD) brains and drug (especially rapamycin)-oriented in vitro and in vivo models implicated an aberrant accumulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) in tangle-bearing neurons in AD brains and its role in the formation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau. Compelling evidence indicated that the sequential molecular events such as the synthesis and phosphorylation of tau can be regulated through p70 S6 kinase, the well characterized immediate downstream target of mTor. In the present study, we further identified that the active form of mTor per se accumulates in tangle-bearing neurons, particularly those at early stages in AD brains. By using mass spectrometry and Western blotting, we identified three phosphoepitopes of tau directly phosphorylated by mTor. We have developed a variety of stable cell lines with genetic modification of mTor activity using SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells as background. In these cellular systems, we not only confirmed the tau phosphorylation sites found in vitro but also found that mTor mediates the synthesis and aggregation of tau, resulting in compromised microtubule stability. Changes of mTor activity cause fluctuation of the level of a battery of tau kinases such as protein kinase A, v-Akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-1, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, cyclin-dependent kinase 5, and tau protein phosphatase 2A. These results implicate mTor in promoting an imbalance of tau homeostasis, a condition required for neurons to maintain physiological function.

  15. Targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway with everolimus: implications for the management of metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ng, Vin Cci; Johnson, Jeremy J; Cuellar, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    The inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have documented antitumor activity via disruption of various signaling pathways leading to impaired cellular growth, proliferation, and survival. In preclinical studies, mTOR inhibitors use in combination with hormonal therapy has shown promising results in overcoming endocrine resistance in breast cancer cells. The role of everolimus in breast cancer was established in the Breast Cancer Trial of Oral Everolimus-2 (BOLERO-2) trial in combination with exemestane for patients with advanced metastatic hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer, who relapsed after initial hormonal manipulation. The study met its primary endpoint of significant improvement in progression free survival (PFS) with a median time to progression of 6.9 months in the combination group versus 2.8 months in exemestane group. Favorable improvements in PFS were reported across all patient subgroups regardless of age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, number of prior therapies, and presence of visceral metastases. Adverse events were mostly mild to moderate in severity and consistent with the known safety profile of everolimus. Major toxicities reported include stomatitis, non-infectious pneumonitis, and hyperglycemia. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of everolimus as a valuable component in advanced metastatic breast cancer and delineate current strategies to prevent and manage the most common toxicities associated with this combination regimen.

  16. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Hitting the Bull's-Eye for Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen; Zhang, Lijie; Wang, Shaohui; Maiese, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its associated cell signaling pathways have garnered significant attention for their roles in cell biology and oncology. Interestingly,the explosion of information in this field has linked mTOR to neurological diseases with promising initial studies. mTOR, a 289 kDa serine/threonine protein kinase, plays an important role in cell growth and proliferation and is activated through phosphorylation in response to growth factors, mitogens and hormones. Growth factors, amino acids, cellular nutrients and oxygen deficiency can downregulate mTOR activity. The function of mTOR signaling is mediated primarily through two mTOR complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 initiates cap-dependent protein translation, a rate-limiting step of protein synthesis, through the phosphorylation of the targets eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K). In contrast, mTORC2 regulates development of the cytoskeleton and also controls cell survival. Although closely tied to tumorigenesis, mTOR and the downstream signaling pathways are significantly involved in the central nervous system (CNS) with synaptic plasticity, memory retention, neuroendocrine regulation associated with food intake and puberty and modulation of neuronal repair following injury. The signaling pathways of mTOR also are believed to be a significant component in a number of neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and Huntington disease, tuberous sclerosis, neurofibromatosis, fragile X syndrome, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury and ischemic stroke. Here we describe the role of mTOR in the CNS and illustrate the potential for new strategies directed against neurological disorders. PMID:21307646

  17. Mammalian intestinal alkaline phosphatase acts as highly active exopolyphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B; Schröder, H C

    2001-06-11

    Recent results revealed that inorganic polyphosphates (polyP), being energy-rich linear polymers of orthophosphate residues known from bacteria and yeast, also exist in higher eukaryotes. However, the enzymatic basis of their metabolism especially in mammalian cells is still uncertain. Here we demonstrate for the first time that alkaline phosphatase from calf intestine (CIAP) is able to cleave polyP molecules up to a chain length of about 800. The enzyme acts as an exopolyphosphatase degrading polyP in a processive manner. The pH optimum is in the alkaline range. Divalent cations are not required for catalytic activity but inhibit the degradation of polyP. The rate of hydrolysis of short-chain polyP by CIAP is comparable to that of the standard alkaline phosphatase (AP) substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The specific activity of the enzyme decreases with increasing chain length of the polymer both in the alkaline and in the neutral pH range. The K(m) of the enzyme also decreases with increasing chain length. The mammalian tissue non-specific isoform of AP was not able to hydrolyze polyP under the conditions applied while the placental-type AP and the bacterial (Escherichia coli) AP displayed polyP-degrading activity.

  18. Targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells by using engineered zinc-finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Yolanda; Chan, Edmond; Liu, Pei-Qi; Orlando, Salvatore; Zhang, Lin; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Guschin, Dmitry; Waite, Adam; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Klug, Aaron; Collingwood, Trevor N.

    2008-01-01

    Gene knockout is the most powerful tool for determining gene function or permanently modifying the phenotypic characteristics of a cell. Existing methods for gene disruption are limited by their efficiency, time to completion, and/or the potential for confounding off-target effects. Here, we demonstrate a rapid single-step approach to targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells, using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). ZFNs can be designed to target a chosen locus with high specificity. Upon transient expression of these nucleases the target gene is first cleaved by the ZFNs and then repaired by a natural—but imperfect—DNA repair process, nonhomologous end joining. This often results in the generation of mutant (null) alleles. As proof of concept for this approach we designed ZFNs to target the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. We observed biallelic gene disruption at frequencies >1%, thus obviating the need for selection markers. Three new genetically distinct DHFR−/− cell lines were generated. Each new line exhibited growth and functional properties consistent with the specific knockout of the DHFR gene. Importantly, target gene disruption is complete within 2–3 days of transient ZFN delivery, thus enabling the isolation of the resultant DHFR−/− cell lines within 1 month. These data demonstrate further the utility of ZFNs for rapid mammalian cell line engineering and establish a new method for gene knockout with application to reverse genetics, functional genomics, drug discovery, and therapeutic recombinant protein production. PMID:18359850

  19. Mammalian target of rapamycin is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and heart development in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Shan, Tizhong; Liang, Xinrong; Deng, Changyan; Kuang, Shihuan

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • mTOR is a critical regulator of many biological processes yet its function in heart is not well understood. • MCK-Cre/Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice were established to delete Mtor in cardiomyocytes. • The mTOR-mKO mice developed normally but die prematurely within 5 weeks after birth due to heart disease. • The mTOR-mKO mice had dilated myocardium and increased cell death. • mTOR-mKO hearts had reduced expression of metabolic genes and activation of mTOR target proteins. - Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive knockout of Mtor leads to embryonic lethality, the in vivo function of mTOR in perinatal development and postnatal growth of heart is not well defined. In this study, we established a muscle-specific mTOR conditional knockout mouse model (mTOR-mKO) by crossing MCK-Cre and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Although the mTOR-mKO mice survived embryonic and perinatal development, they exhibited severe postnatal growth retardation, cardiac muscle pathology and premature death. At the cellular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice had fewer cardiomyocytes due to apoptosis and necrosis, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy. At the molecular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice expressed lower levels of fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis related genes compared to the WT littermates. In addition, the mTOR-mKO cardiac muscle had reduced Myh6 but elevated Myh7 expression, indicating cardiac muscle degeneration. Furthermore, deletion of Mtor dramatically decreased the phosphorylation of S6 and AKT, two key targets downstream of mTORC1 and mTORC2 mediating the normal function of mTOR. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and cardiac muscle function.

  20. The Microprocessor controls the activity of mammalian retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Heras, Sara R; Macias, Sara; Plass, Mireya; Fernandez, Noemí; Cano, David; Eyras, Eduardo; Garcia-Perez, José L; Cáceres, Javier F

    2013-10-01

    More than half of the human genome is made of transposable elements whose ongoing mobilization is a driving force in genetic diversity; however, little is known about how the host regulates their activity. Here, we show that the Microprocessor (Drosha-DGCR8), which is required for microRNA biogenesis, also recognizes and binds RNAs derived from human long interspersed element 1 (LINE-1), Alu and SVA retrotransposons. Expression analyses demonstrate that cells lacking a functional Microprocessor accumulate LINE-1 mRNA and encoded proteins. Furthermore, we show that structured regions of the LINE-1 mRNA can be cleaved in vitro by Drosha. Additionally, we used a cell culture-based assay to show that the Microprocessor negatively regulates LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition in vivo. Altogether, these data reveal a new role for the Microprocessor as a post-transcriptional repressor of mammalian retrotransposons and a defender of human genome integrity.

  1. Inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling pathway reduces itch behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Obara, Ilona; Medrano, Maria C; Signoret-Genest, Jérémy; Jiménez-Díaz, Lydia; Géranton, Sandrine M; Hunt, Stephen P

    2015-08-01

    Activated mammalian target of rapamycin (P-mTOR) has been shown to maintain the sensitivity of subsets of small-diameter primary afferent A-nociceptors. Local or systemic inhibition of the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway reduced punctate mechanical and cold sensitivity in neuropathic pain and therefore offered a new approach to chronic pain control. In this study, we have investigated the effects of the rapamycin analog temsirolimus (CCI-779) on itch. Bouts of scratching induced by the histamine-dependent pruritogenic compound 48/80 and histamine-independent pruritogens, chloroquine and SLIGRL-NH2, injected intradermally were significantly reduced by local (intradermal) or systemic (intraperitoneal, i.p.) pretreatment with CCI-779. We also investigated the action of metformin, a drug taken to control type 2 diabetes and recently shown to inhibit mTORC1 in vivo. Although the response to nonhistaminergic stimuli was reduced at all of the time points tested, scratching to compound 48/80 was modified by metformin only when the drug was injected 24 hours before this pruritogen. We also examined the colocalization of P-mTOR with gastrin-releasing peptide, a putative marker for some itch-sensitive primary afferents, and found that P-mTOR was coexpressed in less than 5% of gastrin-releasing peptide-positive fibers in the mouse skin. Taken together, the data highlight the role that P-mTOR-positive A-fibers play in itch signaling and underline the importance of the mTORC1 pathway in the regulation of homeostatic primary afferent functions such as pain and itch. The actions of the antidiabetic drug metformin in ameliorating nonhistamine-mediated itch also suggest a new therapeutic route for the control of this category of pruritus.

  2. Synthetic neomycin-kanamycin phosphotransferase, type II coding sequence for gene targeting in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seung-Gi; Mann, Jeffrey R

    2005-07-01

    The bacterial neomycin-kanamycin phosphotransferase, type II enzyme is encoded by the neo gene and confers resistance to aminoglycoside drugs such as neomycin and kanamycin-bacterial selection and G418-eukaryotic cell selection. Although widely used in gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells, the neo coding sequence contains numerous cryptic splice sites and has a high CpG content. At least the former can cause unwanted effects in cis at the targeted locus. We describe a synthetic sequence, sneo, which encodes the same protein as that encoded by neo. This synthetic sequence has no predicted splice sites in either strand, low CpG content, and increased mammalian codon usage. In mouse embryonic stem cells sneo expressability is similar to neo. The use of sneo in gene targeting experiments should substantially reduce the probability of unwanted effects in cis due to splicing, and perhaps CpG methylation, within the coding sequence of the selectable marker.

  3. Synthesis of “clickable” acylhomoserine lactone quorum sensing probes: unanticipated effects on mammalian cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Amanda L.; Yu, Jing; Struss, Anjali Kumari; Lowery, Colin A.; Zhu, Jie; Kim, Sook Kyung; Park, Junguk; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Kaufmann, Gunnar F.; Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; Janda, Kim D.

    2010-01-01

    Alkynyl- and azido-tagged 3-oxo-C12-acylhomoserine lactone probes have been synthesized to examine their potential utility as probes for discovering the mammalian protein target of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer, 3-oxo-C12-acylhomoserine lactone. Although such substitutions are commonly believed to be quite conservative, from these studies, we have uncovered a drastic difference in activity between the alkynyl- and azido-modified compounds, and provide an example where such structural modification has proved to be much less than conservative. PMID:21190852

  4. Regulation of expression and activity of DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferases in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Shannon R Morey; Pradhan, Sriharsa

    2011-01-01

    Three active DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferases (DNMTs) have been identified in mammalian cells, Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b. DNMT1 is primarily a maintenance methyltransferase, as it prefers to methylate hemimethylated DNA during DNA replication and in vitro. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are de novo methyltransferases and show similar activity on unmethylated and hemimethylated DNA. DNMT3L, which lacks the catalytic domain, binds to DNMT3A and DNMT3B variants and facilitates their chromatin targeting, presumably for de novo methylation. There are several mechanisms by which mammalian cells regulate DNMT levels, including varied transcriptional activation of the respective genes and posttranslational modifications of the enzymes that can affect catalytic activity, targeting, and enzyme degradation. In addition, binding of miRNAs or RNA-binding proteins can also alter the expression of DNMTs. These regulatory processes can be disrupted in disease or by environmental factors, resulting in altered DNMT expression and aberrant DNA methylation patterns.

  5. Multifaceted role of insulin-like growth factors and mammalian target of rapamycin in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Frost, Robert A; Lang, Charles H

    2012-06-01

    This review describes the current literature on the interaction between insulin-like growth factors, endocrine hormones, and branched-chain amino acids on muscle physiology in healthy young individuals and during select pathologic conditions. Emphasis is placed on the mechanism by which physical and hormonal signals are transduced at the cellular level to either grow or atrophy skeletal muscle. The key role of the mammalian target of rapamycin and its ability to respond to hypertrophic and atrophic signals informs our understanding how a combination of physical, nutritional, and pharmacologic therapies may be used in tandem to prevent or ameliorate reductions in muscle mass.

  6. Prediction of human miRNA target genes using computationally reconstructed ancestral mammalian sequences

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Mickael; Diallo, Abdoulaye Baniré; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are short single-stranded RNA molecules derived from hairpin-forming precursors that play a crucial role as post-transcriptional regulators in eukaryotes and viruses. In the past years, many microRNA target genes (MTGs) have been identified experimentally. However, because of the high costs of experimental approaches, target genes databases remain incomplete. Although several target prediction programs have been developed in the recent years to identify MTGs in silico, their specificity and sensitivity remain low. Here, we propose a new approach called MirAncesTar, which uses ancestral genome reconstruction to boost the accuracy of existing MTGs prediction tools for human miRNAs. For each miRNA and each putative human target UTR, our algorithm makes uses of existing prediction tools to identify putative target sites in the human UTR, as well as in its mammalian orthologs and inferred ancestral sequences. It then evaluates evidence in support of selective pressure to maintain target site counts (rather than sequences), accounting for the possibility of target site turnover. It finally integrates this measure with several simpler ones using a logistic regression predictor. MirAncesTar improves the accuracy of existing MTG predictors by 26% to 157%. Source code and prediction results for human miRNAs, as well as supporting evolutionary data are available at http://cs.mcgill.ca/∼blanchem/mirancestar. PMID:27899600

  7. Molecular and Enzymatic Profiles of Mammalian DNA Methyltransferases: Structures and Targets for Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, F.; Mao, C.; Ding, Y.; Rui, C.; Wu, L.; Shi, A.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, L.; Xu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic event involved in a variety array of processes that may be the foundation of genetic phenomena and diseases. DNA methyltransferase is a key enzyme for cytosine methylation in DNA, and can be divided into two functional families (Dnmt1 and Dnmt3) in mammals. All mammalian DNA methyltransferases are encoded by their own single gene, and consisted of catalytic and regulatory regions (except Dnmt2). Via interactions between functional domains in the regulatory or catalytic regions and other adaptors or cofactors, DNA methyltransferases can be localized at selective areas (specific DNA/nucleotide sequence) and linked to specific chromosome status (euchromatin/heterochromatin, various histone modification status). With assistance from UHRF1 and Dnmt3L or other factors in Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a/Dnmt3b, mammalian DNA methyltransferases can be recruited, and then specifically bind to hemimethylated and unmethylated double-stranded DNA sequence to maintain and de novo setup patterns for DNA methylation. Complicated enzymatic steps catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases include methyl group transferred from cofactor Ado-Met to C5 position of the flipped-out cytosine in targeted DNA duplex. In the light of the fact that different DNA methyltransferases are divergent in both structures and functions, and use unique reprogrammed or distorted routines in development of diseases, design of new drugs targeting specific mammalian DNA methyltransferases or their adaptors in the control of key steps in either maintenance or de novo DNA methylation processes will contribute to individually treating diseases related to DNA methyltransferases. PMID:20939822

  8. Adenovirus Vectors Target Several Cell Subtypes of Mammalian Inner Ear In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Shen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian inner ear harbors diverse cell types that are essential for hearing and balance. Adenovirus is one of the major vectors to deliver genes into the inner ear for functional studies and hair cell regeneration. To identify adenovirus vectors that target specific cell subtypes in the inner ear, we studied three adenovirus vectors, carrying a reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) from two vendors or with a genome editing gene Cre recombinase (Cre), by injection into postnatal days 0 (P0) and 4 (P4) mouse cochlea through scala media by cochleostomy in vivo. We found three adenovirus vectors transduced mouse inner ear cells with different specificities and expression levels, depending on the type of adenoviral vectors and the age of mice. The most frequently targeted region was the cochlear sensory epithelium, including auditory hair cells and supporting cells. Adenovirus with GFP transduced utricular supporting cells as well. This study shows that adenovirus vectors are capable of efficiently and specifically transducing different cell types in the mammalian inner ear and provides useful tools to study inner ear gene function and to evaluate gene therapy to treat hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. PMID:28116172

  9. Targeted detection of mammalian species using carrion fly-derived DNA.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Grit; Stockhausen, Melanie; Hoffmann, Constanze; Merkel, Kevin; Vigilant, Linda; Leendertz, Fabian H; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    DNA analysis from carrion flies (iDNA analysis) has recently been promoted as a powerful tool for cost- and time-efficient monitoring of wildlife. While originally applied to identify any mammalian species present in an area, it should also allow for targeted detection of species and individuals. Using carrion flies captured in the Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, we assessed this possibility by (i) screening carrion fly DNA extracts with nonspecific and species-specific PCR systems, respectively, targeting mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragments of any mammal or of Jentink's duiker (Cephalophus jentinki), three colobine monkeys (subfamily Colobinae) and sooty mangabey (Cercocebus atys); and (ii) genotyping carrion fly extracts containing sooty mangabey mtDNA. In comparison with the nonspecific PCR assay, the use of specific PCRs increased the frequency of detection of target species up to threefold. Detection rates partially reflected relative abundances of target species in the area. Amplification of seven microsatellite loci from carrion flies positive for sooty mangabey mtDNA yielded an average PCR success of 46%, showing that the identification of individuals is, to some extent, possible. Regression analysis of microsatellite PCR success and mtDNA concentration revealed that, among all carrion flies analysed for this study, 1% contained amounts of mammal mtDNA sufficient to attempt genotyping with potentially high success. We conclude that carrion fly-derived DNA analysis represents a promising tool for targeted monitoring of mammals in their natural habitat.

  10. Plant growth-promoting hormones activate mammalian guanylate cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Hudson, J L; Pipkin, J L; Pack, L D; Meiners, S E

    1985-05-01

    In vivo injections of plant growth-promoting hormones increase the growth of animals as well as plants. Plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators are known to increase RNA and protein synthesis. Since cyclic GMP also increases RNA and protein synthesis, the object of the present investigation was to determine whether physiological levels of plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators have part of their mechanism(s) of action through stimulation of the guanylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.2)-cyclic GMP system. Representatives of the three classes of growth-promoting hormones were investigated. Thus, auxins (indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, beta-naphthoxyacetic acid, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy acetic acid), gibberellins (gibberellic acid), and cytokinins [N6-benzyl adenine, kinetin (6-furfuryl aminopurine), and beta-(2-furyl) acrylic acid] all increased rat lung, small intestine, liver, and renal cortex guanylate cyclase activity 2- to 4-fold at the 1 microM concentration. Dose response curves revealed that maximal stimulation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth regulators was at 1 microM; there was no augmented cyclase activity at 1 nM. The guanylate cyclase cationic cofactor manganese was not essential for augmentation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting regulators. The antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene did not block the enhancement of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting factors. These data suggest that guanylate cyclase may play a role in the mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting hormones and even of positive plant regulators at the cellular level.

  11. Larger Mammalian Body Size Leads to Lower Retroviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Katzourakis, Aris; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Lim, Aaron G.; Gupta, Sunetra; Belshaw, Robert; Gifford, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses have been infecting mammals for at least 100 million years, leaving descendants in host genomes known as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). The abundance of ERVs is partly determined by their mode of replication, but it has also been suggested that host life history traits could enhance or suppress their activity. We show that larger bodied species have lower levels of ERV activity by reconstructing the rate of ERV integration across 38 mammalian species. Body size explains 37% of the variance in ERV integration rate over the last 10 million years, controlling for the effect of confounding due to other life history traits. Furthermore, 68% of the variance in the mean age of ERVs per genome can also be explained by body size. These results indicate that body size limits the number of recently replicating ERVs due to their detrimental effects on their host. To comprehend the possible mechanistic links between body size and ERV integration we built a mathematical model, which shows that ERV abundance is favored by lower body size and higher horizontal transmission rates. We argue that because retroviral integration is tumorigenic, the negative correlation between body size and ERV numbers results from the necessity to reduce the risk of cancer, under the assumption that this risk scales positively with body size. Our model also fits the empirical observation that the lifetime risk of cancer is relatively invariant among mammals regardless of their body size, known as Peto's paradox, and indicates that larger bodied mammals may have evolved mechanisms to limit ERV activity. PMID:25033295

  12. CX-5461 induces autophagy and inhibits tumor growth via mammalian target of rapamycin-related signaling pathways in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Leiming; Li, Yan; Zhao, Jiansong; Fan, Shuli; Wang, Liguo; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone tumor, but molecular mechanisms of the disease have not been well understood, and treatment of metastatic OS remains a challenge. Rapid ribosomal RNA synthesis in cancer is transcribed by RNA polymerase I, which results in unbridled cell growth. The recent discovery of CX-5461, a selective RNA polymerase I inhibitor, exerted its inhibitory effect of ribosomal RNA synthesis and antiproliferative potency. Here, we demonstrate that CX-5461 induces G2 arrest in the cell cycle and expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 II isoform in OS cell lines. Autophagic vacuoles could be observed in electron microscopy and 3-methyladenine prevented cell death mediated by CX-5461. Moreover, it significantly augmented phosphorylated AMP-Activated Protein Kinases α (p-AMPK α). (Thr172) expression in U2-OS cells and decreased p-Akt (Ser473) expression in MNNG cells, respectively, which repressed their downstream effector, mammalian target of rapamycin. On the other hand, CX-5461 increased p53 accumulation and messenger RNA level of its target genes, p21, MDM2, and Sestrin1/2 in U2-OS cells. Knockdown of p53 expression markedly impaired cell death as well as the expression of light chain 3-II and p21 induced by CX-5461. It also significantly enhanced doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxic effect in vitro and in vivo together with additive expression of p53, p21, and light chain 3-II in U2-OS cells. Our data indicate that CX-5461 might induce autophagy via mammalian target of rapamycin-associated signaling pathways dependent on p53 status and exert p53-dependent synergistic antitumor effect combined with doxorubicin in OS. These results suggest that CX-5461 might be promising in clinical therapy for OS, especially cases harboring wild-type p53. PMID:27729807

  13. Coupling nutrient sensing to metabolic homoeostasis: the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway.

    PubMed

    André, Caroline; Cota, Daniela

    2012-11-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is known to couple different environmental cues to the regulation of several energy-demanding functions within the cell, spanning from protein translation to mitochondrial activity. As a result, at the organism level, mTORC1 activity affects energy balance and general metabolic homoeostasis by modulating both the activity of neuronal populations that play key roles in the control of food intake and body weight, as well as by determining storage and use of fuel substrates in peripheral tissues. This review focuses on recent advances made in understanding the role of the mTORC1 pathway in the regulation of energy balance. More particularly, it aims at providing an overview of the status of knowledge regarding the mechanisms underlying the ability of certain amino acids, glucose and fatty acids, to affect mTORC1 activity and in turn illustrates how the mTORC1 pathway couples nutrient sensing to the hypothalamic regulation of the organisms' energy homoeostasis and to the control of intracellular metabolic processes, such as glucose uptake, protein and lipid biosynthesis. The evidence reviewed pinpoints the mTORC1 pathway as an integrator of the actions of nutrients on metabolic health and provides insight into the relevance of this intracellular pathway as a potential target for the therapy of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type-2 diabetes.

  14. Targeting the dysregulated mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in organ transplantation: killing 2 birds with 1 stone.

    PubMed

    Haidinger, Michael; Werzowa, Johannes; Weichhart, Thomas; Säemann, Marcus D

    2011-10-01

    Dysregulation and hyperactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway define the molecular basis of the hamartoma syndromes, including Cowden syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)/lymphangioleiomyomatosis, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Loss of the tumor suppressors phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), TSC1, TSC2, and LKB1 results in uncontrolled growth of usually benign tumors in various organs that, however, frequently lead to organ failure. Therefore, organ transplantation is a common therapeutic option in distinct patients with hamartoma syndromes, especially those with TSC/lymphangioleiomyomatosis. mTOR inhibitors are currently used in allogeneic transplantation as immunosuppressants and for the treatment of a growing number of cancers with dysregulated mTOR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway. This dual targeting provides the unique opportunity for mTOR inhibitors to affect hamartoma syndromes at the molecular level along with potent immunosuppression in transplanted individuals. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of hamartoma syndromes and discuss the recent clinical progress in transplant patients with hamartomas. Combining the identification of novel molecular targets of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mTOR pathway with insights into the clinical effectiveness of current therapeutic strategies sets the stage for a broader translational potential essential for further progress both in the treatment of cancer and for transplantation.

  15. Live imaging and modeling of inner nuclear membrane targeting reveals its molecular requirements in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Boni, Andrea; Politi, Antonio Z.; Strnad, Petr; Xiang, Wanqing; Hossain, M. Julius

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins is essential for nuclear architecture and function, yet its mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we established a new reporter that allows real-time imaging of membrane protein transport from the ER to the INM using Lamin B receptor and Lap2β as model INM proteins. These reporters allowed us to characterize the kinetics of INM targeting and establish a mathematical model of this process and enabled us to probe its molecular requirements in an RNA interference screen of 96 candidate genes. Modeling of the phenotypes of genes involved in transport of these INM proteins predicted that it critically depended on the number and permeability of nuclear pores and the availability of nuclear binding sites, but was unaffected by depletion of most transport receptors. These predictions were confirmed with targeted validation experiments on the functional requirements of nucleoporins and nuclear lamins. Collectively, our data support a diffusion retention model of INM protein transport in mammalian cells. PMID:26056140

  16. Targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling network in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martelli, A M; Evangelisti, C; Follo, M Y; Ramazzotti, G; Fini, M; Giardino, R; Manzoli, L; McCubrey, J A; Cocco, L

    2011-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) comprise a subset of hierarchically organized, rare cancer cells with the ability to initiate cancer in xenografts of genetically modified murine models. CSCs are thought to be responsible for tumor onset, self-renewal/maintenance, mutation accumulation, and metastasis. The existence of CSCs could explain the high frequency of neoplasia relapse and resistance to all of currently available therapies, including chemotherapy. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is a key regulator of physiological cell processes which include proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, motility, metabolism, and autophagy. Nevertheless, aberrantly upregulated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling characterizes many types of cancers where it negatively influences prognosis. Several lines of evidence indicate that this signaling system plays a key role also in CSC biology. Of note, CSCs are more sensitive to pathway inhibition with small molecules when compared to healthy stem cells. This observation provides the proof-of-principle that functional differences in signaling transduction pathways between CSCs and healthy stem cells can be identified. Here, we review the evidence which links the signals deriving from the PI3K/Akt/mTOR network with CSC biology, both in hematological and solid tumors. We then highlight how therapeutic targeting of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling with small molecule inhibitors could improve cancer patient outcome, by eliminating CSCs.

  17. Susceptibility of PTEN-positive metastatic tumors to small interfering RNA targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Koide, Hiroyuki; Asai, Tomohiro; Kato, Hiroki; Yonenaga, Norihito; Yokota, Masafumi; Ando, Hidenori; Dewa, Takehisa; Nango, Mamoru; Maeda, Noriyuki; Oku, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    PTEN-positive tumors are not susceptible to the treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Here, we determined the susceptibility of PTEN-positive cells to small interfering RNA for mTOR (si-mTOR) by using a novel liposomal delivery system. We prepared dicetyl phosphate-tetraethylenepentamine-based polycation liposomes (TEPA-PCL) decorated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafting Ala-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gly (APRPG), a VRGFR-1-targeting peptide. APRPG-PEG-decorated TEPA-PCL carrying si-mTOR (APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR) had an antiproliferative effect against B16F10 murine melanoma cells (PTEN-positive) and significantly inhibited both the proliferation and tube formation of mouse 2H-11 endothelial-like cells (PTEN-positive). APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR treatment did not induce Akt phosphorylation (Ser473) in either B16F10 or 2H-11 cells although there was strong phosphorylation of Akt in response to rapamycin treatment. Intravenous injection of APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR significantly suppressed the tumor growth compared with rapamycin treatment in mice bearing B16F10 melanoma. These findings suggest that APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR is useful for the treatment of PTEN-positive tumors.

  18. The progesterone-induced enhancement of object recognition memory consolidation involves activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways in the dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Orr, Patrick T; Rubin, Amanda J; Fan, Lu; Kent, Brianne A; Frick, Karyn M

    2012-04-01

    Although much recent work has elucidated the biochemical mechanisms underlying the modulation of memory by 17β-estradiol, little is known about the signaling events through which progesterone (P) regulates memory. We recently demonstrated that immediate post-training infusion of P into the dorsal hippocampus enhances object recognition memory consolidation in young ovariectomized female mice (Orr et al., 2009). The goal of the present study was to identify the biochemical alterations that might underlie this mnemonic enhancement. We hypothesized that the P-induced enhancement of object recognition would be dependent on activation of the ERK and mTOR pathways. In young ovariectomized mice, we found that bilateral dorsal hippocampal infusion of P significantly increased levels of phospho-p42 ERK and the mTOR substrate S6K in the dorsal hippocampus 5 min after infusion. Phospho-p42 ERK levels were downregulated 15 min after infusion and returned to baseline 30 min after infusion, suggesting a biphasic effect of P on ERK activation. Dorsal hippocampal ERK and mTOR activation were necessary for P to facilitate memory consolidation, as suggested by the fact that inhibitors of both pathways infused into the dorsal hippocampus immediately after training blocked the P-induced enhancement of object recognition. Collectively, these data provide the first demonstration that the ability of P to enhance memory consolidation depends on the rapid activation of cell signaling and protein synthesis pathways in the dorsal hippocampus.

  19. Managing stomatitis in patients treated with Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pilotte, Amy Potter; Hohos, Melissa Beth; Polson, Kathleen M O; Huftalen, Tarsha Marie; Treister, Nathaniel

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are a class of targeted cancer therapeutic agents with clinical benefit for multiple tumor types. Oral ulcerations are a common side effect of mTOR inhibitors; however, the clinical findings resemble aphthous stomatitis rather than the mucositis seen with chemotherapy. Consequently, the appearance of aphthous-like oral ulcerations has been referred to as mTOR inhibitor-associated stomatitis (mIAS). The severity of mIAS can be minimized by following common preventive steps and initiating treatment at the first sign of mouth discomfort, thereby reducing the likelihood of treatment discontinuation. mIAS can be managed through prophylactic measures, such as patient education in oral hygiene and avoidance of triggers. Patients who develop mIAS may be treated topically using rinses or other local therapies, including corticosteroids. In severe cases, dose modifications may be required. Oncology nurses have an important role in the management of patients with cancer and are well positioned to offer strategies for minimizing the occurrence and impact of mIAS.

  20. Defining the Domain Arrangement of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex Component Rictor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Ning; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complexes play a pivotal role in the cell. Raptor and Rictor proteins interact with mTOR to form two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, respectively. While the domain structure of Raptor is known, current bioinformatics tools failed to classify the domains in Rictor. Here we focus on identifying specific domains in Rictor by searching for conserved regions. We scanned the pdb structural database and constructed three protein domain datasets. Next we carried out multiple pairwise sequence alignments of the proteins in the domain dataset. By analyzing the z-scores of Rictor sequence similarity to protein sequences in the dataset, we assigned the structural and functional domains of Rictor. We found that, like Raptor, Rictor also has HEAT and WD40 domains, which could be the common motif binding to mTORC. Rictor may also have pleckstrin homology domains, which mediate cellular localization and transmit signals to downstream targets, as well as a domain that is homologous to 50S protein L17 and human 39S protein L17. This putative ribosome binding domain could mediate mTORC2–ribosome interaction. PMID:26176550

  1. SHEDDING NEW LIGHT ON NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES THROUGH THE MAMMALIAN TARGET OF RAPAMYCIN

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen; Wang, Shaohui; Maiese, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders affect a significant portion of the world's population leading to either disability or death for almost 30 million individuals worldwide. One novel therapeutic target that may offer promise for multiple disease entities that involve Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, trauma, stroke, and tumors of the nervous system is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). mTOR signaling is dependent upon the mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes that are composed of mTOR and several regulatory proteins including the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC1, hamartin/ TSC2, tuberin). Through a number of integrated cell signaling pathways that involve those of mTORC1 and mTORC2 as well as more novel signaling tied to cytokines, Wnt, and forkhead, mTOR can foster stem cellular proliferation, tissue repair and longevity, and synaptic growth by modulating mechanisms that foster both apoptosis and autophagy. Yet, mTOR through its proliferative capacity may sometimes be detrimental to central nervous system recovery and even promote tumorigenesis. Further knowledge of mTOR and the critical pathways governed by this serine/threonine protein kinase can bring new light for neurodegeneration and other related diseases that currently require new and robust treatments. PMID:22980037

  2. Dazl is a target RNA suppressed by mammalian NANOS2 in sexually differentiating male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yuzuru; Katsuki, Takeo; Kokubo, Hiroki; Masuda, Aki; Saga, Yumiko

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionally conserved Nanos RNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in germ cell development. While a mammalian Nanos family protein, NANOS2, is required for sexual differentiation of male (XY) germ cells in mice, the underlying mechanisms and the identities of its target RNAs in vivo remain elusive. Using comprehensive microarray analysis and a bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic system, here we identify Dazl, a germ cell-specific gene encoding an RNA-binding protein implicated in translation, as a crucial target of NANOS2. Importantly, removal of the Dazl 3′-untranslated region in XY germ cells stabilizes the Dazl mRNA, resulting in elevated meiotic gene expression, abnormal resumption of the cell cycle and impaired processing-body formation, reminiscent of Nanos2-knockout phenotypes. Furthermore, our data suggest that NANOS2 acts as an antagonist of the DAZL protein. We propose a dual system of NANOS2-mediated suppression of Dazl expression as a pivotal molecular mechanism promoting sexual differentiation of XY germ cells. PMID:27072294

  3. Inhibiting PLK1 induces autophagy of acute myeloid leukemia cells via mammalian target of rapamycin pathway dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yan-Fang; Li, Zhi-Heng; Du, Wei-Wei; Xu, Li-Xiao; Ren, Jun-Li; Li, Xiao-Lu; Fang, Fang; Xie, Yi; Li, Mei; Qian, Guang-Hui; Li, Yan-Hong; Li, Yi-Ping; Li, Gang; Wu, Yi; Feng, Xing; Wang, Jian; He, Wei-Qi; Hu, Shao-Yan; Lu, Jun; Pan, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Decreased autophagy is accompanied by the development of a myeloproliferative state or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML cells are often sensitive to autophagy‑inducing stimuli, prompting the idea that targeting autophagy can be useful in AML cytotoxic therapy. AML NB4 cells overexpressing microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-green fluorescent protein were screened with 69 inhibitors to analyze autophagy activity. AML cells were treated with the polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibitors RO3280 and BI2536 before autophagy analysis. Cleaved LC3 (LC3-II) and the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, and Unc-51-like kinase 1 during autophagy was detected with western blotting. Autophagosomes were detected using transmission electron microscopy. Several inhibitors had promising autophagy inducer effects: BI2536, MLN0905, SK1-I, SBE13 HCL and RO3280. Moreover, these inhibitors all targeted PLK1. Autophagy activity was increased in the NB4 cells treated with RO3280 and BI2536. Inhibition of PLK1 expression in NB4, K562 and HL-60 leukemia cells with RNA interference increased LC3-II and autophagy activity. The phosphorylation of mTOR was reduced significantly in NB4 cells treated with RO3280 and BI2536, and was also reduced significantly when PLK1 expression was downregulated in the NB4, K562 and HL-60 cells. We demonstrate that PLK1 inhibition induces AML cell autophagy and that it results in mTOR dephosphorylation. These results may provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of PLK1 in regulating autophagy.

  4. Inhibiting PLK1 induces autophagy of acute myeloid leukemia cells via mammalian target of rapamycin pathway dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yan-Fang; Li, Zhi-Heng; Du, Wei-Wei; Xu, Li-Xiao; Ren, Jun-Li; Li, Xiao-Lu; Fang, Fang; Xie, Yi; Li, Mei; Qian, Guang-Hui; Li, Yan-Hong; Li, Yi-Ping; Li, Gang; Wu, Yi; Feng, Xing; Wang, Jian; He, Wei-Qi; Hu, Shao-Yan; Lu, Jun; Pan, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Decreased autophagy is accompanied by the development of a myeloproliferative state or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML cells are often sensitive to autophagy-inducing stimuli, prompting the idea that targeting autophagy can be useful in AML cytotoxic therapy. AML NB4 cells overexpressing microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-green fluorescent protein were screened with 69 inhibitors to analyze autophagy activity. AML cells were treated with the polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibitors RO3280 and BI2536 before autophagy analysis. Cleaved LC3 (LC3-II) and the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, and Unc-51-like kinase 1 during autophagy was detected with western blotting. Autophagosomes were detected using transmission electron microscopy. Several inhibitors had promising autophagy inducer effects: BI2536, MLN0905, SK1-I, SBE13 HCL and RO3280. Moreover, these inhibitors all targeted PLK1. Autophagy activity was increased in the NB4 cells treated with RO3280 and BI2536. Inhibition of PLK1 expression in NB4, K562 and HL-60 leukemia cells with RNA interference increased LC3-II and autophagy activity. The phosphorylation of mTOR was reduced significantly in NB4 cells treated with RO3280 and BI2536, and was also reduced significantly when PLK1 expression was downregulated in the NB4, K562 and HL-60 cells. We demonstrate that PLK1 inhibition induces AML cell autophagy and that it results in mTOR dephosphorylation. These results may provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of PLK1 in regulating autophagy. PMID:28184925

  5. ATP-Competitive Inhibitors of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Design and Synthesis of Highly Potent and Selective Pyrazolopyrimidines

    SciTech Connect

    Zask, Arie; Verheijen, Jeroen C.; Curran, Kevin; Kaplan, Joshua; Richard, David J.; Nowak, Pawel; Malwitz, David J.; Brooijmans, Natasja; Bard, Joel; Svenson, Kristine; Lucas, Judy; Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Hollander, Irwin; Gibbons, James J.; Abraham, Robert T.; Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Mansour, Tarek S.; Yu, Ker

    2009-09-18

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central regulator of growth, survival, and metabolism, is a validated target for cancer therapy. Rapamycin and its analogues, allosteric inhibitors of mTOR, only partially inhibit one mTOR protein complex. ATP-competitive, global inhibitors of mTOR that have the potential for enhanced anticancer efficacy are described. Structural features leading to potency and selectivity were identified and refined leading to compounds with in vivo efficacy in tumor xenograft models.

  6. Complex regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in the basomedial hypothalamus by leptin and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Eneida C; Münzberg, Heike; Cota, Daniela; Leshan, Rebecca L; Kopp, Keely; Ishida-Takahashi, Ryoko; Jones, Justin C; Fingar, Diane C; Seeley, Randy J; Myers, Martin G

    2009-10-01

    The medial basal hypothalamus, including the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH), integrates signals of energy status to modulate metabolism and energy balance. Leptin and feeding regulate the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the hypothalamus, and hypothalamic mTORC1 contributes to the control of feeding and energy balance. To determine the mechanisms by which leptin modulates mTORC1 in specific hypothalamic neurons, we immunohistochemically assessed the mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (pS6). In addition to confirming the modulation of ARC mTORC1 activity by acute leptin treatment, this analysis revealed the robust activation of mTORC1-dependent ARC pS6 in response to fasting and leptin deficiency in leptin receptor-expressing Agouti-related protein neurons. In contrast, fasting and leptin deficiency suppress VMH mTORC1 signaling. The appropriate regulation of ARC mTORC1 by mutant leptin receptor isoforms correlated with their ability to suppress the activity of Agouti-related protein neurons, suggesting the potential stimulation of mTORC1 by the neuronal activity. Indeed, fasting- and leptin deficiency-induced pS6-immunoreactivity (IR) extensively colocalized with c-Fos-IR in ARC and VMH neurons. Furthermore, ghrelin, which activates orexigenic ARC neurons, increased ARC mTORC1 activity and induced colocalized pS6- and c-Fos-IR. Thus, neuronal activity promotes mTORC1/pS6 in response to signals of energy deficit. In contrast, insulin, which activates mTORC1 via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, increased ARC and VMH pS6-IR in the absence of neuronal activation. The regulation of mTORC1 in the basomedial hypothalamus thus varies by cell and stimulus type, as opposed to responding in a uniform manner to nutritional and hormonal perturbations.

  7. The role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and phosphatidic acid in the regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin following eccentric contractions.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, T K; Duffy, L R; Frey, J W; Hornberger, T A

    2009-07-15

    Resistance exercise induces a hypertrophic response in skeletal muscle and recent studies have begun to shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. For example, several studies indicate that signalling by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is necessary for a hypertrophic response. Furthermore, resistance exercise has been proposed to activate mTOR signalling through an upstream pathway involving the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase B (PKB); however, this hypothesis has not been thoroughly tested. To test this hypothesis, we first evaluated the temporal pattern of signalling through PI3K-PKB and mTOR following a bout of resistance exercise with eccentric contractions (EC). Our results indicated that the activation of signalling through PI3K-PKB is a transient event (<15 min), while the activation of mTOR is sustained for a long duration (>12 h). Furthermore, inhibition of PI3K-PKB activity did not prevent the activation of mTOR signalling by ECs, indicating that PI3K-PKB is not part of the upstream regulatory pathway. These observations led us to investigate an alternative pathway for the activation of mTOR signalling involving the synthesis of phosphatidic acid (PA) by phospholipase D (PLD). Our results demonstrate that ECs induce a sustained elevation in [PA] and inhibiting the synthesis of PA by PLD prevented the activation of mTOR. Furthermore, we determined that similar to ECs, PA activates mTOR signalling through a PI3K-PKB-independent mechanism. Combined, the results of this study indicate that the activation of mTOR following eccentric contractions occurs through a PI3K-PKB-independent mechanism that requires PLD and PA.

  8. Ubiquilin-mediated Small Molecule Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Rory T.; Shi, Yuntao; Long, Marcus J. C.; Marr, Michael T.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation. mTORC1 has been implicated in many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration, and is a target to prolong lifespan. Here we report a small molecule inhibitor (Cbz-B3A) of mTORC1 signaling. Cbz-B3A inhibits the phosphorylation of eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) and blocks 68% of translation. In contrast, rapamycin preferentially inhibits the phosphorylation of p70S6k and blocks 35% of translation. Cbz-B3A does not appear to bind directly to mTORC1, but instead binds to ubiquilins 1, 2, and 4. Knockdown of ubiquilin 2, but not ubiquilins 1 and 4, decreases the phosphorylation of 4EBP1, suggesting that ubiquilin 2 activates mTORC1. The knockdown of ubiquilins 2 and 4 decreases the effect of Cbz-B3A on 4EBP1 phosphorylation. Cbz-B3A slows cellular growth of some human leukemia cell lines, but is not cytotoxic. Thus Cbz-B3A exemplifies a novel strategy to inhibit mTORC1 signaling that might be exploited for treating many human diseases. We propose that Cbz-B3A reveals a previously unappreciated regulatory pathway coordinating cytosolic protein quality control and mTORC1 signaling. PMID:26740621

  9. Grape polyphenols inhibit Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and potentiate the effects of gefitinib in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie F

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that a combination of dietary grape polyphenols resveratrol, quercetin, and catechin (RQC), at low concentrations, was effective at inhibiting metastatic cancer progression. Herein, we investigate the molecular mechanisms of RQC in breast cancer and explore the potential of RQC as a potentiation agent for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapeutic gefitinib. Our in vitro experiments showed RQC induced apoptosis in gefitinib-resistant breast cancer cells via regulation of a myriad of proapoptotic proteins. Because the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is often elevated during development of anti-EGFR therapy resistance, the effect of RQC on the mTOR upstream effector Akt and the negative regulator AMP kinase (AMPK) was investigated. RQC was found to reduce Akt activity, induce the activation of AMPK, and inhibit mTOR signaling in breast cancer cells. Combined RQC and gefitinib decreased gefitinib resistant breast cancer cell viability to a greater extent than RQC or gefitinib alone. Moreover, RQC inhibited Akt and mTOR and activated AMPK even in the presence of gefitinib. Our in vivo experiments showed combined RQC and gefitinib was more effective than the individual treatments at inhibiting mammary tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice. Therefore, RQC treatment inhibits breast cancer progression and may potentiate anti-EGFR therapy by inhibition of Akt/mTOR signaling.

  10. A central role for the mammalian target of rapamycin in LPS-induced anorexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yunshuang; Wang, Yi; Li, Dan; Song, Zhigang; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), also known as endotoxin, induces profound anorexia. However, the LPS-provoked pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and the neural mechanisms underlying the development of anorexia are not clear. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of metabolism, cell growth, and protein synthesis. This study aimed to determine whether the mTOR pathway is involved in LPS-induced anorexia. Effects of LPS on hypothalamic gene/protein expression in mice were measured by RT-PCR or western blotting analysis. To determine whether inhibition of mTOR signaling could attenuate LPS-induced anorexia, we administered an i.c.v. injection of rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, on LPS-treated male mice. In this study, we showed that LPS stimulates the mTOR signaling pathway through the enhanced phosphorylation of mTOR(Ser2448) and p70S6K(Thr389). We also showed that LPS administration increased the phosphorylation of FOXO1(Ser256), the p65 subunit of nuclear factor kappa B (P<0.05), and FOXO1/3a(Thr) (24) (/) (32) (P<0.01). Blocking the mTOR pathway significantly attenuated the LPS-induced anorexia by decreasing the phosphorylation of p70S6K(Thr389), FOXO1(Ser256), and FOXO1/3a(Thr) (24) (/) (32). These results suggest promising approaches for the prevention and treatment of LPS-induced anorexia.

  11. Regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAT3 by mammalian target of rapamycin mTOR.

    PubMed

    Almilaji, Ahmad; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Guo, Anne; Munoz, Carlos; Föller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2012-05-04

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is stimulated by insulin, growth factors and nutrients and confers survival of several cell types. The kinase has previously been shown to stimulate amino acid uptake. In neurons, the cellular uptake of glutamate by the excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs) decreases excitation and thus confers protection against excitotoxicity. In epithelia, EAAT3 accomplishes transepithelial glutamate and aspartate transport. The present study explored, whether mTOR regulates EAAT3 (SLC1A1). To this end, cRNA encoding EAAT3 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without cRNA encoding mTOR and the glutamate induced current (I(glu)), a measure of glutamate transport, determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. Moreover, EAAT3 protein abundance was determined utilizing chemiluminescence. As a result, I(glu) was observed in Xenopus oocytes expressing EAAT3 but not in water injected oocytes. Coexpression of mTOR significantly increased I(glu), an effect reversed by rapamycin (100 nM). mTOR coexpression increased EAAT3 protein abundance in the cell membrane. The decay of I(glu) following inhibition of carrier insertion with brefeldin A in oocytes coexpressing EAAT3 with mTOR was similar in the presence and absence of rapamycin (100 nM). In conclusion, mTOR is a novel powerful regulator of EAAT3 and may thus contribute to protection against neuroexcitotoxicity.

  12. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 is involved in differentiation of regenerating myofibers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miyabara, Elen H; Conte, Talita C; Silva, Meiricris T; Baptista, Igor L; Bueno, Carlos; Fiamoncini, Jarlei; Lambertucci, Rafael H; Serra, Carmen S; Brum, Patricia C; Pithon-Curi, Tania; Curi, Rui; Aoki, Marcelo S; Oliveira, Antonio C; Moriscot, Anselmo S

    2010-11-01

    This work was undertaken to provide further insight into the role of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in skeletal muscle regeneration, focusing on myofiber size recovery. Rats were treated or not with rapamycin, an mTORC1 inhibitor. Soleus muscles were then subjected to cryolesion and analyzed 1, 10, and 21 days later. A decrease in soleus myofiber cross-section area on post-cryolesion days 10 and 21 was accentuated by rapamycin, which was also effective in reducing protein synthesis in these freeze-injured muscles. The incidence of proliferating satellite cells during regeneration was unaltered by rapamycin, although immunolabeling for neonatal myosin heavy chain (MHC) was weaker in cryolesion+rapamycin muscles than in cryolesion-only muscles. In addition, the decline in tetanic contraction of freeze-injured muscles was accentuated by rapamycin. This study indicates that mTORC1 plays a key role in the recovery of muscle mass and the differentiation of regenerating myofibers, independently of necrosis and satellite cell proliferation mechanisms.

  13. L-leucine availability regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, p70 S6 kinase and glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity in L6 muscle cells: evidence for the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the L-leucine-induced up-regulation of system A amino acid transport.

    PubMed Central

    Peyrollier, K; Hajduch, E; Blair, A S; Hyde, R; Hundal, H S

    2000-01-01

    Amino acid availability is known to regulate diverse cell processes including the activation of p70 S6 kinase, initiation factors involved in mRNA translation, gene expression and cellular amino acid uptake. Essential amino acids, in particular the branched-chain amino acids (e.g. leucine), have been shown to be the dominant players in mediating these effects, although the precise nature by which they regulate these processes remain poorly understood. In this study we have investigated the mechanisms involved in the leucine-induced modulation of p70 S6 kinase and addressed whether this kinase participates in the up-regulation of the System A amino acid transporter in L6 muscle cells. Incubation of muscle cells that had been amino acid-deprived for 1 h with L-leucine (2 mM) led to a rapid (>2-fold) activation of p70 S6 kinase, which was suppressed by both wortmannin and rapamycin. Consistent with this finding, addition of leucine caused a rapid ( approximately 5-fold) but transient stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). PI3K activation was inhibited by wortmannin and was not dependent upon insulin receptor substrate-1 activation. Unlike stimulation by insulin, activation of neither protein kinase B nor p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase accompanied the leucine-induced stimulation of PI3K. However, the leucine-induced activation of PI3K and p70 S6 kinase did result in the concomitant inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). Leucine enhanced System A transport by approximately 50%. We have shown previously that this stimulation is protein-synthesis-dependent and in the current study we show that it was blocked by both wortmannin and rapamycin. Our findings indicate that PI3K and the mammalian target of rapamycin are components of a nutrient signalling pathway that regulates the activation of p70 S6 kinase and induction of System A in L6 cells. The activation of this pathway by leucine is also responsible for the inactivation of GSK-3

  14. Dysregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in chromophobe renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Alcides; Albadine, Roula; Schultz, Luciana; Hicks, Jessica; Carducci, Michael A; Argani, Pedram; Allaf, Mohamad; Netto, George J

    2013-10-01

    Targeted therapy in advanced clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCC) is now an established modality. The latter is in stark contrast to non-clear cell subtypes. We explored the translational support for the use of antagonists of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor pathways in chromophobe RCC. The immunoexpression of PTEN, phos-AKT, phosphorylated S6 (phos-S6), 4EBP1, p27, c-MYC, and HIF-1α was evaluated in 33 patients with chromophobe RCC who were treated by partial/radical nephrectomy without adjuvant therapy. PTEN was lower in tumor than in normal kidney (P<.001), and loss of PTEN expression was found in 67% of the tumors. In tumor tissues, phos-S6 and 4EBP1 were higher than in normal kidney (P≤.005). Conversely, scores of p27 were lower in tumor than in normal kidney (P<.001). Finally, scores of phos-AKT, c-MYC, and HIF-1α were not significantly different in tumor and in normal kidney. Overall mortality and cancer-specific mortality were 9% and 0%, respectively. Multifocal tumors had higher levels of PTEN, phos-AKT, and HIF-1α (P≤.01). None of the clinicopathologic variables (age, ethnicity, gender, pT stage, tumor size, multifocality, and positive surgical margins) was associated with outcome. Similarly, none of the tested biomarkers predicted overall mortality, either in unadjusted or adjusted Cox regression models. In summary, our study provides new evidence of dysregulation of the mTOR pathway in chromophobe RCC. Immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway and hypoxia-induced pathway members lacked prognostic significance in our cohort.

  15. Characterization of the RNA Silencing Suppression Activity of the Ebola Virus VP35 Protein in Plants and Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yali; Cherukuri, Nil Celebi; Jackel, Jamie N.; Wu, Zetang; Crary, Monica; Buckley, Kenneth J.; Bisaro, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a lethal hemorrhagic fever for which there is no approved effective treatment or prevention strategy. EBOV VP35 is a virulence factor that blocks innate antiviral host responses, including the induction of and response to alpha/beta interferon. VP35 is also an RNA silencing suppressor (RSS). By inhibiting microRNA-directed silencing, mammalian virus RSSs have the capacity to alter the cellular environment to benefit replication. A reporter gene containing specific microRNA target sequences was used to demonstrate that prior expression of wild-type VP35 was able to block establishment of microRNA silencing in mammalian cells. In addition, wild-type VP35 C-terminal domain (CTD) protein fusions were shown to bind small interfering RNA (siRNA). Analysis of mutant proteins demonstrated that reporter activity in RSS assays did not correlate with their ability to antagonize double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase R (PKR) or bind siRNA. The results suggest that enhanced reporter activity in the presence of VP35 is a composite of nonspecific translational enhancement and silencing suppression. Moreover, most of the specific RSS activity in mammalian cells is RNA binding independent, consistent with VP35's proposed role in sequestering one or more silencing complex proteins. To examine RSS activity in a system without interferon, VP35 was tested in well-characterized plant silencing suppression assays. VP35 was shown to possess potent plant RSS activity, and the activities of mutant proteins correlated strongly, but not exclusively, with RNA binding ability. The results suggest the importance of VP35-protein interactions in blocking silencing in a system (mammalian) that cannot amplify dsRNA. PMID:22238300

  16. Engineered tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease active in the secretory pathway of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cesaratto, Francesca; López-Requena, Alejandro; Burrone, Oscar R; Petris, Gianluca

    2015-10-20

    Tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) is a unique endopeptidase with stringent substrate specificity. TEVp has been widely used as a purified protein for in vitro applications, but also as a biological tool directly expressing it in living cells. To adapt the protease to diverse applications, several TEVp mutants with different stability and enzymatic properties have been reported. Herein we describe the development of a novel engineered TEVp mutant designed to be active in the secretory pathway. While wild type TEVp targeted to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells is synthetized as an N-glycosylated and catalytically inactive enzyme, a TEVp mutant with selected mutations at two verified N-glycosylation sites and at an exposed cysteine was highly efficient. This mutant was very active in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of living cells and can be used as a biotechnological tool to cleave proteins within the secretory pathway. As an immediate practical application we report the expression of a complete functional monoclonal antibody expressed from a single polypeptide, which was cleaved by our TEVp mutant into the two antibody chains and secreted as an assembled and functional molecule. In addition, we show active TEVp mutants lacking auto-cleavage activity.

  17. Contribution of mammalian target of rapamycin in the pathophysiology of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Saeedi Saravi, Seyed Soheil; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Nobakht, Maliheh; Mousavi, Seyyedeh Elaheh; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the pathogenesis of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy and the potential of rapamycin to improve this pathologic condition. METHODS: Male albino Wistar rats weighing 100-120 g were treated with tetrachloride carbon (CCl4) for 8 wk to induce cirrhosis. Subsequently, animals were administered rapamycin (2 mg/kg per day). The QTc intervals were calculated in a 5-min electrocardiogram. Then, the left ventricular papillary muscles were isolated to examine inotropic responsiveness to β-adrenergic stimulation using a standard organ bath equipped by Powerlab system. Phosphorylated-mTOR localization in left ventricles was immunohistochemically assessed, and ventricular tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was measured. Western blot was used to measure levels of ventricular phosphorylated-mTOR protein. RESULTS: Cirrhosis was confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin staining of liver tissues, visual observation of lethargy, weight loss, jaundice, brown urine, ascites, liver stiffness, and a significant increase of spleen weight (P < 0.001). A significant prolongation in QTc intervals occurred in cirrhotic rats exposed to CCl4 (P < 0.001), while this prolongation was decreased with rapamycin treatment (P < 0.01). CCl4-induced cirrhosis caused a significant decrease of contractile responsiveness to isoproterenol stimulation and a significant increase in cardiac TNF-α. These findings were correlated with data from western blot and immunohistochemical studies on phosphorylated-mTOR expression in left ventricles. Phosphorylated-mTOR was significantly enhanced in cirrhotic rats, especially in the endothelium, compared to controls. Rapamycin treatment significantly increased contractile force and myocardial localization of phosphorylated-mTOR and decreased cardiac TNF-α concentration compared to cirrhotic rats with no treatment. CONCLUSION: In this study, we demonstrated a potential role for cardiac mTOR in the pathophysiology of

  18. Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Munari, Enrico; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Faraj, Sheila; Chaux, Alcides; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Hicks, Jessica; Meeker, Alan; Nonomura, Norio; Netto, George J

    2013-12-01

    Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) accounts for 5% to 10% of all urothelial carcinomas. Despite many shared features, key clinical and molecular genetic differences between upper tract and bladder urothelial carcinomas are becoming apparent. We have previously demonstrated alterations of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in bladder carcinoma with a potential impact on biological behavior. In the current study, we evaluated the expression status and prognostic significance of mTOR pathway members in UTUC. Archival formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues from 99 primary UTUCs were retrieved from one of the authors' institution. Tissue microarrays were constructed with triplicate tumor samples and paired nonneoplastic urothelium. Tissue microarrays were analyzed using immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway members: PTEN, phos-AKT, phos-mTOR, phos-S6, phos-4EBP1, and related markers p27 and c-MYC; correlation with clinicopathologic parameters and outcome was performed. We found significantly lower expression of PTEN, phos-AKT, phos-mTOR, phos-S6, phos-4EBP1, p27, and c-MYC in UTUC compared with paired benign urothelium (P < .0005). We found a strong positive correlation between PTEN and phos-AKT. Moderate correlation was observed between phos-mTOR and phos-S6, PTEN and p27, phos-AKT and p27, phos-S6 and p27, phos-mTOR and c-MYC, phos-S6 and c-MYC, and p27 and c-MYC. None of the evaluated biomarkers were associated with increased hazard ratios for tumor recurrence or for cancer-specific mortality, when adjusting for relevant clinicopathologic variables. Dysregulation of the mTOR pathway was observed in UTUC compared with normal urothelium, implicating a potential pathogenic role in tumor development. In our cohort, expression of the evaluated biomarkers had no prognostic value.

  19. Is proteinuria reversible, after withdrawal of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Arnau, A; Ruiz, J C; Rodrigo, E; Quintanar, J A; Arias, M

    2011-01-01

    Conversion to mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) is an ever more frequent practice in renal transplant recipients, even if it is not always satisfactory, needing to be suspended for various reasons in certain patients. We analyzed the evolution of proteinuria as a marker of kidney damage after withdrawal of mTORi for any reason in order to assess conversion failure risk. Among 1633 renal transplant patients with 185 converted to mTORi, we considered the 52 (28%) who withdrew as result of intolerance or a bad evolution after at least 3 months use (median: 142 days after conversion). Four groups were defined according to the evolution of proteinuria: group 1 (G1), stable after conversion; group 2 (G2), increased with complete recovery (<1 g); group 3 (G3), increased with partial recovery (>1 g); or group 4 (G4), increased without recovery. The evolution according to the groups was: G1 (57.1%), G2 (17.2%), G3 (5.7%), and G4 (20%). There were no differences between the good (G1 and G2) and the bad evolution groups (G3 and G4) in proteinuria at the time of conversion (838 ± 641 vs 532 ± 404 mg/d) or renal function (1.95 ± 0.47 vs 1.90 ± 0.4 mg/dL). Six months after withdrawal, proteinuria was stable in G1 and G2 but worse in G3 and G4 (781 ± 643 vs 4479 ± 3235 mg/d); the same observation was noted for renal failure (2.1 ± 0.71 vs 2.8 ± 1.57 mg/dL). Among about 75% of patients in whom mTORi was withdrawn, no injury remained in the medium term whereas among the other 25%, there was a residual injury.

  20. Targeted Deletion of a Plasmodium Site-2 Protease Impairs Life Cycle Progression in the Mammalian Host

    PubMed Central

    Goulielmaki, Evi; Chalari, Anna; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Siden-Kiamos, Inga; Matuschewski, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Site-2 proteases (S2P) belong to the M50 family of metalloproteases, which typically perform essential roles by mediating activation of membrane–bound transcription factors through regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). Protease-dependent liberation of dormant transcription factors triggers diverse cellular responses, such as sterol regulation, Notch signalling and the unfolded protein response. Plasmodium parasites rely on regulated proteolysis for controlling essential pathways throughout the life cycle. In this study we examine the Plasmodium-encoded S2P in a murine malaria model and show that it is expressed in all stages of Plasmodium development. Localisation studies by endogenous gene tagging revealed that in all invasive stages the protein is in close proximity to the nucleus. Ablation of PbS2P by reverse genetics leads to reduced growth rates during liver and blood infection and, hence, virulence attenuation. Strikingly, absence of PbS2P was compatible with parasite life cycle progression in the mosquito and mammalian hosts under physiological conditions, suggesting redundant or dispensable roles in vivo. PMID:28107409

  1. Generation and evaluation of mammalian secreted and membrane protein expression libraries for high-throughput target discovery.

    PubMed

    Panavas, Tadas; Lu, Jin; Liu, Xuesong; Winkis, Ann-Marie; Powers, Gordon; Naso, Michael F; Amegadzie, Bernard

    2011-09-01

    Expressed protein libraries are becoming a critical tool for new target discovery in the pharmaceutical industry. In order to get the most meaningful and comprehensive results from protein library screens, it is essential to have library proteins in their native conformation with proper post-translation modifications. This goal is achieved by expressing untagged human proteins in a human cell background. We optimized the transfection and cell culture conditions to maximize protein expression in a 96-well format so that the expression levels were comparable with the levels observed in shake flasks. For detection purposes, we engineered a 'tag after stop codon' system. Depending on the expression conditions, it was possible to express either native or tagged proteins from the same expression vector set. We created a human secretion protein library of 1432 candidates and a small plasma membrane protein set of about 500 candidates. Utilizing the optimized expression conditions, we expressed and analyzed both libraries by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. Two thirds of secreted proteins could be detected by Western-blot analyses; almost half of them were visible on Coomassie stained gels. In this paper, we describe protein expression libraries that can be easily produced in mammalian expression systems in a 96-well format, with one protein expressed per well. The libraries and methods described allow for the development of robust, high-throughput functional screens designed to assay for protein specific functions associated with a relevant disease-specific activity.

  2. Exogenous plant MIR168a specifically targets mammalian LDLRAP1: evidence of cross-kingdom regulation by microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Hou, Dongxia; Chen, Xi; Li, Donghai; Zhu, Lingyun; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Jing; Bian, Zhen; Liang, Xiangying; Cai, Xing; Yin, Yuan; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Tianfu; Zhu, Dihan; Zhang, Dianmu; Xu, Jie; Chen, Qun; Ba, Yi; Liu, Jing; Wang, Qiang; Chen, Jianqun; Wang, Jin; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Qipeng; Zhang, Junfeng; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that stable microRNAs (miRNAs) in mammalian serum and plasma are actively secreted from tissues and cells and can serve as a novel class of biomarkers for diseases, and act as signaling molecules in intercellular communication. Here, we report the surprising finding that exogenous plant miRNAs are present in the sera and tissues of various animals and that these exogenous plant miRNAs are primarily acquired orally, through food intake. MIR168a is abundant in rice and is one of the most highly enriched exogenous plant miRNAs in the sera of Chinese subjects. Functional studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that MIR168a could bind to the human/mouse low-density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (LDLRAP1) mRNA, inhibit LDLRAP1 expression in liver, and consequently decrease LDL removal from mouse plasma. These findings demonstrate that exogenous plant miRNAs in food can regulate the expression of target genes in mammals. PMID:21931358

  3. Exogenous plant MIR168a specifically targets mammalian LDLRAP1: evidence of cross-kingdom regulation by microRNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Hou, Dongxia; Chen, Xi; Li, Donghai; Zhu, Lingyun; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Jing; Bian, Zhen; Liang, Xiangying; Cai, Xing; Yin, Yuan; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Tianfu; Zhu, Dihan; Zhang, Dianmu; Xu, Jie; Chen, Qun; Ba, Yi; Liu, Jing; Wang, Qiang; Chen, Jianqun; Wang, Jin; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Qipeng; Zhang, Junfeng; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that stable microRNAs (miRNAs) in mammalian serum and plasma are actively secreted from tissues and cells and can serve as a novel class of biomarkers for diseases, and act as signaling molecules in intercellular communication. Here, we report the surprising finding that exogenous plant miRNAs are present in the sera and tissues of various animals and that these exogenous plant miRNAs are primarily acquired orally, through food intake. MIR168a is abundant in rice and is one of the most highly enriched exogenous plant miRNAs in the sera of Chinese subjects. Functional studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that MIR168a could bind to the human/mouse low-density lipoprotein receptor adapter protein 1 (LDLRAP1) mRNA, inhibit LDLRAP1 expression in liver, and consequently decrease LDL removal from mouse plasma. These findings demonstrate that exogenous plant miRNAs in food can regulate the expression of target genes in mammals.

  4. Induction of Direct Antimicrobial Activity Through Mammalian Toll-Like Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma-Uszynski, Sybille; Stenger, Steffen; Takeuchi, Osamu; Ochoa, Maria Teresa; Engele, Matthias; Sieling, Peter A.; Barnes, Peter F.; Röllinghoff, Martin; Bölcskei, Pal L.; Wagner, Manfred; Akira, Shizuo; Norgard, Michael V.; Belisle, John T.; Godowski, Paul J.; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2001-02-01

    The mammalian innate immune system retains from Drosophila a family of homologous Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that mediate responses to microbial ligands. Here, we show that TLR2 activation leads to killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis in both mouse and human macrophages, through distinct mechanisms. In mouse macrophages, bacterial lipoprotein activation of TLR2 leads to a nitric oxide-dependent killing of intracellular tubercle bacilli, but in human monocytes and alveolar macrophages, this pathway was nitric oxide-independent. Thus, mammalian TLRs respond (as Drosophila Toll receptors do) to microbial ligands and also have the ability to activate antimicrobial effector pathways at the site of infection.

  5. Antioxidation activities of pteridines in mammalian cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Shen, R. )

    1991-03-11

    L-erythro-5,6,7,8-Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH{sub 4}), the cofactor for aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AAA-H), is a predominant form of pteridines which occur ubiquitously in nature. When BH{sub 4} is oxidized to quinonoid dihydrobiopterin by AAA-H, it is regenerated by dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR) at the expense of NADH. The role of BH{sub 4} other than serving as the hydroxylase cofactor is not clear. The existence of BH{sub 4} and DHPR in tissues which are devoid of AAA-H suggests that BH{sub 4} may play an as yet undiscovered physiological function. This study demonstrates a BH{sub 4}-mediated antioxidation system, which consists of BH{sub 4}, DHPR, peroxidase and NADH in rat pheochromocytoma PC 12 cells and mouse macrophages J774A.1. This system was as effective as catalase and ascorbic acid in protecting cells against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and xanthine/xanthine oxidase-induced toxicity and was more effective than catalase in defense against nitrofurantoin-induced toxicity. The antioxidation effect of this system was not due to peroxidase and was improved when synthetic pteridines were substituted for BH{sub 4}. Since BH{sub 4}, DHPR, peroxidases and NADH are widely distributed in major organs and blood cells, they may constitute an as yet little known antioxidation system in mammalian cells.

  6. Targeted killing of a mammalian cell based upon its specialized metabolic state.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Peter B; Wang, Jian; McKnight, Steven L

    2011-09-20

    Mouse ES cells use a mitochondrial threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) enzyme to catabolize threonine into glycine and acetyl-CoA. Measurements of mRNA abundance have given evidence that ES cells express upwards of 1,000-fold higher levels of TDH mRNA than any of seven other mouse tissues tested. When cell culture medium is deprived of threonine, ES cells rapidly discontinue DNA synthesis, arrest cell division, and eventually die. Such studies led to the conclusion that mouse ES cells exist in a threonine-dependent metabolic state. Proceeding with the assumption that the active TDH enzyme should be essential for the growth and viability of mouse ES cells, we performed a drug screen in search of specific inhibitors of the purified TDH enzyme. Such efforts led to the discovery of a class of quinazolinecarboxamide (Qc) compounds that inhibit the ability of the TDH enzyme to catabolize threonine into glycine and acetyl-CoA. Administration of Qc inhibitors of TDH to mouse ES cells impeded cell growth and resulted in the induction of autophagy. By contrast, the same chemicals failed to affect the growth of HeLa cells at concentrations 300-fold higher than that required to kill mouse ES cells. It was likewise observed that the Qc class of TDH inhibitors failed to affect the growth or viability of ES cell-derived embryoid body cells known to have extinguished TDH expression. These studies demonstrate how it is possible to kill a specific mammalian cell type on the basis of its specialized metabolic state.

  7. Angiographic and volumetric effects of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors on angiomyolipomas in tuberous sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Rahul A; Feldman, Adam S; Paul, Elahna; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Walker, T Gregory

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the angiographic and volumetric effects of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors on angiomyolipomas (AMLs) in a case series of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. METHODS: All patients who underwent catheter angiography prior to and following mTOR inhibitor therapy (n = 3) were evaluated. All cross-sectional imaging studies were analyzed with three-dimensional volumetrics, and tumor volume curves for all three tissue compartments (soft tissue, vascular, and fat) were generated. Segmentation analysis tools were used to automatically create a region of interest (ROI) circumscribing the AML. On magnetic resonance images, the “fat only” map calculated from the in- and opposed-phase gradient recalled echo sequences was used to quantify fat volume within tumors. Tumor vascularity was measured by applying a thresholding tool within the ROI on post-contrast subtraction images. On computed tomography images, volume histogram analysis of Hounsfield unit was performed to quantify tumor tissue composition. The angiography procedures were also reviewed, and tumor vascularity based on pre-embolization angiography was characterized in a semi-quantitative manner. RESULTS: Patient 1 presented at the age of 15 with a 6.8 cm right lower pole AML and a 4.0 cm right upper pole AML. Embolization was performed of both tumors, and after a few years of size control, the tumors began to grow, and the patient was initiated on mTOR inhibitor therapy. There was an immediate reduction in the size of both lesions. The patient then underwent repeat embolization and discontinuation of mTOR inhibition, after which point there was a substantial regrowth in both tumors across all tissue compartments. Patient 2 presented at the age of 18 with a right renal AML. Following a brief period of tumor reduction after embolization, she was initiated on mTOR inhibitor therapy, with successful reduction in tumor size across all tissue compartments. As with patient 1

  8. Transcriptionally active genome regions are preferred targets for retrovirus integration.

    PubMed Central

    Scherdin, U; Rhodes, K; Breindl, M

    1990-01-01

    We have analyzed the transcriptional activity of cellular target sequences for Moloney murine leukemia virus integration in mouse fibroblasts. At least five of the nine random, unselected integration target sequences studied showed direct evidence for transcriptional activity by hybridization to nuclear run-on transcripts prepared from uninfected cells. At least four of the sequences contained multiple recognition sites for several restriction enzymes that cut preferentially in CpG-rich islands, indicating integration into 5' or 3' ends or flanking regions of genes. Assuming that only a minor fraction (less than 20%) of the genome is transcribed in mammalian cells, we calculated the probability that this association of retroviral integration sites with transcribed sequences is due to chance to be very low (1.6 x 10(-2]. Thus, our results strongly suggest that transcriptionally active genome regions are preferred targets for retrovirus integration. Images PMID:2296087

  9. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-assisted gene targeting enables rapid and precise genetic manipulation of mammalian neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Raul Bardini; Dewari, Pooran Singh; Kalantzaki, Maria; Gangoso, Ester; Matjusaitis, Mantas; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Blin, Carla; Grant, Vivien; Bulstrode, Harry; Gogolok, Sabine; Skarnes, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cell (NSC) lines provide a tractable model for discovery across stem cell and developmental biology, regenerative medicine and neuroscience. They can be derived from foetal or adult germinal tissues and continuously propagated in vitro as adherent monolayers. NSCs are clonally expandable, genetically stable, and easily transfectable – experimental attributes compatible with targeted genetic manipulations. However, gene targeting, which is crucial for functional studies of embryonic stem cells, has not been exploited to date in NSC lines. Here, we deploy CRISPR/Cas9 technology to demonstrate a variety of sophisticated genetic modifications via gene targeting in both mouse and human NSC lines, including: (1) efficient targeted transgene insertion at safe harbour loci (Rosa26 and AAVS1); (2) biallelic knockout of neurodevelopmental transcription factor genes; (3) simple knock-in of epitope tags and fluorescent reporters (e.g. Sox2-V5 and Sox2-mCherry); and (4) engineering of glioma mutations (TP53 deletion; H3F3A point mutations). These resources and optimised methods enable facile and scalable genome editing in mammalian NSCs, providing significant new opportunities for functional genetic analysis. PMID:28096221

  10. Membrane perturbation activity of cationic phenylene ethynylene oligomers and polymers: selectivity against model bacterial and mammalian membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Tang, Yanli; Zhou, Zhijun; Ji, Eunkyung; Lopez, Gabriel P; Chi, Eva Y; Schanze, Kirk S; Whitten, David G

    2010-08-03

    Poly(phenylene ethyneylene) (PPE)-based cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) and cationic phenylene ethynylene oligomers (OPEs) exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, and their main target is believed to be the cell membrane. To understand better how these antimicrobial molecules interact with membranes, a series of PPE-based CPEs and OPEs with different side chains were studied. Large unilamellar vesicles with lipid compositions mimicking those of mammalian or bacterial membranes were used as model membranes. Among the CPEs and OPEs tested, the anionic CPE, PPE-SO(3)(2-) and the smallest cationic OPE-1 are inactive against all vesicles. Other cationic CPEs and OPEs show significant membrane perturbation ability against bacterial membrane mimics but are inactive against a mammalian cell membrane mimic with the exception of PPE-DABCO and two end-only-functionalized OPEs, which also disrupted a mammalian cell membrane mimic. The results suggest that the phospholipid composition of vesicles dominates the interaction of CPE and OPE with lipid membranes.

  11. Sodium Pumps Mediate Activity-Dependent Changes in Mammalian Motor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Picton, Laurence D.; Nascimento, Filipe; Broadhead, Matthew J.; Sillar, Keith T.

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitously expressed sodium pumps are best known for maintaining the ionic gradients and resting membrane potential required for generating action potentials. However, activity- and state-dependent changes in pump activity can also influence neuronal firing and regulate rhythmic network output. Here we demonstrate that changes in sodium pump activity regulate locomotor networks in the spinal cord of neonatal mice. The sodium pump inhibitor, ouabain, increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of drug-induced locomotor bursting, effects that were dependent on the presence of the neuromodulator dopamine. Conversely, activating the pump with the sodium ionophore monensin decreased burst frequency. When more “natural” locomotor output was evoked using dorsal-root stimulation, ouabain increased burst frequency and extended locomotor episode duration, whereas monensin slowed and shortened episodes. Decreasing the time between dorsal-root stimulation, and therefore interepisode interval, also shortened and slowed activity, suggesting that pump activity encodes information about past network output and contributes to feedforward control of subsequent locomotor bouts. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from spinal motoneurons and interneurons, we describe a long-duration (∼60 s), activity-dependent, TTX- and ouabain-sensitive, hyperpolarization (∼5 mV), which is mediated by spike-dependent increases in pump activity. The duration of this dynamic pump potential is enhanced by dopamine. Our results therefore reveal sodium pumps as dynamic regulators of mammalian spinal motor networks that can also be affected by neuromodulatory systems. Given the involvement of sodium pumps in movement disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism, knowledge of their contribution to motor network regulation also has considerable clinical importance. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The sodium pump is ubiquitously expressed and responsible

  12. Mammalian polyamine catabolism: a therapeutic target, a pathological problem, or both?

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlin; Casero, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    With the recent discovery of the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermine oxidase (SMO/PAOh1), the apparent complexity of the polyamine metabolic pathway has increased considerably. Alone or in combination with the two other known members of human polyamine catabolism, spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase, and N(1)-acetylpolyamine oxidase (PAO), SMO/PAOh1 expression has the potential to alter polyamine homeostasis in response to normal cellular signals, drug treatment and environmental and/or cellular stressors. The activity of the oxidases producing toxic aldehydes and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) H(2)O(2), suggest a mechanism by which these oxidases can be exploited as an antineoplastic drug target. However, inappropriate activation of the pathways may also lead to pathological outcomes, including DNA damage that can lead to cellular transformation. The most recent data suggest that the two polyamine catabolic pathways exhibit distinct properties and understanding these properties should aid in their exploitation for therapeutic and/or chemopreventive strategies.

  13. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Song, Sang Heon; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Bae, Sun Sik

    2015-08-14

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs.

  14. Calcium-dependent activation of mitochondrial metabolism in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaspers, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Endogenous fluorophores provide a simple, but elegant means to investigate the relationship between agonist-evoked Ca2+ signals and the activation of mitochondrial metabolism. In this article, we discuss the methods and strategies to measure cellular pyridine nucleotide and flavoprotein fluorescence alone or in combination with Ca2+-sensitive indicators. These methods were developed using primary cultured hepatocytes and neurons, which contain relatively high levels of endogenous fluorophores and robust metabolic responses. Nevertheless, these methods are amendable to a wide variety of primary cell types and cell lines that maintain active mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:18854213

  15. Novel pentapeptide activators of mammalian and mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Ubeid, Anan Abu; Hantash, Basil M

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma incidence continues to rise due to intentional exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from sunlight and indoor tanning beds. Eumelanin exhibits photoprotective effects; thus, agents that induce its synthesis offer a means for sunless tanning without UVR damage. Herein, we report the development of two pentapeptides, P9 and P10, capable of enhancing melanin synthesis in B16 melanoma cells by activating mushroom and mouse tyrosinases without any effect on cell viability or proliferation. P9 and P10 significantly increased melanin content in a dose-dependent manner comparable to the positive controls, IBMX, scoparone, and α-MSH. However, unlike IBMX and scoparone, but similar to α-MSH, P9 and P10 were able to reverse 6BH4-dependent tyrosinase inhibition. We hypothesize that P9 and P10 allosterically activate tyrosinase and consequently enhance epidermal melanin synthesis. P9 and P10 may offer an alternative to tanning bed use and non-photoprotective tanning products. Moreover, sustained increase of melanin content in skin has the potential to reduce symptoms of photosensitivity disorders such as erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), solar urticaria (SU) and polymorphic light eruption (PLE), which lack fully effective treatments and result in significant morbidity.

  16. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes: Insecticidal activity, mammalian toxicity, and mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Horsham, M.A.; Palmer, C.J.; Cole, L.M.; Casida, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    4-Ethynyl- and 4-(prop-1-ynyl)phenylsilatranes (N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub 3}SiR, R = C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CH or C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CCH{sub 3}) are highly toxic to houseflies (pretreated with piperonyl butoxide) and milkweed bugs (topical LD{sub 50}s 3-14 {mu}g/g) and to mice (intraperitoneal LD{sub 50}s 0.4-0.9 mg/kg), and they are moderately potent inhibitors of the ({sup 35}S)-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate or TBPS binding site (GABA-gated chloride channel) of mouse brain membranes. Scatchard analysis indicates noncompetitive interaction of 4-ethynylphenylsilatrane with the TBPS binding site. Phenylsilatrane analogues with 4-substituents of H, CH{sub 3}, Cl, Br, and C{triple bond}CSi(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} are highly toxic to mice but have little or no activity in the insect and receptor assays. Radioligand binding studies with (4-{sup 3}H)phenylsilatrane failed to reveal a specific binding site in mouse brain. Silatranes with R = H, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}Cl, CH{double bond}CH{sub 2}, OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3} are of little or no activity in the insect and mouse toxicity and TBPS binding site assays as are the trithia and monocyclic analogues of phenylsilatrane. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes are new probes to examine the GABA receptor-ionophore complex of insects and mammals.

  17. High-throughput Analysis of Mammalian Olfactory Receptors: Measurement of Receptor Activation via Luciferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Trimmer, Casey; Snyder, Lindsey L.; Mainland, Joel D.

    2014-01-01

    Odorants create unique and overlapping patterns of olfactory receptor activation, allowing a family of approximately 1,000 murine and 400 human receptors to recognize thousands of odorants. Odorant ligands have been published for fewer than 6% of human receptors1-11. This lack of data is due in part to difficulties functionally expressing these receptors in heterologous systems. Here, we describe a method for expressing the majority of the olfactory receptor family in Hana3A cells, followed by high-throughput assessment of olfactory receptor activation using a luciferase reporter assay. This assay can be used to (1) screen panels of odorants against panels of olfactory receptors; (2) confirm odorant/receptor interaction via dose response curves; and (3) compare receptor activation levels among receptor variants. In our sample data, 328 olfactory receptors were screened against 26 odorants. Odorant/receptor pairs with varying response scores were selected and tested in dose response. These data indicate that a screen is an effective method to enrich for odorant/receptor pairs that will pass a dose response experiment, i.e. receptors that have a bona fide response to an odorant. Therefore, this high-throughput luciferase assay is an effective method to characterize olfactory receptors—an essential step toward a model of odor coding in the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:24961834

  18. Probing the target search of DNA-binding proteins in mammalian cells using TetR as model searcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normanno, Davide; Boudarène, Lydia; Dugast-Darzacq, Claire; Chen, Jiji; Richter, Christian; Proux, Florence; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Darzacq, Xavier; Dahan, Maxime

    2015-07-01

    Many cellular functions rely on DNA-binding proteins finding and associating to specific sites in the genome. Yet the mechanisms underlying the target search remain poorly understood, especially in the case of the highly organized mammalian cell nucleus. Using as a model Tet repressors (TetRs) searching for a multi-array locus, we quantitatively analyse the search process in human cells with single-molecule tracking and single-cell protein-DNA association measurements. We find that TetRs explore the nucleus and reach their target by 3D diffusion interspersed with transient interactions with non-cognate sites, consistent with the facilitated diffusion model. Remarkably, nonspecific binding times are broadly distributed, underlining a lack of clear delimitation between specific and nonspecific interactions. However, the search kinetics is not determined by diffusive transport but by the low association rate to nonspecific sites. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view of the recruitment dynamics of proteins at specific loci in mammalian cells.

  19. Probing the target search of DNA-binding proteins in mammalian cells using TetR as model searcher

    PubMed Central

    Normanno, Davide; Boudarène, Lydia; Dugast-Darzacq, Claire; Chen, Jiji; Richter, Christian; Proux, Florence; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Darzacq, Xavier; Dahan, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular functions rely on DNA-binding proteins finding and associating to specific sites in the genome. Yet the mechanisms underlying the target search remain poorly understood, especially in the case of the highly organized mammalian cell nucleus. Using as a model Tet repressors (TetRs) searching for a multi-array locus, we quantitatively analyse the search process in human cells with single-molecule tracking and single-cell protein–DNA association measurements. We find that TetRs explore the nucleus and reach their target by 3D diffusion interspersed with transient interactions with non-cognate sites, consistent with the facilitated diffusion model. Remarkably, nonspecific binding times are broadly distributed, underlining a lack of clear delimitation between specific and nonspecific interactions. However, the search kinetics is not determined by diffusive transport but by the low association rate to nonspecific sites. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view of the recruitment dynamics of proteins at specific loci in mammalian cells. PMID:26151127

  20. Localization and Targeting of Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Central Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vacher, Helene; Mohapatra, Durga P.; Trimmer, James S.

    2008-01-01

    The intrinsic electrical properties and the synaptic input-output relationships of neurons are governed by the action of voltage-dependent ion channels. The localization of specific population of ion channels with distinct functional properties at discrete sites in neurons dramatically impacts excitability and synaptic transmission. Molecular cloning studies have revealed a large family of genes encoding voltage-dependent ion channel principal and auxiliary subunits, most of which are expressed in mammalian central neurons. Much recent effort has focused on determining which of these subunits co-assemble into native neuronal channel complexes, and the cellular and subcellular distributions of these complexes, as a crucial step in understanding the contribution of these channels to specific aspects of neuronal function. Here we review progress made on recent studies aimed at determining the cellular and subcellular distribution of specific ion channel subunits in mammalian brain neurons using in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. We also discuss the repertoire of ion channel subunits in specific neuronal compartments and implications for neuronal physiology. Finally, we discuss the emerging mechanisms for determining the discrete subcellular distributions observed for many neuronal ion channels. PMID:18923186

  1. Visualization of sialidase activity in Mammalian tissues and cancer detection with a novel fluorescent sialidase substrate.

    PubMed

    Minami, Akira; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ieno, Daisuke; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Kanazawa, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Kosuke; Ohata, Ko; Yokochi, Tsunehiro; Horii, Yuuki; Fukumoto, Hokuto; Taguchi, Risa; Takahashi, Tadanobu; Oku, Naoto; Suzuki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Sialidase removes sialic acid from sialoglycoconjugates and plays crucial roles in many physiological and pathological processes. Various human cancers express an abnormally high level of the plasma membrane-associated sialidase isoform.Visualization of sialidase activity in living mammalian tissues would be useful not only for understanding sialidase functions but also for cancer diagnosis. However, since enzyme activity of mammalian sialidase is remarkably weak compared with that of bacterial and viral sialidases, it has been difficult to detect sialidase activity in mammalian tissues. We synthesized a novel benzothiazolylphenol-based sialic acid derivative (BTP-Neu5Ac) as a fluorescent sialidase substrate. BTP-Neu5Ac can visualize sialidase activities sensitively and selectively in acute rat brain slices. Cancer cells implanted orthotopically in mouse colons and human colon cancers (stages T3-T4) were also clearly detected with BTP-Neu5Ac. The results suggest that BTP-Neu5Ac is useful for histochemical imaging of sialidase activities.

  2. NFκB up-regulation of glucose transporter 3 is essential for hyperactive mammalian target of rapamycin-induced aerobic glycolysis and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xiaojun; Hu, Zhongdong; Ji, Shuang; Jin, Fuquan; Jiang, Keguo; Li, Chunjia; Zhao, Pan; Tu, Zhenzhen; Chen, Xianguo; Di, Lijun; Zhou, Haisheng; Zhang, Hongbing

    2015-04-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) exerts a crucial role in aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely obscure. Results from Tsc1- or Tsc2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and human cancer cell lines consistently indicate that the expression of glucose transporter 3 (Glut3) is dramatically up-regulated by mTOR. The rapamycin-sensitive mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), but not the rapamycin-insensitive mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), was involved in the regulation of Glut3 expression. Moreover, mTORC1 enhances Glut3 expression through the activation of the IKK/NFκB pathway. Depletion of Glut3 led to the suppression of aerobic glycolysis, the inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation, and the attenuation of the tumorigenic potential of the cells with aberrantly hyper-activated mTORC1 signaling in nude mice. We conclude that Glut3 is a downstream target of mTORC1, and it is critical for oncogenic mTORC1-mediated aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. Hence Glut3 may be a potential target for therapy against cancers caused by the aberrantly activated mTORC1 signaling.

  3. Strong transcriptional activators isolated from viral DNA by the 'activator trap', a novel selection system in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gstaiger, M; Schaffner, W

    1994-10-11

    Transcription factors often contain activation domains that interact with the basic transcription machinery. We have developed a functional screening strategy in mammalian cells to selectively isolate activation domains from a library of random DNA inserts. For this, sonicated DNA fragments are cloned next to the DNA binding domain of GAL4 factor in a plasmid that also contains the SV40 origin of replication. Pools of fusion protein clones are transfected into CV-1-5GT monkey cells containing an SV40 T antigen gene under the control of a promoter with GAL4 binding sites. Plasmids that express functional transactivating fusion proteins activate the T antigen gene, thus promoting selective amplification of the plasmid in the mammalian host cell line. Using this method, we were able to select strong enhancer-type activation domains from the immediate early regions of two herpesviruses, namely pseudorabies virus and bovine herpesvirus 1. In both cases, the activation domains selected were homologues of the ICP4 regulatory protein of herpes simplex virus. The activation domain from pseudorabies virus is four times stronger than the activation domain of herpes simplex virus protein VP16 (Vmw65), making it the strongest activation domain characterized so far. This activator trap method should be useful for precisely localizing activation domain(s) in known factors, or to identify mammalian transcriptional adaptors that do not bind DNA and which may escape conventional detection methods.

  4. Controlled delivery of β-globin-targeting TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 into mammalian cells for genome editing using microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Cottle, Renee N.; Lee, Ciaran M.; Archer, David; Bao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Tal-effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins are genome editing tools with unprecedented potential. However, the ability to deliver optimal amounts of these nucleases into mammalian cells with minimal toxicity poses a major challenge. Common delivery approaches are transfection- and viral-based methods; each associated with significant drawbacks. An alternative method for directly delivering genome-editing reagents into single living cells with high efficiency and controlled volume is microinjection. Here, we characterize a glass microcapillary-based injection system and demonstrate controlled co-injection of TALENs or CRISPR/Cas9 together with donor template into single K562 cells for targeting the human β-globin gene. We quantified nuclease induced insertions and deletions (indels) and found that, with β-globin-targeting TALENs, similar levels of on- and off-target activity in cells could be achieved by microinjection compared with nucleofection. Furthermore, we observed 11% and 2% homology directed repair in single K562 cells co-injected with a donor template along with CRISPR/Cas9 and TALENs respectively. These results demonstrate that a high level of targeted gene modification can be achieved in human cells using glass-needle microinjection of genome editing reagents. PMID:26558999

  5. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Its Role in Early Neural Development and in Adult and Aged Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Lombó, Carla; Gonsebatt, María E.

    2016-01-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates signals triggered by energy, stress, oxygen levels, and growth factors. It regulates ribosome biogenesis, mRNA translation, nutrient metabolism, and autophagy. mTOR participates in various functions of the brain, such as synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, memory, and learning. mTOR is present during early neural development and participates in axon and dendrite development, neuron differentiation, and gliogenesis, among other processes. Furthermore, mTOR has been shown to modulate lifespan in multiple organisms. This protein is an important energy sensor that is present throughout our lifetime its role must be precisely described in order to develop therapeutic strategies and prevent diseases of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to present our current understanding of the functions of mTOR in neural development, the adult brain and aging. PMID:27378854

  6. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser319 and Thr24, as well as p-Foxo3a Thr32 decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was upregulated only

  7. Synthesis of Fluorophores that Target Small Molecules to the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Living Mammalian Cells**

    PubMed Central

    Matthew Meinig, J.; Fu, Liqiang; Peterson, Blake R.

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays critical roles in the processing of secreted and transmembrane proteins. To deliver small molecules to this organelle, we synthesized fluorinated hydrophobic analogues of the fluorophore rhodol. These cell-permeable fluorophores are exceptionally bright, with quantum yields of ~ 0.8, and specifically accumulate in the ER of living HeLa cells, as imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy. To target a biological pathway controlled by the ER, we linked a fluorinated hydrophobic rhodol to 5-nitrofuran-2-acrylaldehyde. In contrast to an untargeted nitrofuran warhead, delivery of this electrophilic nitrofuran to the ER by the rhodol resulted in cytotoxicity comparable to the ER-targeted cytotoxin eeyarestatin I, and specifically inhibited protein processing by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Fluorinated hydrophobic rhodols represent outstanding fluorophores that enable delivery of small molecules for targeting of ER-associated proteins and pathways. PMID:26118368

  8. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP encoded by the mammalian rapgef3 gene: Structure, function and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Upasana; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-10-10

    Mammalian exchange protein directly activated by cAMP isoform 1 (EPAC1), encoded by the RAPGEF3 gene, is one of the two-membered family of cAMP sensors that mediate the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Extensive studies have revealed that EPAC1-mediated cAMP signaling is highly coordinated spatiotemporally through the formation of dynamic signalosomes by interacting with a diverse array of cellular partners. Recent functional analyses of genetically engineered mouse models further suggest that EPAC1 functions as an important stress response switch and is involved in pathophysiological conditions of cardiac stresses, chronic pain, cancer and infectious diseases. These findings, coupled with the development of EPAC specific small molecule modulators, validate EPAC1 as a promising target for therapeutic interventions.

  9. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP encoded by the mammalian rapgef3 gene: Structure, function and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Upasana; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian exchange protein directly activated by cAMP isoform 1 (EPAC1), encoded by the RAPGEF3 gene, is one of the two-membered family of cAMP sensors that mediate the intracellular functions of cAMP by acting as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like Rap small GTPases. Extensive studies have revealed that EPAC1-mediated cAMP signaling is highly coordinated spatiotemporally through the formation of dynamic signalosomes by interacting with a diverse array of cellular partners. Recent functional analyses of genetically engineered mouse models further suggest that EPAC1 functions as an important stress response switch and is involved in pathophysiological conditions of cardiac stresses, chronic pain, cancer and infectious diseases. These findings, coupled with the development of EPAC specific small molecule modulators, validate EPAC1 as a promising target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26119090

  10. Conversion of the lac repressor into an allosterically regulated transcriptional activator for mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Labow, M A; Baim, S B; Shenk, T; Levine, A J

    1990-01-01

    A novel mammalian regulatory system was created by using the Escherichia coli lac repressor. The lac repressor was converted into a mammalian transcriptional activator by modifying the lac repressor coding region to include a nuclear localization signal from the simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen and the transcription activation domain from the herpes simplex virus type 1 virion protein 16. The lac activator protein (LAP) fusions were potent activators of several promoters containing lac operator sequences positioned either upstream or downstream of the transcription unit. A single lac operator allowed for transactivation, whereas multiple operators acted synergistically when separated by a small distance. Promoters containing 14 or 21 operator sequences were induced at least 1,000-fold in response to LAP, reaching levels of activity 20 to 30 times greater than that of the SV40 early promoter in HeLa cells. Activation was strongly inhibited by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG), indicating that LAP retained the functions needed for allosteric regulation. LAP was bifunctional, also acting as a repressor of expression of an SV40 promoter containing an operator immediately downstream of the TATA box. Finally, genetic selection schemes were developed such that LAP-expressing cell lines can be generated at high frequency from either established or primary cells in culture. Images PMID:2162473

  11. Tunicamycins: translocase-I inhibitors that target bacterial cell wall and mammalian N-glycoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tunicamycins, streptovirudins, and corynetoxins are natural products that target the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and eukaryotic N-glycoproteins. The mechanism of action is known, with the tunicamycin-Mg**2+ complex established as a transition state analog for hexosamine-1-phosphate:pren...

  12. Targeted Cytoplasmic Irradiation with Alpha Particles Induces Mutations in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-Jun; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Xu, An; Waldren, Charles A.; Geard, Charles R.; Yu, Zengliang; Hei, Tom K.

    1999-04-01

    Ever since x-rays were shown to induce mutation in Drosophila more than 70 years ago, prevailing dogma considered the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, such as mutations and carcinogenesis, as being due mostly to direct damage to the nucleus. Although there was indication that alpha particle traversal through cellular cytoplasm was innocuous, the full impact remained unknown. The availability of the microbeam at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility of Columbia University made it possible to target and irradiate the cytoplasm of individual cells in a highly localized spatial region. By using dual fluorochrome dyes (Hoechst and Nile Red) to locate nucleus and cellular cytoplasm, respectively, thereby avoiding inadvertent traversal of nuclei, we show here that cytoplasmic irradiation is mutagenic at the CD59 (S1) locus of human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells, while inflicting minimal cytotoxicity. The principal class of mutations induced are similar to those of spontaneous origin and are entirely different from those of nuclear irradiation. Furthermore, experiments with radical scavenger and inhibitor of intracellular glutathione indicated that the mutagenicity of cytoplasmic irradiation depends on generation of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that cytoplasm is an important target for genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, particularly radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. In addition, cytoplasmic traversal by alpha particles may be more dangerous than nuclear traversal, because the mutagenicity is accomplished by little or no killing of the target cells.

  13. End-targeting proteomics of isolated chromatin segments of a mammalian ribosomal RNA gene promoter

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Satoru; Dejardin, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The unbiased identification of proteins associated with specific loci is crucial for understanding chromatin-based processes. The proteomics of isolated chromatin fragment (PICh) method has previously been developed to purify telomeres and identify associated proteins. This approach is based on the affinity capture of endogenous chromatin segments by hybridization with oligonucleotide containing locked nucleic acids. However, PICh is only efficient with highly abundant genomic targets, limiting its applicability. Here we develop an approach for identifying factors bound to the promoter region of the ribosomal RNA genes that we call end-targeting PICh (ePICh). Using ePICh, we could specifically enrich the RNA polymerase I pre-initiation complex, including the selectivity factor 1. The high purity of the ePICh material allowed the identification of ZFP106, a novel factor regulating transcription initiation by targeting RNA polymerase I to the promoter. Our results demonstrate that ePICh can uncover novel proteins controlling endogenous regulatory elements in mammals. PMID:25812914

  14. Target-specific variants of Flp recombinase mediate genome engineering reactions in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, Riddhi; Li, Feng; Voziyanova, Eugenia; Voziyanov, Yuri

    2015-09-01

    Genome engineering relies on DNA-modifying enzymes that are able to locate a DNA sequence of interest and initiate a desired genome rearrangement. Currently, the field predominantly utilizes site-specific DNA nucleases that depend on the host DNA repair machinery to complete a genome modification task. We show here that genome engineering approaches that employ target-specific variants of the self-sufficient, versatile site-specific DNA recombinase Flp can be developed into promising alternatives. We demonstrate that the Flp variant evolved to recombine an FRT-like sequence, FL-IL10A, which is located upstream of the human interleukin-10 gene, and can target this sequence in the model setting of Chinese hamster ovary and human embryonic kidney 293 cells. This target-specific Flp variant is able to perform the integration reaction and, when paired with another recombinase, the dual recombinase-mediated cassette exchange reaction. The efficiency of the integration reaction in human cells can be enhanced by 'humanizing' the Flp variant gene and by adding the nuclear localization sequence to the recombinase.

  15. Dynamics of tRNA fragments and their targets in aging mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Karaiskos, Spyros; Grigoriev, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Background: The progress of next-generation sequencing technologies has unveiled various non-coding RNAs that have previously been considered products of random degradation and attracted only minimal interest. Among small RNA families, microRNA (miRNAs) have traditionally been considered key post-transcriptional regulators. However, recent studies have reported evidence for widespread presence of fragments of tRNA molecules (tRFs) across a range of organisms and tissues, and of tRF involvement in Argonaute complexes.  Methods:To elucidate potential tRF functionality, we compared available RNA sequencing datasets derived from the brains of young, mid-aged and old rats. Using sliding 7-mer windows along a tRF, we searched for putative seed sequences with high numbers of conserved complementary sites within 3' UTRs of 23 vertebrate genomes. We analyzed Gene Ontology term enrichment of predicted tRF targets and compared their transcript levels with targets of miRNAs in the context of age.  Results and Discussion: We detected tRFs originating from 3’- and 5’-ends of tRNAs in rat brains at significant levels. These fragments showed dynamic changes: 3’ tRFs monotonously increased with age, while 5’ tRFs displayed less consistent patterns. Furthermore, 3’ tRFs showed a narrow size range compared to 5’ tRFs, suggesting a difference in their biogenesis mechanisms. Similar to our earlier results in Drosophila and compatible with other experimental findings, we found “seed” sequence locations on both ends of different tRFs. Putative targets of these fragments were found to be enriched in neuronal and developmental functions. Comparison of tRFs and miRNAs increasing in abundance with age revealed small, but distinct changes in brain target transcript levels for these two types of small RNA, with the higher proportion of tRF targets decreasing with age. We also illustrated the utility of tRF analysis for annotating tRNA genes in sequenced genomes. PMID

  16. Structures of glycosylated mammalian glutaminyl cyclases reveal conformational variability near the active center.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Carrillo, David; Koch, Birgit; Parthier, Christoph; Wermann, Michael; Dambe, Tresfore; Buchholz, Mirko; Ludwig, Hans-Henning; Heiser, Ulrich; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Stubbs, Milton T; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-07-19

    Formation of N-terminal pyroglutamate (pGlu or pE) from glutaminyl or glutamyl precursors is catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclases (QC). As the formation of pGlu-amyloid has been linked with Alzheimer's disease, inhibitors of QCs are currently the subject of intense development. Here, we report three crystal structures of N-glycosylated mammalian QC from humans (hQC) and mice (mQC). Whereas the overall structures of the enzymes are similar to those reported previously, two surface loops in the neighborhood of the active center exhibit conformational variability. Furthermore, two conserved cysteine residues form a disulfide bond at the base of the active center that was not present in previous reports of hQC structure. Site-directed mutagenesis suggests a structure-stabilizing role of the disulfide bond. At the entrance to the active center, the conserved tryptophan residue, W(207), which displayed multiple orientations in previous structure, shows a single conformation in both glycosylated human and murine QCs. Although mutagenesis of W(207) into leucine or glutamine altered substrate conversion significantly, the binding constants of inhibitors such as the highly potent PQ50 (PBD150) were minimally affected. The crystal structure of PQ50 bound to the active center of murine QC reveals principal binding determinants provided by the catalytic zinc ion and a hydrophobic funnel. This study presents a first comparison of two mammalian QCs containing typical, conserved post-translational modifications.

  17. Active Targets For Capacitive Proximity Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenstrom, Del T.; Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power active targets devised for use with improved capacitive proximity sensors described in "Capacitive Proximity Sensor Has Longer Range" (GSC-13377), and "Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields" (GSC-13475). Active targets are short-distance electrostatic beacons; they generate known alternating electro-static fields used for alignment and/or to measure distances.

  18. Mammalian thioredoxin reductase 1: roles in redox homoeostasis and characterization of cellular targets.

    PubMed

    Turanov, Anton A; Kehr, Sebastian; Marino, Stefano M; Yoo, Min-Hyuk; Carlson, Bradley A; Hatfield, Dolph L; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2010-09-01

    The classical Trx (thioredoxin) system, composed of TR (Trx reductase), Trx and NADPH, defines a major pathway of cellular thiol-based redox regulation. Three TRs have been identified in mammals: (i) cytosolic TR1, (ii) mitochondrial TR3 and (iii) testes-specific TGR (Trx-glutathione reductase). All three are selenocysteine-containing enzymes with broad substrate specificity in in vitro assays, but which protein substrates are targeted by TRs in vivo is not well understood. In the present study, we used a mechanism-based approach to characterize the molecular targets of TR1. Cytosolic Trx1 was the major target identified in rat and mouse liver, as well as in rat brain and mouse serum. The results suggest that the main function of TR1 is to reduce Trx1. We also found that TR1-based affinity resins provide a convenient tool for specific isolation of Trxs from a variety of biological samples. To better assess the role of TRs in redox homoeostasis, we comparatively analysed TR1- and TR3-knockdown cells. Although cells deficient in TR1 were particularly sensitive to diamide, TR3-knockdown cells were more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide. To further examine the TR1-Trx1 redox pair, we used mice with a liver-specific knockout of selenocysteine tRNA. In this model, selenocysteine insertion into TR1 was blocked, but the truncated form of this protein was not detected. Instead, TR1 and TR3 levels were decreased in the knockout samples. Diminished hepatic TR1 function was associated with elevated Trx1 levels, but this protein was mostly in the oxidized state. Overall, this study provides evidence for the key role of the TR1-Trx1 pair in redox homoeostasis.

  19. The N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotransmitter receptor is a mammalian brain target for the dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida toxin.

    PubMed

    El-Nabawi, A; Quesenberry, M; Saito, K; Silbergeld, E; Vasta, G; Eldefrawi, A

    2000-11-15

    Blooms of Pfiesteria piscicida, a dinoflagellate in eastern U.S. coastal rivers, are believed to secrete toxins that kill fish and produce short-term memory loss in humans. Only one or two of Pfiesteria's multiple stages secrete the toxin, and only under certain environmental conditions. Thus, neither the presence of Pfiesteria nor fish kill alone can be indicative of toxin presence. The objective of this study was to identify the mammalian molecular brain target for the toxin that is associated with decrements in memory. Seven rat brain neurotransmitter receptors were selected to study because of their reported roles in cognitive function: receptors for nicotine, muscarine, AMPA/kainate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), gamma-aminobutyric acid, and dopamine 1 and 2. The effects of 17 environmental and laboratory samples on radioactive ligand binding to these receptors were studied. Of the seven receptors, binding only to the NMDA receptor was inhibited by only the two Pfiesteria-containing waters (identified by PCR) that also killed fish, and not by any of the other 15 samples tested. It is suggested that inhibition of NMDA-receptor binding is the cause of memory loss in exposed humans. Thus, it could be a useful biomarker for the toxin's presence in rivers for decisions on closures and for identification of the fractions containing the toxin during its purification. Knowledge of the toxin's molecular target, and how it affects its function, also leads to suggestions for therapeutics to use in animal models.

  20. MiRNA-Target Interaction Reveals Cell-Specific Post-Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Varun; Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Uttamani, Juhi Raju; Nares, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are 18–22 nucleotides long, non-coding RNAs that bind transcripts with complementary sequences leading to either mRNA degradation or translational suppression. However, the inherent differences in preferred mode of miRNA regulation among cells of different origin have not been examined. In our previous transcriptome profiling studies, we observed that post-transcriptional regulation can differ substantially depending on the cell in context. Here we examined mechanistic differences in the regulation of a let-7a targeted (wild type) or resistant (mutant) engineered renilla transcript across various mammalian cell lines of diverse origin. Dual luciferase assays show that compared to mutant (mut), the reporter gene containing wild type (wt) let-7a binding sites was efficiently suppressed upon transfection in various cell lines. Importantly, the strength of miRNA regulation varied across the cell lines. Total RNA analysis demonstrates that wt renilla mRNA was expressed to similar or higher levels compared to mut suggesting that translation repression is a predominant mode of miRNA regulation. Nonetheless, transcript degradation was observed in some cell lines. Ago-2 immunoprecipitation show that miRNA repressed renilla mRNA are associated with functional mi-RISC (miRNA-RNA induced silencing complex). Given the immense potential of miRNA as a therapeutic option, these findings highlight the necessity to thoroughly examine the mode of mRNA regulation in order to achieve the beneficial effects in targeting cells. PMID:26761000

  1. Probabilistic Evaluation of Mammalian Pharmacology Data to Target Pharmaceuticals for Environmental Hazard Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) are being detected with increasing frequency in aquatic systems associated with municipal effluent. APIs considered a Contaminant of Emerging Concern (CEC) -Little, if any, regulation considering aquatic systems -Effects on aquatic o...

  2. The effects of selenium on glutathione peroxidase activity and radioprotection in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P.; Tritz, R.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-09-05

    The media of representative mammalian cell lines were supplemented with low levels of selenium in the form of sodium selenite in order to investigate the effects of selenium on mammalian cells. Following incubation in 30 nM sodium selenite, these cells were assayed for changes in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The cells examined included NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, PC12 rat sympathetic precursor cells, SupT-1 human lymphocytes, MCF-7{sup adr} human breast carcinoma cells and AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. Selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in GPx activity for the NIH 3T3, MCF-7{sup adr} and Supt-1 cells but stimulated GPx activity approximately 5-fold in PC12 and AA8 cells. AA8 cells were selected to evaluate whether selenium supplementation was radioprotective against {sup 60}cobalt gamma irradiation. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was measured by evaluating mutation frequency at the hprt locus. In this assay, preincubation of AA8 CHO cells significantly protected these cells from exposure to 8 Gy.

  3. Undermethylation associated with retroelement activation and chromosome remodelling in an interspecific mammalian hybrid.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, R J; O'Neill, M J; Graves, J A

    1998-05-07

    Genetic models predict that genomic rearrangement in hybrids can facilitate reproductive isolation and the formation of new species by preventing gene flow between the parent species and hybrid (sunflowers are an example). The mechanism underlying hybridization-induced chromosome remodelling is as yet unknown, although mobile element activity has been shown to be involved in DNA rearrangement in some dysgenic Drosophila hybrids. It has been proposed that DNA methylation evolved as a means of repressing the movement of mobile elements (the host defence model). If such a protective mechanism were to fail, mobile elements could be activated, and could cause major and rapid genome alterations. Here we demonstrate the occurrence of genome-wide undermethylation, retroviral element amplification and chromosome remodelling in an interspecific mammalian hybrid (Macropus eugenii x Wallabia bicolor). Atypically extended centromeres of Macropus eugenii derived autosomes in the hybrid were composed primarily of an unmethylated, amplified retroviral element not detectable in either parent species. These results, taken with the observation of deficient methylation and de novo chromosome change in other mammalian hybrids, indicate that the failure of DNA methylation and subsequent mobile-element activity in hybrids could facilitate rapid karyotypic evolution.

  4. A novel mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease links mammalian target of rapamycin-dependent hyperproliferation of colonic epithelium to inflammation-associated tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lin; Zhou, Jin-Feng; Sellers, Rani S; Li, Jiu-Feng; Nguyen, Andrew V; Wang, Yubao; Orlofsky, Amos; Liu, Qiang; Hume, David A; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Augenlicht, Leonard; Lin, Elaine Y

    2010-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a high-risk condition for human colorectal cancer. However, our mechanistic understanding of the link between inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon is limited. Here we established a novel mouse model of colitis-associated cancer by genetically inactivating signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in macrophages, with partial deletion in other myeloid and lymphoid cells. Inflammation developed in the colon of mutant mice spontaneously, and tumor lesions, including invasive carcinoma, arose in the inflamed region of the intestine with a frequency similar to that observed in human IBD patients. The development of both inflammation and tumors in the mutant mice required the presence of microflora. Indeed, inflammation was associated with disruption of colonic homeostasis, fulminant epithelial/tumor cell proliferation, and activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-Stat3 pathway in epithelial and tumor cells. The activation of this pathway was essential for both the excess proliferation of epithelial/tumor cells and the disruption of colonic homeostasis in the mutant mice. Notably, a similar abnormal up-regulation of mTOR-Stat3 signaling was consistently observed in the colonic epithelial cells of human IBD patients with active disease. These studies demonstrate a novel mouse model of IBD-colorectal cancer progression in which disrupted immune regulation, mTOR-Stat3 signaling, and epithelial hyperproliferation are integrated and simultaneously linked to the development of malignancy.

  5. Cellular senescence or EGFR signaling induces Interleukin 6 (IL-6) receptor expression controlled by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, Christoph; Kuck, Fabian; Aparicio-Siegmund, Samadhi; Konzak, Kirstin; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Sommerfeld, Annika; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Philipp A; Brenner, Dirk; Mak, Tak W.; Rose-John, Stefan; Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Piekorz, Roland P; Scheller, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) signaling plays a role in inflammation, cancer, and senescence. Here, we identified soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) as a member of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Senescence-associated sIL-6R upregulation was mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). sIL-6R was mainly generated by a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10)-dependent ectodomain shedding to enable IL-6 trans-signaling. In vivo, heterozygous PTEN-knockout mice exhibited higher mTOR activity and increased sIL-6R levels. Moreover, aberrant EGF receptor (EGFR) activation triggered IL-6 synthesis. In analogy to senescence, EGFR-induced activation of mTOR also induced IL-6R expression and sIL-6R generation. Hence, mTOR activation reprograms IL-6 non-responder cells into IL-6 responder cells. Our data suggest that mTOR serves as a central molecular switch to facilitate cellular IL-6 classic and trans-signaling via IL-6R upregulation with direct implications for cellular senescence and tumor development. PMID:24047696

  6. A Novel Mouse Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Links Mammalian Target of Rapamycin-Dependent Hyperproliferation of Colonic Epithelium to Inflammation-Associated Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lin; Zhou, Jin-Feng; Sellers, Rani S.; Li, Jiu-Feng; Nguyen, Andrew V.; Wang, Yubao; Orlofsky, Amos; Liu, Qiang; Hume, David A.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Augenlicht, Leonard; Lin, Elaine Y.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a high-risk condition for human colorectal cancer. However, our mechanistic understanding of the link between inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon is limited. Here we established a novel mouse model of colitis-associated cancer by genetically inactivating signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in macrophages, with partial deletion in other myeloid and lymphoid cells. Inflammation developed in the colon of mutant mice spontaneously, and tumor lesions, including invasive carcinoma, arose in the inflamed region of the intestine with a frequency similar to that observed in human IBD patients. The development of both inflammation and tumors in the mutant mice required the presence of microflora. Indeed, inflammation was associated with disruption of colonic homeostasis, fulminant epithelial/tumor cell proliferation, and activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-Stat3 pathway in epithelial and tumor cells. The activation of this pathway was essential for both the excess proliferation of epithelial/tumor cells and the disruption of colonic homeostasis in the mutant mice. Notably, a similar abnormal up-regulation of mTOR-Stat3 signaling was consistently observed in the colonic epithelial cells of human IBD patients with active disease. These studies demonstrate a novel mouse model of IBD-colorectal cancer progression in which disrupted immune regulation, mTOR-Stat3 signaling, and epithelial hyperproliferation are integrated and simultaneously linked to the development of malignancy. PMID:20042677

  7. Protection Against Epithelial Damage During Candida albicans Infection Is Mediated by PI3K/Akt and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, David L.; Shen, Chengguo; Murciano, Celia; Runglall, Manohursingh; Richardson, Jonathan P.; Arno, Matthew; Aldecoa-Otalora, Estibaliz; Naglik, Julian R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The ability of epithelial cells (ECs) to discriminate between commensal and pathogenic microbes is essential for healthy living. Key to these interactions are mucosal epithelial responses to pathogen-induced damage. Methods. Using reconstituted oral epithelium, we assessed epithelial gene transcriptional responses to Candida albicans infection by microarray. Signal pathway activation was monitored by Western blotting and transcription factor enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the role of these pathways in C. albicans–induced damage protection was determined using chemical inhibitors. Results. Transcript profiling demonstrated early upregulation of epithelial genes involved in immune responses. Many of these genes constituted components of signaling pathways, but only NF-κB, MAPK, and PI3K/Akt pathways were functionally activated. We demonstrate that PI3K/Akt signaling is independent of NF-κB and MAPK signaling and plays a key role in epithelial immune activation and damage protection via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation. Conclusions. PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling may play a critical role in protecting epithelial cells from damage during mucosal fungal infections independent of NF-κB or MAPK signaling. PMID:24357630

  8. Phase I Study of Apitolisib (GDC-0980), Dual Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Kinase Inhibitor, in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dolly, Saoirse O.; Wagner, Andrew J.; Bendell, Johanna C.; Kindler, Hedy L.; Krug, Lee M.; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Zauderer, Marjorie G.; Lolkema, Martijn P.; Apt, Doris; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Fredrickson, Jill O.; Spoerke, Jill M.; Koeppen, Hartmut; Ware, Joseph A.; Lauchle, Jennifer O.; Burris, Howard A.; de Bono, Johann S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This first-in-human phase I trial assessed the safety, tolerability, and preliminary anti-tumor activity of apitolisib (GDC-0980), a dual inhibitor of class I phosphatidylinositol-3-(PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinases. Experimental Design Once-daily (QD) oral apitolisib was administered to patients with solid tumors for days 1-21 or 1-28 of 28-day cycles. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters were assessed. Results Overall, 120 patients were treated at doses between 2-70 mg. The commonest ≥G3 toxicities related to apitolisib at the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) at 40mg QD included hyperglycemia (18%), rash (14%), liver dysfunction (12%), diarrhea (10%), pneumonitis (8%), mucosal inflammation (6%), and fatigue (4%). Dose-limiting toxicities (one patient each) were G4 fasting hyperglycemia at 40 mg (21/28-schedule), and G3 maculopapular rash and G3 fasting hyperglycemia at 70 mg (21/28-schedule). The pharmacokinetic profile was dose-proportional. Phosphorylated serine-473 AKT levels were suppressed by ≥90% in platelet-rich plasma within 4 hours at the maximum tolerated dose (50 mg). Pharmacodynamic decreases in FDG-PET uptake of >25% occurred in 66% (21/32) of patients dosed at 40 mg QD. Evidence of single agent activity included ten RECIST partial responses (confirmed for peritoneal mesothelioma, PIK3CA mutant head- and-neck cancer, and three pleural mesotheliomas). Conclusion Apitolisib exhibited dose-proportional pharmacokinetics with target modulation at doses ≥16 mg. The RP2D was 40 mg QD 28/28-schedule; severe on-target toxicities were apparent at ≥40 mg, particularly pneumonitis. Apitolisib was reasonably tolerated at 30 mg, the selected dose for pleural mesothelioma patients given limited respiratory reserve. Modest but durable anti-tumor activity was demonstrated. PMID:26787751

  9. Calcineurin functions in Ca(2+)-activated cell death in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Calcineurin is a calcium-dependent protein phosphatase that functions in T cell activation. We present evidence that calcineurin functions more generally in calcium-triggered apoptosis in mammalian cells deprived of growth factors. Specifically, expression of epitope-tagged calcineurin A induces rapid cell death upon calcium signaling in the absence of growth factors. We show that this apoptosis does not require new protein synthesis and therefore calcineurin must operate through existing substrates. Co-expression of the Bcl-2 protooncogene efficiently blocks calcineurin-induced cell death. Significantly, we demonstrate that a calcium-independent calcineurin mutant induces apoptosis in the absence of calcium, and that this apoptotic response is a direct consequence of calcineurin's phosphatase activity. These data suggest that calcineurin plays an important role in mediating the upstream events in calcium-activated cell death. PMID:7593193

  10. Loss and Gain of Human Acidic Mammalian Chitinase Activity by Nonsynonymous SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Okawa, Kazuaki; Ohno, Misa; Kashimura, Akinori; Kimura, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yuki; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Kamaya, Minori; Kino, Yoshihiro; Bauer, Peter O.; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is implicated in asthma, allergic inflammation, and food processing. Little is known about genetic and evolutional regulation of chitinolytic activity of AMCase. Here, we relate human AMCase polymorphisms to the mouse AMCase, and show that the highly active variants encoded by nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) are consistent with the mouse AMCase sequence. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant human AMCase was significantly lower than that of the mouse counterpart. By creating mouse-human chimeric AMCase protein we found that the presence of the N-terminal region of human AMCase containing conserved active site residues reduced the enzymatic activity of the molecule. We were able to significantly increase the activity of human AMCase by amino acid substitutions encoded by nsSNPs (N45, D47, and R61) with those conserved in the mouse homologue (D45, N47, and M61). For abolition of the mouse AMCase activity, introduction of M61R mutation was sufficient. M61 is conserved in most of primates other than human and orangutan as well as in other mammals. Orangutan has I61 substitution, which also markedly reduced the activity of the mouse AMCase, indicating that the M61 is a crucial residue for the chitinolytic activity. Altogether, our data suggest that human AMCase has lost its chitinolytic activity by integration of nsSNPs during evolution and that the enzyme can be reactivated by introducing amino acids conserved in the mouse counterpart. PMID:27702777

  11. Quantitative Persulfide Site Identification (qPerS-SID) Reveals Protein Targets of H2S Releasing Donors in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Longen, Sebastian; Richter, Florian; Köhler, Yvette; Wittig, Ilka; Beck, Karl-Friedrich; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    H2S is an important signalling molecule involved in diverse biological processes. It mediates the formation of cysteine persulfides (R-S-SH), which affect the activity of target proteins. Like thiols, persulfides show reactivity towards electrophiles and behave similarly to other cysteine modifications in a biotin switch assay. In this manuscript, we report on qPerS-SID a mass spectrometry-based method allowing the isolation of persulfide containing peptides in the mammalian proteome. With this method, we demonstrated that H2S donors differ in their efficacy to induce persulfides in HEK293 cells. Furthermore, data analysis revealed that persulfide formation affects all subcellular compartments and various cellular processes. Negatively charged amino acids appeared more frequently adjacent to cysteines forming persulfides. We confirmed our proteomic data using pyruvate kinase M2 as a model protein and showed that several cysteine residues are prone to persulfide formation finally leading to its inactivation. Taken together, the site-specific identification of persulfides on a proteome scale can help to identify target proteins involved in H2S signalling and enlightens the biology of H2S and its releasing agents. PMID:27411966

  12. Device-based local delivery of siRNA against mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a murine subcutaneous implant model to inhibit fibrous encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hironobu; Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrous encapsulation of surgically implant devices is associated with elevated proliferation and activation of fibroblasts in tissues surrounding these implants, frequently causing foreign body complications. Here we test the hypothesis that inhibition of the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in fibroblasts can mitigate the soft tissue implant foreign body response by suppressing fibrotic responses around implants. In this study, mTOR was knocked down using small interfering RNA conjugated with branched cationic polyethylenimine (bPEI) in fibroblastic lineage cells in serum-based cell culture as shown by both gene and protein analysis. This mTOR knockdown led to an inhibition in fibroblast proliferation by 70% and simultaneous down-regulation in the expression of type I collagen in fibroblasts in vitro. These siRNA/bPEI complexes were released from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel coatings surrounding model polymer implants in a subcutaneous rodent model in vivo. No significant reduction in fibrous capsule thickness and mTOR expression in the foreign body capsules was observed. Observed siRNA inefficacy in this in vivo implant model was attributed to siRNA dosing limitations in the gel delivery system, and lack of targeting ability of the siRNA complex specifically to fibroblasts. While in vitro data supported mTOR knock-down in fibroblast cultures, in vivo siRNA delivery must be further improved to produce clinically relevant effects on fibrotic encapsulation around implants. PMID:20727922

  13. Screening of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in natural product extracts by capillary electrophoresis in combination with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmei; Li, Feng; Li, Mingxia; Kang, Jingwu

    2015-04-03

    In this study, capillary electrophoresis (CE) combined with HPLC-MS/MS were used as a powerful platform for screening of inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in natural product extracts. The screening system has been established by using 5-carboxyfluorescein labeled substrate peptide F-4EBP1, a known mTOR inhibitor AZD8055, and a small chemical library consisted of 18 natural product extracts. Biochemical screening of natural product extracts was performed by CE with laser induced fluorescence detection. The CE separation allowed a quantitative measurement of the phosphorylated product, hence the quantitation of enzymatic inhibition as well as inhibition kinetics. The hits are readily identified as long as the peak area of the phosphorylated product is reduced in comparison with the negative control. Subsequent assay-guided isolation of the active natural product extract was performed with HPLC-MS/MS to track the particular active components. The structures of the identified active components were elucidated by the molecular ions and fragmentation information provided by MS/MS analysis. The CE-based assay method only requires minute pure compounds, which can be readily purified by HPLC. Therefore, the combination of CE and HPLC-MS/MS provides a high-throughput platform for screening bioactive compounds from the crude nature extracts. By taking the advantage of the screening system, salvianolic acid A and C in extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza were discovered as the new mTOR inhibitors.

  14. [Regulative mechanisms of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in glomerular hypertrophy in diabetic nephropathy and interventional effects of Chinese herbal medicine].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Jing; Huang, Yan-ru; Wan, Yi-gang; Shen, Shan-mei; Mao, Zhi-min; Wu, Wei; Yao, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Glomerular hypertrophy is the main pathological characteristic in the early stage of diabetic nephropathy (DN), and its regulatory mechanism is closely related to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway activity. mTOR includes mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2(mTORC2), in which, the upstream pathway of mTORC1 is phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/serine-threonine kinase(Akt)/adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase(AMPK), and the representative signaling molecules in the downstream pathway of mTORC1 are 4E-binding proteins(4EBP) and phosphoprotein 70 S6Kinase(p70S6K). Some Chinese herbal extracts could improve cell proliferation via intervening the expressions of the key molecules in the upstream or downstream of PIK/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in vivo. As for glomerular mesangial cells(MC) and podocyte, mTOR plays an important role in regulating glomerular inherent cells, including adjusting cell cycle, energy metabolism and matrix protein synthesis. Rapamycin, the inhibitor of mTOR, could suppress glomerular inherent cell hypertrophy, cell proliferation, glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickening and mesangial matrix deposition in model rats with DN. Some Chinese herbal extracts could alleviate glomerular lesions by intervening mTOR signaling pathway activity in renal tissue of DN animal models or in renal inherent cells in vivo and in vitro.

  15. Myopathy caused by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inactivation is not reversed by restoring mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Romanino, Klaas; Mazelin, Laetitia; Albert, Verena; Conjard-Duplany, Agnès; Lin, Shuo; Bentzinger, C Florian; Handschin, Christoph; Puigserver, Pere; Zorzato, Francesco; Schaeffer, Laurent; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Rüegg, Markus A

    2011-12-20

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is central to the control of cell, organ, and body size. Skeletal muscle-specific inactivation of mTORC1 in mice results in smaller muscle fibers, fewer mitochondria, increased glycogen stores, and a progressive myopathy that causes premature death. In mTORC1-deficient muscles, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α), which regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and glucose homeostasis, is strongly down-regulated. Here we tested whether induction of mitochondrial biogenesis pharmacologically or by the overexpression of PGC-1α is sufficient to reverse the phenotype of mice deficient for mTORC1. We show that both approaches normalize mitochondrial function, such as oxidative capacity and expression of mitochondrial genes. However, they do not prevent or delay the progressive myopathy. In addition, we find that mTORC1 has a much stronger effect than PGC-1α on the glycogen content in muscle. This effect is based on the strong activation of PKB/Akt in mTORC1-deficient mice. We also show that activation of PKB/Akt not only affects glycogen synthesis but also diminishes glycogen degradation. Thus, our work provides strong functional evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction in mice with inactivated mTORC1 signaling is caused by the down-regulation of PGC-1α. However, our data also show that the impairment of mitochondria does not lead directly to the lethal myopathy.

  16. Distinct domains of the spinal muscular atrophy protein SMN are required for targeting to Cajal bodies in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Renvoisé, Benoît; Khoobarry, Kevinee; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Cibert, Christian; Viollet, Louis; Lefebvre, Suzie

    2006-02-15

    Mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN1 cause the inherited disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The ubiquitous SMN protein facilitates the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). The protein is detected in the cytoplasm, nucleoplasm and enriched with snRNPs in nuclear Cajal bodies. It is structurally divided into at least an amino-terminal region rich in basic amino acid residues, a central Tudor domain, a self-association tyrosine-glycine-box and an exon7-encoded C-terminus. To examine the domains required for the intranuclear localization of SMN, we have used fluorescently tagged protein mutants transiently overexpressed in mammalian cells. The basic amino acid residues direct nucleolar localization of SMN mutants. The Tudor domain promotes localization of proteins in the nucleus and it cooperates with the basic amino acid residues and the tyrosine-glycine-box for protein localization in Cajal bodies. Moreover, the most frequent disease-linked mutant SMNDeltaex7 reduces accumulation of snRNPs in Cajal bodies, suggesting that the C-terminus of SMN participates in targeting to Cajal bodies. A reduced number of Cajal bodies in patient fibroblasts associates with the absence of snRNPs in Cajal bodies, revealing that intranuclear snRNA organization is modified in disease. These results indicate that direct and indirect mechanisms regulate localization of SMN in Cajal bodies.

  17. Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting Parasite Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Inhibits Mammalian Host Cell Invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki; Nara, Takeshi; Hirawake, Hiroko; Morales, Jorge; Enomoto, Masahiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2014-02-01

    Chagas disease is caused by an intracellular parasitic protist, Trypanosoma cruzi. As there are no highly effective drugs against this agent that also demonstrate low toxicity, there is an urgent need for development of new drugs to treat Chagas disease. We have previously demonstrated that the parasite inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (TcIP3R) is crucial for invasion of the mammalian host cell by T. cruzi. Here, we report that TcIP3R is a short-lived protein and that its expression is significantly suppressed in trypomastigotes. Treatment of trypomastigotes, an infective stage of T. cruzi, with antisense oligonucleotides specific to TcIP3R deceased TcIP3R protein levels and impaired trypomastigote invasion of host cells. Due to the resulting instability and very low expression level of TcIP3R in trypomastigotes indicates that TcIP3R is a promising target for antisense therapy in Chagas disease.

  18. Role of inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin in the treatment of luminal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ciruelos, Eva; Cortes-Funes, Hernán; Ghanem, Ismael; Manso, Luis; Arteaga, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    Approximately 75% of patients with breast cancer present hormone receptor-positive tumors. This subtype of breast cancer initially shows a high overall response rate to hormonal treatments. However, resistance eventually develops, resulting in tumor progression. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway regulates several cellular functions in cancer such as cell growth, survival, and proliferation. In addition, a high activation level of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is related to resistance to conventional chemotherapy and hormone therapy. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus, in combination with hormonal treatments, has led to excellent results in progression-free survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer resistant to hormone therapies. Therefore, everolimus has entered the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines 2012 and its combination with exemestane was approved recently by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. This is the first time that a drug will have been approved for the restoration of hormone sensitivity in breast cancer.

  19. A single amino acid substitution confers enhanced methylation activity of mammalian Dnmt3b on chromatin DNA.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Gao, Ge; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, He; Ye, Zhiqiang; Huang, Shichao; Huang, Jinyan; Kang, Jiuhong

    2010-10-01

    Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b are paralogous enzymes responsible for de novo DNA methylation but with distinguished biological functions. In mice, disruption of Dnmt3b but not Dnmt3a causes global DNA hypomethylation, especially in repetitive sequences, which comprise the large majority of methylated DNA in the genome. By measuring DNA methylation activity of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b homologues from five species, we found that mammalian Dnmt3b possessed significantly higher methylation activity on chromatin DNA than Dnmt3a and non-mammalian Dnmt3b. Sequence comparison and mutagenesis experiments identified a single amino acid substitution (I662N) in mammalian Dnmt3b as being crucial for its high chromatin DNA methylation activity. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated this substitution markedly enhanced the binding of Dnmt3b to nucleosomes and hence increased the chromatin DNA methylation activity. Moreover, this substitution was crucial for Dnmt3b to efficiently methylate repetitive sequences, which increased dramatically in mammalian genomes. Consistent with our observation that Dnmt3b evolved more rapidly than Dnmt3a during the emergence of mammals, these results demonstrated that the I662N substitution in mammalian Dnmt3b conferred enhanced chromatin DNA methylation activity and contributed to functional adaptation in the epigenetic system.

  20. Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in plasmacytoid variant of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda D; Chaux, Alcides; Al-Hussain, Turki; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Bezerra, Stephania Martins; Hicks, Jessica; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J

    2013-04-01

    Plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma is a rare but aggressive variant of bladder cancer with no clear therapeutic guidelines. Dysregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been linked to oncogenesis in conventional bladder cancer. Several antineoplastic agents targeting mTOR pathway are currently available. This study assesses mTOR pathway status as well as c-myc and p27 expression. We retrieved 19 archival cases of plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma from two institutions. Whole tissue sections were evaluated for immunoexpression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), phosphorylated mTOR, phosphorylated protein kinase B (AKT), phosphorylated S6, c-myc, and p27. We evaluated intensity (0 to 3+) and extent (0%-100%) of expression for all markers. An H score was calculated as the sum of products of intensity and extent for each marker and used during analysis. In addition, PTEN loss was defined as absence of expression in >10% of tumor cells. We encountered PTEN loss in 28%. Higher H score for nuclear phosphorylated AKT and a lower H score for phosphorylated S6 was encountered in muscle invasive tumors compared to non-muscle invasive tumors (P = .007 and P = .009, respectively). Although a trend for negative prognostic impact on overall survival for higher phosphorylated mTOR expression was noted (P = .051), markers expression levels failed to predict survival in our cohort. We found dysregulation of mTOR pathway members in urinary bladder plasmacytoid urothelial carcinoma, suggesting that the use of mTOR pathway inhibitors might be beneficial for patients with this aggressive tumor.

  1. ZP3-dependent activation of sperm cation channels regulates acrosomal secretion during mammalian fertilization

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The sperm acrosome reaction is a Ca(2+)-dependent secretory event required for fertilization. Adhesion to the egg's zona pellucida promotes Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive channels, thereby initiating secretion. We used potentiometric fluorescent probes to determine the role of sperm membrane potential in regulating Ca2+ entry. ZP3, the glycoprotein agonist of the zona pellucida, depolarizes sperm membranes by activating a pertussis toxin-insensitive mechanism with the characteristics of a poorly selective cation channel. ZP3 also activates a pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway that produces a transient rise in internal pH. The concerted effects of depolarization and alkalinization open voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. These observations suggest that mammalian sperm utilize membrane potential-dependent signal transduction mechanisms and that a depolarization pathway is an upstream transducing element coupling adhesion to secretion during fertilization. PMID:8707844

  2. Mammalian TBX1 preferentially binds and regulates downstream targets via a tandem T-site repeat.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Raquel; Xie, Qing; Zheng, Deyou; Cvekl, Ales; Morrow, Bernice E

    2014-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency or mutation of TBX1 is largely responsible for the etiology of physical malformations in individuals with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS/22q11.2 deletion syndrome). TBX1 encodes a transcription factor protein that contains an evolutionarily conserved DNA binding domain termed the T-box that is shared with other family members. All T-box proteins, examined so far, bind to similar but not identical consensus DNA sequences, indicating that they have specific binding preferences. To identify the TBX1 specific consensus sequence, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) was performed. In contrast to other TBX family members recognizing palindrome sequences, we found that TBX1 preferentially binds to a tandem repeat of 5'-AGGTGTGAAGGTGTGA-3'. We also identified a second consensus sequence comprised of a tandem repeat with a degenerated downstream site. We show that three known human disease-causing TBX1 missense mutations (F148Y, H194Q and G310S) do not alter nuclear localization, or disrupt binding to the tandem repeat consensus sequences, but they reduce transcriptional activity in cell culture reporter assays. To identify Tbx1-downstream genes, we performed an in silico genome wide analysis of potential cis-acting elements in DNA and found strong enrichment of genes required for developmental processes and transcriptional regulation. We found that TBX1 binds to 19 different loci in vitro, which may correspond to putative cis-acting binding sites. In situ hybridization coupled with luciferase gene reporter assays on three gene loci, Fgf8, Bmper, Otog-MyoD, show that these motifs are directly regulated by TBX1 in vitro. Collectively, the present studies establish new insights into molecular aspects of TBX1 binding to DNA. This work lays the groundwork for future in vivo studies, including chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to further elucidate the molecular

  3. Mammalian Antimicrobial Peptides: Promising Therapeutic Targets Against Infection and Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Pujarini; Das, Santasabuj

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are integral components of the host innate immune system and functional throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. AMPs are short cationic molecules and lethal against a wide range of bacteria, viruses, fungi, yeast and protozoa due to their membranolytic effects on the negatively-charged microbial membranes. In addition, they exert multiple immunomodulatory roles like chemotaxis, modulation of cytokine and chemokine expression, leukocyte activation etc. Since AMPs suffer loss of microbicidal properties under serum and tissue environments, their capacity to modulate the immune system may predominates under the physiological conditions. Discovery of new antibiotics is lagging far behind the rapidly spreading drug resistance among the microorganisms. Both natural and synthetic AMPs have shown promise as 'next generation antibiotics' due to their unique mode of action, which minimises the chance of development of microbial resistance. In addition, they have therapeutic potential against non-infectious diseases like chronic inflammation and cancer. Many of the synthetic AMPs are currently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of debilitating diseases, such as catheter-related infections, diabetic foot ulcers, chemotherapy-associated infections etc. Some of them have already entered the market as topical preparations. In this review, we synopsise the current literature of natural and synthetic AMPs in different infectious and inflammatory diseases of human microfloral habitats, especially the gastrointestinal, respiratory and genitourinary tracts and the skin. We also discuss the classification of AMPs, their mode action and antimicrobial spectrum, including the pathogen evasion mechanisms. In short, we tried to present the locus standi of AMPs in relation to human diseases and highlight the most promising synthetic peptides emerging from the clinical trials. Finally, we focused on the limitations and hurdles in terms of cost of

  4. Functional genomic mapping of an early-activated centromeric mammalian origin of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, R; Price, G B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M

    1999-09-15

    Ors12, a mammalian autonomously replicating sequence (812 bp), was previously isolated by extrusion of African green monkey (CV-1 cells) nascent DNA from active replication bubbles. It contains a region of alpha-satellite extending 168-bp from the 5'-end, and a nonrepetitive portion extending from nucleotide position 169 to nucleotide 812 that is present in less than nine copies per haploid genome. Ors12 is capable of transient autonomous DNA replication in vivo and in vitro, associates with the nuclear matrix in a cell cycle-dependent manner, and hybridizes at the centromeric region of six CV-1 cell chromosomes as well as a marker chromosome. To demonstrate that DNA replication initiates at ors12 at a native chromosomal locus, a 14.2 kb African green monkey genomic clone was isolated and sequence information was obtained that allowed us to generate eight sets of PCR primers spanning a region of 8 kb containing ors12. One set of primers occurred inside ors12. These primers were used to amplify nascent DNA strands from asynchronously growing CV-1 and African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells, using noncompetitive and competitive PCR-based mapping methodologies. Both assays showed that DNA replication in vivo initiates preferentially in a 2.3 kb region containing ors12, as well as at a second site located 1.7 kb upstream of ors12. This study provides the first demonstration of genomic function for a centromeric mammalian origin of DNA replication, originally isolated by nascent strand extrusion.

  5. Opposing motor activities are required for the organization of the mammalian mitotic spindle pole

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We use both in vitro and in vivo approaches to examine the roles of Eg5 (kinesin-related protein), cytoplasmic dynein, and dynactin in the organization of the microtubules and the localization of NuMA (Nu-clear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus) at the polar ends of the mammalian mitotic spindle. Perturbation of the function of Eg5 through either immunodepletion from a cell free system for assembly of mitotic asters or antibody microinjection into cultured cells leads to organized astral microtubule arrays with expanded polar regions in which the minus ends of the microtubules emanate from a ring-like structure that contains NuMA. Conversely, perturbation of the function of cytoplasmic dynein or dynactin through either specific immunodepletition from the cell free system or expression of a dominant negative subunit of dynactin in cultured cells results in the complete lack of organization of microtubules and the failure to efficiently concentrate the NuMA protein despite its association with the microtubules. Simultaneous immunodepletion of these proteins from the cell free system for mitotic aster assembly indicates that the plus end- directed activity of Eg5 antagonizes the minus end-directed activity of cytoplasmic dynein and a minus end-directed activity associated with NuMA during the organization of the microtubules into a morphologic pole. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the unique organization of the minus ends of microtubules and the localization of NuMA at the polar ends of the mammalian mitotic spindle can be accomplished in a centrosome-independent manner by the opposing activities of plus end- and minus end-directed motors. PMID:8896597

  6. L1Base 2: more retrotransposition-active LINE-1s, more mammalian genomes

    PubMed Central

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Jäger, Marten; Figlerowicz, Marek; Badge, Richard; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N.; Zemojtel, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    LINE-1 (L1) insertions comprise as much as 17% of the human genome sequence, and similar proportions have been recorded for other mammalian species. Given the established role of L1 retrotransposons in shaping mammalian genomes, it becomes an important task to track and annotate the sources of this activity: full length elements, able to encode the cis and trans acting components of the retrotransposition machinery. The L1Base database (http://l1base.charite.de) contains annotated full-length sequences of LINE-1 transposons including putatively active L1s. For the new version of L1Base, a LINE-1 annotation tool, L1Xplorer, has been used to mine potentially active L1 retrotransposons from the reference genome sequences of 17 mammals. The current release of the human genome, GRCh38, contains 146 putatively active L1 elements or full length intact L1 elements (FLIs). The newest versions of the mouse, GRCm38 and the rat, Rnor_6.0, genomes contain 2811 and 492 FLIs, respectively. Most likely reflecting the current level of completeness of the genome project, the latest reference sequence of the common chimpanzee genome, PT 2.19, only contains 19 FLIs. Of note, the current assemblies of the dog, CF 3.1 and the sheep, OA 3.1, genomes contain 264 and 598 FLIs, respectively. Further developments in the new version of L1Base include an updated website with implementation of modern web server technologies. including a more responsive design for an improved user experience, as well as the addition of data sharing capabilities for L1Xplorer annotation. PMID:27924012

  7. Target activation by regulatory RNAs in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Papenfort, Kai; Vanderpool, Carin K.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are commonly known to repress gene expression by base pairing to target mRNAs. In many cases, sRNAs base pair with and sequester mRNA ribosome-binding sites, resulting in translational repression and accelerated transcript decay. In contrast, a growing number of examples of translational activation and mRNA stabilization by sRNAs have now been documented. A given sRNA often employs a conserved region to interact with and regulate both repressed and activated targets. However, the mechanisms underlying activation differ substantially from repression. Base pairing resulting in target activation can involve sRNA interactions with the 5′ untranslated region (UTR), the coding sequence or the 3′ UTR of the target mRNAs. Frequently, the activities of protein factors such as cellular ribonucleases and the RNA chaperone Hfq are required for activation. Bacterial sRNAs, including those that function as activators, frequently control stress response pathways or virulence-associated functions required for immediate responses to changing environments. This review aims to summarize recent advances in knowledge regarding target mRNA activation by bacterial sRNAs, highlighting the molecular mechanisms and biological relevance of regulation. PMID:25934124

  8. Group D prothrombin activators from snake venom are structural homologues of mammalian blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Veena S; Joseph, Jeremiah S; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2003-01-01

    Procoagulant venoms of several Australian elapids contain proteinases that specifically activate prothrombin; among these, Group D activators are functionally similar to coagulation factor Xa (FXa). Structural information on this class of prothrombin activators will contribute significantly towards understanding the mechanism of FXa-mediated prothrombin activation. Here we present the purification of Group D prothrombin activators from three Australian snake venoms (Hoplocephalus stephensi, Notechis scutatus scutatus and Notechis ater niger) using a single-step method, and their N-terminal sequences. The N-terminal sequence of the heavy chain of hopsarin D (H. stephensi) revealed that a fully conserved Cys-7 was substituted with a Ser residue. We therefore determined the complete amino acid sequence of hopsarin D. Hopsarin D shows approximately 70% similarity with FXa and approximately 98% similarity with trocarin D, a Group D prothrombin activator from Tropidechis carinatus. It possesses the characteristic Gla domain, two epidermal growth factor-like domains and a serine proteinase domain. All residues important for catalysis are conserved, as are most regions involved in interactions with factor Va and prothrombin. However, there are some structural differences. Unlike FXa, hopsarin D is glycosylated in both its chains: in light-chain residue 52 and heavy-chain residue 45. The glycosylation on the heavy chain is a large carbohydrate moiety adjacent to the active-site pocket. Overall, hopsarin D is structurally and functionally similar to mammalian coagulation FXa. PMID:12403650

  9. The Mammalian “Obesogen” Tributyltin Targets Hepatic Triglyceride Accumulation and the Transcriptional Regulation of Lipid Metabolism in the Liver and Brain of Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lyssimachou, Angeliki; Santos, Joana G.; André, Ana; Soares, Joana; Lima, Daniela; Guimarães, Laura; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Teixeira, Catarina; Castro, L. Filipe C.; Santos, Miguel M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that different Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) interfere with lipid metabolic pathways in mammals and promote fat accumulation, a previously unknown site of action for these compounds. The antifoulant and environmental pollutant tributyltin (TBT), which causes imposex in gastropod snails, induces an “obesogenic” phenotype in mammals, through the activation of the nuclear receptors retinoid X receptor (RXR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). In teleosts, the effects of TBT on the lipid metabolism are poorly understood, particularly following exposure to low, environmental concentrations. In this context, the present work shows that exposure of zebrafish to 10 and 50 ng/L of TBT (as Sn) from pre-hatch to 9 months of age alters the body weight, condition factor, hepatosomatic index and hepatic triglycerides in a gender and dose related manner. Furthermore, TBT modulated the transcription of key lipid regulating factors and enzymes involved in adipogenesis, lipogenesis, glucocorticoid metabolism, growth and development in the brain and liver of exposed fish, revealing sexual dimorphic effects in the latter. Overall, the present study shows that the model mammalian obesogen TBT interferes with triglyceride accumulation and the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism in zebrafish and indentifies the brain lipogenic transcription profile of fish as a new target of this compound. PMID:26633012

  10. The Mammalian "Obesogen" Tributyltin Targets Hepatic Triglyceride Accumulation and the Transcriptional Regulation of Lipid Metabolism in the Liver and Brain of Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lyssimachou, Angeliki; Santos, Joana G; André, Ana; Soares, Joana; Lima, Daniela; Guimarães, Laura; Almeida, C Marisa R; Teixeira, Catarina; Castro, L Filipe C; Santos, Miguel M

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that different Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) interfere with lipid metabolic pathways in mammals and promote fat accumulation, a previously unknown site of action for these compounds. The antifoulant and environmental pollutant tributyltin (TBT), which causes imposex in gastropod snails, induces an "obesogenic" phenotype in mammals, through the activation of the nuclear receptors retinoid X receptor (RXR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). In teleosts, the effects of TBT on the lipid metabolism are poorly understood, particularly following exposure to low, environmental concentrations. In this context, the present work shows that exposure of zebrafish to 10 and 50 ng/L of TBT (as Sn) from pre-hatch to 9 months of age alters the body weight, condition factor, hepatosomatic index and hepatic triglycerides in a gender and dose related manner. Furthermore, TBT modulated the transcription of key lipid regulating factors and enzymes involved in adipogenesis, lipogenesis, glucocorticoid metabolism, growth and development in the brain and liver of exposed fish, revealing sexual dimorphic effects in the latter. Overall, the present study shows that the model mammalian obesogen TBT interferes with triglyceride accumulation and the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism in zebrafish and indentifies the brain lipogenic transcription profile of fish as a new target of this compound.

  11. Bothriurus bonariensis scorpion venom activates voltage-dependent sodium channels in insect and mammalian nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Douglas Silva; Carvalho, Evelise Leis; de Lima, Jeferson Camargo; Breda, Ricardo Vaz; Oliveira, Raquel Soares; de Freitas, Thiago Carrazoni; Salamoni, Simone Denise; Domingues, Michelle Flores; Piovesan, Angela Regina; Boldo, Juliano Tomazzoni; de Assis, Dênis Reis; da Costa, Jaderson Costa; Dal Belo, Cháriston André; Pinto, Paulo Marcos

    2016-10-25

    Animal venoms have been widely recognized as a major source of biologically active molecules. Bothriurus bonariensis, popularly known as black scorpion, is the arthropod responsible for the highest number of accidents involving scorpion sting in Southern Brazil. Here we reported the first attempt to investigate the neurobiology of B. bonariensis venom (BBV) in the insect and mammalian nervous system. BBV (32 μg/g) induced a slow neuromuscular blockade in the in vivo cockroach nerve-muscle preparations (70 ± 4%, n = 6, p < 0.001), provoking repetitive twitches and significantly decreasing the frequency of spontaneous leg action potentials (SNCAPs) from 82 ± 3 min(-1) to 36 ± 1.3 min(-1) (n = 6, p < 0.05), without affecting the amplitude. When tested in primary cultures of rat hippocampal cells, BBV induced a massive increase of Ca(2+) influx (250 ± 1% peak increase, n = 3, p < 0.0001). The disturbance of calcium homeostasis induced by BBV on the mammalian central nervous system was not accompanied by cellular death and was prevented by the co-treatment of the hippocampal cells with tetrodotoxin, a selective sodium channel blocker. The results suggest that the biological activity of BBV is mostly related to a modulation of sodium channels function. Our biological activity survey suggests that BBV may have a promising insecticidal and therapeutic potential.

  12. Noncoding flavivirus RNA displays RNA interference suppressor activity in insect and Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schnettler, Esther; Sterken, Mark G; Leung, Jason Y; Metz, Stefan W; Geertsema, Corinne; Goldbach, Rob W; Vlak, Just M; Kohl, Alain; Khromykh, Alexander A; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2012-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are highly pathogenic, mosquito-borne flaviviruses (family Flaviviridae) that cause severe disease and death in humans. WNV and DENV actively replicate in mosquitoes and human hosts and thus encounter different host immune responses. RNA interference (RNAi) is the predominant antiviral response against invading RNA viruses in insects and plants. As a countermeasure, plant and insect RNA viruses encode RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to block the generation/activity of small interfering RNA (siRNA). Enhanced flavivirus replication in mosquitoes depleted for RNAi factors suggests an important biological role for RNAi in restricting virus replication, but it has remained unclear whether or not flaviviruses counteract RNAi via expression of an RSS. First, we established that flaviviral RNA replication suppressed siRNA-induced gene silencing in WNV and DENV replicon-expressing cells. Next, we showed that none of the WNV encoded proteins displayed RSS activity in mammalian and insect cells and in plants by using robust RNAi suppressor assays. In contrast, we found that the 3'-untranslated region-derived RNA molecule known as subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) efficiently suppressed siRNA- and miRNA-induced RNAi pathways in both mammalian and insect cells. We also showed that WNV sfRNA inhibits in vitro cleavage of double-stranded RNA by Dicer. The results of the present study suggest a novel role for sfRNA, i.e., as a nucleic acid-based regulator of RNAi pathways, a strategy that may be conserved among flaviviruses.

  13. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a tool to predict chemical activity on mammalian development and identify mechanisms influencing toxicological outcome

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, Philippa H.; Perry, Simon J.; Widdison, Stephanie; Daniels, Shannon; Bondo, Eddie; Lamberth, Clemens; Currie, Richard A.; Flemming, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether a C. elegans bioassay could predict mammalian developmental activity, we selected diverse compounds known and known not to elicit such activity and measured their effect on C. elegans egg viability. 89% of compounds that reduced C. elegans egg viability also had mammalian developmental activity. Conversely only 25% of compounds found not to reduce egg viability in C. elegans were also inactive in mammals. We conclude that the C. elegans egg viability assay is an accurate positive predictor, but an inaccurate negative predictor, of mammalian developmental activity. We then evaluated C. elegans as a tool to identify mechanisms affecting toxicological outcomes among related compounds. The difference in developmental activity of structurally related fungicides in C. elegans correlated with their rate of metabolism. Knockdown of the cytochrome P450s cyp-35A3 and cyp-35A4 increased the toxicity to C. elegans of the least developmentally active compounds to the level of the most developmentally active. This indicated that these P450s were involved in the greater rate of metabolism of the less toxic of these compounds. We conclude that C. elegans based approaches can predict mammalian developmental activity and can yield plausible hypotheses for factors affecting the biological potency of compounds in mammals. PMID:26987796

  14. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a tool to predict chemical activity on mammalian development and identify mechanisms influencing toxicological outcome.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Philippa H; Perry, Simon J; Widdison, Stephanie; Daniels, Shannon; Bondo, Eddie; Lamberth, Clemens; Currie, Richard A; Flemming, Anthony J

    2016-03-18

    To determine whether a C. elegans bioassay could predict mammalian developmental activity, we selected diverse compounds known and known not to elicit such activity and measured their effect on C. elegans egg viability. 89% of compounds that reduced C. elegans egg viability also had mammalian developmental activity. Conversely only 25% of compounds found not to reduce egg viability in C. elegans were also inactive in mammals. We conclude that the C. elegans egg viability assay is an accurate positive predictor, but an inaccurate negative predictor, of mammalian developmental activity. We then evaluated C. elegans as a tool to identify mechanisms affecting toxicological outcomes among related compounds. The difference in developmental activity of structurally related fungicides in C. elegans correlated with their rate of metabolism. Knockdown of the cytochrome P450s cyp-35A3 and cyp-35A4 increased the toxicity to C. elegans of the least developmentally active compounds to the level of the most developmentally active. This indicated that these P450s were involved in the greater rate of metabolism of the less toxic of these compounds. We conclude that C. elegans based approaches can predict mammalian developmental activity and can yield plausible hypotheses for factors affecting the biological potency of compounds in mammals.

  15. Luminol electrochemiluminescence for the analysis of active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guangzhong; Zhou, Junyu; Tian, Chunxiu; Jiang, Dechen; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Hongyuan

    2013-04-16

    A luminol electrochemiluminescence assay was reported to analyze active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single mammalian cells. The cellular membrane cholesterol was activated by the exposure of the cells to low ionic strength buffer or the inhibition of intracellular acyl-coA/cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). The active membrane cholesterol was reacted with cholesterol oxidase in the solution to generate a peak concentration of hydrogen peroxide on the electrode surface, which induced a measurable luminol electrochemiluminescence. Further treatment of the active cells with mevastatin decreased the active membrane cholesterol resulting in a drop in luminance. No change in the intracellular calcium was observed in the presence of luminol and voltage, which indicated that our analysis process might not interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Single cell analysis was performed by placing a pinhole below the electrode so that only one cell was exposed to the photomultiplier tube (PMT). Twelve single cells were analyzed individually, and a large deviation on luminance ratio observed exhibited the cell heterogeneity on the active membrane cholesterol. The smaller deviation on ACAT/HMGCoA inhibited cells than ACAT inhibited cells suggested different inhibition efficiency for sandoz 58035 and mevastatin. The new information obtained from single cell analysis might provide a new insight on the study of intracellular cholesterol trafficking.

  16. Differential enzymatic activity of common haplotypic versions of the human acidic Mammalian chitinase protein.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Max A; Reese, Tiffany A; Choudhry, Shweta; Salam, Muhammad T; Beckman, Kenny; Eng, Celeste; Atakilit, Amha; Meade, Kelley; Lenoir, Michael; Watson, H Geoffrey; Thyne, Shannon; Kumar, Rajesh; Weiss, Kevin B; Grammer, Leslie C; Avila, Pedro; Schleimer, Robert P; Fahy, John V; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Boot, Rolf G; Sheppard, Dean; Gilliland, Frank D; Locksley, Richard M; Burchard, Esteban G

    2009-07-17

    Mouse models have shown the importance of acidic mammalian chitinase activity in settings of chitin exposure and allergic inflammation. However, little is known regarding genetic regulation of AMCase enzymatic activity in human allergic diseases. Resequencing the AMCase gene exons we identified 8 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms including three novel variants (A290G, G296A, G339T) near the gene area coding for the enzyme active site, all in linkage disequilibrium. AMCase protein isoforms, encoded by two gene-wide haplotypes, and differentiated by these three single nucleotide polymorphisms, were recombinantly expressed and purified. Biochemical analysis revealed the isoform encoded by the variant haplotype displayed a distinct pH profile exhibiting greater retention of chitinase activity at acidic and basic pH values. Determination of absolute kinetic activity found the variant isoform encoded by the variant haplotype was 4-, 2.5-, and 10-fold more active than the wild type AMCase isoform at pH 2.2, 4.6, and 7.0, respectively. Modeling of the AMCase isoforms revealed positional changes in amino acids critical for both pH specificity and substrate binding. Genetic association analyses of AMCase haplotypes for asthma revealed significant protective associations between the variant haplotype in several asthma cohorts. The structural, kinetic, and genetic data regarding the AMCase isoforms are consistent with the Th2-priming effects of environmental chitin and a role for AMCase in negatively regulating this stimulus.

  17. Mammalian pheromones.

    PubMed

    Liberles, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors.

  18. Mammalian Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  19. PLCζ or PAWP: revisiting the putative mammalian sperm factor that triggers egg activation and embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kashir, Junaid; Nomikos, Michail; Swann, Karl; Lai, F Anthony

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, egg activation is initiated by multiple cytosolic Ca(2+) transients (Ca(2+) oscillations) that are triggered following delivery of a putative sperm factor from the fertilizing sperm. The identity of this 'sperm factor' thus holds much significance, not only as a vital component in creating a new life, but also for its potential therapeutic and diagnostic value in human infertility. Recent data have emerged suggesting the sperm factor may be a post-acrosomal sheath WW domain-binding protein (PAWP). However, a significant body of research points to a testis-specific phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) as the sperm factor. Herein, we examine the evidence presented in favour of PAWP in relation to PLCζ and the requisite physiological properties of the mammalian sperm factor.

  20. Immunolocalization of the Ca2+-Activated K+ Channel Slo1 in Axons and Nerve Terminals of Mammalian Brain and Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Misonou, Hiroaki; Menegola, Milena; Buchwalder, Lynn; Park, Eunice W.; Meredith, Andrea; Rhodes, Kenneth J.; Aldrich, Richard W.; Trimmer, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+-activated voltage-dependent K+ channels (Slo1, KCa1.1, Maxi-K, or BK channel) play a crucial role in controlling neuronal signaling by coupling channel activity to both membrane depolarization and intracellular Ca2+ signaling. In mammalian brain, immunolabeling experiments have shown staining for Slo1 channels predominantly localized to axons and presynaptic terminals of neurons. We have developed anti-Slo1 mouse monoclonal antibodies that have been extensively characterized for specificity of staining against recombinant Slo1 in heterologous cells, and native Slo1 in mammalian brain, and definitively by the lack of detectable immunoreactivity against brain samples from Slo1 knockout mice. Here we provide precise immunolocalization of Slo1 in rat brain with one of these monoclonal antibodies and show that Slo1 is accumulated in axons and synaptic terminal zones associated with glutamatergic synapses in hippocampus and GABAergic synapses in cerebellum. By using cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurons as a model system, we show that heterologously expressed Slo1 is initially targeted to the axonal surface membrane, and with further development in culture, become localized in presynaptic terminals. These studies provide new insights into the polarized localization of Slo1 channels in mammalian central neurons and provide further evidence for a key role in regulating neurotransmitter release in glutamatergic and GABAergic terminals. PMID:16566008

  1. High Inorganic Triphosphatase Activities in Bacteria and Mammalian Cells: Identification of the Enzymes Involved

    PubMed Central

    Lakaye, Bernard; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Scholer, Georges; Fillet, Marianne; Elias, Benjamin; Derochette, Jean-Michel; Crommen, Jacques; Wins, Pierre; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2012-01-01

    Background We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase) from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this family are annotated as predicted adenylate cyclases, because one of the founding members is CyaB adenylate cyclase from A. hydrophila. The aim of the present study is to determine whether other members of the CYTH protein family also have a PPPase activity, if there are PPPase activities in animal tissues and what enzymes are responsible for these activities. Methodology/Principal Findings Recombinant enzymes were expressed and purified as GST- or His-tagged fusion proteins and the enzyme activities were determined by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate. We show that the hitherto uncharacterized E. coli CYTH protein ygiF is a specific PPPase, but it contributes only marginally to the total PPPase activity in this organism, where the main enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of inorganic triphosphate (PPPi) is inorganic pyrophosphatase. We further show that CyaB hydrolyzes PPPi but this activity is low compared to its adenylate cyclase activity. Finally we demonstrate a high PPPase activity in mammalian and quail tissue, particularly in the brain. We show that this activity is mainly due to Prune, an exopolyphosphatase overexpressed in metastatic tumors where it promotes cell motility. Conclusions and General Significance We show for the first time that PPPase activities are widespread in bacteria and animals. We identified the enzymes responsible for these activities but we were unable to detect significant amounts of PPPi in E. coli or brain extracts using ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The role of these enzymes may be to hydrolyze PPPi, which could be cytotoxic because of its high affinity for Ca2+, thereby interfering with Ca2+ signaling. PMID:22984449

  2. Deubiquitinating enzyme USP22 positively regulates c-Myc stability and tumorigenic activity in mammalian and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongyeon; Hong, Ahyoung; Park, Hye In; Shin, Woo Hyun; Yoo, Lang; Jeon, Seo Jeong; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2017-02-04

    The proto-oncogene c-Myc has a pivotal function in growth control, differentiation and apoptosis and is frequently affected in human cancer, including breast cancer. Ubiquitin-specific protease 22 (USP22), a member of the USP family of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), mediates deubiquitination of target proteins, including histone H2B and H2A, telomeric repeat binding factor 1, and cyclin B1. USP22 is also a component of the mammalian SAGA transcriptional co-activating complex. In this study, we explored the functional role of USP22 in modulating c-Myc stability and its physiological relevance in breast cancer progression. We found that USP22 promotes deubiquitination of c-Myc in several breast cancer cell lines, resulting in increased levels of c-Myc. Consistent with this, USP22 knockdown reduces c-Myc levels. Furthermore, overexpression of USP22 stimulates breast cancer cell growth and colony formation, and increases c-Myc tumorigenic activity. In conclusion, the present study reveals that USP22 in breast cancer cell lines increases c-Myc stability through c-Myc deubiquitination, which is closely correlated with breast cancer progression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunoexpression status and prognostic value of mammalian target of rapamycin and hypoxia-induced pathway members in papillary cell renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Alcides; Schultz, Luciana; Albadine, Roula; Hicks, Jessica; Kim, Jenny J; Allaf, Mohamad E; Carducci, Michael A; Rodriguez, Ronald; Hammers, Hans-Joerg; Argani, Pedram; Reuter, Victor E; Netto, George J

    2012-12-01

    Dysregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin and hypoxia-induced pathways has been consistently identified in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. However, experience with non-clear cell renal cell carcinoma subtypes is scant. In this study, we evaluated the immunohistochemical expression of upstream (PTEN and phosphorylated AKT) and downstream (phosphorylated S6 and 4EBP1) effectors of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, as well as related cell-cycle proteins (p27 and c-MYC), and a member of the hypoxia-induced pathway (HIF-1α) in 54 patients with papillary renal cell carcinoma treated by nephrectomy. PTEN was lower in tumor than in normal kidney, and loss of PTEN expression was found in 48% of the patients. In tumor tissues, phosphorylated S6, 4EBP1, and HIF-1α were higher than in normal kidney. Conversely, scores of p27 were lower in tumor than in normal kidney. Finally, scores of c-MYC and phosphorylated AKT were similar in tumor and in normal kidney. Overall mortality and cancer-specific mortality were 24% and 11%, respectively. Tumor progression was observed in 17% of the patients. None of the tested biomarkers predicted cancer-specific mortality or tumor progression. As expected, patients with high T-stage tumors had higher hazard ratios for cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 6.9) and tumor progression (hazard ratio, 6.7). Patients with higher Fuhrman grades also had higher risks for cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 11.4) and tumor progression (hazard ratio, 4.5). In summary, our study provides evidence of dysregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin and hypoxia-induced pathways in papillary renal cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry for members of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and for HIF-1α lacked prognostic significance in our cohort.

  4. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids*

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  5. Ketamine Exhibits Different Neuroanatomical Profile After Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibition in the Prefrontal Cortex: the Role of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; de Moura, Airam B; Matos, Danyela; Demo, Júlia P; da Silva, Júlia B I; Danielski, Lucineia G; Petronilho, Fabricia; Carvalho, André F; Quevedo, João

    2016-09-02

    Studies indicated that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), oxidative stress, and inflammation are involved in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been identified as a novel MDD therapy; however, the antidepressant mechanism is not fully understood. In addition, the effects of ketamine after mTOR inhibition have not been fully investigated. In the present study, we examined the behavioral and biochemical effects of ketamine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens after inhibition of mTOR signaling in the PFC. Male adult Wistar rats received pharmacological mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin (0.2 nmol) or vehicle into the PFC and then a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). Immobility was assessed in forced swimming tests, and then oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory markers were evaluated in the brain and periphery. mTOR activation in the PFC was essential to ketamine's antidepressant-like effects. Ketamine increased lipid damage in the PFC, hippocampus, and amygdala. Protein carbonyl was elevated in the PFC, amygdala, and NAc after ketamine administration. Ketamine also increased nitrite/nitrate in the PFC, hippocampus, amygdala, and NAc. Myeloperoxidase activity increased in the hippocampus and NAc after ketamine administration. The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were reduced after ketamine administration in all brain areas studied. Inhibition of mTOR signaling pathways by rapamycin in the PFC was required to protect against oxidative stress by reducing damage and increasing antioxidant enzymes. Finally, the TNF-α level was increased in serum by ketamine; however, the rapamycin plus treatment group was not able to block this increase. Activation of mTOR in the PFC is involved in the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine; however, the inhibition of this pathway was able to protect certain brain areas against

  6. Sodium Pumps Mediate Activity-Dependent Changes in Mammalian Motor Networks.

    PubMed

    Picton, Laurence D; Nascimento, Filipe; Broadhead, Matthew J; Sillar, Keith T; Miles, Gareth B

    2017-01-25

    Ubiquitously expressed sodium pumps are best known for maintaining the ionic gradients and resting membrane potential required for generating action potentials. However, activity- and state-dependent changes in pump activity can also influence neuronal firing and regulate rhythmic network output. Here we demonstrate that changes in sodium pump activity regulate locomotor networks in the spinal cord of neonatal mice. The sodium pump inhibitor, ouabain, increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of drug-induced locomotor bursting, effects that were dependent on the presence of the neuromodulator dopamine. Conversely, activating the pump with the sodium ionophore monensin decreased burst frequency. When more "natural" locomotor output was evoked using dorsal-root stimulation, ouabain increased burst frequency and extended locomotor episode duration, whereas monensin slowed and shortened episodes. Decreasing the time between dorsal-root stimulation, and therefore interepisode interval, also shortened and slowed activity, suggesting that pump activity encodes information about past network output and contributes to feedforward control of subsequent locomotor bouts. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from spinal motoneurons and interneurons, we describe a long-duration (∼60 s), activity-dependent, TTX- and ouabain-sensitive, hyperpolarization (∼5 mV), which is mediated by spike-dependent increases in pump activity. The duration of this dynamic pump potential is enhanced by dopamine. Our results therefore reveal sodium pumps as dynamic regulators of mammalian spinal motor networks that can also be affected by neuromodulatory systems. Given the involvement of sodium pumps in movement disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism, knowledge of their contribution to motor network regulation also has considerable clinical importance.

  7. Altered motor activity of alternative splice variants of the mammalian kinesin-3 protein KIF1B.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Ruri; Mitsui, Keiji; Kanazawa, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    Several mammalian kinesin motor proteins exist as multiple isoforms that arise from alternative splicing of a single gene. However, the roles of many motor protein splice variants remain unclear. The kinesin-3 motor protein KIF1B has alternatively spliced isoforms distinguished by the presence or absence of insertion sequences in the conserved amino-terminal region of the protein. The insertions are located in the loop region containing the lysine-rich cluster, also known as the K-loop, and in the hinge region adjacent to the motor domain. To clarify the functions of these alternative splice variants of KIF1B, we examined the biochemical properties of recombinant KIF1B with and without insertion sequences. In a microtubule-dependent ATPase assay, KIF1B variants that contained both insertions had higher activity and affinity for microtubules than KIF1B variants that contained no insertions. Mutational analysis of the K-loop insertion revealed that variants with a longer insertion sequence at this site had higher activity. However, the velocity of movement in motility assays was similar between KIF1B with and without insertion sequences. Our results indicate that splicing isoforms of KIF1B that vary in their insertion sequences have different motor activities.

  8. Rictor/mammalian target of rapamycin 2 regulates the development of Notch1 induced murine T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia via forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chunlan; Guo, Huidong; Bu, Jiachen; Zhou, Mi; Cheng, Hui; He, Fuhong; Wang, Jinhong; Wang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yinchi; Wang, Qianfei; Zhou, Jianfeng; Cheng, Tao; Xu, Mingjiang; Yuan, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is composed of two distinct biochemical complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. In response to nutrients and growth factors, mTORC1 is known to control cellular growth by regulating the translational regulators S6 kinase 1 and 4E binding protein 1, whereas mTORC2 mediates cell proliferation and survival by activating Akt through phosphorylation at Ser473. Studies have shown that the deregulation of mTORC2 leads to the development of myeloproliferative disorder and leukemia in the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN)-deleted mouse model. However, the mechanism by which mTORC2 specifically affects leukemogenesis is still not fully understood. Here, we investigated the role of mTORC2 in NOTCH1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in a Rictor-deficient mouse model. We found that, by deleting Rictor, an essential component of mTORC2, leukemia progression was significantly suppressed by arresting a greater proportion of Rictor(△/△) leukemic cells at the G0 phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, the absence of Rictor led to the overexpression of chemotaxis-related genes, such as CCR2, CCR4 and CXCR4, which contributed to the homing and migration of Rictor-deficient T-ALL cells to the spleen but not the bone marrow. In addition, we demonstrated that inactivation of mTORC2 caused the overexpression of forkhead box O3 and its downstream effectors and eased the progression of leukemia in T-ALL mice. Our study thus indicates that forkhead box O3 could be a potential drug target for the treatment of T-ALL leukemia.

  9. The novel orally bioavailable inhibitor of phosphoinositol-3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin, NVP-BEZ235, inhibits growth and proliferation in multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Philipp Mandl-Weber, Sonja; Oduncu, Fuat; Schmidmaier, Ralf

    2009-02-01

    NVP-BEZ235 is a new inhibitor of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3 kinase) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) whose efficacy in advanced solid tumours is currently being evaluated in a phase I/II clinical trial. Here we show that NVP-BEZ235 inhibits growth in common myeloma cell lines as well as primary myeloma cells at nanomolar concentrations in a time and dose dependent fashion. Further experiments revealed induction of apoptosis in three of four cell lines. Inhibition of cell growth was mainly due to inhibition of myeloma cell proliferation, as shown by the BrdU assay. Cell cycle analysis revealed induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, which was due to downregulation of cyclin D1, pRb and cdc25a. NVP-BEZ235 inhibited phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt), P70S6k and 4E-BP-1. Furthermore we show that the stimulatory effect of CD40-ligand (CD40L), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and conditioned medium of HS-5 stromal cells on myeloma cell growth is completely abrogated by NVP-BEZ235. In addition, synergism studies revealed synergistic and additive activity of NVP-BEZ235 together with melphalan, doxorubicin and bortezomib. Taken together, inhibition of PI3 kinase/mTOR by NVP-BEZ235 is highly effective and NVP-BEZ235 represents a potential new candidate for targeted therapy in multiple myeloma.

  10. Oral Adverse Events Associated with Tyrosine Kinase and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Structured Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Joel B.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Ouwerkerk, Jan; Logan, Richard M.; Brakenhoff, Jan A.; Lacouture, Mario E.; Gelderblom, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background. Oral adverse events (OAEs) associated with multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORIs) are underestimated but frequent and novel presentations of mucosal manifestations. Because optimal antitumor activity requires maintaining the optimal dose, it is essential to avoid unintended treatment delays or interruptions. Methods. We review the reported prevalence and appearance of OAEs with TKIs and mTORIs and the current oral assessment tools commonly used in clinical trials. We discuss the correlations between OAEs and hand–foot skin reaction (HFSR) and rash. Results. The reported prevalence of oral mucositis/stomatitis of any grade is 4% for pazopanib, 28% for sorafenib, 38% for sunitinib, 41% for temsirolimus, and 44% for everolimus. Oral lesions associated with these agents have been reported to more closely resemble aphthous stomatitis than OM caused by conventional agents. In addition, these agents may result in symptoms such as oral mucosal pain, dysgeusia, and dysphagia, in the absence of clinical lesions. Because of these factors, OAEs secondary to targeted agents may be underreported. In addition, a correlation between OAEs and HFSR was identified. Conclusions. OAEs caused by TKIs and mTORIs may represent dose-limiting toxicities, especially considering the fact that even low grades of OAEs may be troubling to the patient. We discuss how these novel AEs can be assessed because current mucositis assessment tools have limitations. Prospective studies investigating the pathogenesis, risk factors, and management of OAEs are needed in order to minimize the impact on patient's health-related quality of life. PMID:22207567

  11. Anti-Breast Cancer Potential of Quercetin via the Akt/AMPK/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling Cascade.

    PubMed

    Rivera Rivera, Amilcar; Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Gerena, Yamil; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2016-01-01

    The Akt/adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has emerged as a critical signaling nexus for regulating cellular metabolism, energy homeostasis, and cell growth. Thus, dysregulation of this pathway contributes to the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2diabetes, and cancer. We previously reported that a combination of grape polyphenols (resveratrol, quercetin and catechin: RQC), at equimolar concentrations, reduces breast cancer (BC) growth and metastasis in nude mice, and inhibits Akt and mTOR activities and activates AMPK, an endogenous inhibitor of mTOR, in metastatic BC cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the contribution of individual polyphenols to the effect of combined RQC on mTOR signaling. Metastatic BC cells were treated with RQC individually or in combination, at various concentrations, and the activities (phosphorylation) of AMPK, Akt, and the mTOR downstream effectors, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and 4E binding protein (4EBP1), were determined by Western blot. Results show that quercetin was the most effective compound for Akt/mTOR inhibition. Treatment with quercetin at 15μM had a similar effect as the RQC combination in the inhibition of BC cell proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. However, cell cycle analysis showed that the RQC treatment arrested BC cells in the G1 phase, while quercetin arrested the cell cycle in G2/M. In vivo experiments, using SCID mice with implanted tumors from metastatic BC cells, demonstrated that administration of quercetin at 15mg/kg body weight resulted in a ~70% reduction in tumor growth. In conclusion, quercetin appears to be a viable grape polyphenol for future development as an anti BC therapeutic.

  12. Anti-Breast Cancer Potential of Quercetin via the Akt/AMPK/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Rivera Rivera, Amilcar; Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Gerena, Yamil; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2016-01-01

    The Akt/adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has emerged as a critical signaling nexus for regulating cellular metabolism, energy homeostasis, and cell growth. Thus, dysregulation of this pathway contributes to the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2diabetes, and cancer. We previously reported that a combination of grape polyphenols (resveratrol, quercetin and catechin: RQC), at equimolar concentrations, reduces breast cancer (BC) growth and metastasis in nude mice, and inhibits Akt and mTOR activities and activates AMPK, an endogenous inhibitor of mTOR, in metastatic BC cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the contribution of individual polyphenols to the effect of combined RQC on mTOR signaling. Metastatic BC cells were treated with RQC individually or in combination, at various concentrations, and the activities (phosphorylation) of AMPK, Akt, and the mTOR downstream effectors, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and 4E binding protein (4EBP1), were determined by Western blot. Results show that quercetin was the most effective compound for Akt/mTOR inhibition. Treatment with quercetin at 15μM had a similar effect as the RQC combination in the inhibition of BC cell proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. However, cell cycle analysis showed that the RQC treatment arrested BC cells in the G1 phase, while quercetin arrested the cell cycle in G2/M. In vivo experiments, using SCID mice with implanted tumors from metastatic BC cells, demonstrated that administration of quercetin at 15mg/kg body weight resulted in a ~70% reduction in tumor growth. In conclusion, quercetin appears to be a viable grape polyphenol for future development as an anti BC therapeutic. PMID:27285995

  13. Active Targets for Experiments with Rare Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    Experimental studies of un-bound nuclear states and nuclear reaction rates relevant for astrophysical processes are an important area of research with rare isotope beams. Both topics require the development of specialized experimental methods to study resonant reactions. The so-called active target approach, where the target material becomes part of the detection process, promises to combine high yields from thicker targets and low background with high resolution. This presentation will describe the implementation of the active-target technique in the ANASEN detector, which was developed by researchers from Louisiana State University and Florida State University. ANASEN was used in a number of stable and rare iosotope experiments in α- and proton scattering, as well as (α , p) and (d , p) reactions at FSU's in-flight radioactive beam facility RESOLUT. ANASEN also was used to perform the first experiment, proton scattering off a 37K beam at the ReA3 facility. Another active-target detector with a very different approach is found in the Active Target Time-Projection Chamber, which was developed by a collaboration between researchers from MSU, the University of Notre Dame, Western Michigan University, LLNL, LBNL, and St. Mary's University (Canada). First experiments with an AT-TPC prototype have been reported. The talk will summarize the results from the first experiments with these systems, describe further development and future research projects. Experimental studies of un-bound nuclear states and nuclear reaction rates relevant for astrophysical processes are an important area of research with rare isotope beams. Both topics require the development of specialized experimental methods to study resonant reactions. The so-called active target approach, where the target material becomes part of the detection process, promises to combine high yields from thicker targets and low background with high resolution. This presentation will describe the implementation of the

  14. The phosphatase activity of mammalian polynucleotide kinase takes precedence over its kinase activity in repair of single strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Caroline J; Allinson, Sarah L

    2006-01-01

    The dual function mammalian DNA repair enzyme, polynucleotide kinase (PNK), facilitates strand break repair through catalysis of 5'-hydroxyl phosphorylation and 3'-phosphate dephosphorylation. We have examined the relative activities of the kinase and phosphatase functions of PNK using a novel assay, which allows the simultaneous characterization of both activities in processing nicks and gaps containing both 3'-phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl. Under multiple turnover conditions the phosphatase activity of the purified enzyme is significantly more active than its kinase activity. Consistent with this result, phosphorylation of the 5'-hydroxyl is rate limiting in cell extract mediated-repair of a nicked substrate. On characterizing the effects of individually mutating the two active sites of PNK we find that while site-directed mutagenesis of the kinase domain of PNK does not affect its phosphatase activity, disruption of the phosphatase domain also abrogates kinase function. This loss of kinase function requires the presence of a 3'-phosphate, but it need not be present in the same strand break as the 5'-hydroxyl. PNK preferentially binds 3'-phosphorylated substrates and DNA binding to the phosphatase domain blocks further DNA binding by the kinase domain.

  15. N-nitroso-N-ethylurea activates DNA damage surveillance pathways and induces transformation in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    treatment indicating NEU to have the potential to cause early transformation in the cells. Conclusion NEU causes damage in mammalian cells in the form of double strand and single strand breaks that temporally activate the major checkpoint signalling kinases without the occurrence of cross-talk between the pathways. NEU also appear to cause transformation in three-dimensional spheroid cultures. PMID:24758542

  16. CFTR targeting during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hang Pong; Valentine, Vincent G; Wang, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel, plays critical roles in phagocytic host defense. However, how activated neutrophils regulate CFTR channel distribution subcellularly is not well defined. To investigate, we tested multiple Abs against different CFTR domains, to examine CFTR expression in human peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. The data confirmed that resting neutrophils had pronounced CFTR expression. Activation of neutrophils with soluble or particulate agonists did not significantly increase CFTR expression level, but induced CFTR redistribution to cell surface. Such CFTR mobilization correlated with cell-surface recruitment of formyl-peptide receptor during secretory vesicle exocytosis. Intriguingly, neutrophils from patients with ΔF508-CF, despite expression of the mutant CFTR, showed little cell-surface mobilization upon stimulation. Although normal neutrophils effectively targeted CFTR to their phagosomes, ΔF508-CF neutrophils had impairment in that process, resulting in deficient hypochlorous acid production. Taken together, activated neutrophils regulate CFTR distribution by targeting this chloride channel to the subcellular sites of activation, and ΔF508-CF neutrophils fail to achieve such targeting, thus undermining their host defense function.

  17. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  18. Rapid monitoring of RNA degradation activity in vivo for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tani, Hidenori; Sato, Hiroaki; Torimura, Masaki

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a rapid fluorescence assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for the monitoring of RNA degradation activity in mammalian cells. In this technique, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fluorescent probes are used. The dsRNA fluorescent probes consist of a 5' fluorophore-labeled strand hybridized to a 3' quencher-labeled strand, and the fluorescent dye is quenched by a quencher dye. When the dsRNA is degraded by nascent RNases in cells, the fluorescence emission of the fluorophore is induced following the degradation of the double strands. The degradation rates of the dsRNA are decelerated in response to chemical or environmental toxicity; therefore, in the case of cellular toxicity, the dsRNA is not degraded and remains intact, thus quenching the fluorescence. Unlike in conventional cell-counting assays, this new assay eliminates time-consuming steps, and can be used to simply evaluate the cellular toxicity via a single reaction. Our results demonstrate that this assay can rapidly quantify the RNA degradation rates in vivo within 4 h for three model chemicals. We propose that this assay will be useful for monitoring cellular toxicity in high-throughput applications.

  19. Transcription is Associated with Z-DNA Formation in Metabolically Active Permeabilized Mammalian Cell Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, Burghardt; Dorbic, Tomislav; Rich, Alexander

    1991-03-01

    Mammalian cells have been encapsulated in agarose microbeads, and from these cells metabolically active permeabilized nuclei were prepared. Previously, we showed that biotin-labeled monoclonal antibodies against Z-DNA can be diffused into the nuclei and, over a specific concentration range, they will bind to Z-DNA within the nucleus in a concentration-independent manner. By using radiolabeled streptavidin, we showed that the amount of Z-DNA antibody bound is related to the torsional strain of the DNA in the nucleus. Relaxation of the DNA results in a decrease of Z-DNA formation, whereas increasing torsional strain through inhibiting topoisomerase I results in increased Z-DNA formation. Here we measure the influence of RNA transcription and DNA replication. Transcription is associated with a substantial increase in the binding of anti-Z-DNA antibodies, paralleling the increased level of RNA synthesized as the level of ribonucleoside triphosphate in the medium is increased. DNA replication yields smaller increases in the binding of Z-DNA antibodies. Stopping RNA transcription with inhibitors results in a large loss of Z-DNA antibody binding, whereas only a small decrease is associated with inhibition of DNA replication.

  20. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for the toxicity of chlorophenols to mammalian submitochondrial particles.

    PubMed

    Argese, E; Bettiol, C; Giurin, G; Miana, P

    1999-04-01

    The toxicity of a series of chlorophenols, determined by a short-term in vitro assay utilizing mammalian submitochondrial particles, was related to the physicochemical and structural properties of these compounds. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships were defined by correlating EC50 values with six molecular descriptors, chosen to represent lipophilic, electronic and steric effects: the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log Kow), the constant of Hammett (sigma sigma), the acid dissociation constant (pKa), the first order valence molecular connectivity index (1 chi v), the perimeter of the efficacious section (sigma D) and the melting point (m.p.). The results of regression analysis showed that log Kow is the most successful descriptor, indicating that the ability of chlorophenols to partition into the lipid bilayer of the mitochondrial membrane has an important role in determining their toxic effects. These results are consistent with a molecular mechanism of uncoupling action based on the chemiosmotic theory and on the protonophoric properties of chlorophenols. The quality of the QSAR models confirms the suitability of the SMP assay as a short-term prediction tool for aquatic toxicity of environmental pollutants acting on respiratory functions.

  1. Characterization of orderly spatiotemporal patterns of clock gene activation in mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Nicholas C.; Tong, Tina Y.; Foley, Duncan; LeSauter, Joseph; Welsh, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Because we can observe oscillation within individual cells and in the tissue as a whole, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) presents a unique system in the mammalian brain for the analysis of individual cells and the networks of which they are a part. While dispersed cells of the SCN sustain circadian oscillations in isolation, they are unstable oscillators that require network interactions for robust cycling. Using cluster analysis to assess bioluminescence in acute brain slices from PERIOD2∷Luciferase (PER2∷LUC) knockin mice, and immunochemistry of SCN from animals harvested at various circadian times, we assessed the spatiotemporal activation patterns of PER2 to explore the emergence of a coherent oscillation at the tissue level. The results indicate that circadian oscillation is characterized by a stable daily cycle of PER2 expression involving orderly serial activation of specific SCN subregions, followed by a silent interval, with substantial symmetry between the left and right side of the SCN. The biological significance of the clusters identified in living slices was confirmed by co-expression of LUC and PER2 in fixed, immunochemically stained brain sections, with the spatiotemporal pattern of LUC expression resembling that revealed in the cluster analysis of bioluminescent slices. We conclude that the precise timing of PER2 expression within individual neurons is dependent on their location within the nucleus, and that small groups of neurons within the SCN give rise to distinctive and identifiable subregions. We propose that serial activation of these subregions is the basis of robustness and resilience of the daily rhythm of the SCN. PMID:21488990

  2. Recruitment of the Mammalian Histone-modifying EMSY Complex to Target Genes Is Regulated by ZNF131.

    PubMed

    Varier, Radhika A; Carrillo de Santa Pau, Enrique; van der Groep, Petra; Lindeboom, Rik G H; Matarese, Filomena; Mensinga, Anneloes; Smits, Arne H; Edupuganti, Raghu Ram; Baltissen, Marijke P; Jansen, Pascal W T C; Ter Hoeve, Natalie; van Weely, Danny R; Poser, Ina; van Diest, Paul J; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    Recent work from others and us revealed interactions between the Sin3/HDAC complex, the H3K4me3 demethylase KDM5A, GATAD1, and EMSY. Here, we characterize the EMSY/KDM5A/SIN3B complex in detail by quantitative interaction proteomics and ChIP-sequencing. We identify a novel substoichiometric interactor of the complex, transcription factor ZNF131, which recruits EMSY to a large number of active, H3K4me3 marked promoters. Interestingly, using an EMSY knock-out line and subsequent rescue experiments, we show that EMSY is in most cases positively correlated with transcriptional activity of its target genes and stimulates cell proliferation. Finally, by immunohistochemical staining of primary breast tissue microarrays we find that EMSY/KDM5A/SIN3B complex subunits are frequently overexpressed in primary breast cancer cases in a correlative manner. Taken together, these data open venues for exploring the possibility that sporadic breast cancer patients with EMSY amplification might benefit from epigenetic combination therapy targeting both the KDM5A demethylase and histone deacetylases.

  3. The Transcription Factor p8 Regulates Autophagy in Response to Palmitic Acid Stress via a Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR)-independent Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jia, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Cheng; Chen, Dian-Fu; Li, An-Qi; Dai, Li; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Fan; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2016-02-26

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved degradative process that allows cells to maintain homoeostasis in numerous physiological situations. This process also functions as an essential protective response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which promotes the removal and degradation of unfolded proteins. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which autophagy is initiated and regulated in response to ER stress. In this study, different types of autophagy were identified in human gastric cancer MKN45 cells in response to the stress induced by nutrient starvation or lipotoxicity in which the regulation of these pathways is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent or -independent, respectively. Interestingly, we found that p8, a stress-inducible transcription factor, was enhanced in MKN45 cells treated with palmitic acid to induce lipotoxicity. Furthermore, an increase in autophagy was observed in MKN45 cells stably overexpressing p8 using a lentivirus system, and autophagy induced by palmitic acid was blocked by p8 RNAi compared with the control. Western blotting analyses showed that autophagy was regulated by p8 or mTOR in response to the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/activating transcription factor 6-mediated ER stress of lipotoxicity or the parkin-mediated mitochondrial stress of nutrient starvation, respectively. Furthermore, our results indicated that autophagy induced by palmitic acid is mTOR-independent, but this autophagy pathway was regulated by p8 via p53- and PKCα-mediated signaling in MKN45 cells. Our findings provide insights into the role of p8 in regulating autophagy induced by the lipotoxic effects of excess fat accumulation in cells.

  4. Mammalian target of rapamycin/p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase signaling is altered by sevoflurane and/or surgery in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongzhe; Ma, Li; Jiao, Linbo; Gao, Minglong; Guo, Wenzhi; Chen, Lin; Pan, Ningling; Ma, Yaqun

    2015-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70S6k) pathway exerts anti‑apoptotic effects that may contribute to disease pathogenesis. The memory impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been suggested to be contributed to by abnormal mTOR signaling. The aim of the current study was to investigate the association between sevoflurane and/or surgery and AD through the mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Sprague‑Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the sevoflurane, surgery or control groups. The animals in the surgery group received a partial hepatectomy under sevoflurane anesthesia. The hippocampal levels of phosphorylated (p)‑mTOR, p‑p70S6K, caspase‑3 and p‑tau/total (t)‑tau were analyzed. The Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate cognitive function following treatment. The levels of p‑mTOR and p‑p70S6K were reduced, whereas caspase‑3 levels were increased in the surgery group compared with the sevoflurane group. The p‑tau/t‑tau levels were increased, however, tau mRNA was unaffected by sevoflurane and/or surgery. The rats in the surgery group required a significantly longer time to locate the platform in the MWM test compared with the control and sevoflurane groups. Sevoflurane treatment and/or surgery reduced anti‑apoptotic activity, and the postoperative cognitive dysfunction following surgery may be due to mTOR signaling pathway inhibition in aged rats. Increased neuronal apoptosis and tau phosphorylation are suggested to be involved in the association between anesthesia and AD occurrence.

  5. Mammalian target of rapamycin/eukaryotic initiation factor 4F pathway regulates follicle growth and development of theca cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Xiao-Ran; Cao, Yong-Chun; Tian, Jin-Ling; Zhen, Di; Luo, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Xin-Mei; Tian, Jian-Hui; Gao, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-11

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the roles of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway in follicular growth and development of thecal cells. Using in vivo-grown and in vitro-cultured ovaries, histological changes were evaluated using haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from 0 day post partum (d.p.p.) to 8 d.p.p. ovaries were screened by microarray and verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Forty-two DEGs related to cell proliferation and differentiation were screened out, with most DEGs being related to the to mTOR signalling pathway. Then, 3 d.p.p. ovaries were retrieved and used to verify the role of mTOR signalling in follicle and thecal cell development using its activators (Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) and GTP) and inhibitor (rapamycin). The development of follicles and thecal cells was significantly impaired in ovaries cultured in vitro Day 3 to Day 8. In in vitro-cultured ovaries, Rheb and GTP (is 100 ng mL-1 Rheb and 500 ng mL-1 GTP for 48 h) significantly increased follicle diameter, the percentage of primary and secondary follicles and the umber of thecal cells, and upregulated expression of mTOR, phosphorylated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1), eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F and cytochrome P450, family 17, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP17A1). Rapamycin (10 nM rapamycin for 24 h) had opposite effects to those of Rheb and GTP, and partly abrogated (significant) the effects of Rheb and GTP when added to the culture in combination with these drugs. Thus, mTOR signalling plays an important role in follicle growth and thecal cell development.

  6. Cytotoxic activities of Leptospira interrogans hemolysin SphH as a pore-forming protein on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung Hoon; Kim, Sangduk; Park, Seung Chul; Kim, Min Ja

    2002-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a spirochetal zoonosis that causes an acute febrile systemic illness in humans. Leptospira sp. hemolysins have been shown to be virulence factors for the pathogenesis of leptospirosis. Previously, we cloned a hemolysin SphH of Leptospira interrogans serovar lai, a homologue of L. borgpetersenii sphingomyelinase (SphA), from a genomic library (S. H. Lee, K. A. Kim, Y. K. Kim, I. W. Seong, M. J. Kim, and Y. J. Lee, Gene 254:19-28, 2000). Escherichia coli lysate harboring the sphH showed high hemolytic activities on sheep erythrocytes. However, it neither showed sphingomyelinase nor phospholipase activities, in contrast to SphA which was known to have sphingomyelinase activity. Interestingly, the SphH-mediated hemolysis on erythrocytes was osmotically protected by PEG 5000, suggesting that the SphH might have caused pore formation on the erythrocyte membrane. In the present study, we have prepared the Leptospira hemolysin SphH and investigated its hemolytic and cytotoxic activities on mammalian cells. SphH was shown to be a pore-forming protein on several mammalian cells: When treated with the SphH, the sheep erythrocyte membranes formed pores, which were morphologically confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the SphH-mediated cytotoxicities on mammalian cells were demonstrated by the release of LDH and by inverted microscopic examinations. Finally, the immune serum against the full-length hemolysin could effectively neutralize the SphH-mediated hemolytic and cytotoxic activities. In conclusion, these results suggest that the virulence of Leptospira SphH was due to the pore formation on mammalian cell membranes.

  7. Human PLCζ exhibits superior fertilization potency over mouse PLCζ in triggering the Ca2+ oscillations required for mammalian oocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Nomikos, Michail; Theodoridou, Maria; Elgmati, Khalil; Parthimos, Dimitris; Calver, Brian L.; Buntwal, Luke; Nounesis, George; Swann, Karl; Lai, F. Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A sperm-specific phospholipase C-zeta (PLCζ) is believed to play an essential role in oocyte activation during mammalian fertilization. Sperm PLCζ has been shown to trigger a prolonged series of repetitive Ca2+ transients or oscillations in oocytes that precede activation. This remarkable intracellular Ca2+ signalling phenomenon is a distinctive characteristic observed during in vitro fertilization by sperm. Previous studies have notably observed an apparent differential ability of PLCζ from disparate mammalian species to trigger Ca2+ oscillations in mouse oocytes. However, the molecular basis and confirmation of the apparent PLCζ species difference in activity remains to be provided. In the present study, we provide direct evidence for the superior effectiveness of human PLCζ relative to mouse PLCζ in generating Ca2+ oscillations in mouse oocytes. In addition, we have designed and constructed a series of human/mouse PLCζ chimeras to enable study of the potential role of discrete PLCζ domains in conferring the enhanced Ca2+ signalling potency of human PLCζ. Functional analysis of these human/mouse PLCζ domain chimeras suggests a novel role of the EF-hand domain in the species-specific differences in PLCζ activity. Our empirical observations are compatible with a basic mathematical model for the Ca2+ dependence of generating cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations in mammalian oocytes by sperm PLCζ. PMID:24478462

  8. The effect of space microgravity on the physiological activity of mammalian resident cardiac stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Zakharov, Eugeny

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness during space flights is known to cause depression of heart function in mammals. The decrease in heart weight and its remodeling under the influence of prolonged weightlessness (or space microgravity) is assumed to be due to both morphological changes of working cardiomyocytes and their progressive loss, as well as to possible depletion of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) population, or their inability to self-renewal and regeneration of muscle tissue under conditions of weightlessness. We have previously shown that the presence of different maturity clones formed by resident CSCs not only in culture but also in the mammalian myocardium can be used as an indicator of the regenerative activity of myocardial cells [Belostotskaya, et al., 2013: 2014]. In this study, we were interested to investigate whether the 30-day near-Earth space flight on the spacecraft BION-M1 affects the regenerative potential of resident CSCs. Immediately after landing of the spacecraft, we had examined the presence of resident c-kit+, Sca-1+ and Isl1+ CSCs and their development in suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells of C57BL mice in comparison to controls. Cardiac cell suspension was obtained by enzymatic digestion of the heart [Belostotskaya and Golovanova, 2014]. Immunocytochemically stained preparations of fixed cells were analyzed with confocal microscope Leica TCS SP5 (Germany) in the Resource Center of St-Petersburg State University. CSCs were labeled with appropriate antibodies. CSCs differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes was verified using antibodies to Sarcomeric α-Actinin and Cardiac Troponin T. Antibodies to Connexin43 were used to detect cell-cell contacts. All antibodies were conjugated with Alexa fluorochromes (488, 532, 546, 568, 594 and/or 647 nm), according to Zenon-technology (Invitrogen). It has been shown that, under identical conditions of cell isolation, more complete digestion of heart muscle was observed in

  9. Peptidoglycan: a critical activator of the mammalian immune system during infection and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sorbara, Matthew T; Philpott, Dana J

    2011-09-01

    Peptidoglycan is a conserved structural component of the bacterial cell wall with molecular motifs unique to bacteria. The mammalian immune system takes advantage of these properties and has evolved to recognize this microbial associated molecular pattern. Mammals have four secreted peptidoglycan recognition proteins, PGLYRP-1-4, as well as two intracellular sensors of peptidoglycan, Nod1 and Nod2. Recognition of peptidoglycan is important in initiating and shaping the immune response under both homeostatic and infection conditions. During infection, peptidoglycan recognition drives both cell-autonomous and whole-organism defense responses. Here, we examine recent advances in the understanding of how peptidoglycan recognition shapes mammalian immune responses in these diverse contexts.

  10. GSK621 Targets Glioma Cells via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Shi-Kun; Pan, Yi-Xin; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang; Pan, Si-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the anti-glioma cell activity by a novel AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator GSK621. We showed that GSK621 was cytotoxic to human glioma cells (U87MG and U251MG lines), possibly via provoking caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Its cytotoxicity was alleviated by caspase inhibitors. GSK621 activated AMPK to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downregulate Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) in glioma cells. AMPK inhibition, through shRNA knockdown of AMPKα or introduction of a dominant negative (T172A) AMPKα, almost reversed GSK621-induced AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition and Tspan8 degradation. Consequently, GSK621’s cytotoxicity in glioma cells was also significantly attenuated by AMPKα knockdown or mutation. Further studies showed that GSK621, at a relatively low concentration, significantly potentiated temozolomide (TMZ)’s sensitivity and lethality against glioma cells. We summarized that GSK621 inhibits human glioma cells possibly via activating AMPK signaling. This novel AMPK activator could be a novel and promising anti-glioma cell agent. PMID:27532105

  11. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTOR) pathway modulates blood-testis barrier (BTB) function through F-actin organization and gap junction.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-09-01

    mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) is one of the most important signaling molecules in mammalian cells which regulates an array of cellular events, ranging from cell metabolism to cell proliferation. Based on the association of mTOR with the core component proteins, such as Raptor or Rictor, mTOR can become the mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) or mTORC2, respectively. Studies have shown that during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis, mTORC1 promotes remodeling and restructuring of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) in vitro and in vivo, making the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier "leaky"; whereas mTORC2 promotes BTB integrity, making the Sertoli cell TJ-barrier "tighter". These contrasting effects, coupled with the spatiotemporal expression of the core signaling proteins at the BTB that confer the respective functions of mTORC1 vs. mTORC2 thus provide a unique mechanism to modulate BTB dynamics, allowing or disallowing the transport of biomolecules and also preleptotene spermatocytes across the immunological barrier. More importantly, studies have shown that these changes to BTB dynamics conferred by mTORC1 and mTORC2 are mediated by changes in the organization of the actin microfilament networks at the BTB, and involve gap junction (GJ) intercellular communication. Since GJ has recently been shown to be crucial to reboot spermatogenesis and meiosis following toxicant-induced aspermatogenesis, these findings thus provide new insightful information regarding the integration of mTOR and GJ to regulate spermatogenesis.

  12. Regulation of succinate dehydrogenase activity by SIRT3 in mammalian mitochondria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A member of the sirtuin family of NAD (+) dependent deacetylases, SIRT3, is identified as one of the major mitochondrial deacetylases, located in mammalian mitochondria responsible for deacetylation of several metabolic enzymes and components of oxidative phosphorylation. Regulation of protein deace...

  13. Genome-scale RNA interference screen identifies antizyme 1(OAZ1) as a target for improvement of recombinant protein production in mammalian cells†

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Su; Chen, Yu Chi; Buehler, Eugene; Mandal, Swati; Mandal, Ajeet; Betenbaugh, Michael; HeePark, Myung; Martin, Scott; Shiloach, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of improving recombinant protein production from mammalian cells, an unbiased, high-throughput whole-genome RNA interference screen was conducted using human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells expressing firefly luciferase. 21,585 human genes were individually silenced with three different siRNAs for each gene. The screen identified 56 genes that led to the greatest improvement in luciferase expression. These genes were found to be included in several pathways involved in spliceosome formation and mRNA processing, transcription, metabolic processes, transport and protein folding. The 10 genes that most enhanced protein expression when down regulated, were further confirmed by measuring the effect of their silencing on the expression of three additional recombinant proteins. Among the confirmed genes, OAZ1- the gene encoding the ornithine decarboxylase antizyme1- was selected for detailed investigation, since its silencing improved the reporter protein production without affecting cell viability. Silencing OAZ1 caused an increase of the ornithine decarboxylase enzyme and the cellular levels of putrescine and spermidine; an indication that increased cellular polyamines enhances luciferase expression without affecting its transcription. The study shows that OAZ1 is a novel target for improving expression of recombinant proteins. The genome-scale screening performed in this work can establish the foundation for targeted design of an efficient mammalian cell platform for various biotechnological applications. PMID:27215166

  14. Active debris removal of multiple priority targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Vitali; Lüpken, A.; Flegel, S.; Gelhaus, J.; Möckel, M.; Kebschull, C.; Wiedemann, C.; Vörsmann, P.

    2013-05-01

    Today's space debris environment shows major concentrations of objects within distinct orbital regions for nearly all size regimes. The most critical region is found at orbital altitudes near 800 km with high declinations. Within this region many satellites are operated in so called sun-synchronous orbits (SSO). Among those, there are Earth observation, communication and weather satellites. Due to the orbital geometry in SSO, head-on encounters with relative velocities of about 15 km/s are most probable and would thus result in highly energetic collisions, which are often referred to as catastrophic collisions, leading to the complete fragmentation of the participating objects. So called feedback collisions can then be triggered by the newly generated fragments, thus leading to a further population increase in the affected orbital region. This effect is known as the Kessler syndrome.Current studies show that catastrophic collisions are not a major problem today, but will become the main process for debris generation within the SSO region in the near future, even without any further launches. In order to avoid this effect, objects with a major impact on collisional cascading have to be actively removed from the critical region after their end of life. Not having the capability to perform an end-of-life maneuver in order to transfer to a graveyard orbit or to de-orbit, many satellites and rocket bodies would have to be de-orbited within a dedicated mission. In such a mission, a service satellite would perform a de-orbit maneuver, after having docked to a specific target.In this paper, chemical and electric propulsion systems were analysed with the main focus on removing multiple targets within one single mission. The targets were chosen from a previously defined priority list in order to enhance the mission efficiency. Total mission time, ΔV and system mass were identified as key parameters to allow for an evaluation of the different concepts. It was shown that it

  15. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-05

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase.

  16. Roles of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in mammalian glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, Guy A; Da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Leclerc, Isabelle

    2003-01-01

    AMPK (5'-AMP-activated protein kinase) is emerging as a metabolic master switch, by which cells in both mammals and lower organisms sense and decode changes in energy status. Changes in AMPK activity have been shown to regulate glucose transport in muscle and glucose production by the liver. Moreover, AMPK appears to be a key regulator of at least one transcription factor linked to a monogenic form of diabetes mellitus. As a result, considerable efforts are now under way to explore the usefulness of AMPK as a therapeutic target for other forms of this disease. Here we review this topic, and discuss new findings which suggest that AMPK may play roles in regulating insulin release and the survival of pancreatic islet beta-cells, and nutrient sensing by the brain. PMID:12839490

  17. In Vitro Antileishmanial, Trypanocidal, and Mammalian Cell Activities of Diverse N,N′ -Dihetaryl Substituted Diamines and Related Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Sandra M.; Amado, Diego F.; Kouznetsov, Vladimir V.; Escobar, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    The leishmaniasis and Chagas diseases constitute a serious public health problem worldwide with few and ineffective treatment options. The search for new antiparasitic candidates at the initial steps of drug discovery and development is still necessary. The synthesis of 22 de novo synthetized N,N′-dihetaryl-alkyldiamine derivatives and in vitro antiparasitic activity were evaluated for the first time against intracellular and extracellular forms of Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum, L. (Viannia) panamensis, L. (Leishmania) amazonensis, and Trypanosoma cruzi. Additionally, the toxicity on mammalian cells was determined. Some of these substituted N,N′-diamines (25–35 % of the tested compounds) showed interesting results against free-living forms of parasites with activities at the inhibitory concentration (IC50) level of 1.96 to 28.83 μM for L. (L.) infantum promastigotes and IC50 of 0.02 to 5.31 μM for T. cruzi epimastigotes. No activity at the IC50 level on intracellular amastigotes of T. cruzi was observed. However, N1,N2-dibenzylethane-1,2-diamine 5a revealed an important activity against the intracellular amastigotes of L. infantum (IC50 25.42 μM ±0.33) and L. panamensis (IC50 58.20 μM ±3.23), while their analogue N1,N4-dibenzylbutane-1,4-diamine 5c resulted in activity only against L. panamensis (IC50 11.19 μM ±0.20) without toxicity on Vero and THP-1 mammalian cells. The active compounds against intracellular parasites with low toxicity in mammalian cells may be considered for future studies in experimental models. PMID:23641328

  18. Rhodopsin Kinase Activity in the Mammalian Pineal Gland and Other Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Robert L.; Klein, David C.

    1984-10-01

    Rhodopsin kinase, an enzyme involved in photochemical transduction in the retina, has been found in the mammalian pineal gland in amounts equal to those in the retina; other tissues had 7 percent of this amount, or less. This finding suggests that, in mammals, rhodopsin kinase functions in the pineal gland and other tissues to phosphorylate rhodopsin-like integral membrane receptors and is thereby involved in signal transduction.

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Produces a Yeast Substance that Exhibits Estrogenic Activity in Mammalian Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, David; Stathis, Peter A.; Hirst, Margaret A.; Price Stover, E.; Do, Yung S.; Kurz, Walter

    1984-06-01

    Partially purified lipid extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contain a substance that displaces tritiated estradiol from rat uterine cytosol estrogen receptors. The yeast product induces estrogenic bioresponses in mammalian systems as measured by induction of progesterone receptors in cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and by a uterotrophic response and progesterone receptor induction after administration to ovariectomized mice. The findings raise the possibility that bakers' yeast may be a source of environmental estrogens.

  20. Factors Influencing the Central Nervous System Distribution of a Novel Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitor GSK2126458: Implications for Overcoming Resistance with Combination Therapy for Melanoma Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Vaidhyanathan, Shruthi; Wilken-Resman, Brynna; Ma, Daniel J.; Parrish, Karen E.; Mittapalli, Rajendar K.; Carlson, Brett L.; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors targeting the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (Braf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase) have had success in extending survival for patients with metastatic melanoma. Unfortunately, resistance may occur via cross-activation of alternate signaling pathways. One approach to overcome resistance is to simultaneously target the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. Recent reports have shown that GSK2126458 [2,4-difluoro-N-(2-methoxy-5-(4-(pyridazin-4-yl)quinolin-6-yl)pyridin-3-yl) benzenesulfonamide], a dual phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, can overcome acquired resistance to Braf and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitors in vitro. These resistance mechanisms may be especially important in melanoma brain metastases because of limited drug delivery across the blood–brain barrier. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that influence the brain distribution of GSK2126458 and to examine the efficacy of GSK2126458 in a novel patient-derived melanoma xenograft (PDX) model. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that GSK2126458 is a substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), two dominant active efflux transporters in the blood–brain barrier. The steady-state brain distribution of GSK2126458 was 8-fold higher in the P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice compared with the wild type. We also observed that when simultaneously infused to steady state, GSK212658, dabrafenib, and trametinib, a rational combination to overcome mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor resistance, all had limited brain distribution. Coadministration of elacridar, a P-gp/Bcrp inhibitor, increased the brain distribution of GSK2126458 by approximately 7-fold in wild-type mice. In the PDX model, GSK2126458 showed efficacy in flank tumors but was ineffective in intracranial melanoma. These results show

  1. Yugoslavia. "Migration" -- programme activities targeting men.

    PubMed

    Dzeletovic, A; Matovic-miljanovic, S

    1999-01-01

    In Yugoslavia, companies send their workers to different parts of the world, including countries with a high incidence of AIDS. It has been noted that it is characteristic for migrants to accommodate themselves to foreign conditions, which subsequently lead to health problems, especially with regards to reproductive and sexual health. Often, in the case of partner separation, men may seek sexual relations with an unknown partner and/or neglect to use proper protection. According to research carried out in Yugoslavia, there are critical gaps in workers' knowledge on sexual and reproductive health. Based on research results, an educational program for migrants, designed to train and strengthen individuals¿ capabilities and modify their risky behavior, was created. Program activities include production of brochures targeting those people travelling to countries with a high incidence of HIV/AIDS. In addition, a process for creating more cooperation between the state and other organizations at regional and local levels was initiated.

  2. High-resolution genetic mapping of mammalian motor activity levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Kas, M J H; de Mooij-van Malsen, J G; de Krom, M; van Gassen, K L I; van Lith, H A; Olivier, B; Oppelaar, H; Hendriks, J; de Wit, M; Groot Koerkamp, M J A; Holstege, F C P; van Oost, B A; de Graan, P N E

    2009-02-01

    The generation of motor activity levels is under tight neural control to execute essential behaviors, such as movement toward food or for social interaction. To identify novel neurobiological mechanisms underlying motor activity levels, we studied a panel of chromosome substitution (CS) strains derived from mice with high (C57BL/6J strain) or low motor activity levels (A/J strain) using automated home cage behavioral registration. In this study, we genetically mapped the expression of baseline motor activity levels (horizontal distance moved) to mouse chromosome 1. Further genetic mapping of this trait revealed an 8.3-Mb quantitative trait locus (QTL) interval. This locus is distinct from the QTL interval for open-field anxiety-related motor behavior on this chromosome. By data mining, an existing phenotypic and genotypic data set of 2445 genetically heterogeneous mice (http://gscan.well.ox.ac.uk/), we confirmed linkage to the peak marker at 79 970 253 bp and refined the QTL to a 312-kb interval containing a single gene (A830043J08Rik). Sequence analysis showed a nucleotide deletion in the 3' untranslated region of the Riken gene. Genome-wide microarray gene expression profiling in brains of discordant F(2) individuals from CS strain 1 showed a significant upregulation of Epha4 in low-active F(2) individuals. Inclusion of a genetic marker for Epha4 confirmed that this gene is located outside of the QTL interval. Both Epha4 and A830043J08Rik are expressed in brain motor circuits, and similar to Epha4 mutants, we found linkage between reduced motor neurons number and A/J chromosome 1. Our findings provide a novel QTL and a potential downstream target underlying motor circuitry development and the expression of physical activity levels.

  3. Diosmetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis by regulating autophagy via the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Ren, Hao; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Qingyu; Li, Mingyi; Zhu, Runzhi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is a type of malignant tumor, is the fifth most common cancer in men and ninth in women worldwide. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antitumor effect of diosmetin (DIOS) in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. The proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy rates of HepG2 cells were measured following treatment with DIOS. The effects of DIOS treatment on HepG2 cell proliferation and apoptosis rates were analyzed using MTT assays and Annexin V staining, respectively. The effect of DIOS treatment on autophagy levels was assessed using transmission electron microscopy, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (LC3) transfection and LysoTracker Red staining. Furthermore, bafilomycin A1 (BA1), an autophagy inhibitor, was used to assess the association between DIOS and cell autophagy, proliferation and apoptosis. In addition, the expression of autophagy-related proteins [mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, P70S6K, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase and Akt] and apoptosis-related proteins [B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2-associated X protein, Bak, p53, Bcl-2 and caspase-3] were analyzed by western blotting. The results revealed that DIOS significantly inhibited proliferation (P<0.01) and induced apoptosis (P<0.001) in HepG2 cells. It was also demonstrated that DIOS triggered autophagy by regulating the mTOR pathway in HepG2 cells. Notably, following treatment of HepG2 cells with the autophagy inhibitor, BA1, the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, including Bax, Bak and p53, were significantly decreased (P<0.05), and cell viability was recovered to a certain extent. In conclusion, DIOS inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells via regulation of the mTOR pathway. Thus, the results of the current study indicate that DIOS may present a potential therapeutic

  4. Activation and proliferation of lymphocytes and other mammalian cells in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Cogoli, A; Cogoli-Greuter, M

    1997-01-01

    The experimental findings reviewed in this chapter support the following conclusions: Proliferation. Human T-lymphocytes, associated with monocytes as accessory cells, show dramatic changes in the centrifuge, in the clinostat and in space. In free-floating cells the mitogenic response is depressed by 90% in microgravity, whereas in cells attached to a substratum activation is enhanced by 100% compared to 1-G ground and inflight controls. The duration of phase G1 of the mitotic cycle of HeLa cells is reduced in hypergravity, resulting in an increased proliferation rate. Other systems like Friend cells and WI38 human embryonic lung cells do not show significant changes. Genetic expression and signal transduction. T-lymphocytes and monocytes show important changes in the expression of cytokines like interleukin-1, interleukin-2, interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor. The data from space experiments in Spacelab, Space Shuttle mid-deck, and Biokosmos have helped to clarify certain aspects of the mechanism of T-cell activation. Epidermoid A431 cells show changes in the genetic expression of the proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun in the clinostat and in sounding rockets. Membrane function, in particular the binding of ligates as first messengers of a signal, is not changed in most of the cell systems in microgravity. Morphology and Mortility. Free cells, lymphocytes in particular, are able to move and form aggregates in microgravity, indicating that cell-cell contacts and cell communications do take place in microgravity. Dramatic morphological and ultrastructural changes are not detected in cells cultured in microgravity. Important experiments with single mammalian cells, including immune cells, were carried out recently in three Spacelab flights, (SL-J, D-2, and IML-2 in 1992, 1993, and 1994, respectively). The results of the D-2 mission have been published in ref. 75; those of the IML-2 mission in ref. 76. Finally, many cell biology experiments in space have suffered

  5. Activation and proliferation of lymphocytes and other mammalian cells in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.; Cogoli-Greuter, M.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental findings reviewed in this chapter support the following conclusions: Proliferation. Human T-lymphocytes, associated with monocytes as accessory cells, show dramatic changes in the centrifuge, in the clinostat and in space. In free-floating cells the mitogenic response is depressed by 90% in microgravity, whereas in cells attached to a substratum activation is enhanced by 100% compared to 1-G ground and inflight controls. The duration of phase G1 of the mitotic cycle of HeLa cells is reduced in hypergravity, resulting in an increased proliferation rate. Other systems like Friend cells and WI38 human embryonic lung cells do not show significant changes. Genetic expression and signal transduction. T-lymphocytes and monocytes show important changes in the expression of cytokines like interleukin-1, interleukin-2, interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor. The data from space experiments in Spacelab, Space Shuttle mid-deck, and Biokosmos have helped to clarify certain aspects of the mechanism of T-cell activation. Epidermoid A431 cells show changes in the genetic expression of the proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun in the clinostat and in sounding rockets. Membrane function, in particular the binding of ligates as first messengers of a signal, is not changed in most of the cell systems in microgravity. Morphology and Mortility. Free cells, lymphocytes in particular, are able to move and form aggregates in microgravity, indicating that cell-cell contacts and cell communications do take place in microgravity. Dramatic morphological and ultrastructural changes are not detected in cells cultured in microgravity. Important experiments with single mammalian cells, including immune cells, were carried out recently in three Spacelab flights, (SL-J, D-2, and IML-2 in 1992, 1993, and 1994, respectively). The results of the D-2 mission have been published in ref. 75; those of the IML-2 mission in ref. 76. Finally, many cell biology experiments in space have suffered

  6. Single-stranded shuttle phagemid for mutagenesis studies in mammalian cells: 8-oxoguanine in DNA induces targeted G.C-->T.A transversions in simian kidney cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moriya, M

    1993-01-01

    A single-stranded shuttle vector has been developed for the purpose of investigating translesional events in mammalian cells. The vector is designed to permit site-specific introduction of defined DNA lesions between a gene for neomycin resistance and its promoter. Efficiencies of translesional synthesis in simian kidney cells (COS) and Escherichia coli are established by determining the number of neomycin- and ampicillin-resistant colonies recovered, respectively, after introduction of a modified vector. Fidelity of translesional synthesis is evaluated by analyzing the nucleotide sequence of progeny phagemid DNA in the region corresponding to the lesion site. This experimental system, capable of detecting mutagenic and nonmutagenic events at and adjacent to the lesion site, was used to establish the mutagenic potential of a single 8-oxoguanine residue in DNA. This modified base, produced by attack of reactive oxygen species on cellular DNA, did not cause a decrease in the number of transformants when single-stranded DNA containing the lesion replicated in COS cells or E. coli. The predominant mutations observed (> 78%) were G-->T transversions targeted to the site of the lesion. The mutation frequencies for this event were 2.5-4.8% in COS cells and 1.8% in E. coli. It is concluded that a single-stranded shuttle vector, utilized in conjunction with a site-specific approach, can be used to investigate translesional events in mammalian cells and in bacteria. Images PMID:8430083

  7. Single-stranded shuttle phagemid for mutagenesis studies in mammalian cells: 8-oxoguanine in DNA induces targeted G.C-->T.A transversions in simian kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Moriya, M

    1993-02-01

    A single-stranded shuttle vector has been developed for the purpose of investigating translesional events in mammalian cells. The vector is designed to permit site-specific introduction of defined DNA lesions between a gene for neomycin resistance and its promoter. Efficiencies of translesional synthesis in simian kidney cells (COS) and Escherichia coli are established by determining the number of neomycin- and ampicillin-resistant colonies recovered, respectively, after introduction of a modified vector. Fidelity of translesional synthesis is evaluated by analyzing the nucleotide sequence of progeny phagemid DNA in the region corresponding to the lesion site. This experimental system, capable of detecting mutagenic and nonmutagenic events at and adjacent to the lesion site, was used to establish the mutagenic potential of a single 8-oxoguanine residue in DNA. This modified base, produced by attack of reactive oxygen species on cellular DNA, did not cause a decrease in the number of transformants when single-stranded DNA containing the lesion replicated in COS cells or E. coli. The predominant mutations observed (> 78%) were G-->T transversions targeted to the site of the lesion. The mutation frequencies for this event were 2.5-4.8% in COS cells and 1.8% in E. coli. It is concluded that a single-stranded shuttle vector, utilized in conjunction with a site-specific approach, can be used to investigate translesional events in mammalian cells and in bacteria.

  8. Two small enzyme isoforms mediate mammalian mitochondrial poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ralph G. . E-mail: meyerg@vet.upenn.edu; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Whatcott, Clifford J.; Jacobson, Elaine L.; Jacobson, Myron K.

    2007-08-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)glycohydrolase (PARG) is the major enzyme capable of rapidly hydrolyzing poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) formed by the diverse members of the PARP enzyme family. This study presents an alternative splice mechanism by which two novel PARG protein isoforms of 60 kDa and 55 kDa are expressed from the human PARG gene, termed hPARG60 and hPARG55, respectively. Homologous forms were found in the mouse (mPARG63 and mPARG58) supporting the hypothesis that expression of small PARG isoforms is conserved among mammals. A PARG protein of {approx} 60 kDa has been described for decades but with its genetic basis unknown, it was hypothesized to be a product of posttranslational cleavage of larger PARG isoforms. While this is not excluded entirely, isolation and expression of cDNA clones from different sources of RNA indicate that alternative splicing leads to expression of a catalytically active hPARG60 in multiple cell compartments. A second enzyme, hPARG55, that can be expressed through alternative translation initiation from hPARG60 transcripts is strictly targeted to the mitochondria. Functional studies of a mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) in PARG exon IV suggest that hPARG60 may be capable of shuttling between nucleus and mitochondria, which would be in line with a proposed function of PAR in genotoxic stress-dependent, nuclear-mitochondrial crosstalk.

  9. Neohesperidin dihydrochalcone: presentation of a small molecule activator of mammalian alpha-amylase as an allosteric effector.

    PubMed

    Kashani-Amin, Elaheh; Larijani, Bagher; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2013-03-18

    Flavonoids and their precursor trans-chalcone have been reported as inhibitors of mammalian alpha-amylase. With regard to this background, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) effect was investigated toward porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA), and found to be an activator of the enzyme. The maximal activation (up to threefold) was found to occur at 4.8mM of NHDC, which could be considered to have a high activation profile, with regard to the alpha and beta parameters (alpha<1activator of the enzyme and based on the results obtained from modeling tools, it is suggested to interact with PPA at a hydrophilic site located at the N-terminal, far from the active site of the enzyme.

  10. The Polymerase Activity of Mammalian DNA Pol ζ Is Specifically Required for Cell and Embryonic Viability

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Tomida, Junya; Boulware, Karen S.; Bhetawal, Sarita; Wood, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase ζ (pol ζ) is exceptionally important for maintaining genome stability. Inactivation of the Rev3l gene encoding the polymerase catalytic subunit causes a high frequency of chromosomal breaks, followed by lethality in mouse embryos and in primary cells. Yet it is not known whether the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ is specifically essential, as the large REV3L protein also serves as a multiprotein scaffold for translesion DNA synthesis via multiple conserved structural domains. We report that Rev3l cDNA rescues the genomic instability and DNA damage sensitivity of Rev3l-null immortalized mouse fibroblast cell lines. A cDNA harboring mutations of conserved catalytic aspartate residues in the polymerase domain of REV3L could not rescue these phenotypes. To investigate the role of REV3L DNA polymerase activity in vivo, a Rev3l knock-in mouse was constructed with this polymerase-inactivating alteration. No homozygous mutant mice were produced, with lethality occurring during embryogenesis. Primary fibroblasts from mutant embryos showed growth defects, elevated DNA double-strand breaks and cisplatin sensitivity similar to Rev3l-null fibroblasts. We tested whether the severe Rev3l-/- phenotypes could be rescued by deletion of DNA polymerase η, as has been reported with chicken DT40 cells. However, Rev3l-/- Polh-/- mice were inviable, and derived primary fibroblasts were as sensitive to DNA damage as Rev3l-/- Polh+/+ fibroblasts. Therefore, the functions of REV3L in maintaining cell viability, embryonic viability and genomic stability are directly dependent on its polymerase activity, and cannot be ameliorated by an additional deletion of pol η. These results validate and encourage the approach of targeting the DNA polymerase activity of pol ζ to sensitize tumors to DNA damaging agents. PMID:26727495

  11. Construction of simple and efficient siRNA validation systems for screening and identification of effective RNAi-targeted sequences from mammalian genes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Hui; Chang, Wen-Tsan

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of gene silencing induced by double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs). Among the widely used dsRNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and short hairpin RNAs have evolved as extremely powerful and the most popular gene silencing reagents. The key challenge to achieving efficient gene silencing especially for the purpose of therapeutics is mainly dependent on the effectiveness and specificity of the selected RNAi-targeted sequences. Practically, only a small number of dsRNAs are capable of inducing highly effective and sequence-specific gene silencing via RNAi mechanism. In addition, the efficiency of gene silencing induced by dsRNAs can only be experimentally examined based on inhibition of the target gene expression. Therefore, it is essential to develop a fully robust and comparative validation system for measuring the efficacy of designed dsRNAs. In this chapter, we focus our discussion on a reliable and quantitative reporter-based siRNA validation system that has been previously established in our laboratory. The system consists of a short synthetic DNA fragment containing an RNAi-targeted sequence of interest and two expression vectors for targeting reporter and triggering siRNA expressions. The efficiency of siRNAs is determined by their abilities to inhibit expression of the targeting reporters with easily quantified readouts including enhanced green fluorescence protein and firefly luciferase. Since only a readily available short synthetic DNA fragment is needed for constructing this reliable and efficient reporter-based siRNA validation system, this system not only provides a powerful strategy for screening highly effective RNAi-targeted sequences from mammalian genes but also implicates the use of RNAi-based dsRNA reagents for reverse functional genomics and molecular therapeutics.

  12. Position based nucleotide analysis of miR168 family in higher plants and its targets in mammalian transcripts.

    PubMed

    Javed, Mohammed; Solanki, Manish; Sinha, Anshika; Shukla, Lata Israni

    2017-02-15

    The conserved miR168 family is evaluated for position based nucleotide preference in higher plants. The mature miRNA sequences include miR168-5p and miR168-3p, were obtained from miRBase (v21, June 2014) for 15 families (28 plants) containing a-c subfamilies. The preferred position based nucleotide sequences were obtained for miR168-5p and miR168-3p using Data Analysis in Molecular Biology and Evolution (DAMBE). miR168-5p shows same nucleotides at positions 1-6, 8-9, 11-12, 15-17 and 19. Also, miR168-3p is present in 3 families (10 plants) shows the same nucleotide at position 1-11, 13-15 and 17-21. Our work suggests that miR168 family has conserved sequence in higher plants. The miR168-5p was subjected to cross kingdom analysis using psRNATarget. The seed region position 2-8 shows 70-95% pairing and cleavage site at position 10-14 were analysed for the base preference, in which pairing with the targets showed 80-96% Watson Crick pairing. The 123 targets in human transcriptome were identified showing 58% cleavage and 41% translation repression. Earlier reported Low density lipoprotein receptor adaptor protein 1(LDLRAP1) target validated for miR168a obtained from rice origin, could also be targeted from miR168 from any other plant sources. The randomly selected 10 targets include some important genes like RPL34, ATXN1, AKAPI3 and ALS2 and is involved in transcription, cell trafficking, cell metabolism and neurodegenerative disorder. This paper provides DAMBE analysis for miR168 across the plant kingdom and identification of new cross kingdom targets for miR168 using psRNATarget.

  13. RAB10 Interacts with the Male Germ Cell-Specific GTPase-Activating Protein during Mammalian Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Hung; Ke, Chih-Chun; Wang, Ya-Yun; Chen, Mei-Feng; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Ku, Wei-Chi; Chiang, Han-Sun; Yeh, Chung-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    According to recent estimates, 2%–15% of couples are sterile, and approximately half of the infertility cases are attributed to male reproductive factors. However, the reasons remain undefined in approximately 25% of male infertility cases, and most infertility cases exhibit spermatogenic defects. Numerous genes involved in spermatogenesis still remain unknown. We previously identified Male Germ Cells Rab GTPase-Activating Proteins (MGCRABGAPs) through cDNA microarray analysis of human testicular tissues with spermatogenic defects. MGCRABGAP contains a conserved RABGAP catalytic domain, TBC (Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16). RABGAP family proteins regulate cellular function (e.g., cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular trafficking, and cell migration) by inactivating RAB proteins. MGCRABGAP is a male germ cell-specific protein expressed in elongating and elongated spermatids during mammalian spermiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins that interact with MGCRABGAP during mammalian spermiogenesis using a proteomic approach. We found that MGCRABGAP exhibited GTPase-activating bioability, and several MGCRABGAP interactors, possible substrates (e.g., RAB10, RAB5C, and RAP1), were identified using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and nano liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS). We confirmed the binding ability between RAB10 and MGCRABGAP via co-IP. Additionally, MGCRABGAP–RAB10 complexes were specifically colocalized in the manchette structure, a critical structure for the formation of spermatid heads, and were slightly expressed at the midpiece of mature spermatozoa. Based on these results, we propose that MGCRABGAP is involved in mammalian spermiogenesis by modulating RAB10. PMID:28067790

  14. CUL4-DDB1-CDT2 E3 Ligase Regulates the Molecular Clock Activity by Promoting Ubiquitination-Dependent Degradation of the Mammalian CRY1

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Deqiang; Guha, Anirvan; Arthurs, Blake; Cazares, Victor; Gupta, Neil; Yin, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The CUL4-DDB1 E3 ligase complex serves as a critical regulator in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, DNA damage repair, and cell cycle progression. However, whether this E3 ligase complex regulates clock protein turnover and the molecular clock activity in mammalian cells is unknown. Here we show that CUL4-DDB1-CDT2 E3 ligase ubiquitinates CRY1 and promotes its degradation both in vitro and in vivo. Depletion of the major components of this E3 ligase complex, including Ddb1, Cdt2, and Cdt2-cofactor Pcna, leads to CRY1 stabilization in cultured cells or in the mouse liver. CUL4A-DDB1-CDT2 E3 ligase targets lysine 585 within the C-terminal region of CRY1 protein, shown by the CRY1 585KA mutant’s resistance to ubiquitination and degradation mediated by the CUL4A-DDB1 complex. Surprisingly, both depletion of Ddb1 and over-expression of Cry1-585KA mutant enhance the oscillatory amplitude of the Bmal1 promoter activity without altering its period length, suggesting that CUL4A-DDB1-CDT2 E3 targets CRY1 for degradation and reduces the circadian amplitude. All together, we uncovered a novel biological role for CUL4A-DDB1-CDT2 E3 ligase that regulates molecular circadian behaviors via promoting ubiquitination-dependent degradation of CRY1. PMID:26431207

  15. Tunicamycins: translocase-I inhibitors that target bacterial cell wall and mammalian N-glycoproteins. The potential for selective inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tunicamycins are a heterologous family of nucleoside antibiotics that target the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and eukaryotic N-glycoproteins. The mechanism of action is known, with the tunicamycin-Mg2+ complex established as a transition state analog for hexosamine-1-phosphate: prenol pho...

  16. Cross-talk between sirtuin and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in the regulation of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungki; Zhao, Bin; Lombard, David B; Fingar, Diane C; Inoki, Ken

    2014-05-09

    p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (S6K1), a major substrate of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase, regulates diverse cellular processes including protein synthesis, cell growth, and survival. Although it is well known that the activity of S6K1 is tightly coupled to its phosphorylation status, the regulation of S6K1 activity by other post-translational modifications such as acetylation has not been well understood. Here we show that the acetylation of the C-terminal region (CTR) of S6K1 blocks mTORC1-dependent Thr-389 phosphorylation, an essential phosphorylation site for S6K1 activity. The acetylation of the CTR of S6K1 is inhibited by the class III histone deacetylases, SIRT1 and SIRT2. An S6K1 mutant lacking acetylation sites in its CTR shows enhanced Thr-389 phosphorylation and kinase activity, whereas the acetylation-mimetic S6K1 mutant exhibits decreased Thr-389 phosphorylation and kinase activity. Interestingly, relative to the acetylation-mimetic S6K1 mutant, the acetylation-defective mutant displays higher affinity toward Raptor, an essential scaffolding component of mTORC1 that recruits mTORC1 substrates. These observations indicate that sirtuin-mediated regulation of S6K1 acetylation is an additional important regulatory modification that impinges on the mechanisms underlying mTORC1-dependent S6K1 activation.

  17. Dopamine antagonists reduce spontaneous electrical activity in cultured mammalian neurons from ventral mesencephalon.

    PubMed

    Heyer, E J

    1986-09-24

    Mammalian neurons from ventral mesencephalon (VM) were grown in primary dissociated cell (PDC) culture. These neurons are predominantly non-dopaminergic. Many of these non-dopaminergic neurons have dopamine agonist and antagonist binding sites. Intracellular recordings were obtained from these neurons. When bathed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution they generated action potentials spontaneously. However, in the presence of haloperidol dissolved in PBS solution, the percentage of neurons which generated action potentials spontaneously was reduced in a dose-dependent manner (1-10 microM). This response was also obtained with (+) butaclamol (1 microM) but not with (-) butaclamol (1 microM). This neuroleptic inhibition of spontaneously generated action potentials was specific for neurons in PDC cultures of VM since neurons in PDC cultures of spinal cord did not demonstrate this phenomenon.

  18. Effects of Intermediates between Vitamins K2 and K3 on Mammalian DNA Polymerase Inhibition and Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Jun; Irino, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Masayuki; Nishiumi, Shin; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Nishio, Kazuyuki; Kuramochi, Kouji; Tsubaki, Kazunori; Kuriyama, Isoko; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hiromi; Yoshida, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that vitamin K3 (VK3), but not VK1 or VK2 (=MK-4), inhibits the activity of human DNA polymerase γ (pol γ). In this study, we chemically synthesized three intermediate compounds between VK2 and VK3, namely MK-3, MK-2 and MK-1, and investigated the inhibitory effects of all five compounds on the activity of mammalian pols. Among these compounds, MK-2 was the strongest inhibitor of mammalian pols α, κ and λ, which belong to the B, Y and X families of pols, respectively; whereas VK3 was the strongest inhibitor of human pol γ, an A-family pol. MK-2 potently inhibited the activity of all animal species of pol tested, and its inhibitory effect on pol λ activity was the strongest with an IC50 value of 24.6 μM. However, MK-2 did not affect the activity of plant or prokaryotic pols, or that of other DNA metabolic enzymes such as primase of pol α, RNA polymerase, polynucleotide kinase or deoxyribonuclease I. Because we previously found a positive relationship between pol λ inhibition and anti-inflammatory action, we examined whether these compounds could inhibit inflammatory responses. Among the five compounds tested, MK-2 caused the greatest reduction in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced acute inflammation in mouse ear. In addition, in a cell culture system using mouse macrophages, MK-2 displayed the strongest suppression of the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, MK-2 was found to inhibit the action of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In an in vivo mouse model of LPS-evoked acute inflammation, intraperitoneal injection of MK-2 in mice led to suppression of TNF-α production in serum. In conclusion, this study has identified VK2 and VK3 intermediates, such as MK-2, that are promising anti-inflammatory candidates. PMID:21541047

  19. Mitochondrial import of human and yeast fumarase in live mammalian cells: Retrograde translocation of the yeast enzyme is mainly caused by its poor targeting sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Bhag; Gupta, Radhey S. . E-mail: gupta@mcmaster.ca

    2006-08-04

    Studies on yeast fumarase provide the main evidence for dual localization of a protein in mitochondria and cytosol by means of retrograde translocation. We have examined the subcellular targeting of yeast and human fumarase in live cells to identify factors responsible for this. The cDNAs for mature yeast or human fumarase were fused to the gene for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and they contained, at their N-terminus, a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) derived from either yeast fumarase, human fumarase, or cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIII (COX) protein. Two nuclear localization sequences (2x NLS) were also added to these constructs to facilitate detection of any cytosolic protein by its targeting to nucleus. In Cos-1 cells transfected with these constructs, human fumarase with either the native or COX MTSs was detected exclusively in mitochondria in >98% of the cells, while the remainder 1-2% of the cells showed varying amounts of nuclear labeling. In contrast, when human fumarase was fused to the yeast MTS, >50% of the cells showed nuclear labeling. Similar studies with yeast fumarase showed that with its native MTS, nuclear labeling was seen in 80-85% of the cells, but upon fusion to either human or COX MTS, nuclear labeling was observed in only 10-15% of the cells. These results provide evidence that extramitochondrial presence of yeast fumarase is mainly caused by the poor mitochondrial targeting characteristics of its MTS (but also affected by its primary sequence), and that the retrograde translocation mechanism does not play a significant role in the extramitochondrial presence of mammalian fumarase.

  20. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  1. Pirarubicin induces an autophagic cytoprotective response through suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in human bladder cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kuiqing; Chen, Xu; Liu, Cheng; Gu, Peng; Li, Zhuohang; Wu, Shaoxu; Xu, Kewei; Lin, Tianxin; Huang, Jian

    2015-05-01

    Pirarubicin is widely used in intravesical chemotherapy for bladder cancer, but its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance; the mechanism has not been well studied. Emerging evidence shows that autophagy can be a novel target for cancer therapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Bladder cancer cells EJ and J82 were treated with pirarubicin, siRNA, 3-methyladenine or hydroxychloroquine. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were tested by cell survival assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Autophagy was evaluated by immunoblotting before and after the treatments. The phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, serine/threonine kinase p70 S6 kinase, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 were also investigated by immunoblotting. We found that pirarubicin could induce autophagy in bladder cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine, hydroxychloroquine or knockdown of autophagy related gene 3 significantly increased apoptosis in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Pirarubicin-induced autophagy was mediated via the mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 signaling pathway. In conclusion, autophagy induced by pirarubicin plays a cytoprotective role in bladder cancer cells, suggesting that inhibition of autophagy may improve efficacy over traditional pirarubicin chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients. - Highlights: • Pirarubicin induced autophagy in bladder cancer cells. • Inhibition of autophagy enhanced pirarubicin-induced apoptosis. • Pirarubicin induced autophagy through inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway.

  2. Antagonism of microRNA-99a promotes cell invasion and down-regulates E-cadherin expression in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Li, Xiaohan; Cao, Wei; Qi, Yafei; Yang, Xianghong

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNA-99a (miRNA-99a), a potential tumor suppressor, has been implicated in tumorigenesis of many human malignancies. However, the role of miRNA-99a in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In the present study, we transfected miRNA-99a antagonism into human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells to inhibit miRNA-99a expression and investigated its influence on cell migration and invasion as well as the underlying possible mechanisms. We found that miRNA-99a antagonism significantly increased proliferation, migration and invasion abilities of AsPC-1 cells, which was accompanied by increased expression of mesenchymal phenotype cell biomarkers (N-cadherin, Vimentin, and α-SMA), and decreased expression of epithelial phenotype cell biomarker (E-cadherin). Interestingly, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) remarkably restored miRNA-99a antagonism-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin. In conclusion, our data suggest that miRNA-99a is involved in pancreatic cancer migration and invasion by regulating mTOR, and may provide a target for effective therapies against pancreatic cancer.

  3. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling in the Insular Cortex Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minjee; Han, Jeongsoo; Kim, Un Jeng; Cha, Myeounghoon; Um, Sun Woo; Bai, Sun Joon; Hong, Seong-Karp; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Injury of peripheral nerves can trigger neuropathic pain, producing allodynia and hyperalgesia via peripheral and central sensitization. Recent studies have focused on the role of the insular cortex (IC) in neuropathic pain. Because the IC is thought to store pain-related memories, translational regulation in this structure may reveal novel targets for controlling chronic pain. Signaling via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is known to control mRNA translation and influence synaptic plasticity, has been studied at the spinal level in neuropathic pain, but its role in the IC under these conditions remains elusive. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the role of mTOR signaling in neuropathic pain and to assess the potential therapeutic effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, in the IC of rats with neuropathic pain. Mechanical allodynia was assessed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after neuropathic surgery and following microinjections of rapamycin into the IC on postoperative days (PODs) 3 and 7. Optical recording was conducted to observe the neural responses of the IC to peripheral stimulation. Rapamycin reduced mechanical allodynia and downregulated the expression of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), decreased neural excitability in the IC, thereby inhibiting neuropathic pain-induced synaptic plasticity. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling in the IC may be a critical molecular mechanism modulating neuropathic pain. PMID:28377693

  4. A new functional role for mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Ko, Michael Lee; Ko, Gladys Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities.

  5. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E.; González-Muñoz, Ricardo; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7), voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2), the A-type transient outward (IA) and delayed rectifier (IDR) currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27164140

  6. Methylglyoxal activates the target of rapamycin complex 2-protein kinase C signaling pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2015-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is a typical 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis. We show here that methylglyoxal activates the Pkc1-Mpk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in a target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent manner in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that TORC2 phosphorylates Pkc1 at Thr(1125) and Ser(1143). Methylglyoxal enhanced the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), which transmitted the signal to the downstream Mpk1 MAP kinase cascade. We found that the phosphorylation status of Pkc1(T1125) affected the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), in addition to its protein levels. Methylglyoxal activated mammalian TORC2 signaling, which, in turn, phosphorylated Akt at Ser(473). Our results suggest that methylglyoxal is a conserved initiator of TORC2 signaling among eukaryotes.

  7. Methylglyoxal Activates the Target of Rapamycin Complex 2-Protein Kinase C Signaling Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Methylglyoxal is a typical 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis. We show here that methylglyoxal activates the Pkc1-Mpk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in a target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent manner in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that TORC2 phosphorylates Pkc1 at Thr1125 and Ser1143. Methylglyoxal enhanced the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser1143, which transmitted the signal to the downstream Mpk1 MAP kinase cascade. We found that the phosphorylation status of Pkc1T1125 affected the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser1143, in addition to its protein levels. Methylglyoxal activated mammalian TORC2 signaling, which, in turn, phosphorylated Akt at Ser473. Our results suggest that methylglyoxal is a conserved initiator of TORC2 signaling among eukaryotes. PMID:25624345

  8. Sustained ERK activation underlies reprogramming in regeneration-competent salamander cells and distinguishes them from their mammalian counterparts.

    PubMed

    Yun, Maximina H; Gates, Phillip B; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2014-07-08

    In regeneration-competent vertebrates, such as salamanders, regeneration depends on the ability of various differentiated adult cell types to undergo natural reprogramming. This ability is rarely observed in regeneration-incompetent species such as mammals, providing an explanation for their poor regenerative potential. To date, little is known about the molecular mechanisms mediating natural reprogramming during regeneration. Here, we have identified the extent of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation as a key component of such mechanisms. We show that sustained ERK activation following serum induction is required for re-entry into the cell cycle of postmitotic salamander muscle cells, partially by promoting the downregulation of p53 activity. Moreover, ERK activation induces epigenetic modifications and downregulation of muscle-specific genes such as Sox6. Remarkably, while long-term ERK activation is found in salamander myotubes, only transient activation is seen in their mammalian counterparts, suggesting that the extent of ERK activation could underlie differences in regenerative competence between species.

  9. Definition of two agonist types at the mammalian cold-activated channel TRPM8

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Annelies; Gees, Maarten; Toth, Balazs Istvan; Ghosh, Debapriya; Mulier, Marie; Vennekens, Rudi; Vriens, Joris; Talavera, Karel; Voets, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Various TRP channels act as polymodal sensors of thermal and chemical stimuli, but the mechanisms whereby chemical ligands impact on TRP channel gating are poorly understood. Here we show that AITC (allyl isothiocyanate; mustard oil) and menthol represent two distinct types of ligands at the mammalian cold sensor TRPM8. Kinetic analysis of channel gating revealed that AITC acts by destabilizing the closed channel, whereas menthol stabilizes the open channel, relative to the transition state. Based on these differences, we classify agonists as either type I (menthol-like) or type II (AITC-like), and provide a kinetic model that faithfully reproduces their differential effects. We further demonstrate that type I and type II agonists have a distinct impact on TRPM8 currents and TRPM8-mediated calcium signals in excitable cells. These findings provide a theoretical framework for understanding the differential actions of TRP channel ligands, with important ramifications for TRP channel structure-function analysis and pharmacology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17240.001 PMID:27449282

  10. Role of the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase-Akt-Mammalian Target of the Rapamycin Signaling Pathway in Long-Term Potentiation and Trace Fear Conditioning Memory in Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sui, Li; Wang, Jing; Li, Bao-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets, including Akt (also known as protein kinase B, PKB), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the 70-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6k), and the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), may play important roles in long-term synaptic plasticity and memory in many…

  11. Activation of Heat Shock and Antioxidant Responses by the Natural Product Celastrol: Transcriptional Signatures of a Thiol-targeted Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Trott, Amy; West, James D.; Klaić, Lada; Westerheide, Sandy D.; Silverman, Richard B.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2008-01-01

    Stress response pathways allow cells to sense and respond to environmental changes and adverse pathophysiological states. Pharmacological modulation of cellular stress pathways has implications in the treatment of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. The quinone methide triterpene celastrol, derived from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has numerous pharmacological properties, and it is a potent activator of the mammalian heat shock transcription factor HSF1. However, its mode of action and spectrum of cellular targets are poorly understood. We show here that celastrol activates Hsf1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae at a similar effective concentration seen in mammalian cells. Transcriptional profiling revealed that celastrol treatment induces a battery of oxidant defense genes in addition to heat shock genes. Celastrol activated the yeast Yap1 oxidant defense transcription factor via the carboxy-terminal redox center that responds to electrophilic compounds. Antioxidant response genes were likewise induced in mammalian cells, demonstrating that the activation of two major cell stress pathways by celastrol is conserved. We report that celastrol's biological effects, including inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor activity, can be blocked by the addition of excess free thiol, suggesting a chemical mechanism for biological activity based on modification of key reactive thiols by this natural product. PMID:18199679

  12. Retrograde fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22) signaling regulates insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) expression for activity-dependent synapse stabilization in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Akiko; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M; Bullock, Brenna; Lehtinen, Maria K; Umemori, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Communication between pre- and postsynaptic cells promotes the initial organization of synaptic specializations, but subsequent synaptic stabilization requires transcriptional regulation. Here we show that fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22), a target-derived presynaptic organizer in the mouse hippocampus, induces the expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) for the stabilization of presynaptic terminals. FGF22 is released from CA3 pyramidal neurons and organizes the differentiation of excitatory nerve terminals formed onto them. Local application of FGF22 on the axons of dentate granule cells (DGCs), which are presynaptic to CA3 pyramidal neurons, induces IGF2 in the DGCs. IGF2, in turn, localizes to DGC presynaptic terminals and stabilizes them in an activity-dependent manner. IGF2 application rescues presynaptic defects of Fgf22-/- cultures. IGF2 is dispensable for the initial presynaptic differentiation, but is required for the following presynaptic stabilization both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal a novel feedback signal that is critical for the activity-dependent stabilization of presynaptic terminals in the mammalian hippocampus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12151.001 PMID:27083047

  13. Mammalian-target of rapamycin inhibition with temsirolimus in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients is associated with considerable toxicity: results of the temsirolimus pilot trial by the German MDS Study Group (D-MDS).

    PubMed

    Wermke, Martin; Schuster, Claudia; Nolte, Florian; Al-Ali, Haifa-Kathrin; Kiewe, Philipp; Schönefeldt, Claudia; Jakob, Christiane; von Bonin, Malte; Hentschel, Leopold; Klut, Ina-Maria; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bornhäuser, Martin; Baretton, Gustavo; Germing, Ulrich; Herbst, Regina; Haase, Detelef; Hofmann, Wolf K; Platzbecker, Uwe

    2016-12-01

    The mammalian-target of rapamycin (also termed mechanistic target of rapamycin, mTOR) pathway integrates various pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic stimuli and is involved in regulatory T-cell (TREG) development. As these processes contribute to the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), we hypothesized that mTOR modulation with temsirolimus (TEM) might show activity in MDS. This prospective multicentre trial enrolled lower and higher risk MDS patients, provided that they were transfusion-dependent/neutropenic or relapsed/refractory to 5-azacitidine, respectively. All patients received TEM at a weekly dose of 25 mg. Of the 9 lower- and 11 higher-risk patients included, only 4 (20%) reached the response assessment after 4 months of treatment and showed stable disease without haematological improvement. The remaining patients discontinued TEM prematurely due to adverse events. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached in the lower-risk group and 296 days in the higher-risk group. We observed a significant decline of bone marrow (BM) vascularisation (P = 0·006) but were unable to demonstrate a significant impact of TEM on the balance between TREG and pro-inflammatory T-helper-cell subsets within the peripheral blood or BM. We conclude that mTOR-modulation with TEM at a dose of 25 mg per week is accompanied by considerable toxicity and has no beneficial effects in elderly MDS patients.

  14. Conservation of inner nuclear membrane targeting sequences in mammalian Pom121 and yeast Heh2 membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kralt, Annemarie; Jagalur, Noorjahan B.; van den Boom, Vincent; Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Steen, Anton; Cingolani, Gino; Fornerod, Maarten; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum–synthesized membrane proteins traffic through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) en route to the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Although many membrane proteins pass the NPC by simple diffusion, two yeast proteins, ScSrc1/ScHeh1 and ScHeh2, are actively imported. In these proteins, a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and an intrinsically disordered linker encode the sorting signal for recruiting the transport factors for FG-Nup and RanGTP-dependent transport through the NPC. Here we address whether a similar import mechanism applies in metazoans. We show that the (putative) NLSs of metazoan HsSun2, MmLem2, HsLBR, and HsLap2β are not sufficient to drive nuclear accumulation of a membrane protein in yeast, but the NLS from RnPom121 is. This NLS of Pom121 adapts a similar fold as the NLS of Heh2 when transport factor bound and rescues the subcellular localization and synthetic sickness of Heh2ΔNLS mutants. Consistent with the conservation of these NLSs, the NLS and linker of Heh2 support INM localization in HEK293T cells. The conserved features of the NLSs of ScHeh1, ScHeh2, and RnPom121 and the effective sorting of Heh2-derived reporters in human cells suggest that active import is conserved but confined to a small subset of INM proteins. PMID:26179916

  15. An active learning mammalian skeletal muscle lab demonstrating contractile and kinetic properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Head, S I; Arber, M B

    2013-12-01

    The fact that humans possess fast- and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of ∼50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic properties of fast- and slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle. This laboratory illustrates the major differences in contractile properties and fatigue profiles exhibited by the two muscle types. Students compare and contrast twitch kinetics, fused tetanus characteristics, force-frequency relationships, and fatigue properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscles. Examples of results collected by students during class are used to illustrate the type of data collected and analysis performed. During the laboratory, students are encouraged to connect factual information from their skeletal muscle lectures to their laboratory findings. This enables student learning in an active fashion; in particular, the isolated muscle preparation demonstrates that much of what makes muscle fast or slow is myogenic and not the product of the nervous or circulatory systems. This has far-reaching implications for motor control and exercise behavior and therefore is a crucial element in exercise science, with its focus on power and endurance sport activities. To measure student satisfaction with this active learning technique, a questionnaire was administered after the laboratory; 96% of the comments were positive in their support of active versus passive learning strategies.

  16. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 regulates leptin biosynthesis in adipocytes at the level of translation: the role of the 5'-untranslated region in the expression of leptin messenger ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Partha; Anno, Takatoshi; Manning, Brendan D; Luo, Zhijun; Kandror, Konstantin V

    2008-10-01

    Leptin production by adipose cells in vivo is increased after feeding and decreased by food deprivation. However, molecular mechanisms that control leptin expression in response to food intake remain unknown. Here, we test the hypothesis that leptin expression in adipose cells is regulated by nutrient- and insulin-sensitive mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-mediated pathway. The activity of mTORC1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes was up-regulated by stable expression of either constitutively active Rheb or dominant-negative AMP-activated protein kinase. In both cases, expression of endogenous leptin was significantly elevated at the level of translation. To investigate the role of leptin 5'-untranslated region (UTR) in the regulation of protein expression, we created bicistronic reporter constructs with and without the 5'-UTR. We found that the presence of leptin 5'-UTR renders mRNA resistant to regulation by mTORC1. It appears, therefore, that mTORC1 controls translation of leptin mRNA via a novel mechanism that does not require the presence of either the 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract or the 5'-UTR.

  17. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a role in Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT)-induced protein synthesis and proliferation in Swiss 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Oubrahim, Hammou; Wong, Allison; Wilson, Brenda A; Chock, P Boon

    2013-01-25

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is a potent mitogen known to activate several signaling pathways via deamidation of a conserved glutamine residue in the α subunit of heterotrimeric G-proteins. However, the detailed mechanism behind mitogenic properties of PMT is unknown. Herein, we show that PMT induces protein synthesis, cell migration, and proliferation in serum-starved Swiss 3T3 cells. Concomitantly PMT induces phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase (S6K1) and its substrate, ribosomal S6 protein (rpS6), in quiescent 3T3 cells. The extent of the phosphorylation is time and PMT concentration dependent, and is inhibited by rapamycin and Torin1, the two specific inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Interestingly, PMT-mediated mTOR signaling activation was observed in MEF WT but not in Gα(q/11) knock-out cells. These observations are consistent with the data indicating that PMT-induced mTORC1 activation proceeds via the deamidation of Gα(q/11), which leads to the activation of PLCβ to generate diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate, two known activators of the PKC pathway. Exogenously added diacylglycerol or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, known activators of PKC, leads to rpS6 phosphorylation in a rapamycin-dependent manner. Furthermore, PMT-induced rpS6 phosphorylation is inhibited by PKC inhibitor, Gö6976. Although PMT induces epidermal growth factor receptor activation, it exerts no effect on PMT-induced rpS6 phosphorylation. Together, our findings reveal for the first time that PMT activates mTORC1 through the Gα(q/11)/PLCβ/PKC pathway. The fact that PMT-induced protein synthesis and cell migration is partially inhibited by rapamycin indicates that these processes are in part mediated by the mTORC1 pathway.

  18. Effect of supplemental dietary zinc on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in skeletal muscle and liver from post-absorptive mice.

    PubMed

    McClung, James P; Tarr, Tyson N; Barnes, Brian R; Scrimgeour, Angus G; Young, Andrew J

    2007-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element that functions in cellular signaling. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the initiation of protein synthesis. The objective of this study was to determine whether Zn could stimulate protein phosphorylation in the mTOR pathway in vivo. Mice (C57BL/6J, n = 30) were fed Zn marginal diets (ZM, 5 mg/kg) for 4 weeks, followed by fasting (F) and/or refeeding with ZM or Zn supplemental (300 mg/kg, ZS) diets for 3 or 6 h. Plasma insulin was greater (P < 0.05) in refed animals as compared to F animals. Protein phosphorylation was detected using multiplex analysis and Western blotting. Multiplex analysis indicated greater (P < 0.05) p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3 alpha/beta) phosphorylation in livers from 6-h refed ZS animals as compared to F animals. Western blots indicated increased (P < 0.05) Akt (Ser 473) phosphorylation in skeletal muscle from animals refed ZS diets for 3 and 6 h as compared to F animals. The ZS diet affected phosphorylation of GSK-3 (alpha/beta) in liver, as 3-h ZS refed animals had greater (P < 0.01) phosphorylation than F animals. These findings indicate that Zn may contribute to the initiation of protein synthesis as a signaling molecule in vivo.

  19. 8-Methoxypsoralen induced mutations are highly targeted at crosslinkable sites of photoaddition on the non-transcribed strand of a mammalian chromosomal gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sage, E; Drobetsky, E A; Moustacchi, E

    1993-01-01

    We have determined the mutational specificity of 8-methoxypsoralen photoaddition at the endogenous adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene of Chinese hamster ovary cells hemizygous for this locus. In addition, the distribution of 8-methoxypsoralen photo-adducts was resolved in vitro at the DNA sequence level, and compared with the observed site specificity for mutation. Among 27 mutants characterized, all were single base changes at AT base pairs: 16 A:T-->T:A, six A:T-->C:G, four A:T-->G:C and one -T frameshift. All these vents were targeted to potential sites of photoaddition. The vast majority of these sites were also detectable in vitro, suggesting that 8-methoxypsoralen plus UVA-induced mutational hotspots may be damage hotspots. Furthermore 26/27 mutations occurred at crosslinkable 5'TpA sites, supporting the notion that 8-methoxypsoralen biadducts rather than monoadducts are major premutagenic lesions in mammalian cells. Since 90% of our mutation collection could have resulted from damage on the non-transcribed strand, it appears that photoadducted thymine residues on the transcribed strand of the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene may be preferentially repaired. We therefore suggest a model for mutagenesis, induced by psoralen biadducts, based on the preferential incision of biadducts followed by translesion synthesis past modified T bases persisting on the non-transcribed strand. Images PMID:8440233

  20. Temporal changes in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and phosphorylated-mTOR expressions in the hippocampal CA1 region of rat with vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-A

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has an important role in various biological processes in cells. In the present study, we investigated temporal changes in mTOR and phosphorylated-mTOR (p-mTOR) expressions in the rat hippocampal CA1 region following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) induced by permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (2VO). The mTOR immunoreactivity in the pyramidal neurons and mTOR protein level in the hippocampal CA1 region were markedly decreased at 21 and 28 days after 2VO surgery. However, p-mTOR protein expression was significantly increased at 7 days following CCH but then decreased with time. The results indicate that mTOR and p-mTOR expressions change in the hippocampal CA1 region after 2VO surgery and that reduced expressions of mTOR and p-mTOR may be closely related to the CCH-induced neuronal damage in the hippocampal CA1 region. PMID:27297423

  1. The mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 binds diverse nuclear proteins through a common motif that targets the chromoshadow domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Mark S. . E-mail: msl27@drexel.edu; Schultz, David C.; Negorev, Dmitri; Maul, Gerd G.; Rauscher, Frank J.

    2005-06-17

    The HP1 proteins regulate epigenetic gene silencing by promoting and maintaining chromatin condensation. The HP1 chromodomain binds to methylated histone H3. More enigmatic is the chromoshadow domain (CSD), which mediates dimerization, transcription repression, and interaction with multiple nuclear proteins. Here we show that KAP-1, CAF-1 p150, and NIPBL carry a canonical amino acid motif, PxVxL, which binds directly to the CSD with high affinity. We also define a new class of variant PxVxL CSD-binding motifs in Sp100A, LBR, and ATRX. Both canonical and variant motifs recognize a similar surface of the CSD dimer as demonstrated by a panel of CSD mutants. These in vitro binding results were confirmed by the analysis of polypeptides found associated with nuclear HP1 complexes and we provide the first evidence of the NIPBL/delangin protein in human cells, a protein recently implicated in the developmental disorder, Cornelia de Lange syndrome. NIPBL is related to Nipped-B, a factor participating in gene activation by remote enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus, this spectrum of direct binding partners suggests an expanded role for HP1 as factor participating in promoter-enhancer communication, chromatin remodeling/assembly, and sub-nuclear compartmentalization.

  2. Heterogeneity of mammalian DNA ligase detected on activity and DNA sequencing gels.

    PubMed Central

    Mezzina, M; Sarasin, A; Politi, N; Bertazzoni, U

    1984-01-01

    A new method to detect DNA ligase activity in situ after NaDodSO4 polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis has been developed. After renaturation of active polypeptides the ligase reaction occurs in situ by incubating the intact gel in the presence of Mg++ and ATP. Further treatment with alkaline phosphatase removes the unligated 5'-32P-end of oligo (dT) used as a substrate and active polypeptides having ligase activity are identified by autoradiography. Analysis on DNA sequencing gels of the oligo (dT) reaction products present in the activity bands ensures that the radioactive material detected in activity gels or in standard in vitro ligase assays corresponds unambiguously to a ligase activity. Using these methods, we have analysed the purified phage T4 DNA ligase, and the activities present in crude extracts and in purified fractions from monkey kidney (CV1-P) cells. The purified T4 enzyme yields one or two active peptides with Mr values of 60,000 and 70,000. Crude extracts from CV1-P cells contain several polypeptides having DNA ligase activity. Partial purification of these extracts shows that DNA ligase I isolated from hydroxylapatite column is enriched in polypeptides with Mr 200,000, 150,000 and 120,000, while DNA ligase II is enriched in those with Mr 60,000 and 70,000. Images PMID:6377238

  3. Organization of left–right coordination of neuronal activity in the mammalian spinal cord: Insights from computational modelling

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsova, Natalia A; Talpalar, Adolfo E; Markin, Sergey N; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M; Kiehn, Ole; Rybak, Ilya A

    2015-01-01

    Different locomotor gaits in mammals, such as walking or galloping, are produced by coordinated activity in neuronal circuits in the spinal cord. Coordination of neuronal activity between left and right sides of the cord is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs), whose axons cross the midline. In this study, we construct and analyse two computational models of spinal locomotor circuits consisting of left and right rhythm generators interacting bilaterally via several neuronal pathways mediated by different CINs. The CIN populations incorporated in the models include the genetically identified inhibitory (V0D) and excitatory (V0V) subtypes of V0 CINs and excitatory V3 CINs. The model also includes the ipsilaterally projecting excitatory V2a interneurons mediating excitatory drive to the V0V CINs. The proposed network architectures and CIN connectivity allow the models to closely reproduce and suggest mechanistic explanations for several experimental observations. These phenomena include: different speed-dependent contributions of V0D and V0V CINs and V2a interneurons to left–right alternation of neural activity, switching gaits between the left–right alternating walking-like activity and the left–right synchronous hopping-like pattern in mutants lacking specific neuron classes, and speed-dependent asymmetric changes of flexor and extensor phase durations. The models provide insights into the architecture of spinal network and the organization of parallel inhibitory and excitatory CIN pathways and suggest explanations for how these pathways maintain alternating and synchronous gaits at different locomotor speeds. The models propose testable predictions about the neural organization and operation of mammalian locomotor circuits. Key points Coordination of neuronal activity between left and right sides of the mammalian spinal cord is provided by several sets of commissural interneurons (CINs) whose axons cross the midline. Genetically identified inhibitory V

  4. Solution structure and alanine scan of a spider toxin that affects the activation of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Sabo, Jennifer K; Bosmans, Frank; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Tytgat, Jan; Norton, Raymond S

    2007-02-16

    Magi 5, from the hexathelid spider Macrothele gigas, is a 29-residue polypeptide containing three disulfide bridges. It binds specifically to receptor site 4 on mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels and competes with scorpion beta-toxins, such as Css IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus. As a consequence, Magi 5 shifts the activation voltage of the mammalian rNav1.2a channel to more hyperpolarized voltages, whereas the insect channel, DmNav1, is not affected. To gain insight into toxin-channel interactions, Magi 5 and 23 analogues were synthesized. The three-dimensional structure of Magi 5 in aqueous solution was determined, and its voltage-gated sodium channel-binding surfaces were mapped onto this structure using data from electrophysiological measurements on a series of Ala-substituted analogues. The structure clearly resembles the inhibitor cystine knot structural motif, although the triple-stranded beta-sheet typically found in that motif is partially distorted in Magi 5. The interactive surface of Magi 5 toward voltage-gated sodium channels resembles in some respects the Janus-faced atracotoxins, with functionally important charged residues on one face of the toxin and hydrophobic residues on the other. Magi 5 also resembles the scorpion beta-toxin Css IV, which has distinct nonpolar and charged surfaces that are critical for channel binding and has a key Glu involved in voltage sensor trapping. These two distinct classes of toxin, with different amino acid sequences and different structures, may utilize similar groups of residues on their surface to achieve the common end of modifying voltage-gated sodium channel function.

  5. Mammalian oocyte activation by the synergistic action of discrete sperm head components: induction of calcium transients and involvement of proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Perry, A C; Wakayama, T; Cooke, I M; Yanagimachi, R

    2000-01-15

    Sperm-borne oocyte-activating factor (SOAF) elicits activation sufficient for full development and originates from sperm head submembrane matrices. SOAF comprises discrete, heat-sensitive and -stable components (referred to here respectively as SOAF-I and -II) which are each necessary but not sufficient to activate oocytes. The heat-sensitive SOAF component, SOAF-I(m), becomes solubilized from the perinuclear matrix under reducing conditions (the SOAF transition) to generate SOAF-I(s). Although calcium transients likely play an important role in oocyte activation at fertilization, the question is open as to whether demembranated heads or SOAF-I(s) and/or SOAF-II can induce calcium transients. We now report that injection of demembranated sperm heads into mouse oocytes efficiently induced Ca(2+) oscillations. When injected independently, SOAF-I(s) and demembranated heads heated to 48 degrees C failed to generate Ca(2+) oscillations. However, co-injection of SOAF-I(s) and 48 degrees C-heated heads induced oscillations, mirroring their synergistic ability to activate oocytes. This suggests that SOAF-mediated activation proceeds via pathways resembling those at fertilization and provides the first direct evidence that multiple sperm components are required to induce Ca(2+) oscillations. We probed the SOAF-I(s) liberation at the center of this activation and show that in vitro it was sensitive to a profile of serine protease inhibitors. These findings support a model in which mammalian oocyte activation, including the induction of calcium transients, involves proteolytic processing of SOAF from sperm head submembrane compartments.

  6. Modulation of Rhythmic Activity in Mammalian Spinal Networks Is Dependent on Excitability State

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Neuromodulators play an important role in activating rhythmically active motor networks; however, what remains unclear are the network interactions whereby neuromodulators recruit spinal motor networks to produce rhythmic activity. Evidence from invertebrate systems has demonstrated that the effect of neuromodulators depends on the pre-existing state of the network. We explored how network excitation state affects the ability of dopamine to evoke rhythmic locomotor activity in the neonatal mouse isolated spinal cord. We found that dopamine can evoke unique patterns of motor activity that are dependent on the excitability state of motor networks. Different patterns of motor activity ranging from tonic, nonrhythmic activity to multirhythmic, nonlocomotor activity to locomotor activity were produced by altering global motor network excitability through manipulations of the extracellular potassium and bath NMDA concentration. A similar effect was observed when network excitation was manipulated during an unstable multirhythm evoked by a low concentration (15 µm) of 5-HT, suggesting that our results are not neuromodulator specific. Our data show in vertebrate systems that modulation is a two-way street and that modulatory actions are largely influenced by the network state. The level of network excitation can account for variability between preparations and is an additional factor to be considered when circuit elements are removed from the network. PMID:28144626

  7. Target-specific control of lymphoid-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp) activity

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Zandra E.; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoid-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp), a member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) superfamily of enzymes, is an important mediator of human-leukocyte signaling. Lyp has also emerged as a potential anti-autoimmune therapeutic target, owing to the association of a Lyp-activating mutation with an array of autoimmune disorders. Toward the goal of generating a selective inhibitor of Lyp activity that could be used for investigating Lyp’s roles in cell signaling and autoimmune-disease progression, here we report that Lyp’s PTP domain can be readily sensitized to target-specific inhibition by a cell-permeable small molecule. Insertion of a tetracysteine-motif-containing peptide at a conserved position in Lyp’s catalytic domain generated a mutant enzyme (Lyp-CCPGCC) that retains activity comparable to that of wild-type Lyp in the absence of added ligand. Upon addition of a tetracysteine-targeting biarsenical compound (FlAsH), however, the activity of the Lyp-CCPGCC drops dramatically, as assayed with either small-molecule or phosphorylated-peptide PTP substrates. We show that FlAsH-induced Lyp-CCPGCC inhibition is potent, specific, rapid, and independent of the nature of the PTP substrate used in the inhibition assay. Moreover, we show that FlAsH can be used to specifically target overexpressed Lyp-CCPGCC in a complex proteomic mixture. Since the mammalian-cell permeability of FlAsH is well established, it is likely that FlAsH-mediated inhibition of Lyp-CCPGCC will be useful for specifically targeting Lyp activity in engineered leukocytes and autoimmune-disease models. PMID:20594861

  8. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  9. Targeted, noninvasive blockade of cortical neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a novel method to noninvasively modulate targeted brain areas through the temporary disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) via focused ultrasound, enabling focal delivery of a neuroactive substance. Ultrasound was used to locally disrupt the BBB in rat somatosensory cortex, and intravenous administration of GABA then produced a dose-dependent suppression of somatosensory-evoked potentials in response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve. No suppression was observed 1-5 days afterwards or in control animals where the BBB was not disrupted. This method has several advantages over existing techniques: it is noninvasive; it is repeatable via additional GABA injections; multiple brain regions can be affected simultaneously; suppression magnitude can be titrated by GABA dose; and the method can be used with freely behaving subjects. We anticipate that the application of neuroactive substances in this way will be a useful tool for noninvasively mapping brain function, and potentially for surgical planning or novel therapies.

  10. The heat-shock factor is not activated in mammalian cells exposed to cellular phone frequency microwaves.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Andrei; Moros, Eduardo G; Davidson, Teri; Bradbury, Matt; Straube, William; Roti Roti, Joseph

    2005-08-01

    There has been considerable interest in the biological effects of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation, given the explosive growth of cellular telephone use, with the possible induction of malignancy being a significant concern. Thus the determination of whether nonthermal effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation contribute to the process leading to malignancy is an important task. One proposed pathway to malignancy involves the induction of the stress response by exposures to cell phone frequency microwaves. The first step in the induction of the stress response is the activation of the DNA-binding activity of the specific transcription factor involved in this response, the heat-shock factor (HSF). The DNA-binding activity of HSF in hamster, mouse and human cells was determined after acute and continuous exposures to frequency domain multiple access (FDMA)- or code domain multiple access (CDMA)-modulated microwaves at low (0.6 W/kg) or high (approximately 5 W/kg) SARs at frequencies used for mobile communication. The DNA-binding activity of HSF was monitored using a gel shift assay; the calibration of this assay indicated that an increase of approximately 10% in the activation of the DNA-binding activity of HSF after a 1 degrees C increase in temperature could be detected. We failed to detect any increase in the DNA-binding ability of HSF in cultured mammalian cells as a consequence of any exposure tested, within the sensitivity of our assay. Our results do not support the notion that the stress response is activated as a consequence of exposure to microwaves of frequencies associated with mobile communication devices.

  11. Signaling through the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Axis Is Responsible for Aerobic Glycolysis mediated by Glucose Transporter in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-mutated Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Makinoshima, Hideki; Takita, Masahiro; Saruwatari, Koichi; Umemura, Shigeki; Obata, Yuuki; Ishii, Genichiro; Matsumoto, Shingo; Sugiyama, Eri; Ochiai, Atsushi; Abe, Ryo; Goto, Koichi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2015-07-10

    Oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling plays an important role in regulating global metabolic pathways, including aerobic glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), and pyrimidine biosynthesis. However, the molecular mechanism by which EGFR signaling regulates cancer cell metabolism is still unclear. To elucidate how EGFR signaling is linked to metabolic activity, we investigated the involvement of the RAS/MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways on metabolic alteration in lung adenocarcinoma (LAD) cell lines with activating EGFR mutations. Although MEK inhibition did not alter lactate production and the extracellular acidification rate, PI3K/mTOR inhibitors significantly suppressed glycolysis in EGFR-mutant LAD cells. Moreover, a comprehensive metabolomics analysis revealed that the levels of glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate as early metabolites in glycolysis and PPP were decreased after inhibition of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, suggesting a link between PI3K signaling and the proper function of glucose transporters or hexokinases in glycolysis. Indeed, PI3K/mTOR inhibition effectively suppressed membrane localization of facilitative glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), which, instead, accumulated in the cytoplasm. Finally, aerobic glycolysis and cell proliferation were down-regulated when GLUT1 gene expression was suppressed by RNAi. Taken together, these results suggest that PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling is indispensable for the regulation of aerobic glycolysis in EGFR-mutated LAD cells.

  12. The anti-diabetic drug metformin inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor expression via the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α signaling pathway in ELT-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Tadakawa, Mari; Takeda, Takashi; Li, Bin; Tsuiji, Kenji; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-05

    The aim of this study was to elucidate whether metformin can regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat-derived uterine leiomyoma cells (ELT-3 cells). In vitro studies were conducted using ELT-3 cells. Under normoxic conditions, metformin suppressed VEGF protein levels in the supernatant and cells in a dose-dependent manner. In hypoxia-mimicking conditions, VEGF and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) proteins were both highly expressed and were suppressed by the metformin treatment. Metformin did not affect HIF-1α mRNA levels, which indicated that its effects occurred at the post-translational level. Metformin inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity by phosphorylating the mTORC1 component raptor. This study revealed the anti-angiogenic activity of metformin in ELT-3 cells by suppressing the expression of VEGF via the mTORC1/HIF-1α pathway. These results indicate that metformin may represent an effective alternative in the future treatment of uterine leiomyomas.

  13. VCP, the mammalian homolog of cdc48, is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to T cell antigen receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Egerton, M; Ashe, O R; Chen, D; Druker, B J; Burgess, W H; Samelson, L E

    1992-01-01

    Activation of T cells through the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) results in the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of cellular proteins, one of the earliest being a 100 kDa protein. We have sought to identify this 100 kDa substrate by partially purifying the protein by antiphosphotyrosine (APT) affinity purification, in order to obtain amino acid sequence data and, using this information, to isolate the cDNA clone encoding the molecule. We report here that the amino acid sequence data showed pp100 to be the murine equivalent of porcine valosin containing protein (VCP), a finding confirmed from the cloning and sequencing of the murine pp100 cDNA. Sequence analysis has shown VCP to be a member of a family of ATP binding, homo-oligomeric proteins, and the mammalian homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cdc48p, a protein essential to the completion of mitosis in yeast. We also provide proof that both endogenous and expressed murine VCP are tyrosine phosphorylated in response to T cell activation. Thus we have identified a novel component of the TCR mediated tyrosine kinase activation pathway that may provide a link between TCR ligation and cell cycle control. Images PMID:1382975

  14. Inhibitory effects of catechin derivatives on mammalian DNA polymerase and topoisomerase activities and mouse one-cell zygote development.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naoko; Kuriyama, Isoko; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the inhibitory activities against DNA polymerases (pols) and DNA topoisomerases (topos) by eight major green tea catechin derivatives (flavan-3-ols) were investigated. Some catechins inhibited mammalian pols (α and β) and human topos (I and II), with (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) the strongest inhibitor of both enzyme types, showing IC(50) values of 3.8-21.5 and 2.0-20.0 μM, respectively. EGCg did not affect the activities of plant (cauliflower) pol α or prokaryotic pols and showed no effect on the activities of other DNA metabolic enzymes tested. Next, a method was established for assay of mouse one-cell zygote development inhibition, the catechin derivatives screened for bioactivity, and the inhibition was assessed and their effects ranked as: EGCg > GCg > Cg > others. In the mouse one-cell zygote assay, EGCg at 50 μM increased abnormal cells and 75 μM of EGCg-induced apoptosis. The observed ranking of catechin derivative inhibition effects against mouse one-cell zygote development in vivo was similar to their ranking by topo inhibition in vitro rather than by pol inhibition; therefore, topo inhibition might have been effecting zygote development inhibition. These results suggested that catechin derivatives indeed reached the nuclear DNA where topo inhibition can occur, thus causing the observed cellular effects. From these findings, this zygote development inhibition assay will be useful as an anti-pregnant agent screening.

  15. The C. elegans apoptotic nuclease NUC-1 is related in sequence and activity to mammalian DNase II.

    PubMed

    Lyon, C J; Evans, C J; Bill, B R; Otsuka, A J; Aguilera, R J

    2000-07-11

    The Caenorhabditis elegans nuc-1 gene has previously been implicated in programmed cell death due to the presence of persistent undegraded apoptotic DNA in nuc-1 mutant animals. In this report, we describe the cloning and characterization of nuc-1, which encodes an acidic nuclease with significant sequence similarity to mammalian DNase II. Database searches performed with human DNase II protein sequence revealed a significant similarity with the predicted C. elegans C07B5.5 ORF. Subsequent analysis of crude C. elegans protein extracts revealed that wild-type animals contained a potent endonuclease activity with a cleavage preference similar to DNase II, while nuc-1 mutant worms demonstrated a marked reduction in this nuclease activity. Sequence analysis of C07B5.5 DNA and mRNA also revealed that nuc-1(e1392), but not wild-type animals contained a nonsense mutation within the CO7B5.5 coding region. Furthermore, nuc-1 transgenic lines carrying the wild-type C07B5.5 locus demonstrated a complete complementation of the nuc-1 mutant phenotype. Our results therefore provide compelling evidence that the C07B5.5 gene encodes the NUC-1 apoptotic nuclease and that this nuclease is related in sequence and activity to DNase II.

  16. SR4 Uncouples Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation, Modulates AMP-dependent Kinase (AMPK)-Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling, and Inhibits Proliferation of HepG2 Hepatocarcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Figarola, James L.; Singhal, Jyotsana; Tompkins, Joshua D.; Rogers, George W.; Warden, Charles; Horne, David; Riggs, Arthur D.; Awasthi, Sanjay; Singhal, Sharad S.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation produces most of the energy in aerobic cells by coupling respiration to the production of ATP. Mitochondrial uncouplers, which reduce the proton gradient across the mitochondrial inner membrane, create a futile cycle of nutrient oxidation without generating ATP. Regulation of mitochondrial dysfunction and associated cellular bioenergetics has been recently identified as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Here, we show that SR4 is a novel mitochondrial uncoupler that causes dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial respiration and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells. These effects were reversed by the recoupling agent 6-ketocholestanol but not cyclosporin A and were nonexistent in mitochondrial DNA-depleted HepG2 cells. In isolated mouse liver mitochondria, SR4 similarly increased oxygen consumption independent of adenine nucleotide translocase and uncoupling proteins, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and promoted swelling of valinomycin-treated mitochondria in potassium acetate medium. Mitochondrial uncoupling in HepG2 cells by SR4 results in the reduction of cellular ATP production, increased ROS production, activation of the energy-sensing enzyme AMPK, and inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Global analysis of SR4-associated differential gene expression confirms these observations, including significant induction of apoptotic genes and down-regulation of cell cycle, mitochondrial, and oxidative phosphorylation pathway transcripts at 24 h post-treatment. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that the previously reported indirect activation of AMPK and in vitro anticancer properties of SR4 as well as its beneficial effects in both animal xenograft and obese mice models could be a direct consequence of its mitochondrial uncoupling activity. PMID:26534958

  17. Development of coherent neuronal activity patterns in mammalian cortical networks: common principles and local hetereogeneity.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Alexei V; Draguhn, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Many mammals are born in a very immature state and develop their rich repertoire of behavioral and cognitive functions postnatally. This development goes in parallel with changes in the anatomical and functional organization of cortical structures which are involved in most complex activities. The emerging spatiotemporal activity patterns in multi-neuronal cortical networks may indeed form a direct neuronal correlate of systemic functions like perception, sensorimotor integration, decision making or memory formation. During recent years, several studies--mostly in rodents--have shed light on the ontogenesis of such highly organized patterns of network activity. While each local network has its own peculiar properties, some general rules can be derived. We therefore review and compare data from the developing hippocampus, neocortex and--as an intermediate region--entorhinal cortex. All cortices seem to follow a characteristic sequence starting with uncorrelated activity in uncoupled single neurons where transient activity seems to have mostly trophic effects. In rodents, before and shortly after birth, cortical networks develop weakly coordinated multineuronal discharges which have been termed synchronous plateau assemblies (SPAs). While these patterns rely mostly on electrical coupling by gap junctions, the subsequent increase in number and maturation of chemical synapses leads to the generation of large-scale coherent discharges. These patterns have been termed giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) for predominantly GABA-induced events or early network oscillations (ENOs) for mostly glutamatergic bursts, respectively. During the third to fourth postnatal week, cortical areas reach their final activity patterns with distinct network oscillations and highly specific neuronal discharge sequences which support adult behavior. While some of the mechanisms underlying maturation of network activity have been elucidated much work remains to be done in order to fully

  18. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity in mononuclear leukocytes of 13 mammalian species correlates with species-specific life span.

    PubMed Central

    Grube, K; Bürkle, A

    1992-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a eukaryotic posttranslational modification of proteins that is strongly induced by the presence of DNA strand breaks and plays a role in DNA repair and the recovery of cells from DNA damage. We compared poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP; EC 2.4.2.30) activities in Percoll gradient-purified, permeabilized mononuclear leukocytes from mammalian species of different maximal life span. Saturating concentrations of a double-stranded octameric oligonucleotide were applied to provide a direct and maximal stimulation of PARP. Our results on 132 individuals from 13 different species yield a strong positive correlation between PARP activity and life span (r = 0.84; P << 0.001), with human cells displaying approximately 5 times the activity of rat cells. Intraspecies comparisons with both rat and human cells from donors of all age groups revealed some decline of PARP activity with advancing age, but it was only weakly correlated. No significant polymer degradation was detectable under our assay conditions, ruling out any interference by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity. By Western blot analysis of mononuclear leukocytes from 11 species, using a crossreactive antiserum directed against the extremely well-conserved NAD-binding domain, no correlation between the amount of PARP protein and the species' life spans was found, suggesting a greater specific enzyme activity in longer-lived species. We propose that a higher poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity in cells from long-lived species might contribute to the efficient maintenance of genome integrity and stability over their longer life span. Images PMID:1465394

  19. A rapid quantitative assay for the detection of mammalian heparanase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, C; Parish, C R

    1997-01-01

    Heparan sulphate (HS) is an important component of the extracellular matrix and the vasculature basal laminar which functions as a barrier to the extravasation of metastatic and inflammatory cells. Cleavage of HS by endoglycosidase or heparanase activity produced by invading cells may assist in the disassembly of the extracellular matrix and basal laminar, and thereby facilitate cell migration. Heparanase activity has previously been shown to be related to the metastatic potential of murine and human melanoma cell lines [Nakajima, Irimura and Nicolson (1988) J. Cell. Biochem. 36, 157-167]. To determine heparanase activity, porcine mucosal HS was partially de-N-acetylated and re-N-acetylated with [3H]acetic anhydride to yield a radiolabelled substrate. This procedure prevented the masking of, or possible formation of, new heparanase-sensitive cleavage sites as has been observed with previous methods of radiolabelling. Heparanase activity in a variety of tissues and cell homogenates including human platelets, colonic carcinoma cells, umbilical vein endothelial cells and rat mammary adenocarcinoma cells (both metastatic and non-metastatic variants) and liver homogenates all degraded the substrate in a stepwise fashion from 18.5 to approximately 13, 8 and finally to 4.5 kDa fragments, as assessed by gel-filtration analysis, confirming the substrate as suitable for the detection of heparanase activity present in a variety of cells and tissues. A rapid quantitative assay was developed with the HS substrate using a novel method for separating degradation products from the substrate by taking advantage of the decreased affinity of the heparanase-cleaved products for the HS-binding plasma protein chicken histidine-rich glycoprotein (cHRG). Incubation mixtures were applied to cHRG-Sepharose columns, with unbound material corresponding to heparanase-degradation products. Heparanase activity was determined for a variety of human, rat and murine cell and tissue homogenates. The

  20. Insights into Substrate Specificity and Metal Activation of Mammalian Tetrahedral Aspartyl Aminopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Farquhar, Erik R.; Chance, Mark R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kiser, Philip D.

    2012-07-11

    Aminopeptidases are key enzymes involved in the regulation of signaling peptide activity. Here, we present a detailed biochemical and structural analysis of an evolutionary highly conserved aspartyl aminopeptidase called DNPEP. We show that this peptidase can cleave multiple physiologically relevant substrates, including angiotensins, and thus may play a key role in regulating neuron function. Using a combination of x-ray crystallography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and single particle electron microscopy analysis, we provide the first detailed structural analysis of DNPEP. We show that this enzyme possesses a binuclear zinc-active site in which one of the zinc ions is readily exchangeable with other divalent cations such as manganese, which strongly stimulates the enzymatic activity of the protein. The plasticity of this metal-binding site suggests a mechanism for regulation of DNPEP activity. We also demonstrate that DNPEP assembles into a functionally relevant tetrahedral complex that restricts access of peptide substrates to the active site. These structural data allow rationalization of the enzyme's preference for short peptide substrates with N-terminal acidic residues. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the physiology and bioinorganic chemistry of DNPEP and other M18 family aminopeptidases.

  1. Active calibration target for bistatic radar cross-section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienaar, M.; Odendaal, J. W.; Joubert, J.; Cilliers, J. E.; Smit, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    Either passive calibration targets are expensive and complex to manufacture or their bistatic radar cross section (RCS) levels are significantly lower than the monostatic RCS levels of targets such as spheres, dihedral, and trihedral corner reflectors. In this paper the performance of an active calibration target with relative high bistatic RCS values is illustrated as a reference target for bistatic RCS measurements. The reference target is simple to manufacture, operates over a wide frequency range, and can be configured to calibrate all four polarizations (VV, HH, HV, and VH). Bistatic RCS measurements of canonical targets, performed in a controlled environment, are calibrated with the reference target and the results are compared to simulated results using FEKO.

  2. Transposable elements become active and mobile in the genomes of aging mammalian somatic tissues.

    PubMed

    De Cecco, Marco; Criscione, Steven W; Peterson, Abigail L; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M; Kreiling, Jill A

    2013-12-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) were discovered by Barbara McClintock in maize and have since been found to be ubiquitous in all living organisms. Transposition is mutagenic and organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress the activity of their endogenous TEs. Transposition in somatic cells is very low, but recent evidence suggests that it may be derepressed in some cases, such as cancer development. We have found that during normal aging several families of retrotransposable elements (RTEs) start being transcribed in mouse tissues. In advanced age the expression culminates in active transposition. These processes are counteracted by calorie restriction (CR), an intervention that slows down aging. Retrotransposition is also activated in age-associated, naturally occurring cancers in the mouse. We suggest that somatic retrotransposition is a hitherto unappreciated aging process. Mobilization of RTEs is likely to be an important contributor to the progressive dysfunction of aging cells.

  3. Evaluation of beta-naphthoxyacetic acid for mutagenic activity in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome assay.

    PubMed

    Rashid, K A; Mumma, R O

    1986-06-01

    Beta-naphthoxyacetic acid (BNOA) is used as a plant growth regulator on tomatoes and strawberries. It is the active ingredient in Blossom-Set and Berry-Set, two plant hormone sprays for fruit-set. The mutagenic activity of BNOA was evaluated in four strains of Salmonella typhimurium (TA97, TA98, TA100 and TA1535) in the presence and absence of liver microsomal and cytosolic enzymes derived from Aroclor induced rats. BNOA did not produce any significant increase (p less than 0.05) in the reversion of any of the four tester strains in the standard plate incorporation assay. Results of the agar overlay toxicity tests indicates that the chemical shows toxic effects at concentrations above 500 micrograms/plate. It was concluded that under the conditions of these tests, BNOA did not exhibit any mutagenic activity.

  4. Transposable elements become active and mobile in the genomes of aging mammalian somatic tissues

    PubMed Central

    De Cecco, Marco; Criscione, Steven W.; Peterson, Abigail L.; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M.; Kreiling, Jill A.

    2013-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) were discovered by Barbara McClintock in maize and have since been found to be ubiquitous in all living organisms. Transposition is mutagenic and organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress the activity of their endogenous TEs. Transposition in somatic cells is very low, but recent evidence suggests that it may be derepressed in some cases, such as cancer development. We have found that during normal aging several families of retrotransposable elements (RTEs) start being transcribed in mouse tissues. In advanced age the expression culminates in active transposition. These processes are counteracted by calorie restriction (CR), an intervention that slows down aging. Retrotransposition is also activated in age-associated, naturally occurring cancers in the mouse. We suggest that somatic retrotransposition is a hitherto unappreciated aging process. Mobilization of RTEs is likely to be an important contributor to the progressive dysfunction of aging cells. PMID:24323947

  5. Functional differences between junctional and extrajunctional adrenergic receptor activation in mammalian ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Vaseghi, Marmar; Zhou, Wei; Yamakawa, Kentaro; Benharash, Peyman; Hadaya, Joseph; Lux, Robert L.; Mahajan, Aman

    2013-01-01

    Increased cardiac sympathetic activation worsens dispersion of repolarization and is proarrhythmic. The functional differences between intrinsic nerve stimulation and adrenergic receptor activation remain incompletely understood. This study was undertaken to determine the functional differences between efferent cardiac sympathetic nerve stimulation and direct adrenergic receptor activation in porcine ventricles. Female Yorkshire pigs (n = 13) underwent surgical exposure of the heart and stellate ganglia. A 56-electrode sock was placed over the ventricles to record epicardial electrograms. Animals underwent bilateral sympathetic stimulation (BSS) (n = 8) or norepinephrine (NE) administration (n = 5). Activation recovery intervals (ARIs) were measured at each electrode before and during BSS or NE. The degree of ARI shortening during BSS or NE administration was used as a measure of functional nerve or adrenergic receptor density. During BSS, ARI shortening was nonuniform across the epicardium (F value 9.62, P = 0.003), with ARI shortening greatest in the mid-basal lateral right ventricle and least in the midposterior left ventricle (LV) (mean normalized values: 0.9 ± 0.08 vs. 0.56 ± 0.08; P = 0.03). NE administration resulted in greater ARI shortening in the LV apex than basal segments [0.91 ± 0.04 vs. 0.63 ± 0.05 (averaged basal segments); P = 0.003]. Dispersion of ARIs increased in 50% and 60% of the subjects undergoing BSS and NE, respectively, but decreased in the others. There is nonuniform response to cardiac sympathetic activation of both porcine ventricles, which is not fully explained by adrenergic receptor density. Different pools of adrenergic receptors may mediate the cardiac electrophysiological effects of efferent sympathetic nerve activity and circulating catecholamines. PMID:23241324

  6. Extracellular stimulation of mammalian neurons through repetitive activation of Na+ channels by weak capacitive currents on a silicon chip.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Ingmar; Fromherz, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Reliable extracellular stimulation of neuronal activity is the prerequisite for electrical interfacing of cultured networks and brain slices, as well as for neural implants. Safe stimulation must be achieved without damage to the cells. With respect to a future application of highly integrated semiconductor chips, we present an electrophysiological study of capacitive stimulation of mammalian cells in the geometry of adhesion on an insulated titanium dioxide/silicon electrode. We used HEK293 cells with overexpressed Na(V)1.4 channels and neurons from rat hippocampus. Weak biphasic stimuli of falling and rising voltage ramps were applied in the absence of Faradaic current and electroporation. We recorded the response of the intra- and extracellular voltage and evaluated the concomitant polarization of the attached and free cell membranes. Falling ramps efficiently depolarized the central area of the attached membrane. A transient sodium inward current was activated that gave rise to a weak depolarization of the cell on the order of 1 mV. The depolarization could be enhanced step by step by a train of biphasic stimuli until self-excitation of sodium channels set in. We applied the same protocol to cultured rat neurons and found that pulse trains of weak capacitive stimuli were able to elicit action potentials. Our results provide a basis for safe extracellular stimulation not only for cultured neurons on insulated semiconductor electrodes, but also more generally for metal electrodes in cell culture and brain tissue.

  7. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in breast cancer: the impact of oestrogen receptor and HER2 pathways.

    PubMed

    Jerjees, Dena A; Negm, Ola H; Alabdullah, M Layth; Mirza, Sameer; Alkaabi, Methaq; Hameed, Mohamed R; Abduljabbar, Rezvan; Muftah, Abir; Nolan, Chris C; Green, Andrew R; Tighe, Patrick J; Band, Vimla; Ellis, Ian O; Rakha, Emad A

    2015-02-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a downstream of the PI3K/Akt pathway which affects cancer development. mTORC1 has many downstream signalling effectors that can enhance different cellular responses. This study aims to investigate the expression of mTORC1 in breast cancer (BC) and correlate it with key clinicopathological and molecular features of BC especially to proteins related to oestrogen receptor (ER) and HER2 pathways in different BC classes. Moreover, mTORC1 expression was assessed in 6 BC cell lines including ER+ and ER- cell lines with and without HER2 transfection. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of phospho (p) mTORC1 in a large (n = 1300) annotated BC series prepared as tissue microarray. Reverse phase protein array (RPPA) was used to assess its expression in the different BC cell lines. The expression of p-mTORC1 was cytoplasmic with moderate/high expression noted in 44 % of BC. p-mTORC1 expression was associated with clinicopathological variables characteristic of good prognosis. Positive correlation with ER, ER-related proteins AKT, PI3K and luminal differentiation markers were observed in the whole series and in the ER+HER2- subgroup. Association with HER2 was mainly observed in the ER-negative class. RPPA indicated that p-mTORC1 expression was mainly related to ER expression and with better outcome in the Akt positive tumours. p-mTORC1 is associated with good prognostic features. Its expression is related to ER and ER related proteins in addition to AKT and PI3K. Its relation with HER2 expression is mainly seen in the absence of ER expression.

  8. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-associated stomatitis in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients receiving sirolimus prophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alessandro; Aboalela, Ali; Luskin, Katharine A; Cutler, Corey S; Sonis, Stephen T; Woo, Sook Bin; Peterson, Douglas E; Treister, Nathaniel S

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor sirolimus is effective in reducing incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Agents that inhibit the mTOR pathway are known to be associated with significant and potentially dose-limiting toxicities, including stomatitis. The objective of this study was to report the clinical features and management outcomes of sirolimus-associated oral ulcers in the context of post-HSCT prophylaxis of GVHD. Seventeen patients, from a study cohort of 967, who were treated with sirolimus as prophylaxis for GVHD after allogeneic HSCT at the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center developed oral ulcers and were referred to the oral medicine clinic for evaluation and treatment over a period of 6 years. Clinical characteristics (appearance, anatomic site, size) and therapeutic outcomes (time to complete resolution) were documented. Median time to onset of oral ulceration was 55 days after allogeneic HSCT (range, 6 to 387 days); 92.9% of ulcers were located on nonkeratinized mucosa, with the ventrolateral tongue the most common site of involvement. Thirteen patients were treated with topical corticosteroid therapy; 12 of these patients also required intralesional corticosteroid injections. Clinical improvement (resolution of the lesions and improvement of symptoms) was noted in all cases, with no reported adverse events. Median time to complete resolution after onset of therapy was 14 days (range, 2 to 70 days). Patients receiving sirolimus for GVHD prophylaxis may develop painful oral ulcerations, which can be effectively managed with topical steroid treatment. Further prospective studies are needed to better elucidate the incidence of this complication, identify risk factors, and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions.

  9. A treadmill exercise reactivates the signaling of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) in the skeletal muscles of starved mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong-Mei; Bian, Zehua; Furuya, Norihiko; Oliva Trejo, Juan Alejandro; Takeda-Ezaki, Mitsue; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Hiraoka, Yuka; Mineki, Reiko; Taka, Hikari; Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Komatsu, Masaaki; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Ueno, Takashi; Ezaki, Junji

    2015-01-02

    It has been well established that a starvation-induced decrease in insulin/IGF-I and serum amino acids effectively suppresses the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) signaling to induce autophagy, which is a major degradative cellular pathway in skeletal muscles. In this study, we investigated the systematic effects of exercise on the mTor signaling of skeletal muscles. Wild type C57BL/6J mice were starved for 24h under synchronous autophagy induction conditions. Under these conditions, endogenous LC3-II increased, while both S6-kinse and S6 ribosomal protein were dephosphorylated in the skeletal muscles, which indicated mTor inactivation. Using GFP-LC3 transgenic mice, it was also confirmed that fluorescent GFP-LC3 dots in the skeletal muscles increased, including soleus, plantaris, and gastrocnemius, which clearly showed autophagosomal induction. These starved mice were then subjected to a single bout of running on a treadmill (12m/min, 2h, with a lean of 10 degrees). Surprisingly, biochemical analyses revealed that the exercise elicited a decrease in the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio as well as an inversion from the dephosphorylated state to the rephosphorylated state of S6-kinase and ribosomal S6 in these skeletal muscles. Consistently, the GFP-LC3 dots of the skeletal muscles were diminished immediately after the exercise. These results indicated that exercise suppressed starvation-induced autophagy through a reactivation of mTor signaling in the skeletal muscles of these starved mice.

  10. Mutagenicity studies on coffee. The influence of different factors on the mutagenic activity in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome assay.

    PubMed

    Friederich, U; Hann, D; Albertini, S; Schlatter, C; Würgler, F E

    1985-01-01

    Recently, mutagenic activity on several strains of Salmonella typhimurium has been found in many heat-processed foodstuffs. The previously reported direct-acting mutagenic activity of coffee in Salmonella typhimurium TA100 (Ames assay) was confirmed in our study. In addition to TA100, a mutagenic effect of coffee was also found by using the newly developed strain TA102. The mutagenic activity was abolished by the addition of rat-liver homogenate. 10% S9 mix completely eliminated the mutagenic activity of 30 mg of coffee per plate. The addition of reduced glutathione to active S9 further decreased the mutagenic activity and also reduced the mutagenicity together with inactivated S9. The compound or compounds responsible for this inactivation are heat-labile and seem to be located in the cytosol fraction of the S9. Part of the mutagenicity of coffee was also lost spontaneously upon incubation at temperatures between 0 degrees and 50 degrees C. The loss of activity was dependent on temperature, being more pronounced at 50 degrees C compared to 0 degrees C (at 50 degrees C approximately 50% of the mutagenic activity was lost after 6 h). As anaerobic conditions prevented this loss of mutagenicity almost totally, oxidative processes are probably responsible for the inactivation. The stability of the mutagen was not influenced by incubation at low pH values (pH 1-3), with or without the addition of pepsinogen. The mutagenic properties of methylglyoxal, which to some extent could be responsible for the mutagenic activity of coffee, were compared with those of coffee. Methylglyoxal was strongly mutagenic towards Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and TA102. Its mutagenic activity was partially inactivated by the addition of 10% S9. Glyoxalase I and II together with reduced glutathione abolished the mutagenic activity of methylglyoxal but reduced the mutagenicity of coffee by only 80%. Since these enzymes occur in mammalian cells, the mutagenic compound(s) of coffee could also be

  11. Cholinergic modulation of activation sequence in the atrial myocardium of non-mammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Abramochkin, Denis V; Kuzmin, Vladislav S; Sukhova, Galina S; Rosenshtraukh, Leonid V

    2010-02-01

    Cholinergic changes of electric activity were studied in isolated atrium preparations from fishes (cod and carp), amphibians (frog) and reptilians (lizard) using the microelectrode technique and high-resolution optical mapping. Perfusion of isolated atrium with acetylcholine (10(-6)-5.10(-5) M) caused gradual suppression of action potential generation and, eventually, completely blocked the excitation in a part of the preparation. Other regions of atrium, situated close to the sinoatrial and atrioventricular junctions, remained excitable. Such cholinergic suppression of electric activity was observed in the atrial myocardium of frog and in both fish species, but not in reptilians. Ba(2+) (10(-4) M), which blocks the acetylcholine-dependent potassium current (I(KACh)), prevented cholinergic reduction of action potential amplitude. In several preparations of frog atrium, cholinergic suppression of excitation coincided with episodes of atrial fibrillation. We conclude that the phenomenon of cholinergic suppression of electric activity is typical for atria of fishes and amphibians. It is likely to be caused by I(KACh) activation and may be important for initiation of atrial arrhythmias.

  12. A New Functional Role for Mechanistic/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) in the Circadian Regulation of L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Avian Cone Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Ko, Michael Lee; Ko, Gladys Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities. PMID:23977383

  13. The Herbicide Atrazine Activates Endocrine Gene Networks via Non-Steroidal NR5A Nuclear Receptors in Fish and Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzawa, Miyuki; Ingraham, Holly A.

    2008-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) remains a widely used broadleaf herbicide in the United States despite the fact that this s-chlorotriazine has been linked to reproductive abnormalities in fish and amphibians. Here, using zebrafish we report that environmentally relevant ATR concentrations elevated zcyp19a1 expression encoding aromatase (2.2 µg/L), and increased the ratio of female to male fish (22 µg/L). ATR selectively increased zcyp19a1, a known gene target of the nuclear receptor SF-1 (NR5A1), whereas zcyp19a2, which is estrogen responsive, remained unchanged. Remarkably, in mammalian cells ATR functions in a cell-specific manner to upregulate SF-1 targets and other genes critical for steroid synthesis and reproduction, including Cyp19A1, StAR, Cyp11A1, hCG, FSTL3, LHß, INHα, αGSU, and 11ß-HSD2. Our data appear to eliminate the possibility that ATR directly affects SF-1 DNA- or ligand-binding. Instead, we suggest that the stimulatory effects of ATR on the NR5A receptor subfamily (SF-1, LRH-1, and zff1d) are likely mediated by receptor phosphorylation, amplification of cAMP and PI3K signaling, and possibly an increase in the cAMP-responsive cellular kinase SGK-1, which is known to be upregulated in infertile women. Taken together, we propose that this pervasive and persistent environmental chemical alters hormone networks via convergence of NR5A activity and cAMP signaling, to potentially disrupt normal endocrine development and function in lower and higher vertebrates. PMID:18461179

  14. The herbicide atrazine activates endocrine gene networks via non-steroidal NR5A nuclear receptors in fish and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Suzawa, Miyuki; Ingraham, Holly A

    2008-05-07

    Atrazine (ATR) remains a widely used broadleaf herbicide in the United States despite the fact that this s-chlorotriazine has been linked to reproductive abnormalities in fish and amphibians. Here, using zebrafish we report that environmentally relevant ATR concentrations elevated zcyp19a1 expression encoding aromatase (2.2 microg/L), and increased the ratio of female to male fish (22 microg/L). ATR selectively increased zcyp19a1, a known gene target of the nuclear receptor SF-1 (NR5A1), whereas zcyp19a2, which is estrogen responsive, remained unchanged. Remarkably, in mammalian cells ATR functions in a cell-specific manner to upregulate SF-1 targets and other genes critical for steroid synthesis and reproduction, including Cyp19A1, StAR, Cyp11A1, hCG, FSTL3, LHss, INHalpha, alphaGSU, and 11ss-HSD2. Our data appear to eliminate the possibility that ATR directly affects SF-1 DNA- or ligand-binding. Instead, we suggest that the stimulatory effects of ATR on the NR5A receptor subfamily (SF-1, LRH-1, and zff1d) are likely mediated by receptor phosphorylation, amplification of cAMP and PI3K signaling, and possibly an increase in the cAMP-responsive cellular kinase SGK-1, which is known to be upregulated in infertile women. Taken together, we propose that this pervasive and persistent environmental chemical alters hormone networks via convergence of NR5A activity and cAMP signaling, to potentially disrupt normal endocrine development and function in lower and higher vertebrates.

  15. Mammalian peptide isomerase: platypus-type activity is present in mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jennifer M S; Chow, Stephanie J P; Crossett, Ben; Kuchel, Philip W

    2010-06-01

    Male platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) venom has a peptidyl aminoacyl L/D-isomerase (hereafter called peptide isomerase) that converts the second amino acid residue in from the N-terminus from the L- to the D-form, and vice versa. A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay has been developed to monitor the interconversion using synthetic hexapeptides derived from defensin-like peptide-2 (DLP-2) and DLP-4 as substrates. It was hypothesised that animals other than the platypus would have peptide isomerase with the same substrate specificity. Accordingly, eight mouse tissues were tested and heart was shown to have the activity. This is notable for being the first evidence of a peptide isomerase being present in a higher mammal and heralds finding the activity in man.

  16. Probable nature of higher-dimensional symmetries underlying mammalian grid-cell activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Alexander; Stemmler, Martin B; Herz, Andreas Vm

    2015-04-24

    Lattices abound in nature-from the crystal structure of minerals to the honey-comb organization of ommatidia in the compound eye of insects. These arrangements provide solutions for optimal packings, efficient resource distribution, and cryptographic protocols. Do lattices also play a role in how the brain represents information? We focus on higher-dimensional stimulus domains, with particular emphasis on neural representations of physical space, and derive which neuronal lattice codes maximize spatial resolution. For mammals navigating on a surface, we show that the hexagonal activity patterns of grid cells are optimal. For species that move freely in three dimensions, a face-centered cubic lattice is best. This prediction could be tested experimentally in flying bats, arboreal monkeys, or marine mammals. More generally, our theory suggests that the brain encodes higher-dimensional sensory or cognitive variables with populations of grid-cell-like neurons whose activity patterns exhibit lattice structures at multiple, nested scales.

  17. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background.

  18. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background. PMID:23630316

  19. Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase tissue-specific activities: evidence for baseline levels in mammalian tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M.; Griffin, G.D.; Walsh, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The tissue-specific activities of arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase benzo(a)pyrene (AHH(BaP)) in human, mouse, rat, and hamster tissues have been reviewed. Three categories of AHH activities are defined: baseline values from tissues that have been protected from adventitious exposures to AHH inducers; background levels from tissues where there have been no overt measures to protect against exposure; and induced levels resulting from overt exposure to chemical inducers. Evidence that the baseline category exists is derived from the observations that an upper limit of AHH tissue-specific activity of about 1.5 nmol/h x g tissue occurs in human placenta, human foreskin, lymphocyte, and epitheliod and fibroblastoid cell lines; mouse lung and liver; rat fetal liver, and noninducible rat cell lines from lung, liver, embryo kidney, and adrenals; and hamster kidney. The collected values for nonexposed tissues range from 0.02 nmol/h x g to values less than 1.5 nmol/h x g. The most consistent observation of this type was from human placental material from nonsmoking mothers. Animals raised under standard laboratory conditions without special dietary precautions show background AHH activities that range from 2 nmol/h x g to 200 nmol/h x g in portal of entry tissues such as liver, lung, and intestines. Almost all tissue samples showed induced AHH levels of up to 500 nmol/h x g when those tissues were overtly exposed to substances containing chemical inducers of AHH. Measurements of placental AHH from smoking mothers showed that more than 95% of those samples had AHH values exceeding 2.5 nmol/h x g.

  20. Drosophila pico and its mammalian ortholog lamellipodin activate serum response factor and promote cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lyulcheva, Ekaterina; Taylor, Eleanor; Michael, Magdalene; Vehlow, Anne; Tan, Shengjiang; Fletcher, Adam; Krause, Matthias; Bennett, Daimark

    2008-11-01

    MIG-10/RIAM/lamellipodin (MRL) proteins link activated Ras-GTPases with actin regulatory Ena/VASP proteins to induce local changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and cell motility. MRL proteins alter monomeric (G):filamentous (F) actin ratios, but the impact of these changes had not been fully appreciated. We report here that the Drosophila MRL ortholog, pico, is required for tissue and organismal growth. Reduction in pico levels resulted in reduced cell division rates, growth retardation, increased G:F actin ratios and lethality. Conversely, pico overexpression reduced G:F actin ratios and promoted tissue overgrowth in an epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner. Consistently, in HeLa cells, lamellipodin was required for EGF-induced proliferation. We show that pico and lamellipodin share the ability to activate serum response factor (SRF), a transcription factor that responds to reduced G:F-actin ratios via its co-factor Mal. Genetics data indicate that mal/SRF levels are important for pico-mediated tissue growth. We propose that MRL proteins link EGFR activation to mitogenic SRF signaling via changes in actin dynamics.

  1. Quantitation of Na+, K+-atpase Enzymatic Activity in Tissues of the Mammalian Vestibular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, T. P.

    1985-01-01

    In order to quantify vestibular Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, a microassay technique was developed which is sufficiently sensitive to measure the enzymatic activity in tissue from a single animal. The assay was used to characterize ATPase in he vestibular apparatus of the Mongolian gerbil. The quantitative procedure employs NPP (5 mM) as synthetic enzyme substrate. The assay relies upon spectrophotometric measurement (410 nm) of nitrophenol (NP) released by enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate. Product formation in the absence of ouabain reflects both specific (Na(+), K(+)-ATPase) and non-specific (Mg(++)-ATPase) enzymatic activity. By measuring the accumulation of reaction product (NP) at three-minute intervals during the course of incubation, it is found that the overall enzymatic reaction proceeds linearly for at least 45 minutes. It is therefore possible to determine two separate reaction rates from a single set of tissues. Initial results indicate that total activity amounts to 53.3 + or - 11.2 (S.E.M.) nmol/hr/mg dry tissue, of which approximately 20% is ouabain-sensitive.

  2. African Swine Fever Virus IAP Homologue Inhibits Caspase Activation and Promotes Cell Survival in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nogal, María L.; González de Buitrago, Gonzalo; Rodríguez, Clara; Cubelos, Beatriz; Carrascosa, Angel L.; Salas, María L.; Revilla, Yolanda

    2001-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) A224L is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family. We have investigated the antiapoptotic function of the viral IAP both in stably transfected cells and in ASFV-infected cells. A224L was able to substantially inhibit caspase activity and cell death induced by treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha and cycloheximide or staurosporine when overexpressed in Vero cells by gene transfection. We have also observed that ASFV infection induces caspase activation and apoptosis in Vero cells. Furthermore, using a deletion mutant of ASFV lacking the A224L gene, we have shown that the viral IAP modulates the proteolytic processing of the effector cell death protease caspase-3 and the apoptosis which are induced in the infected cells. Our findings indicate that A224L interacts with the proteolytic fragment of caspase-3 and inhibits the activity of this protease during ASFV infection. These observations could indicate a conserved mechanism of action for ASFV IAP and other IAP family members to suppress apoptosis. PMID:11222676

  3. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity measurement of mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Lib, Margarita; Rodriguez-Mari, Adriana; Marusich, Michael F; Capaldi, Roderick A

    2003-03-01

    Altered pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) functioning occurs in primary PDH deficiencies and in diabetes, starvation, sepsis, and possibly Alzheimer's disease. Currently, the activity of the enzyme complex is difficult to measure in a rapid high-throughput format. Here we describe the use of a monoclonal antibody raised against the E2 subunit to immunocapture the intact PDH complex still active when bound to 96-well plates. Enzyme turnover was measured by following NADH production spectrophotometrically or by a fluorescence assay on mitochondrial protein preparations in the range of 0.4 to 5.0 micro g per well. Activity is sensitive to known PDH inhibitors and remains regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation after immunopurification because of the presence of bound PDH kinase(s) and phosphatase(s). It is shown that the immunocapture assay can be used to detect PDH deficiency in cell extracts of cultured fibroblasts from patients, making it useful in patient screens, as well as in the high-throughput format for discovery of new modulators of PDH functioning.

  4. Structural characterization and anti-aging activity of a novel extracellular polysaccharide from fungus Phellinus sp. in a mammalian system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Kui; Guo, Dan Dan; Peterson, Eric Charles; Dun, Ying; Li, Dan Yang

    2016-08-10

    Little is known about the chemical structure of purified extracellular polysaccharides from Phellinus sp., a fungal species with known medicinal properties. A combination of IR spectroscopy, methylation analysis and NMR were performed for the structural analysis of a purified extracellular polysaccharide derived from Phellinus sp. culture, denoted as SHP-1, along with an evaluation of the anti-aging effect in vivo of the polysaccharide supplementation. The structure of SHP-1 was established, with a backbone composed of →2,4)-α-d-glucopyranose-(1→ and →2)-β-d-mannopyranose-(1→ and two terminal glucopyranose branches. Biochemical analysis from mammalian animal experiments demonstrated that SHP-1 possesses the ability to enhance antioxidant enzyme activities, such as catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) in serum of d-galactose-aged mice, while reducing lipofuscin levels, another indicator of cell aging, indicating a potential association with anti-aging activities in a dose dependent manner. This compound had a favourable influence on immune organ indices, and a marked amelioration ability of histopathological hepatic lesions such as necrosis, karyolysis and reduced inflammation and apoptosis in mouse hepatocytes. These results suggest that SHP-1 has strong antioxidant activities and a significant protective effect against oxidative stress or hepatotoxicity induced by d-galactose in mice and it could be developed as a food ingredient or a pharmaceutical to prevent many age-associated diseases such as major depressive disorder and hepatotoxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the antioxidant effects of a novel purified exopolysaccharide derived from Phellinus sp.

  5. Body size and activity times mediate mammalian responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    McCain, Christy M; King, Sarah R B

    2014-06-01

    Model predictions of extinction risks from anthropogenic climate change are dire, but still overly simplistic. To reliably predict at-risk species we need to know which species are currently responding, which are not, and what traits are mediating the responses. For mammals, we have yet to identify overarching physiological, behavioral, or biogeographic traits determining species' responses to climate change, but they must exist. To date, 73 mammal species in North America and eight additional species worldwide have been assessed for responses to climate change, including local extirpations, range contractions and shifts, decreased abundance, phenological shifts, morphological or genetic changes. Only 52% of those species have responded as expected, 7% responded opposite to expectations, and the remaining 41% have not responded. Which mammals are and are not responding to climate change is mediated predominantly by body size and activity times (phylogenetic multivariate logistic regressions, P < 0.0001). Large mammals respond more, for example, an elk is 27 times more likely to respond to climate change than a shrew. Obligate diurnal and nocturnal mammals are more than twice as likely to respond as mammals with flexible activity times (P < 0.0001). Among the other traits examined, species with higher latitudinal and elevational ranges were more likely to respond to climate change in some analyses, whereas hibernation, heterothermy, burrowing, nesting, and study location did not influence responses. These results indicate that some mammal species can behaviorally escape climate change whereas others cannot, analogous to paleontology's climate sheltering hypothesis. Including body size and activity flexibility traits into future extinction risk forecasts should substantially improve their predictive utility for conservation and management.

  6. Targeting glutamine metabolism and the focal adhesion kinase additively inhibits the mammalian target of the rapamycin pathway in spheroid cancer stem-like properties of ovarian clear cell carcinoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masakazu; Kawana, Kei; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Fujimoto, Asaha; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Nakamura, Hiroe; Nishida, Haruka; Inoue, Tomoko; Taguchi, Ayumi; Ogishima, Juri; Eguchi, Satoko; Yamashita, Aki; Tomio, Kensuke; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2017-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the world, which is linked to its resistance to chemotherapy. Strategies to overcome chemoresistance have been keenly investigated. Culturing cancer cells in suspension, which results in formation of spheroids, is a more accurate reflection of clinical cancer behavior in vitro than conventional adherent cultures. By performing RNA-seq analysis, we found that the focal adhesion pathway was essential in spheroids. The phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was increased in spheroids compared to adherent cells, and inhibition of FAK in spheroids resulted in inhibition of the downstream mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in ovarian clear cell carcinomas. This result also suggested that only using a FAK inhibitor might have limitations because the phosphorylation level of FAK could not be reduced to the level in adherent cells, and it appeared that some combination therapies might be necessary. We previously reported that glutamine and glutamate concentrations were higher in spheroids than adherent cells, and we investigated a synergistic effect targeting glutamine metabolism with FAK inhibition on the mTOR pathway. The combination of AOA, a pan-transaminase inhibitor, and PF 573228, a FAK inhibitor, additively inhibited the mTOR pathway in spheroids from ovarian clear cell carcinomas. Our in vitro study proposed a rationale for the positive and negative effects of using FAK inhibitors in ovarian clear cell carcinomas and suggested that targeting glutamine metabolism could overcome the limitation of FAK inhibitors by additively inhibiting the mTOR pathway.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K-Akt-mTOR) signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a devastating disease with poor prognosis. Systemic chemotherapy has been the mainstay of treatment in advanced disease for many decades. Personalized targeted therapy such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR TKIs) and crizotinib has significantly changed the treatment paradigm in NSCLC. The future success of development of molecular targeted therapy relies on the understanding of signal transduction pathways. The PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway is commonly deregulated in human malignancy including NSCLC. Therefore, this pathway is a target for many therapeutic developments. This review will provide an overview of PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway, genetic alterations activating the pathway and clinical therapeutic development of pathway inhibitors. PMID:25870799

  8. Developments of thick solid neon as an active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiguchi, Nagaaki; Moriguchi, Tetsurou; Ozawa, Akira; Isimoto, Sigeru

    2009-10-01

    One of research subjects in our group is to measure reaction cross sections (σR) of RI beams. By measuring σR, we can deduce root mean square radii of unstable nuclei. In the measurements of σR, we usually used a carbon as the reaction targets (a few cm thickness). If we use the reaction target as a detector (active target), there are some advantages in the measurements; (1)The events only colliding with the reaction target can be selected. (2)If position information is available, we may define the colliding point inside the target. (3)If energy information is available, we may measure the energy loss of the beams inside the target. As the active target in the σR measurements, we noticed the solid neon. Since the neon is a noble gas, it is predicted to emit scintillations and work as an ionization chamber for charged particles. Indeed, scintillations from liquid and solid neon have been already observed. We will present production of the thick solid neon (˜30mm thickness), and observations of scintillations and ionization signals from the solid neon. We will also discuss possibility to use the sold neon as the active target in the σR measurements.

  9. Satellite glial cells in situ within mammalian prevertebral ganglia express K+ channels active at rest potential.

    PubMed

    Gola, M; Niel, J P; Delmas, P; Jacquet, G

    1993-10-01

    Patch-clamp experiments were performed on satellite glial cells wrapped around sympathetic neurons in the rabbit coeliac ganglion. With the cleaning method used, the glial cells could be kept in place and were directly accessible to the patch-clamp pipettes. Whole-cell recordings showed that glial cells had almost ohmic properties. Their resting potential (-79.1 +/- 1.2 mV) was found to be very nearly the same as the K+ reversal potential and approximately 20 mV more negative than that of the neurons they encapsulated. Unitary currents from ionic channels present in the glial membrane were recorded in the cell-attached configuration with pipettes filled with various amounts of K+, Na+ and gluconate. Only K(+)-selective channels with slight inwardly rectifying properties (in the presence of 150 mM [K+]o) were detected. These channels were active (Po = 0.7-0.8) at the cell resting potential. The channel conductance, but not its opening probability, was dependent on the [K+] in the pipette. Cl(-)-selective channels (outwardly rectifying and large conductance channels) were detected in excised patches. The properties of the K+ channels (increased inward current with [K+] and detectable outward current at low [K+]) are well suited for siphoning the K+ released by active neurons.

  10. Probable nature of higher-dimensional symmetries underlying mammalian grid-cell activity patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Alexander; Stemmler, Martin B; Herz, Andreas VM

    2015-01-01

    Lattices abound in nature—from the crystal structure of minerals to the honey-comb organization of ommatidia in the compound eye of insects. These arrangements provide solutions for optimal packings, efficient resource distribution, and cryptographic protocols. Do lattices also play a role in how the brain represents information? We focus on higher-dimensional stimulus domains, with particular emphasis on neural representations of physical space, and derive which neuronal lattice codes maximize spatial resolution. For mammals navigating on a surface, we show that the hexagonal activity patterns of grid cells are optimal. For species that move freely in three dimensions, a face-centered cubic lattice is best. This prediction could be tested experimentally in flying bats, arboreal monkeys, or marine mammals. More generally, our theory suggests that the brain encodes higher-dimensional sensory or cognitive variables with populations of grid-cell-like neurons whose activity patterns exhibit lattice structures at multiple, nested scales. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05979.001 PMID:25910055

  11. Cesium blockade of delayed outward currents and electrically induced pacemaker activity in mammalian ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Meier, C F; Katzung, B G

    1981-05-01

    The effects of Cs+, 5-25 mM, were studied in cat and guinea pig papillary muscles using voltage clamp and current clamp techniques. In solutions containing normal K+, the major effects of Cs+ were depolarization of the resting potential and reduction of the delayed outward current (ixl) between -80 and -20 mV. Both inward and outward portions of the isochronal current voltage relation (l-s clamps) were reduced by extracellular Cs+. This resulted in a substantial reduction of inward rectification and, by subtraction from the normal I-V relationship, the definition of a Cs+-sensitive component of current. Under current clamp conditions, 5-10 mM Cs+ produced a dose-dependent slowing of repetitive firing induced by depolarization. At higher concentrations (25 mM) the resting potential was depolarized and repetitive activity could not be induced by further depolarization. However, release of hyperpolarizing pulses was followed by prolonged bursts of repetitive action potentials, suggesting partial reversal of blockade or participation of another pacemaker process. The experimental results and a numerical simulation show that under readily attainable conditions, reduction in an outward pacemaker current may slow pacemaker activity.

  12. The effect of diet on the mammalian gut flora and its metabolic activities.

    PubMed

    Rowland, I R; Mallett, A K; Wise, A

    1985-01-01

    The review will encompass the following points: A brief introduction to the role of the gut flora in the toxicology of ingested food components, contaminants, and additives, including known pathways of activation and detoxication of foreign compounds and the implication of the flora in enterohepatic circulation of xenobiotics. The advantages and disadvantages of the various methods of studying the gut flora (classical bacteriological techniques, metabolic and enzymological methods) will be critically discussed with special reference to their relevance to dietary, toxicological, and biochemical studies. Sources of nutrients available to the gut flora will be described including host products (mucus, sloughed mucosal cells, hormones, proteins) and exogenous nutrients derived from diet. An account of the problems involved in studies of dietary modification with special reference to the use of stock laboratory animal diets, purified diets, and human dietary studies. The influence of dietary modification on the flora will be assessed on the basis of changes in numbers and types of bacteria and their metabolic activity, drawing on data from human and animal studies. The effects of manipulation of the quantity and quality of protein, fat, and indigestible residues (fiber) of the diet will be described together with their possible implications for toxicity of ingested compounds.

  13. Pouterin, a novel potential cytotoxic lectin-like protein with apoptosis-inducing activity in tumorigenic mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Boleti, Ana Paula de A; Ventura, Cláudio A; Justo, Giselle Z; Silva, Rodrigo A; de Sousa, Ana Carolina T; Ferreira, Carmen V; Yano, Tomomasa; Macedo, Maria Lígia R

    2008-06-15

    In this study, the cytotoxicity of pouterin in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mammalian cell lines was investigated. We found that HeLa, Hep-2 and HT-29 tumor cells were highly sensitive to pouterin cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas non-tumorigenic Vero cells and human lymphocytes were relatively resistant to the protein. Among the tumor cell lines, HeLa cells showed the highest susceptibility to pouterin cytotoxicity, exhibiting a time-dependent increase in LDH leakage and an IC(50) value of 5mug/mL. Morphological alterations such as rounding, cell shrinkage and chromatin condensation, consistent with apoptotic cell death were observed. Apoptosis induction was demonstrated by DNA fragmentation as detected by terminal dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). Furthermore, HeLa cells incubated with pouterin showed disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Western blot analysis revealed that pouterin caused increased expression of p21, thus indicating cell cycle arrest. Subsequent studies provided evidence that apoptosis may be partially explained in the activation of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling. Interestingly, a time-dependent decrease of the expression of p65 nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) subunit, concomitant with a downregulation of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (IAP1) was observed, suggesting that TNFR-mediated apoptosis is the predominant pathway induced by pouterin in HeLa cells.

  14. Nucleotide excision repair-dependent DNA double-strand break formation and ATM signaling activation in mammalian quiescent cells.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Mitsuo; Sasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Megumi; Nagaoka, Miyuki; Inoue, Keiko; Inobe, Manabu; Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Matsunaga, Tsukasa

    2014-10-10

    Histone H2A variant H2AX is phosphorylated at Ser(139) in response to DNA double-strand break (DSB) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formation. UV light dominantly induces pyrimidine photodimers, which are removed from the mammalian genome by nucleotide excision repair (NER). We previously reported that in quiescent G0 phase cells, UV induces ATR-mediated H2AX phosphorylation plausibly caused by persistent ssDNA gap intermediates during NER. In this study, we have found that DSB is also generated following UV irradiation in an NER-dependent manner and contributes to an earlier fraction of UV-induced H2AX phosphorylation. The NER-dependent DSB formation activates ATM kinase and triggers the accumulation of its downstream factors, MRE11, NBS1, and MDC1, at UV-damaged sites. Importantly, ATM-deficient cells exhibited enhanced UV sensitivity under quiescent conditions compared with asynchronously growing conditions. Finally, we show that the NER-dependent H2AX phosphorylation is also observed in murine peripheral T lymphocytes, typical nonproliferating quiescent cells in vivo. These results suggest that in vivo quiescent cells may suffer from NER-mediated secondary DNA damage including ssDNA and DSB.

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II CTD is associated with antisense promoter transcription and active enhancers in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Descostes, Nicolas; Heidemann, Martin; Spinelli, Lionel; Schüller, Roland; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Fenouil, Romain; Koch, Frederic; Innocenti, Charlène; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Eick, Dirk; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase (Pol) II consists of 52 conserved heptapeptide repeats containing the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7. Post-translational modifications of the CTD coordinate the transcription cycle and various steps of mRNA maturation. Here we describe Tyr1 phosphorylation (Tyr1P) as a hallmark of promoter (5′ associated) Pol II in mammalian cells, in contrast to what was described in yeast. Tyr1P is predominantly found in antisense orientation at promoters but is also specifically enriched at active enhancers. Mutation of Tyr1 to phenylalanine (Y1F) prevents the formation of the hyper-phosphorylated Pol IIO form, induces degradation of Pol II to the truncated Pol IIB form, and results in a lethal phenotype. Our results suggest that Tyr1P has evolved specialized and essential functions in higher eukaryotes associated with antisense promoter and enhancer transcription, and Pol II stability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02105.001 PMID:24842994

  16. Chd7 is indispensable for mammalian brain development through activation of a neuronal differentiation programme

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Weijun; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Körkel-Qu, Huiqin; Deng, Huan; Serger, Elisabeth; Sieber, Laura; Lieberman, Jenna Ariel; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Lambo, Sander; Hanna, Bola S.; Harim, Yassin; Jansen, Malin; Neuerburg, Anna; Friesen, Olga; Zuckermann, Marc; Rajendran, Vijayanad; Gronych, Jan; Ayrault, Olivier; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T. W.; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Lichter, Peter; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Pfister, Stefan M.; Liu, Hai-Kun

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in chromatin modifier genes are frequently associated with neurodevelopmental diseases. We herein demonstrate that the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (Chd7), frequently associated with CHARGE syndrome, is indispensable for normal cerebellar development. Genetic inactivation of Chd7 in cerebellar granule neuron progenitors leads to cerebellar hypoplasia in mice, due to the impairment of granule neuron differentiation, induction of apoptosis and abnormal localization of Purkinje cells, which closely recapitulates known clinical features in the cerebella of CHARGE patients. Combinatory molecular analyses reveal that Chd7 is required for the maintenance of open chromatin and thus activation of genes essential for granule neuron differentiation. We further demonstrate that both Chd7 and Top2b are necessary for the transcription of a set of long neuronal genes in cerebellar granule neurons. Altogether, our comprehensive analyses reveal a mechanism with chromatin remodellers governing brain development via controlling a core transcriptional programme for cell-specific differentiation. PMID:28317875

  17. Chd7 is indispensable for mammalian brain development through activation of a neuronal differentiation programme.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weijun; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Körkel-Qu, Huiqin; Deng, Huan; Serger, Elisabeth; Sieber, Laura; Lieberman, Jenna Ariel; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Lambo, Sander; Hanna, Bola S; Harim, Yassin; Jansen, Malin; Neuerburg, Anna; Friesen, Olga; Zuckermann, Marc; Rajendran, Vijayanad; Gronych, Jan; Ayrault, Olivier; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A; Lichter, Peter; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Pfister, Stefan M; Liu, Hai-Kun

    2017-03-20

    Mutations in chromatin modifier genes are frequently associated with neurodevelopmental diseases. We herein demonstrate that the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (Chd7), frequently associated with CHARGE syndrome, is indispensable for normal cerebellar development. Genetic inactivation of Chd7 in cerebellar granule neuron progenitors leads to cerebellar hypoplasia in mice, due to the impairment of granule neuron differentiation, induction of apoptosis and abnormal localization of Purkinje cells, which closely recapitulates known clinical features in the cerebella of CHARGE patients. Combinatory molecular analyses reveal that Chd7 is required for the maintenance of open chromatin and thus activation of genes essential for granule neuron differentiation. We further demonstrate that both Chd7 and Top2b are necessary for the transcription of a set of long neuronal genes in cerebellar granule neurons. Altogether, our comprehensive analyses reveal a mechanism with chromatin remodellers governing brain development via controlling a core transcriptional programme for cell-specific differentiation.

  18. Characteristics of GABA-activated chloride channels in mammalian dorsal root ganglion neurones.

    PubMed

    Robertson, B

    1989-04-01

    1. The properties of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated chloride channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones obtained from rats and cats were examined using the single-electrode voltage clamp in conjunction with suction-electrode techniques. 2. GABA-evoked currents showed voltage-sensitive kinetics. Time constants (tau D) were measured from voltage-jump relaxations and tau D became briefer with membrane hyperpolarization. tau D was 33 ms at -120 mV with 60 microM-GABA and changed e-fold for 188 mV. tau D decreased as GABA concentration was increased - the extrapolated tau D at 'zero' GABA concentration was approximately equal to 50 ms at -120 mV. 3. The steady-state current in GABA was curvilinear, rectifying at negative potentials. The instantaneous current was linear with symmetrical chloride concentrations (140 mM) on both sides of the cell membrane. 4. Muscimol was a more effective agonist than GABA, while piperidine-4-sulphonic acid and ethylenediamine monocarbamate were only weakly effective agonists. Taurine and glycine had no detectable agonist activity. 5. Ion substitution experiments revealed the permeability sequence I- greater than Br- greater than Cl- greater than F- greater than propionate (1.88 greater than 1.21 greater than 1.0 approximately equal to 0.1 approximately equal to 0.1). 6. The presence of iodide and bromide ions externally caused an increase in chloride efflux at membrane potentials more negative than -40 mV, and caused a prolongation of voltage-jump relaxations. Relaxations in fluoride and propionate solutions were faster than those seen in chloride.

  19. Activation of Presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) Receptors Inhibits Synaptic Transmission at Mammalian Inhibitory Cholinergic Olivocochlear–Hair Cell Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wedemeyer, Carolina; Zorrilla de San Martín, Javier; Ballestero, Jimena; Gómez-Casati, María Eugenia; Torbidoni, Ana Vanesa; Fuchs, Paul A.; Bettler, Bernhard; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    The synapse between olivocochlear (OC) neurons and cochlear mechanosensory hair cells is cholinergic, fast, and inhibitory. The inhibitory sign of this cholinergic synapse is accounted for by the activation of Ca2+-permeable postsynaptic α9α10 nicotinic receptors coupled to the opening of hyperpolarizing Ca2+-activated small-conductance type 2 (SK2)K+ channels. Acetylcholine (ACh) release at this synapse is supported by both P/Q- and N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Although the OC synapse is cholinergic, an abundant OC GABA innervation is present along the mammalian cochlea. The role of this neurotransmitter at the OC efferent innervation, however, is for the most part unknown. We show that GABA fails to evoke fast postsynaptic inhibitory currents in apical developing inner and outer hair cells. However, electrical stimulation of OC efferent fibers activates presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) receptors [GABAB(1a,2)Rs] that downregulate the amount of ACh released at the OC–hair cell synapse, by inhibiting P/Q-type VGCCs. We confirmed the expression of GABABRs at OC terminals contacting the hair cells by coimmunostaining for GFP and synaptophysin in transgenic mice expressing GABAB1–GFP fusion proteins. Moreover, coimmunostaining with antibodies against the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and synaptophysin support the idea that GABA is directly synthesized at OC terminals contacting the hair cells during development. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time a physiological role for GABA in cochlear synaptic function. In addition, our data suggest that the GABAB1a isoform selectively inhibits release at efferent cholinergic synapses. PMID:24068816

  20. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening

  1. Tobramycin variants with enhanced ribosome-targeting activity

    PubMed Central

    Fosso, Marina Y.; Zhu, Hongkun; Green, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    With the increased evolution of aminoglycoside (AG)-resistant bacterial strains, the need to develop AGs with (i) enhanced antimicrobial activity, (ii) the ability to evade resistance mechanisms, and (iii) the capability of targeting the ribosome with higher efficiency, is more and more pressing. The chemical derivatization of the naturally occurring tobramycin (TOB) by attachment of 37 different thioethers groups at the 6″-position led to the identification of generally poorer substrates of TOB-targeting AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Thirteen of these displayed better antibacterial activity than the parental TOB while retaining ribosome-targeting specificity. Analysis of these compounds in vitro shed light on the mechanism by which they act and revealed three with clearly enhanced ribosome-targeting activity. PMID:26033429

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  3. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well. PMID:20936127

  4. The oxygen consumption of mammalian non-myelinated nerve fibres at rest and during activity

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, J. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the oxygen consumption of non-myelinated nerve fibres of rabbit desheathed cervical vagus nerves at rest and during activity. 2. The average resting oxygen consumption (Qr) was 0·0924 μmole/g. min at 21° C. Stimulation for 1-3 min at 3/sec caused an extra oxygen consumption (Qs) of 816 p-mole/g.shock. 3. When the frequency of stimulation was increased, to 10/sec and 30/sec, Qs fell. When the frequency was decreased, to 1/sec and 0·3/sec, Qs increased slightly. 4. When the temperature was decreased, Qr fell; when the temperature was increased, Qs also increased. Temperature similarly affected Qs with high frequencies of stimulation, but had relatively little effect on Qs at low frequencies of stimulation. 5. An isolated single shock seemed to produce an increase in oxygen consumption of about 1200 p-mole/g, and this value was largely independent of temperature. 6. When part of the sodium in the Locke solution was replaced by barium, Qr decreased (by 12%) whereas Qs increased (by 87%). 7. Veratrine (1 μg/ml.) increased both Qr (by 142%) and Qs (by 361%). 8. Acetylcholine (1·7 mM) increased Qr (by 32%). 9. When nerves were transferred to potassium-free solutions there was little change in Qr, and Qs fell slightly (by 8%). 10. When the potassium concentration in the Locke solution was increased 4-fold, Qr increased (by 27%). 11. Salicylate (1-10 mM) increased Qr (by 24%) and abolished Qs. 12. When the sodium of Locke solution was replaced by lithium, Qr decreased (by 19%) and Qs was abolished. 13. In sodium-Locke solution ouabain (100 μM) decreased Qr (by 26%) and abolished Qs. In lithium-Locke solution ouabain also decreased Qr (by 28%). 14. All or nearly all of the oxygen consumed at rest or during activity seemed to be used to pump potassium ions into, and sodium ions out of, the axoplasm. 15. The K/O2 ratio during pumping was about 5·0. PMID:6032203

  5. Activated air produced by shielded sliding discharge plasma mediates plasmid DNA delivery to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Heller, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Cold plasma is emerging as a potential method for medical applications. The current study assessed the efficacy of a novel cold plasma reactor based on shielded sliding discharge producing cathode-directed streamers generated in ambient air for the delivery of plasmid DNA. Experiments were performed with mouse melanoma cells (B16F10) and human keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) inoculated with plasmid DNA encoding luciferase. Quantitative results measured over a 72-h period displayed luciferase expression levels as high as 5-fold greater in cells exposed to plasma-activated air (PAA) than levels obtained from the inoculation of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). No effect on cell viability was observed. Delivery of plasmid encoding GFP to HaCaT cells seeded on polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds was confirmed by immunostaining. The use of cold plasma for DNA delivery is attractive as it provides a non-viral, non-invasive method where the electrode or the plasma itself never directly contacts the exposed site. The current device design provides localized DNA transfer using a novel technology. Our report suggests PAA warrants further exploration as an alternative or supplemental approach for DNA transfer.

  6. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic activities in live mammalian hippocampal tissues with stimulated Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fanghao; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Wei, Lu; Morrison, Barclay; Min, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Brain is an immensely complex system displaying dynamic and heterogeneous metabolic activities. Visualizing cellular metabolism of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids in brain with chemical specificity has been a long-standing challenge. Recent development in metabolic labeling of small biomolecules allows the study of these metabolisms at the global level. However, these techniques generally require nonphysiological sample preparation for either destructive mass spectrometry imaging or secondary labeling with relatively bulky fluorescent labels. In this study, we have demonstrated bioorthogonal chemical imaging of DNA, RNA, protein and lipid metabolism in live rat brain hippocampal tissues by coupling stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with integrated deuterium and alkyne labeling. Heterogeneous metabolic incorporations for different molecular species and neurogenesis with newly-incorporated DNA were observed in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus at the single cell level. We further applied this platform to study metabolic responses to traumatic brain injury in hippocampal slice cultures, and observed marked upregulation of protein and lipid metabolism particularly in the hilus region of the hippocampus within days of mechanical injury. Thus, our method paves the way for the study of complex metabolic profiles in live brain tissue under both physiological and pathological conditions with single-cell resolution and minimal perturbation. PMID:28000773

  7. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic activities in live mammalian hippocampal tissues with stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fanghao; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Wei, Lu; Morrison, Barclay; Min, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Brain is an immensely complex system displaying dynamic and heterogeneous metabolic activities. Visualizing cellular metabolism of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids in brain with chemical specificity has been a long-standing challenge. Recent development in metabolic labeling of small biomolecules allows the study of these metabolisms at the global level. However, these techniques generally require nonphysiological sample preparation for either destructive mass spectrometry imaging or secondary labeling with relatively bulky fluorescent labels. In this study, we have demonstrated bioorthogonal chemical imaging of DNA, RNA, protein and lipid metabolism in live rat brain hippocampal tissues by coupling stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with integrated deuterium and alkyne labeling. Heterogeneous metabolic incorporations for different molecular species and neurogenesis with newly-incorporated DNA were observed in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus at the single cell level. We further applied this platform to study metabolic responses to traumatic brain injury in hippocampal slice cultures, and observed marked upregulation of protein and lipid metabolism particularly in the hilus region of the hippocampus within days of mechanical injury. Thus, our method paves the way for the study of complex metabolic profiles in live brain tissue under both physiological and pathological conditions with single-cell resolution and minimal perturbation.

  8. Cholecystokinin activation of central satiety centers changes seasonally in a mammalian hibernator.

    PubMed

    Otis, Jessica P; Raybould, Helen E; Carey, Hannah V

    2011-05-01

    Hibernators that rely on lipids during winter exhibit profound changes in food intake over the annual cycle. The mechanisms that regulate appetite changes in seasonal hibernators remain unclear, but likely consist of complex interactions between gut hormones, adipokines, and central processing centers. We hypothesized that seasonal changes in the sensitivity of neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) to the gut hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) may contribute to appetite regulation in ground squirrels. Spring (SPR), late summer (SUM), and winter euthermic hibernating (HIB) 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) were treated with intraperitoneal CCK (100 μg/kg) or vehicle (CON) for 3h and Fos expression in the NTS was quantified. In CON squirrels, numbers of Fos-positive neurons in HIB were low compared to SPR and SUM. CCK treatment increased Fos-positive neurons in the NTS at the levels of the area postrema (AP) and pre AP during all seasons and at the level of the rostral AP in HIB squirrels. The highest absolute levels of Fos-positive neurons were found in SPR CCK squirrels, but the highest relative increase from CON was found in HIB CCK squirrels. Fold-changes in Fos-positive neurons in SUM were intermediate between SPR and HIB. Thus, CCK sensitivity falls from SPR to SUM suggesting that seasonal changes in sensitivity of NTS neurons to vagally-derived CCK may influence appetite in the active phase of the annual cycle in hibernating squirrels. Enhanced sensitivity to CCK signaling in NTS neurons of hibernators indicates that changes in gut-brain signaling may contribute to seasonal changes in food intake during the annual cycle.

  9. DTG and (+)-3-PPP inhibit a ligand-activated hyperpolarization in mammalian neurons.

    PubMed

    Bobker, D H; Shen, K Z; Surprenant, A; Williams, J T

    1989-12-01

    The effects of three compounds with high affinity for the haloperidol-sensitive alpha-binding site were studied with intracellular recordings in the vitro neuronal preparations of the rat locus ceruleus, rat dorsal raphe and the guinea pig submucous plexus. Both (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine [(+)-3-PPP] and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) inhibited the hyperpolarization induced by a ligand-activated potassium conductance. In the locus ceruleus, (+)-3-PPP and DTG produced a maximal 40 to 45% inhibition of the [Met5]enkephalin hyperpolarization, and had EC50 values of 6.6 and 2.2 microM, respectively. In the submucous plexus, the two compounds had a similar action on the alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist UK14304 hyperpolarization, producing a maximal 50% inhibition with EC50 values of 140 and 32 nM, respectively. In addition, DTG inhibited the alpha-2-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potential in both preparations. In contrast, (+)-3-PPP increased and prolonged the inhibitory postsynaptic potential. This action is qualitatively similar to the actions of cocaine on locus ceruleus and submucous plexus neurons. Haloperidol (1-10 microM) shared none of these actions. It is concluded that DTG and (+)-3-PPP are inhibitors of the opiate and alpha-2-mediated hyperpolarization at a postreceptor site, possibly the potassium channel. In addition, (+)-3-PPP, but not DTG, inhibits norepinephrine reuptake. None of these effects appear to be related to the sigma -binding site, because haloperidol acted as neither an agonist nor an antagonist.

  10. Selenite-induced variation in glutathione peroxidase activity of three mammalian cell lines: no effect on radiation-induced cell killing or DNA strand breakage

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, B.E.C.; Carlsson, J.; Marklund, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    The selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activities of three mammalian cell lines, HT29, P31, and N-18, cultured in medium with low serum content, increased about 2-, 5-, and 40-fold, respectively, after supplementation with 100 nM selenite. Catalase, CuZn superoxide dismutase, and Mn superoxide dismutase activities were not generally influenced by selenite supplementation, and there was only a minor nonselenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity in the investigated cell lines. Gamma-irradiated control and selenite-supplemented cells showed no changes in the surviving fractions, as estimated by clonogenic survival or (/sup 3/H)-thymidine uptake, nor were there any significant differences between the two groups in the induction of DNA strand breaks after gamma irradiation under repairing (37 degrees C) or nonrepairing (0 degrees C) conditions. The results suggest that selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase does not contribute significantly to the radiation resistance of cultured mammalian cells.

  11. Effect of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone on the activity and stability of alpha-amylase: a comparative study on bacterial, fungal, and mammalian enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kashani-Amin, Elaheh; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Larijani, Bagher; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2015-10-01

    Neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) was recently introduced as an activator of mammalian alpha-amylase. In the current study, the effect of NHDC has been investigated on bacterial and fungal alpha-amylases. Enzyme assays and kinetic analysis demonstrated the capability of NHDC to significantly activate both tested alpha-amylases. The ligand activation pattern was found to be more similar between the fungal and mammalian enzyme in comparison with the bacterial one. Further, thermostability experiments indicated a stability increase in the presence of NHDC for the bacterial enzyme. In silico (docking) test locates a putative binding site for NHDC on alpha-amylase surface in domain B. This domain shows differences in various alpha-amylase types, and the different behavior of the ligand toward the studied enzymes may be attributed to this fact.

  12. Presynaptic Localization and Possible Function of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Anoctamin 1 in the Mammalian Retina

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Myung-Hoon; Oh, Uhtaek; Kim, In-Beom

    2013-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+)-activated chloride (Cl−) channels (CaCCs) play a role in the modulation of action potentials and synaptic responses in the somatodendritic regions of central neurons. In the vertebrate retina, large Ca2+-activated Cl− currents (ICl(Ca)) regulate synaptic transmission at photoreceptor terminals; however, the molecular identity of CaCCs that mediate ICl(Ca) remains unclear. The transmembrane protein, TMEM16A, also called anoctamin 1 (ANO1), has been recently validated as a CaCC and is widely expressed in various secretory epithelia and nervous tissues. Despite the fact that tmem16a was first cloned in the retina, there is little information on its cellular localization and function in the mammalian retina. In this study, we found that ANO1 was abundantly expressed as puncta in 2 synaptic layers. More specifically, ANO1 immunoreactivity was observed in the presynaptic terminals of various retinal neurons, including photoreceptors. ICl(Ca) was first detected in dissociated rod bipolar cells expressing ANO1. ICl(Ca) was abolished by treatment with the Ca2+ channel blocker Co2+, the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, and the Cl− channel blockers 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and niflumic acid (NFA). More specifically, a recently discovered ANO1-selective inhibitor, T16Ainh-A01, and a neutralizing antibody against ANO1 inhibited ICl(Ca) in rod bipolar cells. Under a current-clamping mode, the suppression of ICl(Ca) by using NPPB and T16Ainh-A01 caused a prolonged Ca2+ spike-like depolarization evoked by current injection in dissociated rod bipolar cells. These results suggest that ANO1 confers ICl(Ca) in retinal neurons and acts as an intrinsic regulator of the presynaptic membrane potential during synaptic transmission. PMID:23840801

  13. Amino acids 473V and 598P of PB1 from an avian-origin influenza A virus contribute to polymerase activity, especially in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Hu, Wei-Bin; Xu, Ke; He, Yun-Xia; Wang, Tong-Yan; Chen, Ze; Li, Tian-Xian; Liu, Jin-Hua; Buchy, Philippe; Sun, Bing

    2012-03-01

    It has been reported that the avian-origin influenza A virus PB1 protein (avian PB1) enhances influenza A virus polymerase activity in mammalian cells when it replaces the human-origin PB1 protein (human PB1). Characterization of the amino acid residues that contribute to this enhancement is needed. In this study, it was found that PB1 from an avian-origin influenza A virus [A/Cambodia/P0322095/2005, H5N1 (Cam)] could enhance the polymerase activity of an attenuated human isolated virus, A/WSN/33, carrying the PB2 K627E mutation (WSN627E) in vitro. Furthermore, 473V and 598P in the Cam PB1 were identified as the residues responsible for this enhanced activity. The results from recombinant virus experiments demonstrated the contribution of PB1 amino acids 473V and 598P to polymerase activity in mammalian cells and in mice. Interestingly, 473V is conserved in pH1N1 viruses from the 2009 pandemic. Substitution of 473V by leucine in pH1N1 PB1 led to a decreased viral polymerase activity and a lower growth rate in mammalian cells, suggesting that the PB1 473V also plays a role in maintaining efficient virus replication of the pH1N1 virus. Thus, it was concluded that two amino acids in avian-origin PB1, 473V and 598P, contribute to the polymerase activity of the H5N1 virus, especially in mammalian cells, and that 473V in PB1 also contributes to efficient replication of the pH1N1 strain.

  14. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  15. Salmonid Tollip and MyD88 factors can functionally replace their mammalian orthologues in TLR-mediated trout SAA promoter activation.

    PubMed

    Rebl, Alexander; Rebl, Henrike; Liu, Shuzhen; Goldammer, Tom; Seyfert, Hans-Martin

    2011-01-01

    Many functional details of the piscine Toll-like receptor (TLR) signal-mediated activation of immune defense are still elusive. We used an established reconstitution system of mammalian TLR signaling to examine if this system would allow for pathogen-dependent promoter activation of the serum amyloid A (SAA)-encoding gene from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and if the key mediators MyD88 and Tollip from trout can functionally substitute for their mammalian orthologues. Cells of the established human embryonic kidney line HEK-293 were transiently co-transfected with vectors expressing bovine TLR2 or TLR4 factors and a reporter gene driven by the promoter of the trout SAA gene. Escherichia coli stimulation increased reporter gene expression more than 3-fold. Deletion series and point mutations identified in the proximal SAA promoter a composite overlapping binding site for NF-κB and CEBP factors as crucial for promoter activation. Overexpression of NF-κB p65, but not of p50 or different members of the CEBP factor family proved this factor as an essential driver for SAA expression. Overexpression of a transdominant-negative mutant of the trout MyD88 factor reduced TLR-mediated SAA promoter activation confirming functional conservation of its TIR domain. Overexpression of the Tollip factor from trout also quenched TLR-mediated NF-κB and TLR4-mediated SAA promoter activation. The MyD88 mutant and Tollip expression studies confirm the functional homology of both piscine factors and their mammalian counterparts. We provide for the first time evidence that also the Tollip-mediated negative loop of TLR signaling may be conserved in non-mammalian organisms.

  16. A Comparison of Ci/Gli Activity as Regulated by Sufu in Drosophila and Mammalian Hedgehog Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Guo, Yurong; Beachy, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Suppressor of fused (Su(fu)/Sufu), one of the most conserved components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, binds Ci/Gli transcription factors and impedes activation of target gene expression. In Drosophila, the Su(fu) mutation has a minimal phenotype, and we show here that Ci transcriptional activity in large part is regulated independently of Su(fu) by other pathway components. Mutant mice lacking Sufu in contrast show excessive pathway activity and die as embryos with patterning defects. Here we show that in cultured cells Hh stimulation can augment transcriptional activity of a Gli2 variant lacking Sufu interaction and, surprisingly, that regulation of Hh pathway targets is nearly normal in the neural tube of Sufu-/- mutant embryos that also lack Gli1 function. Some degree of Hh-induced transcriptional activation of Ci/Gli thus can occur independently of Sufu in both flies and mammals. We further note that Sufu loss can also reduce Hh induction of high-threshold neural tube fates, such as floor plate, suggesting a possible positive pathway role for Sufu. PMID:26271100

  17. Proper regulation of Cdc42 activity is required for tight actin concentration at the equator during cytokinesis in adherent mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Wang, Junxia; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Liow, Lu Ting; Ahmed, Sohail; Kaverina, Irina; Murata-Hori, Maki

    2011-10-01

    Cytokinesis in mammalian cells requires actin assembly at the equatorial region. Although functions of RhoA in this process have been well established, additional mechanisms are likely involved. We have examined if Cdc42 is involved in actin assembly during cytokinesis. Depletion of Cdc42 had no apparent effects on the duration of cytokinesis, while overexpression of constitutively active Cdc42 (CACdc42) caused cytokinesis failure in normal rat kidney epithelial cells. Cells depleted of Cdc42 displayed abnormal cell morphology and caused a failure of tight accumulation of actin and RhoA at the equator. In contrast, in cells overexpressing CACdc42, actin formed abnormal bundles and RhoA was largely eliminated from the equator. Our results suggest that accurate regulation of Cdc42 activity is crucial for proper equatorial actin assembly and RhoA localization during cytokinesis. Notably, our observations also suggest that tight actin concentration is not essential for cytokinesis in adherent mammalian cells.

  18. Mammalian sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  19. Crystal structures of glutaminyl cyclases (QCs) from Drosophila melanogaster reveal active site conservation between insect and mammalian QCs.

    PubMed

    Koch, Birgit; Kolenko, Petr; Buchholz, Mirko; Carrillo, David Ruiz; Parthier, Christoph; Wermann, Michael; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Reuter, Gunter; Schilling, Stephan; Stubbs, Milton T; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-09-18

    Glutaminyl cyclases (QCs), which catalyze the formation of pyroglutamic acid (pGlu) at the N-terminus of a variety of peptides and proteins, have attracted particular attention for their potential role in Alzheimer's disease. In a transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) fruit fly model, oral application of the potent competitive QC inhibitor PBD150 was shown to reduce the burden of pGlu-modified Aβ. In contrast to mammals such as humans and rodents, there are at least three DmQC species, one of which (isoDromeQC) is localized to mitochondria, whereas DromeQC and an isoDromeQC splice variant possess signal peptides for secretion. Here we present the recombinant expression, characterization, and crystal structure determination of mature DromeQC and isoDromeQC, revealing an overall fold similar to that of mammalian QCs. In the case of isoDromeQC, the putative extended substrate binding site might be affected by the proximity of the N-terminal residues. PBD150 inhibition of DromeQC is roughly 1 order of magnitude weaker than that of the human and murine QCs. The inhibitor binds to isoDromeQC in a fashion similar to that observed for human QCs, whereas it adopts alternative binding modes in a DromeQC variant lacking the conserved cysteines near the active center and shows a disordered dimethoxyphenyl moiety in wild-type DromeQC, providing an explanation for the lower affinity. Our biophysical and structural data suggest that isoDromeQC and human QC are similar with regard to functional aspects. The two Dm enzymes represent a suitable model for further in-depth analysis of the catalytic mechanism of animal QCs, and isoDromeQC might serve as a model system for the structure-based design of potential AD therapeutics.

  20. The sea urchin embryo as a model for mammalian developmental neurotoxicity: ontogenesis of the high-affinity choline transporter and its role in cholinergic trophic activity.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dan; Nikitina, Lyudmila A; Buznikov, Gennady A; Lauder, Jean M; Seidler, Frederic J; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2003-11-01

    Embryonic development in the sea urchin requires trophic actions of the same neurotransmitters that participate in mammalian brain assembly. We evaluated the development of the high-affinity choline transporter, which controls acetylcholine synthesis. A variety of developmental neurotoxicants affect this transporter in mammalian brain. [3H]Hemicholinium-3 binding to the transporter was found in the cell membrane fraction at stages from the unfertilized egg to pluteus, with a binding affinity comparable with that seen in mammalian brain. Over the course of development, the concentration of transporter sites rose more than 3-fold, achieving concentrations comparable with those of cholinergically enriched mammalian brain regions. Dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE), a competitive inhibitor of choline transport, elicited dysmorphology beginning at the mid-blastula stage, with anomalies beginning progressively later as the concentration of DMAE was lowered. Pretreatment, cotreatment, or delayed treatment with acetylcholine or choline prevented the adverse effects of DMAE. Because acetylcholine was protective at a lower threshold, the DMAE-induced defects were most likely mediated by its effects on acetylcholine synthesis. Transient removal of the hyaline layer enabled a charged transport inhibitor, hemicholinium-3, to penetrate sufficiently to elicit similar anomalies, which were again prevented by acetylcholine or choline. These results indicate that the developing sea urchin possesses a high-affinity choline transporter analogous to that found in the mammalian brain, and, as in mammals, the functioning of this transporter plays a key role in the developmental, trophic activity of acetylcholine. The sea urchin model may thus be useful in high-throughput screening of suspected developmental neurotoxicants.

  1. Short Promoters in Viral Vectors Drive Selective Expression in Mammalian Inhibitory Neurons, but do not Restrict Activity to Specific Inhibitory Cell-Types

    PubMed Central

    Nathanson, Jason L.; Jappelli, Roberto; Scheeff, Eric D.; Manning, Gerard; Obata, Kunihiko; Brenner, Sydney; Callaway, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    Short cell-type specific promoter sequences are important for targeted gene therapy and studies of brain circuitry. We report on the ability of short promoter sequences to drive fluorescent protein expression in specific types of mammalian cortical inhibitory neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentivirus (LV) vectors. We tested many gene regulatory sequences derived from fugu (Takifugu rubripes), mouse, human, and synthetic composite regulatory elements. All fugu compact promoters expressed in mouse cortex, with only the somatostatin (SST) and the neuropeptide Y (NPY) promoters largely restricting expression to GABAergic neurons. However these promoters did not control expression in inhibitory cells in a subtype specific manner. We also tested mammalian promoter sequences derived from genes putatively coexpressed or coregulated within three major inhibitory interneuron classes (PV, SST, VIP). In contrast to the fugu promoters, many of the mammalian sequences failed to express, and only the promoter from gene A930038C07Rik conferred restricted expression, although as in the case of the fugu sequences, this too was not inhibitory neuron subtype specific. Lastly and more promisingly, a synthetic sequence consisting of a composite regulatory element assembled with PAX6 E1.1 binding sites, NRSE and a minimal CMV promoter showed markedly restricted expression to a small subset of mostly inhibitory neurons, but whose commonalities are unknown. PMID:19949461

  2. Development of an improved active gas target design for ANASEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, Sabina; Blackmon, J. C.; Deibel, C. M.; Macon, K. T.; Rasco, B. C.; Wiedenhoever, I.

    2014-09-01

    The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged particle detector array with an active gas target-detector capability for sensitive measurements using radioactive ion beams. One of the main goals is to improve our understanding of nuclear reactions important in stellar explosions. Following initial experimental campaigns with ANASEN, we have been developing an improved active gas target design for ANASEN that incorporates an innovative cylindrical gas ionization detector for heavy ions surrounding the beam axis inside of the other ANASEN charged particle detectors. The detection of heavy ions in coincidence with lighter ions in a redesigned proportional counter will provide greater discriminating power. The new active gas target design will be presented, and its simulated performance will be compared with test data. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged particle detector array with an active gas target-detector capability for sensitive measurements using radioactive ion beams. One of the main goals is to improve our understanding of nuclear reactions important in stellar explosions. Following initial experimental campaigns with ANASEN, we have been developing an improved active gas target design for ANASEN that incorporates an innovative cylindrical gas ionization detector for heavy ions surrounding the beam axis inside of the other ANASEN charged particle detectors. The detection of heavy ions in coincidence with lighter ions in a redesigned proportional counter will provide greater discriminating power. The new active gas target design will be presented, and its simulated performance will be compared with test data. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the Dept of Energy's Office of Science.

  3. Targeting poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mégnin-Chanet, Frédérique; Bollet, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a ubiquitous protein modification found in mammalian cells that modulates many cellular responses, including DNA repair. The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family catalyze the formation and addition onto proteins of negatively charged ADP-ribose polymers synthesized from NAD+. The absence of PARP-1 and PARP-2, both of which are activated by DNA damage, results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and alkylating agents. PARP inhibitors that compete with NAD+ at the enzyme’s activity site are effective chemo- and radiopotentiation agents and, in BRCA-deficient tumors, can be used as single-agent therapies acting through the principle of synthetic lethality. Through extensive drug-development programs, third-generation inhibitors have now entered clinical trials and are showing great promise. However, both PARP-1 and PARP-2 are not only involved in DNA repair but also in transcription regulation, chromatin modification, and cellular homeostasis. The impact on these processes of PARP inhibition on long-term therapeutic responses needs to be investigated. PMID:20725763

  4. An Aromatic Diamidine That Targets Kinetoplast DNA, Impairs the Cell Cycle in Trypanosoma cruzi, and Diminishes Trypomastigote Release from Infected Mammalian Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Richard M. B. M.; Crispim, Marcell; Stolić, Ivana; Damasceno, Flávia Silva; Santos da Silva, Marcelo; Pral, Eizabeth Mieko Furusho; Elias, Maria Carolina; Bajić, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, affecting approximately 10 million people in the Americas and with some 40 million people at risk. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-T. cruzi activity of three new diamidines that have a 3,4-ethylenedioxy extension of the thiophene core, designated MB17, MB19, and MB38. All three diamidines exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of epimastigote replication. The mechanisms of action of these diamidines were investigated. Unlike MB17 and MB19, MB38 exhibited a significant increase in the number of annexin-propidium iodide double-labeled cells compared to levels in control parasites. As MB17 had shown a lower 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) against epimastigote growth, the mechanism of action of this drug was studied in more detail. MB17 triggered a decrease in the intracellular ATP levels. As a consequence, MB17 affected the genomic DNA and kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) and impaired the parasite cell cycle. Moreover, MB17 caused DNA fragmentation, with a more severe effect on kDNA than on nuclear DNA, resulting in dyskinetoplastic cells. MB17 was tested for toxicity and effectiveness for the treatment of infected CHO-K1 cells, exhibiting a 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of 13.47 ± 0.37 μM and an IC50 of 0.14 ± 0.12 μM against trypomastigote release. MB17 also diminished the infection index by 60% at 0.5 μM. In conclusion, despite belonging to the same family, these diamidines have different efficiencies. To summarize, MB17 was the most potent of these diamidines against epimastigotes, producing DNA damage preferentially in kDNA, impairing the parasite cell cycle, and decreasing the infection index and trypomastigote release from infected mammalian host cells, with a high selectivity index (SI) (<90). These data suggest that MB17 could be an interesting lead compound against T. cruzi. PMID:27431229

  5. Anti-Tumor Effects of Novel 5-O-Acyl Plumbagins Based on the Inhibition of Mammalian DNA Replicative Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Moe; Kuriyama, Isoko; Maruo, Sayako; Kuramochi, Kouji; Tsubaki, Kazunori; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that vitamin K3 (menadione, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) inhibits the activity of human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (pol γ). In this study, we focused on plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), and chemically synthesized novel plumbagins conjugated with C2:0 to C22:6 fatty acids (5-O-acyl plumbagins). These chemically modified plumbagins enhanced mammalian pol inhibition and their cytotoxic activity. Plumbagin conjugated with chains consisting of more than C18-unsaturated fatty acids strongly inhibited the activities of calf pol α and human pol γ. Plumbagin conjugated with oleic acid (C18:1-acyl plumbagin) showed the strongest suppression of human colon carcinoma (HCT116) cell proliferation among the ten synthesized 5-O-acyl plumbagins. The inhibitory activity on pol α, a DNA replicative pol, by these compounds showed high correlation with their cancer cell proliferation suppressive activity. C18:1-Acyl plumbagin selectively inhibited the activities of mammalian pol species, but did not influence the activities of other pols and DNA metabolic enzymes tested. This compound inhibited the proliferation of various human cancer cell lines, and was the cytotoxic inhibitor showing strongest inhibition towards HT-29 colon cancer cells (LD50 = 2.9 µM) among the nine cell lines tested. In an in vivo anti-tumor assay conducted on nude mice bearing solid tumors of HT-29 cells, C18:1-acyl plumbagin was shown to be a promising tumor suppressor. These data indicate that novel 5-O-acyl plumbagins act as anti-cancer agents based on mammalian DNA replicative pol α inhibition. Moreover, the results suggest that acylation of plumbagin is an effective chemical modification to improve the anti-cancer activity of vitamin K3 derivatives, such as plumbagin. PMID:24520419

  6. A targeted siRNA screen identifies regulators of Cdc42 activity at the natural killer cell immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Leo M; Evans, Rachel; Milewicz, Hanna; Fernandes, Luis; Matthews, Daniel R; Perani, Michela; Levitt, James; Keppler, Melanie D; Monypenny, James; Coolen, Ton; Barber, Paul R; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Suhling, Klaus; Fraternali, Franca; Ameer-Beg, Simon; Parker, Peter J; Thomas, N Shaun B; Ng, Tony

    2011-11-29

    Natural killer (NK) cells kill tumor cells and virally infected cells, and an effective NK cell response requires processes, such as motility, recognition, and directional secretion, that rely on cytoskeletal rearrangement. The Rho guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Cdc42 coordinates cytoskeletal reorganization downstream of many receptors. The Rho-related GTPase from plants 1 (ROP1) exhibits oscillatory activation behavior at the apical plasma membrane of growing pollen tubes; however, a similar oscillation in Rho GTPase activity has so far not been demonstrated in mammalian cells. We hypothesized that oscillations in Cdc42 activity might occur within NK cells as they interact with target cells. Through fluorescence lifetime imaging of a Cdc42 biosensor, we observed that in live NK cells forming immunological synapses with target cells, Cdc42 activity oscillated after exhibiting an initial increase. We used protein-protein interaction networks and structural databases to identify candidate proteins that controlled Cdc42 activity, leading to the design of a targeted short interfering RNA screen. The guanine nucleotide exchange factors RhoGEF6 and RhoGEF7 were necessary for Cdc42 activation within the NK cell immunological synapse. In addition, the kinase Akt and the p85α subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were required for Cdc42 activation, the periodicity of the oscillation in Cdc42 activity, and the subsequent polarization of cytotoxic vesicles toward target cells. Given that PI3Ks are targets of tumor therapies, our findings suggest the need to monitor innate immune function during the course of targeted therapy against these enzymes.

  7. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  8. Truncation of the A,A(∗),A' helices segment impairs the actin bundling activity of mammalian eEF1A1.

    PubMed

    Vlasenko, Dmytro O; Novosylna, Oleksandra V; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2015-05-08

    Translation elongation factor eEF1A is a G-protein which has a crucial role in the ribosomal polypeptide elongation and possesses a number of non-translational functions. Here, we show that the A,A(∗),A' helices segment of mammalian eEF1A is dispensable for the eEF1A*eEF1Bα complex formation. The A,A(∗),A' helices region did not interact with actin; however, its removal eliminates the actin bundling activity of eEF1A, probably due to the destruction of a dimeric structure of eEF1A. The translation function of monomers and the actin-bundling function of dimers of mammalian eEF1A is suggested.

  9. Eliciting Production of L2 Target Structures through Priming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel; Neumann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the pedagogical applications of structural priming research in an English for academic purposes (EAP) context, investigating whether priming activities are an effective tool for eliciting production of target grammatical structures. University students across four EAP classes carried out a total of 6 information-exchange…

  10. Phosphorylated Mammalian Target of Rapamycin p-mTOR Is a Favorable Prognostic Factor than mTOR in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-wei; Chen, Bo; Xiong, Mao-ming

    2016-01-01

    Aims The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and phosphorylated mTOR (p-mTOR) occurring downstream in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, are regarded as potential prognostic markers for gastric cancer (GC). However, the prognostic value of mTOR/p-mTOR expression remains controversial. In this study, we determined the expression of mTOR, p-mTOR, p70S6k, and p-p70S6K in GC, and investigated the correlation between their overexpression, clinicopathological parameters, and overall survival (OS). Methods The expression of mTOR, p-mTOR, p70S6k, and p-p70S6K was examined in 120 GC patients by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The association of protein expression with clinicopathological features and OS was explored. The p-mTOR expression was detected in normal, adjacent, and GC tissues using Western blot. Eligible studies retrieved from PubMed, Ovid, Web of Science and Cochrane databases, were reviewed in this meta-analysis. Results IHC showed that the rates of expression of the signal transduction molecules mTOR, p-mTOR, p70S6k and p-p70S6K in GC were 60.8%, 54.2%, 53.3% and 53.3%, respectively. Overexpression of mTOR and p70S6K showed no significant association with clinical variables. Expression of p-mTOR was significantly associated with differentiation (P < 0.01), depth of invasion (P < 0.01), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.04) and TNM stage (P = 0.02). Expression of p-p70S6K was associated with differentiation (P = 0.006), depth of invasion (P < 0.001), and TNM stage (P = 0.02). In survival analysis, differentiation, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis and TNM stage were not related to OS (all P > 0.05). Furthermore, p-mTOR and p-p70S6K expression, but not mTOR and p70S6K, were tightly associated with OS of GC patients (P = 0.006 and P < 0.001, respectively). In Western blot, p-mTOR was significantly higher in GC tissues than in normal and adjacent tissues. In the present meta-analysis, mTOR overexpression showed no relationship with any clinicopathological variables

  11. Rapid, Specific, No-wash, Far-red Fluorogen Activation in Subcellular Compartments by Targeted Fluorogen Activating Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Live cell imaging requires bright photostable dyes that can target intracellular organelles and proteins with high specificity in a no-wash protocol. Organic dyes possess the desired photochemical properties and can be covalently linked to various protein tags. The currently available fluorogenic dyes are in the green/yellow range where there is high cellular autofluorescence and the near-infrared (NIR) dyes need to be washed out. Protein-mediated activation of far-red fluorogenic dyes has the potential to address these challenges because the cell-permeant dye is small and nonfluorescent until bound to its activating protein, and this binding is rapid. In this study, three single chain variable fragment (scFv)-derived fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs), which activate far-red emitting fluorogens, were evaluated for targeting, brightness, and photostability in the cytosol, nucleus, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endoplasmic reticulum with a cell-permeant malachite green analog in cultured mammalian cells. Efficient labeling was achieved within 20–30 min for each protein upon the addition of nM concentrations of dye, producing a signal that colocalized significantly with a linked mCerulean3 (mCer3) fluorescent protein and organelle specific dyes but showed divergent photostability and brightness properties dependent on the FAP. These FAPs and the ester of malachite green dye (MGe) can be used as specific, rapid, and wash-free labels for intracellular sites in live cells with far-red excitation and emission properties, useful in a variety of multicolor experiments. PMID:25650487

  12. Soay rams target reproductive activity towards promiscuous females' optimal insemination period.

    PubMed

    Preston, B T; Stevenson, I R; Wilson, K

    2003-10-07

    Female promiscuity is thought to have resulted in the evolution of male behaviours that confer advantages in the sperm competition that ensues. In mammalian species, males can gain a post-copulatory advantage in this sperm 'raffle' by inseminating females at the optimal time relative to ovulation, leading to the prediction that males should preferentially associate and copulate with females at these times. To the best of our knowledge, we provide the first high-resolution test of this prediction using feral Soay sheep, which have a mating system characterized by male competition for access to highly promiscuous females. We find that competitive males time their mate guarding (and hence copulations) to occur close to the optimal insemination period (OIP), when females are also increasingly likely to 'cooperate' with copulation attempts. Subordinate males practice an alternative mating tactic, where they break the integrity of the consort pair and force copulations on females. The timing of these forced copulations is also targeted towards the OIP. We thus provide quantitative evidence that female promiscuity has resulted in the evolution of reproductive strategies in which males 'load' the sperm raffle by targeting their mating activity towards female OIPs, when the probability of sperm-competition success is at its greatest.

  13. Inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) by rapamycin increases chemosensitivity of CaSki cells to paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Faried, L S; Faried, A; Kanuma, T; Nakazato, T; Tamura, T; Kuwano, H; Minegishi, T

    2006-05-01

    Paclitaxel, a potent anti-neoplastic agent, has been found to be effective against several tumours, including cervical cancer. However, the exact mechanism underlying the cytotoxic effects of pacitaxel, especially in the survival-signalling pathway, is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular pathway of the cytotoxic effect of paclitaxel in human cervical cancer cell lines. Four human cervical cancer cell lines were treated for 24 h with various concentration of paclitaxel, and the sensitivity was analysed by an MTT assay. The cell cycle progression and sub-G1 population were analysed by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was further measured by DNA fragmentation and microscope examination. The protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Our results showed that HeLa cells demonstrated the highest sensitivity to paclitaxel, whereas CaSki cells showed the lowest. In cervical cancer cells, paclitaxel induced apoptosis through an intrinsic pathway with prior G2/M arrest. In addition, we showed that paclitaxel downregulated the phosphorylation of Akt in both HeLa and CaSki cells. Interestingly, in CaSki cells, which were more suggestive of a resistant phenotype, paclitaxel induced the activation of mTOR as a downstream target of Akt. Pre-treatment with rapamycin inhibited activation of mTOR signalling and significantly enhanced the sensitivity of CaSki cells to paclitaxel by increasing apoptotic cell death. This effect was mediated, at least partly, through caspase activation. Overall, paclitaxel exerts its anti-tumour effects on cervical cancer cells by inducing apoptosis through intrinsic pathway, and rapamycin targeted to mTOR can sensitise paclitaxel-resistant cervical cancer cells.

  14. Active helium target: Neutron scalar polarizability extraction via Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Meg Hornidge, David; Annand, John; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-12-31

    Precise measurement of the neutron scalar polarizabilities has been a lasting challenge because of the lack of a free-neutron target. Led by the University of Glasgow and the Mount Allison University groups of the A2 collaboration in Mainz, Germany, preparations have begun to test a recent theoretical model with an active helium target with the hope of determining these elusive quantities with small statistical, systematic, and model-dependent errors. Apparatus testing and background-event simulations have been carried out, with the full experiment projected to run in 2015. Once determined, these values can be applied to help understand quantum chromodynamics in the nonperturbative region.

  15. Reversible, activity-dependent targeting of profilin to neuronal nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Birbach, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.birbach@lbicr.lbg.ac.at; Verkuyl, J. Martin; Matus, Andrew . E-mail: aim@fmi.ch

    2006-07-15

    The actin cytoskeleton in pyramidal neurons plays a major role in activity-dependent processes underlying neuronal plasticity. The small actin-binding protein profilin shows NMDA receptor-dependent accumulation in dendritic spines, which is correlated with suppression of actin dynamics and long-term stabilization of synaptic morphology. Here we show that following NMDA receptor activation profilin also accumulates in the nucleus of hippocampal neurons via a process involving rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. This simultaneous targeting to dendritic spines and the cell nucleus suggests a novel mechanism of neuronal plasticity in which profilin both tags activated synapses and influences nuclear events.

  16. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 interacts with p21-activated kinase 6 to control neurite complexity in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Civiero, Laura; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Beilina, Alexandra; Rodella, Umberto; Russo, Isabella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Lobbestael, Evy; Reyniers, Lauran; Hondhamuni, Geshanthi; Lewis, Patrick A; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Bubacco, Luigi; Piccoli, Giovanni; Cookson, Mark R; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Greggio, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a causative gene for Parkinson's disease, but the physiological function and the mechanism(s) by which the cellular activity of LRRK2 is regulated are poorly understood. Here, we identified p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of the GTPase/ROC domain of LRRK2. p21-activated kinases are serine-threonine kinases that serve as targets for the small GTP binding proteins Cdc42 and Rac1 and have been implicated in different morphogenetic processes through remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton such as synapse formation and neuritogenesis. Using an in vivo neuromorphology assay, we show that PAK6 is a positive regulator of neurite outgrowth and that LRRK2 is required for this function. Analyses of post-mortem brain tissue from idiopathic and LRRK2 G2019S carriers reveal an increase in PAK6 activation state, whereas knock-out LRRK2 mice display reduced PAK6 activation and phosphorylation of PAK6 substrates. Taken together, these results support a critical role of LRRK2 GTPase domain in cytoskeletal dynamics in vivo through the novel interactor PAK6, and provide a valuable platform to unravel the mechanism underlying LRRK2-mediated pathophysiology. We propose p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a kinase involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). In health, PAK6 regulates neurite complexity in the brain and LRRK2 is required for its function, (a) whereas PAK6 is aberrantly activated in LRRK2-linked PD brain (b) suggesting that LRRK2 toxicity is mediated by PAK6.

  17. PA residues in the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus enhance avian influenza virus polymerase activity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bussey, Kendra A; Desmet, Emily A; Mattiacio, Jonelle L; Hamilton, Alice; Bradel-Tretheway, Birgit; Bussey, Howard E; Kim, Baek; Dewhurst, Stephen; Takimoto, Toru

    2011-07-01

    The 2009 pandemic influenza virus (pH1N1) is a swine-origin reassortant containing human, avian, and swine influenza genes. We have previously shown that the polymerase complex of the pH1N1 strain A/California/04/2009 (Cal) is highly active in mammalian 293T cells, despite the avian origin of both its PA and PB2. In this study, we analyzed the polymerase residues that are responsible for high pH1N1 polymerase activity in the mammalian host. Characterization of polymerase complexes containing various combinations of Cal and avian influenza virus A/chicken/Nanchang/3-120/01 (H3N2) (Nan) by reporter gene assay indicates that Cal PA, but not PB2, is a major contributing factor to high Cal polymerase activity in 293T cells. In particular, Cal PA significantly activates the otherwise inactive Nan polymerase at 37 and 39°C but not at the lower temperature of 34°C. Further analysis using site-directed mutagenesis showed that the Cal PA residues 85I, 186S, and 336M contribute to enhanced activity of the Cal polymerase. Recombinant A/WSN/33 (H1N1) (WSN) viruses containing Nan NP and polymerase (PA, PB1, PB2) genes with individual mutations in PA at residues 85, 186, and 336 produced higher levels of viral protein than the virus containing wild-type (WT) Nan PA. Interestingly, compared to the WT, the virus containing the 85I mutation grew faster in human A549 cells and the 336M mutation most significantly enhanced pathogenicity in a mouse model, among the three PA mutations tested. Our results suggest that multiple mutations in PA, which were rarely present in previous influenza isolates, are involved in mammalian adaptation and pathogenicity of the 2009 pH1N1.

  18. Comparison of amphibian and mammalian thyroperoxidase ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Thyroperoxidase (TPO) catalyzes the production of thyroid hormones in the vertebrate thyroid gland by oxidizing iodide (I- ) to produce iodinated tyrosines on thyroglobulin, and further coupling of specific mono- or di-iodinated tyrosines to generate the triiodo- and tetra-iodothyronine, precursors to thyroid hormone. This enzyme is a target for thyroid disrupting chemicals. TPO-inhibition by xenobiotics is a molecular initiating event that is known to perturb the thyroid axis by preventing synthesis of thyroid hormone. Previous work on TPO-inhibition has been focused on mammalian TPO; specifically, the rat and pig. A primary objective of this experiment was to directly measure TPO activity in a non-mammalian system, in this case a thyroid gland homogenate from Xenopus laevis; as well as compare chemical inhibition from past mammalian studies to the amphibian data generated. Thyroid glands obtained from X. laevis tadpoles at NF stages 58-60, were pooled and homogenized by sonication in phosphate buffer. This homogenate was then used to test 24 chemicals for inhibition of TPO as measured by conversion of Amplex UltraRed (AUR) substrate to its fluorescent product. The test chemicals were selected based upon previous results from rat in vitro TPO assays, and X. laevis in vitro and in vivo studies for thyroid disrupting endpoints, and included both positive and negative chemicals in these assays. An initial screening of the chemicals was done at a single high con

  19. Kinome-wide Selectivity Profiling of ATP-competitive Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Inhibitors and Characterization of Their Binding Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingsong; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Hur, Wooyoung; Niepel, Mario; Westover, Kenneth; Thoreen, Carson C.; Wang, Jinhua; Ni, Jing; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Vogel, Kurt; Riddle, Steve; Waller, David L.; Traynor, Ryan; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Kang, Seong A.; Zhao, Jean; Look, A. Thomas; Sorger, Peter K.; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2012-01-01

    An intensive recent effort to develop ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors has resulted in several potent and selective molecules such as Torin1, PP242, KU63794, and WYE354. These inhibitors are being widely used as pharmacological probes of mTOR-dependent biology. To determine the potency and specificity of these agents, we have undertaken a systematic kinome-wide effort to profile their selectivity and potency using chemical proteomics and assays for enzymatic activity, protein binding, and disruption of cellular signaling. Enzymatic and cellular assays revealed that all four compounds are potent inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2, with Torin1 exhibiting ∼20-fold greater potency for inhibition of Thr-389 phosphorylation on S6 kinases (EC50 = 2 nm) relative to other inhibitors. In vitro biochemical profiling at 10 μm revealed binding of PP242 to numerous kinases, although WYE354 and KU63794 bound only to p38 kinases and PI3K isoforms and Torin1 to ataxia telangiectasia mutated, ATM and Rad3-related protein, and DNA-PK. Analysis of these protein targets in cellular assays did not reveal any off-target activities for Torin1, WYE354, and KU63794 at concentrations below 1 μm but did show that PP242 efficiently inhibited the RET receptor (EC50, 42 nm) and JAK1/2/3 kinases (EC50, 780 nm). In addition, Torin1 displayed unusually slow kinetics for inhibition of the mTORC1/2 complex, a property likely to contribute to the pharmacology of this inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of PP242, available ATP-competitive compounds are highly selective mTOR inhibitors when applied to cells at concentrations below 1 μm and that the compounds may represent a starting point for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at developing inhibitors of other PI3K kinase-related kinases. PMID:22223645

  20. Statistical algorithms for target detection in coherent active polarimetric images.

    PubMed

    Goudail, F; Réfrégier, P

    2001-12-01

    We address the problem of small-target detection with a polarimetric imager that provides orthogonal state contrast images. Such active systems allow one to measure the degree of polarization of the light backscattered by purely depolarizing isotropic materials. To be independent of the spatial nonuniformities of the illumination beam, small-target detection on the orthogonal state contrast image must be performed without using the image of backscattered intensity. We thus propose and develop a simple and efficient target detection algorithm based on a nonlinear pointwise transformation of the orthogonal state contrast image followed by a maximum-likelihood algorithm optimal for additive Gaussian perturbations. We demonstrate the efficiency of this suboptimal technique in comparison with the optimal one, which, however, assumes a priori knowledge about the scene that is not available in practice. We illustrate the performance of this approach on both simulated and real polarimetric images.

  1. Radiation damage/activity calculation for CSNS target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.; Liang, T. J.; Yu, Q. Z.; Jia, X. J.

    2010-03-01

    The radiation damages have been performed for Chinese spallation neutron source (CSNS) target center components that relies on Monte Carlo simulation code MCNPX. During the calculation, Bertini intranuclear cascade model, three level-density formulation GCCI, and multistage pre-equilibrium model MPM on which are provided within MCNPX are employed. We calculate the displacement per atom (DPA) and afterheat of the tungsten target, the stainless steel target vessel window and the aluminum alloy moderator vessel. As a hundred kW-level source, these spallation center components have the lifetime more than 5 year. We also give the activity for the T0 chopper of the beam line HIPD to get the primary data for making out a maintenance scenario.

  2. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Chia-Ying; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs) conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs). Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs), which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+)) and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-), which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+) is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell biomarker, our

  3. Target identification with quantitative activity based protein profiling (ABPP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Wong, Yin Kwan; Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Lee, Yew-Mun; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2017-02-01

    As many small bioactive molecules fulfill their functions through interacting with protein targets, the identification of such targets is crucial in understanding their mechanisms of action (MOA) and side effects. With technological advancements in target identification, it has become possible to accurately and comprehensively study the MOA and side effects of small molecules. While small molecules with therapeutic potential were derived solely from nature in the past, the remodeling and synthesis of such molecules have now been made possible. Presently, while some small molecules have seen successful application as drugs, the majority remain undeveloped, requiring further understanding of their MOA and side effects to fully tap into their potential. Given the typical promiscuity of many small molecules and the complexity of the cellular proteome, a high-flux and high-accuracy method is necessary. While affinity chromatography approaches combined with MS have had successes in target identification, limitations associated with nonspecific results remain. To overcome these complications, quantitative chemical proteomics approaches have been developed including metabolic labeling, chemical labeling, and label-free methods. These new approaches are adopted in conjunction with activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), allowing for a rapid process and accurate results. This review will briefly introduce the principles involved in ABPP, then summarize current advances in quantitative chemical proteomics approaches as well as illustrate with examples how ABPP coupled with quantitative chemical proteomics has been used to detect the targets of drugs and other bioactive small molecules including natural products.

  4. Inhibition of mammalian DNA polymerases and the suppression of inflammatory and allergic responses by tyrosol from used activated charcoal waste generated during sake production.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Yoshiaki; Onodera, Takefumi; Kuriyama, Isoko; Sakamoto, Yuka; Nishikori, Shu; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sugawara, Fumio

    2014-08-06

    The components adsorbed onto activated charcoal following the fermentation process of the Japanese rice wine "sake" have been studied with the aim of identifying suitable applications for this industrial food waste product. The absorbed materials were effectively extracted from the charcoal, and inhibited the activity of several mammalian DNA polymerases (pols). Subsequent purification of the extract afforded tyrosol [4-(2-hydroxyethyl)phenol] as the active component, which selectively inhibited the activity of 11 mammalian pols with IC50 values in the range of 34.3-46.1 μM. In contrast, this compound did not influence the activities of plant or prokaryotic pols or any of the other DNA metabolic enzymes tested. Tyrosol suppressed both anti-inflammatory and antiallergic effects in vivo, including 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced inflammatory mouse ear edema, and immunoglobulin E-induced passive cutaneous anaphylactic reaction in mice. These results suggested that this byproduct formed during the sake-brewing process could be used as an anti-inflammatory and/or antiallergic agent.

  5. A diamond active target for the PADME experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, G.

    2017-02-01

    The PADME (Positron Annihilation into Dark Mediator Experiment) collaboration searches for dark photons produced in the annihilation e++e-→γ+A' of accelerated positrons with atomic electrons of a fixed target at the Beam Test Facility of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati. The apparatus can detect dark photons decaying into visible A'→e+e- and invisible A'→χχ channels, where χ's are particles of a secluded sector weakly interacting and therefore undetected. In order to improve the missing mass resolution and to measure the beam flux, PADME has an active target able to reconstruct the beam spot position and the bunch multiplicity. In this work the active target is described, which is made of a detector grade polycrystalline synthetic diamond with strip electrodes on both surfaces. The electrodes segmentation allows to measure the beam profile along X and Y and evaluate the average beam position bunch per bunch. The results of beam tests for the first two diamond detector prototypes are shown. One of them holds innovative graphitic electrodes built with a custom process developed in the laboratory, and the other one with commercially available traditional Cr-Au electrodes. The front-end electronics used in the test beam is discussed and the performance observed is presented. Finally, the final design of the target to be realized at the beginning of 2017 to be ready for data taking in 2018 is illustrated.

  6. From Drug Screening to Target Deconvolution: a Target-Based Drug Discovery Pipeline Using Leishmania Casein Kinase 1 Isoform 2 To Identify Compounds with Antileishmanial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Durieu, Emilie; Prina, Eric; Leclercq, Olivier; Oumata, Nassima; Gaboriaud-Kolar, Nicolas; Vougogiannopoulou, Konstantina; Aulner, Nathalie; Defontaine, Audrey; No, Joo Hwan; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Galons, Hervé; Späth, Gerald F.; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Existing therapies for leishmaniases present significant limitations, such as toxic side effects, and are rendered inefficient by parasite resistance. It is of utmost importance to develop novel drugs targeting Leishmania that take these two limitations into consideration. We thus chose a target-based approach using an exoprotein kinase, Leishmania casein kinase 1.2 (LmCK1.2) that was recently shown to be essential for intracellular parasite survival and infectivity. We developed a four-step pipeline to identify novel selective antileishmanial compounds. In step 1, we screened 5,018 compounds from kinase-biased libraries with Leishmania and mammalian CK1 in order to identify hit compounds and assess their specificity. For step 2, we selected 88 compounds among those with the lowest 50% inhibitory concentration to test their biological activity on host-free parasites using a resazurin reduction assay and on intramacrophagic amastigotes using a high content phenotypic assay. Only 75 compounds showed antileishmanial activity and were retained for step 3 to evaluate their toxicity against mouse macrophages and human cell lines. The four compounds that displayed a selectivity index above 10 were then assessed for their affinity to LmCK1.2 using a target deconvolution strategy in step 4. Finally, we retained two compounds, PP2 and compound 42, for which LmCK1.2 seems to be the primary target. Using this four-step pipeline, we identify from several thousand molecules, two lead compounds with a selective antileishmanial activity. PMID:26902771

  7. Molecular pathways: targeting MALT1 paracaspase activity in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fontán, Lorena; Melnick, Ari

    2013-12-15

    MALT1 mediates the activation of NF-κB in response to antigen receptor signaling. MALT1, in association with BCL10 and CARD11, functions as a scaffolding protein to activate the inhibitor of IκB kinase (IKK) complex. In addition, MALT1 is a paracaspase that targets key proteins in a feedback loop mediating termination of the NF-κB response, thus promoting activation of NF-κB signaling. Activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCL), which tend to be more resistant to chemotherapy, are often biologically dependent on MALT1 activity. Newly developed MALT1 small-molecule inhibitors suppress the growth of ABC-DLBCLs in vitro and in vivo. This review highlights the recent advances in the normal and disease-related functions of MALT1. Furthermore, recent progress targeting MALT1 proteolytic activity raises the possibility of deploying MALT1 inhibitors for the treatment of B-cell lymphomas and perhaps autoimmune diseases that involve increased B- or T-cell receptor signaling.

  8. AMPK activation: a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Kimberly A; Valentine, Rudy J; Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and elevated hepatic glucose output. Over 350 million people worldwide have T2D, and the International Diabetes Federation projects that this number will increase to nearly 600 million by 2035. There is a great need for more effective treatments for maintaining glucose homeostasis and improving insulin sensitivity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activation elicits insulin-sensitizing effects, making it an ideal therapeutic target for T2D. AMPK is an energy-sensing enzyme that is activated when cellular energy levels are low, and it signals to stimulate glucose uptake in skeletal muscles, fatty acid oxidation in adipose (and other) tissues, and reduces hepatic glucose production. There is substantial evidence suggesting that AMPK is dysregulated in animals and humans with metabolic syndrome or T2D, and that AMPK activation (physiological or pharmacological) can improve insulin sensitivity and metabolic health. Numerous pharmacological agents, natural compounds, and hormones are known to activate AMPK, either directly or indirectly - some of which (for example, metformin and thiazolidinediones) are currently used to treat T2D. This paper will review the regulation of the AMPK pathway and its role in T2D, some of the known AMPK activators and their mechanisms of action, and the potential for future improvements in targeting AMPK for the treatment of T2D.

  9. Electroporation into Cultured Mammalian Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Takahashi, Masanori; Osumi, Noriko

    Over the last century, mammalian embryos have been used extensively as a common animal model to investigate fundamental questions in the field of developmental biology. More recently, the establishment of transgenic and gene-targeting systems in laboratory mice has enabled researchers to unveil the genetic mechanisms under lying complex developmental processes (Mak, 2007). However, our understanding of cell—cell interactions and their molecular basis in the early stages of mammalian embryogenesis is still very fragmentary. One of the major problems is the difficulty of precise manipulation and limited accessibility to mammalian embryos via uterus wall. Unfortunately, existing tissue and organotypic culture systems per se do not fully recapitulate three-dimensional, dynamic processes of organogenesis observed in vivo. Although transgenic animal technology and virus-mediated gene delivery are useful to manipulate gene expression, these techniques take much time and financial costs, which limit their use.

  10. Enzymology of Mammalian DNA Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Jurkowska, Renata Z; Jeltsch, Albert

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is currently one of the hottest topics in basic and biomedical research. Despite tremendous progress in understanding the structures and biochemical properties of the mammalian DNA nucleotide methyltransferases (DNMTs), principles of their regulation in cells have only begun to be uncovered. In mammals, DNA methylation is introduced by the DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B enzymes, which are all large multi-domain proteins. These enzymes contain a catalytic C-terminal domain with a characteristic cytosine-C5 methyltransferase fold and an N-terminal part with different domains that interacts with other proteins and chromatin and is involved in targeting and regulation of the DNMTs. The subnuclear localization of the DNMT enzymes plays an important role in their biological function: DNMT1 is localized to replicating DNA via interaction with PCNA and UHRF1. DNMT3 enzymes bind to heterochromatin via protein multimerization and are targeted to chromatin by their ADD and PWWP domains. Recently, a novel regulatory mechanism has been discovered in DNMTs, as latest structural and functional data demonstrated that the catalytic activities of all three enzymes are under tight allosteric control of their N-terminal domains having autoinhibitory functions. This mechanism provides numerous possibilities for the precise regulation of the methyltransferases via controlling the binding and release of autoinhibitory domains by protein factors, noncoding RNAs, or by posttranslational modifications of the DNMTs. In this chapter, we summarize key enzymatic properties of DNMTs, including their specificity and processivity, and afterward we focus on the regulation of their activity and targeting via allosteric processes, protein interactors, and posttranslational modifications.

  11. Brain Activation Underlying Threat Detection to Targets of Different Races

    PubMed Central

    Senholzi, Keith B.; Depue, Brendan E.; Correll, Joshua; Banich, Marie T.; Ito, Tiffany A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal underlying racial differences in threat detection. During fMRI, participants determined whether pictures of Black or White individuals held weapons. They were instructed to make shoot responses when the picture showed armed individuals but don’t shoot responses to unarmed individuals, with the cost of not shooting armed individuals being greater than that of shooting unarmed individuals. Participants were faster to shoot armed Blacks than Whites, but faster in making don’t shoot responses to unarmed Whites than Blacks. Brain activity differed to armed versus unarmed targets depending on target race, suggesting different mechanisms underlying threat versus safety decisions. Anterior cingulate cortex was preferentially engaged for unarmed Whites than Blacks. Parietal and visual cortical regions exhibited greater activity for armed Blacks than Whites. Seed-based functional connectivity of the amygdala revealed greater coherence with parietal and visual cortices for armed Blacks than Whites. Furthermore, greater implicit Black-danger associations were associated with increased amygdala activation to armed Blacks, compared to armed Whites. Our results suggest that different neural mechanisms may underlie racial differences in responses to armed versus unarmed targets. PMID:26357911

  12. Threonine-4 of mammalian RNA polymerase II CTD is targeted by Polo-like kinase 3 and required for transcriptional elongation

    PubMed Central

    Hintermair, Corinna; Heidemann, Martin; Koch, Frederic; Descostes, Nicolas; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Fenouil, Romain; Ferrier, Pierre; Flatley, Andrew; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Chapman, Rob D; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Eick, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has evolved an array of heptad repeats with the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 at the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit (Rpb1). Differential phosphorylation of Ser2, Ser5, and Ser7 in the 5′ and 3′ regions of genes coordinates the binding of transcription and RNA processing factors to the initiating and elongating polymerase complexes. Here, we report phosphorylation of Thr4 by Polo-like kinase 3 in mammalian cells. ChIPseq analyses indicate an increase of Thr4-P levels in the 3′ region of genes occurring subsequently to an increase of Ser2-P levels. A Thr4/Ala mutant of Pol II displays a lethal phenotype. This mutant reveals a global defect in RNA elongation, while initiation is largely unaffected. Since Thr4 replacement mutants are viable in yeast we conclude that this amino acid has evolved an essential function(s) in the CTD of Pol II for gene transcription in mammalian cells. PMID:22549466

  13. Identification of a crab gill FXYD2 protein and regulation of crab microsomal Na,K-ATPase activity by mammalian FXYD2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elias C C; Masui, Douglas C; Furriel, Rosa P; McNamara, John C; Barrabin, Hector; Scofano, Helena M; Perales, Jonas; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Leone, Francisco A; Fontes, Carlos Frederico L

    2012-11-01

    This investigation discloses the recognition of an FXYD2 protein in a microsomal Na,K-ATPase preparation from the posterior gills of the blue crab, Callinectes danae, by a mammalian (rabbit) FXYD2 peptide specific antibody (γC(33)) and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry techniques. This is the first demonstration of an invertebrate FXYD2 protein. The addition of exogenous pig FXYD2 peptide to the crab gill microsomal fraction stimulated Na,K-ATPase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Exogenous pig FXYD2 also considerably increased enzyme affinity for K(+), ATP and NH(4)(+). K(0.5) for Na(+) was unaffected. Exogenous pig FXYD2 increased the V(max) for stimulation of gill Na,K-ATPase activity by Na(+), K(+) and ATP, by 30% to 40%. The crab gill FXYD2 is phosphorylated by PKA, suggesting a regulatory function similar to that known for the mammalian enzyme. The PKA-phosphorylated pig FXYD2 peptide stimulated the crab gill Na,K-ATPase activity by 80%, about 2-fold greater than did the non-phosphorylated peptide. Stimulation by the PKC-phosphorylated pig FXYD2 peptide was minimal. These findings confirm the presence of an FXYD2 peptide in the crab gill Na,K-ATPase and demonstrate that this peptide plays an important role in regulating enzyme activity.

  14. Activation of mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, also known as mammalian target of rapamycin) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation and survival. These effects are cell-type-specific, and are elicited in response to stimulation by growth factors, hormones and cytokines, as well as to internal and external metabolic cues. Rapamycin was initially developed as an inhibitor of T-cell proliferation and allograft rejection in the organ transplant setting. Subsequently, its molecular target (mTOR) was identified as a component of two interacting complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, that regulate T-cell lineage specification and macrophage differentiation. mTORC1 drives the proinflammatory expansion of T helper (TH) type 1, TH17, and CD4−CD8− (double-negative, DN) T cells. Both mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibit the development of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory (TREG) cells and, indirectly, mTORC2 favours the expansion of Tfollicular helper (TFH) cells which, similarly to DN T cells, promote B-cell activation and autoantibody production. In contrast to this proinflammatory effect of mTORC2, mTORC1 favours, to some extent, an anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization that is protective against infections and tissue inflammation. Outside the immune system, mTORC1 controls fibroblast proliferation and chondrocyte survival, with implications for tissue fibrosis and osteoarthritis, respectively. Rapamycin (which primarily inhibits mTORC1), ATP-competitive, dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors and upstream regulators of the mTOR pathway are being developed to treat autoimmune, hyperproliferative and degenerative diseases. In this regard, mTOR blockade promises to increase life expectancy through treatment and prevention of rheumatic diseases. PMID:26698023

  15. Successful Targeted Treatment of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome with Tofacitinib.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Fox, Roger W; Zito, Susan L; Choe, Leo; Glover, Sarah C

    2017-04-06

    Mast cell (MC) activation syndrome (MCAS) is a collection of illnesses of inappropriate MC activation with little to no neoplastic MC proliferation, distinguishing it from mastocytosis. MCAS presents as chronic, generally inflammatory multisystem polymorbidity likely driven in most by heterogeneous patterns of constitutively activating mutations in MC regulatory elements, posing challenges for identifying optimal mutation-targeted treatment in individual patients. Targeting commonly affected downstream effectors may yield clinical benefit independent of upstream mutational profile. For example, both activated KIT and numerous cytokine receptors activate the Janus kinases (JAKs). Thus, JAK-inhibiting therapies may be useful against the downstream inflammatory effects of MCAS. The oral JAK1/JAK3 inhibitor, tofacitinib, is currently approved for rheumatoid arthritis and is in clinical trials for other chronic inflammatory disorders. Herein, we report two MCAS patients who rapidly gained substantial symptomatic response to tofacitinib. Their improvement suggests need for further evaluation of this class of drugs in MCAS treatment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeting Gli Transcription Activation by Small Molecule Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Clément, Geneviève; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Li, Hui; Mikami, Iwao; Hirata, Tomomi; Yagui-Beltran, Adam; Lui, Natalie; Do, Hanh T.; Cheng, Tiffany; Tseng, Hsin-Hui; Choi, Helen; Fang, Li-Tai; Kim, Il-Jin; Yue, Dongsheng; Wang, Changli; Zheng, Qingfeng; Fujii, Naoaki; Mann, Michael; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of Hedgehog signaling at the cell membrane has been associated with anti-cancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies. Hedgehog signaling involves activation of Gli transcription factors that can also be induced by alternative pathways. In this study we identified an interaction between Gli proteins and a transcription co-activator TAF9, and validated its functional relevance in regulating Gli transactivation. We also describe a novel, synthetic small molecule, FN1-8, that efficiently interferes with Gli/TAF9 interaction and down-regulate Gli/TAF9 dependent transcriptional activity. More importantly, FN1-8 suppresses cancer cell proliferation in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that blocking Gli transactivation, a key control point of multiple oncogenic pathways, may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:23686308

  17. Kinome-wide selectivity profiling of ATP-competitive mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and characterization of their binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingsong; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Hur, Wooyoung; Niepel, Mario; Westover, Kenneth; Thoreen, Carson C; Wang, Jinhua; Ni, Jing; Patricelli, Matthew P; Vogel, Kurt; Riddle, Steve; Waller, David L; Traynor, Ryan; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Kang, Seong A; Zhao, Jean; Look, A Thomas; Sorger, Peter K; Sabatini, David M; Gray, Nathanael S

    2012-03-23

    An intensive recent effort to develop ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors has resulted in several potent and selective molecules such as Torin1, PP242, KU63794, and WYE354. These inhibitors are being widely used as pharmacological probes of mTOR-dependent biology. To determine the potency and specificity of these agents, we have undertaken a systematic kinome-wide effort to profile their selectivity and potency using chemical proteomics and assays for enzymatic activity, protein binding, and disruption of cellular signaling. Enzymatic and cellular assays revealed that all four compounds are potent inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2, with Torin1 exhibiting ∼20-fold greater potency for inhibition of Thr-389 phosphorylation on S6 kinases (EC(50) = 2 nM) relative to other inhibitors. In vitro biochemical profiling at 10 μM revealed binding of PP242 to numerous kinases, although WYE354 and KU63794 bound only to p38 kinases and PI3K isoforms and Torin1 to ataxia telangiectasia mutated, ATM and Rad3-related protein, and DNA-PK. Analysis of these protein targets in cellular assays did not reveal any off-target activities for Torin1, WYE354, and KU63794 at concentrations below 1 μM but did show that PP242 efficiently inhibited the RET receptor (EC(50), 42 nM) and JAK1/2/3 kinases (EC(50), 780 nM). In addition, Torin1 displayed unusually slow kinetics for inhibition of the mTORC1/2 complex, a property likely to contribute to the pharmacology of this inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of PP242, available ATP-competitive compounds are highly selective mTOR inhibitors when applied to cells at concentrations below 1 μM and that the compounds may represent a starting point for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at developing inhibitors of other PI3K kinase-related kinases.

  18. Asp-ase Activity of the Opossum Granzyme B Supports the Role of Granzyme B as Part of Anti-Viral Immunity Already during Early Mammalian Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhirong; Thorpe, Michael; Akula, Srinivas; Hellman, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Granzyme B is one of the key effector molecules in our defense against viruses and intracellular bacteria. This serine protease together with the pore forming protein perforin, induces caspase or Bid-dependent apoptosis in target cells. Here we present the first characterization of a granzyme B homolog, the grathepsodenase, in a non-placental mammal, the American opossum (Monodelphis domestica). The recombinant enzyme was produced in a human cell line and used to study its primary and extended cleavage specificity using a panel of chromogenic substrates and recombinant protein substrates. The opossum granzyme B was found to have a specificity similar to human granzyme B, although slightly less restrictive in its extended specificity. The identification of a granzyme B homolog with asp-ase (cleaving after aspartic acid) specificity in a non-placental mammal provides strong indications that caspase or Bid-dependent apoptosis by a serine protease with a conserved primary specificity has been part of anti-viral immunity since early mammalian evolution. This finding also indicates that an asp-ase together with a chymase were the first two serine protease genes to appear in the mammalian chymase locus. PMID:27152961

  19. Novel assay for simultaneous measurement of pyridine mononucleotides synthesizing activities allows dissection of the NAD(+) biosynthetic machinery in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zamporlini, Federica; Ruggieri, Silverio; Mazzola, Francesca; Amici, Adolfo; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    The redox coenzyme NAD(+) is also a rate-limiting co-substrate for several enzymes that consume the molecule, thus rendering its continuous re-synthesis indispensable. NAD(+) biosynthesis has emerged as a therapeutic target due to the relevance of NAD(+) -consuming reactions in complex intracellular signaling networks whose alteration leads to many neurologic and metabolic disorders. Distinct metabolic routes, starting from various precursors, are known to support NAD(+) biosynthesis with tissue/cell-specific efficiencies, probably reflecting differential expression of the corresponding rate-limiting enzymes, i.e. nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase, nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase. Understanding the contribution of these enzymes to NAD(+) levels depending on the tissue/cell type and metabolic status is necessary for the rational design of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating NAD(+) availability. Here we report a simple, fast and sensitive coupled fluorometric assay that enables simultaneous determination of the four activities in whole-cell extracts and biological fluids. Its application to extracts from various mouse tissues, human cell lines and plasma yielded for the first time an overall picture of the tissue/cell-specific distribution of the activities of the various enzymes. The screening enabled us to gather novel findings, including (a) the presence of quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide riboside kinase in all examined tissues/cell lines, indicating that quinolinate and nicotinamide riboside are relevant NAD(+) precursors, and (b) the unexpected occurrence of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase in human plasma.

  20. The neurotensin gene is a downstream target for Ras activation.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Zhou, Z; Celano, P; Li, J

    1995-01-01

    Ras regulates novel patterns of gene expression and the differentiation of various eukaryotic cell types. Stable transfection of Ha-ras into the human colon cancer line CaCo2 results in the morphologic differentiation to a small bowel phenotype. The purpose of our study was to determine whether the Ras regulatory pathway plays a role in the expression of the neurotensin gene (NT/N), a terminally differentiated endocrine product specifically localized in the gastrointestinal tract to the adult small bowel. We found that CaCo2-ras cells, but not parental CaCo2, express high levels of the human NT/N gene and, moreover, that this increase in gene expression is regulated at the level of transcription. Transfection experiments using NT/N-CAT mutation constructs identify the proximal 200 bp of NT/N flanking sequence as sufficient for maximal Ras-mediated NT/N reporter gene induction. Furthermore, a proximal AP-1/CRE motif is crucial for this Ras-mediated NT/N activation. Wild-type Ha-ras induces NT/N gene expression, albeit at lower levels than activated Ras; a dominant-negative Raf blocks this NT/N induction, suggesting that Raf lies down-stream of Ras in this pathway. In addition, postconfluent cultures of CaCo2 cells, which are differentiated to a small bowel phenotype, express the NT/N gene by 6 d after reaching confluency; this increase of NT/N expression is associated with concomitant increases of cellular p21ras protein. We conclude that Ras (both wild-type and activated) enhances expression of the NT/N gene in the gut-derived CaCo2 cell line, suggesting an important role for the Ras signaling pathway in NT/N gene transcription. Our results underscore the possibility that tissue-specific genes (such as NT/N) expressed in distinct subpopulations of the gut may be subject to Ras regulation. Finally, we speculate that the NT/N gene and the CaCo2 and CaCo2-ras cell systems will provide unique models to further define the cellular mechanisms leading to mammalian

  1. Factor XI and Contact Activation as Targets for Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gailani, David; Bane, Charles E.; Gruber, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Summary The most commonly used anticoagulants produce therapeutic antithrombotic effects either by inhibiting thrombin or factor Xa, or by lowering the plasma levels of the precursors of these key enzymes, prothrombin and factor X. These drugs do not distinguish between thrombin generation contributing to thrombosis from thrombin generation required for hemostasis. Thus, anticoagulants increase bleeding risk, and many patients who would benefit from therapy go untreated because of comorbidities that place them at unacceptable risk for hemorrhage. Studies in animals demonstrate that components of the plasma contact activation system contribute to experimentally-induced thrombosis, despite playing little or no role in hemostasis. Attention has focused on factor XII, the zymogen of a protease (factor XIIa) that initiates contact activation when blood is exposed to foreign surfaces; and factor XI, the zymogen of the protease factor XIa, which links contact activation to the thrombin generation mechanism. In the case of factor XI, epidemiologic data indicate this protein contributes to stroke and venous thromboembolism, and perhaps myocardial infarction, in humans. A phase 2 trial showing that reduction of factor XI may be more effective than low-molecular-weight heparin at preventing venous thrombosis during knee replacement surgery provides proof of concept for the premise that an antithrombotic effect can be uncoupled from an anticoagulant effect in humans by targeting components of contact activation. Here we review data on the role of factor XI and factor XII in thrombosis, and results of pre-clinical and human trials for therapies targeting these proteins. PMID:25976012

  2. Factor XI and contact activation as targets for antithrombotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gailani, D; Bane, C E; Gruber, A

    2015-08-01

    The most commonly used anticoagulants produce therapeutic antithrombotic effects either by inhibiting thrombin or factor Xa (FXa) or by lowering the plasma levels of the precursors of these key enzymes, prothrombin and FX. These drugs do not distinguish between thrombin generation contributing to thrombosis from thrombin generation required for hemostasis. Thus, anticoagulants increase bleeding risk, and many patients who would benefit from therapy go untreated because of comorbidities that place them at unacceptable risk for hemorrhage. Studies in animals demonstrate that components of the plasma contact activation system contribute to experimentally induced thrombosis, despite playing little or no role in hemostasis. Attention has focused on FXII, the zymogen of a protease (FXIIa) that initiates contact activation when blood is exposed to foreign surfaces, and FXI, the zymogen of the protease FXIa, which links contact activation to the thrombin generation mechanism. In the case of FXI, epidemiologic data indicate this protein contributes to stroke and venous thromboembolism, and perhaps myocardial infarction, in humans. A phase 2 trial showing that reduction of FXI may be more effective than low molecular weight heparin at preventing venous thrombosis during knee replacement surgery provides proof of concept for the premise that an antithrombotic effect can be uncoupled from an anticoagulant effect in humans by targeting components of contact activation. Here, we review data on the role of FXI and FXII in thrombosis and results of preclinical and human trials for therapies targeting these proteins.

  3. Mechanistic or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) may determine robustness in young male mice at the cost of accelerated aging

    PubMed Central

    Leontieva, Olga V.; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine M.; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2012-01-01

    Males, who are bigger and stronger than females, die younger in most species from flies to mammals including humans. Cellular mass growth is driven in part by mTOR (Target of Rapamycin). When developmental growth is completed, then, instead of growth, mTOR drives aging, manifested by increased cellular functions, such as hyper-secretion by fibroblasts, thus altering homeostasis, leading to age-related diseases and death. We hypothesize that MTOR activity is elevated in male mice compared with females. Noteworthy, 6 months old males were 28 % heavier than females. Also levels of phosphorylated S6 (pS6) and phospho-AKT (p-AKT, Ser 473), markers of the mTOR activity, were higher in male organs tested. Levels of pS6 were highly variable among mice and correlated with body weight and p-AKT. With age, the difference between levels of pS6 between sexes tended to minimize, albeit males still had hyperactive mTOR. Unlike fasting, the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of rapamycin eliminated pS6 in all organs of all females measured by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry without affecting p-AKT and blood insulin. Although i.p. rapamycin dramatically decreased levels of pS6 in males too, it was still detectable by immunoblotting upon longer exposure. Our study demonstrated that both tissue p-AKT and pS6 were higher in young males than young females and were associated with increased body weight and insulin. These data can explain larger body size and faster aging in males. Our data suggest higher efficacy of rapamycin compared to fasting. Higher sensitivity of females to rapamycin may explain more pronounced life extension by rapamycin observed in females compared to males in several studies. PMID:23443503

  4. Haem-activated promiscuous targeting of artemisinin in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Chia, Wan Ni; Loh, Cheryl C. Y.; Li, Zhengjun; Lee, Yew Mun; He, Yingke; Yuan, Li-Xia; Lim, Teck Kwang; Liu, Min; Liew, Chin Xia; Lee, Yan Quan; Zhang, Jianbin; Lu, Nianci; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Shen, Han-Ming; Tan, Kevin S. W.; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of action of artemisinin and its derivatives, the most potent of the anti-malarial drugs, is not completely understood. Here we present an unbiased chemical proteomics analysis to directly explore this mechanism in Plasmodium falciparum. We use an alkyne-tagged artemisinin analogue coupled with biotin to identify 124 artemisinin covalent binding protein targets, many of which are involved in the essential biological processes of the parasite. Such a broad targeting spectrum disrupts the biochemical landscape of the parasite and causes its death. Furthermore, using alkyne-tagged artemisinin coupled with a fluorescent dye to monitor protein binding, we show that haem, rather than free ferrous iron, is predominantly responsible for artemisinin activation. The haem derives primarily from the parasite's haem biosynthesis pathway at the early ring stage and from haemoglobin digestion at the latter stages. Our results support a unifying model to explain the action and specificity of artemisinin in parasite killing. PMID:26694030

  5. Utilization of a BGO detector as an active oxygen target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveman, R.; Gozani, T.; Bendahan, J.; Krivicich, J.; Elias, E.; Altschuler, E.

    1994-12-01

    The (n, n'γx) cross section for the 6.13 MeV state in oxygen has recently become of general interest because of the possibility of using this process to assay oxygen as a part of non-intrusive inspections. Localized densities of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are particularly useful in determining the presence of explosives and/or drugs in containers of all sizes, from suitcases to cargo containers. The presence of oxygen in BGO (Bi 4Ge 3O 12) scintillator makes this detector suitable for use as an active target for the measurement of the energy dependence of the excitation, of the first (6.049 MeV O +) and second (6.130 MeV 3 -) excited states in 16O by fast neutron interactions. An active target functions as both a target and an active device such as a detector. The de-excitations of the 6.049 and 6.130 states take place by nuclear pair production and γ-ray emission respectively. There is a large probability of absorbing all of the de-excitation energy in the scintillator in either of these cases. Since the energies deposited in the scintillator by these transitions are very close, the de-excitations are indistinguishable. However, since the cross section for the excitation of the 6.13 MeV state is believed to be larger than that of the 6.049 MeV, the major measured features of the energy variations are those related to the second state. The validity of the technique was initially tested using (MCNP) calculations. The calculations established that the detected neutron count rate in the crystal was proportional to the cross-sections used as input for the calculations, and that the constant of proportionality did not vary with neutron energy. Subsequently, measurements were made with a BGO detector as an active oxygen target. The results clearly show a strong energy dependence including several resonances.

  6. Dedicated high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy radiation fields for in vitro cell exposures at variable source-target cell distances: killing of mammalian cells depends on temporal dose rate fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veigel, Cornelia; Hartmann, Günther H.; Fritz, Peter; Debus, Jürgen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2017-02-01

    Afterloading brachytherapy is conducted by the stepwise movement of a radioactive source through surgically implanted applicator tubes where at predefined dwell positions calculated dwell times optimize spatial dose delivery with respect to a planned dose level. The temporal exposure pattern exhibits drastic fluctuations in dose rate at a given coordinate and within a single treatment session because of the discontinuous and repeated source movement into the target volume. This could potentially affect biological response. Therefore, mammalian cells were exposed as monolayers to a high dose rate 192Ir source by utilizing a dedicated irradiation device where the distance between a planar array of radioactive source positions and the plane of the cell monolayer could be varied from 2.5 mm to 40 mm, thus varying dose rate pattern for any chosen total dose. The Gammamed IIi afterloading system equipped with a nominal 370 GBq (10 Ci) 192-Ir source was used to irradiate V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts from both confluent and from exponential growth phase with dose up to 12 Gy (at room temperature, total exposure not exceeding 1 h). For comparison, V79 cells were also exposed to 6 MV x-rays from a clinical linear accelerator (dose rate of 2.5 Gy min‑1). As biological endpoint, cell survival was determined by standard colony forming assay. Dose measurements were conducted with a diamond detector (sensitive area 7.3 mm2), calibrated by means of 60Co radiation. Additionally, dose delivery was simulated by Monte Carlo calculations using the EGSnrc code system. The calculated secondary electron fluence spectra at the cell location did not indicate a significant change of radiation quality (i.e. higher linear energy transfer) at the lower distances. Clonogenic cell survival curves obtained after brachytherapy exhibited an altered biological response compared to x-rays which was characterized by a significant reduction of the survival curve shoulder when dose rate

  7. Effects of simian virus 40 large and small tumor antigens on mammalian target of rapamycin signaling: small tumor antigen mediates hypophosphorylation of eIF4E-binding protein 1 late in infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjun; Kudchodkar, Sagar B; Alwine, James C

    2005-06-01

    We report that late in a simian virus 40 (SV40) infection in CV-1 cells, there are significant decreases in phosphorylations of two mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling effectors, the eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP1) and p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K). The hypophosphorylation of 4E-BP1 results in 4E-BP1 binding to eIF4E, leading to the inhibition of cap-dependent translation. The dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 is specifically mediated by SV40 small t antigen and requires the protein phosphatase 2A binding domain but not an active DnaJ domain. Serum-starved primary African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells also showed decreased phosphorylations of mTOR, 4E-BP1, and p70S6K at late times in infection (48 h postinfection [hpi]). However, at earlier times (12 and 24 hpi), in AGMK cells, phosphorylated p70S6K was moderately increased, correlating with a significant increase in phosphorylation of the p70S6K substrate, ribosomal protein S6. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at early times could not be determined, since hyperphosphorylated 4E-BP1 was present in mock-infected AGMK cells. Elevated levels of phosphorylated eIF4G, a third mTOR effector, were detected in both CV-1 and AGMK cells at all times after infection, indicating that eIF4G phosphorylation was induced throughout the infection and unaffected by small t antigen. The data suggest that during SV40 lytic infection in monkey cells, the phosphorylations of p70S6K, S6, and eIF4G are increased early in the infection (12 and 24 hpi), but late in the infection (48 hpi), the phosphorylations of mTOR, p70S6K, and 4E-BP1 are dramatically decreased by a mechanism mediated, at least in part, by small t antigen.

  8. Effects of Simian Virus 40 Large and Small Tumor Antigens on Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling: Small Tumor Antigen Mediates Hypophosphorylation of eIF4E-Binding Protein 1 Late in Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongjun; Kudchodkar, Sagar B.; Alwine, James C.

    2005-01-01

    We report that late in a simian virus 40 (SV40) infection in CV-1 cells, there are significant decreases in phosphorylations of two mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling effectors, the eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP1) and p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K). The hypophosphorylation of 4E-BP1 results in 4E-BP1 binding to eIF4E, leading to the inhibition of cap-dependent translation. The dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 is specifically mediated by SV40 small t antigen and requires the protein phosphatase 2A binding domain but not an active DnaJ domain. Serum-starved primary African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells also showed decreased phosphorylations of mTOR, 4E-BP1, and p70S6K at late times in infection (48 h postinfection [hpi]). However, at earlier times (12 and 24 hpi), in AGMK cells, phosphorylated p70S6K was moderately increased, correlating with a significant increase in phosphorylation of the p70S6K substrate, ribosomal protein S6. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at early times could not be determined, since hyperphosphorylated 4E-BP1 was present in mock-infected AGMK cells. Elevated levels of phosphorylated eIF4G, a third mTOR effector, were detected in both CV-1 and AGMK cells at all times after infection, indicating that eIF4G phosphorylation was induced throughout the infection and unaffected by small t antigen. The data suggest that during SV40 lytic infection in monkey cells, the phosphorylations of p70S6K, S6, and eIF4G are increased early in the infection (12 and 24 hpi), but late in the infection (48 hpi), the phosphorylations of mTOR, p70S6K, and 4E-BP1 are dramatically decreased by a mechanism mediated, at least in part, by small t antigen. PMID:15890927

  9. Protection of mammalian cells by o-phenanthroline from lethal and DNA-damaging effects produced by active oxygen species.

    PubMed

    de Mello Filho, A C; Meneghini, R

    1985-10-30

    Active oxygen species are suspected as being a cause of the cellular damage that occurs at the site of inflammation. Phagocytic cells accumulate at these sites and produce superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical. The ultimate killing species, the cellular target and the mechanism whereby the lethal injury is produced are unknown. We exposed mouse fibroblasts to xanthine oxidase and acetaldehyde, a system which mimics the membrane of phagocytic cells in terms of production of oxygen species. We observed that the generation of these species produced DNA strand breaks and cellular death. The metal chelator o-phenanthroline completely abolished the former effect, and at the same time it effectively protected the cells from lethal injuries. Because complexing iron o-phenanthroline prevents the formation of hydroxyl radical by the Fendon reaction (Fe(II) + H2O2----Fe(III) + OH- + OH.), it is proposed that most of the cell death and DNA damage are brought about by OH radical, produced from other species by iron-mediated reactions.

  10. KV1 channels identified in rodent myelinated axons, linked to Cx29 in innermost myelin: support for electrically active myelin in mammalian saltatory conduction

    PubMed Central

    Vanderpool, Kimberly G.; Yasumura, Thomas; Hickman, Jordan; Beatty, Jonathan T.; Nagy, James I.

    2016-01-01

    Saltatory conduction in mammalian myelinated axons was thought to be well understood before recent discoveries revealed unexpected subcellular distributions and molecular identities of the K+-conductance pathways that provide for rapid axonal repolarization. In this study, we visualize, identify, localize, quantify, and ultrastructurally characterize axonal KV1.1/KV1.2 channels in sciatic nerves of rodents. With the use of light microscopic immunocytochemistry and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling electron microscopy, KV1.1/KV1.2 channels are localized to three anatomically and compositionally distinct domains in the internodal axolemmas of large myelinated axons, where they form densely packed “rosettes” of 9-nm intramembrane particles. These axolemmal KV1.1/KV1.2 rosettes are precisely aligned with and ultrastructurally coupled to connexin29 (Cx29) channels, also in matching rosettes, in the surrounding juxtaparanodal myelin collars and along the inner mesaxon. As >98% of transmembrane proteins large enough to represent ion channels in these specialized domains, ∼500,000 KV1.1/KV1.2 channels define the paired juxtaparanodal regions as exclusive membrane domains for the voltage-gated K+ conductance that underlies rapid axonal repolarization in mammals. The 1:1 molecular linkage of KV1 channels to Cx29 channels in the apposed juxtaparanodal collars, plus their linkage to an additional 250,000–400,000 Cx29 channels along each inner mesaxon in every large-diameter myelinated axon examined, supports previously proposed K+ conductance directly from juxtaparanodal axoplasm into juxtaparanodal myeloplasm in mammalian axons. With neither Cx29 protein nor myelin rosettes detectable in frog myelinated axons, these data showing axon-to-myelin linkage by abundant KV1/Cx29 channels in rodent axons support renewed consideration of an electrically active role for myelin in increasing both saltatory conduction velocity and maximum propagation frequency in

  11. Photodynamic inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  12. Recent advances in mammalian protein production

    PubMed Central

    Bandaranayake, Ashok D.; Almo, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian protein production platforms have had a profound impact in many areas of basic and applied research, and an increasing number of blockbuster drugs are recombinant mammalian proteins. With global sales of these drugs exceeding US$120 billion per year, both industry and academic research groups continue to develop cost effective methods for producing mammalian proteins to support preclinical and clinical evaluations of potential therapeutics. While a wide range of platforms have been successfully exploited for laboratory use, the bulk of recent biologics have been produced in mammalian cell lines due to the requirement for post translational modification and the biosynthetic complexity of the target proteins. In this review we highlight the range of mammalian expression platforms available for recombinant protein production, as well as advances in technologies for the rapid and efficient selection of highly productive clones. PMID:24316512

  13. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  14. Bat auditory cortex – model for general mammalian auditory computation or special design solution for active time perception?

    PubMed

    Kössl, Manfred; Hechavarria, Julio; Voss, Cornelia; Schaefer, Markus; Vater, Marianne

    2015-03-01

    Audition in bats serves passive orientation, alerting functions and communication as it does in other vertebrates. In addition, bats have evolved echolocation for orientation and prey detection and capture. This put a selective pressure on the auditory system in regard to echolocation-relevant temporal computation and frequency analysis. The present review attempts to evaluate in which respect the processing modules of bat auditory cortex (AC) are a model for typical mammalian AC function or are designed for echolocation-unique purposes. We conclude that, while cortical area arrangement and cortical frequency processing does not deviate greatly from that of other mammals, the echo delay time-sensitive dorsal cortex regions contain special designs for very powerful time perception. Different bat species have either a unique chronotopic cortex topography or a distributed salt-and-pepper representation of echo delay. The two designs seem to enable similar behavioural performance.

  15. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor cells. These results indicated that FA-AN may be used as a promising actively targetable drug delivery system to improve drug

  16. Mammalian Polyamine Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, Anthony E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Polyamines are ubiquitous small basic molecules that play multiple essential roles in mammalian physiology. Their cellular content is highly regulated and there is convincing evidence that altered metabolism is involvement in many disease states. Drugs altering polyamine levels may therefore have a variety of important targets. This review will summarize the current state of understanding of polyamine metabolism and function, the regulation of polyamine content, and heritable pathological conditions that may be derived from altered polyamine metabolism. PMID:19603518

  17. TRAF6 Activation in Multiple Myeloma: A Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong; Tamashiro, Samantha; Baritaki, Stavroula; Penichet, Manuel; Yu, Youhua; Chen, Haiming; Berenson, James; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable B-lymphocyte malignancy. New therapeutic options have become available during the past several years; however nearly all patients acquire resistance to currently available therapeutic agents. Mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis and chemoresistance of MM include genetic abnormalities, chromosomal translocations, gene mutations, the interaction between MM cells and the bone marrow microenvironment, and defects in the apoptotic signaling pathways. Survival signaling pathways associated with the pathogenesis of MM and bone marrow stromal cells play crucial roles in promoting growth, survival, adhesion, immortalization, angiogenesis, and drug resistance. The receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B/receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand/tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (RANK/RANKL-TRAF6) signal pathway mediates osteolytic bone lesions through the activation of the NF-κB and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JNK) pathways in osteoclast precursor cells and thus contributes to the main clinical manifestations of bone disease. TRAF6 has also been identified as a ligase for Akt ubiquitination and membrane recruitment and its phosphorylation on growth factor stimulation. The inhibition of TRAF6 by silencing RNA or by decoy peptides decreases MM tumor cell proliferation and increases apoptosis as well as bone resorption. Some proteasome inhibitors and benzoxadiazole derivatives showed inhibitory effects on the activity and function of TRAF6. Overall, we propose that TRAF6 may be considered as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of MM. PMID:22440007

  18. Novel strategies for ultrahigh specific activity targeted nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dong

    2012-12-13

    We have developed novel strategies optimized for preparing high specific activity radiolabeled nanoparticles, targeting nuclear imaging of low abundance biomarkers. Several compounds have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64 for radiolabeling of SCK-nanoparticles via Copper(I) catalyzed or copper-free alkyne-azide cyclolization. Novel strategies have been developed to achieve ultrahigh specific activity with administrable amount of dose for human study using copper-free chemistry. Ligands for carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12), a low abundance extracellular biomarker for the responsiveness of breast cancer to endocrine therapie, have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64, and one of them has been evaluated in animal models. The results of this project will lead to major improvements in the use of nanoparticles in nuclear imaging and will significantly advance their potential for detecting low abundance biomarkers of medical importance.

  19. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  20. Health Activism Targeting Corporations: A Critical Health Communication Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zoller, Heather M

    2017-02-01

    Health activists and health social movements have transformed medical treatment, promoted public health policies, and extended civil rights for people with illness and disability. This essay explores health activism that targets corporate-generated illness and risk in order to understand the unique communicative challenges involved in this area of contention. Arguing for greater critical engagement with policy, the article integrates policy research with social movements, subpolitics, and issue management literature. Drawing from activist discourse and multidisciplinary research, the article describes how a wide array of groups groups build visibility for corporate health effects, create the potential for networking and collaboration, and politicize health by attributing illness to corporate behaviors. The discussion articulates the implications of this activism for health communication theory, research, and practice.

  1. Small molecule inhibitors targeting activator protein 1 (AP-1).

    PubMed

    Ye, Na; Ding, Ye; Wild, Christopher; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2014-08-28

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases.

  2. Precise Measurement of Drift Velocities in Active-Target Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Louis

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear experiments with radioactive beams are needed to improve our understanding of nuclei structure far from stability. Radioactive beams typically have low beam rates, but active-target detectors can compensate for these low beam rates. In active-target detectors that are also Time-Projection Chambers (TPC), ionized electrons drift through an electric fieldto a detection device to imagethe trajectory of charged-particle ionization tracks within the chamber's gas volume. The measurement of the ionized electrons' drift velocity is crucial for the accurate imaging of these tracks. In order to measure this drift velocity, we will use a UV laser and photo-sensitive foil in a the ND-Cubedetector we are developing, periodically releasingelectrons from the foil at a known timesand a known distance from the electron detector, thereby precisely measuring the drift velocity in situ. We have surveyed several materials to find a material that will work well with typical solid-state UV lasers on the market. We plan to determine the best material and thickness of the foil to maximize the number of photoelectrons. The precision that will be afforded by this measurement of the drift velocity will allow us to eliminate a source of systematic uncertainty.

  3. 78 FR 35612 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Targeted Teacher Shortage Areas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Targeted Teacher Shortage Areas Nationwide... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Targeted Teacher Shortage... Family Education Loan Programs (FFELP) regulations, which address the targeted teacher...

  4. mRNA Targeting to Endoplasmic Reticulum Precedes Ago Protein Interaction and MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated Translation Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Barman, Bahnisikha; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2015-10-09

    MicroRNA (miRNA) binds to the 3'-UTR of its target mRNAs to repress protein synthesis. Extensive research was done to understand the mechanism of miRNA-mediated repression in animal cells. Considering the progress in understanding the mechanism, information about the subcellular sites of miRNA-mediated repression is surprisingly limited. In this study, using an inducible expression system for an miRNA target message, we have delineated how a target mRNA passes through polysome association and Ago2 interaction steps on rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before the miRNA-mediated repression sets in. From this study, de novo formed target mRNA localization to the ER-bound polysomes manifested as the earliest event, which is followed by Ago2 micro-ribonucleoprotein binding, and translation repression of target message. Compartmentalization of this process to rough ER membrane ensures enrichment of miRNA-targeted messages and micro-ribonucleoprotein components on ER upon reaching a steady state.

  5. Targeting of Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis Underlies the Enhanced Antitumor Activity of Lenvatinib in Combination with Everolimus.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Masahiro; Adachi, Yusuke; Ozawa, Yoichi; Kimura, Takayuki; Hoshi, Taisuke; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Tohyama, Osamu; Mitsuhashi, Kaoru; Yamaguchi, Atsumi; Matsui, Junji; Funahashi, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-20

    The combination of lenvatinib-a multiple receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor-plus everolimus-a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor-significantly improved clinical outcomes versus everolimus monotherapy in a phase 2 clinical study of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, we investigated potential mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of the combination treatment in preclinical RCC models. Lenvatinib plus everolimus showed greater antitumor activity than either monotherapy in 3 human RCC xenograft mouse models (A-498, Caki-1, and Caki-2). In particular, the combination led to tumor regression in the A-498 and Caki-1 models. In the A-498 model, everolimus demonstrated antiproliferative activity, whereas lenvatinib showed antiangiogenic effects. The antiangiogenic activity was potentiated by the lenvatinib plus everolimus combination in Caki-1 xenografts, where FGF-driven angiogenesis may contribute to tumor growth. The combination showed mostly additive activity in VEGF-activated, and synergistic activity against FGF-activated endothelial cells in cell proliferation and tube formation assays, as well as strongly suppressed mTOR-S6K-S6 signaling. Enhanced antitumor activities of the combination versus each monotherapy were also observed in mice bearing human pancreatic KP-1 xenografts overexpressing VEGF or FGF. Our results indicated that simultaneous targeting tumor cell growth and angiogenesis by lenvatinib plus everolimus resulted in enhanced antitumor activity. The enhanced inhibition of both VEGF- and FGF-signaling pathways by the combination underlies its superior antiangiogenic activity in human RCC xenograft models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  7. Crowding and Follicular Fate: Spatial Determinants of Follicular Reserve and Activation of Follicular Growth in the Mammalian Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Gaytan, Francisco; Morales, Concepcion; Leon, Silvia; Garcia-Galiano, David; Roa, Juan; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Initiation of growth of resting ovarian follicles is a key phenomenon for providing an adequate number of mature oocytes in each ovulation, while preventing premature exhaustion of primordial follicle reserve during the reproductive lifespan. Resting follicle dynamics strongly suggest that primordial follicles are under constant inhibitory influences, by mechanisms and factors whose nature remains ill defined. In this work, we aimed to assess the influence of spatial determinants, with special attention to clustering patterns and crowding, on the fate of early follicles in the adult mouse and human ovary. To this end, detailed histological and morphometric analyses, targeting resting and early growing follicles, were conducted in ovaries from mice, either wild type (WT) or genetically modified to lack kisspeptin receptor expression (Kiss1r KO), and healthy adult women. Kiss1r KO mice were studied as model of persistent hypogonadotropism and anovulation. Different qualitative and quantitative indices of the patterns of spatial distribution of resting and early growing follicles in the mouse and human ovary, including the Morisita’s index of clustering, were obtained. Our results show that resting primordial follicles display a clear-cut clustered pattern of spatial distribution in adult mouse and human ovaries, and that resting follicle aggrupation is inversely correlated with the proportion of follicles initiating growth and entering into the growing pool. As a whole, our data suggest that resting follicle crowding, defined by changes in density and clustered pattern of distribution, is a major determinant of follicular activation and the fate of ovarian reserve. Uneven follicle crowding would constitute the structural counterpart of the major humoral regulators of early follicular growth, with potential implications in ovarian ageing and pathophysiology. PMID:26642206

  8. Envelope lipid-packing as a critical factor for the biological activity and stability of alphavirus particles isolated from mammalian and mosquito cells.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ivanildo P; Carvalho, Carlos A M; Ferreira, Davis F; Weissmüller, Gilberto; Rocha, Gustavo M; Silva, Jerson L; Gomes, Andre M O

    2011-01-21

    Alphaviruses are enveloped arboviruses. The viral envelope is derived from the host cell and is positioned between two icosahedral protein shells (T = 4). Because the viral envelope contains glycoproteins involved in cell recognition and entry, the integrity of the envelope is critical for the success of the early events of infection. Differing levels of cholesterol in different hosts leads to the production of alphaviruses with distinct levels of this sterol loaded in the envelope. Using Mayaro virus, a New World alphavirus, we investigated the role of cholesterol on the envelope of alphavirus particles assembled in either mammalian or mosquito cells. Our results show that although quite different in their cholesterol content, Mayaro virus particles obtained from both cells share a similar high level of lateral organization in their envelopes. This organization, as well as viral stability and infectivity, is severely compromised when cholesterol is depleted from the envelope of virus particles isolated from mammalian cells, but virus particles isolated from mosquito cells are relatively unaffected by cholesterol depletion. We suggest that it is not cholesterol itself, but rather the organization of the viral envelope, that is critical for the biological activity of alphaviruses.

  9. Cytotoxic activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins on mammalian cells transfected with cadherin-like Cry receptor gene of Bombyx mori (silkworm).

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Yoko; Nakatani, Fumiki; Hashimoto, Keiko; Ikawa, Satoshi; Matsuura, Chikako; Fukada, Takashi; Sugimoto, Kenji; Himeno, Michio

    2003-01-01

    Cry1Aa, an insecticidal protein produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, has been shown to bind to cadherin-like protein, BtR175, in Bombyx mori (silkworm) midgut. We previously reported three variant alleles of BtR175 (BtR175a, b and c). When transiently expressed in COS7 cells, all the three BtR175 variants bound to Cry1Aa. We stably expressed BtR175b in HEK293 cells. These BtR175b-expressing cells swelled and died in the presence of activated Cry1Aa in a dose- and time-dependent manner, showing that BtR175b itself can impart Cry1Aa-susceptibility to mammalian cells. These cells were more susceptible to Cry1Aa than to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. Since dispersed B. mori midgut cells were reported to be highly susceptible to Cry1Ac, this result suggested that other Cry1Ac-specific receptor(s) were simultaneously working with BtR175 in the midgut cells. Advantages are also discussed of applying these transfected mammalian cells to toxicity assays of mutant Cry proteins. PMID:12403648

  10. Mammalian Mon2/Ysl2 regulates endosome-to-Golgi trafficking but possesses no guanine nucleotide exchange activity toward Arl1 GTPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Divyanshu; Boh, Boon Kim; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Li; Cornvik, Tobias Carl; Hong, Wanjin; Lu, Lei

    2013-11-01

    Arl1 is a member of Arf family small GTPases that is essential for the organization and function of Golgi complex. Mon2/Ysl2, which shares significant homology with Sec7 family Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors, was poorly characterized in mammalian cells. Here, we report the first in depth characterization of mammalian Mon2. We found that Mon2 localized to trans-Golgi network which was dependent on both its N and C termini. The depletion of Mon2 did not affect the Golgi localized or cellular active form of Arl1. Furthermore, our in vitro assay demonstrated that recombinant Mon2 did not promote guanine nucleotide exchange of Arl1. Therefore, our results suggest that Mon2 could be neither necessary nor sufficient for the guanine nucleotide exchange of Arl1. We demonstrated that Mon2 was involved in endosome-to-Golgi trafficking as its depletion accelerated the delivery of furin and CI-M6PR to Golgi after endocytosis.

  11. Target selectivity of vertebrate notch proteins. Collaboration between discrete domains and CSL-binding site architecture determines activation probability.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chin-Tong; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Chang, Li-Wei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Stormo, Gary D; Kopan, Raphael

    2006-02-24

    All four mammalian Notch proteins interact with a single DNA-binding protein (RBP-jkappa), yet they are not equivalent in activating target genes. Parallel assays of three Notch-responsive promoters in several cell lines revealed that relative activation strength is dependent on protein module and promoter context more than the cellular context. Each Notch protein reads binding site orientation and distribution on the promoter differently; Notch1 performs extremely well on paired sites, and Notch3 prefers single sites in conjunction with a proximal zinc finger transcription factor. Although head-head sites can elicit a Notch response on their own, use of CBS (CSL binding site) in tail-tail orientation is context-dependent. Bias for specific DNA elements is achieved by interplay between the N-terminal RAM (RBP-jkappa-associated molecule/ankyrin region), which interprets CBS proximity and orientation, and the C-terminal transactivation domain that interacts specifically with the transcription machinery or nearby factors. To confirm the prediction that modular design underscores the evolution of functional divergence between Notch proteins, we generated a synthetic Notch protein (Notch1 ankyrin with Notch3 transactivation domain) that displayed superior signaling strength on the hes5 promoter. Consistent with the prediction that "preferred" targets (Hes1) should respond faster and at lower Notch concentration than other targets, we showed that Hes5-GFP was extinguished fast and recovered slowly, whereas Hes1-GFP was inhibited late and recovered quickly after a pulse of DAPT in metanephroi cultures.

  12. Targeting lymphocyte activation through the lymphotoxin and LIGHT pathways

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Summary Cytokines mediate key communication pathways essential for regulation of immune responses. Full activation of antigen-responding lymphocytes requires cooperating signals from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related cytokines and their specific receptors. LIGHT, a lymphotoxin-β (LTβ)-related TNF family member, modulates T-cell activation through two receptors, the herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and indirectly through the LT-β receptor. An unexpected finding revealed a non-canonical binding site on HVEM for the immunoglobulin superfamily member, B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA), and an inhibitory signaling protein suppressing T-cell activation. Thus, HVEM can act as a molecular switch between proinflammatory and inhibitory signaling. The non-canonical HVEM-BTLA pathway also acts to counter LTβR signaling that promotes the proliferation of antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) within lymphoid tissue microenvironments. These results indicate LTβ receptor and HVEM-BTLA pathways form an integrated signaling circuit. Targeting these cytokine pathways with specific antagonists (antibody or decoy receptor) can alter lymphocyte differentiation and activation. Alternately, agonists directed at their cell surface receptors can restore homeostasis and potentially reset immune and inflammatory processes, which may be useful in treating autoimmune and infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:18613837

  13. Permanent Genetic Access to Transiently Active Neurons via TRAP: Targeted Recombination in Active Populations

    PubMed Central

    Guenthner, Casey J.; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Yang, Helen H.; Heller, H. Craig; Luo, Liqun

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Targeting genetically encoded tools for neural circuit dissection to relevant cellular populations is a major challenge in neurobiology. We developed a new approach, Targeted Recombination in Active Populations (TRAP), to obtain genetic access to neurons that were activated by defined stimuli. This method utilizes mice in which the tamoxifen-dependent recombinase CreERT2 is expressed in an activity-dependent manner from the loci of the immediate early genes Arc and Fos. Active cells that express CreERT2 can undergo recombination only when tamoxifen is present, allowing genetic access to neurons that are active during a time window of less than 12 h. We show that TRAP can selectively provide access to neurons activated by specific somatosensory, visual, and auditory stimuli, and by experience in a novel environment. When combined with tools for labeling, tracing, recording, and manipulating neurons, TRAP offers a powerful new approach for understanding how the brain processes information and generates behavior. PMID:23764283

  14. Dynamin1 Is a Novel Target for IRSp53 Protein and Works with Mammalian Enabled (Mena) Protein and Eps8 to Regulate Filopodial Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ai Mei; Sem, Kai Ping; Wright, Graham Daniel; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Ahmed, Sohail

    2014-01-01

    Filopodia are dynamic actin-based structures that play roles in processes such as cell migration, wound healing, and axonal guidance. Cdc42 induces filopodial formation through IRSp53, an Inverse-Bin-Amphiphysins-Rvs (I-BAR) domain protein. Previous work from a number of laboratories has shown that IRSp53 generates filopodia by coupling membrane protrusion with actin dynamics through its Src homology 3 domain binding partners. Here, we show that dynamin1 (Dyn1), the large guanosine triphosphatase, is an interacting partner of IRSp53 through pulldown and Förster resonance energy transfer analysis, and we explore its role in filopodial formation. In neuroblastoma cells, Dyn1 localizes to filopodia, associated tip complexes, and the leading edge just behind the anti-capping protein mammalian enabled (Mena). Dyn1 knockdown reduces filopodial formation, which can be rescued by overexpressing wild-type Dyn1 but not the GTPase mutant Dyn1-K44A and the loss-of-function actin binding domain mutant Dyn1-K/E. Interestingly, dynasore, an inhibitor of Dyn GTPase, also reduced filopodial number and increased their lifetime. Using rapid time-lapse total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we show that Dyn1 and Mena localize to filopodia only during initiation and assembly. Dyn1 actin binding domain mutant inhibits filopodial formation, suggesting a role in actin elongation. In contrast, Eps8, an actin capping protein, is seen most strongly at filopodial tips during disassembly. Taken together, the results suggest IRSp53 partners with Dyn1, Mena, and Eps8 to regulate filopodial dynamics. PMID:25031323

  15. Dynamin1 is a novel target for IRSp53 protein and works with mammalian enabled (Mena) protein and Eps8 to regulate filopodial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ai Mei; Sem, Kai Ping; Wright, Graham Daniel; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Ahmed, Sohail

    2014-08-29

    Filopodia are dynamic actin-based structures that play roles in processes such as cell migration, wound healing, and axonal guidance. Cdc42 induces filopodial formation through IRSp53, an Inverse-Bin-Amphiphysins-Rvs (I-BAR) domain protein. Previous work from a number of laboratories has shown that IRSp53 generates filopodia by coupling membrane protrusion with actin dynamics through its Src homology 3 domain binding partners. Here, we show that dynamin1 (Dyn1), the large guanosine triphosphatase, is an interacting partner of IRSp53 through pulldown and Förster resonance energy transfer analysis, and we explore its role in filopodial formation. In neuroblastoma cells, Dyn1 localizes to filopodia, associated tip complexes, and the leading edge just behind the anti-capping protein mammalian enabled (Mena). Dyn1 knockdown reduces filopodial formation, which can be rescued by overexpressing wild-type Dyn1 but not the GTPase mutant Dyn1-K44A and the loss-of-function actin binding domain mutant Dyn1-K/E. Interestingly, dynasore, an inhibitor of Dyn GTPase, also reduced filopodial number and increased their lifetime. Using rapid time-lapse total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we show that Dyn1 and Mena localize to filopodia only during initiation and assembly. Dyn1 actin binding domain mutant inhibits filopodial formation, suggesting a role in actin elongation. In contrast, Eps8, an actin capping protein, is seen most strongly at filopodial tips during disassembly. Taken together, the results suggest IRSp53 partners with Dyn1, Mena, and Eps8 to regulate filopodial dynamics.

  16. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  17. Hyaluronic acid-coated liposomes for active targeting of gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Arpicco, Silvia; Lerda, Carlotta; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Costanzo, Chiara; Tsapis, Nicolas; Stella, Barbara; Donadelli, Massimo; Dando, Ilaria; Fattal, Elias; Cattel, Luigi; Palmieri, Marta

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was the preparation, characterization, and preliminary evaluation of the targeting ability toward pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells of liposomes containing the gemcitabine lipophilic prodrug [4-(N)-lauroyl-gemcitabine, C12GEM]. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was selected as targeting agent since it is biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be chemically modified and its cell surface receptor CD44 is overexpressed on various tumors. For this purpose, conjugates between a phospholipid, the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), and HA of two different low molecular weights 4800 Da (12 disaccharidic units) and 12,000 Da (32 disaccharidic units), were prepared, characterized, and introduced in the liposomes during the preparation. Different liposomal formulations were prepared and their characteristics were analyzed: size, Z potential, and TEM analyses underline a difference in the HA-liposomes from the non-HA ones. In order to better understand the HA-liposome cellular localization and to evaluate their interaction with CD44 receptor, confocal microscopy studies were performed. The results demonstrate that HA facilitates the recognition of liposomes by MiaPaCa2 cells (CD44(+)) and that the uptake increases with increase in the polymer molecular weight. Finally, the cytotoxicity of the different preparations was evaluated and data show that incorporation of C12GEM increases their cytotoxic activity and that HA-liposomes inhibit cell growth more than plain liposomes. Altogether, the results demonstrate the specificity of C12GEM targeting toward CD44-overexpressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line using HA as a ligand.

  18. Human mammalian cell sorting using a highly integrated micro-fabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorter (microFACS).

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Chen, Chun H; Tsai, Frank S; Godin, Jessica M; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2010-06-21

    We demonstrate a high performance microfabricated FACS system with highly integrated microfluidics, optics, acoustics, and electronics. Single cell manipulation at a high speed is made possible by the fast response time (approximately 0.1 ms) of the integrated PZT actuator and the nozzle structure at the sorting junction. A Teflon AF-coated optofluidic waveguide along the microfluidic channel guides the illumination light, enabling multi-spot detection, while a novel space-time coding technology enhances the detection sensitivity of the microFACS system. The real-time control loop system is implemented using a field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) for automated and accurate sorting. The microFACS achieves a high purification enrichment factor: up to approximately 230 fold for both polystyrene microbeads and suspended human mammalian cells (K562) at a high throughput (>1000 cells s(-1)). The sorting mechanism is independent of cell properties such as size, density, and shape, thus the presented system can be applied to sort out any pure sub-populations. This new lab-on-a-chip FACS system, therefore, holds promise to revolutionize microfluidic cytometers to meet cost, size, and performance goals.

  19. Interferon-Induced Genes of the Expanded IFIT Family Show Conserved Antiviral Activities in Non-Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, Patricia; Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Costa, Maria M.; Dios, Sonia; Romero, Alejandro; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) are involved in the protective response to viral infection, although the precise mechanism of IFITs for reducing viral proliferation is currently unknown. The interaction with the translation initiation factor eIF-3 or viral proteins and the sequestering of viral RNA have been proposed as potential antiviral functions for these proteins. In humans, four members of this family have been characterized. Nevertheless, information about these proteins in fish is almost non-existent. Exploiting the conservation of synteny between human and zebrafish genomes, we have identified ten members of the IFIT family located on four different chromosomes. The induction of these genes was examined both in vitro and in vivo after interferon (IFN) administration and rhabdovirus challenge. Whereas an induction of IFIT genes was observed after interferon treatments (IFNΦ1, IFNΦ2 and IFNΦ3), the viral infection did not affect these IFN-induced genes in vitro, and even reduced the IFN-induced expression of these genes. The response was largely different in vivo, with a broad up-regulation of IFIT genes after viral challenge. In addition, three selected IFITs were cloned in an expression vector and microinjected into zebrafish larvae to examine the protective effect of IFITs upon viral infection. Reduction in the mortality rate was observed confirming a conserved antiviral function in non-mammalian species. PMID:24950240

  20. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  1. Activating frataxin expression by repeat-targeted nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an incurable genetic disorder caused by a mutant expansion of the trinucleotide GAA within an intronic FXN RNA. This expansion leads to reduced expression of frataxin (FXN) protein and evidence suggests that transcriptional repression is caused by an R-loop that forms between the expanded repeat RNA and complementary genomic DNA. Synthetic agents that increase levels of FXN protein might alleviate the disease. We demonstrate that introducing anti-GAA duplex RNAs or single-stranded locked nucleic acids into patient-derived cells increases FXN protein expression to levels similar to analogous wild-type cells. Our data are significant because synthetic nucleic acids that target GAA repeats can be lead compounds for restoring curative FXN levels. More broadly, our results demonstrate that interfering with R-loop formation can trigger gene activation and reveal a new strategy for upregulating gene expression. PMID:26842135

  2. Arenavirus nucleoprotein targets interferon regulatory factor-activating kinase IKKε.

    PubMed

    Pythoud, Christelle; Rodrigo, W W Shanaka I; Pasqual, Giulia; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kunz, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    Arenaviruses perturb innate antiviral defense by blocking induction of type I interferon (IFN) production. Accordingly, the arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) was shown to block activation and nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in response to virus infection. Here, we sought to identify cellular factors involved in innate antiviral signaling targeted by arenavirus NP. Consistent with previous studies, infection with the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) prevented phosphorylation of IRF3 in response to infection with Sendai virus, a strong inducer of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)/mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway of innate antiviral signaling. Using a combination of coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, we found that LCMV NP associates with the IκB kinase (IKK)-related kinase IKKε but that, rather unexpectedly, LCMV NP did not bind to the closely related TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1). The NP-IKKε interaction was highly conserved among arenaviruses from different clades. In LCMV-infected cells, IKKε colocalized with NP but not with MAVS located on the outer membrane of mitochondria. LCMV NP bound the kinase domain (KD) of IKKε (IKBKE) and blocked its autocatalytic activity and its ability to phosphorylate IRF3, without undergoing phosphorylation. Together, our data identify IKKε as a novel target of arenavirus NP. Engagement of NP seems to sequester IKKε in an inactive complex. Considering the important functions of IKKε in innate antiviral immunity and other cellular processes, the NP-IKKε interaction likely plays a crucial role in arenavirus-host interaction.

  3. Putting one step before the other: distinct activation pathways for Cdk1 and Cdk2 bring order to the mammalian cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Karl A; Fisher, Robert P

    2010-02-15

    Eukaryotic cell division is controlled by the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Cdk1 and Cdk2, which function at different stages of the mammalian cell cycle, both require cyclin-binding and phosphorylation of the activation (T-) loop for full activity, but differ with respect to the order in which the two steps occur in vivo. To form stable complexes with either of its partners-cyclins A and B-Cdk1 must be phosphorylated on its T-loop, but that phosphorylation in turn depends on the presence of cyclin. Cdk2 can follow a kinetically distinct path to activation in which T-loop phosphorylation precedes cyclin-binding, and thereby out-compete the more abundant Cdk1 for limiting amounts of cyclin A. Mathematical modeling suggests this could be a principal basis for the temporal ordering of CDK activation during S phase, which may dictate the sequence in which replication origins fire. Still to be determined are how: (1) the activation machinery discriminates between closely related CDKs, and (2) coordination of the cell cycle is affected when this mechanism of pathway insulation breaks down.

  4. A mitochondria-targeting artemisinin derivative with sharply increased antitumor but depressed anti-yeast and anti-malaria activities

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Yu; Zhu, Pan; Zhou, Bing

    2017-01-01

    The potent anti-malarial drug artemisinins are additionally anti-tumorigenic and inhibitory to yeast growth. The action mechanism of artemisinins, however, is not well understood. Heme and mitochondrial membrane are both suggested to be involved in the action of artemisinins. Because heme is also synthesized in the mitochondrion, mitochondria appear to be a critical organelle for artemisinins’ activities. In this study, we synthesized a mitochondria-targeting artemisinin derivative by conjugating triphenylphosphonium (TPP) to artelinic acid (ARTa). ARTa-TPP displays far more potent anti-tumorigenic activity than its parent compound. In contrast, ARTa-TPP is much less active against yeast respiration growth and malarial parasites. Notably, ARTa-TPP is also associated with increased toxicity to other kinds of control mammalian cells. These results suggest divergent action modes for artemisinins against cancer cells and malaria or yeast cells. We conclude that mitochondrial targeting could substantially elevate the anticancer potency of artemisinins, but the accompanied increased toxicity to normal cells raises an alert. The mechanism regarding the opposing effects of TPP conjugation to ARTa on its anticancer and anti-malarial/anti-yeast potencies is discussed based on our current understandings of artemisinins’ action. PMID:28368011

  5. A mitochondria-targeting artemisinin derivative with sharply increased antitumor but depressed anti-yeast and anti-malaria activities.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Yu; Zhu, Pan; Zhou, Bing

    2017-04-03

    The potent anti-malarial drug artemisinins are additionally anti-tumorigenic and inhibitory to yeast growth. The action mechanism of artemisinins, however, is not well understood. Heme and mitochondrial membrane are both suggested to be involved in the action of artemisinins. Because heme is also synthesized in the mitochondrion, mitochondria appear to be a critical organelle for artemisinins' activities. In this study, we synthesized a mitochondria-targeting artemisinin derivative by conjugating triphenylphosphonium (TPP) to artelinic acid (ARTa). ARTa-TPP displays far more potent anti-tumorigenic activity than its parent compound. In contrast, ARTa-TPP is much less active against yeast respiration growth and malarial parasites. Notably, ARTa-TPP is also associated with increased toxicity to other kinds of control mammalian cells. These results suggest divergent action modes for artemisinins against cancer cells and malaria or yeast cells. We conclude that mitochondrial targeting could substantially elevate the anticancer potency of artemisinins, but the accompanied increased toxicity to normal cells raises an alert. The mechanism regarding the opposing effects of TPP conjugation to ARTa on its anticancer and anti-malarial/anti-yeast potencies is discussed based on our current understandings of artemisinins' action.

  6. Is the zona pellucida an intrinsic source of signals activating maternal recognition of the developing mammalian embryo?

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Araki, Yoshihiko; Toshimori, Kiyotaka

    2009-07-01

    Mammalian mothers undergoing embryo implantation must specifically recognize the developing embryo in a species-restricted manner. We previously observed that immune cells derived from early pregnant mice could promote endometrial differentiation and embryo implantation in blastocyst-transferred pseudopregnant mice. Although the precise mechanism remains unknown, it is suggested that the maternal immune system undergoes functional changes after recognizing developing embryos from the very early stages of pregnancy. Since it is physically impossible for immune cells to directly interact with the developing embryo while it is surrounded by the zona pellucida (ZP), it is speculated that the embryo produces certain embryo- and species-specific soluble factor(s) in the oviduct before hatching. As a candidate for this factor, we have paid attention to the ZP that is normally protected from immunological attack during oogenesis in the ovarian follicle. ZP-specific glycoproteins are known to play important roles in the species- and oocyte-specific binding of sperm, and the ZP can also be considered an abundant store of oocyte- and species-specific glycoproteins. In contrast to unfertilized oocytes, developing embryos may degrade the ZP starting just after fertilization and proceeding until hatching using enzymes that are released from cortical granules or produced by the developing embryo. Accordingly, the developing embryo might provide ZP-degradation products including oligosaccharide chains to the immune system from the very early stages. Taken together, we propose here a novel hypothesis that these ZP-derivatives can act as an intrinsic signal from the developing embryo for maternal recognition by the immune system.

  7. Significantly higher activity of a cytoplasmic hammerhead ribozyme than a corresponding nuclear counterpart: engineered tRNAs with an extended 3′ end can be exported efficiently and specifically to the cytoplasm in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Tomoko; Warashina, Masaki; Koseki, Shiori; Sano, Masayuki; Ohkawa, Jun; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Taira, Kazunari

    2001-01-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes were expressed under the control of similar tRNA promoters, localizing transcripts either in the cytoplasm or the nucleus. The tRNAVal-driven ribozyme (tRNA-Rz; tRNA with extra sequences at the 3′ end) that has been used in our ribozyme studies was exported efficiently into the cytoplasm and ribozyme activity was detected only in the cytoplasmic fraction. Both ends of the transported tRNA-Rz were characterized comprehensively and the results confirmed that tRNA-Rz had unprocessed 5′ and 3′ ends. Furthermore, it was also demonstrated that the activity of the exported ribozyme was significantly higher than that of the ribozyme which remained in the nucleus. We suggest that it is possible to engineer tRNA-Rz, which can be exported to the cytoplasm based on an understanding of secondary structures, and then tRNA-driven ribozymes may be co-localized with their target mRNAs in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. PMID:11433023

  8. Mammalian polycomb-like Pcl2/Mtf2 is a novel regulatory component of PRC2 that can differentially modulate polycomb activity both at the Hox gene cluster and at Cdkn2a genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangzhi; Isono, Kyo-Ichi; Yamada, Daisuke; Endo, Takaho A; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Shinga, Jun; Mizutani-Koseki, Yoko; Otte, Arie P; Casanova, Miguel; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Kamijo, Takehiko; Sharif, Jafar; Ohara, Osamu; Toyada, Tetsuro; Bernstein, Bradley E; Brockdorff, Neil; Koseki, Haruhiko

    2011-01-01

    The Polycomb group of proteins forms at least two distinct complexes designated the Polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and PRC2. These complexes cooperate to mediate transcriptional repression of their target genes, including the Hox gene cluster and the Cdkn2a genes. Mammalian Polycomb-like gene Pcl2/Mtf2 is expressed as four different isoforms, and the longest one contains a Tudor domain and two plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers. Pcl2 forms a complex with PRC2 and binds to Hox genes in a PRC2-dependent manner. We show that Pcl2 is a functional component of PRC2 and is required for PRC2-mediated Hox repression. Pcl2, however, exhibits a profound synergistic effect on PRC1-mediated Hox repression, which is not accompanied by major alterations in the local trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) or PRC1 deposition. Pcl2 therefore functions in collaboration with both PRC2 and PRC1 to repress Hox gene expression during axial development. Paradoxically, in embryonic fibroblasts, Pcl2 is shown to activate the expression of Cdkn2a and promote cellular senescence, presumably by suppressing the catalytic activity of PRC2 locally. Taken together, we show that Pcl2 differentially regulates Polycomb-mediated repression of Hox and Cdkn2a genes. We therefore propose a novel role for Pcl2 to modify functional engagement of PRC2 and PRC1, which could be modulated by sensing cellular circumstances.

  9. Tumor therapeutics by design: targeting and activation of death receptors.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2005-02-01

    Due to their strong apoptosis-inducing capacity, the death receptor ligands CD95L, TNF and TRAIL have been widely viewed as potential cancer therapeutics. While clinical data with CD95L and TRAIL are not yet available, TNF is a registered drug, albeit only for loco-regional application in a limited number of indications. The TNF experience has told us that specific delivery and restricted action is a major challenge in the development of multifunctional, pleiotropically acting cytokines into effective cancer therapeutics. Thus, gene-therapeutic approaches and new cytokine variants have been designed over the last 10 years with the aim of increasing anti-tumoral activity and reducing systemic side effects. Here, we present our current view of the therapeutic potential of the death receptor ligands TNF, CD95L and TRAIL and of the progress made towards improving their efficacy by tumor targeting, use of gene therapy and genetic engineering. Results generated with newly designed fusion proteins suggest that enhanced tumor-directed activity and prevention of undesirable actions of death receptor ligands is possible, thereby opening up a useful therapeutic window for all of the death receptor ligands, including CD95L.

  10. Understanding central carbon metabolism of rapidly proliferating mammalian cells based on analysis of key enzymatic activities in GS-CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wu; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    The central carbon metabolism (glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway [PPP], and the tricarboxylic acid [TCA] cycle) plays an essential role in the supply of biosynthetic precursors and energy. How the central carbon metabolism changes with the varying growth rates in the in vitro cultivation of rapidly proliferating mammalian cells, such as cancer cells and continuous cell lines for recombinant protein production, remains elusive. Based on relationships between the growth rate and the activity of seven key enzymes from six cell clones, this work reports finding an important metabolic characteristic in rapidly proliferating glutamine synthetase-Chinese hamster ovary cells. The key enzymatic activity involved in the TCA cycle that is responsible for the supply of energy became elevated as the growth rate exhibited increases, while the activity of key enzymes in metabolic pathways (glycolysis and the PPP), responsible for the supply of biosynthetic precursors, tended to decrease-suggesting that rapidly proliferating cells still depended predominantly on the TCA cycle rather than on aerobic glycolysis for their energetic demands. Meanwhile, the growth-limiting resource was most likely biosynthetic substrates rather than energy provision. In addition, the multifaceted role of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (PGI) was confirmed, based on a significant correlation between PGI activity and the percentage of G2/M-phase cells.

  11. Searching for Common Mammalian Retroviruses in Pediatric Idiopathic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jeziorski, Eric; Foulongne, Vincent; Ludwig, Catherine; Louhaem, Djamel; Rodiere, Michel; Sitbon, Marc; Courgnaud, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian retroviruses cause a variety of diseases in their hosts, including hematological and immunodeficiency disorders. Both human T-cell leukemia (HTLV) and human immunodeficiency (HIV) viruses originated from several independent zoonotic transmissions, indicating that cross-species transmissions from animal to humans may still occur. Thus, as the risk for retroviral transmissions from animals to humans increase, we investigated whether mammalian retroviruses are involved in selected pediatric idiopathic diseases whose symptoms evoke retroviral infections. Blood samples, sera, and synovial fluids, or bone marrow cells were collected from pediatric patients under 18 years of age with different autoimmune idiopathic diseases. Overall, we screened clinical samples from 110 children using sensitive nested and semi-nested PCR strategies targeting env genes, and a C-type retrovirus reverse transcriptase (RT) activity kit. All clinical samples were free of retroviral signatures, indicating the unlikelihood of an etiological role of the retroviruses we assessed in the pediatric diseases we tested. PMID:27102168

  12. Different intracellular distribution of avian reovirus core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Lostale-Seijo, Irene; Martinez-Costas, Jose; Benavente, Javier

    2012-10-25

    A comparative analysis of the intracellular distribution of avian reovirus (ARV) core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin revealed that, whereas the viral protein accumulates in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of avian cells, most sigmaA concentrates in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells in tight association with the insoluble nuclear matrix fraction. Our results further showed that sigmaA becomes arrested in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells via association with mammalian cell-specific factors and that this association prevents nucleolar targeting. Inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity, but not of RNA polymerase I activity, in infected mammalian cells induces nucleus-to-cytoplasm sigmaA translocation through a CRM1- and RanGTP-dependent mechanism, yet a heterokaryon assay suggests that sigmaA does not shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The scarcity of sigmaA in cytoplasmic viral factories of infected mammalian cells could be one of the factors contributing to limited ARV replication in mammalian cells.

  13. The role of repair in the survival of mammalian cells from heavy ion irradiation - Approximation to the ideal case of target theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lett, J. T.; Cox, A. B.; Story, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments are discussed in which the cell-cycle dependency of the repair deficiency of the S/S variant of the L5178Y murine leukemic lymphoblast was examined by treatment with the heavy ions, Ne-20, Si-28, Ar-40, Fe-56, and Nb-93. Evidence from those studies provide support for the notion that as the linear energy transfer of the incident radiation increases the ability of the S/S cell to repair radiation damage decreases until it is eliminated around 500 keV/micron. In the region of the latter linear energy transfer value, the behavior of the S/S cell approximates the ideal case of target theory where post-irradiation metabolism does not influence cell survival.

  14. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-11-09

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general.

  15. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  16. Increase of microRNA-210, Decrease of Raptor Gene Expression and Alteration of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Regulated Proteins following Mithramycin Treatment of Human Erythroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Nicoletta; Finotti, Alessia; Ferracin, Manuela; Lampronti, Ilaria; Zuccato, Cristina; Breveglieri, Giulia; Brognara, Eleonora; Fabbri, Enrica; Borgatti, Monica; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Expression and regulation of microRNAs is an emerging issue in erythroid differentiation and globin gene expression in hemoglobin disorders. In the first part of this study microarray analysis was performed both in mithramycin-induced K562 cells and erythroid precursors from healthy subjects or β-thalassemia patients producing low or high levels of fetal hemoglobin. We demonstrated that: (a) microRNA-210 expression is higher in erythroid precursors from β-thalassemia patients with high production of fetal hemoglobin; (b) microRNA-210 increases as a consequence of mithramycin treatment of K562 cells and human erythroid progenitors both from healthy and β-thalassemia subjects; (c) this increase is associated with erythroid induction and elevated expression of γ-globin genes; (d) an anti-microRNA against microRNA-210 interferes with the mithramycin-induced changes of gene expression. In the second part of the study we have obtained convergent evidences suggesting raptor mRNA as a putative target of microRNA-210. Indeed, microRNA-210 binding sites of its 3’-UTR region were involved in expression and are targets of microRNA-210-mediated modulation in a luciferase reporter assays. Furthermore, (i) raptor mRNA and protein are down-regulated upon mithramycin-induction both in K562 cells and erythroid progenitors from healthy and β-thalassemia subjects. In addition, (ii) administration of anti-microRNA-210 to K562 cells decreased endogenous microRNA-210 and increased raptor mRNA and protein expression. Finally, (iii) treatment of K562 cells with premicroRNA-210 led to a decrease of raptor mRNA and protein. In conclusion, microRNA-210 and raptor are involved in mithramycin-mediated erythroid differentiation of K562 cells and participate to the fine-tuning and control of γ-globin gene expression in erythroid precursor cells. PMID:25849663

  17. Proatherogenic macrophage activities are targeted by the flavonoid quercetin.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guzman, Oscar J; Tabares-Guevara, Jorge H; Leon-Varela, Yudy M; Álvarez, Rafael M; Roldan, Miguel; Sierra, Jelver A; Londoño-Londoño, Julian A; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2012-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the flavonoid quercetin protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related risk factors. Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of CVD, is also attenuated by oral quercetin administration in animal models. Although macrophages are key players during fatty streak formation and plaque progression and aggravation, little is known about the effects of quercetin on atherogenic macrophages. Here, we report that primary bone marrow-derived macrophages internalized less oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and accumulated less intracellular cholesterol in the presence of quercetin. This reduction of foam cell formation correlated with reduced surface expression of the oxLDL receptor CD36. Quercetin also targeted the lipopolysaccharide-dependent, oxLDL-independent pathway of lipid droplet formation in macrophages. In oxLDL-stimulated macrophages, quercetin inhibited reactive oxygen species production and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In a system that evaluated cholesterol crystal-induced IL-1β secretion via nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing protein 3 inflammasome activation, quercetin also exhibited an inhibitory effect. Dyslipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice chronically treated with intraperitoneal quercetin injections had smaller atheromatous lesions, reduced lipid deposition, and less macrophage and T cell inflammatory infiltrate in the aortic roots than vehicle-treated animals. Serum levels of total cholesterol and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde were also reduced in these mice. Our results demonstrate that quercetin interferes with both key proatherogenic activities of macrophages, namely foam cell formation and pro-oxidant/proinflammatory responses, and these effects may explain the atheroprotective properties of this common flavonoid.

  18. Target of rapamycin activation predicts lifespan in fruit flies

    PubMed Central

    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Naudí, Alba; Ayala, Victoria; Jové, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Sanz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Aging and age-related diseases are one of the most important health issues that the world will confront during the 21st century. Only by understanding the proximal causes will we be able to find treatments to reduce or delay the onset of degenerative diseases associated with aging. Currently, the prevalent paradigm in the field is the accumulation of damage. However, a new theory that proposes an alternative explanation is gaining momentum. The hyperfunction theory proposes that aging is not a consequence of a wear and tear process, but a result of the continuation of developmental programs during adulthood. Here we use Drosophila melanogaster, where evidence supporting both paradigms has been reported, to identify which parameters that have been previously related with lifespan best predict the rate of aging in wild type flies cultured at different temperatures. We find that mitochondrial function and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation correlates with metabolic rate, but not with the rate of aging. Importantly, we find that activation of nutrient sensing pathways (i.e. insulin-PI3K/Target of rapamycin (Tor) pathway) correlates with lifespan, but not with metabolic rate. Our results, dissociate metabolic rate and lifespan in wild type flies and instead link nutrient sensing signaling with longevity as predicted by the hyperfunction theory. PMID:26259964

  19. An active electron polarized scintillating GSO target for neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiboussinov, B.; Braggio, C.; Cardini, A.; Carugno, G.; Congiu, F.; Gain, S.; Galeazzi, G.; Lai, A.; Lehman, A.; Mocci, P.; Mura, A.; Quochi, F.; Saba, M.; Saitta, B.; Sartori, G.

    2012-12-01

    The feasibility of an electron-polarized, active target to be used as detector in neutrino scattering experiments, suggested by several theoretical papers, has been investigated. We report on the properties of the paramagnetic crystal Gd2SiO5 (GSO), in which 7.7% of the total number of electrons present can be polarized by lowering the temperature and applying an intense external magnetic field. The material magnetic susceptibility has been measured down to cryogenic temperatures showing that for H=5 T and T=4 K about 80% of the maximum allowed magnetization can be attained. Also the spectral and time response of the crystal have been characterized and the scintillation process has been studied using a photomultiplier to measure the response to gamma rays irradiation and cosmic rays operating the GSO crystal at 13.5 K. An avalanche photodiode (APD) readout of the scintillation signal from the GSO crystal has also been performed, since the magnetic field-independent response of this device allows it to be placed close to the crystal in the cryogenic environment.

  20. Expression of the surface antigen 4F2hc affects system-L-like neutral-amino-acid-transport activity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bröer, S; Bröer, A; Hamprecht, B

    1997-01-01

    Mammalian cells possess a variety of amino acid-transport systems with overlapping substrate specificity. System L is one of the major amino acid-transport systems of non-epithelial cells. By expression cloning we have recently demonstrated that the surface antigen 4F2hc (CD98) is a necessary component for expression of system-L-like amino acid-transport activity in C6-BU-1 rat glioma cells [Bröer, Bröer and Hamprecht (1995) Biochem. J. 312, 863-870]. 4F2hc mRNA was detected in CHO cells, COS cells, activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse spleen and primary cultures of astrocytes. In all these cell types, Na+-independent isoleucine transport was mediated by system L. No contribution of system y+L to isoleucine or arginine transport was detected in C6-BU-1 cells. In lymphocytes, both system-L-like amino acid-transport activity and 4F2hc mRNA levels increased after treatment with phorbol ester plus ionomycin. Antisense oligonucleotides caused modest inhibition of Na+-independent isoleucine transport in C6-BU-1 cells and primary cultures of astroglial cells, whereas arginine transport was unaffected. Overexpression of 4F2hc cDNA in CHO cells resulted in an increase in Na+-independent isoleucine transport. PMID:9182715

  1. The peptide toxin amylosin of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens from moisture-damaged buildings is immunotoxic, induces potassium efflux from mammalian cells, and has antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Rasimus-Sahari, Stiina; Teplova, Vera V; Andersson, Maria A; Mikkola, Raimo; Kankkunen, Päivi; Matikainen, Sampsa; Gahmberg, Carl G; Andersson, Leif C; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2015-04-01

    Amylosin, a heat-stable channel-forming non-ribosomally synthesized peptide toxin produced by strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens isolated from moisture-damaged buildings, is shown in this paper to have immunotoxic and cytotoxic effects on human cells as well as antagonistic effects on microbes. Human macrophages exposed to 50 ng of amylosin ml(-1) secreted high levels of cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 within 2 h, indicating activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, an integral part of the innate immune system. At the same exposure level, expression of IL-1β and IL-18 mRNA increased. Amylosin caused dose-dependent potassium ion efflux from all tested mammalian cells (human monocytes and keratinocytes and porcine sperm cells) at 1 to 2 μM exposure. Amylosin also inhibited the motility of porcine sperm cells and depolarized the mitochondria of human keratinocytes. Amylosin may thus trigger the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequently cytokine release by causing potassium efflux from exposed cells. The results of this study indicate that exposure to amylosin activates the innate immune system, which could offer an explanation for the inflammatory symptoms experienced by occupants of moisture-damaged buildings. In addition, the amylosin-producing B. amyloliquefaciens inhibited the growth of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic indoor microbes, and purified amylosin also had an antimicrobial effect. These antimicrobial effects could make amylosin producers dominant and therefore significant causal agents of health problems in some moisture-damaged sites.

  2. Camptothecin enhances the frequency of oligonucleotide-directed gene repair in mammalian cells by inducing DNA damage and activating homologous recombination.

    Pu