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Sample records for activated mononuclear cells

  1. Activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with sarcoidosis: visualisation of single cell activation products.

    PubMed Central

    Pantelidis, P.; Southcott, A. M.; Cambrey, A. D.; Laurent, G. J.; du Bois, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Interstitial lung diseases are characterised by the recruitment of mononuclear cells to disease sites where maturation occurs and activation products, including lysozyme (LZM), are released. Analysis of in vitro cell culture supernatants for activation products masks the functional heterogeneity of cell populations. It is therefore necessary to examine the secretion of activation products by single cells to assess whether the activation of newly recruited mononuclear phagocytes at the sites of disease in the lung is uniform and controlled by the local microenvironment. METHODS--The reverse haemolytic plaque assay was used to evaluate, at a single cell level, the ability of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from seven patients with sarcoidosis to activate Ficoll-Hypaque-separated peripheral blood mononuclear cells by comparison with BAL fluid from six normal volunteers and nine patients with systemic sclerosis. Monolayers of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and sheep red blood cells were cultured either alone or in the presence of 20% (v/v) BAL fluid with a polyclonal anti-LZM antibody. LZM/anti-LZM complexes bound to red blood cells surrounding the secreting cells were disclosed following complement lysis of red blood cells and quantification of plaque dimensions using microscopy and image analysis. RESULTS--Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from all the patients with sarcoidosis increased LZM secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells compared with unstimulated mononuclear cells. By contrast, BAL fluid from the other individuals had no effect on LZM secretion. CONCLUSIONS--Single cells activated by BAL fluid can be evaluated by the reverse haemolytic plaque assay. BAL fluid from patients with sarcoidosis, but not from patients with systemic sclerosis or normal individuals, contains components capable of activating mononuclear phagocytes to secrete lysozyme. Images PMID:7831632

  2. Mononuclear cells phagocytic activity affects the crosstalk between immune and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Djaldetti, Meir; Bessler, Hanna

    2014-07-01

    The "professional phagocytes", i.e. monocytes and macrophages, play an important role as eliminators of pathogens and as essential components of the immune system. It is well established that monocytes induced for phagocytosis by various stimulators, produce cytokines that are closely related to inflammation. Considering the role of inflammation in carcinogenesis and the existence of an immune dialog between mononuclear and cancer cells, the aim of the present work was to examine cytokine production by immune cells stimulated for phagocytosis by latex particles and incubated with cells from HT-29 and RKO human cancer lines. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were incubated with various numbers of polysterene latex beads, 0.8μm in diameter and the secretion of the following cytokines: TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1ra was examined before and after further incubation with cells of the both cancer lines. Phagocytosis of latex beads by PBMC caused an increased production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-10, whereas that of IL-6 declined. PBMC activated by latex beads and co-cultured with cancer cells generated lesser amount of the three pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, while that of the anti-inflammatory IL-10 and IL-1ra remained unchanged. The results indicate that phagocytosis of polystyrene latex beads by human PBMC alters the dialogue between immune and cells of human colon carcinoma lines, an observation that may clarify the role of the immune cells in attenuating inflammation and restraining carcinogenesis. PMID:25194440

  3. HCG-Activated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) Promote Trophoblast Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqin; Guo, Yue; Zhou, Danni; Xu, Mei; Ding, Jinli; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Successful embryo implantation and placentation depend on appropriate trophoblast invasion into the maternal endometrial stroma. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is one of the earliest embryo-derived secreted signals in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that abundantly expresses hCG receptors. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of human embryo–secreted hCG on PBMC function and investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of activated PBMC in trophoblast invasion. Blood samples were collected from women undergoing benign gynecological surgery during the mid-secretory phase. PBMC were isolated and stimulated with or without hCG for 0 or 24 h. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) expressions in PBMC were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The JAR cell line served as a model for trophoblast cells and was divided into four groups: control, hCG only, PBMC only, and PBMC with hCG. JAR cell invasive and proliferative abilities were detected by trans-well and CCK8 assays and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells were detected by western blotting and real-time PCR analysis. We found that hCG can remarkably promote IL-1β and LIF promotion in PBMC after 24-h culture. PBMC activated by hCG significantly increased the number of invasive JAR cells in an invasion assay without affecting proliferation, and hCG-activated PBMC significantly increased MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF and decreased TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that hCG stimulates cytokine secretion in human PBMC and could stimulate trophoblast invasion. PMID:26087261

  4. Lymphokine-activated killer cytotoxicity in neonatal mononuclear cells: in vitro responses to tumor cell lines from pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Chin, T; Toy, C; Vandeven, C; Cairo, M S

    1989-02-01

    The presence of neonatal (cord) lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell activity toward natural killer cell resistant Raji and Daudi cell lines has recently been reported from our laboratory. We investigated the future therapeutic use of LAK adoptive immunotherapy by examining LAK in vitro cytotoxicity from both neonatal and adult mononuclear cells against solid tumor cell lines of relevance to pediatric oncology: SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma), SK-NM-C (neuroblastoma-neuroepithelioma), NEP-1 (Wilms' tumor), SK-ES-1 (Ewing's sarcoma), and A-204 (rhabdomyosarcoma). Cord and adult mononuclear cells were activated by recombinant IL-2 (100 mu/ml) for 5-7 days and added in an effector:target ratio of 40:1 to 51Cr-labeled target cells. Specific cell lysis was determined after a 4-h incubation. There was a significantly high level of cord and adult LAK cytotoxicity against Wilms' (76.4 +/- 9.8 versus 77.3 +/- 6.8%) and Ewing's (84.2 +/- 5.5 versus 71.1 +/- 6.5%) cell lines and significant but moderate LAK activity against neuroepithelioma (52.0 +/- 6.6 versus 55.4 +/- 4.5%) and rhabdomyosarcoma (46.6 +/- 5.7 versus 43.9 +/- 5.2%) cell lines. There was no difference between cord and adult LAK activity toward these targets. However, a differential response toward the more classical neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y, was noted with significantly more LAK cytotoxicity from cord mononuclear cells than adult mononuclear cells (51.2 +/- 6.9 versus 28.5 +/- 8.2%) (p less than or equal to 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Aberrant activation of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Tsung-Chieh; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Hsieh, Yi-Yueh; Chen, Tse-Chin; Yeh, Chien-Yu; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lin, Deng-Yn; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 (NFAT2), the major NFAT protein in peripheral T cells, in sustained T cell activation and intractable inflammation in human ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: We used two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis, immunohistochemistry, double immunohistochemical staining, and confocal microscopy to inspect the expression of NFAT2 in 107, 15, 48 and 5 cases of UC, Crohn’s disease (CD), non-specific colitis, and 5 healthy individuals, respectively. RESULTS: Up-regulation with profound nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 of lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) of colonic mucosa was found specifically in the affected colonic mucosa from patients with UC, as compared to CD or NC (P < 0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 primarily occurred in CD8+T, but was less prominent in CD4+ T cells or CD20+B cells. It was strongly associated with the disease activity, including endoscopic stage (τ = 0.2145, P = 0.0281) and histologic grade (τ = 0.4167, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: We disclose for the first time the nucleo-translocation/activatin of NFAT2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis. Activation of NFAT2 was specific for ulcerative colitis and highly associated with disease activity. Since activation of NFAT2 is implicated in an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop of sustained T-cell activation and NFAT proteins play key roles in the calcium/calcineurin signaling pathways, our results not only provide new insights into the mechanism for sustained intractable inflammation, but also suggest the calcium-calcineurin/NFAT pathway as a new therapeutic target for ulcerative colitis. PMID:18350607

  6. Mononuclear cells in dementia.

    PubMed

    Mandas, Antonella; Dessì, Sandra

    2014-04-20

    According to the World Health Organization statistics, dementias are the largest contributors to disease burden in advanced market economies, and the leading cause of disability and dependence among older people worldwide. So far, several techniques have been developed to identify dementias with reasonable accuracy while the patient is still alive, however, no single of them has proven to be ideal, especially if you need to have a satisfactory early diagnosis. Studies of early onset dementia are largely limited by the inaccessibility to direct examination of the living human brain: it appears therefore that for a correct biochemical and molecular characterization of dementias, potential surrogate tissues must be identified. In this context, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) appear particularly attractive because they can be obtained in a minimally invasive manner and can be easily analyzed. This review focuses on the most representative methodologies and strategies in detecting and quantifying fluctuation in dementia that are currently being developed. In addition it provides a comprehensive evaluation of the diagnostic sensitivity of PBMCs in patients with dementia. Finally, it discusses the data supporting the use of the determination of neutral lipids (NLs) in PBMCs by Oil Red O (ORO) staining, which is a minimally invasive, cheap, easy and fast procedure, as the promising method for early detection of dementia and to search for new effective treatments.

  7. Repetitive cryotherapy attenuates the in vitro and in vivo mononuclear cell activation response.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Angus; Othman, Mohd Izani; Prebble, Hannah; Davies, Sian; Gieseg, Steven P

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Acute and repetitive cryotherapy are routinely used to accelerate postexercise recovery, although the effect on resident immune cells and repetitive exposure has largely been unexplored and neglected. What is the main finding and its importance? Using blood-derived mononuclear cells and semi-professional mixed martial artists, we show that acute and repetitive cryotherapy reduces the in vitro and in vivo T-cell and monocyte activation response whilst remaining independent of the physical performance of elite athletes. We investigated the effect of repetitive cryotherapy on the in vitro (cold exposure) and in vivo (cold water immersion) activation of blood-derived mononuclear cells following high-intensity exercise. Single and repeated cold exposure (5°C) of a mixed cell culture (T cells and monocytes) was investigated using in vitro tissue culture experimentation for total neopterin production (neopterin plus 7,8-dihydroneopterin). Fourteen elite mixed martial art fighters were also randomly assigned to either a cold water immersion (15 min at 10°C) or passive recovery protocol, which they completed three times per week during a 6 week training camp. Urine was collected and analysed for neopterin and total neopterin three times per week, and perceived soreness, fatigue, physical performance (broad jump, push-ups and pull-ups) and training performance were also assessed. Single and repetitive cold exposure significantly (P < 0.001) reduced total neopterin production from the mixed cell culture, whereas cold water immersion significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated urinary neopterin and total neopterin during the training camp without having any effect on physical performance parameters. Soreness and fatigue showed little variation between the groups, whereas training session performance was significantly (P < 0.05) elevated in the cold water immersion group. The data suggest that acute and repetitive cryotherapy

  8. Repetitive cryotherapy attenuates the in vitro and in vivo mononuclear cell activation response.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Angus; Othman, Mohd Izani; Prebble, Hannah; Davies, Sian; Gieseg, Steven P

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Acute and repetitive cryotherapy are routinely used to accelerate postexercise recovery, although the effect on resident immune cells and repetitive exposure has largely been unexplored and neglected. What is the main finding and its importance? Using blood-derived mononuclear cells and semi-professional mixed martial artists, we show that acute and repetitive cryotherapy reduces the in vitro and in vivo T-cell and monocyte activation response whilst remaining independent of the physical performance of elite athletes. We investigated the effect of repetitive cryotherapy on the in vitro (cold exposure) and in vivo (cold water immersion) activation of blood-derived mononuclear cells following high-intensity exercise. Single and repeated cold exposure (5°C) of a mixed cell culture (T cells and monocytes) was investigated using in vitro tissue culture experimentation for total neopterin production (neopterin plus 7,8-dihydroneopterin). Fourteen elite mixed martial art fighters were also randomly assigned to either a cold water immersion (15 min at 10°C) or passive recovery protocol, which they completed three times per week during a 6 week training camp. Urine was collected and analysed for neopterin and total neopterin three times per week, and perceived soreness, fatigue, physical performance (broad jump, push-ups and pull-ups) and training performance were also assessed. Single and repetitive cold exposure significantly (P < 0.001) reduced total neopterin production from the mixed cell culture, whereas cold water immersion significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated urinary neopterin and total neopterin during the training camp without having any effect on physical performance parameters. Soreness and fatigue showed little variation between the groups, whereas training session performance was significantly (P < 0.05) elevated in the cold water immersion group. The data suggest that acute and repetitive cryotherapy

  9. Activation of mononuclear cells by interleukin-12: an in vivo study in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Lauw, F N; te Velde, A A; Dekkers, P E; Speelman, P; Aerts, J M; Hack, C E; van Deventer, S J; van der Poll, T

    1999-07-01

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is considered a central regulator of host resistance against a variety of pathogens. Therefore, IL-12 has been advocated as a potential therapeutic agent in infections. To determine the in vivo effects of IL-12 on mononuclear cells involved in the host immune response, four chimpanzees received an intravenous injection of recombinant IL-12 (1 microgram/kg). IL-12 induced a sustained decrease in lymphocyte counts, with decreases in CD3+/CD4+ and CD3+/CD8+ cells, while monocyte counts showed a transient increase. IL-12 injection resulted in a shift toward a Th1-mediated immune response as indicated by increased interferon-gamma production during whole-blood stimulation, while not influencing IL-4 production. IL-12-induced activation of NK cells and phagocytes, as indicated by increased NK cell cytotoxicity and increased plasma levels of granzymes A and B and of chitotriosidase activity. These data support the hypothesis that IL-12 may serve as a useful therapeutic agent in infections where a cell-mediated response is protective.

  10. Calcitriol stimulates prolactin expression in non-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: breaking paradigms.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Lorenza; Martínez-Reza, Isela; García-Becerra, Rocío; González, Leticia; Larrea, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel

    2011-08-01

    Calcitriol, the hormonal form of vitamin D(3), exerts immunomodulatory effects through the vitamin D(3) receptor (VDR) and increases prolactin (PRL) expression in the pituitary and decidua. Nevertheless, the effects of calcitriol upon lymphocyte PRL have not been evaluated. Therefore, we investigated calcitriol effects upon PRL in resting and phytohemagglutinin-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) and Jurkat T lymphoma cells. Immunoblots showed constitutive expression of the 50-kDa VDR species in activated PBMNC and Jurkat cells, while a 75-kDa species was recognized in both resting and activated-PBMNC. Only in resting PBMNC calcitriol significantly stimulated PRL expression in a dose-dependent manner. The positive control CYP24A1, a highly VDR-responsive gene, was stimulated by calcitriol, effect that was stronger in resting than in activated-PBMNC (P<0.05), and without effect in Jurkat cells. Calcitriol upregulation of PRL and CYP24A1 was significantly inhibited by the VDR antagonist TEI-9647. EMSA showed that resting PBMNC contain a protein that binds to DR3-type VDRE. Cell activation reduced basal CYP24A1 while induced CYP27B1, VDR and pregnane X receptor (PXR) expression. In summary, calcitriol stimulated PRL and CYP24A1 gene expression in quiescent lymphocytes through a VDR-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that the 75-kDa VDR species could be participating in calcitriol-mediated effects, and that activation induces factors such as PXR that restrain VDR transcriptional processes. This study supports the presence of a functional VDR in quiescent lymphocytes, providing evidence to reevaluate the VDR paradigm that assumes that lymphocytes respond to calcitriol only after activation. Altogether, our results offer new insights into the mechanisms whereby PRL is regulated in immune cells.

  11. Activation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells during hepatosplenic Schistosoma mansoni infections.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, H M; Demian, S R; Heshmat, M G; Ismail, N S; El-Sayed, Laila H

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important regulator of host responses during infection with a variety of intra- and extra-cellular pathogens. The present work aimed at assessment of in vitro spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced apoptosis in mononuclear cells isolated from patients with hepatosplenic form of S. mansoni infections. Cell death data were correlated to the degree of lymphoproliferative responses to PHA as well as to the serum anti-schistosomal antibody titers. A markedly significant increase in PHA-induced apoptosis in lymphocytes isolated from S. mansoni-infected patients was seen when compared to the corresponding healthy controls. However, a slight difference was recorded between the two studied groups regarding the spontaneous apoptosis. This was accompanied with a significant impairment of in vitro PHA-induced lymphoproliferation of T cells from S. mansoni patients. Data of the present study supports the hypothesis that activation-induced cell death (AICD) is a potentially contributing factor in T helper (Th) cell regulation during chronic stages of schistosomiasis, which represents a critically determinant factor in the host-parasite interaction and might influence the destiny of parasitic infections either towards establishment of chronic infection or towards host death.

  12. Activation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells during hepatosplenic Schistosoma mansoni infections.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, H M; Demian, S R; Heshmat, M G; Ismail, N S; El-Sayed, Laila H

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important regulator of host responses during infection with a variety of intra- and extra-cellular pathogens. The present work aimed at assessment of in vitro spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced apoptosis in mononuclear cells isolated from patients with hepatosplenic form of S. mansoni infections. Cell death data were correlated to the degree of lymphoproliferative responses to PHA as well as to the serum anti-schistosomal antibody titers. A markedly significant increase in PHA-induced apoptosis in lymphocytes isolated from S. mansoni-infected patients was seen when compared to the corresponding healthy controls. However, a slight difference was recorded between the two studied groups regarding the spontaneous apoptosis. This was accompanied with a significant impairment of in vitro PHA-induced lymphoproliferation of T cells from S. mansoni patients. Data of the present study supports the hypothesis that activation-induced cell death (AICD) is a potentially contributing factor in T helper (Th) cell regulation during chronic stages of schistosomiasis, which represents a critically determinant factor in the host-parasite interaction and might influence the destiny of parasitic infections either towards establishment of chronic infection or towards host death. PMID:20306689

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction and mitophagy activation in blood mononuclear cells of fibromyalgia patients: implications in the pathogenesis of the disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology. Recent studies have shown some evidence demonstrating that oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia. However, it is still not clear whether oxidative stress is the cause or the effect of the abnormalities documented in fibromyalgia. Furthermore, the role of mitochondria in the redox imbalance reported in fibromyalgia also is controversial. We undertook this study to investigate the role of mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and mitophagy in fibromyalgia. Methods We studied 20 patients (2 male, 18 female patients) from the database of the Sevillian Fibromyalgia Association and 10 healthy controls. We evaluated mitochondrial function in blood mononuclear cells from fibromyalgia patients measuring, coenzyme Q10 levels with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and mitochondrial membrane potential with flow cytometry. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring mitochondrial superoxide production with MitoSOX™ and lipid peroxidation in blood mononuclear cells and plasma from fibromyalgia patients. Autophagy activation was evaluated by quantifying the fluorescence intensity of LysoTracker™ Red staining of blood mononuclear cells. Mitophagy was confirmed by measuring citrate synthase activity and electron microscopy examination of blood mononuclear cells. Results We found reduced levels of coenzyme Q10, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased levels of mitochondrial superoxide in blood mononuclear cells, and increased levels of lipid peroxidation in both blood mononuclear cells and plasma from fibromyalgia patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was also associated with increased expression of autophagic genes and the elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria with mitophagy. Conclusions These findings may support the role of oxidative stress and mitophagy in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia. PMID:20109177

  14. Ubiquitin enzymes, ubiquitin and proteasome activity in blood mononuclear cells of MCI, Alzheimer and Parkinson patients.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, C; Mlekusch, R; Kuschnig, A; Marksteiner, J; Humpel, C

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a severe chronic neurodegenerative disease. During aging and neurodegeneration, misfolded proteins accumulate and activate the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The aim of the present study is to explore whether ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, ubiquitin or proteasome activity are affected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared to healthy subjects. PBMCs were isolated from EDTA blood samples and extracts were analyzed by Western Blot. Proteasome activity was measured with fluorogenic substrates. When compared to healthy subjects, the concentration of enzyme E1 was increased in PBMCs of AD patients, whereas the concentration of the enzyme E2 was decreased in these same patients. Ubiquitin levels and proteasome activity were unchanged in AD patients. No changes in enzyme expression or proteasome activity was observed in MCI patients compared to healthy and AD subjects. In PD patients E2 levels and proteasomal activity were significantly reduced, while ubiquitin and E1 levels were unchanged. The present investigation demonstrates the differences in enzyme and proteasome activity patterns of AD and PD patients. These results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasomal system in different neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Effects of rare earth elements on telomerase activity and apoptosis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Dai, Yucheng; Yuan, Zhaokang; Li, Jie

    2007-04-01

    To study the effects of rare earth exposure on human telomerase and apoptosis of mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood (PBMNCs). The blood contents of 15 rare earth elements, including La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y, were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay and flow cytometer analysis were carried out to analyze the telomerase activity and apoptosis of PBMNCs, respectively. The total content of rare earth elements in the blood showed significant differences between the exposed group and the control group. The rare earth exposure increased the telomerase activity and the percentages of cells in the S-phase and the G2/M phase in PBMNCs, but it had no effect on the apoptotic rate of PBMNCs. Under the exposure to lower concentrations of rare earth elements, the telomerase activity of PBMNCs in the exposed group was higher than that of the control group, and there was no effect on the apoptotic rate of PBMNCs, but promoted the diploid DNA replication and increased the percentages of G2/M- and S-phase cells.

  16. ALDOSTERONISM AND PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELL ACTIVATION: A NEUROENDOCRINE-IMMUNE INTERFACE

    PubMed Central

    Ahokas, Robert A.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Gerling, Ivan C.; Sun, Yao; Wodi, Linus A.; Herring, Paula A.; Lu, Li; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Postlethwaite, Arnold E.; Weber, Karl T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Aldosteronism eventuates in a proinflammatory/fibrogenic vascular phenotype of the heart and systemic organs. It remains uncertain whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are activated prior to tissue invasion by monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes as is the case for responsible pathogenic mechanisms. Uninephrectomized rats, treated for 4 wks with dietary 1%NaCl and aldosterone (0.75 μg/h, ALDOST) ± spironolactone (Spi, 100 mg/kg/daily gavage), were compared to unoperated/-untreated and uninephrectomized/salt-treated controls. Before intramural coronary vascular lesions appeared at wk 4 ALDOST, we found: 1) a reduction of PBMC cytosolic free [Mg2+]i, together with intracellular Mg2+ and Ca2+ loading while plasma and cardiac tissue Mg2+ were no different from controls; 2) increased H2O2 production by monocytes and lymphocytes together with upregulated PBMC gene expression of oxidative stress-inducible tyrosine phosphatase and Mn2+-superoxide dismutase, and the presence of 3-nitrotyrosine in CD4+ and ED-1-positive inflammatory cells that had invaded intramural coronary arteries; 3) B cell activation, including transcription of immunoglobulins, ICAM-1, CC and CXC chemokines and their receptors; 4) expansion of B lymphocyte subset and MHC Class II-expressing lymphocytes; and 5) autoreactivity with gene expression for antibodies to acetylcholine receptors and a downregulation of RT-6.2, which is in keeping with cell activation and associated with autoimmunity. Spi co-treatment attenuated the rise in intracellular Ca2+, the appearance of oxi/nitrosative stress in PBMC and invading inflammatory cells, and alterations in PBMC transcriptome. Thus, aldosteronism is associated with an activation of circulating immune cells induced by iterations in PBMC divalent cations and transduced by oxi/nitrosative stress. ALDO receptor antagonism modulates this neuroendocrine-immune interface. PMID:14576195

  17. Bovine colostrum modulates immune activation cascades in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Marcel; Pedersen, Ninfa R; Hidayat, Budi J; Schennach, Harald; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2010-04-01

    Bovine colostrum (BC) is the thick yellow fluid a lactating cow gives to a suckling calf during its first days of life to support the growth of the calf and prevent gastrointestinal infections until the calf has synthesized its own active immune defense system. BC contains a complex system of immune factors and has a long history of use in traditional medicine. In an approach to evaluate the effects of bovine colostrum (BC) on the T-cell/macrophage interplay, we investigated and compared the capacity of BC containing low and high amounts of lactose and lactoferrin to modulate tryptophan degradation and neopterin formation in unstimulated and mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The present study shows significant immunomodulatory effects of these BC preparations in human PBMC, either by enhancing or suppressing the occurrence of a Th-1 type immune response. The amount of lactose present in BC seems to diminish the activity of BC in our test system, since BC with higher amounts of lactose attenuated the stimulatory as well as the suppressive activity of BC. PMID:20518274

  18. Transcription factor expression in lipopolysaccharide-activated peripheral-blood-derived mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Jared C.; Smith, Kelly D.; Strobe, Katie L.; Nissen, Stephanie M.; Haudenschild, Christian D.; Zhou, Daixing; Vasicek, Thomas J.; Held, G. A.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A.; Hood, Leroy E.; Aderem, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factors play a key role in integrating and modulating biological information. In this study, we comprehensively measured the changing abundances of mRNAs over a time course of activation of human peripheral-blood-derived mononuclear cells (“macrophages”) with lipopolysaccharide. Global and dynamic analysis of transcription factors in response to a physiological stimulus has yet to be achieved in a human system, and our efforts significantly advanced this goal. We used multiple global high-throughput technologies for measuring mRNA levels, including massively parallel signature sequencing and GeneChip microarrays. We identified 92 of 1,288 known human transcription factors as having significantly measurable changes during our 24-h time course. At least 42 of these changes were previously unidentified in this system. Our data demonstrate that some transcription factors operate in a functional range below 10 transcripts per cell, whereas others operate in a range three orders of magnitude greater. The highly reproducible response of many mRNAs indicates feedback control. A broad range of activation kinetics was observed; thus, combinatorial regulation by small subsets of transcription factors would permit almost any timing input to cis-regulatory elements controlling gene transcription. PMID:17913878

  19. Activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by dengue virus infection depotentiates balapiravir.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Liang; Abdul Ghafar, Nahdiyah; Karuna, Ratna; Fu, Yilong; Lim, Siew Pheng; Schul, Wouter; Gu, Feng; Herve, Maxime; Yokohama, Fumiaki; Wang, Gang; Cerny, Daniela; Fink, Katja; Blasco, Francesca; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2014-02-01

    In a recent clinical trial, balapiravir, a prodrug of a cytidine analog (R1479), failed to achieve efficacy (reducing viremia after treatment) in dengue patients, although the plasma trough concentration of R1479 remained above the 50% effective concentration (EC(50)). Here, we report experimental evidence to explain the discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo results and its implication for drug development. R1479 lost its potency by 125-fold when balapiravir was used to treat primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs; one of the major cells targeted for viral replication) that were preinfected with dengue virus. The elevated EC(50) was greater than the plasma trough concentration of R1479 observed in dengue patients treated with balapiravir and could possibly explain the efficacy failure. Mechanistically, dengue virus infection triggered PBMCs to generate cytokines, which decreased their efficiency of conversion of R1479 to its triphosphate form (the active antiviral ingredient), resulting in decreased antiviral potency. In contrast to the cytidine-based compound R1479, the potency of an adenosine-based inhibitor of dengue virus (NITD008) was much less affected. Taken together, our results demonstrate that viral infection in patients before treatment could significantly affect the conversion of the prodrug to its active form; such an effect should be calculated when estimating the dose efficacious for humans.

  20. Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from children with active hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sumegi, Janos; Barnes, Michael G; Nestheide, Shawnagay V; Molleran-Lee, Susan; Villanueva, Joyce; Zhang, Kejian; Risma, Kimberly A; Grom, Alexei A; Filipovich, Alexandra H

    2011-04-14

    Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is a rare, genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive immune disorder that results when the critical regulatory pathways that mediate immune defense mechanisms and the natural termination of immune/inflammatory responses are disrupted or overwhelmed. To advance the understanding of FHL, we performed gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 11 children with untreated FHL. Total RNA was isolated and gene expression levels were determined using microarray analysis. Comparisons between patients with FHL and normal pediatric controls (n = 30) identified 915 down-regulated and 550 up-regulated genes with more than or equal to 2.5-fold difference in expression (P ≤ .05). The expression of genes associated with natural killer cell functions, innate and adaptive immune responses, proapoptotic proteins, and B- and T-cell differentiation were down-regulated in patients with FHL. Genes associated with the canonical pathways of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10 IL-1, IL-8, TREM1, LXR/RXR activation, and PPAR signaling and genes encoding of antiapoptotic proteins were overexpressed in patients with FHL. This first study of genome-wide expression profiling in children with FHL demonstrates the complexity of gene expression patterns, which underlie the immunobiology of FHL.

  1. Fuel feeds function: Energy balance and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cell activation.

    PubMed

    Schwarm, A; Viergutz, T; Kuhla, B; Hammon, H M; Schweigel-Röntgen, M

    2013-01-01

    A general phenomenon in peripartum mammals is the breakdown of (acquired) immunity. The incidence of parasite load, disease and inflammation often rise during the specific energetically demanding time of pregnancy and lactation. In this period, blood leukocytes display decreased DNA synthesis in response to mitogens in vitro. Leukocyte activation, the phase of the cell cycle preceding the DNA synthetic phase has hardly been investigated, but the few studies suggest that leukocyte activation may also be impaired by the limited energy/nutrient availability. Leukocyte activation is characterized by manifold processes, thus, we used the cellular oxygen consumption rate (OCR) as a measure of ATP turnover to support all these processes. We hypothesized that the activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) - in terms of oxygen consumed over basal levels after in vitro stimulation - is altered by energy balance around parturition. We studied peripartum high-yielding dairy cows because they undergo substantial fluctuations in energy intake, energy output and body fat mass. We established a fluorescence-based test strategy allowing for long-term (≥24h) quantification of O(2)-consumption and studied the peripartum period from 5 weeks ante partum to 5 weeks postpartum. In addition, we determined cellular lactate production, DNA/RNA synthesis and cell size and zoo-technical parameters such as animal energy intake and milk yield were assessed, as well as selected plasma parameters, e.g. glucose concentration. The basal OCR of PBMC from pregnant, non-lactating cows (n=6, -5 weeks ante partum) was 1.19±0.15 nmol min(-1) (10(7)cells)(-1) and increased to maximum levels of 2.54±0.49 nmol min(-1) (10(7)cells)(-1) in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC. The basal OCR did not change over the peripartum period. Whereas the activation indices, herein defined as the PHA-induced 24h-increase of OCR above baseline, amounted to 1.1±0.3, 4.2±0.3, 4.1±1.1, 2.1±0.3, and

  2. Lactobacillus isolates from healthy volunteers exert immunomodulatory effects on activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Keyi; Xie, Chao; Xu, Donghua; Yang, Xiaofan; Tang, James; Ji, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    As probiotics in the gut, Lactobacilli are believed to play important roles in the development and maintenance of both the mucosal and systemic immune system of the host. This study was aimed to investigate the immuno-modulatory function of candiate lactobacilli on T cells. Lactobacilli were isolated from healthy human feces and the microbiological characteristics were identified by API 50 CHL and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assays. Anti-CD3 antibody activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated by viable, heat-killed lactobacilli and genomic DNA of lactobacilli, and cytokine profiles were tested by ELISA. Isolated lactobacilli C44 and C48 were identified as L. acidophilus and L. paracacei, which have properties of acid and bile tolerance and inhibitor effects on pathogens. Viable and heat-killed C44 and C48 induced low levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8) and high levels of IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in PBMCs. In anti-CD3 antibody activated PBMCs, viable and heat-killed C44 increased Th2 cytokine levels (IL-5, IL-6 and IL-10), and simultaneously enhanced Th1 responses by inducing IFN-γ and IL-12p70 production. Different from that of lactabacillus strains, their genomic DNA induced low levels of IL-12p70, IFN-γ and proinflammatory cytokines in PBMCs with or without anti-CD3 antibody activation. These results provided in vitro evidence that the genomic DNA of strains of C44 and C48, especially C44, induced weaker inflammation, and may be potentially applied for treating allergic diseases. PMID:23554802

  3. Activation dependent expression of MMPs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells involves protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Saja, K; Chatterjee, Urmimala; Chatterjee, B P; Sudhakaran, P R

    2007-02-01

    Monocyte/Macrophages are integral cellular components of inflammation. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by these cells play a crucial role in every aspect of inflammation. Results of the investigations on activation dependent upregulation of MMPs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture using different lectins as an in vitro model system to mimic inflammatory monocytes are presented. Under normal physiological conditions the monocytes produced only very low amount of MMPs in an indomethacin insensitive PG/cAMP independent manner. Zymographic analysis and ELISA showed that treatment of monocyte with lectins like concanavalin A (ConA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA) caused upregulation of MMPs and the maximum effect was produced by ALA. ALA significantly upregulated MMP-9 in a concentration and time dependent manner. Immunoblot analysis and RT-PCR confirmed ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 production. Inhibition of ALA effect by indomethacin and reversal of the indomethacin effect by Bt(2)cAMP indicated involvement of cAMP dependent signaling pathway. Further support for the prostaglandin mediated effect was obtained by the upregulation of cyclooxygenase by ALA. H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), inhibited the expression of MMP-9 indicating that ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 is mediated through PKA pathway. Increase in MMP production and increase in cyclooxygenase activity and inhibition of the effect of ALA on MMP production by indomethacin suggested that the ALA activated monocytes in culture can be used as an in vitro model system to study the intracellular signaling process involved in the mediation of inflammatory response.

  4. The Elevated Secreted Immunoglobulin D Enhanced the Activation of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hengshi; Zhang, Lingling; Chang, Yan; Yan, Shangxue; Dai, Xing; Ma, Yang; Huang, Qiong; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin D (IgD) is a surface immunoglobulin that is expressed as either membrane IgD (mIgD) or secreted IgD (sIgD). Researchers have shown that sIgD is often elevated in patients with autoimmune diseases. The possible roles of sIgD on the function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are still unclear. In this study, we compared the expression of sIgD, mIgD and IgD receptor (IgDR) in RA patients and healthy controls, and investigated the effect of sIgD on the function of PBMCs. We found that the levels of sIgD, mIgD and IgDR were significantly higher in RA patients compared with healthy controls. The concentrations of sIgD were positively correlated with soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (sRANKL), rheumatoid factor (RF) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in RA patients. Strikingly, IgD could enhance the proliferation of PBMCs and induce IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 production from PBMCs. Moreover, the percentage of activated T cell subsets (CD4+CD69+, CD4+CD154+) and activated B cell subsets (CD19+CD23+, CD19+CD21+, CD19+IgD+ and CD19-CD138+) were increased by IgD. The percentage of unactivated T cell subset (CD4+CD62L+) and immature B cell subset (CD19+IgM+IgD-) were decreased by IgD in PBMCs. Furthermore, the expressions of IgDR on T and B cells were significantly increased by treatment with IgD. Our results demonstrate that IgD enhanced the activation of PBMCs, which may contribute to RA pathogenesis. Therefore, IgD could be a potential novel immunotherapeutic target for the management of RA. PMID:26814717

  5. Postprandial activation of metabolic and inflammatory signalling pathways in human peripheral mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Kerstin; Brand, Tina; Bangert, Adina; Hauner, Hans; Laumen, Helmut

    2014-06-28

    High-fat, high-carbohydrate (HFHC) meals induce an inflammatory response in mononuclear cells (MNC). Here, we studied the interaction between metabolic and inflammatory signalling pathways by the measurement of postprandial effects of three different test meals on intracellular Akt, S6 kinase (S6K)/mammalian target of rapamycin and NF-κB signalling in human MNC. We recruited six healthy, lean individuals. Each individual ingested three different meals in the morning separated by at least 3 d: a HFHC meal; an oral lipid-tolerance test meal; a healthy breakfast. Blood samples were obtained before and 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after ingestion. Plasma insulin and IL-6 levels were measured. Intracellular metabolic and inflammatory signalling pathways were assessed by measuring the phosphorylation of Akt kinase and S6K, the degradation of inhibitory κB-α (IκB-α) protein and the DNA binding activity of NF-κB in MNC. mRNA expression levels of the Akt and NF-κB target genes Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), CC-chemokine-receptor 5 (CCR5), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. We found a positive correlation of Akt phosphorylation with NF-κB activation (NF-κB binding activity: r 0·4500, P= 0·0003; IκB-α protein levels: r -0·5435, P< 0·0001), a negative correlation of plasma insulin levels with NF-κB binding activity (r -0·3993, P= 0·0016) and a positive correlation of plasma insulin levels with S6K activation (r 0·4786, P< 0·0001). The activation of Akt and pro-inflammatory NF-κB signalling was supported by the up-regulation of the respective target genes MnSOD and CCR5. In conclusion, the present data suggest a postprandial interaction between the metabolic and inflammatory signalling pathways Akt and NF-κB in MNC.

  6. Porcine MHC classical class I genes are coordinately expressed in superantigen-activated mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kametani, Yoshie; Ohshima, Shino; Kita, Yuki F; Shimada, Shin; Kamiguchi, Hiroshi; Shiina, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Kulski, Jerzy K; Ando, Asako

    2012-08-15

    The expression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classical class I genes is important for the adaptive immune response to target virus-infected cells and cancer cells. The up-regulation of the MHC is achieved by hormonal/cytokine signals including IFN-γ-inducible elements. The swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), the MHC class I region of pigs, consists of the duplicated classical class I genes, SLA-1, SLA-2 and SLA-3, but the molecular mechanisms involved in their up-regulation after T cell stimulation have not been fully elucidated. In order to better understand some of the putative regulatory mechanisms of SLA class I gene expression in activated T cells, we examined the coordinated expression of the SLA classical class I, IFN-γ and interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) genes in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of SLA homozygous Clawn miniature swine stimulated for 72 h with either IFN-γ or an enterotoxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus. This enterotoxin, toxic shock syndrome-1 (TSST-1), is known to act as a superantigen (sAG) to activate the T cells in various vertebrate species. We showed by using mAbs and flow cytometry that the CD4(+)CD25(+) cell number of swine PBMCs was also increased by TSST-1 and to a lesser degree by IFN-γ. Time course analyses of the expression of the IFN-γ, IRF-1 and the three classical class I genes, SLA-1, SLA-2, and SLA-3, in PBMCs by quantitative real-time PCR revealed a transitory response to TSST-1 or IFN-γ stimulation. The IFN-γ mRNA levels in the PBMCs were continuously up-regulated over the first 48 h by TSST-1 or IFN-γ. In contrast, SLA class I expression moderately increased at 24h and then decreased to a baseline level or less at 72 h of IFN-γ or TSST-1 stimulation. The three classical SLA class I genes showed similar expression kinetics, although SLA-3 mRNA level was consistently lower than those of SLA-1 and -2. The expression of IRF-1, a modulator of SLA expression, showed similar

  7. Rhesus rotavirus VP4 sequence-specific activation of mononuclear cells is associated with cholangiopathy in murine biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Walther, Ashley; Mohanty, Sujit K; Donnelly, Bryan; Coots, Abigail; Lages, Celine S; Lobeck, Inna; Dupree, Phylicia; Meller, Jaroslaw; McNeal, Monica; Sestak, Karol; Tiao, Greg

    2015-09-15

    Biliary atresia (BA), a neonatal obstructive cholangiopathy, remains the most common indication for pediatric liver transplantation in the United States. In the murine model of BA, Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) VP4 surface protein determines biliary duct tropism. In this study, we investigated how VP4 governs induction of murine BA. Newborn mice were injected with 16 strains of rotavirus and observed for clinical symptoms of BA and mortality. Cholangiograms were performed to confirm bile duct obstruction. Livers and bile ducts were harvested 7 days postinfection for virus titers and histology. Flow cytometry assessed mononuclear cell activation in harvested cell populations from the liver. Cytotoxic NK cell activity was determined by the ability of NK cells to kill noninfected cholangiocytes. Of the 16 strains investigated, the 6 with the highest homology to the RRV VP4 (>87%) were capable of infecting bile ducts in vivo. Although the strain Ro1845 replicated to a titer similar to RRV in vivo, it caused no symptoms or mortality. A Ro1845 reassortant containing the RRV VP4 induced all BA symptoms, with a mortality rate of 89%. Flow cytometry revealed that NK cell activation was significantly increased in the disease-inducing strains and these NK cells demonstrated a significantly higher percentage of cytotoxicity against noninfected cholangiocytes. Rotavirus strains with >87% homology to RRV's VP4 were capable of infecting murine bile ducts in vivo. Development of murine BA was mediated by RRV VP4-specific activation of mononuclear cells, independent of viral titers.

  8. Rhesus rotavirus VP4 sequence-specific activation of mononuclear cells is associated with cholangiopathy in murine biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Walther, Ashley; Mohanty, Sujit K; Donnelly, Bryan; Coots, Abigail; Lages, Celine S; Lobeck, Inna; Dupree, Phylicia; Meller, Jaroslaw; McNeal, Monica; Sestak, Karol; Tiao, Greg

    2015-09-15

    Biliary atresia (BA), a neonatal obstructive cholangiopathy, remains the most common indication for pediatric liver transplantation in the United States. In the murine model of BA, Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) VP4 surface protein determines biliary duct tropism. In this study, we investigated how VP4 governs induction of murine BA. Newborn mice were injected with 16 strains of rotavirus and observed for clinical symptoms of BA and mortality. Cholangiograms were performed to confirm bile duct obstruction. Livers and bile ducts were harvested 7 days postinfection for virus titers and histology. Flow cytometry assessed mononuclear cell activation in harvested cell populations from the liver. Cytotoxic NK cell activity was determined by the ability of NK cells to kill noninfected cholangiocytes. Of the 16 strains investigated, the 6 with the highest homology to the RRV VP4 (>87%) were capable of infecting bile ducts in vivo. Although the strain Ro1845 replicated to a titer similar to RRV in vivo, it caused no symptoms or mortality. A Ro1845 reassortant containing the RRV VP4 induced all BA symptoms, with a mortality rate of 89%. Flow cytometry revealed that NK cell activation was significantly increased in the disease-inducing strains and these NK cells demonstrated a significantly higher percentage of cytotoxicity against noninfected cholangiocytes. Rotavirus strains with >87% homology to RRV's VP4 were capable of infecting murine bile ducts in vivo. Development of murine BA was mediated by RRV VP4-specific activation of mononuclear cells, independent of viral titers. PMID:26206856

  9. Biotin uptake into human peripheral blood mononuclear cells increases early in the cell cycle, increasing carboxylase activities.

    PubMed

    Stanley, J Steven; Mock, Donald M; Griffin, Jacob B; Zempleni, Janos

    2002-07-01

    Cells respond to proliferation with increased accumulation of biotin, suggesting that proliferation enhances biotin demand. Here we determined whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) increase biotin uptake at specific phases of the cell cycle, and whether biotin is utilized to increase biotinylation of carboxylases. Biotin uptake was quantified in human PBMC that were arrested chemically at specific phases of the cell cycle, i.e., biotin uptake increased in the G1 phase of the cycle [658 +/- 574 amol biotin/(10(6) cells x 30 min)] and remained increased during phases S, G2, and M compared with quiescent controls [200 +/- 62 amol biotin/(10(6) cells x 30 min)]. The abundance of the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT, which transports biotin) was similar at all phases of the cell cycle, suggesting that transporters other than SMVT or splicing variants of SMVT may account for the increased biotin uptake observed in proliferating cells. Activities of biotin-dependent 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase and propionyl-CoA carboxylase were up to two times greater in proliferating PBMC compared with controls. The abundance of mRNA encoding 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase and propionyl-CoA carboxylase paralleled carboxylase activities, suggesting that PBMC respond to proliferation with increased expression of genes encoding carboxylases. Similarly, expression of the gene encoding holocarboxylase synthetase (which catalyzes binding of biotin to carboxylases) increased in response to proliferation, suggesting that cellular capacity to biotinylate carboxylases was increased. In summary, these findings suggest that PBMC respond to proliferation with increased biotin uptake early in the cell cycle, and that biotin is utilized to increase activities of two of the four biotin-requiring carboxylases.

  10. Bos taurus papillomavirus activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells: demonstrating a productive infection.

    PubMed

    Melo, T C; Araldi, R P; Pessoa, N S D; de-Sá-Júnior, P L; Carvalho, R F; Beçak, W; Stocco, R C

    2015-12-11

    Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) is an oncogenic virus with mucous and epithelial tropism. Possible productive virus infection in other tissues, such as blood, has been hypothesized. In order to investigate this possibility, three samples of skin papillomas and blood were collected from bovines with BPV infection and five samples of peripheral blood and one sample of normal tissue were collected from a calf without BPV infection. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from whole blood and examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence, in situ hybridization, and electron microscopy. The tissue samples were examined for histopathological and immunohistochemical features. The skin papillomas showed the presence of DNA sequences of BPV-2, BPV-11, and a putative virus type. The blood samples showed DNA sequences of BPV-1, 2, and 4 simultaneously. Immunohistochemistry showed BPV L1 protein in both epithelium and stroma and BPV E2 protein in koilocytes. In situ hybridization confirmed the presence of BPV DNA in PBMCs and immunofluorescence showed nuclear labeling of E2 and L1 BPV proteins in PBMCs. The transcription analysis revealed transcripts of BPV-1 L1, BPV-2 L2, and BPV-4 E7 in blood and papilloma samples of BPV-infected cattle. The comet assay revealed high levels of host cell DNA damage upon BPV infection. Electron microscopy analysis of PBMCs identified the presence of particles in the cytoplasm that are consistent with papillomavirus in size and shape. The productive infection of PBMCs with BPV has been previously discussed and this study provides evidence indicating that PBMCs are a target of BPV.

  11. Active hepatitis C virus infection in bone marrow and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, A; Manzin, A; Candela, M; Caniglia, M L; Paolucci, S; Danieli, M G; Clementi, M

    1994-01-01

    The presence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genomic sequences was checked in plasma, liver, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and bone marrow cells from 11 patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia positive for anti-HCV antibodies, and from 11 patients with chronic HCV hepatitis without serological evidence of cryoglobulinaemia. HCV RNA sequences were demonstrated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in seven plasma samples, in six PBMC samples, and in seven bone marrow cell samples from the 11 cryoglobulinaemic subjects; otherwise, viral specific nucleic acids were detected in 10 plasma samples, in one PBMC sample, and in two bone marrow cell samples from the 11 patients with chronic hepatitis. The HCV replicative intermediate was evidenced in four of the six PBMC and in five of the seven bone marrow aspirate HCV RNA-positive samples. Analysis of subpopulations isolated from bone marrow and peripheral blood samples showed HCV RNA sequences in mononuclear cells belonging either the CD2+ subset or to the CD19+ subpopulation or to the adherent cells. Finally, we compared the nucleotide sequences of a large portion (-270 to -59) of the HCV 5'-untranslated region from five patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia and from seven patients with chronic hepatitis without cryoglobulinaemia; the degree of heterogeneity, compared with the prototype HCV sequence, was similar in both groups. These findings from two groups of HCV-infected patients indicate that transient or permanent active HCV infection of bone marrow and PBMC is frequent in anti-HCV-positive patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia, and suggest that extra-hepatic infection may play a major role in influencing the pathophysiology of this infection as well as the viral persistence. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8033425

  12. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated silver nanoparticles: activation of neutrophils and nanotoxicology effects in human hepatocarcinoma and mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Paino, Iêda Maria Martinez; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2015-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNps) have been described as important for their excellent biocompatibility, biomedical applications. Nevertheless, AgNps can interact with the immune system which is essential to analyze human exposure to assess their potential risk to health and environment. In general, the primary site for accumulation of nanoparticles has been demonstrated to be the liver. Furthermore, the direct activation of neutrophils or oxidative burst by a given nanoparticle is poorly documented. In this paper, we investigated the cell uptake, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2), primary normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the direct activation of primary isolated neutrophils through the oxidative burst on exposure to AgNps coated with Polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA). All cell types were incubated in the presence of 1.0 and 50.0 μM of AgNps-PVA for 24h. A significant cyto- and genotoxic-response and the activation of human neutrophils were induced by AgNps-PVA (p<0.05). Our results revealed that AgNps can interact with the normal isolated neutrophils, PBMC and HepG2 cells in vitro, which opens the way for further studies on the toxicological effects of AgNps in the human immune system response and cancer cells. PMID:25681999

  13. Membrane Transfer from Mononuclear Cells to Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Transduces Cell Survival and Activation Signals in the Recipient Cells via Anti-Extrinsic Apoptotic and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ko-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Shen, Chieh-Yu; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yu, Chia-Li; Hsieh, Song-Chou

    2016-01-01

    The biological significance of membrane transfer (trogocytosis) between polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and mononuclear cells (MNCs) remains unclear. We investigated the biological/immunological effects and molecular basis of trogocytosis among various immune cells in healthy individuals and patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). By flow cytometry, we determined that molecules in the immunological synapse, including HLA class-I and-II, CD11b and LFA-1, along with CXCR1, are exchanged among autologous PMNs, CD4+ T cells, and U937 cells (monocytes) after cell-cell contact. Small interfering RNA knockdown of the integrin adhesion molecule CD11a in U937 unexpectedly enhanced the level of total membrane transfer from U937 to PMN cells. Functionally, phagocytosis and IL-8 production by PMNs were enhanced after co-culture with T cells. Total membrane transfer from CD4+ T to PMNs delayed PMN apoptosis by suppressing the extrinsic apoptotic molecules, BAX, MYC and caspase 8. This enhancement of activities of PMNs by T cells was found to be mediated via p38- and P44/42-Akt-MAP kinase pathways and inhibited by the actin-polymerization inhibitor, latrunculin B, the clathrin inhibitor, Pitstop-2, and human immunoglobulin G, but not by the caveolin inhibitor, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In addition, membrane transfer from PMNs enhanced IL-2 production by recipient anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activated MNCs, and this was suppressed by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (PD98059) and protein kinase C (Rottlerin). Of clinical significance, decreased total membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs in patients with active SLE suppressed mononuclear IL-2 production. In conclusion, membrane transfer from MNCs to PMNs, mainly at the immunological synapse, transduces survival and activation signals to enhance PMN functions and is dependent on actin polymerization, clathrin activation, and Fcγ receptors, while membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs depends on MAP kinase and

  14. Effect of activated platelets on expression of cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells - potential role of prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Waehre, Torgun; Damås, Jan Kristian; Yndestad, Arne; Taskén, Kjetil; Pedersen, Turid M; Smith, Camilla; Halvorsen, Bente; Frøland, Stig S; Solum, Nils O; Aukrust, Pål

    2004-12-01

    Platelets may act as inflammatory cells. To study the effects of soluble and cell-bound platelet factors on the expression of several cytokines and related mediators in leukocytes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were incubated with platelet-free supernatants from SFLLRN-activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or SFLLRN-activated PRP in itself. Our main findings were: (i) the gene expression of several chemokines and some cytokines were markedly increased by both activated PRP and supernatants, as also confirmed at the protein level for IL-6, IL-8 and MIP-1alpha; (ii) the selective protein kinase A type I (PKAI) antagonist Rp-8-Br-cAMP reduced this platelet-induced expression of IL-6, IL-8 and MIP-1alpha in PBMC, suggesting a role of cAMP/PKAI mediated mechanisms in this interaction; (iii) PGE(2) dose-dependently increased the release of IL-6, IL-8 and MIP-1alpha from PBMC mimicking the effect of activated platelets. Furthermore, activated platelets released comparable amounts of PGE(2), suggesting that platelet-derived PGE2 could interact with PBMC in co-cultures; (iv) IL-10 inhibited the platelet-inducing effect on IL-6, IL-8 and MIP-1alpha in PBMC, and notably, the addition PGE2 totally abolished this IL-10 effect suggesting that the suppressive effect of IL-10 on the plateletinduced activation of PBMC might at least partly involve PGE(2) related mechanisms. The present study supports a view of platelets as inflammatory cells, and suggests a potential role of platelet-derived PGE(2) in platelet-induced inflammatory responses. PMID:15583745

  15. Dimethyl fumarate activates the prostaglandin EP2 receptor and stimulates cAMP signaling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Sarah E; Kerns, Amelia R; Tsang, Catherine; Tsang, Vivian; Bourdette, Dennis; Salinthone, Sonemany

    2016-06-17

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of relapsing remitting MS. The pathology of MS is a result of both immune dysregulation and oxidative stress induced damage, and DMF is believed to have therapeutic effects on both of these processes. However, the mechanisms of action of DMF are not fully understood. To determine if DMF is able to activate signaling cascades that affect immune dysregulation, we treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with DMF. We discovered that DMF stimulates cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production after 1 min treatment in vitro. cAMP is a small molecule second messenger that has been shown to modulate immune response. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we determined that adenylyl cyclase mediates DMF induced cAMP production; DMF activated the prostaglandin EP2 receptor to produce cAMP. This response was not due to increased endogenous production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), but was enhanced by addition of exogenous PGE2. Furthermore, we determined that the bioactive metabolite of DMF, monomethyl fumarate (MMF), also stimulates cAMP production. These novel findings suggest that DMF may provide protection against MS by inhibiting immune cell function via the cAMP signaling pathway. PMID:27157139

  16. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells therapy attenuates activated microglial/macrophage response and improves spatial learning after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Supinder S.; Walker, Peter A.; Shah, Shinil K.; Jimenez, Fernando; Thomas, Chelsea P.; Smith, Philippa; Hetz, Robert A.; Xue, Hasen; Pati, Shibani; Dash, Pramod K.; Cox, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (AMNC) have shown therapeutic promise for central nervous system insults such as stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). We hypothesized that intravenous injection of AMNC provides neuroprotection which leads to cognitive improvement after TBI. Methods A controlled cortical impact (CCI) rodent traumatic brain injury (TBI) model was used to examine blood-brain barrier permeability (BBB), neuronal and glial apoptosis and cognitive behavior. Two groups of rats underwent CCI with (CCI-Autologous) or without AMNC treatment (CCI-Alone), consisting of 2 million AMNC/kilogram body weight harvested from the tibia and intravenously injected 72 hr after injury. CCI-Alone animals underwent sham harvests and received vehicle injections. Results 96 hr after injury, AMNC significantly reduced the BBB permeability in injured animals, and there was an increase in apoptosis of pro-inflammatory activated microglia in the ipsilateral hippocampus. At 4 weeks after injury, we examined changes in spatial memory after TBI due to AMNC treatment. There was a significant improvement in probe testing of CCI-Autologous group in comparison to CCI-Alone in the Morris Water Maze paradigm. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the intravenous injection of AMNC after TBI leads to neuroprotection by preserving early BBB integrity and increasing activated microglial apoptosis. In addition, AMNC also improves cognitive function. PMID:23928737

  17. Melatonin synthesis in human colostrum mononuclear cells enhances dectin-1-mediated phagocytosis by mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pires-Lapa, Marco A; Tamura, Eduardo K; Salustiano, Eugenia M A; Markus, Regina P

    2013-10-01

    Many cells in the organism besides pinealocytes, synthesize melatonin. Here, we evaluate both the mechanism of zymosan-induced melatonin synthesis and its autocrine effect in human colostral mononuclear cells. The synthesis of melatonin was induced by activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), as either the blockade of the proteasome or the binding of NF-κB to DNA inhibits zymosan-induced melatonin synthesis. As observed in RAW 264.7 lineage cells, the dimer involved is RelA/c-Rel. Melatonin plays a direct role in mononuclear cell activity, increasing zymosan-induced phagocytosis by stimulating MT2 melatonin receptors and increasing the expression of dectin-1. This role was confirmed by the blockade of melatonin receptors using the competitive antagonist luzindole and the MT2 -selective partial agonist 4P-PDOT. In summary, we show that melatonin produced by immune-competent cells acts in an autocrine manner, enhancing the clearance of pathogens by increasing phagocyte efficiency. Given that these cells are present in human colostrum for 4 or 5 days after birth, this mechanism may be relevant for the protection of infant health.

  18. Circulating leptin and NF-κB activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Faustmann, Gernot; Tiran, Beate; Maimari, Theopisti; Kieslinger, Petra; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Gruber, Hans-Jürgen; Roob, Johannes M; Winklhofer-Roob, Brigitte M

    2016-07-01

    Using the menstrual cycle as a model, this study focused on longitudinal changes and associations within a physiological network known to play a role in female fertility, including, as biologically active nodes, NF-κB, leptin and adiponectin, β-carotene, adipose tissue, and progesterone. In 28 women, leptin, adiponectin, β-carotene, and progesterone concentrations, NF-κB p65 and p50 activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (known to possess estrogen, progesterone and leptin receptors), total body fat (TBF) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) mass were determined at early (T1) and late follicular (T2) and mid (T3) and late (T4) luteal phase. Leptin and adiponectin concentrations were higher, while NF-κB p65 activation was lower at T3 compared with T1. NF-κB p65 activation was inversely related to leptin concentrations at T1, T3, and T4. β-Carotene was inversely related to leptin (T1,T2,T4) and SAT (T1,T3,T4). NF-κB p50 activation was inversely related to TBF (T4) and SAT (T3,T4), and leptin was positively related to TBF and SAT (T1-T4). Progesterone was inversely related to leptin (T2,T3), adiponectin (T3), TBF (T3,T4), and SAT (T2,T3,T4). By providing evidence of luteal phase-specific reduced NF-κB p65 activation in women under physiological conditions, this study bridges the gap between existing evidence of a Th1-Th2 immune response shift induced by reduced NF-κB p65 activation and a Th1-Th2 shift previously observed at luteal phase. For the first time, inverse regressions suggest inhibitory effects of leptin on NF-κB p65 activation at luteal phase, along with inhibitory effects of leptin as well as adiponectin on progesterone production in corpus luteum. © 2016 The Authors BioFactors published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 24(4):376-387, 2016. PMID:27093900

  19. The effect of laser activation of 5,10,15,20-tetra-sulphophenyl-porphyrin loaded in K562 cells and human normal mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Carolina; Neagu, Monica; Manda, Gina; Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Iordăchescu, Dana Iord

    2004-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a relatively new type of treatment in cancer, based on a photosensitizer, visible light and molecular oxygen. Reactive oxygen species are generated, causing tumor cells death by apoptosis or necrosis. Significant nowadays research efforts are focused on finding new photosensitizers with antineoplastic activity and an acceptable toxicological profile. Although consistent information exists regarding PDT in solid tumors, relatively few data are available for PDT of blood cancers. Therefore, we carried out a comparative study on lymphoblastic K562 cells and human normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) treated at a density of 2 x 10(5) cells/mL with 5,10,15,20-tetra-sulphophenyl-porphyrin (TSPP) and then irradiated with He-Ne laser light (lamda = 632.8 nm). The following cell functions were investigated: viability, multiplication, RNA synthesis, total RNA levels and apoptosis. After irradiation, the viability of TSPP-loaded tumor cells decrease, the multiplication rate and the total RNA level are drastically reduced and cells undergo apoptosis. TSPP alone loaded into cells but not activated by irradiation, does not affect these cell parameters. Human normal PBMC subjected to TSPP loading and laser-irradiation develop a different cellular response, their viability and proliferative capacity not being altered by experimental PDT. Accordingly, it appears that TSPP is a non-aggressive compound for cellular physiology and becomes cytotoxic only by irradiation; moreover laser-activated TSPP affects only cells that have a tumoral pattern.

  20. In vitro activation of peripheral mononuclear cells by zinc in HIV-infected patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed Central

    Harrer, T; Wolf, B; Näger, W; Schwarz, W; Bergner, D; Kalden, J R

    1992-01-01

    Zinc is a mitogen for peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The optimal mitogenic concentration was found to be 0.05 mmol/l (327 micrograms/dl), four times higher than physiological serum levels. Maximal proliferation was observed after 6 days. Limited dilution technique revealed a frequency of zinc reactive cells of 1:3467 (median; range 1:1628-1:6235). Cord blood mononuclear cells from four of six healthy children could be stimulated to proliferate by zinc. A normal zinc-induced proliferative response could be demonstrated in all six HIV-infected patients in the Walter-Reed-stage I, in nine of 11 patients in Walter-Reed II and in only two of five patients in Walter-Reed III. In Walter-Reed IV to VI all eight patients showed a weak response to zinc (less than 50% of the healthy day control). Decreased zinc serum levels were found in 10 of 28 patients and in one of 16 controls. There was a significant correlation of a diminished zinc-induced proliferation with lower serum levels of zinc and a reduced proportion of CD4 helper cells in HIV-1-infected men. Because of a suppression of mitogenesis by high dose of zinc an excessive intake of zinc as used by some HIV-1-infected patients can presently not be recommended. The value of zinc-induced proliferation for monitoring HIV-infected patients has still to be established. PMID:1638772

  1. Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis Is Related With Telomerase Activity and Treatment Duration.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, Ioannis; Voliotis, Georgios; Papanikolaou, Vassilios; Chronopoulou, Ioanna; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Kowald, Axel; Zintzaras, Elias; Tsezou, Aspasia

    2015-09-01

    Telomere shortening to a critical limit is associated with replicative senescence. This process is prevented by the enzyme telomerase. Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are factors accelerating telomere loss. Chronic hemodialysis, typically accompanied by oxidative stress and inflammation, may be also associated with replicative senescence. To test this hypothesis, we determined telomere length and telomerase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a cross-sectional study. Hemodialysis patients at the University Hospital Larissa and healthy controls were studied. Telomere length was determined by the TeloTAGGG Telomere Length Assay and telomerase activity by Telomerase PCR-ELISA (Roche Diagnostics GmbH, Mannheim, Germany). We enrolled 43 hemodialysis patients (17 females; age 65.0 ± 12.7 years) and 23 controls (six females; age 62.1 ± 15.7 years). Between the two groups, there was no difference in telomere length (6.95 ± 3.25 vs. 7.31 ± 1.96 kb; P = 0.244) or in telomerase activity (1.82 ± 2.91 vs. 2.71 ± 3.0; P = 0.085). Telomere length correlated inversely with vintage of hemodialysis (r = -0.332, P = 0.030). In hemodialysis patients, positive telomerase activity correlated with telomere length (r = 0.443, P = 0.030). Only age, and neither telomere length nor telomerase activity, was an independent survival predictor (hazard ratio 1.116, 95% confidence interval 1.009-1.234, P = 0.033). In this study, telomere length and telomerase activity in PBMCs are not altered in hemodialysis patients compared with healthy controls. Long duration of hemodialysis treatment is associated with telomere shortening and positive telomerase activity with an increased telomere length in PBMCs of hemodialysis patients. The underlying mechanism and clinical implications of our findings require further investigation.

  2. Ochratoxin A inhibits the production of tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 by human blood mononuclear cells: Another potential mechanism of immune-suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Rossiello, Maria R.; Rotunno, Crescenzia; Coluccia, Addolorata; Carratu, Maria R.; Di Santo, Angelomaria; Evangelista, Virgilio; Semeraro, Nicola; Colucci, Mario

    2008-06-01

    The mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA), an ubiquitous contaminant of food products endowed with a wide spectrum of toxicity, affects several functions of mononuclear leukocytes. Monocytes/macrophages play a major role in fibrin accumulation associated with immune-inflammatory processes through the production of tissue factor (TF) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 2 (PAI-2). We studied the effect of OTA on TF and PAI-2 production by human blood mononuclear cells (MNC). The cells were incubated for 3 or 18 h at 37 deg. C with non toxic OTA concentrations in the absence and in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or other inflammatory agents. TF activity was measured by a one-stage clotting test. Antigen assays were performed by specific ELISAs in cell extracts or conditioned media and specific mRNAs were assessed by RT-PCR. OTA had no direct effect on TF and PAI-2 production by MNC. However, OTA caused a dose-dependent reduction in LPS-induced TF (activity, antigen and mRNA) and PAI-2 (antigen and mRNA) production with > 85% inhibition at 1 {mu}g/ml. Similar results were obtained when monocyte-enriched preparations were used instead of MNC. TF production was also impaired by OTA (1 {mu}g/ml) when MNC were stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (98% inhibition), IL-1{beta} (83%) or TNF-{alpha} (62%). The inhibition of TF and PAI-2 induction might represent a hitherto unrecognized mechanism whereby OTA exerts immunosuppressant activity.

  3. In vitro replication activity of bovine viral diarrhea virus in an epithelial cell line and in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Turin, Lauretta; Lucchini, Barbara; Bronzo, Valerio; Luzzago, Camilla

    2012-11-01

    The present study focused on the in vitro infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from naÏve animals with non-cytopathic (ncp, BVDV-1b NY-1) and cytopathic (cp, BVDV-1a NADL) strains. Infections with 0.1 and 1 multiplicity of infections (MOI) and incubation times of 18 and 36 hr were compared. Twelve BVDV naÏve heifers were enrolled to collect PBMCs. The viral loads in MDBK cells and in PBMCs after in vitro infections were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The highest viral loads were measured at 1 MOI and 36 hr post infection in both cell systems and the lowest at 0.1 MOI and 18 hr with the exception of the cp strain NADL in PBMCs, for which the highest viral load was observed at 0.1 MOI and 36 hr. Viral load mean values were higher for the cp strain than the ncp strain irrespective of the extent of the infection period and MOI. The models of infection studied uncovered different replication activities respectively according to the biotype of virus, the cell substrate and the duration of infection. Replication tends to be higher in PBMCs, particularly at low MOIs and for the ncp strain.

  4. Global suppression of mitogen-activated ovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells by surface protein activity from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, W; Ajuwape, Adebowale Titilayo Phillip; Rosenbusch, Ricardo Francisco

    2010-07-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is associated with chronic non-progressive pneumonia of sheep and goats. As with many other mycoplasmas involved in animal diseases, protective immune responses have not been achieved with vaccines, even though antibody responses can be obtained. This study focuses on characterizing the interaction of M. ovipneumoniae with ovine PBMC using carboxy-fluorescein-succinimidyl-ester (CFSE) loading and flow cytometry to measure lymphoid cell division. M. ovipneumoniae induced a strong in vitro polyclonal suppression of CD4(+), CD8(+), and B blood lymphocyte subsets. The suppressive activity could be destroyed by heating to 60 degrees C, and partially impaired by formalin and binary ethyleneimine treatment that abolished its viability. The activity resided on the surface-exposed membrane protein fraction of the mycoplasma, since mild trypsin treatment not affecting viability was shown to reduce suppressive activity. Trypsin-treated mycoplasma regained suppressive activity once the mycoplasma was allowed to re-synthesize its surface proteins. Implications for the design of vaccines against M. ovipneumoniae are discussed.

  5. Human lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells: III. Effect of L-phenylalanine methyl ester on LAK cell activation from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: possible protease involvement of monocytes, natural killer cells and LAK cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, K H

    1991-01-01

    We have shown that depletion of monocytes from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by L-phenylalanine methyl ester (PheOMe) enhanced lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) generation by recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) at high cell density. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of action of PheOMe on LAK activation by using trypsin, chymotrypsin, tosylphenylalaninechloromethanol (TPCK, a chymotrypsin inhibitor), tosyl-L-lysinechloromethane (TLCK, a trypsin inhibitor), phenylalaninol (PheOH), and benzamidine. PBMC were treated with 1-5 mM PheOMe for 40 min at room temperature in combination with the various agents, washed and assessed for their effects on natural killer (NK) activity against K562 cells and monocyte depletion. The treated cells were then cultured with or without rIL-2 for 3 days. LAK cytotoxicity was assayed against 51Cr-labeled K562 and Raji tumor target cells. TPCK at 10 micrograms/ml partially inhibited depletion of monocytes by PheOMe. TLCK did not prevent depletion of monocytes nor inhibition of NK activity induced by PheOMe. TPCK and TLCK inhibited NK activity by themselves. TPCK but not TLCK inhibited rIL-2 induction of LAK cells. On the other hand, PheOH and benzamidine (analogs of PheOMe) lacked any effect on monocyte depletion but abrogated the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity. They had no effect on rIL-2 activation of LAK activity enhanced by PheOMe. Trypsin potentiated the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity and monocyte depletion. Trypsin partially inhibited IL-2 activation of LAK activity enhanced by PheOMe. Chymotrypsin had little effect on NK activity but prevented the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity. It had little effect on monocyte depletion induced by PheOMe. PheOMe was hydrolysed by monocytes and chymotrypsin to Phe and methanol as determined by HPLC. TPCK inhibited hydrolysis of PheOMe by monocytes. Our data suggest that the effects of PheOMe on monocytes, NK cells and LAK

  6. Effect of Blood Component Coatings of Enosseal Implants on Proliferation and Synthetic Activity of Human Osteoblasts and Cytokine Production of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hulejova, Hana; Bartova, Jirina; Riedel, Tomas; Pesakova, Vlasta

    2016-01-01

    The study monitored in vitro early response of connective tissue cells and immunocompetent cells to enosseal implant materials coated by different blood components (serum, activated plasma, and plasma/platelets) to evaluate human osteoblast proliferation and synthetic activity and inflammatory response presented as a cytokine profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) under conditions imitating the situation upon implantation. The cells were cultivated on coated Ti-plasma-sprayed (Ti-PS), Ti-etched (Ti-Etch), Ti-hydroxyapatite (Ti-HA), and ZrO2 surfaces. The plasma/platelets coating supported osteoblast proliferation only on osteoconductive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch whereas activated plasma enhanced proliferation on all surfaces. Differentiation (BAP) and IL-8 production remained unchanged or decreased irrespective of the coating and surface; only the serum and plasma/platelets-coated ZrO2 exhibited higher BAP and IL-8 expression. RANKL production increased on serum and activated plasma coatings. PBMCs produced especially cytokines playing role in inflammatory phase of wound healing, that is, IL-6, GRO-α, GRO, ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, EGF, and MCP-1. Cytokine profiles were comparable for all tested surfaces; only ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, and MCP-1 expression depended on materials and coatings. The activated plasma coating led to uniformed surfaces and represented a favorable treatment especially for bioinert Ti-PS and ZrO2 whereas all coatings had no distinctive effect on bioactive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch.

  7. Enhanced proliferation and activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with psoriasis vulgaris mediated by streptococcal antigen with bacterial DNA.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi-Hua; Lu, Zhi-Yong; Shi, Ruo-Fei; Xue, Feng; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Pan, Meng; Yuan, Wei-Ru; Xu, Han; Li, Wei-Ping; Zheng, Jie

    2009-11-01

    Streptococcal infection is believed to have an intimate relationship with psoriasis, although the pathogenic role of streptococcal DNA is not fully understood. To gain a clearer understanding of these dynamics, we investigated the effect of streptococcal DNA on lymphocyte proliferation and activation as well as cytokine secretion in psoriasis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from psoriatic patients had higher proliferative responses upon stimulation by streptococcal antigen (SA) when compared with those from healthy individuals. Strikingly, this enhanced proliferation of PBMCs was attenuated after administration of SA treated with DNase-I. In addition, CD69 expression levels on T cells, including skin-homing lymphocyte cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen positive T cells, and IFN-alpha secretion by PBMCs were also attenuated in patients after stimulation with SA without nucleic acid (non-nucleic acid SA, non-NASA) compared with stimulation with untreated SA. However, activation marker CD86 expression levels on B cells as well as the secretion of IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha following stimulation with SA or non-NASA were not significantly altered. Interestingly, the attenuated T-cell activation and IFN-alpha secretion in psoriatic patients could be reconstituted when stimulated by non-NASA combined with synthetic CpG-A, but not when combined with synthetic CpG-B. This study demonstrates the integral function of SA, particularly streptococcal DNA, in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  8. Costimulation with anti-cluster of differentiation 3 and anti-cluster of differentiation 28 reduces the activity of mucin 1-stimulated human mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    WRIGHT, STEPHEN E.; REWERS-FELKINS, KATHLEEN A.; QUINLIN, IMELDA; ZOHRA, FATEMA; AHMED, JEWEL

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activation and extension of the cell life span is necessary in order to enable immunotherapy to perform effectively against cancer. In the present study, mucin 1 (MUC1)-stimulated human mononuclear cells (M1SHMCs) were costimulated with bead-attached monoclonal antibodies specific for cluster of differentiation (CD)3 and CD28 receptors. The study was undertaken to determine whether costimulation was capable of enhancing the killing of cancer cells in vitro and of protecting non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mice from tumor development. Lysis of MCF-7 tumor cells by M1SHMCs was reduced following costimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28. Furthermore, costimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 eliminated the protective effects of M1SHMCs on MCF-7 breast cancer cell growth in the non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mice. The present study suggested that costimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 is not advisable following antigen activation of lymphocytes under the conditions used here. Using a lower anti-CD3/CD28 bead to T-cell ratio may prevent immune suppression, however, further studies are required to support this hypothesis. PMID:26870234

  9. Augmentation of cell number and LAK activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells activated with anti-CD3 and interleukin-2. Preliminary results in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia and neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P M; Bach, F H; Ochoa, A C

    1988-01-01

    A wide variety of human cancers currently have no effective treatment and are potential targets for lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cellular immunotherapy. Relapsed acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and neuroblastoma are two of the major therapeutic challenges in pediatric oncology today. However, one problem which makes LAK immunotherapy in children particularly difficult is obtaining the large numbers of cells required. Present adult therapeutic LAK protocols have utilized short-term (5 day) cultures of interleukin-2 (IL2)-activated cells which are initially obtained from leukopheresis. Since routine use of this procedure in small children is not practical, we have investigated a different approach to obtain increased cell numbers by activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with OKT3, a mitogenic anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, and IL2. Cell growth and LAK activity in OKT3 + IL2-activated cultures were compared to cultures activated with IL2 alone in 2 children with relapsed ALL and 2 children with stage IV neuroblastoma. OKT3 + IL2-activated cultures had marked increases in cell number: after 14 days the OKT3 + IL2-activated cultures yielded an approximately 500-fold increase in cell number compared to a 7-fold increase for cultures activated with IL2 alone. In vitro 51Cr release assays were used to estimate LAK activity of the cultures at 7 and 14 days. When tested against HL60, a natural killer (NK)-resistant tumor cell line, not only were total cytolytic units greatly increased in OKT3 + IL2-stimulated cultures by lytic activity on a per cell basis (lytic units/1 x 10(6) cells) had also markedly increased on day 14 of culture. Phenotypic analysis demonstrated that 80% to 90% of cells in OKT3 + IL2-stimulated cultures were CD3 + T cells. Variable low percentages of CD16 + NK cells were seen in these cultures. In summary, OKT3 + IL2 activation resulted in a large increase in cell yield and the development of high level LAK activity using peripheral blood

  10. Cadmium administration affects circulatory mononuclear cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Djokic, Jelena; Popov Aleksandrov, Aleksandra; Ninkov, Marina; Mirkov, Ivana; Zolotarevski, Lidija; Kataranovski, Dragan; Kataranovski, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous investigations have demonstrated a direct effect of cadmium (Cd) on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) activity in humans, there is virtually no data concerning the in vivo impact of this metal on circulatory mononuclear cells. In this study, the effects of a sub-lethal Cd (1 mg/kg) dose were examined in rats 48 h following a single intraperitoneal injection. Cd treatment resulted in increased total peripheral blood leukocyte levels; however, decreases in PBMC numbers were seen. These changes coincided with an accumulation of mononuclear cells in the lungs and an increase in mononuclear cells expressing CD11b. A lack of effect of Cd on spontaneous nitric oxide (NO) production and on iNOS mRNA levels in the PBMC was also noted. Differential effects of Cd on PBMC inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, IFNγ, and IL-17) gene expression and production were also seen. Specifically, except for IL-1β (levels increased), there were decreases (relative to controls) in mRNA levels for all the other cytokines examined. While there were no Cd treatment-related changes in spontaneous production of the cytokines assessed, there seemed to be a trend (p = 0.06) toward a decrease in spontaneous IL-6 release. When these harvested cells were stimulated ex vivo, there was no effect from Cd exposure on LPS-stimulated IL-1β and TNFα or on ConA-stimulated IFNγ or IL-17 production, but a decrease in IL-6 production in response to LPS was, again, noted. A preliminary study with a lower Cd dose (0.5 mg/kg) revealed some of the same outcomes noted here (mononuclear cell infiltration into lungs, increases in PBMC IL-1β mRNA levels), but differential (increased IL-17 mRNA levels) or newly detected outcomes (increased levels of IL-1α mRNA) as well. The described effects of the single in vivo exposure to Cd on PBMC might contribute to a better overall understanding of the immunomodulatory potential of this environmental contaminant.

  11. Ephrin-B2–Activated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells From Diabetic Patients Restore Diabetes-Induced Impairment of Postischemic Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Broquères-You, Dong; Leré-Déan, Carole; Merkulova-Rainon, Tatiana; Mantsounga, Chris S.; Allanic, David; Hainaud, Patricia; Contrères, Jean-Olivier; Wang, Yu; Vilar, José; Virally, Marie; Mourad, Jean-Jacques; Guillausseau, Pierre-Jean; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Lévy, Bernard I.

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that in vitro treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PB-MNCs) from diabetic patients with ephrin-B2/Fc (EFNB2) improves their proangiogenic therapeutic potential in diabetic ischemic experimental models. Diabetes was induced in nude athymic mice by streptozotocin injections. At 9 weeks after hyperglycemia, 105 PB-MNCs from diabetic patients, pretreated by EFNB2, were intravenously injected in diabetic mice with hindlimb ischemia. Two weeks later, the postischemic neovascularization was evaluated. The mechanisms involved were investigated by flow cytometry analysis and in vitro cell biological assays. Paw skin blood flow, angiographic score, and capillary density were significantly increased in ischemic leg of diabetic mice receiving EFNB2-activated diabetic PB-MNCs versus those receiving nontreated diabetic PB-MNCs. EFNB2 bound to PB-MNCs and increased the adhesion and transmigration of PB-MNCs. Finally, EFNB2-activated PB-MNCs raised the number of circulating vascular progenitor cells in diabetic nude mice and increased the ability of endogenous bone marrow MNCs to differentiate into cells with endothelial phenotype and enhanced their proangiogenic potential. Therefore, EFNB2 treatment of PB-MNCs abrogates the diabetes-induced stem/progenitor cell dysfunction and opens a new avenue for the clinical development of an innovative and accessible strategy in diabetic patients with critical ischemic diseases. PMID:22596048

  12. Mononuclear cells and vascular repair in HHT

    PubMed Central

    Dingenouts, Calinda K. E.; Goumans, Marie-José; Bakker, Wineke

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu–Osler–Weber disease is a rare genetic vascular disorder known for its endothelial dysplasia causing arteriovenous malformations and severe bleedings. HHT-1 and HHT-2 are the most prevalent variants and are caused by heterozygous mutations in endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1, respectively. An undervalued aspect of the disease is that HHT patients experience persistent inflammation. Although endothelial and mural cells have been the main research focus trying to unravel the mechanism behind the disease, wound healing is a process with a delicate balance between inflammatory and vascular cells. Inflammatory cells are part of the mononuclear cells (MNCs) fraction, and can, next to eliciting an immune response, also have angiogenic potential. This biphasic effect of MNC can hold a promising mechanism to further elucidate treatment strategies for HHT patients. Before MNC are able to contribute to repair, they need to home to and retain in ischemic and damaged tissue. Directed migration (homing) of MNCs following tissue damage is regulated by the stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1). MNCs that express the C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) migrate toward the tightly regulated gradient of SDF1. This directed migration of monocytes and lymphocytes can be inhibited by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). Interestingly, MNC of HHT patients express elevated levels of DPP4 and show impaired homing toward damaged tissue. Impaired homing capacity of the MNCs might therefore contribute to the impaired angiogenesis and tissue repair observed in HHT patients. This review summarizes recent studies regarding the role of MNCs in the etiology of HHT and vascular repair, and evaluates the efficacy of DPP4 inhibition in tissue integrity and repair. PMID:25852751

  13. Activation of NRF2 pathway in spleen, thymus as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells by acute arsenic exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaoxu; Li, Jinlong; Zhang, Yang; Li, Wei; Zhao, Lu; Nie, Huifang; Sun, Guifan; Li, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic has already been demonstrated to activate the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) in many different organs and cell lines. The present study tried to explore the expression of NRF2 pathway by acute arsenic exposure in immune system in vivo. Our results showed that treatment with arsenic (sodium arsenite, 5, 10 and 20mg/kg, intra-gastrically) increased the expression of NRF2 and its downstream targets heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) and glutathione reductase (GR) consistently in spleen, thymus, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as early as treatment from 6h. Arsenic was also detected to up-regulate the mRNA levels of Hmox1, NAD(P)H: quinine oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1), Gclc and Gclm in spleen and thymus. Besides, we detected the enhancement of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein (KEAP1) expression in these immune organs and immunocytes. What's more, our results also found the imbalanced oxidative redox status under the circumstances that arsenic activated NRF2 pathway, reflected by the generation of lipid peroxidation, as well as the reduction of antioxidative capacities in both spleen and thymus. Taken together, our results here strongly suggested the expression and activation of NRF2 pathway by acute arsenic exposure in immune system in vivo. Further studies are being investigated to explore the possible roles and functions of NRF2 pathway stimulation in the regulation of immune responses of this metalloid.

  14. Effect of Blood Component Coatings of Enosseal Implants on Proliferation and Synthetic Activity of Human Osteoblasts and Cytokine Production of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Himmlova, Lucie; Kubies, Dana; Hulejova, Hana; Bartova, Jirina; Riedel, Tomas; Stikarova, Jana; Suttnar, Jiri; Pesakova, Vlasta

    2016-01-01

    The study monitored in vitro early response of connective tissue cells and immunocompetent cells to enosseal implant materials coated by different blood components (serum, activated plasma, and plasma/platelets) to evaluate human osteoblast proliferation and synthetic activity and inflammatory response presented as a cytokine profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) under conditions imitating the situation upon implantation. The cells were cultivated on coated Ti-plasma-sprayed (Ti-PS), Ti-etched (Ti-Etch), Ti-hydroxyapatite (Ti-HA), and ZrO2 surfaces. The plasma/platelets coating supported osteoblast proliferation only on osteoconductive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch whereas activated plasma enhanced proliferation on all surfaces. Differentiation (BAP) and IL-8 production remained unchanged or decreased irrespective of the coating and surface; only the serum and plasma/platelets-coated ZrO2 exhibited higher BAP and IL-8 expression. RANKL production increased on serum and activated plasma coatings. PBMCs produced especially cytokines playing role in inflammatory phase of wound healing, that is, IL-6, GRO-α, GRO, ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, EGF, and MCP-1. Cytokine profiles were comparable for all tested surfaces; only ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, and MCP-1 expression depended on materials and coatings. The activated plasma coating led to uniformed surfaces and represented a favorable treatment especially for bioinert Ti-PS and ZrO2 whereas all coatings had no distinctive effect on bioactive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch. PMID:27651560

  15. Effect of Blood Component Coatings of Enosseal Implants on Proliferation and Synthetic Activity of Human Osteoblasts and Cytokine Production of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hulejova, Hana; Bartova, Jirina; Riedel, Tomas; Pesakova, Vlasta

    2016-01-01

    The study monitored in vitro early response of connective tissue cells and immunocompetent cells to enosseal implant materials coated by different blood components (serum, activated plasma, and plasma/platelets) to evaluate human osteoblast proliferation and synthetic activity and inflammatory response presented as a cytokine profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) under conditions imitating the situation upon implantation. The cells were cultivated on coated Ti-plasma-sprayed (Ti-PS), Ti-etched (Ti-Etch), Ti-hydroxyapatite (Ti-HA), and ZrO2 surfaces. The plasma/platelets coating supported osteoblast proliferation only on osteoconductive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch whereas activated plasma enhanced proliferation on all surfaces. Differentiation (BAP) and IL-8 production remained unchanged or decreased irrespective of the coating and surface; only the serum and plasma/platelets-coated ZrO2 exhibited higher BAP and IL-8 expression. RANKL production increased on serum and activated plasma coatings. PBMCs produced especially cytokines playing role in inflammatory phase of wound healing, that is, IL-6, GRO-α, GRO, ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, EGF, and MCP-1. Cytokine profiles were comparable for all tested surfaces; only ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, and MCP-1 expression depended on materials and coatings. The activated plasma coating led to uniformed surfaces and represented a favorable treatment especially for bioinert Ti-PS and ZrO2 whereas all coatings had no distinctive effect on bioactive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch. PMID:27651560

  16. Ellagic Acid, a Dietary Polyphenol, Inhibits Tautomerase Activity of Human Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Its Pro-inflammatory Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Asim A; Mazumder, Somnath; De, Rudranil; Saha, Shubhra J; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Iqbal, Mohd S; Adhikari, Susanta; Alam, Athar; Roy, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2015-05-27

    Ellagic acid (EA), a phenolic lactone, inhibited tautomerase activity of human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) noncompetitively (Ki = 1.97 ± 0.7 μM). The binding of EA to MIF was determined by following the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence. We synthesized several EA derivatives, and their structure-activity relationship studies indicated that the planar conjugated lactone moiety of EA was essential for MIF inhibition. MIF induces nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to promote inflammation. We were interested in evaluating the effect of EA on nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotactic activity in human PBMCs in the presence of MIF. The results showed that EA inhibited MIF-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation in PBMCs, as evident from confocal immunofluorescence microscopic data. EA also inhibited MIF-mediated chemotaxis of PBMCs. Thus, we report MIF-inhibitory activity of EA and inhibition of MIF-mediated proinflammatory responses in PBMCs by EA.

  17. Expression of VSTM1-v2 Is Increased in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Is Correlated with Disease Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dashan; Li, Yan; Liu, Yuan; He, Yan; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systematic autoimmune disease that mainly affects joints and bones. Although the precise etiology is still unknown, Th17 cell is being recognized as an important mediator in pathogenesis of RA. VSTM1-v2 is a novel cytokine which has recently been reported to promote the differentiation of Th17 cells. This study is performed to study whether VSTM1-v2 can be recognized as a biomarker of RA, and is correlated to IL-17 expression. We obtained peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 40 patients with RA and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy controls by standard Ficoll-Paque Plus density centrifugation. The mRNA expression levels of VSTM1-v2 and IL-17A in PBMCs were detected by real time-PCR. Disease activity parameters of RA were measured by routine methods. Our results showed that VSTM1-v2 mRNA expression in PBMCs from RA patients was significantly increased in comparison of that in healthy individuals. The VSTM1-v2 mRNA expression level was positively correlated with IL-17A mRNA expression level, DAS28, CRP and ESR, but was not correlated to RF, Anti-CCP or ANA. VSTM1-v2 might be a biomarker of RA and a novel factor in the pathogenesis of RA.

  18. Abnormal activation of calpain and protein kinase Cα promotes a constitutive release of matrix metalloproteinase 9 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Averna, Monica; Bavestrello, Margherita; Cresta, Federico; Pedrazzi, Marco; De Tullio, Roberta; Minicucci, Laura; Sparatore, Bianca; Salamino, Franca; Pontremoli, Sandro; Melloni, Edon

    2016-08-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is physiologically involved in remodeling the extracellular matrix components but its abnormal release has been observed in several human pathologies. We here report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients homozygous for F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), express constitutively and release at high rate MMP9 due to the alteration in their intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. This spontaneous and sustained MMP9 secretion may contribute to the accumulation of this protease in fluids of CF patients. Conversely, in PBMCs isolated from healthy donors, expression and secretion of MMP9 are undetectable but can be evoked, after 12 h of culture, by paracrine stimulation which also promotes an increase in [Ca(2+)]i. We also demonstrate that in both CF and control PBMCs the Ca(2+)-dependent MMP9 secretion is mediated by the concomitant activation of calpain and protein kinase Cα (PKCα), and that MMP9 expression involves extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Our results are supported by the fact that either the inhibition of Ca(2+) entry or chelation of [Ca(2+)]i as well as the inhibition of single components of the signaling pathway or the restoration of CFTR activity all promote the reduction of MMP9 secretion. PMID:27349634

  19. Super-oxide anion production and antioxidant enzymatic activities associated with the executive functions in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy adult samples.

    PubMed

    Pesce, M; Rizzuto, A; La Fratta, I; Tatangelo, R; Campagna, G; Iannasso, M; Ferrone, A; Franceschelli, S; Speranza, L; Patruno, A; De Lutiis, M A; Felaco, M; Grilli, A

    2016-05-01

    Executive Functions (EFs) involve a set of high cognitive abilities impairment which have been successfully related to a redox omeostasis imbalance in several psychiatric disorders. Firstly, we aimed to investigate the relationship between executive functioning and some oxidative metabolism parameters in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from healthy adult samples. The Brown Attention-Deficit Disorder Scales were administered to assess five specific facets of executive functioning. Total superoxide anion production, Super Oxide Dismutase (SOD), Catalase (CAT), Glutathione Reductase (GR) and Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) activities were evaluated on proteins extracted from the PBMCs. We found significant positive correlations between superoxide anion production and the total score of the 'Brown' Scale and some of its clusters. The GPx and CAT activities were negatively associated with the total score and some clusters. In a linear regression analysis, these biological variables were indicated as the most salient predictors of the total score, explaining the 24% variance (adjusted R(2)=0.24, ANOVA, p<.001). This study provides novel evidence that Executive Functions have underpinnings in the oxidative metabolism, as ascertained in healthy subjects. PMID:26646400

  20. Physalin F, a seco-steroid from Physalis angulata L., has immunosuppressive activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with HTLV1-associated myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lorena A; Meira, Cássio S; Villarreal, Cristiane F; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; de Souza, Claudia V C; Ribeiro, Ivone M; Tomassini, Therezinha C B; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Soares, Milena B P; Grassi, Maria F R

    2016-04-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) induces a strong activation of the immune system, especially in individuals with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Physalin F is a secosteroid with potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of physalin F on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of HAM/TSP subjects. A concentration-dependent inhibition of spontaneous proliferation of PBMC from HAM/TSP subjects was observed in the presence of physalin F, as evaluated by (3)H-thymidine uptake. The IC50 for physalin F was 0.97 ± 0.11 μM. Flow cytometry analysis using Cytometric Bead Array (CBA) showed that physalin F (10 μM) significantly reduced the levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ, but not IL-17A, in supernatants of PBMC cultures. Next, apoptosis induction was addressed by using flow cytometry to evaluate annexin V expression. Treatment with physalin F (10 μM) increased the apoptotic population of PBMC in HAM/TSP subjects. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of PBMC showed that physalin F induced ultrastructural changes, such as pyknotic nuclei, damaged mitochondria, enhanced autophagic vacuole formation, and the presence of myelin-like figures. In conclusion, physalin F induces apoptosis of PBMC, decreasing the spontaneous proliferation and cytokine production caused by HTLV-1 infection.

  1. Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells Have a Potential to Produce NK Cells Using IL2Rg Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Khaziri, Nahid; Mohammadi, Momeneh; Aliyari, Zeinab; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Tayefi Nasrabadi, Hamid; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although bone marrow represents the main site for NK cell development and also distinct thymic-dependentNK cell pathway was identified, the cytokines effect on the NK cell generation from cord blood is unclear. Studies were identified the role of cytokines in the regulation of bone marrow and thymic NK cells. Previous studies reported that IL15 are critical for bone marrow dependent and IL7 is important for thymic NK cells. It is remain unclear the cytokines influence on the expantion of NK cells in cord blood mononuclear cells. Methods: We evaluated cultured cord blood mononuclear cells suplememnted with combinations of cytokines using FACS in distinct time points. In this study, we presented the role of IL2, IL7 and IL15 as members of the common gamma receptor -chain (Il2rg) on the expansion NK cells from cord blood cells. Results: By investigating cord blood mononuclear cells in vitro , we demonstrated that IL2 and IL15 are important for expansion of NK cells. IL2 in comparision with IL15 has more influences in NK cell expansion. In contrast IL-7 is dispensable for NK cell generation in cord blood. Conclusion: Thus,IL-2Rg cytokines play complementary roles and are indispensable for homeostasis of NK cell development in cord blood. Probably these cytokines could help to use NK beneficials in engrafment of transplanted cells and Anti tumor activity of NK cells. PMID:27123412

  2. The antagonist activity of lipid IVa on the stimulation by lipid A of TNF-alpha production from canine blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Takasawa, Kenji; Kano, Rui; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2011-09-15

    Lipid A, the active component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), exists in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and binds to the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex. On the other hand, the synthetic precursor of Escherichia coli lipid A, tetraacylated lipid IVa, is an agonist for TLR4 and MD-2 complex in murine, equine and feline cells but is an antagonist for lipid A in human cells. The aim of the study was to examine the function of canine Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex on canine blood mononuclear cells (BMC), by analyzing lipid A- or lipid IVa-induction of TNF-α production from these cells in order to understand canine innate immune system. After 5-h culture of canine BMC with lipid A (lipid A culture) or lipid IVa (lipid IVa culture), the TNF-α, as determined by ELISA, had increased in the supernatants of the lipid A cultures in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the TNF-α was undetectable in supernatant of lipid IVa-treated cultures. The TNF-α was statistically significantly different between the lipid A and lipid IVa cultures (100 and 1000 ng/ml). TNF-α production from canine BMC was inhibited, in a lipid IVa-dose-dependent manner, when the BMC were pre-cultured with lipid IVa for 60 min and then cultured with lipid A for 5h, while in control BMC cultures production if TNF-α was unchanged. These results indicate that the TNF-α production stimulated by lipid A was competed out by pre-exposing the BMC to lipid IVa. Thus, lipid A is an agonist for TNF-α production in canine BMC, whereas lipid IVa appears to be an antagonist against this lipid A stimulation of canine BMC.

  3. Analysis of mononuclear cell functions in Holstein cattle with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Nochi, H; Sanada, Y; Tamoto, K; Noda, H; Kociba, G J

    1994-08-01

    Lymphocyte functions in cattle affected with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD, termed BLAD in cattle) were evaluated by lymphocyte markers, blastogenic response, and immunoglobulin concentrations; mononuclear phagocyte functions were assessed by chemotactic and luminol-dependent chemiluminescent (CL) responses to determine the effects of impaired expression of leukocyte CD18 on mononuclear cell functions. Deficient CD18 expression on lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes from cattle with BLAD was clearly detected by use of flow cytometric analysis. There were no significant differences in the population of peanut agglutinin (PNA)-positive and surface immunoglobulin-bearing blood lymphocytes from clinically normal cattle and cattle with BLAD, as determined by flow cytometric analysis. Lymphocytes from cattle with BLAD had strong mitogen-induced blastogenic responses, which were greater than those from controls. Adherence of mononuclear phagocytes from cattle with BLAD was markedly impaired, and their chemotactic responses had diminished values, compared with those of controls. Luminol-dependent CL of mononuclear phagocytes from affected cattle, stimulated by opsonized zymosan, had significantly (P < 0.01) decreased values, compared with those of controls. Concentrations of IgG were markedly increased in serum from cattle with BLAD, compared with those in controls. These results indicated that impaired expression of leukocyte CD18 has marked effects on adhering activity of mononuclear phagocytes, and significantly inhibits CL response of mononuclear phagocytes mediated by inactivated-complement 3b-dependent functions. High selective immunoglobulin concentrations indicated that lymphocytes of B-cell lineage may have normal function. PMID:7978649

  4. Lactobacillus acidophilus modulates inflammatory activity by regulating the TLR4 and NF-κB expression in porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells after lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang In; Kim, Hyun Soo; Koo, Jin Mo; Kim, In Ho

    2016-02-28

    A total of forty weaned pigs ((Landrace × Yorkshire) × Duroc) were used to evaluate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus on inflammatory activity after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Experimental treatments were as follows: (T1) control diet+saline challenge; (T2) control diet with 0·1% L. acidophilus+saline challenge; (T3) control diet+LPS challenge; and (T4) control diet with 0·1% L. acidophilus+LPS challenge. On d-14, piglets were challenged with saline (T1 and T2) or LPS (T3 and T4). Blood samples were obtained at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 12 h after being challenged and analysed for immune cell cytokine production and gene expression pattern. The L. acidophilus treatment increased the average daily weight gain (ADWG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) compared with the control diet. With the control diet, the LPS challenge (T3) increased the number of immune cells and expression of TNF-α and IL-6 compared with the saline challenge (T1). Whereas with the saline challenge L. acidophilus treatment (T2) increased the number of leucocytes and CD4 compared with the control diet (T1), with the LPS challenge L. acidophilus treatment (T4) decreased the number of leucocytes, lymphocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ and expression of TNF-α and IL-6 compared with the control diet (T3). L. acidophilus treatment decreased the expression of TRL4 and NF-κB in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after LPS challenge, which leads to inhibition of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-8 and IL1B1 and to induction of IL-4 and IL-10. We suggested that L. acidophilus improved ADWG and ADFI and protected against LPS-induced inflammatory responses by regulating TLR4 and NF-κB expression in porcine PBMC. PMID:26769562

  5. Influence of atopic heredity on IL-4-, IL-12- and IFN-gamma-producing cells in in vitro activated cord blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, S; Söderlund, A; Nilsson, C; Lilja, G; Nordlund, M; Troye-Blomberg, M

    2001-12-01

    Several reports have claimed that there is a greater risk for a child with an atopic mother to develop allergy as compared to a child with an atopic father. This suggests that the fetal environment during pregnancy might be of importance for the development of atopic disease. Both proliferative and cytokine responses have been detected in cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) after stimulation with allergens, suggesting allergen priming already in utero. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the atopic status of the mother influences cytokine production by CBMC. We compared interleukin (IL)-4, IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-gamma-producing CBMC from children with double atopic heredity (dh), maternal atopic heredity only (mh) or no atopic heredity (nh). CBMC were stimulated in vitro with allergens (birch, ovalbumin and cat), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) or purified protein derivative (PPD) and cytokine-producing cells were measured by the enzyme-linked immunospot assay. In response to PHA, the frequency of IL-4-producing cells, as well as the ratio of IL-4/IFN-gamma-producing cells, were significantly higher in the dh group compared to the nh group. High numbers of IL-12-producing cells in response to allergens were detected, significantly highest in the nh group, followed by the dh and mh groups. Our results suggest that there is a stronger Th2 bias after in vitro stimulation of CBMC from children with atopic heredity, as reflected by higher IL-4/IFN-gamma ratios in response to PHA, and lower numbers of IL-12-producing cells after allergen stimulation. Whether these differences influence later allergy development will be evaluated when the atopic status of the children is assessed at 2 years of age.

  6. Induction of autoantibody-producing cells after the coculture of haptenated and normal human mononuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Pisko, E J; Foster, S L; Turner, R A

    1981-10-01

    The coculture of normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBL) and autologous mononuclear leukocytes coupled to the trinitrophenyl (TNP) hapten (TNP-PBL) was found to induce a polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cells. The polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cells was demonstrated by detecting the induction of cells producing antibody to sheep red blood cells using a complement-dependent, direct, hemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay. A ratio of four normal to one haptenated mononuclear leukocyte was found to be optimal for inducing the polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cell in these cultures. The plaque-forming cells assay in these experiments utilized monolayers of indicator red cells. Further evidence for the polyclonal induction of antibody-producing cells by TNP-PBL was provided by demonstrating PFC on monolayers of not only sheep red blood cells, but also autologous human red cells, bromelain-treated autologous red cells, TNP-coupled human and sheep red cells, and human autologous red cells coupled to human heat-aggregated IgG with chromic chloride. Thus cells secreting antibody to TNP, human red cells, and human IgG were induced. Anti-IgG and anti-human red cell-producing cells were first detected on Day 2 of culture and were still present on Day 9. Mononuclear leukocytes altered by chemical haptenation polyclonally stimulate normal mononuclear leukocytes to become antibody-producing cells. This polyclonal stimulation of antibody-producing cells includes cells producing antibodies to human IgG and human autologous red blood cells suggesting that autoantibody-producing cells are induced.

  7. In vitro activation of cord blood mononuclear cells and cytokine production in a remote coastal population exposed to organochlorines and methyl mercury.

    PubMed

    Bilrha, Houda; Roy, Raynald; Moreau, Brigitte; Belles-Isles, Marthe; Dewailly, Eric; Ayotte, Pierre

    2003-12-01

    Remote coastal populations that rely on seafood for subsistence often receive unusually high doses of organochlorines and methyl mercury. Immunosuppression resulting from prenatal exposure to organochlorines has been reported in wildlife species and humans. In this study, we assessed lymphocyte activation and associated cytokine secretion in 47 newborns from a remote maritime population living on the Mid and Lower North Shore regions of the St. Lawrence River (Québec, Canada; subsistence fishing group) and 65 newborns from nearby urban settings (reference group). Cord blood samples were collected for organochlorine and mercury analyses and also to isolate cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) for the in vitro assessment of cytokine production and expression of surface markers after mitogenic stimulation (CD4(+)CD45RO(+), CD8(+)CD45RO(+), CD3(+)CD25(+), and CD8(+)HLA-DR(+)). Blood mercury and plasma concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were significantly higher in the subsistence fishing group than in the reference group (p < 0.001). No difference was observed between the two groups regarding subsets of lymphocytes showing markers of activation. In vitro secretion of cytokines by CBMCs after mitogenic stimulation was lower in the subsistence fishing group than in the reference group (p < 0.05). Moreover, we found an inverse correlation between tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion and plasma PCB, p,p'-DDE, and HCB concentrations (p < 0.05). Our data support a negative association between TNF-alpha secretion by CBMCs and prenatal organochlorine exposure. If the relationship between organochlorine and TNF-alpha secretion is causal, it would suggest a role for this important proinflammatory cytokine in mediating organochlorine-induced immunotoxicity in infants developmentally exposed to these compounds. PMID:14644672

  8. Piperine inhibits cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Chuchawankul, S; Khorana, N; Poovorawan, Y

    2012-01-01

    Piperine, an amide isolated from Piper species (Piperaceae), has been reported to exhibit central nervous system depression, anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory activity. Immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activity of piperine has been demonstrated in mouse carcinomas. However, there is little information available concerning the effect of piperine on humans. We evaluated the immunopharmacological activity of this compound in human immune cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were exposed to piperine, and cell proliferation was determined by the MTS assay. Piperine significantly inhibited phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human PBMC proliferation after exposure for 72 h. This compound inhibited PBMC activity, with an IC(50) of 100.73 ± 11.16 μg/mL. Production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was measured using an ELISA assay and RT-PCR. Piperine inhibited IL-2 and IFN-γ production in the PBMCs. RT-PCR data indicated that IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA expression in PBMCs is suppressed by piperine. This compound significantly inhibited the production of these two cytokines by activated PBMCs in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, piperine appears to have potential as an immunomodulatory agent for immune system suppression. PMID:22535397

  9. Combination of nifedipine and subtherapeutic dose of cyclosporin additively suppresses mononuclear cells activation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal individuals via Ca2+–calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lai, N-S; Yu, C-L; Yin, W-Y; Yu, H-C; Huang, H-B; Tung, C-H; Lu, M-C

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal Ca2+-mediated signalling contributes to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the potential implication of calcium channel blocker in RA remained unknown. We hypothesized that nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, combined with a calcineurin inhibitor, could suppress T cell activation via targeting different level of the Ca2+ signalling pathway. The percentage of activated T cells and the apoptotic rate of mononuclear cells (MNCs) was measured by flow cytometry. The MNC viability, cytokine production, cytosolic Ca2+ level and activity of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The NFAT-regulated gene expression, including interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-γ and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We found that the percentage of activated T cells in anti-CD3 + anti-CD28-activated MNC was higher in RA patients. High doses of nifedipine (50 µM) increased MNCs apoptosis, inhibited T cell activation and decreased T helper type 2 (Th1) (IFN-γ)/Th2 (IL-10) cytokine production in both groups. The Ca2+ influx was lower in anti-CD3 + anti-CD28-activated MNC from RA patients than healthy volunteers and suppressed by nifedipine. When combined with a subtherapeutic dose (50 ng/ml) of cyclosporin, 1 µM nifedipine suppressed the percentage of activated T cells in both groups. Moreover, this combination suppressed more IFN-γ secretion and NFAT-regulated gene (GM-CSF and IFN-γ) expression in RA-MNCs than normal MNCs via decreasing the activity of NFATc1. In conclusion, we found that L-type Ca2+ channel blockers and subtherapeutic doses of cyclosporin act additively to suppress the Ca2+-calcineurin-NFAT signalling pathway, leading to inhibition of T cell activity. We propose that this combination may become a potential treatment of RA. PMID:22385242

  10. Mononuclear cells are not involved in BGP synthesis and secretion.

    PubMed

    Cantatore, F P; Carrozzo, M; Magli, D M; Pipitone, V

    1991-03-01

    Osteocalcin or bone GLA protein (BGP) is found at high levels in only two tissues, the extracellular matrix of bone and dentine. Tissue culture experiments have demonstrated that BGP is synthesized by two osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell lines (ROS 2/3 and 17/2) and by normal osteoblastic cells in primary culture. BGP was not found in rat cartilage nor in liver, kidney, lung, spleen, brain, heart, thymus, skeletal muscle. In this study secretion of BGP was assayed by RIA in the supernatants of 48-hour cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes or monocytes. Lymphocyte cultures were carried out using RPMI-1640 supplemented with L-glutamine and antibiotics at the concentration of 1 x 10(6) cells/ml and activated by PHA (10 ng/ml). Peripheral blood monocytes were purified by adherence to plastic Petri dishes and treated with cold PBS supplemented with EDTA. Monocytes were cultured as previously described and stimulated with LPS (50 micrograms/ml). Cell-free supernatants were obtained by centrifugation and stored at -20 degrees C, until the BGP assay was performed. The authors did not observe secretion of detectable amounts of BGP in the supernatants of short-term lymphocyte or monocyte cultures. These data indicate that circulating mononuclear cells are not involved in BGP synthesis and secretion.

  11. Mononuclear cells in the corneal response to endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, E.L.; Cruse, V.K.; Kwok, M.T.

    1982-04-01

    A severe keratitis can be produced after the direct injection of bacterial endotoxin, or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in rabbits. Corneal inflammation can progress to scarring and vascularization within a 2 to 3 week period. Pretreatment with systemic adrenal corticosteroids (triamcinolone) prevents this response. Limbal cellular and vascular events were studied during the first 20 hr after injection of LPS in treated and nontreated rabbits. Perivascular limbal inflammatory cells were counted and limbal vascular permeability was assessed by extravasation of 131I-albumin and 125I-fibrinogen in the cornea. Corticosteroids decreased but did not prevent the early protein extravasation and profoundly altered the inflammatory cell population around blood vessels at the limbus. Mononuclear cells, particularly mononuclear phagocytes, were sharply reduced. It is proposed that these cell types play an important role in the perpetuation and amplification of the inflammatory response in this reaction.

  12. Cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Hadinedoushan; Mahroo, Mirahmadian; Abbas, Aflatounian; Firouzeh, Akbari; Nadia, Hatmi

    2004-10-21

    It has been postulated that a proportion of recurrent miscarriage (RM) might be due to immune causes. The objective was to determine whether cytokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cell is altered in patients with a history of RM. We compared the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, TGFbeta1 and IFNgamma in the supernatant of Phytohemagglutinin stimulated mononuclear cells in 21 women with RM at the time of 3rd or higher abortion (group I), 32 women who were at least 3 months past their 3rd or higher abortion (group II) and 32 pregnant women with no history of abortion (group III). Gestational age was matched between groups I and III. Group I had higher level of IL-2 than group III (P=0.001). Group II showed higher level of IL-2 (P=0.001) and IFNgamma (P=0.015) than group III. The production of IL-10 by mononuclear cells of group III was higher than both group I (P=0.002) and group II (P=0.001). There was no difference in the levels of IL-2, IL-10 and IFNgamma between groups I and II. Also, the levels of IL-4, IL-13, and TGFbeta1 were similar among the groups. The data indicate an elevation of Th1 cytokines in women with RM as compared to normal pregnant women, and IL-10 is an important cytokine in the maintenance of pregnancy.

  13. Bioenergetic analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, N; Piasecka, J; Bryant, A H; Jones, R H; Skibinski, D O F; Francis, Nigel J; Thornton, C A

    2015-10-01

    Leucocytes respond rapidly to pathogenic and other insults, with responses ranging from cytokine production to migration and phagocytosis. These are bioenergetically expensive, and increased glycolytic flux provides adenosine triphosphate (ATP) rapidly to support these essential functions. However, much of this work is from animal studies. To understand more clearly the relative role of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in human leucocytes, especially their utility in a translational research setting, we undertook a study of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) bioenergetics. Glycolysis was essential during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α production, as 2-deoxy-D-glucose decreased significantly the output of all three cytokines. After optimizing cell numbers and the concentrations of all activators and inhibitors, oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis profiles of fresh and cryopreserved/resuscitated MNCs were determined to explore the utility of MNCs for determining the bioenergetics health profile in multiple clinical settings. While the LPS-induced cytokine response did not differ significantly between fresh and resuscitated cells from the same donors, cryopreservation/resuscitation significantly affected mainly some measures of oxidative phosphorylation, but also glycolysis. Bioenergetics analysis of human MNCs provides a quick, effective means to measure the bioenergetics health index of many individuals, but cryopreserved cells are not suitable for such an analysis. The translational utility of this approach was tested by comparing MNCs of pregnant and non-pregnant women to reveal increased bioenergetics health index with pregnancy but significantly reduced basal glycolysis and glycolytic capacity. More detailed analysis of discrete leucocyte populations would be required to understand the relative roles of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation during inflammation and

  14. Bioenergetic analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, N; Piasecka, J; Bryant, A H; Jones, R H; Skibinski, D O F; Francis, Nigel J; Thornton, C A

    2015-01-01

    Leucocytes respond rapidly to pathogenic and other insults, with responses ranging from cytokine production to migration and phagocytosis. These are bioenergetically expensive, and increased glycolytic flux provides adenosine triphosphate (ATP) rapidly to support these essential functions. However, much of this work is from animal studies. To understand more clearly the relative role of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in human leucocytes, especially their utility in a translational research setting, we undertook a study of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) bioenergetics. Glycolysis was essential during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated interleukin (IL)−1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α production, as 2-deoxy-D-glucose decreased significantly the output of all three cytokines. After optimizing cell numbers and the concentrations of all activators and inhibitors, oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis profiles of fresh and cryopreserved/resuscitated MNCs were determined to explore the utility of MNCs for determining the bioenergetics health profile in multiple clinical settings. While the LPS-induced cytokine response did not differ significantly between fresh and resuscitated cells from the same donors, cryopreservation/resuscitation significantly affected mainly some measures of oxidative phosphorylation, but also glycolysis. Bioenergetics analysis of human MNCs provides a quick, effective means to measure the bioenergetics health index of many individuals, but cryopreserved cells are not suitable for such an analysis. The translational utility of this approach was tested by comparing MNCs of pregnant and non-pregnant women to reveal increased bioenergetics health index with pregnancy but significantly reduced basal glycolysis and glycolytic capacity. More detailed analysis of discrete leucocyte populations would be required to understand the relative roles of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation during inflammation and

  15. Theophylline therapy inhibits neutrophil and mononuclear cell chemotaxis from chronic asthmatic children.

    PubMed Central

    Condino-Neto, A; Vilela, M M; Cambiucci, E C; Ribeiro, J D; Guglielmi, A A; Magna, L A; De Nucci, G

    1991-01-01

    1. Theophylline is commonly used to relieve symptoms of chronic asthma. Since neutrophil and mononuclear cell activation are associated with late phase asthmatic reactions, effects of theophylline on these cells may be of importance. 2. In the present investigation we compared neutrophil and mononuclear cell chemotaxis from chronic asthmatic children during and after theophylline therapy. 3. Thirty patients were recruited for the study. Each patient received theophylline orally for 10 days. The theophylline dose was 20 mg kg-1 day-1 given in four divided doses. On the tenth day, blood was collected into heparinized (100 u ml-1) and siliconized tubes 2 h after the last theophylline dose for chemotactic assays, cAMP and theophylline plasma determinations. When clinical conditions allowed, theophylline was discontinued for 7 days and the chemotactic assays, cAMP and theophylline plasma concentrations repeated. Serum complement and IgE levels were also determined. 4. Theophylline therapy clearly inhibited both spontaneous and stimulated neutrophil and mononuclear cell chemotaxis. Twenty-seven patients had therapeutic plasma concentrations of theophylline (5-20 micrograms ml-1). Discontinuation of theophylline therapy caused a significant decrease in plasma cAMP levels (44 and 31 pmol ml-1 respectively during and after treatment, n = 30, P less than 0.001). 5. The inhibition of neutrophil and mononuclear cell migration by theophylline therapy in chronic asthmatic children may be beneficial for the control of the inflammatory response observed in these patients. PMID:1659436

  16. Pro-angiogenic Cell Colonies Grown In Vitro from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatis, Kreton; Sutcliffe, Diane; Joseph, Giji; Alexander, R. Wayne; Waller, Edmund K.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Taylor, W. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Although multiple culture assays have been designed to identify “endothelial progenitor cells” (EPCs), the phenotype of cells grown in culture often remains undefined. We sought to define and characterize the pro-angiogenic cell population within human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood and grown under angiogenic conditions for 7 days. Formed colonies (CFU-As) were identified and analyzed for proliferation, mRNA and surface antigen expression, tube-forming ability and chromosomal content. Colonies were composed of a heterogeneous group of cells expressing the leukocyte antigens CD45, CD14, and CD3, as well as the endothelial proteins vascular endothelial (VE) cadherin, von Willebrand's Factor (vWF), CD31 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Colony cells expressed increased levels of pro-angiogenic growth factors, and they formed tubes in Matrigel. In comparison with colonies from the CFU-Hill assay, our assay resulted in a greater number of colonies (19±9 vs. 13±7; p<0.0001) with a substantial number of cells expressing an endothelial phenotype (20.2±7.4% vs. 2.2±1.2% expressing eNOS, p=0006). Chromosomal analysis indicated the colony cells were bone marrow-derived. We, therefore, describe a colony forming unit assay that measures bone marrow-derived circulating mononuclear cells with the capacity to proliferate and mature into proangiogenic leukocytic and endothelial-like cells. This assay, therefore, reflects circulating, bone marrow-derived pro-angiogenic activity. PMID:22904201

  17. Mononuclear cell secretome protects from experimental autoimmune myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Zimmermann, Matthias; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Schweiger, Thomas; Kollmann, Dagmar; Mildner, Michael; Hegedus, Balazs; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Hacker, Stefan; Birner, Peter; Gabriel, Christian; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Eriksson, Urs; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Supernatants of serum-free cultured mononuclear cells (MNC) contain a mix of immunomodulating factors (secretome), which have been shown to attenuate detrimental inflammatory responses following myocardial ischaemia. Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (iDCM) is a common cause of heart failure in young patients. Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a CD4+ T cell-dependent model, which mirrors important pathogenic aspects of iDCM. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of MNC secretome on myocardial inflammation in the EAM model. Methods and results BALB/c mice were immunized twice with an alpha myosin heavy chain peptide together with Complete Freund adjuvant. Supernatants from mouse mononuclear cells were collected, dialysed, and injected i.p. at Day 0, Day 7, or Day 14, respectively. Myocarditis severity, T cell responses, and autoantibody formation were assessed at Day 21. The impact of MNC secretome on CD4+ T cell function and viability was evaluated using in vitro proliferation and cell viability assays. A single high-dose application of MNC secretome, injected at Day 14 after the first immunization, effectively attenuated myocardial inflammation. Mechanistically, MNC secretome induced caspase-8-dependent apoptosis in autoreactive CD4+ T cells. Conclusion MNC secretome abrogated myocardial inflammation in a CD4+ T cell-dependent animal model of autoimmune myocarditis. This anti-inflammatory effect of MNC secretome suggests a novel and simple potential treatment concept for inflammatory heart diseases. PMID:23321350

  18. Proteinase-activated receptors induce nonoxidative, antimicrobial peptides and increased antimicrobial activity in human mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Lippuner, Nadine; Morell, Bernhard; Schaffner, Andreas; Schaer, Dominik J

    2007-02-01

    As thrombin and SFLLRNPNDKYEPF (SFLLRN-14), a synthetic ligand, mainly of the proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), induce in monocytes the synthesis and secretion of chemokines, the PAR pathway can be viewed as a mononuclear phagocyte-activating principle. Classically, antimicrobial activity of mononuclear phagocytes is the measure for activation. Here, we investigated whether thrombin or SFLLRN-14 increases the antimicrobial activity of human monocytes and compared these effects to those of IFN-gamma. Furthermore, we measured the effects of these agents on the secretion of reactive oxygen intermediates and the antimicrobial activity of acid peptide extracts from monocytes. Human monocytes were exposed to maximally active concentrations of thrombin, SFLLRN-14, and IFN-gamma. Human monocytes treated with thrombin or SFLLRN-14 and then challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium, including its attenuated mutant phoP, or Listeria monocytogenes killed, within 3 h, significantly more bacteria than control cells, an effect comparable with or surpassing the effect of IFN-gamma. This finding establishes the proteinase-PAR pathway as a potent, alternate activation pathway of mononuclear phagocytes. Thrombin and SFLLRN-14 had no significant effects on the amount of H(2)O(2) secreted by monocytes. This was in contrast to IFN-gamma, which as expected, increased the secretion of H(2)O(2) by approximately fourfold. Thrombin and SFLLRN-14, but not IFN-gamma, however, significantly increased the antimicrobial activity of acid peptide extracts of monocytes in a radial diffusion assay. Taken together, these findings suggest that IFN-gamma and thrombin differentially regulate oxidative and nonoxidative killing systems of human monocytes. PMID:17095611

  19. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Sendai Virus.

    PubMed

    Soares, Filipa A C; Pedersen, Roger A; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the efficient isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from circulating blood via density gradient centrifugation and subsequent generation of integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured for 9 days to allow expansion of the erythroblast population. The erythroblasts are then used to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells using Sendai viral vectors, each expressing one of the four reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc.

  20. Vigorous, but differential mononuclear cell response of cirrhotic patients to bacterial ligands

    PubMed Central

    Barbero-Becerra, Varenka J; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, María Concepción; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen; Téllez-Avila, Félix I; Alfaro-Lara, Roberto; Vargas-Vorácková, Florencia

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in the pathogenesis of liver injury, specifically the activation of inflammatory mediators. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 20 out-patients were studied, 10 of them with cirrhosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and exposed to lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid. CD14, Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 expression was determined by flow cytometry, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-12 and IL-10 secretion in supernatants was determined by ELISA. RESULTS: Higher CD14, Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 expression was observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cirrhotic patients, (P < 0.01, P < 0.006, P < 0.111) respectively. Lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid induced a further increase in CD14 expression (P < 0.111 lipopolysaccharide, P < 0.013 lipoteichoic acid), and a decrease in Toll-like receptor 2 (P < 0.008 lipopolysaccharide, P < 0.008 lipoteichoic acid) and Toll-like receptor 4 (P < 0.008 lipopolysaccharide, P < 0.028 lipoteichoic acid) expression. With the exception of TNFα, absolute cytokine secretion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was lower in cirrhotic patients under non-exposure conditions (P < 0.070 IL-6, P < 0.009 IL-1β, P < 0.022 IL-12). Once exposed to lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid, absolute cytokine secretion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was similar in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients, determining a more vigorous response in the former (P < 0.005 TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2 and IL-10 lipopolysaccharide; P < 0.037 TNFα; P < 0.006 IL-1β; P < 0.005 IL-6; P < 0.007 IL-12; P < 0.014 IL-10 lipoteichoic acid). Response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was more intense after lipopolysaccharide than after lipoteichoic acid exposure. CONCLUSION: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of cirrhotic patients are able to respond to a sudden bacterial ligand exposure, particularly lipopolysaccharide

  1. Simultaneous determination of 2',3'-dideoxyinosine and the active metabolite, 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine-5'-triphosphate in human peripheral-blood mononuclear cell by HPLC-MS/MS and the application to cell pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xu; Mingdao, Lei; Huilin, Guo; Wei, Gan; Lvjiang, Hu; Yan, Zhou; Gang, Li

    2015-10-01

    A specific and reliable HPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI) and the active metabolites, 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine-5'-triphosphate (ddA-TP) in human peripheral-blood mononuclear cell for the first time. The analytes were separated on a HILIC column (100mm×2.1mm, 1.7μm) and a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry equipped with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source was used for detection. The cell homogenates sample was prepared by the solid phase extraction. The calibration curves were linear over a concentration range of 0.5-200.0ng/mL for ddI and 0.25-100.0ng/mL for ddA-TP. The intra-day and inter-day precision was less than 15% and the relative error (RE) were all within ±15%. The validated method was successfully applied to assess the disposition characteristics of ddI and support cell pharmacokinetics after the patients with AIDS were orally administrated with ddI and tenofovir disoproxyl fumarate (TDF).

  2. Mononuclear cell complement receptor blockade in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aghbar, M N; Neuberger, J; Williams, R; Eddleston, A L

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral blood monocyte and lymphocyte receptors for Fc and C3b fragments were examined in vitro in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases using sheep red blood cells coated with anti-SRBC IgG1 (to detect Fc receptors) and with anti-SRBC IgM and complement (to detect C3b receptors). The number of C3b receptors detected on 100 monocytes was significantly lower in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (23.0 +/- 12.0, mean +/- 1 SD) compared with normal controls (57.4 +/- 16.9) and other chronic liver disease (HBsAg negative chronic active hepatitis 62.0 +/- 17.0, alcoholic cirrhosis 50.9 +/- 4.0), while the number of Fc receptors detected on 100 monocytes was not significantly different in all the groups (primary biliary cirrhosis 72.8 +/- 28.6, chronic active hepatitis 74.7 +/- 14.0, alcoholic cirrhosis 58.0 +/- 13.5 and normal controls 69.6 +/- 19.9). When mononuclear cells isolated from normal individuals were pre-incubated with serum from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis before testing their receptor function there was a significant reduction in the number of C3b receptors detected per 100 monocytes (27.6 +/- 10.8) compared with pre-incubation with normal serum (72.0 +/- 18.0). This reduction in C3b-receptor function was again observed when the serum used for pre-incubation was depleted of circulating immune complexes; but when complement was further depleted from these sera, the number of C3b-receptors detected after pre-incubation was similar to normal values (64.0 +/- 11.8). Lymphocyte receptors showed a similar pattern of results. This implies a specific C3b receptor blockade on monocytes and lymphocytes from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis which appears to be because of blocking by serum factor(s) including complement fragments. PMID:3155513

  3. Alternatively Activated Mononuclear Phagocytes from the Skin Site of Infection and the Impact of IL-4Rα Signalling on CD4+T Cell Survival in Draining Lymph Nodes after Repeated Exposure to Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Catriona T.; Sanin, David E.; Mountford, Adrian P.

    2016-01-01

    In a murine model of repeated exposure of the skin to infective Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, events leading to the priming of CD4 cells in the skin draining lymph nodes were examined. The dermal exudate cell (DEC) population recovered from repeatedly (4x) exposed skin contained an influx of mononuclear phagocytes comprising three distinct populations according to their differential expression of F4/80 and MHC-II. As determined by gene expression analysis, all three DEC populations (F4/80-MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIhigh, F4/80+MHC-IIint) exhibited major up-regulation of genes associated with alternative activation. The gene encoding RELMα (hallmark of alternatively activated cells) was highly up-regulated in all three DEC populations. However, in 4x infected mice deficient in RELMα, there was no change in the extent of inflammation at the skin infection site compared to 4x infected wild-type cohorts, nor was there a difference in the abundance of different mononuclear phagocyte DEC populations. The absence of RELMα resulted in greater numbers of CD4+ cells in the skin draining lymph nodes (sdLN) of 4x infected mice, although they remained hypo-responsive. Using mice deficient for IL-4Rα, in which alternative activation is compromised, we show that after repeated schistosome infection, levels of regulatory IL-10 in the skin were reduced, accompanied by increased numbers of MHC-IIhigh cells and CD4+ T cells in the skin. There were also increased numbers of CD4+ T cells in the sdLN in the absence of IL-4Rα compared to cells from singly infected mice. Although their ability to proliferate was still compromised, increased cellularity of sdLN from 4x IL-4RαKO mice correlated with reduced expression of Fas/FasL, resulting in decreased apoptosis and cell death but increased numbers of viable CD4+ T cells. This study highlights a mechanism through which IL-4Rα may regulate the immune system through the induction of IL-10 and regulation of Fas/FasL mediated cell death

  4. Single-cell network profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors reveals age- and race-associated differences in immune signaling pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Longo, Diane M; Louie, Brent; Putta, Santosh; Evensen, Erik; Ptacek, Jason; Cordeiro, James; Wang, Ena; Pos, Zoltan; Hawtin, Rachael E; Marincola, Francesco M; Cesano, Alessandra

    2012-02-15

    A greater understanding of the function of the human immune system at the single-cell level in healthy individuals is critical for discerning aberrant cellular behavior that occurs in settings such as autoimmunity, immunosenescence, and cancer. To achieve this goal, a systems-level approach capable of capturing the response of the interdependent immune cell types to external stimuli is required. In this study, an extensive characterization of signaling responses in multiple immune cell subpopulations within PBMCs from a cohort of 60 healthy donors was performed using single-cell network profiling (SCNP). SCNP is a multiparametric flow cytometry-based approach that enables the simultaneous measurement of basal and evoked signaling in multiple cell subsets within heterogeneous populations. In addition to establishing the interindividual degree of variation within a broad panel of immune signaling responses, the possible association of any observed variation with demographic variables including age and race was investigated. Using half of the donors as a training set, multiple age- and race-associated variations in signaling responses in discrete cell subsets were identified, and several were subsequently confirmed in the remaining samples (test set). Such associations may provide insight into age-related immune alterations associated with high infection rates and diminished protection following vaccination and into the basis for ethnic differences in autoimmune disease incidence and treatment response. SCNP allowed for the generation of a functional map of healthy immune cell signaling responses that can provide clinically relevant information regarding both the mechanisms underlying immune pathological conditions and the selection and effect of therapeutics.

  5. Generation of avian cells resembling osteoclasts from mononuclear phagocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, J. I.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Blair, H. C.; Greenfield, E. M.; Athanasou, N. A.; Ross, F. P.

    1991-01-01

    Several lines of indirect evidence suggest that a monocyte family precursor gives rise to the osteoclast, although this hypothesis is controversial. Starting with a uniform population of nonspecific esterase positive, tartrate-sensitive, acid phosphatase-producing, mannose receptor-bearing mononuclear cells, prepared from dispersed marrow of calcium-deprived laying hens by cell density separation and selective cellular adherence, we generated multinucleated cells in vitro. When cultured with devitalized bone, these cells show, by electron microscopy, the characteristic osteoclast morphology in that they are mitochondria-rich, multinucleated, and, most importantly, develop characteristic ruffled membranes at the matrix attachment site. Moreover, as documented by scanning electron microscopy, these cells pit bone slices in a manner identical to freshly isolated osteoclasts. In addition, isoenzymes of acid phosphatase from generated osteoclasts, separated by 7.5% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 4, are identical to those of mature osteoclasts in migration pattern and tartrate resistance, although the precursor cells from which the osteoclasts are generated produce an entirely different isoenzyme, which is tartrate-sensitive and migrates less rapidly at pH 4. The fused cells also exhibit a cAMP response to prostaglandin E2. Therefore, osteoclast-like cells can be derived by in vitro culture of a marrow-derived monocyte cell population.

  6. Decreased interleukin-15 from activated cord versus adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the effect of interleukin-15 in upregulating antitumor immune activity and cytokine production in cord blood.

    PubMed

    Qian, J X; Lee, S M; Suen, Y; Knoppel, E; van de Ven, C; Cairo, M S

    1997-10-15

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is an important lymphokine regulating natural killer (NK) activity, T-cell proliferation, and T-cell cytotoxic activities. We hypothesized that the reduced expression and production of IL-15 from cord blood (CB) may contribute to the immaturity of CB immunity and potentially delay immune reconstitution after CB transplantation. We compared the expression and production of IL-15 from activated cord versus adult mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the regulatory mechanisms associated with IL-15 expression in CB MNCs. We have also studied the effect of exogenous IL-15 stimulation on CB and adult peripheral blood (APB) MNCs in terms of NK and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activities and cytokine induction. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated CB and APB MNCs were used to determine IL-15 expression and protein production by Northern analysis and Western immunoblot analysis. IL-15 mRNA expression and protein accumulation in CB MNC were 25% +/- 2.0% (12 hours, n = 4, P < .05) and 30% +/- 2.5% (12 hours, n = 3, P < .05), respectively, when compared with APB MNCs. Nuclear run-on assays showed no differences between CB and APB MNCs during basal levels of transcription and after transcriptional activation. However, the half-life of IL-15 mRNA was approximately twofold lower in activated CB MNCs than in activated APB MNCs (CB: 101 +/- 5.8 minutes v APB: 210 +/- 8.2 minutes, n = 3, P < .05). Exogenous IL-15 significantly enhanced CB NK and LAK activities up to comparable levels of APB (P < .05). IL-15 also significantly induced interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) protein production (days 1, 3, and 6, P < .05, n = 3) in CB MNCs. IL-15-stimulated LAK cells induced a significant lytic response against two acute lymphoblastic cell lines and two pediatric neuroblastoma cell lines. Both NK and LAK activities were augmented by the combination of IL-12 and IL-15, and the low-dose combination of IL-12 and IL-15 achieved similar

  7. Adhesion molecules on the endothelium and mononuclear cells in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    van der Wal, A. C.; Das, P. K.; Tigges, A. J.; Becker, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions show features of a cell-mediated immune inflammatory process. From this viewpoint, the potential role of arterial endothelium in the recruitment of mononuclear cells (T lymphocytes and macrophages) was studied. The endothelium of diffuse intimal thickening (DIT) and atheromatous plaques (AP) in human coronary arteries and abdominal aortas was characterized for the expression of adhesion molecules ELAM-1, ICAM-1, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens HLA-DR/DP. A marked increase in expression of ICAM-1 and ELAM-1, and to a lesser extent HLA-DR/DP was observed on endothelial cells that were adjacent to subendothelial infiltrates of T lymphocytes (CD3+, CD11a+, HLA-DR/DP+) and macrophages (CD14+, CD11a+, CD11c+, HLA-DR/DP+). This contrasted with a lower or absent expression of these activation markers at sites without prominent inflammatory cell infiltrates. These findings could be demonstrated in DIT as well as in AP. The observations suggest that cytokines produced by the subintimal infiltrates may activate the endothelium in a similar way as is observed in the microvasculature at sites of immune inflammation. The expression of these activation markers in the microvasculature is associated with enhanced leukocyte adhesion, permeability for macromolecules, and procoagulant activity, features known to occur also in early experimental atherosclerosis. The findings therefore support the concept that arterial endothelium plays an active role in the recruitment of mononuclear cells in atherosclerotic lesions. Images Figure 1 PMID:1281621

  8. Isolation of whole mononuclear cells from peripheral blood and cord blood.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Ivan J; Kanof, Marjorie E; Smith, Phillip D; Zola, Heddy

    2009-04-01

    Peripheral blood is the primary source of lymphoid cells for investigation of the human immune system. Its use is facilitated by Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation-a simple and rapid method of purifying peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that takes advantage of the density differences between mononuclear cells and other elements found in the blood sample. Thus, cells are distributed in the solution in layers based on the differences in their density/size. Additional purification methods can be employed as the mononuclear cell sample can be purified from monocytes by adherence or by exposure to L-leucine methyl ester; these methods are described for both procedures. Cord blood and peripheral blood from infants contain immature cells, including nucleated red cells, which can result in significant contamination of the mononuclear cell layer, and removal of these cells requires additional steps that are described. The isolation procedures presented here can also be applied to cell populations derived from tissues.

  9. Secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells enhances wound healing.

    PubMed

    Mildner, Michael; Hacker, Stefan; Haider, Thomas; Gschwandtner, Maria; Werba, Gregor; Barresi, Caterina; Zimmermann, Matthias; Golabi, Bahar; Tschachler, Erwin; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-healing skin ulcers are often resistant to most common therapies. Treatment with growth factors has been demonstrated to improve closure of chronic wounds. Here we investigate whether lyophilized culture supernatant of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is able to enhance wound healing. PBMC from healthy human individuals were prepared and cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were collected, dialyzed and lyophilized (SEC(PBMC)). Six mm punch biopsy wounds were set on the backs of C57BL/6J-mice and SEC(PBMC) containing emulsion or controls were applied daily for three days. Morphology and neo-angiogenesis were analyzed by H&E-staining and CD31 immuno-staining, respectively. In vitro effects on diverse skin cells were investigated by migration assays, cell cycle analysis, and tube formation assay. Signaling pathways were analyzed by Western blot analysis. Application of SEC(PBMC) on 6 mm punch biopsy wounds significantly enhanced wound closure. H&E staining of the wounds after 6 days revealed that wound healing was more advanced after application of SEC(PBMC) containing emulsion. Furthermore, there was a massive increase in CD31 positive cells, indicating enhanced neo-angiogenesis. In primary human fibroblasts (FB) and keratinocytes (KC) migration but not proliferation was induced. In endothelial cells (EC) SEC(PBMC) induced proliferation and tube-formation in a matrigel-assay. In addition, SEC(PBMC) treatment of skin cells led to the induction of multiple signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and survival. In summary, we could show that emulsions containing the secretome of PBMC derived from healthy individuals accelerates wound healing in a mouse model and induce wound healing associated mechanisms in human primary skin cells. The formulation and use of such emulsions might therefore represent a possible novel option for the treatment of non-healing skin ulcers.

  10. Immunomodulatory Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum Lp62 on Intestinal Epithelial and Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Dos Santos, Thalis; Alves Melo, Tauá; Almeida, Milena Evangelista; Passos Rezende, Rachel; Romano, Carla Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria are known for their ability to modulate the immune system. They have been shown to inhibit inflammation in experiments with animal models, cell culture, and clinical trials. The objective of this study was to elucidate the anti-inflammatory potential of Lactobacillus plantarum Lp62, isolated from cocoa fermentation, in a cell culture model. Lp62 inhibited IL-8 production by Salmonella Typhi-stimulated HT-29 cells and prevented the adhesion of pathogens to these epithelial cells. The probiotic strain was able to modulate TNF-α, IL1-β, and IL-17 secretion by J774 macrophages. J774 activation was reduced by coincubation with Lp62. PBMC culture showed significantly higher levels of CD4(+)CD25(+) T lymphocytes following treatment with Lp62. Probiotics also induced increased IL-10 secretion by mononuclear cells. L. plantarum Lp62 was able to inhibit inflammatory stimulation in epithelial cells and macrophages and activated a tolerogenic profile in mononuclear cells of healthy donors. These results indicate this strain for a possible application in the treatment or prevention of inflammatory diseases. PMID:27446958

  11. Immunomodulatory Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum Lp62 on Intestinal Epithelial and Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alves Melo, Tauá; Almeida, Milena Evangelista; Passos Rezende, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria are known for their ability to modulate the immune system. They have been shown to inhibit inflammation in experiments with animal models, cell culture, and clinical trials. The objective of this study was to elucidate the anti-inflammatory potential of Lactobacillus plantarum Lp62, isolated from cocoa fermentation, in a cell culture model. Lp62 inhibited IL-8 production by Salmonella Typhi-stimulated HT-29 cells and prevented the adhesion of pathogens to these epithelial cells. The probiotic strain was able to modulate TNF-α, IL1-β, and IL-17 secretion by J774 macrophages. J774 activation was reduced by coincubation with Lp62. PBMC culture showed significantly higher levels of CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes following treatment with Lp62. Probiotics also induced increased IL-10 secretion by mononuclear cells. L. plantarum Lp62 was able to inhibit inflammatory stimulation in epithelial cells and macrophages and activated a tolerogenic profile in mononuclear cells of healthy donors. These results indicate this strain for a possible application in the treatment or prevention of inflammatory diseases. PMID:27446958

  12. Oxygen Activation at Mononuclear Nonheme Iron Centers: A Superoxo Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anusree; Cranswick, Matthew A.; Chakraborti, Mrinmoy; Paine, Tapan K.; Fujisawa, Kiyoshi; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Dioxygen activation by iron enzymes is responsible for many metabolically important transformations in biology. Often a high-valent iron-oxo oxidant is proposed to form upon dioxygen activation at a mononuclear nonheme iron center, presumably via intervening iron-superoxo and iron-peroxo species. While iron(IV)-oxo intermediates have been trapped and characterized in enzymes and models, less is known of the putative iron(III)-superoxo species. Utilizing a synthetic model for the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent monoiron enzymes, [(TpiPr2)FeII(O2CC(O)CH3)], we have obtained indirect evidence for the formation of the putative iron(III)-superoxo species, which can undergo one-electron reduction, hydrogen-atom transfer, or conversion to an iron(IV)-oxo species, depending on the reaction conditions. These results demonstrate the various roles the iron(III)-superoxo species can play in the course of dioxygen activation at a nonheme iron center. PMID:20380464

  13. Osteoclastogenic potential of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in cleidocranial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Ventura, Annamaria; Piacente, Laura; Ciccarelli, Maria; Gigante, Margherita; Gesualdo, Loreto; Colucci, Silvia; Cavallo, Luciano; Grano, Maria; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by hypoplastic or aplastic clavicles, dental abnormalities, and delayed closure of the cranial sutures. In addition, mid-face hypoplasia, short stature, skeletal anomalies and osteoporosis are common. We aimed to evaluate osteoclastogenesis in a child (4 years old), who presented with clinical signs of CCD and who have been diagnosed as affected by deletion of RUNX2, master gene in osteoblast differentiation, but also affecting T cell development and indirectly osteoclastogenesis. The results of this study may help to understand whether in this disease is present an alteration in the bone-resorptive cells, the osteoclasts (OCs). Unfractionated and T cell-depleted Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from patient were cultured in presence/absence of recombinant human M-CSF and RANKL. At the end of the culture period, OCs only developed following the addition of M-CSF and RANKL. Moreover, real-time PCR experiment showed that freshly isolated T cells expressed the osteoclastogenic cytokines (RANKL and TNFα) at very low level, as in controls. This is in accordance with results arising from flow cytometry experiments demonstrating an high percentage of circulating CD4(+)CD28(+) and CD4(+)CD27(+) T cells, not able to produce osteoclastogenic cytokines. Also RANKL, OPG and CTX serum levels in CCD patient are similar to controls, whereas QUS measurements showed an osteoporotic status (BTT-Z score -3.09) in the patient. In conclusions, our findings suggest that the heterozygous deletion of RUNX2 in this CCD patient did not alter the osteoclastogenic potential of PBMCs in vitro.

  14. Estradiol and progesterone strongly inhibit the innate immune response of mononuclear cells in newborns.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Eric; Guignard, Laurence; Knaup Reymond, Marlies; Perreau, Matthieu; Roth-Kleiner, Matthias; Calandra, Thierry; Roger, Thierry

    2011-07-01

    Newborns are particularly susceptible to bacterial infections due to qualitative and quantitative deficiencies of the neonatal innate immune system. However, the mechanisms underlying these deficiencies are poorly understood. Given that fetuses are exposed to high concentrations of estradiol and progesterone during gestation and at time of delivery, we analyzed the effects of these hormones on the response of neonatal innate immune cells to endotoxin, bacterial lipopeptide, and Escherichia coli and group B Streptococcus, the two most common causes of early-onset neonatal sepsis. Here we show that at concentrations present in umbilical cord blood, estradiol and progesterone are as powerful as hydrocortisone for inhibition of cytokine production by cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) and newborn monocytes. Interestingly, CBMCs and newborn monocytes are more sensitive to the effects of estradiol and progesterone than adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes. This increased sensitivity is associated with higher expression levels of estrogen and membrane progesterone receptors but is independent of a downregulation of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 in newborn cells. Estradiol and progesterone mediate their anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in CBMCs. Altogether, these results suggest that elevated umbilical cord blood concentrations of estradiol and progesterone acting on mononuclear cells expressing high levels of steroid receptors contribute to impair innate immune responses in newborns. Therefore, intrauterine exposure to estradiol and progesterone may participate in increasing susceptibility to infection during the neonatal period.

  15. Particulate matter induces prothrombotic microparticle shedding by human mononuclear and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neri, Tommaso; Pergoli, Laura; Petrini, Silvia; Gravendonk, Lotte; Balia, Cristina; Scalise, Valentina; Amoruso, Angela; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Bollati, Valentina; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Particulate airborne pollution is associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity. Microparticles are extracellular vesicles shed by cells upon activation or apoptosis involved in physiological processes such as coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation. We investigated the hypothesis that particulate matter causes the shedding of microparticles by human mononuclear and endothelial cells. Cells, isolated from the blood and the umbilical cords of normal donors, were cultured in the presence of particulate from a standard reference. Microparticles were assessed in the supernatant as phosphatidylserine concentration. Microparticle-associated tissue factor was assessed by an one-stage clotting assay. Nanosight technology was used to evaluate microparticle size distribution. Particulate matter induces a dose- and time- dependent, rapid (1h) increase in microparticle generation in both cells. These microparticles express functional tissue factor. Particulate matter increases intracellular calcium concentration and phospholipase C inhibition reduces microparticle generation. Nanosight analysis confirmed that upon exposure to particulate matter both cells express particles with a size range consistent with the definition of microparticles (50-1000 nm). Exposure of mononuclear and endothelial cells to particulate matter upregulates the generation of microparticles at least partially mediated by calcium mobilization. This observation might provide a further link between airborne pollution and cardiopulmonary morbidity. PMID:26876346

  16. Particulate matter induces prothrombotic microparticle shedding by human mononuclear and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neri, Tommaso; Pergoli, Laura; Petrini, Silvia; Gravendonk, Lotte; Balia, Cristina; Scalise, Valentina; Amoruso, Angela; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Bollati, Valentina; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Particulate airborne pollution is associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity. Microparticles are extracellular vesicles shed by cells upon activation or apoptosis involved in physiological processes such as coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation. We investigated the hypothesis that particulate matter causes the shedding of microparticles by human mononuclear and endothelial cells. Cells, isolated from the blood and the umbilical cords of normal donors, were cultured in the presence of particulate from a standard reference. Microparticles were assessed in the supernatant as phosphatidylserine concentration. Microparticle-associated tissue factor was assessed by an one-stage clotting assay. Nanosight technology was used to evaluate microparticle size distribution. Particulate matter induces a dose- and time- dependent, rapid (1h) increase in microparticle generation in both cells. These microparticles express functional tissue factor. Particulate matter increases intracellular calcium concentration and phospholipase C inhibition reduces microparticle generation. Nanosight analysis confirmed that upon exposure to particulate matter both cells express particles with a size range consistent with the definition of microparticles (50-1000 nm). Exposure of mononuclear and endothelial cells to particulate matter upregulates the generation of microparticles at least partially mediated by calcium mobilization. This observation might provide a further link between airborne pollution and cardiopulmonary morbidity.

  17. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory effect of GcMAF on PBMCs. In addition, we demonstrate that GcMAF (1 ng/ml) inhibited prostaglandin E(1)- and human breast cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Finally, we tested different GcMAF preparations on CAM, and the assay proved to be a reliable, reproducible and inexpensive method to determine the relative potencies of different preparations and their stability; we observed that storage at room temperature for 15 days decreased GcMAF potency by about 50%. These data could prove useful for upcoming clinical trials on GcMAF. PMID:21170647

  18. THE ROLE OF ENDOGENOUSLY PRODUCED EXTRACELLULAR HSP72 IN MONONUCLEAR CELL REPROGRAMMING

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Patricia A.; Lahni, Patrick M.; Page, Kristen; Giuliano, John S.; Harmon, Kelli; Dunsmore, Katherine E.; Wong, Hector R.; Wheeler, Derek S.

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) is known to serve a broad cytoprotective role. Recent data indicate that stressed cells can release Hsp72 into the extracellular compartment, although the biological function of extracellular Hsp72 remains to be fully elucidated. Because extracellular Hsp72 has been demonstrated to interact with Toll-like receptor 4, we hypothesized that endogenously produced and released Hsp72 would reprogram the mononuclear cell responses to LPS. THP-1 cells treated with LPS were used as a model for nuclear factor (NF)–κB activation. Heat shock conditions consisted of incubation at 43°C for 1 h. Control cells were incubated at 37°C. Twenty four hours after incubation, heat shock conditioned media (HSCM) and control media (CM) were centrifuged, and the respective cells were discarded. A separate group of naive THP-1 cells were then incubated with either HSCM or CM for 18 h and then stimulated with LPS (1 µg/mL). Heat shock significantly increased Hsp72 in HSCM compared with CM. In THP-1 cells transfected with an NF-κB luciferase reporter plasmid, the addition of HSCM attenuated subsequent LPS-mediated luciferase activity compared with cells incubated in CM. The addition of HSCM also attenuated LPS-mediated NF-κB–DNA binding and IκBα degradation. Heat shock protein 72–mediated inhibition of NF-κB activation was further corroborated by a significant decrease in TNF-α production. When HSCM and CM were subjected to Hsp72 depletion via adenosine triphosphate–agarose binding, LPS-mediated activation of NF-κB was partially restored, suggesting that Hsp72 is partially responsible for cellular reprogramming in response to HSCM. These data demonstrate that endogenously produced and released extracellular Hsp72 has the ability to reprogram the in vitro response to endotoxin in cultured human mononuclear cells. PMID:18323737

  19. The effects of teriflunomide on lymphocyte subpopulations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Jingchun; Delohery, Thomas; Zhang, Donghui; Arendt, Christopher; Jones, Catherine

    2013-12-15

    Teriflunomide is an inhibitor of dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), and is hypothesized to ameliorate multiple sclerosis by reducing proliferation of stimulated lymphocytes. We investigated teriflunomide's effects on proliferation, activation, survival, and function of stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets in vitro. Teriflunomide had little/no impact on lymphocyte activation but exerted significant dose-dependent inhibition of T- and B-cell proliferation, which was uridine-reversible (DHODH-dependent). Viability analyses showed no teriflunomide-associated cytotoxicity. Teriflunomide significantly decreased release of several pro-inflammatory cytokines from activated monocytes in a DHODH-independent fashion. In conclusion, teriflunomide acts on multiple immune cell types and processes via DHODH-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:24182769

  20. CD11b(+) Mononuclear Cells Mitigate Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Eldredge, Laurie C; Treuting, Piper M; Manicone, Anne M; Ziegler, Steven F; Parks, William C; McGuire, John K

    2016-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common consequence of life-saving interventions for infants born with immature lungs. Resident tissue myeloid cells regulate lung pathology, but their role in BPD is poorly understood. To determine the role of lung interstitial myeloid cells in neonatal responses to lung injury, we exposed newborn mice to hyperoxia, a neonatal mouse lung injury model with features of human BPD. In newborn mice raised in normoxia, we identified a CD45(+) F4/80(+) CD11b(+), Ly6G(lo-int) CD71(+) population of cells in lungs of neonatal mice present in significantly greater percentages than in adult mice. In response to hyperoxia, surface marker and gene expression in whole lung macrophages/monocytes was biased to an alternatively activated phenotype. Partial depletion of these CD11b(+) mononuclear cells using CD11b-diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor transgenic mice resulted in 60% mortality by 40 hours of hyperoxia exposure with more severe lung injury, perivascular edema, and alveolar hemorrhage compared with DT-treated CD11b-DT receptor-negative controls, which displayed no mortality. These results identify an antiinflammatory population of CD11b(+) mononuclear cells that are protective in hyperoxia-induced neonatal lung injury in mice, and suggest that enhancing their beneficial functions may be a treatment strategy in infants at risk for BPD.

  1. Cell type-specific responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Greulich, C; Diendorf, J; Gessmann, J; Simon, T; Habijan, T; Eggeler, G; Schildhauer, T A; Epple, M; Köller, M

    2011-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are increasingly used in biomedical applications because of their remarkable antimicrobial activity. In biomedicine, Ag-NP are coated onto or embedded in wound dressings, surgical instruments and bone substitute biomaterials, such as silver-containing calcium phosphate cements. Free Ag-NP and silver ions are released from these coatings or after the degradation of a biomaterial, and may come into close contact with blood cells. Despite the widespread use of Ag-NP as an antimicrobial agent, there is a serious lack of information on the biological effects of Ag-NP on human blood cells. In this study, the uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral monocytes and lymphocytes (T-cells) was analyzed, and the influence of nanosilver on cell biological functions (proliferation, the expression of adhesion molecules, cytokine release and the generation of reactive oxygen species) was studied. After cell culture in the presence of monodispersed Ag-NP (5-30μgml(-1) silver concentration), agglomerates of nanoparticles were detected within monocytes (CD14+) but not in T-cells (CD3+) by light microscopy, flow cytometry and combined focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy. The uptake rate of nanoparticles was concentration dependent, and the silver agglomerates were typically found in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, a concentration-dependent activation (e.g. an increased expression of adhesion molecule CD54) of monocytes at Ag-NP concentrations of 10-15μgml(-1) was observed, and cytotoxicity of Ag-NP-treated monocytes was observed at Ag-NP levels of 25μgml(-1) and higher. However, no modulation of T-cell proliferation was observed in the presence of Ag-NP. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence for a cell-type-specific uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the resultant cellular responses after exposure.

  2. Human mononuclear cell function after 4 C storage during 1-G and microgravity conditions of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, Richard; Taylor, Gerald; Lionetti, Fabian; Neale, Laurie; Curren, Tim

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of restoring immune competence of crewmembers during a prolonged spaceflight by infusions of autologous blood components, the effect of storage at 4 C aboard Space Shuttle Columbia (Mission 61-c) on the activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs), stored as leukocyte concentrates in autologous plasa, was investigated. The results of preflight storage at 4 C demonstrated a progressive daily loss in mitogen-stimulated protein synthesis, and thymidine uptake, as well as a progressive reduction in the percentage of PBMNCs expressing cell-surface phenotype markers. The ability of PBMNCs stored at 4 C for 8 d in Columbia's middeck, to become activated and proliferate in vitro was similar to that of cells that remained for 7 d on ground.

  3. The Transcriptome of Equine Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pacholewska, Alicja; Drögemüller, Michaela; Klukowska-Rötzler, Jolanta; Lanz, Simone; Hamza, Eman; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Marti, Eliane; Gerber, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Complete transcriptomic data at high resolution are available only for a few model organisms with medical importance. The gene structures of non-model organisms are mostly computationally predicted based on comparative genomics with other species. As a result, more than half of the horse gene models are known only by projection. Experimental data supporting these gene models are scarce. Moreover, most of the annotated equine genes are single-transcript genes. Utilizing RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) the experimental validation of predicted transcriptomes has become accessible at reasonable costs. To improve the horse genome annotation we performed RNA-seq on 561 samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from 85 Warmblood horses. The mapped sequencing reads were used to build a new transcriptome assembly. The new assembly revealed many alternative isoforms associated to known genes or to those predicted by the Ensembl and/or Gnomon pipelines. We also identified 7,531 transcripts not associated with any horse gene annotated in public databases. Of these, 3,280 transcripts did not have a homologous match to any sequence deposited in the NCBI EST database suggesting horse specificity. The unknown transcripts were categorized as coding and noncoding based on predicted coding potential scores. Among them 230 transcripts had high coding potential score, at least 2 exons, and an open reading frame of at least 300 nt. We experimentally validated 9 new equine coding transcripts using RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing. Our results provide valuable detailed information on many transcripts yet to be annotated in the horse genome. PMID:25790166

  4. Rac1 Regulates the NLRP3 Inflammasome Which Mediates IL-1beta Production in Chlamydophila pneumoniae Infected Human Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Orlovski, Christine; Hocke, Andreas; Schmeck, Bernd; Hippenstiel, Stefan; N'Guessan, Philippe Dje; Suttorp, Norbert; Opitz, Bastian

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydophila pneumoniae causes acute respiratory tract infections and has been associated with development of asthma and atherosclerosis. The production of IL-1β, a key mediator of acute and chronic inflammation, is regulated on a transcriptional level and additionally on a posttranslational level by inflammasomes. In the present study we show that C. pneumoniae-infected human mononuclear cells produce IL-1β protein depending on an inflammasome consisting of NLRP3, the adapter protein ASC and caspase-1. We further found that the small GTPase Rac1 is activated in C. pneumoniae-infected cells. Importantly, studies with specific inhibitors as well as siRNA show that Rac1 regulates inflammasome activation in C. pneumoniae-infected cells. In conclusion, C. pneumoniae infection of mononuclear cells stimulates IL-1β production dependent on a NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated processing of proIL-1β which is controlled by Rac1. PMID:22276187

  5. Beryllium alters lipopolysaccharide-mediated intracellular phosphorylation and cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Shannon; Ganguly, Kumkum; Fresquez, Theresa M; Gupta, Goutam; McCleskey, T Mark; Chaudhary, Anu

    2009-12-01

    Beryllium exposure in susceptible individuals leads to the development of chronic beryllium disease, a lung disorder marked by release of inflammatory cytokine and granuloma formation. We have previously reported that beryllium induces an immune response even in blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. In this study, we investigate the effects of beryllium on lipopolysaccharide-mediated cytokine release in blood mononuclear and dendritic cells from healthy individuals. We found that in vitro treatment of beryllium sulfate inhibits the secretion of lipopolysaccharide-mediated interleukin 10, while the release of interleukin 1beta is enhanced. In addition, not all lipopolysaccharide-mediated responses are altered, as interleukin 6 release in unaffected upon beryllium treatment. Beryllium sulfate-treated cells show altered phosphotyrosine levels upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Significantly, beryllium inhibits the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transducer 3, induced by lipopolysaccharide. Finally, inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3 kinase mimic the effects of beryllium in inhibition of interleukin 10 release, while they have no effect on interleukin 1beta secretion. This study strongly suggests that prior exposures to beryllium could alter host immune responses to bacterial infections in healthy individuals, by altering intracellular signaling.

  6. Ex vivo effects of naphthoquinones on allergen-sensitized mononuclear cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Inoue, K; Shimada, A; Takano, H

    2016-09-01

    Naphthoquinone (NQ), one of the extractable chemical compounds of diesel exhaust particles, enhances allergic asthma traits in mice. However, it remains unknown whether: (1) several types of NQs have the same potential to facilitate allergies; and (2) NQs synergistically disrupt the functional phenotypes of immune cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of two types (1,2- and 1,4-) of NQs on sensitized mononuclear cells using an ex vivo assay. Male BALB/c mice were repeatedly and intraperitoneally administered ovalbumin (OVA: 20 µg) plus alum with or without two different doses of each NQ. After the final administration, splenocytes (mononuclear cells) were isolated from these mice and cultured in the presence of OVA. Helper T-related cytokines in the culture supernatants and downstream molecules were then evaluated. Protein levels of interferon-γ were higher in the supernatants from 1,2-NQ and 1,4-NQ at low dose + OVA-exposed mononuclear cells following the OVA stimulation than in those from OVA-exposed mononuclear cells. Interleukin (IL)-13 levels were higher in the supernatants from low dose NQs + OVA-exposed mononuclear cells. IL-17 levels were significantly higher in the supernatants from low dose 1,2-NQ + OVA-exposed mononuclear cells. The quantity of phosphorylated STAT6 in the nuclei of these cells was significantly greater in the low dose NQ + OVA groups than in the OVA group. These findings suggest NQs differently enhance allergen sensitization in the context of the Th response against mononuclear cells such as lymphocytes. PMID:26884456

  7. Generation of iPS Cells from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Episomal Vectors.

    PubMed

    Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Neises, Amanda; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood is the easy-to-access, minimally invasive, and the most abundant cell source to use for cell reprogramming. The episomal vector is among the best approaches for generating integration-free induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells due to its simplicity and affordability. Here we describe the detailed protocol for the efficient generation of integration-free iPS cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. With this optimized protocol, one can readily generate hundreds of iPS cell colonies from 1 ml of peripheral blood.

  8. Antiangiogenic activity of mononuclear copper(II) polypyridyl complexes for the treatment of cancers.

    PubMed

    Nagababu, Penumaka; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Thulasiram, Bathini; Devi, C Shobha; Satyanarayana, S; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Sreedhar, Bojja

    2015-07-01

    A series of four new mononuclear copper(II) polypyridyl complexes (1-4) have been designed, developed, and thoroughly characterized by several physicochemical techniques. The CT-DNA binding properties of 1-4 have been investigated by absorption, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. All the complexes especially 1 and 4 exhibit cytotoxicity toward several cancer cell lines, suggesting their anticancer properties as observed by several in vitro assays. Additionally, the complexes show inhibition of endothelial cell (HUVECs) proliferation, indicating their antiangiogenic nature. In vivo chick embryo angiogenesis assay again confirms the antiangiogenic properties of 1 and 4. The formation of excessive intracellular ROS (H2O2 and O2(•-)) and upregulation of BAX induced by copper(II) complexes may be the plausible mechanisms behind their anticancer activities. The present study may offer a basis for the development of new transition metal complexes through suitable choice of ligands for cancer therapeutics by controlling tumor angiogenesis.

  9. Effect of streptococcal lyzate OK-432 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, F; Iwagaki, H; Gouchi, A; Hizuta, A; Isozaki, H; Takakura, N; Tanaka, N

    1998-01-01

    OK-432, a killed preparation of Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum are all known biological response modifiers. To examine the immunomodulatory effects of OK-432, natural killer cell activity and cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were assessed in 32 patients with gastric cancer. Skin tests for Streptococcus pyogenes A-3Su (Su-PS) and BCG were performed in all patients. Other nutritional and immunological parameters were also determined. OK-432-treated PBMCs showed a significant increase of cytotoxicity against K562 cells (p < 0.01). Increased levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) were found in the supernatants of cultures treated with OK-432 in 29 (90.6%), 20 (62.5%), and 8 (25.0%) out of 32 patients, respectively. Natural killer cell activity, IFN-gamma production, and the Su-PS skin test were positively correlated (p < 0.01). In contrast, the BCG test and other markers were not correlated with natural killer cell activity and IFN-gamma production. These results suggest that the Su-PS skin test could predict OK-432-induced natural killer cell activity and IFN-gamma production in patients with gastric cancer, and was therefore useful to determine whether patients were responders to OK-432. PMID:9865458

  10. Differential MSC activation leads to distinct mononuclear leukocyte binding mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Daniel J.; Dicarlo, Bryan; Hetz, Robert A.; Smith, Philippa; Cox, Charles S.; Olson, Scott D.

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the field of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal cell (MSC) biology have demonstrated that MSCs can improve disease outcome when `activated' to exert immunomodulatory effects. However, the precise mechanisms modulating MSC-immune cells interactions remain largely elusive. In here, we activated MSC based on a recent polarization paradigm, in which MSCs can be polarized towards a pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotype depending on the Toll-like receptor stimulated, to dissect the mechanisms through which MSCs physically interact with and modulate leukocytes in this context. Our data show that MSCs activated through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 dependent binding of leukocytes. On the other hand, TLR3 stimulation strongly increases leukocytes affinity to MSC comparatively, through the formation of cable-like hyaluronic acid structures. In addition, TLR4 activation elicited secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators by MSCs, whereas TLR3-activated MSCs displayed a milder pro-inflammatory phenotype, similar to inactivated MSCs. However, the differently activated MSCs maintained their ability to suppress leukocyte activation at similar levels in our in vitro model, and this immunomodulatory property was shown here to be partially mediated by prostaglandin. These results reinforce the concept that alternate activation profiles control MSC responses and may impact the therapeutic use of MSCs.

  11. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester, an antioxidant from propolis, protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells of competitive cyclists against hyperthermal stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Huang, Ai-Chun; Chang, Hen-Hong; Liao, Hui-Fen; Jiang, Chii-Ming; Lai, Li-Yun; Chan, Jen-Te; Chen, Yu-Yawn; Chiang, Jasson

    2009-08-01

    Hyperthermal stress and resulting free radical generation is known to impair endurance capacity and immune cell redistribution during prolonged exercise. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a phenolic compound purified from propolis, has many biological and pharmacological activities including antioxidation. To examine whether CAPE has protective effect against hyperthermal stress in athletes, we isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) from competitive cyclists and assessed their response to hyperthermia with or without CAPE pretreatment. We found that pretreatment of cyclists' MNC with CAPE (0, 1, 2, 4 microg/mL) reversed or reduced hyperthermia-induced survival inhibition, necrosis, superoxide production, glutathione depletion, and intracellular superoxide burst in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that CAPE may enhance the hyperthermal tolerance in immune mononuclear cells of competitive cyclists. PMID:19723200

  12. Conditioning causes an increase in glucose transporter-4 levels in mononuclear cells in sled dogs.

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Theresia M; Reynolds, Arleigh J; Gustafson, Sally J; Duffy, Lawrence K; Dunlap, Kriya L

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of physical conditioning on the expression of the insulin sensitive glucose transporter-4 protein (GLUT4) on mononuclear cells and HOMA-IR levels in dogs and compared to results reported in human skeletal muscle and the skeletal muscle of rodent models. Blood was sampled from conditioned dogs (n = 8) and sedentary dogs (n = 8). The conditioned dogs were exercised four months prior the experiment and were following a uniform training protocol, whereas the sedentary dogs were not. GLUT4 expression in mononuclear cells and plasma insulin levels were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Blood glucose levels were determined using blood plasma. HOMA-IR was calculated using plasma insulin and blood glucose levels using the linear approximation formula. Our results indicate that the state of conditioning had a significant effect on the GLUT4 expression at the surface of mononuclear cells. HOMA-IR was also affected by conditioning in dogs. GLUT4 levels in mononuclear cells of sled dogs were inversely correlated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity. This study demonstrates that conditioning increases GLUT4 levels in mononuclear cells of sled dogs as it has been previously reported in skeletal muscle. Our results support the potential of white blood cells as a proxy tissue for studying insulin signaling and may lead to development of a minimally invasive and direct marker of insulin resistance. This may be the first report of GLUT4 in mononuclear cells in response to exercise and measured with ELISA.

  13. Conditioning causes an increase in Glucose Transporter-4 levels in mononuclear cells in sled dogs

    PubMed Central

    Schnurr, Theresia M.; Reynolds, Arleigh J.; Gustafson, Sally J.; Duffy, Lawrence K.; Dunlap, Kriya L.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of physical conditioning on the expression of the insulin sensitive glucose transporter 4 protein (GLUT4) on mononuclear cells and HOMA-IR levels in dogs and compared to results reported in human skeletal muscle and the skeletal muscle of rodent models. Blood was sampled from conditioned dogs (n=8) and sedentary dogs (n=8). The conditioned dogs were exercised four months prior the experiment and were following a uniform training protocol, whereas the sedentary dogs were not. GLUT4 expression in mononuclear cells and plasma insulin levels were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Blood glucose levels were determined using blood plasma. HOMA-IR was calculated using plasma insulin and blood glucose levels using the linear approximation formula. Our results indicate that the state of conditioning had a significant effect on the GLUT4 expression at the surface of mononuclear cells. HOMA-IR was also affected by conditioning in dogs. GLUT4 levels in mononuclear cells of sled dogs were inversely correlated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity. This study demonstrates that conditioning increases GLUT4 levels in mononuclear cells of sled dogs as it has been previously reported in skeletal muscle. Our results support the potential of white blood cells as a proxy tissue for studying insulin signaling and may lead to development of a minimally invasive and direct marker of insulin resistance. This may be the first report of GLUT4 in mononuclear cells in response to exercise and measured with ELISA. PMID:25236492

  14. Viable mononuclear cell stability study for implementation in a proficiency testing program: impact of shipment conditions.

    PubMed

    Kofanova, Olga A; Davis, Kristine; Glazer, Barbara; De Souza, Yvonne; Kessler, Joseph; Betsou, Fotini

    2014-06-01

    The impact of shipping temperatures and preservation media used during transport of either peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or Jurkat cells was assessed, in view of implementing of a proficiency testing scheme on mononuclear cell viability. Samples were analyzed before and after shipment at different temperatures (ambient temperature, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen) and in different preservation media (serum with cryoprotectant, commercial cryopreservation solution, and room temperature transport medium). Sample quality was assessed by viability assays (Trypan Blue dye exclusion, flow cytometry, Cell Analysis System cell counting (CASY)), and by ELISpot functional assay. The liquid nitrogen storage and shipment were found to be the most stable conditions to preserve cell viability and functionality. However, we show that alternative high quality shipment conditions for viable cells are dry ice shipment and commercial cryopreservation solution. These were also cost-efficient shipment conditions, satisfying the requirements of a proficiency testing scheme for viable mononuclear cells. Room temperature transport medium dramatically and adversely affected the integrity of mononuclear cells. PMID:24955735

  15. Deficient immune function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Gardner syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R P; Stembridge, A M; Gardner, E J

    1985-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to certain cancers is recognized as a contributor to malignancy in man and experimental animals. Colorectal adenocarcinoma associated with Gardner syndrome is considered to be a hereditary form of cancer in which family members are at increased risk because they inherit an autosomal dominant gene for adenomas of the colorectum. The adenomas, if untreated, transform into adenocarcinoma. The purpose of the current study was to characterize immune function in patients with Gardner syndrome since reports exist of immune defects in patients with other forms of hereditary cancer. An analysis of the ability of lymphocytes from the patients to be stimulated by the T cell mitogens, phytohaemmaglutinin and concanavalin A, revealed severely depressed responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from all of the patients studied. A depressed response by patient PBMC to the B cell mitogen, pokeweed mitogen, also was observed but the extent of depression was not statistically significant. Natural killer (NK) cell activity of the patients was studied to determine if a possible genetic defect in this function is associated with Gardner syndrome. PBMC from half of the patients had marginally depressed NK cell function. An enumeration of patient cells revealed a significantly lower ratio of T4 (helper) to T8 (suppressor) T cells, but normal percentages of rosette forming, 7.2 (Ia) positive and Leu 11 positive (NK) cells. PMID:3160513

  16. The mononuclear phagocyte system: a new classification of macrophages, monocytes, and their precursor cells*

    PubMed Central

    van Furth, R.; Cohn, Z. A.; Hirsch, J. G.; Humphrey, J. H.; Spector, W. G.; Langevoort, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    There have been many attempts in the past to classify phagocytic mononuclear cells and to define the cell system they are considered to form—among these being the “macrophage system” of Metchnikoff, the “reticulo-endothelial system” of Aschoff, and the “reticulo-histiocyte system” proposed by Volterra and reintroduced by Thomas. None of these is entirely adequate in the light of present knowledge. In 1969, therefore, a group of workers proposed a new classification of all highly phagocytic mononuclear cells and their precursors in what they termed the “mononuclear phagocyte system”. This system includes the promonocytes and their precursors in the bone marrow, the monocytes in the peripheral blood, and the macrophages in the tissues. Subsequent consultation with numerous other specialists throughout the world led to a certain number of changes in this classification, which is now proposed in revised form. Inclusion of cells in the “mononuclear phagocyte system” is based on similarities in the morphology, function, origin, and kinetics of the phagocytes. By these criteria reticular cells, dendritic cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts (fibrocytes) are excluded. The proponents point out that as new knowledge is acquired modifications may have to be made, certain cells being added to or removed from the new classification. PMID:4538544

  17. Naive Treg-like CCR7(+) mononuclear cells indicate unfavorable prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie-Yi; Duan, Meng; Sun, Qi-Man; Yang, Liuxiao; Wang, Zhi-Chao; Mynbaev, Ospan A; He, Yi-Feng; Wang, Ling-Yan; Zhou, Jian; Tang, Qi-Qun; Cao, Ya; Fan, Jia; Wang, Xiao-Ying; Gao, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Chemokine receptor-like 1 (CCRL1) has the potential in creating a low level of CCL19 and CCL21 to hinder CCR7(+) cell tracking to tumor tissue. Previously, we found a tumor suppressive role of CCRL1 by impairing CCR7-related chemotaxis of tumor cells in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we reported a contribution of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells in the tumor microenvironment to the progression of disease. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the distribution and clinical significance of CCR7(+) cells in a cohort of 240 HCC patients. Furthermore, the phenotype, composition, and functional status of CCR7(+) cells were determined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and in vitro co-culture assays. We found that CCR7(+) mononuclear cells were dispersed around tumor tissue and negatively related to tumoral expression of CCRL1 (P < 0.001, r = 0.391). High density of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells positively correlated with the absence of tumor capsule, vascular invasion, and poor differentiation (P < 0.05). Survival analyses revealed that increased number of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells was significantly associated with worse survival and increased recurrence. We found that CCR7(+) mononuclear cells featured a naive Treg-like phenotype (CD45RA(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)) and possessed tumor-promoting potential by producing TGF-β1. Moreover, CCR7(+) cells were also composed of several immunocytes, a third of which were CD8(+) T cells. CCR7(+) Treg-like cells facilitate tumor growth and indicate unfavorable prognosis in HCC patients, but fortunately, their tracking to tumor tissue is under the control of CCRL1. PMID:26813566

  18. Do androgen deprivation drugs affect the immune cross-talk between mononuclear and prostate cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Salman, Hertzel; Bergman, Michael; Blumberger, Naava; Djaldetti, Meir; Bessler, Hanna

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of androgen deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide on the immune cross-talk between human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cells from PC-3 and LNCaP human prostate cancer lines. PBMC, PC-3 and LNCaP were separately incubated without and with two androgen-deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide, and the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-1ra and IL-10 was examined. In addition, the effect of both drugs on the production of those cytokines was carried out after 24 hours incubation of PBMC with both types of cancer cells. Leuprolide or bicalutamide did not affect the production of the cytokines by PBMC or by the prostate cancer cells from the two lines. Incubation of PBMC with PC-3 or LNCaP cells caused increased production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 as compared with PBMC incubated without malignant cells. While 10(-7) M and 10(-8) M of leuprolide caused a decreased secretion of IL-1β by PBMC previously incubated with prostate cancer cells without the drug, bicalutamide did not affect this PBMC activity at any drug concentration. This observation suggests the existence of an additional mechanism explaining the effect of androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer patients.

  19. Transient Canonical Wnt Stimulation Enriches Human Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Isolates for Osteoprogenitors

    PubMed Central

    Janeczek, Agnieszka A.; Tare, Rahul S.; Scarpa, Edoardo; Moreno‐Jimenez, Ines; Rowland, Caroline A.; Jenner, Dominic; Newman, Tracey A.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway is an attractive anabolic therapeutic strategy for bone. Emerging data suggest that activation of the Wnt signaling pathway promotes bone mineral accrual in osteoporotic patients. The effect of Wnt stimulation in fracture healing is less clear as Wnt signaling has both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on osteogenesis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that transient Wnt stimulation promotes the expansion and osteogenesis of a Wnt‐responsive stem cell population present in human bone marrow. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) were isolated from patients undergoing hip arthroplasty and exposed to Wnt3A protein. The effect of Wnt pathway stimulation was determined by measuring the frequency of stem cells within the BMMNC populations by fluorescence‐activated cell sorting and colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU‐F) assays, before determining their osteogenic capacity in in vitro differentiation experiments. We found that putative skeletal stem cells in BMMNC isolates exhibited elevated Wnt pathway activity compared with the population as whole. Wnt stimulation resulted in an increase in the frequency of skeletal stem cells marked by the STRO‐1bright/Glycophorin A− phenotype. Osteogenesis was elevated in stromal cell populations arising from BMMNCs transiently stimulated by Wnt3A protein, but sustained stimulation inhibited osteogenesis in a concentration‐dependent manner. These results demonstrate that Wnt stimulation could be used as a therapeutic approach by transient targeting of stem cell populations during early fracture healing, but that inappropriate stimulation may prevent osteogenesis. Stem Cells 2016;34:418–430 PMID:26573091

  20. Spontaneous generation of functional osteoclasts from synovial fluid mononuclear cells as a model of inflammatory osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Greisen, Stinne R; Einarsson, Halldór Bjarki; Hvid, Malene; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Deleuran, Bent; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel

    2015-09-01

    In osteoimmunology, osteoclastogenesis is understood in the context of the immune system. Today, the in vitro model for osteoclastogenesis necessitates the addition of recombinant human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The peripheral joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA) are characterized by an immune-mediated inflammation that can lead to bone destruction. Here, we evaluate spontaneous in vitro osteoclastogenesis in cultures of synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) activated only in vivo. SFMCs were isolated and cultured for 21 days at 0.5-1.0 × 10(6) cells/mL in culture medium. SFMCs and healthy control peripheral blood monocytes were cultured with RANKL and M-CSF as controls. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive multinucleated cells were found in the SFMC cultures after 21 days. These cells expressed the osteoclast genes calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, and integrin β3, formed lacunae on dentin plates and secreted matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and TRAP. Adding RANKL and M-CSF potentiated this secretion. In conclusion, we show that SFMCs from inflamed peripheral joints can spontaneously develop into functionally active osteoclasts ex vivo. Our study provides a simple in vitro model for studying inflammatory osteoclastogenesis.

  1. A novel subpopulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells presents in major burn patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin; Ding, Jie; Ma, Zengshuan; Zhu, Zhenshen; Shankowsky, Heather A; Tredget, Edward E

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are generally believed to result from proliferation and activation of resident connective tissue fibroblasts after burns. To demonstrate a potential role of blood-borne cells, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and the effect of PBMCs on dermal fibroblast behavior was investigated. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the surface and intracellular protein expression of PBMCs and fibroblasts. Transwell migration assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to assess fibroblast functions. We identified a novel subpopulation of PBMCs in burn patients in vivo that appears at an early stage following major thermal injuries, which primarily express procollagen 1, leukocyte specific protein 1, CD204, toll-like receptor 4 and stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) receptor CXCR4. In vitro, the conditioned media from burn patient PBMCs up-regulated the expression of fibrotic growth factors and extracellular matrix molecules, down-regulated antifibrotic factor decorin, enhanced cell chemotaxis and promoted cell differentiation into contractile myofibroblasts in dermal fibroblasts. After thermal injury, this novel subpopulation of PBMCs is systemically triggered and attracted to the wounds under SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling where they appear to modulate the functions of resident connective tissue cells and thus contribute to the development of HTS. PMID:25683215

  2. [Detection of stimulator-induced cytotoxicity of human mononuclear cells in short-term culture].

    PubMed

    von Baehr, R; Timm, M; Fröbe, I

    1983-01-01

    A new test modification for the detection of stimulant-induced cytotoxicity of human mononuclear blood cells is described. Papain-treated human erythrocytes were used as indicator cells. The effector cells were lymphocytes. The ratio of target cells to effector cells was 10/1. Haemoglobin as a marker of lysis of the erythrocytes, released in the supernatant, was measured quantitatively in form of its pseudoperoxidase-activity. PHA, ConA and tannic acid were ascertained and tested as stimulants of cytotoxicity. The reaction was inhibitable by anti-human-lymphocyte-globulin. The test conditions were optimized in regard to incubation time, -temperature, -vessels, culture medium and target cells. The technique is easy to manipulate, has only slight pretensions to the equipment of the laboratory and appears to be very effective. We recommend to apply this method of stimulant-induced cytotoxicity within the detection of the immune state, especially in the progress of immunopathological diseases and the analysis of efficiency of immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:6224413

  3. Changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cell subpopulations during antithymocyte globulin therapy for severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    López-Karpovitch, X; Zarzosa, M E; Cárdenas, M R; Piedras, J

    1989-01-01

    The short-term effect of a domestically produced equine antithymocyte globulin (ATG) was analyzed in 6 patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia (AA). All patients received 5 doses of ATG every other day in a 60-min intravenous infusion. Five peripheral blood immunoregulatory mononuclear cell (MNC) subsets, defined by monoclonal antibodies, were enumerated before and 24 h after each application of ATG. Following the first dose of ATG there was a significant and transient reduction in the absolute number of helper T lymphocytes. There was no statistically significant difference pre-ATG to post-ATG in the absolute number of MNC expressing activation antigen Tac (interleukin-2 receptor). However, Tac+ cells, which were significantly increased before ATG therapy, decreased to nearly normal levels after the fourth dose of ATG. A significant and sustained increment in the absolute number of monocytes (CD14+ cells) occurred following the third dose of ATG. The absolute numbers of MNC, suppressor T lymphocytes and cells bearing HLA-DR antigen remain without significant change along ATG treatment. These results suggest that: (a) Tac+ cells are probably involved in the pathogenesis of AA; (b) the target of ATG may be a Tac+ cell, and (c) ATG may stimulate monopoiesis.

  4. The expression and function of human CD300 receptors on blood circulating mononuclear cells are distinct in neonates and adults

    PubMed Central

    Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Vitallé, Joana; García-Obregón, Susana; Astigarraga, Itziar; Eguizabal, Cristina; Santos, Silvia; Simhadri, Venkateswara R.; Borrego, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neonates are more susceptible to infections than adults. This susceptibility is thought to reflect neonates’ qualitative and quantitative defects in the adaptive and innate immune responses. Differential expression of cell surface receptors may result in altered thresholds of neonatal immune cell activation. We determined whether the expression and function of the lipid-binding CD300 family of receptors are different on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. A multiparametric flow cytometry analysis was performed to determine the expression of CD300 receptors on adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neonatal cord blood mononuclear cells. The expression of the CD300a inhibitory receptor was significantly reduced on cells from the newborn adaptive immune system, and neonatal antigen presenting cells exhibited a different CD300 receptors expression pattern. We also found differential LPS-mediated regulation of CD300 receptors expression on adult monocytes compared to cord blood monocytes, and that CD300c and CD300e-mediated activation was quantitatively different in neonatal monocytes. This is the first complete study examining the expression of CD300 receptors on human neonatal immune cells compared with adult immune cells. Significant differences in the expression and function of CD300 receptors may help to explain the peculiarities and distinctness of the neonatal immune responses. PMID:27595670

  5. The expression and function of human CD300 receptors on blood circulating mononuclear cells are distinct in neonates and adults.

    PubMed

    Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Vitallé, Joana; García-Obregón, Susana; Astigarraga, Itziar; Eguizabal, Cristina; Santos, Silvia; Simhadri, Venkateswara R; Borrego, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neonates are more susceptible to infections than adults. This susceptibility is thought to reflect neonates' qualitative and quantitative defects in the adaptive and innate immune responses. Differential expression of cell surface receptors may result in altered thresholds of neonatal immune cell activation. We determined whether the expression and function of the lipid-binding CD300 family of receptors are different on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. A multiparametric flow cytometry analysis was performed to determine the expression of CD300 receptors on adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neonatal cord blood mononuclear cells. The expression of the CD300a inhibitory receptor was significantly reduced on cells from the newborn adaptive immune system, and neonatal antigen presenting cells exhibited a different CD300 receptors expression pattern. We also found differential LPS-mediated regulation of CD300 receptors expression on adult monocytes compared to cord blood monocytes, and that CD300c and CD300e-mediated activation was quantitatively different in neonatal monocytes. This is the first complete study examining the expression of CD300 receptors on human neonatal immune cells compared with adult immune cells. Significant differences in the expression and function of CD300 receptors may help to explain the peculiarities and distinctness of the neonatal immune responses. PMID:27595670

  6. Antinociceptive and antitumor activity of novel synthetic mononuclear Ruthenium (II) compounds

    PubMed Central

    Sunder A, Shyam; Dhulipala, Satyavati; Thota, Sreekanth; Yerra, Rajeshwar; Balzarini, Jan; De Clercq, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Background: From the thousands of years, metal compounds have been used in medicine for treatment of various diseases including various types of cancers. Ruthenium was seen as a promising metal due to its similar kinetics to platinum and its lower toxicity. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the newer mononuclear ruthenium (II) compounds for antinociceptive and antitumor activities. Materials and Methods: Ruthenium (II) compounds were evaluated for antinociceptive and antitumor activity using the various in vitro and in vivo models. The compounds were injected to mice at concentrations of 1 and 2 mg kg-1 intraperitoneally and were screened for antinociceptive activity, and the antiproliferative effect was evaluated against murine leukemia cells (L1210), human T-lymphocyte cells (CEM) and human cervix carcinoma cells (HeLa) using MTT assay. Results: The results for antitumor activity clearly indicated that compound R1 was potent cytotoxic agent than R2 with IC50 values ranging from 4-6 μM for R1, whereas IC50 values for compound R2 ranging from 65-103 μM. The compounds have shown a significant anti-inflammatory effect in carrageenan and dextran models but do not having the central analgesic activity, this indicating that the antinociceptive activity is related to the peripheral nervous system. The results for 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity showed that both R1 and R2 compounds were found to be significant 5-LOX inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 14.35 μg ml-1 and 29.24 μg ml-1 respectively. Conclusion: These findings concluded that the new ruthenium compounds might be the promising antiproliferative agents as these compounds showing significant 5-LOX inhibitory activity and potential agents in the management of pain related disorders. PMID:23930118

  7. [Mononuclear phagocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid. Studies on the clinical significance and factors of activation].

    PubMed

    Weitbrecht, W U

    1984-09-27

    Examination of 1050 cerebrospinal fluid samples showed, that mononuclear phagocytes contribute only slightly to the explanation of affections of the CNS except they are containing specific particles e.g. iron. Further investigations on patients with concussion, herniation of the intervertebral disk and cerebral infarction turned out, that the relative proportion of mononuclear phagocytes and qualitative cytological changes correlate with the extent of the CNS lesion. Phagocytosis of India ink was studied dependent on milieu and different mediators. Phagocytosis correlates with alpha-1-glycoproteid and the relative part of mononuclear phagocytes in cerebrospinal fluid. It depends on pH, various ions and mediators (adrenalin, histamine, prostaglandines, cAMP, cGMP). DNA-contents of the nucleus was measured by cytophotometria. No signs of proliferation (tetraploidia) were found. The slightly increased contents of nuclear DNA of some phagocytes was interpreted as a metabolically active DNA.

  8. A study of zearalenone cytotoxicity on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Vlata, Zaxarenia; Porichis, Filippos; Tzanakakis, George; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Krambovitis, Elias

    2006-09-10

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) is a common contaminant of all major cereal grains worldwide with estrogenic and anabolic activity. We investigated the in vitro cytopathic effects of ZEA on freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in relation to proliferation and cell death patterns of untreated and mitogen-activated cells. The higher concentration of 30microg/ml ZEA was found to totally inhibit T and B lymphocyte proliferation from the stimulation with phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen. The inhibitory effects of ZEA were further related to cell necrosis/apoptosis. Flow cytometry analysis showed a distinct necrotic effect on PBMC, irrespective of mitogen stimulation, whereas apoptotic activity was less evident. Necrosis was observed in both the lymphocyte and monocyte/granulocyte gates. Measurements of ZEA-induced intracellular calcium ion (Ca(2+)) mobilization showed an increase of both Ca(2+) levels and the number of cells with high Ca(2+) only in the monocyte/granulocyte gated cells. Using phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor, and ammonium chloride (NH(4)Cl), a lysosomal inhibitor, both associated with cell necrosis inhibition, we showed that PMSF at 0.05mM and NH(4)Cl at 1 and 10mM reduced the cytopathic effects induced by 30microg/ml ZEA, whereas apoptosis was less affected. Expose of PBMC to 1microg/ml ZEA did not alter the viability of the cells. Our results suggest that high ZEA concentrations in the blood may well exert cytotoxic effects that merit further investigation.

  9. Comparison of immunological status of African and European cord blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Carsten; Adegnika, Ayola A; Van der Linden, Reinier; Agnandji, Selidji T; Chai, Sanders K; Luty, Adrian J F; Szepfalusi, Zsolt; Kremsner, Peter G; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2008-12-01

    The cellular aspects of the immunologic development of the fetus during pregnancy have been studied mainly in populations living in economically well developed countries, and there is no data concerning variation of the neonatal cellular immune system in geographically distinct areas with different environments. Here, we report a comparative immunologic marker analysis of the circulating mononuclear cell subsets in unstimulated cord blood of newborns from Gabon and Austria, assessing the activation and maturation status of T and B lymphocytes as well as antigen-presenting cells. Cells and markers hypothesized to be modulated by frequent exposure to microorganisms and parasites such as regulatory T cells and the expression of toll-like receptor 2 on antigen-presenting cells were also studied. We found marked differences in terms of expression of immunologic markers between the two populations, pointing to a comparatively enhanced maturation status of the neonatal immune system in general in the African setting. The observations suggest that environmental factors, including differential exposure to pathogens as well as nutritional differences, may have substantial impact on the development of the fetal immune system.

  10. Infectibility of separated peripheral blood mononuclear cell subpopulations by varicella-zoster virus (VZV).

    PubMed

    Koenig, Andreas; Wolff, Manfred H

    2003-01-01

    Varicella zoster-virus (VZV) is a humanpathogenic alpha-Herpesvirus that causes chickenpox after primary infection. The virus spreads by aerosol or direct contact with infectious vesical fluids, it enters the body via the respiratory tract. In a first viremic stage it replicates in local lymph nodes, followed by a secondary viremic stage. In the course it spreads through the body to endothelial cells in the periphery. During acute viremia of chickenpox viral DNA can be detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by PCR and in situ hybridization. Recently published results quantified the viral DNA load in PBMC and subpopulations by real-time PCR. In the animal SCID-hu mouse model system VZV showed a tropism for T-lymphocytes. The aim of this work was the investigation of viral ability to infect and to replicate in purified primary subtypes of PBMC, i.e., T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and monocytes. These cells were isolated from whole peripheral blood or tonsils and infected with cell-free VZV for different time periods. In all cell types, transcriptional activity was shown by amplification and detection of immediate early (IE) and late (L) viral mRNA by NASBA or RT-PCR. Expression of viral glycoproteins was analyzed and proved in lymphocytes by immunofluorescence microscopy. PMID:12627490

  11. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  12. Cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells in elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Longhini-Dos-Santos, Nathalia; Barbosa-de-Oliveira, Valter Abraão; Kozma, Rodrigo Heras; Faria, Carolina Arruda de; Stessuk, Talita; Frei, Fernando; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2013-04-01

    Emphysema is characterized by destruction of alveolar walls with loss of gas exchange surface and consequent progressive dyspnea. This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) in an animal model of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema. Emphysema was induced in C57Bl/J6 female mice by intranasal instillation of elastase. After 21 days, the mice received bone marrow mononuclear cells from EGFP male mice with C57Bl/J6 background. The groups were assessed by comparison and statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed among the groups treated with BMMC and evaluated after 7, 14 and 21 days. Analysis of the mean linear intercept (Lm) values for the different groups allowed to observe that the group treated with BMMC and evaluated after 21 days showed the most significant result. The group that received no treatment showed a statistically significant difference when compared to other groups, except the group treated and evaluated after 21 days, evidencing the efficacy of cell therapy with BMMC in pulmonary emphysema.

  13. Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) mushroom extract protects against hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, U R; Chong, Y L; Mahmood, A A; Indran, M; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Vikineswary, S

    2009-04-01

    Lentinula edodes (Berk) Pegler, commonly known as Shiitake mushroom has been used as medicinal food in Asian countries, especially in China and Japan and is believed to possess strong immunomodulatory property. In the present study, the methanolic extract of the fruit bodies of L. edodes was investigated for cytoprotective effect against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by measuring the activities of xanthine oxidase (XO) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) . H2O2 at a concentration of 5 microM caused 50% inhibition of PBMCs viability. The extract improved the PBMC viability and exerted a dose-dependent protection against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. At 100 microg/ml of extract concentration, the cell viability increased by 60% compared with the PBMCs incubated with H2O2 alone. The extract also inhibited XO activity in PBMC, while showing moderate stimulatory effect on GPx. However, in the presence of H2O2 alone, both the enzyme activities were increased significantly. The GPx activity increased, possibly in response to the increased availability of H2O2 in the cell. When the cells were pretreated with the extract and washed (to remove the extract) prior to the addition of H2O2, the GPx and XO activities as well as the cell viability were comparable to those when incubated with the extract alone. Thus, it is suggested that one of the possible mechanisms via which L. edodes methanolic extract confers protection against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in PBMC is by inhibiting the superoxide-producing XO and increasing GPx activity which could rapidly inactivate H2O2. PMID:19517993

  14. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  15. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  16. Influence of rimonabant treatment on peripheral blood mononuclear cells; flow cytometry analysis and gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Almestrand, Stefan; Wang, Xiao; Jeppsson-Ahlberg, Åsa; Nordgren, Marcus; Flygare, Jenny; Christensson, Birger; Rössner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonist rimonabant has been used as treatment for obesity. In addition, anti-proliferative effects on mitogen-activated leukocytes have been demonstrated in vitro. We have previously shown that rimonabant (SR141716A) induces cell death in ex vivo isolated malignant lymphomas with high expression of CB1 receptors. Since CB1 targeting may be part of a future lymphoma therapy, it was of interest to investigate possible effects on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients treated with rimonabant. We therefore evaluated leukocyte subsets by 6 color flow cytometry in eight patients before and at treatment with rimonabant for 4 weeks. Whole-transcript gene expression profiling in PBMC before and at 4 weeks of rimonabant treatment was done using Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Our data show no significant changes of monocytes, B cells, total T cells or T cell subsets in PBMC during treatment with rimonabant. There was a small but significant increase in CD3–, CD16+ and/or CD56+ cells after rimonabant therapy. Gene expression analysis detected significant changes in expression of genes associated with innate immunity, cell death and metabolism. The present study shows that normal monocytes and leukocyte subsets in blood remain rather constant during rimonabant treatment. This is in contrast to the induction of cell death previously observed in CB1 expressing lymphoma cells in response to treatment with rimonabant in vitro. These differential effects observed on normal and malignant lymphoid cells warrant investigation of CB1 targeting as a potential lymphoma treatment. PMID:26157624

  17. Mitochondrial Alterations in Peripheral Mononuclear Blood Cells from Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients

    PubMed Central

    Delbarba, A.; Abate, G.; Prandelli, C.; Marziano, M.; Buizza, L.; Arce Varas, N.; Novelli, A.; Cuetos, F.; Martinez, C.; Lanni, C.; Memo, M.; Uberti, D.

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to neurodegeneration occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, evidences of mitochondrial defects in AD peripheral cells are still inconclusive. Here, some mitochondrial-encoded and nuclear-encoded proteins, involved in maintaining the correct mitochondria machine, were investigated in terms of protein expression and enzymatic activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients and healthy subjects. In addition mitochondrial DNA copy number was measured by real time PCR. We found some differences and some similarities between AD and MCI patients when compared with healthy subjects. For example, cytochrome C and cytochrome B were decreased in AD, while MCI showed only a statistical reduction of cytochrome C. On the other hand, both AD and MCI blood cells exhibited highly nitrated MnSOD, index of a prooxidant environment inside the mitochondria. TFAM, a regulator of mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, was decreased in both AD and MCI patients' blood cells. Moreover also the mitochondrial DNA amount was reduced in PBMCs from both patient groups. In conclusion these data confirmed peripheral mitochondria impairment in AD and demonstrated that TFAM and mtDNA amount reduction could be two features of early events occurring in AD pathogenesis. PMID:26881032

  18. Intramuscular injection of bone marrow mononuclear cells contributes to bone repair following midpalatal expansion in rats

    PubMed Central

    CHE, XIAOXIA; GUO, JIE; LI, XIANGDONG; WANG, LVE; WEI, SILONG

    2016-01-01

    Healing from injury requires the activation and proliferation of stem cells for tissue repair. Previous studies have demonstrated that bone marrow is a central pool of stem cells. The present study aimed to investigate the route undertaken by bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) following BMMC transplantation by masseter injection in a rat model of midpalatal expansion. The rats were divided into five groups according to the types of midpalatal expansion, incision and BMMC transplantation. Samples of midpalatal bone from the rats in each group were used for histological and immunohistochemical assessments to track and evaluate the differential potentials of the transplanted BMMCs in the masseter muscle and midpalatal bone. Bromodeoxyuridine was used as a BMMC tracing label, and M-cadherin was used to detect muscle satellite cells. The BMMCs injected into the masseter were observed, not only in the masseter, but also in the blood vessels and oral mucosa, and enveloped the midpalatal bone. A number of the BMMCs transformed into osteoblasts at the boundary of the neuromuscular bundle, and were embedded in the newly formed bone during midpalatal bone regeneration. The results of the present study suggested that BMMCs entered the circulation and migrated from muscle to the bone tissue, where they were involved in bone repair. Therefore, BMMCs may prove useful in the treatment of various types of cancer. PMID:26648442

  19. Dengue-2 virus infection of human mononuclear cell lines and establishment of persistent infections.

    PubMed

    Kurane, I; Kontny, U; Janus, J; Ennis, F A

    1990-01-01

    Twenty three human mononuclear cell lines including ten myelomonocytic cell lines, eight B cell lines and five T cell lines, were examined to determine whether they could be infected with dengue-2 virus. All the cell lines were infected with dengue-2 virus as determined by immunofluorescent staining and by virus titration of culture supernatant fluids. K562, Jiyoye and Jurkat, respectively, showed the highest percentage of infected cells of these myelomonocytic, B and T cell lines. Antibody to dengue-2 virus at subneutralizing concentrations augmented dengue-2 virus infection of myelomonocytic cell lines, but not of B cell lines or of T cell lines. Persistent dengue-2 virus infection was established using a myelomonocytic cell line (K562), a B cell line (Raji), and a T cell line (HSB-2). These cell lines maintained a high percentage (more than 70%) of dengue-2 virus antigen-positive cells for at least 25 weeks. Very low titers of infectious dengue-2 virus were detected in the culture supernatant fluids of the persistently infected cells. Dengue-2 virus antigen-positive Raji cell clones were established from persistently-infected Raji cells using limiting dilutions and all of the cells in these clones were dengue-2 virus antigen-positive. These findings demonstrate that a variety of human mononuclear cell lines can be infected with dengue-2 virus and may be useful as models for the analysis of dengue virus-human cell interactions in dengue virus infections.

  20. Nipah Virus Infects Specific Subsets of Porcine Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stachowiak, Beata; Weingartl, Hana M.

    2012-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV), a zoonotic paramyxovirus, is highly contagious in swine, and can cause fatal infections in humans following transmission from the swine host. The main viral targets in both species are the respiratory and central nervous systems, with viremia implicated as a mode of dissemination of NiV throughout the host. The presented work focused on the role of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the viremic spread of the virus in the swine host. B lymphocytes, CD4−CD8−, as well as CD4+CD8− T lymphocytes were not permissive to NiV, and expansion of the CD4+CD8− cells early post infection was consistent with functional humoral response to NiV infection observed in swine. In contrast, significant drop in the CD4+CD8− T cell frequency was observed in piglets which succumbed to the experimental infection, supporting the hypothesis that antibody development is the critical component of the protective immune response. Productive viral replication was detected in monocytes, CD6+CD8+ T lymphocytes and NK cells by recovery of infectious virus in the cell supernatants. Virus replication was supported by detection of the structural N and the non-structural C proteins or by detection of genomic RNA increase in the infected cells. Infection of T cells carrying CD6 marker, a strong ligand for the activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule ALCAM (CD166) highly expressed on the microvascular endothelial cell of the blood-air and the blood-brain barrier may explain NiV preferential tropism for small blood vessels of the lung and brain. PMID:22303463

  1. In vitro transdifferentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to photoreceptor-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Komuta, Yukari; Ishii, Toshiyuki; Kaneda, Makoto; Ueda, Yasuji; Miyamoto, Kiyoko; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Direct reprogramming is a promising, simple and low-cost approach to generate target cells from somatic cells without using induced pluripotent stem cells. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have attracted considerable attention as a somatic cell source for reprogramming. As a cell source, PBMCs have an advantage over dermal fibroblasts with respect to the ease of collecting tissues. Based on our studies involving generation of photosensitive photoreceptor cells from human iris cells and human dermal fibroblasts by transduction of photoreceptor-related transcription factors via retrovirus vectors, we transduced these transcription factors into PBMCs via Sendai virus vectors. We found that retinal disease-related genes were efficiently detected in CRX-transduced cells, most of which are crucial to photoreceptor functions. In functional studies, a light-induced inward current was detected in some CRX-transduced cells. Moreover, by modification of the culture conditions including additional transduction of RAX1 and NEUROD1, we found a greater variety of retinal disease-related genes than that observed in CRX-transduced PBMCs. These data suggest that CRX acts as a master control gene for reprogramming PBMCs into photoreceptor-like cells and that our induced photoreceptor-like cells might contribute to individualized drug screening and disease modeling of inherited retinal degeneration. PMID:27170256

  2. Secretomes of apoptotic mononuclear cells ameliorate neurological damage in rats with focal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Patrick; Mildner, Michael; Haider, Thomas; Traxler, Denise; Beer, Lucian; Ristl, Robin; Golabi, Bahar; Gabriel, Christian; Leutmezer, Fritz; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of targeting multiple pathways in the ischemic cascade of cerebral stroke is a promising treatment option. We examined the regenerative potential of conditioned medium derived from rat and human apoptotic mononuclear cells (MNC), rMNC apo sec and hMNC apo sec, in experimental stroke. We performed middle cerebral artery occlusion on Wistar rats and administered apoptotic MNC-secretomes intraperitoneally in two experimental settings. Ischemic lesion volumes were determined 48 hours after cerebral ischemia. Neurological evaluations were performed after 6, 24 and 48 hours. Immunoblots were conducted to analyze neuroprotective signal-transduction in human primary glia cells and neurons. Neuronal sprouting assays were performed and neurotrophic factors in both hMNC apo sec and rat plasma were quantified using ELISA. Administration of rat as well as human apoptotic MNC-secretomes significantly reduced ischemic lesion volumes by 36% and 37%, respectively. Neurological examinations revealed improvement after stroke in both treatment groups. Co-incubation of human astrocytes, Schwann cells and neurons with hMNC apo sec resulted in activation of several signaling cascades associated with the regulation of cytoprotective gene products and enhanced neuronal sprouting in vitro. Analysis of neurotrophic factors in hMNC apo sec and rat plasma revealed high levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Our data indicate that apoptotic MNC-secretomes elicit neuroprotective effects on rats that have undergone ischemic stroke. PMID:25383184

  3. Secretomes of apoptotic mononuclear cells ameliorate neurological damage in rats with focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Patrick; Mildner, Michael; Haider, Thomas; Traxler, Denise; Beer, Lucian; Ristl, Robin; Golabi, Bahar; Gabriel, Christian; Leutmezer, Fritz; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of targeting multiple pathways in the ischemic cascade of cerebral stroke is a promising treatment option. We examined the regenerative potential of conditioned medium derived from rat and human apoptotic mononuclear cells (MNC), rMNC (apo sec) and hMNC (apo sec), in experimental stroke. We performed middle cerebral artery occlusion on Wistar rats and administered apoptotic MNC-secretomes intraperitoneally in two experimental settings. Ischemic lesion volumes were determined 48 hours after cerebral ischemia. Neurological evaluations were performed after 6, 24 and 48 hours. Immunoblots were conducted to analyze neuroprotective signal-transduction in human primary glia cells and neurons. Neuronal sprouting assays were performed and neurotrophic factors in both hMNC (apo sec) and rat plasma were quantified using ELISA. Administration of rat as well as human apoptotic MNC-secretomes significantly reduced ischemic lesion volumes by 36% and 37%, respectively. Neurological examinations revealed improvement after stroke in both treatment groups. Co-incubation of human astrocytes, Schwann cells and neurons with hMNC (apo sec) resulted in activation of several signaling cascades associated with the regulation of cytoprotective gene products and enhanced neuronal sprouting in vitro. Analysis of neurotrophic factors in hMNC (apo sec) and rat plasma revealed high levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Our data indicate that apoptotic MNC-secretomes elicit neuroprotective effects on rats that have undergone ischemic stroke.

  4. Analysis of cytotoxic effects of silver nanoclusters on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells 'in vitro'.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra Teresa; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ochoa-Martínez, Angeles Catalina; Ruiz-Vera, Tania; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Yacamán, Miguel José; Navarro-Contreras, Hugo Ricardo; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2015-10-01

    The antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have made these particles one of the most used nanomaterials in consumer products. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions (unwanted toxicity) between nanoparticles and human cells is of significant interest. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity effects of silver nanoclusters (AgNC, < 2 nm diameter) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Using flow cytometry and comet assay methods, we demonstrate that exposure of PBMC to AgNC induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage and apoptosis at 3, 6 and 12 h, with a dose-dependent response (0.1, 1, 3, 5 and 30 µg ml(-1)). Advanced electron microscopy imaging of complete and ultrathin-sections of PBMC confirmed the cytotoxic effects and cell damage caused by AgNC. The present study showed that AgNC produced without coating agents induced significant cytotoxic effects on PBMC owing to their high aspect ratio and active surface area, even at much lower concentrations (<1 µg ml(-1)) than those applied in previous studies, resembling what would occur under real exposure conditions to nanosilver-functionalized consumer products.

  5. Reduction of cytokine release of blood and bronchoalveolar mononuclear cells by ambroxol.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, S; Zissel, G; Kienast, K; Müller-Quernheim, J

    1997-03-24

    Ambroxol is a mucolytic agent frequently used in the treatment of chronic bronchitis. It has been reported, following clinical and in-vitro studies, that ambroxol exhibits an anti-inflammatory action. This capability was investigated by activating bronchoalveolar lavage cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in-vitro to elicit the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-2 and interferon gamma, whilst simultaneously exposing them to varying pharmacological concentrations of ambroxol (10, 1, and 0.1 microM). After 24 h it was observed that the isolated tissue-culture supernatants showed a dose-dependent reduction in the concentration of the tested cytokines; 10 microM (12 to 37% reduction) and 1 microM to (6 to 27% reduction). At 0.1 microM, a significant reduction could only be observed in the release of interleukin-2 by bronchoalveolar lavage cells. These results demonstrate, that ambroxol exhibits anti-inflammatory actions in concentrations achievable in vivo.

  6. Rapid Column-Free Enrichment of Mononuclear Cells from Solid Tissues.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Keller, Karen A; Cheng, Stephanie; Zhang, Michael; Zhang, Xiaoli; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2015-07-30

    We have developed a rapid negative selection method to enrich rare mononuclear cells from human tissues. Unwanted and antibody-tethered cells are selectively depleted during a Ficoll separation step, and there is no need for magnetic-based reagents and equipment. The new method is fast, customizable, inexpensive, remarkably efficient, and easy to perform, and per sample the overall cost is less than one-tenth the cost associated with a magnetic column-based method.

  7. Comparison of performance of six different cell separators in collecting peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Bellavita, P; Celega, E; Poma, R

    1997-06-01

    We compared the efficacy of six different cell separators in collecting peripheral mononuclear cells to be used for autologous or homologous peripheral stem cell transplantation. The product obtained with the Dideco Vivacell cell separator showed a low percentage of mononuclear cells (38%) in the final product and a high platelet efficiency (38%). The Baxter CS3000 Plus cell separator required the longest time to load and prime the kit (18 min), it showed a high MNC efficiency (68%), with the highest percentage of MNC in the final product, the highest platelet efficiency (45%), a low red blood cell contamination in the final product (2.7 mL), the highest extracorporeal volume (450 mL) and a high percentage of technical failures (15%). The product obtained with the Fresenius AS104 cell separator with P1Y kit showed the highest final volume (297 mL), the lowest platelet efficiency (12%) and the lowest extracorporeal volume (230 mL). The same cell separator with C4Y kit showed a lower MNC efficiency (52 vs 60%) and a higher percentage of MNC in final product (63 vs 41%). The platelet contamination in final product was the lowest (18 x 10(9)/100 mL). The Haemonetics MCS3p cell separator required the lowest time to load and prime the kit (5 min), it showed the highest MNC efficiency (71%). The blood volume processed per hour (1328 mL) and the percentage of MNC in final product was lowest (32%), the extracorporeal volume (450 mL) was the highest. The Cobe Spectra cell separator allowed to process the highest blood volume per hour (3383 mL) and the final product had the lowest red blood cell contamination (2.3 mL/100 mL). The Dideco Excel cell separator required the longest time to load and prime the kit (18 min), the lowest MNC efficiency (38%), the highest platelet contamination in final product. Furthermore this machine showed the highest percentage of technical failure (20%). None of the six instruments have all the required preconditions and the ideal cell separator

  8. Receptor expression and responsiveness of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a human cytomegalovirus encoded CC chemokine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Xu, Jun; Gao, Huihui; Tao, Ran; Li, Wei; Shang, Shiqiang; Gu, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects the majority of the world's population. After long period of time co-evolving with human being, this pathogen has developed several strategies to evade host immune surveillance. One of the major trick is encoding homologous to those of the host organism or stealing host cellular genes that have significant functions in immune system. To date, we have found several viral immune analogous which include G protein coupled receptor, class I major histocompatibility complex and chemokine. Chemokine is a small group of molecules which is defined by the presence of four cysteines in highly conserved region. The four kinds of chemokines (C, CC, CXC, and CX3C) are classified based on the arrangement of 1 or 2 N-terminal cysteine residues. UL128 protein is one of the analogous that encoded by human cytomegalovirus that has similar amino acid sequences to the human CC chemokine. It has been proved to be one of the essential particles that involved in human cytomegalovirus entry into epithelial/endothelial cells as well as macrophages. It is also the target of potent neutralizing antibodies in human cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals. We had demonstrated the chemotactic trait of UL128 protein in our previous study. Recombinant UL128 in vitro has the ability to attract monocytes to the infection region and enhances peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. However, the way that this viral encoded chemokine interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the detailed mechanism that involving the virus entry into host cells keeps unknown. Here we performed in vitro investigation into the effects of UL128 protein on peripheral blood mononuclear cell's activation and receptor binding, which may help us further understand the immunomodulatory function of UL128 protein as well as human cytomegalovirus diffusion mechanism.

  9. Concise Review: Prospects of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treating Status Epilepticus and Chronic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Agadi, Satish; Shetty, Ashok K

    2015-07-01

    Mononuclear cells (MNCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the bone marrow and other sources have received significant attention as donor cells for treating various neurological disorders due to their robust neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, it is relatively easy to procure these cells from both autogenic and allogenic sources. Currently, there is considerable interest in examining the usefulness of these cells for conditions such as status epilepticus (SE) and chronic epilepsy. A prolonged seizure activity in SE triggers neurodegeneration in the limbic brain areas, which elicits epileptogenesis and evolves into a chronic epileptic state. Because of their potential for providing neuroprotection, diminishing inflammation and curbing epileptogenesis, early intervention with MNCs or MSCs appears attractive for treating SE as such effects may restrain the development of chronic epilepsy typified by spontaneous seizures and learning and memory impairments. Delayed administration of these cells after SE may also be useful for easing spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction in chronic epilepsy. This concise review evaluates the current knowledge and outlook pertaining to MNC and MSC therapies for SE and chronic epilepsy. In the first section, the behavior of these cells in animal models of SE and their efficacy to restrain neurodegeneration, inflammation, and epileptogenesis are discussed. The competence of these cells for suppressing seizures and improving cognitive function in chronic epilepsy are conferred in the next section. The final segment ponders issues that need to be addressed to pave the way for clinical application of these cells for SE and chronic epilepsy.

  10. Concise Review: Prospects of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treating Status Epilepticus and Chronic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Agadi, Satish; Shetty, Ashok K

    2015-07-01

    Mononuclear cells (MNCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the bone marrow and other sources have received significant attention as donor cells for treating various neurological disorders due to their robust neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, it is relatively easy to procure these cells from both autogenic and allogenic sources. Currently, there is considerable interest in examining the usefulness of these cells for conditions such as status epilepticus (SE) and chronic epilepsy. A prolonged seizure activity in SE triggers neurodegeneration in the limbic brain areas, which elicits epileptogenesis and evolves into a chronic epileptic state. Because of their potential for providing neuroprotection, diminishing inflammation and curbing epileptogenesis, early intervention with MNCs or MSCs appears attractive for treating SE as such effects may restrain the development of chronic epilepsy typified by spontaneous seizures and learning and memory impairments. Delayed administration of these cells after SE may also be useful for easing spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction in chronic epilepsy. This concise review evaluates the current knowledge and outlook pertaining to MNC and MSC therapies for SE and chronic epilepsy. In the first section, the behavior of these cells in animal models of SE and their efficacy to restrain neurodegeneration, inflammation, and epileptogenesis are discussed. The competence of these cells for suppressing seizures and improving cognitive function in chronic epilepsy are conferred in the next section. The final segment ponders issues that need to be addressed to pave the way for clinical application of these cells for SE and chronic epilepsy. PMID:25851047

  11. HIV-1 reduces Aβ-degrading enzymatic activities in primary human mononuclear phagocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xiqian; Xu, Jiqing; Kiyota, Tomomi; Peng, Hui; Zheng, Jialin C.; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2011-01-01

    The advent and wide introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has greatly improved the survival and longevity of HIV-infected patients. Unfortunately, despite ART treatment, these patients are still afflicted with many complications including cognitive dysfunction. There is a growing body of reports indicating accelerated deposition of amyloid plaques, which are composed of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), in HIV-infected brains. Though how HIV viral infection precipitates Aβ accumulation is poorly understood. It is suggested that viral infection leads to increased production and impaired degradation of Aβ. Mononuclear phagocytes (macrophages and microglia) that are productively infected by HIV in brains play a pivotal role in Aβ degradation through the expression and execution of two endopeptidases: neprilysin (NEP) and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE). Here we report that NEP has the dominant endopeptidase activity towards Aβ in macrophages. Further, we demonstrate that monomeric Aβ degradation by primary cultured macrophages and microglia was significantly impaired by HIV infection. This was accompanied with great reduction of NEP endopeptidase activity, which might be due to the diminished transport of NEP to cell surface and intracellular accumulation at the endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes. Therefore, these data suggest that malfunction of NEP in infected macrophages may contribute to acceleration of beta amyloidosis in HIV-inflicted brains and modulation of macrophages may be a potential preventative target of Aβ-related cognitive disorders in HIV-affected patients. PMID:21551363

  12. Relationship between plasma cholesterol levels and cholesterol esterification in isolated human mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dallongeville, J.; Davignon, J.; Lussier-Cacan, S. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors studied the relationship between plasma lipoprotein concentrations and cholesterol esterification in freshly isolated human mononuclear cells from 27 normolipidemic and 32 hyperlipidemic individuals. Cells were either incubated for 5 hours with radiolabeled oleate immediately after isolation or were preincubated for 18 hours in the presence of exogenous cholesterol, and then incubated with ({sup 14}C)sodium-oleate-albumin complex. In the absence of exogenous cholesterol, control and hypercholesterolemic subjects had similarly low values of intracellular cholesterol esterification. In the presence of exogenous cholesterol, both hypertriglyceridemic and hypercholesterolemic subjects had higher cholesterol esterification than controls. There was a significant correlation between the rate of cholesterol esterification and plasma total cholesterol. These results suggest that plasma cholesterol levels may regulate mononuclear cell intra-cellular cholesterol esterification in humans.

  13. Cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, K N; Leung, J C; Li, P K; Lui, S F

    1991-01-01

    The regulation of cytokine production and T cell proliferation by other cytokines is mandatory in mediating inflammatory responses but the full understanding is far from complete. We have previously reported increased production of IL-2 and IL-2 receptors (IL-2R) in IgA nephropathy. The present study was undertaken to examine other cytokine production during T cell activation in IgA nephropathy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 17 IgA nephritic patients and 14 controls were cultured with phytohaemagglutinin and phorbol myristate acetate for 48 h for maximal cytokine production. IL-2Rs and IL-4 receptors (IL-4Rs) expressed on cultured PBMC were studied by a radioimmunoassay using monoclonal antibodies against these receptors. Although the total cellular IL-2R expression and percentages of T helper and T suppressor cells did not differ between the patients and controls, there was a significant increase in activated T helper cells expressing IL-2R in patients with IgA nephropathy. The total cellular IL-4R expression was elevated in IgA nephritic patients (P less than 0.005). IL-2 production by PBMC was raised in IgA nephritic patients compared with controls (P less than 0.05) but no difference in IL-4 or IL-6 production was observed. The interferon-gamma production by PBMC was significantly increased in patients with IgA nephropathy (P less than 0.025). No correlation was observed between individual cytokine levels. Our data suggest there are selective increases in cytokine production in IgA nephropathy. PMID:1907530

  14. Focused microarray analysis of peripheral mononuclear blood cells from Churg-Strauss syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Tougan, Takahiro; Onda, Hiroaki; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Shigeto; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2008-04-30

    DNA diagnostics are useful but are hampered by difficult ethical issues. Moreover, it cannot provide enough information on the environmental factors that are important for pathogenesis of certain diseases. However, this is not a problem for RNA diagnostics, which evaluate the expression of the gene in question. We here report a novel RNA diagnostics tool that can be employed with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). To establish this tool, we identified 290 genes that are highly expressed in normal PBMCs but not in TIG-1, a normal human fibroblast cell. These genes were entitled PREP after predominantly expressed in PBMC and included 50 uncharacterized genes. We then conducted PREP gene-focused microarray analysis on PBMCs from seven cases of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS), which is a small-vessel necrotizing vasculitis. We found that PREP135 (coactosin-like protein), PREP77 (prosaposin), PREP191 (cathepsin D), PREP234 (c-fgr), and PREP136 (lysozyme) were very highly up-regulated in all seven CSS patients. Another 28 genes were also up-regulated, albeit more moderately, and three were down-regulated in all CSS patients. The nature of these up- and down-regulated genes suggest that the immune systems of the patients are activated in response to invading microorganisms. These observations indicate that focused microarray analysis of PBMCs may be a practical, useful, and low-cost bedside diagnostics tool. PMID:18263571

  15. Focused Microarray Analysis of Peripheral Mononuclear Blood Cells from Churg–Strauss Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tougan, Takahiro; Onda, Hiroaki; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Shigeto; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    DNA diagnostics are useful but are hampered by difficult ethical issues. Moreover, it cannot provide enough information on the environmental factors that are important for pathogenesis of certain diseases. However, this is not a problem for RNA diagnostics, which evaluate the expression of the gene in question. We here report a novel RNA diagnostics tool that can be employed with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). To establish this tool, we identified 290 genes that are highly expressed in normal PBMCs but not in TIG-1, a normal human fibroblast cell. These genes were entitled PREP after predominantly expressed in PBMC and included 50 uncharacterized genes. We then conducted PREP gene-focused microarray analysis on PBMCs from seven cases of Churg–Strauss syndrome (CSS), which is a small-vessel necrotizing vasculitis. We found that PREP135 (coactosin-like protein), PREP77 (prosaposin), PREP191 (cathepsin D), PREP234 (c-fgr), and PREP136 (lysozyme) were very highly up-regulated in all seven CSS patients. Another 28 genes were also up-regulated, albeit more moderately, and three were down-regulated in all CSS patients. The nature of these up- and down-regulated genes suggest that the immune systems of the patients are activated in response to invading microorganisms. These observations indicate that focused microarray analysis of PBMCs may be a practical, useful, and low-cost bedside diagnostics tool. PMID:18263571

  16. Anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin involves downregulation of MMP-9 in blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Saja, K; Babu, Mani Shankar; Karunagaran, D; Sudhakaran, P R

    2007-12-15

    Curcumin (1, 7-bis (4-hydroxyl-3-methoxyphenyl)-1, 6 heptadiene-3, 5-dione) is a potent natural anti oxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, which mediates its effects mainly by inhibiting the activity of enzymes like cyclooxygenase, lipooxygenases and phospholipase A2. Here we examined the possibility of curcumin affecting the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which play an important role in inflammation. Zymographic analysis and ELISA showed that curcumin significantly inhibited the activity and level of MMPs produced by PBMCs isolated from human and inflammation-induced rabbit in a concentration dependent manner. The administration of curcumin to inflammation-induced rabbits also caused downregulation of MMP-9. Kinetic analysis showed that the effect of curcumin was a delayed one indicating inhibition of de novo protein synthesis. RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis showed inhibition of the production of MMP-9 mRNA and protein respectively by human PBMCs, which were activated in vitro by Artocarpus Lakoocha agglutinin (ALA) lectin. EMSA and super shift showed activation of classical NFkappaB in in vitro activated PBMCs and treatment with curcumin inhibited activation of NFkappaB. Immunoblot analysis suggested that ALA-induced activation of NFkappaB leading to the upregulation of MMP-9 was due to the degradation of IkappaB-alpha. Curcumin inhibited the degradation of IkappaB-alpha, which inhibited the ALA mediated activation of NFkappaB and upregulation of MMP-9. These results indicated that anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin also involves inhibition of the production of MMP-9 in PBMCs.

  17. Transcription of hepatitis B virus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from persistently infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Stoll-Becker, S; Repp, R; Glebe, D; Schaefer, S; Kreuder, J; Kann, M; Lampert, F; Gerlich, W H

    1997-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been reported to exist in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), but it is not clear whether it replicates there. A precondition for replication should be the formation of covalently closed viral DNA and transcription of all essential viral mRNAs. The mRNAs of HBV form a nested box with common 3' ends. In order to detect even low levels of potential replication, we developed a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method for detection of a smaller HBV mRNA species in the presence of the larger ones. All three highly viremic patients tested so far had mRNAs for the large and the small surface proteins and the X protein of the virus within PBMC but not in the virus from their sera. Furthermore, we detected by PCR covalently closed viral DNA in their PBMC. These data suggest that HBV may be not only taken up but also replicated by mononuclear blood cells and that these cells may be an extrahepatic site of viral persistence. X mRNA was detected in the largest amount. Possibly, X protein interferes with functions of the mononuclear cells during the immune response against the virus. PMID:9188611

  18. Subplasmalemmal linear densities in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system in lung.

    PubMed Central

    Kawanami, O.; Ferrans, V. J.; Crystal, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of subplasmalemmal linear densities in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system was investigated in pulmonary biopsies from 33 patients with fibrotic lung disorders. Subplasmalemmal linear densities, consisting of a thin layer of electron-dense material immediately subjacent to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, were found in 30 of the 33 patients, including each of 6 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis, 18 of 19 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, 4 of 5 patients with collagen-vascular diseases, 1 patient with pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis, and 1 patient with marked interstitial pulmonary fibrosis associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Subplasmalemmal linear densities were found in epithelioid cells, macrophages, and giant cells in granulomas in the 6 patients with sarcoidosis and in alveolar macrophages in 4 of these patients. In patients with other fibrotic lung disorders, subplasmalemmal linear densities were limited in distribution to interstitial and alveolar macrophages. In all patients with sarcoidosis some of the subplasmalemmal linear densities of adjacent mononuclear phagocytes, particularly of those in granulomas, were paired and formed specialized intercellular junctions. Such junctions also were observed in macrophages in 10 of the patients with other fibrotic lung disorders. The junctions formed by subplasmalemmal linear densities differed from other types of junctional structures. Subplasmalemmal linear densities appear to function in 1) the binding of action filalar junctions, which may contribute to the immobilization of mononuclear phagocytes in granulomas and alveolar lumens. Images Figures 5 and 66 Figure 7 figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7190361

  19. [ASSESSMENT OF THE GENETIC MODIFICATION INDUCING DIET THROUGH BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS].

    PubMed

    de Luis Román, Daniel Antonio; Izaola, Olatz; Aller, Rocio

    2015-12-01

    The term nutrigenomics was created to describe how nutrition affects genes and the functions of the protein, at the transcriptional level, proteomic, and metabolic. Using changes in gene expression in blood mononuclear cells could be a model to assess the dietary intervention studies in order to understand the underlying mechanisms and impact of diet and nutrients in atherosclerosis, resistance insulin, obesity and diabetes mellitus. There are studies that have changed the dietary intake of cholesterol, polyunsaturated fat, monounsaturated, antioxidants and decreased caloric intake showing a variety of effects on the expression of mRNA in blood mononuclear cells related to inflammation, immunity, lipid metabolism genes, etc. These molecular findings entrench awareness of our body's response to diet and open up the possibility of rapid analysis of new diagnostic pathways in this area of knowledge and even new therapeutic tools.

  20. Vaccination with heat-shocked mononuclear cells as a strategy for treating neurodegenerative disorders driven by microglial inflammation.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Al-Harbi, Saleh A

    2013-11-01

    Naturally occurring T regulatory cells targeting epitopes derived from various heat shock proteins escape thymic negative selection and can be activated by vaccination with heat shock proteins; hence, vaccination with such proteins has exerted favorable effects on rodent models of autoimmune disorders. A more elegant way to achieve such vaccination, first evaluated clinically by Al-Harbi in the early 1990s, is to subject mononuclear cells to survivable heat shock ex vivo, incubate them at physiological temperature for a further 24-48 h, and then inject them subcutaneously; anecdotally, beneficial effects were observed with this strategy in a wide range of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. There is growing evidence that M1-activated microglia play a primary or secondary role in the pathogenesis of numerous neurodegenerative diseases, as well as in major depression. T regulatory cells, by polarizing microglial toward a reparative M2 phenotype, have the potential to aid control of such disorders. It would be appropriate to test the heat-shocked mononuclear cell vaccination strategy in animal models of neurodegeneration and major depression, and to evaluate this approach clinically if such studies yield encouraging results. PMID:23968572

  1. M cells and granular mononuclear cells in Peyer's patch domes of mice depleted of their lymphocytes by total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ermak, T.H.; Steger, H.J.; Strober, S.; Owen, R.L.

    1989-03-01

    The cytoarchitecture of Peyer's patches that were depleted of their lymphocytes by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) was examined with particular attention to the effects on M cells in the follicle epithelium and on mononuclear cells in follicle domes underlying the epithelium. Five-month-old, specific pathogen-free Balb/c mice were irradiated with 200-250 rad/day, five times a week to a total dose of 3400-4250, and their Peyer's patches were either fixed for electron microscopy or frozen for immunohistochemistry 1-4 days after completion of irradiation. Control mice were examined at the same time intervals. Follicle domes of TLI mice had approximately one fourth the epithelial surface area of domes of control mice. Within the epithelium, lymphoid cells were virtually depleted after TLI, and yet the epithelium contained M cells. In control mice, most M cells were accompanied by lymphoid cells in invaginations of the apical-lateral cell membrane. In TLI mice, most M cells did not have such apical-lateral invaginations and were columnar shaped. Other than lacking lymphocytes, these cells appeared to be mature M cells. Some M cells did have lymphoid cells or granular mononuclear cells below their basal membranes, adjacent to the basal lamina. Below the epithelium, the proportion of granular mononuclear cells was greatly increased following TLI. The retention of M cells and the increase in proportion of granular mononuclear cells in follicle domes are consistent with selective depletion of lymphocytes following TLI. Persistence of M cells without lymphocytic invaginations after TLI suggests that M cells can differentiate in the absence of, or at least in the presence of very few, lymphocytes, and that invagination by lymphocytes is not necessary to maintain mature M cell morphology.

  2. Changes of cytokine production and cell viability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from silicosis patients: effect of in vitro treatment with acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Dobreva, Zlatka Georgieva; Prakova, Gospodinka Radeva; Slavov, Emil Slavov; Stanilova, Spaska Angelova

    2010-02-01

    In this study, IL-6 and IL-12p40 production and cell viability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from silicosis patients after in vitro stimulation were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of introducing acetylsalicylic acid to stimulated patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells on cytokine production and cell viability were determined. Nine patients with moderate silicosis, 11 with severe silicosis and 14 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. The level of IL-6 produced by patients peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased depending on the stage of the disease. The addition of acetylsalicylic acid had significantly suppressive effect on the IL-6 production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Acetylsalicylic acid treatment of C3 binding glycoprotein-stimulated patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells led to significant upregulation of IL-12p40 production. Results showed a stage-dependent decrease of cell viability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from silicosis patients. Acetylsalicylic acid significantly decreased cell viability entirely in stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with severe silicosis. In conclusion, this study showed that the disease progression affects peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with silicosis and causes functional changes that became apparent after stimulation. Our study demonstrated that in severe silicosis the treatment with acetylsalicylic acid, as an anti-inflammatory agent, might not be beneficial for patients.

  3. Differential proteomics analysis of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lifei; Wang, Dongtao; Wang, Lihong; Lan, Wenjie; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one common neurodegenerative disease featured with degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. Multiple factors participate in the pathogenesis and progression of PD. In this study, we investigated the proteomics profiles of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluids from both PD patients and normal people, in order to explore the correlation between disease factors and PD. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from both PD and normal people and were separated for mononuclear cells in vitro. Proteins were then extracted and separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins with differential expressions were identified by comparison to standard proteome expression profile map, followed by software and database analysis. In PD patients, there were 8 proteins with consistent expression profile and 16 proteins with differential expressions. Those differential proteins identified include cytoskeleton proteins (actin, myosin), signal transduction proteins (adenosine cyclase binding protein 1, calcium binding protein, talin) and anti-oxidation factor (thioredoxin peroxide reductase). PD patients had differential protein expressional profiles in the mononuclear cells of cerebrospinal fluids compared to normal people, suggesting the potential involvement of cytoskeleton and signal transduction proteins in apoptosis of neuronal apoptosis and PD pathogenesis. PMID:26823915

  4. Neutrophils and mononuclear cells from patients with chronic granulomatous disease release nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Condino-Neto, A; Muscará, M N; Grumach, A S; Carneiro-Sampaio, M M; De Nucci, G

    1993-01-01

    1. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a group of genetic disorders characterised by recurrent severe suppurative infections due to impaired microbial killing. The principal biochemical defect is an impairment in the production of reactive oxygen intermediates by phagocytes. 2. Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesised from the guanidino nitrogen atom(s) of L-arginine and has recently been proposed to be involved in defence mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the oxidative burst in the biosynthesis of NO by neutrophils and mononuclear cells from patients with CGD. 3. NO synthesis was assayed by the ability of neutrophils and mononuclear cells to inhibit thrombin-induced washed platelet aggregation while superoxide anion (O2-) production was measured spectrophotometrically by the superoxide dismutase inhibitable reduction of cytochrome c. 4. Neutrophils and mononuclear cells from patients with CGD released NO. This release was inhibited by nitro-L-arginine methyl ester but could be reversed by L-arginine. Zymosan- and PMA-induced O2- production was less than 10% as compared with healthy controls. 5. These results indicate that O2- production is not essential for NO synthesis in human leucocytes. PMID:8390277

  5. A mononuclear Ni(II) complex with 5,6-diphenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazine: DNA- and BSA-binding and anticancer activity against human breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Anjomshoa, Marzieh; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Fatemi, Seyed Jamilaldin; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2015-02-01

    DNA- and BSA-binding properties of a mononuclear Ni(II) complex, [Ni(dppt)2Cl2] (dppt = 5,6-diphenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazine), have been investigated under physiological conditions. The interaction of the complex with the fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) has been studied by UV-Vis absorption, thermal denaturation, viscosity measurement, competitive DNA-binding studies with ethidium bromide (EB) by fluorescence, and gel electrophoresis technique. The experimental results indicate that the complex interacts with DNA by intercalative binding mode. The competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) shows that the complex competes for the DNA-binding sites with EB and displaces the DNA-bound EB molecule. The interactions of the dppt ligand and the complex with BSA have been studied by UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The values of Kb for the BSA-dppt and the BSA-complex systems at room temperature were calculated to be 0.14×10(4) M(-1) and 0.32×10(5) M(-1), respectively, indicating that the complex has stronger tendency to bind with BSA than the dppt ligand. The quenching constants (Ksv), binding constants (Kbin), and number of binding sites (n) at different temperatures, as well as the binding distance (r) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG°) have been calculated for the BSA-dppt and the BSA-complex systems. The cytotoxicities of the dppt ligand and the complex have been also tested against the human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line using the MTT assay. The results indicate that the dppt ligand and the complex display cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) with the IC50 values of 17.35 μM and 13.00 μM, respectively. It is remarkable that the complex can introduce as a potential anticancer drug.

  6. A mononuclear Ni(II) complex with 5,6-diphenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazine: DNA- and BSA-binding and anticancer activity against human breast carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjomshoa, Marzieh; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Fatemi, Seyed Jamilaldin; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2015-02-01

    DNA- and BSA-binding properties of a mononuclear Ni(II) complex, [Ni(dppt)2Cl2] (dppt = 5,6-diphenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazine), have been investigated under physiological conditions. The interaction of the complex with the fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) has been studied by UV-Vis absorption, thermal denaturation, viscosity measurement, competitive DNA-binding studies with ethidium bromide (EB) by fluorescence, and gel electrophoresis technique. The experimental results indicate that the complex interacts with DNA by intercalative binding mode. The competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) shows that the complex competes for the DNA-binding sites with EB and displaces the DNA-bound EB molecule. The interactions of the dppt ligand and the complex with BSA have been studied by UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The values of Kb for the BSA-dppt and the BSA-complex systems at room temperature were calculated to be 0.14 × 104 M-1 and 0.32 × 105 M-1, respectively, indicating that the complex has stronger tendency to bind with BSA than the dppt ligand. The quenching constants (Ksv), binding constants (Kbin), and number of binding sites (n) at different temperatures, as well as the binding distance (r) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG°) have been calculated for the BSA-dppt and the BSA-complex systems. The cytotoxicities of the dppt ligand and the complex have been also tested against the human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line using the MTT assay. The results indicate that the dppt ligand and the complex display cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) with the IC50 values of 17.35 μM and 13.00 μM, respectively. It is remarkable that the complex can introduce as a potential anticancer drug.

  7. Alteration of the electrophoretic mobility of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells following treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Skrabut, E.M.; Catsimpoolas, N.; Kurtz, S.R.; Griffith, A.L.; Valeri, C.R.

    1983-12-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine the effects of DMSO and freezing on the electrophoretic distribution of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Sodium (/sup 51/Cr)chromate was used to label the cells, and the distributions of cell number and cell-associated radioactivity were determined. Cells treated with DMSO had a narrower distribution of electrophoretic mobilities when compared with those not treated. DMSO-treated cells also demonstrated a more homogeneous distribution of radioactivity relative to the cell distribution than did the nontreated cells. The freezing of DMSO-treated cells did not result in any additional alteration of electrophoretic pattern compared to DMSO treatment alone. Analysis by linear categorization techniques indicated that the DMSO-treated and nontreated cells were completely distinguished by their electrophoretic behavior.

  8. 10th NTES Conference: Nickel and Arsenic Compounds Alter the Epigenome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie metal carcinogenesis are the subject of intense investigation; however, data from in vitro and in vivo studies are starting to piece together a story that implicates epigenetics as a key player. Data from our lab has shown that nickel compounds inhibit dioxygenase enzymes by displacing iron in the active site. Arsenic is hypothesized to inhibit these enzymes by diminishing ascorbate levels--an important co-factor for dioxygenases. Inhibition of histone demethylase dioxygenases can increase histone methylation levels, which also may affect gene expression. Recently, our lab conducted a series of investigations in human subjects exposed to high levels of nickel or arsenic compounds. Global levels of histone modifications in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from exposed subjects were compared to low environmentally exposed controls. Results showed that nickel increased H3K4me3 and decreased H3K9me2 globally. Arsenic increased H3K9me2 and decreased H3K9ac globally. Other histone modifications affected by arsenic were sex-dependent. Nickel affected the expression of 2756 genes in human PBMCs and many of the genes were involved in immune and carcinogenic pathways. This review will describe data from our lab that demonstrates for the first time that nickel and arsenic compounds affect global levels of histone modifications and gene expression in exposed human populations.

  9. 10th NTES Conference: Nickel and Arsenic Compounds Alter the Epigenome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie metal carcinogenesis are the subject of intense investigation; however, data from in vitro and in vivo studies are starting to piece together a story that implicates epigenetics as a key player. Data from our lab has shown that nickel compounds inhibit dioxygenase enzymes by displacing iron in the active site. Arsenic is hypothesized to inhibit these enzymes by diminishing ascorbate levels--an important co-factor for dioxygenases. Inhibition of histone demethylase dioxygenases can increase histone methylation levels, which also may affect gene expression. Recently, our lab conducted a series of investigations in human subjects exposed to high levels of nickel or arsenic compounds. Global levels of histone modifications in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from exposed subjects were compared to low environmentally exposed controls. Results showed that nickel increased H3K4me3 and decreased H3K9me2 globally. Arsenic increased H3K9me2 and decreased H3K9ac globally. Other histone modifications affected by arsenic were sex-dependent. Nickel affected the expression of 2756 genes in human PBMCs and many of the genes were involved in immune and carcinogenic pathways. This review will describe data from our lab that demonstrates for the first time that nickel and arsenic compounds affect global levels of histone modifications and gene expression in exposed human populations. PMID:24837610

  10. 10th NTES Conference: Nickel and arsenic compounds alter the epigenome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie metal carcinogenesis are the subject of intense investigation ; however, data from in vitro and in vivo studies are starting to piece together a story that implicates epigenetics as a key player. Data from our lab has shown that nickel compounds inhibit dioxygenase enzymes by displacing iron in the active site. Arsenic is hypothesized to inhibit these enzymes by diminishing ascorbate levels- an important co-factor for dioxygenases. Inhibition of histone demethylase dioxygenases can increase histone methylation levels, which also may affect gene expression. Recently, our lab conducted a series of investigations in human subjects exposed to high levels of nickel or arsenic compounds. Global levels of histone modifications in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from exposed subjects were compared to low environmentally exposed controls. Results showed that nickel increased H3K4me3 and decreased H3K9me2 globally. Arsenic increased H3K9me2 and decreased H3K9ac globally. Other histone modifications affected by arsenic were sex-dependent. Nickel affected the expression of 2,756 genes in human PBMCs and many of the genes were involved in immune and carcinogenic pathways. This review will describe data from our lab that demonstrates for the first time that nickel and arsenic compounds affect global levels of histone modifications and gene expression in exposed human populations. PMID:24837610

  11. Characterization of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells on Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Verboket, René; Kontradowitz, Kerstin; Oppermann, Elsie; Brune, Jan C.; Nau, Christoph; Meier, Simon; Bonig, Halvard; Marzi, Ingo; Seebach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, without coating or coated with fibronectin or human plasma), demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and bovine cancellous bone (BS) were assessed. Seeding efficacy on β-TCP was 95% regardless of the surface coating. BMC demonstrated a significantly increased initial adhesion on DBM and β-TCP compared to BS. On day 14, metabolic activity was significantly increased in BMC seeded on DBM in comparison to BMC seeded on BS. Likewise increased VEGF-synthesis was observed on day 2 in BMC seeded on DBM when compared to BMC seeded on BS. The seeding efficacy of BMC on uncoated biomaterials is generally high although there are differences between these biomaterials. Beta-TCP and DBM were similar and both superior to BS, suggesting either as suitable materials for spatial restriction of BMC used for regenerative medicine purposes in vivo. PMID:25802865

  12. Reduced pCREB in Alzheimer's disease prefrontal cortex is reflected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartolotti, N; Bennett, D A; Lazarov, O

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has a critical role in the formation of memories. CREB signaling is dysfunctional in the brains of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and evidence suggests that CREB signaling may be disrupted in human AD brains as well. Here, we show that both CREB and its activated form pCREB-Ser133 (pCREB) are reduced in the prefrontal cortex of AD patients. Similarly, the transcription cofactors CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 are reduced in the prefrontal cortex of AD patients, indicating additional dysfunction of CREB signaling in AD. Importantly, we show that pCREB expression is reduced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of AD subjects. In addition, pCREB levels in PBMC positively correlated with pCREB expression in the postmortem brain of persons with AD. These results suggest that pCREB expression in PBMC may be indicative of its expression in the brain, and thus offers the intriguing possibility of pCREB as a biomarker of cognitive function and disease progression in AD. PMID:27480489

  13. Gene expression profiling of circulating tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hensler, Michal; Vančurová, Irena; Becht, Etienne; Palata, Ondřej; Strnad, Pavel; Tesařová, Petra; Čabiňaková, Michaela; Švec, David; Kubista, Mikael; Bartůňková, Jiřina; Špíšek, Radek; Sojka, Luděk

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cancer cells that are released from a tumor into the bloodstream. The presence of CTCs in peripheral blood has been associated with metastasis formation in patients with breast cancer. Therefore, the molecular characterization of CTCs may improve diagnostics and support treatment decisions. We performed gene expression profiling to evaluate the enriched CTCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of breast cancer patients using an expression panel of 55 breast cancer-associated genes. The study revealed several significantly differentially expressed genes in the CTC-positive samples, including a few that were exclusively expressed in these cells. However, the expression of these genes was barely detectable in the PBMC samples. Some genes were differentially expressed in PBMCs, and the expression of these genes was correlated with tumor grade and the formation of metastasis. In this study, we have shown that the enriched CTCs of breast cancer patients overexpress genes involved in proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as well as genes that play important roles in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process that may occur in these cells. PMID:27141386

  14. Inhibitor treatment of peripheral mononuclear cells from Parkinson's disease patients further validates LRRK2 dephosphorylation as a pharmacodynamic biomarker.

    PubMed

    Perera, G; Ranola, M; Rowe, D B; Halliday, G M; Dzamko, N

    2016-01-01

    Activating mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are strongly associated with increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). Thus, LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are in development as potential Parkinson's disease therapeutics. A reduction in the constitutive levels of phosphorylation on leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is currently used to measure target engagement of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors in cell and animal models. We aimed to determine if reduced phosphorylation of LRRK2 following inhibitor treatment is also a valid measure of target engagement in peripheral mononuclear cells from Parkinson's disease patients. Peripheral mononuclear cells from idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients and controls were treated ex vivo with two structurally distinct inhibitors of LRRK2, at four different doses, and immunoblotting was used to assess the reduction in LRRK2 phosphorylation at Ser910, Ser935, Ser955 and Ser973. Both inhibitors showed no acute toxicity in primary cells and both inhibitors reduced the constitutive phosphorylation of LRRK2 at all measured residues equally in both control and Parkinson's disease groups. Measuring the reduction in LRRK2 phosphorylation resulting from LRRK2 kinase inhibition, is thus a valid measure of acute peripheral target engagement in Parkinson's disease patients. This is important if LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are to be used in a clinical setting.

  15. Inhibitor treatment of peripheral mononuclear cells from Parkinson's disease patients further validates LRRK2 dephosphorylation as a pharmacodynamic biomarker.

    PubMed

    Perera, G; Ranola, M; Rowe, D B; Halliday, G M; Dzamko, N

    2016-01-01

    Activating mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are strongly associated with increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). Thus, LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are in development as potential Parkinson's disease therapeutics. A reduction in the constitutive levels of phosphorylation on leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is currently used to measure target engagement of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors in cell and animal models. We aimed to determine if reduced phosphorylation of LRRK2 following inhibitor treatment is also a valid measure of target engagement in peripheral mononuclear cells from Parkinson's disease patients. Peripheral mononuclear cells from idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients and controls were treated ex vivo with two structurally distinct inhibitors of LRRK2, at four different doses, and immunoblotting was used to assess the reduction in LRRK2 phosphorylation at Ser910, Ser935, Ser955 and Ser973. Both inhibitors showed no acute toxicity in primary cells and both inhibitors reduced the constitutive phosphorylation of LRRK2 at all measured residues equally in both control and Parkinson's disease groups. Measuring the reduction in LRRK2 phosphorylation resulting from LRRK2 kinase inhibition, is thus a valid measure of acute peripheral target engagement in Parkinson's disease patients. This is important if LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are to be used in a clinical setting. PMID:27503089

  16. Spontaneous cytotoxicity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for the lymphoblastoid cell line CCRF-CEM: augmentation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Schacter, B; Kleinhenz, M E; Edmonds, K; Ellner, J J

    1981-01-01

    Spontaneous cell-mediated cytotoxicity (SCMC) of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for a poor target, CCRF-CEM, a lymphoblastoid cell line, was rapidly and markedly elevated by E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). SCMC for K562, a myeloid cell line sensitive to SCMC, was only slightly elevated by LPS. The cytotoxicities of both adherent and non-adherent mononuclear cells for CCRF-CEM were elevated. A response to LPS was found in Fc gamma R-positive and Fc gamma R-negative T cells. LPS increased the binding of non-adherent cells to both targets, but analysis of the binding suggests that a subsequent step, either triggering of the cytotoxic mechanisms or susceptibility of the target was the basis for the increased SCMC. PMID:7039896

  17. Modulation of TNF-α Secretion in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Cocoa Flavanols and Procyanidins

    PubMed Central

    Mao, T. K.; van de Water, J.; Keen, C. L.; Schmitz, H. H.; Gershwin, M. E.

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological reports have suggested that the consumption of foods rich in flavonoids is associated with a lower incidence of certain degenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease. Flavanols and their related oligomers, the procyanidins CFP, isolated from cocoa can modulate the production and level of several signaling molecules associated with immune function and inflammation in vitro, including several cytokines and eicosanoids. To further elucidate the potential immuno-modulatory functions of flavanol-rich cocoa, the present investigation examined whether isolated CFP fractions (monomers through decamers) influence the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from resting and phytohemagluttinin (PHA)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We used an in vitro culture system where PBMC from 14 healthy subjects were introduced to individual CFP fractions for 72 h prior to measuring the levels of TNF-α released. The intermediate-sized CFP fractions (tetramers through octamers) were the most active on resting cells, causing a 3–4 fold increase in TNF-α relative to media baseline. The monomers and dimers were the least stimulatory of the fractions tested, displaying a 42 and 31% increase, respectively, over media control, whereas the trimers, nonamers and decamers showed an intermediate stimulation of this cytokine. In the presence of PHA, the intermediate-sized CFP fractions again were the most active, enhancing TNF-α secretion in the range of 48–128% relative to the PHA control. The monomers and dimers were slightly inhibitory (–1.5 and –15%, respectively), while trimers, nonamers and decamers stimulated moderate increases in TNF-α levels (13, 19 and 15%, respectively). The above results lend support to the concept that CFP can be immunomodulatory. The stimulation of TNF-α secretion may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of dietary flavanoids against microbial infection and tumorigenesis. PMID:12885154

  18. Evaluating mononuclear cells as nanoparticle delivery vehicles for the treatment of breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, Jaclyn K.; Hu, Chelin; Ahmed, Mona M.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Nysus, Monique; Anderson Daniels, Tamara; Norenberg, Jeffrey P.; Adolphi, Natalie L.

    2015-08-01

    In breast cancer, certain types of circulating immune cells respond to long-range chemical signals from tumors by leaving the blood stream to actively infiltrate tumor tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether immune cells could be used to deliver therapeutic nanoparticles into breast tumors in mice. Mononuclear splenocytes (MS) were harvested from donor mice, labeled with Indium-111, injected intravenously into immune-competent recipient mice (3 tumor-bearing and 3 control), and imaged longitudinally by SPECT/CT. For comparison, the biodistribution of bonemarrow derived macrophages (BMDM) in one pair of mice was also imaged. Quantitative analysis of the SPECT images demonstrates that, after 24 hours, the concentration of MS detected in mammary tumors is more than 3-fold higher than the concentration detected in normal mammary glands. The ratio of MS concentration in mammary tissue to MS concentration in non-target tissues (muscle, lung, heart, liver, spleen, and kidney) was enhanced in tumor-bearing mice (compared to controls), with statistical significance achieved for mammary/muscle (p<0.01), mammary/lung (p<0.05), and mammary/kidney (p<0.05). By contrast, BMDM did not show a different affinity for tumors relative to normal mammary tissue. MS were incubated with 100 nm red fluorescent nanoparticles, and flow cytometry demonstrated that ~35% of the MS population exhibited strong phagocytic uptake of the nanoparticles. After intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice, fluorescence microscopy images of tumor sections show qualitatively that nanoparticle-loaded MS retain the ability to infiltrate mammary tumors. Taken together, these results suggest that MS carriers are capable of actively targeting therapeutic nanoparticles to breast tumors.

  19. Fatty acid profile and proliferation of bovine blood mononuclear cells after conjugated linoleic acid supplementation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are in focus of dairy cattle research because of its milk fat reducing effects. Little is known about the impact of CLA on immune function in dairy cows. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of a long term supplementation of dairy cows with CLA on the fatty acid profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and their proliferation ex vivo. Results The supplementation of dairy cows with either 100 g/d of a control fat preparation (CON, n = 15), 50 g/d of the control fat preparation and 50 g/d CLA supplement – containing 12.0% cis-9, trans-11 and 11.9% trans-10, cis-12 CLA of total fatty acid methyl esters – (CLA-50, n = 15) or 100 g/d of the CLA supplement (CLA-100, n = 16) did not influence the major fatty acids (C18:0, C16:0, cis-9 C18:1, cis-9, cis-12 C18:2, cis-5, cis-8, cis-11, cis-14 C20:4) in the lipid fraction of PBMC. The proportion of trans-10, cis-12 CLA of total fatty acids was increased in both CLA supplemented groups, but there was no effect on the cis-9, trans-11 isomer. Furthermore, the proportion of trans-9 C18:1 and cis-12 C24:1 was reduced in the CLA-100 group. The mitogen stimulated cell proliferation was not influenced by CLA feeding. Conclusion CLA supplementation influenced the FA profile of some minor FA in PBMC, but these changes did not lead to differences in the mitogen induced activation of the cells. PMID:22668674

  20. The effects of calpain inhibition upon IL-2 and CD25 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Schaecher, K E; Goust, J M; Banik, N L

    2001-10-01

    Calcium is an important contributor to T cell activation; it is also the major factor in the activation of the calcium-activated neutral proteinase, calpain. For this reason, we wanted to investigate if calpain has a role in T cell activation and what aspects of this activation calpain affects. As measured by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), calpain inhibition decreased interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, at early time points following the initial activation, and over extended periods of time in activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Using an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) specific for human IL-2, we found that calpain inhibition decreased IL-2 secretion in a dose-dependent manner, shortly after activation, and continuously over time. Inhibiting calpain caused a dose-dependent inhibition of CD25 cell surface expression and also inhibited expression shortly after activation and for at least 48 h. This study showed that calpain has an integral role in the synthesis of the two important T cell activation factors, IL-2 and CD25. PMID:11585637

  1. IFN-{gamma} gene expression in pancreatic islet-infiltrating mononuclear cells correlates with autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, A.; Suarez-Pinzon, W.L.; Sorensen, O.

    1995-05-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice results from selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta}-cells following islet filtration by mononuclear leukocytes. Cytokines produced by islet-infiltrating mononuclear cells may be involved in {beta}-cell destruction. Therefore, we analyzed cytokine mRNA expression, by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay, in mononuclear leukocytes isolated from pancreatic islets of four groups of mice: diabetes-prone female NOD mice; female NOD mice protected from diabetes by injection of CFA at an early age; male NOD mice with a low diabetes incidence; and female BALB/c mice that do not develop diabetes. We found that mRNA levels of IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-{gamma} in mononuclear cells from islets of diabetes-prone female NOD mice increased progressively as these cells infiltrated the islets from age 5 wk to diabetes onset (>13 wk). However, only IFN-{gamma} mRNA levels were significantly higher in islet mononuclear cells from 12-wk-old diabetes-prone female NOD mice than from less diabetes-prone NOD mice (CFA-treated females, and males) and normal mice (BALB/c). In contrast, IL-4 mRNA levels were lower in islet mononuclear cells from diabetes-prone female NOD mice than from NOD mice with low diabetes incidence (CFA-treated females and males). Splenic cell mRNA levels of IFN-{gamma} and IL-4 were not different in the four groups of mice. These results suggest that islet {beta}-cell destruction and diabetes in female NOD mice are dependent upon intra-islet IFN-{gamma} production by mononuclear cells, and that CFA-treated female NOD mice and male NOD mice may be protected from diabetes development by down-regulation of IFN-{gamma} production in the islets. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Properties Generate Various Response of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Szwed, Marzena; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2016-06-01

    In the present study we report the interactions of four types of different nanoparticles with normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To our research we chose four types of nanoparticles which possess therapeutic properties (Trastuzumab, ethylene-diamine-tetra-methylene-phosphonic for breast and bone cancers treatment, respectively) or can be used as the ingredients of sun-protected films (nanoemulsions with or without chitosan). By carrying out XTT survival assay we observed that both types of tested nanoemulsions suppressed the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. However, the survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells after incubation neither with Trastuzumab nor with ethylene-diamine-tetra-methylene-phosphonic nanoparticles decreased below 80%. If the investigated nanoparticles were analyzed for their effectiveness to the induction of programmed cell death, we proved that only nanoemulsions with or without chitosan provoked an increase of the fraction of apoptotic cells. Moreover we noticed the characteristic, typical for apoptosis changes of cells morphology, which appeared in lymphocytes after all tested nanoparticles treatment. Interestingly, representative for necrosis swollen, enlarged cells were observed after nanoemulsions treatment.

  3. Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Properties Generate Various Response of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Szwed, Marzena; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2016-06-01

    In the present study we report the interactions of four types of different nanoparticles with normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To our research we chose four types of nanoparticles which possess therapeutic properties (Trastuzumab, ethylene-diamine-tetra-methylene-phosphonic for breast and bone cancers treatment, respectively) or can be used as the ingredients of sun-protected films (nanoemulsions with or without chitosan). By carrying out XTT survival assay we observed that both types of tested nanoemulsions suppressed the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. However, the survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells after incubation neither with Trastuzumab nor with ethylene-diamine-tetra-methylene-phosphonic nanoparticles decreased below 80%. If the investigated nanoparticles were analyzed for their effectiveness to the induction of programmed cell death, we proved that only nanoemulsions with or without chitosan provoked an increase of the fraction of apoptotic cells. Moreover we noticed the characteristic, typical for apoptosis changes of cells morphology, which appeared in lymphocytes after all tested nanoparticles treatment. Interestingly, representative for necrosis swollen, enlarged cells were observed after nanoemulsions treatment. PMID:27427750

  4. Vitamin B6 Modifies the Immune Cross-Talk between Mononuclear and Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Bessler, H; Djaldetti, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of vitamin B6 as a key component in a number of biological events has been well established. Based on the relationship between chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis on the one hand, and the interaction between immune and cancer cells expressed by modulated cytokine production on the other hand, the aim of the present work was to examine the possibility that vitamin B6 affects cancer development by an interference in the cross-talk between human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and those from two colon carcinoma cell lines. Both non-stimulated PBMC and mononuclear cells induced for cytokine production by HT-29 and RKO cells from human colon carcinoma lines were incubated without and with 4, 20 and 100 μg/ml of pyridoxal hydrochloride (vitamin B6) and secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-1ra was examined. Vit B6 caused a dose-dependent decrease in production of all cytokines examined, except for that of IL-1ra. The results indicate that vitamin B6 exerts an immunomodulatory effect on human PBMC. The finding that production of inflammatory cytokines is more pronounced when PBMC are in contact with malignant cells and markedly inhibited by the vitamin suggests an additional way by which vitamin B6 may exert its carcinopreventive effect. PMID:27085010

  5. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell infiltration and neuroinflammation in the HexB−/− mouse model of neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kyrkanides, Stephanos; Miller, Ann W.; Miller, Jen-nie H.; Tallents, Ross H.; Brouxhon, Sabine M.; Olschowka, Malory E.; O’Banion, M. Kerry; Olschowka, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Myeloid-derived immune cells, including microglia, macrophages and monocytes, have been previously implicated in neurodegeneration. We investigated the role of infiltrating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the HexB−/− mouse model of Sandhoff disease. Ablation of the chemokine receptor CCR2 in the HexB−/− mouse resulted in significant inhibition of PBMC infiltration into the brain, decrease in TNFα and MHC-II mRNA abundance and retardation in clinical disease development. There was no change in the level of GM2 storage and pro-apoptotic activity or astrocyte activation in HexB−/−;Ccr2−/− double knockout mice, which eventually succumbed secondary to GM2 gangliosidosis. PMID:18657867

  6. Obesity alters the expression profile of clock genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Tahira, Kazunobu; Fukuda, Noboru; Aoyama, Takahiko; Tsunemi, Akiko; Matsumoto, Siroh; Nagura, Chinami; Matsumoto, Taro; Soma, Masayoshi; Shimba, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the variation in expression profile of clock genes and obesity using peripheral blood mononuclear (PMN) cells. Material and methods The subjects comprised 10 obese patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Blood was collected at different time-points during the day and levels of blood sugar, IRI, adiponectin and leptin were determined. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were sampled, and expression levels of brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (BMAL1), Period (PER)1, PER2, Cryptochrome (CRY)1, CRY2, and REV-ERBα mRNA were quantified. Results During the day, the expression levels of BMAL1, CRY1, CRY2 and PER2 genes in PMN cells of the obese group were all significantly higher compared to those in the non-obese group. In addition, expression of BMAL1, CRY1, CRY2 and PER2 genes in PMN cells increased between 12:00 and 21:00 in the obese group. In PMN cells of both groups, PER1 gene expression showed a bimodal pattern, with high expression at 9:00 and 18:00. Conclusions Differences were observed in the expression profile variation of clock genes between the obese and non-obese groups. This study reveals the differences in clock gene expression profiles between obese and non-obese subjects, with evidence for two distinct chronotypes, and suggests a contribution of these chronotypes to fat accumulation in humans. PMID:22328874

  7. Thrombin-mediated IL-10 up-regulation involves protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 expression in human mononuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Naldini, Antonella; Bernini, Claudia; Pucci, Annalisa; Carraro, Fabio

    2005-09-01

    Thrombin, the key enzyme of the coagulation cascade, exerts cellular effects through activation of the protease-activated receptors (PARs). Interleukin (IL)-10, besides its anti-inflammatory properties, is considered a major denominator of the immunosuppressive effect during human endotoxemia. We have recently shown that thrombin inhibits IL-12 production in human mononuclear cells and that such inhibition is accompanied by IL-10 up-regulation. To our knowledge, there are no data available to show that thrombin mediates IL-10 production by its interactions with PAR-1. We here report that human alpha-thrombin enhances IL-10 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in established monocytic cell lines and that this up-regulation requires PAR-1 expression. The use of proteolytically inactive thrombin reveals that such enhancement requires thrombin proteolytic activity. Addition of PAR-1 agonist peptides, such as SFLLRN, results in a significant increase of IL-10 production. PAR-1 expression is required for thrombin-induced IL-10 production, as shown by experiments performed with antisense or sense PAR-1 oligonucleotides. Treatment with thrombin or SFLLRN of monocytic cell lines, such as U937 and Mono Mac-6, results in an increased IL-10 production. This suggests that the observed IL-10 up-regulation may be the result of a direct interaction with monocytes. The observation that thrombin-mediated up-regulation of IL-10 may require the expression of the PAR-1 receptor identifies a new, functional link between inflammation and coagulation. Our results may also contribute to better design therapeutic strategies to treat several disorders, characterized by the presence of inflammatory as well as coagulant responses. PMID:15961578

  8. CpG- and LPS-activated MAPK signaling in in vitro cultured salmon (Salmo salar) mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Iliev, Dimitar B; Hansen, Tom; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Krasnov, Aleksei; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2013-10-01

    The Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in transmitting intracellular signals downstream of diverse cell surface receptors and mediate the response to ligands such as growth factors, hormones and cytokines. In addition, MAPK are critically involved in the innate immune response to pathogen-derived substances, commonly referred to as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial DNA rich in CpG dinucleotides. Currently, a great deal of knowledge is available about the involvement of MAPK in the innate immune response to PAMPs in mammals; however, little is known about the role of the different MAPK classes in the immune response to PAMPs in lower vertebrates. In the current study, p38 phosphorylation was induced by CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) and LPS in primary salmon mononuclear phagocytes. Pre-treatment of the cells with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) blocked the PAMP-induced p38 activity and suppressed the upregulation of most of the CpG- and LPS-induced transcripts highlighting the role of this kinase in the salmon innate immune response to PAMPs. In contrast to p38, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a MAPK involved primarily in response to mitogens, was high in resting cells and, surprisingly, incubation with both CpG and control ODNs downregulated the phospho-ERK levels independently of p38 activation. The basal phospho-ERK level and the CpG-inducible p38 phosphorylation were greatly influenced by the length of in vitro incubation. The basal phospho-ERK level increased gradually throughout a 5-day culture period and was PI3K-dependent as demonstrated by its sensitivity to Wortmannin suggesting it is influenced by growth factors. Overall these data indicate that both basal and PAMP-induced activity of MAPKs might be greatly influenced by the differentiation status of salmon mononuclear phagocytes.

  9. Autologous red blood cells potentiate antibody synthesis by unfractionated human mononuclear cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rugeles, M T; La Via, M; Goust, J M; Kilpatrick, J M; Hyman, B; Virella, G

    1987-08-01

    We have tried to determine the most favourable conditions for the in vitro induction of specific antibody (Ab) responses to tetanus toxoid (TT) and keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were obtained from normal volunteers and stimulated with PWM, TT, KLH, and mixtures of PWM and antigens in the presence or absence of autologous red blood cells (RBC) (1:50 ratio of PBMNC/RBC). The cultures were harvested on day 11; immunoglobulins were determined immunonephelometrically and Ab levels by ELISA with human antibodies used for calibration. While anti-TT responses were easy to induce with PBMNC from recently boosted individuals, the production of anti-TT from PBMNC obtained from non-recently boosted individuals was only possible when PBMNC were stimulated with TT and PWM in the presence of autologous RBC. Similarly, anti-KLH responses were easier to induce with PBMNC from an immune donor; maximal response was observed after stimulation with PWM + KLH in the presence of autologous RBC. Stimulation of primary anti-KLH responses with PBMNC from non-immune donors was only successful when the cells were stimulated with KLH + PWM in the presence of autologous RBC. The potentiation of human B-cell responses with autologous RBC can be abrogated by pretreatment of PBMNC with anti-CD2 antibodies and is associated with increased expression of IL-2 receptors and increased production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). However, addition of IFN-gamma in different doses and at different times to PWM-stimulated PBMNC cultures was not as effective as addition of RBC in enhancing the production of immunoglobulin and antibody. PMID:3114872

  10. Almond Skin Inhibits HSV-2 Replication in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Modulating the Cytokine Network.

    PubMed

    Arena, Adriana; Bisignano, Carlo; Stassi, Giovanna; Filocamo, Angela; Mandalari, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of almond skin extracts on the production of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs were either infected or not by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), with and without prior treatment with almond skin extracts. Production of IL-17 induced by HSV-2 was inhibited by natural skins (NS) treatment. NS triggered PBMC in releasing IFN-α, IFN-γ and IL-4 in cellular supernatants. These results may explain the antiviral potential of almond skins.

  11. Changes in transcriptional output of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Lara A; Tighe, S W; Kenefick, R W; Dragon, J; Westcott, N W; Leclair, R J

    2011-12-01

    Various types of exercise alter the population of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and change their transcriptional output. This work examines changes in PBMC populations and transcription in response to resistance exercise training (RET), and identify key transcriptional changes in PBMCs that may play a role in altering peripheral tissues in response to RET. Ten resistance-trained men (20-24 years), performed an acute bout of RET for ~30 min following a 12 h fast. Venous blood was sampled at rest, immediately following exercise, and at 2 h post-exercise and analyzed for total and differential leukocytes and global gene expression using Affymetrix Genechips. Results showed elevated leukocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, and lactate values immediately post-exercise (P < 0.05) over baseline. At 2 h post-exercise, leukocytes, and granulocytes remained elevated (P < 0.05), whereas lymphocytes were lower than (P < 0.05) baseline values. Initial microarray results showed the greatest transcriptional changes in pathways related to immune response, inflammation, and cellular communication. The change in PBMC population (2 h time point) correlated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of CD160, and XCL1, markers of lymphocyte populations. At the 2 h recovery time point upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9, orosomucoid 1, dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 2, and arginase 1 suggest an induction in muscle damage and repair during this time frame. These results demonstrate that an acute bout of RET disrupts cellular homeostasis, induces a transient redistribution of certain leukocytes, and results in transcriptional changes in PBMCs translating into systemic changes in response to RET. PMID:21437602

  12. Changes in transcriptional output of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Lara A; Tighe, S W; Kenefick, R W; Dragon, J; Westcott, N W; Leclair, R J

    2011-12-01

    Various types of exercise alter the population of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and change their transcriptional output. This work examines changes in PBMC populations and transcription in response to resistance exercise training (RET), and identify key transcriptional changes in PBMCs that may play a role in altering peripheral tissues in response to RET. Ten resistance-trained men (20-24 years), performed an acute bout of RET for ~30 min following a 12 h fast. Venous blood was sampled at rest, immediately following exercise, and at 2 h post-exercise and analyzed for total and differential leukocytes and global gene expression using Affymetrix Genechips. Results showed elevated leukocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, and lactate values immediately post-exercise (P < 0.05) over baseline. At 2 h post-exercise, leukocytes, and granulocytes remained elevated (P < 0.05), whereas lymphocytes were lower than (P < 0.05) baseline values. Initial microarray results showed the greatest transcriptional changes in pathways related to immune response, inflammation, and cellular communication. The change in PBMC population (2 h time point) correlated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of CD160, and XCL1, markers of lymphocyte populations. At the 2 h recovery time point upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9, orosomucoid 1, dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 2, and arginase 1 suggest an induction in muscle damage and repair during this time frame. These results demonstrate that an acute bout of RET disrupts cellular homeostasis, induces a transient redistribution of certain leukocytes, and results in transcriptional changes in PBMCs translating into systemic changes in response to RET.

  13. Relationship between T cell subpopulations and the mitogen responsiveness and suppressor cell function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in normal individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Victorino, R M; Hodgson, H J

    1980-01-01

    A simultaneous analysis was made of numbers and proportions of T cell subsets (T mu and T gamma cells), lymphocyte responsiveness to non-specific mitogens in vitro and 'short-lived suppressor cell activity' in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of normal individuals. No correlation was found between either T gamma or T mu cells and the 'short-lived suppressor cell activity', suggesting that suppression in this system is not a reflection of quantitative alteration in these subsets. However, a highly significant positive correlation was found between numbers of T mu cells and PBMC responses to the mitogens phytohaemagglutinin, concanavalin A and pokeweek mitogen. This may reflect either a helper effect of T mu cells on lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens or the presence of the majority of mitogen-responsive cells within this subpopulation. As in normal individuals lymphocyte responsiveness correlates with the number of circulating T mu cells, it is possible that a reduction in these cells in disease states may contribute to defects in cell-mediated immunity. PMID:6452237

  14. Effect of curcumin on ethanol-induced stress on mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Rajakrishnan, V; Shiney, S J; Sudhakaran, P R; Menon, V P

    2002-03-01

    Blood cells in circulation are exposed to a wide variety of stress-causing agents, causing a number of changes including interactions with other cells and the extracellular matrix of the endothelial wall. In order to understand the role of curcumin, an antioxidant principle from Curcuma longa Linn., on blood mononuclear cells from rabbits given ethanol for 30 days and ethanol with curcumin, cells were isolated and an attachment assay was carried out. The monocytes from ethanol-treated rabbits showed a lesser attachment to collagen, the major component of the vessel wall subendothelium, and those from curcumin treated animals along with ethanol showed a higher affinity to collagen, causing an alteration in the attachment of monocyte to collagen due to ethanol-induced stress. PMID:11933122

  15. Isolation and propagation of HIV-1 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    van 't Wout, Angélique B; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is characterized by a gradual loss of CD4+ T cells and T-cell function and an ongoing high level of virus replication. The high replication rate and the error-prone nature of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase create a diverse viral quasispecies throughout infection. To study biological properties of HIV-1 quasispecies in relation to the clinical course of infection, the in vitro preservation of phenotypical characteristics of the virus is essential. Here, we describe the method for bulk isolation of the HIV-1 quasispecies and a limiting dilution virus isolation protocol by which single coexisting HIV-1 variants can be obtained using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor as target cells. In addition, methods for propagation and titration of HIV-1 are provided.

  16. Separation of large quantities of mononuclear cells from human blood using a blood processor.

    PubMed

    Beaujean, F; Gourdin, M F; Farcet, J P; Le Forestier, C; Bouguet, J; Reyes, F; Duedari, N

    1985-01-01

    A blood processor (IBM 2991) was used to separate lymphocytes from large volumes of blood. The procedure included the centrifugation of 200 ml whole blood on a density gradient. The results of this procedure were compared with those obtained with a manual procedure. Mononuclear cell (MNC) viability was preserved well in the two methods. But with the processor, recovery of MNC was better (63.5 +/- 2.5%) than with manual separation (26.5 +/- 4.1%). Monoclonal antibodies were used to identify the various cell subsets in the MNC fractions. No particular cell selection was observed when MNC fractions were obtained by the separator. In conclusion, the use of a cell separator provided an efficient technique for rapid isolation of large quantities of lymphocytes. PMID:3872489

  17. Changes in Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Garg, Nisha Jain; Soman, Kizhake V; Zago, Maria P; Koo, Sue-Jie; Spratt, Heidi; Stafford, Susan; Blell, Zinzi N; Gupta, Shivali; Nuñez Burgos, Julio; Barrientos, Natalia; Brasier, Allan R; Wiktorowicz, John E

    2016-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) infection causes chagasic cardiomyopathy; however, why 30-40% of the patients develop clinical disease is not known. To discover the pathomechanisms in disease progression, we obtained the proteome signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal healthy controls (N/H, n = 30) and subjects that were seropositive for Tc-specific antibodies, but were clinically asymptomatic (C/A, n = 25) or clinically symptomatic (C/S, n = 28) with cardiac involvement and left ventricular dysfunction. Protein samples were labeled with BODIPY FL-maleimide (dynamic range: > 4 orders of magnitude, detection limit: 5 f-mol) and resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE). After normalizing the gel images, protein spots that exhibited differential abundance in any of the two groups were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and searched against UniProt human database for protein identification. We found 213 and 199 protein spots (fold change: |≥ 1.5|, p< 0.05) were differentially abundant in C/A and C/S individuals, respectively, with respect to N/H controls. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of PBMCs proteome dataset identified an increase in disorganization of cytoskeletal assembly and recruitment/activation and migration of immune cells in all chagasic subjects, though the invasion capacity of cells was decreased in C/S individuals. IPA predicted with high probability a decline in cell survival and free radical scavenging capacity in C/S (but not C/A) subjects. The MYC/SP1 transcription factors that regulate hypoxia and oxidative/inflammatory stress were predicted to be key targets in the context of control of Chagas disease severity. Further, MARS-modeling identified a panel of proteins that had >93% prediction success in classifying infected individuals with no disease and those with cardiac involvement and LV dysfunction. In conclusion, we have identified molecular pathways and a panel of proteins that could aid in detecting seropositive

  18. Changes in Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Kizhake V.; Zago, Maria P.; Koo, Sue-Jie; Spratt, Heidi; Stafford, Susan; Blell, Zinzi N.; Gupta, Shivali; Nuñez Burgos, Julio; Barrientos, Natalia; Brasier, Allan R.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) infection causes chagasic cardiomyopathy; however, why 30–40% of the patients develop clinical disease is not known. To discover the pathomechanisms in disease progression, we obtained the proteome signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal healthy controls (N/H, n = 30) and subjects that were seropositive for Tc-specific antibodies, but were clinically asymptomatic (C/A, n = 25) or clinically symptomatic (C/S, n = 28) with cardiac involvement and left ventricular dysfunction. Protein samples were labeled with BODIPY FL-maleimide (dynamic range: > 4 orders of magnitude, detection limit: 5 f-mol) and resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE). After normalizing the gel images, protein spots that exhibited differential abundance in any of the two groups were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and searched against UniProt human database for protein identification. We found 213 and 199 protein spots (fold change: |≥ 1.5|, p< 0.05) were differentially abundant in C/A and C/S individuals, respectively, with respect to N/H controls. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of PBMCs proteome dataset identified an increase in disorganization of cytoskeletal assembly and recruitment/activation and migration of immune cells in all chagasic subjects, though the invasion capacity of cells was decreased in C/S individuals. IPA predicted with high probability a decline in cell survival and free radical scavenging capacity in C/S (but not C/A) subjects. The MYC/SP1 transcription factors that regulate hypoxia and oxidative/inflammatory stress were predicted to be key targets in the context of control of Chagas disease severity. Further, MARS-modeling identified a panel of proteins that had >93% prediction success in classifying infected individuals with no disease and those with cardiac involvement and LV dysfunction. In conclusion, we have identified molecular pathways and a panel of proteins that could aid in detecting

  19. Standardization of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells through a resting process for clinical immunomonitoring--Development of an algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hückelhoven, Angela; Hong, Jian; Jin, Nan; Mani, Jiju; Chen, Bao-an; Schmitt, Michael; Schmitt, Anita

    2016-03-01

    Flow cytometry, as a powerful tool for immunomonitoring and quality control of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), is routinely used in clinical studies. However, flow cytometry based assays for cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (cPBMCs) constitute a challenge. Down-regulation of surface and intracellular markers, as well as impairment of cell function might result from cryopreservation. Furthermore, protocols for resting cPBMCs are available but diverse. Therefore, we performed a standardization of the resting process concerning resting position, cell concentration, resting period and material of cell culture tubes as well as culture media. We further investigated the influence of resting on the phenotype and functionality of T cells comparing fresh PBMCs as gold standard to rested and non-rested cPBMCs. Polychromatic flow cytometry staining, peptide-MHC class I restricted tetramer staining and intracellular cytokine staining as major methods were used. Our results revealed that a horizontal position, a cell concentration of 2 to 5 × 10(6) cells/ml and an overnight resting phase is beneficial to eliminate dead or dying cells in cPBMCs with a mean cell loss of 14% overall cell populations. In addition, the quality and quantity of regulatory T cells and antigen specific T cells recovered upon resting. For multifunctional T cells a decrease of activation threshold in the way of a twofold mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) and increase of degranulation marker CD107a, co-stimulatory marker CD28, adhesion molecule CD62L as well as the ability to secrete antiviral cytokines like interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin 2 (IL-2) comparable to fresh PBMCs were observed. However, based upon our data resting is not helpful for the flow cytometric analyses of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and large/intermediate size lymphocytes which rather decreased/vanished ex vivo. Therefore, we developed an algorithm to

  20. TGF-β receptor 1 inhibition prevents stenosis of tissue-engineered vascular grafts by reducing host mononuclear phagocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Ung; de Dios Ruiz-Rosado, Juan; Mahler, Nathan; Best, Cameron A; Tara, Shuhei; Yi, Tai; Shoji, Toshihiro; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Lee, Avione Y; Robledo-Avila, Frank; Hibino, Narutoshi; Pober, Jordan S; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Breuer, Christopher K

    2016-07-01

    Stenosis is a critical problem in the long-term efficacy of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs). We previously showed that host monocyte infiltration and activation within the graft drives stenosis and that TGF-β receptor 1 (TGF-βR1) inhibition can prevent it, but the latter effect was attributed primarily to inhibition of mesenchymal cell expansion. In this study, we assessed the effects of TGF-βR1 inhibition on the host monocytes. Biodegradable TEVGs were implanted as inferior vena cava interposition conduits in 2 groups of C57BL/6 mice (n = 25/group): unseeded grafts and unseeded grafts with TGF-βR1 inhibitor systemic treatment for the first 2 wk. The TGF-βR1 inhibitor treatment effectively improved TEVG patency at 6 mo compared to the untreated control group (91.7 vs. 48%, P < 0.001), which is associated with a reduction in classic activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Consistent with these findings, the addition of rTGF-β to LPS/IFN-γ-stimulated monocytes enhanced secretion of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-6; this effect was blocked by TGF-βR1 inhibition (P < 0.0001). These findings suggest that the TGF-β signaling pathway contributes to TEVG stenosis by inducing classic activation of host monocytes. Furthermore, blocking monocyte activation by TGF-βR1 inhibition provides a viable strategy for preventing TEVG stenosis while maintaining neotissue formation.-Lee, Y.-U., de Dios Ruiz-Rosado, J., Mahler, N., Best, C. A., Tara, S., Yi, T., Shoji, T., Sugiura, T., Lee, A. Y., Robledo-Avila, F., Hibino, N., Pober, J. S., Shinoka, T., Partida-Sanchez, S., Breuer, C. K. TGF-β receptor 1 inhibition prevents stenosis of tissue-engineered vascular grafts by reducing host mononuclear phagocyte activation. PMID:27059717

  1. Blocking Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Release Modulates Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Response to Porphyromonas Gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Berker, Ezel; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Hasturk, Hatice; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease in which cytokines play a major role in the progression of disease. Anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) were reported to be absent or reduced in diseased periodontal tissues, suggesting an imbalance between the pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. We have tested the hypothesis that there is cellular cross-talk mediated by pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and that blocking pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α and IL-1) production will enhance anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-4 and IL-10) production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in response to P. gingivalis. Methods PBMC were isolated from individuals diagnosed with chronic periodontitis or healthy individuals and cultured for 24 hours. Concanavalin-A (ConA) was used as an activator of lymphocyte function. Live and heat-killed P .gingivalis or lipopolysaccharide from P. gingivalis was used as the bacterial stimulants. TNF-α and IL-1 production was neutralized by specific antibodies against TNF-α and IL-1α or β. Culture supernatants were evaluated by ELISA for TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-4, and IL-10 production. Results Live P. gingivalis did not result in any significant IL-10 or IL-4 release while heat-killed P. gingivalis led to a significant increase in IL-10 levels compared to unstimulated or live P. gingivalis-stimulated cells from both healthy and periodontitis individuals. Overall, PBMC from patients with chronic periodontitis produced significantly lower IL-10 in response to ConA and P. gingivalis suggesting chronic suppression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine production. Blocking the pro-inflammatory cytokine response did not result in any substantial change in IL-10 or IL-4 response to live P. gingivalis. Blocking the pro-inflammatory cytokine response restored IL-10 production by cells from chronic periodontitis in response to P. gingivalis LPS. Conclusion These findings suggest that PBMC from patients with chronic

  2. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure.

    PubMed

    Camarca, Alessandra; Gianfrani, Carmen; Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; Valentino, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  3. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  4. Evaluation of apoptosis induction in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and synovial cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Demian, Soheir R; Abo-Shousha, Seham A; Sultan, Hussein E; Zarka, Wael El

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory destructive disease involving the joint and characterized by T-lymphocyte accumulation within the synovial compartment. It is dominated by the presence of macrophages, plasma cells and synovial fibroblasts which are the main pathogenic factors leading to the destruction of bone and cartilage. The survival of these cells may be promoted by inadequate apoptosis leading to synovial hyperplasia. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the apoptosis levels before and after induction of apoptosis using anti-Fas mAb, both in peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) infiltrating mononuclear cells (MCs) of patients with RA. CD4+ T cell subsets and cell survival assays were also done to investigate correlations between these parameters. The study was conducted on 15 patients with RA, 10 individual volunteers as a control group and 10 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) as a control group for SF evaluations (have defective Fas expression on their cells). Results of this work revealed that in vitro induction of apoptosis by anti-Fas mAb resulted in increase of: percent (%) reduction of cell viability in PBMCs and SFMCs, % reduction of CD4+ T cell subsets and apoptotic cell % in all studied groups than before induction. The increase in the three parameters is only significant in SF of RA group compared to PB while it is non significant in OA group due to the defective Fas expression on OA cells. Our results also showed a significant positive correlation between CD4+ T cell and viability percentages before induction of apoptosis in SF of RA and between apoptosis levels and CD4+ T cell percentage after induction of apoptosis in the SF of RA group. In conclusion, activated T cells infiltrating SF of RA patients have functional Fas antigen which enable them to undergo in vitro apoptosis using anti-Fas mAb. The cytotoxicity of which is more specific to local lesion such as SF of RA patients suggesting that local

  5. Evaluation of apoptosis induction in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and synovial cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Demian, Soheir R; Abo-Shousha, Seham A; Sultan, Hussein E; Zarka, Wael El

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory destructive disease involving the joint and characterized by T-lymphocyte accumulation within the synovial compartment. It is dominated by the presence of macrophages, plasma cells and synovial fibroblasts which are the main pathogenic factors leading to the destruction of bone and cartilage. The survival of these cells may be promoted by inadequate apoptosis leading to synovial hyperplasia. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the apoptosis levels before and after induction of apoptosis using anti-Fas mAb, both in peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) infiltrating mononuclear cells (MCs) of patients with RA. CD4+ T cell subsets and cell survival assays were also done to investigate correlations between these parameters. The study was conducted on 15 patients with RA, 10 individual volunteers as a control group and 10 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) as a control group for SF evaluations (have defective Fas expression on their cells). Results of this work revealed that in vitro induction of apoptosis by anti-Fas mAb resulted in increase of: percent (%) reduction of cell viability in PBMCs and SFMCs, % reduction of CD4+ T cell subsets and apoptotic cell % in all studied groups than before induction. The increase in the three parameters is only significant in SF of RA group compared to PB while it is non significant in OA group due to the defective Fas expression on OA cells. Our results also showed a significant positive correlation between CD4+ T cell and viability percentages before induction of apoptosis in SF of RA and between apoptosis levels and CD4+ T cell percentage after induction of apoptosis in the SF of RA group. In conclusion, activated T cells infiltrating SF of RA patients have functional Fas antigen which enable them to undergo in vitro apoptosis using anti-Fas mAb. The cytotoxicity of which is more specific to local lesion such as SF of RA patients suggesting that local

  6. Impact of fexofenadine, osthole and histamine on peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Karolina Kordulewska, Natalia; Kostyra, Elżbieta; Matysiewicz, Michał; Cieślińska, Anna; Jarmołowska, Beata

    2015-08-15

    This paper compares results of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) incubation with fexofenadine (FXF) and osthole. FXF is a third-generation antihistamine drug and osthole is assumed a natural antihistamine alternative. To our best knowledge, this is the first comparative study on FXF, osthole and histamine cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity in PBMC in vitro cultures using cell proliferation ELISA BrdU. The cultures were treated 12, 42, 48 and 72h with FXF and osthole at 150, 300 and 450ng/ml concentrations and histamine at 50, 100 and 200ng/ml. Our study results confirm that FXF, osthole and histamine exert no cytotoxic effect on PBMCs and that IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α cytokine secretion following osthole cell stimulation was similar to that by FXF stimulation.This confirms our hypothesis that osthole is a natural histamine antagonist, and can therefore be beneficially applied in antihistamine treatment.

  7. Mononuclear phagocyte intercellular crosstalk facilitates transmission of cell-targeted nanoformulated antiretroviral drugs to human brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kanmogne, Georgette D; Singh, Sangya; Roy, Upal; Liu, Xinming; McMillan, Joellyn; Gorantla, Santhi; Balkundi, Shantanu; Smith, Nathan; Alnouti, Yazen; Gautam, Nagsen; Zhou, You; Poluektova, Larisa; Kabanov, Alexander; Bronich, Tatiana; Gendelman, Howard E

    2012-01-01

    Despite the successes of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders remain prevalent in infected people. This is due, in part, to incomplete ART penetration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and lymph nodes and to the establishment of viral sanctuaries within the central nervous system. In efforts to improve ART delivery, our laboratories developed a macrophage-carriage system for nanoformulated crystalline ART (nanoART) (atazanavir, ritonavir, indinavir, and efavirenz). We demonstrate that nanoART transfer from mononuclear phagocytes (MP) to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) can be realized through cell-to-cell contacts, which can facilitate drug passage across the BBB. Coculturing of donor MP containing nanoART with recipient HBMEC facilitates intercellular particle transfer. NanoART uptake was observed in up to 52% of HBMEC with limited cytotoxicity. Folate coating of nanoART increased MP to HBMEC particle transfer by up to 77%. To translate the cell assays into relevant animal models of disease, ritonavir and atazanavir nanoformulations were injected into HIV-1-infected NOD/scid-γ(c)(null) mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Atazanavir and ritonavir levels in brains of mice treated with folate-coated nanoART were three- to four-fold higher than in mice treated with noncoated particles. This was associated with decreased viral load in the spleen and brain, and diminished brain CD11b-associated glial activation. We postulate that monocyte-macrophage transfer of nanoART to brain endothelial cells could facilitate drug entry into the brain.

  8. Bone marrow and bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells therapy for the chronically ischemic myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, Ron; Baffour, Richard

    2003-09-01

    Bone marrow stem cells have been shown to differentiate into various phenotypes including cardiomyocytes, vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Bone marrow stem cells are mobilized and home in to areas of injured myocardium where they are involved in tissue repair. In addition, bone marrow secretes multiple growth factors, which are essential for angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. In some patients, these processes are not enough to avert clinical symptoms of ischemic disease. Therefore, in vivo administration of an adequate number of stem cells would be a significant therapeutic advance. Unfractionated bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells, which contain both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells may be more appropriate for cell therapy. Studies in animal models suggest that implantation of different types of stem cells improve angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, tissue perfusion as well as left ventricular function. Several unanswered questions remain. For example, the optimal delivery approach, dosage and timing of the administration of cell therapy as well as durability of improvements need to be studied. Early clinical studies have demonstrated safety and feasibility of various cell therapies in ischemic disease. Randomized, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials need to be completed to determine the effectiveness of stem cell.

  9. Human cord blood-derived mononuclear cell transplantation for viral encephalitis-associated cognitive impairment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Herpes simplex virus is the most common cause of sporadic viral encephalitis. Cognitive impairments persist in most patients who survive herpes simplex virus-caused encephalitis after undergoing currently available treatments. This is the first report on the development of human cord blood-derived mononuclear cell transplantation as a new treatment intervention to improve the prognosis of sequelae of viral encephalitis. Case presentation An 11-year-old Han Chinese boy developed sequelae of viral encephalitis with cognitive, mental and motor impairments in the 8 months following routine treatments. Since receiving allogeneic cord blood-derived mononuclear cell transplantation combined with comprehensive rehabilitation therapies 7 years ago, the patient’s health has significantly improved and remained stable. Conclusions Human cord blood-derived mononuclear cell transplantation may be a potential therapeutic strategy for treating the neuropsychiatric and neurobehavioral sequelae of viral encephalitis. PMID:23835552

  10. The effect of catechol on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Bożena; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Catechol also known as pyrocatechol or 1,2-dihydroxybenzene is formed endogenously in the organism from neurotransmitters including adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine. It is also a metabolite of many drugs like DOPA, isoproterenol or aspirin and it is also formed in the environment during transformation of various xenobiotics. We evaluated in vitro the effect of catechol on the structure and function of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The cells were incubated with xenobiotic at concentration range from 2 to 500μg/mL for 1h. Human blood mononuclear cells were obtained from leucocyte-platelet buffy coat taken from healthy donors in the Blood Bank of Łódź, Poland. Using flow cytometry we have evaluated necrotic, apoptotic and morphological changes in PBMCs incubated with catechol. Moreover, we have estimated changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation in the cells studied. The compound studied provoked necrotic (from 250μg/mL), apoptotic (from 100μg/mL), and morphological changes (from 250μg/mL) in the incubated cells. We have also noted that catechol decreased H2DCF oxidation at 2 and 10μg/mL but at higher concentrations of 250 and 500μg/mL it caused statistically significant increase in the oxidation of this probe. We also observed an increase in lipid peroxidation (from 250μg/mL) and protein carbonylation (from 50μg/mL) of PBMCs. It was observed that catechol only at high concentrations was capable of inducing changes in PBMCs. The obtained results clearly showed that catechol may induce change in PBMCs only in the caste of poisoning with this compound. PMID:25528409

  11. Development of a FACS-based assay for evaluating antiviral potency of compound in dengue infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yilong; Chen, Yen-Liang; Herve, Maxime; Gu, Feng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Blasco, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arthropod-transmitted viral disease affecting humans. It is a blood-borne disease characterized by persistent fever and joint pain. In the blood, primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), in particular monocytes, are the main target of the dengue virus (DENV). These cells are poorly permissive for in vitro dengue virus infection and their infectivity varies from donor to donor. To overcome this barrier, an anti-dengue antibody was used to improve the infectivity of DENV-2 clinical isolates to PBMCs, the monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1 and the granulocyte cell line, KU812. A higher throughput 96-well-format assay based on a fluorescent-activated cell sorter could potentially be developed to evaluate the antiviral potency of compounds in DENV-infected PBMCs in vitro. The results correlate well with data obtained by a standard plaque assay. Altogether, an assay has been developed that enables evaluation of the antiviral activity of test compounds in a physiologically-relevant cell system (PBMCs). These screening processes are urgently needed for dengue drug discovery.

  12. Maternal Gene Expression Profiling During Pregnancy And Preeclampsia In Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rajakumar, Augustine; Tianjiao, Chu; Handley, Daniel E.; Bunce, Kimberly D.; Burke, Brian; Hubel, Carl A.; Jeyabalan, Arundhathi; Peters, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a major obstetrical complication affecting maternal and fetal health. While it is clear that there is a substantial placental contribution to preeclampsia pathogenesis, the maternal contribution is less well characterized. We therefore performed a genome wide transcriptome analysis to explore disease-associated changes in maternal gene expression patterns in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Methods Preeclampsia was defined as gestational hypertension, proteinuria and hyperurecimia. Total RNA was isolated from PBMCs obtained from women with uncomplicated pregnancies (n=5) and women with preeclamptic pregnancies (n=5). Gene expression analysis was carried out using Agilent oligonucleotide microarrays. Biological pathway analysis was undertaken using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Quantitative real time PCR (QRTPCR) was performed to validate the gene expression changes of selected genes in normotensive and preeclamptic patients (n=12 each). Results We identified a total of 368 genes that were differentially expressed in women with preeclampsia compared to normal controls with false discovery rate (FDR) controlled at 10%. In follow up experiments we further analyzed the expression levels of a number of genes that were identified as altered by the microarray data including survivin (BIRC5), caveolin (CAV1), GATA binding protein-1 (GATA1), signal tranducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), E2F transcription factor-1 (E2F1), fibronectin-1 (FN1), interleukin-4 (IL-4), matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and WAP four-disulfide domain protein (WFDC-1) by QRTPCR. Additionally we performed immunoblot analysis and zymography to verify some of these candidate genes at the protein level. Computational analysis of gene function identified an anti-proliferative and altered immune function cellular phenotype in severe preeclamptic samples. Conclusions We have characterized the genome-wide mRNA expression changes associated with preeclampsia

  13. Limits of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells for Gene Expression-Based Biomarkers in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Laiping; Jiang, Kaiyu; Chen, Yanmin; Hennon, Teresa; Holmes, Lucy; Wallace, Carol A.; Jarvis, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is one of the most common chronic disease conditions affecting children in the USA. As with many rheumatic diseases, there is growing interest in using genomic technologies to develop biomarkers for either diagnosis or to guide treatment (“personalized medicine”). Here, we explore the use of gene expression patterns in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a first step approach to developing such biomarkers. Although PBMC carry many theoretical advantages for translational research, we have found that sample heterogeneity makes RNASeq on PBMC unsuitable as a first-step method for screening biomarker candidates in JIA. RNASeq studies of homogeneous cell populations are more likely to be useful and informative. PMID:27385437

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence monitoring of cholesterol in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinakova, Z.; Horilova, J.; Lajdova, I.; Marcek Chorvatova, A.

    2014-12-01

    Precise evaluation of intracellular cholesterol distribution is crucial for improving diagnostics of diseased states associated with cholesterol alteration. Time-resolved fluorescence techniques are tested for non-invasive investigation of cholesterol in living cells. Fluorescent probe NBD attached to cholesterol was employed to evaluate cholesterol distribution in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from the human blood. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) was successfully applied to simultaneously monitor the spatial distribution and the timeresolved characteristics of the NBD-cholesterol fluorescence in PBMC. Gathered data are the first step in the development of a new perspective non-invasive diagnostic method for evaluation of cholesterol modifications in diseases associated with disorders of lipid metabolism.

  15. Grass immunotherapy induces inhibition of allergen-specific human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baskar, S; Hamilton, R G; Norman, P S; Ansari, A A

    1997-02-01

    The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from humans allergic to grass pollens (GR+ subjects) show strong in vitro proliferative responses to purified allergens from Lolium perenne pollen Lol p 1, and to a lesser extent to Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. By contrast, PBMC from grass allergic patients undergoing immunotherapy (GR + IT subjects) exhibit a very poor Lol p-specific proliferative response, similar to that observed in nongrass allergic subjects (GR-subjects). Unlike GR-subjects, both GR+ and GR + IT subjects have high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. While GR+ subjects exhibit a significant correlation between antigen-specific serum antibody and PBMC responses, GR + IT subjects do not show a correlation between the two responses. The possible mechanisms by which immunotherapy may modulate allergen-specific T cell proliferative response are discussed.

  16. CDNA microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in blood mononuclear cells of SLA-DRB1-defined Yorkshire pigs.

    PubMed

    Nino-Soto, M I; Jozani, R J; Bridle, B; Mallard, B A

    2008-01-01

    Three lines of commercialYorkshire pigs with defined SLA-DRB1 alleles were developed at the University of Guelph for xenotransplantation and immune response studies. Two of the SLA-DRB1 alleles have been previously reported (SLA-DRB1*0502 and *0701), whereas the third one is a new allele. The influence of defined SLA-DRB1 alleles on transcriptional patterns of immune-related genes in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) of pigs was explored using cDNA microarray. Microarray analysis showed significant differential expression of inflammatory genes in association with the various SLA-DRB1 alleles. A better understanding of the association between SLA genotypes and gene activity can increase the knowledge of the function of these molecules, as well as define new strategies to control animal health and optimize animal production.

  17. Crotalus durissus collilineatus Venom Induces TNF-α and IL-10 Production in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Camila Bastos; dos Santos, Jéssica Cristina; Silva, Jacyelle Medeiros; de Godoi, Pedro Henrique Silva; Magalhães, Marta Regina; Spadafora-Ferreira, Mônica; Fonseca, Simone Gonçalves; Pfrimer, Irmtraut Araci Hoffman

    2014-01-01

    Snake venom has been the subject of numerous studies in an attempt to find properties and biological effects that may be beneficial to man. In this study we evaluated in vitro the effects of Crotalus durissus terrificus (Cdt) and Crotalus durissus collilineatus (Cdc) venom in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). At 24 h, a significant decrease of viable cells was observed in cells stimulated with the Cdc venom at 0.0005 mg/mL and 0.005 mg/mL compared to the negative control. At 48 h, a significant decrease of viable cells was observed only in cells stimulated with Cdc venom at 0.005 mg/mL. A significant increase of TNF-α and IL-10 was detected 48 hours after culture of PBMC with Cdc, but not with Cdt venom. The expression of CD69 and PD1 (programmed death-1), activation and regulatory cell markers, on CD8+ and CD8− T cells did not change in the presence of Cdt and Cdc venom. Our results suggest the presence of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory components in the Cdc venom. Further analysis should be done to identify those Cdc venom components as it has been done for the Cdt venom by other authors, indicating that modulatory components are found in the venom of different species of Crotalus snakes. PMID:24563803

  18. The in vitro exposure to cypermethrin does not inhibit the proliferative response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Tatiana Fernandes Araujo; Lauton Santos, Sandra; Nicomedes, Ulisses Lara; Brito-Melo, Gustavo Eustáquio; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of in vitro exposure to cypermethrin on peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferative response, considering reduced peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferative response observed in individuals occupationally exposed to pyrethroids. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 21 healthy subjects (28.0 ± 9.0 years old). The effect of cypermethrin (at 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 mg/ml) on cell viability was evaluated by flow cytometry using an apoptosis detection kit. Cell proliferation (PI) was evaluated by 5-(and 6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) fluorescence decay using flow cytometry. Cells labeled with CFSE were exposed, in vitro, to cypermethrin (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 2.5 and 4 μg/ml) and stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA 1.0 or 5.0 μg/ml) for 5 d (37 °C, 5% CO2). The in vitro treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with cypermethrin did not induce apoptosis or necrosis after 5 d in culture. Stimulation by PHA induced cell proliferation (PI = 1.29 ± 1.09 and 2.01 ± 0.62, PHA at 1.0 and 5.0 μg/ml, respectively, mean ± SD) and in vitro exposure to cypermethrin did not alter cellular proliferative response to PHA (PI = 1.80 ± 0.50, 2.60 ± 0.05 and 2.10 ± 1.20 for cypermethrin at 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 μg/ml, respectively, and PHA at 5.0 μg/ml). In vitro treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with cypermethrin, at the doses tested, does not affect cell viability or proliferation. These findings suggest that the reduction of proliferation observed on lymphocytes derived from individuals occupationally exposed to pesticides may be related to other mechanisms than direct action of cypermethrin on lymphocytes.

  19. The mononuclear phagocyte system and lymphocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter outlines the cellular processes that are activated and interact during host immune responses including: (a) phagocytosis and antigen presentation by cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system (monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells), and (b) cell-mediated and humoral immunity ...

  20. Productive Infection of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: Implications for Vector Development

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, James; Power, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 101.3 to 102.1 50% tissue culture infective doses/106 cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy. PMID:9971834

  1. Human mononuclear cell function after 4 degrees C storage during 1-G and microgravity conditions of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R.; Taylor, G.; Lionetti, F.; Neale, L.; Curren, T.

    1989-01-01

    Future space missions of long duration may require that autologous leukocytes be stored in flight for infusion to restore normal immune competence in crewmembers. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs), as leukocyte concentrates in autologous plasma and 2% dextrose, were stored in the microgravity conditions provided by the U.S. Space Shuttle Columbia (Mission 61-C). Activity of PBMNC after space flight was compared with that from a series of preflight ground control experiments, which demonstrated in culture a progressive daily loss in mitogen-stimulated protein synthesis at 24 h and thymidine uptake at 72 h after storage for 7 d at 4 degrees C. Post-storage viabilities were at least 90% as determined by trypan dye exclusion. A progressive reduction in the percentage of PBMNC expressing cell-surface phenotype markers, which was similar for monocytes, B cells, and T-cell subsets, also occurred after storage. The ability of PBMNC, stored for 8 d in Columbia's middeck, to become activated and proliferate in vitro was similar to that of cells that remained in identical flight lockers on the ground as 1-G controls, thus indicating that PBMNCs were not adversely affected by storage under microgravity conditions.

  2. Excess apoptosis of mononuclear cells contributes to the depressed cytomegalovirus-specific immunity in HIV-infected patients on HAART

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Adriana . E-mail: Adriana.Weinberg@uchsc.edu; Jesser, Renee D.; Edelstein, Charles L.; Bill, Jerome R.; Wohl, David A.

    2004-12-05

    HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have persistently decreased cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific proliferative responses [lymphocyte proliferation assay (LPA)] in spite of increases in CD4+ T cell counts. Here we demonstrate an association between apoptosis of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (uPBMC) and decreased CMV-LPA. HAART recipients had more apoptosis of uPBMC than controls when measured by caspases 3, 8, and 9 activities and by annexin V binding. Patients with undetectable HIV replication maintained significantly higher apoptosis of CD4+ and CD14+ cells compared to controls. CMV-LPA decreased with higher apoptosis of uPBMC in patients only. This association was independent of CD4+ cell counts or HIV replication. Furthermore, rescuing PBMC from apoptosis with crmA, but not with TRAIL- or Fas-pathway blocking agents or with other caspase inhibitors, increased CMV-LPA in HAART recipients. This effect was not observed in uninfected controls, further indicating that the down regulatory effect of apoptosis on cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was specifically associated with the HIV-infected status.

  3. Long-term three-dimensional perfusion culture of human adult bone marrow mononuclear cells in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Eva; Finoli, Anthony; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2015-04-01

    The construction and long-term maintenance of three-dimensional in vitro bone marrow models is of great interest but still quite challenging. Here we describe the use of a multi-compartment hollow-fiber membrane based three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor for long-term culture of whole human bone marrow mononuclear cells. We also investigated bioreactors with incorporated open-porous foamed hydroxyapatite scaffolds, mimicking the in vivo bone matrix. Cells in bioreactors with and without scaffolds were cultured to 6 weeks and compared to Petri dish controls. Cells were analyzed for gene expression, surface markers by flow cytometry, metabolic activity, hematopoietic potential, viability, and attachment by immunocytochemistry. Cells in bioreactors were metabolic active during long-term culture. The percentages of hematopoietic stem cell and mature endothelial cell fractions were maintained in bioreactors. The expression of most of the analyzed genes stabilized and increased after long-term culture of 6 weeks. Compared to Petri dish culture controls, bioreactor perfusion culture improved in both the short and long-term, the colony formation unit capacity of hematopoietic progenitors. Cells attached to the ample surface area provided by hydroxyapatite scaffolds. The implementation of a hydroxyapatite scaffold did not influence colony formation capacity, percentages of cell type specific fractions, gene expression, cell viability or metabolic turnover when compared to control cells cultured in bioreactors without scaffolds. In conclusion, three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture enables long-term maintenance of primary human bone marrow cells, with hydroxyapatite scaffolds providing an in vivo-like scaffold for three-dimensional culture.

  4. Flow cytometric analysis of in vitro bluetongue virus infection of bovine blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Barratt-Boyes, S M; Rossitto, P V; Stott, J L; MacLachlan, N J

    1992-08-01

    Cultures of adherent and non-adherent bovine peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells were inoculated with bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 10. Some cultures of non-adherent cells were stimulated with interleukin 2 (IL-2) and concanavalin A for 24 h prior to virus inoculation. Cells were harvested at various intervals up to 72 h after inoculation. A panel of leukocyte differentiation antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), specific for bovine CD2, CD4 or CD8, monocytes and granulocytes, B cells, gamma delta T cells or the IL-2 receptor (IL-2r), was directly conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate, and a MAb specific for the BTV major core protein VP7 was directly conjugated to phycoerythrin. Cells were labelled with conjugated MAbs in single- and double-label immunofluorescence studies to identify specifically the BTV-infected cells in inoculated cultures. The viability of cells was determined by propidium iodide exclusion, and all analyses were done using flow cytometry. Productive infection of cultures of PBM cells was confirmed by virus titration. The data revealed a clear difference between subsets of bovine PBM cells in susceptibility to infection with BTV in vitro. Monocytes were readily infected with BTV, as were stimulated CD4+ cells, and infection was cytopathic to monocytes and stimulated lymphocytes. The proportion of infected cells decreased after 24 h and virus titres dropped markedly by 72 h in all cultures. CD4+ cells in cultures of unstimulated non-adherent cells inoculated with BTV showed increased expression of IL-2r. The possible relevance of these findings to the pathogenesis of BTV infection of cattle is discussed.

  5. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001), even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET) technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures. PMID:24713904

  6. Docosahexaenoic diet supplementation, exercise and temperature affect cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Capó, Xavier; Martorell, Miquel; Sureda, Antoni; Batle, Juan Miguel; Tur, Josep Antoni; Pons, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Acute exercise induces changes in peripheral mononuclear cells' (PBMCs) capabilities to produce cytokines. The aim was to investigate the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) diet supplementation on cytokine production, by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PBMCs after exercise, and the in vitro influence of temperature. Fifteen male soccer players were randomly assigned to a placebo or an experimental group. The experimental group consumed an almond-based beverage enriched with DHA (1.16 g DHA/day) for 8 weeks, whereas the placebo group consumed a similar non-enriched beverage. Blood samples were taken before and after the nutritional intervention in basal conditions and 2 h after acute exercise. Nutritional intervention significantly increased the DHA content in erythrocytes only in experimental group (from 34 ± 3.6 to 43 ± 3.6 nmols DHA/10(9) erythrocytes). Exercise significantly increased Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in PBMCs but only in the placebo group (203 %). Exercise also significantly increased IL6, IL8, VEGF, INFγ, TNFα, IL1α, IL1β, MCP1, and EGG production rates by LPS-stimulated PBMCs, and this response was attenuated by DHA supplementation. Temperature but not DHA also affected the pattern of cytokine production increasing IL6, IL8, IL1β, and MCP1 synthesis. The higher change was evidenced in IL1β increasing the production rate at 39.5 °C from 3.19 ± 0.77 to 22.4 ± 6.1 pg/h 10(6) PBMC in placebo and from 2.36 ± 0.11 to 10.6 ± 0.38 pg/h 10(6) PBMC in the supplemented group. The profile of affected cytokines differs between temperature and exercise, suggesting a different PBMC activation pathway. DHA diet supplementation only attenuated cytokine production after exercise and not that induced by temperature. PMID:27139422

  7. Inverse relationship of tumors and mononuclear cell leukemia infiltration in the lungs of F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, D.L.; Griffith, W.C.; Hahn, F.F.

    1995-12-01

    In 1970 and F344 rat, along with the B6C3F{sub 1} mouse, were selected as the standard rodents for the National Cancer Institute Carcinogenic Bioassay program for studies of potentially carcinogenic chemicals. The F344 rat has also been used in a variety of other carcinogenesis studies, including numerous studies at ITRI. A major concern to be considered in evaluating carcinogenic bioassay studies using the F344 rat is the relatively high background incidence of mononuclear cell leukemia (MCL) (also referred to as large granular lymphocytic leukemia, Fischer rat leukemia, or monocytic leukemia). Incidences of MCL ranging from 10 to 72% in male F344 rats to 6 to 31% in female F344 rats have been reported. Gaining the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the negative correlations noted should enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of lung cancer.

  8. [Research advances on DNA extraction methods from peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Chen-Xi

    2014-10-01

    DNA extraction is a basic technology of molecular biology. The purity and the integrality of DNA structure are necessary for different experiments of gene engineering. As commonly used materials in the clinical detection, the fast, efficient isolation and extraction of genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells is very important for the inspection and analysis of clinical blood. At present, there are many methods for extracting DNA, such as phenol-chloroform method, salting out method, centrifugal adsorption column chromatography method (artificial methods), magnetic beads (semi-automatic method) and DNA extraction kit. In this article, a brief review of the principle for existing DNA blood extraction method, the specific steps and the assessment of the specific methods briefly are summarized.

  9. Chemokine receptor expression on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Talvani, Andre; Rocha, Manoel O C; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2004-01-15

    We evaluated the expression of chemokine receptors (CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4) on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) and noninfected individuals. Only CCR5 and CXCR4 expression was different on the surface of the subsets (CD4, CD8, and CD14) evaluated. Patients with mild CCC had elevated leukocyte expression of CCR5, compared with noninfected individuals or those with severe disease. CXCR4 expression was lower on leukocytes from patients with severe CCC. The differential expression of both receptors on leukocytes of patients with CCC was consistent and clearly correlated with the degree of heart function such that the lower the heart function, the lower the expression of either CCR5 or CXCR4. These results highlight the possible participation of the chemokine system in early forms of chagasic cardiomyopathy and the relevance of heart failure-induced remodeling in modifying immune parameters in infected individuals.

  10. Lack of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate binding to biologically relevant binding sites on mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, E M; Lubrano, T M; Gordon, J; Fields, J Z

    1992-09-01

    We analyzed the binding characteristics of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate ([3H]QNB), a muscarinic cholinergic ligand, to rat and human mononuclear cells (MNC). Under various assay conditions, atropine-sensitive, saturable binding occurred with an apparent Kd of 10 nM. Conditions which disrupted the MNC membrane reduced total binding and eliminated specific binding. Muscarinic agonists were unable to inhibit [3H]QNB binding to MNC at concentrations up to 10(-2) M. Stereoisomers dexetimide and levetimide were equipotent inhibitors of binding (IC50 2 x 10(-5) M). We conclude that, although atropine-sensitive binding of [3H]QNB to MNC occurs, the binding is not consistent with the presence of a biologically relevant muscarinic cholinergic receptor. PMID:1392105

  11. Principles of bone marrow processing and progenitor cell/mononuclear cell concentrate collection in a continuous flow blood cell separation system.

    PubMed

    Hester, J P; Rondón, G; Huh, Y O; Lauppe, M J; Champlin, R E; Deisseroth, A B

    1995-08-01

    The application of continuous flow apheresis technology to processing bone marrow for collection of the mononuclear progenitor cell population appears to follow the same principles as collection of mononuclear cells from peripheral blood. Unlike peripheral blood, however, where mobilization of cells from extravascular sites during the procedures contributes significantly to the final cell yield, the entire quantity of progenitor cells available for recovery from marrow is present in the original marrow when it is pooled. The process then becomes one of attempting optimal recovery of the cells of interest while excluding contaminating erythrocytes and cells of the myeloid series. This study reports the development of a protocol for recovery of MNC, CD33+, CD34+, and CD34+/DR- cells from harvested marrow for autologous and allogeneic transplants using a continuous flow blood cell separator, the variables influencing the recovery of the cells of interest and the clinical response to infusion of the processed cells.

  12. Analyses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in operational tolerance after pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Koshiba, Takaaki; Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Yonekawa, Yukihide; Masuda, Kosuke; Ito, Atsushi; Ueda, Mikiko; Mori, Takahide; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Minato, Nagahiro; Wood, Kathryn J; Tanaka, Koichi

    2004-12-01

    Operational tolerance (graft acceptance in an immunosuppression (IS)-free environment) after living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) could occur by our elective protocol in some patients. There is, nevertheless, no reliable parameter to monitor patients who may discontinue IS without a risk of rejection. To identify such parameters, we systemically phenotyped peripheral blood mononuclear cells from operationally tolerant patients. An increase was observed in the frequency of CD4+CD25high+ cells, B cells and Vdelta1/Vdelta2 gammadeltaT-cells ratio in operationally tolerant patients (Gr-tol; n = 12), compared with those from age-matched volunteers (Gr-vol; n = 24) or patients on IS (Gr-IS; n = 19). The frequency of NK cells was decreased in Gr-tol, compared with those in Gr-IS or Gr-vol. The frequency of NKT cells was decreased after LDLT, compared with that in Gr-vol. Although the contribution of those subsets to the tolerant state remains elusive, the results may provide important clues for reliable indicators of tolerance after LDLT.

  13. Infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with a temperature-sensitive mutant of measles virus.

    PubMed Central

    Vydelingum, S; Ilonen, J; Salonen, R; Marusyk, R; Salmi, A

    1989-01-01

    A stable temperature-sensitive mutant of measles virus (MV ts38) was used to study the mechanism of virus-mediated immune suppression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. Both unstimulated and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated cultures released infectious virus at 32 degrees C, whereas no virus was released at 37 degrees C, although both viral RNA and viral proteins were synthesized. However, the response of the lymphoid cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and herpes simplex virus antigen was decreased in the presence of MV ts38 at 37 degrees C. The viability of infected cells was not diminished, therefore excluding cell death as a reason for immunosuppression. Interleukin 2 did not play a role in the inhibitory effect of MV ts38. Antibodies to alpha interferon partially reversed the inhibitory effect of the virus infection on lymphocyte mitogenesis, thus implying that alpha interferon plays a role in the immunosuppression. Depletion experiments indicated that adherent cells play a greater role in the measles virus-induced immunosuppression than nonadherent cells. However, monocyte maturation to macrophages had no effect on the degree of immunosuppression. Images PMID:2911119

  14. Transcriptional Response of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Cattle Infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Federico Carlos; Soria, Marcelo; Bianco, María Verónica; Bigi, Fabiana

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of most cases of bovine tuberculosis. The identification of bTB biomarkers in specific stages of the disease will contribute to a better understanding of the immunopathology associated with tuberculosis and will enable their use in disease diagnosis and prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gene expression profile induced after specific stimulation of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cattle infected with M. bovis using the Affymetrix® GeneChip® Bovine Genome Array. A total of 172 genes showed differential expression profile that was statistically significant with log2-fold change >2.5 and <−2.5. Twenty-four out of these genes were upregulated and 148 were downregulated in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells of M. bovis-infected cattle. The highest differentially-expressed genes were related to immune and inflammatory responses, apoptosis, endocytosis, cellular trafficking and genes encoding proteins involved in cellular matrix degradation. Microarray results were confirmed in another group of infected cattle by RT-qPCR for the CD14, IL-1R, THBS1, MMP9 and FYVE genes. This study confirms previous findings that have shown that M. bovis infection in cattle results in the downregulation of immune response-related genes. Moreover, it validates the use of microarray platforms in combination with RT-qPCR to identify biomarkers of bovine tuberculosis. In addition, we propose CD14, IL-1R, THBS1, MMP9 and FYVE as potential biomarkers of bovine tuberculosis. PMID:22815916

  15. Generation of Patient-Specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cell from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Sendai Reprogramming Vectors.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Segovia, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) technology has changed preclinical research since their generation was described by Shinya Yamanaka in 2006. iPSCs are derived from somatic cells after being reprogrammed back to an embryonic state by specific combination of reprogramming factors. These reprogrammed cells resemble all the characteristic of embryonic stem cells (ESC). The reprogramming technology is even more valuable to research diseases biology and treatment by opening gene and cell therapies in own patient's iPSC. Patient-specific iPSC can be generated from a large variety of patient cells by any of the myriad of reprogramming platforms described. Here, we describe the generation of patient-specific iPSC from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells by Sendai Reprogramming vectors.

  16. A Hitchhiker’s Guide to Myeloid Cell Subsets: Practical Implementation of a Novel Mononuclear Phagocyte Classification System

    PubMed Central

    Guilliams, Martin; van de Laar, Lianne

    2015-01-01

    The classification of mononuclear phagocytes as either dendritic cells or macrophages has been mainly based on morphology, the expression of surface markers, and assumed functional specialization. We have recently proposed a novel classification system of mononuclear phagocytes based on their ontogeny. Here, we discuss the practical application of such a classification system through a number of prototypical examples we have encountered while hitchhiking from one subset to another, across species and between steady-state and inflammatory settings. Finally, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of such a classification system and propose a number of improvements to move from theoretical concepts to concrete guidelines. PMID:26322042

  17. [Bone marrow mononuclear cells from murine tibia after the space flight on biosatellite "Bion-M1"].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, E R; Goncharova, E A; Gornostaeva, A N; Grigor'eva, O V; Buravkova, L B

    2014-01-01

    Cellularity, viability and immunophenotype of mononuclear cells derived from the tibial marrow of C57bL/6 mice were measured after the 30-day "Bion-M1" space flight and subsequent 7-day recovery. Cell number in the flight group was significantly less than in the group of vivarium control. There was no difference in the parameter between the flight and control groups after the recovery. Viability of mononuclear cells was more than 95% in all examined groups. Flow cytometric analysis failed to show differences in bone marrow cell immunophenotype (CD45, CD34, CD90.1 (Thy1); however, the flight animals had more large-sized CD45+ mononuclears than the control groups of mice. These results indicate that spaceflight factors did not have significant damaging effects on the number or immunophenotype of murine bone marrow mononuclears. These observations are consistent with the previously made assumption of a moderate and reversible stress reaction of mammals to space flight.

  18. Thrombin inhibits IFN-gamma production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by promoting a Th2 profile.

    PubMed

    Naldini, Antonella; Morena, Emilia; Filippi, Irene; Pucci, Annalisa; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Cirino, Giuseppe; Carraro, Fabio

    2006-11-01

    Thrombin, the key enzyme of the coagulation cascade, is involved in inflammation. It was proposed recently that thrombin activity may play an important role in allergic inflammation. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is a potent Th1-related cytokine secreted by activated T cells and is usually downregulated in allergic inflammation. We recently demonstrated that thrombin enhances interleukin-10 (IL-10) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Thus, we hypothesized that thrombin may promote a Th2 profile. We here report that human alpha- thrombin downregulates IFN-gamma expression at both protein and mRNA levels in activated PBMCs. The use of proteolytically inactive thrombin and of the specific thrombin receptor agonist peptide, SFLLRN, shows that this downregulation is thrombin specific and requires thrombin proteolytic activity. The addition of an anti- IL-10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to thrombin-treated PBMCs abolishes IFN-gamma downregulation, suggesting that thrombin exerts its effect through IL-10, a Th2-related cytokine. Furthermore, IFN-gamma reduction was accompanied by increased IL-4 release, as well as by an increase in the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1. In conclusion, the observation that thrombin affects the production of IFN-gamma (Th1 profile) and IL-4 (Th2 profile) provides further evidence for the role played by thrombin in modulating Th1/Th2 cytokine balance, which could be particularly relevant in allergic inflammation. PMID:17115897

  19. Alterations of mitogenic responses of mononuclear cells by arsenic in arsenical skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Yu, H S; Chang, K L; Wang, C M; Yu, C L

    1992-11-01

    We have studied the endemic occurrence of chronic arsenism in a limited area on the southwest coast of Taiwan. The effects of arsenic on the mitogenic responses of mononuclear cells (MNC) derived from patients with arsenical skin cancers in that area were evaluated. The subjects enrolled in this study included patients with 1) Bowen's disease, 2) arsenical skin cancers (basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma), 3) non-arsenical skin cancers (basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma), 4) nasopharyngeal cancer and 5) healthy controls from endemic and non-endemic areas. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation in MNC in all groups except the arsenical skin cancer group. However, when a low concentration of As2O3 (2.5 x 10(-7) M) was added to PHA-stimulated MNC, a tremendous amplification of the uptake of [3H]thymidine was noticed in patients with arsenical skin cancer. In this study, this phenomenon did not occur in cancers not related to arsenic. This result shows that arsenical carcinomas are hyperreactive to its specific etiology--arsenic. Arsenic seems to play a role as a co-stimulant of PHA similar to interleukin-1.

  20. Effect of arsenic, cadmium and lead on the induction of apoptosis of normal human mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    DE LA FUENTE, H; PORTALES-PÉREZ, D; BARANDA, L; DÍAZ-BARRIGA, F; SAAVEDRA-ALANÍS, V; LAYSECA, E; GONZÁLEZ-AMARO, R

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of cadmium, lead and arsenic on the apoptosis of human immune cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) were incubated with increasing concentrations of these metals and then cellular apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and by DNA electrophoresis. We found that arsenic induced a significant level of apoptosis at 15 μm after 48h of incubation. Cadmium had a similar effect, but at higher concentrations (65 μm). In addition, cadmium exerted a cytotoxic effect on MNC that seemed to be independent of the induction of apoptosis. In contrast, concentrations of lead as high as 500 μm were nontoxic and did not induce a significant degree of apoptosis. Additional experiments showed that arsenic at concentrations as low as 1·0 μm had a significant pro-apoptotic effect when cells were cultured in the presence of this pollutant for more than 72. Non-T cells were more susceptible than T lymphocytes to the effect of arsenic and cadmium. Interestingly, MNC from children chronically exposed to arsenic showed a high basal rate of apoptosis and a diminished in vitro sensibility to this metalloid. Our results indicate that both arsenic and cadmium are able to induce apoptosis of lymphoid cells, and suggest that this phenomenon may contribute to their immunotoxic effect in vivo. PMID:12100024

  1. Human cord blood mononuclear cells decrease cytokines and inflammatory cells in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Henning, Robert J; Shariff, Masood; Eadula, Ujwala; Alvarado, Felipe; Vasko, Mark; Sanberg, Paul R; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Delostia, Vincent

    2008-12-01

    We investigated whether human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HUCBC), which contain hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells, can limit myocardial cytokine expression and inflammatory cell infiltration in acute myocardial infarction. We permanently ligated the left coronary artery of rats and injected into the myocardium either Isolyte or 4 x 10(6) HUCBC in Isolyte and measured myocardial cytokines with antibody arrays at 2, 6, 12, 24, and 72 hours after infarction. We then measured with flow cytometry myocardial macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes at 12, 24, and 72 hours after infarctions in rats treated with either intramyocardial Isolyte or 4 x 10(6) HUCBC. In the Isolyte-treated hearts, between 2 and 12 hours after myocardial infarction, tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased from 6.7 +/- 0.9% to 52.3 +/- 4.7%, monocyte chemoattract protein increased from 9.5 +/- 1.2% to 39.8 +/- 2.1%, fractalkine increased from 11 +/- 1.5% to 28.1 +/- 1.3%, ciliary neurotrophic factor increased from 12.1 +/- 0.02% to 25.9 +/- 1.1%, macrophage inflammatory protein increased from 10.3 +/- 1.5% to 23.9.0 +/- 1.4%, interferon-gamma increased from 8.7 +/- 0.4% to 26.0 +/- 1.6%, interleukin-1beta increased from 6.1 +/- 0.04% to 19.0 +/- 1.2%, and IL-4 increased from 5.9 +/- 0.03% to 15 +/- 1.5% (all p < 0.001 compared with controls). The concentrations of fractalkine remained significantly increased at 72 hours after acute infarction. In contrast, the myocardial concentrations of these cytokines did not significantly change in HUCBC treated hearts at 2, 6, 12, 24, or 72 hours after infarction. The percentage of neutrophils increased from 0.04 +/- 0.2%/50,000 heart cells in the controls to 5.3 +/- 1.2%/50,000 heart cells 12 hours after infarction in Isolyte-treated hearts but averaged only 1.3 +/- 0.7%/50,000 heart cells in HUCBC treated hearts (p < 0.02). Thereafter, the percentages of neutrophils rapidly decreased at 24 and at 72 hours after infarction and

  2. [Autotransfusion of UV-irradiated blood and the morphofunctional status of mononuclear cells in neurodermitis patients].

    PubMed

    Finkel'shteĭn, B B; Zver'kova, F A

    1989-01-01

    Structural changes in the blood mononuclear glycocalyx has been revealed in children suffering from neurodermatitis. These shifts correlated with the cellular ability to respond to mitogenic stimulation. Treatment by UV-irradiated blood autotransfusions normalized the structure and function of mononuclears whereas routine therapy has been ineffective. PMID:2728605

  3. [Modulation of apoptosis in mononuclear cells with different variants of polymorphism C-262T in catalase gene].

    PubMed

    Komina, A V; Ruksha, T G

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is a clue enzyme metabolizing hydrogen peroxide under conditions of oxidative stress. It is known that the C-262T polymorphism in catalase gene is implicated in higher risk of some diseases onset. In this article we have evaluated the viability of mononuclear leukocytes isolated from patients with different variants of C-262T polymorphism in catalase gene (CC, CT, TT) under conditions of hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress. It has been revealed that cells with TT variant of polymorphism have lower viability in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in a concentration of 1000 μM/L in comparison with cells having CC and CT genotypes. Furthermore, unlike CC and CT variants, cells with TT polymorphism showed no activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway even with hydrogen peroxide at a concentration of 1 mM. The data obtained may explain the increased risk of diseases related with the activity of the antioxidant system in patients with 262 TT promoter polymorphism in catalase gene.

  4. Sam68 is tyrosine phosphorylated and recruited to signalling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Najib, S; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Ríos, M J; Muniain, M A; Goberna, R; Sánchez-Margalet, V

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) codes for a protein, Rev, that mediates the viral RNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Recently, it has been found that Sam68, the substrate of Src associated in mitosis, is a functional homologue of Rev, and a synergistic activator of Rev activity. Thus, it has been suggested that Sam68 may play an important role in the post-transcriptional regulation of HIV. Sam68 contains an RNA binding motif named KH [homology to the nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K]. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Sam68 and binding to SH3 domains have been found to negatively regulate its RNA binding capacity. Besides, tyrosine phosphorylation of Sam68 allows the formation of signalling complexes with other proteins containing SH2 and SH3 domains, suggesting a role in signal transduction of different systems in human lymphocytes, such as the T cell receptor, and leptin receptor, or the insulin receptor in other cell types. In the present work, we have found that Sam68 is tyrosine phosphorylated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HIV infected subjects, leading to the formation of signalling complexes with p85 the regulatory subunit of PI3K, GAP and STAT-3, and decreasing its RNA binding capacity. In contrast, PBMC from HIV infected subjects have lower expression levels of Sam68 compared with controls. These results suggest that Sam68 may play some role in the immune function of lymphocytes in HIV infection. PMID:16045742

  5. Separation of Escherichia coli Bacteria from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Standing Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic device was developed to separate heterogeneous particle or cell mixtures in a continuous flow using acoustophoresis. In this device, two identical surface acoustic waves (SAWs) generated by interdigital transducers (IDTs) propagated toward a microchannel, which accordingly built up a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) field across the channel. A numerical model, coupling a piezoelectric effect in the solid substrate and acoustic pressure in the fluid, was developed to provide a better understanding of SSAW-based particle manipulation. It was found that the pressure nodes across the channel were individual planes perpendicular to the solid substrate. In the separation experiments, two side sheath flows hydrodynamically focused the injected particle or cell mixtures into a very narrow stream along the centerline. Particles flowing through the SSAW field experienced an acoustic radiation force that highly depends on the particle properties. As a result, dissimilar particles or cells were laterally attracted toward the pressure nodes at different magnitudes, and were eventually switched to different outlets. Two types of fluorescent microspheres with different sizes were successfully separated using the developed device. In addition, Escherichia coli bacteria premixed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were also efficiently isolated using the SSAW-base separation technique. Flow cytometric analysis on the collected samples found that the purity of separated E. coli bacteria was 95.65%. PMID:23968497

  6. Immunotoxicity Assessment of Rice-Derived Recombinant Human Serum Albumin Using Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai; Cheng, Qin; Liu, Zhenwei; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Yan; Ruan, Honggang; Zhou, Lu; Xiong, Jie; Xiao, Ruijing; Liu, Shengwu; Zhang, Qiuping; Yang, Daichang

    2014-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is extensively used in clinics to treat a variety of diseases, such as hypoproteinemia, hemorrhagic shock, serious burn injuries, cirrhotic ascites and fetal erythroblastosis. To address supply shortages and high safety risks from limited human donors, we recently developed recombinant technology to produce HSA from rice endosperm. To assess the risk potential of HSA derived from Oryza sativa (OsrHSA) before a First-in-human (FIH) trial, we compared OsrHSA and plasma-derived HSA (pHSA), evaluating the potential for an immune reaction and toxicity using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The results indicated that neither OsrHSA nor pHSA stimulated T cell proliferation at 1x and 5x dosages. We also found no significant differences in the profiles of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets between OsrHSA- and pHSA-treated cells. Furthermore, the results showed that there were no significant differences between OsrHSA and pHSA in the production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-4. Our results demonstrated that OsrHSA has equivalent immunotoxicity to pHSA when using the PBMC model. Moreover, this ex vivo system could provide an alternative approach to predict potential risks in novel biopharmaceutical development. PMID:25099245

  7. Isolation and Flow Cytometric Analysis of Glioma-infiltrating Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Gregory J.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory has recently demonstrated that natural killer (NK) cells are capable of eradicating orthotopically implanted mouse GL26 and rat CNS-1 malignant gliomas soon after intracranial engraftment if the cancer cells are rendered deficient in their expression of the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-1 (gal-1). More recent work now shows that a population of Gr-1+/CD11b+ myeloid cells is critical to this effect. To better understand the mechanisms by which NK and myeloid cells cooperate to confer gal-1-deficient tumor rejection we have developed a comprehensive protocol for the isolation and analysis of glioma-infiltrating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The method is demonstrated here by comparing PBMC infiltration into the tumor microenvironment of gal-1-expressing GL26 gliomas with those rendered gal-1-deficient via shRNA knockdown. The protocol begins with a description of how to culture and prepare GL26 cells for inoculation into the syngeneic C57BL/6J mouse brain. It then explains the steps involved in the isolation and flow cytometric analysis of glioma-infiltrating PBMCs from the early brain tumor microenvironment. The method is adaptable to a number of in vivo experimental designs in which temporal data on immune infiltration into the brain is required. The method is sensitive and highly reproducible, as glioma-infiltrating PBMCs can be isolated from intracranial tumors as soon as 24 hr post-tumor engraftment with similar cell counts observed from time point matched tumors throughout independent experiments. A single experimentalist can perform the method from brain harvesting to flow cytometric analysis of glioma-infiltrating PBMCs in roughly 4–6 hr depending on the number of samples to be analyzed. Alternative glioma models and/or cell-specific detection antibodies may also be used at the experimentalists’ discretion to assess the infiltration of several other immune cell types of interest without the need for alterations to the

  8. Bisphenol A and its analogs exhibit different apoptotic potential in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Mokra, Katarzyna; Kocia, Magdalena; Michałowicz, Jaromir

    2015-10-01

    There are only a few studies that have assessed the effect of bisphenol A (BPA) on human blood cells and no study has been conducted to analyze the impact of BPA analogs on human leucocytes. In this study, we have investigated the effect of BPA and its analogs like bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol AF (BPAF) on apoptosis induction in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In order to clarify the mechanism of bisphenols-induced programmed cell death, changes in various signaling molecules of this process have been assessed. We observed an increase in cytosolic calcium ions (Ca(2+)) level and reduction of transmembrane mitochondrial potential (ΔΨm) in PBMCs incubated with all compounds examined, and particularly BPA and BPAF. All compounds studied changed PBMCs membrane permeability, activated caspase-8, -9, -3 and induced PARP-1 cleavage and chromatin condensation, which confirmed that they were capable of inducing apoptosis both via intrinsic and extrinsic pathway. Moreover, we have found that modus operandi of bisphenols studied was different. We noticed that BPAF and BPS caused mainly necrotic and apoptotic changes, respectively, whereas BPA induced comparable apoptotic and necrotic effects in the incubated cells.

  9. Effect of asbestos exposure on differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in mixed lymphocyte reaction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Maeda, Megumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2013-07-01

    Asbestos fibers are associated with tumorigenicity, and are thought to cause mesothelioma. However, their effect on immune response remains unclear. We examined the effect of asbestos exposure on differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) upon exposure to chrysotile B (CB) or crocidolite (CR) asbestos at 5 μg/ml for 7 days. Exposure to CB during MLR suppressed increases in the percentage and number of CD8⁺ T cells in response to allogenic cells. The cytotoxicity for allogenic targets decreased in PBMCs exposed to CB, but not CR, when compared with PBMCs without any exposure during MLR. Exposure to CB during MLR resulted in suppression of increases in granzyme B⁺ cells and IFN-γ⁺ cells. CB exposure also resulted in suppression of increases in CD45RO⁺ effector/memory cells and CD25⁺-activated cells in CD8⁺ lymphocytes, and a decrease in CD45RA⁺ cells. CB exposure suppressed the proliferation of CD8⁺ lymphocytes without an increase in annexin V⁺ apoptotic cells in CD8⁺ lymphocytes. Moreover, the production of IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, but not IL-2, decreased in the presence of CB. These results suggest that exposure to asbestos potentially suppresses the differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte, accompanied by decreases in IFN-γ and TNF-α.

  10. Activation of cathepsins B and L in mouse lymphosarcoma tissue under the effect of cyclophosphamide is associated with apoptosis induction and infiltration by mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhanaeva, S Ya; Mel'nikova, E V; Trufakin, V A; Korolenko, T A

    2013-11-01

    We analyzed activities of lysosomal cystein cathepsins B and L in mouse LS lymphosarcoma and its drug-resistant RLS 40 strain and their correlations with the dynamics of the percentage of cells with fragmented DNA and CD14 (+) phagocytes over 3 days after cyclophosphamide injection. LS regression and inhibition of RLS 40 growth after cyclophosphamide injection were paralleled by an increase in cathepsins B and L activities in tumor tissues. The antitumor effect of cyclophosphamide associated with apoptosis intensity and protease activities were significantly higher in LS. Positive correlations between activities of cathepsins B and L and the LS tissue content of cells with fragmented DNA and CD14 (+) phagocytes and negative correlations thereof with tumor weight were detected. It seems that the increase in cathepsins B and L activities in LS tissues was caused by cyclophosphamide induction of apoptosis and depended on the level of tumor cell infiltration with mononuclear phagocytes.

  11. Novel Fc gamma receptor I family gene products in human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Porges, A J; Redecha, P B; Doebele, R; Pan, L C; Salmon, J E; Kimberly, R P

    1992-01-01

    Unlike the human Fc gamma RII and Fc gamma RIII families, which exhibit considerable diversity at both the nucleic acid and protein levels, the human Fc gamma RI family has only a single recognized product expressed as a 70-kD cell surface receptor with high affinity for monomeric IgG (hFc gamma RIa1). Using both polymerase chain reaction-based amplification and Northern hybridization, we document multiple interferon-gamma-inducible hFc gamma RI RNA transcripts in human mononuclear cells and neutrophils. The sequences of two of these Fc gamma RI related transcripts indicate that they are alternatively spliced products of a second Fc gamma RI family gene, termed Fc gamma RIB. The cDNA derived from the larger of these transcripts, termed hFc gamma RIb1, encodes a surface molecule that is not recognized by Fc gamma RI specific monoclonal antibodies when transfected into COS-7 cells. Unlike the interferon-gamma-inducible hFc gamma RIA gene product, hFc gamma RIb1 does not bind monomeric IgG with high affinity. However, both hFc gamma RIa1 and hFc gamma RIb1 do bind aggregated human IgG. Previously unrecognized diversity within the hFc gamma RI family includes an interferon-gamma-inducible, putative low affinity Fc gamma receptor that may play an important role in the mechanism by which Fc gamma receptors participate in the humoral immune response. Images PMID:1430234

  12. Modifications of the endosomal compartment in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and fibroblasts from Alzheimer's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Corlier, F; Rivals, I; Lagarde, J; Hamelin, L; Corne, H; Dauphinot, L; Ando, K; Cossec, J-C; Fontaine, G; Dorothée, G; Malaplate-Armand, C; Olivier, J-L; Dubois, B; Bottlaender, M; Duyckaerts, C; Sarazin, M; Potier, M-C; Alnajjar-Carpentier, Dr Amer; Logak, Dr Michel; Leder, Dr Sara; Marchal, Dr Dominique; Pitti-Ferandi, Dr Hélène; Brugeilles, Dr Hélene; Roualdes, Dr Brigitte; Michon, Dr Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Identification of blood-based biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains a challenge. Neuropathological studies have identified enlarged endosomes in post-mortem brains as the earliest cellular change associated to AD. Here the presence of enlarged endosomes was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 48 biologically defined AD patients (25 with mild cognitive impairment and 23 with dementia (AD-D)), and 23 age-matched healthy controls using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. The volume and number of endosomes were not significantly different between AD and controls. However, the percentage of cells containing enlarged endosomes was significantly higher in the AD-D group as compared with controls. Furthermore, endosomal volumes significantly correlated to [C11]PiB cortical index measured by positron emission tomography in the AD group, independently of the APOE genotype, but not to the levels of amyloid-beta, tau and phosphorylated tau measured in the cerebrospinal fluid. Importantly, we confirmed the presence of enlarged endosomes in fibroblasts from six unrelated AD-D patients as compared with five cognitively normal controls. This study is the first, to our knowledge, to report morphological alterations of the endosomal compartment in peripheral cells from AD patients correlated to amyloid load that will now be evaluated as a possible biomarker. PMID:26151923

  13. Molecular Imaging of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Survival and Homing in Murine Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Bogt, Koen E.A.; Hellingman, Alwine A.; Lijkwan, Maarten A.; Bos, Ernst-Jan; de Vries, Margreet R.; Fischbein, Michael P.; Quax, Paul H.; Robbins, Robert C.; Hamming, Jaap F.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow mononuclear cell (MNC) therapy is a promising treatment for peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study aims to provide insight into cellular kinetics using molecular imaging following different transplantation methods. Methods and Results MNCs were isolated from F6 transgenic mice (FVB background) that express firefly luciferase (Fluc) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Male FVB and C57Bl6 mice (n=50) underwent femoral artery ligation and were randomized into 4 groups receiving: (1) single intramuscular (i.m.) injection of 2×106 MNC; (2) four weekly i.m. injections of 5×105 MNC; (3) 2×106 MNCs intravenously (i.v.); and (4) PBS. Cellular kinetics, measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI), revealed near-complete donor cell death 4 weeks after i.m. transplantation. Following i.v. transplantation, BLI monitored cells homed in on the injured area in the limb, as well as to the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Ex vivo BLI showed presence of MNCs in the scar tissue and adductor muscle. However, no significant effects on neovascularisation were observed as monitored by Laser-Doppler-Perfusion-Imaging and histology. Conclusion This is one of the first studies to assess kinetics of transplanted MNCs in PAD using in vivo molecular imaging. MNC survival is short lived and MNCs do not significantly stimulate perfusion in this model. PMID:22239892

  14. Chinese goose (Anser cygnoides) CD8a: cloning, tissue distribution and immunobiological in splenic mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiurong; Liu, Fei; Chen, Shun; Yan, Xiaoling; Qi, Yulin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2013-10-25

    CD8 molecule is a cell membrane glycoprotein, which plays an important role in cell-mediated immunity. Here, we identified Chinese goose CD8α (goCD8α) gene for the first time. The full-length cDNA of goCD8α is 1459bp in length and contains a 711bp open reading frame. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the waterfowl CD8α formed a monophyletic group. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that transcripts of goCD8α mRNA were high in the immune-related organs and mucosal immune system in gosling, and high in thymus and spleen comparing to other immune-related tissues in goose. The obvious increase of CD8α expression was observed in spleen of acute new type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV) infected bird, while the increase of CD8α were observed in the thymus, bursa of fabricius, and cecum of chronic infected bird. The CD8α mRNA transcription level in spleen mononuclear cells was significantly up-regulated when stimulated by phytohemagglutinin, but not by lipopolysaccharide in vitro.

  15. In vitro synthesis of primary specific anti-breast cancer antibodies by normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Norkina, Oxana; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a unique in vitro model to mimic the endogenous tumor microenvironment to understand the effect of immunotherapy with activated T-cells (ATC) armed with anti-CD3 × anti-Her2 bispecific antibody (aATC) on antibody response by naive immune cells. This model contained a co-culture of naïve peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3), ATC or aATC and CpG ODNs. Culture supernatants were tested at various time points for anti-SK-BR-3 antibodies by ELISA, Western blot and flow cytometry. PBMC cocultured with non-irradiated aATC or irradiated (*) aATC showed significant increases in anti-tumor antibody production at day 14 (P < 0.0001) in the presence of CpG-ODN compared to unstimulated PBMC cultures (n = 9). Antibody specificity was confirmed by ELISA, Western blot and flow cytometry. Co-cultures containing *aATC and CpG showed significantly enhanced levels of IgG2 (P < 0.001) and cytokines that promote IgG2 synthesis including IL-13 (P < 0.02), IFNγ (P < 0.01) and GM-CSF (P < 0.05) compared to unstimulated PBMC control (n = 3). We show that aATC targeting and lysis of tumor cells induces an anti-tumor antibody response in our in vitro model. This model provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the interactions of T-cells, B-cells, and antigen-presenting cells leading to specific anti-tumor antibody responses. PMID:21713642

  16. Characterization of surface interleukin-2 receptor expression on gated populations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Sweat, J M; Johnson, C M; Marikar, Y; Gibbs, E P

    2005-12-15

    An in vitro system to determine surface interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) expression on mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from free-ranging manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris was developed. Human recombinant IL-2, conjugated with a fluorescein dye was used in conjunction with flow cytometric analysis to determine changes in surface expression of IL-2R at sequential times over a 48-h period of in vitro stimulation. Surface expression of IL-2R was detected on manatee PBMC, which also cross-reacted with an anti-feline pan T-cell marker. An expression index (EI) was calculated by comparing mitogen-activated and non-activated PBMC. Based on side- and forward-scatter properties, flow cytometric analysis showed an increase in the number of larger, more granular "lymphoblasts" following concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation. The appearance of lymphoblasts was correlated with an increase in their surface expression of IL-2 receptors. Surface IL-2R expression, in Con A-stimulated PBMC, was detected at 16 h, peaked at 24-36 h, and began to decrease by 48 h. Characterization of the IL-2R expression should provide additional information on the health status of manatees, and the effect of their sub lethal exposure to brevetoxin.

  17. Novel humanized anti-CD3 antibodies induce a predominantly immunoregulatory profile in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hernandez M; Vieira, Pedro M M M; Costa, Patricia L N; Pimentel, Bárbara M S; Moro, Ana M; Kalil, Jorge; Maranhão, Andrea Q; Coelho, Verônica; Brigido, Marcelo M

    2009-08-15

    Strategies to minimize the immunogenicity and toxicity of murine anti-CD3 antibodies (e.g. OKT3) are of special interest for organ transplantation and for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In the present work, we have developed two humanized anti-CD3 antibodies. These molecules were shown to bind to human CD3, though less efficiently, and display less mitogenic activity than OKT3. These results prompted us to investigate whether this reduced mitogenic potential was associated with the development of anti-inflammatory properties. Indeed, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), the humanized antibody versions induced a predominantly anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, in contrast with the pro-inflammatory profile induced by OKT3. Neither OKT3 nor the humanized versions induced the expression of IL-4, IL-2 or TGF-beta. Both humanized antibodies induced significantly lower production of IFN-gamma and IL-5 and slightly higher production of IL-10 than OKT3. This immunomodulatory profile was most evident by the 80-fold higher ratio of IL-10/IFN-gamma production in PBMCs cultured in the presence of the humanized antibodies, compared to those stimulated with OKT3. Furthermore, these humanized anti-CD3 antibodies induced a late FOXP3 gene expression while OKT3 led to a more transient expression of FOXP3. Taken our results, we suggest that these humanized anti-CD3 antibodies may promote the development of T cells with immunoregulatory activity.

  18. Analysis of the Secretome of Apoptotic Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Impact of Released Proteins and Exosomes for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Lucian; Zimmermann, Matthias; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Ellinger, Adolf; Gruber, Florian; Narzt, Marie-Sophie; Zellner, Maria; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Madlener, Sibylle; Simader, Elisabeth; Gabriel, Christian; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that, when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stressed with ionizing radiation, they released paracrine factors that showed regenerative capacity in vitro and in vivo. This study aimed to characterize the secretome of PBMCs and to investigate its biologically active components in vitro and vivo. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that irradiated PBMCs differentially expressed genes that encoded secreted proteins. These genes were primarily involved in (a) pro-angiogenic and regenerative pathways and (b) the generation of oxidized phospholipids with known pro-angiogenic and inflammation-modulating properties. Subsequently, in vitro assays showed that the exosome and protein fractions of irradiated and non-irradiated PBMC secretome were the major biological components that enhanced cell mobility; conversely, secreted lipids and microparticles had no effects. We tested a viral-cleared PBMC secretome, prepared according to good manufacturing practice (GMP), in a porcine model of closed chest, acute myocardial infarction. We found that the potency for preventing ventricular remodeling was similar with the GMP-compliant and experimentally-prepared PBMC secretomes. Our results indicate that irradiation modulates the release of proteins, lipid-mediators and extracellular vesicles from human PBMCs. In addition our findings implicate the use of secretome fractions as valuable material for the development of cell-free therapies in regenerative medicine. PMID:26567861

  19. Analysis of the Secretome of Apoptotic Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Impact of Released Proteins and Exosomes for Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Beer, Lucian; Zimmermann, Matthias; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Ellinger, Adolf; Gruber, Florian; Narzt, Marie-Sophie; Zellner, Maria; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Madlener, Sibylle; Simader, Elisabeth; Gabriel, Christian; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that, when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stressed with ionizing radiation, they released paracrine factors that showed regenerative capacity in vitro and in vivo. This study aimed to characterize the secretome of PBMCs and to investigate its biologically active components in vitro and vivo. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that irradiated PBMCs differentially expressed genes that encoded secreted proteins. These genes were primarily involved in (a) pro-angiogenic and regenerative pathways and (b) the generation of oxidized phospholipids with known pro-angiogenic and inflammation-modulating properties. Subsequently, in vitro assays showed that the exosome and protein fractions of irradiated and non-irradiated PBMC secretome were the major biological components that enhanced cell mobility; conversely, secreted lipids and microparticles had no effects. We tested a viral-cleared PBMC secretome, prepared according to good manufacturing practice (GMP), in a porcine model of closed chest, acute myocardial infarction. We found that the potency for preventing ventricular remodeling was similar with the GMP-compliant and experimentally-prepared PBMC secretomes. Our results indicate that irradiation modulates the release of proteins, lipid-mediators and extracellular vesicles from human PBMCs. In addition our findings implicate the use of secretome fractions as valuable material for the development of cell-free therapies in regenerative medicine. PMID:26567861

  20. Decreased TIM-3 mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from nephropathy patients.

    PubMed

    Cai, X Z; Liu, N; Qiao, Y; Du, S Y; Chen, Y; Chen, D; Yu, S; Jiang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that TIM-1 and TIM-3 in-fluence chronic autoimmune diseases, and their expression levels in immune cells from nephritic patients are still unknown. Real-time transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to deter-mine expression levels of TIM-1 and TIM-3 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 36 patients with minimal change glo-merulopathy (MCG), 65 patients with lupus nephritis (LN), 78 patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), 55 patients with membranous nephropa-thy (MN), 22 patients with crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN), 26 patients with anaphylactoid purpura nephritis (APN), and 63 healthy controls. TIM-3 mRNA expression significantly decreased in PBMCs from nephritic patients (LN, P < 0.0001; MCG, P < 0.0001; MN, P = 0.0031; CGN, P = 0.0464; IgAN, P = 0.0002; APN, P = 0.0392) com-pared with healthy controls. In contrast, there was no significant differ-ence in TIM-1 mRNA expression between the patients and the healthy controls. Our results suggest that insufficient expression of TIM-3 mRNA may be involved in the pathogenesis of nephropathy.

  1. Evaluation of proliferation and cytokines production by mitogen-stimulated bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Norian, Reza; Delirezh, Nowruz; Azadmehr, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate lymphocyte blastogenic and cytokine production by bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and concanavalin A (Con A) mitogens, by using tetrazolium salt and ELISA tests, respectively. The results presented that Interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ production in response to PWM mitogens was the highest and Con A the lowest amount and the median values of three mitogens were in the following order: PWM > PHA > Con A > cell control. In the case of IL-6, the production of this cytokine was the same amount for PWM and Con A and a lower amount for PHA stimulation. The results of this study not only showed a normal range for the production of these cytokines from PBMCs that were affected by mitogens, but it demonstrated that the bovine immune system at 2.5 to 3 months was post-natally matured enough to mount an effective immune response to mitogens as well as specific antigens. PMID:26973760

  2. Differential expression and interaction of host factors augment HIV-1 gene expression in neonatal mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaravaradan, Vasudha; Mehta, Roshni; Harris, David T.; Zack, Jerome A.; Ahmad, Nafees

    2010-04-25

    We have previously shown a higher level of HIV-1 replication and gene expression in neonatal (cord) blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) compared with adult blood cells (PBMC), which could be due to differential expression of host factors. We performed the gene expression profile of CBMC and PBMC and found that 8013 genes were expressed at higher levels in CBMC than PBMC and 8028 genes in PBMC than CBMC, including 1181 and 1414 genes upregulated after HIV-1 infection in CBMC and PBMC, respectively. Several transcription factors (NF-kappaB, E2F, HAT-1, TFIIE, Cdk9, Cyclin T1), signal transducers (STAT3, STAT5A) and cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10) were upregulated in CBMC than PBMC, which are known to influence HIV-1 replication. In addition, a repressor of HIV-1 transcription, YY1, was down regulated in CBMC than PBMC and several matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7, -12, -14) were significantly upregulated in HIV-1 infected CBMC than PBMC. Furthermore, we show that CBMC nuclear extracts interacted with a higher extent to HIV-1 LTR cis-acting sequences, including NF-kappaB, NFAT, AP1 and NF-IL6 compared with PBMC nuclear extracts and retroviral based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for STAT3 and IL-6 down regulated their own and HIV-1 gene expression, signifying that these factors influenced differential HIV-1 gene expression in CBMC than PBMC.

  3. A Clinical Study of Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for Cerebral Palsy Patients: A New Frontier

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Alok; Sane, Hemangi; Gokulchandran, Nandini; Kulkarni, Pooja; Sundaram, Jyothi; Paranjape, Amruta; Shetty, Akshata; Bhagwanani, Khushboo; Biju, Hema; Badhe, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a nonprogressive heterogeneous group of neurological disorders with a growing rate of prevalence. Recently, cellular therapy is emerging as a potential novel treatment strategy for cerebral palsy. The various mechanisms by which cellular therapy works include neuroprotection, immunomodulation, neurorestoration, and neurogenesis. We conducted an open label, nonrandomized study on 40 cases of cerebral palsy with an aim of evaluating the benefit of cellular therapy in combination with rehabilitation. These cases were administered autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells intrathecally. The follow-up was carried out at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after the intervention. Adverse events of the treatment were also monitored in this duration. Overall, at six months, 95% of patients showed improvements. The study population was further divided into diplegic, quadriplegic, and miscellaneous group of cerebral palsy. On statistical analysis, a significant association was established between the symptomatic improvements and cell therapy in diplegic and quadriplegic cerebral palsy. PET-CT scan done in 6 patients showed metabolic improvements in areas of the brain correlating to clinical improvements. The results of this study demonstrate that cellular therapy may accelerate the development, reduce disability, and improve the quality of life of patients with cerebral palsy. PMID:25788947

  4. Influence of calorie reduction on DNA repair capacity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Gebhard, Daniel; Bergemann, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restrictive feeding prolongs the lifespan of a variety of model organisms like rodents and invertebrates. It has been shown that caloric restriction reduces age-related as well as overall-mortality, reduces oxidative stress and influences DNA repair ability positively. There are numerous studies underlining this, but fewer studies involving humans exist. To contribute to a better understanding of the correlation of calorie reduction and DNA repair in humans, we adapted the host cell reactivation assay to an application with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, we used this reliable and reproducible assay to research the influence of a special kind of calorie reduction, namely F. X. Mayr therapy, on DNA repair capacity. We found a positive effect in all persons with low pre-existing DNA repair capacity. In individuals with normal pre-existing DNA repair capacity, no effect on DNA repair capacity was detectable. Decline of DNA repair, accumulation of oxidative DNA damages, mitochondrial dysfunction, telomere shortening as well as caloric intake are widely thought to contribute to aging. With regard to that, our results can be considered as a strong indication that calorie reduction may support DNA repair processes and thus contribute to a healthier aging.

  5. Variation of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell RNA Quality in Archived Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kozlakidis, Zisis; Mant, Christine; Abdinur, Fartun; Cope, Andrew; Steiner, Szabi; Peakman, Mark; Hayday, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    The Infectious Diseases BioBank (IDB) has consistently archived peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMNC) RNA for transcriptome analyses. RNA is particularly labile, and hence, these samples provide a sensitive indicator for assessing the IDB's quality-assurance measures. Independent analyses of 104 PBMNC RNA specimens from 26 volunteers revealed that the mean RNA integrity number (RIN) was high (9.02), although RIN ranged between scores of 7 and 10. This variation of RIN values was not associated with ischemic time, PBMNC quality, number of samples processed per day, self-medication after immunization, freezer location, donor characteristics, differential white blood cell counts, or daily variation in RNA extractions (all P>0.05). RIN values were related to the date of collection, with those processed during mid-summer having highest RIN scores (P=0.0001). Amongst specimens with the lowest RIN scores, no common feature could be identified. Thus, no technical explanation for the variation in RNA quality could be ascertained and these may represent normal physiological variations. These data provide strong evidence that current IDB protocols for the isolation and preservation PBMNC RNA are robust. PMID:21977241

  6. In vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation in a crossbred cattle population.

    PubMed

    Young, F J; Woolliams, J A; Williams, J L; Glass, E J; O'Neill, R G; Fitzpatrick, J L

    2005-07-01

    Immune function measured by Staphylococcus aureus- and phytohemagglutinin- (PHA-) induced cell proliferation was assessed in a population of 445 genetically defined, F2 and backcross Charolais-Holstein crossbred cattle when the animals were approximately 5 mo of age. Variation in Staph. aureus-induced, PHA-induced, and control proliferation [peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and media only] was observed at d 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, and 10 of in vitro culture. The levels of Staph. aureus-induced, PHA-induced, and control proliferation were strongly positively correlated between days of culture within-assay (e.g., between d 2 and d 3 or between d 4 and d 5). Responses were also positively correlated when the same individuals were resampled and the assay repeated within 3 mo. Analyses fitting linear mixed models using REML showed that Staph. aureus-induced and PHA-induced proliferation was significantly associated with control proliferation and the year of birth. The age of the animal at sampling influenced only Staph. aureus-induced proliferation, with Staph. aureus-induced proliferation increasing with the age of the animal. Control proliferation was influenced by a sex x cross interaction, although in this study, sex was confounded by management, as female cattle were housed and reared differently from male cattle. All 3 measures of immune function were influenced by sire, demonstrating that these traits are partially under genetic control, and indicating that it may ultimately be possible to identify quantitative trait loci for these measures of immunity.

  7. Interaction of herpes simplex virus with mononuclear phagocytes is dependent on the differentiation stage of the cells.

    PubMed

    Bruun, T; Kristoffersen, A K; Rollag, H; Degré, M

    1998-02-01

    The interaction of herpes simplex virus (HSV) with mononuclear phagocytes (MP), i.e. monocytes and macrophages, is of importance for the pathogenesis of HSV infections. MP are known to play a significant role in the cellular defence against infections with HSV, but it has also been shown that HSV-1 affects MP. The infection of these cells at different stages of differentiation has different outcomes, and may result in the alteration of important cellular functions. HSV-1 inhibits the morphological differentiation of human monocytes, and this inhibition occurs in spite of the fact that human monocytes are non-permissive to HSV-1. We have studied the effect of HSV infection of monocytes and macrophages on production of essential cytokines and related this effect to the reproduction of the virus. Blood-derived MP were cultured in vitro and inoculated with HSV at different stages of differentiation. Replication of the virus was measured by infectivity titration, detection of HSV antigens by immunofluorescence and detection of HSV-specific mRNA. In monocytes, no viral replication and no production of late protein was seen. HSV IE gene was transcribed in monocytes from some donors, but not from others. In macrophages, virus replicated, but less efficiently than in fully permissive fibroblast cells. The production of IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha in both non-permissive monocytes and permissive macrophages was assayed both at the transcriptional level, as mRNA, and as protein released from the cells. Production of cytokines by MP was affected by HSV-1. The level of cytokine mRNA and cytokine protein did not correspond for all cytokines, which may suggest that translational regulation and/or cytokine inhibitors are important in the regulation of the cytokine response. The cytokine modulation, both at the transcriptional level and measured as biological activity, was different in monocytes and macrophages, and varied between different donors. Our results indicate a relation

  8. Comparison of osteoclast precursors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis patients.

    PubMed

    Nose, Michinari; Yamazaki, Hidetoshi; Hagino, Hiroshi; Morio, Yasuo; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Teshima, Ryota

    2009-01-01

    Osteolytic disorders cause serious problems for quality of life with aging. Osteolysis is performed by osteoclasts of the hematopoietic lineage that share some characteristics with monocytes and macrophages. As osteoclast precursors (pOCs) are present in peripheral blood, their characterization in osteolytic diseases may help us to understand risk factors. Although essential factors for osteoclastogenesis have been reported, the effective induction from pOCs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mature osteoclasts in culture requires further improvement. The aim of this study was development of an efficient culture system for human osteoclastogenesis and providing a simple system for the enrichment of pOCs from PBMCs. We employed coculturing of human PBMCs with a mouse stromal cell line. Significant numbers of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP(+)) multinucleated osteoclasts (MNCs), which could resorb dentine slices, were efficiently induced in this culture condition. pOCs were enriched in an anti-CD16 antibody column-passed anti-CD14 antibody-bound cell population isolated by magnetic cell sorting. We compared the percentage of the CD14(high) CD16(dull) cell population, which mainly contained pOCs in PBMCs, from age-matched patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoporosis (OP), but it was comparable. However, the mean number of TRAP(+) MNCs generated in cultures from PBMCs of RA was higher. In contrast, the frequency of pOCs in PBMCs from OP was relatively higher. These results suggest the characteristics of pOCs from RA and OP may be different, because single pOCs from OP gave rise to lower numbers of osteoclasts than those from RA. PMID:19082778

  9. Comparison of osteoclast precursors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis patients.

    PubMed

    Nose, Michinari; Yamazaki, Hidetoshi; Hagino, Hiroshi; Morio, Yasuo; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Teshima, Ryota

    2009-01-01

    Osteolytic disorders cause serious problems for quality of life with aging. Osteolysis is performed by osteoclasts of the hematopoietic lineage that share some characteristics with monocytes and macrophages. As osteoclast precursors (pOCs) are present in peripheral blood, their characterization in osteolytic diseases may help us to understand risk factors. Although essential factors for osteoclastogenesis have been reported, the effective induction from pOCs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mature osteoclasts in culture requires further improvement. The aim of this study was development of an efficient culture system for human osteoclastogenesis and providing a simple system for the enrichment of pOCs from PBMCs. We employed coculturing of human PBMCs with a mouse stromal cell line. Significant numbers of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP(+)) multinucleated osteoclasts (MNCs), which could resorb dentine slices, were efficiently induced in this culture condition. pOCs were enriched in an anti-CD16 antibody column-passed anti-CD14 antibody-bound cell population isolated by magnetic cell sorting. We compared the percentage of the CD14(high) CD16(dull) cell population, which mainly contained pOCs in PBMCs, from age-matched patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoporosis (OP), but it was comparable. However, the mean number of TRAP(+) MNCs generated in cultures from PBMCs of RA was higher. In contrast, the frequency of pOCs in PBMCs from OP was relatively higher. These results suggest the characteristics of pOCs from RA and OP may be different, because single pOCs from OP gave rise to lower numbers of osteoclasts than those from RA.

  10. Phagocytosis-induced 51Cr release from activated macrophages and blood mononuclears. Effect of colchicine and antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.P.; Hale, A.H.

    1981-09-01

    The chromium-release test was adapted to the measurement of the cellular injury induced when activated macrophages phagocytose particulates. Macrophages obtained from rabbit lungs undergoing BCG-induced chronic inflammation released more chromium when incubated in the presence of phagocytosable particles than when incubated under resting conditions. Blood mononuclear cells, 40-60% monocytes, procured from the same BCG-injected animals, were less susceptible to phagocytosis-induced injury than the macrophages obtained from the lungs. The amount of chromium released by the activated macrophages was proportional to the number of particles present during incubation. In the presence of catalase, the amounts of chromium released by phagocytosing and resting macrophages were similar; in the presence of superoxide dismutase and cytochrome c, the amount of chromium released by phagocytosing macrophages was 13-35% less than the amount of chromium released by macrophages incubated without the antioxidants. In addition, colchicine, an inhibitor of degranulation also exerted partial inhibition of the chromium release. These results suggest that oxygen radicals and lysosomal contents contribute to the cellular injury that results from phagocytosis.

  11. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhance Cartilage Repair in in vivo Osteochondral Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Hopper, Niina; Wardale, John; Brooks, Roger; Power, Jonathan; Rushton, Neil; Henson, Frances

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in terms of their potential in cartilage repair and investigated their ability to improve the healing in a pre-clinical large animal model. Human PBMCs were isolated with gradient centrifugation and adherent PBMC’s were evaluated for their ability to differentiate into adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages and also for their expression of musculoskeletal genes. The phenotype of the PBMCs was evaluated using Stro-1, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD90, CD106, CD105, CD146 and CD166 cell surface markers. Osteochondral defects were created in the medial femoral condyle (MFC) of 24 Welsh mountain sheep and evaluated at a six month time point. Four cell treatment groups were evaluated in combination with collagen-GAG-scaffold: (1) MSC alone; (2) MSCs and PBMCs at a ratio of 20:1; (3) MSCs and PBMC at a ratio of 2:1 and (4) PBMCs alone. Samples from the surgical site were evaluated for mechanical properties, ICRS score and histological repair. Fresh PBMC samples were 90% positive for hematopoietic cell surface markers and negative for the MSC antibody panel (<1%, p = 0.006). However, the adherent PBMC population expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers in hypoxic culture and lacked CD34/45 positive cells (<0.2%). This finding demonstrated that the adherent cells had acquired an MSC-like phenotype and transformed in hypoxia from their original hematopoietic lineage. Four key genes in muskuloskeletal biology were significantly upregulated in adherent PBMCs by hypoxia: BMP2 4.2-fold (p = 0.0007), BMP6 10.7-fold (p = 0.0004), GDF5 2.0-fold (p = 0.002) and COL1 5.0-fold (p = 0.046). The monolayer multilineage analysis confirmed the trilineage mesenchymal potential of the adherent PBMCs. PBMC cell therapy was equally good as bone marrow MSC therapy for defects in the ovine large animal model. Our results show that PBMCs support cartilage healing and oxygen tension of the environment was found to have a key

  12. Lymphocyte transformation and interferon production in human mononuclear cell microcultures for assay of cellular immunity to herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Haahr, S; Rasmussen, L; Merigan, T C

    1976-01-01

    Interferon production and transformation in response to herpes simplex virus antigen were studied in microcultures of human mononuclear cells. Mononuclear cells consisting of monocytes and both T and B lymphocytes were purified by Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Lymphocytes, predominantly T with 5% B, were obtained by passage of buffy-coat cells through nylon fiber columns. For some experiments, autochthonous macrophages and column-purified lymphocytes were stimulated with herpesvirus antigen. The effect of specific antibody and cell concentration on reactivity is described. Crude and purified antigens were compared as cell culture stimulants. Significant differences in transformation and interferon were observed between donors with a history of herpes labialis and donors with no detectable antibody, both in cultures prepared by Ficoll-Hypaque gradients and by column purification of lymphocytes. Cultures from seronegative donors prepared by Ficoll-Hypaque gradients produced interferon but did not transform when stimulated by herpes simplex antigen. "Immune" interferon production, that is, type II as opposed to type I, occurred only with autochthonous macrophage and column-purified lymphocyte cultures. Interferon produced by Ficoll-Hypaque-purified mononuclear cultures was type I, and its production was unrelated to immune status. Similarly, column-purified lymphocytes responded to herpes simplex virus antigen with type I interferon if obtained from a seropositive donor. PMID:181328

  13. Cytokine mRNA profiles in mononuclear cells in acute aseptic meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Navikas, V; Haglund, M; Link, J; He, B; Lindqvist, L; Fredrikson, S; Link, H

    1995-01-01

    Cytokines are important modulators of inflammation and immune responses. Using in situ hybridization with radiolabelled cDNA oligonucleotide probes, we studied the expression of mRNA encoding the cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), lymphotoxin, and perforin in mononuclear cells (MNC) from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with acute aseptic meningoencephalitis (AM) and from blood of healthy controls. Patients in the acute phase of AM had elevated numbers of IFN-gamma mRNA-expressing cells in the blood compared with that of controls and higher numbers of IFN-gamma mRNA-expressing cells in their CSF compared with that of convalescent-phase patients, which is in accordance with the antiviral effects of this cytokine. Upregulation of IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 was found in convalescent-phase patients, which is consistent with the longstanding B-cell response found in AM. TGF-beta and perforin were upregulated in both stages of AM, while the numbers of blood and CSF MNC expressing cytokine mRNA of the TNF family (TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin) did not differ between patients with AM and controls. An even higher elevation in CSF was noticed for MNC expressing most of the cytokines, particularly IL-4 and TGF-beta, reflecting the autonomy of the immune response in the CSF. The definition of cytokine profiles in AM, a self-limiting and benign disease, provides a foundation for future comparisons with other infectious and inflammatory nervous system diseases. PMID:7890425

  14. Dynamic changes in the proteome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with low dose ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Nishad, S; Ghosh, Anu

    2016-02-01

    Humans are continually exposed to ionizing radiation from natural as well as anthropogenic sources. Though biological effects of high dose radiation exposures have been well accepted, studies on low-to-moderate dose exposures (in the range of 50-500 mGy) have been strongly debated even as researchers continue to search for elusive 'radiation signatures' in humans. Proteins are considered as dynamic functional players that drive cellular responses. However, there is little proteomic information available in context of human exposure to ionizing radiation. In this study, we determined differential expressed proteins in G0 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy individuals 1h and 4h after 'ex vivo' exposure with two radiation doses (300 mGy and 1 Gy). Twenty-three proteins were found to be significantly altered in irradiated cells when compared to sham irradiated cells with fold change ± 1.5-fold (p ≤ 0.05), with only three proteins showing ≥ 2.5-fold change, either with dose or with time. Mass spectrometry analyses identified redox sensor protein, chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC-1), the antioxidant protein, peroxiredoxin-6 and the pro-survival molecular chaperone 78 KDa glucose regulated protein (GRP78) among the 23 modulated proteins. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for the twenty-three radiation responsive protein spots was found to be 33.7% for 300 mGy and 48.3% for 1 Gy. We thus, conclude that the radiation proteomic response of G0 human PBMCs, which are in the resting stage of the cell cycle, involves moderate upregulation of protective mechanisms, with low inter-individual variability. This study will help further our understanding of cellular effects of low dose acute radiation in humans and contribute toward differential biomarker discovery. PMID:26921016

  15. Immunological effects of the anti-programmed death-1 antibody on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Nonomura, Chizu; Kondou, Ryota; Miyata, Haruo; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Maeda, Chie; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint antibody-mediated blockade has gained attention as a new cancer immunotherapy strategy. Accumulating evidence suggests that this therapy imparts a survival benefit to metastatic melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer patients. A substantial amount of data on immune checkpoint antibodies has been collected from clinical trials; however, the direct effect of the antibodies on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has not been exclusively investigated. In this study, we developed an anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibody (with biosimilarity to nivolumab) and examined the effects of the antibody on PBMCs derived from cancer patients. Specifically, we investigated the effects of the anti-PD-1 antibody on proliferation, cytokine production, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and regulatory T cells. These investigations yielded several important results. First, the anti-PD-1 antibody had no obvious effect on resting PBMCs; however, high levels of the anti-PD-1 antibody partly stimulated PBMC proliferation when accompanied by an anti-CD3 antibody. Second, the anti-PD-1 antibody restored the growth inhibition of anti-CD3 Ab-stimulated PBMCs mediated by PD-L1. Third, the anti-PD-1 antibody exhibited a moderate inhibitory effect on the induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) by anti-CD3 antibody stimulation. Additionally, the presence of the anti-PD-1 antibody promoted antigen-specific CTL induction, which suggests that combining anti-PD-1 antibody and conventional immunotherapy treatments may have beneficial effects. These results indicate that specific cellular immunological mechanisms are partly responsible for the antitumor effect exhibited by the anti-PD-1 antibody against advanced cancers in clinical trials. PMID:27573705

  16. Effects of spironolactone on human blood mononuclear cells: mineralocorticoid receptor independent effects on gene expression and late apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Sønder, Søren Ulrik Salling; Mikkelsen, Marianne; Rieneck, Klaus; Hedegaard, Chris Juul; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2006-05-01

    1 Spironolactone (SPIR) binds to cytoplasmic mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and functions as an aldosterone antagonist. Recently, the drug was shown to have an early suppressive effect on several immunoactive and proinflammatory cytokines. 2 To elucidate the mechanism behind this, the four MR-binding steroids SPIR, canrenone, 7alpha-thiomethyl-spironolactone and aldosterone (ALDO) were investigated for effects on lipopolysaccharide- and phytohemagglutinin-A-activated human blood mononuclear cells. Gene expression was examined after 4 h using microarrays, and SPIR affected 1018 transcripts of the (=) 22,000 probed. In contrast, the SPIR-related steroids affected 17 or fewer transcripts. Combining SPIR and ALDO resulted in 940 affected transcripts, indicating that SPIR has an early gene-regulatory effect independent of MR. 3 The affected genes encode a large number of signalling proteins and receptors, including immunoinflammatory response genes and apoptosis and antiapoptosis genes. Apoptosis was evident in CD3-, CD14- and CD19-positive cells, but only after 18 h of exposure to SPIR. 4 The transcriptional network involving the differentially regulated genes was examined and the results indicate that SPIR affects genes controlled by the transcription factors NF-kappaB, CEBPbeta and MYC. 5 These observations provide new insight into the non-MR-mediated effects of SPIR. PMID:16520746

  17. Effects of spironolactone on human blood mononuclear cells: mineralocorticoid receptor independent effects on gene expression and late apoptosis induction

    PubMed Central

    Sønder, Søren Ulrik Salling; Mikkelsen, Marianne; Rieneck, Klaus; Hedegaard, Chris Juul; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Spironolactone (SPIR) binds to cytoplasmic mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and functions as an aldosterone antagonist. Recently, the drug was shown to have an early suppressive effect on several immunoactive and proinflammatory cytokines. To elucidate the mechanism behind this, the four MR-binding steroids SPIR, canrenone, 7α-thiomethyl-spironolactone and aldosterone (ALDO) were investigated for effects on lipopolysaccharide- and phytohemagglutinin-A-activated human blood mononuclear cells. Gene expression was examined after 4 h using microarrays, and SPIR affected 1018 transcripts of the (=) 22,000 probed. In contrast, the SPIR-related steroids affected 17 or fewer transcripts. Combining SPIR and ALDO resulted in 940 affected transcripts, indicating that SPIR has an early gene-regulatory effect independent of MR. The affected genes encode a large number of signalling proteins and receptors, including immunoinflammatory response genes and apoptosis and antiapoptosis genes. Apoptosis was evident in CD3-, CD14- and CD19-positive cells, but only after 18 h of exposure to SPIR. The transcriptional network involving the differentially regulated genes was examined and the results indicate that SPIR affects genes controlled by the transcription factors NF-κB, CEBPβ and MYC. These observations provide new insight into the non-MR-mediated effects of SPIR. PMID:16520746

  18. Time-Course Study of the Transcriptome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from Sheep Infected with Fasciola hepatica

    PubMed Central

    Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre; Ansell, Brendan R. E.; Hall, Ross S.; Gasser, Robin B.; Jex, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a parasitic trematode that infects a wide range of mammalian hosts, including livestock and humans, in temperate and tropical regions globally. This trematode causes the disease fascioliasis, which consists of an acute phase (≤ 12 weeks) during which juvenile parasites migrate through the host liver tissues, and a chronic phase (> 12 weeks) following the establishment of adult parasites in the liver bile ducts. Few studies have explored the progression of the host response over the course of Fasciola infection in the same animals. In this study, we characterized transcriptomic changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from sheep at three time points over the first eight weeks of infection relative to uninfected controls. In total, 183 and 76 genes were found to be differentially transcribed at two and eight weeks post-infection respectively. Functional and pathway analysis of differentially transcribed genes revealed changes related to T-cell activation that may underpin a Th2-biased immune response against this parasite. This first insight into the dynamics of host responses during the early stages of infection improves the understanding of the pathogenesis of acute fascioliasis, informs vaccine development and presents a set of PBMC markers with diagnostic potential. PMID:27438474

  19. Successful simultaneous measurement of cell membrane and cytokine induced phosphorylation pathways [CIPP] in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Montag, David T; Lotze, Michael T

    2006-06-30

    Phenotyping and simple enumeration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is of limited value for the assessment of many clinical states. As a preferred alternative, cell surface phenotyping may be combined with functional assays for enhanced assessment of altered cells circulating in patients. One simple, yet informative and rapid approach is to examine signaling within individual cells following brief periods of stimulation via flow cytometry. Although monocytes and lymphoid cells can be distinguished based on size, current permeabilization strategies necessary for identifying intracellular phosphorylated signaling molecules largely compromise the labeling of cell surface proteins used to distinguish individual cellular subsets. We have successfully developed conditions that allow for simultaneous detection of cell surface proteins and intracellular phosphorylated proteins in human PBMC following rapid in vitro cytokine stimulation. We analyzed permeabilized CD4, CD8, CD14, CD19, and CD56 expressing cells together with intracellular pSTAT1, pSTAT3, pSTAT5, pSTAT6, pp38 MAPK, or pERK1/2 within total PBMC. Of the permeabilizing conditions tested, 75% methanol enabled superior simultaneous detection of both cell surface and intracellular epitopes. This method enables the rapid functional analysis of subsets within complex cell mixtures and provides an opportunity for assessing abnormalities arising in the setting of acute or chronic inflammatory states.

  20. Age and metabolic risk factors associated with oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise; Grønbæk, Morten; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-02-20

    Aging is associated with oxidative stress-generated damage to DNA and this could be related to metabolic disturbances. This study investigated the association between levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and metabolic risk factors in 1,019 subjects, aged 18-93 years. DNA damage was analyzed as strand breaks by the comet assay and levels of formamidopyrimidine (FPG-) and human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1)-sensitive sites There was an association between age and levels of FPG-sensitive sites for women, but not for men. The same tendency was observed for the level of hOGG1-sensitive sites, whereas there was no association with the level of strand breaks. The effect of age on oxidatively damaged DNA in women disappeared in multivariate models, which showed robust positive associations between DNA damage and plasma levels of triglycerides, cholesterol and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). In the group of men, there were significant positive associations between alcohol intake, HbA1c and FPG-sensitive sites in multivariate analysis. The levels of metabolic risk factors were positively associated with age, yet only few subjects fulfilled all metabolic syndrome criteria. In summary, positive associations between age and levels of oxidatively damaged DNA appeared mediated by age-related increases in metabolic risk factors. PMID:25650665

  1. Global changes in DNA methylation in Alzheimer's disease peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Andrea; Arosio, Beatrice; Falconi, Anastasia; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Karimi, Mohsen; Mari, Daniela; Casati, Martina; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Changes in epigenetic marks may help explain the late onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study we measured genome-wide DNA methylation by luminometric methylation assay, a quantitative measurement of genome-wide DNA methylation, on DNA isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 37 subjects with late-onset AD (LOAD) and 44 healthy controls (CT). We found an increase in global DNA methylation in LOAD subjects compared to CT (p=0.0122), associated with worse cognitive performances (p=0.0002). DNA hypermethylation in LOAD group was paralleled by higher DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) gene expression and protein levels. When data were stratified on the basis of the APOE polymorphisms, higher DNA methylation levels were associated with the presence of APOE ε4 allele (p=0.0043) in the global population. Among the APOE ε3 carriers, a significant increase of DNA methylation was still observed in LOAD patients compared to healthy controls (p=0.05). Our data suggest global DNA methylation in peripheral samples as a useful marker for screening individuals at risk of developing AD.

  2. Simultaneous gene expression signature of heart and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in astemizole-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Park, Han-Jin; Kim, Do-Geun; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Kim, Choong-Yong; Kwon, Myung-Sang; Yoon, Seokjoo

    2010-08-01

    We investigated the effects of astemizole, a second-generation antihistamine, on the heart and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and identified the early markers of its cardiotoxicity using gene expression profiling. Astemizole causes torsades de pointes, which is a type of ventricular tachycardia. We administered astemizole (dosage: 20, 60 mg/kg) to male Sprague-Dawley rats, using an oral gavage. Cardiac tissue and PBMCs were collected from the rats 4 h after treatment. Gene expression profiles were obtained using an Affymetrix GeneChip. The most deregulated genes were associated with energy metabolism pathways and calcium ion homeostasis in the heart of astemizole-treated rats. The most altered genes in the PBMCs were those involved in developmental processes and cardiotoxicity. Genes related to the response to oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, heat shock proteins, hypoxia, immunity, and inflammation were also deregulated in the heart and PBMCs. These data provide further insight into the genetic pathways affected by astemizole. In addition, the simultaneously deregulated genes identified herein may be further studied. It will be interesting to find out whether single genes or certain sets of these genes could finally serve as biomarkers for cardiotoxicity of astemizole or other similar antihistamine drugs. PMID:20221588

  3. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Therapy for Autism: An Open Label Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Alok; Gokulchandran, Nandini; Sane, Hemangi; Nagrajan, Anjana; Kulkarni, Pooja; Shetty, Akshata; Mishra, Priti; Kali, Mrudula; Biju, Hema; Badhe, Prerna

    2013-01-01

    Cellular therapy is an emerging therapeutic modality with a great potential for the treatment of autism. Recent findings show that the major underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of autism are hypoperfusion and immune alterations in the brain. So conceptually, cellular therapy which facilitates counteractive processes of improving perfusion by angiogenesis and balancing inflammation by immune regulation would exhibit beneficial clinical effects in patients with autism. This is an open label proof of concept study of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) intrathecal transplantation in 32 patients with autism followed by multidisciplinary therapies. All patients were followed up for 26 months (mean 12.7). Outcome measures used were ISAA, CGI, and FIM/Wee-FIM scales. Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT) scan recorded objective changes. Out of 32 patients, a total of 29 (91%) patients improved on total ISAA scores and 20 patients (62%) showed decreased severity on CGI-I. The difference between pre- and postscores was statistically significant (P < 0.001) on Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test. On CGI-II 96% of patients showed global improvement. The efficacy was measured on CGI-III efficacy index. Few adverse events including seizures in three patients were controlled with medications. The encouraging results of this leading clinical study provide future directions for application of cellular therapy in autism. PMID:24062774

  4. Comparison of dengue virus antigens in sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from dengue infected patients.

    PubMed

    Kittigul, L; Meethien, N; Sujirarat, D; Kittigul, C; Vasanavat, S

    1997-12-01

    The presence of dengue virus antigens in acute sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from dengue infected patients were determined by a biotin-streptavidin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BS-ELISA). The frequency of the antigens detected in PBMC was higher than that in sera (53.8% vs 18.9%). In comparison with sera, the detection rate in PBMC was greater than six times: 7 cases were positive only in sera whereas 44 cases were positive only in PBMC, p < 0.001. The presence of the antigens in the sera did not depend on the severity of the disease, i.e. dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever (grades I and II) or dengue shock syndrome (grades III and IV). In contrast, the presence of the antigens in PBMC increased from 36.8% to 100% when the infection was more severe. The dengue virus antigens could be detected in the samples collected between day 2 and day 7 after onset of the disease with the highest rate of detection (68.8%) in PBMC collected on day 4. The data suggest the use of PBMC with access to the appropriate acute-phase specimen for detection of dengue virus antigens.

  5. Inhibitory effect of prolactin on Toxoplasma proliferation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Dzitko, K; Lawnicka, H; Gatkowska, J; Dziadek, B; Komorowski, J; Długońska, H

    2012-06-01

    Despite many years of studies on the mechanisms of immunological defence responses induced in host organisms by Toxoplasma, no satisfactory immunoprophylaxis or chemotherapy have yet been established for humans. Thus, alternative methods to prevent toxoplasmosis and to enhance the efficacy of currently used antitoxoplasmic drugs are under evaluation. In this work, we strove to determine the influence of human prolactin (endogenous present in serum--sPRL and recombinant--rhPRL) on the course of Toxoplasma infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) originating from female hyperprolactinemia patients. This study revealed that exogenous rhPRL as well as autologous sPRL from inactivated sera significantly restricted intracellular growth of Toxoplasma in PBMC cultures. Moreover, analysis of IL-10 production by PBMC infected with Toxoplasma and cultured in the presence of sPRL showed a positive correlation between sPRL concentration and the level of IL-10. The obtained results could indicate the possible protective action of PRL in a host organism infected with Toxoplasma and suggest that a significant increase in the serum PRL level, during pregnancy for instance, might significantly limit the risk of Toxoplasma spreading and could play an important role in natural protection against toxoplasmosis. The mechanism of inhibitory effect of PRL needs further detailed study.

  6. Mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlates with depressive subsymptoms and severity of major depression.

    PubMed

    Karabatsiakis, A; Böck, C; Salinas-Manrique, J; Kolassa, S; Calzia, E; Dietrich, D E; Kolassa, I-T

    2014-06-10

    Mitochondrial dysfunction might have a central role in the pathophysiology of depression. Phenotypically, depression is characterized by lack of energy, concentration problems and fatigue. These symptoms might be partially explained by reduced availability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a consequence of impaired mitochondrial functioning. This study investigated mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), an established model to investigate the pathophysiology of depression. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in intact PBMCs in 22 individuals with a diagnosis of major depression (MD) compared with 22 healthy age-matched controls using high-resolution respirometry. Individuals with MD showed significantly impaired mitochondrial functioning: routine and uncoupled respiration as well as spare respiratory capacity, coupling efficiency and ATP turnover-related respiration were significantly lower in the MD compared with the control group. Furthermore, mitochondrial respiration was significantly negatively correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms, in particular, with loss of energy, difficulties concentrating and fatigue. The results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the biomolecular pathophysiology of depressive symptoms. The decreased immune capability observed in MD leading to a higher risk of comorbidities could be attributable to impaired energy supply due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus mitochondrial respiration in PBMCs and its functional consequences might be an interesting target for new therapeutical approaches in the treatment of MD and immune-related comorbidities.

  7. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Gene Expression Profiles Predict Poor Outcome in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Herazo-Maya, Jose D.; Noth, Imre; Duncan, Steven R.; Kim, SungHwan; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Tseng, George C.; Feingold, Eleanor; Juan-Guardela, Brenda M.; Richards, Thomas J.; Lussier, Yves; Huang, Yong; Vij, Rekha; Lindell, Kathleen O.; Xue, Jianmin; Gibson, Kevin F.; Shapiro, Steven D.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Kaminski, Naftali

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to identify peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression profiles predictive of poor outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) by performing microarray experiments of PBMCs in discovery and replication cohorts of IPF patients. Microarray analyses identified 52 genes associated with transplant-free survival (TFS) in the discovery cohort. Clustering the microarray samples of the replication cohort using the 52-gene outcome-predictive signature distinguished two patient groups with significant differences in TFS. We studied the pathways associated with TFS in each independent microarray cohort and identified decreased expression of “The costimulatory signal during T cell activation” Biocarta pathway and, in particular, the genes CD28, ICOS, LCK, and ITK, results confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). A proportional hazards model, including the qRT-PCR expression of CD28, ICOS, LCK, and ITK along with patient’s age, gender, and percent predicted forced vital capacity (FVC%), demonstrated an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 78.5% at 2.4 months for death and lung transplant prediction in the replication cohort. To evaluate the potential cellular source of CD28, ICOS, LCK, and ITK expression, we analyzed and found significant correlation of these genes with the PBMC percentage of CD4+CD28+ T cells in the replication cohort. Our results suggest that CD28, ICOS, LCK, and ITK are potential outcome biomarkers in IPF and should be further evaluated for patient prioritization for lung transplantation and stratification in drug studies. PMID:24089408

  8. Persistent Alterations of Gene Expression Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells From Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Daniel Y.; Chen, Jinguo; Taslim, Cenny; Hsu, Ping-Ching; Marian, Catalin; David, Sean P.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Shields, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The number of validated biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure is limited, and none exist for tobacco-related cancer. Additional biomarkers for smoke, effects on cellular systems in vivo are needed to improve early detection of lung cancer, and to assist the Food and Drug Administration in regulating exposures to tobacco products. We assessed the effects of smoking on the gene expression using human cell cultures and blood from a cross-sectional study. We profiled global transcriptional changes in cultured smokers’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) treated with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in vitro (n = 7) and from well-characterized smokers’ blood (n = 36). ANOVA with adjustment for covariates and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis in this study. CSC in vitro altered the expression of 1 178 genes (177 genes with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05. In vivo, PBMCs of heavy and light smokers differed for 614 genes (29 with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05 (309 remaining significant after adjustment for age, race, and gender). Forty-one genes were persistently altered both in vitro and in vivo, 22 having the same expression pattern reported for non-small cell lung cancer. Our data provides evidence that persistent alterations of gene expression in vitro and in vivo may relate to carcinogenic effects of cigarette smoke, and the identified genes may serve as potential biomarkers for cancer. The use of an in vitro model to corroborate results from human studies provides a novel way to understand human exposure and effect. PMID:26294040

  9. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation Delays Progression of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kefei; Ma, Xiao; Yu, Lie; Jiang, Chao; Fu, Chao; Fu, Xiaojie; Yu, Xiaofang; Huang, Yuanjing; Hou, Suyun; Si, Caifeng; Chen, Zhengguang; Yu, Jing; Wan, Jieru; Wang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) can counteract oxidative stress and inhibit the inflammatory response in focal ischemic stroke models. However, the effect of BMMNC transplantation on carotid atherosclerosis needs to be determined. The carotid atherosclerotic plaque model was established in New Zealand White rabbits by balloon injury and 8 weeks of high-fat diet. Rabbits were randomized to receive an intravenous injection of autologous bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled BMMNCs or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline. Plaques were evaluated for expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, anti-oxidant proteins, and markers of cell death. BMMNCs migrated into atherosclerotic plaque on the first day after cell transplantation. BMMNC-treated rabbits had smaller plaques and more collagen deposition than did the vehicle-treated controls on day 28 (p < 0.05). BMMNC treatment significantly increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the anti-oxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in plaques compared to vehicle treatment on day 7. BMMNC-treated rabbits also had lower levels of cleaved caspase-3 expression; lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and matrix metalloproteinase 9; and higher levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and its receptor (p < 0.05). Autologous BMMNC transplantation can suppress the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation and is associated with enhanced anti-oxidative effect, reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines and cleaved caspase-3, and increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and its receptor. BMMNC transplantation represents a novel approach for the treatment of carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:26232064

  10. Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation Restores Inflammatory Balance of Cytokines after ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Alestalo, Kirsi; Miettinen, Johanna A.; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Huikuri, Heikki; Lehenkari, Petri

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) launches an inflammatory response and a repair process to compensate cardiac function. During this process, the balance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is important for optimal cardiac repair. Stem cell transplantation after AMI improves tissue repair and increases the ventricular ejection fraction. Here, we studied in detail the acute effect of bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMNC) transplantation on proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods Patients with STEMI treated with thrombolysis followed by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomly assigned to receive either BMMNC or saline as an intracoronary injection. Cardiac function was evaluated by left ventricle angiogram during the PCI and again after 6 months. The concentrations of 27 cytokines were measured from plasma samples up to 4 days after the PCI and the intracoronary injection. Results Twenty-six patients (control group, n = 12; BMMNC group, n = 14) from the previously reported FINCELL study (n = 80) were included to this study. At day 2, the change in the proinflammatory cytokines correlated with the change in the anti-inflammatory cytokines in both groups (Kendall’s tau, control 0.6; BMMNC 0.7). At day 4, the correlation had completely disappeared in the control group but was preserved in the BMMNC group (Kendall’s tau, control 0.3; BMMNC 0.7). Conclusions BMMNC transplantation is associated with preserved balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines after STEMI in PCI-treated patients. This may partly explain the favorable effect of stem cell transplantation after AMI. PMID:26690350

  11. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L P; Iglesias, D; Nicola, F C; Steffens, D; Valentim, L; Witczak, A; Zanatta, G; Achaval, M; Pranke, P; Netto, C A

    2012-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old) were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a) 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 10(6) cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group); b) into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 10(6) cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group). The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day). The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05). The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation. PMID:22183246

  12. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, L.P.; Iglesias, D.; Nicola, F.C.; Steffens, D.; Valentim, L.; Witczak, A.; Zanatta, G.; Achaval, M.; Pranke, P.; Netto, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old) were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a) 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 106 cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group); b) into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 106 cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group). The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day). The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05). The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation. PMID:22183246

  13. Inhibition of HBV Replication in HepG2.2.15 Cells by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Song, Hong-Li; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Anti-HBV therapy is essential for patients awaiting liver transplantation. This study aimed to explore the effects of dendritic cells (DCs) derived from the peripheral blood of hepatitis B patients on the replication of HBV in vivo and to evaluate the biosafety of DCs in clinical therapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from HBV-infected patients and maturation-promoting factors and both HBsAg and HBcAg were used to induce DC maturation. Mature DCs and lymphocytes were co-cultured with human hepatocyte cell HL-7702 or HBV-producing human hepatocellular carcinoma cell HepG2.2.15. We found that mature lymphocytes exposed to DCs in vitro did not influence morphology or activities of HL-7702 and HepG2.2.15 cells. Liver function indexes and endotoxin levels in the cell supernatants did not change in these co-cultures. Additionally, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA levels were reduced when HepG2.2.15 cells were co-cultured with mature lymphocytes that had been cultured with DCs, and HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) levels in HepG2.2.15 cells also decreased. Importantly, DC-mediated immunotherapy had no mutagenic effect on HBV genomic DNA by gene sequencing of the P, S, X, and C regions of HBV genomic DNA. We conclude that PBMC-derived DCs from HBV-infected patients act on autologous lymphocytes to suppress HBV replication and these DC clusters showed favorable biosafety.

  14. Clearance and binding of radiolabeled glycoproteins by cells of the murine mononuclear phagocyte system

    SciTech Connect

    Imber, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The clearance and binding of radiolabeled lactoferrin and fast ..cap alpha../sub 2/-macroglobulin were studied. Both glycoproteins cleared rapidly following intravenous injection in mice, and both bound specifically to discrete receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages. The simultaneous presence of excess, unlabeled ligands specific for receptors recognizing terminal fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine or galactose residues did not inhibit the clearance or binding of either lactoferrin or fast-..cap alpha../sub 2/M. The clearance and binding of enzymatically defucosylated lactoferrin was indistinguishable from native lactoferrin, indicating that terminal ..cap alpha..(1-3)-linked fucose on lactoferrin is not necessary for receptor recognition. The clearance and binding of two fast -..cap alpha../sub 2/M forms, ..cap alpha../sub 2/M-trypsin and ..cap alpha../sub 2/M-MeNH/sub 2/ cross compete with each other. Saturation binding studies indicated that the total binding of mannosyl -BSA, fusocyl-BSA, and N-acetylglucosaminyl-BSA to macrophages activated by BCG was approximately 15% of the levels observed with inflammatory macrophages elicited by thioglycollate broth. Cross-competition binding studies demonstrated a common surface receptor mediated binding of all three neoglycoprotein ligands and was identical to the receptor on mononuclear phagocytes that binds mannosyl- and N-acetylglucosaminyl-terminated glycoproteins. These results suggest that difference between discrete states of macrophage function may be correlated with selective changes in levels of the surface receptor for mannose-containing glycoproteins.

  15. Comparative genomics analysis of mononuclear phagocyte subsets confirms homology between lymphoid tissue-resident and dermal XCR1(+) DCs in mouse and human and distinguishes them from Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Sabrina; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Chelbi, Rabie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ginhoux, Florent; Dalod, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mononuclear phagocytes which exhibit a branching (dendritic) morphology and excel at naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of cell surface molecules and later shown to possess distinct functions. DC subset differentiation is orchestrated by transcription factors, growth factors and cytokines. Identifying DC subsets is challenging as very few cell surface molecules are uniquely expressed on any one of these cell populations. There is no standard consensus to identify mononuclear phagocyte subsets; varying antigens are employed depending on the tissue and animal species studied and between laboratories. This has led to confusion in how to accurately define and classify DCs across tissues and between species. Here we report a comparative genomics strategy that enables universal definition of DC and other mononuclear phagocyte subsets across species. We performed a meta-analysis of several public datasets of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte subsets isolated from blood, spleen, skin or cutaneous lymph nodes, including by using a novel and user friendly software, BubbleGUM, which generates and integrates gene signatures for high throughput gene set enrichment analysis. This analysis demonstrates the equivalence between human and mouse skin XCR1(+) DCs, and between mouse and human Langerhans cells.

  16. Comparative genomics analysis of mononuclear phagocyte subsets confirms homology between lymphoid tissue-resident and dermal XCR1(+) DCs in mouse and human and distinguishes them from Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Sabrina; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Chelbi, Rabie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ginhoux, Florent; Dalod, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mononuclear phagocytes which exhibit a branching (dendritic) morphology and excel at naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of cell surface molecules and later shown to possess distinct functions. DC subset differentiation is orchestrated by transcription factors, growth factors and cytokines. Identifying DC subsets is challenging as very few cell surface molecules are uniquely expressed on any one of these cell populations. There is no standard consensus to identify mononuclear phagocyte subsets; varying antigens are employed depending on the tissue and animal species studied and between laboratories. This has led to confusion in how to accurately define and classify DCs across tissues and between species. Here we report a comparative genomics strategy that enables universal definition of DC and other mononuclear phagocyte subsets across species. We performed a meta-analysis of several public datasets of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte subsets isolated from blood, spleen, skin or cutaneous lymph nodes, including by using a novel and user friendly software, BubbleGUM, which generates and integrates gene signatures for high throughput gene set enrichment analysis. This analysis demonstrates the equivalence between human and mouse skin XCR1(+) DCs, and between mouse and human Langerhans cells. PMID:26966045

  17. Comparative genomics analysis of mononuclear phagocyte subsets confirms homology between lymphoid tissue-resident and dermal XCR1+ DCs in mouse and human and distinguishes them from Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Sabrina; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Chelbi, Rabie; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ginhoux, Florent; Dalod, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are mononuclear phagocytes which exhibit a branching (dendritic) morphology and excel at naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of cell surface molecules and later shown to possess distinct functions. DC subset differentiation is orchestrated by transcription factors, growth factors and cytokines. Identifying DC subsets is challenging as very few cell surface molecules are uniquely expressed on any one of these cell populations. There is no standard consensus to identify mononuclear phagocyte subsets; varying antigens are employed depending on the tissue and animal species studied and between laboratories. This has led to confusion in how to accurately define and classify DCs across tissues and between species. Here we report a comparative genomics strategy that enables universal definition of DC and other mononuclear phagocyte subsets across species. We performed a meta-analysis of several public datasets of human and mouse mononuclear phagocyte subsets isolated from blood, spleen, skin or cutaneous lymph nodes, including by using a novel and user friendly software, BubbleGUM, which generates and integrates gene signatures for high throughput gene set enrichment analysis. This analysis demonstrates the equivalence between human and mouse skin XCR1+ DCs, and between mouse and human Langerhans cells. PMID:26966045

  18. Gene expression of interleukin 18 in unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Hanck, C; Manigold, T; Bocker, U; Kurimoto, M; Kolbel, C; Singer, M; Rossol, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Most patients with alcohol induced cirrhosis (AC) and chronic endotoxinaemia are not suffering from clinically evident systemic inflammatory reactions. This may be due to altered gene expression of cytokines, possibly related to endotoxin (for example, tolerance and sensitisation). Interleukin 18 (IL-18; interleukin γ inducing factor) modulates local cytokine production in response to endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)).
AIM—To investigate the systemic immune response of patients with AC and to see if unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with AC are activated and contribute to gene expression of IL-18.
METHODS—Plasma levels of endotoxin (LPS) and serum levels of IL-18 were measured by enzyme linked immunoassay and the amoebocyte lysate test in 74 abstinent patients with different stages of AC (Child-Pugh stage A, n=18; B, n=22; C, n=34) and compared with healthy controls (n=43). Gene expression of IL-18 was assessed by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in freshly isolated unstimulated PBMC of a subgroup of 14 patients with AC compared with five healthy controls.
RESULTS—Gene expression of IL-18 specific mRNA in unstimulated PBMC was significantly enhanced in patients with advanced AC (Child-Pugh stage C) and correlated with plasma LPS and serum CD14 levels (Spearman rank correlation factors r=0.76 and r=0.72). Serum concentrations of IL-18 were also elevated compared with healthy controls (p<0.001) but correlation with serum levels of CD14 and plasma levels of LPS was much weaker compared with mRNA data (Spearman rank correlation factors r=0.47 and r=0.26).
CONCLUSIONS—Our in vivo data suggest a presensitisation of "unstimulated" PBMC in the circulation of patients with AC by endotoxin. The term "unstimulated" may be inadequate in patients with AC. Further investigations are needed to define the exact mechanisms and localisation of sensitisation of PBMC in vivo

  19. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells and regulatory T cells in acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnaba, V; Tamburrini, E; Laghi, V; Cauda, R; Levrero, M; Ruocco, G; Ortona, L; Balsano, F

    1985-01-01

    During acute viral hepatitis, we observed a significant decrease in OKT4/OKT8 ratio with a significant increase in the OKT8 positive subset in acute type B and non-A-non-B hepatitis. This altered ratio persisted in type B for a long time until HBsAg antibody became detectable, while it soon returned to normal in type A and non-A-non-B hepatitis. In the majority of acute hepatitis the altered ratio is because of an increase and not to a decrease in the whole T cell population, as described in chronic HBV infection. The number of HNK-1 positive cells remained raised during the recovery phase of type B and non-A-non-B hepatitis, a finding consistent with the hypothesis that NK cells play a role in the host defence against B and non-A-non-B virus infections. Serum beta 2-microglobulin concentrations were increased only in acute hepatitis B and non-A-non-B where immunological mechanisms are suspected to be involved, and showed a good correlation with the population of activated OKIa positive cells. PMID:2862096

  20. Cytokines profile and peripheral blood mononuclear cells morphology in Rett and autistic patients.

    PubMed

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Cervellati, Franco; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Montagner, Giulia; Waldon, PhiAnh; Hayek, Joussef; Gambari, Roberto; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A potential role for immune dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been well established. However, immunological features of Rett syndrome (RTT), a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder closely related to autism, have not been well addressed yet. By using multiplex Luminex technology, a panel of 27 cytokines and chemokines was evaluated in serum from 10 RTT patients with confirmed diagnosis of MECP2 mutation (typical RTT), 12 children affected by classic autistic disorder and 8 control subjects. The cytokine/chemokine gene expression was assessed by real time PCR on mRNA of isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Moreover, ultrastructural analysis of PBMCs was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Significantly higher serum levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-9, IL-13 were detected in RTT compared to control subjects, and IL-15 shows a trend toward the upregulation in RTT. In addition, IL-1β and VEGF were the only down-regulated cytokines in autistic patients with respect to RTT. No difference in cytokine/chemokine profile between autistic and control groups was detected. These data were also confirmed by ELISA real time PCR. At the ultrastructural level, the most severe morphological abnormalities were observed in mitochondria of both RTT and autistic PBMCs. In conclusion, our study shows a deregulated cytokine/chemokine profile together with morphologically altered immune cells in RTT. Such abnormalities were not quite as evident in autistic subjects. These findings indicate a possible role of immune dysfunction in RTT making the clinical features of this pathology related also to the immunology aspects, suggesting, therefore, novel possible therapeutic interventions for this disorder.

  1. Mapping Variation in Cellular and Transcriptional Response to 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Silvia N.; Maranville, Joseph C.; Baxter, Shaneen S.; Jeong, Choongwon; Nakagome, Shigeki; Hrusch, Cara L.; Witonsky, David B.; Sperling, Anne I.; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The active hormonal form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D) is an important modulator of the immune system, inhibiting cellular proliferation and regulating transcription of immune response genes. In order to characterize the genetic basis of variation in the immunomodulatory effects of 1,25D, we mapped quantitative traits of 1,25D response at both the cellular and the transcriptional level. We carried out a genome-wide association scan of percent inhibition of cell proliferation (Imax) induced by 1,25D treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 88 healthy African-American individuals. Two genome-wide significant variants were identified: rs1893662 in a gene desert on chromosome 18 (p = 2.32 x 10−8) and rs6451692 on chromosome 5 (p = 2.55 x 10−8), which may influence the anti-proliferative activity of 1,25D by regulating the expression of nearby genes such as the chemokine gene, CCL28, and the translation initiation gene, PAIP1. We also identified 8 expression quantitative trait loci at a FDR<0.10 for transcriptional response to 1,25D treatment, which include the transcriptional regulator ets variant 3-like (ETV3L) and EH-domain containing 4 (EHD4). In addition, we identified response eQTLs in vitamin D receptor binding sites near genes differentially expressed in response to 1,25D, such as FERM Domain Containing 6 (FRMD6), which plays a critical role in regulating both cell proliferation and apoptosis. Combining information from the GWAS of Imax and the response eQTL mapping enabled identification of putative Imax-associated candidate genes such as PAIP1 and the transcriptional repressor gene ZNF649. Overall, the variants identified in this study are strong candidates for immune traits and diseases linked to vitamin D, such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:27454520

  2. DDE and PCB 153 independently induce aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Salgado-Bustamante, Mariana; González-Amaro, Roberto; Hernandez-Castro, Berenice; Pérez-Maldonado, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that compounds inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines enhance AhR expression. The aim of this study was 2-fold: (1) to determine if two pro-inflammatory compounds, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexa-chlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), independently affect AhR gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC); and (2) if affected, to determine whether the mechanism involved was due to AhR activation or to a pro-inflammatory effect of the chemicals. PBMC isolated from healthy individuals were incubated in the presence of DDE (10 µg/ml) and PCB 153 (20 ng/ml) over time and AhR and CYP1A1 expression was assessed with a real-time PCR technique. The results indicated there was over-expression of the AhR mRNA in PBMC when the cells were treated with DDE and PCB 153. No changes in expression levels of CYP1A1 mRNA were found. Importantly, when the cells were exposed to DDE and PCB 153 in the presence of an antagonist of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, the over-expression of AhR was abolished; as expected, the expression of CYP1A1 was unaffected. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated for the first time an increment of AhR expression "in vitro" in PBMC treated with two pro-inflammatory environmental pollutants, DDE and PCB153. Moreover, the over-expression of AhR was dependent of TNFα induced by DDE and PCB 153 and was independent of AhR activation.

  3. Characterisation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of Meningococcal Opa Proteins on Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susan; Payne, Isabelle; Saleem, Muhammad; Derrick, Jeremy P.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Opa proteins are major surface-expressed proteins located in the Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane, and are potential meningococcal vaccine candidates. Although Opa proteins elicit high levels of bactericidal antibodies following immunisation in mice, progress towards human clinical trials has been delayed due to previous findings that Opa inhibits T cell proliferation in some in vitro assays. However, results from previous studies are conflicting, with different Opa preparations and culture conditions being used. We investigated the effects of various Opa+ and Opa- antigens from N. meningitidis strain H44/76 in a range of in vitro conditions using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and purified CD4+ T cells, measuring T cell proliferation by CFSE dilution using flow cytometry. Wild type recombinant and liposomal Opa proteins inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation after stimulation with IL-2, anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and these effects were reduced by mutation of the CEACAM1-binding region of Opa. These effects were not observed in culture with ex vivo PBMCs. Opa+ and Opa- OMVs did not consistently exert a stimulatory or inhibitory effect across different culture conditions. These data do not support a hypothesis that Opa proteins would be inhibitory to T cells if given as a vaccine component, and T cell immune responses to OMV vaccines are unlikely to be significantly affected by the presence of Opa proteins. PMID:27111850

  4. Mechanism and role of MCP-1 upregulation upon chikungunya virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Mulder, H. Lie; Smit, Jolanda M.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2)-mediated migration of monocytes is essential for immunological surveillance of tissues. During chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection however, excessive production of MCP-1 has been linked to disease pathogenesis. High MCP-1 serum levels are detected during the viremic phase of CHIKV infection and correlate with the virus titre. In vitro CHIKV infection was also shown to stimulate MCP-1 production in whole blood; yet the role and the mechanism of MCP-1 production upon infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells remain unknown. Here we found that active CHIKV infection stimulated production of MCP-1 in monocytes. Importantly however, we found that communication with other leukocytes is crucial to yield MCP-1 by monocytes upon CHIKV infection. Indeed, blocking interferon-α/β receptor or the JAK1/JAK2 signalling downstream of the receptor abolished CHIKV-mediated MCP-1 production. Additionally, we show that despite the apparent correlation between IFN type I, CHIKV replication and MCP-1, modulating the levels of the chemokine did not influence CHIKV infection. In summary, our data disclose the complexity of MCP-1 regulation upon CHIKV infection and point to a crucial role of IFNβ in the chemokine secretion. We propose that balance between these soluble factors is imperative for an appropriate host response to CHIKV infection. PMID:27558873

  5. Effect of Vitamin D on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Patients with Psoriasis Vulgaris and Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cubillos, Susana; Krieg, Nadine; Norgauer, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriasis, a chronic skin disease with or without joint inflammation, has increased circulating proinflammatory cytokine levels. Vitamin D is involved in calcium homeostasis, bone formation, osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, as well as regulation of immune response. We aimed to study osteoclast differentiation and cytokine secretion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis, in response to 1,25(OH)2D3. Methods Serum levels of bone turnover markers were measured by ELISA in patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis, and healthy controls. PBMCs were isolated and cultured with or without RANKL/M-CSF and 1,25(OH)2D3. Osteoclast differentiation and cytokine secretion were assessed. Results Psoriatic arthritis patients had lower osteocalcin, as well as higher C-telopeptide of type I collagen and cathepsin K serum levels compared with psoriasis vulgaris patients and controls. RANKL/M-CSF-stimulated PBMCs from psoriatic arthritis patients produced higher proinflammatory cytokine levels and had a differential secretion profile in response to 1,25(OH)2D3, compared with psoriasis vulgaris and control PBMCs. Conclusions Our data confirmed altered bone turnover in psoriatic arthritis patients, and demonstrated increased osteoclastogenic potential and proinflammatory cytokine secretion capacity of these PBMCs compared with psoriasis vulgaris and controls. 1,25(OH)2D3 abrogated these effects. PMID:27050092

  6. A clinical study of the effectiveness of oral glutamine supplementation during total parenteral nutrition: influence on mesenteric mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Aosasa, S; Mochizuki, H; Yamamoto, T; Ono, S; Ichikura, T

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial translocation (BT) is a well-known insult during total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and a high incidence of morbidity has been reported in septic patients receiving TPN. Inflammatory cytokines were shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of critical complications following sepsis. Previous studies have indicated that supplementation of TPN with glutamine is effective in preventing BT in animals, but its effectiveness in humans is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of oral glutamine supplementation to patients receiving TPN in suppressing cytokine production of mesenteric blood mononuclear cells (M-MNC). Fifteen colorectal cancer patients were divided into 3 groups according to preoperative nutrition management. (1) TPN group: TPN with conventional glutamine-free amino acid solution. (2) Gln group: TPN with oral glutamine supplementation of 30 g/d. (3) CONTROL GROUP: oral intake of normal food. M-MNC were obtained immediately after laparotomy and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production of M-MNC was evaluated with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. TNF-alpha and IL-10 production by LPS-stimulated M-MNC was increased in the TPN group and suppressed in the Gln group. In conclusion, oral glutamine supplementation to patients with TPN was shown to be effective for the prevention of M-MNC activation to avoid excessive production of cytokines.

  7. Mechanism and role of MCP-1 upregulation upon chikungunya virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Mulder, H Lie; Smit, Jolanda M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2)-mediated migration of monocytes is essential for immunological surveillance of tissues. During chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection however, excessive production of MCP-1 has been linked to disease pathogenesis. High MCP-1 serum levels are detected during the viremic phase of CHIKV infection and correlate with the virus titre. In vitro CHIKV infection was also shown to stimulate MCP-1 production in whole blood; yet the role and the mechanism of MCP-1 production upon infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells remain unknown. Here we found that active CHIKV infection stimulated production of MCP-1 in monocytes. Importantly however, we found that communication with other leukocytes is crucial to yield MCP-1 by monocytes upon CHIKV infection. Indeed, blocking interferon-α/β receptor or the JAK1/JAK2 signalling downstream of the receptor abolished CHIKV-mediated MCP-1 production. Additionally, we show that despite the apparent correlation between IFN type I, CHIKV replication and MCP-1, modulating the levels of the chemokine did not influence CHIKV infection. In summary, our data disclose the complexity of MCP-1 regulation upon CHIKV infection and point to a crucial role of IFNβ in the chemokine secretion. We propose that balance between these soluble factors is imperative for an appropriate host response to CHIKV infection. PMID:27558873

  8. Procalcitonin neutralizes bacterial LPS and reduces LPS-induced cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Procalcitonin (PCT) is a polypeptide with several cationic aminoacids in its chemical structure and it is a well known marker of sepsis. It is now emerging that PCT might exhibit some anti-inflammatory effects. The present study, based on the evaluation of the in vitro interaction between PCT and bacterial lipopolisaccharide (LPS), reports new data supporting the interesting and potentially useful anti-inflammatory activity of PCT. Results PCT significantly decreased (p < 0.05) the limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay reactivity of LPS from both Salmonella typhimurium (rough chemotype) and Escherichia coli (smooth chemotype). Subsequently, the in vitro effects of PCT on LPS-induced cytokine release were studied in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). When LPS was pre-incubated for 30 minutes with different concentrations of PCT, the release of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) by PBMC decreased in a concentration-dependent manner after 24 hours for IL-10 and 4 hours for TNFα. The release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) exhibited a drastic reduction at 4 hours for all the PCT concentrations assessed, whereas such decrease was concentration-dependent after 24 hours. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of the capability of PCT to directly neutralize bacterial LPS, thus leading to a reduction of its major inflammatory mediators. PMID:22568957

  9. Rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever through identification of Salmonella typhi within 18 hours of specimen acquisition by culture of the mononuclear cell-platelet fraction of blood.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, F A; McWhirter, P D; Burr, D; Punjabi, N H; Lane, E; Kumala, S; Sudarmono, P; Pulungsih, S P; Lesmana, M; Tjaniadi, P

    1990-01-01

    Detection of Salmonella typhi in blood by culture of the mononuclear cell-platelet layer was compared with other methods currently used for the diagnosis of typhoid fever. Colonies of S. typhi were present in all mononuclear cell-platelet layer-positive cultures within 18 h of plating and were identified within an additional 10 min by a coagglutination technique. In contrast, identification of all positive cultures by conventional blood culture required 3 days. PMID:2332479

  10. Inhibitor treatment of peripheral mononuclear cells from Parkinson’s disease patients further validates LRRK2 dephosphorylation as a pharmacodynamic biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Perera, G.; Ranola, M.; Rowe, D. B.; Halliday, G. M.; Dzamko, N.

    2016-01-01

    Activating mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are strongly associated with increased risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Thus, LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are in development as potential Parkinson’s disease therapeutics. A reduction in the constitutive levels of phosphorylation on leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is currently used to measure target engagement of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors in cell and animal models. We aimed to determine if reduced phosphorylation of LRRK2 following inhibitor treatment is also a valid measure of target engagement in peripheral mononuclear cells from Parkinson’s disease patients. Peripheral mononuclear cells from idiopathic Parkinson’s disease patients and controls were treated ex vivo with two structurally distinct inhibitors of LRRK2, at four different doses, and immunoblotting was used to assess the reduction in LRRK2 phosphorylation at Ser910, Ser935, Ser955 and Ser973. Both inhibitors showed no acute toxicity in primary cells and both inhibitors reduced the constitutive phosphorylation of LRRK2 at all measured residues equally in both control and Parkinson’s disease groups. Measuring the reduction in LRRK2 phosphorylation resulting from LRRK2 kinase inhibition, is thus a valid measure of acute peripheral target engagement in Parkinson’s disease patients. This is important if LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are to be used in a clinical setting. PMID:27503089

  11. Radiofrequency currents exert cytotoxic effects in NB69 human neuroblastoma cells but not in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    HERNÁNDEZ-BULE, MARÍA LUISA; ROLDÁN, ERNESTO; MATILLA, JOAQUÍN; TRILLO, MARÍA ÁNGELES; ÚBEDA, ALEJANDRO

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a number of electric and electrothermal therapies have been applied to the treatment of specific cancer types. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the response to such therapies have not been well characterized yet. Capacitive-resistive electric transfer (CRET) therapy uses electric currents at frequencies within the 0.45–0.6 MHz range to induce hyperthermia in target tissues. Preliminary trials in cancer patients have shown consistent signs that CRET could slow down growth of tumor tissues in brain gliomas, without inducing detectable damage in the surrounding healthy tissue. Previous studies by our group have shown that subthermal treatment with 0.57-MHz electric currents can induce a cytostatic, not cytotoxic response in HepG2 human hepatocarcinoma cells; such effect being mediated by cell cycle alterations. In contrast, the study of the response of NB69 human neuroblastoma cells to the same electric treatment revealed consistent indications of cytotoxic effects. The present study extends the knowledge on the response of NB69 cells to the subthermal stimulus, comparing it to that of primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to the same treatment. The results showed no sensitivity of PBMC to the 0.57 MHz subthermal currents and confirmed that the treatment exerts a cytotoxic action in NB69 cells. The data also revealed a previously undetected cytostatic response of the neuroblastoma cell line. CRET currents affected NB69 cell proliferation by significantly reducing the fraction of cells in the phase G2/M of the cell cycle at 12 h of exposure. These data provide new information on the mechanisms of response to CRET therapy, and are consistent with a cytotoxic and/or cytostatic action of the electric treatment, which would affect human cells of tumor origin but not normal cells with a low proliferation rate. PMID:22843038

  12. Production of nitric oxide by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Catherine J; Stuckey, Joyce E; Cox, Heather; Smith, Brett; Funke, Christina; Stott, Jeff; Colle, Clarence; Gaspard, Joseph; Manire, Charles A

    2007-08-15

    Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are exposed to many conditions in their habitat that may adversely impact health and impair immune function in this endangered species. In an effort to increase the current knowledge base regarding the manatee immune system, the production of an important reactive nitrogen intermediate, nitric oxide (NO), by manatee peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was investigated. PBMC from healthy captive manatees were stimulated with LPS, IFN-gamma, or TNF-alpha, either alone or in various combinations, with NO production assessed after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of culture. NO production in response to LPS stimulation was significantly greater after 48, 72, or 96 h of culture compared to NO production after 24h of culture. A specific inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), L-NIL (L-N(6)-(1-iminoethyl)lysine), significantly decreased NO production by LPS-stimulated manatee PBMC. Manatee specific oligonucleotide primers for iNOS were designed to measure expression of relative amounts of mRNA in LPS-stimulated manatee PBMC from captive manatees. NO production by PBMC from manatees exposed to red tide toxins was analyzed, with significantly greater NO production by both unstimulated and LPS stimulated PBMC from red tide exposed compared with healthy captive or cold-stress manatees. Free-ranging manatees produced significantly lower amounts of nitric oxide compared to either captive or red tide rescued manatees. Results presented in this paper contribute to the current understanding of manatee immune function and represent the first report of nitric oxide production in the immune system of a marine mammal.

  13. Production of nitric oxide by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Catherine J; Stuckey, Joyce E; Cox, Heather; Smith, Brett; Funke, Christina; Stott, Jeff; Colle, Clarence; Gaspard, Joseph; Manire, Charles A

    2007-08-15

    Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are exposed to many conditions in their habitat that may adversely impact health and impair immune function in this endangered species. In an effort to increase the current knowledge base regarding the manatee immune system, the production of an important reactive nitrogen intermediate, nitric oxide (NO), by manatee peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was investigated. PBMC from healthy captive manatees were stimulated with LPS, IFN-gamma, or TNF-alpha, either alone or in various combinations, with NO production assessed after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of culture. NO production in response to LPS stimulation was significantly greater after 48, 72, or 96 h of culture compared to NO production after 24h of culture. A specific inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), L-NIL (L-N(6)-(1-iminoethyl)lysine), significantly decreased NO production by LPS-stimulated manatee PBMC. Manatee specific oligonucleotide primers for iNOS were designed to measure expression of relative amounts of mRNA in LPS-stimulated manatee PBMC from captive manatees. NO production by PBMC from manatees exposed to red tide toxins was analyzed, with significantly greater NO production by both unstimulated and LPS stimulated PBMC from red tide exposed compared with healthy captive or cold-stress manatees. Free-ranging manatees produced significantly lower amounts of nitric oxide compared to either captive or red tide rescued manatees. Results presented in this paper contribute to the current understanding of manatee immune function and represent the first report of nitric oxide production in the immune system of a marine mammal. PMID:17614139

  14. Effects of Caffeine Supplementation on Plasma and Blood Mononuclear Cell Interleukin-10 Levels After Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tauler, Pedro; Martinez, Sonia; Martinez, Pau; Lozano, Leticia; Moreno, Carlos; Aguiló, Antoni

    2016-02-01

    This study compared the response of interleukin (IL)-10, and also of IL-6 and IL-12 p40, to exercise and caffeine supplementation between plasma and blood mononuclear cells (BMNCs). Participants in the study (n = 28) were randomly allocated in a double-blind fashion to either caffeine (n = 14) or placebo (n = 14) treatments. One hour before completing a 15-km run competition, athletes took 6 mg/kg body mass of caffeine or a placebo. Plasma and BMNCs were purified from blood samples taken before and after competition. Concentrations of interleukins (IL-10, IL-6, and IL-12 p40), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), caffeine, adrenaline, and cortisol were measured in plasma. IL-10, IL-6, and IL-12 p40 and cAMP levels were also determined in BMNCs. Exercise induced significant increases in IL-6 and IL-10 plasma levels, with higher increases in the caffeine-supplemented group. After 2-hr recovery, these levels returned to almost preexercise values. However, no effect of caffeine on BMNC cytokines was observed. IL-10, IL-6, and IL-12 p40 levels in BMNCs increased mainly at 2 hr postexercise. cAMP levels increased postexercise in plasma and after recovery in BMNCs, but no effects of caffeine were observed. In conclusion, caffeine did not modify cytokine levels in BMNCs in response to exercise. However, higher increases of IL-10 were observed in plasma after exercise in the supplemented participants, which could suppose an enhancement of the anti-inflammatory properties of exercise.

  15. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and interleukin-8 production in mononuclear cells stimulated by oral microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Y; Russell, T R; Graves, D T; Cheng, H; Nong, S H; Levitz, S M

    1996-01-01

    Chemokines are a family of low-molecular-weight proinflammatory cytokines that stimulate recruitment of leukocytes. The chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) are relatively specific chemoattractants for neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. Chemokine expression contributes to the presence of different leukocyte populations observed in normal and pathologic states. In the present studies, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stimulated by microbes (Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans) selected based upon their importance as oral pathogens. IL-8 and MCP-1 gene expression and protein release were determined by Northern blot (RNA blot) analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. C. albicans, P. gingivalis, and A. actinomycetemcomitans induced high levels of production of both MCP-1 and IL-8. S. mutans was a strong inducer of MCP-1, but it did not stimulate significant production of IL-8. C. albicans, S. mutans, and A. actinomycetemcomitans were 500 to 5,000 times more potent than P. gingivalis in terms of MCP-1 production. In general, the microbe-to-PBMC ratios required for maximum gene expression of MCP-1 were lower than those for IL-8. However, for actual protein release of MCP-1 versus IL-8, differences in the effects of various microbe concentrations were observed only for A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results demonstrate that different oral pathogens induce specific dose-dependent patterns of chemokine gene expression and release. Such patterns may help explain the immunopathology of oral infections, particularly with regard to inflammatory leukocyte recruitment. PMID:8890191

  16. Synergistic Effects of Calcineurin Inhibitors and Steroids on Steroid Sensitivity of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hironori; Iwamoto, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Yuki; Hirano, Toshihiko; Konno, Osamu; Kihara, Yu; Chiba, Naokazu; Yokoyama, Takayoshi; Takano, Kiminori; Toraishi, Tatsunori; Okuyama, Kiyoshi; Ikeda, Chie; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Soga, Akiko; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kawaguchi, Takashi; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Unezaki, Sakae; Shimazu, Motohide

    2015-02-01

    The steroid receptor (SR) complex contains FKBP51 and FKBP52, which bind to tacrolimus (TAC) and cyclophilin 40, which, in turn, bind to cyclosporine (CYA); these influence the intranuclear mobility of steroid-SR complexes. Pharmacodynamic interactions are thought to exist between steroids and calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) on the SR complex. We examined the effect of CNIs on steroid sensitivity. Methylprednisolone (MPSL) sensitivity was estimated as the concentration inhibiting mitosis in 50% (IC50) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and as the area under the MPSL concentration-proliferation suppressive rate curves (CPS-AUC) in 30 healthy subjects. MPSL sensitivity was compared between the additive group (AG) as the MPSL sensitivity that was a result of addition of the proliferation suppressive rate of CNIs to that of MPSL and the mixed culture group (MCG) as MPSL sensitivity of mixed culture with both MPSL and CNIs in identical patients. IC50 values of MPSL and cortisol sensitivity were examined before and 2 months after CNI administration in 23 renal transplant recipients. IC50 and CPS-AUC values of MPSL were lower in the MCG than in the AG with administration of TAC and CYA. The CPS-AUC ratio of MCG and AG was lower in the TAC group. IC50 values of MPSL and cortisol tended to be lower after administration of TAC and CYA, and a significant difference was observed in the IC50 of cortisol after TAC administration. Steroid sensitivity increased with both TAC and CYA. Furthermore, TAC had a greater effect on increasing sensitivity. Thus, concomitant administration of CNIs and steroids can increase steroid sensitivity. PMID:26858893

  17. Elevated peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived superoxide production in healthy young black men.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shekhar H; Holwerda, Seth W; Keller, David M; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that blacks exhibit elevations in systemic oxidative stress. However, the source(s) and mechanism(s) contributing to the elevation in oxidative stress remain unclear. Given that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) can be a major source of NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide production, we tested the hypothesis that young black men demonstrate greater superoxide production and NADPH oxidase expression in PBMCs compared with whites. PBMCs were freshly isolated from whole blood in young normotensive black (n = 18) and white (n = 16) men. Intracellular superoxide production in PBMCs was measured using dihydroethidium fluorescence, protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, gp91(phox) (membranous) and p47(phox) (cytosolic) in PBMCs were assessed using Western blot analysis, and plasma protein carbonyls were measured as a marker of systemic oxidative stress. Black men showed elevated intracellular superoxide production (4.3 ± 0.5 vs. 2.0 ± 0.6 relative fluorescence units; black men vs. white men, P < 0.05), increased protein expression for gp91(phox) and p47(phox) (e.g., p47(phox): 1.1 ± 0.2, black men vs. 0.4 ± 0.1, white men, P < 0.05) in PBMCs and higher circulating protein carbonyl levels (22 ± 4 vs. 14 ± 2 nmol/ml; black men vs. white men, P < 0.05). Interestingly, a positive family history of hypertension in black men did not further enhance PBMC-derived intracellular superoxide production or NADPH oxidase subunit protein expression. These findings indicate that black men exhibit greater resting PBMC-derived superoxide production and an upregulation of the NADPH oxidase pathway with a possible contribution to increases in systemic oxidative stress.

  18. Effects of Caffeine Supplementation on Plasma and Blood Mononuclear Cell Interleukin-10 Levels After Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tauler, Pedro; Martinez, Sonia; Martinez, Pau; Lozano, Leticia; Moreno, Carlos; Aguiló, Antoni

    2016-02-01

    This study compared the response of interleukin (IL)-10, and also of IL-6 and IL-12 p40, to exercise and caffeine supplementation between plasma and blood mononuclear cells (BMNCs). Participants in the study (n = 28) were randomly allocated in a double-blind fashion to either caffeine (n = 14) or placebo (n = 14) treatments. One hour before completing a 15-km run competition, athletes took 6 mg/kg body mass of caffeine or a placebo. Plasma and BMNCs were purified from blood samples taken before and after competition. Concentrations of interleukins (IL-10, IL-6, and IL-12 p40), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), caffeine, adrenaline, and cortisol were measured in plasma. IL-10, IL-6, and IL-12 p40 and cAMP levels were also determined in BMNCs. Exercise induced significant increases in IL-6 and IL-10 plasma levels, with higher increases in the caffeine-supplemented group. After 2-hr recovery, these levels returned to almost preexercise values. However, no effect of caffeine on BMNC cytokines was observed. IL-10, IL-6, and IL-12 p40 levels in BMNCs increased mainly at 2 hr postexercise. cAMP levels increased postexercise in plasma and after recovery in BMNCs, but no effects of caffeine were observed. In conclusion, caffeine did not modify cytokine levels in BMNCs in response to exercise. However, higher increases of IL-10 were observed in plasma after exercise in the supplemented participants, which could suppose an enhancement of the anti-inflammatory properties of exercise. PMID:26132827

  19. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Declining of Circulating Proangiogenic Mononuclear Progenitor Cells in Chronic Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berezin, Alexander E.; Kremzer, Alexander A.; Samura, Tatyana A.; Berezina, Tatyana A.; Martovitskaya, Yulia V.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Serum uric acid (SUA) is considered a marker for natural progression of chronic heart failure (CHF) mediated cardiovascular remodelling. CHF associates with declining of circulating mononuclear progenitor cells (MPCs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the interrelationship between SUA concentrations and proangiogenic MPCs in ischemic CHF patients. Methods: The study population was structured retrospectively after determining the coronary artery disease (CAD) by contrast-enhanced spiral computed tomography angiography in 126 subjects with symptomatic ischemic mild-to-severe CHF and 128 CAD subjects without CHF. Baseline biomarkers were measured in all patients. Cox proportional multivariate hazard ratio was calculated for predictors of MPCs declining in both CHF and non-CHF patient population predictors of MPCs declining in CHF subjects were examined in stepwise logistic regression. C-statistics, integrated discrimination indices (IDI) and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. Results: Cox proportional adjusted hazard ratio analyses for CD14+CD309+ and CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs by SUA has shown that the higher quartiles (Q3 and Q4) of SUA compared to the lower quartiles (Q1 and Q2) are associated with increased risks of depletion of both CD14+CD309+ and CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs. The addition of Q4 SUA to the ABC model improved the relative IDI by 13.8% for depletion of CD14+CD309+ MPCs and by 14.5% for depletion of CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs. Conclusion: Circulating levels of proangiogenic MPCs are declined progressively depending on the levels of SUA in the HF subjects with CHF. We suggest that even mild elevations of SUA might be used to predict of relative depletion of proangiogenic MPCs among chronic HF patients. PMID:25320662

  20. Synergistic Effects of Calcineurin Inhibitors and Steroids on Steroid Sensitivity of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hironori; Iwamoto, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Yuki; Hirano, Toshihiko; Konno, Osamu; Kihara, Yu; Chiba, Naokazu; Yokoyama, Takayoshi; Takano, Kiminori; Toraishi, Tatsunori; Okuyama, Kiyoshi; Ikeda, Chie; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Soga, Akiko; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kawaguchi, Takashi; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Unezaki, Sakae; Shimazu, Motohide

    2015-02-01

    The steroid receptor (SR) complex contains FKBP51 and FKBP52, which bind to tacrolimus (TAC) and cyclophilin 40, which, in turn, bind to cyclosporine (CYA); these influence the intranuclear mobility of steroid-SR complexes. Pharmacodynamic interactions are thought to exist between steroids and calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) on the SR complex. We examined the effect of CNIs on steroid sensitivity. Methylprednisolone (MPSL) sensitivity was estimated as the concentration inhibiting mitosis in 50% (IC50) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and as the area under the MPSL concentration-proliferation suppressive rate curves (CPS-AUC) in 30 healthy subjects. MPSL sensitivity was compared between the additive group (AG) as the MPSL sensitivity that was a result of addition of the proliferation suppressive rate of CNIs to that of MPSL and the mixed culture group (MCG) as MPSL sensitivity of mixed culture with both MPSL and CNIs in identical patients. IC50 values of MPSL and cortisol sensitivity were examined before and 2 months after CNI administration in 23 renal transplant recipients. IC50 and CPS-AUC values of MPSL were lower in the MCG than in the AG with administration of TAC and CYA. The CPS-AUC ratio of MCG and AG was lower in the TAC group. IC50 values of MPSL and cortisol tended to be lower after administration of TAC and CYA, and a significant difference was observed in the IC50 of cortisol after TAC administration. Steroid sensitivity increased with both TAC and CYA. Furthermore, TAC had a greater effect on increasing sensitivity. Thus, concomitant administration of CNIs and steroids can increase steroid sensitivity.

  1. Opposing Effects of Low Molecular Weight Heparins on the Release of Inflammatory Cytokines from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Shastri, Madhur D.; Stewart, Niall; Eapen, Mathew; Peterson, Gregory M.; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R.; Gueven, Nuri; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Patel, Rahul P.

    2015-01-01

    Background T-cell-mediated inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), play an important role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory airways diseases. Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), widely used anticoagulants, possess anti-inflammatory properties making them potential treatment options for inflammatory diseases, including asthma. In the current study, we investigated the modulating effects of two LMWHs (enoxaparin and dalteparin) on the release of cytokines from stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of asthmatic subjects to identify the specific components responsible for the effects. Methods PBMCs from asthmatic subjects (consist of ~75% of T-cells) were isolated from blood taken from ten asthmatic subjects. The PBMCs were pre-treated in the presence or absence of different concentrations of LMWHs, and were then stimulated by phytohaemagglutinin for the release of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and TNF-α. LMWHs were completely or selectively desulfated and their anticoagulant effect, as well as the ability to modulate cytokine release, was determined. LMWHs were chromatographically fractionated and each fraction was tested for molecular weight determination along with an assessment of anticoagulant potency and effect on cytokine release. Results Enoxaparin inhibited cytokine release by more than 48%, whereas dalteparin increased their release by more than 25%. The observed anti-inflammatory effects of enoxaparin were independent of their anticoagulant activities. Smaller fractions, in particular dp4 (four saccharide units), were responsible for the inhibitory effect of enoxaparin. Whereas, the larger fractions, in particular dp22 (twenty two saccharide units), were associated with the stimulatory effect of dalteparin. Conclusion Enoxaparin and dalteparin demonstrated opposing effects on inflammatory markers. These observed effects could be due to the presence of structurally

  2. Cultures and co-cultures of human blood mononuclear cells and endothelial cells for the biocompatibility assessment of surface modified AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Stio, Maria; Martinesi, Maria; Treves, Cristina; Borgioli, Francesca

    2016-12-01

    Samples of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel were subjected either to grinding and polishing procedure, or to grinding and then low temperature glow-discharge nitriding treatment, or to grinding, nitriding and subsequently coating with collagen-I. Nitrided samples, even if only ground, show a higher corrosion resistance in PBS solution, in comparison with ground and polished AISI 316L. Biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro by incubating the samples with either peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), tested separately or in co-culture. HUVEC-PBMC co-culture and co-incubation of HUVEC with PBMC culture medium, after the previous incubation of PBMC with metallic samples, allowed to determine whether the incubation of PBMC with the different samples might affect HUVEC behaviour. Many biological parameters were considered: cell proliferation, release of cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and sICAM-1, gelatinolytic activity of MMPs, and ICAM-1 protein expression. Nitriding treatment, with or without collagen coating of the samples, is able to ameliorate some of the biological parameters taken into account. The obtained results point out that biocompatibility may be successfully tested in vitro, using cultures of normal human cells, as blood and endothelial cells, but more than one cell line should be used, separately or in co-culture, and different parameters should be determined, in particular those correlated with inflammatory phenomena. PMID:27612806

  3. Sperm Cells Induce Distinct Cytokine Response in Peripheral Mononuclear Cells from Infertile Women with Serum Anti-Sperm Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kverka, Miloslav; Ulcova-Gallova, Zdenka; Bartova, Jirina; Cibulka, Jan; Bibkova, Katarina; Micanova, Zdenka; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Anti-sperm antibodies in can markedly reduce the likelihood of natural conception. The etiology of this anti-sperm immunity in human females is unknown. We compared the cytokine response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from infertile patients with or without anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) and fertile women. Methodology/Principal Findings We cultivated the PBMCs together with sperm antigens (whole cells or cell lysate), and screened the supernatants for 40 cytokines by antibody array. When stimulated with whole sperm cells, the PBMCs from patients with ASA produce less IL-3, IL-11, IL-13, ICAM-1, GCSF and more IL-2, IL-4 and IL-12p70 as compared to healthy women. PBMCs from patients with ASA produce typically less IL-13, IL-7, IL-17 and MIG, and more MIP-1β and IL-8, as compared to PBMCs from patients without ASA. In response to sperm cell lysate, PBMCs from infertile women without ASA respond initially by increase in production of growth factors (GCSF, GM-CSF and PDGF-BB) followed by increase in chemokines (e.g. IL-8, MCP-1 and MIP-1β). Conclusions Cellular immune responses to sperm antigens, measured by production of cytokines, differ among infertile women with ASA, infertile women without ASA and healthy women. This difference could play an important role in the initial steps of the infertility pathogenesis. PMID:22952917

  4. Microculture assay for isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and for titration of infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, D H; Melnick, J L; Hollinger, F B

    1990-04-01

    To define the optimal conditions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection in microcultures, experiments were conducted with different ratios of patient and donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Donor/patient PBMC ratios ranged from 1:1 to 1:125. Optimal results were obtained when 1,500,000 donor cells were cocultured with equal or smaller quantities of patient PBMCs. Thus, virologic endpoints could be achieved by diluting patient cells. Smaller numbers of donor cells, with or without larger numbers of patients cells, resulted in lower rates of HIV isolation. Similarly, the direct stimulation of patient PBMCs with phytohemagglutinin without the addition of normal donor cells lowered the sensitivity of the assay significantly. We suggest that a microculture procedure using a fixed quantity of donor cells with different dilutions of patient cells may be useful for monitoring changing HIV levels during antiviral therapy.

  5. Effect of nonmyeloablative unrelated fetal and neonatal murine peripheral blood mononuclear cell infusion on MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Chuan, W; Wu-qing, W; Zhu-wen, Y; Zuo, L

    2014-09-01

    For patients with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), current medications are insufficient to control their condition, and new treatments are necessary. We investigated the effect of fetal and neonatal murine peripheral blood (FNPB) mononuclear cells on MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. Female MRL/lpr mice were randomized to three groups (control, radiation and infusion groups). The infusion group had significantly better results for survival rate, body weight increase, reduction of spleen index, serum anti-ds-DNA antibody, antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and creatinine (Cr), 24 h urine protein and pathological renal tissue lesions than either the control or radiation group. Graft versus host disease (GVHD) was not observed in MRL/lpr mice in the infusion group. The infusion group also had better hematogenesis reconstruction than the radiation group. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a significant increase in Th1, CD8+ T and T reg cells and a reduction in Th2, CD4+ T and Th17 cells in the peripheral blood of the radiation and infusion groups compared with the control group. Immunocytochemical assay revealed a significant increase in serum transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and a significant reduction in interleukin (IL)-17 in the radiation and infusion groups compared with the control group. Therefore, our study showed that FNPB mononuclear cell infusion has a significant role in regulating CD4+ T cells, Th1/Th2, Th17/T reg balance and their corresponding cytokines in MRL/lpr mice. The FNPB mononuclear cell infusion provided evidence in animals and suggested a potential clinical application for umbilical cord blood transplantation to treat SLE patients.

  6. Telomete length in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is associated with folate status in men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human chromosomes are capped by tandem repeats of DNA and associated proteins termed telomeres. The length of the telomeres is reduced with increasing cell divisions except when the enzyme telomerase is active as seen in stem cells and germ cells. Telomere dysfunction has been associated with deve...

  7. The Effect of Long-Term Exercise on the Production of Osteoclastogenic and Antiosteoclastogenic Cytokines by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and on Serum Markers of Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Rhesa; Chi, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that the mechanical stresses associated with physical activity augment bone mineral density and improve bone quality, our understanding of how exercise modulates bone homeostasis at the molecular level is lacking. In a before and after trial involving 43 healthy adults, we measured the effect of six months of supervised exercise training on the spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin-induced production of osteoclastogenic cytokines (interleukin-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α), antiosteoclastogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor-β1 and interleukins 4 and 10), pleiotropic cytokines with variable effects on osteoclastogenesis (interferon-γ, interleukin-6), and T cell growth and differentiation factors (interleukins 2 and 12) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also measured lymphocyte phenotypes and serum markers of bone formation (osteocalcin), bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of Type I collagen), and bone homeostasis (25 (OH) vitamin D, estradiol, testosterone, parathyroid hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1). A combination of aerobic, resistance, and flexibility exercises done on average of 2.5 hours a week attenuated the production of osteoclastogenic cytokines and enhanced the production of antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. These changes were accompanied by a 16% reduction in collagen degradation products and a 9.8% increase in osteocalcin levels. We conclude that long-term moderate intensity exercise exerts a favorable effect on bone resorption by changing the balance between blood mononuclear cells producing osteoclastogenic cytokines and those producing antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02765945.

  8. The Effect of Long-Term Exercise on the Production of Osteoclastogenic and Antiosteoclastogenic Cytokines by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and on Serum Markers of Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Rhesa; Chi, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that the mechanical stresses associated with physical activity augment bone mineral density and improve bone quality, our understanding of how exercise modulates bone homeostasis at the molecular level is lacking. In a before and after trial involving 43 healthy adults, we measured the effect of six months of supervised exercise training on the spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin-induced production of osteoclastogenic cytokines (interleukin-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α), antiosteoclastogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor-β1 and interleukins 4 and 10), pleiotropic cytokines with variable effects on osteoclastogenesis (interferon-γ, interleukin-6), and T cell growth and differentiation factors (interleukins 2 and 12) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also measured lymphocyte phenotypes and serum markers of bone formation (osteocalcin), bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of Type I collagen), and bone homeostasis (25 (OH) vitamin D, estradiol, testosterone, parathyroid hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1). A combination of aerobic, resistance, and flexibility exercises done on average of 2.5 hours a week attenuated the production of osteoclastogenic cytokines and enhanced the production of antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. These changes were accompanied by a 16% reduction in collagen degradation products and a 9.8% increase in osteocalcin levels. We conclude that long-term moderate intensity exercise exerts a favorable effect on bone resorption by changing the balance between blood mononuclear cells producing osteoclastogenic cytokines and those producing antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02765945. PMID:27642534

  9. The Effect of Long-Term Exercise on the Production of Osteoclastogenic and Antiosteoclastogenic Cytokines by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and on Serum Markers of Bone Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Smith, J Kelly; Dykes, Rhesa; Chi, David S

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that the mechanical stresses associated with physical activity augment bone mineral density and improve bone quality, our understanding of how exercise modulates bone homeostasis at the molecular level is lacking. In a before and after trial involving 43 healthy adults, we measured the effect of six months of supervised exercise training on the spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin-induced production of osteoclastogenic cytokines (interleukin-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α), antiosteoclastogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor-β1 and interleukins 4 and 10), pleiotropic cytokines with variable effects on osteoclastogenesis (interferon-γ, interleukin-6), and T cell growth and differentiation factors (interleukins 2 and 12) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also measured lymphocyte phenotypes and serum markers of bone formation (osteocalcin), bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of Type I collagen), and bone homeostasis (25 (OH) vitamin D, estradiol, testosterone, parathyroid hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1). A combination of aerobic, resistance, and flexibility exercises done on average of 2.5 hours a week attenuated the production of osteoclastogenic cytokines and enhanced the production of antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. These changes were accompanied by a 16% reduction in collagen degradation products and a 9.8% increase in osteocalcin levels. We conclude that long-term moderate intensity exercise exerts a favorable effect on bone resorption by changing the balance between blood mononuclear cells producing osteoclastogenic cytokines and those producing antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02765945. PMID:27642534

  10. Use of 51Cr-labeled mononuclear cells for measuring the cellular immune response in mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkower, A.; Scheuchenzuber, W.J.; Ferguson, F.G.

    1981-02-01

    Spleen cells labeled with 51Cr were used in sensitized syngeneic mice to measure the degree of mononuclear cell infiltration into antigen-challenged tissues. With this method, increased cellular infiltration was found after footpad challenge of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocyte, Escherichia coli, and BCG antigens. Cellular response also was determined by using this technique in the lungs of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocytes and BCG. This procedure offers the opportunity to measure cellular infiltration, whether due to cellular or humoral influences, in tissues not easily accessible to conventional immunological manipulation.

  11. Use of /sup 51/Cr-labeled mononuclear cells for measuring the cellular immune response in mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkower, A.; Scheuchenzuber, W.J.; Ferguson, F.G.

    1981-02-01

    Spleen cells labeled with /sup 51/Cr were used in sensitized syngeneic mice to measure the degree of mononuclear cell infiltration into antigen-challenged tissues. With this method, increased cellular infiltration was found after footpad challenge of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocyte, Escherichia coli, and BCG antigens. Cellular response also was determined by using this technique in the lungs of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocytes and BCG. This procedure offers the opportunity to measure cellular infiltration, whether due to cellular or humoral influences, in tissues not easily accessible to conventional immunological manipulation.

  12. In vitro expansion of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul; Rohaya, M. A. W.

    2013-11-27

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin{sup −}) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin{sup +}) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin{sup −} cell population. The ability of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin{sup +} mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin{sup −} stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however

  13. Comparison of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes, Cardiovascular Progenitors, and Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sarah; Chong, James J.H.; Paige, Sharon L.; Iwata, Mineo; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Keller, Gordon; Reinecke, Hans; Murry, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-CMs) can improve the contractility of injured hearts. We hypothesized that mesodermal cardiovascular progenitors (hESC-CVPs), capable of generating vascular cells in addition to cardiomyocytes, would provide superior repair by contributing to multiple components of myocardium. We performed a head-to-head comparison of hESC-CMs and hESC-CVPs and compared these with the most commonly used clinical cell type, human bone marrow mononuclear cells (hBM-MNCs). In a nude rat model of myocardial infarction, hESC-CMs and hESC-CVPs generated comparable grafts. Both similarly improved systolic function and ventricular dilation. Furthermore, only rare human vessels formed from hESC-CVPs. hBM-MNCs attenuated ventricular dilation and enhanced host vascularization without engrafting long-term or improving contractility. Thus, hESC-CMs and CVPs show similar efficacy for cardiac repair, and both are more efficient than hBM-MNCs. However, hESC-CVPs do not form larger grafts or more significant numbers of human vessels in the infarcted heart. PMID:26607951

  14. Effect of buckminsterfullerenes on cells of the innate and adaptive immune system: an in vitro study with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Bunz, Hanno; Plankenhorn, Sandra; Klein, Reinhild

    2012-01-01

    C60 nanoparticles, the so-called buckminsterfullerenes, have attracted great attention for medical applications as carriers, enzyme inhibitors or radical scavengers. However, publications evaluating their immunological mechanisms are still rather limited. Therefore, we aimed to analyze systematically the in vitro influence of polyhydroxy-C60 (poly-C60) and N-ethyl-polyamino-C60 (nepo-C60) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy individuals, angling their effect on proliferation, expression of surface markers, and cytokine production. We isolated PBMC from 20 healthy subjects and incubated them in a first step only with poly-C60 or nepo-C60, and in a second step together with recall antigens (purified protein derivative, tetanus toxoid, bacillus Calmette-Guérin). Proliferation was determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation, activation of PBMC-subpopulations by flow cytometry by measurement of the activation marker CD69, and secretion of T helper cell type 1 (TH1)- (interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor beta [TNF-β]), TH2- (interleukin-5 [IL-5], −13, −10) and macrophage/monocyte-related cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α) into the supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Both fullerenes did not influence T cell reactivity, with no enhanced expression of CD69 and production of T cell cytokines observed, the CD4/CD8 ratio remaining unaffected. In contrast, they significantly enhanced the release of IL-6 and CD69-expression by CD56 positive natural killer cells. PBMC, which had been cultured together with the three recall antigens were not affected by both fullerenes at all. These data indicate that fullerenes do not interact with T cell reactivity but may activate cells of the innate immune system. Furthermore, they seem to act only on ‘naïve’ cells, which have not been prestimulated with recall antigens, there are however, large inter individual differences. PMID:22942641

  15. Coxsackievirus group B type 3 infection upregulates expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in cardiac myocytes, which leads to enhanced migration of mononuclear cells in viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Xu, Wei; Chu, Yi-Wei; Wang, Ying; Liu, Quan-Sheng; Xiong, Si-Dong

    2004-11-01

    Coxsackievirus group B type 3 (CVB3) is an important cause of viral myocarditis. The infiltration of mononuclear cells into the myocardial tissue is one of the key events in viral myocarditis. Immediately after CVB3 infects the heart, the expression of chemokine(s) by infected myocardial cells may be the first trigger for inflammatory infiltration and immune response. However, it is unknown whether CVB3 can induce the chemokine expression in cardiac myocytes. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a potent chemokine that stimulates the migration of mononuclear cells. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of CVB3 infection on MCP-1 expression in murine cardiac myocytes and the role of MCP-1 in migration of mononuclear cells in viral myocarditis. Our results showed that the expression of MCP-1 was significantly increased in cardiac myocytes after wild-type CVB3 infection in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which resulted in enhanced migration of mononuclear cells in mice with viral myocarditis. The migration of mononuclear cells was partially abolished by antibodies specific for MCP-1 in vivo and in vitro. Administration of anti-MCP-1 antibody prevented infiltration of mononuclear cells bearing the MCP-1 receptor CCR2 in mice with viral myocarditis. Infection by UV-irradiated CVB3 induced rapid and transient expression of MCP-1 in cardiac myocytes. In conclusion, our results indicate that CVB3 infection stimulates the expression of MCP-1 in myocardial cells, which subsequently leads to migration of mononuclear cells in viral myocarditis. PMID:15507642

  16. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Pediatric Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Scott L.; Selak, Mary A.; Tuluc, Florin; Villarroel, Jose Perales; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Becker, Lance B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mitochondrial dysfunction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been linked to immune dysregulation and organ failure in adult sepsis but pediatric data are limited. We hypothesized that pediatric septic shock patients exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction within PBMCs which in turn correlates with global organ injury. Design Prospective observational study. Setting Academic pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Patients Thirteen pediatric patients with septic shock and ≥2 organ failures and 11 PICU controls without sepsis or organ failure. Interventions Ex vivo measurements of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and membrane potential (ΔΨm) were performed in intact PBMCs on day 1–2 and day 5–7 of septic illness and in controls. The Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) score, inotrope score, and organ failure-free days were determined from medical records. Measurements and Main Results Spare respiratory capacity (SRC), an index of bioenergetic reserve, was lower in septic PBMCs on day 1–2 (median 1.81, IQR 0.52–2.09 pmol O2/s/106 cells) compared to controls (5.55, 2.80–7.21; p=0.03). SRC normalized by day 5–7. Septic patients on day 1–2 exhibited a higher ratio of LEAK to maximal respiration than controls (17% versus <1%, p=0.047) with normalization by day 5–7 (1%, p=0.008), suggesting mitochondrial uncoupling early in sepsis. However, septic PBMCs exhibited no differences in basal or ATP-linked oxygen consumption or ΔΨm. Oxygen consumption did not correlate with PELOD, inotrope score, or organ failure-free days (all p>0.05). While there was a weak overall association between ΔΨm on day 1–2 and organ failure-free days (Spearman’s ρ=0.56, p=0.06), septic patients with normal organ function by day 7 exhibited higher ΔΨm on day 1–2 compared to patients with organ failure for >7 days (p=0.04). Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction was present in PBMCs in pediatric sepsis, evidenced by decreased bioenergetic

  17. Human T cell leukaemia virus type 2 tax protein mediates CC-chemokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells via the nuclear factor kappa B canonical pathway.

    PubMed

    Barrios, C S; Castillo, L; Zhi, H; Giam, C-Z; Beilke, M A

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral co-infections with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and human T cell leukaemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) or type 2 (HTLV-2) are prevalent in many areas worldwide. It has been observed that HIV-1/HTLV-2 co-infections are associated with slower rates of CD4(+) T cell decline and delayed progression to AIDS. This immunological benefit has been linked to the ability of Tax2, the transcriptional activating protein of HTLV-2, to induce the expression of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4 and regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5 and to down-regulate the expression of the CCR5 co-receptor in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This study aimed to assess the role of Tax2-mediated activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway on the production of the anti-viral CC-chemokines MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES. Recombinant Tax1 and Tax2 proteins, or proteins expressed via adenoviral vectors used to infect cells, were tested for their ability to activate the NF-κB pathway in cultured PBMCs in the presence or absence of NF-κB pathway inhibitors. Results showed a significant release of MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES by PBMCs after the activation of p65/RelA and p50. The secretion of these CC-chemokines was significantly reduced (P < 0·05) by canonical NF-κB signalling inhibitors. In conclusion, Tax2 protein may promote innate anti-viral immune responses through the activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway.

  18. An isomeric mixture of novel cerebrosides isolated from Impatiens pritzellii reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced release of IL-18 from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefeng; Tang, Lan; Liu, Yonghong

    2009-08-01

    An isomeric mixture of two cerebrosides, soya-cerebrosides I and II, was isolated from an ethno drug, the rhizomes of Impatiens pritzellii Hook. f. var. hupehensis Hook. f., and their structures were identified by spectroscopic (NMR, MS) analysis. In order to determine the immunomodulatory activities of soya-cerebrosides I and II, the effects of the mixture of cerebrosides (MC) on cytotoxicity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the inhibitory activities to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin (IL)-18 in PBMC were studied. The MC at concentrations of 10 and 1 microM, without toxicity to PBMC in 24 h, showed obvious inhibitory activity on IL-18 secretion. Because of this effect of modulating the cellular immune response, soya-cerebrosides I and II were considered to be the active substances of this ethno drug.

  19. Isolation and expression profiling of genes upregulated in bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nobuo; Shimaoka, Yasunori; Tougan, Takahiro; Onda, Hiroaki; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Zhao, Hanjun; Fujimori, Azumi; Yabuta, Norikazu; Nagamori, Ippei; Tanigawa, Akie; Sato, Jun; Oda, Takenori; Hayashida, Kenji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Yukioka, Masao; Nojima, Hiroshi; Ochi, Takahiro

    2006-08-31

    We have comprehensively identified the genes whose expressions are augmented in bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMC) from patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) as compared with BMMCs from Osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and named them AURA after augmented in RA. Both stepwise subtractive hybridization and microarray analyses were used to identify AURA genes, which were confirmed by northern blot analysis and/or reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We also assessed their expression levels in individual patients by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Of 103 AURA genes we have identified, the mRNA levels of the following 10 genes, which are somehow related to immune responses, were increased in many of the RA patients: AREG (=AURA9), FK506-binding protein 5 (FKBP5 = AURA45), C-type lectin superfamily member 9 (CLECSF9 = AURA24), tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase 1 (TPST1 = AURA52), lymphocyte G0/G1 switch gene (G0S2 = AURA8), chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4 = AURA86), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB = AURA25) and two genes of unknown function (FLJ11106 = AURA1, BC022398 = AURA2 and XM_058513 = AURA17). Since AREG was most significantly increased in many of the RA patients, we subjected it to further analysis and found that AREG-epidermal growth factor receptor signaling is highly activated in synovial cells isolated from RA patients, but not in OA synoviocytes. We propose that the expression profiling of these AURA genes may improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:17082220

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Mononuclear Cells From Cord Blood: Cotransplantation Provides a Better Effect in Treating Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gecai; Yue, Aihuan; Yu, Hong; Ruan, Zhongbao; Yin, Yigang; Wang, Ruzhu; Ren, Yin; Zhu, Li

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cotransplanting mononuclear cells from cord blood (CB-MNCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as treatment for myocardial infarction (MI). Transplanting CD34+ cells or MSCs separately has been shown effective in treating MI, but the effect of cotransplanting CB-MNCs and MSCs is not clear. In this study, MSCs were separated by their adherence to the tissue culture. The morphology, immunophenotype, and multilineage potential of MSCs were analyzed. CB-MNCs were separated in lymphocyte separation medium 1.077. CD34+ cell count and viability were analyzed by flow cytometry. Infarcted male Sprague-Dawley rats in a specific-pathogen-free grade were divided into four treatment groups randomly: group I, saline; group II, CB-MNCs; group III, MSCs; and group IV, CB-MNCs plus MSCs. The saline, and CB-MNCs and/or MSCs were injected intramyocardially in infarcted rats. Their cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography. The myocardial capillary density was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Both cell types induced an improvement in the left ventricular cardiac function and increased tissue cell proliferation in myocardial tissue and neoangiogenesis. However, CB-MNCs plus MSCs were more effective in reducing the infarct size and preventing ventricular remodeling. Scar tissue was reduced significantly in the CB-MNCs plus MSCs group. MSCs facilitate engraftment of CD34+ cells and immunomodulation after allogeneic CD34+ cell transplantation. Cotransplanting MSCs and CB-MNCs might be more effective than transplanting MSCs or CB-MNCs separately for treating MI. This study contributes knowledge toward effective treatment strategies for MI.

  1. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect

    Katika, Madhumohan R.; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Shao, Jia; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  2. Differential effects of glucose and alcohol on reactive oxygen species generation and intranuclear nuclear factor-kappaB in mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dhindsa, Sandeep; Tripathy, Devjit; Mohanty, Priya; Ghanim, Husam; Syed, Tufail; Aljada, Ahmad; Dandona, Paresh

    2004-03-01

    It has previously been shown that oral intake of 300 calories of glucose (75 g), lipid, or protein increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by polymorphonuclear cells (PMNL) and mononuclear cells (MNCs). We investigated the effects of 75 g glucose on proinflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkappaB), in mononuclear cells. To further investigate whether the effects of macronutrient-induced oxidative stress are due to consumption of calories or are nutrient specific, we investigated the effects of acute oral challenge of equicaloric amounts of alcohol (300 calories) on ROS generation and NF-kappaB activation in MNCs and PMNL and compared them with those of glucose and water (control). Sixteen normal healthy adult volunteers were given either vodka (10 subjects), glucose solution (10 subjects), or 300 mL water (7 subjects). Vodka and glucose drinks were equivalent to 300 calories. We measured ROS generation and intranuclear NF-kappaB activation by PMNL cells and MNCs at 1 hour, 2 hours, and 3 hours following ingestion. ROS generation by both MNC and PMNL increased significantly (P <.05 for MNC and P <.01 for PMNL) following intake of glucose solution, but did not change significantly following alcohol or water. NF-kappaB binding activity in MNC nuclear extracts also increased (P <.001) following ingestion of glucose solution, but did not change after the administration of alcohol or water. We conclude that (1) 75 g oral glucose increases NF-kappaB binding activity in MNCs. (2) While 75 g glucose (300 calories) induces an increase in ROS generation and intranuclear NF-kappaB, equicaloric amounts of alcohol did not produce these effects.

  3. Damage Associated Molecular Pattern Molecule-Induced microRNAs (DAMPmiRs) in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Unlu, Sebnem; Tang, Siuwah; Wang, E. na; Martinez, Ivan; Tang, Daolin; Bianchi, Marco E.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Lotze, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous damage associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) released from necrotic, damaged or stressed cells are associated with an inflammatory response. Whether the microRNA (miR) expression signature of this response is different from that of a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-stimulated inflammatory response is unknown. We report here that miR-34c and miR-214 are significantly expressed in fresh human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to DAMP-containing freeze-thaw lysates, or to conditioned media from serum-starved and glucose-deprived cells (p<6×10−4 and p<3.7×10−3), respectively. Interestingly, only miR-34c expression was differentially expressed in PBMCs exposed to freeze-thaw lysates or conditioned media from wildtype High Mobility Group B1 (HMGB1+/+) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, when compared to cultures exposed to lysates or conditioned media from HMGB1−/− MEFs. miR-155 expression in these cultures was negligible, but was significantly expressed in PBMCs stimulated with Lipopolysaccahride (LPS) or most other Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, making it the prototypic “PAMPmiR”. Exposure to a damaged human colorectal carcinoma cell line lysate (HCT116) similarly resulted in increased miR-34c and miR-214 levels. When PBMCs were pre-transfected with anti-miR-34c and then exposed to lysate, expression levels of IKKγ mRNA, a putative target of miR-34c, increased, while protein levels of IKKγ in cultures transfected with a pre-miR-34c were abrogated. Levels of miR-34c expression (as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and TNFα) decreased when PBMC cultures were briefly pre-incubated with the K+ channel (inflammasome) inhibitor, glybenclamide, suggesting that inflammasome activation is upstream of miR-34c expression in response to DAMPs. Our findings demonstrate that a specific microRNA expression signature is associated with the inflammatory response to damaged/injured cells and carries

  4. Dynamic Changes in Fetal Microchimerism in Maternal Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, CD4+ and CD8+ Cells in Normal Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Gammill, Hilary S.; Lucas, Joëlle; Aydelotte, Tessa M.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Lambert, Nathalie C.; Nelson, J. Lee

    2010-01-01

    Objective Cell trafficking during pregnancy results in persistence of small populations of fetal cells in the mother, known as fetal microchimerism (FMc). Changes in cell-free fetal DNA during gestation have been well-described, however, less is known about dynamic changes in fetal immune cells in maternal blood. We investigated FMc in maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) longitudinally across gestation. Study Design Thirty-five women with normal pregnancies were studied. FMc was identified in PBMC, CD4+ and CD8+ subsets employing quantitative PCR assays targeting fetal-specific genetic polymorphisms. FMc quantities were reported as fetal genome equivalents (gEq) per 1,000,000 gEq mother’s cells. Poisson regression modeled the rate of FMc detection. Main Outcome Measure FMc in PBMC Results The probability of detecting one fetal cell equivalent increased 6.2-fold each trimester [Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR) 95% CI: 1.73, 21.91; p=0.005]. Although FMC in PBMC was not detected for the majority of time points, 7 of 35 women had detectable FMc during pregnancy at one or more time points, with the majority of positive samples being from the third trimester. There was a suggestion of greater HLA-sharing in families where women had FMc in PBMC. FMc was detected in 9% of CD4+ (2/23) and 18% of CD8+ (3/25) subsets. Conclusions FMc in PBMC increased as gestation progressed and was found within CD4+ and CD8+ subsets in some women in the latter half of gestation. A number of factors could influence cellular FMc levels including subclinical fetal-maternal interface changes and events related to parturition. Whether FMc during pregnancy predicts persistent FMc and/or correlates with fetal-maternal HLA-relationships also merits further study. PMID:20569981

  5. Pharmacologic immunosuppression of mononuclear phagocyte phagocytosis by caffeine.

    PubMed

    Steck, Ryan P; Hill, Spencer L; Weagel, Evita G; Weber, K Scott; Robison, Richard A; O'Neill, Kim L

    2015-12-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used neurostimulant in the world. There is considerable debate on its effect on immune cells as it has been shown to antagonize adenosine receptors (ARs), which mediate an anti-inflammatory switch in activated immune cells. A second target is phosphodiesterase, where it acts as an inhibitor. If the primary effect of caffeine on mononuclear phagocytes were to antagonize ARs we would expect cells exposed to caffeine to have a prolonged proinflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of action of caffeine in mononuclear phagocytes. Human mononuclear phagocytes were separated from whole blood and pretreated with protein kinase A inhibitor (PKA) and then exposed to micromolar physiological concentrations of caffeine. Phagocytosis and phagocytosis exhaustion were quantified using flow cytometry. Treatments were analyzed and compared to controls, using a beta regression controlling for factors of age, gender, caffeine intake, and exercise. We found that caffeine suppresses phagocytosis at micromolar physiological concentrations. This suppression was prevented when mononuclear phagocytes were pretreated with PKA inhibitor, suggesting that caffeine's phagocytic suppression may be due to its function as a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, pushing cells towards an anti-inflammatory response. Additionally, these effects are altered by regular caffeine intake and fitness level, emphasizing that tolerance and immune robustness are important factors in mononuclear phagocyte activation. These results demonstrate that caffeine may be acting as a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and suppressing phagocytosis in mononuclear phagocytes by promoting an anti-inflammatory response.

  6. Proteomic methodological recommendations for studies involving human plasma, platelets, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    de Roos, Baukje; Duthie, Susan J; Polley, Abigael C J; Mulholland, Francis; Bouwman, Freek G; Heim, Carolin; Rucklidge, Garry J; Johnson, Ian T; Mariman, Edwin C; Daniel, Hannelore; Elliott, Ruan M

    2008-06-01

    This study was designed to develop, optimize and validate protocols for blood processing prior to proteomic analysis of plasma, platelets and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and to determine analytical variation of a single sample of depleted plasma, platelet and PBMC proteins within and between four laboratories each using their own standard operating protocols for 2D gel electrophoresis. Plasma depleted either using the Beckman Coulter IgY-12 proteome partitioning kit or the Amersham albumin and IgG depletion columns gave good quality gels, but reproducibility appeared better with the single-use immuno-affinity column. The use of the Millipore Filter Device for protein concentration gave a 16% ( p < 0.005) higher recovery of protein in flow-through sample compared with acetone precipitation. The use of OptiPrep gave the lowest level of platelet contamination (1:0.8) during the isolation of PBMC from blood. Several proteins (among which are alpha-tropomyosin, fibrinogen and coagulation factor XIII A) were identified that may be used as biomarkers of platelet contamination in future studies. When identifying preselected spots, at least three out of the four centers found similar identities for 10 out of the 10 plasma proteins, 8 out of the 10 platelet proteins and 8 out of the 10 PBMC proteins. The discrepancy in spot identifications has been described before and may be explained by the mis-selection of spots due to laboratory-to-laboratory variation in gel formats, low scores on the peptide analysis leading to no or only tentative identifications, or incomplete resolution of different proteins in what appears as a single abundant spot. The average within-laboratory coefficient of variation (CV) for each of the matched spots after automatic matching using either PDQuest or ProteomWeaver software ranged between 18 and 69% for depleted plasma proteins, between 21 and 55% for platelet proteins, and between 22 and 38% for PBMC proteins. Subsequent manual

  7. Concise review: bone marrow mononuclear cells for the treatment of ischemic syndromes: medicinal product or cell transplantation?

    PubMed

    Cuende, Natividad; Rico, Laura; Herrera, Concha

    2012-05-01

    In November of 2011, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) published two scientific recommendations regarding the classification of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and autologous bone marrow-derived CD133+ cells as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), specifically tissue-engineered products, when intended for regeneration in ischemic heart tissue on the basis that they are not used for the same essential function (hematological restoration) that they fulfill in the donor. In vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that bone marrow cells are physiologically involved in adult neovascularization and tissue repair, making their therapeutic use for these purposes a simple exploitation of their own essential functions. Therefore, from a scientific/legal point of view, nonsubstantially manipulated BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells are not an ATMP, because they have a physiological role in the processes of postnatal neovascularization and, when used therapeutically for vascular restoration in ischemic tissues, they are carrying out one of their essential physiological functions (the legal definition recognizes that cells can have several essential functions). The consequences of classifying BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells as medicinal products instead of cellular transplantation, like bone marrow transplantation, in terms of costs and time for these products to be introduced into clinical practice, make this an issue of crucial importance. Therefore, the recommendations of EMA/CAT could be reviewed in collaboration with scientific societies, in light of organizational and economic consequences as well as scientific knowledge recently acquired about the mechanisms of postnatal neovascularization and the function of bone marrow in the regeneration of remote tissues.

  8. Effect of 900 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation on the Induction of ROS in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, E.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Ali-Ghanbari, A.; Sharifzadeh, S.; Ranjbaran, R.; Mostafavi-pour, Z.; Zal, F.; Haghani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite numerous studies over a decade, it still remains controversial about the biological effects of RF EMF emitted by mobile phone telephony. Objective Here we investigated the effect of 900 MHz GSM on the induction of oxidative stress and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes as defence system cells. Method 6 ml Peripheral Blood samples were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers (21-30 year-old). Each sample was devided into 2 groups: one was exposed RF radiation emitted from a mobile phone simulator for 2 hour and the other used as control group which was not exposed to any fields. After that, mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood by density gradient centrifugation in Ficoll-Paque. The intracellular ROS content in monocytes and lymphocytes was measured by the CM-H2DCFDA fluorescence probe using flowcytometry technique. Results Our results showed significant increase in  ROS production after exposure in population rich in monocytes. This effect was not significant in population rich in lymphocytes in comparison with non exposed cells. Conclusion The results obtained in this study clearly showed the oxidative stress induction capability of RF electromagnetic field in the portion of PBMCs mostly in monocytes, like the case of exposure to micro organisms, although the advantages or disadvantages of this effect should be evaluated. PMID:26396966

  9. [Intracardial transplantation of mononuclear cells of the autologous bone marrow in complex treatment of patients with valvular heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Davydenko, V V; Gretsenko, V V; Afanas'ev, B V; Pizin, V M; Mochalov, O Iu; Degtereva, O A; Matiukov, A A

    2007-01-01

    The authors present the first clinical experience with intramyocardial transplantation of the mononuclear fraction of cells of the autologous bone marrow in complex surgical treatment of 10 patients with valvular heart disease. The cellular transplantation was fulfilled intraoperatively when making a prosthetic mitral (5 patients) and aortal (5 patients) valves on the open heart under conditions of extracorporeal circulation. Simultaneously direct revascularization of the myocardium (aorto-coronary and mammary-coronary shunts) was performed in 4 patients (1--with a mitral and 3--with aortal heart diseases). An investigation of the results of the examination including ECG, EchoCG and investigation of the myocardium perfusion using one-photon emission computed tomography fulfilled in the early postoperative period and within 6-12 months after operation has shown that the cell cardiomyoplasty with mononuclear fraction of cells of the autologous bone marrow improves the myocardium perfusion, however, in the early postoperative period the appearance of transitory impairments of the heart rate is possible. PMID:18050635

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations from whole blood cultures correlate with isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many cellular immune assays are impractical because they require labor-intensive isolation of cells from their natural environment. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between cell culture supernatant TNF-alpha from isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and w...

  11. The effects of acute oral glutamine supplementation on exercise-induced gastrointestinal permeability and heat shock protein expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Dokladny, Karol; Mermier, Christine; Schneider, Suzanne; Salgado, Roy; Moseley, Pope

    2015-01-01

    Chronic glutamine supplementation reduces exercise-induced intestinal permeability and inhibits the NF-κB pro-inflammatory pathway in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These effects were correlated with activation of HSP70. The purpose of this paper is to test if an acute dose of oral glutamine prior to exercise reduces intestinal permeability along with activation of the heat shock response leading to inhibition of pro-inflammatory markers. Physically active subjects (N = 7) completed baseline and exercise intestinal permeability tests, determined by the percent ratio of urinary lactulose (5 g) to rhamnose (2 g). Exercise included two 60-min treadmill runs at 70 % of VO2max at 30 °C after ingestion of glutamine (Gln) or placebo (Pla). Plasma levels of endotoxin and TNF-α, along with peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) protein expression of HSP70 and IκBα, were measured pre- and post-exercise and 2 and 4 h post-exercise. Permeability increased in the Pla trial compared to that at rest (0.06 ± 0.01 vs. 0.02 ± 0.018) and did not increase in the Gln trial. Plasma endotoxin was lower at the 4-h time point in the Gln vs. 4 h in the Pla (6.715 ± 0.046 pg/ml vs. 7.952 ± 1.11 pg/ml). TNF-α was lower 4 h post-exercise in the Gln vs. Pla (1.64 ± 0.09 pg/ml vs. 1.87 ± 0.12 pg/ml). PBMC expression of IkBα was higher 4 h post-exercise in the Gln vs. 4 h in the Pla (1.29 ± 0.43 vs. 0.8892 ± 0.040). HSP70 was higher pre-exercise and 2 h post-exercise in the Gln vs. Pla (1.35 ± 0.21 vs. 1.000 ± 0.000 and 1.65 ± 0.21 vs. 1.27 ± 0.40). Acute oral glutamine supplementation prevents an exercise-induced rise in intestinal permeability and suppresses NF-κB activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:25062931

  12. The effects of acute oral glutamine supplementation on exercise-induced gastrointestinal permeability and heat shock protein expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Dokladny, Karol; Mermier, Christine; Schneider, Suzanne; Salgado, Roy; Moseley, Pope

    2015-01-01

    Chronic glutamine supplementation reduces exercise-induced intestinal permeability and inhibits the NF-κB pro-inflammatory pathway in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These effects were correlated with activation of HSP70. The purpose of this paper is to test if an acute dose of oral glutamine prior to exercise reduces intestinal permeability along with activation of the heat shock response leading to inhibition of pro-inflammatory markers. Physically active subjects (N = 7) completed baseline and exercise intestinal permeability tests, determined by the percent ratio of urinary lactulose (5 g) to rhamnose (2 g). Exercise included two 60-min treadmill runs at 70 % of VO2max at 30 °C after ingestion of glutamine (Gln) or placebo (Pla). Plasma levels of endotoxin and TNF-α, along with peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) protein expression of HSP70 and IκBα, were measured pre- and post-exercise and 2 and 4 h post-exercise. Permeability increased in the Pla trial compared to that at rest (0.06 ± 0.01 vs. 0.02 ± 0.018) and did not increase in the Gln trial. Plasma endotoxin was lower at the 4-h time point in the Gln vs. 4 h in the Pla (6.715 ± 0.046 pg/ml vs. 7.952 ± 1.11 pg/ml). TNF-α was lower 4 h post-exercise in the Gln vs. Pla (1.64 ± 0.09 pg/ml vs. 1.87 ± 0.12 pg/ml). PBMC expression of IkBα was higher 4 h post-exercise in the Gln vs. 4 h in the Pla (1.29 ± 0.43 vs. 0.8892 ± 0.040). HSP70 was higher pre-exercise and 2 h post-exercise in the Gln vs. Pla (1.35 ± 0.21 vs. 1.000 ± 0.000 and 1.65 ± 0.21 vs. 1.27 ± 0.40). Acute oral glutamine supplementation prevents an exercise-induced rise in intestinal permeability and suppresses NF-κB activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  13. Chungsim-Yeunja-Tang decreases the inflammatory response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with cerebral infarction through an NF-κB dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chungsim-Yeunja-Tang (CYT) has been used as a medicine for cerebral infarction (CI) patients in Korea. The objective of this study was to determine precisely the effect of CYT on CI patients using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Methods For a clinical study, 47 CI patients were identified who had taken CYT (0.01 g/kg) 3 times a day after meals for 2 weeks by oral administration. For ex vivo experiments, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from CI patients. We analyzed the effect of CYT and its main components on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine production and mechanism on PBMCs of CI patients by using ELISA, western blot analysis, transcription factor enzyme-linked immunoassay, and caspase assay. Results Clinical signs of CI significantly disappeared about 2 weeks after oral administration of CYT to CI patients (P < 0.05). CYT and quercetin, an active compound of CYT, significantly inhibited LPS-induced interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production and expression in PBMCs. CYT and quercetin also inhibited LPS-induced nuclear translocation and DNA binding activities of nuclear factor-κB and degradation of IκBα. In addition, CYT and quercetin inhibited LPS-induced IL-32 expression and caspase-1 activation. Conclusion These results suggest a mechanism that might explain the beneficial effect of CYT in treating CI patients. Taken together, our findings indicate that inhibition of IL-32 expression and caspase-1 activation may be a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic target in CI. PMID:21108840

  14. Mononuclear Phagocyte-Derived Microparticulate Caspase-1 Induces Pulmonary Vascular Endothelial Cell Injury.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Srabani; Wewers, Mark D; Sarkar, Anasuya

    2015-01-01

    Lung endothelial cell apoptosis and injury occurs throughout all stages of acute lung injury (ALI/ARDS) and impacts disease progression. Lung endothelial injury has traditionally been focused on the role of neutrophil trafficking to lung vascular integrin receptors induced by proinflammatory cytokine expression. Although much is known about the pathogenesis of cell injury and death in ALI/ARDS, gaps remain in our knowledge; as a result of which there is currently no effective pharmacologic therapy. Enzymes known as caspases are essential for completion of the apoptotic program and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that caspase-1 may serve as a key regulator of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) apoptosis in ALI/ARDS. Our recent experiments confirm that microparticles released from stimulated monocytic cells (THP1) induce lung endothelial cell apoptosis. Microparticles pretreated with the caspase-1 inhibitor, YVAD, or pan-caspase inhibitor, ZVAD, were unable to induce cell death of HPMVEC, suggesting the role of caspase-1 or its substrate in the induction of HPMVEC cell death. Neither un-induced microparticles (control) nor direct treatment with LPS induced apoptosis of HPMVEC. Further experiments showed that caspase-1 uptake into HPMVEC and the induction of HPMVEC apoptosis was facilitated by caspase-1 interactions with microparticulate vesicles. Altering vesicle integrity completely abrogated apoptosis of HPMVEC suggesting an encapsulation requirement for target cell uptake of active caspase-1. Taken together, we confirm that microparticle centered caspase-1 can play a regulator role in endothelial cell injury. PMID:26710067

  15. Proinflammatory effect of trivalent arsenical species in a co-culture of Caco-2 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Marta; Gimeno-Alcañiz, José V; Devesa, Vicenta; Vélez, Dinoraz

    2015-04-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (As) is associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Ingested inorganic As is transformed within the gastrointestinal tract and can give rise to more toxic species such as monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] and dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)]. Thus, the intestinal epithelium comes into contact with toxic arsenical species, and the effects of such exposure upon epithelial function are not clear. The present study has evaluated the effect of 1 µM arsenite [As(III)], 0.1 µM MMA(III) and 1 µM DMA(III) upon the release of cytokines [interleukin-6 (IL6), IL8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)], using a compartmentalized co-culture model with differentiated Caco-2 cells in the apical compartment and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the basolateral compartment. In addition, the combined effect of arsenical species and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), both added into the apical compartment, has been analyzed. The results indicate that exposure to the arsenical forms induces a proinflammatory response. An increase in cytokine secretion into the basolateral compartment was observed, particularly as regards TNFα (up to 1,600 %). The cytokine levels on the apical side also increased, though to a lesser extent. As/LPS co-exposure significantly affected the proinflammatory response as compared to treatment with As alone. Treatment with DMA(III) and As/LPS co-exposure increased the permeability of the intestinal monolayer. In addition, As/LPS treatments enhanced As(III) and MMA(III) transport through the intestinal monolayer. PMID:24862236

  16. West Nile Virus Challenge Alters the Transcription Profiles of Innate Immune Genes in Rabbit Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Muhammad J.; Suen, Willy W.; Prow, Natalie A.; Hall, Roy A.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2015-01-01

    The peripheral innate immune response to West Nile virus (WNV) is crucial for control of virus spread to the central nervous system. Therefore, transcriptomes encoding the innate immune response proteins against WNV were investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of New Zealand White rabbits, a recently established novel rabbit model for WNV pathogenesis studies. PBMCs were challenged with an Australian WNV strain, WNVNSW2011, in vitro, and mRNA expression of selected immune response genes were quantified at 2-, 6-, 12-, and 24-h post-infection (pi) using qRT-PCR. Compared to mock-inoculated PBMCs, WNV-stimulated PBMCs expressed high levels of interferon (IFN) alpha (IFNA), gamma (IFNG), IL6, IL12, IL22, CXCL10, and pentraxin 3 (PTX3) mRNA. Likewise, TLR1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 10 mRNA became up-regulated with the highest expression seen for TLR3, 4, and 6. TLRs-signaling downstream genes (MyD88, STAT1, TRAF3, IRF7, and IRF9) subsequently became up-regulated. The high expression of IFNs, TLR3, TLR4, TRAF3, STAT1, IRF7, and IRF9 are in accordance with antiviral activities, while expression of TNFA, HO1, iNOS, caspase 3, and caspase 9 transcripts suggests the involvement of oxidative stress and apoptosis in WNV-stimulated rabbit PBMCs, respectively. The level of WNVNSW2011 RNA increased at 24-h pi in PBMCs challenged with virus in vitro compared to input virus. The expression dynamics of selected genes were validated in PBMCs from rabbits experimentally infected with WNV in vivo. Higher expression of IFNA, IFN beta (IFNB), IFNG, TNFA, IL6, IL22, PTX3, TLR3 and TLR4, IRF7, IRF9, STST1, TRAF3, caspase 3, and caspase 9 were seen in PBMCs from WNV-infected rabbits on day 3 post-intradermal virus inoculation compared to PBMCs from uninfected control rabbits. This study highlights the array of cytokines and TLRs involved in the host innate immune response to WNV in the rabbit leukocytes and suggests that these cells may be a useful in vitro model for WNV

  17. Antiepileptic and neuroprotective effects of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells in a pilocarpine-induced epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Costa-Ferro, Zaquer Suzana Munhoz; de Borba Cunha, Fernanda; de Freitas Souza, Bruno Solano; Leal, Marcos Maurício Tosta; da Silva, Adelson Alves; de Bellis Kühn, Telma Ingrid Borges; Forte, Andresa; Sekiya, Eliseo Joji; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; Dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro

    2014-03-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a condition of persistent seizure that leads to brain damage and, frequently, to the establishment of chronic epilepsy. Cord blood is an important source of adult stem cells for the treatment of neurological disorders. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HUCBC) transplanted into rats after induction of SE by the administration of lithium and pilocarpine chloride. Transplantation of HUCBC into epileptic rats protected against neuronal loss in the hippocampal subfields CA1, CA3 and in the hilus of the dentate gyrus, up to 300 days after SE induction. Moreover, transplanted rats had reduced frequency and duration of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) 15, 120 and 300 days after the SE. Our study shows that HUCBC provide prominent antiepileptic and neuroprotective effects in the experimental model of epilepsy and reinforces that early interventions can protect the brain against the establishment of epilepsy.

  18. Effect of soluble factors derived from oral cancer cells on the production of interferon-γ from peripheral blood mononuclear cells following stimulation with OK-432.

    PubMed

    Ohe, Go; Sasai, Akiko; Uchida, Daisuke; Tamatani, Tetsuya; Nagai, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Youji

    2013-08-01

    The streptococcal antitumor agent OK-432 is commonly used as an immunopotentiator for immunotherapy in various types of malignant tumors including oral cancer. It has been demonstrated that OK-432 elicits an antitumor effect by stimulating immunocompetent cells, thereby inducing multiple cytokines including interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-12. Serum concentrations of IFN-γ in patients with oral cancer were examined 24 h after administration of OK-432. Serum concentrations of IFN-γ in patients with advanced cancer were significantly lower than those in patients with early cancer. These results suggested that some soluble factors produced by cancer cells may inhibit IFN-γ production with OK-432. Thus, in the present study, an in vitro simulation model was established for the immune status of patients with oral cancer by adding conditioned medium (CM) derived from oral cancer cell lines into a culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from a healthy volunteer. We investigated whether soluble factors derived from oral cancer cells affected IFN-γ production from PBMCs following stimulation with OK-432. PBMCs stimulated with OK-432 produced a large amount of IFN-γ; however, both IFN-γ production and cytotoxic activity from PBMCs induced by OK-432 were inhibited by the addition of CM in a dose-dependent manner. In order to examine these inhibitory effects against IFN-γ production, the contribution of inhibitory cytokines such as IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor was investigated. However, neutralization of these inhibitory cytokines did not recover IFN-γ production inhibited by CM. These results indicated that unknown molecules may inhibit IFN-γ production from PBMCs following stimulation with OK-432.

  19. Cell-mediated immune responses of synovial mononuclear cells to sexually transmitted, enteric and mumps antigens in patients with Reiter's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ford, D K; da Roza, D M; Shah, P

    1981-01-01

    3H-thymidine uptake responses by synovial mononuclear cells to stimulation with sexually transmitted, enteric and mumps antigens were studied in 12 patients with "sexually transmitted Reiter's syndrome", 5 with "enteric Reiter's syndrome", 5 with rheumatoid arthritis, 4 with ankylosing spondylitis and 10 with "indolent arthritis of one knee." The "sexually transmitted" and salmonella cases were distinguishable by the responses. Synovial responses were sometimes marked when peripheral blood responses were negligible.

  20. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Cultured in Normal and Hyperglycemic Media in Simulated Microgravity Using NASA Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales

    2003-01-01

    We sought answers to several questions this summer at NASA Johnson Space Center. Initial studies involved the in vitro culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear in cells in different conditioned culture media. Several human cancer clones were similarly studied to determine responses to aberrant glycosylation by the argon laser. The cells were grown at unit gravity in flasks and in simulated microgravity using NASA bioreactors. The cells in each instance were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell cycle analysis was acquired by staining nuclear DNA with propidium iodide. Responses to the laser stimulation was measured by observing autofluorescence emitted in the green and red spectra after stimulation. Extent of glycosylation correlated with the intensity of the laser stimulated auto-fluorescence. Our particular study was to detect and monitor aberrant glycosylation and its role in etiopathogenesis. Comparisons were made between cells known to be neoplastic and normal cell controls using the same Laser Induced Autofluorescence technique. Studies were begun after extensive literature searches on using the antigen presenting potential of dendritic cells to induce proliferation of antigen specific cytotoxic T-cells. The Sendai virus served as the antigen. Our goal is to generate sufficient numbers of such cells in the simulated microgravity environment for use in autologous transplants of virally infected individuals including those positive for hepatitis and HIV.

  1. Infusion of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Reduces Lung Fibrosis but Not Inflammation in the Late Stages of Murine Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Ventura, Túlio G.; de Oliveira, Helena D'Anunciação; Monção-Ribeiro, Leonardo C.; Gutfilen, Bianca; de Souza, Sergio A. L.; Rocco, Patrícia R. M.; Borojevic, Radovan; Morales, Marcelo M.; Takiya, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that infusion of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) in the late stages of silica-induced damage would reduce the remodelling process in a murine model of silicosis. C57BL/6 mice were assigned to 2 groups. In the SIL group, mice were instilled with a silica particle suspension intratracheally. Control (C) mice received saline under the same protocol. On the 40th day, some of the animals from both groups were killed. The others were treated with either saline or BMMCs (1×106cells) intravenously (C+BMMC and SIL+BMMC), and the mice were killed 70 days after the start of the protocol. In the mice in the SIL+BMMC group, collagen deposition, the presence of silica particles inside nodules, the presence of macrophages and cells reactive for inducible nitric oxide synthase were reduced. Lung parameters also improved. Beyond that, the total and differential cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, immunoexpression of transforming growth factor-β, the number of T regulatory cells and apoptosis were increased. However, the presence of male donor cells in lung tissue was not observed using GFP+ cells (40d) or Y chromosome DNA (70d). Therefore, BMMC therapy in the late stages of experimental silicosis improved lung function by diminishing fibrosis but inflammatory cells persisted, which could be related to expansion of T regulatory cells, responsible for the beneficial effects of cell therapy. PMID:25299237

  2. The expression of pluripotency genes and neuronal markers after neurodifferentiation in fibroblasts co-cultured with human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Marinowic, D R; Domingues, M F; Machado, D C; DaCosta, J C

    2015-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood is an attractive source of stem cells; however, it has a heterogeneous cell population with few mesenchymal stem cells. Cell reprogramming induced by different methodologies can confer pluripotency to differentiated adult cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reprogramming of fibroblasts and their subsequent neural differentiation after co-culture with umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells. Cells were obtained from four human umbilical cords. The mononuclear cells were cultured for 7 d and subsequently co-cultured with mouse fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells for 6 d. The pluripotency of the cells was evaluated by RT-PCR using primers specific for pluripotency marker genes. The pluripotency was also confirmed by adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. Neural differentiation of the reprogrammed cells was evaluated by immunofluorescence. All co-cultured cells showed adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity. After co-cultivation, cells expressed the pluripotency gene KLF4. Statistically significant differences in cell area, diameter, optical density, and fractal dimension were observed by confocal microscopy in the neurally differentiated cells. Contact in the form of co-cultivation of fibroblasts with umbilical cord blood mononuclear fraction for 6 d promoted the reprogramming of these cells, allowing the later induction of neural differentiation. PMID:25134818

  3. [The presence of an endogenous peroxidase activity in hairy cell leukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Reyes, F; Gourdin, M F; Farcet, J P; Dreyfus, B; Breton-Gorius, J

    1977-02-01

    Mononuclear cells from hairy cell leukemia have been studied in three cases by ultrastructural immunocytochemistry. Cells have fairly detectable surface immunoglobulins, without monoclonal distribution however. In addition these cells have a peroxidatic activity which is revealed in the perinuclear space and strands of endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:404081

  4. Detection of hepatitis C virus RNA in CD19 peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chronically infected patients.

    PubMed

    Zehender, G; Meroni, L; De Maddalena, C; Varchetta, S; Monti, G; Galli, M

    1997-11-01

    The presence of HCV RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) has been reported. To identify the cell populations carrying HCV RNA, the presence and amount of HCV RNA was investigated by limiting dilution nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in PBMC subpopulations fractionated by automated cell sorting. Fifteen chronically HCV-infected patients were included in the study, 4 of whom also had mixed cryoglobulinemia. HCV RNA was present in the CD19 cells of all 15 patients, but only 5 (35.7%) of 14 and 5 (41.6%) of 12 showed HCV RNA in CD3 and CD14 cells, respectively (P < .001 by Fisher's test for each comparison). The median titer of HCV RNA was 1 PCR unit/380 CD19 cells, compared with median of 1 PCR unit/6600 PBMC as a whole. Titration was difficult in the CD3 and CD14 cells because of the frequent negativity of the first diluted sample. This study suggests that HCV RNA is selectively concentrated in B cells.

  5. Optimization of lentiviral vector transduction into peripheral blood mononuclear cells in combination with the fibronectin fragment CH-296 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chono, Hideto; Goto, Yumi; Yamakawa, Satoko; Tanaka, Shinya; Tosaka, Yasuhiro; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi

    2011-03-01

    Large scale T-cell expansion and efficient gene transduction are required for adoptive T-cell gene therapy. Based on our previous observations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) can be expanded efficiently while conserving a naïve phenotype by stimulating with both recombinant human fibronectin fragment (CH-296) and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies. In this article, we explored the possibility of using this co-stimulation method to generate engineered T cells using lentiviral vector. Human PBMCs were stimulated with anti-CD3 together with immobilized CH-296 or anti-CD28 antibody as well as anti-CD3/anti-CD28 conjugated beads and transduced with lentiviral vector simultaneously. Co-stimulation with CH-296 gave superior transduction efficiency than with anti-CD28. Next, PBMCs were stimulated and transduced with anti-CD3/CH-296 or with anti-CD3/CD28 beads. T-cell expansion, gene transfer efficiencies and immunophenotypes were analysed. Stimulation with anti-CD3/CH-296 resulted in more than 10-times higher cell expansion and higher gene transfer efficiency with conservation of the naïve phenotype compared with anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation method. Thus, lentiviral transduction with anti-CD3/CH-296 co-stimulation is an efficient way to generate large numbers of genetically modified T cells and may be suitable for many gene therapy protocols that use adoptive T-cell transfer therapy.

  6. The immunophenotype of antigen presenting cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system in normal human liver--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Otto; Dunbar, P Rod; Bartlett, Adam; Phillips, Anthony

    2015-02-01

    The mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), comprised of monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, is essential in tissue homeostasis and in determining the balance of the immune response through its role in antigen presentation. It has been identified as a therapeutic target in infectious disease, cancer, autoimmune disease and transplant rejection. Here, we review the current understanding of the immunophenotype and function of the MPS in normal human liver. Using well-defined selection criteria, a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases identified 76 appropriate studies. The majority (n=67) described Kupffer cells (KCs), although the definition of KC differs between sources, and little data were available regarding their function. Only 10 papers looked at liver dendritic cells (DCs), and largely confirmed the presence of the major dendritic cell subsets identified in human blood. Monocytes were thoroughly characterized in four studies that utilized flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy and highlighted their prominent role in liver homeostasis and displayed subtle differences from circulating monocytes. There was some limited evidence that liver DCs are tolerogenic but neither liver dendritic cell subsets nor macrophages have been thoroughly characterized, using either multi-colour flow cytometry or multi-parameter fluorescence microscopy. The lobular distribution of different subsets of liver MPS cells was also poorly described, and the ability to distinguish between passenger leukocytes and tissue resident cells remains limited. It was apparent that further research, using modern immunological techniques, is now required to accurately characterize the cells of the MPS in human liver.

  7. Unravelling mononuclear phagocyte heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Frédéric; Gordon, Siamon; Hume, David A.; Mowat, Allan M.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2011-01-01

    When Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn first described dendritic cells (DCs) in 1973 it took many years to convince the immunology community that these cells were truly distinct from macrophages. Almost four decades later, the DC is regarded as the key initiator of adaptive immune responses; however, distinguishing DCs from macrophages still leads to confusion and debate in the field. Here, Nature Reviews Immunology asks five experts to discuss the issue of heterogeneity in the mononuclear phagocyte system and to give their opinion on the importance of defining these cells for future research. PMID:20467425

  8. Opposite effects of bone marrow-derived cells transplantation in MPTP-rat model of Parkinson's disease: a comparison study of mononuclear and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Capitelli, Caroline Santos; Lopes, Carolina Salomão; Alves, Angélica Cristina; Barbiero, Janaína; Oliveira, Lucas Felipe; da Silva, Valdo José Dias; Vital, Maria Aparecida Barbato Frazão

    2014-01-01

    The 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) animal model is a useful tool to study Parkinson's disease (PD) and was used in the present study to investigate the potential beneficial as well as deleterious effects of systemic bone-marrow mononuclear cell (BMMC) or mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC) transplantation. MPTP administration resulted in a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and motor impairment in the open field test 24 h after surgery. Three and 7 days after receiving the lesion, the injured animals showed remaining motor impairment compared to the sham groups along with a significant loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) cells in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). The MPTP-lesioned rats treated with BMMCs immediately after lesioning exhibited motor impairment similar to the MPTP-saline group, though they presented a significantly higher loss of TH-ir cells in the SNpc compared to the MPTP-saline group. This increased loss of TH-ir cells in the SNpc was not observed when BMMC transplantation was performed 24 h after MPTP administration. In contrast, in the MPTP animals treated early with systemic BM-MSCs, no loss of TH-ir cells was observed. BMMCs and BM-MSCs previously labeled with CM-DiI cell tracker were found in brain sections of all transplanted animals. In addition, cells expressing CD45, an inflammatory white blood cell marker, were found in all brain sections analyzed and were more abundant in the MPTP-BMMC animals. In these animals, Iba1+ microglial cells showed also marked morphological changes indicating increased microglial activation. These results show that systemic BMMC transplantation did not ameliorate or prevent the lesion induced by MPTP. Instead, BMMC transplantation in MPTP-lesioned rats accelerated dopaminergic neuronal damage and induced motor impairment and immobility behavior. These findings suggest that caution should be taken when considering cell therapy using BMMCs to treat PD. However, systemic

  9. Adequate Selection of a Therapeutic Site Enables Efficient Development of Collateral Vessels in Angiogenic Treatment With Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Masaru; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Ayako; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Miyata, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Induction of angiogenic mechanisms to promote development of collateral vessels is considered promising for the treatment of peripheral arterial diseases. Collateral vessels generally develop from preexisting arteriolar connections, bypassing the diseased artery. We speculated that induction of angiogenic mechanisms should be directed to such arteriolar connections to achieve efficient collateral development. The aim of this study was to verify this hypothesis using autologous transplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells in the rabbit model of chronic limb ischemia. Methods and Results The left femoral artery was excised to induce limb ischemia in male rabbits. In this model, arteriolar connections in the left coccygeofemoral muscle tend to develop into collateral vessels, although this transformation is insufficient to alleviate the limb ischemia. In contrast, arteriolar connections in the closely located adductor muscle do not readily develop into collateral vessels. At 21 days after ischemia initiation, a sufficient number of automononuclear cells were selectively injected in the left coccygeofemoral muscle (coccygeo group) or left adductor muscle (adductor group). Evaluation of calf blood pressure ratios, blood flow in the left internal iliac artery, and angiographic scores at day 28 after injection revealed that collateral development and improvement of limb ischemia were significantly more efficient in the coccygeo group than in the adductor group. Morphometric analysis of the coccygeofemoral muscle at day 14 showed similar results. Conclusions Specific delivery of mononuclear cells to the coccygeofemoral but not the adductor muscle effectively improves collateral circulation in the rabbit model of limb ischemia and suggests that adequate site selection can facilitate therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:26370447

  10. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin enhances production and secretion of type IV collagenases in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Y; Kawakami, S; Fujii, Y; Kihara, K; Oshima, H

    1997-03-01

    Intravesical administration of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an effective and widely accepted treatment for superficial bladder cancer. Rapid progression of the disease after BCG therapy, however, has been reported in some cases refractory to the treatment. We examined whether BCG treatment and coexistence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) alter the invasive potential of bladder cancer cells. Production and secretion of two type IV collagenases, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and MMP 9, by PBMCs from five healthy donors or bladder cancer cells (T24, JTC 30, and JTC 32) were evaluated by gelatin zymography, western blot analysis, and northern blot analysis. Invasion of bladder cancer cells was also examined using reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel). BCG (5, 50, and 500 micrograms/ml) had no effect on secretion of MMP 2 and MMP 9 by bladder cancer cells, but increased the production and secretion of MMP 9 by PBMCs in a dose-dependent manner. The coexistence of PBMCs increased invasion of T24 cells and BCG further enhanced the invasion. Thus, BCG promotes invasion of bladder cancer cells under certain conditions. An increase in the secretion of MMP 9 by PBMCs may account in part for the effect.

  11. Human mononuclear phagocyte system reunited.

    PubMed

    Haniffa, Muzlifah; Bigley, Venetia; Collin, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    The human mononuclear phagocyte network comprises dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes and macrophages with a range of immune functions including antigen presentation linking innate and adaptive immunity. A number of DC, monocyte and macrophage subsets have been described in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues of mouse and human, with increased understanding of their distinct functional properties and genetic and cellular pathways of development. More recently, through comparative biology studies, a unified nomenclature of mononuclear phagocytes has begun to emerge with the identification of homologous subsets in several species. In this review, we discuss the current classification of human mononuclear phagocytes and the parallel organization of this network in the mouse. We also review the genetic control and developmental pathway of human mononuclear phagocytes and the immunological functions of the distinct subsets in health and inflammation.

  12. Selenium supplementation restores the decreased albumin level of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    AHN, Taeho; BAE, Chun-Sik; YUN, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Previously, it has been suggested that the phenotypic level of albumin in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) decreased in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Concomitantly, the production of oxidative stresses was also elevated in the diabetic PBMC compared to that of normal control. These results suggest the close relationship between PBMC-albumin and its antioxidant roles. Here, we expanded the previous studies and investigated the effect of selenium supplementation as inorganic (sodium selenate) forms on the levels of albumin expression and oxidative stress in PBMC of STZ-induced diabetic mice. Selenium intake recovered the decreased albumin levels to those of normal mice and reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results support that selenium intake may alleviate the etiology and pathology of PBMC in type 1 diabetic mice by restoring the decrease in albumin contents and the production of ROS. PMID:26726102

  13. Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis L., Papaveraceae) Enhances Proliferation and Cytokine Production by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in an In Vitro Model.

    PubMed

    Senchina, David S; Flinn, Gina N; McCann, Dustin A; Kohut, Marian L; Shearn, Colin T

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that phytomedicinal preparations from bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis L.) may harbor immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of alcohol tinctures and water infusions generated from bloodroot flowers, leaves, rhizomes, and roots on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine production and proliferation in vitro. PBMCs were collected from 16 healthy young adults and cultured with bloodroot extracts or respective controls for interleukins-1β, -2, -8, -10, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor. Proliferative capabilities of both PBMCs and K562 cells (an immortalized human myelogenous leukemia cell line) following extract treatment were determined. High-pressure liquid chromatography was used to quantify berberine, chelerythrine, and sanguinarine in the extracts and to correlate extract composition with observed effects. Overall, infusions demonstrated greater immunomodulatory capabilities than tinctures, and flower- and root-based extracts showed greater immunomodulatory properties than leaf- or rhizome-based extracts (some effects seen with root-based extracts may be due to endotoxin). Several extracts were able to augment PBMC proliferation and diminish K562 proliferation, suggesting a selective anti-carcinogenic activity. The rhizome alcohol tincture had a markedly stronger effect against K562 cells than other extracts. Chelerythrine, sanguinarine, and endotoxin (but not berberine) sometimes correlated with observed effects. The in vitro activities demonstrated here suggest bloodroot extracts may have potential as therapeutic immunomodulators.

  14. Flow cytometry analysis of hormone receptors on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to identify stress-induced neuroendocrine effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding the role of circulating peptide hormones in the pathogenesis of space-flight induced disorders would be greatly facilitated by a method which monitors chronic levels of hormones and their effects upon in vivo cell physiology. Single and simultaneous multiparameter flow cytometry analysis was employed to identify subpopulations of mononuclear cells bearing receptors for ACTH, Endorphin, and Somatomedin-C using monoclonal antibodies and monospecific antisera with indirect immunofluorescence. Blood samples were obtained from normal donors and subjects participating in decompression chamber studies (acute stress), medical student academic examination (chronic stress), and a drug study (Dexamethasone). Preliminary results indicate most ACTH and Endorphin receptor positive cells are monocytes and B-cells, exhibit little diurnal variation but the relative percentages of receptor positive cells are influenced by exposure to various stressors and ACTH inhibition. This study demonstrates the capability of flow cytometry analysis to study cell surface hormone receptor regulation which should allow insight into neuroendocrine modulation of the immune and other cellular systems during exposure to stress or microgravity.

  15. Assessment of the cytokine profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of naturally Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis infested dogs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanker K; Dimri, Umesh; Sharma, Bhaskar; Saxena, Meeta; Kumari, Priyambada

    2014-12-15

    The mechanism of cytokine secretion from T lymphocytes plays an important role in the immune response of dogs and parasitic skin infestations. Assessment of the cytokine profile of naturally S. scabiei var. canis infested dogs could augment understanding of the pathobiology of canine sarcoptic mange. Therefore, the present study examined the cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of dogs suffering from sarcoptic mange. Thirteen dogs naturally infected with sarcoptic mange participated in the study. The dogs were found positive for S. scabiei var. canis mites in skin scraping examinations and revealed at least three clinical inclusion criteria. Another five clinically healthy dogs were kept as healthy controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from heparinized blood samples and used for extraction of mRNA. Further, cDNA was synthesized by using 1 mg of mRNA by reverse transcription using oligonucleotide primers. Relative levels of cytokine expression were compared with normalized glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) transcripts. The levels of interleukin-4, interleukin-5 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) mRNA expression in dogs with sarcoptic mange were significantly higher (P ≤ 0.01), whereas the level of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was significantly lower (P ≤ 0.01) in comparison with the healthy dogs. No remarkable difference was seen for interleukin-2 mRNA expression between these animals. An overproduction IL-4 and IL-5 might be involved in immuno-pathogenesis of canine sarcoptic mange. S. scabiei var. canis mites possibly induce an overproduction of TGF-β and reduced expression of TNF-α and thus could be conferring the immune suppression of infested dogs.

  16. Assessment of the cytokine profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of naturally Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis infested dogs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanker K; Dimri, Umesh; Sharma, Bhaskar; Saxena, Meeta; Kumari, Priyambada

    2014-12-15

    The mechanism of cytokine secretion from T lymphocytes plays an important role in the immune response of dogs and parasitic skin infestations. Assessment of the cytokine profile of naturally S. scabiei var. canis infested dogs could augment understanding of the pathobiology of canine sarcoptic mange. Therefore, the present study examined the cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of dogs suffering from sarcoptic mange. Thirteen dogs naturally infected with sarcoptic mange participated in the study. The dogs were found positive for S. scabiei var. canis mites in skin scraping examinations and revealed at least three clinical inclusion criteria. Another five clinically healthy dogs were kept as healthy controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from heparinized blood samples and used for extraction of mRNA. Further, cDNA was synthesized by using 1 mg of mRNA by reverse transcription using oligonucleotide primers. Relative levels of cytokine expression were compared with normalized glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) transcripts. The levels of interleukin-4, interleukin-5 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) mRNA expression in dogs with sarcoptic mange were significantly higher (P ≤ 0.01), whereas the level of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was significantly lower (P ≤ 0.01) in comparison with the healthy dogs. No remarkable difference was seen for interleukin-2 mRNA expression between these animals. An overproduction IL-4 and IL-5 might be involved in immuno-pathogenesis of canine sarcoptic mange. S. scabiei var. canis mites possibly induce an overproduction of TGF-β and reduced expression of TNF-α and thus could be conferring the immune suppression of infested dogs. PMID:25468023

  17. Phosphorylation of Transcription Factor Specificity Protein 4 Is Increased in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of First-Episode Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Fusté, Montserrat; Meléndez-Pérez, Iria; Villalta-Gil, Victoria; Haro, Josep Maria; Gill, Grace; Ramos, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Background Altered expression of transcription factor specificity protein 4 (SP4) has been found in the postmortem brain of patients with psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Reduced levels of SP4 protein have recently been reported in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in first-episode psychosis. Also, SP4 levels are modulated by lithium treatment in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of SP4 at S770 is increased in the cerebellum of bipolar disorder subjects and upon inhibition of NMDA receptor signaling in cultured neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate whether SP4 S770 phosphorylation is increased in lymphocytes of first-episode psychosis patients and the effect of lithium treatment on this phosphorylation. Methods A cross-sectional study of S770 phosphorylation relative to total SP4 immunoreactivity using specific antibodies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in first-episode psychosis patients (n = 14, treated with lithium or not) and matched healthy controls (n = 14) by immunoblot was designed. We also determined the effects of the prescribed drugs lithium, olanzapine or valproic acid on SP4 phosphorylation in rat primary cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Results We found that SP4 S770 phosphorylation was significantly increased in lymphocytes in first-episode psychosis compared to controls and decreased in patients treated with lithium compared to patients who did not receive lithium. Moreover, incubation with lithium but not olanzapine or valproic acid reduced SP4 phosphorylation in rat cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Conclusions The findings presented here indicate that SP4 S770 phosphorylation is increased in lymphocytes in first-episode psychosis which may be reduced by lithium treatment in patients. Moreover, our study shows lithium treatment prevents this phosphorylation in vitro in neurons. This pilot study suggests that S770 SP4 phosphorylation could be a peripheral biomarker of psychosis, and may

  18. Activation of the antigen presentation function of mononuclear phagocyte populations associated with the basilar membrane of the cochlea after acoustic overstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiping; Vethanayagam, R. Robert; Dong, Youyi; Cai, Qunfeng; Hu, Bo Hua

    2015-01-01

    The immune response is an important component of the cochlear response to stress. As an important player in the cochlear immune system, the basilar membrane immune cells reside on the surface of the scala tympani side of the basilar membrane. At present, the immune cell properties in this region and their responses to stress are not well understood. Here, we investigated the functional role of these immune cells in the immune response to acoustic overstimulation. This study reveals that tissue macrophages are present in the entire length of the basilar membrane under steady-state conditions. Notably, these cells in the apical and the basal sections of the basilar membrane display distinct morphologies and immune protein expression patterns. Following acoustic trauma, monocytes infiltrate into the region of the basilar membrane, and the infiltrated cells transform into macrophages. While monocyte infiltration and transformation occur in both the apical and the basal sections of the basilar membrane, only the basal monocytes and macrophages display a marked increase in the expression of MHC II and CIITA, a MHC II production cofactor, suggesting the site-dependent activation of antigen-presenting function. Consistent with the increased expression of the antigen-presenting proteins, CD4+ T cells, the antigen-presenting partner, infiltrate into the region of the basilar membrane where antigen-presenting proteins are upregulated. Further pathological analyses revealed that the basal section of the cochlea displays a greater level of sensory cell damage, which is spatially correlated with the region of antigen-presenting activity. Together, these results suggest that the antigen-presenting function of the mononuclear phagocyte population is activated in response to acoustic trauma, which could bridge the innate immune response to adaptive immunity. PMID:26102003

  19. Sickle red cells as danger signals on proinflammatory gene expression, leukotriene B4 and interleukin-1 beta production in peripheral blood mononuclear cell.

    PubMed

    Pitanga, Thassila N; Oliveira, Ricardo R; Zanette, Dalila L; Guarda, Caroline C; Santiago, Rayra P; Santana, Sanzio S; Nascimento, Valma M L; Lima, Jonilson B; Carvalho, Graziele Q; Maffili, Vitor V; Carvalho, Magda O S; Alcântara, Luiz C J; Borges, Valéria M; Goncalves, Marilda S

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that sickle red blood cell (SS-RBC) induce Toll-like receptors (TLR) and Nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)- inflammasome expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). TLR and NLRP3 inflammasome could contribute to the maintenance of the inflammatory status in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients, since SS-RBC act as danger signals activating these pathways. In this study, first, we evaluated TLR (2, 4, 5 and 9), NLRP3, Caspase-1, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 expression in PBMC freshly isolated from SCA patients (SS-PBMC) in comparison with PBMC from healthy individuals (AA-PBMC). In the second moment, we investigated whether SS-RBC could interfere with the expression of these molecules in PBMC from healthy donor, in the absence or presence of hydroxyurea (HU) in vitro. TLRs and NLRP3 inflammasome expression were investigated by qPCR. IL-1β, Leukotriene-B4 (LTB4) and nitrite production were measured in PBMC (from healthy donor) culture supernatants. TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, NLRP3 and IL-1β were highly expressed in SS-PBMC when compared to AA-PBMC. Additionally, SS-RBC induced TLR9, NLRP3, Caspase-1, IL-1β and IL-18 expression and induced IL-1β, LTB4 and nitrite production in PBMC cultures. HU did not prevent TLR and NLRP3 inflammasome expression, but increased TLR2 and IL-18 expression and reduced nitrite production. In conclusion, our data suggest that TLR and inflammasome complexes may be key inducers of inflammation in SCA patients, probably through SS-RBC; also, HU does not prevent NLRP3 inflammasome- and TLR-dependent inflammation, indicating the need to develop new therapeutic strategies to SCA patients that act with different mechanisms of those observed for HU.

  20. Clinical disease upregulates expression of CD40 and CD40 ligand on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cattle naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD40 and CD40L interactions have costimulatory effects that are part of a complex series of events in host cellular and humoral immune responses and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in expression of CD40 and CD40L on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolat...

  1. Bisphenol A and its analogs induce morphological and biochemical alterations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Michałowicz, Jaromir; Mokra, Katarzyna; Bąk, Agata

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have addressed the cellular effects of bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol AF (BPAF) on cells, and no study has been conducted to analyze the mechanism of action of bisphenols in blood cells. In this study, the effect of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol F (BPF), BPS and BPAF on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed. It was shown that BPA, BPF and BPAF in particular, decreased cell viability, which was associated with depletion of intracellular ATP level and alterations in PBMCs size and granulation. Bisphenols enhanced ROS (including OH˙) formation, which led to damage to lipids and proteins in PBMCs. The most significant alterations in ROS level were induced by BPF, and particularly BPAF. Moreover, it was shown that BPAF most strongly provoked lipid peroxidation, while BPA and BPS caused the greatest damage to proteins. It may be concluded that BPA and its analogs were capable of inducing oxidative stress and damage in PBMCs in the concentrations ranging from 0.06 to 0.5 μM (0.02-0.1 μg/ml), which may be present in human blood as a result of environmental exposure. Although, most of bisphenols studied decreased cell viability, size and ATP level at higher concentrations, BPAF exhibited its cytotoxic potential at low concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 3 μM (0.1-1.0 μg/ml) that may correspond to concentrations in humans following occupational exposure. PMID:26028149

  2. Bisphenol A and its analogs induce morphological and biochemical alterations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Michałowicz, Jaromir; Mokra, Katarzyna; Bąk, Agata

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have addressed the cellular effects of bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol AF (BPAF) on cells, and no study has been conducted to analyze the mechanism of action of bisphenols in blood cells. In this study, the effect of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol F (BPF), BPS and BPAF on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed. It was shown that BPA, BPF and BPAF in particular, decreased cell viability, which was associated with depletion of intracellular ATP level and alterations in PBMCs size and granulation. Bisphenols enhanced ROS (including OH˙) formation, which led to damage to lipids and proteins in PBMCs. The most significant alterations in ROS level were induced by BPF, and particularly BPAF. Moreover, it was shown that BPAF most strongly provoked lipid peroxidation, while BPA and BPS caused the greatest damage to proteins. It may be concluded that BPA and its analogs were capable of inducing oxidative stress and damage in PBMCs in the concentrations ranging from 0.06 to 0.5 μM (0.02-0.1 μg/ml), which may be present in human blood as a result of environmental exposure. Although, most of bisphenols studied decreased cell viability, size and ATP level at higher concentrations, BPAF exhibited its cytotoxic potential at low concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 3 μM (0.1-1.0 μg/ml) that may correspond to concentrations in humans following occupational exposure.

  3. Quantification and characterization of ACTH-related peptides produced by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, G.M.; Maimon, J.; Schneider, B.S. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors have used a sensitive radioimmunoassay to quantify and characterize PBMC-associated immunoreactive ACTH (ACTH-IR). Mean ACTH content of freshly isolated human PBMCs was 3.8 {plus minus} 0.72 pg (SEM) per 10(6) cells. During 3 days of incubation ACTH-IR in conditioned media of control PBMCs increased significantly, p less than 0.02. Gel filtration chromatography revealed a minor peak of ACTH-IR coeluting with ACTH (1-39) and a major peak coeluting with ACTH (11-24). Treatment with 15 nM CRH did not alter the amount of ACTH-IR secreted or its gel pattern. Synthetic ACTH (11-24), was radioiodinated and was used for binding experiments that demonstrated specific high- and low-affinity binding sites for ACTH (11-24) on a human T cell line. These results add support for a role of ACTH and related peptides in immune regulatory systems and suggest that cell-specific post-translational processing of PBMC may generate an expanding number of biologically active moieties.

  4. Intravenous Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation for Stroke: Phase1/2a Clinical Trial in a Homogeneous Group of Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Akihiko; Sakai, Chiaki; Soma, Toshihiro; Kasahara, Yukiko; Stern, David M; Kajimoto, Katsufumi; Ihara, Masafumi; Daimon, Takashi; Yamahara, Kenichi; Doi, Kaori; Kohara, Nobuo; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Naritomi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this clinical trial was to assess the feasibility and safety of transplanting autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells into patients suffering severe embolic stroke. Major inclusion criteria included patients with cerebral embolism, age 20-75 years, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score displaying improvement of ≤ 5 points during the first 7 days after stroke, and NIHSS score of ≥ 10 on day 7 after stroke. Bone marrow aspiration (25 or 50 mL; N = 6 patients in each case) was performed 7-10 days poststroke, and bone marrow mononuclear cells were administrated intravenously. Mean total transplanted cell numbers were 2.5 × 10(8) and 3.4 × 10(8) cells in the lower and higher dose groups, respectively. No apparent adverse effects of administering bone marrow cells were observed. Compared with the lower dose, patients receiving the higher dose of bone marrow cells displayed a trend toward improved neurologic outcomes. Compared with 1 month after treatment, patients receiving cell therapy displayed a trend toward improved cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate of oxygen consumption 6 months after treatment. In comparison with historical controls, patients receiving cell therapy had significantly better neurologic outcomes. Our results indicated that intravenous transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells is safe and feasible. Positive results and trends favoring neurologic recovery and improvement in cerebral blood flow and metabolism by cell therapy underscore the relevance of larger scale randomized controlled trials using this approach.

  5. Cross-talk between human neural stem/progenitor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in an allogeneic co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxia; Shao, Bei; Zhuge, Qichuan; Wang, Peng; Zheng, Chengcai; Huang, Weilong; Yang, Chenqi; Wang, Brian; Su, Dong-Ming; Jin, Kunlin

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSCs) as a regenerative cell replacement therapy holds great promise. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We, here, focused on the interaction between hNSCs and allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a co-culture model. We found that hNSCs significantly decrease the CD3+ and CD8+ T cells, reduce the gamma delta T cells and increase the regulatory T cells, along with reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased anti-inflammatory cytokines after co-culture. We also found that PBMCs, in turn, significantly promote the proliferation and differentiation of hNSCs. Our data suggest that hNSCs cross-talk with immune cells.

  6. Cytomegalovirus upregulates expression of CCR5 in central memory cord blood mononuclear cells, which may facilitate in utero HIV type 1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erica L; Howard, Chanie L; Thurman, Joy; Pontiff, Kyle; Johnson, Elan S; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-15

    Administration of combination antiretroviral therapy to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected pregnant women significantly reduces vertical transmission. In contrast, maternal co-opportunistic infection with primary or reactivated cytomegalovirus (CMV) or other pathogens may facilitate in utero transmission of HIV-1 by activation of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs). Here we examine the targets and mechanisms that affect fetal susceptibility to HIV-1 in utero. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the fraction of CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CCR5(+) CBMCs is minimal, which may account for the low level of in utero HIV-1 transmission. Unstimulated CD4(+) CBMCs that lack CCR5/CD45RO showed reduced levels of HIV-1 infection. However, upon in vitro stimulation with CMV, CBMCs undergo increased proliferation to upregulate the fraction of T central memory cells and expression of CCR5, which enhances susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro. These data suggest that activation induced by CMV in vivo may alter CCR5 expression in CD4(+) T central memory cells to promote in utero transmission of HIV-1.

  7. Glycoconjugates Effects: do Gender and Ethnicity Influence Exposure of Pathogen by Peripheral Mononuclear Cells ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiani, Mohamed; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group demonstrate different pathological effects. B. cereus is a spore-forming, gram positive bacterium responsible for most foodborne illnesses. It was shown that susceptibility to infection and response to vaccines or treatments can be attributed to specific immunogenetic factors including gender and ethnicity. Glycoconjugate polymers (GCs) are potentially important in pharmaceutical and biomedical research. Our group has shown that GCs activate murine macrophages and promote killing of Bacillus cereus spores during phagocytosis. We hypothesized that the GCs effects are independent from gender and race. The goal of the present study was two-folds: A) determine whether GCs influence on human PMNC exposure of B. cereus spores and B) analyze whether gender and ethnicity influence of the effect of GCs. GCs were studied during exposure and post-exposure conditions. Phagocytosis was performed during exposure of PMNC to Bacillus spores. Post-exposure analysis involved cytotoxicity, cell viability and activation, and colonies forming unit. GC1 and GC3 enhance Bacillus spore killing. GC1 proved more effective than GC3 in spore killing while activating PMNC. Results demonstrate GCs effect were independent from ethnicity or gender. Findings of this research demonstrated that GC can be used as ligands to stimulate PMNC and kill B. cereus spores.

  8. Spontaneous reduction of mononuclear high-spin iron(III) complexes to mononuclear low-spin iron(II) complexes in aqueous media and nuclease activity via self-activation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kaushik; Tyagi, Nidhi; Kumar Dhara, Ashish; Singh, Udai P

    2015-02-01

    Mononuclear high-spin [Fe(III) (Pyimpy)Cl3 ]⋅2 CH2 Cl2 (1⋅2 CH2 Cl2 ) and [Fe(III) (Me-Pyimpy)Cl3 ] (2), as well as low-spin Fe(II) (Pyimpy)2 ](ClO4 )2 (3) and [Fe(II) (Me-Pyimpy)2 ](ClO4 )2 (4) complexes of tridentate ligands Pyimpy and Me-Pyimpy have been synthesized and characterized by analytical techniques, spectral, and X-ray structural analyses. We observed an important type of conversion and associated spontaneous reduction of mono-chelated high-spin Fe(III) (1⋅2 CH2 Cl2 and 2) complexes to low-spin bis-chelated Fe(II) complexes 3 and 4, respectively. This process has been explored in detail by UV/Vis, fluorescence, and (1) H NMR spectroscopic measurements. The high positive potentials observed in electrochemical studies suggested a better stabilization of Fe(II) centers in 3 and 4. Theoretical studies by density functional theory (DFT) calculations supported an increased stabilization for 3 in polar solvents. Self-activated nuclease activity of complexes 1⋅2CH2 Cl2 and 2 during their spontaneous reduction was examined for the first time and the mechanism of nuclease activity was investigated.

  9. Modulation of the proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-1 infected patients by drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Jessica L.; Mahajan, Supriya D.; Aalinkeel, Ravikunar; Nair, Bindukumar; Sykes, Donald E.; Agosto-Mujica, Arnadri; Hsiao, Chiu Bin; Schwartz, Stanley A.

    2010-01-01

    We used proteomic analyses to assess how drug abuse modulates immunologic responses to infections with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Two dimensional (2D) difference gel electrophoresis was utilized to determine changes in the proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from HIV-1 positive donors that occurred after treatment with cocaine or methamphetamine. Both drugs differentially regulated the expression of several functional classes of proteins. We further isolated specific subpopulations of PBMC to determine which subpopulations were selectively affected by treatment with drugs of abuse. Monocytes, B cells and T cells were positively or negatively selected from PBMC isolated from HIV-1 positive donors. Our results demonstrate that cocaine and methamphetamine modulate gene expression primarily in monocytes and T cells, the primary targets of HIV-1 infection. Proteomic data were validated with quantitative, real-time PCR. These studies elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of drugs of abuse on HIV-1 infections. Several functionally relevant classes of proteins were identified as potential mediators of HIV-1 pathogenesis and disease progression associated with drug abuse. PMID:19543960

  10. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells prevents memory impairment in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Lee, Hyunjin; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Ueda, Masayuki; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-04-24

    Stem cell transplantation therapy is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of ischemic stroke, and several beneficial aspects have been reported. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), stem cell therapy is expected to provide an efficient therapeutic approach. Indeed, the intracerebral transplantation of stem cells reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and rescued memory deficits in AD model mice. Here, we show that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMCs) improves cognitive function in two different AD mouse models, DAL and APP mice, and prevents neurodegeneration. GFP-positive BMMCs were isolated from tibiae and femurs of 4-week-old mice and then transplanted intravenously into DAL and APP mice. Transplantation of BMMCs suppressed neuronal loss and restored memory impairment of DAL mice to almost the same level as in wild-type mice. Transplantation of BMMCs to APP mice reduced Aβ deposition in the brain. APP mice treated with BMMCs performed significantly better on behavioral tests than vehicle-injected mice. Moreover, the effects were observed even with transplantation after the onset of cognitive impairment in DAL mice. Together, our results indicate that intravenous transplantation of BMMCs has preventive effects against the cognitive decline in AD model mice and suggest a potential therapeutic effect of BMMC transplantation therapy.

  11. Butachlor induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative DNA damage and necrosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-12-01

    Butachlor is a systemic herbicide widely applied on rice, tea, wheat, beans and other crops; however, it concurrently exerts toxic effects on beneficial organisms like earthworms, aquatic invertebrates and other non-target animals including humans. Owing to the associated risk to humans, this chloroacetanilide class of herbicide was investigated with the aim to assess its potential for the (i) interaction with DNA, (ii) mitochondria membrane damage and DNA strand breaks and (iii) cell cycle arrest and necrosis in butachlor treated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (Ka=1.2×10(4)M(-1)) and binding capacity (n=1.02) of butachlor with ctDNA. The oxidative potential of butachlor was ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and substantial amounts of promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. Also, the discernible butachlor dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) and increased fluorescence intensity of 2',7'-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) due to intracellular ROS generation. The comet data revealed significantly greater Olive tail moment (OTM) values in butachlor treated PBMN cells vs untreated and DMSO controls. Treatment of cultured PBMN cells for 24h resulted in significantly increased number of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells with a dose dependent reduction in the nuclear division index (NDI). The flow cytometry analysis of annexin V(-)/7-AAD(+) stained cells demonstrated substantial reduction in live population due to complete loss of cell membrane integrity. Overall the data suggested the formation of butachlor-DNA complex, as an initiating event in butachlor-induced DNA damage. The results elucidated the oxidative role of butachlor in intracellular ROS production, and

  12. S-Nitrosylation Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Human Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sue-Jie; Spratt, Heidi M; Soman, Kizhake V; Stafford, Susan; Gupta, Shivali; Petersen, John R; Zago, Maria P; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N; Brasier, Allan R; Wiktorowicz, John E; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) protects the heart against ischemic injury; however, NO- and superoxide-dependent S-nitrosylation (S-NO) of cysteines can affect function of target proteins and play a role in disease outcome. We employed 2D-GE with thiol-labeling FL-maleimide dye and MALDI-TOF MS/MS to capture the quantitative changes in abundance and S-NO proteome of HF patients (versus healthy controls, n = 30/group). We identified 93 differentially abundant (59-increased/34-decreased) and 111 S-NO-modified (63-increased/48-decreased) protein spots, respectively, in HF subjects (versus controls, fold-change | ≥1.5|, p ≤ 0.05). Ingenuity pathway analysis of proteome datasets suggested that the pathways involved in phagocytes' migration, free radical production, and cell death were activated and fatty acid metabolism was decreased in HF subjects. Multivariate adaptive regression splines modeling of datasets identified a panel of proteins that will provide >90% prediction success in classifying HF subjects. Proteomic profiling identified ATP-synthase, thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), and vinculin (VCL) as top differentially abundant and S-NO-modified proteins, and these proteins were verified by Western blotting and ELISA in different set of HF subjects. We conclude that differential abundance and S-NO modification of proteins serve as a mechanism in regulating cell viability and free radical production, and THBS1 and VCL evaluation will potentially be useful in the prediction of heart failure. PMID:27635260

  13. S-Nitrosylation Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Heidi M.; Gupta, Shivali; Petersen, John R.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) protects the heart against ischemic injury; however, NO- and superoxide-dependent S-nitrosylation (S-NO) of cysteines can affect function of target proteins and play a role in disease outcome. We employed 2D-GE with thiol-labeling FL-maleimide dye and MALDI-TOF MS/MS to capture the quantitative changes in abundance and S-NO proteome of HF patients (versus healthy controls, n = 30/group). We identified 93 differentially abundant (59-increased/34-decreased) and 111 S-NO-modified (63-increased/48-decreased) protein spots, respectively, in HF subjects (versus controls, fold-change | ≥1.5|, p ≤ 0.05). Ingenuity pathway analysis of proteome datasets suggested that the pathways involved in phagocytes' migration, free radical production, and cell death were activated and fatty acid metabolism was decreased in HF subjects. Multivariate adaptive regression splines modeling of datasets identified a panel of proteins that will provide >90% prediction success in classifying HF subjects. Proteomic profiling identified ATP-synthase, thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), and vinculin (VCL) as top differentially abundant and S-NO-modified proteins, and these proteins were verified by Western blotting and ELISA in different set of HF subjects. We conclude that differential abundance and S-NO modification of proteins serve as a mechanism in regulating cell viability and free radical production, and THBS1 and VCL evaluation will potentially be useful in the prediction of heart failure. PMID:27635260

  14. S-Nitrosylation Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Heidi M.; Gupta, Shivali; Petersen, John R.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) protects the heart against ischemic injury; however, NO- and superoxide-dependent S-nitrosylation (S-NO) of cysteines can affect function of target proteins and play a role in disease outcome. We employed 2D-GE with thiol-labeling FL-maleimide dye and MALDI-TOF MS/MS to capture the quantitative changes in abundance and S-NO proteome of HF patients (versus healthy controls, n = 30/group). We identified 93 differentially abundant (59-increased/34-decreased) and 111 S-NO-modified (63-increased/48-decreased) protein spots, respectively, in HF subjects (versus controls, fold-change | ≥1.5|, p ≤ 0.05). Ingenuity pathway analysis of proteome datasets suggested that the pathways involved in phagocytes' migration, free radical production, and cell death were activated and fatty acid metabolism was decreased in HF subjects. Multivariate adaptive regression splines modeling of datasets identified a panel of proteins that will provide >90% prediction success in classifying HF subjects. Proteomic profiling identified ATP-synthase, thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), and vinculin (VCL) as top differentially abundant and S-NO-modified proteins, and these proteins were verified by Western blotting and ELISA in different set of HF subjects. We conclude that differential abundance and S-NO modification of proteins serve as a mechanism in regulating cell viability and free radical production, and THBS1 and VCL evaluation will potentially be useful in the prediction of heart failure.

  15. Neuroprotective effects of intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells from 5-fluorouracil pre-treated rats on ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Mao, W W; Zhang, C G; Wan, L; Jing, C H; Hua, X M; Li, S T; Cheng, J

    2016-03-15

    Our previous findings showed bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) from 5- fluorouracil (5-FU) pre-treated rats (named BMRMNCs) had a better therapeutic efficacy in ischemia/reperfusion rats as compared to BMMNCs from untreated rats. This study was undertaken to explore the potential mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of BMRMNCs in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat model. Rats were intravenously pre-treated with 5-FU and BMRMNCs were collected at different time points. The contents of growth factors in the supernatant and CXCR4 expression were detected by ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. MCAO was introduced to rats, and BMMNCs and BMRMNCs collected at 7 days after 5-FU pre-treatment were independently transplanted via the tail vein 24h later. The neurological function was evaluated before cell transplantation and at 24h, 7d and 14d after cell transplantation. Rats were sacrificed at 14d after cell transplantation, the brains were collected for TTC staining, infarct volume detection, NISSL staining, counting of viable cells in the CA1 region, and observation of transplanted cells. BMRMNCs had elevated expressions of growth factors as well as CXCR4 expression. Our results confirmed the better therapeutic effects of BMRMNCs in MCAO rats, demonstrated by reduction in infarct volume, improvement of neurological function and more viable cells in the hippocampus. In addition, more transplanted cells were found after BMRMNCs transplantation at 7 days and 14 days although there was no marked difference at 14 days. These findings indicate that BMRMNCs transplantation may protect ischemic stroke, at least partially, via increasing the secretion of growth factors and migration to the injured site.

  16. Concentration of bone marrow mononuclear cells for in vitro treatment and AB0-incompatible transplantation: a rapid and reproducible procedure using the haemonetics V50 cell separator.

    PubMed

    Wiesneth, M; Hertenstein, B; Koerner, K; Heimpel, H; Heit, W

    1988-01-01

    Forty-nine allogeneic and 14 autologous bone marrow grafts were processed with the Haemonetics V50 cell separator (Haemonetics Corp., Braintree, USA) for in vitro treatment with antibodies and cryopreservation respectively. The concentration of hemopoietic progenitor cells was performed without any sedimentation or density gradient agents. The recovery is given in percent (mean +/- sd) of the original marrow values: mononuclear cells (MNC) 74 +/- 10%, polymorphonuclear cells (PMC) 48 +/- 17%, red blood cells (RBC) 12 +/- 5%, granulocyte/monocyte progenitors (CFU-GM) 83 +/- 36%, and erythroid progenitors (BFU-E) 78 +/- 38%. The recovery of nucleated cells (NC) was 90 +/- 13% and the viability 82 +/- 11% after cryopreservation. The technique described provides a simple, rapid and efficient preparation of large bone marrow volumes for in vitro treatment and AB0-incompatible transplantation.

  17. Infection of chicken bone marrow mononuclear cells with subgroup J avian leukosis virus inhibits dendritic cell differentiation and alters cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Qiu, Qianqian; Zhang, Xu; Dai, Manman; Qin, Jianru; Hao, Jianjong; Liao, Ming; Cao, Weisheng

    2016-10-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus known to induce tumor formation and immunosuppression in infected chickens. One of the organs susceptible to ALV-J is the bone marrow, from which specialized antigen-presenting cells named dendritic cells (BM-DCs) are derived. Notably, these cells possess the unique ability to induce primary immune responses. In the present study, a method of cultivating and purifying DCs from chicken bone marrow in vitro was established to investigate the effects of ALV-J infection on BM-DC differentiation or generation. The results indicated that ALV-J not only infects the chicken bone marrow mononuclear cells but also appears to inhibit the differentiation and maturation of BM-DCs and to trigger apoptosis. Moreover, substantial reductions in the mRNA expression of TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, MHCI, and MHCII and in cytokine production were detected in the surviving BM-DCs following ALV-J infection. These findings indicate that ALV-J infection disrupts the process of bone marrow mononuclear cell differentiation into BM-DCs likely via altered antigen presentation, resulting in a downstream immune response in affected chickens.

  18. Senescence-Related Changes in Gene Expression of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Octo/Nonagenarians Compared to Their Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Abdul Hamid, Noor Aini; Harun, Roslan; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms determining both functional rate of decline and the time of onset in aging remain elusive. Studies of the aging process especially those involving the comparison of long-lived individuals and young controls are fairly limited. Therefore, this research aims to determine the differential gene expression profile in related individuals from villages in Pahang, Malaysia. Genome-wide microarray analysis of 18 samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from two groups: octo/nonagenarians (80–99 years old) and their offspring (50.2  ±  4.0 years old) revealed that 477 transcripts were age-induced and 335 transcripts were age-repressed with fold changes ≥1.2 in octo/nonagenarians compared to offspring. Interestingly, changes in gene expression were associated with increased capacity for apoptosis (BAK1), cell cycle regulation (CDKN1B), metabolic process (LRPAP1), insulin action (IGF2R), and increased immune and inflammatory response (IL27RA), whereas response to stress (HSPA8), damage stimulus (XRCC6), and chromatin remodelling (TINF2) pathways were downregulated in octo/nonagenarians. These results suggested that systemic telomere maintenance, metabolism, cell signalling, and redox regulation may be important for individuals to maintain their healthy state with advancing age and that these processes play an important role in the determination of the healthy life-span. PMID:24381713

  19. Senescence-related changes in gene expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from octo/nonagenarians compared to their offspring.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahman, Amirah; Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Abdul Hamid, Noor Aini; Harun, Roslan; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms determining both functional rate of decline and the time of onset in aging remain elusive. Studies of the aging process especially those involving the comparison of long-lived individuals and young controls are fairly limited. Therefore, this research aims to determine the differential gene expression profile in related individuals from villages in Pahang, Malaysia. Genome-wide microarray analysis of 18 samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from two groups: octo/nonagenarians (80-99 years old) and their offspring (50.2 ± 4.0 years old) revealed that 477 transcripts were age-induced and 335 transcripts were age-repressed with fold changes ≥1.2 in octo/nonagenarians compared to offspring. Interestingly, changes in gene expression were associated with increased capacity for apoptosis (BAK1), cell cycle regulation (CDKN1B), metabolic process (LRPAP1), insulin action (IGF2R), and increased immune and inflammatory response (IL27RA), whereas response to stress (HSPA8), damage stimulus (XRCC6), and chromatin remodelling (TINF2) pathways were downregulated in octo/nonagenarians. These results suggested that systemic telomere maintenance, metabolism, cell signalling, and redox regulation may be important for individuals to maintain their healthy state with advancing age and that these processes play an important role in the determination of the healthy life-span.

  20. Expression of cytokine and apoptosis-related genes in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with Brucella abortus recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Im, Young Bin; Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Suk; Yoo, Han Sang

    2016-02-11

    Brucellosis is a clinically and economically important disease. Therefore, eradication programs of the disease have been implemented in several countries. One hurdle in these programs is the detection of infected animals at the early stage. Although the protein antigens as diagnostic antigens have recently received attention, the exact mechanisms at the beginning of immune responses are not yet known. Therefore, genes encoding five B. abortus cellular proteins were cloned and the expressed recombinant proteins were purified. The expression of several cytokine genes (IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12p40, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and iNOS) was analyzed in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (bPBMC) after stimulation with the recombinant proteins. Three apoptosis-related genes, Bax, Bcl-2, and TLR4, were also included in the analysis to find out the adverse effects of the proteins to the cells. Each protein induced different patterns of cytokine expression depending on the stimulation time and antigen dose. Expression of IL-6, IL-12p40, and IFN-γ was induced with all of the proteins while IL-1β, IL-4, TNF-α, and iNOS gene expression was not. Expression of apoptosis-related genes was not altered except TLR4. These results suggest that the cellular antigens of B. abortus induce both humoral and cellular immunity via the production of IL-6, IL-12p40, and IFN-γ in bPBMC without exerting any adverse effects on the cells.

  1. Effects of aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Chagas' heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Haline; Teixeira, Maxelle Martins; Sousa, Rodrigo Cunha de; Silva, Marcos Vinícius da; Correia, Dalmo; Rodrigues Junior, Virmondes; Levy, Bruce David; Rogério, Alexandre de Paula

    2016-04-15

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). In some patients with Chagas disease, symptoms progress to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Endogenously, inflammation is resolved in the presence of lipid mediators such as aspirin-triggered RvD1 (AT-RvD1) which has anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution effects. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, the effects of AT-RvD1 on T. cruzi antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with Chagas heart disease. The levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-13 increased in PBMCs from cardiac-form Chagas patients in stage B1 (patients with fewer heart abnormalities) stimulated with T. cruzi antigen compared to those in non-stimulated PBMCs. AT-RvD1 reduced the IFN-γ concentrations in PBMCs from patients with Chagas disease stimulated with T. cruzi antigen compared to stimulated with T. cruzi antigen cells. AT-RvD1 treatment resulted in no observable changes in TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-13 levels. AT-RvD1 significantly decreased the percentage of necrotic cells and caused a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of T. cruzi antigen-stimulated PBMCs from patients with Chagas disease. These findings demonstrate that AT-RvD1 modulates the immune response in Chagas disease patients and might have potential to be used as an alternative approach for slowing the development of further heart damage.

  2. Effect of thermal stress on expression profile of apoptosis related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of transition Sahiwal cow

    PubMed Central

    Somal, A; Aggarwal, A; Upadhyay, R.C

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of thermal stress on expression profile of genes related to apoptosis in peripartum Sahiwal cows. For this, twelve pregnant dry Sahiwal cows were selected from Livestock Research Centre at National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal. The cows were divided into two groups consisting of six Sahiwal cows each. Cows of group I calved during thermoneutral temperature conditions (THI=67.3) and cows of group II calved in summer season (THI=79.9). Blood samples were collected on -15, 0 and +15 days with respect to calving where day ‘0’ represents the day of calving. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were separated and total RNA was isolated for the BCL-2 (B-Cell Lymphoma-2), BAX (BCL-2 antagonist killer-1), BAK (Bcl-2-associated X protein), CASP-3 (cysteine-aspartic proteases-3) and P53 (tumour protien-53) mRNAs expression. It was found that there was up regulation of CASP-3 on the day of calving during both temperature conditions. Comparison between the two temperature conditions showed that expression of CASP-3, BCL-2, BAK, P53 and ratio of BAX/BCL-2 in PBMC increased during summer as compared to thermoneutral condition suggesting the susceptibility of these cells to apoptosis. Based on the above findings it can be concluded that during calving PBMC are more susceptible to apoptosis, and summer being more stressful potentiates the apoptosis of PBMC in Sahiwal cows. PMID:27175165

  3. Effect of thermal stress on expression profile of apoptosis related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of transition Sahiwal cow.

    PubMed

    Somal, A; Aggarwal, A; Upadhyay, R C

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of thermal stress on expression profile of genes related to apoptosis in peripartum Sahiwal cows. For this, twelve pregnant dry Sahiwal cows were selected from Livestock Research Centre at National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal. The cows were divided into two groups consisting of six Sahiwal cows each. Cows of group I calved during thermoneutral temperature conditions (THI=67.3) and cows of group II calved in summer season (THI=79.9). Blood samples were collected on -15, 0 and +15 days with respect to calving where day '0' represents the day of calving. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were separated and total RNA was isolated for the BCL-2 (B-Cell Lymphoma-2), BAX (BCL-2 antagonist killer-1), BAK (Bcl-2-associated X protein), CASP-3 (cysteine-aspartic proteases-3) and P53 (tumour protien-53) mRNAs expression. It was found that there was up regulation of CASP-3 on the day of calving during both temperature conditions. Comparison between the two temperature conditions showed that expression of CASP-3, BCL-2, BAK, P53 and ratio of BAX/BCL-2 in PBMC increased during summer as compared to thermoneutral condition suggesting the susceptibility of these cells to apoptosis. Based on the above findings it can be concluded that during calving PBMC are more susceptible to apoptosis, and summer being more stressful potentiates the apoptosis of PBMC in Sahiwal cows.

  4. Phenotypic characterization of mononuclear cells and class II antigen expression in angular cheilitis infected by Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Jonsson, R

    1989-04-01

    In the present study we characterized the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells in angular cheilitis lesions to further explore the pathogenesis of this disorder. Frozen sections from lesions infected by Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed to subsets of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and macrophages. In addition, the expression of Class II antigens (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR), the interleukin 2- and transferrin-receptors was studied on resident and infiltrating cells. An intense infiltration of T-lymphocytes was accompanied by expression of Class II antigens on the epidermal keratinocytes in lesion infected by Candida albicans. The Staphylococcus aureus infected lesions displayed a diffuse infiltration of T-lymphocytes but virtually no expression of Class II antigen by epidermal keratinocytes. These observations suggest that the cell-mediated arm of the immune system is involved in the inflammatory reaction of lesions infected by Candida albicans. In addition, the present study confirms that epidermal expression of Class II antigens is closely related to the type and magnitude of the infiltrating T-lymphocyte. Finally, these findings indicate that the type of inflammatory reaction in angular cheilitis is primarily dependent on the isolated microorganism, although the clinical pictures of the disorder are virtually identical. PMID:2468179

  5. Sustained effect of bone marrow mononuclear cell therapy in axonal regeneration in a model of optic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Zaverucha-do-Valle, Camila; Mesentier-Louro, Louise; Gubert, Fernanda; Mortari, Nicoli; Padilha, Ana Beatriz; Paredes, Bruno D; Mencalha, Andre; Abdelhay, Eliana; Teixeira, Camila; Ferreira, Fernanda G M; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; de Souza, Sergio Augusto L; Gutfilen, Bianca; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F

    2014-10-31

    In adult mammals, the regeneration of the optic nerve is very limited and at the moment there are several groups trying different approaches to increase retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axonal outgrowth. One promising approach is cell therapy. In previous work, we performed intravitreal transplantation of bone-marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) after optic nerve crush in adult rats and we demonstrated an increase in RGC survival and axon outgrowth 14 days after injury. In the present work, we investigated if these results could be sustained for a longer period of time. Optic nerve crush was performed in Lister-hooded adult rats and BMMC or saline injections were performed shortly after injury. Neuronal survival and regeneration were evaluated in rats׳ retina and optic nerve after 28 days. We demonstrated an increase of 5.2 fold in the axon outgrowth 28 days after lesion, but the BMMCs had no effect on RGC survival. In an attempt to prolong RGC survival, we established a new protocol with two BMMC injections, the second one 7 days after the injury. Untreated animals received two injections of saline. We observed that although the axonal outgrowth was still increased after the second BMMC injection, the RGC survival was not significantly different from untreated animals. These results demonstrate that BMMCs transplantation promotes neuroregeneration at least until 28 days after injury. However, the effects on RGC survival previously observed by us at 14 days were not sustained at 28 days and could not be prolonged with a second dose of BMMC.

  6. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis: correlation with respiratory atopy.

    PubMed

    Sawai, T; Ikai, K; Uehara, M

    1998-05-01

    We determined the cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from 100 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) aged 13-57 years (mean +/- SD, 29.8 +/- 17.7 years). The correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and clinical parameters such as the severity of eczema and a personal or family predisposition to atopic respiratory diseases (ARD) (asthma or allergic rhinitis) was examined. Although the enzymic activity varied from normal to very high in the AD patients, cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.005) elevated in AD patients (42.1 +/- 22.0 units) as compared with the normal controls (12.4 +/- 5.6) and clinical control subjects (13.4 +/- 9.5). In contrast, we found no correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and the severity of eczema when AD patients were classified into four categories (remission, mild, moderate and severe) according to the extent of their skin involvement. Furthermore, we found that systemic corticosteroid therapy in severe AD patients did not alter the cAMP-PDE activity. cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in those AD patients who had a personal history of ARD (47.2 +/- 11.2) than in AD patients with a family history of ARD (37.2 +/- 17.4) and those without a personal or family history ('pure' AD) (34.4 +/- 19.8). Nevertheless, the cAMP-PDE activity was significantly higher even in 'pure' AD patients than in the controls. These results suggest that an elevation of cAMP-PDE activity is closely related to a predisposition to respiratory atopy, and does not follow inflammation in AD patients. PMID:9666832

  7. Regeneration of the liver at different periods of mononuclear infiltration induced by zymosan granules

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbakov, V.I.; Komlyagina, T.G.; Mayanskii, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to discover how the liver,with areas of mononuclear infiltration, developing in response to activation of Kupffer cells (KC) by zymosan granules (ZG), regenerates. In the experiments, an intraperitoneal injection of 1 microCi of /sup 3/H-thymidine/g body weight was given to the mice 1 h before sacrifice. Proliferation of hepatocytes and regeneration of the liver were intensified most when partial resection of the liver (PRL) was performed at the peak of mononuclear infiltration of the liver, namely five days after injection of ZG. The data indicate that not only activated KC, but also areas of mononuclear infiltration potentiate hepatocyte regeneration.

  8. Vibration Induces BAFF Overexpression and Aberrant O-Glycosylation of IgA1 in Cultured Human Tonsillar Mononuclear Cells in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Muyao; Liu, Chan; Yan, Wenzhe; Peng, Xiaofei; He, Liyu; Liu, Hong; Liu, Fuyou

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of in vitro vibratory stimulation of human tonsillar mononuclear cells (TMCs). Methods. Fourteen IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients with chronic tonsillitis (CT) and 12 CT patients with no renal pathology were enrolled. Group A TMCs were collected after 24 hours of culture and used to determine baseline levels. TMCs in groups B, C, D, E, and F were exposed to vibratory stimulation (60 Hz) for 0 (as the control group), 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes, respectively. Results. Baseline concentrations of B-cell-activation factor (BAFF) and IgA1, BAFF mRNA expression, and aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 level were higher in the IgAN group as compared to that in the CT group, and all increased after vibratory stimulation. Baseline mRNA expressions of core β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and core β1,3GalT-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc) were lower in the IgAN group; the levels decreased further after vibratory stimulation. Conclusion. In patients with IgAN, vibratory stimulation of TMCs appears to induce IgA1 secretion through activation of BAFF release and to aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 by suppressing C1GALT1 and Cosmc expression. In vitro vibratory stimulation of human TMCs mimics the vibratory simulation of palatine tonsils produced by vocal cords during phonation.

  9. Vibration Induces BAFF Overexpression and Aberrant O-Glycosylation of IgA1 in Cultured Human Tonsillar Mononuclear Cells in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Muyao; Liu, Chan; Yan, Wenzhe; Peng, Xiaofei; He, Liyu; Liu, Hong; Liu, Fuyou

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of in vitro vibratory stimulation of human tonsillar mononuclear cells (TMCs). Methods. Fourteen IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients with chronic tonsillitis (CT) and 12 CT patients with no renal pathology were enrolled. Group A TMCs were collected after 24 hours of culture and used to determine baseline levels. TMCs in groups B, C, D, E, and F were exposed to vibratory stimulation (60 Hz) for 0 (as the control group), 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes, respectively. Results. Baseline concentrations of B-cell-activation factor (BAFF) and IgA1, BAFF mRNA expression, and aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 level were higher in the IgAN group as compared to that in the CT group, and all increased after vibratory stimulation. Baseline mRNA expressions of core β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and core β1,3GalT-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc) were lower in the IgAN group; the levels decreased further after vibratory stimulation. Conclusion. In patients with IgAN, vibratory stimulation of TMCs appears to induce IgA1 secretion through activation of BAFF release and to aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 by suppressing C1GALT1 and Cosmc expression. In vitro vibratory stimulation of human TMCs mimics the vibratory simulation of palatine tonsils produced by vocal cords during phonation. PMID:27672662

  10. Proliferation and TH1/TH2 Cytokine Production in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells after Treatment with Cypermethrin and Mancozeb In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, human cell-based assays are gaining attention in assessments of immunomodulatory effects of chemicals. In the study here, the possible effects of cypermethrin and mancozeb on lymphocyte proliferation and proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α) and immunoregulatory cytokine (interferon- (IFN-) γ, interleukins (IL) 2, 4, 6, and 10) formation in vitro were investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and exposed for 6 hr to noncytotoxic doses (0.45–30 µM) of cypermethrin or mancozeb in the presence of activating rat S9 fraction. Cultures were then further incubated for 48 or 72 hr in fresh medium containing phytohemagglutinin (10 µg/mL) to assess, respectively, effects on cell proliferation (BrdU-ELISA method) and cytokine formation (flow cytometric bead immunoassays). Mancozeb induced dose-dependent increases in lymphocyte proliferation, inhibition of production of TNFα and the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10, and an increase in IFNγ (TH1 cytokine) production (at least 2-fold compared to control); mancozeb also induced inhibition of IL-4 (TH2) and stimulated IL-2 (TH1) production, albeit only in dose-related manners for each. In contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant effects on proliferation or cytokine profiles. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of our in vitro findings. PMID:25328518

  11. Proliferation and TH1/TH2 cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after treatment with cypermethrin and mancozeb in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, human cell-based assays are gaining attention in assessments of immunomodulatory effects of chemicals. In the study here, the possible effects of cypermethrin and mancozeb on lymphocyte proliferation and proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α) and immunoregulatory cytokine (interferon- (IFN-) γ, interleukins (IL) 2, 4, 6, and 10) formation in vitro were investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and exposed for 6 hr to noncytotoxic doses (0.45-30 µM) of cypermethrin or mancozeb in the presence of activating rat S9 fraction. Cultures were then further incubated for 48 or 72 hr in fresh medium containing phytohemagglutinin (10 µg/mL) to assess, respectively, effects on cell proliferation (BrdU-ELISA method) and cytokine formation (flow cytometric bead immunoassays). Mancozeb induced dose-dependent increases in lymphocyte proliferation, inhibition of production of TNFα and the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10, and an increase in IFNγ (TH1 cytokine) production (at least 2-fold compared to control); mancozeb also induced inhibition of IL-4 (TH2) and stimulated IL-2 (TH1) production, albeit only in dose-related manners for each. In contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant effects on proliferation or cytokine profiles. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of our in vitro findings. PMID:25328518

  12. Effect of azacytidine in the release of leukemia inhibitory factor, oncostatin m, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-11 by mononuclear cells of patients with refractory anemia.

    PubMed

    López-Karpovitch, Xavier; Barrales-Benítez, Olga; Flores, Martín; Piedras, Josefa

    2002-11-24

    5-azacytidine (AZA) yields hematologic improvement in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Ineffective hemopoiesis in MDS produce the paradox of high intramedullary cellularity with peripheral cytopenias. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin M (OSM), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-11 regulate hemopoiesis and LIF, OSM, and IL-6 also inhibit the proliferation of myeloid leukemic cell lines through the signal-transducing subunit gp130. These IL-6-type cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in cell culture supernatants (SN) obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) and monocyte-depleted MNC of patients with refractory anemia (RA; n=12) and healthy individuals (n=10). AZA down-regulated OSM, IL-6, and IL-11 release by MNC of patients but not by MNC from healthy individuals. Patient's SN had significantly lower concentrations of LIF, OSM, and IL-11 than SN of normal subjects. When monocyte-depleted MNC of patients were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin a significant increment in OSM levels was observed. In contrast, monocyte depletion in healthy subjects did not cause any significant change in OSM values. We conclude that: (a) AZA inhibits the release of OSM, IL-6, and IL-11 exclusively in RA-diseased MNC, (b) Patient's MNC release subnormal amounts of LIF, OSM, and IL-11, and (c) RA-derived monocytes probably down-regulate OSM release by phytohemagglutinin-activated MNC.

  13. Proliferation and TH1/TH2 cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after treatment with cypermethrin and mancozeb in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, human cell-based assays are gaining attention in assessments of immunomodulatory effects of chemicals. In the study here, the possible effects of cypermethrin and mancozeb on lymphocyte proliferation and proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α) and immunoregulatory cytokine (interferon- (IFN-) γ, interleukins (IL) 2, 4, 6, and 10) formation in vitro were investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and exposed for 6 hr to noncytotoxic doses (0.45-30 µM) of cypermethrin or mancozeb in the presence of activating rat S9 fraction. Cultures were then further incubated for 48 or 72 hr in fresh medium containing phytohemagglutinin (10 µg/mL) to assess, respectively, effects on cell proliferation (BrdU-ELISA method) and cytokine formation (flow cytometric bead immunoassays). Mancozeb induced dose-dependent increases in lymphocyte proliferation, inhibition of production of TNFα and the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10, and an increase in IFNγ (TH1 cytokine) production (at least 2-fold compared to control); mancozeb also induced inhibition of IL-4 (TH2) and stimulated IL-2 (TH1) production, albeit only in dose-related manners for each. In contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant effects on proliferation or cytokine profiles. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of our in vitro findings.

  14. Plasma Derived From Human Umbilical Cord Blood Modulates Mitogen-Induced Proliferation of Mononuclear Cells Isolated From the Peripheral Blood of ALS Patients.

    PubMed

    Eve, David J; Ehrhart, Jared; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Jahan, Israt; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Cyndy Davis; Gooch, Clifton; Sanberg, Paul R; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. This disease clinically manifests as gradual muscular weakness and atrophy leading to paralysis and death by respiratory failure. While multiple interdependent factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS, increasing evidence shows the possible presence of autoimmune mechanisms that promote disease progression. The potential use of plasma derived from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) as a therapeutic tool is currently in its infancy. The hUCB plasma is rich in cytokines and growth factors that are required for growth and survival of cells during hematopoiesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of hUCB plasma on the mitogen-induced proliferation of mononuclear cells (MNCs) isolated from the peripheral blood of ALS patients and apoptotic activity by detection of caspase 3/7 expression of the isolated MNCs in vitro. Three distinct responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced proliferation of MNCs were observed, which were independent of age, disease duration, and the ALS rating scale: Group I responded normally to PHA, Group II showed no response to PHA, while Group III showed a hyperactive response to PHA. hUCB plasma attenuated the hyperactive response (Group III) and potentiated the normal response in Group I ALS patients, but did not alter that of the nonresponders to PHA (Group II). The elevated activity of caspase 3/7 observed in the MNCs from ALS patients was significantly reduced by hUCB plasma treatment. Thus, study results showing different cell responses to mitogen suggest alteration in lymphocyte functionality in ALS patients that may be a sign of immune deficiency in the nonresponders and autoimmunity alterations in the hyperactive responders. The ability of hUCB plasma to modulate the mitogen cell response and reduce caspase activity suggests that the use of hUCB plasma alone, or with

  15. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and chorionic plate-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote axon survival in a rat model of optic nerve crush injury

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, SOKJOONG; RHO, SEUNGSOO; KIM, GIJIN; KIM, SO-RA; BAEK, KWANG-HYUN; KANG, MYUNGSEO; LEW, HELEN

    2016-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cell therapy in regenerative medicine has great potential, particularly in the treatment of nerve injury. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) reportedly contains stem cells, which have been widely used as a hematopoietic source and may have therapeutic potential for neurological impairment. Although ongoing research is dedicated to the management of traumatic optic nerve injury using various measures, novel therapeutic strategies based on the complex underlying mechanisms responsible for optic nerve injury, such as inflammation and/or ischemia, are required. In the present study, a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury was established in order to examine the effects of transplanting human chorionic plate-derived MSCs (CP-MSCs) isolated from the placenta, as well as human UCB mononuclear cells (CB-MNCs) on compressed rat optic nerves. Expression markers for inflammation, apoptosis, and optic nerve regeneration were analyzed, as well as the axon survival rate by direct counting. Increased axon survival rates were observed following the injection of CB-MNCs at at 1 week post-transplantation compared with the controls. The levels of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) were increased after the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs compared with the controls, and the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were also significantly increased following the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs. ERM-like protein (ERMN) and SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2) were found to be expressed in the optic nerves of the CP-MSC-injected rats with ONC injury. The findings of our study suggest that the administration of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs may promote axon survival through systemic concomitant mechanisms involving GAP-43 and HIF-1α. Taken together, these findings provide further understanding of the mechanisms repsonsible for optic nerve injury and may aid in the development of novel cell-based therapeutic strategies with

  16. Interferon (IFN) production by peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells of an elderly population

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.J.; Murasko, D.M.

    1986-03-05

    Previous investigations in the laboratory have reported decreased mitogen responses of PBM's from elderly individuals compared to responses of young adults to PHA and ConA. Current studies have investigated the role of IFN in this decreased T cell responsiveness of the elderly. Supernatants of PBM's from 80 elderly (mean age 85) and 50 young individuals (mean age 28) were assayed for antiviral activity, after incubation with optimum and supraoptimum concentrations of mitogen for 24-120 hrs. IFN levels were maximum for both elderly and young populations at 72 hrs coinciding with time of maximum proliferation as determined by uptake of /sup 3/H thymidine. IFN levels declined with longer incubation periods. All IFN produced was IFN-gamma as determined by sensitivity to pH 2 and by neutralizations with monoclonal antibody specific for human IFN-gamma and polyclonal antiserum specific for IFN-alpha. The elderly population's mean IFN titers for both PHA and ConA were about 39% of the mean titers of the young (p less than or equal to 0.02). Both elderly and young groups displayed significant positive correlation between the amount of IFN produced and the level of proliferation in response to the mitogens (p less than or equal to 0.036). Therefore, the above data suggests the decreased levels of IFN produced by elderly PBM's may be one of the factors responsible for the observed decreased proliferative response to mitogens.

  17. The renal mononuclear phagocytic system.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Peter J; Rees, Andrew J; Griffin, Matthew D; Hughes, Jeremy; Kurts, Christian; Duffield, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    The renal mononuclear phagocytic system, conventionally composed of macrophages (Mø) and dendritic cells (DCs), plays a central role in health and disease of the kidney. Overlapping definitions of renal DCs and Mø, stemming from historically separate research tracks and the lack of experimental tools to specifically study the roles of these cells in vivo, have generated confusion and controversy, however, regarding their immunologic function in the kidney. This brief review provides an appraisal of the current state of knowledge of the renal mononuclear phagocytic system interpreted from the perspective of immunologic function. Physical characteristics, ontogeny, and known functions of the main subsets of renal mononuclear phagocytes as they relate to homeostasis, surveillance against injury and infection, and immune-mediated inflammatory injury and repair within the kidney are described. Gaps and inconsistencies in current knowledge are used to create a roadmap of key questions to be answered in future research. PMID:22135312

  18. Intrauterine insemination of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells prior to embryo transfer improves clinical outcome for patients with repeated implantation failures.

    PubMed

    Madkour, Aicha; Bouamoud, Nouzha; Louanjli, Noureddine; Kaarouch, Ismail; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Sefrioui, Omar

    2016-02-01

    Implantation failure is a major limiting factor in assisted reproduction improvement. Dysfunction of embryo-maternal immuno-tolerance pathways may be responsible for repeated implantation failures. This fact is supported by immunotropic theory stipulating that maternal immune cells, essentially uterine CD56+ natural killer cells, are determinants of implantation success. In order to test this hypothesis, we applied endometrium immuno-modulation prior to fresh embryo transfer for patients with repeated implantation failures. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from repeated implantation failure patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology cycles. On the day of ovulation induction, cells were isolated and then cultured for 3 days and transferred into the endometrium cavity prior to fresh embryo transfer. This immunotherapy was performed on 27 patients with repeated implantation failures and compared with another 27 patients who served as controls. Implantation and clinical pregnancy were increased significantly in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell test versus control (21.54, 44.44 vs. 8.62, 14.81%). This finding suggests a clear role for endometrium immuno-modulation and the inflammation process in implantation success. Our study showed the feasibility of intrauterine administration of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells as an effective therapy to improve clinical outcomes for patients with repeated implantation failures and who are undergoing in vitro fertilization cycles. PMID:25613318

  19. CD3(+) and/or CD14(+) depletion from cord blood mononuclear cells before ex vivo expansion culture improves total nucleated cell and CD34(+) cell yields.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Robinson, S N; Lu, J; Decker, W K; Xing, D; Steiner, D; Parmar, S; Shah, N; Champlin, R E; Munsell, M; Leen, A; Bollard, C; Simmons, P J; Shpall, E J

    2010-06-01

    Cord blood (CB) is used increasingly in transplant patients lacking sibling or unrelated donors. A major hurdle in the use of CB is its low cell dose, which is largely responsible for an elevated risk of graft failure and a significantly delayed neutrophil and platelet engraftment. As a positive correlation has been shown between the total nucleated cell (TNC) and CD34(+) cell dose transplanted and time to neutrophil and platelet engraftment, strategies to increase these measures are under development. One strategy includes the ex vivo expansion of CB mononuclear cells (MNC) with MSC in a cytokine cocktail. We show that this strategy can be further improved if CD3(+) and/or CD14(+) cells are first depleted from the CB MNC before ex vivo expansion. Ready translation of this depletion strategy to improve ex vivo CB expansion in the clinic is feasible as clinical-grade devices and reagents are available. Ultimately, the aim of improving TNC and CD34(+) transplant doses is to further improve the rate of neutrophil and platelet engraftment in CB recipients.

  20. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-04-29

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (Sec(PBMC)), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-Sec(PBMC)), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-Sec(PBMC) significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting.

  1. Synaptic plasticity and sensory-motor improvement following fibrin sealant dorsal root reimplantation and mononuclear cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Suzana U.; Barbizan, Roberta; Spejo, Aline B.; Ferreira, Rui S.; Barraviera, Benedito; Góes, Alfredo M.; de Oliveira, Alexandre L. R.

    2014-01-01

    Root lesions may affect both dorsal and ventral roots. However, due to the possibility of generating further inflammation and neuropathic pain, surgical procedures do not prioritize the repair of the afferent component. The loss of such sensorial input directly disturbs the spinal circuits thus affecting the functionality of the injuried limb. The present study evaluated the motor and sensory improvement following dorsal root reimplantation with fibrin sealant (FS) plus bone marrow mononuclear cells (MC) after dorsal rhizotomy. MC were used to enhance the repair process. We also analyzed changes in the glial response and synaptic circuits within the spinal cord. Female Lewis rats (6–8 weeks old) were divided in three groups: rhizotomy (RZ group), rhizotomy repaired with FS (RZ+FS group) and rhizotomy repaired with FS and MC (RZ+FS+MC group). The behavioral tests electronic von-Frey and Walking track test were carried out. For immunohistochemistry we used markers to detect different synapse profiles as well as glial reaction. The behavioral results showed a significant decrease in sensory and motor function after lesion. The reimplantation decreased glial reaction and improved synaptic plasticity of afferent inputs. Cell therapy further enhanced the rewiring process. In addition, both reimplanted groups presented twice as much motor control compared to the non-treated group. In conclusion, the reimplantation with FS and MC is efficient and may be considered an approach to improve sensory-motor recovery following dorsal rhizotomy. PMID:25249946

  2. In vitro effects of two extracts and two pure alkaloid preparations of Uncaria tomentosa on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Winkler, C; Wirleitner, B; Schroecksnadel, K; Schennach, H; Mur, E; Fuchs, D

    2004-03-01

    In the traditional Peruvian medicine, hot aqueous extracts of Uncaria tomentosa have been used for the treatment of a wide range of health problems, particularly digestive complaints and arthritis. Some of the beneficial effects observed in patients suggest an immunomodulatory capacity of Uncaria tomentosa extracts. In this study, the effects of two extracts and two mixtures of tetracyclic and pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids of Uncaria tomentosa were investigated in freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with the mitogens phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) in vitro. Neopterin production and tryptophan degradation were monitored in culture supernatants to determine the effects of the test substances on immunobiochemical pathways induced by interferon-gamma. Compared to unstimulated cells PHA and Con A increased the production of neopterin and degradation of tryptophan (p < 0.01). HCl and ethanol extracts and mixtures of alkaloids of Uncaria tomentosa inhibited both effects in a dose-dependent manner, the lowest effective concentrations of the extracts were 500 - 1000 microg/mL and of the alkaloid mixtures 100 - 175 microg/mL (p < 0.05 and < 0.01). With the highest concentrations of extracts and mixtures complete suppression of mitogen-induced neopterin production and tryptophan degradation was observed. These data demonstrate that Uncaria tomentosa extracts and mixtures of alkaloids modulate the immunobiochemical pathways induced by interferon-gamma. The findings imply a potential application of the extracts as immunoregulators and would be in line with observations in patients using these extracts.

  3. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (SecPBMC), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-SecPBMC), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-SecPBMC had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-SecPBMC had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-SecPBMC significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  4. Probiotic supplement consumption alters cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells: a preliminary study using healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, N J; Garaiova, I; Williams, E A; Michael, D R; Plummer, S

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of daily probiotic supplementation upon the immune profile of healthy participants by the assessment of ex vivo cytokine production. Twenty healthy adult volunteers received a multi-strain probiotic supplement consisting of two strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus (CUL60 and CUL21), Bifidobacterium lactis (CUL34) and Bifidobacterium bifidum (CUL20) and fructooligosaccharide for 12 weeks. Blood samples were collected at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and cultured ex vivo in the presence or absence of lipopolysaccharide and cytokine production was assessed. Postintervention, a significant decrease in the production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β was apparent when PBMCs were incubated in the presence of lipopolysaccharide, whilst a significant increase in IL-10 and transforning growth factor-β production was seen when the cells were incubated without an additional stimulus. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of a multi-strain probiotic supplement to alter the immune response as demonstrated by changes in ex vivo cytokine production. Such results demonstrate the potential benefit of probiotic supplementation for healthy individuals and warrants further investigation.

  5. Probiotic supplement consumption alters cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells: a preliminary study using healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, N J; Garaiova, I; Williams, E A; Michael, D R; Plummer, S

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of daily probiotic supplementation upon the immune profile of healthy participants by the assessment of ex vivo cytokine production. Twenty healthy adult volunteers received a multi-strain probiotic supplement consisting of two strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus (CUL60 and CUL21), Bifidobacterium lactis (CUL34) and Bifidobacterium bifidum (CUL20) and fructooligosaccharide for 12 weeks. Blood samples were collected at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and cultured ex vivo in the presence or absence of lipopolysaccharide and cytokine production was assessed. Postintervention, a significant decrease in the production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β was apparent when PBMCs were incubated in the presence of lipopolysaccharide, whilst a significant increase in IL-10 and transforning growth factor-β production was seen when the cells were incubated without an additional stimulus. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of a multi-strain probiotic supplement to alter the immune response as demonstrated by changes in ex vivo cytokine production. Such results demonstrate the potential benefit of probiotic supplementation for healthy individuals and warrants further investigation. PMID:24311314

  6. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (Sec(PBMC)), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-Sec(PBMC)), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-Sec(PBMC) significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  7. Intratracheal therapy with autologous bone m