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Sample records for activated mononuclear cells

  1. Enhanced production of prostaglandins and plasminogen activator during activation of human articular chondrocytes by products of mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Meats, J E; McGuire, M K; Ebsworth, N M; Englis, D J; Russell, R G

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the way in which products of cultured human blood mononuclear cells activate human articular chondrocytes. Conditioned medium from mononuclear cells enhanced the production of prostaglandin E by cultured human chondrocytes and also stimulated fibrinolytic activity in these cultures. These two effects may be interrelated, since the increased fibrinolysis in response to products of mononuclear cells was partially inhibited by indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis. The increased fibrinolysis is probably attributable to plasminogen activator, since it was strongly dependent on the presence of plasminogen. Increased amounts of PGE and chondroitin sulphate were also released from intact fragments of cartilage exposed to medium from cultured mononuclear cells. The time course and dose dependence of these effects were studied. The addition of exogenous arachidonic acid markedly enhanced production of PGE2. Ultrogel AcA54 was used to fractionate medium from cultured mononuclear cells and the chondrocyte-stimulating activity eluted with an apparent molecular weight between 12 000 and 25 000 daltons. Adherent and non-adherent mononuclear blood cells were also partially separated and conditioned medium from each was assayed for chondrocyte-stimulating factors. Both populations released factor(s) which increased the production of prostaglandin E by chondrocytes, but more activity came from the adherent mononuclear cells. The possible interrelationship between the chondrocyte activating factor studied here and others described in the literature is discussed.

  2. Mitogen-activated Tasmanian devil blood mononuclear cells kill devil facial tumour disease cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Tovar, Cesar; Cooray, Anne A; Kreiss, Alexandre; Darby, Jocelyn; Murphy, James M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Bettiol, Silvana S; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer that has brought the host species, the Tasmanian devil, to the brink of extinction. The cancer cells avoid allogeneic immune recognition by downregulating cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I expression. This should prevent CD8(+) T cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxicity. The reason why NK cells, normally reactive to MHC-negative cells, are not activated to kill DFTD cells has not been determined. The immune response of wild devils to DFTD, if it occurs, is uncharacterised. To investigate this, we tested 12 wild devils with DFTD, and found suggestive evidence of low levels of antibodies against DFTD cells in one devil. Eight of these devils were also analysed for cytotoxicity, however, none showed evidence for cytotoxicity against cultured DFTD cells. To establish whether mimicking activation of antitumour responses could induce cytotoxic activity against DFTD, Tasmanian devil peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated with either the mitogen Concanavalin A, the Toll-like receptor agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or recombinant Tasmanian devil IL-2. All induced the PBMC cells to kill cultured DFTD cells, suggesting that activation does not occur after encounter with DFTD cells in vivo, but can be induced. The identification of agents that activate cytotoxicity against DFTD target cells is critical for developing strategies to protect against DFTD. Such agents could function as adjuvants to induce functional immune responses capable of targeting DFTD cells and tumours in vivo.

  3. Increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activity reduces imatinib uptake and efficacy in chronic myeloid leukemia mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jueqiong; Lu, Liu; Kok, Chung H; Saunders, Verity A; Goyne, Jarrad M; Dang, Phuong; Leclercq, Tamara M; Hughes, Timothy P; White, Deborah L

    2017-02-02

    Imatinib is actively transported by OCT-1 influx transporter, and low OCT-1 activity in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia blood mononuclear cells is significantly associated with poor molecular response to imatinib. Here we report that, in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia mononuclear cells and BCR-ABL1+ cell lines, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (GW1929, rosiglitazone, pioglitazone) significantly decrease OCT-1 activity; conversely, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists (GW9662, T0070907) increase OCT-1 activity. Importantly, these effects can lead to corresponding changes in sensitivity to Bcr-Abl kinase inhibition. Results were confirmed in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-transduced K562 cells. Furthermore, we identified a strong negative correlation between OCT-1 activity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma transcriptional activity in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia patients (n=84; p<0.0001), suggesting that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation has a negative impact on the intracellular uptake of imatinib and consequent Bcr-Abl kinase inhibition. The inter-patient variability of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation likely accounts for the heterogeneity observed in patient OCT-1 activity at diagnosis. Recently, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist pioglitazone was reported to act synergistically with imatinib targeting the residual chronic myeloid leukemia stem cell pool. Our findings suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma ligands have differential effects on circulating mononuclear cells compared to stem cells. Since the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation on imatinib uptake in mononuclear cells may counteract the clinical benefit of this activation in stem cells, caution should be applied when combining these therapies, especially in patients

  4. Carvedilol differentially regulates cytokine production from activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Ping; Ho, Ling-Jun; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Hsu, Yu-Lin; Tsao, Tien-Ping; Chang, Deh-Ming; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2004-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is one of the important mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis formation. The activated monocytes and their secreted cytokines contribute significantly to this inflammatory process. Here we examined the effects of carvedilol, a recently introduced cardio-protective alpha-1- and beta-receptor blocker, on cytokine production from various stimuli-activated human immune effector cells. By ELISA analysis, we showed that carvedilol inhibited interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but enhanced interleukin (IL)-12 production in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)- and concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was marginally affected. When purified monocytes were examined, we observed the consistent up-regulation of IL-12 production while both IL-10 and TNF-alpha were unaffected or marginally down-regulated, respectively, by carvedilol. In agreement with the observation in monocytes, the production of IL-12 from activated macrophages was also up-regulated by carvedilol. We concluded that carvedilol might mediate its therapeutic effects through differentially regulating cytokine production from activated mononuclear cells, including at least monocytes and macrophages.

  5. Bone resorptive activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after fusion with polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Edwin; Castillo, Luz M; Lazala, Oswaldo; Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2017-03-01

    The bone remodeling process occurs through bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts, a process involving the contribution of endocrine and nervous systems. The mechanisms associated to differentiation and proliferation of osteoclasts and osteoblasts are considered a potential therapeutic target for treating some erosive bone diseases. The aim of the present study is to explore the feasibility of generating active osteoclast-like cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) following polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced fusion. PEG-fused PBMCs showed TRAP(+)-multinucleated cells and bone resorption activity, and were also positive for osteoclast markers such as carbonic anhydrase II, calcitonin receptor, vacuolar ATPase, and cathepsin K, when examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunochemistry and Western blotting. TRAP expression and bone resorptive activity were higher in whole PEG-fused PBMCs than in separated T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes or monocytes. Both TRAP expression and bone resorptive activity were also higher in osteogenesis imperfecta patients compared to PEG-fused PBMCs from healthy individuals. PEG-induced fusion was more efficient in inducing TRAP and bone resorptive activities than macrophage colony-stimulating factor or dexamethasone treatment. Bone resorptive activity of PEG-fused PMBCs was inhibited by bisphosphonates. Evidence is provided that the use of PEG-based cell fusion is a straightforward and amenable method for studying human osteoclast differentiation and testing new therapeutic strategies.

  6. Hemorrhage activates NF-kappa B in murine lung mononuclear cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Schwartz, M D; Terada, L S; Repine, J E; McCord, J; Abraham, E

    1996-05-01

    Hemorrhage rapidly increases the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines in the lungs. Binding elements for the nuclear transcriptional regulatory factors (NF)-kappa B and NF-IL6 (C/EBP beta) are present in the promoter regions of multiple cytokine genes, including those whose expression is increased after blood loss. In the present experiments, we found increased activation in vivo of NF-kappa B in lung mononuclear cells, but not in splenocytes, taken from mice 1 h after hemorrhage. In contrast, hemorrhage did not activate NF-IL6 in lung cells or splenocytes. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by prior feeding of a tungsten-enriched diet prevented hemorrhage-induced activation in lung cells of NF-kappa B. Incubating splenocytes in vitro with xanthine oxidase activated NF-kappa B but not NF-IL6. Xanthine oxidase-induced activation of NF-kappa B was inhibited by manganese superoxide dismutase, but not by catalase. These results suggest that xanthine oxidase-mediated superoxide anion-dependent activation of NF-kappa B occurs in vivo and in vitro. This mechanism may contribute to increased lung cytokine responses after hemorrhage.

  7. Antioxidant enzyme activities of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to trace elements.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, U R; Dharmani, M; Kanthimathi, M S; Indran, M

    2005-07-01

    The trace elements copper, zinc, and selenium are important immune modulators and essential cofactors of the antioxidant enzymes. In the present study, the proliferative effect of human peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that have been exposed to copper, zinc, and selenium and the corresponding activities of antioxidant enzymes, namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase, were determined. Zinc and copper stimulated the PBMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner within the dose range 25-200 micromol/L. SOD and GPx activities in PBMCs exposed to zinc were inhibited, whereas catalase activity was unaffected. All the three antioxidant enzymes in the cells exposed to copper were inhibited. Selenium exerted more potent inhibition of the cell proliferation while causing stimulation of the antioxidant enzymes at the lowest dose (25 micromol/L) than at the highest dose (200 micromol/L) tested. A significant negative correlation was observed between proliferation and antioxidant enzyme (SOD and GPx) activities in trace-element-exposed PBMC. The present findings substantiate the importance of trace elements as immune modulators and the involvement of enzymatic antioxidant system in the immune cell regulation.

  8. Repetitive cryotherapy attenuates the in vitro and in vivo mononuclear cell activation response.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Angus; Othman, Mohd Izani; Prebble, Hannah; Davies, Sian; Gieseg, Steven P

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Acute and repetitive cryotherapy are routinely used to accelerate postexercise recovery, although the effect on resident immune cells and repetitive exposure has largely been unexplored and neglected. What is the main finding and its importance? Using blood-derived mononuclear cells and semi-professional mixed martial artists, we show that acute and repetitive cryotherapy reduces the in vitro and in vivo T-cell and monocyte activation response whilst remaining independent of the physical performance of elite athletes. We investigated the effect of repetitive cryotherapy on the in vitro (cold exposure) and in vivo (cold water immersion) activation of blood-derived mononuclear cells following high-intensity exercise. Single and repeated cold exposure (5°C) of a mixed cell culture (T cells and monocytes) was investigated using in vitro tissue culture experimentation for total neopterin production (neopterin plus 7,8-dihydroneopterin). Fourteen elite mixed martial art fighters were also randomly assigned to either a cold water immersion (15 min at 10°C) or passive recovery protocol, which they completed three times per week during a 6 week training camp. Urine was collected and analysed for neopterin and total neopterin three times per week, and perceived soreness, fatigue, physical performance (broad jump, push-ups and pull-ups) and training performance were also assessed. Single and repetitive cold exposure significantly (P < 0.001) reduced total neopterin production from the mixed cell culture, whereas cold water immersion significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated urinary neopterin and total neopterin during the training camp without having any effect on physical performance parameters. Soreness and fatigue showed little variation between the groups, whereas training session performance was significantly (P < 0.05) elevated in the cold water immersion group. The data suggest that acute and repetitive cryotherapy

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction and mitophagy activation in blood mononuclear cells of fibromyalgia patients: implications in the pathogenesis of the disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology. Recent studies have shown some evidence demonstrating that oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia. However, it is still not clear whether oxidative stress is the cause or the effect of the abnormalities documented in fibromyalgia. Furthermore, the role of mitochondria in the redox imbalance reported in fibromyalgia also is controversial. We undertook this study to investigate the role of mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and mitophagy in fibromyalgia. Methods We studied 20 patients (2 male, 18 female patients) from the database of the Sevillian Fibromyalgia Association and 10 healthy controls. We evaluated mitochondrial function in blood mononuclear cells from fibromyalgia patients measuring, coenzyme Q10 levels with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and mitochondrial membrane potential with flow cytometry. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring mitochondrial superoxide production with MitoSOX™ and lipid peroxidation in blood mononuclear cells and plasma from fibromyalgia patients. Autophagy activation was evaluated by quantifying the fluorescence intensity of LysoTracker™ Red staining of blood mononuclear cells. Mitophagy was confirmed by measuring citrate synthase activity and electron microscopy examination of blood mononuclear cells. Results We found reduced levels of coenzyme Q10, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased levels of mitochondrial superoxide in blood mononuclear cells, and increased levels of lipid peroxidation in both blood mononuclear cells and plasma from fibromyalgia patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was also associated with increased expression of autophagic genes and the elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria with mitophagy. Conclusions These findings may support the role of oxidative stress and mitophagy in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia. PMID:20109177

  10. Activation of the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel reduces apoptosis of spleen mononuclear cells induced by hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated that increased rates of superoxide generation by extra-mitochondrial enzymes induce the activation of the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mitoKATP) in the livers of hypertriglyceridemic (HTG) mice. The resulting mild uncoupling mediated by mitoKATP protects mitochondria against oxidative damage. In this study, we investigate whether immune cells from HTG mice also present increased mitoKATP activity and evaluate the influence of this trait on cell redox state and viability. Methods Oxygen consumption (Clark-type electrode), reactive oxygen species production (dihydroethidium and H2-DCF-DA probes) and cell death (annexin V, cytocrome c release and Trypan blue exclusion) were determined in spleen mononuclear cells. Results HTG mice mononuclear cells displayed increased mitoKATP activity, as evidenced by higher resting respiration rates that were sensitive to mitoKATP antagonists. Whole cell superoxide production and apoptosis rates were increased in HTG cells. Inhibition of mitoKATP further increased the production of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in these cells. Incubation with HTG serum induced apoptosis more strongly in WT cells than in HTG mononuclear cells. Cytochrome c release into the cytosol and caspase 8 activity were both increased in HTG cells, indicating that cell death signaling starts upstream of the mitochondria but does involve this organelle. Accordingly, a reduced number of blood circulating lymphocytes was found in HTG mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that spleen mononuclear cells from hyperlipidemic mice have more active mitoKATP channels, which downregulate mitochondrial superoxide generation. The increased apoptosis rate observed in these cells is exacerbated by closing the mitoKATP channels. Thus, mitoKATP opening acts as a protective mechanism that reduces cell death induced by hyperlipidemia. PMID:23764148

  11. The effect of experimental haemocarbofiltration upon activity of mononuclear cells from normal and autoimmune patients.

    PubMed Central

    Grando, S A; Glukhenky, B T; Drannik, G N; Kostromin, A P; Romanenko, A B

    1989-01-01

    We examined the functional activity of peripheral blood mononuclears (PBM) of 18 healthy subjects, 18 patients with pemphigus vulgaris, 12 with bullous pemphigoid and nine with discoid lupus erythematosus, after haemofiltration on carbon haemo-adsorbents of 'SKN' type. Proliferation in the response to PHA and Con A, for IL-1 and IL-2 production, and exogenous IL-2 absorption were assayed. The presence of IL-1 and IL-2 inhibitors in haemocarbo-adsorbent eluants was shown. We also investigated the natural killer (NK) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic (ADCC) activities. We found significant increases of both lectin-dependent proliferation and of interleukin production by PBM of autoimmune patients after two to four perfusions. The ability of PBM to absorb IL-2 displayed a steady growth after each perfusion, whereas increase of NK and ADCC activities was observed after not less than six passes. The enhancement of PBM functional activity in autoimmune patients was accompanied by accumulation of IL-1 and IL-2 inhibitors in the sorbent. It was concluded that therapeutic effects of haemofiltration in autoimmune diseases involve improvement of immunocompetent cell function due to their deligandization by activated charcoal. PMID:15493276

  12. Phenotypes of lung mononuclear phagocytes in HIV seronegative tuberculosis patients: evidence for new recruitment and cell activation.

    PubMed

    Lapa e Silva, J R; Linhares, C; Boechat, N; Rego, L; Almeida, M G; Kriski, A L; Ho, J L

    1996-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis preferentially resides in mononuclear phagocytes. The mechanisms by which mononuclear phagocytes keep M. tuberculosis in check or by which the microbe evades control to cause disease remain poorly understood. As an initial effort to delineate these mechanisms, we examined by immunostaining the phenotype of mononuclear phagocytes obtained from lungs of patients with active tuberculosis. From August 1994 to March 1995, consecutive patients who had an abnormal chest X-ray, no demonstrable acid-fast bacilli in sputum specimens and required a diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were enrolled. Of the 39 patients enrolled, 21 had microbiologically diagnosed tuberculosis. Thirteen of the 21 tuberculosis patients were either HIV seronegative (n = 12) or had no risk factor for HIV and constituted the tuberculosis group. For comparison, M. tuberculosis negative patients who had BAL samples taken during this time (n = 9) or normal healthy volunteers (n = 3) served as control group. Compared to the control group, the tuberculosis group had significantly higher proportion of cells expressing markers of young monocytes (UCHM1) and RFD7, a marker for phagocytic cells, and increased expression of HLA-DR, a marker of cell activation. In addition, tuberculosis group had significantly higher proportion of cells expressing dendritic cell marker (RFD1) and epithelioid cell marker (RFD9). These data suggest that despite recruitment of monocytes probably from the peripheral blood and local cell activation, host defense of the resident lung cells is insufficient to control M. tuberculosis.

  13. Fuel feeds function: Energy balance and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cell activation.

    PubMed

    Schwarm, A; Viergutz, T; Kuhla, B; Hammon, H M; Schweigel-Röntgen, M

    2013-01-01

    A general phenomenon in peripartum mammals is the breakdown of (acquired) immunity. The incidence of parasite load, disease and inflammation often rise during the specific energetically demanding time of pregnancy and lactation. In this period, blood leukocytes display decreased DNA synthesis in response to mitogens in vitro. Leukocyte activation, the phase of the cell cycle preceding the DNA synthetic phase has hardly been investigated, but the few studies suggest that leukocyte activation may also be impaired by the limited energy/nutrient availability. Leukocyte activation is characterized by manifold processes, thus, we used the cellular oxygen consumption rate (OCR) as a measure of ATP turnover to support all these processes. We hypothesized that the activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) - in terms of oxygen consumed over basal levels after in vitro stimulation - is altered by energy balance around parturition. We studied peripartum high-yielding dairy cows because they undergo substantial fluctuations in energy intake, energy output and body fat mass. We established a fluorescence-based test strategy allowing for long-term (≥24h) quantification of O(2)-consumption and studied the peripartum period from 5 weeks ante partum to 5 weeks postpartum. In addition, we determined cellular lactate production, DNA/RNA synthesis and cell size and zoo-technical parameters such as animal energy intake and milk yield were assessed, as well as selected plasma parameters, e.g. glucose concentration. The basal OCR of PBMC from pregnant, non-lactating cows (n=6, -5 weeks ante partum) was 1.19±0.15 nmol min(-1) (10(7)cells)(-1) and increased to maximum levels of 2.54±0.49 nmol min(-1) (10(7)cells)(-1) in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC. The basal OCR did not change over the peripartum period. Whereas the activation indices, herein defined as the PHA-induced 24h-increase of OCR above baseline, amounted to 1.1±0.3, 4.2±0.3, 4.1±1.1, 2.1±0.3, and

  14. Docosahexanoic acid diet supplementation attenuates the peripheral mononuclear cell inflammatory response to exercise following LPS activation.

    PubMed

    Capó, X; Martorell, M; Llompart, I; Sureda, A; Tur, J A; Pons, A

    2014-10-01

    Exercise induces changes in circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The aim was to investigate the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) diet supplementation on the plasma cytokine levels and on the peripheral mononuclear (PBMCs) cells cytokine production after a training season or an acute bout of exercise. Fifteen male soccer players were randomly assigned to a placebo or an experimental group. The experimental group consumed an almond-based beverage enriched with DHA, whereas the placebo group consumed the same beverage without DHA. Three blood samples were taken: in basal conditions at the beginning of the nutritional intervention and after eight weeks of training season in basal and post-exercise conditions. The DHA content increased in erythrocytes after 8weeks of training and supplementation. Neither diet supplementation with DHA nor training season altered the basal plasma cytokines and growth factors. Only acute exercise significantly increased plasma IL6 in experimental and placebo groups. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation induced the inflammatory response in PBMCs, with a significant production rate of TNFα, IL6 and IL8 mainly after acute exercise. DHA supplementation significantly reduced the rate of TNFα and IL6 production by stimulated PBMCs. Acute exercise increased the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) protein levels in PBMCs, although the increase was only statistically significant in the placebo group. In conclusion, a training season does not induce significant changes in the circulating cytokine profile in well-trained soccer players. Exercise increases the PBMCs cell capabilities to produce cytokines after TLR4 stimulation with LPS and this rate of cytokine production is attenuated by diet DHA supplementation.

  15. Rhesus rotavirus VP4 sequence-specific activation of mononuclear cells is associated with cholangiopathy in murine biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Walther, Ashley; Mohanty, Sujit K; Donnelly, Bryan; Coots, Abigail; Lages, Celine S; Lobeck, Inna; Dupree, Phylicia; Meller, Jaroslaw; McNeal, Monica; Sestak, Karol; Tiao, Greg

    2015-09-15

    Biliary atresia (BA), a neonatal obstructive cholangiopathy, remains the most common indication for pediatric liver transplantation in the United States. In the murine model of BA, Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) VP4 surface protein determines biliary duct tropism. In this study, we investigated how VP4 governs induction of murine BA. Newborn mice were injected with 16 strains of rotavirus and observed for clinical symptoms of BA and mortality. Cholangiograms were performed to confirm bile duct obstruction. Livers and bile ducts were harvested 7 days postinfection for virus titers and histology. Flow cytometry assessed mononuclear cell activation in harvested cell populations from the liver. Cytotoxic NK cell activity was determined by the ability of NK cells to kill noninfected cholangiocytes. Of the 16 strains investigated, the 6 with the highest homology to the RRV VP4 (>87%) were capable of infecting bile ducts in vivo. Although the strain Ro1845 replicated to a titer similar to RRV in vivo, it caused no symptoms or mortality. A Ro1845 reassortant containing the RRV VP4 induced all BA symptoms, with a mortality rate of 89%. Flow cytometry revealed that NK cell activation was significantly increased in the disease-inducing strains and these NK cells demonstrated a significantly higher percentage of cytotoxicity against noninfected cholangiocytes. Rotavirus strains with >87% homology to RRV's VP4 were capable of infecting murine bile ducts in vivo. Development of murine BA was mediated by RRV VP4-specific activation of mononuclear cells, independent of viral titers.

  16. PSP activates monocytes in resting human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: immunomodulatory implications for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Bhagwant Kaur; Sze, Daniel Man-Yuen; Chan, Wing Keung; Fan, Kei; Li, George Qian; Moore, Douglas Edwin; Roubin, Rebecca Heidi

    2013-06-15

    Polysaccharopeptide (PSP), from Coriolus versicolor, has been used as an adjuvant to chemotherapy, and has demonstrated anti-tumor and immunomodulating effects. However its mechanism remains unknown. To elucidate how PSP affects immune populations, we compared PSP treatments both with and without prior incubation in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) - a process commonly used in immune population experimentation. We first standardised a capillary electrophoresis fingerprinting technique for PSP identification and characterisation. We then established the proliferative capability of PSP on various immune populations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, using flow cytometry, without prior PHA treatment. It was found that PSP significantly increased the number of monocytes (CD14(+)/CD16(-)) compared to controls without PHA. This increase in monocytes was confirmed using another antibody panel of CD14 and MHCII. In contrast, proliferations of T-cells, NK, and B-cells were not significantly changed by PSP. Thus, stimulating monocyte/macrophage function with PSP could be an effective therapeutic intervention in targeting tumors.

  17. Hemorrhage induces rapid in vivo activation of CREB and NF-kappaB in murine intraparenchymal lung mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Abraham, E

    1997-02-01

    Increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines appears to be an important factor contributing to the development of acute lung injury. In murine models, mRNA levels of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines, including IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TGF-beta1, and TNF-alpha, are increased in intraparenchymal lung mononuclear cells 1 h after hemorrhage. Binding elements for the nuclear transcriptional regulatory factors, nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta), serum protein 1 (Sp1), activator protein 1 (AP-1), and the cyclic AMP response-element binding protein (CREB) are present in the promoter regions of numerous cytokine genes, including those whose expression is increased after blood loss. To investigate early transcriptional mechanisms which may be involved in regulating pulmonary cytokine expression after hemorrhage, we examined in vivo activation of these five nuclear transcriptional factors among intraparenchymal lung mononuclear cells obtained in the immediate post-hemorrhage period. Activation of NF-kappaB and CREB, but not C/EBPbeta, Sp1, or AP-1, was present in lung mononuclear cells isolated from mice 15 min after hemorrhage. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by prior feeding with either an allopurinol-supplemented or a tungsten-enriched diet prevented hemorrhage-induced activation of CREB, but not NF-kappaB. These results demonstrate that hemorrhage leads to rapid in vivo activation in the lung of CREB through a xanthine oxidase-dependent mechanism and of NF-kappaB through other pathways, and suggest that the activation of these transcriptional factors may have an important role in regulating pulmonary cytokine expression and the development of acute lung injury after blood loss.

  18. Medical-grade silicone induces release of proinflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells without activating T cells.

    PubMed

    Miro-Mur, Francesc; Hindié, Mathilde; Kandhaya-Pillai, Renuka; Tobajas, Vanessa; Schwartz, Simo; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume

    2009-08-01

    For more than 40 years, silicone implants had been employed in aesthetic, cosmetic medicine, and plastic surgery. Although adverse reactions produced by these products are rare, cases of immuno-mediated reactions have been reported. To evaluate the aspects of immuno-reactivity to medical-grade silicone dermal filler, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 39 individuals were studied. PBMC used include individuals with silicone injection-related delayed adverse reactions, with silicone injections, and healthy control. Silicone induced production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in all three groups. Notably, elevated production of IL-6 was observed in nonstimulated PBMC and also the percentage of CD4(+)CD69(+) T cells was higher in PHA-stimulated PBMC from individuals with silicone injection-related adverse reactions when compared with other two groups. However, IFN-gamma was not released in silicone-stimulated or silicone+LPS-stimulated PBMC from any group and no production of IL-2 was measured indicating no proliferative response of PBMC. Subsequently, no CD4(+)CD69(+) T cells were observed in these conditions. Finally, the inflammatory response in silicone-stimulated cultures of monocyte-derived macrophages with autologous lymphocytes is lesser than that observed in PBMC. In conclusion, silicone induces a release of proinflammatory cytokines but does not act as a polyclonal activator of CD4(+) T cells. Thus, silicone is mounting an immune response in individuals with silicone-related adverse effects but is not silicone antigen-dependent.

  19. TT virus (TTV) loads associated with different peripheral blood cell types and evidence for TTV replication in activated mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Maggi, F; Fornai, C; Zaccaro, L; Morrica, A; Vatteroni, M L; Isola, P; Marchi, S; Ricchiuti, A; Pistello, M; Bendinelli, M

    2001-06-01

    TT virus (TTV) loads associated with the peripheral blood cells of seven patients known to carry the virus in plasma were investigated by real-time PCR. Whereas red cells/platelets were uniformly negative, six and four patients yielded positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, respectively, but viral titres were generally low. Fractionation of PBMCs into monocyte- and B, T4, and T8 lymphocyte-enriched subpopulations showed no pattern in the viral loads that might suggest the preferential association of TTV to one or more specific cell types. TTV-negative PBMCs absorbed measurable amounts of virus when incubated with infected plasma at 4 degrees C. Furthermore, cultures of TTV-negative phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated PBMCs exposed in vitro to virus-positive plasma and faecal extracts released considerable levels of infectious TTV into the supernatant fluid and the same was true for TTV-positive stimulated PBMCs. These results indicate that, whereas freshly harvested resting PBMCs seem to produce little, if any TTV, stimulated PBMCs actively replicate the virus.

  20. Progesterone reverts LPS-reduced FAAH activity in murine peripheral blood mononuclear cells by a receptor-mediated fashion.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Manuel L; Aisemberg, Julieta; Salazar, Ana I; Domínguez Rubio, Ana P; Vercelli, Claudia A; Franchi, Ana M

    2013-12-05

    Increased anandamide concentrations are associated with pregnancy failure. Anandamide levels are regulated by the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The aim of the study was to investigate the role of progesterone (P) on FAAH modulation in murine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) under septic conditions. We observed that in vivo administration of LPS to non-pregnant (NP) mice decreased FAAH activity of PBMC while in pregnant mice no changes in FAAH activity were observed. NP animals administered with P had a similar response to LPS as the pregnant animals. Also, NP mice injected with P antagonist and P showed that the effect of P on LPS-reduced FAAH activity was impaired. Furthermore, LPS produced a decrease in the ratio of PR-B/PR-A in NP animals. Our results showed that, in our model the endotoxin decreased PBMC's FAAH activity and this condition was reverted by P in a receptor-mediated fashion.

  1. Effects of active bufadienolide compounds on human cancer cells and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in mitogen-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; He, Jing; Kisoh, Keishi; Hayashi, Hideki; Tanaka, Sachiko; Si, Nan; Zhao, Hai-Yu; Hirano, Toshihiko; Bian, Baolin; Takagi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The growth inhibitory effects of bufadienolide compounds were investigated in two intractable cancer cells, a human glioblastoma cell line U-87 and a pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. Among four bufadienolide compounds, a dose-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in these cancer cells after treatment with gamabufotalin and arenobufagin. The IC50 values of the two compounds were 3-5 times higher in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) than these values for both cancer cell lines. However, similar phenomena were not observed for two other bufadienolide compounds, telocinobufagin and bufalin. These results thus suggest that gamabufotalin and arenobufagin possess selective cytotoxic activity against tumor cells rather than normal cells. Moreover, a clear dose-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, a well-known hallmark of necrosis, was observed in both cancer cells treated with gamabufotalin, suggesting that gamabufotalin-mediated cell death is predominantly associated with a necrosis-like phenotype. Of most importance, treatment with as little as 8 ng/ml of gamabufotalin, even an almost non-toxic concentration to PBMCs, efficiently downregulated the percentages of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulator T (Treg) cells in mitogen-activated PBMCs. Given that Treg cells play a critical role in tumor immunotolerance by suppressing antitumor immunity, these results suggest that gamabufotalin may serve as a promising candidate, as an adjuvant therapeutic agent by manipulating Treg cells to enhance the efficacy of conventional anticancer drugs and lessen their side-effects. These findings provide insights into the clinical application of gamabufotalin for cancer patients with glioblastoma/pancreatic cancer based on its cytocidal effect against tumor cells as well as its depletion of Treg cells.

  2. In vitro effects of 'designer' amphetamines on human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes proliferation and on natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, L; Lacroix, F; Chan, J; Buttar, H S

    1992-12-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML) proliferation was measured in the presence or absence of amphetamines. Proliferation in response to T-cell mitogen PHA was suppressed from 22 to 34% by d- and dl-amphetamine, respectively, contrarily to 1-form which did not affect proliferation of PHA-stimulated PBML. The 'designer' amphetamines appeared to be more potent inhibitors of PBML proliferation induced by both PHA and PWM stimulation than those of the racemic and isomeric forms of amphetamine. A wide variation was seen in the suppressive actions of the 'designer' amphetamines, and the mean percentages of suppression varied from 12 to 45% compared with the control values. 4-Propoxy-amphetamine (4-PA) was found to be the most active among the 'designer' drugs. In vitro effects of d-, 1- and dl-amphetamine were also studied on natural killer (NK) cell activity. A marked increase in the NK cell activity was observed only in the presence of very low concentrations (10(-12) to 10(-10) M) of dl-amphetamine, however, the activity of the NK cell remained within the control limits in the presence of d- or 1-forms. The findings suggest that the abuse of amphetamines, especially the 'designer' drugs, may adversely affect the activity of immunoregulatory cells and might lead to a compromised immune system in amphetamine abusers.

  3. Modulation of transglutaminase activity in mononuclear phagocytes and macrophage-like tumor cell lines by differentiation agents

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of glucocorticosteroids, retinoids, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ (1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/) and the tumor promoter phorbol myristate acetate (TPA) on the expression of transglutaminase activity in in vitro differentiating bone marrow-derived mouse and rat mononuclear phagocytes (BMDMP) and mouse and human myeloid leukemia cell lines was assessed. Dexamethasone was found to induce an increase of about 100% in transglutaminase activity in mouse and rat BMDMP. The effect was time- and dose-dependent, and specific for steroids with glucocorticoid activity. Retinoic acid (RA) suppressed transglutaminase activity in mouse BMDMP and enhanced it in rat BMDMP. In murine and human myeloid leukemia cell lines, dexamethasone enhanced transglutaminase activity to a varying degree, RA suppressed it in P388D1 cells and enhanced it in the other cell lines. 1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ induced a rather small augmentation of enzyme expression, whereas TPA suppressed enzyme expression (70-100%). The species-specific differences previously observed by the authors for the effect of RA, dexamethasone and 1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ on the formation of BMDMP from mouse and rat bone marrow progenitor cells are now shown to extend also to effects on expression of transglutaminase activity. From a mechanistic point of view it is of interest that dexamethasone uniformly enhanced transglutaminase activity, whereas TPA suppressed it. The data suggest that modulation of transglutaminase activity by the four agents occurs via disparate mechanisms.

  4. Surfactant protein D induces immune quiescence and apoptosis of mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Hrishikesh; Thakur, Gargi; Koippallil Gopalakrishnan, Aghila Rani; Dodagatta-Marri, Eswari; Patil, Anushree; Kishore, Uday; Madan, Taruna

    2016-02-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an integral molecule of the innate immunity secreted by epithelial cells lining the mucosal surfaces. The C-type lectin domain of SP-D performs pattern recognition functions while it binds to putative receptors on immune cells to modify cellular functions. Activation of immune cells and increased serum SP-D is observed in a range of patho-physiological conditions including infections. We speculated if SP-D can modulate systemic immune response via direct interaction with activated PBMCs. In this study, we examined interaction of a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rhSP-D) on PHA-activated PBMCs. We report a significant downregulation of activation receptors such as TLR2, TLR4, CD11c and CD69 upon rhSP-D treatment. rhSP-D inhibited production of Th1 (TNF-α and IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17A) cytokines along with IL-6. Interestingly, levels of IL-2, Th2 (IL-4) and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines remained unaltered. Analysis of co-stimulatory CD28 and co-inhibitory CTLA4 receptors along with their ligands CD80 and CD86 revealed a selective up-regulation of CTLA4 in the lymphocyte subset. rhSP-D induced apoptosis in the activated but not in non-activated lymphocytes. Blockade of CTLA4 inhibited rhSP-D mediated apoptosis of activated lymphocytes, confirming involvement of CTLA4. We conclude that SP-D restores immune homeostasis. It regulates expression of immunomodulatory receptors and cytokines, which is followed by induction of apoptosis in activated lymphocytes. These findings suggest a critical role of SP-D in immune surveillance against activated immune cells.

  5. Phase I study of the adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer with lectin activated autologous mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, A; Eberlein, T J; Grimm, E A; Wilson, D J; Keenan, A M; Aamodt, R; Rosenberg, S A

    1984-02-15

    In previous in vitro studies, the authors showed that phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from cancer patients to generate cells that were lytic for fresh autologous tumor but not for lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. Thus, after IRB approval, a phase I clinical protocol was instituted in cancer patients who had failed all other therapy to determine the toxicity and effects, in vivo, of the infusion of large numbers of such PHA activated autologous PBL. Ten patients were treated on the protocol, six with sarcoma, one with melanoma, and three with colorectal cancer. Up to a total of 1.7 X 10(11) PBL were obtained from 7 to 15 successive leukaphereses, the cells from each leukapheresis being incubated in vitro in medium containing PHA and human AB serum for 2 days and then reinfused following the next leukapheresis 2 days later. Toxicity encountered included fever and chills in 10/10 patients, headaches in 5/10, nausea and vomiting in 3/10, and requirement for erythrocyte transfusion in 8/10. No evidence for autoimmune disease, abnormal serum chemical or coagulation studies, or pulmonary emboli was found. 111Indium trafficing studies showed distribution of infused cells mainly to the spleen and liver, with some accumulation in the lungs and tumor especially after repeated infusions. In 9/10 patients, activated PBL were detected in the peripheral circulation by the sixth leukapheresis. Evidence for this was found by assaying the incorporation of tritiated thymidine (3H-Tdr) into, and lysis of fresh tumor cells by, unstimulated PBL from successive leukaphereses. No tumor regression was seen in these patients with bulk disease. These studies demonstrated that large numbers of PHA-activated PBL can be safely obtained and infused into humans, achieving an increase in the number of circulating activated cells with evidence of migration of cells to tumor, lungs, liver and spleen. Further studies of the use of activated lymphocyte infusion in

  6. Effect of bovine lactoferrin on functions of activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells during chronic feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Saori; Sato, Reeko; Aoki, Takako; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Inanami, Osamu; Hankanga, Careen; Yamada, Yuichi; Tomizawa, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Jun; Sasaki, Juso

    2008-05-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection is characterized by chronic overactivation of immune and inflammatory system, resulting in anergic state and dysfunction of immune cells. Lactoferrin (LF), a glycoprotein present in exocrine secretions and neutrophils, plays an important role in host defense system. Our previous study showed that oral administration of bovine LF (bLF) suppressed oral inflammation, improved the clinical symptoms and decreased serum gamma-globulin as a marker of inflammation in FIV-infected cats with intractable stomatitis. The anti-inflammatory effect was partly involved in regulation of neutrophil function by bLF. In this study, to clarify the relationship between anti-inflammatory effects of bLF and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we examined the effect of bLF on proliferation, cell cycle progression and cytokine expression in mitogen-activated PBMC. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay showed that bLF inhibited the concanavalin A (ConA)-induced cell proliferation in FIV-infected cats with the asymptomatic carrier and AIDS-related complex (ARC) phase. Bovine LF restored ConA-induced cell cycle progression and resulted in suppression of the induced apoptosis in feline PBMC. Real-time RT-PCR showed that bLF suppressed ConA-induced expression of interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 in cells of the ARC group regardless of the time of its addition to the medium. These results suggest the hypothesis that therapy with bLF may have the potential to improve and protect functions of overactivated lymphocytes by modulating the cell proliferation, cell cycle and cytokines expression in cats in terminal stage of FIV infection.

  7. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Infiltration Downregulates Decidual FAAH Activity in an LPS-Induced Embryo Resorption Model.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Manuel Luis; Aisemberg, Julieta; Correa, Fernando; Franchi, Ana María

    2017-06-01

    Maternal infections with gram-negative bacteria are associated with miscarriage and are one of the most common complications during pregnancy. Previous studies from our group have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated infiltrating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) into decidual tissue plays an important role in the establishment of a local inflammatory process that results in embryo cytotoxicity and early embryo resorption. Moreover, we have also shown that an increased endocannabinoid tone mediates LPS-induced deleterious effects during early pregnancy loss. Here, we sought to investigate whether the infiltrating PBMC modulates the decidual endocannabinoid tone and the molecular mechanisms involved. PBMC isolated from 7-day pregnant mice subjected to different treatments were co-cultured in a transwell system with decidual tissue from control 7-day pregnant mice. Decidual fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) activity was measured by radioconvertion, total decidual protein nitration by Western blot (WB), and decidual FAAH nitration by immunoprecipitation followed by WB. We found that co-culture of PBMC obtained from LPS-treated mice increased the level of nitration of decidual FAAH, which resulted in a negative modulation of decidual FAAH activity. Interestingly, co-treatment with progesterone or aminoguanidine prevented this effect. We found that LPS-treated PBMC release high amounts of nitric oxide (NO) which causes tyrosine nitration of decidual FAAH, diminishing its enzymatic activity. Inactivation of FAAH, the main degrading enzyme of anandamide and similar endocannabinoids, could lead to an increased decidual endocannabinoid tone with embryotoxic effects. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1441-1447, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Fermented Papaya Preparation Restores Age-Related Reductions in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Cytolytic Activity in Tube-Fed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuhzo; Tsuno, Haruo; Nakayama, Jiro

    2017-01-01

    Tube-fed elderly patients are generally supplied with the same type of nutrition over long periods, resulting in an increased risk for micronutrient deficiencies. Dietary polyphenols promote immunity and have anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-oxidative properties. Carica papaya Linn. is rich in several polyphenols; however, these polyphenols are poorly absorbed from the digestive tract in their original polymerized form. Therefore, we determined the molecular components of a fermented Carica papaya Linn. preparation, as well as its effects on immunity and the composition of gut microbiota in tube-fed patients. Different doses of the fermented C. papaya L. preparation were administered to three groups of tube-fed patients for 30 days. Its effects on fecal microbiota composition and immunity were assessed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and immune-marker analysis, respectively. The chemical composition of the fermented C. papaya L. preparation was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis- and liquid chromatography- time of flight mass spectrometry. The fermented C. papaya L. preparation restored peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytolytic activity; however, no other biomarkers of immunity were observed. Treatment with the preparation (9 g/day) significantly reduced the abundance of Firmicutes in the fecal microbiota. In particular, treatment reduced Clostridium scindens and Eggerthella lenta in most patients receiving 9 g/day. Chemical analysis identified low-molecular-weight phenolic acids as polyphenol metabolites; however, no polymerized, large-molecular-weight molecules were detected. Our study indicates that elderly patients who are tube-fed over the long-term have decreased PBMC cytolytic activity. In addition, low-molecular-weight polyphenol metabolites fermented from polymerized polyphenols restore PBMC cytolytic activity and modulate the composition of gut microbiota in tube-fed patients. PMID:28060858

  9. The effect of laser activation of 5,10,15,20-tetra-sulphophenyl-porphyrin loaded in K562 cells and human normal mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Carolina; Neagu, Monica; Manda, Gina; Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Iordăchescu, Dana Iord

    2004-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a relatively new type of treatment in cancer, based on a photosensitizer, visible light and molecular oxygen. Reactive oxygen species are generated, causing tumor cells death by apoptosis or necrosis. Significant nowadays research efforts are focused on finding new photosensitizers with antineoplastic activity and an acceptable toxicological profile. Although consistent information exists regarding PDT in solid tumors, relatively few data are available for PDT of blood cancers. Therefore, we carried out a comparative study on lymphoblastic K562 cells and human normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) treated at a density of 2 x 10(5) cells/mL with 5,10,15,20-tetra-sulphophenyl-porphyrin (TSPP) and then irradiated with He-Ne laser light (lamda = 632.8 nm). The following cell functions were investigated: viability, multiplication, RNA synthesis, total RNA levels and apoptosis. After irradiation, the viability of TSPP-loaded tumor cells decrease, the multiplication rate and the total RNA level are drastically reduced and cells undergo apoptosis. TSPP alone loaded into cells but not activated by irradiation, does not affect these cell parameters. Human normal PBMC subjected to TSPP loading and laser-irradiation develop a different cellular response, their viability and proliferative capacity not being altered by experimental PDT. Accordingly, it appears that TSPP is a non-aggressive compound for cellular physiology and becomes cytotoxic only by irradiation; moreover laser-activated TSPP affects only cells that have a tumoral pattern.

  10. Activation of p38 MAPK by feline infectious peritonitis virus regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine production in primary blood-derived feline mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Regan, Andrew D; Cohen, Rebecca D; Whittaker, Gary R

    2009-02-05

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is an invariably fatal disease of cats caused by systemic infection with a feline coronavirus (FCoV) termed feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). The lethal pathology associated with FIP (granulomatous inflammation and T-cell lymphopenia) is thought to be mediated by aberrant modulation of the immune system due to infection of cells such as monocytes and macrophages. Overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines occurs in cats with FIP, and has been suggested to play a significant role in the disease process. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unknown. Here we show that infection of primary blood-derived feline mononuclear cells by FIPV WSU 79-1146 and FIPV-DF2 leads to rapid activation of the p38 MAPK pathway and that this activation regulates production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta). FIPV-induced p38 MAPK activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production was inhibited by the pyridinyl imidazole inhibitors SB 203580 and SC 409 in a dose-dependent manner. FIPV-induced p38 MAPK activation was observed in primary feline blood-derived mononuclear cells individually purified from multiple SPF cats, as was the inhibition of TNF-alpha production by pyridinyl imidazole inhibitors.

  11. Ochratoxin A inhibits the production of tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 by human blood mononuclear cells: Another potential mechanism of immune-suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Rossiello, Maria R.; Rotunno, Crescenzia; Coluccia, Addolorata; Carratu, Maria R.; Di Santo, Angelomaria; Evangelista, Virgilio; Semeraro, Nicola; Colucci, Mario

    2008-06-01

    The mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA), an ubiquitous contaminant of food products endowed with a wide spectrum of toxicity, affects several functions of mononuclear leukocytes. Monocytes/macrophages play a major role in fibrin accumulation associated with immune-inflammatory processes through the production of tissue factor (TF) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 2 (PAI-2). We studied the effect of OTA on TF and PAI-2 production by human blood mononuclear cells (MNC). The cells were incubated for 3 or 18 h at 37 deg. C with non toxic OTA concentrations in the absence and in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or other inflammatory agents. TF activity was measured by a one-stage clotting test. Antigen assays were performed by specific ELISAs in cell extracts or conditioned media and specific mRNAs were assessed by RT-PCR. OTA had no direct effect on TF and PAI-2 production by MNC. However, OTA caused a dose-dependent reduction in LPS-induced TF (activity, antigen and mRNA) and PAI-2 (antigen and mRNA) production with > 85% inhibition at 1 {mu}g/ml. Similar results were obtained when monocyte-enriched preparations were used instead of MNC. TF production was also impaired by OTA (1 {mu}g/ml) when MNC were stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (98% inhibition), IL-1{beta} (83%) or TNF-{alpha} (62%). The inhibition of TF and PAI-2 induction might represent a hitherto unrecognized mechanism whereby OTA exerts immunosuppressant activity.

  12. In vitro replication activity of bovine viral diarrhea virus in an epithelial cell line and in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Turin, Lauretta; Lucchini, Barbara; Bronzo, Valerio; Luzzago, Camilla

    2012-11-01

    The present study focused on the in vitro infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from naÏve animals with non-cytopathic (ncp, BVDV-1b NY-1) and cytopathic (cp, BVDV-1a NADL) strains. Infections with 0.1 and 1 multiplicity of infections (MOI) and incubation times of 18 and 36 hr were compared. Twelve BVDV naÏve heifers were enrolled to collect PBMCs. The viral loads in MDBK cells and in PBMCs after in vitro infections were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The highest viral loads were measured at 1 MOI and 36 hr post infection in both cell systems and the lowest at 0.1 MOI and 18 hr with the exception of the cp strain NADL in PBMCs, for which the highest viral load was observed at 0.1 MOI and 36 hr. Viral load mean values were higher for the cp strain than the ncp strain irrespective of the extent of the infection period and MOI. The models of infection studied uncovered different replication activities respectively according to the biotype of virus, the cell substrate and the duration of infection. Replication tends to be higher in PBMCs, particularly at low MOIs and for the ncp strain.

  13. Plasma from hemorrhaged mice activates CREB and increases cytokine expression in lung mononuclear cells through a xanthine oxidase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Abraham, E

    1996-02-01

    Hemorrhage rapidly increases plasma xanthine oxidase levels as well as the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines in the lungs. To determine the role of circulating xanthine oxidase (XO), as well as other plasma factors, in affecting pulmonary cytokine expression, we conducted studies in which plasma from hemorrhaged mice was transferred into unhemorrhaged recipient mice. Administration of posthemorrhage plasma to recipient mice increased the levels of mRNA for interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) in lung mononuclear cells. No enhancement of mRNA levels for these cytokines was found in the lungs of mice given allopurinol-treated posthemorrhage plasma or fed a tungsten-enriched, XO-depleting diet prior to transfer of posthemorrhage plasma. Among the nuclear transcriptional regulatory factors examined, only the cyclic AMP response-element binding protein (CREB) was activated in nuclear extracts from lung mononuclear cells of mice that were given posthemorrhage plasma. No activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B), nuclear factor interleukin 6 (NF-IL6), activating protein-1 (AP-1), or serum protein-1 (SP-1) was found. These results suggest that the mechanism for hemorrhage-induced increases in pulmonary cytokine expression is by activation of the enhancer CREB through a tissue XO-dependent pathway initiated by plasma-borne mediators.

  14. In vitro and in vivo effect of interleukin-2 on the 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity of peripheral mononuclear blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Handgretinger, R.; Bruchelt, G.; Kimmig, A.; Lang, P.; Daurer, B.; Dopfer, R.; Treuner, J.; Niethammer, D. )

    1990-02-01

    The in vitro and in vivo influence of interleukin-2 (IL-2) on 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase activity and natural killer (NK) activity of peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMCs) was investigated. Incubation of PBMCs in vitro with IL-2 resulted in a considerable secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and in a significant elevation of 2-5A synthetase activity, as well as NK activity. Neutralizing monoclonal anti-IFN-gamma antibodies inhibited the elevation of 2-5A synthetase activity, but not the IL-2-induced augmentation of NK activity. Additionally, 2-5A synthetase and NK activity of PBMCs was measured in a child with neuroblastoma that was treated with recombinant IL-2 by continuous intravenous application. During the treatment, NK activity against the NK-sensitive cell line K 562 and against autologous tumor cells was not augmented. However, a significant increase of 2-5A synthetase activity in PBMCs was observed during IL-2 treatment, whereas there was no detectable serum level of IFN-gamma. We conclude that measuring 2-5A synthetase activity in patients treated with IL-2 may be helpful in monitoring the immunomodulatory effects of IL-2 on immune effector cells.

  15. Cytotoxicity of bovine and porcine collagen membranes in mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Moura, Camilla Christian Gomes; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Carneiro, Karine Fernandes; Souza, Maria Aparecida de; Magalhães, Denildo

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the cytotoxicity and the release of nitric oxide induced by collagen membranes in human mononuclear cells. Peripheral blood was collected from each patient and the separation of mononuclear cells was performed by Ficoll. Then, 2x10(5) cells were plated in 48-well culture plates under the membranes in triplicate. The polystyrene surface was used as negative control. Cell viability was assessed by measuring mitochondrial activity (MTT) at 4, 12 and 24 h, with dosage levels of nitrite by the Griess method for the same periods. Data had non-normal distribution and were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were observed between the membranes and the control in the experimental period, although there was a significant reduction in viability over time (p<0.01). At 4 and 12 h, the porcine membrane induced a higher release of nitrite compared with the control and bovine membrane, respectively (p<0.01), and this difference was maintained at 24 h (p<0.05). This in vitro study showed that the porcine collagen membrane induces an increased production of proinflammatory mediators by mononuclear cells in the first hours of contact, decreasing with time.

  16. Augmentation by interleukin-18 of MHC-nonrestricted killer activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to interleukin-12.

    PubMed

    Singh, S M; Yanagawa, H; Hanibuchi, M; Miki, T; Okamura, H; Sone, S

    2000-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a novel cytokine with pleiotropic functions. In the present study, we examined the induction of the killer activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) against lung cancer cell lines upon treatment with IL-18 in combination with IL-12. Cytotoxic activity was measured by standard (51)Cr release assay. IL-18 (100 ng/ml) was found to significantly augment IL-12-induced killer activity in a MHC-nonrestricted manner against allogeneic NK-resistant Daudi cells and lung cancer cell lines: SBC-3, RERF-LC-AI and A549. IL-18 could augment IL-12-induced killer activity both at the optimal as well as suboptimal doses of the latter. However, IL-18 was found to have little effect on the killer activity of MNC induced by optimal or suboptimal dose of IL-2 or IL-15. Treatment of MNC with IL-18 in combination with IL-12 for a period of more than 4 days was observed to optimally induce the killer activity. As for induction of IFN-gamma production by MNC, IL-18 augmented that induced by IL-2 and IL-15, as well as that induced by IL-12. These results show the potential of IL-18 in combination with IL-12 for clinical application in treatment of cancer.

  17. Phenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells during acute dengue illness demonstrates infection and increased activation of monocytes in severe cases compared to classic dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Anna P; Vargas, Maria José; Wanionek, Kimberli; Hammond, Samantha N; Gordon, Aubree; Rocha, Crisanta; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2008-07-05

    In vitro studies have attempted to identify dengue virus (DEN) target cells in peripheral blood; however, extensive phenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dengue patients has not been reported. PBMCs collected from hospitalized children suspected of acute dengue were analyzed for DEN prM, CD32, CD86, CD14, CD11c, CD16, CD209, CCR7, CD4, and CD8 by flow cytometry to detect DEN antigen in PBMCs and to phenotype DEN-positive cells. DEN prM was detected primarily in activated monocytes (CD14(+), CD32(+), CD86(+), CD11c(+)). A subset of samples analyzed for DEN nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) confirmed that approximately half of DEN antigen-positive cells contained replicating virus. A higher percentage of PBMCs from DHF patients expressed prM, CD86, CD32, and CD11c than did those from DF patients. Increased activation of monocytes and greater numbers of DEN-infected cells were associated with more severe dengue, implicating a role for monocyte activation in dengue immunopathogenesis.

  18. Altered IL-10 and TNF-α production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of systemic lupus erythematosus patients after Toll-like receptor 2, 4, or 9 activation.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Jeng-Ting; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Yu, Chia-Li; Lin, Shih-Chang

    2012-09-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation and cytokines have been linked to the disease flare of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), yet the expression profiles of TLRs and cytokines in response to TLR activation in SLE patients remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of IL-10, TNF-α, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), TLR-2, TLR-4, and TLR-9 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from SLE patients and normal controls after PBMCs were stimulated with a TLR-2, TLR-4, or TLR-9 agonist. The expression levels in SLE patient group were statistically compared with those in normal control group. It was found in SLE patients that the IL-10 protein production was down-regulated after the activation of TLR-2, TLR-4, or TLR-9 and that the TNF-α protein production was decreased after the activation of TLR-2 or TLR-9, but not TLR-4. However, the transcript levels of IL-10 and TNF-α as well as the protein and transcript levels of IFN-γ were comparable between SLE and normal control groups. In addition, the TLR-2 transcript levels seem to be diminished after the activation of TLR-2, TLR-4, or TLR-9, but TLR-4 and TLR-9 transcript levels were not altered. The results indicate that the cytokine production from PBMCs in response to TLR activation is dysregulated in SLE patients, supporting the possibility that TLR activation may influence lupus disease activity through regulating cytokine production.

  19. Mononuclear cells and vascular repair in HHT.

    PubMed

    Dingenouts, Calinda K E; Goumans, Marie-José; Bakker, Wineke

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is a rare genetic vascular disorder known for its endothelial dysplasia causing arteriovenous malformations and severe bleedings. HHT-1 and HHT-2 are the most prevalent variants and are caused by heterozygous mutations in endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1, respectively. An undervalued aspect of the disease is that HHT patients experience persistent inflammation. Although endothelial and mural cells have been the main research focus trying to unravel the mechanism behind the disease, wound healing is a process with a delicate balance between inflammatory and vascular cells. Inflammatory cells are part of the mononuclear cells (MNCs) fraction, and can, next to eliciting an immune response, also have angiogenic potential. This biphasic effect of MNC can hold a promising mechanism to further elucidate treatment strategies for HHT patients. Before MNC are able to contribute to repair, they need to home to and retain in ischemic and damaged tissue. Directed migration (homing) of MNCs following tissue damage is regulated by the stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1). MNCs that express the C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) migrate toward the tightly regulated gradient of SDF1. This directed migration of monocytes and lymphocytes can be inhibited by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). Interestingly, MNC of HHT patients express elevated levels of DPP4 and show impaired homing toward damaged tissue. Impaired homing capacity of the MNCs might therefore contribute to the impaired angiogenesis and tissue repair observed in HHT patients. This review summarizes recent studies regarding the role of MNCs in the etiology of HHT and vascular repair, and evaluates the efficacy of DPP4 inhibition in tissue integrity and repair.

  20. Activation of NRF2 pathway in spleen, thymus as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells by acute arsenic exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaoxu; Li, Jinlong; Zhang, Yang; Li, Wei; Zhao, Lu; Nie, Huifang; Sun, Guifan; Li, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic has already been demonstrated to activate the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) in many different organs and cell lines. The present study tried to explore the expression of NRF2 pathway by acute arsenic exposure in immune system in vivo. Our results showed that treatment with arsenic (sodium arsenite, 5, 10 and 20mg/kg, intra-gastrically) increased the expression of NRF2 and its downstream targets heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) and glutathione reductase (GR) consistently in spleen, thymus, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as early as treatment from 6h. Arsenic was also detected to up-regulate the mRNA levels of Hmox1, NAD(P)H: quinine oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1), Gclc and Gclm in spleen and thymus. Besides, we detected the enhancement of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein (KEAP1) expression in these immune organs and immunocytes. What's more, our results also found the imbalanced oxidative redox status under the circumstances that arsenic activated NRF2 pathway, reflected by the generation of lipid peroxidation, as well as the reduction of antioxidative capacities in both spleen and thymus. Taken together, our results here strongly suggested the expression and activation of NRF2 pathway by acute arsenic exposure in immune system in vivo. Further studies are being investigated to explore the possible roles and functions of NRF2 pathway stimulation in the regulation of immune responses of this metalloid.

  1. Expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with acute Charcot neuroarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bergamini, Alberto; Bolacchi, Francesca; Pesce, Caterina Delfina; Veneziano, Giada; Uccioli, Luigi; Girardi, Valentina; De Corato, Laura; Mondillo, Maria Teresa; Squillaci, Ettore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB (RANK), ligand (RANK-L) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) are implicated in the pathogenesis of acute Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN). Materials and Methods. This study aimed to investigate the expression of RANK-L and OPG in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with acute CN. Results. We found that the expression of RANK-L was lower in patients with acute CN as compared with diabetic control subjects and healthy control participants; whereas OPG expression was not detected in patients and in both control groups. RANK-L expression at the onset of disease was inversely correlated with the index of polyunsaturation (PUI), a bone marrow MRS-derived measurable index that allows evaluation of disease activity in acute CN, and recovery time. Finally, the expression of RANK-L increased at the time of healing compared with the values found during the acute phase. Conclusions. In conclusion, our preliminary data provide a first step in applying analysis of RANK-L expression in peripheral blood cells to the diagnosis of acute CN. Based on our data we also suggest that analysis of RANK-L expression could be a complementary tool that can be employed to obtain quantitative parameters that may help clinicians to monitor disease activity in patients with acute CN. PMID:28090190

  2. High concentration of branched-chain amino acids promotes oxidative stress, inflammation and migration of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells via mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhenyukh, Olha; Civantos, Esther; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Sánchez, Maria Soledad; Vázquez, Clotilde; Peiró, Concepción; Egido, Jesús; Mas, Sebastián

    2017-03-01

    Leucine, isoleucine and valine are essential aminoacids termed branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) due to its aliphatic side-chain. In several pathological and physiological conditions increased BCAA plasma concentrations have been described. Elevated BCAA levels predict insulin resistance development. Moreover, BCAA levels higher than 2mmol/L are neurotoxic by inducing microglial activation in maple syrup urine disease. However, there are no studies about the direct effects of BCAA in circulating cells. We have explored whether BCAA could promote oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy donors. In cultured PBMCs, 10mmol/L BCAA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via both NADPH oxidase and the mitochondria, and activated Akt-mTOR signalling. By using several inhibitors and activators of these molecular pathways we have described that mTOR activation by BCAA is linked to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. BCAA stimulated the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB, which resulted in the release of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 or CD40L, and the migration of PBMCs. In conclusion, elevated BCAA blood levels can promote the activation of circulating PBMCs, by a mechanism that involving ROS production and NF-κB pathway activation. These data suggest that high concentrations of BCAA could exert deleterious effects on circulating blood cells and therefore contribute to the pro-inflammatory and oxidative status observed in several pathophysiological conditions.

  3. Effect of Blood Component Coatings of Enosseal Implants on Proliferation and Synthetic Activity of Human Osteoblasts and Cytokine Production of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hulejova, Hana; Bartova, Jirina; Riedel, Tomas; Pesakova, Vlasta

    2016-01-01

    The study monitored in vitro early response of connective tissue cells and immunocompetent cells to enosseal implant materials coated by different blood components (serum, activated plasma, and plasma/platelets) to evaluate human osteoblast proliferation and synthetic activity and inflammatory response presented as a cytokine profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) under conditions imitating the situation upon implantation. The cells were cultivated on coated Ti-plasma-sprayed (Ti-PS), Ti-etched (Ti-Etch), Ti-hydroxyapatite (Ti-HA), and ZrO2 surfaces. The plasma/platelets coating supported osteoblast proliferation only on osteoconductive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch whereas activated plasma enhanced proliferation on all surfaces. Differentiation (BAP) and IL-8 production remained unchanged or decreased irrespective of the coating and surface; only the serum and plasma/platelets-coated ZrO2 exhibited higher BAP and IL-8 expression. RANKL production increased on serum and activated plasma coatings. PBMCs produced especially cytokines playing role in inflammatory phase of wound healing, that is, IL-6, GRO-α, GRO, ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, EGF, and MCP-1. Cytokine profiles were comparable for all tested surfaces; only ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, and MCP-1 expression depended on materials and coatings. The activated plasma coating led to uniformed surfaces and represented a favorable treatment especially for bioinert Ti-PS and ZrO2 whereas all coatings had no distinctive effect on bioactive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch. PMID:27651560

  4. Ellagic Acid, a Dietary Polyphenol, Inhibits Tautomerase Activity of Human Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Its Pro-inflammatory Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Asim A; Mazumder, Somnath; De, Rudranil; Saha, Shubhra J; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Iqbal, Mohd S; Adhikari, Susanta; Alam, Athar; Roy, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2015-05-27

    Ellagic acid (EA), a phenolic lactone, inhibited tautomerase activity of human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) noncompetitively (Ki = 1.97 ± 0.7 μM). The binding of EA to MIF was determined by following the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence. We synthesized several EA derivatives, and their structure-activity relationship studies indicated that the planar conjugated lactone moiety of EA was essential for MIF inhibition. MIF induces nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to promote inflammation. We were interested in evaluating the effect of EA on nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotactic activity in human PBMCs in the presence of MIF. The results showed that EA inhibited MIF-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation in PBMCs, as evident from confocal immunofluorescence microscopic data. EA also inhibited MIF-mediated chemotaxis of PBMCs. Thus, we report MIF-inhibitory activity of EA and inhibition of MIF-mediated proinflammatory responses in PBMCs by EA.

  5. Menstrual cycle and reproductive aging alters immune reactivity, NGF expression, antioxidant enzyme activities, and intracellular signaling pathways in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy women.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, Hannah P; Sharma, Utsav; Gopinath, Srinivasan; Sharma, Varun; Hima, Lalgi; ThyagaRajan, Srinivasan

    2013-08-01

    Reproductive senescence in women is a process that begins with regular menstrual cycles and culminates in menopause followed by gradual development of diseases such as autoimmune diseases, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and hormone-dependent cancers. The age-associated impairment in the functions of neuroendocrine system and immune system results in menopause which contributes to subsequent development of diseases and cancer. The aim of this study is to characterize the alterations in immune responses, compensatory factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and antioxidant enzyme activities, and the molecular mechanisms of actions in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of young (follicular and luteal phases), middle-aged, and old healthy women. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from young women in follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle (n=20; 22.6±2.9 yrs), middle-aged women (n=19; 47.1±3.8 yrs; perimenopausal) and old (n=16; 63.2±4.7 yrs; post-menopausal) women and analyzed for Concanavalin (Con A)-induced proliferation of lymphocytes and cytokine (IL-2 and IFN-γ) production, expression of NGF, p-NF-κB, p-ERK, p-CREB, and p-Akt, antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], extent of lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide (NO) production. Serum gonadal hormones (17β-estradiol and progesterone) were also measured. A characteristic age- and menstrual cycle-related change was observed in the serum gonadal hormone secretion (estrogen and progesterone), T lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production. Salient features include the age-related decline observed in target-derived growth factors (lymphocyte NGF expression), signaling molecules (p-ERK/ERK and p-CREB/CREB ratios) and compensatory factors such as the activities of plasma and PBMC antioxidant enzymes (SOD and catalase) and NO production. Further, an age-associated increase in p

  6. Transcription Factors Regulating Inflammatory Cytokine Production Are Differentially Expressed in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Behçet Disease Depending on Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Min-Yeong; Yun, Su Jin; Lee, Mi Jin; Kim, Kyongmin

    2017-01-01

    Background Behçet disease (BD) is a relapsing inflammatory disease with increased production of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well known. Objective To analyze whether the differential expression of transcription factors is involved in the increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 production by PBMCs of BD patients compared to healthy controls (HCs). Methods Expression of transcription factors was examined by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Cytokine production by CD11b+ cells transfected with siRNAs against transcription factors was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results In the absence of lipopolysaccharide stimulation, the transcript level of CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) β was increased in PBMCs from patients with active BD compared to that in PBMCs from patients with stable BD. The C/EBPδ transcript level was higher in PBMCs from patients with active BD than in those from HCs. The activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) transcript level was increased in PBMCs from patients with stable BD compared to that in PBMCs from HCs. siRNAs targeting C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ significantly reduced the production of IL-6 and TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated CD11b+ cells from patients with BD as well as from HCs. Conclusion We found differential expression of C/EBPβ, C/EBPδ, and ATF3 in PBMCs from patients with BD depending on disease activity, indicating the involvement of these molecules in BD pathogenesis.

  7. Physalin F, a seco-steroid from Physalis angulata L., has immunosuppressive activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with HTLV1-associated myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lorena A; Meira, Cássio S; Villarreal, Cristiane F; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; de Souza, Claudia V C; Ribeiro, Ivone M; Tomassini, Therezinha C B; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Soares, Milena B P; Grassi, Maria F R

    2016-04-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) induces a strong activation of the immune system, especially in individuals with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Physalin F is a secosteroid with potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of physalin F on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of HAM/TSP subjects. A concentration-dependent inhibition of spontaneous proliferation of PBMC from HAM/TSP subjects was observed in the presence of physalin F, as evaluated by (3)H-thymidine uptake. The IC50 for physalin F was 0.97 ± 0.11 μM. Flow cytometry analysis using Cytometric Bead Array (CBA) showed that physalin F (10 μM) significantly reduced the levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ, but not IL-17A, in supernatants of PBMC cultures. Next, apoptosis induction was addressed by using flow cytometry to evaluate annexin V expression. Treatment with physalin F (10 μM) increased the apoptotic population of PBMC in HAM/TSP subjects. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of PBMC showed that physalin F induced ultrastructural changes, such as pyknotic nuclei, damaged mitochondria, enhanced autophagic vacuole formation, and the presence of myelin-like figures. In conclusion, physalin F induces apoptosis of PBMC, decreasing the spontaneous proliferation and cytokine production caused by HTLV-1 infection.

  8. Super-oxide anion production and antioxidant enzymatic activities associated with the executive functions in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy adult samples.

    PubMed

    Pesce, M; Rizzuto, A; La Fratta, I; Tatangelo, R; Campagna, G; Iannasso, M; Ferrone, A; Franceschelli, S; Speranza, L; Patruno, A; De Lutiis, M A; Felaco, M; Grilli, A

    2016-05-01

    Executive Functions (EFs) involve a set of high cognitive abilities impairment which have been successfully related to a redox omeostasis imbalance in several psychiatric disorders. Firstly, we aimed to investigate the relationship between executive functioning and some oxidative metabolism parameters in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from healthy adult samples. The Brown Attention-Deficit Disorder Scales were administered to assess five specific facets of executive functioning. Total superoxide anion production, Super Oxide Dismutase (SOD), Catalase (CAT), Glutathione Reductase (GR) and Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) activities were evaluated on proteins extracted from the PBMCs. We found significant positive correlations between superoxide anion production and the total score of the 'Brown' Scale and some of its clusters. The GPx and CAT activities were negatively associated with the total score and some clusters. In a linear regression analysis, these biological variables were indicated as the most salient predictors of the total score, explaining the 24% variance (adjusted R(2)=0.24, ANOVA, p<.001). This study provides novel evidence that Executive Functions have underpinnings in the oxidative metabolism, as ascertained in healthy subjects.

  9. Correction of Aberrant NADPH Oxidase Activity in Blood-Derived Mononuclear Cells from Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients by a Naturally Fermented Papaya Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Ryan; Deshpande, Bhakthi; Gnyawali, Urmila; Lynch, Debbie; Gordillo, Gayle M.; Schuster, Dara; Osei, Kwame

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Supplementation of standardized fermented papaya preparation (FPP) to adult diabetic mice improves dermal wound healing outcomes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients elicit a compromised respiratory burst activity resulting in increased risk of infections for the diabetic patients. Aims: The objectives of the current study were to determine the effect of FPP supplementation on human diabetic PBMC respiratory burst activity and to understand underlying mechanisms of such action of FPP. Results: When stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, the production of reactive oxygen species by T2DM PBMC was markedly compromised compared to that of the PBMC from non-DM donors. FPP treated ex vivo improved respiratory burst outcomes in T2DM PBMC. FPP treatment significantly increased phosphorylation of the p47phox subunit of NADPH oxidase. In addition, the protein and mRNA expression of Rac2 was potently upregulated after FPP supplemention. The proximal human Rac2 gene promoter is G–C rich and contains consensus binding sites for Sp1 and AP-1. While FPP had no significant effect on the AP-1 DNA binding activity, the Sp1 DNA binding activity was significantly upregulated in PBMC after treatment of the cells with FPP. Innovation: This work provided first evidence that compromised respiratory burst performance of T2DM PBMC may be corrected by a nutritional supplement. Conclusion: FPP can correct respiratory burst performance of T2DM PBMC via an Sp-1-dependant pathway. Studies testing the outcome of FPP supplementation in diabetic patients are warranted. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 485–491. PMID:22369197

  10. The antagonist activity of lipid IVa on the stimulation by lipid A of TNF-alpha production from canine blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Takasawa, Kenji; Kano, Rui; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2011-09-15

    Lipid A, the active component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), exists in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and binds to the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex. On the other hand, the synthetic precursor of Escherichia coli lipid A, tetraacylated lipid IVa, is an agonist for TLR4 and MD-2 complex in murine, equine and feline cells but is an antagonist for lipid A in human cells. The aim of the study was to examine the function of canine Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and MD-2 complex on canine blood mononuclear cells (BMC), by analyzing lipid A- or lipid IVa-induction of TNF-α production from these cells in order to understand canine innate immune system. After 5-h culture of canine BMC with lipid A (lipid A culture) or lipid IVa (lipid IVa culture), the TNF-α, as determined by ELISA, had increased in the supernatants of the lipid A cultures in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the TNF-α was undetectable in supernatant of lipid IVa-treated cultures. The TNF-α was statistically significantly different between the lipid A and lipid IVa cultures (100 and 1000 ng/ml). TNF-α production from canine BMC was inhibited, in a lipid IVa-dose-dependent manner, when the BMC were pre-cultured with lipid IVa for 60 min and then cultured with lipid A for 5h, while in control BMC cultures production if TNF-α was unchanged. These results indicate that the TNF-α production stimulated by lipid A was competed out by pre-exposing the BMC to lipid IVa. Thus, lipid A is an agonist for TNF-α production in canine BMC, whereas lipid IVa appears to be an antagonist against this lipid A stimulation of canine BMC.

  11. Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells Have a Potential to Produce NK Cells Using IL2Rg Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Khaziri, Nahid; Mohammadi, Momeneh; Aliyari, Zeinab; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Tayefi Nasrabadi, Hamid; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although bone marrow represents the main site for NK cell development and also distinct thymic-dependentNK cell pathway was identified, the cytokines effect on the NK cell generation from cord blood is unclear. Studies were identified the role of cytokines in the regulation of bone marrow and thymic NK cells. Previous studies reported that IL15 are critical for bone marrow dependent and IL7 is important for thymic NK cells. It is remain unclear the cytokines influence on the expantion of NK cells in cord blood mononuclear cells. Methods: We evaluated cultured cord blood mononuclear cells suplememnted with combinations of cytokines using FACS in distinct time points. In this study, we presented the role of IL2, IL7 and IL15 as members of the common gamma receptor -chain (Il2rg) on the expansion NK cells from cord blood cells. Results: By investigating cord blood mononuclear cells in vitro , we demonstrated that IL2 and IL15 are important for expansion of NK cells. IL2 in comparision with IL15 has more influences in NK cell expansion. In contrast IL-7 is dispensable for NK cell generation in cord blood. Conclusion: Thus,IL-2Rg cytokines play complementary roles and are indispensable for homeostasis of NK cell development in cord blood. Probably these cytokines could help to use NK beneficials in engrafment of transplanted cells and Anti tumor activity of NK cells. PMID:27123412

  12. Lactobacillus acidophilus modulates inflammatory activity by regulating the TLR4 and NF-κB expression in porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells after lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang In; Kim, Hyun Soo; Koo, Jin Mo; Kim, In Ho

    2016-02-28

    A total of forty weaned pigs ((Landrace × Yorkshire) × Duroc) were used to evaluate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus on inflammatory activity after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Experimental treatments were as follows: (T1) control diet+saline challenge; (T2) control diet with 0·1% L. acidophilus+saline challenge; (T3) control diet+LPS challenge; and (T4) control diet with 0·1% L. acidophilus+LPS challenge. On d-14, piglets were challenged with saline (T1 and T2) or LPS (T3 and T4). Blood samples were obtained at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 12 h after being challenged and analysed for immune cell cytokine production and gene expression pattern. The L. acidophilus treatment increased the average daily weight gain (ADWG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) compared with the control diet. With the control diet, the LPS challenge (T3) increased the number of immune cells and expression of TNF-α and IL-6 compared with the saline challenge (T1). Whereas with the saline challenge L. acidophilus treatment (T2) increased the number of leucocytes and CD4 compared with the control diet (T1), with the LPS challenge L. acidophilus treatment (T4) decreased the number of leucocytes, lymphocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ and expression of TNF-α and IL-6 compared with the control diet (T3). L. acidophilus treatment decreased the expression of TRL4 and NF-κB in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after LPS challenge, which leads to inhibition of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-8 and IL1B1 and to induction of IL-4 and IL-10. We suggested that L. acidophilus improved ADWG and ADFI and protected against LPS-induced inflammatory responses by regulating TLR4 and NF-κB expression in porcine PBMC.

  13. Transcriptional Activity of Gene Encoding Subunits R1 and R2 of Interferon Gamma Receptor in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Slow Coronary Flow

    PubMed Central

    Faramarz-Gaznagh, Sanaz; Khadem-Ansari, Mohammad-Hasan; Seyed-Mohammadzad, Mir-Hossein; Bagheri, Morteza; Nemati, Mohadeseh; Shirpoor, Alireza; Saboori, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Slow coronary flow (SCF) is a coronary artery disorder characterized with delayed opacification of epicardial coronary arteries without obstructive coronary disease. The pathophysiological mechanisms of SCF remain unclear. One of the possible mechanisms that may participate in the pathology of SCF is endothelial dysfunction related to the inflammatory process. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is an inflammatory cytokine that acts through its specific receptor composed of two subunits, IFN-γR1 and IFN-γR2. Transcriptional activity of the gene encoding these subunits influences IFN-γ activity. This study aimed to investigate the gene expression of IFN-γ receptor subunits in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with SCF. Methods The study was performed with 30 patients (22 male/8 female) aged 35–76 (52.8±11.7 years) with SCF and 15 sex- (11 male/4 female), Body Max Index (BMI)- and age-matched (54.73±9.42 years) healthy subjects. Total mRNA was extracted from PBMC and was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The relative expression values (2-ΔΔCt) between control and case groups were determined and the Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis. Results There was a significant increase in the gene expression of IFN-γR1 in PBMC from SCF patients vs. controls (P< 0.0001); but the differences in IFN-γR2 gene expression were statistically insignificant between patient and control groups (P= 0.853). Conclusions It can be concluded that IFN-γ gene expression may influence the function of microvasculature and thereby contribute to the pathophysiology of SCF.

  14. Diagnostic values for the viral load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Michio; Kawada, Jun-ichi; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease (CAEBV) is a distinct EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease with a poor prognosis. Although the viral load in blood samples has been widely used for diagnosing CAEBV, well-defined viral load thresholds to guide clinicians are currently lacking. The aim of the present study was to determine standardized diagnostic values for EBV load in blood samples of CAEBV patients using the World Health Organization international standard for reporting. Levels of EBV DNA in 103 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and 95 plasma/serum samples from 107 cases with CAEBV were quantified and expressed in international units. Receiver operating characteristic curves were analyzed to assess the most appropriate cut-off values for levels of EBV DNA to distinguish CAEBV from EBV-associated infectious mononucleosis (IM) and controls with past EBV infection. Levels of EBV DNA in PBMCs were significantly higher in the CAEBV group (median, 10(4.2) IU/μgDNA) compared to the IM (median, 10(2.1) IU/μgDNA) and control groups. An inconsistent qualitative result was seen in 13 of 86 CAEBV patients; in these, EBV-DNA was positive in PBMCs, but negative in plasma. Diagnostic cut-off values for viral load in PBMCs from CAEBV patients, as compared to those of healthy controls and IM patients, were 10(2.0) IU/μgDNA and 10(3.2) IU/μgDNA, respectively. For diagnostic purposes, the viral load of PBMCs was better than of plasma/serum. A diagnostic cut-off EBV load for CAEBV may be useful for the management of CAEBV patients.

  15. Immunomodulatory properties of human serum immunoglobulin A: anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory activities in human monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Olas, K; Butterweck, H; Teschner, W; Schwarz, H P; Reipert, B M

    2005-01-01

    Our study investigated the immunomodulatory activities of human plasma-derived serum immunoglobulin (Ig)A. Previous findings seem contradictory indicating either pro- or anti-inflammatory activities. We used serum IgA purified from large plasma pools and studied the modulation of the release of cytokines and chemokines from resting and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin)-stimulated human adherent monocytes and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Our results indicate that IgA down-modulates the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP) 1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1α and MIP1β from LPS-stimulated PBMC and the release of MCP1, MIP1α and MIP1β from LPS-stimulated monocytes. Furthermore, we confirmed previous reports that plasma-derived serum IgA down-modulates the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, from LPS-stimulated monocytes and PBMC, and up-regulates the release of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) from resting and LPS-stimulated monocytes and resting PBMC. This IgA-mediated up-regulation of IL-1RA is independent of the simultaneous up-regulation of IL-1β release, as shown by blocking the biological activity of IL-1β with a neutralizing antibody. On the other hand, we also found an IgA-induced pro-inflammatory activity, namely IgA-mediated up-regutation of the release of pro-inflammatory IL-1β as well as down-regulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-12p40 from LPS-stimulated monocytes and PBMC and a down-regulation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β from resting and LPS-stimulated PBMC. We conclude that human serum IgA has both an anti-inflammatory and a pro-inflammatory capacity and this dual capacity might contribute to the feedback mechanisms maintaining a balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:15932509

  16. Increased expression of blood mononuclear cell nitric oxide synthase type 2 in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    St Clair, E W; Wilkinson, W E; Lang, T; Sanders, L; Misukonis, M A; Gilkeson, G S; Pisetsky, D S; Granger, D I; Weinberg, J B

    1996-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important inflammatory mediator in nonhuman animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether blood mononuclear cells from patients with active RA (as compared to control subjects) have higher levels of NO synthase type 2 (NOS2) and produce more NO in vitro. Leukocytes from 25 RA patients and 20 normal subjects were examined. Arthritis activity was assessed by tender and swollen joint counts, duration of morning stiffness, patient assessment of pain, physician and patient global assessment of disease activity, the modified Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire, and by blood levels of acute phase reactants. Blood mononuclear cell NOS enzyme activity/antigen content and nitrite/nitrate formation in vitro were measured. Blood mononuclear cells from RA patients had increased NOS activity and increased NOS2 antigen content as compared to those from normal subjects, and responded to interferon-gamma with increased NOS expression and nitrite/nitrate production in vitro. NOS activity of freshly isolated blood mononuclear cells correlated significantly with disease activity, as assessed by render and swollen joint counts. Our results demonstrate that patients with RA have systemic activation for NOS2 expression, and that the degree of activation correlates with disease activity. Increased NOS2 expression and NO generation may be important in the pathogenesis of RA.

  17. [Effects of recombinant interleukin-2 on several characteristics of functional activity of lymphocytes from the lymph nodes regional to tumor and mononuclear cells of peripheral blood in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Semenova-Kobzar', R A; Kushko, L Ia; Iakhimovich, L V; Protsyk, V S; Tolstopiatov, B A; Konovalenko, V F; Berezhnaia, N M

    1990-01-01

    The level of endogenous production of IL-2 by lymphocytes of lymph nodes regional to tumour and by mononuclear cells of peripheral blood, proliferative response of these cell to recombinant IL-2, as well as a modifying influence of autologous serum and actively proliferating bioptats of autologous tumours on enumerated parameters have been studied in cancer patients (tumours of the head and neck and locomotor system). Regional IL-2-dependent immunotherapy of malignant tumors with obligatory preliminary testing for individual sensitivity of the tumor bioptat to the influence of the RIL-2 and RIL-2 activated lymphocytes is shown to be promising.

  18. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Lamivudine and Zidovudine Triphosphates Predicts Differential Pharmacokinetics in Seminal Mononuclear Cells and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Dumond, Julie B; Yang, Kuo H; Kendrick, Racheal; Reddy, Y Sunila; Kashuba, Angela D M; Troiani, Luigi; Bridges, Arlene S; Fiscus, Susan A; Forrest, Alan; Cohen, Myron S

    2015-10-01

    The male genital tract is a potential site of viral persistence. Therefore, adequate concentrations of antiretrovirals are required to eliminate HIV replication in the genital tract. Despite higher zidovudine (ZDV) and lamivudine (3TC) concentrations in seminal plasma (SP) than in blood plasma (BP) (SP/BP drug concentration ratios of 2.3 and 6.7, respectively), we have previously reported lower relative intracellular concentrations of their active metabolites, zidovudine triphosphate (ZDV-TP) and lamivudine triphosphate (3TC-TP), in seminal mononuclear cells (SMCs) than in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (SMC/PBMC drug concentration ratios of 0.36 and 1.0, respectively). Here, we use population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling-based methods to simultaneously describe parent and intracellular metabolite PK in blood, semen, and PBMCs and SMCs. From this model, the time to steady state in each matrix was estimated, and the results indicate that the PK of 3TC-TP and ZDV-TP in PBMCs are different from the PK of the two in SMCs and different for the two triphosphates. We found that steady-state conditions in PBMCs were achieved within 2 days for ZDV-TP and 3 days for 3TC-TP. However, steady-state conditions in SMCs were achieved within 2 days for ZDV-TP and 2 weeks for 3TC-TP. Despite this, or perhaps because of it, ZDV-TP in SMCs does not achieve the surrogate 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) (as established for PBMCs, assuming SMC IC50 = PBMC IC50) at the standard 300-mg twice-daily dosing. Mechanistic studies are needed to understand these differences and to explore intracellular metabolite behavior in SMCs for other nucleoside analogues used in HIV prevention, treatment, and cure.

  19. Natural OX40L expressed on human T cell leukemia virus type-I-immortalized T cell lines interferes with infection of activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells by CCR5-utilizing human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background OX40 ligand (OX40L) co-stimulates and differentiates T cells via ligation of OX40 that is transiently induced on T cells upon activation, resulting in prolonged T cell survival and enhanced cytokine production by T cells. This view has led to the targeting of OX40 as a strategy to boost antigen specific T cells in the context of vaccination. In addition, the ligation of OX40 has also been shown to inhibit infection by CCR5-utilizing (R5) but not CXCR4-utilizing (X4) human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) via enhancement of production of CCR5-binding β-chemokines. It was reasoned that human T cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-1) immortalized T cell lines that express high levels of OX40L could serve as an unique source of physiologically functional OX40L. The fact that HTLV-1+ T cell lines simultaneously also express high levels of OX40 suggested a potential limitation. Results Results of our studies showed that HTLV-1+ T cell lines bound exogenous OX40 but not OX40L, indicating that HTLV-1+ T cell lines express an active form of OX40L but an inactive form of OX40. Anti-OX40 non-blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb), but not blocking mAb, stained HTLV-1+ T cell lines, suggesting that the OX40 might be saturated with endogenous OX40L. Functionality of the OX40L was confirmed by the fact that a paraformaldehyde (PFA)-fixed HTLV-1+ T cell lines inhibited the infection of autologous activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with R5 HIV-1 which was reversed by either anti-OX40L blocking mAb or a mixture of neutralizing mAbs against CCR5-binding β-chemokines. Conclusions Altogether, these results demonstrated that autologous T cell lines immortalized by HTLV-1 can be utilized as a conventional source of physiologically functional OX40L. PMID:24238037

  20. Mononuclear cells in the corneal response to endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, E.L.; Cruse, V.K.; Kwok, M.T.

    1982-04-01

    A severe keratitis can be produced after the direct injection of bacterial endotoxin, or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in rabbits. Corneal inflammation can progress to scarring and vascularization within a 2 to 3 week period. Pretreatment with systemic adrenal corticosteroids (triamcinolone) prevents this response. Limbal cellular and vascular events were studied during the first 20 hr after injection of LPS in treated and nontreated rabbits. Perivascular limbal inflammatory cells were counted and limbal vascular permeability was assessed by extravasation of 131I-albumin and 125I-fibrinogen in the cornea. Corticosteroids decreased but did not prevent the early protein extravasation and profoundly altered the inflammatory cell population around blood vessels at the limbus. Mononuclear cells, particularly mononuclear phagocytes, were sharply reduced. It is proposed that these cell types play an important role in the perpetuation and amplification of the inflammatory response in this reaction.

  1. Statin-induced proinflammatory response in mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells through the activation of caspase-1 and IL-18 secretion in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Coward, William R; Marei, Ayman; Yang, AiLi; Vasa-Nicotera, Mariuca M; Chow, Sek C

    2006-05-01

    Statins, which inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, have been shown recently to promote proinflammatory responses. We show in this study that both atorvastatin and simvastatin induced proinflammatory responses in mitogen-activated PBMCs by increasing the number of T cells secreting IFN-gamma. This is abolished by the presence of mevalonate, suggesting that statins act specifically by blocking the mevalonate pathway for cholesterol synthesis to promote the proinflammatory response. Both statins at low concentrations induced a dose-dependent increase in the number of IFN-gamma-secreting T cells in mitogen-activated PBMCs, whereas at higher concentrations the effect was abolished. The proinflammatory effect of statins was not seen in purified T cells per se activated with mitogen. However, conditioned medium derived from statin-treated PBMCs enhanced the number of IFN-gamma-secreting cells in activated purified T cells. This effect was not blocked by mevalonate, but was abolished by neutralizing Abs to IL-18 and IL-12. Similarly, the up-regulation of IFN-gamma-secreting T cells in PBMCs costimulated with statins and mitogens was blocked by the neutralizing anti-IL-18 and anti-IL-12. We showed that simvastatin stimulates the secretion of IL-18 and IL-1beta in monocytes. Active caspase-1, which is required for the processing and secretion of IL-18 and IL-1beta, was activated in simvastatin-treated monocytes. This was blocked by mevalonate and the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp (OMe) fluoromethylketone. Taken together, the proinflammatory response mediated by statins in activated PBMCs is mediated mainly via the activation of caspase-1 and IL-18 secretion in the monocytes and to a lesser extent by IL-12.

  2. Stimulation of production of prostaglandin E in gingival cells exposed to products of human blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, S M; Englis, D J; Clark, A; Russell, R G

    1981-01-01

    1. Supernatant media from cultures of unstimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells contained one or more factors that increased by several hundred-fold the production of prostaglandin E by fibroblast-like cells derived from both inflamed and normal human gingival tissue. 2. This stimulation occurred in a dose-dependent manner and was completely inhibited by 14 microM-indomethacin. 3. Responsiveness to the factor declined as the age of the cell culture increased. 4. An increase in prostaglandin E production was first observed after a 2h exposure to the mononuclear cell factor(s) and could be prevented by cycloheximide. 5. Brief exposure (0.5 and 1.0 h) to mononuclear cell factor did not increase prostaglandin E production by the cells in a subsequent 72 h incubation in the absence of mononuclear cell factor. 6. Addition of arachidonate (10 microM and 15 microM) further enhanced stimulation of prostaglandin E production in response to mononuclear cell factor. 7. The stimulatory activity was resistant to digestion by trypsin, but was heat-labile, so that only 17% remained after treatment at 56 degrees C for 30 min. PMID:6798975

  3. Stimulation of production of prostaglandin E in gingival cells exposed to products of human blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, S M; Englis, D J; Clark, A; Russell, R G

    1981-08-15

    1. Supernatant media from cultures of unstimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells contained one or more factors that increased by several hundred-fold the production of prostaglandin E by fibroblast-like cells derived from both inflamed and normal human gingival tissue. 2. This stimulation occurred in a dose-dependent manner and was completely inhibited by 14 microM-indomethacin. 3. Responsiveness to the factor declined as the age of the cell culture increased. 4. An increase in prostaglandin E production was first observed after a 2h exposure to the mononuclear cell factor(s) and could be prevented by cycloheximide. 5. Brief exposure (0.5 and 1.0 h) to mononuclear cell factor did not increase prostaglandin E production by the cells in a subsequent 72 h incubation in the absence of mononuclear cell factor. 6. Addition of arachidonate (10 microM and 15 microM) further enhanced stimulation of prostaglandin E production in response to mononuclear cell factor. 7. The stimulatory activity was resistant to digestion by trypsin, but was heat-labile, so that only 17% remained after treatment at 56 degrees C for 30 min.

  4. P2X7 Receptor-mediated Scavenger Activity of Mononuclear Phagocytes toward Non-opsonized Particles and Apoptotic Cells Is Inhibited by Serum Glycoproteins but Remains Active in Cerebrospinal Fluid*

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ben J.; Duce, James A.; Valova, Valentina A.; Wong, Bruce; Bush, Ashley I.; Petrou, Steven; Wiley, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid phagocytosis of non-opsonized particles including apoptotic cells is an important process that involves direct recognition of the target by multiple scavenger receptors including P2X7 on the phagocyte surface. Using a real-time phagocytosis assay, we studied the effect of serum proteins on this phagocytic process. Inclusion of 1–5% serum completely abolished phagocytosis of non-opsonized YG beads by human monocytes. Inhibition was reversed by pretreatment of serum with 1–10 mm tetraethylenepentamine, a copper/zinc chelator. Inhibitory proteins from the serum were determined as negatively charged glycoproteins (pI < 6) with molecular masses between 100 and 300 kDa. A glycoprotein-rich inhibitory fraction of serum not only abolished YG bead uptake but also inhibited phagocytosis of apoptotic lymphocytes or neuronal cells by human monocyte-derived macrophages. Three copper- and/or zinc-containing serum glycoproteins, ceruloplasmin, serum amyloid P-component, and amyloid precursor protein, were identified, and the purified proteins were shown to inhibit the phagocytosis of beads by monocytes as well as phagocytosis of apoptotic neuronal cells by macrophages. Human adult cerebrospinal fluid, which contains very little glycoprotein, had no inhibitory effect on phagocytosis of either beads or apoptotic cells. These data suggest for the first time that metal-interacting glycoproteins present within serum are able to inhibit the scavenger activity of mononuclear phagocytes toward insoluble debris and apoptotic cells. PMID:22461619

  5. Theophylline therapy inhibits neutrophil and mononuclear cell chemotaxis from chronic asthmatic children.

    PubMed Central

    Condino-Neto, A; Vilela, M M; Cambiucci, E C; Ribeiro, J D; Guglielmi, A A; Magna, L A; De Nucci, G

    1991-01-01

    1. Theophylline is commonly used to relieve symptoms of chronic asthma. Since neutrophil and mononuclear cell activation are associated with late phase asthmatic reactions, effects of theophylline on these cells may be of importance. 2. In the present investigation we compared neutrophil and mononuclear cell chemotaxis from chronic asthmatic children during and after theophylline therapy. 3. Thirty patients were recruited for the study. Each patient received theophylline orally for 10 days. The theophylline dose was 20 mg kg-1 day-1 given in four divided doses. On the tenth day, blood was collected into heparinized (100 u ml-1) and siliconized tubes 2 h after the last theophylline dose for chemotactic assays, cAMP and theophylline plasma determinations. When clinical conditions allowed, theophylline was discontinued for 7 days and the chemotactic assays, cAMP and theophylline plasma concentrations repeated. Serum complement and IgE levels were also determined. 4. Theophylline therapy clearly inhibited both spontaneous and stimulated neutrophil and mononuclear cell chemotaxis. Twenty-seven patients had therapeutic plasma concentrations of theophylline (5-20 micrograms ml-1). Discontinuation of theophylline therapy caused a significant decrease in plasma cAMP levels (44 and 31 pmol ml-1 respectively during and after treatment, n = 30, P less than 0.001). 5. The inhibition of neutrophil and mononuclear cell migration by theophylline therapy in chronic asthmatic children may be beneficial for the control of the inflammatory response observed in these patients. PMID:1659436

  6. Beyond macrophages: the diversity of mononuclear cells in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D; Desvignes, Ludovic

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. Although M. tuberculosis has traditionally been thought to survive and replicate in macrophages, recent work in our laboratory and others has revealed that M. tuberculosis infects multiple subsets of mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro. In experimental animals, M. tuberculosis infects no fewer than five distinct cell subsets in the lungs, including resident alveolar macrophages and 4 types of cells that recruited to the lungs in response to inflammatory signals: neutrophils, monocytes, interstitial macrophages, and dendritic cells. A characteristic of the adaptive immune response in TB is that it is delayed for several weeks following infection, and we have determined that this delay is due to prolonged residence of the bacteria in lung phagocytes prior to acquisition of the bacteria by dendritic cells. Among the mechanisms used by M. tuberculosis to delay acquisition by dendritic cells is to inhibit apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, which sequester the bacteria and prevent their acquisition by dendritic cells in the early stages of infection. We hypothesize that each infected cell subset makes a distinct contribution to the overall biology of M. tuberculosis and allows the bacteria to evade elimination by T-cell responses and to avoid rapid killing by antimycobacterial drugs.

  7. Kinetics and functional implications of Th1 and Th2 cytokine production following activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    McHugh, S; Deighton, J; Rifkin, I; Ewan, P

    1996-06-01

    The importance of cytokine production in some disease processes is now widely recognized. To investigate temporal relationships between cytokines, we stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro using the T cell mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and various antigens chosen to induce predominantly Th1 (streptokinase: streptodornase or purified protein derivative) or Th2 (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, bee or wasp venom: allergens in sensitive subjects) responses. Cytokine production was measured by sensitive bioassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Of the 30 subjects studied, 10 were normal and 20 individuals were allergic to either D. pteronyssinus (n = 10) or bee venom (n = 10) (examined before specific allergen immunotherapy). We examined the temporal profiles of a panel of cytokines produced in primary culture. In PHA-driven cultures, cytokines were found to be sequentially produced in the order interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-3, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-10, IL-6, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. The response to allergen in allergic patients was predominantly Th2 in nature, with the production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-6 and IL-10, but little or no IFN-gamma. IL-2, IL-3, TNF-alpha and IL-12 were also produced in low amounts. The response of both atopic and normal subjects to recall bacterial antigens was predominantly Th1, with high levels of IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha. The relevance of the order, amount and speed of production, characteristic kinetics (production, consumption, homeostatic regulation) and the cell source of the cytokines are discussed.

  8. Mononuclear cell modulation of connective tissue function: suppression of fibroblast growth by stimulation of endogenous prostaglandin production.

    PubMed Central

    Korn, J H; Halushka, P V; LeRoy, E C

    1980-01-01

    The role of immune cell products in modulating connective tissue metabolism was investigated. Supernates of both unstimulated and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human mononuclear cell cultures suppressed fibroblast proliferation (up to 90%) and concomintantly stimulated fibroblast prostaglandin E(PGE) synthesis (20- to 70-fold). The growth suppression was, at least in part, a secondary result of the increased fibroblast PGE synthesis; growth suppression (a) paralled the increased fibroblast PGE synthesis, (b) was reversed by addition of inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis (indomethacin, meclofenamate, and eicostaetraynoic acid), and (c) was reproduced by addition of exogenous PGE2 to fibroblast cultures. The prostaglandin-stimulatory, growth-suppressive activity was a product of non-T-lymphocyte, adherent cells and was present within 6 h of mononuclear cell culture. The activity was heat (56 degrees C) and trypsin sensitive, nondialyzable, and appeared in the 12,000-20,000 mol wt fractions by Sephadex G-100 chromatography. The activity in supernates of mononuclear cell cultures was removed by incubation with fibroblasts but not by similar incubation with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Mononuclear cells release a factor(s) which modulates fibroblast proliferation by altering prostaglandin metabolism. PMID:7356693

  9. Identification of functional antigenic segments of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 by differential immunoreactivity and by differential mitogenic responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, using active toxin fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Edwin, C; Kass, E H

    1989-01-01

    When toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 was subjected to papain hydrolysis, two serologically active fragments of 16.3 kilodaltons (16K fragment) and 12.4 kilodaltons (12K fragment) were generated, whereas a third fragment of 9.7 kilodaltons (10K fragment) was inactive. The biologic activities of the fragments were evaluated in vitro by determining their ability to promote nonspecific proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The 12K fragment was significantly (P less than or equal to 0.013) more stimulatory than the 16K fragment. When human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were preincubated for a period of 24 h with various concentrations of the 16K fragment, followed by incubation with a constant amount (2 x 10(-2) ng/ml) of whole toxin, the level of DNA synthesis induced by the holotoxin was reduced by approximately 60% when compared with that of controls exposed to whole toxin alone. The 12K fragment did not demonstrate a similar blocking effect. Immunoblots of the toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 digest, which were exposed to monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) developed against native toxin, depicted the presence of two different antigenic regions (epitopes). One MAb, 8-5-7, which has been shown previously to inhibit the biologic activity of the holotoxin in vitro and in vivo, reacted primarily with the 12K fragment. A second MAb, 10-6-1, that did not neutralize interleukin-1 production reacted primarily with the 16K fragment. On the basis of the differential mitogenic responses and the identification of heterologous epitopes, it was concluded that the functional region of the holotoxin can be partitioned into at least two functional segments encompassed between amino acid residues 53 and 87 and between amino acid residues 88 and 194 on the polypeptide chain. Images PMID:2731989

  10. Generation of avian cells resembling osteoclasts from mononuclear phagocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, J. I.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Blair, H. C.; Greenfield, E. M.; Athanasou, N. A.; Ross, F. P.

    1991-01-01

    Several lines of indirect evidence suggest that a monocyte family precursor gives rise to the osteoclast, although this hypothesis is controversial. Starting with a uniform population of nonspecific esterase positive, tartrate-sensitive, acid phosphatase-producing, mannose receptor-bearing mononuclear cells, prepared from dispersed marrow of calcium-deprived laying hens by cell density separation and selective cellular adherence, we generated multinucleated cells in vitro. When cultured with devitalized bone, these cells show, by electron microscopy, the characteristic osteoclast morphology in that they are mitochondria-rich, multinucleated, and, most importantly, develop characteristic ruffled membranes at the matrix attachment site. Moreover, as documented by scanning electron microscopy, these cells pit bone slices in a manner identical to freshly isolated osteoclasts. In addition, isoenzymes of acid phosphatase from generated osteoclasts, separated by 7.5% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 4, are identical to those of mature osteoclasts in migration pattern and tartrate resistance, although the precursor cells from which the osteoclasts are generated produce an entirely different isoenzyme, which is tartrate-sensitive and migrates less rapidly at pH 4. The fused cells also exhibit a cAMP response to prostaglandin E2. Therefore, osteoclast-like cells can be derived by in vitro culture of a marrow-derived monocyte cell population.

  11. Effect of malaria components on blood mononuclear cells involved in immune response.

    PubMed

    Punsawad, Chuchard

    2013-09-01

    During malaria infection, elevated levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and nitric oxide production have been associated with pathogenesis and disease severity. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have proposed that both Plasmodium falciparum hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols are able to modulate blood mononuclear cells, contributing to stimulation of signal transduction and downstream regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and subsequently leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide. The present review summarizes the published in vitro and in vivo studies that have investigated the mechanism of intracellular signal transduction and activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway in blood mononuclear cells after being inducted by Plasmodium falciparum malaria components. Particular attention is paid to hemozoin and glycosylphosphatidylinositols which reflect the important mechanism of signaling pathways involved in immune response.

  12. Frequency of Chlamydia trachomatis-specific T cell interferon-γ and interleukin-17 responses in CD4-enriched peripheral blood mononuclear cells of sexually active adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Barral, Romina; Desai, Ruchi; Zheng, Xiaojing; Frazer, Lauren C; Sucato, Gina S; Haggerty, Catherine L; O'Connell, Catherine M; Zurenski, Matthew A; Darville, Toni

    2014-06-01

    An evaluation of CD4 T cell responses to candidate Chlamydia trachomatis vaccine antigens was conducted in an adolescent female cohort exposed through natural infection to explore antigen immunogenicity and correlation with protection from reinfection. The frequency of peripheral blood CD4 T cell IFN-γ and IL-17 responses to three candidate vaccine antigens, polymorphic membrane protein G (PmpG), F (PmpF), and major outer membrane protein (MOMP), were determined by ELISPOT; responses to chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and to elementary bodies (EB) were included for comparison. Responses of Infected (n=8), Seropositive/Uninfected (n=13), and Seronegative/Uninfected (n=18) participants were compared. The median CD4 IFN-γ response to EB was significantly increased in Infected (P=0.003) and Seropositive/Uninfected (P=0.002) versus Seronegative/Uninfected female subjects. Higher rates of positive IFN-γ responders to EB, PmpF, and MOMP were detected in Seropositive/Uninfected versus Seronegative/Uninfected participants (P=0.021). IL-17 responses were generally low. A positive IFN-γ response to any of the antigens tested was associated with a trend toward a reduced risk of reinfection, although not statistically significant. Among this adolescent cohort, chlamydial-specific CD4 IFN-γ but not IL-17 responses were detected in acutely and previously infected participants and a positive CD4 IFN-γ response was associated with a non-significant reduced risk of reinfection.

  13. Frequency of Chlamydia trachomatis-specific T cell interferon-γ and interleukin-17 responses in CD4-enriched peripheral blood mononuclear cells of sexually active adolescent females

    PubMed Central

    Barral, Romina; Desai, Ruchi; Zheng, Xiaojing; Frazer, Lauren C.; Sucato, Gina S.; Haggerty, Catherine L.; O’Connell, Catherine M.; Zurenski, Matthew A.; Darville, Toni

    2015-01-01

    An evaluation of CD4 T cell responses to candidate Chlamydia trachomatis vaccine antigens was conducted in an adolescent female cohort exposed through natural infection to explore antigen immunogenicity and correlation with protection from reinfection. The frequency of peripheral blood CD4 T cell IFN-γ and IL-17 responses to three candidate vaccine antigens, polymorphic membrane protein G (PmpG), F (PmpF), and major outer membrane protein (MOMP), were determined by ELISPOT; responses to chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and to elementary bodies (EB) were included for comparison. Responses of Infected (n = 8), Seropositive/Uninfected (n = 13), and Seronegative/Uninfected (n = 18) participants were compared. The median CD4 IFN-γ response to EB was significantly increased in Infected (P = 0.003) and Seropositive/Uninfected (P = 0.002) versus Seronegative/Uninfected female subjects. Higher rates of positive IFN-γ responders to EB, PmpF, and MOMP were detected in Seropositive/Uninfected versus Seronegative/Uninfected participants (P = 0.021). IL-17 responses were generally low. A positive IFN-γ response to any of the antigens tested was associated with a trend toward a reduced risk of reinfection, although not statistically significant. Among this adolescent cohort, chlamydial-specific CD4 IFN-γ but not IL-17 responses were detected in acutely and previously infected participants and a positive CD4 IFN-γ response was associated with a non-significant reduced risk of reinfection. PMID:24582738

  14. Treatment with at Homeopathic Complex Medication Modulates Mononuclear Bone Marrow Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Beatriz; Abud, Ana Paula R.; de Oliveira, Carolina C.; Cardoso, Francolino; Bernardi, Raffaello Popa Di; Guimarães, Fernando S. F.; Gabardo, Juarez; de Freitas Buchi, Dorly

    2011-01-01

    A homeopathic complex medication (HCM), with immunomodulatory properties, is recommended for patients with depressed immune systems. Previous studies demonstrated that the medication induces an increase in leukocyte number. The bone marrow microenvironment is composed of growth factors, stromal cells, an extracellular matrix and progenitor cells that differentiate into mature blood cells. Mice were our biological model used in this research. We now report in vivo immunophenotyping of total bone marrow cells and ex vivo effects of the medication on mononuclear cell differentiation at different times. Cells were examined by light microscopy and cytokine levels were measured in vitro. After in vivo treatment with HCM, a pool of cells from the new marrow microenvironment was analyzed by flow cytometry to detect any trend in cell alteration. The results showed decreases, mainly, in CD11b and TER-119 markers compared with controls. Mononuclear cells were used to analyze the effects of ex vivo HCM treatment and the number of cells showing ring nuclei, niche cells and activated macrophages increased in culture, even in the absence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Cytokines favoring stromal cell survival and differentiation in culture were induced in vitro. Thus, we observe that HCM is immunomodulatory, either alone or in association with other products. PMID:19736221

  15. Expression of bacterial superantigen genes in mice induces localized mononuclear cell inflammatory responses.

    PubMed Central

    Dow, S W; Potter, T A

    1997-01-01

    Bacterial superantigens are potent T cell activators, and superantigen proteins have been injected into mice and other animals to study T cell responses in vivo. When superantigen proteins are injected, however, the T cell stimulatory effects cannot be confined to specific tissues. Therefore, to target superantigen expression to specific tissues, we used gene transfer techniques to express bacterial superantigen genes in mammalian cells in vitro and in tissues in vivo. Murine, human, and canine cells transfected with superantigen genes in vitro all produced superantigen proteins both intracellularly and extracellularly, as assessed by bioassay, immunocytochemistry, and antigen ELISA. Superantigens produced by transfected eukaryotic cells retained their biologic specificity for T cell receptor binding. Intramuscular injection of superantigen plasmid DNA in vivo induced an intense intramuscular mononuclear cell infiltrate, an effect that could not be reproduced by intramuscular injection of superantigen protein. Intradermal and intravenous injection of superantigen DNA induced cutaneous and intrapulmonary mononuclear cell inflammatory responses, respectively. Thus, superantigen genes can be expressed by mammalian cells in vivo. Superantigen gene therapy represents a novel method of targeting localized T cell inflammatory reactions, with potential application to treatment of cancer and certain infectious diseases. PMID:9169491

  16. Secretome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhances Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Thomas; Gschwandtner, Maria; Werba, Gregor; Barresi, Caterina; Zimmermann, Matthias; Golabi, Bahar; Tschachler, Erwin; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-healing skin ulcers are often resistant to most common therapies. Treatment with growth factors has been demonstrated to improve closure of chronic wounds. Here we investigate whether lyophilized culture supernatant of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is able to enhance wound healing. PBMC from healthy human individuals were prepared and cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were collected, dialyzed and lyophilized (SECPBMC). Six mm punch biopsy wounds were set on the backs of C57BL/6J-mice and SECPBMC containing emulsion or controls were applied daily for three days. Morphology and neo-angiogenesis were analyzed by H&E-staining and CD31 immuno-staining, respectively. In vitro effects on diverse skin cells were investigated by migration assays, cell cycle analysis, and tube formation assay. Signaling pathways were analyzed by Western blot analysis. Application of SECPBMC on 6 mm punch biopsy wounds significantly enhanced wound closure. H&E staining of the wounds after 6 days revealed that wound healing was more advanced after application of SECPBMC containing emulsion. Furthermore, there was a massive increase in CD31 positive cells, indicating enhanced neo-angiogenesis. In primary human fibroblasts (FB) and keratinocytes (KC) migration but not proliferation was induced. In endothelial cells (EC) SECPBMC induced proliferation and tube-formation in a matrigel-assay. In addition, SECPBMC treatment of skin cells led to the induction of multiple signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and survival. In summary, we could show that emulsions containing the secretome of PBMC derived from healthy individuals accelerates wound healing in a mouse model and induce wound healing associated mechanisms in human primary skin cells. The formulation and use of such emulsions might therefore represent a possible novel option for the treatment of non-healing skin ulcers. PMID:23533667

  17. Secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells enhances wound healing.

    PubMed

    Mildner, Michael; Hacker, Stefan; Haider, Thomas; Gschwandtner, Maria; Werba, Gregor; Barresi, Caterina; Zimmermann, Matthias; Golabi, Bahar; Tschachler, Erwin; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-healing skin ulcers are often resistant to most common therapies. Treatment with growth factors has been demonstrated to improve closure of chronic wounds. Here we investigate whether lyophilized culture supernatant of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is able to enhance wound healing. PBMC from healthy human individuals were prepared and cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were collected, dialyzed and lyophilized (SEC(PBMC)). Six mm punch biopsy wounds were set on the backs of C57BL/6J-mice and SEC(PBMC) containing emulsion or controls were applied daily for three days. Morphology and neo-angiogenesis were analyzed by H&E-staining and CD31 immuno-staining, respectively. In vitro effects on diverse skin cells were investigated by migration assays, cell cycle analysis, and tube formation assay. Signaling pathways were analyzed by Western blot analysis. Application of SEC(PBMC) on 6 mm punch biopsy wounds significantly enhanced wound closure. H&E staining of the wounds after 6 days revealed that wound healing was more advanced after application of SEC(PBMC) containing emulsion. Furthermore, there was a massive increase in CD31 positive cells, indicating enhanced neo-angiogenesis. In primary human fibroblasts (FB) and keratinocytes (KC) migration but not proliferation was induced. In endothelial cells (EC) SEC(PBMC) induced proliferation and tube-formation in a matrigel-assay. In addition, SEC(PBMC) treatment of skin cells led to the induction of multiple signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and survival. In summary, we could show that emulsions containing the secretome of PBMC derived from healthy individuals accelerates wound healing in a mouse model and induce wound healing associated mechanisms in human primary skin cells. The formulation and use of such emulsions might therefore represent a possible novel option for the treatment of non-healing skin ulcers.

  18. Immunomodulatory Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum Lp62 on Intestinal Epithelial and Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Dos Santos, Thalis; Alves Melo, Tauá; Almeida, Milena Evangelista; Passos Rezende, Rachel; Romano, Carla Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria are known for their ability to modulate the immune system. They have been shown to inhibit inflammation in experiments with animal models, cell culture, and clinical trials. The objective of this study was to elucidate the anti-inflammatory potential of Lactobacillus plantarum Lp62, isolated from cocoa fermentation, in a cell culture model. Lp62 inhibited IL-8 production by Salmonella Typhi-stimulated HT-29 cells and prevented the adhesion of pathogens to these epithelial cells. The probiotic strain was able to modulate TNF-α, IL1-β, and IL-17 secretion by J774 macrophages. J774 activation was reduced by coincubation with Lp62. PBMC culture showed significantly higher levels of CD4(+)CD25(+) T lymphocytes following treatment with Lp62. Probiotics also induced increased IL-10 secretion by mononuclear cells. L. plantarum Lp62 was able to inhibit inflammatory stimulation in epithelial cells and macrophages and activated a tolerogenic profile in mononuclear cells of healthy donors. These results indicate this strain for a possible application in the treatment or prevention of inflammatory diseases.

  19. Synthesis of multivalent glycoconjugates containing the immunoactive LELTE peptide: effect of glycosylation on cellular activation and natural killing by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Renaudet, Olivier; Krenek, Karel; Bossu, Isabelle; Dumy, Pascal; Kádek, Alan; Adámek, David; Vanek, Ondrej; Kavan, Daniel; Gazák, Radek; Sulc, Miroslav; Bezouska, Karel; Kren, Vladimír

    2010-05-19

    Pentapeptide diacidic sequence LELTE, derived from the mycobacterial heat shock protein hsp65, has been recently identified as a "danger" signal of the immune system effective via specific binding to the universal leukocyte triggering receptor CD69. This sequence is not active per se, only after its presentation within the multivalent environment of its parent protein, or after artificial dimerization using a standard bifunctional reagents. Here we describe an entirely new way of presenting of this peptide based on its attachment to a cyclopeptide RAFT scaffold (K-K-K-P-G)(2) through the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues, alone or in combination with the carbohydrate epitope alphaGalNAc. The ability of such RAFT scaffolds to precipitate the target CD69 receptor or to activate CD69-positive cells is enhanced in compounds 2 and 4 possessing combined peptide/carbohydrate expression. Compounds 2 and 4 are highly efficient activators of natural killer lymphocytes, but they are completely inactive from the point of view of activation-induced apoptosis of lymphocytes by the target cells. These unique properties make the combined peptide/carbohydrate RAFTs highly suitable for future evaluation in animal tumor therapies in vivo and predict them to be readily available and efficient immunoactivators.

  20. Fibroblast prostaglandin E2 synthesis. Persistence of an abnormal phenotype after short-term exposure to mononuclear cell products.

    PubMed

    Korn, J H

    1983-05-01

    Acquired abnormalities of connective tissue metabolism in inflammatory diseases often persist when lesional tissue is maintained in in vitro culture. Although connective tissue cells are exposed to inflammatory cell-derived mediators in vivo and such mediators have been shown to alter connective tissue cell behavior, it is unclear whether the persistence of metabolic defects in vitro could result from remote in vivo exposure to these mediators. An in vitro model was used to test whether transient exposure of normal fibroblasts to inflammatory mediators could lead to metabolic alterations that persist during in vitro culture. Short-term exposure of human foreskin fibroblasts in vitro to supernates of mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells led to persistent abnormalities of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) metabolism. Fibroblasts previously exposed to mononuclear cell products synthesized more than twice as much PGE2 when stimulated compared with similarly stimulated but previously unexposed control fibroblasts of the same strain. The enhanced PGE2 synthesis persisted for as long as 20 wk and 19 cell generations after the original exposure to mononuclear cell products. Exposure of fibroblast populations to mononuclear cell products may, thus, lead to metabolite alterations that are still evident after multiple cell generations.

  1. Osteoclastogenic Potential of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Cleidocranial Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Ventura, Annamaria; Piacente, Laura; Ciccarelli, Maria; Gigante, Margherita; Gesualdo, Loreto; Colucci, Silvia; Cavallo, Luciano; Grano, Maria; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by hypoplastic or aplastic clavicles, dental abnormalities, and delayed closure of the cranial sutures. In addition, mid-face hypoplasia, short stature, skeletal anomalies and osteoporosis are common. We aimed to evaluate osteoclastogenesis in a child (4 years old), who presented with clinical signs of CCD and who have been diagnosed as affected by deletion of RUNX2, master gene in osteoblast differentiation, but also affecting T cell development and indirectly osteoclastogenesis. The results of this study may help to understand whether in this disease is present an alteration in the bone-resorptive cells, the osteoclasts (OCs). Unfractionated and T cell-depleted Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from patient were cultured in presence/absence of recombinant human M-CSF and RANKL. At the end of the culture period, OCs only developed following the addition of M-CSF and RANKL. Moreover, real-time PCR experiment showed that freshly isolated T cells expressed the osteoclastogenic cytokines (RANKL and TNFα) at very low level, as in controls. This is in accordance with results arising from flow cytometry experiments demonstrating an high percentage of circulating CD4+CD28+ and CD4+CD27+ T cells, not able to produce osteoclastogenic cytokines. Also RANKL, OPG and CTX serum levels in CCD patient are similar to controls, whereas QUS measurements showed an osteoporotic status (BTT-Z score -3.09) in the patient. In conclusions, our findings suggest that the heterozygous deletion of RUNX2 in this CCD patient did not alter the osteoclastogenic potential of PBMCs in vitro. PMID:24578613

  2. In vitro action of sho-seiryu-to on allergen-exposed mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Inoue, K; Kitamura, Y; Shimada, A; Takano, H

    2014-01-01

    Although Sho-seiryu-to (SST), used as a traditional herbal (Kampo) medicine mainly in China and Korea, is shown to have immunomodulating potential, such as an anti-allergic one, its underlying mechanism has not been completely clarified. To partially address the issue, we explored its effects on allergen-exposed mononuclear cells. Male balb/c mice were intraperitoneally administered ovalbumin (OVA: 20 μg) plus alum or vehicle twice (Day 0 and Day 14). At Day 21, mice were sacrificed and splenocytes (mononuclear cells) were isolated and cultured in the presence or absence of OVA with or without SST. Thereafter, helper T-related cytokines in the culture supernatants were evaluated by means of ELISA. Protein level of interferon-γ was lower than 5.0 pg/mL in the supernatants from OVA– non-exposed or -exposed mononuclear cells in the presence or absence of OVA stimulation. On the other hand, SST induced the cytokine from both types of mononuclear cells in the presence (P < 0.05) or absence of OVA stimulation as compared to corresponding control. By contrast, interleukin (IL)-4 level tended to be decreased by SST in OVA-non-exposed mononuclear cells as did IL-13 in both non-exposed and exposed mononuclear cells as compared to vehicle. In conclusion, immunoregulating efficacy by SST on allergy-prone subjects may include, at least in part, restoring helper T balance mainly through hyperproduction of IFN-γ against mononuclear cells such as lymphocytes.

  3. Fish peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparation for future monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Pierrard, Marie-Aline; Roland, Kathleen; Kestemont, Patrick; Dieu, Marc; Raes, Martine; Silvestre, Frédéric

    2012-07-15

    Fish species possess many specific characteristics that support their use in ecotoxicology. Widely used in clinical research, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) can reasonably be exploited as relevant target cells in the assessment of environmental chemical toxicity. The current article focuses on the methods necessary to isolate, characterize, and culture fish PBMCs. These procedures were successfully applied on an endangered species, the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.), and on an economically important and worldwide exported species, the Asian catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus S.). Proteomic approaches can be useful to screen xenobiotic exposure at the protein expression level, giving the opportunity to develop early warning signals thanks to molecular signatures of toxicity. To date, a major limitation of proteomic analyses is that most protein expression profiles often reveal the same predominant and frequently differentially expressed families of proteins regardless of the experimental stressing conditions. The current study describes a methodology to get a postnuclear fraction of high quality isolated from fish PBMCs in order to perform subsequent subproteomic analyses. Applied on samples from eel, the subproteomic analysis (two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis) allowed the identification by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and searches in the full NCBInr (National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant) database of 66 proteins representing 36 different proteins validated through Peptide and Protein Prophet of Scaffold software.

  4. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory effect of GcMAF on PBMCs. In addition, we demonstrate that GcMAF (1 ng/ml) inhibited prostaglandin E(1)- and human breast cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Finally, we tested different GcMAF preparations on CAM, and the assay proved to be a reliable, reproducible and inexpensive method to determine the relative potencies of different preparations and their stability; we observed that storage at room temperature for 15 days decreased GcMAF potency by about 50%. These data could prove useful for upcoming clinical trials on GcMAF.

  5. Particulate matter induces prothrombotic microparticle shedding by human mononuclear and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neri, Tommaso; Pergoli, Laura; Petrini, Silvia; Gravendonk, Lotte; Balia, Cristina; Scalise, Valentina; Amoruso, Angela; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Bollati, Valentina; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Particulate airborne pollution is associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity. Microparticles are extracellular vesicles shed by cells upon activation or apoptosis involved in physiological processes such as coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation. We investigated the hypothesis that particulate matter causes the shedding of microparticles by human mononuclear and endothelial cells. Cells, isolated from the blood and the umbilical cords of normal donors, were cultured in the presence of particulate from a standard reference. Microparticles were assessed in the supernatant as phosphatidylserine concentration. Microparticle-associated tissue factor was assessed by an one-stage clotting assay. Nanosight technology was used to evaluate microparticle size distribution. Particulate matter induces a dose- and time- dependent, rapid (1h) increase in microparticle generation in both cells. These microparticles express functional tissue factor. Particulate matter increases intracellular calcium concentration and phospholipase C inhibition reduces microparticle generation. Nanosight analysis confirmed that upon exposure to particulate matter both cells express particles with a size range consistent with the definition of microparticles (50-1000 nm). Exposure of mononuclear and endothelial cells to particulate matter upregulates the generation of microparticles at least partially mediated by calcium mobilization. This observation might provide a further link between airborne pollution and cardiopulmonary morbidity.

  6. Retinoid modulation of collagenase production by adherent human mononuclear cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, A; Louie, J S; Uitto, J

    1987-01-01

    Previous observations have suggested that retinoids might be useful for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study we examined the effects of various retinoids on collagenase production by adherent human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. We have previously shown that these cells, consisting predominantly of monocyte-macrophages, actively synthesize and secrete collagenase upon stimulation with concanavalin A. The cells were incubated in serum free medium with all-trans-retinoic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, all-trans-retinal, or Ro 10-9359 (trimethylmethoxyphenyl retinoic acid ethyl ester) for up to 72 hours, and the collagenase activity was determined with [3H]proline labelled type I collagen as substrate. The incubation of mononuclear cells with all-trans-retinoic acid in the concentration range 10(-7)-10(-5) mol/l resulted in a dose dependent inhibition of the collagenase production. All-trans-retinal was also a potent inhibitor, whereas 13-cis-retinoic acid and Ro 10-9359 in a concentration of 10(-5) mol/l had a lesser effect. Control experiments indicated that the inhibition of collagenase production by all-trans-retinoic acid did not result from inhibition of total protein synthesis nor could it be explained by induction of an inhibitory molecule. These results indicate that retinoids with distinct structural features can inhibit collagenase production by monocyte-macrophages, and suggest a role for retinoids in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:3036026

  7. CD11b(+) Mononuclear Cells Mitigate Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Eldredge, Laurie C; Treuting, Piper M; Manicone, Anne M; Ziegler, Steven F; Parks, William C; McGuire, John K

    2016-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common consequence of life-saving interventions for infants born with immature lungs. Resident tissue myeloid cells regulate lung pathology, but their role in BPD is poorly understood. To determine the role of lung interstitial myeloid cells in neonatal responses to lung injury, we exposed newborn mice to hyperoxia, a neonatal mouse lung injury model with features of human BPD. In newborn mice raised in normoxia, we identified a CD45(+) F4/80(+) CD11b(+), Ly6G(lo-int) CD71(+) population of cells in lungs of neonatal mice present in significantly greater percentages than in adult mice. In response to hyperoxia, surface marker and gene expression in whole lung macrophages/monocytes was biased to an alternatively activated phenotype. Partial depletion of these CD11b(+) mononuclear cells using CD11b-diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor transgenic mice resulted in 60% mortality by 40 hours of hyperoxia exposure with more severe lung injury, perivascular edema, and alveolar hemorrhage compared with DT-treated CD11b-DT receptor-negative controls, which displayed no mortality. These results identify an antiinflammatory population of CD11b(+) mononuclear cells that are protective in hyperoxia-induced neonatal lung injury in mice, and suggest that enhancing their beneficial functions may be a treatment strategy in infants at risk for BPD.

  8. The proliferative effects of asbestos-exposed peripheral blood mononuclear cells on mesothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    MAKI, YUHO; NISHIMURA, YASUMITSU; TOYOOKA, SHINICHI; SOH, JUNICHI; TSUKUDA, KAZUNORI; SHIEN, KAZUHIKO; FURUKAWA, MASASHI; MURAOKA, TAKAYUKI; UENO, TSUYOSHI; TANAKA, NORIMITSU; YAMAMOTO, HIROMASA; ASANO, HIROAKI; MAEDA, MEGUMI; KUMAGAI-TAKEI, NAOKO; LEE, SUNI; MATSUZAKI, HIDENORI; OTSUKI, TAKEMI; MIYOSHI, SHINICHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is thought to arise from the direct effect of asbestos on mesothelial cells. However, MM takes a long time to develop following exposure to asbestos, which suggests that the effects of asbestos are complex. The present study examined the effects of asbestos exposure on the cell growth of MeT-5A human mesothelial cells via cytokines produced by immune cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with antibodies against cluster of differentiation (CD)3 and CD28 upon exposure to the asbestos chrysotile A (CA) or crocidolite (CR); the growth of MeT-5A cells in media supplemented with PBMC culture supernatants was subsequently examined. MeT-5A cells exhibited an increase in proliferation when grown in supernatant from the 7-day PBMC culture exposed to CA or CR. Analysis of cytokine production demonstrated increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-3, IL-5, IL-13 and IL-17A in supernatants. Individual administration of these cytokines, excluding G-CSF and GM-CSF, led to an increase in cell growth of MeT-5A, whereas this effect was not observed following the combined administration of these cytokines. The results indicate that cytokines secreted by immune cells upon exposure to asbestos cause an increase in the growth activity of mesothelial cells, suggesting that alterations in the production of cytokines by immune cells may contribute to tumorigenesis in individuals exposed to asbestos. PMID:27123108

  9. Human mononuclear cell function after 4 C storage during 1-G and microgravity conditions of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, Richard; Taylor, Gerald; Lionetti, Fabian; Neale, Laurie; Curren, Tim

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of restoring immune competence of crewmembers during a prolonged spaceflight by infusions of autologous blood components, the effect of storage at 4 C aboard Space Shuttle Columbia (Mission 61-c) on the activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs), stored as leukocyte concentrates in autologous plasa, was investigated. The results of preflight storage at 4 C demonstrated a progressive daily loss in mitogen-stimulated protein synthesis, and thymidine uptake, as well as a progressive reduction in the percentage of PBMNCs expressing cell-surface phenotype markers. The ability of PBMNCs stored at 4 C for 8 d in Columbia's middeck, to become activated and proliferate in vitro was similar to that of cells that remained for 7 d on ground.

  10. Red Blood Cell Supernatant Potentiates LPS-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Response From Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nydam, Trevor L.; Clarke, Jason H.; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.; McCarter, Martin D.

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion has an immunomodulatory capacity on its recipients through accumulation of immunologically active substances with blood storage, and prestorage leukoreduction reduces many of these mediators. We investigated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to packed red blood cell (PRBC) supernatants from leukoreduced (LR) or non-leukoreduced (NLR) units with variable duration of storage. PRBC units were collected with or without leukoreduction on Day 0 before routine storage. The plasma fraction (supernatant) was isolated from LR and NLR units after 1 day (D1) or 42 days (D42) of storage and exposed to PBMCs versus control media for 24 h, then with LPS for an additional 24 h. Cell supernatants were analyzed for IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α by cytokine bead array. IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 were significantly elevated in PRBC groups versus control. D42 NLR PRBC supernatant significantly increased secretion of IL-1β and IL-6 compared to D1 NLR PRBC supernatant. LR significantly attenuated the cytokine response of IL-1β. Thus, PRBC supernatant potentiates proinflammatory LPS-induced cytokine secretion from PBMCs. This response is accentuated with storage duration and partially attenuated with leukoreduction. These findings may partially explain the immune activation seen clinically after blood transfusion. PMID:19441884

  11. The Transcriptome of Equine Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pacholewska, Alicja; Drögemüller, Michaela; Klukowska-Rötzler, Jolanta; Lanz, Simone; Hamza, Eman; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Marti, Eliane; Gerber, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Complete transcriptomic data at high resolution are available only for a few model organisms with medical importance. The gene structures of non-model organisms are mostly computationally predicted based on comparative genomics with other species. As a result, more than half of the horse gene models are known only by projection. Experimental data supporting these gene models are scarce. Moreover, most of the annotated equine genes are single-transcript genes. Utilizing RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) the experimental validation of predicted transcriptomes has become accessible at reasonable costs. To improve the horse genome annotation we performed RNA-seq on 561 samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from 85 Warmblood horses. The mapped sequencing reads were used to build a new transcriptome assembly. The new assembly revealed many alternative isoforms associated to known genes or to those predicted by the Ensembl and/or Gnomon pipelines. We also identified 7,531 transcripts not associated with any horse gene annotated in public databases. Of these, 3,280 transcripts did not have a homologous match to any sequence deposited in the NCBI EST database suggesting horse specificity. The unknown transcripts were categorized as coding and noncoding based on predicted coding potential scores. Among them 230 transcripts had high coding potential score, at least 2 exons, and an open reading frame of at least 300 nt. We experimentally validated 9 new equine coding transcripts using RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing. Our results provide valuable detailed information on many transcripts yet to be annotated in the horse genome. PMID:25790166

  12. Supernatant of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induces Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Possessing Mesenchymal Features

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gang; Xu, Jun-jun; Deng, Zhi-hong; Feng, Jie; Jin, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that some cells from peripheral blood fibroblast-like mononuclear cells have the capacity to differentiate into mesenchymal lineages. However, the insufficiency of these cells in the circulation challenges the cell isolation and subsequently limits the clinical application of these cells. In the present study, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (pbMNCs) were isolated from wound animals and treated with the supernatant of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs). Results showed these pbMNCs were fibroblast-like, had stromal morphology, were negative for CD34 and CD45, but positive for Vimentin and Collagen I, and had the multipotency to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts. We named these induced peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ipbMSCs). Skin grafts in combination with ipbMSCs and collagen I were applied for wound healing, and results revealed ipbMSC exhibited similar potency and effectiveness in the promotion of wound healing to the bmMSCs. Hereafter, we speculate that the mixture of growth factors and chemokines secreted by bmMSCs may play an important roles in the induction of the proliferation and mesenchymal differentiation of mononuclear cells. Our results are clinically relevant because it provide a new method for the acquisition of MSCs which can be used as a candidate for the wound repair. PMID:21494428

  13. Adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells transdifferentiate in vitro and integrate into the retina in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Guan, Liping; Huang, Bing; Li, Weihua; Su, Qiao; Yu, Minbin; Xu, Xiaoping; Luo, Ting; Lin, Shaochun; Sun, Xuerong; Chen, Mengfei; Chen, Xigu

    2011-06-01

    Adult peripheral blood-derived cells are able to differentiate into a variety of cell types, including nerve cells, liver-like cells and epithelial cells. However, their differentiation into retina-like cells is controversial. In the present study, transdifferentiation potential of human adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells into retina-like cells and integration into the retina of mice were investigated. Freshly isolated adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells were divided into two groups: cells in group I were cultured in neural stem cell medium, and cells in group II were exposed to conditioned medium from rat retinal tissue culture. After 5 days, several distinct cell morphologies were observed, including standard mononuclear, neurons with one or two axons and elongated glial-like cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of neural stem cell, neuron and retina cell markers demonstrated that cells in both groups were nestin-, MAP2 (microtubule-associated protein)- and GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein)-positive. Flow cytometry results suggested a significant increase in nestin-, MAP2- and CD16-positive cells in group I and nestin-, GFAP-, MAP2-, vimentin- and rhodopsin-positive cells in group II. To determine survival, migration and integration in vivo, cell suspensions (containing group I or group II cells) were injected into the vitreous or the peritoneum. Tissue specimens were obtained and immunostained 4 weeks after transplantation. We found that cells delivered by intravitreal injection integrated into the retina. Labelled cells were not detected in the retina of mice receiving differentiated cells by intraperitoneal injection, but cells (groups I and II) were detected in the liver and spleen. Our findings revealed that human adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells could be induced to transdifferentiate into neural precursor cells and retinal progenitor cells in vitro, and the differentiated peripheral blood mononuclear cells can migrate and integrate

  14. Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Protect Neurons and Modulate Microglia in Cell Culture Models of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sushil; Yang, Bing; Strong, Roger; Xi, Xiao Pei; Brenneman, Miranda; Grotta, James C.; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Savitz, Sean I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although several studies have provided evidence for the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (MNCs) in animal models of stroke, the mechanisms underlying their benefits remain largely unknown. We have determined the neuroprotective potential of MNCs in primary neuronal cultures exposed to various injuries in vitro. Methods Cortical neurons in culture were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation, hypoxia, or hydrogen peroxide and cell death was assayed by MTT, caspase-3 activation or TUNEL labelling at 24 hrs. Cultures were randomized to co-treatment with MNC-derived supernatants or media before injury exposure. In separate experiments, macrophage or microglial cultures were exposed to lipopolypolysacharide (LPS) in the presence and absence of MNC-derived supernatants. Neuronal cultures were then exposed to conditioned media derived from activated macrophages or microglia. Cytokines from the supernantants of MNC cultures exposed to normoxia or hypoxia were also estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Results MNC-derived supernatants attenuated neuronal death induced by OGD, hypoxia, hydrogen peroxide, and conditioned macrophage/microglial media and contain a number of trophic factors including IL-10, IGF-1, VEGF, and SDF-1. Conclusion MNCs provide broad neuroprotection against a variety of injuries relevant to stroke. PMID:20629187

  15. Lytic Effects of Serum and Mononuclear Leukocytes on Oral Epithelial Cells in Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-07

    Publiqation 3-32to4-84 RECURRENT APHTHOUS STOMATITIS 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(e) PAUL R. BURNETT AND DAVID...vitro cytolytic reactions correlating with recur- rent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). The cytolytic effects of sera and mononuclear leukocytes from...the attached manuscript entitled "Lytic Effects of Serum and Mononuclear Leukocytes on Oral Epithelial Cells in Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis ." 2. If

  16. Differential MSC activation leads to distinct mononuclear leukocyte binding mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Daniel J.; Dicarlo, Bryan; Hetz, Robert A.; Smith, Philippa; Cox, Charles S.; Olson, Scott D.

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the field of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal cell (MSC) biology have demonstrated that MSCs can improve disease outcome when `activated' to exert immunomodulatory effects. However, the precise mechanisms modulating MSC-immune cells interactions remain largely elusive. In here, we activated MSC based on a recent polarization paradigm, in which MSCs can be polarized towards a pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotype depending on the Toll-like receptor stimulated, to dissect the mechanisms through which MSCs physically interact with and modulate leukocytes in this context. Our data show that MSCs activated through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 dependent binding of leukocytes. On the other hand, TLR3 stimulation strongly increases leukocytes affinity to MSC comparatively, through the formation of cable-like hyaluronic acid structures. In addition, TLR4 activation elicited secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators by MSCs, whereas TLR3-activated MSCs displayed a milder pro-inflammatory phenotype, similar to inactivated MSCs. However, the differently activated MSCs maintained their ability to suppress leukocyte activation at similar levels in our in vitro model, and this immunomodulatory property was shown here to be partially mediated by prostaglandin. These results reinforce the concept that alternate activation profiles control MSC responses and may impact the therapeutic use of MSCs.

  17. Pamidronate infusion in patients with systemic sclerosis results in changes in blood mononuclear cell cytokine profiles

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, L D; Warrington, K J; Barrow, K D; Pugazhenthi, M; Watsky, M A; Somes, G; Ingels, J; Postlethwaite, A E

    2006-01-01

    A single infusion of pamidronate was given to patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma, SSc) to assess effects on cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and lymphocyte subsets. Eighteen patients with SSc received a single intravenous dose of 60 mg of pamidronate and were followed for 6 months. Assessment of cytokine production [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-4] by PBMC and lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry was carried out before and after the pamidronate infusion. Unstimulated PBMC produced increased amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α and reduced levels of TGF-β1 for up to 24 weeks after the infusion. γδ T cells from patients with SSc were activated in vitro and produced increased IFN-γ. The effects of pamidronate on modulation of cytokine profiles in patients with SSc may merit future study. PMID:17100755

  18. Theileria annulata and T. parva infect and transform different bovine mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, R L; Innes, E A; Glass, E J; Brown, C G

    1989-01-01

    Bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were labelled with monoclonal antibodies recognizing bovine MHC class II, sIgM, monocyte, T-helper and T-cytotoxic cell phenotypes. They were sorted into positive and negative populations with a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). The cell populations were infected in vitro with sporozoites of either Theileria annulata or T. parva, and the degree of infection and transformation determined. The results showed that despite the many similarities between these two parasites, they infected different cells of the immune system. T. annulata preferentially infected MHC class II-positive cells but did not infect T cells. Monocytes were infected very efficiently by T. annulata but were uninfectable with T. parva. B cells were infected much more efficiently by T. annulata than T. parva. Cell lines derived from infections with T. annulata were analysed phenotypically. Virtually all reactivity was lost for the anti-sIgM and the anti-monocyte monoclonal antibodies post-infection and no T-cell markers were detected. PMID:2784413

  19. Decreased level of albumin in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Tae; Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the phenotypic level of albumin in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. A specific reduction of albumin was identified by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Decreased albumin content was also confirmed by immunoblotting and quantitative real-time PCR. Since albumin is a major and predominant antioxidant in plasma, the PBMC albumin may also contribute to their antioxidant activity. By measuring the amount of H2O2, lipid peroxidation and the redox form of glutathione, it was found that the production of the oxidative stress was elevated in STZ-diabetic rats compared to that of normal control. We suggest, therefore, that decreased albumin content may lead to the decreased antioxidant activity in the PBMC of type 1 diabetic rats.

  20. Conditioning causes an increase in Glucose Transporter-4 levels in mononuclear cells in sled dogs

    PubMed Central

    Schnurr, Theresia M.; Reynolds, Arleigh J.; Gustafson, Sally J.; Duffy, Lawrence K.; Dunlap, Kriya L.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of physical conditioning on the expression of the insulin sensitive glucose transporter 4 protein (GLUT4) on mononuclear cells and HOMA-IR levels in dogs and compared to results reported in human skeletal muscle and the skeletal muscle of rodent models. Blood was sampled from conditioned dogs (n=8) and sedentary dogs (n=8). The conditioned dogs were exercised four months prior the experiment and were following a uniform training protocol, whereas the sedentary dogs were not. GLUT4 expression in mononuclear cells and plasma insulin levels were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Blood glucose levels were determined using blood plasma. HOMA-IR was calculated using plasma insulin and blood glucose levels using the linear approximation formula. Our results indicate that the state of conditioning had a significant effect on the GLUT4 expression at the surface of mononuclear cells. HOMA-IR was also affected by conditioning in dogs. GLUT4 levels in mononuclear cells of sled dogs were inversely correlated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity. This study demonstrates that conditioning increases GLUT4 levels in mononuclear cells of sled dogs as it has been previously reported in skeletal muscle. Our results support the potential of white blood cells as a proxy tissue for studying insulin signaling and may lead to development of a minimally invasive and direct marker of insulin resistance. This may be the first report of GLUT4 in mononuclear cells in response to exercise and measured with ELISA. PMID:25236492

  1. Viable Mononuclear Cell Stability Study for Implementation in a Proficiency Testing Program: Impact of Shipment Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kristine; Glazer, Barbara; De Souza, Yvonne; Kessler, Joseph; Betsou, Fotini

    2014-01-01

    The impact of shipping temperatures and preservation media used during transport of either peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or Jurkat cells was assessed, in view of implementing of a proficiency testing scheme on mononuclear cell viability. Samples were analyzed before and after shipment at different temperatures (ambient temperature, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen) and in different preservation media (serum with cryoprotectant, commercial cryopreservation solution, and room temperature transport medium). Sample quality was assessed by viability assays (Trypan Blue dye exclusion, flow cytometry, Cell Analysis System cell counting (CASY)), and by ELISpot functional assay. The liquid nitrogen storage and shipment were found to be the most stable conditions to preserve cell viability and functionality. However, we show that alternative high quality shipment conditions for viable cells are dry ice shipment and commercial cryopreservation solution. These were also cost-efficient shipment conditions, satisfying the requirements of a proficiency testing scheme for viable mononuclear cells. Room temperature transport medium dramatically and adversely affected the integrity of mononuclear cells. PMID:24955735

  2. Transcriptomic analysis of mononuclear phagocyte differentiation and activation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Freeman, Tom C

    2014-11-01

    Monocytes and macrophages differentiate from progenitor cells under the influence of colony-stimulating factors. Genome-scale data have enabled the identification of the sets of genes that are associated with specific functions and the mechanisms by which thousands of genes are regulated in response to pathogen challenge. In large datasets, it is possible to identify large sets of genes that are coregulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. They include macrophage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and those associated with endocytosis. Such analyses can also extract macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets. However, cluster analysis provides no support for a signature that distinguishes macrophages from antigen-presenting dendritic cells, nor the classification of macrophage activation states as classical versus alternative, or M1 versus M2. Although there has been a focus on a small subset of lineage-enriched transcription factors, such as PU.1, more than half of the transcription factors in the genome can be expressed in macrophage lineage cells under some state of activation, and they interact in a complex network. The network architecture is conserved across species, but many of the target genes evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. The data and publication deluge related to macrophage biology require the development of new analytical tools and ways of presenting information in an accessible form.

  3. Naive Treg-like CCR7(+) mononuclear cells indicate unfavorable prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie-Yi; Duan, Meng; Sun, Qi-Man; Yang, Liuxiao; Wang, Zhi-Chao; Mynbaev, Ospan A; He, Yi-Feng; Wang, Ling-Yan; Zhou, Jian; Tang, Qi-Qun; Cao, Ya; Fan, Jia; Wang, Xiao-Ying; Gao, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Chemokine receptor-like 1 (CCRL1) has the potential in creating a low level of CCL19 and CCL21 to hinder CCR7(+) cell tracking to tumor tissue. Previously, we found a tumor suppressive role of CCRL1 by impairing CCR7-related chemotaxis of tumor cells in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we reported a contribution of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells in the tumor microenvironment to the progression of disease. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the distribution and clinical significance of CCR7(+) cells in a cohort of 240 HCC patients. Furthermore, the phenotype, composition, and functional status of CCR7(+) cells were determined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and in vitro co-culture assays. We found that CCR7(+) mononuclear cells were dispersed around tumor tissue and negatively related to tumoral expression of CCRL1 (P < 0.001, r = 0.391). High density of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells positively correlated with the absence of tumor capsule, vascular invasion, and poor differentiation (P < 0.05). Survival analyses revealed that increased number of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells was significantly associated with worse survival and increased recurrence. We found that CCR7(+) mononuclear cells featured a naive Treg-like phenotype (CD45RA(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)) and possessed tumor-promoting potential by producing TGF-β1. Moreover, CCR7(+) cells were also composed of several immunocytes, a third of which were CD8(+) T cells. CCR7(+) Treg-like cells facilitate tumor growth and indicate unfavorable prognosis in HCC patients, but fortunately, their tracking to tumor tissue is under the control of CCRL1.

  4. Do androgen deprivation drugs affect the immune cross-talk between mononuclear and prostate cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Salman, Hertzel; Bergman, Michael; Blumberger, Naava; Djaldetti, Meir; Bessler, Hanna

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of androgen deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide on the immune cross-talk between human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cells from PC-3 and LNCaP human prostate cancer lines. PBMC, PC-3 and LNCaP were separately incubated without and with two androgen-deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide, and the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-1ra and IL-10 was examined. In addition, the effect of both drugs on the production of those cytokines was carried out after 24 hours incubation of PBMC with both types of cancer cells. Leuprolide or bicalutamide did not affect the production of the cytokines by PBMC or by the prostate cancer cells from the two lines. Incubation of PBMC with PC-3 or LNCaP cells caused increased production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 as compared with PBMC incubated without malignant cells. While 10(-7) M and 10(-8) M of leuprolide caused a decreased secretion of IL-1β by PBMC previously incubated with prostate cancer cells without the drug, bicalutamide did not affect this PBMC activity at any drug concentration. This observation suggests the existence of an additional mechanism explaining the effect of androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer patients.

  5. The expression and function of human CD300 receptors on blood circulating mononuclear cells are distinct in neonates and adults

    PubMed Central

    Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Vitallé, Joana; García-Obregón, Susana; Astigarraga, Itziar; Eguizabal, Cristina; Santos, Silvia; Simhadri, Venkateswara R.; Borrego, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neonates are more susceptible to infections than adults. This susceptibility is thought to reflect neonates’ qualitative and quantitative defects in the adaptive and innate immune responses. Differential expression of cell surface receptors may result in altered thresholds of neonatal immune cell activation. We determined whether the expression and function of the lipid-binding CD300 family of receptors are different on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. A multiparametric flow cytometry analysis was performed to determine the expression of CD300 receptors on adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neonatal cord blood mononuclear cells. The expression of the CD300a inhibitory receptor was significantly reduced on cells from the newborn adaptive immune system, and neonatal antigen presenting cells exhibited a different CD300 receptors expression pattern. We also found differential LPS-mediated regulation of CD300 receptors expression on adult monocytes compared to cord blood monocytes, and that CD300c and CD300e-mediated activation was quantitatively different in neonatal monocytes. This is the first complete study examining the expression of CD300 receptors on human neonatal immune cells compared with adult immune cells. Significant differences in the expression and function of CD300 receptors may help to explain the peculiarities and distinctness of the neonatal immune responses. PMID:27595670

  6. Nearby clusters of hemagglutinin residues sustain SLAM-dependent canine distemper virus entry in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    von Messling, Veronika; Oezguen, Numan; Zheng, Qi; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Braun, Werner; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2005-05-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM, CD150) is the universal morbillivirus receptor. Based on the identification of measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) amino acids supporting human SLAM-dependent cell entry, we mutated canine distemper virus (CDV) H and identified residues necessary for efficient canine SLAM-dependent membrane fusion. These residues are located in two nearby clusters in a new CDV H structural model. To completely abolish SLAM-dependent fusion, combinations of mutations were necessary. We rescued a SLAM-blind recombinant CDV with six mutations that did not infect ferret peripheral blood mononuclear cells while retaining full infectivity in epithelial cells.

  7. Metabolic and cellular alterations underlying the exaggerated renal prostaglandin and thromboxane synthesis in ureter obstruction in rabbits. Inflammatory response involving fibroblasts and mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Okegawa, T; Jonas, P E; DeSchryver, K; Kawasaki, A; Needleman, P

    1983-01-01

    Unilateral ureter obstruction in rabbits produced profound changes in endogenous and exogenous renal arachidonic acid metabolism. Isolated perfused hydronephrotic kidneys (removed after 3 or 10 d of ureter obstruction) responded to bradykinin stimulation with a markedly enhanced release of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane A2. Reversal (3 or 10 d) of the ureter obstruction resulted in a reduction in the vasoactive peptide-induced release of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane A2 from the perfused hydronephrotic kidney. However, postobstruction reversal of prostaglandin production by the agonist-stimulated perfused kidney was not reflected in the cortical microsomal cyclooxygenase activity, which is greatly enhanced during ureter obstruction and does not decrease after removal of the obstruction. Histological analysis of the renal cortex in rabbits with ureteral obstruction revealed a proliferation of fibroblast-like cells and the presence of mononuclear cells; removal of the obstruction did not result in a disappearance of cortical fibroblasts but did result in a decrease of monocytes. The critical involvement of mononuclear cells in the exaggerated arachidonate metabolism that occurs during hydronephrosis was exhibited by the demonstration that: (a) only the perfused hydronephrotic rabbit kidney responded to administration of endotoxin with a sustained release of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane A2; (b) the contralateral rabbit kidney, which is devoid of mononuclear cells, did not respond to endotoxin; and (c) the hydronephrotic cat kidney, which exhibits a fibroblast proliferation with a low number of mononuclear cells, did not respond to endotoxin. Thus, proliferation of fibroblast-like cells and the presence of mononuclear cells appear to be involved in the exaggerated prostaglandin and thromboxane production underlying hydronephrosis. The increase in microsomal cyclooxygenase activity is apparently most closely correlated with the increased fibroblastic activation

  8. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of mononuclear cells against Langerhans islets of Wistar rats in normal man and in patients at diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Köhler, E; Knospe, S; Woltanski, G; Maciejewski, R; Salzsieder, C; Rjasanowski, I; Strese, J; Michaelis, D

    1984-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against pancreatic islets was investigated in 13 newly diagnosed insulin-dependent diabetics, in 38 patients at high risk for the disease and in 20 age-matched healthy controls. For this purpose 51Cr-labeled neonatal rat pancreatic islets incubated with the specific anti-rat islet cell antiserum 339 or with serum of the lymphocyte donors were used as targets. The antibody-mediated cytotoxic activity of mononuclear cells was evaluated from the specific chromium release after 6 h exposure of pretreated islets to the effector cells. The specific cytotoxic effect of mononuclear cells from healthy controls on pancreatic islets pretreated with serum is weak. ADCC mediated by the specific antirat islet cell antiserum is significantly increased in 54% of newly diagnosed diabetics as well as in 32% of patients at high risk for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. 46% of the newly diagnosed diabetics were also ADCC-positive when their own serum was used for the pretreatment of islets, regardless of whether they were islet cell antibody- or islet cell surface antibody positive or not. Subsets of mononuclear cells (non E-rosette-forming cells, high affinity E-rosette-forming cells, low affinity E-rosette-forming cells) were prepared and their cytotoxic potential was analysed in patients with positive ADCC test results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. A Hitchhiker's Guide to Myeloid Cell Subsets: Practical Implementation of a Novel Mononuclear Phagocyte Classification System.

    PubMed

    Guilliams, Martin; van de Laar, Lianne

    2015-01-01

    The classification of mononuclear phagocytes as either dendritic cells or macrophages has been mainly based on morphology, the expression of surface markers, and assumed functional specialization. We have recently proposed a novel classification system of mononuclear phagocytes based on their ontogeny. Here, we discuss the practical application of such a classification system through a number of prototypical examples we have encountered while hitchhiking from one subset to another, across species and between steady-state and inflammatory settings. Finally, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of such a classification system and propose a number of improvements to move from theoretical concepts to concrete guidelines.

  10. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  11. Global DNA hypomethylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a biomarker of cancer risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global DNA hypomethylation is an early molecular event in carcinogenesis. Whether methylation measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) DNA is a clinically reliable biomarker for early detection or cancer risk assessment is to be established. From an original sample-set of 753 male and...

  12. [Production of mature red blood cell by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan-Jun; Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Ke-Ying; Shang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Wei; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Na; Wang, Lin; Cui, Shuang; Ni, Lei; Zhao, Bo-Tao; Wang, Dong-Mei; Gao, Song-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Most protocols for in vitro producing red blood cells (RBC) use the CD34(+) cells or embryonic stem cells from cord blood, bone marrow or peripheral blood as the start materials. This study was purposed to produce the mature RBC in vitro by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells as start material. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were isolated from buffy coat after blood leukapheresis, the mature red blood cells (RBC) were prepared by a 4-step culture protocol. The results showed that after culture by inducing with the different sets of cytokines and supporting by mouse MS-5 cell line, the expansion of PBMNC reached about 1000 folds at the end of the culture. About 90% of cultured RBC were enucleated mature cells which had the comparable morphological characteristics with normal RBC. Colony-forming assays showed that this culture system could stimulate the proliferation of progenitors in PBMNC and differentiate into erythroid cells. The structure and function analysis indicated that the mean cell volume of in vitro cultured RBC was 118 ± 4 fl, which was slight larger than that of normal RBC (80-100 fl); the mean cell hemoglobin was 36 ± 1.2 pg, which was slight higher than that of normal RBC (27-31 pg); the maximal deformation index was 0.46, which approachs level of normal RBC; the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyrurvate kinase levels was consistant with young RBC. It is concluded that PBMNC are feasble, convenient and low-cost source for producing cultured RBC and this culture system is suitable to generate the RBC from PBMNC.

  13. Cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells in elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Longhini-Dos-Santos, Nathalia; Barbosa-de-Oliveira, Valter Abraão; Kozma, Rodrigo Heras; Faria, Carolina Arruda de; Stessuk, Talita; Frei, Fernando; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2013-04-01

    Emphysema is characterized by destruction of alveolar walls with loss of gas exchange surface and consequent progressive dyspnea. This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) in an animal model of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema. Emphysema was induced in C57Bl/J6 female mice by intranasal instillation of elastase. After 21 days, the mice received bone marrow mononuclear cells from EGFP male mice with C57Bl/J6 background. The groups were assessed by comparison and statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed among the groups treated with BMMC and evaluated after 7, 14 and 21 days. Analysis of the mean linear intercept (Lm) values for the different groups allowed to observe that the group treated with BMMC and evaluated after 21 days showed the most significant result. The group that received no treatment showed a statistically significant difference when compared to other groups, except the group treated and evaluated after 21 days, evidencing the efficacy of cell therapy with BMMC in pulmonary emphysema.

  14. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  15. Combustible and non-combustible tobacco product preparations differentially regulate human peripheral blood mononuclear cell functions.

    PubMed

    Arimilli, Subhashini; Damratoski, Brad E; Prasad, G L

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and T cells play essential roles in innate and adaptive immune responses in protecting against microbial infections and in tumor surveillance. Although evidence suggests that smoking causes immunosuppression, there is limited information whether the use of smokeless tobacco (ST) products affects immune responses. In this study, we assessed the effects of two preparations of cigarette smoke, ST extract and nicotine on T cell and NK cell responses using Toll-like receptor-ligand stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The tobacco product preparations (TPPs) tested included whole smoke conditioned media (WS-CM), total particulate matter (TPM) and a ST product preparation in complete artificial saliva (ST/CAS). The PBMCs were stimulated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A marked reduction of the expression of intracellular IFN-γ and TNF-α was evident in NK cells and T cells treated with WS-CM and TPM. Consistently, attenuation of ligand-induced secretion of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α) from PBMCs treated with WS-CM and TPM were observed. While the treatment with TPPs did not alter the expression of the maturation marker CD69, WS-CM and TPM inhibited the cytolytic activity of human PBMCs. Suppression of perforin by WS-CM was also detected. Although interference from the vehicle confounded the interpretation of effects of ST/CAS, some effects were evident only at high concentrations. Nicotine treatment minimally impacted expression of cytokines and cytolytic activity. Data presented herein suggests that the function of NK cells and T cells is influenced by exposure to TPPs (based on equi-nicotine units) in the following order: WS-CM>TPM>ST/CAS. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis put forward by others that chronic smoking leads to immunosuppression, an effect that may contribute to increased microbial infections and cancer incidence among smokers.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  17. Interleukin 1 production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leprosy patients.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, S; Bullock, W; Nelson, K; Schauf, V; Gelber, R; Jacobson, R

    1984-01-01

    Quantitation of interleukin 1 production by adherent mononuclear cells from peripheral blood was performed in patients with tuberculoid and lepromatous forms of leprosy. Cells from patients with tuberculoid leprosy either secreted interleukin 1 spontaneously or produced amounts within the normal range in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Conversely, stimulated cells from lepromatous patients failed to produce interleukin 1 in 5 of 13 (38.5%) cases. PMID:6332077

  18. Opioid-mediated suppression of interferon-gamma production by cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, P K; Sharp, B; Gekker, G; Brummitt, C; Keane, W F

    1987-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that opiate addiction and stress are associated with impaired cell-mediated immunity. We tested the hypothesis that morphine and the endogenous opioid beta-endorphin (beta-END), a pituitary peptide released in increased concentrations during stress, can suppress the production of the key macrophage-activating lymphokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC). Using a radioimmunoassay to measure IFN-gamma, we found that exposure of PBMNC to biologically relevant concentrations of both opioids significantly inhibited IFN-gamma generation by cells stimulated with concanavalin A and varicella zoster virus. Studies of the mechanism of suppression revealed (a) a classical opioid receptor is involved (suppression was antagonized by naloxone and was specific for the NH2 terminus of beta-END), (b) monocytes are the primary target cell for opioids (monocyte-depleted lymphocyte preparations showed little suppression), and (c) reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and prostaglandin E2 are important mediators (scavengers of ROI and indomethacin eliminated the suppression). Based on these findings we suggest that opioid-triggered release of inhibitory monocyte metabolites may play a role in the immunodeficiency associated with narcotic addiction and stress. Images PMID:3040807

  19. Mitochondrial Alterations in Peripheral Mononuclear Blood Cells from Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients.

    PubMed

    Delbarba, A; Abate, G; Prandelli, C; Marziano, M; Buizza, L; Arce Varas, N; Novelli, A; Cuetos, F; Martinez, C; Lanni, C; Memo, M; Uberti, D

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to neurodegeneration occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, evidences of mitochondrial defects in AD peripheral cells are still inconclusive. Here, some mitochondrial-encoded and nuclear-encoded proteins, involved in maintaining the correct mitochondria machine, were investigated in terms of protein expression and enzymatic activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients and healthy subjects. In addition mitochondrial DNA copy number was measured by real time PCR. We found some differences and some similarities between AD and MCI patients when compared with healthy subjects. For example, cytochrome C and cytochrome B were decreased in AD, while MCI showed only a statistical reduction of cytochrome C. On the other hand, both AD and MCI blood cells exhibited highly nitrated MnSOD, index of a prooxidant environment inside the mitochondria. TFAM, a regulator of mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, was decreased in both AD and MCI patients' blood cells. Moreover also the mitochondrial DNA amount was reduced in PBMCs from both patient groups. In conclusion these data confirmed peripheral mitochondria impairment in AD and demonstrated that TFAM and mtDNA amount reduction could be two features of early events occurring in AD pathogenesis.

  20. Human colonic mononuclear cells: studies of cytotoxic function.

    PubMed Central

    Falchuk, Z M; Barnhard, E; Machado, I

    1981-01-01

    We isolated lymphocytes from the lamina propria of colon from 19 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, and certain benign conditions to determine: (1) if these lymphocytes could mediate mitogen-induced (MICC) and spontaneous cell-mediated cytotoxicity (SCMC), and (2) if there were any differences in cytotoxic effectiveness which could relate to the underlying disease. We found that lamina propria lymphocytes functioned well in MICC reactions with phytohaemagglutinin, but not concanavalin A as the inducing mitogen (specific lysis 28 5% vs 5 3%). Lamina propria lymphocytes did not mediate SCMC (specific lysis 0.3%). Neither the presence of inflammation not the underlying disease of the patient influenced the cytotoxic activity. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal subjects and patients performed well in MICC assay with both phytohaemagglutinin and concanvalin A as the inducing mitogen and were equally effective in SCMC reactions. PMID:6972335

  1. Immunostimulatory acivity of Calophyllum brasiliense, Ipomoea pes-caprae and Matayba elaeagnoides demonstrated by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Philippi, Marina Elisa; Duarte, Bruna Momm; Da Silva, Carolina Vieira; De Souza, Michel Thomaz; Niero, Rivaldo; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Bueno, Edneia Casagranda

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of methanol extracts of three Brazilian medicinal plants on in vitro proliferation of human mononuclear cells. Lymphoproliferation assay was carried out by incubating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors (1 x 10(6) cells/mL) with extracts of Calophyllum brasiliense (roots), Ipomoea pes-caprae (whole plant) and Matayba elaeagnoides (bark), both at 10, 50, 100 and 200 microg/mL, alone or with phytohemagglutinin (PHA, 5 microg/mL), in 96-well microplates at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2, for 72 h. The quantification of cell proliferation assay was performed by blue tetrazolium (MTT) reduction with reading at 540 nm. Cells incubated with only the culture medium were used as negative control for cell proliferation, while the positive control consisted of cells and PHA. The results suggest that the extracts of all three studied plants induce T lymphocyte proliferation. I. pes-caprae showed immunostimulatory activity three times higher than the C. brasiliense extract, while that of the M. elaeagnoides extract was 1.5 times higher. The results demonstrate immunostimulatory effects of these three plants, therefore the continuity of these studies is recommended, in order to determine the active principles.

  2. Medroxyprogesterone acetate increases HIV-1 infection of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sampah, Maame Efua S.; Laird, Gregory M.; Blankson, Joel N.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Coleman, Jenell S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several observational studies suggest that medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) injectable contraception may increase a woman’s risk of sexual HIV-1 acquisition. In vitro studies are conflicting, mainly due to differences in the type of progestin studied or activation status of the primary cells. We sought to determine if MPA increases infection of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods Freshly isolated PBMC from normal blood donors were treated with physiologic MPA concentrations ranging from 0.003 ng/mL to 5 ng/mL and infected with GFP-tagged R5-tropic or X4-tropic HIV-1 pseudoviruses by spinoculation. The infection was limited to a single cycle. Cells were stained with CD3, CD8, and CD14. Infection was quantified as the percentage of GFP+ cells by flow cytometry. Results Absolute infection was greater among unstimulated MPA-treated CD3+CD8− T cells versus untreated cells across MPA concentrations of 0.003 to 3 ng/mL using R5 (P <0.003) and 0.03 to 0.3 ng/mL using X4 pseudovirus (P < 0.005). There was increased relative infection of CD3+CD8− T cells in MPA-treated whole PBMC cultures but not after monocytes were depleted (P<0.02). HIV-1 infection of stimulated PBMC showed no differences in R5 or X4 infection across all MPA concentrations (P > 0.5). Conclusions CD3+CD8− T cell population of MPA-treated unstimulated PBMC were more susceptible to HIV-1 infection than untreated cells. The increased infection was partly due to monocytes and was lost when PBMC were exogenously stimulated. These data provide confirmation of a biological association between MPA exposure and increased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, particularly among women who inject drugs. PMID:26035316

  3. In vitro transdifferentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to photoreceptor-like cells.

    PubMed

    Komuta, Yukari; Ishii, Toshiyuki; Kaneda, Makoto; Ueda, Yasuji; Miyamoto, Kiyoko; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Seko, Yuko

    2016-06-15

    Direct reprogramming is a promising, simple and low-cost approach to generate target cells from somatic cells without using induced pluripotent stem cells. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have attracted considerable attention as a somatic cell source for reprogramming. As a cell source, PBMCs have an advantage over dermal fibroblasts with respect to the ease of collecting tissues. Based on our studies involving generation of photosensitive photoreceptor cells from human iris cells and human dermal fibroblasts by transduction of photoreceptor-related transcription factors via retrovirus vectors, we transduced these transcription factors into PBMCs via Sendai virus vectors. We found that retinal disease-related genes were efficiently detected in CRX-transduced cells, most of which are crucial to photoreceptor functions. In functional studies, a light-induced inward current was detected in some CRX-transduced cells. Moreover, by modification of the culture conditions including additional transduction of RAX1 and NEUROD1, we found a greater variety of retinal disease-related genes than that observed in CRX-transduced PBMCs. These data suggest that CRX acts as a master control gene for reprogramming PBMCs into photoreceptor-like cells and that our induced photoreceptor-like cells might contribute to individualized drug screening and disease modeling of inherited retinal degeneration.

  4. Solution-Phase Crosstalk and Regulatory Interactions Between Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    van’t Hof, Wouter; Reddy, Ashok P.; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; David, Larry L.; Raber, Amy; Bogaerts, Annelies; Timmerman, Lien; Pinxteren, Jef; Roobrouck, Valerie D.; Deans, Robert J.; Maziarz, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) are adult adherent stromal stem cells currently being assessed in clinical trials for acute graft versus host disease with demonstrated immunomodulatory capabilities and the potential to ameliorate detrimental autoimmune and inflammation-related processes. Anti-CD3/anti-CD28 (3/28) activation of T cells within the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) compartment was performed in the presence or absence of MAPCs. Liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry was used to characterize the differential secretion of proteins, and transcriptional profiling was used to monitor mRNA expression changes in both cell populations. Overall, 239 secreted and/or ectodomain-shed proteins were detected in the secretomes of PBMCs and MAPCs. In addition, 3/28 activation of PBMCs induced differential expression of 2,925 genes, and 22% of these transcripts were differentially expressed on exposure to MAPCs in Transwell. MAPCs exposed to 3/28-activated PBMCs showed differential expression of 1,247 MAPC genes. Crosstalk was demonstrated by reciprocal transcriptional regulation. Secretome proteins and transcriptional signatures were used to predict molecular activities by which MAPCs could dampen local and systemic inflammatory responses. These data support the hypothesis that MAPCs block PBMC proliferation via cell cycle arrest coupled to metabolic stress in the form of tryptophan depletion, resulting in GCN2 kinase activation, downstream signaling, and inhibition of cyclin D1 translation. These data also provide a plausible explanation for the immune privilege reported with administration of donor MAPCs. Although most components of the major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation pathway were markedly transcriptionally upregulated, cell surface expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR is minimal on MAPCs exposed to 3/28-activated PBMCs. Significance This study documents experiments quantifying solution

  5. Analysis of cytotoxic effects of silver nanoclusters on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells 'in vitro'.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra Teresa; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ochoa-Martínez, Angeles Catalina; Ruiz-Vera, Tania; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Yacamán, Miguel José; Navarro-Contreras, Hugo Ricardo; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2015-10-01

    The antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have made these particles one of the most used nanomaterials in consumer products. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions (unwanted toxicity) between nanoparticles and human cells is of significant interest. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity effects of silver nanoclusters (AgNC, < 2 nm diameter) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Using flow cytometry and comet assay methods, we demonstrate that exposure of PBMC to AgNC induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage and apoptosis at 3, 6 and 12 h, with a dose-dependent response (0.1, 1, 3, 5 and 30 µg ml(-1)). Advanced electron microscopy imaging of complete and ultrathin-sections of PBMC confirmed the cytotoxic effects and cell damage caused by AgNC. The present study showed that AgNC produced without coating agents induced significant cytotoxic effects on PBMC owing to their high aspect ratio and active surface area, even at much lower concentrations (<1 µg ml(-1)) than those applied in previous studies, resembling what would occur under real exposure conditions to nanosilver-functionalized consumer products.

  6. Paracrine Effects of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells in Survival and Cytokine Expression after 90% Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kieling, Carlos Oscar; Uribe-Cruz, Carolina; López, Mónica Luján; Osvaldt, Alessandro Bersch; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel

    2017-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a complex and fatal disease. Cell-based therapies are a promising alternative therapeutic approach for liver failure due to relatively simple technique and lower cost. The use of semipermeable microcapsules has become an interesting tool for evaluating paracrine effects in vivo. In this study, we aimed to assess the paracrine effects of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) encapsulated in sodium alginate to treat acute liver failure in an animal model of 90% partial hepatectomy (90% PH). Encapsulated BMMC were able to increase 10-day survival without enhancing liver regeneration markers. Gene expression of Il-6 and Il-10 in the remnant liver was markedly reduced at 6 h after 90% PH in animals receiving encapsulated BMMC compared to controls. This difference, however, was neither reflected by changes in the number of CD68+ cells nor by serum levels of IL6. On the other hand, treated animals presented increased caspase activity and gene expression in the liver. Taken together, these results suggest that BMMC regulate immune response and promote apoptosis in the liver after 90% PH by paracrine factors. These changes ultimately may be related to the higher survival observed in treated animals, suggesting that BMMC may be a promising alternative to treat acute liver failure. PMID:28326105

  7. p-Cresol Affects Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, Cell Cycle Arrest, Cytotoxicity and Inflammation/Atherosclerosis-Related Modulators Production in Endothelial Cells and Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chiu-Po; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Hsien, Hsiang-Chi; Lin, Bor-Ru; Yeh, Chien-Yang; Tseng, Wan-Yu; Tseng, Shui-Kuan; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Aims Cresols are present in antiseptics, coal tar, some resins, pesticides, and industrial solvents. Cresol intoxication leads to hepatic injury due to coagulopathy as well as disturbance of hepatic circulation in fatal cases. Patients with uremia suffer from cardiovascular complications, such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, hemolysis, and bleeding, which may be partly due to p-cresol toxicity and its effects on vascular endothelial and mononuclear cells. Given the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation in vascular thrombosis, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of p-cresol on endothelial and mononuclear cells. Methods EA.hy926 (EAHY) endothelial cells and U937 cells were exposed to different concentrations of p-cresol. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 -diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and trypan blue dye exclusion technique, respectively. Cell cycle distribution was analyzed by propidium iodide flow cytometry. Endothelial cell migration was studied by wound closure assay. ROS level was measured by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF) fluorescence flow cytometry. Prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), and uPA production were determined by Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Results Exposure to 100–500 µM p-cresol decreased EAHY cell number by 30–61%. P-cresol also decreased the viability of U937 mononuclear cells. The inhibition of EAHY and U937 cell growth by p-cresol was related to induction of S-phase cell cycle arrest. Closure of endothelial wounds was inhibited by p-cresol (>100 µM). P-cresol (>50 µM) also stimulated ROS production in U937 cells and EAHY cells but to a lesser extent. Moreover, p-cresol markedly stimulated PAI-1 and suPAR, but not PGF2α, and uPA production in EAHY cells. Conclusions p-Cresol may contribute to atherosclerosis and thrombosis in patients with

  8. Receptor expression and responsiveness of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a human cytomegalovirus encoded CC chemokine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Xu, Jun; Gao, Huihui; Tao, Ran; Li, Wei; Shang, Shiqiang; Gu, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects the majority of the world's population. After long period of time co-evolving with human being, this pathogen has developed several strategies to evade host immune surveillance. One of the major trick is encoding homologous to those of the host organism or stealing host cellular genes that have significant functions in immune system. To date, we have found several viral immune analogous which include G protein coupled receptor, class I major histocompatibility complex and chemokine. Chemokine is a small group of molecules which is defined by the presence of four cysteines in highly conserved region. The four kinds of chemokines (C, CC, CXC, and CX3C) are classified based on the arrangement of 1 or 2 N-terminal cysteine residues. UL128 protein is one of the analogous that encoded by human cytomegalovirus that has similar amino acid sequences to the human CC chemokine. It has been proved to be one of the essential particles that involved in human cytomegalovirus entry into epithelial/endothelial cells as well as macrophages. It is also the target of potent neutralizing antibodies in human cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals. We had demonstrated the chemotactic trait of UL128 protein in our previous study. Recombinant UL128 in vitro has the ability to attract monocytes to the infection region and enhances peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. However, the way that this viral encoded chemokine interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the detailed mechanism that involving the virus entry into host cells keeps unknown. Here we performed in vitro investigation into the effects of UL128 protein on peripheral blood mononuclear cell's activation and receptor binding, which may help us further understand the immunomodulatory function of UL128 protein as well as human cytomegalovirus diffusion mechanism.

  9. Concise Review: Prospects of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treating Status Epilepticus and Chronic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Agadi, Satish; Shetty, Ashok K

    2015-07-01

    Mononuclear cells (MNCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the bone marrow and other sources have received significant attention as donor cells for treating various neurological disorders due to their robust neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, it is relatively easy to procure these cells from both autogenic and allogenic sources. Currently, there is considerable interest in examining the usefulness of these cells for conditions such as status epilepticus (SE) and chronic epilepsy. A prolonged seizure activity in SE triggers neurodegeneration in the limbic brain areas, which elicits epileptogenesis and evolves into a chronic epileptic state. Because of their potential for providing neuroprotection, diminishing inflammation and curbing epileptogenesis, early intervention with MNCs or MSCs appears attractive for treating SE as such effects may restrain the development of chronic epilepsy typified by spontaneous seizures and learning and memory impairments. Delayed administration of these cells after SE may also be useful for easing spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction in chronic epilepsy. This concise review evaluates the current knowledge and outlook pertaining to MNC and MSC therapies for SE and chronic epilepsy. In the first section, the behavior of these cells in animal models of SE and their efficacy to restrain neurodegeneration, inflammation, and epileptogenesis are discussed. The competence of these cells for suppressing seizures and improving cognitive function in chronic epilepsy are conferred in the next section. The final segment ponders issues that need to be addressed to pave the way for clinical application of these cells for SE and chronic epilepsy.

  10. Upregulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by CD4 cross-linking in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed Central

    Than, S; Oyaizu, N; Tetali, S; Romano, J; Kaplan, M; Pahwa, S

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 67 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults. It supports the hypothesis that cross-linking of CD4 molecules by HIV gp120 can result in HIV upregulation and spread of infection. Underlying mechanisms include activation of latent infection by factors in addition to, or other than, tumor necrosis factor alpha. PMID:9223523

  11. Upregulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by CD4 cross-linking in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Than, S; Oyaizu, N; Tetali, S; Romano, J; Kaplan, M; Pahwa, S

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 67 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults. It supports the hypothesis that cross-linking of CD4 molecules by HIV gp120 can result in HIV upregulation and spread of infection. Underlying mechanisms include activation of latent infection by factors in addition to, or other than, tumor necrosis factor alpha.

  12. Effect of spirulina on the secretion of cytokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, T K; VAN DE Water, J; Gershwin, M E

    2000-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory activity of Spirulina, a bluegreen alga used as a food supplement. The effects of Spirulina on the secretion of three cytokines from unstimulated and stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were examined. In resting PBMC, Spirulina stimulated secretion of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-4, and interferon (IFN)-gamma to nearly 2.0, 3.3, and 13.6 times basal levels, respectively. Spirulina induced levels of IFN-gamma (229 +/- 104 pg/ml) that were comparable to those seen after phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation (476 +/- 121 pg/ml). However, it was much less mitogenic than PHA (13.1 +/- 6.9 pg/ml) with respect to the induction of IL-4 secretion (0.34 +/- 0.1 pg/ml). In PHA-stimulated cells, Spirulina enhanced secretion of IL-1beta, IL-4, and IFN-beta by 2.9, 4.0., and 1.6 times, respectively. Although Spirulina stimulates several cytokines, it is clearly more effective in the generation of a Thl-type response. This in vitro study offers additional data for consideration of the potential therapeutic benefits of Spirulina.

  13. Focused Microarray Analysis of Peripheral Mononuclear Blood Cells from Churg–Strauss Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tougan, Takahiro; Onda, Hiroaki; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Shigeto; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    DNA diagnostics are useful but are hampered by difficult ethical issues. Moreover, it cannot provide enough information on the environmental factors that are important for pathogenesis of certain diseases. However, this is not a problem for RNA diagnostics, which evaluate the expression of the gene in question. We here report a novel RNA diagnostics tool that can be employed with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). To establish this tool, we identified 290 genes that are highly expressed in normal PBMCs but not in TIG-1, a normal human fibroblast cell. These genes were entitled PREP after predominantly expressed in PBMC and included 50 uncharacterized genes. We then conducted PREP gene-focused microarray analysis on PBMCs from seven cases of Churg–Strauss syndrome (CSS), which is a small-vessel necrotizing vasculitis. We found that PREP135 (coactosin-like protein), PREP77 (prosaposin), PREP191 (cathepsin D), PREP234 (c-fgr), and PREP136 (lysozyme) were very highly up-regulated in all seven CSS patients. Another 28 genes were also up-regulated, albeit more moderately, and three were down-regulated in all CSS patients. The nature of these up- and down-regulated genes suggest that the immune systems of the patients are activated in response to invading microorganisms. These observations indicate that focused microarray analysis of PBMCs may be a practical, useful, and low-cost bedside diagnostics tool. PMID:18263571

  14. Derivation of autism spectrum disorder-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    DeRosa, Brooke A; Van Baaren, Jessica M; Dubey, Gaurav K; Lee, Joycelyn M; Cuccaro, Michael L; Vance, Jeffery M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Dykxhoorn, Derek M

    2012-05-10

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold tremendous potential both as a biological tool to uncover the pathophysiology of disease by creating relevant cell models and as a source of stem cells for cell-based therapeutic applications. Typically, iPSCs have been derived by the transgenic overexpression of transcription factors associated with progenitor cell or stem cell function in fibroblasts derived from skin biopsies. However, the need for skin punch biopsies to derive fibroblasts for reprogramming can present a barrier to study participation among certain populations of individuals, including children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In addition, the acquisition of skin punch biopsies in non-clinic settings presents a challenge. One potential mechanism to avoid these limitations would be the use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as the source of the cells for reprogramming. In this article we describe, for the first time, the derivation of iPSC lines from PBMCs isolated from the whole blood of autistic children, and their subsequent differentiation in GABAergic neurons.

  15. Cardiotrophin-1 induces tumor necrosis factor alpha synthesis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fritzenwanger, Michael; Meusel, Katharina; Jung, Christian; Franz, Marcus; Wang, Zhenhua; Foerster, Martin; Figulla, Hans-R

    2009-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with elevated concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) and altered peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) function. Therefore, we tested whether CT-1 induces TNFalpha in PBMC of healthy volunteers. CT-1 induced in PBMC TNFalpha protein in the supernatant and TNFalpha mRNA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner determined by ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively. Maximal TNFalpha protein was achieved with 100 ng/mL CT-1 after 3-6 hours and maximal TNFalpha mRNA induction after 1 hour. ELISA data were confirmed using immunofluorescent flow cytometry. Inhibitor studies with actinomycin D and brefeldin A showed that both protein synthesis and intracellular transport are essential for CT-1 induced TNFalpha expression. CT-1 caused a dose dependent nuclear factor (NF) kappaB translocation. Parthenolide inhibited both NFkappaB translocation and TNFalpha protein expression indicating that NFkappaB seems to be necessary. We revealed a new mechanism for elevated serum TNFalpha concentrations and PBMC activation in CHF besides the hypothesis of PBMC activation by bacterial translocation from the gut.

  16. [ASSESSMENT OF THE GENETIC MODIFICATION INDUCING DIET THROUGH BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS].

    PubMed

    de Luis Román, Daniel Antonio; Izaola, Olatz; Aller, Rocio

    2015-12-01

    The term nutrigenomics was created to describe how nutrition affects genes and the functions of the protein, at the transcriptional level, proteomic, and metabolic. Using changes in gene expression in blood mononuclear cells could be a model to assess the dietary intervention studies in order to understand the underlying mechanisms and impact of diet and nutrients in atherosclerosis, resistance insulin, obesity and diabetes mellitus. There are studies that have changed the dietary intake of cholesterol, polyunsaturated fat, monounsaturated, antioxidants and decreased caloric intake showing a variety of effects on the expression of mRNA in blood mononuclear cells related to inflammation, immunity, lipid metabolism genes, etc. These molecular findings entrench awareness of our body's response to diet and open up the possibility of rapid analysis of new diagnostic pathways in this area of knowledge and even new therapeutic tools.

  17. MHC-unrestricted lysis of MUC1-expressing cells by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stephen E; Rewers-Felkins, Kathleen A; Quinlin, Imelda S; Fogler, William E; Phillips, Catherine A; Townsend, Mary; Robinson, William; Philip, Ramila

    2008-01-01

    Many human adenocarcinomas can be killed in vitro by targeted cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL); however, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restrictions are typically required. The MUC1 antigen is common in many human adenocarcinomas, and is associated with a variable number of tandem repeats. It has been proposed that antigens with such repeated epitopes may be vulnerable to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing without MHC-restriction. Therefore, it is possible that MUC1-expressing malignant cells may be killed by targeted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte in the absence of MHC-restriction. In this study, a human MUC1-expressing murine mammary carcinoma cell line was used to determine if cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of MUC1-expressing adenocarcinoma cells requires MHC-restriction. Specifically, MUC1-stimulated human mononuclear cells (M1SMC) were observed to kill human MUC1-transfected, MUC1-expressing murine mammary carcinoma cells, but not the mock-transfected, non-MUC1-expressing murine mammary carcinoma cells. Furthermore, the killing was blocked by antibody to MUC1, indicating MUC1-specific killing. In conclusion, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of MUC1-expressing adenocarcinoma cells can be MHC-unrestricted.

  18. Increased basal production of interleukin-10 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in human alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Godot, V; Harraga, S; Deschaseaux, M; Bresson-Hadni, S; Gottstein, B; Emilie, D; Vuitton, D A

    1997-12-01

    The secretion of IL-10 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the expression of IL-10 mRNA in fractionated CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets and non-B-non-T cells, with and without stimulation by the mitogen phytohemagglutinin-C (PHA-C) and specific Echinococcus multilocularis (E. multilocularis) antigens, were assessed in 7 patients with alveolar echinococcosis (AE) and 6 healthy subjects. Results of studies on IL-10 were compared to those on IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-5 in the same patients and control subjects. IL-10 production was significantly higher in patient PBMC-culture supernatants than in the control group supernatants, both at the basal level and after mitogen or specific E. multilocularis antigen stimulation. Both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte populations and non-B-non-T cells of AE patients and controls expressed IL-10 mRNA. Semi-quantification of IL-10 mRNA revealed a significantly higher transcript level in unstimulated-CD8+ T cells from AE patients in comparison with CD8+ T cells of healthy donors. PBMC from patients produced very low levels of IL-4 but the production of IFN-gamma was not significantly depressed compared to the controls. PBMC, isolated from 4 AE patients and 4 control subjects stimulated with specific E. multilocularis antigens, secreted IL-5; IL-5 mRNA was only detected in the CD4+ lymphocyte subset. The secretion of IL-5 and the expression of IL-5 mRNA in healthy subjects could be due to the presence of non-specific mitogenic parasitic factors. This non-specific mitogenic activity of the parasite, besides inducing a high secretion of IL-10 in patients with evolutive AE, may contribute to the lack of host control of parasite growth and to the persistence of granulomatous lesions, due to the inhibition of an efficient Th1 immune response.

  19. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity in mononuclear leukocytes of 13 mammalian species correlates with species-specific life span.

    PubMed Central

    Grube, K; Bürkle, A

    1992-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a eukaryotic posttranslational modification of proteins that is strongly induced by the presence of DNA strand breaks and plays a role in DNA repair and the recovery of cells from DNA damage. We compared poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP; EC 2.4.2.30) activities in Percoll gradient-purified, permeabilized mononuclear leukocytes from mammalian species of different maximal life span. Saturating concentrations of a double-stranded octameric oligonucleotide were applied to provide a direct and maximal stimulation of PARP. Our results on 132 individuals from 13 different species yield a strong positive correlation between PARP activity and life span (r = 0.84; P << 0.001), with human cells displaying approximately 5 times the activity of rat cells. Intraspecies comparisons with both rat and human cells from donors of all age groups revealed some decline of PARP activity with advancing age, but it was only weakly correlated. No significant polymer degradation was detectable under our assay conditions, ruling out any interference by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity. By Western blot analysis of mononuclear leukocytes from 11 species, using a crossreactive antiserum directed against the extremely well-conserved NAD-binding domain, no correlation between the amount of PARP protein and the species' life spans was found, suggesting a greater specific enzyme activity in longer-lived species. We propose that a higher poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity in cells from long-lived species might contribute to the efficient maintenance of genome integrity and stability over their longer life span. Images PMID:1465394

  20. Differential proteomics analysis of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lifei; Wang, Dongtao; Wang, Lihong; Lan, Wenjie; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one common neurodegenerative disease featured with degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. Multiple factors participate in the pathogenesis and progression of PD. In this study, we investigated the proteomics profiles of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluids from both PD patients and normal people, in order to explore the correlation between disease factors and PD. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from both PD and normal people and were separated for mononuclear cells in vitro. Proteins were then extracted and separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins with differential expressions were identified by comparison to standard proteome expression profile map, followed by software and database analysis. In PD patients, there were 8 proteins with consistent expression profile and 16 proteins with differential expressions. Those differential proteins identified include cytoskeleton proteins (actin, myosin), signal transduction proteins (adenosine cyclase binding protein 1, calcium binding protein, talin) and anti-oxidation factor (thioredoxin peroxide reductase). PD patients had differential protein expressional profiles in the mononuclear cells of cerebrospinal fluids compared to normal people, suggesting the potential involvement of cytoskeleton and signal transduction proteins in apoptosis of neuronal apoptosis and PD pathogenesis.

  1. A mononuclear Ni(II) complex with 5,6-diphenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazine: DNA- and BSA-binding and anticancer activity against human breast carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjomshoa, Marzieh; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Fatemi, Seyed Jamilaldin; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2015-02-01

    DNA- and BSA-binding properties of a mononuclear Ni(II) complex, [Ni(dppt)2Cl2] (dppt = 5,6-diphenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazine), have been investigated under physiological conditions. The interaction of the complex with the fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) has been studied by UV-Vis absorption, thermal denaturation, viscosity measurement, competitive DNA-binding studies with ethidium bromide (EB) by fluorescence, and gel electrophoresis technique. The experimental results indicate that the complex interacts with DNA by intercalative binding mode. The competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) shows that the complex competes for the DNA-binding sites with EB and displaces the DNA-bound EB molecule. The interactions of the dppt ligand and the complex with BSA have been studied by UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The values of Kb for the BSA-dppt and the BSA-complex systems at room temperature were calculated to be 0.14 × 104 M-1 and 0.32 × 105 M-1, respectively, indicating that the complex has stronger tendency to bind with BSA than the dppt ligand. The quenching constants (Ksv), binding constants (Kbin), and number of binding sites (n) at different temperatures, as well as the binding distance (r) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG°) have been calculated for the BSA-dppt and the BSA-complex systems. The cytotoxicities of the dppt ligand and the complex have been also tested against the human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line using the MTT assay. The results indicate that the dppt ligand and the complex display cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) with the IC50 values of 17.35 μM and 13.00 μM, respectively. It is remarkable that the complex can introduce as a potential anticancer drug.

  2. 10th NTES Conference: Nickel and Arsenic Compounds Alter the Epigenome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie metal carcinogenesis are the subject of intense investigation; however, data from in vitro and in vivo studies are starting to piece together a story that implicates epigenetics as a key player. Data from our lab has shown that nickel compounds inhibit dioxygenase enzymes by displacing iron in the active site. Arsenic is hypothesized to inhibit these enzymes by diminishing ascorbate levels--an important co-factor for dioxygenases. Inhibition of histone demethylase dioxygenases can increase histone methylation levels, which also may affect gene expression. Recently, our lab conducted a series of investigations in human subjects exposed to high levels of nickel or arsenic compounds. Global levels of histone modifications in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from exposed subjects were compared to low environmentally exposed controls. Results showed that nickel increased H3K4me3 and decreased H3K9me2 globally. Arsenic increased H3K9me2 and decreased H3K9ac globally. Other histone modifications affected by arsenic were sex-dependent. Nickel affected the expression of 2756 genes in human PBMCs and many of the genes were involved in immune and carcinogenic pathways. This review will describe data from our lab that demonstrates for the first time that nickel and arsenic compounds affect global levels of histone modifications and gene expression in exposed human populations.

  3. Characterization of bone marrow mononuclear cells on biomaterials for bone tissue engineering in vitro.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Dirk; Verboket, René; Schaible, Alexander; Kontradowitz, Kerstin; Oppermann, Elsie; Brune, Jan C; Nau, Christoph; Meier, Simon; Bonig, Halvard; Marzi, Ingo; Seebach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, without coating or coated with fibronectin or human plasma), demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and bovine cancellous bone (BS) were assessed. Seeding efficacy on β-TCP was 95% regardless of the surface coating. BMC demonstrated a significantly increased initial adhesion on DBM and β-TCP compared to BS. On day 14, metabolic activity was significantly increased in BMC seeded on DBM in comparison to BMC seeded on BS. Likewise increased VEGF-synthesis was observed on day 2 in BMC seeded on DBM when compared to BMC seeded on BS. The seeding efficacy of BMC on uncoated biomaterials is generally high although there are differences between these biomaterials. Beta-TCP and DBM were similar and both superior to BS, suggesting either as suitable materials for spatial restriction of BMC used for regenerative medicine purposes in vivo.

  4. Microarray analysis after strenuous exercise in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of endurance horses.

    PubMed

    Capomaccio, S; Cappelli, K; Barrey, E; Felicetti, M; Silvestrelli, M; Verini-Supplizi, A

    2010-12-01

    It is known that moderate physical activity may have beneficial effects on health, whereas strenuous effort induces a state resembling inflammation. The molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to exercise remain unclear, although it is clear that the immune system plays a key role. It has been hypothesized that the physio-pathological condition that develops in athletes subjected to heavy training is caused by derangement of cellular immune regulation. The purpose of the present study was to obtain information on endurance horse gene transcription under strenuous conditions and to identify candidate genes causing immune system derangement. We performed a wide gene expression scan, using microarray technology, on peripheral blood mononuclear cells of ten horses chosen from high-level participants in national and international endurance races. The use of three different timepoints revealed changes in gene expression when post-effort samples (T1, taken immediately after the race; and T2, taken 24 h after the race) were compared with basal sample (T0, at rest). Statistical analysis showed no differences in gene expression between T0 and T2 samples, indicating complete restoration of homeostasis by 24 h after racing, whereas T1 showed strong modulation of expression, affecting 132 genes (97 upregulated, 35 downregulated). Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that the main mechanisms and biofunctions involved were significantly associated with immunological and inflammatory responses. Real-time PCR was performed on 26 gene products to validate the array data.

  5. Toll-like receptor 4 expression is increased in circulating mononuclear cells of patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Coppo, R; Camilla, R; Amore, A; Peruzzi, L; Daprà, V; Loiacono, E; Vatrano, S; Rollino, C; Sepe, V; Rampino, T; Dal Canton, A

    2010-01-01

    We investigated Toll-like receptors (TLR-3, -4 and -7) expression in circulating mononuclear cells of patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), a disease with debated relationships with mucosal immunity. TLR-4 expression (detected by fluorescence activated cell sorter) and mRNA transcriptional levels (Taqman) were significantly higher in patients with IgAN than in healthy controls (P = 0·00200 and P = 0·0200). TLR-3 and TLR-7 were not modified significantly. In IgAN patients proteinuria was correlated significantly with TLR-4 expression (P = 0·0312). In a group of nephrotic syndromes, TLR-3, -4 and -7 expression was similar to healthy controls. A significant difference in TLR-4 expression and mRNA levels was found between very active IgAN patients (proteinuria > 1 g/1·73 m2/day in association with severe microscopic haematuria) and inactive patients (proteinuria < 0·5 g/1·73 m2/day, with absent or minimal haematuria). No correlation with levels of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1, age, renal biopsy features or therapy was found. This study shows for the first time an up-regulation of TLR-4 in circulating mononuclear cells of patients with IgAN, particularly in association with proteinuria and heavy microscopic haematuria. PMID:19891659

  6. Inhibitor treatment of peripheral mononuclear cells from Parkinson's disease patients further validates LRRK2 dephosphorylation as a pharmacodynamic biomarker.

    PubMed

    Perera, G; Ranola, M; Rowe, D B; Halliday, G M; Dzamko, N

    2016-08-09

    Activating mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are strongly associated with increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). Thus, LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are in development as potential Parkinson's disease therapeutics. A reduction in the constitutive levels of phosphorylation on leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is currently used to measure target engagement of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors in cell and animal models. We aimed to determine if reduced phosphorylation of LRRK2 following inhibitor treatment is also a valid measure of target engagement in peripheral mononuclear cells from Parkinson's disease patients. Peripheral mononuclear cells from idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients and controls were treated ex vivo with two structurally distinct inhibitors of LRRK2, at four different doses, and immunoblotting was used to assess the reduction in LRRK2 phosphorylation at Ser910, Ser935, Ser955 and Ser973. Both inhibitors showed no acute toxicity in primary cells and both inhibitors reduced the constitutive phosphorylation of LRRK2 at all measured residues equally in both control and Parkinson's disease groups. Measuring the reduction in LRRK2 phosphorylation resulting from LRRK2 kinase inhibition, is thus a valid measure of acute peripheral target engagement in Parkinson's disease patients. This is important if LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are to be used in a clinical setting.

  7. Evaluating mononuclear cells as nanoparticle delivery vehicles for the treatment of breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, Jaclyn K.; Hu, Chelin; Ahmed, Mona M.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Nysus, Monique; Anderson Daniels, Tamara; Norenberg, Jeffrey P.; Adolphi, Natalie L.

    2015-08-01

    In breast cancer, certain types of circulating immune cells respond to long-range chemical signals from tumors by leaving the blood stream to actively infiltrate tumor tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether immune cells could be used to deliver therapeutic nanoparticles into breast tumors in mice. Mononuclear splenocytes (MS) were harvested from donor mice, labeled with Indium-111, injected intravenously into immune-competent recipient mice (3 tumor-bearing and 3 control), and imaged longitudinally by SPECT/CT. For comparison, the biodistribution of bonemarrow derived macrophages (BMDM) in one pair of mice was also imaged. Quantitative analysis of the SPECT images demonstrates that, after 24 hours, the concentration of MS detected in mammary tumors is more than 3-fold higher than the concentration detected in normal mammary glands. The ratio of MS concentration in mammary tissue to MS concentration in non-target tissues (muscle, lung, heart, liver, spleen, and kidney) was enhanced in tumor-bearing mice (compared to controls), with statistical significance achieved for mammary/muscle (p<0.01), mammary/lung (p<0.05), and mammary/kidney (p<0.05). By contrast, BMDM did not show a different affinity for tumors relative to normal mammary tissue. MS were incubated with 100 nm red fluorescent nanoparticles, and flow cytometry demonstrated that ~35% of the MS population exhibited strong phagocytic uptake of the nanoparticles. After intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice, fluorescence microscopy images of tumor sections show qualitatively that nanoparticle-loaded MS retain the ability to infiltrate mammary tumors. Taken together, these results suggest that MS carriers are capable of actively targeting therapeutic nanoparticles to breast tumors.

  8. The effects of calpain inhibition upon IL-2 and CD25 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Schaecher, K E; Goust, J M; Banik, N L

    2001-10-01

    Calcium is an important contributor to T cell activation; it is also the major factor in the activation of the calcium-activated neutral proteinase, calpain. For this reason, we wanted to investigate if calpain has a role in T cell activation and what aspects of this activation calpain affects. As measured by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), calpain inhibition decreased interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, at early time points following the initial activation, and over extended periods of time in activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Using an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) specific for human IL-2, we found that calpain inhibition decreased IL-2 secretion in a dose-dependent manner, shortly after activation, and continuously over time. Inhibiting calpain caused a dose-dependent inhibition of CD25 cell surface expression and also inhibited expression shortly after activation and for at least 48 h. This study showed that calpain has an integral role in the synthesis of the two important T cell activation factors, IL-2 and CD25.

  9. IFN-{gamma} gene expression in pancreatic islet-infiltrating mononuclear cells correlates with autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, A.; Suarez-Pinzon, W.L.; Sorensen, O.

    1995-05-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice results from selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta}-cells following islet filtration by mononuclear leukocytes. Cytokines produced by islet-infiltrating mononuclear cells may be involved in {beta}-cell destruction. Therefore, we analyzed cytokine mRNA expression, by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay, in mononuclear leukocytes isolated from pancreatic islets of four groups of mice: diabetes-prone female NOD mice; female NOD mice protected from diabetes by injection of CFA at an early age; male NOD mice with a low diabetes incidence; and female BALB/c mice that do not develop diabetes. We found that mRNA levels of IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-{gamma} in mononuclear cells from islets of diabetes-prone female NOD mice increased progressively as these cells infiltrated the islets from age 5 wk to diabetes onset (>13 wk). However, only IFN-{gamma} mRNA levels were significantly higher in islet mononuclear cells from 12-wk-old diabetes-prone female NOD mice than from less diabetes-prone NOD mice (CFA-treated females, and males) and normal mice (BALB/c). In contrast, IL-4 mRNA levels were lower in islet mononuclear cells from diabetes-prone female NOD mice than from NOD mice with low diabetes incidence (CFA-treated females and males). Splenic cell mRNA levels of IFN-{gamma} and IL-4 were not different in the four groups of mice. These results suggest that islet {beta}-cell destruction and diabetes in female NOD mice are dependent upon intra-islet IFN-{gamma} production by mononuclear cells, and that CFA-treated female NOD mice and male NOD mice may be protected from diabetes development by down-regulation of IFN-{gamma} production in the islets. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin- mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Rohaya, M. A. W.; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin-) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin+) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin- cell population. The ability of Lin+ and Lin- to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin+ and Lin- were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin+ mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin- stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation medium support Lin

  11. Reactive oxygen species formation and apoptosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell induced by 900 MHz mobile phone radiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao-Sheng; Huang, Bao-Tian; Huang, Yao-Xiong

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays an important role in the process of apoptosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) which is induced by the radiation of 900 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RFEMF) at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of ~0.4 W/kg when the exposure lasts longer than two hours. The apoptosis is induced through the mitochondrial pathway and mediated by activating ROS and caspase-3, and decreasing the mitochondrial potential. The activation of ROS is triggered by the conformation disturbance of lipids, protein, and DNA induced by the exposure of GSM RFEMF. Although human PBMC was found to have a self-protection mechanism of releasing carotenoid in response to oxidative stress to lessen the further increase of ROS, the imbalance between the antioxidant defenses and ROS formation still results in an increase of cell death with the exposure time and can cause about 37% human PBMC death in eight hours.

  12. Interferon-α curbs production of interleukin-22 by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to live Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Berner, Anika; Bachmann, Malte; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Kraiczy, Peter; Mühl, Heiko

    2015-10-01

    Cytokine networks initiated by means of innate immunity are regarded as a major determinant of host defence in response to acute infection by bacteria including Borrelia burgdorferi. Herein, we demonstrate that interferon (IFN)-α, either endogenously produced after exposure of cells to toll-like receptor-9-activating CpG oligonucleotides or provided as recombinant cytokine, weakens activation of the anti-bacterial interleukin (IL)-1/IL-22 axis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to viable B. burgdorferi. As IFN-α has been related to pathological dissemination of the spirochaete, data suggest an immunoregulatory role of type I IFN in this context that is able to significantly modify cytokine profiles thereby possibly determining early course of B. burgdorferi infection.

  13. Dengue Viral RNA Levels in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Are Associated with Disease Severity and Preexisting Dengue Immune Status

    PubMed Central

    Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Gibbons, Robert V.; Green, Sharone; Libraty, Daniel H.; Endy, Timothy P.; Ennis, Francis A.; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Rothman, Alan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Infection with dengue viruses (DENV) causes a wide range of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a febrile illness called dengue fever (DF), to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). The in vivo targets of DENV and the relation between the viral burden in these cells and disease severity are not known. Method The levels of positive and negative strand viral RNA in peripheral blood monocytes, T/NK cells, and B cells and in plasma of DF and DHF cases were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Results Positive strand viral RNA was detected in monocytes, T/NK cells and B cells with the highest amounts found in B cells. Viral RNA levels in CD14+ cells and plasma were significantly higher in DHF compared to DF, and in cases with a secondary infection compared to those undergoing a primary infection. The distribution of viral RNA among cell subpopulations was similar in DF and DHF cases. Small amounts of negative strand RNA were found in a few cases only. The severity of plasma leakage correlated with viral RNA levels in plasma and in CD14+ cells. Conclusions B cells were the principal cells containing DENV RNA in peripheral blood, but overall there was little active DENV RNA replication detectable in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Secondary infection and DHF were associated with higher viral burden in PBMC populations, especially CD14+ monocytes, suggesting that viral infection of these cells may be involved in disease pathogenesis. PMID:23284680

  14. Altered intracellular signaling cascades in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from BD patients.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Izabela Guimarães; Nogueira, Camila R C; Rocha, Natália Pessoa; Queiroz, Ana Luiza Lemos; Vago, Juliana Priscila; Tavares, Luciana Pádua; Assis, Frankcinéia; Fagundes, Caio Tavares; Huguet, Rodrigo Barreto; Bauer, Moisés Evandro; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; de Sousa, Lirlândia Pires

    2013-12-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe psychiatric disorder of complex physiopathology that has been associated with a pro-inflammatory state. The aim of the present study was to investigate intracellular pathways associated with inflammatory signaling, assessing the phosphorylation levels of transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of euthymic BD patients and healthy controls. Fifteen BD euthymic type I patients, and 12 healthy controls matched by age and gender were enrolled in this study. All subjects were assessed by the Mini-International Neuropsychiatry Interview and the patients also by the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Phosphorylation levels of p65 NF-κB subunit, and MAPK ERK1/2, and p38 were assessed by Western blot and flow cytometry. Plasma cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IL6, IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17A) were measured using cytometric bead arrays. Western blot and flow cytometry analyses showed increased phosphorylation levels of p65 NF-κB subunit, and MAPKs ERK1/2, and p38 in BD patients in euthymia in comparison with controls. BD patients presented increased pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in comparison with controls, and TNF-α correlated with the levels of phosphorylated p65 NF-κB. The present study found increased activation of MAPK and NF-κB pathways in BD patients, which is in line with a pro-inflammatory status.

  15. Olanzapine and aripiprazole differentially affect glucose uptake and energy metabolism in human mononuclear blood cells.

    PubMed

    Stapel, Britta; Kotsiari, Alexandra; Scherr, Michaela; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Bleich, Stefan; Frieling, Helge; Kahl, Kai G

    2017-05-01

    The use of antipsychotics carries the risk of metabolic side effects, such as weight gain and new onset type-2 diabetes mellitus. The mechanisms of the observed metabolic alterations are not fully understood. We compared the effects of two atypical antipsychotics, one known to favor weight gain (olanzapine), the other not (aripiprazole), on glucose metabolism. Primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and stimulated with olanzapine or aripiprazole for 72 h. Cellular glucose uptake was analyzed in vitro by 18F-FDG uptake. Further measurements comprised mRNA expression of glucose transporter (GLUT) 1 and 3, GLUT1 protein expression, DNA methylation of GLUT1 promoter region, and proteins involved in downstream glucometabolic processes. We observed a 2-fold increase in glucose uptake after stimulation with aripiprazole. In contrast, olanzapine stimulation decreased glucose uptake by 40%, accompanied by downregulation of the cellular energy sensor AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). GLUT1 protein expression increased, GLUT1 mRNA expression decreased, and GLUT1 promoter was hypermethylated with both antipsychotics. Pyruvat-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex activity decreased with olanzapine only. Our findings suggest that the atypical antipsychotics olanzapine and aripiprazole differentially affect energy metabolism in PBMC. The observed decrease in glucose uptake in olanzapine stimulated PBMC, accompanied by decreased PDH point to a worsening in cellular energy metabolism not compensated by AMKP upregulation. In contrast, aripiprazole stimulation lead to increased glucose uptake, while not affecting PDH complex expression. The observed differences may be involved in the different metabolic profiles observed in aripiprazole and olanzapine treated patients.

  16. CpG- and LPS-activated MAPK signaling in in vitro cultured salmon (Salmo salar) mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Iliev, Dimitar B; Hansen, Tom; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Krasnov, Aleksei; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2013-10-01

    The Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in transmitting intracellular signals downstream of diverse cell surface receptors and mediate the response to ligands such as growth factors, hormones and cytokines. In addition, MAPK are critically involved in the innate immune response to pathogen-derived substances, commonly referred to as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial DNA rich in CpG dinucleotides. Currently, a great deal of knowledge is available about the involvement of MAPK in the innate immune response to PAMPs in mammals; however, little is known about the role of the different MAPK classes in the immune response to PAMPs in lower vertebrates. In the current study, p38 phosphorylation was induced by CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) and LPS in primary salmon mononuclear phagocytes. Pre-treatment of the cells with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) blocked the PAMP-induced p38 activity and suppressed the upregulation of most of the CpG- and LPS-induced transcripts highlighting the role of this kinase in the salmon innate immune response to PAMPs. In contrast to p38, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a MAPK involved primarily in response to mitogens, was high in resting cells and, surprisingly, incubation with both CpG and control ODNs downregulated the phospho-ERK levels independently of p38 activation. The basal phospho-ERK level and the CpG-inducible p38 phosphorylation were greatly influenced by the length of in vitro incubation. The basal phospho-ERK level increased gradually throughout a 5-day culture period and was PI3K-dependent as demonstrated by its sensitivity to Wortmannin suggesting it is influenced by growth factors. Overall these data indicate that both basal and PAMP-induced activity of MAPKs might be greatly influenced by the differentiation status of salmon mononuclear phagocytes.

  17. Autologous red blood cells potentiate antibody synthesis by unfractionated human mononuclear cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rugeles, M T; La Via, M; Goust, J M; Kilpatrick, J M; Hyman, B; Virella, G

    1987-08-01

    We have tried to determine the most favourable conditions for the in vitro induction of specific antibody (Ab) responses to tetanus toxoid (TT) and keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were obtained from normal volunteers and stimulated with PWM, TT, KLH, and mixtures of PWM and antigens in the presence or absence of autologous red blood cells (RBC) (1:50 ratio of PBMNC/RBC). The cultures were harvested on day 11; immunoglobulins were determined immunonephelometrically and Ab levels by ELISA with human antibodies used for calibration. While anti-TT responses were easy to induce with PBMNC from recently boosted individuals, the production of anti-TT from PBMNC obtained from non-recently boosted individuals was only possible when PBMNC were stimulated with TT and PWM in the presence of autologous RBC. Similarly, anti-KLH responses were easier to induce with PBMNC from an immune donor; maximal response was observed after stimulation with PWM + KLH in the presence of autologous RBC. Stimulation of primary anti-KLH responses with PBMNC from non-immune donors was only successful when the cells were stimulated with KLH + PWM in the presence of autologous RBC. The potentiation of human B-cell responses with autologous RBC can be abrogated by pretreatment of PBMNC with anti-CD2 antibodies and is associated with increased expression of IL-2 receptors and increased production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). However, addition of IFN-gamma in different doses and at different times to PWM-stimulated PBMNC cultures was not as effective as addition of RBC in enhancing the production of immunoglobulin and antibody.

  18. Almond Skin Inhibits HSV-2 Replication in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Modulating the Cytokine Network.

    PubMed

    Arena, Adriana; Bisignano, Carlo; Stassi, Giovanna; Filocamo, Angela; Mandalari, Giuseppina

    2015-05-15

    We have investigated the effect of almond skin extracts on the production of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs were either infected or not by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), with and without prior treatment with almond skin extracts. Production of IL-17 induced by HSV-2 was inhibited by natural skins (NS) treatment. NS triggered PBMC in releasing IFN-α, IFN-γ and IL-4 in cellular supernatants. These results may explain the antiviral potential of almond skins.

  19. Oxygen activation by mononuclear Mn, Co, and Ni centers in biology and synthetic complexes.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Adam T; Fischer, Anne A

    2017-04-01

    The active sites of metalloenzymes that catalyze O2-dependent reactions generally contain iron or copper ions. However, several enzymes are capable of activating O2 at manganese or nickel centers instead, and a handful of dioxygenases exhibit activity when substituted with cobalt. This minireview summarizes the catalytic properties of oxygenases and oxidases with mononuclear Mn, Co, or Ni active sites, including oxalate-degrading oxidases, catechol dioxygenases, and quercetin dioxygenase. In addition, recent developments in the O2 reactivity of synthetic Mn, Co, or Ni complexes are described, with an emphasis on the nature of reactive intermediates featuring superoxo-, peroxo-, or oxo-ligands. Collectively, the biochemical and synthetic studies discussed herein reveal the possibilities and limitations of O2 activation at these three "overlooked" metals.

  20. microRNA expression profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Klinefelter syndrome

    PubMed Central

    SUI, WEIGUO; OU, MINGLIN; CHEN, JIEJING; LI, HUAN; LIN, HUA; ZHANG, YUE; LI, WUXIAN; XUE, WEN; TANG, DONGE; GONG, WEIWEI; ZHANG, RUOHAN; LI, FENGYAN; DAI, YONG

    2012-01-01

    microRNAs are a type of small non-coding RNAs which play important roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation, and the characterization of microRNA expression profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with Klinefelter syndrome requires further investigation. In this study, PBMCs were obtained from patients with Klinefelter syndrome and normal controls. After preparation of small RNA libraries, the two groups of samples were sequenced simultaneously using next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, and novel and known microRNAs were analyzed. A total of 9,772,392 and 9,717,633 small RNA reads were obtained; 8,014,466 (82.01%) and 8,104,423 (83.40%) genome-matched reads, 64 and 49 novel microRNAs were identified in the library of Klinefelter syndrome and the library of healthy controls, respectively. There were 71 known microRNAs with differential expression levels between the two libraries. Clustering of over-represented gene ontology (GO) classes in predicted targets of novel microRNAs in the Klinefelter syndrome library showed that the most significant GO terms were genes involved in the endomembrane system, nucleotide binding and kinase activity. Our data revealed that there are a large number of microRNAs deregulated in PBMCs taken from patients with Klinefelter syndrome, of which certain novel and known microRNAs may be involved in the pathological process of Klinefelter syndrome. Further studies are necessary to determine the roles of microRNAs in the pathological process of Klinefelter syndrome in the future. PMID:23226734

  1. microRNA expression profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sui, Weiguo; Ou, Minglin; Chen, Jiejing; Li, Huan; Lin, Hua; Zhang, Yue; Li, Wuxian; Xue, Wen; Tang, Donge; Gong, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruohan; Li, Fengyan; Dai, Yong

    2012-11-01

    microRNAs are a type of small non-coding RNAs which play important roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation, and the characterization of microRNA expression profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with Klinefelter syndrome requires further investigation. In this study, PBMCs were obtained from patients with Klinefelter syndrome and normal controls. After preparation of small RNA libraries, the two groups of samples were sequenced simultaneously using next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, and novel and known microRNAs were analyzed. A total of 9,772,392 and 9,717,633 small RNA reads were obtained; 8,014,466 (82.01%) and 8,104,423 (83.40%) genome-matched reads, 64 and 49 novel microRNAs were identified in the library of Klinefelter syndrome and the library of healthy controls, respectively. There were 71 known microRNAs with differential expression levels between the two libraries. Clustering of over-represented gene ontology (GO) classes in predicted targets of novel microRNAs in the Klinefelter syndrome library showed that the most significant GO terms were genes involved in the endomembrane system, nucleotide binding and kinase activity. Our data revealed that there are a large number of microRNAs deregulated in PBMCs taken from patients with Klinefelter syndrome, of which certain novel and known microRNAs may be involved in the pathological process of Klinefelter syndrome. Further studies are necessary to determine the roles of microRNAs in the pathological process of Klinefelter syndrome in the future.

  2. Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the setting of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a relatively common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that leads to progressive narrowing of the lumen of leg arteries. Circulating monocytes are in contact with the arterial wall and can serve as reporters of vascular pathology in the setting of PAD. We performed gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with PAD and controls without PAD to identify differentially regulated genes. Methods PAD was defined as an ankle brachial index (ABI) ≤0.9 (n = 19) while age and gender matched controls had an ABI > 1.0 (n = 18). Microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix HG-U133 plus 2.0 gene chips and analyzed using GeneSpring GX 11.0. Gene expression data was normalized using Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) normalization method, differential expression was defined as a fold change ≥1.5, followed by unpaired Mann-Whitney test (P < 0.05) and correction for multiple testing by Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate. Meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes was performed using an integrated bioinformatics pipeline with tools for enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, pathway analysis using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), molecular event enrichment using Reactome annotations and network analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suite. Extensive biocuration was also performed to understand the functional context of genes. Results We identified 87 genes differentially expressed in the setting of PAD; 40 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated. We employed an integrated bioinformatics pipeline coupled with literature curation to characterize the functional coherence of differentially regulated genes. Conclusion Notably, upregulated genes mediate immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, stress response, phosphorylation, hemostasis, platelet activation and platelet aggregation. Downregulated genes included several genes from

  3. Interactions of allogeneic human mononuclear cells in the two-way mixed leucocyte culture (MLC): influence of cell numbers, subpopulations and cyclosporin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Deiwick, A; Raddatz, G; Koyama, K; Schlitt, H J

    1999-01-01

    With organ allografts considerable numbers of donor-type mononuclear cells are transferred to the recipient, leading to bilateral immunological interactions between donor and recipient lymphocytes. To study such bilateral immune reactions in detail, human two-way MLC were performed. In this model proliferation kinetics, patterns of activation, and survival of the two populations were analysed, and the relevance of initial cell subset composition, relative cell numbers, and the effect of immunosuppression on this co-culture were evaluated. It could be demonstrated that with an initial 50:50 ratio of two populations of allogeneic cells one population dominated after 21 days of co-culture in 78 out of 80 combinations (97%) tested; the other population decreased markedly after an initially stable phase of 6–7 days. With unequal starting conditions the larger population dominated when resting cells were used, but small populations of preactivated cells or separated CD8+ cells could also dominate. Depletion of CD16+ natural killer (NK) cells and of CD2− cells (B cell and monocytes) had no effect on domination. Addition of cyclosporin delayed or blocked the domination process while addition of IL-2 accelerated it. Disappearance of one population was associated with detection of apoptotic cells. The findings indicate that co-cultures of allogeneic mononuclear cells are generally not stable for more than 1 week, but lead to active elimination of one population. CD8+ cells and particularly preactivated cells seem to play the most important role in that process, while NK cells are of less importance. Cyclosporin can prolong survival of allogeneic cells in co-culture. These observations suggest that under the conditions of clinical organ transplantation even small amounts of immunocompetent donor cells transferred by the graft may persist for some time and may, thereby, have the chance to exert immunomodulatory functions. PMID:9933457

  4. Primary tissue culture of spontaneously regressing flat warts. In vitro attack by mononuclear cells against wart-derived epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Tagami, H; Oku, T; Iwatsuki, K

    1985-05-15

    Although tumors may be resolved due to host immune response, it is difficult to obtain direct evidence of this in man. Numerous flat warts, human papilloma virus type 3-induced papillomas, disappear systemically and simultaneously after showing inflammatory changes. Histologically, there is a dense cellular infiltration composed of lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes as identified by alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase staining in situ, the former being predominant in most cases. The primary tissue culture of such inflamed flat warts from ten cases revealed a proliferation of wart-derived keratinocytes as is the case with ordinary flat warts. However, in nine of the ten cases, massive mononuclear cells, most of which were T-lymphocytes, migrated out of the explants and began to attack these keratinocytes, inducing degenerative changes. These findings indicate that cell-mediated tumor cell destruction rather than antiviral reaction induces systemic spontaneous regression of multiple papillomas in man.

  5. Strawberry intake increases blood fluid, erythrocyte and mononuclear cell defenses against oxidative challenge.

    PubMed

    Tulipani, Sara; Armeni, Tatiana; Giampieri, Francesca; Alvarez-Suarez, José M; Gonzalez-Paramás, Ana M; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Busco, Franco; Principato, Giovanni; Bompadre, Stefano; Quiles, José L; Mezzetti, Bruno; Battino, Maurizio

    2014-08-01

    The health promoting effects of a regular consumption of strawberries deserve attention, and a direct or indirect antioxidant role of strawberry bioactive compounds is among the most probable mechanisms underlying their beneficial properties. In the present study, we evaluated the overall effects of a 2-week daily consumption of strawberries on plasma antioxidant status, membrane lipid susceptibility to ex vivo-induced oxidation, and erythrocyte and mononuclear cell resistance to oxidative damage in apparently healthy volunteers. After strawberry intake, a moderate increase in fasting plasma antioxidant capacity and vitamin C was observed, together with a significant increase in the lag phase preceding plasma lipid oxidation. A significantly enhanced resistance to oxidative hemolysis was confirmed in red blood cells, while no significant changes were found in the extent of their membrane lipid peroxidation. For the first time, increased intake of strawberries for only 2weeks was shown to be sufficient to attenuate mononuclear cell mortality after ex vivo exposure to a single acuteoxidative challenge, but the analysis of DNA oxidative damage gave conflicting results. These findings suggest that a regular consumption of strawberries may enhance body defences against oxidative challenges.

  6. High insulin and leptin increase resistin and inflammatory cytokine production from human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Tsiotra, Panayoula C; Boutati, Eleni; Dimitriadis, George; Raptis, Sotirios A

    2013-01-01

    Resistin and the proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β , produced by adipocytes, and macrophages, are considered to be important modulators of chronic inflammation contributing to the development of obesity and atherosclerosis. Human monocyte-enriched mononuclear cells, from ten healthy individuals, were exposed to high concentrations of insulin, leptin, and glucose (alone or in combination) for 24 hours in vitro. Resistin, TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β production was examined and compared to that in untreated cells. High insulin and leptin concentrations significantly upregulated resistin and the cytokines. The subsequent addition of high glucose significantly upregulated resistin and TNF- α mRNA and protein secretion, while it did not have any effect on IL-6 or IL-1 β production. By comparison, exposure to dexamethasone reduced TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β production, while at this time point it increased resistin protein secretion. These data suggest that the expression of resistin, TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β from human mononuclear cells, might be enhanced by the hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia and possibly by the hyperglycemia in metabolic diseases as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Therefore, the above increased production may contribute to detrimental effects of their increased adipocyte-derived circulating levels on systemic inflammation, insulin sensitivity, and endothelial function of these patients.

  7. Omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA induce apoptosis and enhance drug sensitivity in multiple myeloma cells but not in normal peripheral mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Abdi, J; Garssen, J; Faber, J; Redegeld, F A

    2014-12-01

    The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been shown to enhance the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs in clinical studies in cancer patients and to induce apoptotic tumor cell death in vitro. Until now, EPA and DHA have never been investigated in multiple myeloma (MM). Human myeloma cells (L363, OPM-1, OPM-2 and U266) and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to EPA and DHA, and effects on mitochondrial function and apoptosis, caspase-3 activation, gene expression and drug toxicity were measured. Exposure to EPA and DHA induced apoptosis and increased sensitivity to bortezomib in MM cells. Importantly, they did not affect viability of normal human peripheral mononuclear cells. Messenger RNA expression arrays showed that EPA and DHA modulated genes involved in multiple signaling pathways including nuclear factor (NF) κB, Notch, Hedgehog, oxidative stress and Wnt. EPA and DHA inhibited NFκB activity and induced apoptosis through mitochondrial perturbation and caspase-3 activation. Our study suggests that EPA and DHA induce selective cytotoxic effects in MM and increase sensitivity to bortezomib and calls for further exploration into a potential application of these n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the therapy of MM.

  8. Changes in Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Kizhake V.; Zago, Maria P.; Koo, Sue-Jie; Spratt, Heidi; Stafford, Susan; Blell, Zinzi N.; Gupta, Shivali; Nuñez Burgos, Julio; Barrientos, Natalia; Brasier, Allan R.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) infection causes chagasic cardiomyopathy; however, why 30–40% of the patients develop clinical disease is not known. To discover the pathomechanisms in disease progression, we obtained the proteome signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal healthy controls (N/H, n = 30) and subjects that were seropositive for Tc-specific antibodies, but were clinically asymptomatic (C/A, n = 25) or clinically symptomatic (C/S, n = 28) with cardiac involvement and left ventricular dysfunction. Protein samples were labeled with BODIPY FL-maleimide (dynamic range: > 4 orders of magnitude, detection limit: 5 f-mol) and resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE). After normalizing the gel images, protein spots that exhibited differential abundance in any of the two groups were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and searched against UniProt human database for protein identification. We found 213 and 199 protein spots (fold change: |≥ 1.5|, p< 0.05) were differentially abundant in C/A and C/S individuals, respectively, with respect to N/H controls. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of PBMCs proteome dataset identified an increase in disorganization of cytoskeletal assembly and recruitment/activation and migration of immune cells in all chagasic subjects, though the invasion capacity of cells was decreased in C/S individuals. IPA predicted with high probability a decline in cell survival and free radical scavenging capacity in C/S (but not C/A) subjects. The MYC/SP1 transcription factors that regulate hypoxia and oxidative/inflammatory stress were predicted to be key targets in the context of control of Chagas disease severity. Further, MARS-modeling identified a panel of proteins that had >93% prediction success in classifying infected individuals with no disease and those with cardiac involvement and LV dysfunction. In conclusion, we have identified molecular pathways and a panel of proteins that could aid in detecting

  9. Junin virus replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with Argentine haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, M; Vallejos, A; Saavedra, C; Maiztegui, J I

    1990-02-01

    To study the relationship of Junin virus (JV) to populations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with Argentine Haemorrhagic Fever (AHF), blood samples were obtained during the acute period of disease and cultured as total, adherent, and non-adherent cell populations. JV was sequentially sought in these cell populations by using an Infectious Centre (IC) assay, whereas free JV in the supernatants was evaluated by plaque formation. IC were obtained in cultures of total PBMC from 8 out of 19 patients. Maximum numbers of IC showed high variation among patients, ranging from 3 to 410 IC per 10(6) viable PBMC. In contrast, IC were sporadically demonstrated in the non-adherent cell population. The release of JV into culture supernatants was detected only in total PBMC cultures, thus in the presence of macrophages. These results demonstrate that circulating monocytes (macrophages) are targets for JV replication contributing to the viral spread in the acute phase of AHF.

  10. Treatment of Severe Adult Traumatic Brain Injury Using Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, Charles S; Hetz, Robert A; Liao, George P; Aertker, Benjamin M; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Juranek, Jenifer; Savitz, Sean I; Jackson, Margaret L; Romanowska-Pawliczek, Anna M; Triolo, Fabio; Dash, Pramod K; Pedroza, Claudia; Lee, Dean A; Worth, Laura; Aisiku, Imoigele P; Choi, Huimahn A; Holcomb, John B; Kitagawa, Ryan S

    2017-04-01

    Preclinical studies using bone marrow derived cells to treat traumatic brain injury have demonstrated efficacy in terms of blood-brain barrier preservation, neurogenesis, and functional outcomes. Phase 1 clinical trials using bone marrow mononuclear cells infused intravenously in children with severe traumatic brain injury demonstrated safety and potentially a central nervous system structural preservation treatment effect. This study sought to confirm the safety, logistic feasibility, and potential treatment effect size of structural preservation/inflammatory biomarker mitigation in adults to guide Phase 2 clinical trial design. Adults with severe traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale 5-8) and without signs of irreversible brain injury were evaluated for entry into the trial. A dose escalation format was performed in 25 patients: 5 controls, followed 5 patients in each dosing cohort (6, 9, 12 ×10(6) cells/kg body weight), then 5 more controls. Bone marrow harvest, cell processing to isolate the mononuclear fraction, and re-infusion occurred within 48 hours after injury. Patients were monitored for harvest-related hemodynamic changes, infusional toxicity, and adverse events. Outcome measures included magnetic resonance imaging-based measurements of supratentorial and corpus callosal volumes as well as diffusion tensor imaging-based measurements of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity of the corpus callosum and the corticospinal tract at the level of the brainstem at 1 month and 6 months postinjury. Functional and neurocognitive outcomes were measured and correlated with imaging data. Inflammatory cytokine arrays were measured in the plasma pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 1 and 6 month follow-up. There were no serious adverse events. There was a mild pulmonary toxicity of the highest dose that was not clinically significant. Despite the treatment group having greater injury severity, there was structural preservation of critical regions of interest

  11. Saliva components reestablish the basal production of IL-6 by mononuclear cells, 72 hours after nitinol archiwire placement: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    León-Romero, Luis C; Rodríguez-Orozco, Alain R; Vargas-Purecko, Ma De la Luz; Ruiz-Reyes, Héctor

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate interleukin-6 production, in saliva-activated mononuclear cell cultures from malocclusion patients, before and after placement of .014 NiTi archwires.Four patients receiving .014 Nitinol archwire to correct malocclusion participated in this study. Samples of their blood and saliva were collected before and after placement of the apparatus. Mononuclear cells were obtained from the blood using the Ficoll-Paque (1.077 g/ml) density gradient separation method. Mononuclear Cells were activated with saliva from each patient and were cultured in 96-well plates for 72 hours. Samples were collected at 24 hours before apparatus placement, and at 24 hours and 72 hours after placement. IL-6 expression levels in the cell culture supernatants were quantified by ELISA. An increase in IL-6 levels in the cell culture supernatants was observed 24 hours after placement of the orthodontic apparatus relative to the negative control (p = 0.002) and IL-6 came to basal limits 72 hours after apparatus placement.IL-6 quantification may be useful as a biomarker to estimate the inflammatory response caused by forces applied during orthodontic treatment and their levels came to basal limits 72 hours after apparatus placement in patients without systemic diseases. The isolation of saliva components involved in such effects is important to study the mechanisms to control the acute inflammation in oral cavity after apparatus placement.

  12. Involvement of blood mononuclear cells in the infertility, age-associated diseases and cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin

    2016-01-01

    Blood mononuclear cells consist of T cells and monocyte derived cells. Beside immunity, the blood mononuclear cells belong to the complex tissue control system (TCS), where they exhibit morphostatic function by stimulating proliferation of tissue stem cells followed by cellular differentiation, that is stopped after attaining the proper functional stage, which differs among various tissue types. Therefore, the term immune and morphostatic system (IMS) should be implied. The TCS-mediated morphostasis also consists of vascular pericytes controlled by autonomic innervation, which is regulating the quantity of distinct tissues in vivo. Lack of proper differentiation of tissue cells by TCS causes either tissue underdevelopment, e.g., muscular dystrophy, or degenerative functional failures, e.g., type 1 diabetes and age-associated diseases. With the gradual IMS regression after 35 years of age the gonadal infertility develops, followed by a growing incidence of age-associated diseases and cancers. Without restoring an altered TCS function in a degenerative disease, the implantation of tissue-specific stem cells alone by regenerative medicine can not be successful. Transfused young blood could temporarily restore fertility to enable parenthood. The young blood could also temporarily alleviate aging diseases, and this can be extended by substances inducing IMS regeneration, like the honey bee propolis. The local and/or systemic use of honey bee propolis stopped hair and teeth loss, regressed varicose veins, improved altered hearing, and lowered high blood pressure and sugar levels. Complete regression of stage IV ovarian cancer with liver metastases after a simple elaborated immunotherapy is also reported. PMID:28074124

  13. Effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids on the proliferation of mitogen stimulated bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Thanasak, J; Müller, K E; Dieleman, S J; Hoek, A; Noordhuizen, J P T M; Rutten, V P M G

    2005-04-08

    The present study aimed at analysis of the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), linoleic acid (LA, C18:2n - 6) and linolenic acid (LNA, C18:3n - 3) on bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro. Both mitogen (ConA)-induced proliferative lymphocyte responsiveness during 4 days of culture and eicosanoid (prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4))) production during 36 h were determined in relation to the absence or presence of various concentrations of LA and LNA (0, 1, 5, 25, 125 and 250 microM). Mitogen-driven proliferative responses of lymphocytes tended to be uninfluenced in the presence of lower concentrations of LA, whereas significant inhibition was observed at the higher concentrations of LA (125 and 250 microM). However, increasing amounts of LNA did not affect the proliferation. ConA stimulation induced a clear PGE(2) response, which significantly decreased in the presence of 250 microM of LA. In addition, increasing amounts of LNA, but not LA, led to a significant decrease in LTB(4) levels. However, The production of LTB(4) did not alter due to mitogenic stimulation. In conclusion, the present study shows that bovine mononuclear cells may functionally be influenced by the presence of PUFA in their environment. Further studies need to be conducted to clarify in vivo consequences of these findings in a situation of PUFA enriched rations in ruminants.

  14. Interleukin-5 is the predominant cytokine produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, D; Menzel, J; Gottstein, B; Kern, P

    1995-01-01

    An involvement of cellular immunity in alveolar echinococcosis is strongly suggested by the intense granulomatous infiltrations observed around the hepatic parasite lesions. However, the basis of cellular immunoregulation in patient with alveolar echinococcosis is poorly understood. The present report shows a comparative analysis of lymphoid cell function in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 16 patients with alveolar echinococcosis and of healthy individuals. Our in vitro restimulation studies with crude Echinococcus multilocularis antigen demonstrated that PBMC from patients with alveolar echinococcosis were responsive to challenge with parasitic antigen as measured by lymphoid cell proliferation. In this system, we also evaluated cytokine expression at the gene and protein levels after stimulation with E. multilocularis antigen. Analysis of cytokine mRNA expression revealed distinct patterns of cytokine expression in patients and normal donors. By using reverse transcriptase PCR, we could demonstrate that the TH1 cytokine transcripts interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) are present in PBMC from patients with alveolar echinococcosis. Moreover, it was found that stimulation with E. multilocularis antigen induced or enhanced the expression of the TH2 cytokine IL-3, IL-4, IL-10, and especially IL-5 mRNAs in PBMC from 13 of 16 patients with alveolar echinococcosis. Two patients who were examined after radical surgery, as well as another patient with a stable course of the disease under continuous chemotherapy, were not able to generate the same pattern of cytokine response and had no evidence of IL-5 mRNA synthesis. In contrast to the frequent expression of TH2 cytokine mRNAs observed in patients with alveolar echinococcosis, PBMC cultures from normal donors showed prominent IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA expression but weak IL-3, IL-4, and IL-10 mRNA expression. Most interestingly, IL-5 mRNA was substantially absent in PBMC from healthy

  15. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  16. Integrated Bioinformatics Approach Reveals Crosstalk Between Tumor Stroma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Lang; Wang, Dan; Wei, Na; Guo, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is now the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Cancer progression is driven not only by cancer cell intrinsic alterations and interactions with tumor microenvironment, but also by systemic effects. Integration of multiple profiling data may provide insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of complex systemic processes. We performed a bioinformatic analysis of two public available microarray datasets for breast tumor stroma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, featuring integrated transcriptomics data, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and protein subcellular localization, to identify genes and biological pathways that contribute to dialogue between tumor stroma and the peripheral circulation. Genes of the integrin family as well as CXCR4 proved to be hub nodes of the crosstalk network and may play an important role in response to stroma-derived chemoattractants. This study pointed to potential for development of therapeutic strategies that target systemic signals travelling through the circulation and interdict tumor cell recruitment.

  17. Impact of fexofenadine, osthole and histamine on peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Karolina Kordulewska, Natalia; Kostyra, Elżbieta; Matysiewicz, Michał; Cieślińska, Anna; Jarmołowska, Beata

    2015-08-15

    This paper compares results of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) incubation with fexofenadine (FXF) and osthole. FXF is a third-generation antihistamine drug and osthole is assumed a natural antihistamine alternative. To our best knowledge, this is the first comparative study on FXF, osthole and histamine cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity in PBMC in vitro cultures using cell proliferation ELISA BrdU. The cultures were treated 12, 42, 48 and 72h with FXF and osthole at 150, 300 and 450ng/ml concentrations and histamine at 50, 100 and 200ng/ml. Our study results confirm that FXF, osthole and histamine exert no cytotoxic effect on PBMCs and that IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α cytokine secretion following osthole cell stimulation was similar to that by FXF stimulation.This confirms our hypothesis that osthole is a natural histamine antagonist, and can therefore be beneficially applied in antihistamine treatment.

  18. Mechanism of enhanced fibroblast arachidonic acid metabolism by mononuclear cell factor.

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, P J; Needleman, P

    1984-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with an infiltration of mononuclear cells, fibroblast proliferation, and elevated levels of prostaglandin (PG) E2. Mononuclear cell conditioned factor (MNCF) medium (5%) stimulated a 100-fold increase in basal human dermal fibroblast PGE2 release over 48 h as compared with fibroblasts that were incubated with control medium (conditioned medium prepared without cells). The MNCF-induced PGE2 production was suppressed by protein synthesis inhibitors. Fibroblasts pretreated with control medium released PGE2 only modestly in response to 1 nM bradykinin for 1 h (basal, 50 +/- 7 pg PGE2/micrograms protein; stimulated, 104 +/- 12 pg PGE2/micrograms protein), whereas cells that had been pretreated with MNCF showed a greatly facilitated bradykinin-induced release of PGE2. (basal, 297 +/- 59 pg PGE2/micrograms protein; stimulated, 866 +/- 85 pg PGE2/micrograms protein). The exaggerated agonist response is not specific for bradykinin because platelet-derived growth factor elicits a similar response. Exogenous arachidonic acid conversion to PGE2 was also facilitated (two- to threefold) by MNCF pretreatment as compared with control. Both the enhanced agonist-stimulated and exogenous arachidonic acid-induced PGE2 release from the MNCF pretreated cells were inhibited by actinomyin D or cycloheximide. A kinetic study of microsomal cyclooxygenase prepared from fibroblasts pretreated with MNCF showed a threefold increase in the maximum velocity (Vmax) but the same Michaelis constant (Km) as control-treated cells. This augmented arachidonic acid metabolism and subsequent enhanced PGE2 production may play an important role in macrophage-fibroblast interactions at sites of inflammation. PMID:6439745

  19. Bone marrow and bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells therapy for the chronically ischemic myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, Ron; Baffour, Richard

    2003-09-01

    Bone marrow stem cells have been shown to differentiate into various phenotypes including cardiomyocytes, vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Bone marrow stem cells are mobilized and home in to areas of injured myocardium where they are involved in tissue repair. In addition, bone marrow secretes multiple growth factors, which are essential for angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. In some patients, these processes are not enough to avert clinical symptoms of ischemic disease. Therefore, in vivo administration of an adequate number of stem cells would be a significant therapeutic advance. Unfractionated bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells, which contain both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells may be more appropriate for cell therapy. Studies in animal models suggest that implantation of different types of stem cells improve angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, tissue perfusion as well as left ventricular function. Several unanswered questions remain. For example, the optimal delivery approach, dosage and timing of the administration of cell therapy as well as durability of improvements need to be studied. Early clinical studies have demonstrated safety and feasibility of various cell therapies in ischemic disease. Randomized, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials need to be completed to determine the effectiveness of stem cell.

  20. Artificial niche combining elastomeric substrate and platelets guides vascular differentiation of bone marrow mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Allen, Robert; Gao, Jin; Wang, Yadong

    2011-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells are promising cell sources for vascular tissue engineering. However, conventional bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell expansion and induction strategies require plating on tissue culture plastic, a stiff substrate that may itself influence cell differentiation. Direct scaffold seeding avoids plating on plastic; to the best of our knowledge, there is no report of any scaffold that induces the differentiation of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs) to vascular cells in vitro. In this study, we hypothesize that an elastomeric scaffold with adsorbed plasma proteins and platelets will induce differentiation of BMNCs to vascular cells and promote vascular tissue formation by combining soft tissue mechanical properties with platelet-mediated tissue repairing signals. To test our hypothesis, we directly seeded rat primary BMNCs in four types of scaffolds: poly(lactide-co-glycolide), elastomeric poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS), platelet-poor plasma-coated PGS, and PGS coated by plasma supplemented with platelets. After 21 days of culture, osteochondral differentiation of cells in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) was detected, but most of the adhered cells on the surface of all PGS scaffolds expressed calponin-I and α-smooth muscle actin, suggesting smooth muscle differentiation. Cells in PGS scaffolds also produced significant amount of collagen and elastin. Further, plasma coating improves seeding efficiency, and platelet increases proliferation, the number of differentiated cells, and extracellular matrix content. Thus, the artificial niche composed of platelets, plasma, and PGS is promising for artery tissue engineering using BMNCs.

  1. Study of plasma-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cells survival using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ranjit K; Salman, Ahmad; Mordechai, Shaul; Manor, Esther

    2013-11-01

    Components present in the acellular fraction of blood influence the blood cell survival and function and the response to biotic and abiotic factors. Human plasma and sera have been used as therapeutic agents and are known to increase cell survival. White blood cells in normal blood are exposed to plasma components in vivo, but the effect of such plasma components in vitro on adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that includes monocytes has not been fully investigated. We cultured human PBMCs with autologous plasma and observed structural variation due to plasma addition in PBMCs along with increased cell survival. Light microscopy of the cells showed increased granularity in plasma-treated cells. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to elucidate the possible mechanism by studying the changes in the biochemical composition of the cells that explained the observations. FTIR spectroscopy of plasma-treated cells show altered spectral pattern in the mid-IR region, indicating increased phospholipid levels. Heat-stable components in the plasma possibly increase the differentiation of PBMCs, as evident by increased phospholipid metabolism. The data suggest that plasma-stimulated membrane biogenesis may contribute to PBMC survival by inducing them to differentiate into antigen presenting cells (APCs) like macrophages and dendritic cells.

  2. The effect of catechol on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Bożena; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Catechol also known as pyrocatechol or 1,2-dihydroxybenzene is formed endogenously in the organism from neurotransmitters including adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine. It is also a metabolite of many drugs like DOPA, isoproterenol or aspirin and it is also formed in the environment during transformation of various xenobiotics. We evaluated in vitro the effect of catechol on the structure and function of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The cells were incubated with xenobiotic at concentration range from 2 to 500μg/mL for 1h. Human blood mononuclear cells were obtained from leucocyte-platelet buffy coat taken from healthy donors in the Blood Bank of Łódź, Poland. Using flow cytometry we have evaluated necrotic, apoptotic and morphological changes in PBMCs incubated with catechol. Moreover, we have estimated changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation in the cells studied. The compound studied provoked necrotic (from 250μg/mL), apoptotic (from 100μg/mL), and morphological changes (from 250μg/mL) in the incubated cells. We have also noted that catechol decreased H2DCF oxidation at 2 and 10μg/mL but at higher concentrations of 250 and 500μg/mL it caused statistically significant increase in the oxidation of this probe. We also observed an increase in lipid peroxidation (from 250μg/mL) and protein carbonylation (from 50μg/mL) of PBMCs. It was observed that catechol only at high concentrations was capable of inducing changes in PBMCs. The obtained results clearly showed that catechol may induce change in PBMCs only in the caste of poisoning with this compound.

  3. Development of a FACS-based assay for evaluating antiviral potency of compound in dengue infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yilong; Chen, Yen-Liang; Herve, Maxime; Gu, Feng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Blasco, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arthropod-transmitted viral disease affecting humans. It is a blood-borne disease characterized by persistent fever and joint pain. In the blood, primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), in particular monocytes, are the main target of the dengue virus (DENV). These cells are poorly permissive for in vitro dengue virus infection and their infectivity varies from donor to donor. To overcome this barrier, an anti-dengue antibody was used to improve the infectivity of DENV-2 clinical isolates to PBMCs, the monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1 and the granulocyte cell line, KU812. A higher throughput 96-well-format assay based on a fluorescent-activated cell sorter could potentially be developed to evaluate the antiviral potency of compounds in DENV-infected PBMCs in vitro. The results correlate well with data obtained by a standard plaque assay. Altogether, an assay has been developed that enables evaluation of the antiviral activity of test compounds in a physiologically-relevant cell system (PBMCs). These screening processes are urgently needed for dengue drug discovery.

  4. Detection of Intracellular Factor VIII Protein in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Gouri Shankar; Tseng, Sandra C.; Howard, Tom E.; Sauna, Zuben E.

    2013-01-01

    Flow cytometry is widely used in cancer research for diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, as well as immune monitoring and profiling following immunotherapy. Detection of specific host proteins for diagnosis predominantly uses quantitative PCR and western blotting assays. In this study, we optimized a flow cytometry-based detection assay for Factor VIII protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). An indirect intracellular staining (ICS) method was standardized using monoclonal antibodies to different domains of human Factor VIII protein. The FVIII protein expression level was estimated by calculating the mean and median fluorescence intensities (MFI) values for each monoclonal antibody. ICS staining of transiently transfected cell lines supported the method's specificity. Intracellular FVIII protein expression was also detected by the monoclonal antibodies used in the study in PBMCs of five blood donors. In summary, our data suggest that intracellular FVIII detection in PBMCs of hemophilia A patients can be a rapid and reliable method to detect intracellular FVIII levels. PMID:23555096

  5. Grass immunotherapy induces inhibition of allergen-specific human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baskar, S; Hamilton, R G; Norman, P S; Ansari, A A

    1997-02-01

    The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from humans allergic to grass pollens (GR+ subjects) show strong in vitro proliferative responses to purified allergens from Lolium perenne pollen Lol p 1, and to a lesser extent to Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. By contrast, PBMC from grass allergic patients undergoing immunotherapy (GR + IT subjects) exhibit a very poor Lol p-specific proliferative response, similar to that observed in nongrass allergic subjects (GR-subjects). Unlike GR-subjects, both GR+ and GR + IT subjects have high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. While GR+ subjects exhibit a significant correlation between antigen-specific serum antibody and PBMC responses, GR + IT subjects do not show a correlation between the two responses. The possible mechanisms by which immunotherapy may modulate allergen-specific T cell proliferative response are discussed.

  6. Time-resolved fluorescence monitoring of cholesterol in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinakova, Z.; Horilova, J.; Lajdova, I.; Marcek Chorvatova, A.

    2014-12-01

    Precise evaluation of intracellular cholesterol distribution is crucial for improving diagnostics of diseased states associated with cholesterol alteration. Time-resolved fluorescence techniques are tested for non-invasive investigation of cholesterol in living cells. Fluorescent probe NBD attached to cholesterol was employed to evaluate cholesterol distribution in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from the human blood. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) was successfully applied to simultaneously monitor the spatial distribution and the timeresolved characteristics of the NBD-cholesterol fluorescence in PBMC. Gathered data are the first step in the development of a new perspective non-invasive diagnostic method for evaluation of cholesterol modifications in diseases associated with disorders of lipid metabolism.

  7. Detecting glycogen in peripheral blood mononuclear cells with periodic acid schiff staining.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei Shafiei, Mahdieh; Carvajal Gonczi, Catalina M; Rahman, Mohammed Samiur; East, Ashley; François, Jonathan; Darlington, Peter J

    2014-12-23

    Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining is an immunohistochemical technique used on muscle biopsies and as a diagnostic tool for blood samples. Polysaccharides such as glycogen, glycoproteins, and glycolipids stain bright magenta making it easy to enumerate positive and negative cells within the tissue. In muscle cells PAS staining is used to determine the glycogen content in different types of muscle cells, while in blood cell samples PAS staining has been explored as a diagnostic tool for a variety of conditions. Blood contains a proportion of white blood cells that belong to the immune system. The notion that cells of the immune system possess glycogen and use it as an energy source has not been widely explored. Here, we describe an adapted version of the PAS staining protocol that can be applied on peripheral blood mononuclear immune cells from human venous blood. Small cells with PAS-positive granules and larger cells with diffuse PAS staining were observed. Treatment of samples with amylase abrogates these patterns confirming the specificity of the stain. An alternate technique based on enzymatic digestion confirmed the presence and amount of glycogen in the samples. This protocol is useful for hematologists or immunologists studying polysaccharide content in blood-derived lymphocytes.

  8. Osteoclastogenesis in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of periprosthetic osteolysis patients and the phenotype of T cells localized in periprosthetic tissues.

    PubMed

    Roato, Ilaria; Caldo, Davide; D'Amico, Lucia; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Godio, Laura; Patanè, Salvatore; Astore, Franco; Grappiolo, Guido; Boggio, Maurizio; Scagnelli, Roberto; Molfetta, Luigi; Ferracini, Riccardo

    2010-10-01

    Arthroplasty is a very successful medical procedure. Failures depend on aseptic loosening caused by periprosthetic osteolysis, where T cells have a contradictory role. We analyzed osteoclastogenesis in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures of periprosthetic osteolysis patients and the phenotype of T cells localized in periprosthetic tissues. We enrolled 45 subjects with periprosthetic osteolysis (15), stable prosthesis (15) and healthy controls (15). We performed PBMC cultures to study osteoclastogenesis. Osteoclasts and T cell phenotype were examined by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and flow citometry. Periprosthetic osteolysis patients showed spontaneous osteoclastogenesis, which was inhibited by RANK-Fc and T cell depletion. In periprosthetic osteolysis patients' PBMC cultures, CD4 and CD8 T cells increased and CD8 T cells did not express CD25. In periprosthetic tissues T cells were close to osteoclasts, suggesting their interaction. Local CD8 T cells showed a regulatory phenotype, expressing CD25 and FoxP3, while CD4 T cells did not express activation markers. Our data suggest that, in an early stage of periprosthetic osteolysis, T cells may promote osteoclastogenesis, whereas subsequently osteoclasts activate FoxP3/CD8 T cells, which inhibit CD4 effector T cells. This mechanism may explain the previous finding of non-active T cells in periprosthetic tissues.

  9. Differences in vanadocene dichloride and cisplatin effect on MOLT-4 leukemia and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Havelek, Radim; Siman, Pavel; Cmielova, Jana; Stoklasova, Alena; Vavrova, Jirina; Vinklarek, Jaromir; Knizek, Jiri; Rezacova, Martina

    2012-07-01

    Modern chemotherapy is interested in developing new agents with high efficiency of treatment in low-dose medication strategies, lower side toxicity and stronger specificity to the tumor cells. Vanadocene dichloride (VDC) belongs to the group of the most promising metallocene antitumor agents; however, its mechanism of action and cytotoxicity profile are not fully understood. In this paper we assess cytotoxic effects of VDC in comparison to cisplatin using opposite prototype of cells; human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMCs) cells and human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (MOLT-4). Our findings showed cytotoxic effect of VDC on leukemia cells, but unfortunately on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as well. VDC induces apoptosis in leukemia cells; the induction is, however, lower than that of cisplatin, and in contrary to cisplatin, VDC does not induce p53 up-regulation. Cytotoxic effect of VDC on leukemia cells is less pronounced than that of cisplatin and more pronounced in PBMCs than in MOLT-4 cells.

  10. The mononuclear phagocyte system and lymphocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter outlines the cellular processes that are activated and interact during host immune responses including: (a) phagocytosis and antigen presentation by cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system (monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells), and (b) cell-mediated and humoral immunity ...

  11. Treatment of refractory cutaneous ulcers with mixed sheets consisting of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Koji; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Samura, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuya; Nakamura, Tamami; Nishimoto, Arata; Murata, Tomoaki; Hosoyama, Tohru; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the therapeutic effects of mixed sheets consisting of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) and fibroblasts on cutaneous skin ulcers. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion in mixed cell sheets was much higher than in PBMNCs and fibroblasts. Concerning the mechanism, transforming growth factor beta 1 and platelet-derived growth factor BB secreted from PBMNCs enhanced VEGF production in fibroblasts. In wounds created on the backs of diabetic mice, the therapeutic effect of mixed cell sheets was similar to that of daily treatment with trafermin, a recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor. Although abnormal granulation tissue and inflammatory cell infiltration were observed in trafermin-treated wounds, the transplantation of mixed cell sheets resulted in the natural anatomy of subcutaneous tissues. The expression patterns of identical wound-healing factors in wounds were different between mixed sheet-transfected and trafermin-treated animals. Because mixed cell sheets transplanted into full-thickness skin defects were eliminated in hosts by day 21 in syngeneic transplantation models, allogeneic transplantation was performed using mice with different genetic backgrounds. The wound-healing rates were similar between the mixed cell sheet and trafermin groups. Our data indicated that mixed cell sheets represent a promising therapeutic material for cutaneous ulcers. PMID:27329845

  12. Analysis of quantum dot fluorescence stability in primary blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Summers, Huw D; Holton, Mark D; Rees, Paul; Williams, Paul M; Thornton, Catherine A

    2010-10-01

    A quantitative assessment of fluorescence signal generation and persistence in blood cells, measured at multiple points over a time course, is presented. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorophores that are photostable and nonmetabolized and so can provide quantitative measures of cell biology over multiple cell generations. However, if the potential of these nanoparticles for long-term reporting is to be realized, an understanding of the stability of their fluorescence in living cells is essential. CdTe/ZnS and CdSe/ZnS core/shell dots with peak emission wavelengths of 705 nm and 585 nm, respectively, were loaded, via endocytosis into mononuclear cells extracted from primary blood and flow cytometry used to measure the average fluorescence intensity per cell within populations >10⁴. Time-based study showed a saturation-limited uptake of QDs with a characteristic time of 20 min and a maximum fluorescence signal that is linearly proportional to dot solution concentration. The fluorescence signal decreases after attachment and internalization within cells and is accurately described by a biexponential decay with a rapid initial decay followed by a much slower signal loss with characteristic times of 435 and 7,000 min respectively. Comparison with control samples indicates that interaction with the culture media is a major contributory factor to the initial signal decay. These results provide phenomenological descriptions of the evolving QD fluorescence within live cells with associated analytical equations that allow quantitative assessment of QD-based assays.

  13. Human mononuclear cell function after 4 degrees C storage during 1-G and microgravity conditions of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R.; Taylor, G.; Lionetti, F.; Neale, L.; Curren, T.

    1989-01-01

    Future space missions of long duration may require that autologous leukocytes be stored in flight for infusion to restore normal immune competence in crewmembers. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs), as leukocyte concentrates in autologous plasma and 2% dextrose, were stored in the microgravity conditions provided by the U.S. Space Shuttle Columbia (Mission 61-C). Activity of PBMNC after space flight was compared with that from a series of preflight ground control experiments, which demonstrated in culture a progressive daily loss in mitogen-stimulated protein synthesis at 24 h and thymidine uptake at 72 h after storage for 7 d at 4 degrees C. Post-storage viabilities were at least 90% as determined by trypan dye exclusion. A progressive reduction in the percentage of PBMNC expressing cell-surface phenotype markers, which was similar for monocytes, B cells, and T-cell subsets, also occurred after storage. The ability of PBMNC, stored for 8 d in Columbia's middeck, to become activated and proliferate in vitro was similar to that of cells that remained in identical flight lockers on the ground as 1-G controls, thus indicating that PBMNCs were not adversely affected by storage under microgravity conditions.

  14. Human mononuclear cell function after 4 degrees C storage during 1-G and microgravity conditions of spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Meehan, R; Taylor, G; Lionetti, F; Neale, L; Curren, T

    1989-07-01

    Future space missions of long duration may require that autologous leukocytes be stored in flight for infusion to restore normal immune competence in crewmembers. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs), as leukocyte concentrates in autologous plasma and 2% dextrose, were stored in the microgravity conditions provided by the U.S. Space Shuttle Columbia (Mission 61-C). Activity of PBMNC after space flight was compared with that from a series of preflight ground control experiments, which demonstrated in culture a progressive daily loss in mitogen-stimulated protein synthesis at 24 h and thymidine uptake at 72 h after storage for 7 d at 4 degrees C. Post-storage viabilities were at least 90% as determined by trypan dye exclusion. A progressive reduction in the percentage of PBMNC expressing cell-surface phenotype markers, which was similar for monocytes, B cells, and T-cell subsets, also occurred after storage. The ability of PBMNC, stored for 8 d in Columbia's middeck, to become activated and proliferate in vitro was similar to that of cells that remained in identical flight lockers on the ground as 1-G controls, thus indicating that PBMNCs were not adversely affected by storage under microgravity conditions.

  15. Expression sequence tag library derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the chlorocebus sabaeus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background African Green Monkeys (AGM) are amongst the most frequently used nonhuman primate models in clinical and biomedical research, nevertheless only few genomic resources exist for this species. Such information would be essential for the development of dedicated new generation technologies in fundamental and pre-clinical research using this model, and would deliver new insights into primate evolution. Results We have exhaustively sequenced an Expression Sequence Tag (EST) library made from a pool of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from sixteen Chlorocebus sabaeus monkeys. Twelve of them were infected with the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus. The mononuclear cells were or not stimulated in vitro with Concanavalin A, with lipopolysacharrides, or through mixed lymphocyte reaction in order to generate a representative and broad library of expressed sequences in immune cells. We report here 37,787 sequences, which were assembled into 14,410 contigs representing an estimated 12% of the C. sabaeus transcriptome. Using data from primate genome databases, 9,029 assembled sequences from C. sabaeus could be annotated. Sequences have been systematically aligned with ten cDNA references of primate species including Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, and Macaca mulatta to identify ortholog transcripts. For 506 transcripts, sequences were quasi-complete. In addition, 6,576 transcript fragments are potentially specific to the C. sabaeus or corresponding to not yet described primate genes. Conclusions The EST library we provide here will prove useful in gene annotation efforts for future sequencing of the African Green Monkey genomes. Furthermore, this library, which particularly well represents immunological and hematological gene expression, will be an important resource for the comparative analysis of gene expression in clinically relevant nonhuman primate and human research. PMID:22726727

  16. Long-term three-dimensional perfusion culture of human adult bone marrow mononuclear cells in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Eva; Finoli, Anthony; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2015-04-01

    The construction and long-term maintenance of three-dimensional in vitro bone marrow models is of great interest but still quite challenging. Here we describe the use of a multi-compartment hollow-fiber membrane based three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor for long-term culture of whole human bone marrow mononuclear cells. We also investigated bioreactors with incorporated open-porous foamed hydroxyapatite scaffolds, mimicking the in vivo bone matrix. Cells in bioreactors with and without scaffolds were cultured to 6 weeks and compared to Petri dish controls. Cells were analyzed for gene expression, surface markers by flow cytometry, metabolic activity, hematopoietic potential, viability, and attachment by immunocytochemistry. Cells in bioreactors were metabolic active during long-term culture. The percentages of hematopoietic stem cell and mature endothelial cell fractions were maintained in bioreactors. The expression of most of the analyzed genes stabilized and increased after long-term culture of 6 weeks. Compared to Petri dish culture controls, bioreactor perfusion culture improved in both the short and long-term, the colony formation unit capacity of hematopoietic progenitors. Cells attached to the ample surface area provided by hydroxyapatite scaffolds. The implementation of a hydroxyapatite scaffold did not influence colony formation capacity, percentages of cell type specific fractions, gene expression, cell viability or metabolic turnover when compared to control cells cultured in bioreactors without scaffolds. In conclusion, three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture enables long-term maintenance of primary human bone marrow cells, with hydroxyapatite scaffolds providing an in vivo-like scaffold for three-dimensional culture.

  17. Docosahexaenoic diet supplementation, exercise and temperature affect cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Capó, Xavier; Martorell, Miquel; Sureda, Antoni; Batle, Juan Miguel; Tur, Josep Antoni; Pons, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Acute exercise induces changes in peripheral mononuclear cells' (PBMCs) capabilities to produce cytokines. The aim was to investigate the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) diet supplementation on cytokine production, by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PBMCs after exercise, and the in vitro influence of temperature. Fifteen male soccer players were randomly assigned to a placebo or an experimental group. The experimental group consumed an almond-based beverage enriched with DHA (1.16 g DHA/day) for 8 weeks, whereas the placebo group consumed a similar non-enriched beverage. Blood samples were taken before and after the nutritional intervention in basal conditions and 2 h after acute exercise. Nutritional intervention significantly increased the DHA content in erythrocytes only in experimental group (from 34 ± 3.6 to 43 ± 3.6 nmols DHA/10(9) erythrocytes). Exercise significantly increased Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in PBMCs but only in the placebo group (203 %). Exercise also significantly increased IL6, IL8, VEGF, INFγ, TNFα, IL1α, IL1β, MCP1, and EGG production rates by LPS-stimulated PBMCs, and this response was attenuated by DHA supplementation. Temperature but not DHA also affected the pattern of cytokine production increasing IL6, IL8, IL1β, and MCP1 synthesis. The higher change was evidenced in IL1β increasing the production rate at 39.5 °C from 3.19 ± 0.77 to 22.4 ± 6.1 pg/h 10(6) PBMC in placebo and from 2.36 ± 0.11 to 10.6 ± 0.38 pg/h 10(6) PBMC in the supplemented group. The profile of affected cytokines differs between temperature and exercise, suggesting a different PBMC activation pathway. DHA diet supplementation only attenuated cytokine production after exercise and not that induced by temperature.

  18. Global Levels of Histone Modifications in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Subjects with Exposure to Nickel

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Adriana; Niu, Jingping; Qu, Qingshan; Zhao, Najuan; Ruan, Ye; Nadas, Arthur; Chervona, Yana; Wu, Fen; Sun, Hong; Hayes, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Occupational exposure to nickel (Ni) is associated with an increased risk for lung and nasal cancers. Ni compounds exhibit weak mutagenic activity, cause gene amplification, and disrupt cellular epigenetic homeostasis. However, the Ni-induced changes in global histone modification levels have only been tested in vitro. Objective: This study was conducted in a Chinese population to determine whether occupational exposure to Ni is associated with alterations of global histone modification levels and to evaluate the inter- and intraindividual variance of global histone modification levels. Method: Forty-five subjects with occupational exposure to Ni and 75 referents were recruited. Urinary Ni and global H3K4 trimethylation, H3K9 acetylation, and H3K9 dimethylation levels were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of subjects. Results: H3K4me3 was elevated in Ni-exposed subjects (0.25% ± 0.11%) compared with referents (0.15% ± 0.04%; p = 0.0004), and H3K9me2 was decreased (Ni-exposed subjects, 0.11% ± 0.05%; referents, 0.15% ± 0.04%; p = 0.003). H3K4me3 was positively (r = 0.4, p = 0.0008) and H3K9ac was negatively (r = 0.1, p = 0.01) associated with urinary Ni. Interindividual variances of H3K4me3, H3K9ac, and H3K9me2 were larger compared with intraindividual variance in both exposure test groups, resulting in reliability coefficients (an estimate of consistency of a set of measurements) of 0.60, 0.67, and 0.79 for H3K4me3, H3K9ac, and H3K9me2, respectively, for Ni-exposed subjects and of 0.75, 0.74, and 0.97, respectively, for referent subjects. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that occupational exposure to Ni is associated with alterations of global histone modification levels and that measurements of global levels of histone modifications are relatively stable over time in human PBMCs. PMID:22024396

  19. Identification of Immunopotentiating Lactic Acid Bacteria that Induce Antibody Production by in vitro Stimulated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Makiko; Hitaka, Akira; Fujino, Himiko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Takanori; Morimatsu, Fumiki; Fujiki, Tsukasa; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester (LLME) is known to remove lysosome-rich cells from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). To evaluate the immunopotentiating ability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), we adopted the in vitro stimulation protocol of LLME-treated PBMCs as a model assay system and monitored the level of antibody produced by stimulated PBMCs. The results indicated that several LAB strains have immunopotentiating ability against PBMCs, as evidenced by the enhanced antibody production and increased number of antigen-specific B cells. Next, we identified T cells as the direct target cells of the immunopotentiating LAB strain L32, suggesting that L32 induced antibody production by PBMCs through T-cell activation. Finally, we tested the immunopotentiating ability of ligands for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), which is known to mediate the LAB signal, and observed that both L32 and one of the TLR2 ligands, LTA-BS, induced antigen-specific antibody production by in vitro stimulated PBMC. This suggests that L32 and LTA-BS can be used as an adjuvant for stimulating immune reaction in PBMCs.

  20. Freeze-Drying of Mononuclear Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood Followed by Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Natan, Dity; Nagler, Arnon; Arav, Amir

    2009-01-01

    Background We recently showed that freeze-dried cells stored for 3 years at room temperature can direct embryonic development following cloning. However, viability, as evaluated by membrane integrity of the cells after freeze-drying, was very low; and it was mainly the DNA integrity that was preserved. In the present study, we improved the cells' viability and functionality after freeze-drying. Methodology/Principal Findings We optimized the conditions of directional freezing, i.e. interface velocity and cell concentration, and we added the antioxidant EGCG to the freezing solution. The study was performed on mononuclear cells (MNCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. After freeze-drying, we tested the viability, number of CD34+-presenting cells and ability of the rehydrated hematopoietic stem cells to differentiate into different blood cells in culture. The viability of the MNCs after freeze-drying and rehydration with pure water was 88%–91%. The total number of CD34+-presenting cells and the number of colonies did not change significantly when evaluated before freezing, after freeze-thawing, and after freeze-drying (5.4×104±4.7, 3.49×104±6 and 6.31×104±12.27 cells, respectively, and 31±25.15, 47±45.8 and 23.44±13.3 colonies, respectively). Conclusions This is the first report of nucleated cells which have been dried and then rehydrated with double-distilled water remaining viable, and of hematopoietic stem cells retaining their ability to differentiate into different blood cells. PMID:19381290

  1. [Research advances on DNA extraction methods from peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Chen-Xi

    2014-10-01

    DNA extraction is a basic technology of molecular biology. The purity and the integrality of DNA structure are necessary for different experiments of gene engineering. As commonly used materials in the clinical detection, the fast, efficient isolation and extraction of genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells is very important for the inspection and analysis of clinical blood. At present, there are many methods for extracting DNA, such as phenol-chloroform method, salting out method, centrifugal adsorption column chromatography method (artificial methods), magnetic beads (semi-automatic method) and DNA extraction kit. In this article, a brief review of the principle for existing DNA blood extraction method, the specific steps and the assessment of the specific methods briefly are summarized.

  2. Inverse relationship of tumors and mononuclear cell leukemia infiltration in the lungs of F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, D.L.; Griffith, W.C.; Hahn, F.F.

    1995-12-01

    In 1970 and F344 rat, along with the B6C3F{sub 1} mouse, were selected as the standard rodents for the National Cancer Institute Carcinogenic Bioassay program for studies of potentially carcinogenic chemicals. The F344 rat has also been used in a variety of other carcinogenesis studies, including numerous studies at ITRI. A major concern to be considered in evaluating carcinogenic bioassay studies using the F344 rat is the relatively high background incidence of mononuclear cell leukemia (MCL) (also referred to as large granular lymphocytic leukemia, Fischer rat leukemia, or monocytic leukemia). Incidences of MCL ranging from 10 to 72% in male F344 rats to 6 to 31% in female F344 rats have been reported. Gaining the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the negative correlations noted should enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of lung cancer.

  3. A Hitchhiker’s Guide to Myeloid Cell Subsets: Practical Implementation of a Novel Mononuclear Phagocyte Classification System

    PubMed Central

    Guilliams, Martin; van de Laar, Lianne

    2015-01-01

    The classification of mononuclear phagocytes as either dendritic cells or macrophages has been mainly based on morphology, the expression of surface markers, and assumed functional specialization. We have recently proposed a novel classification system of mononuclear phagocytes based on their ontogeny. Here, we discuss the practical application of such a classification system through a number of prototypical examples we have encountered while hitchhiking from one subset to another, across species and between steady-state and inflammatory settings. Finally, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of such a classification system and propose a number of improvements to move from theoretical concepts to concrete guidelines. PMID:26322042

  4. Generation of Patient-Specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cell from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Sendai Reprogramming Vectors.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Segovia, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) technology has changed preclinical research since their generation was described by Shinya Yamanaka in 2006. iPSCs are derived from somatic cells after being reprogrammed back to an embryonic state by specific combination of reprogramming factors. These reprogrammed cells resemble all the characteristic of embryonic stem cells (ESC). The reprogramming technology is even more valuable to research diseases biology and treatment by opening gene and cell therapies in own patient's iPSC. Patient-specific iPSC can be generated from a large variety of patient cells by any of the myriad of reprogramming platforms described. Here, we describe the generation of patient-specific iPSC from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells by Sendai Reprogramming vectors.

  5. Protective action of aqueous black tea (Camellia sinensis) extract (BTE) against ovariectomy-induced oxidative stress of mononuclear cells and its associated progression of bone loss.

    PubMed

    Das, Asankur Sekhar; Mukherjee, Maitrayee; Das, Dolan; Mitra, Chandan

    2009-09-01

    The protective action of aqueous black tea extract (BTE) against ovariectomy-induced oxidative stress of mononuclear cells and its associated progression of bone loss was demonstrated in this study. Eighteen female adult 6-month-old Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups: sham-control (A), bilaterally ovariectomized (B) and bilaterally ovariectomized + BTE supplemented (C). Studies included the measurement of oxidative (nitric oxide, lipid peroxidation) and antioxidative (superoxide dismutase, catalase) markers, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-alpha), osteoclast differentiation factor (RANKL) and bone resorption markers (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and hydroxyproline). Also quantitative histomorphometry and histological studies were undertaken. The bone breaking force was measured. The results indicate that BTE was effective in preserving and restoring skeletal health by reducing the number of active osteoclasts. Such changes with BTE supplementation were steadily linked with the reduced oxidative stress of mononuclear cells, serum levels of bone resorbing cytokines, osteoclast differentiation factor and resorption markers. The results of the bone breaking force, histological and histomorphometric analyses further supported the hypothesis. This study suggests that BTE has both protective and restorative actions against ovariectomy-induced mononuclear cell oxidative stress and associated bone loss.

  6. [Bone marrow mononuclear cells from murine tibia after the space flight on biosatellite "Bion-M1"].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, E R; Goncharova, E A; Gornostaeva, A N; Grigor'eva, O V; Buravkova, L B

    2014-01-01

    Cellularity, viability and immunophenotype of mononuclear cells derived from the tibial marrow of C57bL/6 mice were measured after the 30-day "Bion-M1" space flight and subsequent 7-day recovery. Cell number in the flight group was significantly less than in the group of vivarium control. There was no difference in the parameter between the flight and control groups after the recovery. Viability of mononuclear cells was more than 95% in all examined groups. Flow cytometric analysis failed to show differences in bone marrow cell immunophenotype (CD45, CD34, CD90.1 (Thy1); however, the flight animals had more large-sized CD45+ mononuclears than the control groups of mice. These results indicate that spaceflight factors did not have significant damaging effects on the number or immunophenotype of murine bone marrow mononuclears. These observations are consistent with the previously made assumption of a moderate and reversible stress reaction of mammals to space flight.

  7. Cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone affect the response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to mycobacterial antigens during tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mahuad, C; Bay, M L; Farroni, M A; Bozza, V; Del Rey, A; Besedovsky, H; Bottasso, O A

    2004-12-01

    The effect of cortisol and/or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on the immune response to antigens obtained from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was studied in vitro by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients at various stages of lung tuberculosis (TB) and from healthy control people (HCo). The results obtained show for the first time that addition of cortisol within concentrations of physiological range can inhibit the mycobacterial antigen-driven proliferation of cells from HCo and TB patients and the production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), indicating that endogenous levels of cortisol may contribute to the decreased lymphoid cell response to mycobacterium antigens observed in TB patients. DHEA did not affect lymphoid cell proliferation, IFN-gamma production and the cortisol-mediated inhibitory effects. Interestingly, we found that DHEA, but not cortisol, suppressed the in vitro transforming growth factor-beta production by lymphoid cells from TB patients with an advanced disease, which is indicative of a selective direct effect of this hormone.

  8. Effect of arsenic, cadmium and lead on the induction of apoptosis of normal human mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    DE LA FUENTE, H; PORTALES-PÉREZ, D; BARANDA, L; DÍAZ-BARRIGA, F; SAAVEDRA-ALANÍS, V; LAYSECA, E; GONZÁLEZ-AMARO, R

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of cadmium, lead and arsenic on the apoptosis of human immune cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) were incubated with increasing concentrations of these metals and then cellular apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and by DNA electrophoresis. We found that arsenic induced a significant level of apoptosis at 15 μm after 48h of incubation. Cadmium had a similar effect, but at higher concentrations (65 μm). In addition, cadmium exerted a cytotoxic effect on MNC that seemed to be independent of the induction of apoptosis. In contrast, concentrations of lead as high as 500 μm were nontoxic and did not induce a significant degree of apoptosis. Additional experiments showed that arsenic at concentrations as low as 1·0 μm had a significant pro-apoptotic effect when cells were cultured in the presence of this pollutant for more than 72. Non-T cells were more susceptible than T lymphocytes to the effect of arsenic and cadmium. Interestingly, MNC from children chronically exposed to arsenic showed a high basal rate of apoptosis and a diminished in vitro sensibility to this metalloid. Our results indicate that both arsenic and cadmium are able to induce apoptosis of lymphoid cells, and suggest that this phenomenon may contribute to their immunotoxic effect in vivo. PMID:12100024

  9. Paracrine Mechanisms of Intravenous Bone Marrow-Derived Mononuclear Stem Cells in Chronic Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Ashu; Srivastava, M.V. Padma; Mohanty, Sujata; Vivekanandhan, Sivasubramaniam; Sharma, Sakshi; Kumaran, Senthil; Bhatia, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Background The emerging role of stem cell technology and transplantation has helped scientists to study their potential role in neural repair and regeneration. The fate of stem cells is determined by their niche, consisting of surrounding cells and the secreted trophic growth factors. This interim report evaluates the safety, feasibility and efficacy (if any) of bone marrow-derived mononuclear stem cells (BM-MNC) in chronic ischemic stroke by studying the release of serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic growth factor (BDNF). Methods Twenty stroke patients and 20 age-matched healthy controls were recruited with the following inclusion criteria: 3 months to 1.5 years from the index event, Medical Research Council (MRC) grade of hand muscles of at least 2, Brunnstrom stage 2-5, conscious, and comprehendible. They were randomized to one group receiving autologous BM-MNC (mean 60-70 million) and to another group receiving saline infusion (placebo). All patients were administered a neuromotor rehabilitation regime for 8 weeks. Clinical assessments [Fugl Meyer scale (FM), modified Barthel index (mBI), MRC grade, Ashworth tone scale] were carried out and serum VEGF and BDNF levels were assessed at baseline and at 8 weeks. Results No serious adverse events were observed during the study. There was no statistically significant clinical improvement between the groups (FM: 95% CI 15.2-5.35, p = 0.25; mBI: 95% CI 14.3-4.5, p = 0.31). VEGF and BDNF expression was found to be greater in group 1 compared to group 2 (VEGF: 442.1 vs. 400.3 pg/ml, p = 0.67; BDNF: 21.3 vs. 19.5 ng/ml) without any statistically significant difference. Conclusion Autologous mononuclear stem cell infusion is safe and tolerable by chronic ischemic stroke patients. The released growth factors (VEGF and BDNF) in the microenvironment could be due to the paracrine hypothesis of stem cell niche and neurorehabilitation regime. PMID:27846623

  10. Functional characteristics of histamine receptor-bearing mononuclear cells. I. Selective production of lymphocyte chemoattractant lymphokines with histamine used as a ligand.

    PubMed

    Center, D M; Cruikshank, W W; Berman, J S; Beer, D J

    1983-10-01

    Mitogens and antigens have been the traditional ligands for activating lymphocytes in vitro for the elaboration of lymphokines. Recently, histamine, by interaction with histamine-type 2 receptors on T lymphocytes, has been found to induce the production of one lymphokine, histamine-induced suppressor factor (HSF), that inhibits lymphocyte proliferation and lymphokine production in vitro. Because the biologic effects of HSF appear to be confined to alterations in lymphocyte function, we assessed the ability of soluble products of histamine-stimulated human blood mononuclear cells to affect another lymphocyte function, motility. Utilizing a modified Boyden chamber assay to assess lymphocyte migration, we identified chemoattractant activity for human blood and rat splenic T lymphocytes in histamine-induced mononuclear cell supernatants. No neutrophil or monocyte chemoattractant activity was present. Sephadex G-100 gel filtration of histamine-induced supernatants showed the lymphotactic activity eluted with a 56,000 m.w. This activity was cationic as determined by its elution pattern from a Sephadex QAE anion exchange matrix with a single pl of 9.0 to 9.4 determined by isoelectric focusing in sucrose. Its biologic activity is predominantly chemokinetic in nature, is stable to heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min, but is sensitive to the effects of trypsin and neuraminidase. These physicochemical and functional characteristics establish it as identical to a recently described concanavalin A-induced (Con A) lymphotactic lymphokine (LCF). Mononuclear cells that did not adhere to a histamine affinity matrix were unable to produce LCF when subsequently stimulated with histamine or Con A. Mononuclear cells incubated with histamine and diphenhydramine produced LCF; the addition of cimetidine eliminated LCF production. In fact, supernatants from cells incubated with histamine and cimetidine significantly inhibited lymphocyte migration, a phenomenon explainable by the two regions

  11. TLR7 Agonist GS-9620 Is a Potent Inhibitor of Acute HIV-1 Infection in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bam, Rujuta A.; Hansen, Derek; Irrinki, Alivelu; Mulato, Andrew; Jones, Gregg S.; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Frey, Christian R.; Cihlar, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT GS-9620 is a potent and selective oral Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonist that directly activates plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). GS-9620 suppressed hepatitis B virus (HBV) in animal models of chronic infection and transiently activated HIV expression ex vivo in latently infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from virally suppressed patients. Currently, GS-9620 is under clinical evaluation for treating chronic HBV infection and for reducing latent reservoirs in virally suppressed HIV-infected patients. Here, we investigated the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of GS-9620. GS-9620 potently inhibited viral replication in PBMCs, particularly when it was added 24 to 48 h prior to HIV infection (50% effective concentration = 27 nM). Depletion of pDCs but not other immune cell subsets from PBMC cultures suppressed GS-9620 antiviral activity. Although GS-9620 was inactive against HIV in purified CD4+ T cells and macrophages, HIV replication was potently inhibited by conditioned medium derived from GS-9620-treated pDC cultures when added to CD4+ T cells prior to infection. This suggests that GS-9620-mediated stimulation of PBMCs induced the production of a soluble factor(s) inhibiting HIV replication in trans. GS-9620-treated PBMCs primarily showed increased production of interferon alpha (IFN-α), and cotreatment with IFN-α-blocking antibodies reversed the HIV-1-inhibitory effect of GS-9620. Additional studies demonstrated that GS-9620 inhibited a postentry event in HIV replication at a step coincident with or prior to reverse transcription. The simultaneous activation of HIV-1 expression and inhibition of HIV-1 replication are important considerations for the clinical evaluation of GS-9620 since these antiviral effects may help restrict potential local HIV spread upon in vivo latency reversal. PMID:27799218

  12. Separation of Escherichia coli bacteria from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using standing surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Ai, Ye; Sanders, Claire K; Marrone, Babetta L

    2013-10-01

    A microfluidic device was developed to separate heterogeneous particle or cell mixtures in a continuous flow using acoustophoresis. In this device, two identical surface acoustic waves (SAWs) generated by interdigital transducers (IDTs) propagated toward a microchannel, which accordingly built up a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) field across the channel. A numerical model, coupling a piezoelectric effect in the solid substrate and acoustic pressure in the fluid, was developed to provide a better understanding of SSAW-based particle manipulation. It was found that the pressure nodes across the channel were individual planes perpendicular to the solid substrate. In the separation experiments, two side sheath flows hydrodynamically focused the injected particle or cell mixtures into a very narrow stream along the centerline. Particles flowing through the SSAW field experienced an acoustic radiation force that highly depends on the particle properties. As a result, dissimilar particles or cells were laterally attracted toward the pressure nodes at different magnitudes, and were eventually switched to different outlets. Two types of fluorescent microspheres with different sizes were successfully separated using the developed device. In addition, Escherichia coli bacteria premixed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were also efficiently isolated using the SSAW-base separation technique. Flow cytometric analysis on the collected samples found that the purity of separated E. coli bacteria was 95.65%.

  13. Isolation and Flow Cytometric Analysis of Glioma-infiltrating Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Gregory J.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory has recently demonstrated that natural killer (NK) cells are capable of eradicating orthotopically implanted mouse GL26 and rat CNS-1 malignant gliomas soon after intracranial engraftment if the cancer cells are rendered deficient in their expression of the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-1 (gal-1). More recent work now shows that a population of Gr-1+/CD11b+ myeloid cells is critical to this effect. To better understand the mechanisms by which NK and myeloid cells cooperate to confer gal-1-deficient tumor rejection we have developed a comprehensive protocol for the isolation and analysis of glioma-infiltrating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The method is demonstrated here by comparing PBMC infiltration into the tumor microenvironment of gal-1-expressing GL26 gliomas with those rendered gal-1-deficient via shRNA knockdown. The protocol begins with a description of how to culture and prepare GL26 cells for inoculation into the syngeneic C57BL/6J mouse brain. It then explains the steps involved in the isolation and flow cytometric analysis of glioma-infiltrating PBMCs from the early brain tumor microenvironment. The method is adaptable to a number of in vivo experimental designs in which temporal data on immune infiltration into the brain is required. The method is sensitive and highly reproducible, as glioma-infiltrating PBMCs can be isolated from intracranial tumors as soon as 24 hr post-tumor engraftment with similar cell counts observed from time point matched tumors throughout independent experiments. A single experimentalist can perform the method from brain harvesting to flow cytometric analysis of glioma-infiltrating PBMCs in roughly 4–6 hr depending on the number of samples to be analyzed. Alternative glioma models and/or cell-specific detection antibodies may also be used at the experimentalists’ discretion to assess the infiltration of several other immune cell types of interest without the need for alterations to the

  14. Effects of alcohol-induced human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) pretreated whey protein concentrate (WPC) on oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yang-Ming; Chen, Sheng-Yi; Chen, Chien-Hung; Jin, Yi-Ru; Tsai, Shih-Meng; Chen, Ing-Jun; Lee, Jang-Hwa; Chiu, Chzng-Cheng; Tsai, Li-Yu

    2008-09-10

    Excessive alcohol consumption can induce apoptosis in a variety of tissues and influence the antioxidant status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This paper investigates the effects of whey protein concentrate (WPC) pretreated in PBMC on the apoptosis and antioxidant status after the treatment of alcohol. The results show that the percentages of apoptotic cells in the alcohol-treated group were higher than those in the group without alcohol treatment. Additionally, there was higher glutathione (GSH) peroxidase (GPx) activity when the PBMC were treated with 300 mg/dL of alcohol. With regard to the activity of GSH reductase (GRx), there was higher activity in the group pretreated with WPC than in the group with the treatment of alcohol only. On the contrary, the levels of GSH were reduced after the treatment of alcohol, but there was a higher level of GSH in the group pretreated with WPC. In this study, it was found that the increased level of GSH in PBMC might not be attributed to the effect of GRx because there was still a higher level of GSH in the group with the treatment of WPC and BCNU (a GRx inhibitor) in this study. The results indicated that PBMC pretreated with WPC might ameliorate alcohol-induced effects such as imbalance of the antioxidant status.

  15. Activation of cathepsins B and L in mouse lymphosarcoma tissue under the effect of cyclophosphamide is associated with apoptosis induction and infiltration by mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhanaeva, S Ya; Mel'nikova, E V; Trufakin, V A; Korolenko, T A

    2013-11-01

    We analyzed activities of lysosomal cystein cathepsins B and L in mouse LS lymphosarcoma and its drug-resistant RLS 40 strain and their correlations with the dynamics of the percentage of cells with fragmented DNA and CD14 (+) phagocytes over 3 days after cyclophosphamide injection. LS regression and inhibition of RLS 40 growth after cyclophosphamide injection were paralleled by an increase in cathepsins B and L activities in tumor tissues. The antitumor effect of cyclophosphamide associated with apoptosis intensity and protease activities were significantly higher in LS. Positive correlations between activities of cathepsins B and L and the LS tissue content of cells with fragmented DNA and CD14 (+) phagocytes and negative correlations thereof with tumor weight were detected. It seems that the increase in cathepsins B and L activities in LS tissues was caused by cyclophosphamide induction of apoptosis and depended on the level of tumor cell infiltration with mononuclear phagocytes.

  16. Increased telomere length and proliferative potential in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of adults of different ages stimulated with concanavalin A

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, a direct correlation with telomere length, proliferative potential and telomerase activity has been found in the process of aging in peripheral blood cells. The objective of the study was to evaluate telomere length and proliferative potential in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after stimulation with Concanavalin A (ConA) of young adults compared with older adults. Methods Blood samples were obtained from 20 healthy young males (20–25 years old) (group Y) and 20 males (60–65 years old) (group O). We compared PBMC proliferation before and after stimulation with ConA. DNA was isolated from cells separated before and after culture with ConA for telomeric measurement by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results In vitro stimulation of PBMCs from young subjects induced an increase of telomere length as well as a higher replicative capacity of cell proliferation. Samples from older adults showed higher loss of telomeric DNA (p = 0.03) and higher levels of senescent (≤6.2 kb) telomeric DNA (p = 0.02) and displayed a marked decrease of proliferation capacity. Viability cell counts and CFSE tracking in 72-h-old cell cultures indicated that group O PBMCs (CD8+ and CD4+ T cells) underwent fewer mitotic cycles and had shorter telomeres than group Y (p = 0.04). Conclusions Our findings confirm that telomere length in older-age adults is shorter than in younger subjects. After stimulation with ConA, cells are not restored to the previous telomere length and undergo replicative senescence. This is in sharp contrast to the response observed in young adults after ConA stimulation where cells increase in telomere length and replicative capacity. The mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are not yet clear and merit further investigation. PMID:24063536

  17. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 stimulates chemokine production and induces chemotaxis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Katsura; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Seno, Takahiro; Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kohno, Masataka; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2014-06-06

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is expressed by macrophages, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in immune-inflammatory disorders such as systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and several vasculopathies. However, its molecular function is not fully understood. In this study, we examined gene expression profiles and induction of chemokines in monocytes treated with recombinant human AIF (rhAIF-1). Using the high-density oligonucleotide microarray technique, we compared mRNA expression profiles of rhAIF-1-stimulated CD14(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (CD14(+) PBMCs) derived from healthy volunteers. We demonstrated upregulation of genes for several CC chemokines such as CCL1, CCL2, CCL3, CCL7, and CCL20. Next, using ELISAs, we confirmed that rhAIF-1 promoted the secretion of CCL3/MIP-1α and IL-6 by CD14(+) PBMCs, whereas only small amounts of CCL1, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL7/MCP-3 and CCL20/MIP-3α were secreted. Conditioned media from rhAIF-1stimulated CD14(+) PBMCs resulted in migration of PBMCs. These findings suggest that AIF-1, which induced chemokines and enhanced chemotaxis of monocytes, may represent a molecular target for the therapy of immune-inflammatory disorders.

  18. Chinese goose (Anser cygnoides) CD8a: cloning, tissue distribution and immunobiological in splenic mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiurong; Liu, Fei; Chen, Shun; Yan, Xiaoling; Qi, Yulin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2013-10-25

    CD8 molecule is a cell membrane glycoprotein, which plays an important role in cell-mediated immunity. Here, we identified Chinese goose CD8α (goCD8α) gene for the first time. The full-length cDNA of goCD8α is 1459bp in length and contains a 711bp open reading frame. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the waterfowl CD8α formed a monophyletic group. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that transcripts of goCD8α mRNA were high in the immune-related organs and mucosal immune system in gosling, and high in thymus and spleen comparing to other immune-related tissues in goose. The obvious increase of CD8α expression was observed in spleen of acute new type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV) infected bird, while the increase of CD8α were observed in the thymus, bursa of fabricius, and cecum of chronic infected bird. The CD8α mRNA transcription level in spleen mononuclear cells was significantly up-regulated when stimulated by phytohemagglutinin, but not by lipopolysaccharide in vitro.

  19. Modifications of the endosomal compartment in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and fibroblasts from Alzheimer's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Corlier, F; Rivals, I; Lagarde, J; Hamelin, L; Corne, H; Dauphinot, L; Ando, K; Cossec, J-C; Fontaine, G; Dorothée, G; Malaplate-Armand, C; Olivier, J-L; Dubois, B; Bottlaender, M; Duyckaerts, C; Sarazin, M; Potier, M-C; Alnajjar-Carpentier, Dr Amer; Logak, Dr Michel; Leder, Dr Sara; Marchal, Dr Dominique; Pitti-Ferandi, Dr Hélène; Brugeilles, Dr Hélene; Roualdes, Dr Brigitte; Michon, Dr Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Identification of blood-based biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains a challenge. Neuropathological studies have identified enlarged endosomes in post-mortem brains as the earliest cellular change associated to AD. Here the presence of enlarged endosomes was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 48 biologically defined AD patients (25 with mild cognitive impairment and 23 with dementia (AD-D)), and 23 age-matched healthy controls using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. The volume and number of endosomes were not significantly different between AD and controls. However, the percentage of cells containing enlarged endosomes was significantly higher in the AD-D group as compared with controls. Furthermore, endosomal volumes significantly correlated to [C11]PiB cortical index measured by positron emission tomography in the AD group, independently of the APOE genotype, but not to the levels of amyloid-beta, tau and phosphorylated tau measured in the cerebrospinal fluid. Importantly, we confirmed the presence of enlarged endosomes in fibroblasts from six unrelated AD-D patients as compared with five cognitively normal controls. This study is the first, to our knowledge, to report morphological alterations of the endosomal compartment in peripheral cells from AD patients correlated to amyloid load that will now be evaluated as a possible biomarker. PMID:26151923

  20. Effect of Static Magnetic Fields on the Peripheral Blood Mononuclear-like Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina-Nava, J. J.; García-Cantú, R.; Cañedo, L.; Rodríguez-Segura, M. A.; Serrano, G.; Alvarado-Alvarez, R.; Toledo-Ramos, F.

    2002-08-01

    In this article the role of static magnetic fields (SMF) in the generation of Ca2+ currents in peripheral blood mononuclear-like cells (PBMLC) is described. Using the sensitivity of Ca2+ channels and pumps to membrane potential and ion concentration we propose a method which uses the conductivity as a dynamical coefficient in the Onsager's reciprocity relations, and the dynamics of the calcium ions described by the electrodiffusion equation deduced by Pelce. The enhanced influx of calcium ion in PBMLC was studied parametrizing the static magnetic fields effects on the conductivity by the coefficients γ, ρ and κ. The parametrization was made according to the symmetry properties of Onsager's reciprocity relations using the most simple expressions. As an example we used available experimental data over chromaffin cell and employing physical considerations concerning to PBMLC, an order of magnitude for the value of ρ ≈ O(-10-5 mol/(Vm2s)), κ = 0, γ ≈ O(-10-3 mol/(VT2m2s) was obtained. The γ parameter was found graphically. With this parametrization, the time to induce calcium current in the cell was always less than the situation without magnetic field application.

  1. Molecular Imaging of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Survival and Homing in Murine Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Bogt, Koen E.A.; Hellingman, Alwine A.; Lijkwan, Maarten A.; Bos, Ernst-Jan; de Vries, Margreet R.; Fischbein, Michael P.; Quax, Paul H.; Robbins, Robert C.; Hamming, Jaap F.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow mononuclear cell (MNC) therapy is a promising treatment for peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study aims to provide insight into cellular kinetics using molecular imaging following different transplantation methods. Methods and Results MNCs were isolated from F6 transgenic mice (FVB background) that express firefly luciferase (Fluc) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Male FVB and C57Bl6 mice (n=50) underwent femoral artery ligation and were randomized into 4 groups receiving: (1) single intramuscular (i.m.) injection of 2×106 MNC; (2) four weekly i.m. injections of 5×105 MNC; (3) 2×106 MNCs intravenously (i.v.); and (4) PBS. Cellular kinetics, measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI), revealed near-complete donor cell death 4 weeks after i.m. transplantation. Following i.v. transplantation, BLI monitored cells homed in on the injured area in the limb, as well as to the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Ex vivo BLI showed presence of MNCs in the scar tissue and adductor muscle. However, no significant effects on neovascularisation were observed as monitored by Laser-Doppler-Perfusion-Imaging and histology. Conclusion This is one of the first studies to assess kinetics of transplanted MNCs in PAD using in vivo molecular imaging. MNC survival is short lived and MNCs do not significantly stimulate perfusion in this model. PMID:22239892

  2. Quantification of mucosal mononuclear cells in tissues with a fluorescent bead-based polychromatic flow cytometry assay.

    PubMed

    Reeves, R Keith; Evans, Tristan I; Gillis, Jacqueline; Wong, Fay E; Connole, Michelle; Carville, Angela; Johnson, R Paul

    2011-03-31

    Since the vast majority of infections occur at mucosal surfaces, accurate characterization of mucosal immune cells is critically important for understanding transmission and control of infectious diseases. Standard flow cytometric analysis of cells obtained from mucosal tissues can provide valuable information on the phenotype of mucosal leukocytes and their relative abundance, but does not provide absolute cell counts of mucosal cell populations. We developed a bead-based flow cytometry assay to determine the absolute numbers of multiple mononuclear cell types in colorectal biopsies of rhesus macaques. Using 10-color flow cytometry panels and pan-fluorescent beads, cells were enumerated in biopsy specimens by adding a constant ratio of beads per mg of tissue and then calculating cell numbers/mg of tissue based on cell-to-bead ratios determined at the time of sample acquisition. Testing in duplicate specimens showed the assay to be highly reproducible (Spearman R=0.9476, P<0.0001). Using this assay, we report enumeration of total CD45(+) leukocytes, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, B cells, NK cells, CD14(+) monocytes, and myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in colorectal biopsies, with cell numbers in normal rhesus macaques varying from medians of 4486 cells/mg (T cells) to 3 cells/mg (plasmacytoid dendritic cells). This assay represents a significant advancement in rapid, accurate quantification of mononuclear cell populations in mucosal tissues and could be applied to provide absolute counts of a variety of different cell populations in diverse tissues.

  3. Ultrastructure of the attack of eosinophils stimulated by blood mononuclear cell products on schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed Central

    Caulfield, J. P.; Lenzi, H. L.; Elsas, P.; Dessein, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    Purified human eosinophils were treated with peripheral blood mononuclear cell supernatants containing eosinophil cytotoxic enhancing activity (ECEA). Schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni which had been coated either with antibody (Ab) from the sera of infected patients or with the lectin concanavalin A (Con A) were incubated with ECEA-treated and untreated cells for 2 minutes to 12 hours and examined ultrastructurally. Killing was assayed at 18 hours. ECEA caused an increase in the killing of Ab-coated worms, but Con-A-coated worms were not killed by either ECEA-treated or untreated cells. Eosinophils began to degranulate on Ab-coated worms within 2 minutes and continued to degranulate, so that by 12 hours about half of the parasites had greater than 50% of their surface covered by discharge material. The ECEA-treated cells degranulated more than the untreated cells. There was much less discharge material on Con-A-coated worms than on Ab-coated worms. Eosinophils adhered to discharge material on the surface of both Ab- and Con-A-coated parasites. At 3 and 12 hours, lysed cells and cell fragments were also seen adhering to discharge material. In the absence of discharge material the cells adhered to residual glycocalyx or to the tegumental outer membrane. These studies suggest that eosinophils kill schistosomula by progressively degranulating onto their surface over many hours and that the increased toxicity caused by ECEA is due to an increase in discharge. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:4037065

  4. Red wine consumption and prevention of atherosclerosis: an in vitro model using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Magrone, T; Tafaro, A; Jirillo, F; Panaro, M A; Cuzzuol, P; Cuzzuol, A C; Pugliese, V; Amati, L; Jirillo, E; Covelli, V

    2007-01-01

    Evidence has been provided that red wine possesses antiatherogenic activities in virtue of its content in polyphenols (flavonoids and non-flavonoids substances). Here, some red wines (Negroamaro, Primitivo and Lambrusco) were tested for their ability to trigger nitric oxide (NO) production from human healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Negroamaro was the strongest inducer of NO from PBMC and deprivation of polyphenols did not influence its NO generation capacity. This fact supports the involvement of polyphenols in the NO production even in the absence of alcohol, which also per se does not exert any significant activity. These results are also corroborated by the evidence that PBMC inducible-nitric oxide synthase expression occurred by the effect of samples containing polyphenols but this expression was very weak when polyphenols were removed from the whole Negroamaro. In synthesis, flavonoids and resveratrol, major constituents of red wine, once absorbed at intestinal level, enter circulation and trigger monocytes for NO production. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a direct effect of red wine on monocytes for NO release to occur. On the other hand, also the macrophage contingent from gut-associated lymphoid tissue can contribute to NO generation, besides the aliquot produced by endothelial cells, as previously demonstrated by various authors. Taken together, these results support the concept that moderate intake of red wine can prevent atherosclerosis via production of NO, a potent vasodilator of terminal vessels.

  5. Characterization of surface interleukin-2 receptor expression on gated populations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Sweat, J M; Johnson, C M; Marikar, Y; Gibbs, E P

    2005-12-15

    An in vitro system to determine surface interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) expression on mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from free-ranging manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris was developed. Human recombinant IL-2, conjugated with a fluorescein dye was used in conjunction with flow cytometric analysis to determine changes in surface expression of IL-2R at sequential times over a 48-h period of in vitro stimulation. Surface expression of IL-2R was detected on manatee PBMC, which also cross-reacted with an anti-feline pan T-cell marker. An expression index (EI) was calculated by comparing mitogen-activated and non-activated PBMC. Based on side- and forward-scatter properties, flow cytometric analysis showed an increase in the number of larger, more granular "lymphoblasts" following concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation. The appearance of lymphoblasts was correlated with an increase in their surface expression of IL-2 receptors. Surface IL-2R expression, in Con A-stimulated PBMC, was detected at 16 h, peaked at 24-36 h, and began to decrease by 48 h. Characterization of the IL-2R expression should provide additional information on the health status of manatees, and the effect of their sub lethal exposure to brevetoxin.

  6. Analysis of the Secretome of Apoptotic Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Impact of Released Proteins and Exosomes for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Lucian; Zimmermann, Matthias; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Ellinger, Adolf; Gruber, Florian; Narzt, Marie-Sophie; Zellner, Maria; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Madlener, Sibylle; Simader, Elisabeth; Gabriel, Christian; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that, when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stressed with ionizing radiation, they released paracrine factors that showed regenerative capacity in vitro and in vivo. This study aimed to characterize the secretome of PBMCs and to investigate its biologically active components in vitro and vivo. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that irradiated PBMCs differentially expressed genes that encoded secreted proteins. These genes were primarily involved in (a) pro-angiogenic and regenerative pathways and (b) the generation of oxidized phospholipids with known pro-angiogenic and inflammation-modulating properties. Subsequently, in vitro assays showed that the exosome and protein fractions of irradiated and non-irradiated PBMC secretome were the major biological components that enhanced cell mobility; conversely, secreted lipids and microparticles had no effects. We tested a viral-cleared PBMC secretome, prepared according to good manufacturing practice (GMP), in a porcine model of closed chest, acute myocardial infarction. We found that the potency for preventing ventricular remodeling was similar with the GMP-compliant and experimentally-prepared PBMC secretomes. Our results indicate that irradiation modulates the release of proteins, lipid-mediators and extracellular vesicles from human PBMCs. In addition our findings implicate the use of secretome fractions as valuable material for the development of cell-free therapies in regenerative medicine. PMID:26567861

  7. Viability and Functionality of Cryopreserved Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Pediatric Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Celis, Federico; Salgado, Doris M.; Castañeda, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are widely used in studies of dengue. In this disease, elevated frequency of apoptotic PBMCs has been described, and molecules such as soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligands (sTRAIL) are involved. This effect of dengue may affect the efficiency of PBMC cryopreservation. Here, we evaluate the viability (trypan blue dye exclusion and amine-reactive dye staining) and functionality (frequency of gamma interferon [IFN-γ]-producing T cells after polyclonal stimulation) of fresh and cryopreserved PBMCs from children with dengue (in acute and convalescence phases), children with other febrile illnesses, and healthy children as controls. Plasma sTRAIL levels were also evaluated. The frequencies of nonviable PBMCs detected by the two viability assays were positively correlated (r = 0.74; P < 0.0001). Cryopreservation particularly affected the PBMCs of children with dengue, who had a higher frequency of nonviable cells than healthy children and children with other febrile illnesses (P ≤ 0.02), and PBMC viability levels were restored in the convalescent phase. In the acute phase, an increased frequency of CD3+ CD8+ amine-positive cells was found before cryopreservation (P = 0.01). Except for B cells in the acute phase, cryopreservation usually did not affect the relative frequencies of viable PBMC subpopulations. Dengue infection reduced the frequency of IFN-γ-producing CD3+ cells after stimulation compared with healthy controls and convalescent-phase patients (P ≤ 0.003), and plasma sTRAIL correlated with this decreased frequency in dengue (rho = −0.56; P = 0.01). Natural dengue infection in children can affect the viability and functionality of cryopreserved PBMCs. PMID:26961858

  8. Therapeutic Time Window and Dose Response of Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bing; Strong, Roger; Sharma, Sushil; Brenneman, Miranda; Mallikarjunarao, Kasam; Xi, XiaoPei; Grotta, James C.; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Savitz, Sean I.

    2012-01-01

    Although mononuclear cells (MNCs) from bone marrow are being investigated in phase I clinical trials in stroke patients, dose response, therapeutic time window and biodistribiton have not been well-characterized in animal stroke models. Long Evans rats underwent common carotid artery/middle cerebral artery occlusion (CCA/MCAo) and 24 hrs later were randomized to receive saline IV or a bone marrow aspiration followed by an IV infusion of autologous separated MNCs (1 million, 10 million or 30 million cells/kg). In another experiment, rats underwent CCAo/MCAo and were randomized at 24 hrs, 72 hrs or 7 days after stroke to receive a saline injection or 10 million/kg MNCs. All animals were evaluated on the cylinder and corner tests up to 28 days. MNCs were tracked using Q-dot nanocrystals to monitor biodistribution. Animals treated with MNCs at 10 million and 30 million cells/kg at 24 hrs after stroke had significant reductions in neurological deficits and lesion size compared to saline controls or animals treated with 1 million cells/kg. There was no difference in neurological deficits in the 10 and 30 million cell/kg groups at 28 days. Animals treated with MNCs at 72 hrs but not at 7 days showed a significant reduction in neurological deficits by 28 days. Labeled MNCs were found in the brain, spleen, lung, liver, and kidney at 1 hr and exponentially decreased over the ensuing week. In conclusion, we found a maximum reduction in neurological deficits at 10 and 30 million cells/kg and a therapeutic time window up to 72 hrs after stroke. PMID:21412816

  9. Viability and Functionality of Cryopreserved Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Pediatric Dengue.

    PubMed

    Perdomo-Celis, Federico; Salgado, Doris M; Castañeda, Diana M; Narváez, Carlos F

    2016-05-01

    Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are widely used in studies of dengue. In this disease, elevated frequency of apoptotic PBMCs has been described, and molecules such as soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligands (sTRAIL) are involved. This effect of dengue may affect the efficiency of PBMC cryopreservation. Here, we evaluate the viability (trypan blue dye exclusion and amine-reactive dye staining) and functionality (frequency of gamma interferon [IFN-γ]-producing T cells after polyclonal stimulation) of fresh and cryopreserved PBMCs from children with dengue (in acute and convalescence phases), children with other febrile illnesses, and healthy children as controls. Plasma sTRAIL levels were also evaluated. The frequencies of nonviable PBMCs detected by the two viability assays were positively correlated (r = 0.74; P < 0.0001). Cryopreservation particularly affected the PBMCs of children with dengue, who had a higher frequency of nonviable cells than healthy children and children with other febrile illnesses (P ≤ 0.02), and PBMC viability levels were restored in the convalescent phase. In the acute phase, an increased frequency of CD3(+) CD8(+) amine-positive cells was found before cryopreservation (P = 0.01). Except for B cells in the acute phase, cryopreservation usually did not affect the relative frequencies of viable PBMC subpopulations. Dengue infection reduced the frequency of IFN-γ-producing CD3(+) cells after stimulation compared with healthy controls and convalescent-phase patients (P ≤ 0.003), and plasma sTRAIL correlated with this decreased frequency in dengue (rho = -0.56; P = 0.01). Natural dengue infection in children can affect the viability and functionality of cryopreserved PBMCs.

  10. The Collection, Purification, and Cryopreservation of Canine Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Obtained as a By-Product of Platelet Apheresis Procedures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-23

    ficoll-hypaque treated mononuclear cells. The white blood cell residue from a plateletpheresis procedure was divided into two equal aliquots. One of...human plateletpheresis residues and cryopreserved them.20 These cellular residues represent a source of universal donor stem cells, providing methods to...average plateletpheresis residue. Purification of the mononuclear cells by ficoll-hypaque density centrifugation eliminates the granulocytes and red

  11. Immunohistochemical detection of major histocompatibility complex antigens and quantitative analysis of tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Y.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Sato, S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate the anti-tumour immune responsiveness of patients with renal cell cancer (RCC), we examined 30 such patients for the degree of expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II antigens on RCC and the populations of tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells (TIM). Normal renal tubular cells expressed class I but not class II antigens. Most of the tumour cells expressed class I antigens in 25 (83%) cases, but the proportion of such cells was reduced in five cases, three of which were of granular cell type histologically. Class II antigens were detected in all specimens with class I positivity. Various numbers of TIM were detected in 25 cases, being composed mainly of T cells and a smaller number of macrophages. Examination for the phenotype of T cells showed that CD8-positive cells were the dominant population. B cells were not detected. Quantitative analysis revealed that the numbers of TIM were significantly lower in cases showing class I reduction than in those with normal class I expression. Therefore, it was clear that class I antigens were preserved in RCC cells in most cases. Furthermore, a higher rate of reduction of class I antigens was observed in cases of granular cell type, which has been reported to have a worse prognosis than the clear cell type. The present data suggest that degree of the expression of MHC class I antigen on RCC might influence the host immune responsiveness against it. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2206942

  12. A gene expression signature for recent onset rheumatoid arthritis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, N; Sokka, T; Seehorn, C; Kraft, B; Maas, K; Moore, J; Aune, T

    2004-01-01

    Background: In previous studies the presence of a distinct gene expression pattern has been shown in peripheral blood cells from patients with autoimmune disease. Objective: To determine whether other specific signatures might be used to identify subsets of these autoimmune diseases and whether gene expression patterns in early disease might identify pathogenetic factors. Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were acquired from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and analysed by microarrays containing over 4300 named human genes. Patients with RA for <2 years were compared with subjects with longstanding RA (average duration 10 years) and with patients with other immune or autoimmune diagnoses. Results: Cluster analyses permitted separation of the patients with early RA (ERA) from those with longstanding disease. Comparison with other patient groups suggested that the ERA signature showed some overlap with that seen in the normal immune response to viral antigen as well as with a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Conclusions: The ERA signature may reflect, in part, a response to an unknown infectious agent. Furthermore, shared features with some lupus patients suggest that common aetiological factors and pathogenetic pathways may be involved in these two autoimmune disorders. PMID:15479887

  13. Proteomic analysis of chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells after infection by Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoyu; Cong, Yanlong; Yin, Renfu; Yang, Guilian; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing; Liu, Xiufan; Wang, Chunfeng; Ding, Zhuang

    2014-12-01

    Characteristic clinical manifestations of Newcastle disease include leukopenia and immunosuppression. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are the main targets of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infection. To survey changes in proteomic expression in chicken PBMCs following NDV infection, PBMC proteins from 30 chickens were separated using two- dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Quantitative intensity analysis showed that the expression of 78 proteins increased more than two-fold. Thirty-five proteins exhibited consistent changes in expression and 13 were identified as unique proteins by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometer/mass spectrometer including three that were down-regulated and 10 that were up-regulated. These proteins were sorted into five groups based on function: macromolecular biosynthesis, cytoskeleton organization, metabolism, stress responses, and signal transduction. Furthermore, Western blot analysis confirmed the down-regulation of integrin-linked kinase expression and up-regulation of lamin A production. These data provide insight into the in vivo response of target cells to NDV infection at the molecular level. Additionally, results from this study have helped elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of NDV and may facilitate the development of new antiviral therapies as well as innovative diagnostic methods.

  14. Gene expression profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of ulcerative colitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ying-Lei; Xiao, Yu-Liang; Du, Yan; Duan, Li-Ping

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To identify peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression profiles of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, using oligonucleotide microarrays, to gain insights into UC molecular mechanisms. METHODS: The Human OneArray microarrays were used for a complete genome-wide transcript profiling of PBMCs from 12 UC patients and 6 controls. Differential analysis per gene was performed with a random variance model; t test and P values were adjusted to control the false discovery rate (5%). Gene ontology (GO) was deployed to analyze differentially expressed genes at significant levels between patients and controls to identify the biological processes involved in UC. RESULTS: Comparative analysis revealed that 4438 probes (4188 genes) were differentially expressed between the two groups, of which 3689 probes (3590 genes) were down-regulated whereas 749 probes (598 genes) were up-regulated. Many disregulated genes in our data have been reported by previous microarray studies carried out on intestinal mucosa samples, such as S100A8, CEACAM1 and S100A9. GO enrichment analysis revealed 67 high enrichment up-regulated categories and one significant down-regulated category. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in immune and inflammatory response, cell cycle and proliferation, DNA metabolism and repair. CONCLUSION: Gene expression profiling of PBMCs from patients with UC has highlighted several novel gene categories that could contribute to the pathogenesis of UC. PMID:23745037

  15. Human cord blood mononuclear cell transplantation for the treatment of premature ovarian failure in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Jianhong; Jin, Zhijun; Liu, Xiaojun; Hu, Dian; Wang, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the potential of human cord blood mononuclear cell (HCMNC) transplantation as a treatment for premature ovarian failure (POF) in a nude mouse model. Methods: Female nude mice were randomly divided into three groups; a normal control group (n = 35), a POF group (POF plus vehicle, n = 35) and a POF plus cell transplantation group (HCMNCs were implanted into the ovaries, n = 35). HCMNCs were isolated by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation and labeled with BrdU. Four weeks after transplantation, the nude mice were sacrificed to determine serum levels of E2, FSH and LH as indicators of ovarian function, and the ovaries were examined both histologically and immunochemically. Results: The transplanted HCMNCs survived in the transplantation group and were detected by BrdU. In the transplantation group, serum levels of E2 significantly increased while serum levels of FSH and LH significantly decreased compared to the POF control group. Additionally, the transplantation group had a recovery in follicle number. Conclusion: HCMNCs can be successfully transplanted into the ovaries of nude mice and can improve ovarian function in POF. PMID:26064319

  16. Periodontal regeneration by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells embedded in a novel thermo reversible gelation polymer.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Seshadri; Jetty, Nadeem; Gadagi, Jayaprakash S; Preethy, Senthilkumar; Abraham, Samuel J K

    2013-01-01

    Regeneration of bony defects caused by periodontal disease continues to be a challenge for clinicians. Application of stem cells from different tissue sources and scaffolds for regeneration have been reported in animal models but clinical studies with long term follow-ups are limited. Herein we report the three years follow-up of the application of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) embedded in a thermo-reversible gelation polymer (TGP) for periodontal regeneration. A 23-year female patient with advanced periodontitis (class IV gingival recession, probing pocket depth (PPD) of 5 mm and 6 mm in relation to mandibular lateral and central incisors respectively, and clinical attachment level (CAL) of 13 mm) correlated with radiographic evidence of severe horizontal bone loss extending up to the apex of mandibular incisors was selected for the treatment. After debridement, the defect was implanted with BMMNCs impregnated in TGP. Then the clinical parameters and radiographic evaluation were made at periodic intervals of 6, 12, 24 and 36 months. At six months, significant improvement with the clinical parameters (PPD had reduced to 2 mm, clinical attachment level had improved by 6 mm) was observed. At 36 months, the radiograph revealed bone regeneration with improvement in vertical and horizontal bone height. Transplantation of BMMNCs in a novel TGP is safe and results in a relatively significant and stable clinical outcome in horizontal alveolar bony defects.

  17. Influence of calorie reduction on DNA repair capacity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Gebhard, Daniel; Bergemann, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restrictive feeding prolongs the lifespan of a variety of model organisms like rodents and invertebrates. It has been shown that caloric restriction reduces age-related as well as overall-mortality, reduces oxidative stress and influences DNA repair ability positively. There are numerous studies underlining this, but fewer studies involving humans exist. To contribute to a better understanding of the correlation of calorie reduction and DNA repair in humans, we adapted the host cell reactivation assay to an application with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, we used this reliable and reproducible assay to research the influence of a special kind of calorie reduction, namely F. X. Mayr therapy, on DNA repair capacity. We found a positive effect in all persons with low pre-existing DNA repair capacity. In individuals with normal pre-existing DNA repair capacity, no effect on DNA repair capacity was detectable. Decline of DNA repair, accumulation of oxidative DNA damages, mitochondrial dysfunction, telomere shortening as well as caloric intake are widely thought to contribute to aging. With regard to that, our results can be considered as a strong indication that calorie reduction may support DNA repair processes and thus contribute to a healthier aging.

  18. Correlations in global DNA methylation measures in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Tehranifar, Parisa; Flom, Julie; Reynolds, Diane; Gonzalez, Karina; Santella, Regina M; Terry, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in global DNA methylation levels have been associated with chronic diseases. Despite the increase in the number of studies measuring markers of global methylation, few have adequately examined within-individual differences by source of DNA and whether within-individual differences by source of DNA differ by age, race and other lifestyle factors. We examined correlations between peripheral mononuclear cell (PBMC) and granulocyte DNA methylation levels measured by the luminometric methylation assay (LUMA), and in LINE-1, Sat2, and Alu by MethyLight and pyrosequencing, in the same individual in 112 women participating in The New York City Multiethnic Breast Cancer Project. Levels of DNA methylation of Sat2 by MethyLight (r = 0.57; P < 0.01) and LINE-1 by pyrosequencing (r = 0.30; P < 0.01) were correlated between PBMC and granulocyte DNA of the same individuals, but LUMA and Alu levels were not. The magnitude of the correlations for Sat2 and LINE-1 varied when stratified by selected demographic and lifestyle factors, although the study sample size limited our comparisons across subgroups. These results lend further support to the importance of considering the source of DNA in epidemiologic studies of white blood cell DNA methylation. Results from studies that combine individuals with different available DNA sources need to be interpreted with caution. PMID:25482109

  19. Correlations in global DNA methylation measures in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Tehranifar, Parisa; Flom, Julie; Reynolds, Diane; Gonzalez, Karina; Santella, Regina M; Terry, Mary Beth

    2014-11-01

    Alterations in global DNA methylation levels have been associated with chronic diseases. Despite the increase in the number of studies measuring markers of global methylation, few have adequately examined within-individual differences by source of DNA and whether within-individual differences by source of DNA differ by age, race and other lifestyle factors. We examined correlations between peripheral mononuclear cell (PBMC) and granulocyte DNA methylation levels measured by the luminometric methylation assay (LUMA), and in LINE-1, Sat2, and Alu by MethyLight and pyrosequencing, in the same individual in 112 women participating in The New York City Multiethnic Breast Cancer Project. Levels of DNA methylation of Sat2 by MethyLight (r = 0.57; P < 0.01) and LINE-1 by pyrosequencing (r = 0.30; P < 0.01) were correlated between PBMC and granulocyte DNA of the same individuals, but LUMA and Alu levels were not. The magnitude of the correlations for Sat2 and LINE-1 varied when stratified by selected demographic and lifestyle factors, although the study sample size limited our comparisons across subgroups. These results lend further support to the importance of considering the source of DNA in epidemiologic studies of white blood cell DNA methylation. Results from studies that combine individuals with different available DNA sources need to be interpreted with caution.

  20. In vitro gene expression profile of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells in early Mycobacterium bovis infection

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, YAFEN; CHOU, CHUNG-HSI; TSAI, HSIANG-JUNG

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes tuberculosis in cattle and humans. Understanding the interactions between M. bovis and host cells is essential in developing tools for the prevention, detection, and treatment of M. bovis infection. Gene expression profiles provide a large amount of information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions. The present study analyzed changes in gene expression in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at 0, 4 and 24 h following exposure to M. bovis. Using bovine whole-genome microarrays, a total of 420 genes were identified that exhibited significant alterations in expression (≥2-fold). Significantly enriched genes were identified using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database, of which the highest differentially expressed genes were associated with the immune system, signal transduction, endocytosis, cellular transport, inflammation, and apoptosis. Of the genes associated with the immune system, 84.85% displayed downregulation. These findings support the view that M. bovis inhibits signaling pathways of antimycobacterial host defense in bovine PBMCs. These in vitro data demonstrated that molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of tuberculosis begin early, during the initial 24 h following M. bovis infection. PMID:26668602

  1. Phagocytosis-induced 51Cr release from activated macrophages and blood mononuclears. Effect of colchicine and antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.P.; Hale, A.H.

    1981-09-01

    The chromium-release test was adapted to the measurement of the cellular injury induced when activated macrophages phagocytose particulates. Macrophages obtained from rabbit lungs undergoing BCG-induced chronic inflammation released more chromium when incubated in the presence of phagocytosable particles than when incubated under resting conditions. Blood mononuclear cells, 40-60% monocytes, procured from the same BCG-injected animals, were less susceptible to phagocytosis-induced injury than the macrophages obtained from the lungs. The amount of chromium released by the activated macrophages was proportional to the number of particles present during incubation. In the presence of catalase, the amounts of chromium released by phagocytosing and resting macrophages were similar; in the presence of superoxide dismutase and cytochrome c, the amount of chromium released by phagocytosing macrophages was 13-35% less than the amount of chromium released by macrophages incubated without the antioxidants. In addition, colchicine, an inhibitor of degranulation also exerted partial inhibition of the chromium release. These results suggest that oxygen radicals and lysosomal contents contribute to the cellular injury that results from phagocytosis.

  2. The Markers of Glutamate Metabolism in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Neurological Complications in Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosius, Wojciech; Gazdulska, Joanna; Gołda-Gocka, Iwona; Kozubski, Wojciech; Ramlau, Rodryg

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the involvement of glutamate metabolism in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the development of neurological complications in lung cancer and during chemotherapy. Methods. The prospective study included 221 lung cancer patients treated with chemotherapeutics. Neurological status and cognitive functions were evaluated at baseline and after 6-month follow-up. Glutamate level, the activities of glutaminase- (GLS-) glutamate synthetizing enzyme, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), and glutamate decarboxylase catalyzing glutamate degradation were analyzed in PBMC and in sera of lung cancer patients by means of spectrophotometric and colorimetric methods. Results. Chemotherapy of lung neoplasms induced increase of glutamate content in PBMC and its concentration in serum increased the activity of GDH in PBMC and decreased activity of glutaminase in PBMC. The changes in glutamate metabolism markers were associated with initial manifestation of neurological deficit in lung cancer patients and with new symptoms, which appear as a complication of chemotherapy. Moreover, the analyzed parameters of glutamate control correlated with a spectrum of cognitive functions measures in lung cancer patients. Conclusion. We have demonstrated dysregulation in glutamate and glutamate metabolism controlling enzymes as promising indicators of risk for chemotherapy-induced neurological complications in lung cancer patients with particular emphasis on cognitive impairment. PMID:28044066

  3. Effect of BjcuL, a lectin isolated from Bothrops jararacussu, on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pires, Weverson Luciano; de Castro, Onassis Boeri; Kayano, Anderson Makoto; da Silva Setúbal, Sulamita; Pontes, Adriana Silva; Nery, Neriane Monteiro; Paloschi, Mauro Valentino; Dos Santos Pereira, Soraya; Stábeli, Rodrigo Guerino; Fernandes, Carla Freire Celedônio; Soares, Andreimar Martins; Zuliani, Juliana Pavan

    2017-02-08

    BjcuL is a C-type lectin with specificity for the binding of β-d-galactose units isolated from Bothrops jararacussu venom. It triggers cellular infiltration in post capillary venules, increases edema and vascular permeability in murine models, contributes to in vitro neutrophil activation and modulates macrophage functional activation towards an M1 state. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of BjcuL on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) activation with a focus on PBMCs proliferation and inflammatory mediators release. Results showed that BjcuL is not toxic to PBMCs, that BjcuL inhibits PBMCs proliferation and that it stimulates PBMCs to produce superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, primarily via lymphocyte stimulation, but does not stimulate the production of nitric oxide and PGE2. These results demonstrate that BjcuL has an immunomodulatory effect on PBMCs. Further studies are needed to confirm the immunomodulatory effect of BjcuL, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of action responsible for its effects and to determine its potential application as an immunopharmacological and biotechnological tool.

  4. A novel monoclonal antibody, Mar 1, directed specifically against mononuclear phagocyte system cells in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, A; Hattori, Y; Kotani, M; Miyasaka, M; Fukumoto, T

    1990-01-01

    Three different monoclonal antibodies (mAb), designated Mar 1, Mar 2, and Mar 3, recognizing three distinct novel antigen molecules expressed preferentially in rat macrophages, were produced by the hybridoma technique. Binding of these mAb to isolated cells or fixed cells was detected by radioactive binding assay, immunohistochemical technique and flow cytometry. Mar 1 binds specifically to the cells constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), but not to granulocytes nor endocytosis-positive cells from non-lymphoid tissues. Mar 2 and Mar 3 recognize both the former and the latter. The isotypes of Mar 1, Mar 2 and Mar 3 were defined as IgG1, IgG1 and IgG2b, respectively. These mAb were species specific, allo-non-specific and not cytotoxic for rat peritoneal macrophages. Immunoelectron microscopic observation demonstrated that Mar 1-3 antigens are located on both surface membrane and cytoplasmic membrane structures of peritoneal macrophages, particularly on the limiting membrane of phagocytic small vesicles and large phagosomes. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the apparent molecular weights (MW) of the reactive antigens of Mar 1, Mar 2 and Mar 3 are 95,000, 100,000 and 55,000 and 27,000, respectively. These findings indicate that all of Mar 1-3 mAb have considerable value in the identification of rat phagocytes and that, of the three kinds of antigens detected with Mar 1-3, Mar 1 antigen is a specific marker for identification of the cells constituting the MPS and may offer the means to assess the functional capability and differentiation process of the macrophage populations. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2197217

  5. Validation of a quantitative real-time PCR assay for HTLV-1 proviral load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Rosadas, Carolina; Cabral-Castro, Mauro Jorge; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo; Peralta, José Mauro; Puccioni-Sohler, Marzia

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to validate a TaqMan real-time PCR assay for HTLV-1 proviral load detection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. TARL-2 cells were used to generate a standard curve. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell gDNA from 27 seropositive and 23 seronegative samples was analyzed. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, precision, dynamic range of the standard curve and qPCR efficiency were evaluated. All of the positive samples amplified the target gene. All of the negative samples amplified only the control gene (β-actin). The assay presented 100% specificity and sensibility. The intra- and inter-assay variability was 2.4% and 2.2%, respectively. The qPCR efficiency, slope and correlation coefficients (r2) were all acceptable. The limit of detection was 1 copy/rxn. This assay can reliably quantify HTLV-1 proviral load.

  6. Analysis of CD28 and bcl-2 expression on peripheral blood and liver-infiltrating mononuclear cells in patients with autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kurokohchi, Kazutaka; Arima, Keiji; Masaki, Tsutomu; Deguchi, Akiihiro; Nakai, Seiji; Morishita, Asahiro; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Ohgi, Tomohiro; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshitake, Akira; Maeta, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yoshihiro; Kohi, Fumikazu; Nishioka, Mikio; Kuriyama, Shigeki

    2006-07-01

    Because the underlying mechanism of hepatocellular damages in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) still remains unclear, analysis of CD28 and bcl-2 molecules, which are critical for T cell activation and survival, was performed in patients with AIH. The number of CD28(+)CD4(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in corticosteroid (CS)-treated patients was comparable to normal control individuals but decreased in untreated AIH patients. In contrast, the number of CD28(+)CD8(+) PBMC was decreased in both CS-treated and untreated AIH patients. Analysis of liver-infiltrating mononuclear cells (LIMC) showed that the number of CD28(+)CD4(+) and CD28(-)CD8(+) LIMC were positively correlated with the histology activity index score. Bcl-2(+)CD4(+) LIMC were observed in the portal area of the liver and the numbers fluctuated with disease activity during the time course after CS administration. By contrast, CD8(+) LIMC were shown not to express bcl-2. Taken collectively, these results suggest that bcl-2(+)CD28(+)CD4(+) and bcl-2(-)CD28(-)CD8(+) cells may play critical and distinct roles in hepatocellular damage in AIH.

  7. Can Melatonin Act as an Antioxidant in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress Model in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Emamgholipour, Solaleh; Hossein-Nezhad, Arash; Ansari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of melatonin on gene expressions and activities of MnSOD and catalase under conditions of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Materials and Methods. PBMCs were isolated from healthy subjects and treated as follows: (1) control (only with 0.1% DMSO for 12 h); (2) melatonin (1 mM) for 12 h; (3) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h; (4) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h following 10 h pretreatment with melatonin (1 mM). The gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. MnSOD and catalase activities in PBMCs were determined by colorimetric assays. Results. Pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin significantly augmented expression and activity of MnSOD which were diminished by H2O2. Melatonin treatment of PBMCs caused a significant upregulation of catalase by almost 2-fold in comparison with untreated cells. However, activity and expression of catalase increased by 1.5-fold in PBMCs under H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared with untreated cell. Moreover, pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin resulted in a significant 1.8-fold increase in catalase expression compared to PBMCs treated only with H2O2. Conclusion. It seems that melatonin could prevent from undesirable impacts of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD downregulation. Moreover, melatonin could promote inductive effect of H2O2 on catalase mRNA expression. PMID:26881079

  8. Time-Course Study of the Transcriptome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from Sheep Infected with Fasciola hepatica

    PubMed Central

    Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre; Ansell, Brendan R. E.; Hall, Ross S.; Gasser, Robin B.; Jex, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a parasitic trematode that infects a wide range of mammalian hosts, including livestock and humans, in temperate and tropical regions globally. This trematode causes the disease fascioliasis, which consists of an acute phase (≤ 12 weeks) during which juvenile parasites migrate through the host liver tissues, and a chronic phase (> 12 weeks) following the establishment of adult parasites in the liver bile ducts. Few studies have explored the progression of the host response over the course of Fasciola infection in the same animals. In this study, we characterized transcriptomic changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from sheep at three time points over the first eight weeks of infection relative to uninfected controls. In total, 183 and 76 genes were found to be differentially transcribed at two and eight weeks post-infection respectively. Functional and pathway analysis of differentially transcribed genes revealed changes related to T-cell activation that may underpin a Th2-biased immune response against this parasite. This first insight into the dynamics of host responses during the early stages of infection improves the understanding of the pathogenesis of acute fascioliasis, informs vaccine development and presents a set of PBMC markers with diagnostic potential. PMID:27438474

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Induced Recruitment of Inflammatory Mononuclear Cells Leads to Inflammation and Altered Brain Development in Murine Cytomegalovirus-Infected Newborn Mice.

    PubMed

    Seleme, Maria C; Kosmac, Kate; Jonjic, Stipan; Britt, William J

    2017-04-15

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is a significant cause of abnormal neurodevelopment and long-term neurological sequelae in infants and children. Resident cell populations of the developing brain have been suggested to be more susceptible to virus-induced cytopathology, a pathway thought to contribute to the clinical outcomes following intrauterine HCMV infection. However, recent findings in a newborn mouse model of the infection in the developing brain have indicated that elevated levels of proinflammatory mediators leading to mononuclear cell activation and recruitment could underlie the abnormal neurodevelopment. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-neutralizing antibodies decreased the frequency of CD45(+) Ly6C(hi) CD11b(+) CCR2(+) activated myeloid mononuclear cells (MMCs) and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the blood and the brains of murine CMV-infected mice. This treatment also normalized neurodevelopment in infected mice without significantly impacting the level of virus replication. These results indicate that TNF-α is a major component of the inflammatory response associated with altered neurodevelopment that follows murine CMV infection of the developing brain and that a subset of peripheral blood myeloid mononuclear cells represent a key effector cell population in this model of virus-induced inflammatory disease of the developing brain.IMPORTANCE Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is the most common viral infection of the developing human fetus and can result in neurodevelopmental sequelae. Mechanisms of disease leading to neurodevelopmental deficits in infected infants remain undefined, but postulated pathways include loss of neuronal progenitor cells, damage to the developing vascular system of the brain, and altered cellular positioning. Direct virus-mediated cytopathic effects cannot explain the phenotypes of brain damage in most infected infants. Using a

  10. Tumour growth inhibition in mice by glycosylated recombinant human lymphotoxin: analysis of tumour-regional mononuclear cells involved with its action.

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, I.; Watanabe, H.; Abo, T.; Indo, K.; Miyaji, H.

    1993-01-01

    We compared the antitumour effects of glycosylated LT (gLT), nonglycosylated LT and TNF against a solid tumour in mice. We found that: (a) The systemic administration of gLT showed significant antitumour activity. These effects were, however, quite small in nude mice. Nonglycosylated LT and TNF attained the same degree of effectiveness as gLT, but at a 5-times higher dose. The serum half-life of gLT was 3-fold longer than that of nonglycosylated LT and 22-fold longer than that of TNF. (b) The effect of gLT was significantly blocked by pretreatment with anti-asialo GM1 antibody. Treatment with gLT produced a significant reduction in numbers of tumour-regional mononuclear cells, which in turn, produced increases intensive necrosis. (c) Mononuclear cells in the tumour tissues before gLT-injection were predominantly IL-2 receptor +/CD3- cells and CD3+ cells. Pretreatment with the anti-asialo GM1 antibody produced a drastic reduction of IL-2 receptor +/CD3- cells. These findings suggest that the efficient antitumour effect of gLT is due to a longer serum half-life than that of nonglycosylated LT or TNF in vivo, and its function is largely mediated by IL-2 receptor +/CD3- cells. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8439496

  11. Acellular components of Chlamydia pneumoniae stimulate cytokine production in human blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Netea, M G; Selzman, C H; Kullberg, B J; Galama, J M; Weinberg, A; Stalenhoef, A F; Van der Meer, J W; Dinarello, C A

    2000-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae is associated with atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Inflammation is important in the initial phase of atherogenesis, and cytokines are important in the initiation and progression of inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the capacity of acellular components of C. pneumoniae to stimulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated in vitro with sonicated C. pneumoniae. Significant amounts of TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) were produced. Inhibition of endotoxin using polymyxin B revealed that chlamydial endotoxin plays a minor role in the cytokine induction. Neutralization of TNF by TNF-binding protein and blockade of IL-1 receptors by IL-1 receptor antagonist revealed that TNF, IL-1 and IL-6 production was independent from each other, whereas IL-8 synthesis was strongly dependent on endogenous TNF and IL-1. In contrast, synthesis of MCP-1 and MIP-1alpha was dependent on endogenous TNF, but not IL-1. In conclusion, acellular components of C. pneumoniae are a potent stimulus for cytokine production, and this mechanism may have an important role in the inflammatory aspects of atherogenesis.

  12. Methamidophos induces cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Vargas, Marco Antonio; Huerta-Beristain, Gerardo; Guzman-Guzman, Iris Paola; Alarcon-Romero, Luz Del Carmen; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Rojas-Garcia, Aurora Elizabeth; Moreno-Godinez, Ma Elena

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that organophosphate pesticide (OP) exposure is associated with oxidative stress. Methamidophos (MET) is an OP widely used in agriculture, which is regarded as a highly toxic pesticide and it is a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether MET can induce oxidative stress at low concentrations in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs from healthy individuals were exposed to MET (0-80 mg/L) for 0-72 h. We performed the MTT and neutral-red assays to assess the cytotoxicity. As indicators of oxidative stress, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed using flow cytometry, and the malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were determined. MET decreased the viability of PBMCs in a dose-dependent manner. At concentrations of 3, 10, or 20 mg/L for 24 h, MET increased the ROS production significantly compared with the vehicle control. Similarly, MET increased the levels of MDA at the same concentrations that increased ROS (10 and 20 mg/L); however, no changes in GSH levels were observed. These results suggest that MET increased the generation of oxidative stress in PBMCs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 147-155, 2017.

  13. Gene expression profiling of mononuclear cells from patients with sepsis secondary to community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Severino, Patricia; Silva, Eliezer; Baggio-Zappia, Giovana Lotici; Brunialti, Milena Karina Colo; Nucci, Laura Alejandra; Junior, Otelo Rigato; da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim Guerreiro; Machado, Flavia Ribeiro; Salomao, Reinaldo

    2014-12-01

    Mechanisms governing the inflammatory response during sepsis involve crosstalk between diverse signaling pathways, but current knowledge provides an incomplete picture of the syndrome. Microarray-based expression profiling is a powerful approach for the investigation of complex clinical conditions such as sepsis. In this study, we investigated whole-genome expression profiles in mononuclear cells from septic patients admitted in intensive care units with community-acquired pneumonia. Blood samples were collected at the time of sepsis diagnosis and seven days later since we aimed to evaluate the role of biological processes or genes possibly involved in patient recovery. Here we provide a detailed description of the study design, including clinical information, experimental methods and procedures regarding data analysis. Metadata corresponding to microarray results deposited in the database Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under the accession number GSE48080 are also described in this report. Our dataset allows the identification of genes possibly associated with host defense to infection as well as gene expression patterns associated with patient outcome.

  14. Mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlates with depressive subsymptoms and severity of major depression.

    PubMed

    Karabatsiakis, A; Böck, C; Salinas-Manrique, J; Kolassa, S; Calzia, E; Dietrich, D E; Kolassa, I-T

    2014-06-10

    Mitochondrial dysfunction might have a central role in the pathophysiology of depression. Phenotypically, depression is characterized by lack of energy, concentration problems and fatigue. These symptoms might be partially explained by reduced availability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a consequence of impaired mitochondrial functioning. This study investigated mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), an established model to investigate the pathophysiology of depression. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in intact PBMCs in 22 individuals with a diagnosis of major depression (MD) compared with 22 healthy age-matched controls using high-resolution respirometry. Individuals with MD showed significantly impaired mitochondrial functioning: routine and uncoupled respiration as well as spare respiratory capacity, coupling efficiency and ATP turnover-related respiration were significantly lower in the MD compared with the control group. Furthermore, mitochondrial respiration was significantly negatively correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms, in particular, with loss of energy, difficulties concentrating and fatigue. The results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the biomolecular pathophysiology of depressive symptoms. The decreased immune capability observed in MD leading to a higher risk of comorbidities could be attributable to impaired energy supply due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus mitochondrial respiration in PBMCs and its functional consequences might be an interesting target for new therapeutical approaches in the treatment of MD and immune-related comorbidities.

  15. Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells are enriched in mouse lungs and liver.

    PubMed

    Unno, Akihiro; Kachi, Seira; Batanova, Tatiana A; Ohno, Tamio; Elhawary, Nagwa; Kitoh, Katsuya; Takashima, Yasuhiro

    2013-06-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is thought to disseminate throughout the host by circulation of tachyzoite-infected leukocytes in the blood, and adherence and migration of such leukocytes into solid tissues. However, it is unclear whether T. gondii-infected leukocytes can migrate to solid organs via the general circulation. In this study, we developed a real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) method to determine the rate of infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) flowing into and remaining within solid organs in mice. A transgenic T. gondii parasite line derived from the PLK strain that expresses DsRed Express, and transgenic green fluorescent protein-positive PBMCs, were used for these experiments. Tachyzoite-infected PBMCs were injected into mouse tail veins and qRT-PCR was used to measure the infection rates of the PBMCs remaining in the lungs, liver, spleen and brain. We found that the PBMCs in the lungs and liver had statistically higher infection rates than that of the original inoculum; this difference was statistically significant. However, the PBMC infection rate in the spleen showed no such enhancement. These results show that tachyzoite-infected PBMCs in the general circulation remain in the lungs and liver more effectively than non-infected PBMCs.

  16. Accumulation of defective viral genomes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, G; Xu, X; Chermann, J C; Hirsch, I

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genomes present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of infected persons or in lymphocytes infected in vitro were studied by long-distance PCR (LD-PCR) using primers localized in the HIV-1 long terminal repeats. The full-length 9-kb DNA was the only LD-PCR product obtained in peripheral and cord blood lymphocytes from seronegative donors infected in vitro. However, a high proportion (27% to 66%) of distinct populations of extensively deleted HIV-1 genomes of variable size was detected in PBMCs of 15 of 16 HIV-1-infected persons. Physical mapping of defective genomes showed that the frequency of deletions is proportional to their proximity to the central part of HIV-1 genome, which is consistent with a deletion mechanism involving a single polymerase jump during reverse transcription. Sequencing of deletion junctions revealed the presence of short direct repeats of three or four nucleotides. The number of defective HIV-1 genomes decreased after in vitro activation of PBMCs. Persistence of full-length and deleted genomes in in vitro activated PBMCs correlated with isolation of an infectious virus. Our results represent the first quantitative assessment of intragenomic rearrangements in HIV-1 genomes in PBMCs of infected persons and demonstrate that, in contrast to in vitro infection, defective genomes accumulate in PBMCs of infected persons. PMID:9032358

  17. Persistent alterations of gene expression profiling of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from smokers.

    PubMed

    Weng, Daniel Y; Chen, Jinguo; Taslim, Cenny; Hsu, Ping-Ching; Marian, Catalin; David, Sean P; Loffredo, Christopher A; Shields, Peter G

    2016-10-01

    The number of validated biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure is limited, and none exist for tobacco-related cancer. Additional biomarkers for smoke, effects on cellular systems in vivo are needed to improve early detection of lung cancer, and to assist the Food and Drug Administration in regulating exposures to tobacco products. We assessed the effects of smoking on the gene expression using human cell cultures and blood from a cross-sectional study. We profiled global transcriptional changes in cultured smokers' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) treated with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in vitro (n = 7) and from well-characterized smokers' blood (n = 36). ANOVA with adjustment for covariates and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis in this study. CSC in vitro altered the expression of 1 178 genes (177 genes with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05. In vivo, PBMCs of heavy and light smokers differed for 614 genes (29 with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05 (309 remaining significant after adjustment for age, race, and gender). Forty-one genes were persistently altered both in vitro and in vivo, 22 having the same expression pattern reported for non-small cell lung cancer. Our data provides evidence that persistent alterations of gene expression in vitro and in vivo may relate to carcinogenic effects of cigarette smoke, and the identified genes may serve as potential biomarkers for cancer. The use of an in vitro model to corroborate results from human studies provides a novel way to understand human exposure and effect. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Persistent Alterations of Gene Expression Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells From Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Daniel Y.; Chen, Jinguo; Taslim, Cenny; Hsu, Ping-Ching; Marian, Catalin; David, Sean P.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Shields, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The number of validated biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure is limited, and none exist for tobacco-related cancer. Additional biomarkers for smoke, effects on cellular systems in vivo are needed to improve early detection of lung cancer, and to assist the Food and Drug Administration in regulating exposures to tobacco products. We assessed the effects of smoking on the gene expression using human cell cultures and blood from a cross-sectional study. We profiled global transcriptional changes in cultured smokers’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) treated with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in vitro (n = 7) and from well-characterized smokers’ blood (n = 36). ANOVA with adjustment for covariates and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis in this study. CSC in vitro altered the expression of 1 178 genes (177 genes with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05. In vivo, PBMCs of heavy and light smokers differed for 614 genes (29 with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05 (309 remaining significant after adjustment for age, race, and gender). Forty-one genes were persistently altered both in vitro and in vivo, 22 having the same expression pattern reported for non-small cell lung cancer. Our data provides evidence that persistent alterations of gene expression in vitro and in vivo may relate to carcinogenic effects of cigarette smoke, and the identified genes may serve as potential biomarkers for cancer. The use of an in vitro model to corroborate results from human studies provides a novel way to understand human exposure and effect. PMID:26294040

  19. Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation Restores Inflammatory Balance of Cytokines after ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Alestalo, Kirsi; Miettinen, Johanna A.; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Huikuri, Heikki; Lehenkari, Petri

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) launches an inflammatory response and a repair process to compensate cardiac function. During this process, the balance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is important for optimal cardiac repair. Stem cell transplantation after AMI improves tissue repair and increases the ventricular ejection fraction. Here, we studied in detail the acute effect of bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMNC) transplantation on proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods Patients with STEMI treated with thrombolysis followed by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomly assigned to receive either BMMNC or saline as an intracoronary injection. Cardiac function was evaluated by left ventricle angiogram during the PCI and again after 6 months. The concentrations of 27 cytokines were measured from plasma samples up to 4 days after the PCI and the intracoronary injection. Results Twenty-six patients (control group, n = 12; BMMNC group, n = 14) from the previously reported FINCELL study (n = 80) were included to this study. At day 2, the change in the proinflammatory cytokines correlated with the change in the anti-inflammatory cytokines in both groups (Kendall’s tau, control 0.6; BMMNC 0.7). At day 4, the correlation had completely disappeared in the control group but was preserved in the BMMNC group (Kendall’s tau, control 0.3; BMMNC 0.7). Conclusions BMMNC transplantation is associated with preserved balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines after STEMI in PCI-treated patients. This may partly explain the favorable effect of stem cell transplantation after AMI. PMID:26690350

  20. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum genes modulating the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modulation of the immune system is one of the most plausible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health. Presently, the specific probiotic cell products responsible for immunomodulation are largely unknown. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic diversity of strains of the Lactobacillus plantarum species were investigated to identify genes of L. plantarum with the potential to influence the amounts of cytokines interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-12 and the ratio of IL-10/IL-12 produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results A total of 42 Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from diverse environmental and human sources were evaluated for their capacity to stimulate cytokine production in PBMCs. The L. plantarum strains induced the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 over an average 14-fold range and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12 over an average 16-fold range. Comparisons of the strain-specific cytokine responses of PBMCs to comparative genome hybridization profiles obtained with L. plantarum WCFS1 DNA microarrays (also termed gene-trait matching) resulted in the identification of 6 candidate genetic loci with immunomodulatory capacities. These loci included genes encoding an N-acetyl-glucosamine/galactosamine phosphotransferase system, the LamBDCA quorum sensing system, and components of the plantaricin (bacteriocin) biosynthesis and transport pathway. Deletion of these genes in L. plantarum WCFS1 resulted in growth phase-dependent changes in the PBMC IL-10 and IL-12 cytokine profiles compared with wild-type cells. Conclusions The altered PBMC cytokine profiles obtained with the L. plantarum WCFS1 mutants were in good agreement with the predictions made by gene-trait matching for the 42 L. plantarum strains. This study therefore resulted in the identification of genes present in certain strains of L. plantarum which might be responsible for the stimulation of anti

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Mononuclear Cells From Cord Blood: Cotransplantation Provides a Better Effect in Treating Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gecai; Yue, Aihuan; Yu, Hong; Ruan, Zhongbao; Yin, Yigang; Wang, Ruzhu; Ren, Yin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cotransplanting mononuclear cells from cord blood (CB-MNCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as treatment for myocardial infarction (MI). Transplanting CD34+ cells or MSCs separately has been shown effective in treating MI, but the effect of cotransplanting CB-MNCs and MSCs is not clear. In this study, MSCs were separated by their adherence to the tissue culture. The morphology, immunophenotype, and multilineage potential of MSCs were analyzed. CB-MNCs were separated in lymphocyte separation medium 1.077. CD34+ cell count and viability were analyzed by flow cytometry. Infarcted male Sprague-Dawley rats in a specific-pathogen-free grade were divided into four treatment groups randomly: group I, saline; group II, CB-MNCs; group III, MSCs; and group IV, CB-MNCs plus MSCs. The saline, and CB-MNCs and/or MSCs were injected intramyocardially in infarcted rats. Their cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography. The myocardial capillary density was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Both cell types induced an improvement in the left ventricular cardiac function and increased tissue cell proliferation in myocardial tissue and neoangiogenesis. However, CB-MNCs plus MSCs were more effective in reducing the infarct size and preventing ventricular remodeling. Scar tissue was reduced significantly in the CB-MNCs plus MSCs group. MSCs facilitate engraftment of CD34+ cells and immunomodulation after allogeneic CD34+ cell transplantation. Cotransplanting MSCs and CB-MNCs might be more effective than transplanting MSCs or CB-MNCs separately for treating MI. This study contributes knowledge toward effective treatment strategies for MI. Significance This study assessed cotransplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+ cells) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) in a rat model. The results demonstrate that MSCs and mononuclear cells from cord blood may have synergistic effects and

  2. A mixture of phytosterols from Dunaliella tertiolecta affects proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cytokine production in sheep.

    PubMed

    Caroprese, Mariangela; Albenzio, Marzia; Ciliberti, Maria Giovanna; Francavilla, Matteo; Sevi, Agostino

    2012-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory role of a mixture of phytosterols extracted from the microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from sheep. PBMC were treated to determine cell proliferation and cytokine production with different sterols: ergosterol (E), a mixture of eleven Algae sterols extracted and purified from D. tertiolecta (Algae Extract, AE), a mixture of ergosterol and 7-dehydroporiferasterol extracted and purified from D. tertiolecta (Purified Extract, PE). Cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-10) was evaluated after cell treatment with Concanavalin A (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The mixture of ergosterol and 7-dehydroporiferasterol extracted and purified from D. tertiolecta showed a suppressive effect on cell proliferation, and a reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines production. Furthermore, a stimulatory effect on the production of the regulatory cytokine IL-10 was found. The immunosuppressive effect exerted by the mixture of ergosterol and 7-dehydroporiferasterol from D. tertiolecta was dose-dependent both in suppressing cell proliferation and in stimulating IL-10 production. Present results showed that the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities were more apparent in the purified extract characterized by the mixture of ergosterol and 7-dehydroporiferasterol, and might depend on the existence of a synergic effect of the structures of the two phytosterols. Furthermore, findings from our study suggest that the purified extract characterized by the mixture of ergosterol and 7-dehydroporiferasterol from D. tertiolecta could be used to reduce immune reactions resulting from inflammatory diseases in sheep production systems, and could have innovative implications on the modulation of sheep immune system when used as feed supplements.

  3. Effects of red grape juice polyphenols in NADPH oxidase subunit expression in human neutrophils and mononuclear blood cells.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, Alberto; de la Peña, Gema; Sánchez-Martín, Carolina C; Teresa Guerra, M; Bartolomé, Begoña; Lasunción, Miguel A

    2009-10-01

    The NADPH oxidase enzyme system is the main source of superoxide anions in phagocytic and vascular cells. NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide generation has been found to be abnormally enhanced in several chronic diseases. Evidence is accumulating that polyphenols may have the potential to improve cardiovascular health, although the mechanism is not fully established. Consumption of concentrated red grape juice, rich in polyphenols, has been recently shown to reduce NADPH oxidase activity in circulating neutrophils from human subjects. In the present work we studied whether red grape juice polyphenols affected NADPH oxidase subunit expression at the transcription level. For this, we used human neutrophils and mononuclear cells from peripheral blood, HL-60-derived neutrophils and the endothelial cell line EA.hy926.Superoxide production was measured with 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate or lucigenin, mRNA expression by real-time RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Each experiment was performed at least three times. In all cell types tested, red grape juice, dealcoholised red wine and pure polyphenols decreased superoxide anion production. Red grape juice and dealcoholised red wine selectively reduced p47phox, p22phox and gp91phox expression at both mRNA and protein levels, without affecting the expression of p67phox. Pure polyphenols, particularly quercetin, also reduced NADPH oxidase subunit expression, especially p47phox, in all cell types tested. The present results showing that red grape juice polyphenols reduce superoxide anion production provide an alternative mechanism by which consumption of grape derivatives may account for a reduction of oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular and/or inflammatory diseases related to NADPH oxidase superoxide overproduction.

  4. Clearance and binding of radiolabeled glycoproteins by cells of the murine mononuclear phagocyte system

    SciTech Connect

    Imber, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The clearance and binding of radiolabeled lactoferrin and fast ..cap alpha../sub 2/-macroglobulin were studied. Both glycoproteins cleared rapidly following intravenous injection in mice, and both bound specifically to discrete receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages. The simultaneous presence of excess, unlabeled ligands specific for receptors recognizing terminal fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine or galactose residues did not inhibit the clearance or binding of either lactoferrin or fast-..cap alpha../sub 2/M. The clearance and binding of enzymatically defucosylated lactoferrin was indistinguishable from native lactoferrin, indicating that terminal ..cap alpha..(1-3)-linked fucose on lactoferrin is not necessary for receptor recognition. The clearance and binding of two fast -..cap alpha../sub 2/M forms, ..cap alpha../sub 2/M-trypsin and ..cap alpha../sub 2/M-MeNH/sub 2/ cross compete with each other. Saturation binding studies indicated that the total binding of mannosyl -BSA, fusocyl-BSA, and N-acetylglucosaminyl-BSA to macrophages activated by BCG was approximately 15% of the levels observed with inflammatory macrophages elicited by thioglycollate broth. Cross-competition binding studies demonstrated a common surface receptor mediated binding of all three neoglycoprotein ligands and was identical to the receptor on mononuclear phagocytes that binds mannosyl- and N-acetylglucosaminyl-terminated glycoproteins. These results suggest that difference between discrete states of macrophage function may be correlated with selective changes in levels of the surface receptor for mannose-containing glycoproteins.

  5. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, L.P.; Iglesias, D.; Nicola, F.C.; Steffens, D.; Valentim, L.; Witczak, A.; Zanatta, G.; Achaval, M.; Pranke, P.; Netto, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old) were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a) 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 106 cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group); b) into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 106 cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group). The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day). The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05). The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation. PMID:22183246

  6. Inhibition of HBV Replication in HepG2.2.15 Cells by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Song, Hong-Li; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Anti-HBV therapy is essential for patients awaiting liver transplantation. This study aimed to explore the effects of dendritic cells (DCs) derived from the peripheral blood of hepatitis B patients on the replication of HBV in vivo and to evaluate the biosafety of DCs in clinical therapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from HBV-infected patients and maturation-promoting factors and both HBsAg and HBcAg were used to induce DC maturation. Mature DCs and lymphocytes were co-cultured with human hepatocyte cell HL-7702 or HBV-producing human hepatocellular carcinoma cell HepG2.2.15. We found that mature lymphocytes exposed to DCs in vitro did not influence morphology or activities of HL-7702 and HepG2.2.15 cells. Liver function indexes and endotoxin levels in the cell supernatants did not change in these co-cultures. Additionally, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA levels were reduced when HepG2.2.15 cells were co-cultured with mature lymphocytes that had been cultured with DCs, and HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) levels in HepG2.2.15 cells also decreased. Importantly, DC-mediated immunotherapy had no mutagenic effect on HBV genomic DNA by gene sequencing of the P, S, X, and C regions of HBV genomic DNA. We conclude that PBMC-derived DCs from HBV-infected patients act on autologous lymphocytes to suppress HBV replication and these DC clusters showed favorable biosafety.

  7. Gene expression of interleukin 18 in unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Hanck, C; Manigold, T; Bocker, U; Kurimoto, M; Kolbel, C; Singer, M; Rossol, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Most patients with alcohol induced cirrhosis (AC) and chronic endotoxinaemia are not suffering from clinically evident systemic inflammatory reactions. This may be due to altered gene expression of cytokines, possibly related to endotoxin (for example, tolerance and sensitisation). Interleukin 18 (IL-18; interleukin γ inducing factor) modulates local cytokine production in response to endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)).
AIM—To investigate the systemic immune response of patients with AC and to see if unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with AC are activated and contribute to gene expression of IL-18.
METHODS—Plasma levels of endotoxin (LPS) and serum levels of IL-18 were measured by enzyme linked immunoassay and the amoebocyte lysate test in 74 abstinent patients with different stages of AC (Child-Pugh stage A, n=18; B, n=22; C, n=34) and compared with healthy controls (n=43). Gene expression of IL-18 was assessed by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in freshly isolated unstimulated PBMC of a subgroup of 14 patients with AC compared with five healthy controls.
RESULTS—Gene expression of IL-18 specific mRNA in unstimulated PBMC was significantly enhanced in patients with advanced AC (Child-Pugh stage C) and correlated with plasma LPS and serum CD14 levels (Spearman rank correlation factors r=0.76 and r=0.72). Serum concentrations of IL-18 were also elevated compared with healthy controls (p<0.001) but correlation with serum levels of CD14 and plasma levels of LPS was much weaker compared with mRNA data (Spearman rank correlation factors r=0.47 and r=0.26).
CONCLUSIONS—Our in vivo data suggest a presensitisation of "unstimulated" PBMC in the circulation of patients with AC by endotoxin. The term "unstimulated" may be inadequate in patients with AC. Further investigations are needed to define the exact mechanisms and localisation of sensitisation of PBMC in vivo

  8. Amyloid precursor protein mRNA levels in the mononuclear blood cells of Alzheimer's and Down's patients.

    PubMed

    Buckland, P; Tidmarsh, S; Spurlock, G; Kaiser, F; Yates, M; O'Mahony, G; McGuffin, P

    1993-06-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is expressed by many non-neural tissues and it is possible that over-expression of the APP gene in non-neural tissue is responsible for the deposition of amyloid beta-protein in the brain and elsewhere. One possible source of beta-protein is circulating mononuclear blood cells which have previously been shown to express APP. To test this hypothesis, RNA was isolated from the mononuclear blood cells of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (n = 27), Down's syndrome (n = 13), senile dementia non-Alzheimer type (n = 14) and from normal individuals (n = 48). The relative abundance of mRNA coding for different splicing variants of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) mRNA was measured using multiprobe oligonucleotide solution hybridisation (MOSH). There was no significant difference in APP mRNA levels between any of the groups. This indicates that Alzheimer's disease is not characterised by an increase in production of APP in circulating mononuclear blood cells.

  9. Cytokines profile and peripheral blood mononuclear cells morphology in Rett and autistic patients.

    PubMed

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Cervellati, Franco; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Montagner, Giulia; Waldon, PhiAnh; Hayek, Joussef; Gambari, Roberto; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A potential role for immune dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been well established. However, immunological features of Rett syndrome (RTT), a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder closely related to autism, have not been well addressed yet. By using multiplex Luminex technology, a panel of 27 cytokines and chemokines was evaluated in serum from 10 RTT patients with confirmed diagnosis of MECP2 mutation (typical RTT), 12 children affected by classic autistic disorder and 8 control subjects. The cytokine/chemokine gene expression was assessed by real time PCR on mRNA of isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Moreover, ultrastructural analysis of PBMCs was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Significantly higher serum levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-9, IL-13 were detected in RTT compared to control subjects, and IL-15 shows a trend toward the upregulation in RTT. In addition, IL-1β and VEGF were the only down-regulated cytokines in autistic patients with respect to RTT. No difference in cytokine/chemokine profile between autistic and control groups was detected. These data were also confirmed by ELISA real time PCR. At the ultrastructural level, the most severe morphological abnormalities were observed in mitochondria of both RTT and autistic PBMCs. In conclusion, our study shows a deregulated cytokine/chemokine profile together with morphologically altered immune cells in RTT. Such abnormalities were not quite as evident in autistic subjects. These findings indicate a possible role of immune dysfunction in RTT making the clinical features of this pathology related also to the immunology aspects, suggesting, therefore, novel possible therapeutic interventions for this disorder.

  10. Controlled meal frequency without caloric restriction alters peripheral blood mononuclear cell cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intermittent fasting (IF) improves healthy lifespan in animals by a mechanism involving reduced oxidative damage and increased resistance to stress. However, no studies have evaluated the impact of controlled meal frequency on immune responses in human subjects. Objective A study was conducted to establish the effects of controlled diets with different meal frequencies, but similar daily energy intakes, on cytokine production in healthy male and female subjects. Design In a crossover study design with an intervening washout period, healthy normal weight middle-age male and female subjects (n = 15) were maintained for 2 months on controlled on-site one meal per day (OMD) or three meals per day (TMD) isocaloric diets. Serum samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) culture supernatants from subjects were analyzed for the presence of inflammatory markers using a multiplex assay. Results There were no significant differences in the inflammatory markers in the serum of subjects on the OMD or TMD diets. There was an increase in the capacity of PBMCs to produce cytokines in subjects during the first month on the OMD or TMD diets. Lower levels of TNF-α, IL-17, MCP-1 and MIP-1β were produced by PBMCs from subjects on the OMD versus TMD diet. Conclusions PBMCs of subjects on controlled diets exhibit hypersensitivities to cellular stimulation suggesting that stress associated with altered eating behavior might affect cytokine production by immune cells upon stimulation. Moreover, stimulated PBMCs derived from healthy individuals on a reduced meal frequency diet respond with a reduced capability to produce cytokines. PMID:21385360

  11. Selected scorpion toxin exposures induce cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Espino-Solis, Gerardo Pavel

    2017-03-01

    A cytokine screening on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with selected scorpion toxins (ScTx's) was performed in order to evaluate their effect on human immune cells. The ScTx's chosen for this report were three typical buthid scorpion venom peptides, one with lethal effects on mammals Centruroides suffussus suffusus toxin II (CssII), another, with lethal effects on insects and crustaceans Centruroides noxius toxin 5 (Cn5), and one more without lethal effects Tityus discrepans toxin (Discrepin). A Luminex multiplex analysis was performed in order to determine the amounts chemokines and cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12-p40, IL-13, interferon alpha (IFN-α), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha TNF-α, and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) secreted from human PBMCs exposed to these toxins. Although, the ScTx Cn5 is not lethal for mammals, it was able to induce the secretion of cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, IL-10 and IP-10 in comparison to the lethal CssII, which was able to induce only IP-10 secretion. Discrepin also was able to induce only IP-10. Interestingly, only low amounts of interferons α and β were induced in the presence of the ScTx's assayed. In a synergic experiment, the combination of Discrepin and Cn5 displayed considerable reverse effects on induction of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, but they had a slight synergic effect on IP-10 cytokine production in comparison with the single effect obtained with the Cn5 alone. Thus, the results obtained suggest that the profile of secreted cytokines promoted by ScTx Cn5 is highly related with a cytokine storm event, and also it suggests that the mammalian lethal neurotoxins are not solely responsible of the scorpion envenomation symptomatology.

  12. Selective growth of human mast cells induced by Steel factor, IL-6, and prostaglandin E2 from cord blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Ebisawa, M; Tachimoto, H; Shichijo, M; Fukagawa, K; Matsumoto, K; Iikura, Y; Awaji, T; Tsujimoto, G; Yanagida, M; Uzumaki, H; Takahashi, G; Tsuji, K; Nakahata, T

    1996-07-01

    To establish the method for generating a large number of mature human mast cells, we cultured cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) in several conditions in the presence of Steel factor (SF). Among several cytokines tested, IL-6 enhanced SF-dependent mast cell growth from purified CD34+ cells for more than 8 wk in culture. When CBMC were cultured instead of CD34+ cells, IL-6 enhanced the mast cell development in the presence but not in the absence of PGE2. PGE2 enhanced the SF- and IL-6-dependent development of mast cells from CBMC probably by blocking granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF) secretion from accessory cells, because 1) PGE2, or anti-GM-CSF enhanced the mast cell development induced by SF and IL-6 from CBMC, but not from CD34+ cells; 2) GM-CSF inhibited the enhancing effect of IL-6 on the mast cell development from CD34+ cells; and 3) PGE2 inhibited GM-CSF secretion from CBMC. The mast cells cultured in the presence of SF, IL-6, and PGE2 for >10 wk were 99% pure, and seemed to be functionally mature, because 1) they contained 5.62 micrograms of histamine and 3.46 micrograms of tryptase per 10(6) cells; and 2) when sensitized with human IgE and then challenged with anti-human IgE, the cells released a variety of mediators such as histamine, and an increase in intracellular Ca2+ was found in advance of the activation of membrane movement by using a confocal laser-scanning microscope. Electron-microscopic analysis revealed that some of the cultured mast cells are morphologically mature since they filled with scroll granules and contained crystal granules.

  13. Mapping Variation in Cellular and Transcriptional Response to 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Silvia N.; Maranville, Joseph C.; Baxter, Shaneen S.; Jeong, Choongwon; Nakagome, Shigeki; Hrusch, Cara L.; Witonsky, David B.; Sperling, Anne I.; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The active hormonal form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D) is an important modulator of the immune system, inhibiting cellular proliferation and regulating transcription of immune response genes. In order to characterize the genetic basis of variation in the immunomodulatory effects of 1,25D, we mapped quantitative traits of 1,25D response at both the cellular and the transcriptional level. We carried out a genome-wide association scan of percent inhibition of cell proliferation (Imax) induced by 1,25D treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 88 healthy African-American individuals. Two genome-wide significant variants were identified: rs1893662 in a gene desert on chromosome 18 (p = 2.32 x 10−8) and rs6451692 on chromosome 5 (p = 2.55 x 10−8), which may influence the anti-proliferative activity of 1,25D by regulating the expression of nearby genes such as the chemokine gene, CCL28, and the translation initiation gene, PAIP1. We also identified 8 expression quantitative trait loci at a FDR<0.10 for transcriptional response to 1,25D treatment, which include the transcriptional regulator ets variant 3-like (ETV3L) and EH-domain containing 4 (EHD4). In addition, we identified response eQTLs in vitamin D receptor binding sites near genes differentially expressed in response to 1,25D, such as FERM Domain Containing 6 (FRMD6), which plays a critical role in regulating both cell proliferation and apoptosis. Combining information from the GWAS of Imax and the response eQTL mapping enabled identification of putative Imax-associated candidate genes such as PAIP1 and the transcriptional repressor gene ZNF649. Overall, the variants identified in this study are strong candidates for immune traits and diseases linked to vitamin D, such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:27454520

  14. DDE and PCB 153 independently induce aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Salgado-Bustamante, Mariana; González-Amaro, Roberto; Hernandez-Castro, Berenice; Pérez-Maldonado, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that compounds inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines enhance AhR expression. The aim of this study was 2-fold: (1) to determine if two pro-inflammatory compounds, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexa-chlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), independently affect AhR gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC); and (2) if affected, to determine whether the mechanism involved was due to AhR activation or to a pro-inflammatory effect of the chemicals. PBMC isolated from healthy individuals were incubated in the presence of DDE (10 µg/ml) and PCB 153 (20 ng/ml) over time and AhR and CYP1A1 expression was assessed with a real-time PCR technique. The results indicated there was over-expression of the AhR mRNA in PBMC when the cells were treated with DDE and PCB 153. No changes in expression levels of CYP1A1 mRNA were found. Importantly, when the cells were exposed to DDE and PCB 153 in the presence of an antagonist of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, the over-expression of AhR was abolished; as expected, the expression of CYP1A1 was unaffected. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated for the first time an increment of AhR expression "in vitro" in PBMC treated with two pro-inflammatory environmental pollutants, DDE and PCB153. Moreover, the over-expression of AhR was dependent of TNFα induced by DDE and PCB 153 and was independent of AhR activation.

  15. An autologous endothelial cell:peripheral blood mononuclear cell assay that detects cytokine storm responses to biologics.

    PubMed

    Reed, Daniel M; Paschalaki, Koralia E; Starke, Richard D; Mohamed, Nura A; Sharp, Giles; Fox, Bernard; Eastwood, David; Bristow, Adrian; Ball, Christina; Vessillier, Sandrine; Hansel, Trevor T; Thorpe, Susan J; Randi, Anna M; Stebbings, Richard; Mitchell, Jane A

    2015-06-01

    There is an urgent unmet need for human tissue bioassays to predict cytokine storm responses to biologics. Current bioassays that detect cytokine storm responses in vitro rely on endothelial cells, usually from umbilical veins or cell lines, cocultured with freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy adult volunteers. These assays therefore comprise cells from 2 separate donors and carry the disadvantage of mismatched tissues and lack the advantage of personalized medicine. Current assays also do not fully delineate mild (such as Campath) and severe (such as TGN1412) cytokine storm-inducing drugs. Here, we report a novel bioassay where endothelial cells grown from stem cells in the peripheral blood (blood outgrowth endothelial cells) and PBMCs from the same donor can be used to create an autologous coculture bioassay that responds by releasing a plethora of cytokines to authentic TGN1412 but only modestly to Campath and not to control antibodies such as Herceptin, Avastin, and Arzerra. This assay performed better than the traditional mixed donor assay in terms of cytokine release to TGN1412 and, thus, we suggest provides significant advancement and a definitive system by which biologics can be tested and paves the way for personalized medicine.

  16. Mechanism and role of MCP-1 upregulation upon chikungunya virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Mulder, H Lie; Smit, Jolanda M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A

    2016-08-25

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2)-mediated migration of monocytes is essential for immunological surveillance of tissues. During chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection however, excessive production of MCP-1 has been linked to disease pathogenesis. High MCP-1 serum levels are detected during the viremic phase of CHIKV infection and correlate with the virus titre. In vitro CHIKV infection was also shown to stimulate MCP-1 production in whole blood; yet the role and the mechanism of MCP-1 production upon infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells remain unknown. Here we found that active CHIKV infection stimulated production of MCP-1 in monocytes. Importantly however, we found that communication with other leukocytes is crucial to yield MCP-1 by monocytes upon CHIKV infection. Indeed, blocking interferon-α/β receptor or the JAK1/JAK2 signalling downstream of the receptor abolished CHIKV-mediated MCP-1 production. Additionally, we show that despite the apparent correlation between IFN type I, CHIKV replication and MCP-1, modulating the levels of the chemokine did not influence CHIKV infection. In summary, our data disclose the complexity of MCP-1 regulation upon CHIKV infection and point to a crucial role of IFNβ in the chemokine secretion. We propose that balance between these soluble factors is imperative for an appropriate host response to CHIKV infection.

  17. Mechanism and role of MCP-1 upregulation upon chikungunya virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Mulder, H. Lie; Smit, Jolanda M.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2)-mediated migration of monocytes is essential for immunological surveillance of tissues. During chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection however, excessive production of MCP-1 has been linked to disease pathogenesis. High MCP-1 serum levels are detected during the viremic phase of CHIKV infection and correlate with the virus titre. In vitro CHIKV infection was also shown to stimulate MCP-1 production in whole blood; yet the role and the mechanism of MCP-1 production upon infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells remain unknown. Here we found that active CHIKV infection stimulated production of MCP-1 in monocytes. Importantly however, we found that communication with other leukocytes is crucial to yield MCP-1 by monocytes upon CHIKV infection. Indeed, blocking interferon-α/β receptor or the JAK1/JAK2 signalling downstream of the receptor abolished CHIKV-mediated MCP-1 production. Additionally, we show that despite the apparent correlation between IFN type I, CHIKV replication and MCP-1, modulating the levels of the chemokine did not influence CHIKV infection. In summary, our data disclose the complexity of MCP-1 regulation upon CHIKV infection and point to a crucial role of IFNβ in the chemokine secretion. We propose that balance between these soluble factors is imperative for an appropriate host response to CHIKV infection. PMID:27558873

  18. Inhibitor treatment of peripheral mononuclear cells from Parkinson’s disease patients further validates LRRK2 dephosphorylation as a pharmacodynamic biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Perera, G.; Ranola, M.; Rowe, D. B.; Halliday, G. M.; Dzamko, N.

    2016-01-01

    Activating mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are strongly associated with increased risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Thus, LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are in development as potential Parkinson’s disease therapeutics. A reduction in the constitutive levels of phosphorylation on leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is currently used to measure target engagement of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors in cell and animal models. We aimed to determine if reduced phosphorylation of LRRK2 following inhibitor treatment is also a valid measure of target engagement in peripheral mononuclear cells from Parkinson’s disease patients. Peripheral mononuclear cells from idiopathic Parkinson’s disease patients and controls were treated ex vivo with two structurally distinct inhibitors of LRRK2, at four different doses, and immunoblotting was used to assess the reduction in LRRK2 phosphorylation at Ser910, Ser935, Ser955 and Ser973. Both inhibitors showed no acute toxicity in primary cells and both inhibitors reduced the constitutive phosphorylation of LRRK2 at all measured residues equally in both control and Parkinson’s disease groups. Measuring the reduction in LRRK2 phosphorylation resulting from LRRK2 kinase inhibition, is thus a valid measure of acute peripheral target engagement in Parkinson’s disease patients. This is important if LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are to be used in a clinical setting. PMID:27503089

  19. Increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate production and endothelial nitric oxide synthase level in mononuclear cells from sildenafil citrate-treated patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    García-Cardoso, J; Vela, R; Mahillo, E; Mateos-Cáceres, P J; Modrego, J; Macaya, C; López-Farré, A J

    2010-01-01

    Mononuclear cells express enzymes involved in the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) generating system, as well as PDE5. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of sildenafil citrate administration on the level of proteins involved in the NO/cGMP generating system in mononuclear cells from patients with ED. Twenty-one patients with ED (International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function Domain (IIEF-EFD) 17.9+/-0.8) were enrolled and 100 mg sildenafil citrate on-demand was administered during 12 weeks. All patients showed cardiovascular risk factors. After sildenafil citrate administration, IIEF-EFD score was improved (26+/-1.2 P<0.05). In the mononuclear cells, the protein level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was higher after sildenafil citrate treatment. It was accompanied by reduction in the circulating plasma levels of both high-sensitive C-reactive protein and soluble intercellular adhesive molecule-1. The protein level of soluble guanylate cyclase and PDE5 did not change in the mononuclear cells after sildenafil citrate treatment. However, in the mononuclear cells exogenous NO induced a higher cGMP production after 12-weeks sildenafil citrate administration. In conclusion, in mononuclear cells from patients with ED sildenafil citrate administration increased the level of eNOS protein and increased cGMP production in response to NO. Moreover, sildenafil citrate administration reduced the plasma circulating levels of two biomarkers associated with inflammation.

  20. Effects of multiple-injection of bone marrow mononuclear cells on spinal cord injury of rats.

    PubMed

    Kanekiyo, Kenji; Nakano, Norihiko; Homma, Tamami; Yamada, Yoshihiro; Tamachi, Masahiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Fukushima, Masanori; Saito, Fukuki; Ide, Chizuka

    2017-03-28

    The effects of multiple-injection of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs) on spinal cord injury (SCI) were compared with those of single-injection in rats. BMNCs separated by density-gradient centrifugation from a bone marrow perfusate were injected 3 times (once weekly) through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via the 4th ventricle, and the locomotor improvement and tissue recovery, including axonal regeneration, were compared with those of single-injection. While the single-injection group showed a steep elevation of the BBB (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan) score 1 week after transplantation, the multiple-injection group maintained a similar steep elevation for 2 weeks after transplantation, and the BBB scores of the multiple-injection group remained thereafter at a level around 2-3 points higher than those of the single-injection group until the end of the experiment. There were significant differences between the single- and multiple-injection groups at 3, 4, and 8 weeks after transplantation. The difference of BBB scores at 8 weeks after transplantation suggested that there was a marked difference in the quality of locomotor behaviors between the single-and multiple-injection groups at this stage. An extensive outgrowth of regenerating axons through the astrocyte-devoid areas, and a marked reduction of cavity formation were found in both the single- and multiple-injection groups. There were, however, no significant differences in the density of regenerating axons or volumes of cavities between the single- and multiple-injection groups. These results showed that, although tissue recoveries were similar between single- and multiple-injection, the multiple-injection of BMNCs was more beneficial for locomotor improvement than single-injection for the treatment of SCI. Considering the technically simple and low-cost procedures for the preparation and injection of BMNCs, multiple-injection of BMNCs by lumbar puncture has an advantage over single-injection on clinical

  1. Bone marrow mononuclear cell therapy in ischaemic stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Prasad, M; Jali, V P; Pandit, A K; Misra, S; Kumar, P; Chakravarty, K; Kathuria, P; Gulati, A

    2017-05-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cell (BM-MNC) therapy has emerged as a potential therapy for the treatment of stroke. We performed a systematic review of published studies using BM-MNC therapy in patients with ischaemic stroke (IS). Literature was searched using MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Trip Database, Cochrane library and clinicaltrial.gov to identify studies on BM-MNC therapy in IS till June, 2016. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers. STATA version 13 was used for carrying out meta-analysis. We included non-randomized open-label, single-arm and non-randomized comparative studies or randomized controlled trials (RCTs) if BM-MNCs were used to treat patients with IS in any phase after the index stroke. One randomized trial, two non-randomized comparative trials and four single-arm open-label trials (total seven studies) involving 227 subjects (137 patients and 90 controls) were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. The pooled proportion for favourable clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale score ≤2) in six studies involving 122 subjects was 29% (95% CI 0.16-0.43) who were exposed to BM-MNCs and pooled proportion for favourable clinical outcome of 69 subjects (taken from two trials) who did not receive BM-MNCs was 20% (95% CI 0.12-0.32). The pooled difference in the safety outcomes was not significant between both the groups. Our systematic review suggests that BM-MNC therapy is safe up to 1 year post-intervention and is feasible; however, its efficacy in the case of IS patients is debatable. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are required to provide more information on the efficacy of BM-MNC transplantation in patients with IS.

  2. Effects of Caffeine Supplementation on Plasma and Blood Mononuclear Cell Interleukin-10 Levels After Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tauler, Pedro; Martinez, Sonia; Martinez, Pau; Lozano, Leticia; Moreno, Carlos; Aguiló, Antoni

    2016-02-01

    This study compared the response of interleukin (IL)-10, and also of IL-6 and IL-12 p40, to exercise and caffeine supplementation between plasma and blood mononuclear cells (BMNCs). Participants in the study (n = 28) were randomly allocated in a double-blind fashion to either caffeine (n = 14) or placebo (n = 14) treatments. One hour before completing a 15-km run competition, athletes took 6 mg/kg body mass of caffeine or a placebo. Plasma and BMNCs were purified from blood samples taken before and after competition. Concentrations of interleukins (IL-10, IL-6, and IL-12 p40), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), caffeine, adrenaline, and cortisol were measured in plasma. IL-10, IL-6, and IL-12 p40 and cAMP levels were also determined in BMNCs. Exercise induced significant increases in IL-6 and IL-10 plasma levels, with higher increases in the caffeine-supplemented group. After 2-hr recovery, these levels returned to almost preexercise values. However, no effect of caffeine on BMNC cytokines was observed. IL-10, IL-6, and IL-12 p40 levels in BMNCs increased mainly at 2 hr postexercise. cAMP levels increased postexercise in plasma and after recovery in BMNCs, but no effects of caffeine were observed. In conclusion, caffeine did not modify cytokine levels in BMNCs in response to exercise. However, higher increases of IL-10 were observed in plasma after exercise in the supplemented participants, which could suppose an enhancement of the anti-inflammatory properties of exercise.

  3. Elevated peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived superoxide production in healthy young black men.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shekhar H; Holwerda, Seth W; Keller, David M; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that blacks exhibit elevations in systemic oxidative stress. However, the source(s) and mechanism(s) contributing to the elevation in oxidative stress remain unclear. Given that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) can be a major source of NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide production, we tested the hypothesis that young black men demonstrate greater superoxide production and NADPH oxidase expression in PBMCs compared with whites. PBMCs were freshly isolated from whole blood in young normotensive black (n = 18) and white (n = 16) men. Intracellular superoxide production in PBMCs was measured using dihydroethidium fluorescence, protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, gp91(phox) (membranous) and p47(phox) (cytosolic) in PBMCs were assessed using Western blot analysis, and plasma protein carbonyls were measured as a marker of systemic oxidative stress. Black men showed elevated intracellular superoxide production (4.3 ± 0.5 vs. 2.0 ± 0.6 relative fluorescence units; black men vs. white men, P < 0.05), increased protein expression for gp91(phox) and p47(phox) (e.g., p47(phox): 1.1 ± 0.2, black men vs. 0.4 ± 0.1, white men, P < 0.05) in PBMCs and higher circulating protein carbonyl levels (22 ± 4 vs. 14 ± 2 nmol/ml; black men vs. white men, P < 0.05). Interestingly, a positive family history of hypertension in black men did not further enhance PBMC-derived intracellular superoxide production or NADPH oxidase subunit protein expression. These findings indicate that black men exhibit greater resting PBMC-derived superoxide production and an upregulation of the NADPH oxidase pathway with a possible contribution to increases in systemic oxidative stress.

  4. Production of nitric oxide by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Catherine J; Stuckey, Joyce E; Cox, Heather; Smith, Brett; Funke, Christina; Stott, Jeff; Colle, Clarence; Gaspard, Joseph; Manire, Charles A

    2007-08-15

    Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are exposed to many conditions in their habitat that may adversely impact health and impair immune function in this endangered species. In an effort to increase the current knowledge base regarding the manatee immune system, the production of an important reactive nitrogen intermediate, nitric oxide (NO), by manatee peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was investigated. PBMC from healthy captive manatees were stimulated with LPS, IFN-gamma, or TNF-alpha, either alone or in various combinations, with NO production assessed after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of culture. NO production in response to LPS stimulation was significantly greater after 48, 72, or 96 h of culture compared to NO production after 24h of culture. A specific inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), L-NIL (L-N(6)-(1-iminoethyl)lysine), significantly decreased NO production by LPS-stimulated manatee PBMC. Manatee specific oligonucleotide primers for iNOS were designed to measure expression of relative amounts of mRNA in LPS-stimulated manatee PBMC from captive manatees. NO production by PBMC from manatees exposed to red tide toxins was analyzed, with significantly greater NO production by both unstimulated and LPS stimulated PBMC from red tide exposed compared with healthy captive or cold-stress manatees. Free-ranging manatees produced significantly lower amounts of nitric oxide compared to either captive or red tide rescued manatees. Results presented in this paper contribute to the current understanding of manatee immune function and represent the first report of nitric oxide production in the immune system of a marine mammal.

  5. Comparative study of the effect of chloro-, dichloro-, bromo-, and dibromoacetic acid on necrotic, apoptotic and morphological changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Michałowicz, Jaromir; Wróblewski, Wojciech; Mokra, Katarzyna; Maćczak, Aneta; Kwiatkowska, Marta

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the effect of monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was assessed. HAAs studied induced at millimolar concentrations necrotic alterations in PBMCs with the strongest effect noted for MBAA and DBAA. Chloro- and bromoacetic acids also provoked changes in PBMCs morphology because they caused a strong decrease in cell size (particularly DCAA and DBAA) and increase in cell granulation (mainly MBAA and DBAA). All HAAs studied, and DCAA and DBAA in particular (at lower concentrations than those, which caused necrosis) induced apoptotic changes, which was confirmed by analysis of alterations in cell membrane permeability and caspase 8, 9 and 3 activation. Moreover, HAAs examined (mainly dihalogenated acids) strongly increased transmembrane mitochondrial potential and enhanced ROS (mainly hydroxyl radical) formation, which was possibly associated with apoptotic changes provoked by those substances. The results showed that DBAA exhibited the strongest effects on PBMCs.

  6. Opposing Effects of Low Molecular Weight Heparins on the Release of Inflammatory Cytokines from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Shastri, Madhur D.; Stewart, Niall; Eapen, Mathew; Peterson, Gregory M.; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R.; Gueven, Nuri; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Patel, Rahul P.

    2015-01-01

    Background T-cell-mediated inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), play an important role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory airways diseases. Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), widely used anticoagulants, possess anti-inflammatory properties making them potential treatment options for inflammatory diseases, including asthma. In the current study, we investigated the modulating effects of two LMWHs (enoxaparin and dalteparin) on the release of cytokines from stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of asthmatic subjects to identify the specific components responsible for the effects. Methods PBMCs from asthmatic subjects (consist of ~75% of T-cells) were isolated from blood taken from ten asthmatic subjects. The PBMCs were pre-treated in the presence or absence of different concentrations of LMWHs, and were then stimulated by phytohaemagglutinin for the release of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and TNF-α. LMWHs were completely or selectively desulfated and their anticoagulant effect, as well as the ability to modulate cytokine release, was determined. LMWHs were chromatographically fractionated and each fraction was tested for molecular weight determination along with an assessment of anticoagulant potency and effect on cytokine release. Results Enoxaparin inhibited cytokine release by more than 48%, whereas dalteparin increased their release by more than 25%. The observed anti-inflammatory effects of enoxaparin were independent of their anticoagulant activities. Smaller fractions, in particular dp4 (four saccharide units), were responsible for the inhibitory effect of enoxaparin. Whereas, the larger fractions, in particular dp22 (twenty two saccharide units), were associated with the stimulatory effect of dalteparin. Conclusion Enoxaparin and dalteparin demonstrated opposing effects on inflammatory markers. These observed effects could be due to the presence of structurally

  7. Cultures and co-cultures of human blood mononuclear cells and endothelial cells for the biocompatibility assessment of surface modified AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Stio, Maria; Martinesi, Maria; Treves, Cristina; Borgioli, Francesca

    2016-12-01

    Samples of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel were subjected either to grinding and polishing procedure, or to grinding and then low temperature glow-discharge nitriding treatment, or to grinding, nitriding and subsequently coating with collagen-I. Nitrided samples, even if only ground, show a higher corrosion resistance in PBS solution, in comparison with ground and polished AISI 316L. Biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro by incubating the samples with either peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), tested separately or in co-culture. HUVEC-PBMC co-culture and co-incubation of HUVEC with PBMC culture medium, after the previous incubation of PBMC with metallic samples, allowed to determine whether the incubation of PBMC with the different samples might affect HUVEC behaviour. Many biological parameters were considered: cell proliferation, release of cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and sICAM-1, gelatinolytic activity of MMPs, and ICAM-1 protein expression. Nitriding treatment, with or without collagen coating of the samples, is able to ameliorate some of the biological parameters taken into account. The obtained results point out that biocompatibility may be successfully tested in vitro, using cultures of normal human cells, as blood and endothelial cells, but more than one cell line should be used, separately or in co-culture, and different parameters should be determined, in particular those correlated with inflammatory phenomena.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYTOKINE-INDUCED MYELOID-DERIVED SUPPRESSOR CELLS FROM NORMAL HUMAN PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Melissa G.; Liebertz, Daniel J.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). In cancer patients, increased MDSC correlate with more aggressive disease and a poor prognosis. Experimental Design Expression of 15 immune factors (TGFβ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF, M-CSF, IDO, FLT3L, c-kit L, iNOS, ARG-1, TNFα, COX2, VEGF) by MDSC-inducing human solid tumor cell lines was evaluated by RT-PCR. Based upon these data, cytokine mixtures were then tested for their ability to generate suppressive CD33+ cells from healthy donor PBMC in vitro by measuring their ability to inhibit the proliferation of, and IFNγ production by, fresh autologous human T cells after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Induced MDSC were characterized with respect to their morphology, surface phenotype, and gene expression profile. Results MDSC-inducing cancer cell lines demonstrated multiple pathways for MDSC generation, including over-expression of IL-6, IL-1β, COX2, M-CSF, and IDO. CD33+ cells with potent suppressive capacity were best generated in vitro by GM-CSF and IL-6, and secondarily by GM-CSF + IL-1β, PGE2, TNFα, or VEGF. Characterization studies of cytokine-induced suppressive cells revealed CD33+CD11b+CD66b+HLA-DRlowIL-13Rα2int large mononuclear cells with abundant basophilic cytoplasm. Expression of iNOS, TGFβ, NOX2, VEGF, and/or ARG-1 was also up-regulated and transwell studies showed suppression of autologous T cells to be contact dependent. Conclusion Suppressive CD33+ cells generated from PBMC by GM-CSF and IL-6 were consistent with human MDSC. This study suggests that these cytokines are potential therapeutic targets for the inhibition of MDSC induction in cancer patients. PMID:20644162

  9. The mononuclear phagocyte system.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2006-02-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) has been defined as a family of cells comprising bone marrow progenitors, blood monocytes and tissue macrophages. Macrophages are a major cell population in most of the tissues in the body, and their numbers increase further in inflammation, wounding and malignancy. Their trophic roles for other cell types in development and homeostasis are becoming increasingly evident. The receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1R) is expressed in a large proportion of cells considered to be mononuclear phagocytes, including antigen-presenting dendritic cells, which can be considered a specialized adaptive state rather than a separate lineage. The unity of the MPS is challenged by evidence that there is a separate embryonic phagocyte lineage, by the transdifferentiation and fusion of MPS cells with other cell types, and by evidence of local renewal of tissue macrophage populations as opposed to monocyte recruitment. The concept of the MPS may have partly outlived its usefulness.

  10. Telomete length in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is associated with folate status in men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human chromosomes are capped by tandem repeats of DNA and associated proteins termed telomeres. The length of the telomeres is reduced with increasing cell divisions except when the enzyme telomerase is active as seen in stem cells and germ cells. Telomere dysfunction has been associated with deve...

  11. Effect of nonmyeloablative unrelated fetal and neonatal murine peripheral blood mononuclear cell infusion on MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Chuan, W; Wu-qing, W; Zhu-wen, Y; Zuo, L

    2014-09-01

    For patients with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), current medications are insufficient to control their condition, and new treatments are necessary. We investigated the effect of fetal and neonatal murine peripheral blood (FNPB) mononuclear cells on MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. Female MRL/lpr mice were randomized to three groups (control, radiation and infusion groups). The infusion group had significantly better results for survival rate, body weight increase, reduction of spleen index, serum anti-ds-DNA antibody, antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and creatinine (Cr), 24 h urine protein and pathological renal tissue lesions than either the control or radiation group. Graft versus host disease (GVHD) was not observed in MRL/lpr mice in the infusion group. The infusion group also had better hematogenesis reconstruction than the radiation group. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a significant increase in Th1, CD8+ T and T reg cells and a reduction in Th2, CD4+ T and Th17 cells in the peripheral blood of the radiation and infusion groups compared with the control group. Immunocytochemical assay revealed a significant increase in serum transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and a significant reduction in interleukin (IL)-17 in the radiation and infusion groups compared with the control group. Therefore, our study showed that FNPB mononuclear cell infusion has a significant role in regulating CD4+ T cells, Th1/Th2, Th17/T reg balance and their corresponding cytokines in MRL/lpr mice. The FNPB mononuclear cell infusion provided evidence in animals and suggested a potential clinical application for umbilical cord blood transplantation to treat SLE patients.

  12. The Effect of Long-Term Exercise on the Production of Osteoclastogenic and Antiosteoclastogenic Cytokines by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and on Serum Markers of Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Rhesa; Chi, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that the mechanical stresses associated with physical activity augment bone mineral density and improve bone quality, our understanding of how exercise modulates bone homeostasis at the molecular level is lacking. In a before and after trial involving 43 healthy adults, we measured the effect of six months of supervised exercise training on the spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin-induced production of osteoclastogenic cytokines (interleukin-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α), antiosteoclastogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor-β1 and interleukins 4 and 10), pleiotropic cytokines with variable effects on osteoclastogenesis (interferon-γ, interleukin-6), and T cell growth and differentiation factors (interleukins 2 and 12) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also measured lymphocyte phenotypes and serum markers of bone formation (osteocalcin), bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of Type I collagen), and bone homeostasis (25 (OH) vitamin D, estradiol, testosterone, parathyroid hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1). A combination of aerobic, resistance, and flexibility exercises done on average of 2.5 hours a week attenuated the production of osteoclastogenic cytokines and enhanced the production of antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. These changes were accompanied by a 16% reduction in collagen degradation products and a 9.8% increase in osteocalcin levels. We conclude that long-term moderate intensity exercise exerts a favorable effect on bone resorption by changing the balance between blood mononuclear cells producing osteoclastogenic cytokines and those producing antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02765945. PMID:27642534

  13. Chemotactic activity of cotyledons for mononuclear leukocytes related to occurrence of retained placenta in dexamethasone induced parturition in cattle.

    PubMed

    Benedictus, L; Jorritsma, R; Knijn, H M; Vos, P L A M; Koets, A P

    2011-09-15

    Induction of parturition with glucocorticosteroids in cattle is used for research purposes, in diseased or injured pregnant cows, and as a management tool to time parturition. A negative side effect of induction of parturition with glucocorticosteroids is the high incidence of retained placenta that occurs after these calvings. Reaction of the maternal immune system against the 'foreign' foetal membranes contributes to the breakdown of the foetal-maternal attachment. Several studies indicate that failure of this immune assisted detachment increases the occurrence of retained placenta. We hypothesized that retained placenta occurring after induction of parturition with glucocorticosteroids is caused by failure of immune assisted detachment of the foetal membranes. The chemotactic activity of cotyledons for mononuclear leukocytes was used as a parameter to see whether immune assisted detachment of the foetal membranes had occurred. Cotyledons were collected from spontaneously calving non-retained placenta cows and from dexamethasone induced non-retained placenta and retained placenta cows. The study showed that the chemotactic activity of cotyledons for mononuclear leukocytes was lower (P < 0.001) in cotyledons obtained from retained placenta cows in which parturition was induced with dexamethasone compared to the chemotactic activity of cotyledons obtained from spontaneously calving non-retained placenta cows, whereas the chemotactic activity of cotyledons obtained from induced non-retained placenta cows was not lower (P = 0.10) than the chemotactic activity of cotyledons obtained from spontaneously calving non-retained placenta cows. We concluded that induction of parturition with dexamethasone causes a failure of immune assisted detachment of the foetal membranes and the accompanying release of chemotactic factors. As a result, the chemotactic activity of cotyledons for mononuclear leukocytes is lower in induced retained placenta cows than in cotyledons from non

  14. Use of /sup 51/Cr-labeled mononuclear cells for measuring the cellular immune response in mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkower, A.; Scheuchenzuber, W.J.; Ferguson, F.G.

    1981-02-01

    Spleen cells labeled with /sup 51/Cr were used in sensitized syngeneic mice to measure the degree of mononuclear cell infiltration into antigen-challenged tissues. With this method, increased cellular infiltration was found after footpad challenge of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocyte, Escherichia coli, and BCG antigens. Cellular response also was determined by using this technique in the lungs of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocytes and BCG. This procedure offers the opportunity to measure cellular infiltration, whether due to cellular or humoral influences, in tissues not easily accessible to conventional immunological manipulation.

  15. Use of 51Cr-labeled mononuclear cells for measuring the cellular immune response in mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkower, A.; Scheuchenzuber, W.J.; Ferguson, F.G.

    1981-02-01

    Spleen cells labeled with 51Cr were used in sensitized syngeneic mice to measure the degree of mononuclear cell infiltration into antigen-challenged tissues. With this method, increased cellular infiltration was found after footpad challenge of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocyte, Escherichia coli, and BCG antigens. Cellular response also was determined by using this technique in the lungs of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocytes and BCG. This procedure offers the opportunity to measure cellular infiltration, whether due to cellular or humoral influences, in tissues not easily accessible to conventional immunological manipulation.

  16. Suppression of immunoglobulin production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by monocytes via secretion of heavy-chain ferritin.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Makiko; Harada, Gakuro; Matsumoto, Shin-ei; Aiba, Yoshihiro; Ichikawa, Akira; Fujiki, Tsukasa; Udono, Miyako; Kabayama, Shigeru; Yoshida, Tadashi; Zhang, Pingbo; Fujii, Hiroshi; Shirahata, Sanetaka; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    In vitro antigen stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) does not induce immunoglobulin (Ig) production. However, pretreatment of PBMCs with l-leucyl-l-leucine methyl ester (LLME) prior to in vitro stimulation removes the suppression of Ig production. In the present study, we attempted to identify the target cells of LLME and determine the mechanisms by which Ig production in PBMCs is suppressed. We found that CD14(+) monocytes are involved in the suppression of Ig production in PBMCs. Furthermore, we confirmed that heavy-chain ferritin derived from CD14(+) monocytes suppresses Ig production in PBMCs, possibly through iron sequestration.

  17. In vitro expansion of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul; Rohaya, M. A. W.

    2013-11-27

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin{sup −}) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin{sup +}) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin{sup −} cell population. The ability of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin{sup +} mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin{sup −} stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however

  18. Superior Potential of CD34-Positive Cells Compared to Total Mononuclear Cells for Healing of Nonunion Following Bone Fracture.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Mifune, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Shoji, Taro; Kawakami, Yohei; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Ii, Masaaki; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Tomoya; Horii, Miki; Yokoyama, Ayumi; Alev, Cantas; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Asahara, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the local transplantation of human peripheral blood (PB) CD34(+) cells, an endothelial/hematopoietic progenitor cell-rich population, contributes to fracture repair via vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis. Human PB mononuclear cells (MNCs) are also considered a potential cell fraction for neovascularization. We have previously shown the feasibility of human PB MNCs to enhance fracture healing. However, there is no report directly comparing the efficacy for fracture repair between CD34(+) cells and MNCs. In addition, an unhealing fracture model, which does not accurately resemble a clinical setting, was used in our previous studies. To overcome these issues, we compared the capacity of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized PB (GM-PB) CD34(+) cells and human GM-PB MNCs in a nonunion model, which more closely resembles a clinical setting. First, the effect of local transplantation of 1 × 10(5) GM-PB CD34(+) cells (CD34(+) group), 1 × 10(7) GM-PB MNCs (containing approximately 1 × 10(5) GM-PB CD34(+) cells) (MNC group), and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (PBS group) on nonunion healing was compared. Similar augmentation of blood flow recovery at perinonunion sites was observed in the CD34(+) and MNC groups. Meanwhile, a superior effect on nonunion repair was revealed by radiological, histological, and functional assessment in the CD34(+) group compared with the other groups. Moreover, through in vivo and in vitro experiments, excessive inflammation induced by GM-PB MNCs was confirmed and believed to be one of the mechanisms underlying this potency difference. These results strongly suggest that local transplantation of GM-PB CD34(+) cells is a practical and effective strategy for treatment of nonunion after fracture.

  19. Optimization and limitations of use of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells for functional and phenotypic T-cell characterization.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Adriana; Song, Lin-Ye; Wilkening, Cynthia; Sevin, Anne; Blais, Bruce; Louzao, Raul; Stein, Dana; Defechereux, Patricia; Durand, Deborah; Riedel, Eric; Raftery, Nancy; Jesser, Renee; Brown, Betty; Keller, M Fran; Dickover, Ruth; McFarland, Elizabeth; Fenton, Terence

    2009-08-01

    The goals of this study were to optimize processing methods of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for immunological assays, identify acceptance parameters for the use of cryopreserved PBMC for functional and phenotypic assays, and to define limitations of the information obtainable with cryopreserved PBMC. Blood samples from 104 volunteers (49 human immunodeficiency virus-infected and 55 uninfected) were used to assess lymphocyte proliferation in response to tetanus, candida, and pokeweed-mitogen stimulation and to enumerate CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and T-cell subpopulations by flow cytometry. We determined that slowly diluting the thawed PBMC significantly improved viable cell recovery, whereas the use of benzonase improved cell recovery only sometimes. Cell storage in liquid nitrogen for up to 15 months did not affect cell viability, recovery, or the results of lymphocyte proliferation assays (LPA) and flow cytometry assays. Storage at -70 degrees C for < or =3 weeks versus storage in liquid nitrogen before shipment on dry ice did not affect cell viability, recovery, or flow cytometric results. Storage at -70 degrees C was associated with slightly higher LPA results with pokeweed-mitogen but not with microbial antigens. Cell viability of 75% was the acceptance parameter for LPA. No other acceptance parameters were found for LPA or flow cytometry assay results for cryopreserved PBMC. Under optimized conditions, LPA and flow cytometry assay results for cryopreserved and fresh PBMC were highly correlated, with the exception of phenotypic assays that used CD45RO or CD62L markers, which seemed labile to freezing and thawing.

  20. Effect of buckminsterfullerenes on cells of the innate and adaptive immune system: an in vitro study with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Bunz, Hanno; Plankenhorn, Sandra; Klein, Reinhild

    2012-01-01

    C60 nanoparticles, the so-called buckminsterfullerenes, have attracted great attention for medical applications as carriers, enzyme inhibitors or radical scavengers. However, publications evaluating their immunological mechanisms are still rather limited. Therefore, we aimed to analyze systematically the in vitro influence of polyhydroxy-C60 (poly-C60) and N-ethyl-polyamino-C60 (nepo-C60) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy individuals, angling their effect on proliferation, expression of surface markers, and cytokine production. We isolated PBMC from 20 healthy subjects and incubated them in a first step only with poly-C60 or nepo-C60, and in a second step together with recall antigens (purified protein derivative, tetanus toxoid, bacillus Calmette-Guérin). Proliferation was determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation, activation of PBMC-subpopulations by flow cytometry by measurement of the activation marker CD69, and secretion of T helper cell type 1 (TH1)- (interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor beta [TNF-β]), TH2- (interleukin-5 [IL-5], −13, −10) and macrophage/monocyte-related cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α) into the supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Both fullerenes did not influence T cell reactivity, with no enhanced expression of CD69 and production of T cell cytokines observed, the CD4/CD8 ratio remaining unaffected. In contrast, they significantly enhanced the release of IL-6 and CD69-expression by CD56 positive natural killer cells. PBMC, which had been cultured together with the three recall antigens were not affected by both fullerenes at all. These data indicate that fullerenes do not interact with T cell reactivity but may activate cells of the innate immune system. Furthermore, they seem to act only on ‘naïve’ cells, which have not been prestimulated with recall antigens, there are however, large inter individual differences. PMID:22942641

  1. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Reduce Therapeutic Intensity for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Children

    PubMed Central

    Liao, George P.; Harting, Matthew T.; Hetz, Robert A.; Walker, Peter A.; DO, Shinil K. Shah; Corkins, Christopher J.; Hughes, Travis G.; Jimenez, Fernando; Kosmach, Steven C.; Day, Mary-Clare; Tsao, KuoJen; Lee, Dean A.; Worth, Laura L.; Baumgartner, James E.; Cox, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The devastating effect of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is exacerbated by an acute secondary neuroinflammatory response, clinically manifest as elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) due to cerebral edema. The treatment effect of cell based therapies in the acute post-TBI period has not been clinically studied although preclinical data demonstrate that bone marrow derived mononuclear cell (BMMNC) infusion downregulates the inflammatory response. Our study evaluates whether pediatric TBI patients receiving intravenous, autologous BMMNCs within 48 hours of injury experienced a reduction in therapeutic intensity directed towards managing elevated ICP relative to matched controls. Design The study was a retrospective cohort design comparing pediatric patients in a Phase I clinical trial treated with intravenous autologous BMMNCs (n=10) to a control group of age and severity matched children (n=19). Setting The study setting was at Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital, an American College of Surgeons Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center and teaching hospital for the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston from 2000-2008. Patients Study patients were 5-14 years with post resuscitation Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 5-8. Interventions The treatment group received 6 million autologous BMMNC/kg body weight intravenously within 48 hours of injury. The control group was treated in an identical fashion, per standard of care, guided by our TBI management protocol, derived from American Association of Neurological Surgeons guidelines. Measurements The primary measure was the Pediatric Intensity Level of Therapy (PILOT) scale, used to quantify treatment of elevated ICP. Secondary measures included the Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) score and days of ICP monitoring as a surrogate for length of neurointensive care. Main Results A repeated measure mixed model with marginal linear predictions identified a significant reduction in the PILOT score beginning

  2. The effects of nano-silver on the proliferation and cytokine expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Heon; Ye, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hae-Sic; Kang, Hyung-Suk

    2007-12-15

    Silver could prove to be a valuable alternative raw material for antibiotics and disinfectants as it is relatively free of adverse effects. Nano-silver is now been put to practical use in commonly used items, such as, clothes, electric home appliances, and electronic industry, but has not been widely applied in the medical or pharmacological fields. This study was designed to investigate the effects of nano-silver on the production of cytokines by and on the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In addition, we investigated the potential cytotoxic effects of nano-silver on PBMCs. PBMCs from healthy human volunteers were stimulated with 5 mug/ml phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) in the presence of varying concentrations of nano-silver. PBMC proliferations were measured using an aqueous cell proliferation assay kit and supernatants were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Interleukin-5 (IL-5), interferon-gamma (INF-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) protein levels were measured to determine the activation state of PBMCs. At levels of over 15 ppm, nano-silver was found to have a significant cytotoxic effect on PBMCs, and PHA-induced cytokine productions were significantly inhibited by nano-silver (IL-5: at 10 ppm, INF-gamma and TNF-alpha at 3 ppm). Although nano-silver had a cytotoxic effect at high concentration, nano-silver modulated cytokine production in a concentration-dependent manner. These experimental data suggest that nano-silver could be used to treat immunologic and inflammatory diseases.

  3. Effects of strenuous exercise on Th1/Th2 gene expression from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells of marathon participants.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Lianbin; Rehm, Kristina E; Marshall, Gailen D

    2014-08-01

    Physical stressors, such as strenuous exercise, can have numerous effects on the human body including the immune system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gene expression profile of Th1/Th2 cytokines and related transcription factor genes in order to investigate possible immune imbalances before and after a marathon. Blood samples were collected from 16 normal volunteers 24-48 h before and one week after completing a marathon race. Gene expression of Th1 and Th2 related cytokines from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using Human Th1-Th2-Th3 RT(2) Profiler PCR Array and qRT-PCR that measured the transcript levels of 84 genes related to T cell activation. We found that PBMC express a characteristic Th2-like gene profile one week post-marathon compared to pre-marathon. The majority of genes up-regulated one week post-marathon such as IL-4, GATA3, and CCR4 were Th2 associated. For Th1-related genes, CXCR3 and IRF1 were up-regulated one week post-marathon. There was a trend of down-regulation of two Th1 related genes, T-bet and STAT1. Th3-related gene expression patterns did not change in the study. The ratios of both IFN-γ/IL-4 and T-bet/GATA3 gene expressions were significantly lower one week after marathon. These findings suggest that a Th1/Th2 immune imbalance persisted at least 1 week after completion of a marathon which offers a mechanistic rationale for the increased risk of upper respiratory tract infections often reported after strenuous exercise.

  4. Hypoxia Pre-Conditioned Embryonic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome Reduces IL-10 Production by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lotfinia, Majid; Lak, Shirin; Ghahhari, Nastaran Mohammadi; Johari, Behrooz; Maghsood, Faezeh; Parsania, Sara; Tabrizi, Bahareh Sadegh; Kadivar, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important candidates for MSC-based cellular therapy. Current paradigm states that MSCs support local progenitor cells in damaged tissue through paracrine signaling. Therefore, the study of paracrine effects and secretome of MSCs could lead to the appreciation of mechanisms and molecules associated with the therapeutic effects of these cells. This study analyzed anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory effects of MSC secretomes derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bone marrow cells after hypoxia and normoxia preconditioning. Methods: ESCs differentiated into MSCs and characterized by flow cytometry as well as by differentiation into adipocytes and osteoblasts. The experimental groups were consisted of individual groups of ESC-MSCs and BM-MSCs (bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells), which were preconditioned with either hypoxia or normoxia for 24, 48 and 72 h. After collecting the cell-free medium from each treatment, secretomes were concentrated by centrifugal filters. Using a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) assay and ELISA, IL-10 concentration in PBMCs was evaluated after their incubation with different secretomes from preconditioned and non-preconditioned MSCs. Results: A significant difference was observed between ESC-MSC normoxia and ESC-MSC hypoxia in IL-10 concentration, and normoxia secretomes increased IL-10 secretion from PBMCs. Moreover, the strongest IL-10 secretion from PBMCs could be detected after the stimulation by ESC-MSC conditioned secretomes, but not BM-MSC conditioned medium. Conclusions: Human hypoxia preconditioned ESC-MSC secretome indicated stronger immune-modulatory effects compared to BM-MSC conditioned medium. It could be suggested that induced MSCs confer less immune-modulatory effects but produce more inflammatory molecules such as tumor necrosis factor α, which needs further investigation. PMID:27132108

  5. PI3K-Akt/PKB signaling pathway in neutrophils and mononuclear cells exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jablonska, Ewa; Garley, Marzena; Jablonski, Jakub; Radziwon, Piotr; Iwaniuk, Agnieszka; Grubczak, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMN) play diverse regulatory and effector functions in the immune system through the release of reactive nitrogen species, including nitric oxide (NO). The enzyme responsible for NO synthesis in PMN is inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) that is regulated by various signaling pathways, e.g. PI3K-Akt/PKB, and transcription factors. N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a xenobiotic widespread in the human environment, affects immune cells. The study objective here was to examine the role of the PI3K-Akt/PKB pathway in induction of NO synthesis (with involvement of iNOS) in human PMN, as well as in autologous mononuclear cells (PBMC), exposed to NDMA. Isolated cells were incubated for 2 h with a sub-lethal dose of NDMA and then the expression of several select proteins in the cell cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions were determined by Western blot analyses. The results indicated that NDMA enhanced expression of iNOS, phospho-PI3K, and phospho-IκBα in the cytoplasmic fraction of the PMN and PBMC. The nuclear fraction of these cells also had a higher NF-κB expression. Moreover, in PMN, NDMA caused an increased expression of phospho-Akt (T308), phospho-Akt (S473), and phospho-IKKαβ in the cytoplasm, and c-Jun and FosB in the nuclear fraction. Blocking of PI3K caused a decrease in expression of all these proteins in NDMA-exposed PMN. However, inhibition of PI3K led to a drop in expression of iNOS, phospho-PI3K, and phospho-IκBα in the cytoplasm, and in NF-κB in the nuclear fraction, of PBMC. The results of these studies indicated to us that NDMA activates the PI3K-Akt/PKB pathway in human PMN and that this, in turn, contributes to the activation of transcription factors NF-κB, c-Jun, and FosB involved in NO production (through modulation of iNOS expression).

  6. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect

    Katika, Madhumohan R.; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Shao, Jia; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  7. Influence of Steroids on Oxidant Generation in Activated Human Granulocytes and Mononuclear Leukocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    and hemorrhage- induced lung injury (31), and lung injury induced by hind limb ischemia (11). Administering scavengers of reactive oxygen species or...be altering protein synthesis. For PMNs, E2 or P4 had no effect on oxidants, whereas all hydro- cortisone concentrations showed a modest trend for...activated and non-activated MNCs (35). Similarly, activated macrophages derived from lungs or a macrophage cell line (J774) treated with pharmacological

  8. Single Dose Pharmacokinetics of Oral Tenofovir in Plasma, Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, Colonic Tissue, and Vaginal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Louissaint, Nicolette A.; Cao, Ying-Jun; Skipper, Paul L.; Liberman, Rosa G.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Anderson, Jean R.; Everts, Stephanie; Bakshi, Rahul; Fuchs, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract HIV seroconversion outcomes in preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trials of oral tenofovir (TFV)-containing regimens are highly sensitive to drug concentration, yet less-than-daily dosing regimens are under study. Description of TFV and its active moiety, TFV diphosphate (TFV-DP), in blood, vaginal tissue, and colon tissue may guide the design and interpretation of PrEP clinical trials. Six healthy women were administered a single oral dose of 300 mg tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and 4.3 mg (12.31 MBq, 333 μCi) 14C-TDF slurry. Blood was collected every 4 h for the first 24 h, then at 4, 8, 11, and 15 days postdosing. Colonic and vaginal samples (tissue, total and CD4+ cells, luminal fluid and cells) were collected 1, 8 and 15 days postdose. Samples were analyzed for TFV and TFV-DP. Plasma TFV demonstrated triphasic decay with terminal elimination half-life median [interquartile range (IQR)] 69 h (58–77). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) TFV-DP demonstrated biphasic peaks (median 12 h and 96 h) followed by a terminal 48 h (38–76) half-life; Cmax was 20 fmol/million cells (2–63). One day postdose, the TFV-DP paired colon:vaginal tissue concentration ratio was 1 or greater in all subjects' tissue homogenates, median 124 (range 1–281), but was not sustained. The ratio was lower and more variable in cells extracted from tissue. Among all sample types, TFV and TFV-DP half-life ranged from 23 to 139 h. PBMC TFV-DP rose slowly in the hours after dosing indicating that success with exposure-driven dosing regimens may be sensitive to timing of the dose prior to exposure. Colonic tissue homogenate TFV-DP concentrations were greater than in vaginal homogenate at 24 h, but not in cells extracted from tissue. These and the other pharmacokinetic findings will guide the interpretation and design of future PrEP trials. PMID:23600365

  9. Hyaluronan mediates the adhesion of porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells to poly (I:C)-treated intestinal cells and modulates their cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Docampo, María José; Cabrera, Jennifer; Bassols, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), has been increasingly recognized as a regulator of inflammation. Its role is complex since it has pro- and anti-inflammatory actions by modulating the expression of inflammatory genes, the recruitment of inflammatory cells and the production of inflammatory cytokines, but also by attenuating the course of inflammation and providing protection against tissue damage. Certain viruses and other inflammatory stimuli induce organization of HA into cable-like structures, which may be responsible for leukocyte recruitment and, on the other hand, low molecular weight fragments of HA have been shown to activate various inflammatory responses. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of a simulated infection with the viral mimetic Poly (I:C) on HA deposition on different porcine intestinal cells (primary colonic muscular smooth muscle cells (SMC), and epithelial IPEC-J2 and IPI-2I cell lines) and on the recruitment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to intestinal cell layers. We show that Poly (I:C) treatment induces the formation of an HA-based pericellular matrix coat in muscular SMC and in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and that, on differentiated IPEC-J2 cells, HA accumulates in the basolateral membrane. Porcine PBMCs bind to Poly (I:C)-treated cells and this binding is dependent on HA, since the increase in adhesion is abolished by hyaluronidase treatment of the cell layers. A second goal was to study the effect of different molecular weight HA forms on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-8) by porcine PBMCs. Low molecular weight HA fragments (100-150kDa), in contrast to high molecular weight HA (2500kDa), stimulate the release of these pro-inflammatory mediators by porcine PBMCs. Our results suggest that HA is involved in the inflammatory response against pathogenic insults to the porcine gut.

  10. Reactivity of mononuclear alkylperoxo copper(II) complex. O-O bond cleavage and C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Kunishita, Atsushi; Ishimaru, Hirohito; Nakashima, Satoru; Ogura, Takashi; Itoh, Shinobu

    2008-04-02

    A detailed reactivity study has been carried out for the first time on a new mononuclear alkylperoxo copper(II) complex, which is generated by the reaction of copper(II) complex supported by the bis(pyridylmethyl)amine tridentate ligand containing a phenyl group at the 6-position of the pyridine donor groups and cumene hydroperoxide (CmOOH) in CH3CN. The cumylperoxo copper(II) complex thus obtained has been found to undergo homolytic cleavage of the O-O bond and induce C-H bond activation of exogenous substrates, providing important insights into the catalytic mechanism of copper monooxygenases.

  11. Effect of 900 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation on the Induction of ROS in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, E.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Ali-Ghanbari, A.; Sharifzadeh, S.; Ranjbaran, R.; Mostafavi-pour, Z.; Zal, F.; Haghani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite numerous studies over a decade, it still remains controversial about the biological effects of RF EMF emitted by mobile phone telephony. Objective Here we investigated the effect of 900 MHz GSM on the induction of oxidative stress and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes as defence system cells. Method 6 ml Peripheral Blood samples were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers (21-30 year-old). Each sample was devided into 2 groups: one was exposed RF radiation emitted from a mobile phone simulator for 2 hour and the other used as control group which was not exposed to any fields. After that, mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood by density gradient centrifugation in Ficoll-Paque. The intracellular ROS content in monocytes and lymphocytes was measured by the CM-H2DCFDA fluorescence probe using flowcytometry technique. Results Our results showed significant increase in  ROS production after exposure in population rich in monocytes. This effect was not significant in population rich in lymphocytes in comparison with non exposed cells. Conclusion The results obtained in this study clearly showed the oxidative stress induction capability of RF electromagnetic field in the portion of PBMCs mostly in monocytes, like the case of exposure to micro organisms, although the advantages or disadvantages of this effect should be evaluated. PMID:26396966

  12. Concise Review: Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for the Treatment of Ischemic Syndromes: Medicinal Product or Cell Transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Laura; Herrera, Concha

    2012-01-01

    In November of 2011, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) published two scientific recommendations regarding the classification of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and autologous bone marrow-derived CD133+ cells as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), specifically tissue-engineered products, when intended for regeneration in ischemic heart tissue on the basis that they are not used for the same essential function (hematological restoration) that they fulfill in the donor. In vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that bone marrow cells are physiologically involved in adult neovascularization and tissue repair, making their therapeutic use for these purposes a simple exploitation of their own essential functions. Therefore, from a scientific/legal point of view, nonsubstantially manipulated BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells are not an ATMP, because they have a physiological role in the processes of postnatal neovascularization and, when used therapeutically for vascular restoration in ischemic tissues, they are carrying out one of their essential physiological functions (the legal definition recognizes that cells can have several essential functions). The consequences of classifying BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells as medicinal products instead of cellular transplantation, like bone marrow transplantation, in terms of costs and time for these products to be introduced into clinical practice, make this an issue of crucial importance. Therefore, the recommendations of EMA/CAT could be reviewed in collaboration with scientific societies, in light of organizational and economic consequences as well as scientific knowledge recently acquired about the mechanisms of postnatal neovascularization and the function of bone marrow in the regeneration of remote tissues. PMID:23197819

  13. Concise review: bone marrow mononuclear cells for the treatment of ischemic syndromes: medicinal product or cell transplantation?

    PubMed

    Cuende, Natividad; Rico, Laura; Herrera, Concha

    2012-05-01

    In November of 2011, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) published two scientific recommendations regarding the classification of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and autologous bone marrow-derived CD133+ cells as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), specifically tissue-engineered products, when intended for regeneration in ischemic heart tissue on the basis that they are not used for the same essential function (hematological restoration) that they fulfill in the donor. In vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that bone marrow cells are physiologically involved in adult neovascularization and tissue repair, making their therapeutic use for these purposes a simple exploitation of their own essential functions. Therefore, from a scientific/legal point of view, nonsubstantially manipulated BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells are not an ATMP, because they have a physiological role in the processes of postnatal neovascularization and, when used therapeutically for vascular restoration in ischemic tissues, they are carrying out one of their essential physiological functions (the legal definition recognizes that cells can have several essential functions). The consequences of classifying BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells as medicinal products instead of cellular transplantation, like bone marrow transplantation, in terms of costs and time for these products to be introduced into clinical practice, make this an issue of crucial importance. Therefore, the recommendations of EMA/CAT could be reviewed in collaboration with scientific societies, in light of organizational and economic consequences as well as scientific knowledge recently acquired about the mechanisms of postnatal neovascularization and the function of bone marrow in the regeneration of remote tissues.

  14. Microarray profiling of mononuclear peripheral blood cells identifies novel candidate genes related to chemoradiation response in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Palma, Pablo; Cuadros, Marta; Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Olmedo, Carmen; Cano, Carlos; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Blanco, Armando; Bueno, Pablo; Ferrón, J Antonio; Medina, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation significantly improves oncological outcome in locally advanced rectal cancer. However there is no effective method of predicting tumor response to chemoradiation in these patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells have emerged recently as pathology markers of cancer and other diseases, making possible their use as therapy predictors. Furthermore, the importance of the immune response in radiosensivity of solid organs led us to hypothesized that microarray gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells could identify patients with response to chemoradiation in rectal cancer. Thirty five 35 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were recruited initially to perform the study. Peripheral blood samples were obtained before neaodjuvant treatment. RNA was extracted and purified to obtain cDNA and cRNA for hybridization of microarrays included in Human WG CodeLink bioarrays. Quantitative real time PCR was used to validate microarray experiment data. Results were correlated with pathological response, according to Mandard´s criteria and final UICC Stage (patients with tumor regression grade 1-2 and downstaging being defined as responders and patients with grade 3-5 and no downstaging as non-responders). Twenty seven out of 35 patients were finally included in the study. We performed a multiple t-test using Significance Analysis of Microarrays, to find those genes differing significantly in expression, between responders (n = 11) and non-responders (n = 16) to CRT. The differently expressed genes were: BC 035656.1, CIR, PRDM2, CAPG, FALZ, HLA-DPB2, NUPL2, and ZFP36. The measurement of FALZ (p = 0.029) gene expression level determined by qRT-PCR, showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. Gene expression profiling reveals novel genes in peripheral blood samples of mononuclear cells that could predict responders and non-responders to chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced

  15. [Enrichment of extracellular DNA from the cultivation medium of human peripheral blood mononuclears with genomic CpG rich fragments results in increased cell production of IL-6 and TNF-a via activation of the NF-kB signaling pathway].

    PubMed

    Speranskii, A I; Kostyuk, S V; Kalashnikova, E A; Veiko, N N

    2016-03-01

    Previously, it was found that blood plasma extracellular DNA (ecDNA) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is enriched with CpG-rich genomic DNA fragments, which contain TLR9 ligands (Veiko et al., 2006). In this study we have demonstrated that ecDNA of a RA patient and model fragments added to a cultivation medium of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy donors stimulate expression of genes for the TLR9-MyD88-NF-kB signaling pathway; this leads to a significant increase in concentrations of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-a in the cultivation medium. Human genomic DNA non-enriched with the CpG sequences did not stimulate IL-6 and TNF-a synthesis in PBMC. A scheme explaining the potential role ecDNA in the induction and maintenance of increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokines under conditions damaging the human cells has been proposed.

  16. The effect of acute exercise on GLUT4 levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of sled dogs.

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Theresia M; Reynolds, Arleigh J; Komac, Alyssa M; Duffy, Lawrence K; Dunlap, Kriya L

    2015-07-01

    Using sled dogs as exercise model, our objectives of this study were to 1) assess the effects of one acute bout of high-intensity exercise on surface GLUT4 concentrations on easily accessible peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and 2) compare our findings with published research on exercise induced GLUT4 in skeletal muscle. During the exercise bout, dogs ran 5 miles at approximately 90% of VO2 max. PMBC were collected before exercise (baseline), immediately after exercise and after 24h recovery.GLUT4 was measured via ELISA. Acute exercise resulted in a significant increase on surface GLUT4 content on PBMC. GLUT4 was increased significantly immediately after exercise (~ 50%; p<0.05) and reduced slightly by 24h post-exercise as compared to baseline (~ 22%; p>0.05). An effect of acute exercise on GLUT4 levels translocated to the cell membrane was observed, with GLUT4 levels not yet returned to baseline after 24h post-exercise. In conclusion, the present investigation demonstrated that acute high-intensity exercise increased GLUT4 content at the surface of PBMC of sled dogs as it has been reported in skeletal muscle in other species. Our findings underline the potential use of peripheral blood mononuclear cell GLUT4 protein content as minimally invasive proxy to investigate relationships between insulin sensitivity, insulin resistance, GLUT4 expression and glucose metabolism.

  17. Olive oil and its phenolic constituent tyrosol attenuates dioxin-induced toxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells via an antioxidant-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvan, Ilavarasi; Dicson, Sheeja Malar; Kasi, Pandima Devi

    2015-01-01

    Olive oil (OO) and its phenolic compounds are reported to possess many potential biological effects, which are ascribed to its powerful antioxidant property. In this study, we have assessed whether OO and its phenolic compound tyrosol (TY) could mitigate 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced oxidative damages in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The results showed that exposure of PBMC to 10 nM TCDD caused significant cell death and elevated cellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. Comet assay indicated that OO and TY protected DNA damage against dioxin toxicity. In addition, alterations in levels of antioxidant enzymes were substantially prevented by OO and TY. TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were significantly reduced by the administration of OO and TY. The results suggested that dietary modifications incorporating diets rich in OO and associated phenolics could prove beneficial in protecting individuals against toxicity induced by dioxins.

  18. Induction by toxic-shock-syndrome toxin-1 of a circulating tumor necrosis factor-like substance in rabbits and of immunoreactive tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 from human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ikejima, T; Okusawa, S; van der Meer, J W; Dinarello, C A

    1988-11-01

    A shock-like syndrome was induced in rabbits by administering toxic-shock-syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1); tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like activity was detected in sera of rabbits 3.5 h after injection, as measured by cytotoxic effects on the tumorigenic L929 murine fibroblast cell line. Appearance of this activity in sera coincided with onset of significant shock-related hemodynamic changes. TSST-1 stimulated release of TNF-like material from rabbit mononuclear cells in culture. Human mononuclear cells also secreted a cytotoxic substance shown to be TNF by radioimmunoassay. Maximal TNF secretion was higher in human mononuclear cells stimulated with TSST-1 than in those stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Lipopolysaccharide, however, was a more potent inducer of interleukin-1 alpha and interleukin-1 beta from the same cells than was TSST-1. Because TNF and interleukin-1 act synergistically during induction of a shock-like state, these results suggest that part of the TSST-1-induced shock is due to production of interleukin-1 and TNF.

  19. Mitigation of variation observed in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) based HIV-1 neutralization assay by donor cell pooling.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Lindsay; Brown, Bruce K; Delsarto Macedo, Camila; Wesberry-Schmierer, Maggie; Ngauy, Viseth; Rosa Borges, Andrew; Michael, Nelson L; Marovich, Mary A; Montefiori, David C; Polonis, Victoria R

    2013-12-01

    Cultured primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) represent a potentially physiologic in vitro model of HIV-1 infection, but assessment of antibody-mediated HIV-1 neutralization using PBMC has been hindered by donor variability and lack of a sustainable individual PBMC source. To advance this model for HIV vaccine evaluation, intra- and inter-assay variability were assessed using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies and PBMC targets from multiple HIV-seronegative donors. Inter-assay variability was introduced by using different PBMC for virus propagation, and more substantially, for assay targets. Neutralization titers varied by as much as 4 logs when using different individual donor PBMC as targets; variability was antibody-specific, with the greatest variation observed using an individual polyclonal plasma. Pooling of multiple PBMC donors significantly reduced median inter-assay variation to the level of intra-assay variation, suggesting a pathway forward for establishing a uniform, sustainable and standardized approach to the assessment of antibody function using a PBMC model.

  20. Chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells for 30 mm goat peroneal nerve defect

    PubMed Central

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Chen, Lin; Wang, Xiyuan; Wei, Yujun; Gong, Kai; Ao, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    In the current research, to find if the combination of chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) can be used to bridge 30 mm long peroneal nerve defects in goats, 15 animals were separated into BM-MNC group (n = 5), vehicle group (n = 5), and autologous nerve graft group (n = 5). 12 months after the surgery, animals were evaluated by behavioral observation, magnetic resonance imaging tests, histomorphological and electrophysiological analysis. Results revealed that animals in BM-MNC group and autologous nerve graft group achieved fine functional recovery; magnetic resonance imaging tests and histomorphometry analysis showed that the nerve defect was bridged by myelinated nerve axons in those animals. No significant difference was found between the two groups concerning myelinated axon density, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness and peroneal nerve action potential. Animals in vehicle group failed to achieve significant functional recovery. The results indicated that chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells have strong potential in bridging long peripheral nerve defects and could be applied in future clinical trials. PMID:28287100

  1. Chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells for 30 mm goat peroneal nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Chen, Lin; Wang, Xiyuan; Wei, Yujun; Gong, Kai; Ao, Qiang

    2017-03-13

    In the current research, to find if the combination of chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) can be used to bridge 30 mm long peroneal nerve defects in goats, 15 animals were separated into BM-MNC group (n = 5), vehicle group (n = 5), and autologous nerve graft group (n = 5). 12 months after the surgery, animals were evaluated by behavioral observation, magnetic resonance imaging tests, histomorphological and electrophysiological analysis. Results revealed that animals in BM-MNC group and autologous nerve graft group achieved fine functional recovery; magnetic resonance imaging tests and histomorphometry analysis showed that the nerve defect was bridged by myelinated nerve axons in those animals. No significant difference was found between the two groups concerning myelinated axon density, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness and peroneal nerve action potential. Animals in vehicle group failed to achieve significant functional recovery. The results indicated that chitosan nerve conduits seeded with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells have strong potential in bridging long peripheral nerve defects and could be applied in future clinical trials.

  2. Mononuclear Phagocyte-Derived Microparticulate Caspase-1 Induces Pulmonary Vascular Endothelial Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Srabani

    2015-01-01

    Lung endothelial cell apoptosis and injury occurs throughout all stages of acute lung injury (ALI/ARDS) and impacts disease progression. Lung endothelial injury has traditionally been focused on the role of neutrophil trafficking to lung vascular integrin receptors induced by proinflammatory cytokine expression. Although much is known about the pathogenesis of cell injury and death in ALI/ARDS, gaps remain in our knowledge; as a result of which there is currently no effective pharmacologic therapy. Enzymes known as caspases are essential for completion of the apoptotic program and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that caspase-1 may serve as a key regulator of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) apoptosis in ALI/ARDS. Our recent experiments confirm that microparticles released from stimulated monocytic cells (THP1) induce lung endothelial cell apoptosis. Microparticles pretreated with the caspase-1 inhibitor, YVAD, or pan-caspase inhibitor, ZVAD, were unable to induce cell death of HPMVEC, suggesting the role of caspase-1 or its substrate in the induction of HPMVEC cell death. Neither un-induced microparticles (control) nor direct treatment with LPS induced apoptosis of HPMVEC. Further experiments showed that caspase-1 uptake into HPMVEC and the induction of HPMVEC apoptosis was facilitated by caspase-1 interactions with microparticulate vesicles. Altering vesicle integrity completely abrogated apoptosis of HPMVEC suggesting an encapsulation requirement for target cell uptake of active caspase-1. Taken together, we confirm that microparticle centered caspase-1 can play a regulator role in endothelial cell injury. PMID:26710067

  3. Induction of RET Dependent and Independent Pro-Inflammatory Programs in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Hirschsprung Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rusmini, Marta; Griseri, Paola; Lantieri, Francesca; Matera, Ivana; Hudspeth, Kelly L.; Roberto, Alessandra; Mikulak, Joanna; Avanzini, Stefano; Rossi, Valentina; Mattioli, Girolamo; Jasonni, Vincenzo; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Pavan, William J.; Pini-Prato, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by the absence of enteric ganglia in the distal intestinal tract. While classified as a multigenic disorder, the altered function of the RET tyrosine kinase receptor is responsible for the majority of the pathogenesis of HSCR. Recent evidence demonstrate a strong association between RET and the homeostasis of immune system. Here, we utilize a unique cohort of fifty HSCR patients to fully characterize the expression of RET receptor on both innate (monocytes and Natural Killer lymphocytes) and adaptive (B and T lymphocytes) human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and to explore the role of RET signaling in the immune system. We show that the increased expression of RET receptor on immune cell subsets from HSCR individuals correlates with the presence of loss-of-function RET mutations. Moreover, we demonstrate that the engagement of RET on PBMCs induces the modulation of several inflammatory genes. In particular, RET stimulation with glial-cell line derived neurotrophic factor family (GDNF) and glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol membrane anchored co-receptor α1 (GFRα1) trigger the up-modulation of genes encoding either for chemokines (CCL20, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL7, CXCL1) and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8) and the down-regulation of chemokine/cytokine receptors (CCR2 and IL8-Rα). Although at different levels, the modulation of these “RET-dependent genes” occurs in both healthy donors and HSCR patients. We also describe another set of genes that, independently from RET stimulation, are differently regulated in healthy donors versus HSCR patients. Among these “RET-independent genes”, there are CSF-1R, IL1-R1, IL1-R2 and TGFβ-1, whose levels of transcripts were lower in HSCR patients compared to healthy donors, thus suggesting aberrancies of inflammatory responses at mucosal level. Overall our results demonstrate that immune system actively participates in the physiopathology of

  4. Levels and values of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, soluble angiogenic factors, and mononuclear cell apoptosis in liver cirrhosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The roles of circulating endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) and mononuclear cell apoptosis (MCA) in liver cirrhosis (LC) patients are unknown. Moreover, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α are powerful endogenous substances enhancing EPC migration into circulation. We assessed the level and function of EPCs [CD31/CD34 (E1), KDR/CD34 (E2), CXCR4/CD34 (E3)], levels of MCA, VEGF and SDF-1α in circulation of LC patients. Methods Blood sample was prospectively collected once for assessing EPC level and function, MCA, and plasma levels of VEGF and SDF-1α using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively, in 78 LC patients and 25 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Results Number of EPCs (E1, E2, E3) was lower (all p < 0.0001), whereas SDF-1α level and MCA were higher (p < 0.001) in study patients compared with healthy controls. Number of EPCs (E2, E3) was higher but MCA was lower (all p < 0.05) in Child's class A compared with Child's class B and C patients, although no difference in VEGF and SDF-1α levels were noted among these patients. Chronic hepatitis B and esophageal varices bleeding were independently, whereas chronic hepatitis C, elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and decompensated LC were inversely and independently correlated with circulating EPC level (all p < 0.03). Additionally, angiogenesis and transwell migratory ability of EPCs were reduced in LC patients than in controls (all p < 0.001). Conclusion The results of this study demonstrated that level, angiogenic capacity, and function of circulating EPCs were significantly reduced, whereas plasma levels of SDF-1α and circulating MCA were substantially enhanced in cirrhotic patients. PMID:22809449

  5. Oxidative DNA damage is prevented by extracts of olive oil, hydroxytyrosol, and other olive phenolic compounds in human blood mononuclear cells and HL60 cells.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Roberto; Rosignoli, Patrizia; De Bartolomeo, Angelo; Fuccelli, Raffaela; Servili, Maurizio; Montedoro, Gian Francesco; Morozzi, Guido

    2008-08-01

    Our aim in this study was to provide further support to the hypothesis that phenolic compounds may play an important role in the anticarcinogenic properties of olive oil. We measured the effect of olive oil phenols on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL60) using single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Hydroxytyrosol [3,4-dyhydroxyphenyl-ethanol (3,4-DHPEA)] and a complex mixture of phenols extracted from both virgin olive oil (OO-PE) and olive mill wastewater (WW-PE) reduced the DNA damage at concentrations as low as 1 micromol/L when coincubated in the medium with H(2)O(2) (40 micromol/L). At 10 micromol/L 3,4-DHPEA, the protection was 93% in HL60 and 89% in PBMC. A similar protective activity was also shown by the dialdehydic form of elenoic acid linked to hydroxytyrosol (3,4-DHPEA-EDA) on both kinds of cells. Other purified compounds such as isomer of oleuropein aglycon (3,4-DHPEA-EA), oleuropein, tyrosol, [p-hydroxyphenyl-ethanol (p-HPEA)] the dialdehydic form of elenoic acid linked to tyrosol, caffeic acid, and verbascoside also protected the cells against H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage although with a lower efficacy (range of protection, 25-75%). On the other hand, when tested in a model system in which the oxidative stress was induced by phorbole 12-myristate 13-acetate-activated monocytes, p-HPEA was more effective than 3,4-DHPEA in preventing the oxidative DNA damage. Overall, these results suggest that OO-PE and WW-PE may efficiently prevent the initiation step of carcinogenesis in vivo, because the concentrations effective against the oxidative DNA damage could be easily reached with normal intake of olive oil.

  6. Flavin fluorescence lifetime imaging of living peripheral blood mononuclear cells on micro and nano-structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplicky, T.; Horilova, J.; Bruncko, J.; Gladine, C.; Lajdova, I.; Mateasik, A.; Chorvat, D.; Marcek Chorvatova, A.

    2015-03-01

    Fabricated micro- and nano-structured surfaces were evaluated for use with living cells. Metabolic state was tested by means of endogenous flavin fluorescence of living peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) positioned on a coverslip, non-covered, or covered with micro- or nano-structured surfaces (OrmoComp polymer structures produced by 2-photon photopolymerisation, or Zinc Oxide (ZnO) layer fabricated by pulsed laser deposition). Confocal microscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) were employed to gather flavin fluorescence lifetime images of living PBMC on structured surfaces. Gathered data are the first step towards monitoring of the live cell interaction with different micro/nano-structured surfaces and thus evaluate their potential applicability in the biomedical field.

  7. Coxiella burnetii stimulates production of RANTES and MCP-1 by mononuclear cells: modulation by adhesion to endothelial cells and its implication in Q fever.

    PubMed

    Meghari, Soraya; Desnues, Benoît; Capo, Christian; Grau, Georges E; Raoult, Didier; Mege, Jean-Louis

    2006-12-01

    Q fever is an infectious disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, which may become chronic when cytokine network and cell-mediated immune responses are altered. Chemokines, such as Regulated upon Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES, CCL5) and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1, CCL2), are specialized in the trafficing of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and are associated with T cell polarization that is essential for intracellular survival of C. burnetii. The present study investigated whether or not the infection status (no infection and acute or chronic infection with C. burnetii) of donors, affected the production of the two chemokines by PBMC with or without stimulation with virulent and avirulent C. burnetii. Our findings indicate that in vitro exposure to virulent or avirulent C. burnetii stimulated the production of RANTES and MCP-1 in PBMC obtained from healthy adults. The co-cultivation of endothelial cells and human PBMC resulted in an increased production of MCP-1 and the up-regulation of RANTES, which were contact-dependent. Unstimulated PBMC from patients with acute or chronic Q fever overproduced MCP-1. Interestingly, the addition of C. burnetii resulted in an increased production of RANTES and MCP-1 by PBMC obtained from patients with chronic Q fever, and the co-cultivation of PBMC with endothelial cells amplified increased production of chemokines. Circulating levels of RANTES and MCP-1 were also increased in chronic Q fever. We suggest that the overproduction of RANTES and MCP-1 secondary to the contact of PBMC with endothelium may perpetuate exaggerated inflammatory responses leading to inappropriate PBMC trafficking and to the pathogenesis of Q fever.

  8. Gene expression changes in mononuclear cells in patients with metabolic syndrome after acute intake of phenol-rich virgin olive oil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that acute intake of high-phenol virgin olive oil reduces pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant and pro-thrombotic markers compared with low phenols virgin olive oil, but it still remains unclear whether effects attributed to its phenolic fraction are exerted at transcriptional level in vivo. To achieve this goal, we aimed at identifying expression changes in genes which could be mediated by virgin olive oil phenol compounds in the human. Results Postprandial gene expression microarray analysis was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells during postprandial period. Two virgin olive oil-based breakfasts with high (398 ppm) and low (70 ppm) content of phenolic compounds were administered to 20 patients suffering from metabolic syndrome following a double-blinded, randomized, crossover design. To eliminate the potential effect that might exist in their usual dietary habits, all subjects followed a similar low-fat, carbohydrate rich diet during the study period. Microarray analysis identified 98 differentially expressed genes (79 underexpressed and 19 overexpressed) when comparing the intake of phenol-rich olive oil with low-phenol olive oil. Many of these genes seem linked to obesity, dyslipemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Among these, several genes seem involved in inflammatory processes mediated by transcription factor NF-κB, activator protein-1 transcription factor complex AP-1, cytokines, mitogen-activated protein kinases MAPKs or arachidonic acid pathways. Conclusion This study shows that intake of virgin olive oil based breakfast, which is rich in phenol compounds is able to repress in vivo expression of several pro-inflammatory genes, thereby switching activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a less deleterious inflammatory profile. These results provide at least a partial molecular basis for reduced risk of cardiovascular disease observed in Mediterranean countries, where virgin olive oil represents a main

  9. Lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and E. coli nissle induce pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Helwig, Ulf; Lammers, Karen M; Rizzello, Fernando; Brigidi, Patricia; Rohleder, Verena; Caramelli, Elisabetta; Gionchetti, Paolo; Schrezenmeir, Juergen; Foelsch, Ulrich R; Schreiber, Stefan; Campieri, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) with the cell debris and cell extraction of different probiotic strains is similar or species specific. METHODS: Three strains of bifidobacteria, 4 strains of lactobacilli, and E. coli nissle were sonicated and centrifuged in order to divide them into cell extract and cell debris. PBMNC were separated by density gradient and incubated for 36 h with either the cell debris or the cell extract of single strains of probiotic bacteria in doses from 102 to 108 CFU/mL. Cell supernatants were taken and interleukin (IL)-10, IL-1β, and tumor necosis factor (TNF)-α were determined by ELISA. RESULTS: Depending on the species super-family, the strains had different stimulation patterns. Except for both L. casei strains, the cell extract of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli had less stimulating capacity than cell debris, whereas the cell extract of E. coli nissle had similar stimulating properties to that of the cell debris of the strain and significantly more stimulating capacity than that of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. The cell debris of bifidobacteria stimulated more cytokine release than the cell debris of lactobacilli. The cell debris of lactobacilli did not have a stimulating capacity when lower concentrations were used. Neither cell extraction nor cell debris had an inhibitory effect on the production of the tested cytokines by stimulated PBMNC. CONCLUSION: The incubation of probiotic strains, which have been used in clinical trials for inflammatory diseases, with immunocompetent cells leads to different species specific reactions. High IL-10 response to cell debris of bifidobacteria and E. coli nissle can be found. This corresponds to positive effects of bifidobacteria and E. coli nissle in clinical trials for inflammatory bowel disease compared to negative outcomes obtained with lactobacilli. PMID:17009396

  10. Gene expression profiles in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as biomarkers for nutritional in vitro and in vivo investigations

    PubMed Central

    Klenow, Stefanie; Borowicki, Anke; Gill, Chris I. R.; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice L.; Glei, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Identification of chemopreventive substances may be achieved by measuring biological endpoints in human cells in vitro. Since generally only tumour cells are available for such investigations, our aim was to test the applicability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as an in vitro primary cell model since they mimic the human in vivo situation and are relatively easily available. Cell culture conditions were refined, and the basal variation of gene expression related to drug metabolism and stress response was determined. Results were compared with profiles of an established human colon cell line (HT29) as standard. For biomarker development of nutritional effects, PBMC and HT29 cells were treated with potentially chemopreventive substances (chrysin and butyrate), and gene expression was determined. Key results were that relevant stress response genes, such as glutathione S-transferase T2 (GSTT2) and GSTM2, were modulated by butyrate in PBMC as in HT29 cells, but the blood cells were less sensitive and responded with high individual differences. We conclude that these cells may serve as a surrogate tissue in dietary investigations and the identified differentially expressed genes have the potential to become marker genes for population studies on biological effects. PMID:21189867

  11. Epstein-Barr Virus Encoded dUTPase Containing Exosomes Modulate Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses in Human Dendritic Cells and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Rivailler, Pierre; Glaser, Ronald; Chen, Min; Williams, Marshall V.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) modulates innate immunity in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages through toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 leading to NF-κB activation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our previous depletion studies indicated that dendritic cells (DCs) may also be a target of the EBV-encoded dUTPase. However, the role of EBV-encoded dUTPase in DC activation/function and its potential contribution to the inflammatory cellular milieu characteristic of EBV-associated diseases remains poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that EBV-encoded dUTPase significantly altered the expression of genes involved in oncogenesis, inflammation and viral defense mechanisms in human primary DCs by microarray analysis. Proteome array studies revealed that EBV-encoded dUTPase modulates DC immune responses by inducing the secretion of pro-inflammatory TH1/TH17 cytokines. More importantly, we demonstrate that EBV-encoded dUTPase is secreted in exosomes from chemically induced Raji cells at sufficient levels to induce NF-κB activation and cytokine secretion in primary DCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Interestingly, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in DCs and PBMCs was TLR2-dependent. Together these findings suggest that the EBV-encoded dUTPase may act as an intercellular signaling molecule capable of modulating the cellular microenvironment and thus, it may be important in the pathophysiology of EBV related diseases. PMID:23894549

  12. Epstein-Barr virus encoded dUTPase containing exosomes modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in human dendritic cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Rivailler, Pierre; Glaser, Ronald; Chen, Min; Williams, Marshall V

    2013-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) modulates innate immunity in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages through toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 leading to NF-κB activation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our previous depletion studies indicated that dendritic cells (DCs) may also be a target of the EBV-encoded dUTPase. However, the role of EBV-encoded dUTPase in DC activation/function and its potential contribution to the inflammatory cellular milieu characteristic of EBV-associated diseases remains poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that EBV-encoded dUTPase significantly altered the expression of genes involved in oncogenesis, inflammation and viral defense mechanisms in human primary DCs by microarray analysis. Proteome array studies revealed that EBV-encoded dUTPase modulates DC immune responses by inducing the secretion of pro-inflammatory TH1/TH17 cytokines. More importantly, we demonstrate that EBV-encoded dUTPase is secreted in exosomes from chemically induced Raji cells at sufficient levels to induce NF-κB activation and cytokine secretion in primary DCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Interestingly, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in DCs and PBMCs was TLR2-dependent. Together these findings suggest that the EBV-encoded dUTPase may act as an intercellular signaling molecule capable of modulating the cellular microenvironment and thus, it may be important in the pathophysiology of EBV related diseases.

  13. West Nile Virus Challenge Alters the Transcription Profiles of Innate Immune Genes in Rabbit Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Muhammad J; Suen, Willy W; Prow, Natalie A; Hall, Roy A; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2015-01-01

    The peripheral innate immune response to West Nile virus (WNV) is crucial for control of virus spread to the central nervous system. Therefore, transcriptomes encoding the innate immune response proteins against WNV were investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of New Zealand White rabbits, a recently established novel rabbit model for WNV pathogenesis studies. PBMCs were challenged with an Australian WNV strain, WNVNSW2011, in vitro, and mRNA expression of selected immune response genes were quantified at 2-, 6-, 12-, and 24-h post-infection (pi) using qRT-PCR. Compared to mock-inoculated PBMCs, WNV-stimulated PBMCs expressed high levels of interferon (IFN) alpha (IFNA), gamma (IFNG), IL6, IL12, IL22, CXCL10, and pentraxin 3 (PTX3) mRNA. Likewise, TLR1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 10 mRNA became up-regulated with the highest expression seen for TLR3, 4, and 6. TLRs-signaling downstream genes (MyD88, STAT1, TRAF3, IRF7, and IRF9) subsequently became up-regulated. The high expression of IFNs, TLR3, TLR4, TRAF3, STAT1, IRF7, and IRF9 are in accordance with antiviral activities, while expression of TNFA, HO1, iNOS, caspase 3, and caspase 9 transcripts suggests the involvement of oxidative stress and apoptosis in WNV-stimulated rabbit PBMCs, respectively. The level of WNVNSW2011 RNA increased at 24-h pi in PBMCs challenged with virus in vitro compared to input virus. The expression dynamics of selected genes were validated in PBMCs from rabbits experimentally infected with WNV in vivo. Higher expression of IFNA, IFN beta (IFNB), IFNG, TNFA, IL6, IL22, PTX3, TLR3 and TLR4, IRF7, IRF9, STST1, TRAF3, caspase 3, and caspase 9 were seen in PBMCs from WNV-infected rabbits on day 3 post-intradermal virus inoculation compared to PBMCs from uninfected control rabbits. This study highlights the array of cytokines and TLRs involved in the host innate immune response to WNV in the rabbit leukocytes and suggests that these cells may be a useful in vitro model for WNV

  14. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Cultured in Normal and Hyperglycemic Media in Simulated Microgravity Using NASA Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales

    2003-01-01

    We sought answers to several questions this summer at NASA Johnson Space Center. Initial studies involved the in vitro culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear in cells in different conditioned culture media. Several human cancer clones were similarly studied to determine responses to aberrant glycosylation by the argon laser. The cells were grown at unit gravity in flasks and in simulated microgravity using NASA bioreactors. The cells in each instance were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell cycle analysis was acquired by staining nuclear DNA with propidium iodide. Responses to the laser stimulation was measured by observing autofluorescence emitted in the green and red spectra after stimulation. Extent of glycosylation correlated with the intensity of the laser stimulated auto-fluorescence. Our particular study was to detect and monitor aberrant glycosylation and its role in etiopathogenesis. Comparisons were made between cells known to be neoplastic and normal cell controls using the same Laser Induced Autofluorescence technique. Studies were begun after extensive literature searches on using the antigen presenting potential of dendritic cells to induce proliferation of antigen specific cytotoxic T-cells. The Sendai virus served as the antigen. Our goal is to generate sufficient numbers of such cells in the simulated microgravity environment for use in autologous transplants of virally infected individuals including those positive for hepatitis and HIV.

  15. Infusion of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Reduces Lung Fibrosis but Not Inflammation in the Late Stages of Murine Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Ventura, Túlio G.; de Oliveira, Helena D'Anunciação; Monção-Ribeiro, Leonardo C.; Gutfilen, Bianca; de Souza, Sergio A. L.; Rocco, Patrícia R. M.; Borojevic, Radovan; Morales, Marcelo M.; Takiya, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that infusion of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) in the late stages of silica-induced damage would reduce the remodelling process in a murine model of silicosis. C57BL/6 mice were assigned to 2 groups. In the SIL group, mice were instilled with a silica particle suspension intratracheally. Control (C) mice received saline under the same protocol. On the 40th day, some of the animals from both groups were killed. The others were treated with either saline or BMMCs (1×106cells) intravenously (C+BMMC and SIL+BMMC), and the mice were killed 70 days after the start of the protocol. In the mice in the SIL+BMMC group, collagen deposition, the presence of silica particles inside nodules, the presence of macrophages and cells reactive for inducible nitric oxide synthase were reduced. Lung parameters also improved. Beyond that, the total and differential cellularity of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, immunoexpression of transforming growth factor-β, the number of T regulatory cells and apoptosis were increased. However, the presence of male donor cells in lung tissue was not observed using GFP+ cells (40d) or Y chromosome DNA (70d). Therefore, BMMC therapy in the late stages of experimental silicosis improved lung function by diminishing fibrosis but inflammatory cells persisted, which could be related to expansion of T regulatory cells, responsible for the beneficial effects of cell therapy. PMID:25299237

  16. The expression of pluripotency genes and neuronal markers after neurodifferentiation in fibroblasts co-cultured with human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Marinowic, D R; Domingues, M F; Machado, D C; DaCosta, J C

    2015-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood is an attractive source of stem cells; however, it has a heterogeneous cell population with few mesenchymal stem cells. Cell reprogramming induced by different methodologies can confer pluripotency to differentiated adult cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reprogramming of fibroblasts and their subsequent neural differentiation after co-culture with umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells. Cells were obtained from four human umbilical cords. The mononuclear cells were cultured for 7 d and subsequently co-cultured with mouse fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells for 6 d. The pluripotency of the cells was evaluated by RT-PCR using primers specific for pluripotency marker genes. The pluripotency was also confirmed by adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. Neural differentiation of the reprogrammed cells was evaluated by immunofluorescence. All co-cultured cells showed adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity. After co-cultivation, cells expressed the pluripotency gene KLF4. Statistically significant differences in cell area, diameter, optical density, and fractal dimension were observed by confocal microscopy in the neurally differentiated cells. Contact in the form of co-cultivation of fibroblasts with umbilical cord blood mononuclear fraction for 6 d promoted the reprogramming of these cells, allowing the later induction of neural differentiation.

  17. Use of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells and cultured bone marrow stromal cells in dogs with orthopaedic lesions.

    PubMed

    Crovace, A; Favia, A; Lacitignola, L; Di Comite, M S; Staffieri, F; Francioso, E

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical application in veterinary orthopedics of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) and cultured bone marrow stromal cells (cBMSCs) for the treatment of some orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The authors carried out a clinical study on 14 dogs of different breed, age and size with the following lesions: 1 bone cyst of the glenoid rime; 2 nonunion of the tibia; 3 nonunion of the femur; 2 lengthening of the radius; 1 large bone defect of the distal radius;1 nonunion with carpus valgus; 4 Legg-Calvé-Perthés disease. In 9 cases the BMMCNs were used in combination with a three dimensional resorbable osteogenic scaffold the chemical composition and size of which facilitates the ingrowth of bone. In these cases the BMMNCs were suspended in an adequate amount of fibrin glue and then distribuited uniformly on a Tricalcium-Phosphate (TCP) scaffold onto which were also added some drops of thrombin. In 1 case of nonunion of the tibia and in 3 cases of Legg-Calvè-Perthés (LCP) disease the cultured BMSCs were used instead because of the small size of the dogs and of the little amount of aspirated bone marrow. X-ray examinations were performed immediately after the surgery. Clinical, ultrasounds and X-ray examinations were performed after 20 days and then every month. Until now the treated dogs have shown very good clinical and X-ray results. One of the objectives of the study was to use the BMMNCs in clinical application in orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The advantages of using the cells immediately after the bone marrow is collected, are that the surgery can be performed the same day, the cells do not need to be expanded in vitro, they preserve their osteogenic potential to form bone and promote the proper integration of the implant with the bone and lastly, the technique is easier and the costs are lower.

  18. Unravelling mononuclear phagocyte heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Frédéric; Gordon, Siamon; Hume, David A.; Mowat, Allan M.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2011-01-01

    When Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn first described dendritic cells (DCs) in 1973 it took many years to convince the immunology community that these cells were truly distinct from macrophages. Almost four decades later, the DC is regarded as the key initiator of adaptive immune responses; however, distinguishing DCs from macrophages still leads to confusion and debate in the field. Here, Nature Reviews Immunology asks five experts to discuss the issue of heterogeneity in the mononuclear phagocyte system and to give their opinion on the importance of defining these cells for future research. PMID:20467425

  19. Plasmodium and mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Mac-Daniel, Laura; Ménard, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria, initially multiplies inside liver cells and then in successive cycles inside erythrocytes, causing the symptoms of the disease. In this review, we discuss interactions between the extracellular and intracellular forms of the Plasmodium parasite and innate immune cells in the mammalian host, with a special emphasis on mononuclear phagocytes. We overview here what is known about the innate immune cells that interact with parasites, mechanisms used by the parasite to evade them, and the protective or detrimental contribution of these interactions on parasite progression through its life cycle and pathology in the host.

  20. Detection of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase mRNA in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Patients With Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chuanwu, Zhu; Feng, Qian; Ming, Li; Haiyan, Wang; Huan, Fang; Xiangrong, Luo; Xuehua, Zhang; Xiang, Zhu; Xiujuan, Shen; Ping, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Telomerase activity is closely associated with the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA; although it can be induced in hepatocytes during liver regeneration, its dynamic change in patients with liver failure has remained unclear. Objectives: We investigated the variation and significance of hTERT mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the patients with liver failure. Patients and Methods: In this clinical experimental study, 76 Chinese patients were enrolled in the study between 2010 and 2012. The level of PBMCs hTERT mRNA was detected by relative quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the samples taken before treatment and at seven-day intervals during a 28-day treatment period. The patients were divided into survivor and non-survivor groups according to the 3-months mortality after treatment. The dynamic variation of PBMCs hTERT mRNA was analyzed and its association with prognosis was assessed by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve. Results: The median level of PBMCs hTERT mRNA in survivors increased with treatment time and was significantly higher than the corresponding level in non-survivors after 14 days of treatment (P < 0.001). Subgroup analyses showed that the levels of PBMCs hTERT mRNA were remarkably higher in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure than in those with chronic liver failure (P < 0.05). In patients with the same clinical type of liver failure, the level was markedly higher in survivors than in non-survivors after 14 days of treatment (P < 0.05); however, the levels were not significantly different between subgroups with different clinical type but the same prognosis. The sensitivity and specificity of PBMCs hTERT mRNA was high in evaluating the prognosis at day 14 and became much higher at days 21 and 28 post treatment. The expression of PBMCs hTERT mRNA had high sensitivity and specificity in evaluating the prognosis as

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA detection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by polymerase chain reaction: enhanced sensitivity after mitogenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tetali, S K; Oyaizu, N; Paul, M; Pahwa, S

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether stimulus-induced up-regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) could enhance the diagnostic sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PBMC derived from 11 HIV-1-infected asymptomatic adults were cultured with a stimulus of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) plus phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) for 36 h prior to lysing the cells for PCR. In all 11 patients studied, the intensity of PCR-assisted HIV RNA amplification (RNA-PCR) performed on stimulated cells was significantly (p < 0.001) higher than that obtained on unstimulated cells. A comparison of conventional PCR-assisted DNA amplification (DNA-PCR) with that of RNA-PCR was made on seven patients. The sensitivity of DNA-PCR was also increased by prior stimulation of cells, although not to the same extent as was observed for RNA-PCR. The results of our study indicate that the sensitivity of PCR can be significantly enhanced by prior activation of cells with PHA and PMA.

  2. Transplanted bone marrow mononuclear cells and MSCs impart clinical benefit to children with osteogenesis imperfecta through different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Otsuru, Satoru; Gordon, Patricia L; Shimono, Kengo; Jethva, Reena; Marino, Roberta; Phillips, Charlotte L; Hofmann, Ted J; Veronesi, Elena; Dominici, Massimo; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2012-08-30

    Transplantation of whole bone marrow (BMT) as well as ex vivo-expanded mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) leads to striking clinical benefits in children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI); however, the underlying mechanism of these cell therapies has not been elucidated. Here, we show that non-(plastic)-adherent bone marrow cells (NABMCs) are more potent osteoprogenitors than MSCs in mice. Translating these findings to the clinic, a T cell-depleted marrow mononuclear cell boost (> 99.99% NABMC) given to children with OI who had previously undergone BMT resulted in marked growth acceleration in a subset of patients, unambiguously indicating the therapeutic potential of bone marrow cells for these patients. Then, in a murine model of OI, we demonstrated that as the donor NABMCs differentiate to osteoblasts, they contribute normal collagen to the bone matrix. In contrast, MSCs do not substantially engraft in bone, but secrete a soluble mediator that indirectly stimulates growth, data which provide the underlying mechanism of our prior clinical trial of MSC therapy for children with OI. Collectively, our data indicate that both NABMCs and MSCs constitute effective cell therapy for OI, but exert their clinical impact by different, complementary mechanisms. The study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00187018.

  3. Enhanced effects of combined bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang (TJ-41) and interleukin-18 on the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Tamura, R; Takahashi, H K; Xue, D; Kubo, S; Saito, S; Nishibori, M; Iwagaki, H; Tanaka, N

    2004-01-01

    Co-stimulatory molecules play important roles in immune responses. We investigated the effect of Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang (TJ-41) on the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), B7.1 and B7.2 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated by interleukin-18 (IL-18) using fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. TJ-41 increased IL-18-induced ICAM-1 and B7.2 expression, resulting in enhanced production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma. These results suggest that TJ-41 enhances IL-18-induced cell-mediated immunity and may enhance host defence mechanisms against pathogens.

  4. Asymptomatic individuals with high HDL-C levels overexpress ABCA1 and ABCG1 and present miR-33a dysregulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, D Z; Zago, V H S; Parra, E S; Avansini, S; Panzoldo, N B; Alexandre, F; Baracat, J; Nakandakare, E R; Quintão, E C R; de Faria, E C

    2015-10-01

    Considering the growing knowledge and perspectives on microRNAs (miRNAs) that control high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and metabolism, this study aimed at evaluating whether hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-128a are differentially expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from asymptomatic individuals with low and high HDL-C, as well as at investigating the potential relationships with ATP binding cassete transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression, cholesterol efflux capacity and other parameters related with reverse cholesterol transport. In addition, the associations with cardiovascular risk were investigated by carotid-intima media thickness (cIMT). Asymptomatic volunteers of both genders (n=51) were classified according to HDL-C (mg/dL) in hypoalphalipoproteinemics (hypo, HDL-C ≤3 9), hyperalphalipoproteinemics (hyper, HDL-C ≥ 68) and controls (CTL, HDL-C ≥ 40<68). cIMT, lipids, lipoproteins, HDL size and volume, C reactive protein and insulin were determined, as well as the activities of several proteins and enzymes related to HDL metabolism. In a subgroup of 19 volunteers the cellular cholesterol efflux and HDL composition were determined. Total RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells for relative quantification experiments. Hypo volunteers presented significantly higher levels of triglycerides, VLDL-C and insulin; in addition, HDL size and volume decreased when compared with CTL and hyper. Regarding gene expression analysis, the hyper group presented a decrease of 72% in hsa-miR-33a and higher mRNA expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 when compared with CTL. No significant differences in hsa-miR-128a expression, cholesterol efflux, cIMT or plaques were found. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the complex miRNA network, regulating cellular cholesterol homeostasis in humans and its clinical repercussions.

  5. Immunomodulation of Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang on in vitro granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, S T; Yang, S L; Hsieh, C C; Yang, M D; Wang, T F; Lin, J G

    2000-11-01

    Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang (BZYQT) is a Chinese medicine, and has been used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. At present, we still do not fully understand the effects of BZYQT on the cellular physiology. Present in vitro study demonstrated that BZYQT is capable of increasing granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in healthy volunteers and patients with HCC. The productions of G-CSF and TNF-alpha by PBMC of volunteers were significantly stimulated by more than 125 microg/ml of BZYQT. G-CSF levels stimulated by PBMC of healthy volunteers were higher than in PBMC of the HCC patients when more than 625 microg/ml of BZYQT was administrated. The reason may be due to the impaired immunologic reactivity of mononuclear cells in HCC patients. However, the production levels of TNF-alpha in HCC patients can be stimulated to levels as high as those in healthy volunteers. When adding high concentration (3.125 mg/ml) of BZYQT to the cultured PBMC, the increments of G-CSF and TNF-alpha production decreased although there were no obvious changes in the number of metabolic active PBMC changed. TNF-alpha andG-CSF are known to play important roles in the biological defensive mechanism. These findings show that BZYQT is a unique formula for the stimulation of PBMC to produce G-CSF and TNF-alpha. Administration of BZYQT may be beneficial for patients with HCC to modulate these cytokines.

  6. Synthesis and DNA cleavage activities of mononuclear macrocyclic polyamine zinc(II), copper(II), cobalt(II) complexes which linked with uracil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Ji; Li, Kun; Jiang, Ning; Chen, Shan-Yong; Lin, Hong-Hui; Huang, Yu; Ma, Li-Jian; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2006-10-01

    Mononuclear macrocyclic polyamine zinc(II), copper(II), cobalt(II) complexes, which could attach to peptide nucleic acid (PNA), were synthesized as DNA cleavage agents. The structures of these new mononuclear complexes were identified by MS and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The catalytic activities on DNA cleavage of these mononuclear complexes with different central metals were subsequently studied, which showed that copper complex was better catalyst in the DNA cleavage process than zinc and cobalt complexes. The effects of reaction time, concentration of complexes were also investigated. The results indicated that the copper(II) complexes could catalyze the cleavage of supercoiled DNA (pUC 19 plasmid DNA) (Form I) under physiological conditions to produce selectively nicked DNA (Form II, no Form III produced) with high yields. The mechanism of the cleavage process was also studied.

  7. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from smokers release higher levels of IL-1-like cytokines after exposure to combustion-generated ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    De Falco, Gianluigi; Terlizzi, Michela; Sirignano, Mariano; Commodo, Mario; D'Anna, Andrea; Aquino, Rita P; Pinto, Aldo; Sorrentino, Rosalinda

    2017-02-22

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) generated by combustion processes are often associated with adverse health effects. However, little is known about the inflammatory processes generated by UFP that may underlie their toxicological activity. Murine macrophages (J774.1 cells) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to evaluate the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-inflammatory activity of UFP. The addition of soot particles to J774.1 cells induced a concentration-dependent release of IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-33 This effect was not associated with cell death and, in contrast to literature, was pronounced at very low concentrations (5-100 pg/ml). Similarly, UFP induced the release of IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 by PBMCs. However, this effect was solely observed in PBMCs obtained from smokers, as the PBMCs from non-smokers instead released higher levels of IL-10. The release of these cytokines after UFP exposure was caspase-1- and NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent in PBMCs from healthy smokers, whereas IL-1α release was calpain-dependent. These results show that UFP at very low concentrations are able to give rise to an inflammatory process that is responsible for IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 release, which is pronounced in PBMCs from smokers, confirming that these individuals are especially susceptible to inflammatory-based airway diseases once exposed to air pollution.

  8. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from smokers release higher levels of IL-1-like cytokines after exposure to combustion-generated ultrafine particles

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Gianluigi; Terlizzi, Michela; Sirignano, Mariano; Commodo, Mario; D’Anna, Andrea; Aquino, Rita P.; Pinto, Aldo; Sorrentino, Rosalinda

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) generated by combustion processes are often associated with adverse health effects. However, little is known about the inflammatory processes generated by UFP that may underlie their toxicological activity. Murine macrophages (J774.1 cells) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to evaluate the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-inflammatory activity of UFP. The addition of soot particles to J774.1 cells induced a concentration-dependent release of IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-33 This effect was not associated with cell death and, in contrast to literature, was pronounced at very low concentrations (5–100 pg/ml). Similarly, UFP induced the release of IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 by PBMCs. However, this effect was solely observed in PBMCs obtained from smokers, as the PBMCs from non-smokers instead released higher levels of IL-10. The release of these cytokines after UFP exposure was caspase-1- and NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent in PBMCs from healthy smokers, whereas IL-1α release was calpain-dependent. These results show that UFP at very low concentrations are able to give rise to an inflammatory process that is responsible for IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 release, which is pronounced in PBMCs from smokers, confirming that these individuals are especially susceptible to inflammatory-based airway diseases once exposed to air pollution. PMID:28223692

  9. Flow cytometry analysis of hormone receptors on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to identify stress-induced neuroendocrine effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding the role of circulating peptide hormones in the pathogenesis of space-flight induced disorders would be greatly facilitated by a method which monitors chronic levels of hormones and their effects upon in vivo cell physiology. Single and simultaneous multiparameter flow cytometry analysis was employed to identify subpopulations of mononuclear cells bearing receptors for ACTH, Endorphin, and Somatomedin-C using monoclonal antibodies and monospecific antisera with indirect immunofluorescence. Blood samples were obtained from normal donors and subjects participating in decompression chamber studies (acute stress), medical student academic examination (chronic stress), and a drug study (Dexamethasone). Preliminary results indicate most ACTH and Endorphin receptor positive cells are monocytes and B-cells, exhibit little diurnal variation but the relative percentages of receptor positive cells are influenced by exposure to various stressors and ACTH inhibition. This study demonstrates the capability of flow cytometry analysis to study cell surface hormone receptor regulation which should allow insight into neuroendocrine modulation of the immune and other cellular systems during exposure to stress or microgravity.

  10. Thrombin potently stimulates cytokine production in human vascular smooth muscle cells but not in mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Kranzhöfer, R; Clinton, S K; Ishii, K; Coughlin, S R; Fenton, J W; Libby, P

    1996-08-01

    Thrombosis frequently occurs during atherogenesis and in response to vascular injury. Accumulating evidence supports a role for inflammation in the same situation. The present study therefore sought links between thrombosis and inflammation by determining whether thrombin, which is present in active form at sites of thrombosis, can elicit inflammatory functions of human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), two major constituents of advanced atheroma. Human alpha-thrombin (EC50, approximately equal to 500 pmol/L) potently induced interleukin (IL)-6 release from SMCs. The tethered-ligand thrombin receptor appeared to mediate this effect. Furthermore, alpha-thrombin also rapidly increased levels of mRNA encoding IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in SMCs. In contrast, only alpha-thrombin concentrations of > or = 100 nmol/L could stimulate release of IL-6 or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) in peripheral blood monocytes or monocyte-derived macrophages. Lipid loading of macrophages did not augment thrombin responsiveness. Likewise, only alpha-thrombin concentrations of > or = 100 nmol/L increased levels of IL-6, IL-1 beta, MCP-1, or TNF alpha mRNA in monocytes. Differential responses of SMCs and monocytes to thrombin extended to early agonist-mediated increases in [Ca2+]i. SMCs and endothelial cells, but not monocytes, contained abundant mRNA encoding the thrombin receptor and displayed cell surface thrombin receptor expression detected with a novel monoclonal antibody. Thus, the level of thrombin receptors appeared to account for the differential thrombin susceptibility of SMCs and monocytes. These data suggest that SMCs may be more sensitive than monocytes/macrophages to thrombin activation in human atheroma. Cytokines produced by thrombin-activated SMCs may contribute to ongoing inflammation in atheroma complicated by thrombosis or subjected to angioplasty.

  11. Clinical and kinomic analysis identifies peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a potential pharmacodynamic biomarker in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients treated with sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Schoemann, Audrey; Rangarajan, Savithri; Naji, Faris; Puszkiel, Alicja; Huillard, Olivier; Saidu, Nathaniel; Golmard, Lisa; Alexandre, Jerome; Goldwasser, Francois; Blanchet, Benoit; Vidal, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Sunitinib is a protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor that has immune-modulating properties. In this context, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), mainly constituted by lymphocytes, could be a perfect surrogate tissue for identifying and assaying pharmacodynamic biomarkers of sunitinib. In this study, we investigated the changes in lymphocytes count as pharmacodynamic biomarker in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients under sunitinib therapy. Thereafter, we studied the ex vivo effect of sunitinib and SU12262 (active metabolite) on PBMC from naïve mRCC patients using a high throughput kinomic profiling method. Methods The prognostic value of total lymphocytes count between Day 0 and Day 21 (expressed as a ratio D21/D0) was retrospectively investigated in 88 mRCC patients under sunitinib therapy. PTK PamChip® microarrays were used to explore prospectively the ex vivo effect of sunitinib and SU12662 on PTK activity in PBMC from 21 naïve mRCC patients. Results In this retrospective study, D21/D0 lymphocytes ratio (Hazard Ratio, 1.83; CI95%, 1.24-2.71; p=0.0023) was independently associated with PFS. Interestingly, kinomic analysis showed that D21/D0 lymphocytes ratio and Heng prognostic model was statistically associated with the ex vivo sunitinib and SU12662 effect in PBMC. Conclusion The present study highlights that D21/D0 total lymphocytes ratio could be a promising pharmacodynamic biomarker in mRCC patients treated with sunitinib. Additionally, it paves the way to investigate the kinomic profile in PBMC as a prognostic factor in a larger cohort of mRCC patients under sunitinib therapy. PMID:27589830

  12. On the active site of mononuclear B1 metallo β-lactamases: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Magistrato, Alessandra; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Vila, Alejandro J.; Carloni, Paolo; Pierattelli, Roberta

    2012-04-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs) are Zn(II)-based bacterial enzymes that hydrolyze β-lactam antibiotics, hampering their beneficial effects. In the most relevant subclass (B1), X-ray crystallography studies on the enzyme from Bacillus Cereus point to either two zinc ions in two metal sites (the so-called `3H' and `DCH' sites) or a single Zn(II) ion in the 3H site, where the ion is coordinated by Asp120, Cys221 and His263 residues. However, spectroscopic studies on the B1 enzyme from B. Cereus in the mono-zinc form suggested the presence of the Zn(II) ion also in the DCH site, where it is bound to an aspartate, a cysteine, a histidine and a water molecule. A structural model of this enzyme in its DCH mononuclear form, so far lacking, is therefore required for inhibitor design and mechanistic studies. By using force field based and mixed quantum-classical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the protein in aqueous solution we constructed such structural model. The geometry and the H-bond network at the catalytic site of this model, in the free form and in complex with two common β-lactam drugs, is compared with experimental and theoretical findings of CphA and the recently solved crystal structure of new B2 MβL from Serratia fonticola (Sfh-I). These are MβLs from the B2 subclass, which features an experimentally well established mono-zinc form, in which the Zn(II) is located in the DCH site. From our simulations the ɛɛδ and δɛδ protomers emerge as possible DCH mono-zinc reactive species, giving a novel contribution to the discussion on the MβL reactivity and to the drug design process.

  13. Sickle red cells as danger signals on proinflammatory gene expression, leukotriene B4 and interleukin-1 beta production in peripheral blood mononuclear cell.

    PubMed

    Pitanga, Thassila N; Oliveira, Ricardo R; Zanette, Dalila L; Guarda, Caroline C; Santiago, Rayra P; Santana, Sanzio S; Nascimento, Valma M L; Lima, Jonilson B; Carvalho, Graziele Q; Maffili, Vitor V; Carvalho, Magda O S; Alcântara, Luiz C J; Borges, Valéria M; Goncalves, Marilda S

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that sickle red blood cell (SS-RBC) induce Toll-like receptors (TLR) and Nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)- inflammasome expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). TLR and NLRP3 inflammasome could contribute to the maintenance of the inflammatory status in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients, since SS-RBC act as danger signals activating these pathways. In this study, first, we evaluated TLR (2, 4, 5 and 9), NLRP3, Caspase-1, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 expression in PBMC freshly isolated from SCA patients (SS-PBMC) in comparison with PBMC from healthy individuals (AA-PBMC). In the second moment, we investigated whether SS-RBC could interfere with the expression of these molecules in PBMC from healthy donor, in the absence or presence of hydroxyurea (HU) in vitro. TLRs and NLRP3 inflammasome expression were investigated by qPCR. IL-1β, Leukotriene-B4 (LTB4) and nitrite production were measured in PBMC (from healthy donor) culture supernatants. TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, NLRP3 and IL-1β were highly expressed in SS-PBMC when compared to AA-PBMC. Additionally, SS-RBC induced TLR9, NLRP3, Caspase-1, IL-1β and IL-18 expression and induced IL-1β, LTB4 and nitrite production in PBMC cultures. HU did not prevent TLR and NLRP3 inflammasome expression, but increased TLR2 and IL-18 expression and reduced nitrite production. In conclusion, our data suggest that TLR and inflammasome complexes may be key inducers of inflammation in SCA patients, probably through SS-RBC; also, HU does not prevent NLRP3 inflammasome- and TLR-dependent inflammation, indicating the need to develop new therapeutic strategies to SCA patients that act with different mechanisms of those observed for HU.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific immunospot assay of pleural exudate mononuclear cells is useful for the exclusion of tuberculous pleuritis in patients with lupus pleuritis.

    PubMed

    Takase, K; Ohno, S; Ideguchi, H; Murakami, S; Takeno, M; Ishigatsubo, Y

    2009-02-01

    It is often difficult to make a diagnosis of pleuritis associated with rheumatic diseases because of lack of specific diagnostic tools. We report a patient with lupus pleuritis from which tuberculous pleuritis was distinguished by Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific enzyme-linked immunospot assay of pleural exudate mononuclear cells. After the diagnosis of lupus pleuritis, the patient was successfully treated with prednisolone.

  15. Clinical disease upregulates expression of CD40 and CD40 ligand on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cattle naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD40 and CD40L interactions have costimulatory effects that are part of a complex series of events in host cellular and humoral immune responses and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in expression of CD40 and CD40L on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolat...

  16. Association of DC-SIGNR Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells with DC-SIGNR Genotypes in HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Omkar; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bala, Manju; Singh, Jasbir; Hazarika, Anjali; Luthra, Kalpana

    2015-10-01

    Dendritic cell-specific intracellular adhesion molecule 3 grabbing nonintegrin related molecule (DC-SIGNR) is a C-type lectin, calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding protein, which can act as a cell-adhesion and pathogen recognition receptor. DC-SIGNR is known to be highly expressed on liver sinusoidal cells and in the lymph nodes. However, its expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in HIV-1 infection has not been addressed. Therefore, this study determined the expression of DC-SIGNR in PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients and healthy seronegative individuals by real-time polymerase chain reaction and assessed its correlation with CD4+ T cell counts and DC-SIGNR genotypes. A significantly higher expression of DC-SIGNR was observed in the PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients compared with healthy seronegative individuals. Further, there was a negative correlation between DC-SIGNR expression and CD4+ T cell counts and positive with viral load, with higher DC-SIGNR expression in the PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients with a CD4+ T cell count <200 cells/μL than those with >200 cells/μL. This is the first study to report the expression of DC-SIGNR in PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients. A salient finding of this study is that the DC-SIGNR expression was higher in HIV-1-infected patients, and its positive correlation with viral load and negative with CD4+ T cells counts suggesting a potential role of DC-SIGNR in HIV-1 infection.

  17. Glycoconjugates Effects: do Gender and Ethnicity Influence Exposure of Pathogen by Peripheral Mononuclear Cells ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiani, Mohamed; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group demonstrate different pathological effects. B. cereus is a spore-forming, gram positive bacterium responsible for most foodborne illnesses. It was shown that susceptibility to infection and response to vaccines or treatments can be attributed to specific immunogenetic factors including gender and ethnicity. Glycoconjugate polymers (GCs) are potentially important in pharmaceutical and biomedical research. Our group has shown that GCs activate murine macrophages and promote killing of Bacillus cereus spores during phagocytosis. We hypothesized that the GCs effects are independent from gender and race. The goal of the present study was two-folds: A) determine whether GCs influence on human PMNC exposure of B. cereus spores and B) analyze whether gender and ethnicity influence of the effect of GCs. GCs were studied during exposure and post-exposure conditions. Phagocytosis was performed during exposure of PMNC to Bacillus spores. Post-exposure analysis involved cytotoxicity, cell viability and activation, and colonies forming unit. GC1 and GC3 enhance Bacillus spore killing. GC1 proved more effective than GC3 in spore killing while activating PMNC. Results demonstrate GCs effect were independent from ethnicity or gender. Findings of this research demonstrated that GC can be used as ligands to stimulate PMNC and kill B. cereus spores.

  18. Effects of interleukin-10 on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell responses to Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; Tabuni, A; Nong, S H; Golenbock, D T

    1996-01-01

    Deactivation of mononuclear phagocytes is critical to limit the inflammatory response but can be detrimental in the face of progressive infection. We compared the effects of the deactivating cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10) on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Cryptococcus neoformans, and Candida albicans. IL-10 effected dose-dependent inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) release in PBMC stimulated by LPS and C. neoformans, with significant inhibition seen with 0.1 U/ml and greater than 90% inhibition noted with 10 U/ml. In contrast, even at doses as high as 100 U/ml, IL-10 inhibited TNF-alpha release in response to C. albicans by only 50%. IL-10 profoundly inhibited release of IL-1beta from PBMC stimulated by all three stimuli. TNF-alpha mRNA and release was inhibited even if IL-10 was added up to 8 h after cryptococcal stimulation. In contrast, inhibition of IL-1 beta mRNA was of lesser magnitude and occurred only when IL-10 was added within 2 h of cryptococcal stimulation. IL-10 inhibited translocation of NF-kappaB in response to LPS but not the fungal stimuli. All three stimuli induced IL-10 production in PBMC, although over 10-fold less IL-10 was released in response to C. neoformans compared with LPS and C. albicans. Thus, while IL-10 has deactivating effects on PBMC responses to all three stimuli, disparate stimulus- and response-specific patterns of deactivation are seen. Inhibition by IL-10 of proinflammatory cytokine release appears to occur at the level of gene transcription for TNF-alpha and both transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally for IL-1beta. PMID:8641805

  19. Cytomegalovirus upregulates expression of CCR5 in central memory cord blood mononuclear cells, which may facilitate in utero HIV type 1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erica L; Howard, Chanie L; Thurman, Joy; Pontiff, Kyle; Johnson, Elan S; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-15

    Administration of combination antiretroviral therapy to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected pregnant women significantly reduces vertical transmission. In contrast, maternal co-opportunistic infection with primary or reactivated cytomegalovirus (CMV) or other pathogens may facilitate in utero transmission of HIV-1 by activation of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs). Here we examine the targets and mechanisms that affect fetal susceptibility to HIV-1 in utero. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the fraction of CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CCR5(+) CBMCs is minimal, which may account for the low level of in utero HIV-1 transmission. Unstimulated CD4(+) CBMCs that lack CCR5/CD45RO showed reduced levels of HIV-1 infection. However, upon in vitro stimulation with CMV, CBMCs undergo increased proliferation to upregulate the fraction of T central memory cells and expression of CCR5, which enhances susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro. These data suggest that activation induced by CMV in vivo may alter CCR5 expression in CD4(+) T central memory cells to promote in utero transmission of HIV-1.

  20. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Therapy is Safe and Promotes Amputation Free Survival in Patients with Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michael P.; Lawson, Jeffrey H.; Rapp, Brian M.; Dalsing, Michael C.; Klein, Janet; Wilson, Michael G.; Hutchins, Gary D.; March, Keith L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this phase I open label non-randomized trial was to assess the safety and efficacy of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell (ABMNC) therapy in promoting amputation free survival (AFS) in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). Methods Between September 2005 and March 2009 twenty-nine patients (30 limbs), with a median age of 66 (range 23–84) (14 male,15 female) with CLI were enrolled . Twentyone limbs presented with rest pain (RP), six with RP and ulceration, and three with ulcer only. All patients were not candidates for surgical bypass due to absence of a patent artery below the knee and/or endovascular approaches to improving perfusion was not possible as determined by an independent vascular surgeon. Patients were treated with an average dose of 1.7 ± 0.7 × 109 ABMNC injected intramuscularly in the index limb distal to the anterior tibial tuberosity. The primary safety endpoint was accumulation of serious adverse events and the primary efficacy endpoint was AFS at one year. Secondary endpoints at 12 weeks post-treatment were changes in first toe pressure (FTP), toe-brachial index (TBI), ankle-brachial index (ABI), and transcutaneous oxygen measurements (TcPO2). Perfusion of the index limb was measured with PET-CT with intra-arterial infusion of H2O15. Rest pain (RP), using a 10-cm visual analog scale, quality of life using the VascuQuol questionnaire, and ulcer healing were assessed at each follow-up interval. Subpopulations of endothelial progenitor cells were quantified prior to ABMNC administration using immunocytochemistry and fluorescent activated cell sorting. Results There were two serious adverse events however there no procedure related deaths. Amputation-free survival at one-year was 86.3%. There was a significant increase in FTP (10.2+ 6.2 mmHg, P=.02) and TBI (0.10± 0.05, P=.02) and a trend in improvement in ABI (0.08±0.04, P=.73). Perfusion Index by PET-CT H2O15 increased by 19.3 ± 3.1 and RP decreased

  1. Dendritic Cells Transfected with a DNA Construct Encoding Tumour-associated Antigen Epitopes Induce a Cytotoxic Immune Response Against Autologous Tumour Cells in a Culture of Mononuclear Cells from Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, E V; Kurilin, V V; Shevchenko, J A; Obleukhova, I A; Khrapov, E A; Boyarskikh, U A; Filipenko, M L; Shorokhov, R V; Yakushenko, V K; Sokolov, A V; Sennikov, S V

    2015-08-01

    Significant effort has been devoted to developing effective cancer vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with various tumour antigens, including DNA constructs that carry sequences of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs). Such vaccines efficiently and selectively activate the T cell immune response. In this study, we describe a method to induce an antitumour immune response in mononuclear cell (MNC) cultures from colorectal cancer patients using DNA-transfected DCs encoding TAA epitopes of carcinoembryonic antigen, epithelial cell adhesion molecule and mucin 4. DCs were obtained from peripheral blood monocytes of colorectal cancer patients. Magnetic-assisted transfection was used to deliver the genetic constructs to DCs. To assess the potency of the immune response, the antitumour cytotoxic response was assessed by lymphocyte intracellular perforin and the MNC cytotoxic activity against autologous tumour cells. We showed that polyepitope DNA-transfected DCs enhanced MNC antitumour activity, increasing tumour cell death and the percentage of perforin-positive lymphocytes. In addition, DNA-transfected DCs elicited a cytotoxic response that was as efficient as that of tumour lysate-loaded DCs. Taken together, the data suggest that it is feasible to induce an antitumour immune response in colorectal MNCs using transfected DCs. Thus, the DNA construct reported in this study may potentially be used in therapeutic and prophylactic DC-based vaccines.

  2. Effect of heat challenge on peripheral blood mononuclear cell viability: comparison of a tropical and temperate pig breed.

    PubMed

    Bambou, Jean-Christophe; Gourdine, Jean-Luc; Grondin, Roxanne; Vachiery, Nathalie; Renaudeau, David

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated the effect of heat challenge on cell viability, concanavalin A-induced proliferation and heat shock protein (HSPs) mRNA expression in peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMC) isolated from Creole (CR) and Large White (LW) pigs. The PBMCs were cultured for 9 h at 37 °C before being subjected to heat challenge: (1) at 42 °C or 45 °C for 2, 4, 6 and 9 h to monitor cell viability;(2) at 45 °C for 2 and 9 h followed by stimulation for 24 h at 37 °C with concanavalin A to evaluate mitogen-induced proliferation; and (3) at 45 °C for 3, 6 and 9 h to measure induction of HSP70.2 and HSP90 mRNA. Cell viability was affected by breed and temperature (P < 0.01), and the viability decrease caused by heat challenge was greater for LW than CR pigs. For mitogen-stimulated PBMCs, incubation at 45 °C reduced lymphoblastogenesis equally in both breeds (P < 0.01). Although heat challenge for 3 and 6 h at 45°C induced expression of HSP70.2 and HSP90 mRNA, no breed difference was observed. In conclusion, differences in heat resistance between these two breeds at the whole organism level are reflected at the cellular level. Neither HSP70.2 nor HSP90 mRNA expression levels explain this effect.

  3. Interferon beta 2/interleukin 6 modulates synthesis of alpha 1-antitrypsin in human mononuclear phagocytes and in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, D H; May, L T; Sehgal, P B

    1989-01-01

    The cytokine IFN beta 2/IL-6 has recently been shown to regulate the expression of genes encoding hepatic acute phase plasma proteins. INF beta 2/IL-6 has also been shown to be identical to MGI-2, a protein that induces differentiation of bone marrow precursor cells toward mature granulocytes and monocytes. Accordingly, we have examined the effect of IFN beta 2/IL-6 on expression of the IL-1- and tumor necrosis factor-unresponsive acute phase protein alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1 AT) in human hepatoma-derived hepatocytes and in human mononuclear phagocytes. Purified human fibroblast and recombinant IFN beta 2/IL-6 each mediate a specific increase in steady-state levels of alpha 1 AT mRNA and a corresponding increase in net synthesis of alpha 1 AT in primary cultures of human peripheral blood monocytes as well as in HepG2 and Hep3B cells. Thus, the effect of IFN beta 2/IL-6 on alpha 1 AT gene expression in these cells is primarily due to an increase in accumulation of alpha 1 AT mRNA and can be distinguished from the direct, predominantly translational effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on expression of this gene in monocytes and macrophages. The results indicate that IFN beta 2/IL-6 regulates acute phase gene expression, specifically alpha 1 AT gene expression, in extrahepatic as well as hepatic cell types. Images PMID:2472425

  4. Proteomic responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) after perfluorooctane sulfonate exposure.

    PubMed

    Roland, Kathleen; Kestemont, Patrick; Hénuset, Laurence; Pierrard, Marie-Aline; Raes, Martine; Dieu, Marc; Silvestre, Frédéric

    2013-03-15

    Since the 1980s, the stocks of European eel have been declining in most of their geographical distribution area. Many factors can be attributed to this decline such as pollution by xenobiotics like perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). This study aimed at evaluating the in vitro toxicity of eel peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to PFOS. Exposure time and two concentrations were chosen to avoid cell mortality (48 h exposure at 10 μg PFOS/L and 1mg PFOS/L). After in vitro contaminations, the post-nuclear fraction was isolated and a proteomic analysis using 2D-DIGE was performed to compare PBMC from the control group with cells exposed to the pollutant. On the 158 spots that were significantly affected by PFOS exposure, a total of 48 different proteins were identified using nano-LCESI-MS/MS and the Peptide and Protein Prophet of Scaffold software. These proteins can be categorized into diverse functional classes, related to cytoskeleton, protein folding, cell signaling, proteolytic pathway and carbohydrate and energy metabolism, which provide clues on the cellular pathways mainly affected by PFOS. Some of the identified proteins are rarely found in other ecotoxicological proteomic studies and could constitute potential biomarkers of exposure to PFOS in fish.

  5. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells prevents memory impairment in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Lee, Hyunjin; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Ueda, Masayuki; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-04-24

    Stem cell transplantation therapy is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of ischemic stroke, and several beneficial aspects have been reported. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), stem cell therapy is expected to provide an efficient therapeutic approach. Indeed, the intracerebral transplantation of stem cells reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and rescued memory deficits in AD model mice. Here, we show that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMCs) improves cognitive function in two different AD mouse models, DAL and APP mice, and prevents neurodegeneration. GFP-positive BMMCs were isolated from tibiae and femurs of 4-week-old mice and then transplanted intravenously into DAL and APP mice. Transplantation of BMMCs suppressed neuronal loss and restored memory impairment of DAL mice to almost the same level as in wild-type mice. Transplantation of BMMCs to APP mice reduced Aβ deposition in the brain. APP mice treated with BMMCs performed significantly better on behavioral tests than vehicle-injected mice. Moreover, the effects were observed even with transplantation after the onset of cognitive impairment in DAL mice. Together, our results indicate that intravenous transplantation of BMMCs has preventive effects against the cognitive decline in AD model mice and suggest a potential therapeutic effect of BMMC transplantation therapy.

  6. Characterization of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoproliferation derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells transferred to severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Okano, M.; Taguchi, Y.; Nakamine, H.; Pirruccello, S. J.; Davis, J. R.; Beisel, K. W.; Kleveland, K. L.; Sanger, W. G.; Fordyce, R. R.; Purtilo, D. T.

    1990-01-01

    Mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) received 6 X 10(7) fresh human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) intraperitoneally from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-seropositive and -seronegative donors. B95-8 EBV was inoculated intraperitoneally and intravenously to the mice 6 weeks after transfer of seronegative PBMC. Three of four mice transferred with PBMC from two EBV-seropositive donors and two of four mice from two EBV-seronegative donors inoculated with EBV developed fatal EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease within 6 to 10 weeks. These tumors were oligoclonal or polyclonal by cytoplasmic immunoglobulin expression. Furthermore no consistent clonal chromosomal abnormalities were shown. Cell lines established from these tumors showed low cloning efficiency in soft agarose. In addition, latent membrane protein, B-lymphocyte activation antigen (CD23), and cell-adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, CD18) all were expressed in the EBV-positive infiltrating lymphoproliferative lesions in each mouse. These results suggest that lymphoid tumors are comparable to lymphoblastoid cell lines immortalized by EBV and are not malignant lymphomas such as Burkitt's lymphoma. This model may be useful for investigating mechanisms responsible for the growing numbers of lymphoproliferative diseases that are occurring in patients with inherited or acquired immunodeficiencies. Images Figure 1 PMID:1975985

  7. Tryptamine and dimethyltryptamine inhibit indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase and increase the tumor-reactive effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Tourino, Melissa Cavalheiro; de Oliveira, Edson Mendes; Bellé, Luziane Potrich; Knebel, Franciele Hinterholz; Albuquerque, Renata Chaves; Dörr, Felipe Augusto; Okada, Sabrina Sayori; Migliorini, Silene; Soares, Irene Silva; Campa, Ana

    2013-07-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced tryptophan-degrading enzyme, producing kynurenine (KYN) that participates in the mechanism of tumor immune tolerance. Thus, IDO inhibition has been considered a strategy for anticancer therapy. The aim of this study was to identify whether the metabolites originated from the competitive routes of tryptophan metabolism, such as the serotonergic or N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) pathways, have inhibitory effects on recombinant human IDO (rhIDO) activity. Serotonin and melatonin had no effect; on the other hand, tryptamine (TRY) and DMT modulated the activity of rhIDO as classical non-competitive inhibitors, with Ki values of 156 and 506 μM, respectively. This inhibitory effect was also observed on constitutively expressed or IFN-γ-induced IDO in the A172 human glioma cell line. TRY and DMT increased the cytotoxic activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in co-culture assays. We conclude that the IDO inhibition by TRY and DMT contributed to a more effective tumor-reactive response by the PBMCs.

  8. S-Nitrosylation Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Heidi M.; Gupta, Shivali; Petersen, John R.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) protects the heart against ischemic injury; however, NO- and superoxide-dependent S-nitrosylation (S-NO) of cysteines can affect function of target proteins and play a role in disease outcome. We employed 2D-GE with thiol-labeling FL-maleimide dye and MALDI-TOF MS/MS to capture the quantitative changes in abundance and S-NO proteome of HF patients (versus healthy controls, n = 30/group). We identified 93 differentially abundant (59-increased/34-decreased) and 111 S-NO-modified (63-increased/48-decreased) protein spots, respectively, in HF subjects (versus controls, fold-change | ≥1.5|, p ≤ 0.05). Ingenuity pathway analysis of proteome datasets suggested that the pathways involved in phagocytes' migration, free radical production, and cell death were activated and fatty acid metabolism was decreased in HF subjects. Multivariate adaptive regression splines modeling of datasets identified a panel of proteins that will provide >90% prediction success in classifying HF subjects. Proteomic profiling identified ATP-synthase, thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), and vinculin (VCL) as top differentially abundant and S-NO-modified proteins, and these proteins were verified by Western blotting and ELISA in different set of HF subjects. We conclude that differential abundance and S-NO modification of proteins serve as a mechanism in regulating cell viability and free radical production, and THBS1 and VCL evaluation will potentially be useful in the prediction of heart failure. PMID:27635260

  9. Temporal relationship of cytokine release by peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated by the streptococcal superantigen pep M5.

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, M; Ohnishi, H; Majumdar, G; Hackett, S; Bryant, A; Higgins, G; Stevens, D

    1993-01-01

    We undertook this study to determine the quality, quantity, and temporal relationship of pep M5-induced cytokine release. The ability of pep M5 to stimulate interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production by a T-cell-depleted, monocyte- and B-cell-enriched cell population was dependent on the presence of T cells. The requirement for T cells could be met by addition of exogenous gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). In the presence of IFN-gamma, pep M5 induced the release of TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6, TNF-alpha levels peaked at 24 h, while IL-1 and IL-6 levels peaked at 48 h. pep M5 induced T cells to produce IFN-gamma, which may have accounted for the ability of the super antigen to induce the production of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and TNF-beta by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The addition of excess IFN-gamma to cultures of pep M5 and PBMC did not further increase the release of these cytokines at 24 and 48 h but resulted in sustained higher levels at 72 h. Interestingly, TNF-beta production occurred only in the presence of pep M5 and exogenous IFN-gamma. The ability of pep M5 to induce cytokine production was compared with that of a potent super antigen, staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). SEB was a 2- to 14-fold-more-potent inducer of IFN-gamma production. Furthermore, the profile of cytokine released by PBMC in response to this super antigen mimicked that seen with pep M5 in the presence of exogenous IFN-gamma. In conclusion, pep M5 induces the production of cytokines that are involved in immune regulation and inflammation. These cytokines also play a major role in human T-cell responses to this super antigen. PMID:8454323

  10. Infection of chicken bone marrow mononuclear cells with subgroup J avian leukosis virus inhibits dendritic cell differentiation and alters cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Qiu, Qianqian; Zhang, Xu; Dai, Manman; Qin, Jianru; Hao, Jianjong; Liao, Ming; Cao, Weisheng

    2016-10-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus known to induce tumor formation and immunosuppression in infected chickens. One of the organs susceptible to ALV-J is the bone marrow, from which specialized antigen-presenting cells named dendritic cells (BM-DCs) are derived. Notably, these cells possess the unique ability to induce primary immune responses. In the present study, a method of cultivating and purifying DCs from chicken bone marrow in vitro was established to investigate the effects of ALV-J infection on BM-DC differentiation or generation. The results indicated that ALV-J not only infects the chicken bone marrow mononuclear cells but also appears to inhibit the differentiation and maturation of BM-DCs and to trigger apoptosis. Moreover, substantial reductions in the mRNA expression of TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, MHCI, and MHCII and in cytokine production were detected in the surviving BM-DCs following ALV-J infection. These findings indicate that ALV-J infection disrupts the process of bone marrow mononuclear cell differentiation into BM-DCs likely via altered antigen presentation, resulting in a downstream immune response in affected chickens.

  11. HSP27 modulates survival signaling in endosulfan-exposed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells treated with curcumin.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, T; Banerjee, B D

    2016-07-01

    Endosulfan, a well-known organochlorine pesticide, induces apoptosis and depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Thus, for the amelioration of its effect, antioxidant and antiapoptotic potential of curcumin was evaluated. For ascertaining the attenuating effect of curcumin, various biochemical indices of cell damage such as cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis (phosphatidylserine externalization, DNA fragmentation, and cytochrome c) in human PBMC was evaluated following endosulfan exposure (0-100 µM). To assess the role of HSP27 on endosulfan-induced apoptosis, the expression of HSP27 was examined. Curcumin (25 µM) increased cell viability significantly. As evident from the restoration of GSH, antiapoptotic potential was directly proportional to their antioxidant nature of curcumin. The present study indicates that the beneficial effect of curcumin on endosulfan-induced cytotoxicity is related to the induced synthesis of HSP27, emphasizing its antioxidant and therapeutic potential as well as underscoring the mechanism of pesticide-induced toxicity at cellular level. Taken together, these findings suggest that curcumin protects against endosulfan-induced immunotoxicity in human PBMC by attenuating apoptosis.

  12. Global gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in rhesus monkey infants with CA16 infection-induced HFMD.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Hu, Yajie; Hu, Yunguang; Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaolong; Wang, Lichun; Guo, Lei; Wang, Yancui; Ning, Ruotong; Liao, Yun; Zhang, Ying; Zheng, Huiwen; Shi, Haijing; He, Zhanlong; Li, Qihan; Liu, Longding

    2016-03-02

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is a dominant pathogen that results in hand, foot, and mouth disease and causes outbreaks worldwide, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Our previous study has demonstrated that the basic CA16 pathogenic process was successfully mimicked in rhesus monkey infant. The present study focused on the global gene expression changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of rhesus monkey infants with hand, foot, and mouth disease induced by CA16 infection at different time points. Genome-wide expression analysis was performed with Agilent whole-genome microarrays and established bioinformatics tools. Nine hundred and forty-eight significant differentially expressed genes that were associated with 5 gene ontology categories, including cell communication, cell cycle, immune system process, regulation of transcription and metabolic process were identified. Subsequently, the mapping of genes related to the immune system process by PANTHER pathway analysis revealed the predominance of inflammation mediated by chemokine and cytokine signaling pathways and the interleukin signaling pathway. Ultimately, co-expressed genes and their networks were analyzed. The results revealed the gene expression profile of the immune system in response to CA16 in rhesus monkey infants and suggested that such an immune response was generated as a result of the positive mobilization of the immune system. This initial microarray study will provide insights into the molecular mechanism of CA16 infection and will facilitate the identification of biomarkers for the evaluation of vaccines against this virus.

  13. In vivo tracing of indium-111 oxine-labeled human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with lymphatic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.Z.; Zielinski, C.C.; Linkesch, W.; Ludwig, H.; Sinzinger, H.

    1989-06-01

    The in vivo migration of (/sup 111/In)oxine-labeled peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC) was studied in 20 patients with various lymphatic malignancies and palpable enlarged lymph nodes. The maximal labeling dose of 10 microCi (0.37 MBq) (/sup 111/In)oxine/10(8) PMNC was found not to adversely influence either cell viability or lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. For in vivo studies, 1.5 X 10(9) PMNC were gained by lymphapheresis and reinjected intravenously after radioactive labeling, 150 microCi (5.55 MBq). The labeling of enlarged palpable lymph nodes was achieved in three out of three patients with Hodgkin's disease and in five out of five with high-malignant lymphoma, whereas three out of seven patients with low malignant lymphoma and no patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia had positive lymph node imaging. We thus conclude that PMNC retain their ability to migrate after (/sup 111/In)oxine labeling and that these cells traffic to involved lymph nodes of some, but not all hematologic malignancies.

  14. Increased transforming growth factor β and interleukin 10 transcripts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Stanilov, Noyko S.; Miteva, Lyuba; Cirovski, Geo

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study The ability of immune cells in peripheral blood to produce certain cytokines affects tumour-elicited inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the gene expression of interleukin 12A (IL-12A), IL-12B, IL-23A, IL-10, IL-6, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), HDAC3, and iNOS in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Material and methods The venous blood for PBMC isolation was collected preoperatively and 10 days after surgery, from CRC patients. After isolation of total RNA and synthesis of cDNA, quantitative real-time PCR assays were performed. Results Our results demonstrated that among investigated cytokine genes IL-10 and TGF-β were significantly upregulated in patients with CRC compared to the control group, while the expression of IL-23 mRNA was significantly decreased in CRC patients. We observed significantly increased mRNA levels in CRC patients’ PBMC before surgery for IL-10 and TGF-β compared to both postoperative and control groups. We also found a significant upregulation of iNOS in early compared to advanced CRC. Conclusions Based on the results we can assume that PBMC gene expression programming in CRC patients drives local differentiation of Th cells towards Treg instead of the Th1 anti-tumour subpopulation. PMID:28239283

  15. Phenotypic characterization of mononuclear cells and class II antigen expression in angular cheilitis infected by Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Jonsson, R

    1989-04-01

    In the present study we characterized the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells in angular cheilitis lesions to further explore the pathogenesis of this disorder. Frozen sections from lesions infected by Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed to subsets of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and macrophages. In addition, the expression of Class II antigens (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR), the interleukin 2- and transferrin-receptors was studied on resident and infiltrating cells. An intense infiltration of T-lymphocytes was accompanied by expression of Class II antigens on the epidermal keratinocytes in lesion infected by Candida albicans. The Staphylococcus aureus infected lesions displayed a diffuse infiltration of T-lymphocytes but virtually no expression of Class II antigen by epidermal keratinocytes. These observations suggest that the cell-mediated arm of the immune system is involved in the inflammatory reaction of lesions infected by Candida albicans. In addition, the present study confirms that epidermal expression of Class II antigens is closely related to the type and magnitude of the infiltrating T-lymphocyte. Finally, these findings indicate that the type of inflammatory reaction in angular cheilitis is primarily dependent on the isolated microorganism, although the clinical pictures of the disorder are virtually identical.

  16. Senescence-Related Changes in Gene Expression of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Octo/Nonagenarians Compared to Their Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Abdul Hamid, Noor Aini; Harun, Roslan; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms determining both functional rate of decline and the time of onset in aging remain elusive. Studies of the aging process especially those involving the comparison of long-lived individuals and young controls are fairly limited. Therefore, this research aims to determine the differential gene expression profile in related individuals from villages in Pahang, Malaysia. Genome-wide microarray analysis of 18 samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from two groups: octo/nonagenarians (80–99 years old) and their offspring (50.2  ±  4.0 years old) revealed that 477 transcripts were age-induced and 335 transcripts were age-repressed with fold changes ≥1.2 in octo/nonagenarians compared to offspring. Interestingly, changes in gene expression were associated with increased capacity for apoptosis (BAK1), cell cycle regulation (CDKN1B), metabolic process (LRPAP1), insulin action (IGF2R), and increased immune and inflammatory response (IL27RA), whereas response to stress (HSPA8), damage stimulus (XRCC6), and chromatin remodelling (TINF2) pathways were downregulated in octo/nonagenarians. These results suggested that systemic telomere maintenance, metabolism, cell signalling, and redox regulation may be important for individuals to maintain their healthy state with advancing age and that these processes play an important role in the determination of the healthy life-span. PMID:24381713

  17. Adhesion of mononuclear cells from multiple sclerosis patients to cerebral vessels in cryostat sections of normal human brain.

    PubMed

    Zaffaroni, M; Martinazzi, S; Crivelli, F; Ghezzi, A; Zampieri, A; Martinazzi, M; Zibetti, A; Canal, N

    1999-09-01

    Leukocyte extravasation across the blood-brain barrier is a critical event in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). This complex multistep process includes the adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelial cells of the central nervous system microvasculature. To investigate this phenomenon in MS, we developed a modified version of the frozen-section assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) from 26 MS patients, 26 healthy controls and 10 patients with other inflammatory non- neurological diseases (OIND) were co-incubated with cryostat sections of normal brain white matter, immunohistochemically labelled with anti-CD45 antibody and counterstained with Giemsa stain. CD45-positive PBM adherent to transected microvasculature were counted with an automated image analyzer. MS patients showed an increased number of vessel-bound PBM (48.8 +/- 36.4) with respect to healthy controls (27.4 +/- 20.7, P = 0.01) and OIND patients (22.6 +/- 7.8, P = 0.01). Significant differences were also obtained counting the number of vessel-bound PBM as a percent of total vascular cells between MS patients (12.7 +/- 7.2%) and healthy controls (6.9 +/- 5.4%, P = 0.002) or OIND patients (7.4 +/- 4.4%, P = 0.03). We confirm that PBM from MS patients show an increased potential of binding to cerebral vessels. The frozen-section assay provides a unique tool to study in situ the molecular interactions of leukocytes with brain vascular structures.

  18. Anti-ovarian tumor response of donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells is due to infiltrating cytotoxic NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Veethika; Oyer, Jeremiah L.; Igarashi, Robert Y.; Gitto, Sarah B.; Copik, Alicja J.; Altomare, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of ovarian cancer, a leading cause of gynecological malignancy, has good initial efficacy with surgery and platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy, but poor long-term survival in patients. Inferior long-term prognosis is attributed to intraperitoneal spreading, relapse and ineffective alternate therapies. Adoptive cell therapy is promising for tumor remission, although logistical concerns impede widespread implementation. In this study, healthy PBMCs were used to examine the immune response in a mouse model with human ovarian cancer, where natural killer (NK) cells were found to be the effector cells that elicited an anti-tumor response. Presence of tumor was found to stimulate NK cell expansion in mice treated intraperitoneally with PBMC+Interleukin-2 (IL-2), as compared to no expansion in non-tumor-bearing mice given the same treatment. PBMC+IL-2 treated mice exhibiting NK cell expansion had complete tumor remission. To validate NK cell mediated anti-tumor response, the intratumoral presence of NK cells and their cytotoxicity was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and granzyme activity of NK cells recovered from the tumor. Collectively, this study highlights the significance of NK cell-cytotoxic response to tumor, which may be attributed to interacting immune cell types in the PBMC population, as opposed to clinically used isolated NK cells showing lack of anti-tumor efficacy in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:26802025

  19. Anti-ovarian tumor response of donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells is due to infiltrating cytotoxic NK cells.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Veethika; Oyer, Jeremiah L; Igarashi, Robert Y; Gitto, Sarah B; Copik, Alicja J; Altomare, Deborah A

    2016-02-09

    Treatment of ovarian cancer, a leading cause of gynecological malignancy, has good initial efficacy with surgery and platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy, but poor long-term survival in patients. Inferior long-term prognosis is attributed to intraperitoneal spreading, relapse and ineffective alternate therapies. Adoptive cell therapy is promising for tumor remission, although logistical concerns impede widespread implementation. In this study, healthy PBMCs were used to examine the immune response in a mouse model with human ovarian cancer, where natural killer (NK) cells were found to be the effector cells that elicited an anti-tumor response. Presence of tumor was found to stimulate NK cell expansion in mice treated intraperitoneally with PBMC+Interleukin-2 (IL-2), as compared to no expansion in non-tumor-bearing mice given the same treatment. PBMC+IL-2 treated mice exhibiting NK cell expansion had complete tumor remission. To validate NK cell mediated anti-tumor response, the intratumoral presence of NK cells and their cytotoxicity was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and granzyme activity of NK cells recovered from the tumor. Collectively, this study highlights the significance of NK cell-cytotoxic response to tumor, which may be attributed to interacting immune cell types in the PBMC population, as opposed to clinically used isolated NK cells showing lack of anti-tumor efficacy in ovarian cancer patients.

  20. A Dose–Response Study of Arsenic Exposure and Global Methylation of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell DNA in Bangladeshi Adults

    PubMed Central

    Niedzwiecki, Megan M.; Hall, Megan N.; Liu, Xinhua; Oka, Julie; Harper, Kristin N.; Slavkovich, Vesna; Ilievski, Vesna; Levy, Diane; van Geen, Alexander; Mey, Jacob L.; Alam, Shafiul; Siddique, Abu B.; Parvez, Faruque; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several studies employing cell culture and animal models have suggested that arsenic (As) exposure induces global DNA hypomethylation. However, As has been associated with global DNA hypermethylation in human study populations. We hypothesized that this discrepancy may reflect a nonlinear relationship between As dose and DNA methylation. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the dose–response relationship between As and global methylation of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) DNA in apparently healthy Bangladeshi adults chronically exposed to a wide range of As concentrations in drinking water. Methods: Global PBMC DNA methylation, plasma folate, blood S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and concentrations of As in drinking water, blood, and urine were measured in 320 adults. DNA methylation was measured using the [3H]-methyl incorporation assay, which provides disintegration-per-minute (DPM) values that are negatively associated with global DNA methylation. Results: Water, blood, and urinary As were positively correlated with global PBMC DNA methylation (p < 0.05). In multivariable-adjusted models, 1-μg/L increases in water and urinary As were associated with 27.6-unit (95% CI: 6.3, 49.0) and 22.1-unit (95% CI: 0.5, 43.8) decreases in DPM per microgram DNA, respectively. Categorical models indicated that estimated mean levels of PBMC DNA methylation were highest in participants with the highest As exposures. Conclusions: These results suggest that As is positively associated with global methylation of PBMC DNA over a wide range of drinking water As concentrations. Further research is necessary to elucidate underlying mechanisms and physiologic implications. Citation: Niedzwiecki MM, Hall MN, Liu X, Oka J, Harper KN, Slavkovich V, Ilievski V, Levy D, van Geen A, Mey JL, Alam S, Siddique AB, Parvez F, Graziano JH, Gamble MV. 2013. A dose–response study of arsenic exposure and global methylation of peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA

  1. Vibration Induces BAFF Overexpression and Aberrant O-Glycosylation of IgA1 in Cultured Human Tonsillar Mononuclear Cells in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Muyao; Liu, Chan; Yan, Wenzhe; Peng, Xiaofei; He, Liyu; Liu, Hong; Liu, Fuyou

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of in vitro vibratory stimulation of human tonsillar mononuclear cells (TMCs). Methods. Fourteen IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients with chronic tonsillitis (CT) and 12 CT patients with no renal pathology were enrolled. Group A TMCs were collected after 24 hours of culture and used to determine baseline levels. TMCs in groups B, C, D, E, and F were exposed to vibratory stimulation (60 Hz) for 0 (as the control group), 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes, respectively. Results. Baseline concentrations of B-cell-activation factor (BAFF) and IgA1, BAFF mRNA expression, and aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 level were higher in the IgAN group as compared to that in the CT group, and all increased after vibratory stimulation. Baseline mRNA expressions of core β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and core β1,3GalT-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc) were lower in the IgAN group; the levels decreased further after vibratory stimulation. Conclusion. In patients with IgAN, vibratory stimulation of TMCs appears to induce IgA1 secretion through activation of BAFF release and to aberrant O-glycosylation IgA1 by suppressing C1GALT1 and Cosmc expression. In vitro vibratory stimulation of human TMCs mimics the vibratory simulation of palatine tonsils produced by vocal cords during phonation. PMID:27672662

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Induced by 900 MHz Mobile Phone Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yao-Sheng; Huang, Bao-Tian; Huang, Yao-Xiong

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays an important role in the process of apoptosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) which is induced by the radiation of 900 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RFEMF) at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of ~0.4 W/kg when the exposure lasts longer than two hours. The apoptosis is induced through the mitochondrial pathway and mediated by activating ROS and caspase-3, and decreasing the mitochondrial potential. The activation of ROS is triggered by the conformation disturbance of lipids, protein, and DNA induced by the exposure of GSM RFEMF. Although human PBMC was found to have a self-protection mechanism of releasing carotenoid in response to oxidative stress to lessen the further increase of ROS, the imbalance between the antioxidant defenses and ROS formation still results in an increase of cell death with the exposure time and can cause about 37% human PBMC death in eight hours. PMID:22778799

  3. A quasi-quantitative dual multiplexed immunoblot method to simultaneously analyze ATM and H2AX Phosphorylation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Czambel, R Kenneth; Hershberger, Pamela A; Tawbi, Hussein; Beumer, Jan H; Schmitz, John C

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic inhibition of DNA repair may increase the efficacy of many cytotoxic cancer agents. Inhibitors of DNA repair enzymes including APE1, ATM, ATR, DNA-PK and PARP have been developed and the PARP inhibitor olaparib is the first-in-class approved in Europe and the USA for the treatment of advanced BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer. Sensitive pharmacodynamic (PD) biomarkers are needed to further evaluate the efficacy of inhibitors of DNA repair enzymes in clinical trials. ATM is a protein kinase that mediates cell-cycle checkpoint activation and DNA double-strand break repair. ATM kinase activation at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is associated with intermolecular autophosphorylation on serine-1981. Exquisite sensitivity and high stoichiometry as well as facile extraction suggest that ATM serine-1981 phosphorylation may be a highly dynamic PD biomarker for both ATM kinase inhibitors and radiation- and chemotherapy-induced DSBs. Here we report the pre-clinical analytical validation and fit-for-purpose biomarker method validation of a quasi-quantitative dual multiplexed immunoblot method to simultaneously analyze ATM and H2AX phosphorylation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We explore the dynamics of these phosphorylations in PBMCs exposed to chemotherapeutic agents and DNA repair inhibitors in vitro, and show that ATM serine-1981 phosphorylation is increased in PBMCs in sarcoma patients treated with DNA damaging chemotherapy.

  4. Plasma Derived From Human Umbilical Cord Blood Modulates Mitogen-Induced Proliferation of Mononuclear Cells Isolated From the Peripheral Blood of ALS Patients.

    PubMed

    Eve, David J; Ehrhart, Jared; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Jahan, Israt; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Cyndy Davis; Gooch, Clifton; Sanberg, Paul R; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. This disease clinically manifests as gradual muscular weakness and atrophy leading to paralysis and death by respiratory failure. While multiple interdependent factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS, increasing evidence shows the possible presence of autoimmune mechanisms that promote disease progression. The potential use of plasma derived from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) as a therapeutic tool is currently in its infancy. The hUCB plasma is rich in cytokines and growth factors that are required for growth and survival of cells during hematopoiesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of hUCB plasma on the mitogen-induced proliferation of mononuclear cells (MNCs) isolated from the peripheral blood of ALS patients and apoptotic activity by detection of caspase 3/7 expression of the isolated MNCs in vitro. Three distinct responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced proliferation of MNCs were observed, which were independent of age, disease duration, and the ALS rating scale: Group I responded normally to PHA, Group II showed no response to PHA, while Group III showed a hyperactive response to PHA. hUCB plasma attenuated the hyperactive response (Group III) and potentiated the normal response in Group I ALS patients, but did not alter that of the nonresponders to PHA (Group II). The elevated activity of caspase 3/7 observed in the MNCs from ALS patients was significantly reduced by hUCB plasma treatment. Thus, study results showing different cell responses to mitogen suggest alteration in lymphocyte functionality in ALS patients that may be a sign of immune deficiency in the nonresponders and autoimmunity alterations in the hyperactive responders. The ability of hUCB plasma to modulate the mitogen cell response and reduce caspase activity suggests that the use of hUCB plasma alone, or with

  5. Effect of N-nitrosodimethylamine on inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and production of nitric oxide by neutrophils and mononuclear cells: the role of JNK signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jablonska, Ewa; Garley, Marzena; Jablonski, Jakub; Radziwon, Piotr

    2011-07-01

    In neutrophils (PMN) and mononuclear cells (PBMC), one of the enzymes responsible for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis is inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Changes in iNOS expression result from various signalling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activated by endogenic and exogenic factors. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a xenobiotic with widespread occurrence in human environment and has an effect on cells of the immune system. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of NDMA on iNOS expression and NO production by human PMN and PBMC cells in the light of superoxide anion production by PMN cells. Moreover, the role of JNK and p38 pathways in NO production with involvement of iNOS was studied. Additionally, the function of JNK pathway in generation of superoxide anion was determined. Moreover, nitrotyrosine expression was studied in PMN and PBMC cells in the presence of NDMA. This work shows that NDMA increases iNOS expression and NO production by PMN and PBMC cells. In addition, elevated expression of phospho-JNK and phospho-p38, which are markers of JNK and p38 MAPK pathways activation, were observed. Lower iNOS expression and NO production by neutrophils exposed to extended action of NDMA were observed after application of inhibitor of JNK and p38 pathways. Lower phospho-p38 expression in PMN stimulated by NDMA was found as a result of arresting JNK pathway, whereas, application of inhibitor of p38 pathway resulted in enhanced phospho-JNK expression in PMN and PBMC cells. Increased ability to release superoxide anion by NDMA-stimulated PMN cells was observed. This ability was reduced after the application of inhibitor of JNK pathway. In PMN and PBMC cells exposed to NDMA, an increased expression of nitrotyrosine, which is dependant on JNK and p38 pathways that are activated by this particular xenobiotic, was observed. Generally, increased induction of iNOS related to elevated production of NO by PMN and PBMC

  6. Proliferation and TH1/TH2 cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after treatment with cypermethrin and mancozeb in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, human cell-based assays are gaining attention in assessments of immunomodulatory effects of chemicals. In the study here, the possible effects of cypermethrin and mancozeb on lymphocyte proliferation and proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α) and immunoregulatory cytokine (interferon- (IFN-) γ, interleukins (IL) 2, 4, 6, and 10) formation in vitro were investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and exposed for 6 hr to noncytotoxic doses (0.45-30 µM) of cypermethrin or mancozeb in the presence of activating rat S9 fraction. Cultures were then further incubated for 48 or 72 hr in fresh medium containing phytohemagglutinin (10 µg/mL) to assess, respectively, effects on cell proliferation (BrdU-ELISA method) and cytokine formation (flow cytometric bead immunoassays). Mancozeb induced dose-dependent increases in lymphocyte proliferation, inhibition of production of TNFα and the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10, and an increase in IFNγ (TH1 cytokine) production (at least 2-fold compared to control); mancozeb also induced inhibition of IL-4 (TH2) and stimulated IL-2 (TH1) production, albeit only in dose-related manners for each. In contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant effects on proliferation or cytokine profiles. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of our in vitro findings.

  7. In vitro response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel subjected to nitriding and collagen coating treatments.

    PubMed

    Stio, Maria; Martinesi, Maria; Treves, Cristina; Borgioli, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification treatments can be used to improve the biocompatibility of austenitic stainless steels. In the present research two different modifications of AISI 316L stainless steel were considered, low temperature nitriding and collagen-I coating, applied as single treatment or in conjunction. Low temperature nitriding produced modified surface layers consisting mainly of S phase, which enhanced corrosion resistance in PBS solution. Biocompatibility was assessed using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in culture. Proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, release of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, IL-10), secretion of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and its inhibitor TIMP-1, and the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-9 were determined. While the 48-h incubation of PBMC with all the sample types did not negatively influence cell proliferation, LDH and MMP-9 levels, suggesting therefore a good biocompatibility, the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines was always remarkable when compared to that of control cells. However, in the presence of the nitrided and collagen coated samples, the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β decreased, while that of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 increased, in comparison with the untreated AISI 316L samples. Our results suggest that some biological parameters were ameliorated by these surface treatments of AISI 316L.

  8. Direct intramyocardial transthoracic transplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells for non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy: INTRACELL, a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Roberto T.; Fracasso, James; Valle, Felipe H.; Castro, Iran; Nardi, Nance B.; Sant'Anna, João Ricardo M.; Nesralla, Ivo Abrahão; Kalil, Renato A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We tested the hypothesis that direct intramyocardial injection of bone marrow mononuclear cells in patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy can improve left ventricular function and physical capacity. Methods Thirty non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <35% were randomized at a 1:2 ratio into two groups, control and treated. The bone marrow mononuclear cells group received 1.06±108 bone marrow mononuclear cells through mini-thoracotomy. There was no intervention in the control group. Assessment was carried out through clinical evaluations as well as a 6-min walk test, nuclear magnectic resonance imaging and echocardiogram. Results The bone marrow mononuclear cells group showed a trend toward left ventricular ejection fraction improvement, with magnectic resonance imaging - at 3 months, showing an increase from 27.80±6.86% to 30.13±9.06% (P=0.08) and returning to baseline at 9 months (28.78%, P=0.77). Magnectic resonance imaging showed no changes in left ventricular ejection fraction during follow-up of the control group (28.00±4.32%, 27.42±7.41%, and 29.57±4.50%). Echocardiogram showed left ventricular ejection fraction improved in the bone marrow mononuclear cells group at 3 months, 25.09±3.98 to 30.94±9.16 (P=0.01), and one year, 30.07±7.25% (P=0.001). The control group showed no change (26.1±4.4 vs 26.5±4.7 and 30.2±7.39%, P=0.25 and 0.10, respectively). Bone marrow mononuclear cells group showed improvement in New York Heart Association functional class, from 3.40±0.50 to 2.41±0.79 (P=0.002); patients in the control group showed no change (3.37±0.51 to 2.71±0.95; P=0.17). Six-minute walk test improved in the bone marrow mononuclear cells group (348.00±93.51m at baseline to 370.41±91.56m at 12 months, P=0.66) and there was a non-significant decline in the control group (361.25±90.78m to 330.00±123.42m after 12 months, P=0.66). Group comparisons were non-significant. Conclusion

  9. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and chorionic plate-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote axon survival in a rat model of optic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sokjoong; Rho, Seungsoo; Kim, Gijin; Kim, So-Ra; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Kang, Myungseo; Lew, Helen

    2016-05-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cell therapy in regenerative medicine has great potential, particularly in the treatment of nerve injury. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) reportedly contains stem cells, which have been widely used as a hematopoietic source and may have therapeutic potential for neurological impairment. Although ongoing research is dedicated to the management of traumatic optic nerve injury using various measures, novel therapeutic strategies based on the complex underlying mechanisms responsible for optic nerve injury, such as inflammation and/or ischemia, are required. In the present study, a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury was established in order to examine the effects of transplanting human chorionic plate-derived MSCs (CP‑MSCs) isolated from the placenta, as well as human UCB mononuclear cells (CB-MNCs) on compressed rat optic nerves. Expression markers for inflammation, apoptosis, and optic nerve regeneration were analyzed, as well as the axon survival rate by direct counting. Increased axon survival rates were observed following the injection of CB‑MNCs at at 1 week post-transplantation compared with the controls. The levels of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP‑43) were increased after the injection of CB‑MNCs or CP‑MSCs compared with the controls, and the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were also significantly increased following the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs. ERM-like protein (ERMN) and SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2) were found to be expressed in the optic nerves of the CP‑MSC-injected rats with ONC injury. The findings of our study suggest that the administration of CB‑MNCs or CP‑MSCs may promote axon survival through systemic concomitant mechanisms involving GAP‑43 and HIF‑1α. Taken together, these findings provide further understanding of the mechanisms repsonsible for optic nerve injury and may aid in the development of novel cell

  10. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and chorionic plate-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote axon survival in a rat model of optic nerve crush injury

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, SOKJOONG; RHO, SEUNGSOO; KIM, GIJIN; KIM, SO-RA; BAEK, KWANG-HYUN; KANG, MYUNGSEO; LEW, HELEN

    2016-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cell therapy in regenerative medicine has great potential, particularly in the treatment of nerve injury. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) reportedly contains stem cells, which have been widely used as a hematopoietic source and may have therapeutic potential for neurological impairment. Although ongoing research is dedicated to the management of traumatic optic nerve injury using various measures, novel therapeutic strategies based on the complex underlying mechanisms responsible for optic nerve injury, such as inflammation and/or ischemia, are required. In the present study, a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury was established in order to examine the effects of transplanting human chorionic plate-derived MSCs (CP-MSCs) isolated from the placenta, as well as human UCB mononuclear cells (CB-MNCs) on compressed rat optic nerves. Expression markers for inflammation, apoptosis, and optic nerve regeneration were analyzed, as well as the axon survival rate by direct counting. Increased axon survival rates were observed following the injection of CB-MNCs at at 1 week post-transplantation compared with the controls. The levels of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) were increased after the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs compared with the controls, and the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were also significantly increased following the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs. ERM-like protein (ERMN) and SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2) were found to be expressed in the optic nerves of the CP-MSC-injected rats with ONC injury. The findings of our study suggest that the administration of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs may promote axon survival through systemic concomitant mechanisms involving GAP-43 and HIF-1α. Taken together, these findings provide further understanding of the mechanisms repsonsible for optic nerve injury and may aid in the development of novel cell-based therapeutic strategies with

  11. Interferon (IFN) production by peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells of an elderly population

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.J.; Murasko, D.M.

    1986-03-05

    Previous investigations in the laboratory have reported decreased mitogen responses of PBM's from elderly individuals compared to responses of young adults to PHA and ConA. Current studies have investigated the role of IFN in this decreased T cell responsiveness of the elderly. Supernatants of PBM's from 80 elderly (mean age 85) and 50 young individuals (mean age 28) were assayed for antiviral activity, after incubation with optimum and supraoptimum concentrations of mitogen for 24-120 hrs. IFN levels were maximum for both elderly and young populations at 72 hrs coinciding with time of maximum proliferation as determined by uptake of /sup 3/H thymidine. IFN levels declined with longer incubation periods. All IFN produced was IFN-gamma as determined by sensitivity to pH 2 and by neutralizations with monoclonal antibody specific for human IFN-gamma and polyclonal antiserum specific for IFN-alpha. The elderly population's mean IFN titers for both PHA and ConA were about 39% of the mean titers of the young (p less than or equal to 0.02). Both elderly and young groups displayed significant positive correlation between the amount of IFN produced and the level of proliferation in response to the mitogens (p less than or equal to 0.036). Therefore, the above data suggests the decreased levels of IFN produced by elderly PBM's may be one of the factors responsible for the observed decreased proliferative response to mitogens.

  12. Antigenotoxic potential of aqueous extracts from the chanterelle mushroom, Cantharellus cibarius (higher Basidiomycetes), on human mononuclear cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Espinoza, Claudia; Garcia-Nieto, Edelmira; Esquivel, Adriana Montoya; Gonzalez, Monica Montiel; Bautista, Efrain Velasco; Ezquerro, Carmen Calderon; Santacruz, Libertad Juarez

    2013-01-01

    Cantharellus cibarius is one of the most important wild, edible, and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms growing at La Malinche National Park, Tlaxcala, Mexico; therefore, the assessment of its biological properties is of great interest to know its potential as an alternative treatment to chemopreventive strategies when it is consumed as part of a diet. Comet assay was used to evaluate the antigenotoxic properties of several concentrations of aqueous extracts (0.0125, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2% w/v) prepared at room temperature (22 ± 2°C). As a test system we used human mononuclear cells exposed to methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) in vitro according to 3 different protocols: previous, simultaneous, and posterior. Previous (0.0125%) and simultaneous (0.1%) treatments resulted in the highest inhibitory efficiency. In the former, the cells assessed showed a tail length of 94.9 ± 64 µm; in the latter, the tails measured 106.2 ± 40 µm. Resulting percentages of reduction in damage were 236% and 196.1%, respectively. We did not obtain a dose-dependent response. The mean tail length for each protocol (previous, 133.1 ± 80 µm; simultaneous, 127.8 ± 57 µm; posterior, 146.3 ± 74 µm) was statistically significant with regard to the positive control (MMS).

  13. Quantification of Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVpco) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, lymph nodes and plasma of naturally infected cougars.

    PubMed

    Blake, David J; Graham, Jon; Poss, Mary

    2006-04-01

    Infection of domestic cats with Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) results in a fatal immunodeficiency disease, similar to Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) in humans. Elevated plasma viral loads in domestic cats are correlated to decreased survival time and disease progression. However, FIV is also maintained as an apathogenic infection in other members of the family Felidae including cougars, Puma concolour (FIVpco). It is not known whether the lack of disease in cougars is a result of diminished virus replication. A real-time PCR assay was developed to quantify both FIVpco proviral and plasma viral loads in naturally infected cougars. Proviral loads quantified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) ranged from 2.90 x 10(1) to 6.72 x 10(4) copies per 10(6) cells. Plasma viral loads ranged from 2.30 x 10(3) to 2.81 x 10(6) RNA copies ml(-1). These data indicate that FIVpco viral loads are comparable to viral loads observed in endemic and epidemic lentivirus infections. Thus, the lack of disease in cougars is not due to low levels of virus replication. Moreover, significant differences observed among cougar PBMC proviral loads correlated to viral lineage and cougar age (P=0.014), which suggests that separate life strategies exist within FIVpco lineages. This is the first study to demonstrate that an interaction of lentivirus lineage and host age significantly effect proviral loads.

  14. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (SecPBMC), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-SecPBMC), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-SecPBMC had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-SecPBMC had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-SecPBMC significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  15. Immune Profile of Obese People and In Vitro Effects of Red Grape Polyphenols on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Sergio; Donvito, Ilaria; Campanella, Angelo; Silvestris, Franco; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The in vitro ability of polyphenols, extracted from red grape, to modulate peripheral blood mononuclear cell responses has been evaluated in 20 obese (Ob) people. With regard to cytokine release in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17 were higher in the Ob than in healthy (H) subjects. Vice versa, IL-21 concentrations were detected only in H people but they were undetectable in the Ob counterpart. In general terms, levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α were higher in Ob people when compared to H controls. On the other hand, polyphenols did not modify IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17 levels. However, an increase in IL-2 was observed in H individuals, whereas its levels were decreased in the Ob counterpart. Polyphenols significantly increased IL-10 release from H donors, whereas a trend to increase was observed in Ob people. In addition, polyphenols were able to significantly increase levels of H IL-21, while this was not the case in Ob people. Since IL-21 is an inducer of Th17 cells, it is likely that polyphenols may suppress the sources of this cytokine via production of IL-10. Accordingly, polyphenols decreased IL-1β and IL-6 release in comparison to H controls. PMID:28243360

  16. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-04-29

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (Sec(PBMC)), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-Sec(PBMC)), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-Sec(PBMC) had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-Sec(PBMC) significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting.

  17. Ciamexone suppressed anti-islet ADCC of mononuclear cells and serum from type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Köhler, E; Knospe, S; Hahn, H J; Roemer, K G; Diamantstein, T

    1989-05-01

    ADCC (Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity) against xenogenic islets has frequently been found in newly diagnosed Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetics suggesting that when combined with autologous serum in vitro, the destruction of islet cells caused by mononuclear cells (MNC) reflects islet destruction in vivo. In this study the ability of Ciamexone to suppress the anti-islet ADCC in vitro was investigated. We selected both ADCC positive and ADCC negative subjects from a group of Type 1 diabetics. The targets, islets from neonatal rats, were incubated for one hour with the probands serum. The ADCC was then measured by the 51Cr-release of the serum-treated islets after a 6h-incubation with MNC of the same donor. Results both with and without co-incubation of Ciamexone were compared. Ciamexone does not influence the spontaneous 51Cr-release from neonatal rat islets treated with the probands serum but significantly suppresses the anti-islet ADCC. The fact that Ciamexone suppresses anti-islet ADCC may explain its possible effectiveness in Type 1 diabetes.

  18. Intrauterine insemination of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells prior to embryo transfer improves clinical outcome for patients with repeated implantation failures.

    PubMed

    Madkour, Aicha; Bouamoud, Nouzha; Louanjli, Noureddine; Kaarouch, Ismail; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Sefrioui, Omar

    2016-02-01

    Implantation failure is a major limiting factor in assisted reproduction improvement. Dysfunction of embryo-maternal immuno-tolerance pathways may be responsible for repeated implantation failures. This fact is supported by immunotropic theory stipulating that maternal immune cells, essentially uterine CD56+ natural killer cells, are determinants of implantation success. In order to test this hypothesis, we applied endometrium immuno-modulation prior to fresh embryo transfer for patients with repeated implantation failures. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from repeated implantation failure patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology cycles. On the day of ovulation induction, cells were isolated and then cultured for 3 days and transferred into the endometrium cavity prior to fresh embryo transfer. This immunotherapy was performed on 27 patients with repeated implantation failures and compared with another 27 patients who served as controls. Implantation and clinical pregnancy were increased significantly in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell test versus control (21.54, 44.44 vs. 8.62, 14.81%). This finding suggests a clear role for endometrium immuno-modulation and the inflammation process in implantation success. Our study showed the feasibility of intrauterine administration of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells as an effective therapy to improve clinical outcomes for patients with repeated implantation failures and who are undergoing in vitro fertilization cycles.

  19. Fc receptor-bearing peripheral blood mononuclear cells in breast cancer patients: a possible marker of tumour burden and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, J; McPherson, T A

    1981-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to identify and quantitate peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells possessing high avidity Fc receptors in 105 patients upon referral to the breast cancer clinic at the Cross Cancer Institute. The cell detected was shown to be a non-adherent PBM, probably belonging to the T or null cell population. The mean percentage +/- 2 standard deviations of PBM-positive cells in 75 patients with no disease or benign breast disease was 5.3 +/- ;6.7, and this was significantly (P less than 0.001) less than the percentage found for 31 patients with breast cancer. The percentage of PBM-positive cells correlated directly with tumour burden in patient with small (less than or equal to 5 cm) tumours without regional node or extranodal metastases (5/13 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM) and in those with small tumours plus regional node metastases, but without extranodal metastases (8/10 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM). This correlation was less, however, in patients with large tumours (greater than 5 cm), and in those with extranodal metastases (4/8 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM), and in patients tested postoperatively (1/13 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM) even though 6!13 had regional node metastases at the time of surgery. Thus, this relatively simple assay, which can be done on peripheral blood samples, may turn out to be useful in patients with breast cancer as a prognostic marker insofar as it may be an indirect indicator of tumour burden preoperatively. If so, it may lead to a more aggressive postoperative adjuvant therapy approach to the subpopulation of node-negative PBM-positive breast cancer patients than is currently used for node-negative patients. PMID:7035033

  20. Infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells transmit latent varicella zoster virus infection to the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Wang, Mingli; Chen, Jason J; Gershon, Michael D; Gershon, Anne A

    2014-10-01

    Latent wild-type (WT) and vaccine (vOka) varicella zoster virus (VZV) are found in the human enteric nervous system (ENS). VZV also infects guinea pig enteric neurons in vitro, establishes latency and can be reactivated. We therefore determined whether lymphocytes infected in vitro with VZV secrete infectious virions and can transfer infection in vivo to the ENS of recipient guinea pigs. T lymphocytes (CD3-immunoreactive) were preferentially infected following co-culture of guinea pig or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with VZV-infected HELF. VZV proliferated in the infected T cells and expressed immediate early and late VZV genes. Electron microscopy confirmed that VZV-infected T cells produced encapsulated virions. Extracellular virus, however, was pleomorphic, suggesting degradation occurred prior to release, which was confirmed by the failure of VZV-infected T cells to secrete infectious virions. Intravenous injection of WT- or vOka-infected PBMCs, nevertheless, transmitted VZV to recipient animals (guinea pig > human lymphocytes). Two days post-inoculation, lung and liver, but not gut, contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4, 40, 66 and 67. Twenty-eight days after infection, gut contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4 and 66 but neither DNA nor transcripts could any longer be found in lung or liver. In situ hybridization revealed VZV DNA in enteric neurons, which also expressed ORF63p (but not ORF68p) immunoreactivity. Observations suggest that VZV infects T cells, which can transfer VZV to and establish latency in enteric neurons in vivo. Guinea pigs may be useful for studies of VZV pathogenesis in the ENS.

  1. Infected Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Transmit Latent Varicella Zoster Virus Infection to the Guinea Pig Enteric Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lin; Wang, Mingli; Chen, Jason J.; Gershon, Michael D.; Gershon, Anne A.

    2014-01-01

    Latent wild-type (WT) and vaccine (vOka) varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are found in the human enteric nervous system (ENS). VZV also infects guinea pig enteric neurons in vitro, establishes latency and can be reactivated. We therefore determined whether lymphocytes infected in vitro with VZV secrete infectious virions and can transfer infection in vivo to the ENS of recipient guinea pigs. T lymphocytes (CD3-immunoreactive) were preferentially infected following co-culture of guinea pig or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with VZV-infected HELF. VZV proliferated in the infected T cells and expressed immediate early and late VZV genes. Electron microscopy confirmed that VZV-infected T cells produced encapsulated virions. Extracellular virus, however, was pleomorphic, suggesting degradation occurred prior to release, which was confirmed by the failure of VZV-infected T cells to secrete infectious virions. Intravenous injection of WT- or vOka-infected PBMCs, nevertheless, transmitted VZV to recipient animals (guinea pig > human lymphocytes). Two days post-inoculation, lung and liver, but not gut, contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4, 40, 66 and 67. Twenty-eight days after infection, gut contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4 and 66 but neither DNA nor transcripts could any longer be found in lung or liver. In situ hybridization revealed VZV DNA in enteric neurons, which also expressed ORF63p (but not ORF68p) immunoreactivity. Observations suggest that VZV infects T cells, which can transfer VZV to and establish latency in enteric neurons in vivo. Guinea pigs may be useful for studies of VZV pathogenesis in the ENS. PMID:24965252

  2. Spectroscopic and computational insight into the activation of O2 by the mononuclear Cu center in polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Christian H; Qayyum, Munzarin F; Wong, Shaun D; Xu, Feng; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Walton, Daniel J; Young, Nigel A; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H; Johansen, Katja Salomon; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-06-17

    Strategies for O2 activation by copper enzymes were recently expanded to include mononuclear Cu sites, with the discovery of the copper-dependent polysaccharide monooxygenases, also classified as auxiliary-activity enzymes 9-11 (AA9-11). These enzymes are finding considerable use in industrial biofuel production. Crystal structures of polysaccharide monooxygenases have emerged, but experimental studies are yet to determine the solution structure of the Cu site and how this relates to reactivity. From X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies, we observed a change from four-coordinate Cu(II) to three-coordinate Cu(I) of the active site in solution, where three protein-derived nitrogen ligands coordinate the Cu in both redox states, and a labile hydroxide ligand is lost upon reduction. The spectroscopic data allowed for density functional theory calculations of an enzyme active site model, where the optimized Cu(I) and (II) structures were consistent with the experimental data. The O2 reactivity of the Cu(I) site was probed by EPR and stopped-flow absorption spectroscopies, and a rapid one-electron reduction of O2 and regeneration of the resting Cu(II) enzyme were observed. This reactivity was evaluated computationally, and by calibration to Cu-superoxide model complexes, formation of an end-on Cu-AA9-superoxide species was found to be thermodynamically favored. We discuss how this thermodynamically difficult one-electron reduction of O2 is enabled by the unique protein structure where two nitrogen ligands from His1 dictate formation of a T-shaped Cu(I) site, which provides an open coordination position for strong O2 binding with very little reorganization energy.

  3. DNA profiling by array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and tumor tissue cell in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Baik, Seung-Ho; Jee, Bo-Keun; Choi, Jin-Soo; Yoon, Hyoung-Kyu; Lee, Kweon-Haeng; Kim, Yeul-Hong; Lim, Young

    2009-09-01

    Lung tumor cell DNA copy number alteration (CNA) was expected to display specific patterns such as a large-scale amplification or deletion of chromosomal arms, as previously published data have reported. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) CNA however, was expected to show normal variations in cancer patients as well as healthy individuals, and has thus been used as normal control DNA samples in various published studies. We performed array CGH to measure and compare genetic changes in terms of the CNA of PBMC samples as well as DNA isolated from tumor tissue samples, obtained from 24 non-small cell lung cancer patients. Contradictory to expectations, our studies showed that the PBMC CNA also showed chromosomal variant regions. The list included well-known tumor-associated NTRK1, FGF8, TP53, and TGFbeta1 genes and potentially novel oncogenes such as THPO (3q27.1), JMJD1B, and EGR1 (5q31.2), which was investigated in this study. The results of this study highlighted the connection between PBMC and tumor cell genomic DNA in lung cancer patients. However, the application of these studies to cancer prognosis may pose a challenge due to the large amount of information contained in genetic predisposition and family history that has to be processed for useful downstream clinical applications.

  4. A novel and simple method for generation of human dendritic cells from unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells within 2 days: its application for induction of HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cells in the hu-PBL SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Akira; Tanaka, Reiko; Saito, Mineki; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2013-01-01

    Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the regulation of adaptive immune responses, they have been ideal candidates for cell-based immunotherapy of cancers and infections in humans. Generally, monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) were generated from purified monocytes by multiple steps of time-consuming physical manipulations for an extended period cultivation. In this study, we developed a novel, simple and rapid method for the generation of type-1 helper T cell (Th1)-stimulating human DCs directly from bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs were cultivated in the presence of 20 ng/ml of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, 20 ng/ml of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and 1,000 U/ml of interferon-β for 24 h followed by 24 h maturation with a cytokine cocktail containing 10 ng/ml of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), 10 ng/ml of IL-1β and 1 μg/ml of prostaglandin E2. The phenotype and biological activity of these new DCs for induction of allogeneic T cell proliferation and cytokine production were comparable to those of the MDDCs. Importantly, these new DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV-1 could generated HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cell responses in humanized mice reconstituted with autologous PBMCs from HIV-1-negative donors. This simple and quick method for generation of functional DCs will be useful for future studies on DC-mediated immunotherapies.

  5. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells enhance recovery after acute ischemic stroke in young and middle-aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Brenneman, Miranda; Sharma, Sushil; Harting, Matthew; Strong, Roger; Cox, Charles S; Aronowski, Jarek; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I

    2010-01-01

    We investigated intra-arterially administered autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNCs) in rats with acute ischemic stroke. Long Evans rats (2 to 3 months or 12 months old) underwent tandem reversible common carotid artery (CCA)/middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion (CCAo/MCAo) for 3 h and then 24 h later underwent tibial bone marrow harvest. Ten million or 4 million cells were re-injected by an intra-carotid infusion. Control animals underwent marrow needle insertion and then saline injection into the carotid artery. Animals were assessed on a battery of neurological tests. MNCs in the ischemic brain were tracked using Q-dot nanocrystal labeling. Infarct volume and cytokines in the ischemia-affected brain were analyzed. Cell-treated animals in the younger and older groups showed improvement from 7 to 30 days after stroke compared with vehicle-treated animals. MNCs significantly reduced infarct volume compared with saline. There was a significant reduction in tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-β, IL-6, and a significant increase in IL-10 in injured brains harvested from the cell-treated groups compared with saline controls. Labeled MNCs were found in the peri-infarcted area at 1 h and exponentially decreased over the ensuing week after injection. Autologous bone marrow MNCs can be safely harvested from rodents after stroke, migrate to the peri-infarct area, enhance recovery, and modulate the post-ischemic inflammatory response. PMID:19773802

  6. Male microchimerism at high levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from women with end stage renal disease before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Albano, Laetitia; Rak, Justyna M; Azzouz, Doua F; Cassuto-Viguier, Elisabeth; Gugenheim, Jean; Lambert, Nathalie C

    2012-01-01

    Patients with end stage renal diseases (ESRD) are generally tested for donor chimerism after kidney transplantation for tolerance mechanism purposes. But, to our knowledge, no data are available on natural and/or iatrogenic microchimerism (Mc), deriving from pregnancy and/or blood transfusion, acquired prior to transplantation. In this context, we tested the prevalence of male Mc using a real time PCR assay for DYS14, a Y-chromosome specific sequence, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 55 women with ESRD, prior to their first kidney transplantation, and compared them with results from 82 healthy women. Male Mc was also quantified in 5 native kidney biopsies obtained two to four years prior to blood testing and in PBMC from 8 women collected after female kidney transplantation, several years after the initial blood testing. Women with ESRD showed statistically higher frequencies (62%) and quantities (98 genome equivalent cells per million of host cells, gEq/M) of male Mc in their PBMC than healthy women (16% and 0.3 gEq/M, p<0.00001 and p = 0.0005 respectively). Male Mc was increased in women with ESRD whether they had or not a history of male pregnancy and/or of blood transfusion. Three out of five renal biopsies obtained a few years prior to the blood test also contained Mc, but no correlation could be established between earlier Mc in a kidney and later presence in PBMC. Finally, several years after female kidney transplantation, male Mc was totally cleared from PBMC in all women tested but one. This intriguing and striking initial result of natural and iatrogenic male Mc persistence in peripheral blood from women with ESRD raises several hypotheses for the possible role of these cells in renal diseases. Further studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms of recruitment and persistence of Mc in women with ESRD.

  7. Effects of Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides on Apoptosis, Cellular Adhesion, and Oxidative Damage in Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells of Mice Exposed to Ionizing Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Pang, Hua; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Qiong; Xu, Lu; Liu, Qian; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lycium barbarum has been used for more than 2500 years as a traditional herb and food in China. We investigated the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) on apoptosis, oxidative damage, and expression of adhesion molecules in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNC) of mice injured by ionizing radiation. Kunming mice were exposed to X-rays; then mice in the LBP groups were continuously injected with various concentrations of LBP intraperitoneally for 14 days. Mice in the control group were continuously injected with normal saline (NS) by the same route for 14 days. A normal group was set up. After 1, 7, and 14 days of treatment, mice were killed and BMNC were extracted. Cell cycle, apoptosis, and the expression of adhesion molecules CD44 and CD49d were detected by flow cytometry. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were identified by colorimetric analyses. LBP significantly decreased the percentage of G0/G1 phase, apoptosis, MDA level, and expression of CD44 and CD49d and distinctly increased the activity of SOD. LBP showed a protective effect on BMNC against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis and oxidative damage and altered the expression of adhesion molecule. PMID:27314019

  8. Investigating the specific core genetic-and-epigenetic networks of cellular mechanisms involved in human aging in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-02-23

    Aging is an inevitable part of life for humans, and slowing down the aging process has become a main focus of human endeavor. Here, we applied a systems biology approach to construct protein-protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic networks, i.e. genetic and epigenetic networks (GENs), of elderly individuals and young controls. We then compared these GENs to extract aging mechanisms using microarray data in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, microRNA (miRNA) data, and database mining. The core GENs of elderly individuals and young controls were obtained by applying principal network projection to GENs based on Principal Component Analysis. By comparing the core networks, we identified that to overcome the accumulated mutation of genes in the aging process the transcription factor JUN can be activated by stress signals, including the MAPK signaling, T-cell receptor signaling, and neurotrophin signaling pathways through DNA methylation of BTG3, G0S2, and AP2B1 and the regulations of mir-223 let-7d, and mir-130a. We also address the aging mechanisms in old men and women. Furthermore, we proposed that drugs designed to target these DNA methylated genes or miRNAs may delay aging. A multiple drug combination comprising phenylalanine, cholesterol, and palbociclib was finally designed for delaying the aging process.

  9. Photoacoustic detection of hemozoin in human mononuclear cells as an early indicator of malaria infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Jonathan R.; Kariuki, Michael; Beerntsen, Brenda T.; Viator, John A.

    2010-02-01

    Malaria is a blood borne infection affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide2. The parasites reproduce within the blood cells, eventually causing their death and lysis. This process releases the parasites into the blood, continuing the cycle of infection. Usually, malaria is diagnosed only after a patient presents symptoms, including high fever, nausea, and, in advanced cases, coma and death. While invading the bloodstream of a host, malaria parasites convert hemoglobin into an insoluble crystal, known as hemozoin. These crystals, approximately several hundred nanometers in size, are contained within red blood cells and white blood cells that ingest free hemozoin in the blood. Thus, infected red blood cells and white blood cells contain a unique optical absorber that can be detected in blood samples using static photoacoustic detection methods. We separated the white blood cells from malaria infected blood and tested it in a photoacoustic set up using a tunable laser system consisting of an optical parametric oscillator pumped by an Nd:YAG laser with pulse duration of 5 ns. Our threshold of detection was 10 infected white blood cells per microliter, which is more sensitive than current diagnosis methods using microscopic analysis of blood.

  10. Infection dynamics of Torque teno sus virus types 1 and 2 in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Tshering, Chenga; Takagi, Mitsuhiro; Deguchi, Eisaburo

    2012-04-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the presence of Torque teno sus virus types 1 (TTSuV1) and 2 (TTSuV2) in a longitudinally (14 to 150 days of age) collected paired pooled sera (pSE) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (pPBMCs) using nested polymerase chain reaction. The detection rate of TTSuV1 in pSE increased from 14 to 90 days of age, but a progressive decline was observed from 120 to 150 days of age, while in pPBMC, a high value was maintained till the end of growing-finishing period. On the contrary, except in PBMCs at 30 days of age, high detection rates of TTSuV2 were found in both pSE and pPBMCs in all sampling ages. The detection rate of TTSuVs between pSE and pPBMCs was positively correlated at all sampling ages except for TTSuV1 at 150 days of age. This is the first study showing the presence of TTSuVs in PBMCs from pigs and describing the in vivo infection dynamics of TTSuV in paired sera and PBMCs during the entire growing and finishing periods of pigs reared in conventional farms.

  11. Quantification of HIV-1 proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using a high throughput four-competitor competitive PCR.

    PubMed

    Comandini, U V; Sönnerborg, A; Vahlne, A; Yun, Z

    1997-12-01

    A multiple competitor PCR (mcPCR) was developed to quantify HIV-1 proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). DNA extracted from a mixture of HIV infected PBMC and four size-mutated DNA competitors were co-amplified. The Cy5-fluorescence labelled PCR products were denatured by heating, separated using an automated DNA sequencer and quantified by a fragment analysis computer software. An internal standard was generated by plotting the peak areas of the four competitors against their inputs. Based on the internal standard, HIV sample DNA was quantified by extrapolating the corresponding signal. The linear range of the mcPCR was three log wide and the quantitation limit was about 20 copies of HIV DNA/10(6) PBMC. Using the mcPCR, HIV DNA was quantified from 14 long-term non progressors (LTNP) and 14 patients with advanced disease. A significantly lower copy number of HIV DNA was obtained in the LTNP (p = 0.018). These data suggest that the mcPCR is sensitive, reliable and especially useful for HIV DNA quantification of a large number of clinical samples.

  12. Differential expression analysis of miRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with non-segmental vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Keyu; Liang, Jianhua; Yang, Hong; Dang, Ningning; Yang, Xi; Kong, Yi

    2015-02-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentary skin disease that may follow a pattern of multifactorial inheritance. The essential factors of its immunopathogenesis is thought to be the selective destruction of melanocytes. As a new class of microregulators of gene expression, miRNA have been reported to play vital roles in autoimmune diseases, metabolic diseases and cancer. This study sought to characterize the different miRNA expression pattern in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with non-segmental vitiligo (NSV) and healthy individuals and to examine their direct responses to thymosin α1 (Tα1) treatment. The miRNA expression profile in the PBMC of patients with NSV was analyzed using Exiqon's miRCURY LNA microRNA Array. The differentially expressed miRNA were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found that the expression levels of miR-224-3p and miR-4712-3p were upregulated, and miR-3940-5p was downregulated in the PBMC. The common clinical immune modulator Tα1 changed the miRNA expression profile. Our analysis showed that differentially expressed miRNA were associated with the mechanism of immune imbalance of vitiligo and that Tα1 could play an important role in changing the expression of these miRNA in the PBMC of patients with NSV. This study provided further evidence that miRNA may serve as novel drug targets for vitiligo therapeutic evaluation.

  13. Hepatitis C virus RNA detection in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Cai, Qing; Chen, You-Chun; Zhang, Mu-Sen; Guan, Jian; Li, Xiao-Juan

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the existence and clinical significance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in the serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with hepatitis C. METHODS: HCV RNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested PCR) in serum and in PBMC of 46 patients with acute hepatitis C (AHC) and in 42 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). RESULTS: The positive rate of HCV RNA in PBMC of patients with CHC was markedly higher than that of patients with AHC (P < 0.01). The positive rates of HCV RNA in serum of patients with AHC and CHC and in PBMC of patients with CHC were significantly higher than those of anti-HCV positive patients with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (P < 0.01). HCV RNA was negative in the serum of two patients, but could be detected in PBMC. In 12 patients, anti HCV was negative while HCV RNA was positive in serum. CONCLUSION: (1) detection of serum HCV RNA by nested PCR might be helpful in the early diagnosis of anti-HCV negative hepatitis C; (2) liver damage in patients with hepatitis C might be correlated with HCV-viremia; (3) infection of PBMC by HCV might play an important role in chronic liver damage in patients with HCV and in the chronicity of its clinical course; and (4) PBMC might be considered as a “reservoir” for HCV. PMID:270419