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Sample records for activated mouse peritoneal

  1. MiR-16 regulates mouse peritoneal macrophage polarization and affects T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaoqin; Li, Xiaomin; Shen, Yating; Miao, Junjun; Liu, Hao; Li, Guoli; Wang, Zhengbing

    2016-10-01

    MiR-16 is a tumour suppressor that is down-regulated in certain human cancers. However, little is known on its activity in other cell types. In this study, we examined the biological significance and underlying mechanisms of miR-16 on macrophage polarization and subsequent T-cell activation. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were isolated and induced to undergo either M1 polarization with 100 ng/ml of interferon-γ and 20 ng/ml of lipopolysaccharide, or M2 polarization with 20 ng/ml of interleukin (IL)-4. The identity of polarized macrophages was determined by profiling cell-surface markers by flow cytometry and cytokine production by ELISA. Macrophages were infected with lentivirus-expressing miR-16 to assess the effects of miR-16. Effects on macrophage-T cell interactions were analysed by co-culturing purified CD4(+) T cells with miR-16-expressing peritoneal macrophages, and measuring activation marker CD69 by flow cytometry and cytokine secretion by ELISA. Bioinformatics analysis was applied to search for potential miR-16 targets and understand its underlying mechanisms. MiR-16-induced M1 differentiation of mouse peritoneal macrophages from either the basal M0- or M2-polarized state is indicated by the significant up-regulation of M1 marker CD16/32, repression of M2 marker CD206 and Dectin-1, and increased secretion of M1 cytokine IL-12 and nitric oxide. Consistently, miR-16-expressing macrophages stimulate the activation of purified CD4(+) T cells. Mechanistically, miR-16 significantly down-regulates the expression of PD-L1, a critical immune suppressor that controls macrophage-T cell interaction and T-cell activation. MiR-16 plays an important role in shifting macrophage polarization from M2 to M1 status, and functionally activating CD4(+) T cells. This effect is potentially mediated through the down-regulation of immune suppressor PD-L1.

  2. Autoantibodies against bromelainized mouse erythrocyte: strain distribution of serum idiotype expression and relative peritoneal cell activity.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, A; Poncet, P; Bussard, A

    1986-10-15

    Previously, we demonstrated that the naturally occurring mouse autoantibodies directed against bromelainized mouse red blood cells (BrMRBC) comprised a family of structurally related molecules bearing a common idiotypic determinant (CP) based on structural and idiotypic analysis of a series of anti-BrMRBC monoclonal autoantibodies derived from a fusion of peritoneal cells (PerC) with plasmacytomas. In the present studies, we have evaluated the quantitative expression of circulating CP idiotype related to autoantibodies against BrMRBC in relation to specific PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in an individual mouse of different strains. The data presented here show no direct relationship between serum CP idiotype expression and PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in an individual mouse of all strains tested. However, the circulating CP idiotype content is higher in strains, viz., CBA/J, NZB, C3H, BXSB, and Biozzi high responder (H) mice which exhibit a high perC autoantibody secretory activity against BrMRBC. The strains such as BALB/c, DBA2, SJL/J, CBA/N, and Biozzi low responder (L) express little or no circulating CP idiotype with a corresponding small or no PerC anti-BrMRBC activity. Furthermore, the PerC "auto"-immune phenomenon is markedly expressed in the normal CBA/J strain since these mice show a higher percentage ratio of CP idiotype over serum IgM (2.68%) as well as highest PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity (11,319 +/- 18,029 plaques per million viable cells) compared to other normal and autoimmune strains tested. Nevertheless, the highest circulating serum CP idiotype (49.4 micrograms/ml) is observed in the autoimmune NZB mouse. The immunodeficient CBA/N mice fail to express detectable levels of CP idiotype in their serum. The experiments conducted in genetically selected outbred Biozzi (H and L) strain have revealed remarkable differences in serum CP idiotype expression as well as PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in these two

  3. Interaction between LPS-induced NO production and IDO activity in mouse peritoneal cells in the presence of activated Valpha14 NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Ito, Hiroyasu; Ando, Kazuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hoshi, Masato; Tanaka, Ryo; Osawa, Yosuke; Yokochi, Takashi; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2009-11-13

    In this study, we demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) markedly increased nitric oxide (NO) production and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in mouse peritoneal cells in the presence of activated Valpha14 natural killer T cells. Moreover, LPS-induced NO production in peritoneal cells from IDO-knockout (KO) mice was more increased than that from wild-type mice. However, there was no significant difference in the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein between the wild-type and IDO-KO mice. No significant difference was also observed in the ratio of CD3- and DX5-positive cells and F4/80- and TLR4-positive cells in peritoneal cells between the wild-type and IDO-KO mice. Since the IDO activity was enhanced by an NO inhibitor, NO may be post-translationally consumed by inhibiting the IDO activity. IDO is well known to play an important role in immunosuppression during inflammatory disease. Therefore, the inhibition of IDO by NO may exacerbate inflammation in the peritoneal cavity.

  4. Relationship between membrane potential changes and superoxide-releasing capacity in resident and activated mouse peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, S.; Johnston, R.B. Jr.

    1985-11-01

    To understand better the molecular basis for the enhanced respiratory burst of activated macrophages (M phi), the relationship between the stimulus-induced changes in membrane potential and release of superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) in mouse peritoneal M phi was investigated. Resident M phi and M phi elicited by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-M phi) or obtained from animals infected with bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG-M phi) were used. LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi showed more pronounced changes in membrane potential (depolarization) and greater release of O/sub 2//sup -/ on contact with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) than did resident macrophages. The lag time between addition of stimulus and onset of release of O/sub 2//sup -/ was reduced in activated compared with resident cells. Membrane potential changes began 60 to 90 sec before release of O/sub 2//sup -/ could be detected in each cell type. The dose-response curves for triggering of membrane potential changes and O/sub 2//sup -/ release by PMA were identical. The magnitude of membrane potential changes and of O/sub 2//sup -/ release in LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi declined progressively during in vitro culture, and values on day 3 approached those in resident macrophages (deactivation). Extracellular glucose was required for effective stimulated change in membrane potential and O/sub 2//sup -/ release. These findings indicate that membrane potential changes are closely associated with O/sub 2//sup -/-releasing capacity in macrophages, and that the systems that mediate membrane potential changes and production of O/sub 2//sup -/ develop or decline concomitantly during activation or deactivation of the cells.

  5. Structure-activity relationships of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate for inhibitory effect on NO production in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisashi; Ando, Shin; Morikawa, Toshio; Kataoka, Shinya; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2005-04-01

    1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate from the rhizomes of Alpinia galanga inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages with an IC(50) value of 2.3 microM. To clarify the structure-activity relationship of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, various natural and synthetic phenylpropanoids and synthetic phenylbutanoids were examined, and the following structural requirements were clarified. (1) The para or ortho substitution of the acetoxyl and 1-acetoxypropenyl groups at the benzene ring was essential. (2) The S configuration of the 1'-acetoxyl group was preferable. (3) The presence of the 3-methoxyl group and disappearance of the 2'-3' double bond by hydrogenation reduced the activity. (4) The substitution of acetyl groups with propionyl or methyl groups reduced the activity. (5) Lengthening of the carbon chain between the 1'- and 2'-positions reduced the activity.

  6. 1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate as a new type inhibitor of interferon-beta production in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ando, Shin; Matsuda, Hisashi; Morikawa, Toshio; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2005-05-01

    1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate from the rhizomes of Alpinia galanga was known to show potent inhibitory effect on the production of nitric oxide (NO) in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages. To clarify its mechanism of action, the effects of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate on the expression of interferon-beta (IFN-beta) mRNA and activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), both of which participate in the induction of inducible NO synthase, were examined in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages. The results were compared with those of two inhibitors of the NF-kappaB activation, costunolide and caffeic acid phenethyl ester. 1'S-1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate inhibited IFN-beta mRNA expression as well as NF-kappaB activation, and two related compounds, (+/-)-1-acetoxy-1-(2-acetoxyphenyl)-2-propene and (+/-)-1-acetoxy-1-(4-acetoxyphenol)-3-butene, also inhibited IFN-beta mRNA expression. In addition, 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate inhibited the production of NO stimulated by poly(I:C) via Toll-like receptor 3.

  7. Oral administration of lipopolysaccharides activates B-1 cells in the peritoneal cavity and lamina propria of the gut and induces autoimmune symptoms in an autoantibody transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    About a half of the antierythrocyte autoantibody transgenic (autoAb Tg) mice, in which almost all B cells are detected in the spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches, but not in the peritoneal cavity, suffer from autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The occurrence of this disease is strongly linked to production of autoAb by activated peritoneal B-1 cells in the Tg mice. In this study, we have shown that oral administration of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) activated B-1 cells in the lamina propria of the gut as well as the peritoneal cavity in the healthy Tg mice and induced the autoimmune symptoms in all the Tg mice. The activation of peritoneal and lamina propria B-1 cells by enteric LPS is found not only in the anti-RBC autoAb Tg mice and normal mice but also in the aly mice which congenitally lack lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. These results suggest that B-1 cells in the two locations may form a common pool independent of Peyer's patches and lymph nodes, and can be activated by enteric thymus-independent antigens or polyclonal activators such as LPS. The induction of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in the Tg mice by enteric LPS through the activation of B-1 cells in the lamina propria of gut and in the peritoneal cavity suggests that B-1 cells and bacterial infection may play a pathogenic role in the onset of autoimmune diseases. PMID:8006578

  8. Use of the short-term inflammatory response in the mouse peritoneal cavity to assess the biological activity of leached vitreous fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, K; Addison, J; Miller, B G; Cullen, R T; Davis, J M

    1994-01-01

    We used a special-purpose glass microfiber sample, Johns-Manville Code 100/475, to study the effects of various acid and alkali treatments on biological activity as assessed by inflammation in the mouse peritoneal cavity, the leaching of Si, and the phase contrast optical microscopy (PCOM) fiber number. We used mild and medium treatments with oxalic acid and Tris buffer and harsh treatment with concentrated HCl and NaOH. Mild oxalic acid and Tris treatment for 2 weeks had no effect on any of the end-points, but prolonging the mild oxalic acid treatment time to 2 months reduced the biological activity and the fiber number. Medium oxalic acid treatment reduced the biological activity and the fiber number and caused a loss of Si. Medium Tris alkali treatment reduced the PCOM-countable fibers and the biological activity but did not cause a substantial loss of Si. Harsh treatment with strong HCl did not affect the fiber number or cause leaching but the biological activity was reduced; strong NaOH reduced the fiber number and biological activity, and caused marked leaching of Si. The medium oxalic acid conditions (pH 1.4) were more acid than those found in lung cells but produced the same effects (reduction in fiber number and biological activity) as the more physiological mild treatment (pH 4.0), when prolonged. This study suggests that medium oxalic acid treatment can be used as a short-term assay to compare loss of Si, reduction in fiber number, and change in biological activity of vitreous fibers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7882922

  9. Hydrogen peroxide-induced chemotaxis of mouse peritoneal neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Klyubin, I V; Kirpichnikova, K M; Gamaley, I A

    1996-08-01

    Directed locomotion of mouse peritoneal neutrophils under agarose was studied, and activity of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a chemoattractant was tested in its concentration range of 10(-6) to 10(-3) M. It has been found that H2O2 at low concentrations (about 10 microM) induces chemotactic activity. This activity was not affected by the presence of serum in the agarose medium. Use of bovine serum albumin instead of the heat-inactivated bovine serum in the medium had no effect on cell locomotion. The H2O2-induced chemotaxis was significantly reduced by catalase. Involvement of [Ca2+]i transients in the H2O2-induced chemotactic response was shown. These data indicate that H2O2 itself in small quantities can act as a chemoattractant without interacting with a plasma precursor to form a chemotactic factor. It has been suggested that H2O2 may form an important link similar to the second messenger in communication between the cells.

  10. Peritonitis

    MedlinePlus

    Acute abdomen; Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis; SBP; Cirrhosis - spontaneous peritonitis ... management of adult patients with ascites due to cirrhosis 2012. Hepatology . 2013;57(4):1651-1653. PMID: ...

  11. Immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Momoko; Ose, Saya; Nishi, Kosuke; Sugahara, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    We herein report the immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract (SAE) on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. SAE significantly enhanced the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α by both J774.1 cells and peritoneal macrophages by enhancing the expression levels of these cytokine genes. In addition, the phagocytosis activity of J774.1 cells was facilitated by SAE. Immunoblot analysis revealed that SAE activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB cascades. It was found that SAE activates macrophages through not only TLR4, but also other receptors. The production of IL-6 was significantly enhanced by peritoneal macrophages from SAE-administered BALB/c mice, suggesting that SAE has a potential to stimulate macrophage activity in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that SAE would be a beneficial functional food with immunostimulatory effects on macrophages.

  12. [Effects of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Peng, Yao-zong; Huang, Tao; Li, Ling; Mou, Shao-xia; Kou, Shu-ming; Li, Xue-gang

    2015-12-01

    This work was mainly studied the effects of the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro and preliminarily discussed the regulating mechanisms. The effect of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the vitality of macrophages was measured by the MTT assay. The effect of alkaloids on the phagocytosis of macrophages was determined by neutral red trial and respiratory burst activity was tested by NBT. The expressions of respiratory-burst-associated genes influenced by alkaloids were detected by qRT-PCR. The conformation change of membrane protein in macrophages by the impact of alkaloids was studied by fluorospectro-photometer. Results showed that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could increase the phagocytosis of macrophages in different level and berberine had the best effect. Berberine, coptisine and palmatine had up-regulation effects on respiratory burst activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated by PMA and regulatory activity on the mRNA expression of PKC, p40phox or p47phox, whereas the epiberberine had no significant influence on respiratory burst. Moreover, alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could change the conformation of membrane protein and the berberine showed the strongest activity. The results suggested that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma might activate macrophages through changing the conformation of membrane protein of macrophages and then enhanced the phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of macrophages. Furthermore, the regulatory mechanism of alkaloids on the respiratory burst activity of macrophages may be also related to the expression level of PKC, p40phox and p47phox.

  13. [Effects of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Peng, Yao-zong; Huang, Tao; Li, Ling; Mou, Shao-xia; Kou, Shu-ming; Li, Xue-gang

    2015-12-01

    This work was mainly studied the effects of the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro and preliminarily discussed the regulating mechanisms. The effect of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the vitality of macrophages was measured by the MTT assay. The effect of alkaloids on the phagocytosis of macrophages was determined by neutral red trial and respiratory burst activity was tested by NBT. The expressions of respiratory-burst-associated genes influenced by alkaloids were detected by qRT-PCR. The conformation change of membrane protein in macrophages by the impact of alkaloids was studied by fluorospectro-photometer. Results showed that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could increase the phagocytosis of macrophages in different level and berberine had the best effect. Berberine, coptisine and palmatine had up-regulation effects on respiratory burst activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated by PMA and regulatory activity on the mRNA expression of PKC, p40phox or p47phox, whereas the epiberberine had no significant influence on respiratory burst. Moreover, alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could change the conformation of membrane protein and the berberine showed the strongest activity. The results suggested that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma might activate macrophages through changing the conformation of membrane protein of macrophages and then enhanced the phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of macrophages. Furthermore, the regulatory mechanism of alkaloids on the respiratory burst activity of macrophages may be also related to the expression level of PKC, p40phox and p47phox. PMID:27141680

  14. Group V Secretory Phospholipase A2 Translocates to the Phagosome after Zymosan Stimulation of Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages and Regulates Phagocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Balestrieri, Barbara; Hsu, Victor W.; Gilbert, Huiya; Leslie, Christina C.; Han, Won K.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Arm, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported that group V secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) amplifies the action of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) α in regulating eicosanoid biosynthesis by mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with zymosan (Satake, Y., Diaz, B. L., Balestrieri, B., Lam, B. K., Kanaoka, Y., Grusby, M. J., and Arm, J. P. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 16488–16494). To further understand the role of group V sPLA2, we studied its localization in resting mouse peritoneal macrophages before and after stimulation with zymosan and the effect of deletion of the gene encoding group V sPLA2 on phagocytosis of zymosan. We report that group V sPLA2 is present in the Golgi apparatus and recycling endosome in the juxtanuclear region of resting peritoneal macrophages. Upon ingestion of zymosan by mouse peritoneal macrophages, group V sPLA2 is recruited to the phagosome. There it co-localizes with cPLA2α, 5-lipoxygenase, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, and leukotriene C4 synthase. Using immunostaining for the cysteinyl leukotrienes in carbodiimide-fixed cells, we show, for the first time, that the phagosome is a site of cysteinyl leukotriene formation. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages from group V sPLA2-null mice demonstrated a >50% attenuation in phagocytosis of zymosan particles, which was restored by adenoviral expression of group V sPLA2 but not group IIA sPLA2. These data demonstrate that group V sPLA2 contributes to the innate immune response both through regulation of eicosanoid generation in response to a phagocytic stimulus and also as a component of the phagocytic machinery. PMID:16407308

  15. Novel anti-inflammatory chalcone derivatives inhibit the induction of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Herencia, F; Ferrándiz, M L; Ubeda, A; Guillén, I; Dominguez, J N; Charris, J E; Lobo, G M; Alcaraz, M J

    1999-06-18

    In a previous work, we tested a series of chalcone derivatives as possible anti-inflammatory compounds. We now investigate the effects of three of those compounds, CHI, CH8 and CH12, on nitric oxide and prostanoid generation in mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and in the mouse air pouch injected with zymosan, where they showed a dose-dependent inhibition with inhibitory concentration 50% values in the microM range. This effect was not the consequence of a direct inhibitory action on enzyme activities. Our results demonstrated that chalcone derivatives inhibited de novo inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 synthesis, being a novel therapeutic approach for inflammatory diseases.

  16. Surface expression and rapid internalization of macrosialin (mouse CD68) on elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kurushima, H; Ramprasad, M; Kondratenko, N; Foster, D M; Quehenberger, O; Steinberg, D

    2000-01-01

    Macrosialin, the mouse homolog of human CD68, is a heavily glycosylated transmembrane protein found almost exclusively in macrophages. Its function remains uncertain. It has a high affinity for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in ligand blots and antibodies against the human homolog, CD68, inhibit the binding of oxidized LDL to a human monocyte-derived cell line (THP-1). However, there is still controversy as to whether macrosialin, found predominantly in late endosomes, is expressed at all on the plasma membrane. The present studies, done in thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, confirm that macrosialin is predominantly intracellular but show clearly that 10-15% of it is expressed on the cell surface. Exchange with intracellular pools occurs at an extremely high rate. The results are compatible with a surface function, including internalization of bound ligands or adhesion to surfaces.

  17. Immunoregulation by macrophages II. Separation of mouse peritoneal macrophages having tumoricidal and bactericidal activities and those secreting PGE and interleukin I

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, K.E.; Cahill, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    Macrophage subpopulations having bactericidal or tumoricidal activities and secreting interleukin I (IL1) or prostaglandin E (PGE) were identified through primary or secondary infection with Salmonella enteritidis and separated by sedimentation velocity. Bactericidal activity was measured by (3H)-thymidine release from Listeria monocytogenes and tumoricidal activity by 51Cr-release from C-4 fibrosarcoma or P815 mastocytoma cells. Macrophages with bactericidal activity were distinguished from those with tumoricidal activity a) during secondary infection when cytolytic activity occurred only at days 1-4 post injection and bactericidal activity remained high throughout and b) after sedimentation velocity separation. Cytolysis was consistently greatest among adherent cells of low sedimentation velocity, whereas cells with bactericidal activity increased in size during the infection. Tumour cytostasis (inhibition and promotion of (3H)-thymidine uptake) differed from cytolysis in that the former was more prolonged during infection and was also detected among large cells. Secretion of immunoregulatory molecules PGE and IL1 occurred maximally among different macrophage subpopulations separated by sedimentation velocity and depending on the type of stimulus used in vitro. There was an inverse correlation between IL1 production and PGE production after stimulation with C3-zymosan or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The development of immunity during infection may therefore be dependent upon the relative proportions of effector and regulatory macrophage subpopulations and the selective effects of environmental stimuli on these functions.

  18. Antibody-dependent cytolysis of chicken erythrocytes by an in vitro-established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Walker, W S; Demus, A

    1975-02-01

    An in vitro-established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages (IC-21) was tested for its ability to mediate the cytolysis of 51chromiun-labeled chicken erythrocytes. In the presence of specific antibody, but independently of complement, the macrophages phagocytized and lysed labeled erythrocytes. The phagocytic process proved to be functionally distinct from the cytolytic reaction as demonstrated by enhanced cytolysis in the presence of iodoacetate, an inhibitor of phagocytosis. This cell line, because of its effector activity in antibody-dependent cell-mediated immune reactions, will be useful in characterizing the mechanism(s) involved in macrophage-mediated cytolysis. PMID:1167563

  19. Regulation of interleukin-1 synthesis by histamine produced by mouse peritoneal macrophages per se.

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, H; Nakano, K

    1990-01-01

    The response of mouse peritoneal macrophages to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in induction of histidine decarboxylase (HDC) and, consequently, of histamine production. Concanavalin A had no effect on the reactions. Alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, a suicide inhibitor of HDC, attenuated, in a dose-dependent manner, both spontaneous and LPS-stimulated IL-1 synthesis by macrophages. IL-1 production was significantly blocked by either an H1 anti-histamine, diphenhydramine, or H2 anti-histamine ranitidine, in the absence of any exogenous histamine. Addition of exogenous histamine accentuated the IL-1 production by macrophages as a function of its dose. These results suggest that IL-1 production by mouse peritoneal macrophages is regulated by histamine synthesized in the system per se and that the effect of histamine is dependent on both H1 and H2 histamine receptors located on the surface of the cells. PMID:2312155

  20. HJB-1, a 17-hydroxy-jolkinolide B derivative, inhibits LPS-induced inflammation in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lei-Chang; Xu, Xiao-Han; Zhang, Na-Na; Liu, Ning; Wu, Dong-Lin; Wang, Yang; Peng, Qi-Sheng; Vandenplas, Michel; Wang, Hong-Bing; Sun, Wan-Chun

    2014-08-01

    Jolkinolide B (JB) and 17-hydroxy-JB (HJB) are diterpenoids from plants and it has been reported that the presence of a C-17 hydroxy group in JB significantly enhances the anti-inflammatory potency of JB. In this study, two HJB derivatives HJB-1 and HJB-2 were generated by the chemical modification of a 17-hydroxy group of HJB. HJB-1 more effectively inhibited TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 release in LPS-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages. In addition, HJB-1 reduced LPS-induced mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and iNOS in a concentration-dependent manner, but did not alter IL-10 mRNA expression. LPS-induced NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation were also effectively inhibited by HJB-1. These results demonstrate that HJB-1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages by inhibiting NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation and modification of a 17-hydroxy group of HJB may enhance the anti-inflammatory potency of HJB derivatives.

  1. A potential role of the NOD genetic background in mouse peritoneal macrophages for the development of primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hiroki; Kariya, Ryusho; Matsuda, Kouki; Kudo, Eriko; Katano, Harutaka; Okada, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Severe immunodeficient mice have become invaluable tools in human stem cell and tumor research. In this study, we compared the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages against primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) among Rag-2/Jak3 double-deficient (Rag-2(-/-)Jak3(-/-)) mice with NOD and non-NOD (Balb/c and C57/BL6). We also evaluated lymphomatous effusion and infiltration in a PEL xenograft mouse model using these severe immunodeficient mice. In the phagocytic assay, peritoneal macrophages in the NOD background phagocytosed CFSE-labeled BCBL-1, a PEL cell line, less efficiently than those in the non-NOD background. BCBL-1 cells were successfully engrafted into both the NOD background and non-NOD background; however, the volume of ascites of the NOD background was significantly higher than that of the non-NOD background. Moreover, the organ invasion of PEL cells was suppressed in non-NOD background mice. Thus, the NOD genetic background is considered to contribute to more lymphomatous effusion and the infiltration of PEL cells than a non-NOD background. Our results showed that the NOD background allowed more lymphomatous effusion and infiltration than other backgrounds and peritoneal macrophages played a critical role in preventing the growth and infiltration of PEL cells. PMID:26859781

  2. Stimulated arachidonate metabolism during foam cell transformation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Yokode, M; Kita, T; Kikawa, Y; Ogorochi, T; Narumiya, S; Kawai, C

    1988-01-01

    Changes in arachidonate metabolism were examined in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with various types of lipoproteins. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) was incorporated by macrophages and stimulated macrophage prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene C4 syntheses, respectively, 10.8- and 10.7-fold higher than by the control. Production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin, was also stimulated. No stimulation was found with native LDL, which was minimally incorporated by the cells. Acetylated LDL and beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), though incorporated more efficiently than oxidized LDL, also had no stimulatory effect. When oxidized LDL was separated into the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex and free lipid peroxides, most of the stimulatory activity was found in the former fraction, indicating that stimulation of arachidonate metabolism in the cell is associated with uptake of the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex. These results suggest that peroxidative modification of LDL could contribute to the progression of atheroma by stimulating arachidonate metabolism during incorporation into macrophages. Images PMID:3125226

  3. [The effect of products of plant and microbial origin on phagocytic function and on the release of oxygen free radicals by mouse peritoneal macrophages].

    PubMed

    Dolganiuc, A; Radu, L D; Olinescu, A

    1997-01-01

    The effect of in vivo stimulation with an aqueous extract obtained from roots of Symphytum officinale and Cantastim on mouse peritoneal macrophages was investigated. The results obtained showed that these products initially activated the respiratory burst of the cells and later inhibited it, activating the synthesis of catalase, SOD etc. These data suggest that macrophages challenged by various ingested antigens destroy them initially through oxygen dependent mechanisms and later through enzymatic digestion in order to retain unimpaired their epitopes. PMID:9235147

  4. Leonurus sibiricus induces nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo-Jin; Rim, Hong-Kun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Suh, Se-Eun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Na-Hyung; Choi, In-Young; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Il Kwang; Lee, Ju-Young; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Um, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2008-10-01

    Using mouse peritoneal macrophages, we have examined the mechanism by which Leonurus sibiricus (LS) regulates nitric oxide (NO) production. When LS was used in combination with recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma), there was a marked cooperative induction of NO production; however, LS by itself had no effect on NO production. The increased production of NO from rIFN-gamma plus LS-stimulated cells was almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaB. Furthermore, treatment of peritoneal macrophages with rIFN-gamma plus LS caused a significant increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. PDTC also decreased the effect of LS on TNF-alpha production significantly. Because NO and TNF-alpha play an important role in immune function and host defense, LS treatment could modulate several aspects of host defense mechanisms as a result of stimulation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase.

  5. Ingestion of yeast forms of Sporothrix schenckii by mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, L M; Kubelka, C F; Alviano, C S; Travassos, L R

    1983-01-01

    The ingestion by thioglycolate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages of yeast forms of two strains of Sporothrix schenckii was studied. Yeast forms opsonized with concanavalin A (ConA) were extensively phagocytized, and the phagocytic indexes depended on the concentration of ConA and apparently on the number of lectin receptors at the yeast surface as well. Neuraminidase treatment of S. schenckii increased the ingestion of unopsonized yeasts 7.7-fold. The addition of monosaccharides and derivatives partially inhibited phagocytosis. Mannose, rhamnose, and galactose, which are major constituents of S. schenckii surface antigens, reduced the phagocytic indexes by 40 to 50%. Glucosamine, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-acetylneuraminic acid were equally effective as inhibitors of phagocytosis. A mixture of five neutral sugars and glucosamine inhibited phagocytosis by 73%. The inhibitory effect of simple sugars could be amplified by using neuraminidase-treated yeast cells. Pentoses and glucose were inactive or slightly inhibitory. A purified rhamnomannan inhibited phagocytosis of the homologous strain, whereas partially purified peptidopolysaccharides were toxic to peritoneal macrophages. A partially purified galactomannan from S. schenckii was inhibitory (62% inhibition), and a peptidopolysaccharide fraction in which the O-linked carbohydrate chains had been removed neither was toxic to macrophages nor inhibited phagocytosis. Pretreatment of macrophages with simple sugars under conditions inhibiting ingestion or binding of S. schenckii did not affect phagocytosis of latex particles or sensitized sheep erythrocytes. The presence of receptors at the peritoneal macrophages which bind S. schenckii cell surface components is suggested. PMID:6832808

  6. Susceptibility and resistance to Echinococcus granulosus infection: Associations between mouse strains and early peritoneal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Merlino, Alicia; Capurro, Rafael; Dematteis, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    In helminth infections, there are no easy associations between host susceptibility and immune responses. Interestingly, immunity to cestodes - unlike most helminths - seems to require Th1-type effectors. In this sense, we reported recently that Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice are high and low susceptible strains, respectively, to experimental infection by Echinococcus granulosus. However, the role of the early cellular peritoneal response in such differential susceptibility is unknown. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of cytokines expression and cellular phenotypes in peritoneal cells from infected Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice. Additionally, Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were conducted to highlight the most relevant differences between strains. Finally, the anti-parasite activities of peritoneal cells were assessed through in vitro systems. PCAs clustered C57Bl/6 mice by their early mixed IL-5/TNF-α responses and less intense expression of Th2-type cytokines. Moreover, they exhibited lower counts of eosinophils and higher numbers of macrophages and B cells. Functional studies showed that peritoneal cells from infected C57Bl/6 mice displayed greater anti-parasite activities, in accordance with higher rates of NO production and more efficient ADCC responses. In conclusion, mild Th2-responses and active cellular mechanisms are key determinants in murine resistance to E. granulosus infection, supporting the cestode immune exception among helminth parasites. PMID:26658113

  7. Susceptibility and resistance to Echinococcus granulosus infection: Associations between mouse strains and early peritoneal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Merlino, Alicia; Capurro, Rafael; Dematteis, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    In helminth infections, there are no easy associations between host susceptibility and immune responses. Interestingly, immunity to cestodes - unlike most helminths - seems to require Th1-type effectors. In this sense, we reported recently that Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice are high and low susceptible strains, respectively, to experimental infection by Echinococcus granulosus. However, the role of the early cellular peritoneal response in such differential susceptibility is unknown. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of cytokines expression and cellular phenotypes in peritoneal cells from infected Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice. Additionally, Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were conducted to highlight the most relevant differences between strains. Finally, the anti-parasite activities of peritoneal cells were assessed through in vitro systems. PCAs clustered C57Bl/6 mice by their early mixed IL-5/TNF-α responses and less intense expression of Th2-type cytokines. Moreover, they exhibited lower counts of eosinophils and higher numbers of macrophages and B cells. Functional studies showed that peritoneal cells from infected C57Bl/6 mice displayed greater anti-parasite activities, in accordance with higher rates of NO production and more efficient ADCC responses. In conclusion, mild Th2-responses and active cellular mechanisms are key determinants in murine resistance to E. granulosus infection, supporting the cestode immune exception among helminth parasites.

  8. Change in degree of type 1 piliation of Escherichia coli during experimental peritonitis in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, M L; Wong, L; Silverblatt, F J

    1986-01-01

    To determine whether expression of type 1 pili varies during the course of Escherichia coli infection in vivo, mice were injected intraperitoneally with 5 X 10(7) CFU of piliated or nonpiliated phase variants per ml, and the degree of piliation was measured in peritoneal exudate by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition method. In the animals challenged with the piliated bacteria, the numbers of organisms increased a log over 9 h and the amount of pilus antigen decreased from 3 to 0.075 micrograms/10 bacteria. After a 4-h delay, nonpiliated bacteria also increased by one log over 9 h; however, the amount of piliation remained virtually undetectable. Piliated E. coli were more virulent than nonpiliated variants in this model (50% lethal dose of 7.5 X 10(6) versus 3 X 10(7), respectively). The difference was significantly reduced by prior passive immunization with rabbit serum containing high titers of antipili antibody. Piliated bacteria adhered in significantly greater numbers to isolated mouse peritoneal membranes than did nonpiliated variants (15,400 +/- 2,700 versus 1,300 +/- 700 bacteria/mm2, respectively; P = 0.05). Adherence was inhibited by the presence of 0.1 M alpha methyl mannose (1,500 +/- 1,800 bacteria/mm2, P = 0.01). These results confirm the results of previous qualitative studies showing that phase variation of type 1 pili occurs in vivo and suggest that these pili may confer an initial advantage for growth of E. coli in the peritoneal cavity, presumably by fostering colonization of the peritoneal serosal surface. Images PMID:2876964

  9. Isofraxidin exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and inhibited TNF-α production in LPS-induced mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro via the MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Xing, Wei; Li, Weifeng; Fan, Ting; Hu, Hua; Li, Yongmei

    2012-10-01

    Isofraxidin (IF) is a Coumarin compound that can be isolated from medicinal plants, such as Sarcandra glabra (Thunb.). Nakai is widely used in Asian countries for the treatment of anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour action. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the effect of IF on inflammation and nociception. In addition, we investigated a potential novel mechanism to explain the anti-inflammatory properties of IF. In vivo, xylene-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, LPS-induced mouse endotoxic shock, acetic acid-induced mice writhing and formalin-induced mouse pain models were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of IF. In vitro, we examined the effects of IF inhibition on TNF-α production and the regulation of ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation activity in LPS-induced mouse peritoneal macrophages. Our results demonstrated that IF can significantly decrease xylene-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema, acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced pain. Moreover, IF greatly inhibited the production of TNF-α in the serum of LPS-stimulated mice and peritoneal macrophages, and it decreased phospho-p38 and ERK1/2 protein expression in LPS-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages. Overall, our data suggest that IF possesses significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities that may be mediated through the regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2.

  10. A Novel Mouse Model of Peritoneal Dialysis: Combination of Uraemia and Long-Term Exposure to PD Fluid.

    PubMed

    Ferrantelli, E; Liappas, G; Keuning, E D; Vila Cuenca, M; González-Mateo, G; Verkaik, M; López-Cabrera, M; Beelen, R H J

    2015-01-01

    Different animal models for peritoneal dialysis (PD) have been used in the past decades to develop PD fluids compatible with patient life and to identify markers of peritoneal fibrosis and inflammation. Only few of those studies have taken into account the importance of uraemia-induced alterations at both systemic and peritoneal levels. Moreover, some animal studies which have reported about PD in a uremic setting did not always entirely succeed in terms of uraemia establishment and animal survival. In the present study we induced uraemia in the recently established mouse PD exposure model in order to obtain a more clinically relevant mouse model for kidney patients. This new designed model reflected both the slight thickening of peritoneal membrane induced by uraemia and the significant extracellular matrix deposition due to daily PD fluid instillation. In addition the model offers the opportunity to perform long-term exposure to PD fluids, as it is observed in the clinical setting, and gives the advantage to knock out candidate markers for driving peritoneal inflammatory mechanisms.

  11. Activation of salt-inducible kinase 2 promotes the viability of peritoneal mesothelial cells exposed to stress of peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H-H; Lin, C-Y; Su, S-H; Chuang, C-T; Chang, Y-L; Lee, T-Y; Lee, S-C; Chang, C-J

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining mesothelial cell viability is critical to long-term successful peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment. To clarify the viability mechanism of peritoneal mesothelial cells under PD solutions exposure, we examined the mechanisms of cellular response to this stress conditions. Here we report that the proteasome activity is inhibited when treated with PD solutions. Proteasome inhibition-mediated activation of salt-inducible kinase 2 (SIK2), an endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein, is important for mesothelial cell viability. SIK2 is mobilized to promote autophagy and protect the cells from apoptosis under PD solution or MG132 treatment. Immunofluorescence staining showed that SIK2 is colocalized with LC3B in the autophagosomes of mesothelial cells treated with PD solution or derived from patients undergoing PD treatment. SIK2 activation is likely via a two-step mechanism, upstream kinases relieving the autoinhibitory conformation of SIK2 molecule followed by autophosphorylation of Thr175 and activation of kinase activity. These results suggest that activation of SIK2 is required for the cell viability when proteasome activity is inhibited by PD solutions. Maintaining or boosting the activity of SIK2 may promote peritoneal mesothelial cell viability and evolve as a potential therapeutic target for maintaining or restoring peritoneal membrane integrity in PD therapy. PMID:27441650

  12. Culture of mouse peritoneal macrophages with mouse serum induces lipid bodies that associate with the parasitophorous vacuole and decrease their microbicidal capacity against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Mota, Laura Azeredo Miranda; Roberto Neto, João; Monteiro, Verônica Gomes; Lobato, Caroliny Samary Silva; Oliveira, Marco Antonio de; Cunha, Maura da; D'Ávila, Heloisa; Seabra, Sérgio Henrique; Bozza, Patrícia Torres; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2014-09-01

    Lipid bodies [lipid droplets (LBs)] are lipid-rich organelles involved in lipid metabolism, signalling and inflammation. Recent findings suggest a role for LBs in host response to infection; however, the potential functions of this organelle in Toxoplasma gondii infection and how it alters macrophage microbicidal capacity during infection are not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of host LBs in T. gondii infection in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. Macrophages cultured with mouse serum (MS) had higher numbers of LBs than those cultured in foetal bovine serum and can function as a model to study the role of LBs during intracellular pathogen infection. LBs were found in association with the parasitophorous vacuole, suggesting that T. gondii may benefit from this lipid source. Moreover, increased numbers of macrophage LBs correlated with high prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and decreased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Accordingly, LB-enriched macrophages cultured with MS were less efficient at controlling T. gondii growth. Treatment of macrophages cultured with MS with indomethacin, an inhibitor of PGE2 production, increased the microbicidal capacity against T. gondii. Collectively, these results suggest that culture with MS caused a decrease in microbicidal activity of macrophages against T. gondii by increasing PGE2 while lowering NO production.

  13. Colorectal cancer-promoting activity of the senescent peritoneal mesothelium

    PubMed Central

    Mikuła-Pietrasik, Justyna; Sosińska, Patrycja; Maksin, Konstantin; Kucińska, Małgorzata; Piotrowska, Hanna; Murias, Marek; Woźniak, Aldona; Szpurek, Dariusz; Książek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancers metastasize into the peritoneal cavity in a process controlled by peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). In this paper we examined if senescent HPMCs can intensify the progression of colorectal (SW480) and pancreatic (PSN-1) cancers in vitro and in vivo. Experiments showed that senescent HPMCs stimulate proliferation, migration and invasion of SW480 cells, and migration of PSN-1 cells. When SW480 cells were injected i.p. with senescent HPMCs, the dynamics of tumor formation and vascularization were increased. When xenografts were generated using PSN-1 cells, senescent HPMCs failed to favor their growth. SW480 cells subjected to senescent HPMCs displayed up-regulated expression of transcripts for various pro-cancerogenic agents as well as increased secretion of their products. Moreover, they underwent an epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the Smad 2/3-Snail1-related pathway. The search for mediators of senescent HPMC activity showed that increased SW480 cell proliferation was stimulated by IL-6, migration by CXCL8 and CCL2, invasion by IL-6, MMP-3 and uPA, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by TGF-β1. Secretion of these agents by senescent HPMCs was increased in an NF-κB- and p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism. Collectively, our findings indicate that in the peritoneum senescent HPMCs may create a metastatic niche in which critical aspects of cancer progression become intensified. PMID:26284488

  14. Amelioration of oxidative DNA damage in mouse peritoneal macrophages by Hippophae salicifolia due to its proton (H+) donation capability: Ex vivo and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mainak; Karmakar, Indrajit; Haldar, Sagnik; Das, Avratanu; Bala, Asis; Haldar, Pallab Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The present study evaluates the antioxidant effect of methanol extract of Hippophae salicifolia (MEHS) bark with special emphasis on its role on oxidative DNA damage in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Material and Methods: In vitro antioxidant activity was estimated by standard antioxidant assays whereas the antioxidant activity concluded the H+ donating capacity. Mouse erythrocytes’ hemolysis and peritoneal macrophages’ DNA damage were determined spectrophotometrically. In vivo antioxidant activity of MEHS was determined in carbon tetrachloride-induced mice by studying its effect on superoxide anion production in macrophages cells, superoxide dismutase in the cell lysate, DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and reduces glutathione. Results: The extract showed good in vitro antioxidant activities whereas the inhibitory concentrations values ranged from 5.80 to 106.5 μg/ml. MEHS significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the oxidative DNA damage. It also attenuated the oxidative conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin and elevation of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant in cells. Conclusion: The result indicates MEHS has good in vitro-in vivo antioxidant property as well as the protective effect on DNA and red blood cell may be due to its H+ donating property. PMID:27413349

  15. Yeast mannans inhibit binding and phagocytosis of zymosan by mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, S S; Nelson, R S; Silverstein, S C

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the effects of various mannans, glycoproteins, oligosaccharides, monosaccharides, and sugar phosphates on the binding and phagocytosis of yeast cell walls (zymosan) by mouse peritoneal macrophages. A phosphonomannan (PO(4):mannose ratio = 1:8:6) from kloeckera brevis was the most potent inhibitor tested; it inhibited binding and phagocytosis by 50 percent at concentrations of approximately 3-5 mug/ml and 10 mug/ml, respectively. Removal of the phosphate from this mannan by mild acid and alkaline phosphatase treatment did not appreciably reduce its capacity to inhibit zymosan phagocytosis. The mannan from saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant LB301 inhibits phagocytosis by 50 percent at 0.3 mg/ml, and a neutral exocellular glucomannan from pichia pinus inhibited phagocytosis by 50 percent at 1 mg/ml. Cell wall mannans from wild type S. cervisiae X2180, its mnn2 mutant which contains mannan with predominantly 1(arrow)6- linked mannose residues, yeast exocellular mannans and O-phosphonomannans were less efficient inhibitors requiring concentrations of 1-5 mg/ml to achieve 50 percent reduction in phagocytosis. Horseradish peroxidase, which contains high-mannose type oligosaccharides, was also inhibitory. Mannan is a specific inhibitor of zymosan binding and phagocytosis. The binding and ingestion of zymosan but not of IgG- or complement-coated erythrocytes can be obliterated by plating macrophages on substrates coated with poly-L-lysin (PLL)-mannan. Zymosan uptake was completely abolished by trypsin treatment of the macrophages and reduced by 50-60 percent in the presence of 10 mM EGTA. Pretreatment of the macrophages with chloroquine inhibited zymosan binding and ingestion. These results support the proposal that the macrophage mannose/N-acetylglucosamine receptor (P. Stahl, J.S. Rodman, M.J. Miller, and P.H. Schlesinger, 1978, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75:1399-1403, mediates the phagocytosis of zymosan particles. PMID:6298248

  16. Activation effect of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes on murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenguang; Xing, Jie; Huang, Yee; Bo, Ruonan; Zheng, Sisi; Luo, Li; Niu, Yale; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun

    2016-01-01

    The activation of murine peritoneal macrophages by Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes (GLPL) was investigated in vitro. After treatment with GLPL, the changes of the nitric oxide (NO) secretion and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) activity were evaluated. The results showed that NO production and iNOS activity of macrophages were enhanced compared to GLP and BL group. In addition, both the phagocytic activity and levels of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ were enhanced in the peritoneal macrophages of mice by stimulation of GLPL. The expression of the major histocompatibility complex class II molecule (MHC II) on the surface of peritoneal macrophages significantly increased. These indicated that GLPL could enhance the activation of peritoneal macrophages and their potential for use as a delivery system of GLP. PMID:26529190

  17. Activation effect of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes on murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenguang; Xing, Jie; Huang, Yee; Bo, Ruonan; Zheng, Sisi; Luo, Li; Niu, Yale; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun

    2016-01-01

    The activation of murine peritoneal macrophages by Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides liposomes (GLPL) was investigated in vitro. After treatment with GLPL, the changes of the nitric oxide (NO) secretion and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) activity were evaluated. The results showed that NO production and iNOS activity of macrophages were enhanced compared to GLP and BL group. In addition, both the phagocytic activity and levels of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ were enhanced in the peritoneal macrophages of mice by stimulation of GLPL. The expression of the major histocompatibility complex class II molecule (MHC II) on the surface of peritoneal macrophages significantly increased. These indicated that GLPL could enhance the activation of peritoneal macrophages and their potential for use as a delivery system of GLP.

  18. Characterization of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of mesothelial cells in a mouse model of chronic peritoneal exposure to high glucose dialysate.

    PubMed

    Aroeira, Luiz S; Loureiro, Jesús; González-Mateo, Guadalupe T; Fernandez-Millara, Vanessa; del Peso, Gloria; Sánchez-Tomero, José Antonio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Bajo, M Auxiliadora; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Selgas, Rafael

    2008-11-01

    Animal models of peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF) exposure are key tools in the study of mechanisms involved in alterations of the peritoneal membrane and in the design of therapies. We recently developed a mouse model of chronic peritoneal exposure to high glucose dialysate. Herein, we make a sequential analysis of the effects of glucose-based PDF on mouse peritoneal membrane and on mesothelium. We demonstrate that chronic exposure to PDF induces thickness and fibrosis of the peritoneal membrane in a time-dependent manner. We also show that mesothelial cells progressively detach and lose cytokeratin expression. In addition, we demonstrate that some mesothelial cells invade the submesothelial space, where they appear as cytokeratin- and alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. These findings demonstrate that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of mesothelial cells takes place in mouse peritoneum exposed to PDF, validating this model for the study of effects of drugs on the EMT process as a therapy for peritoneal deterioration.

  19. Effect of urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    DING, YOUCHENG; ZHANG, HUI; LU, AIGUO; ZHOU, ZHUQING; ZHONG, MINGAN; SHEN, DONGWEI; WANG, XUJING; ZHU, ZHENGGANG

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a primary cause of mortality in patients with gastric cancer. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) has been demonstrated to be associated with tumor cell metastasis through the degradation of the extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of the uPA system in gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis. Expression of uPA, uPA receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in four gastric cell lines (AGS, SGC7901, MKN45 and MKN28) was measured by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting. uPA activity was detected using a uPA activity kit. Peritoneal implantation models of rats were established by injecting four gastric cancer cell lines for the selection of the cancer cells with a high planting potential. Biological behaviors, including adhesion, migration and invasion, were determined using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Expression of the uPA system was observed to be highest in the SGC7901 cells among the four gastric cell lines. uPA activity was observed to be highest in the MKN45 cells and lowest in the AGS cells. Furthermore, peritoneal implantation analysis demonstrated that no peritoneal tumors were identified in the AGS cells, whilst the tumor masses observed in the SGC7901 and MKN45 cells were of different sizes. The survival times of the rats injected with the MKN28 and SGC7901 cells were longer than those of the rats injected with the MKN45 cells. Antibodies for uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 in the uPA system had the ability to inhibit the adhesion, migration and invasion of peritoneal metastasis in the gastric cancer cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that the uPA system was positively associated with peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer. PMID:27313768

  20. Effects of Omega-3-Rich Harp Seal Oil on the Production of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myungwon; Ju, Jaehyun; Suh, Jae Soo; Park, Kun-Young; Kim, Kwang Hyuk

    2015-06-01

    Omega-3, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, is an essential fatty acid necessary for human health, and it protects against cardiovascular disease, inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of omega-3-rich harp seal oil (HSO) on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-(IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) in peritoneal macrophages of mice. The culture supernatants of murine macrophages exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), HSO, or HSO+LPS were harvested to assay IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) cytokines and NO. TNF-α, IL-1 β, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) levels, except IL-6, were lower in the culture supernatants of mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to LPS plus HSO than those of the groups exposed to LPS alone. These observations demonstrate that omega-3-rich harp seal oil downregulates the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40). These results suggest that HSO could be potentially used as a preventive agent or as an adjunct in anti-inflammatory therapy, if more research results were accumulated. PMID:26175994

  1. Carrageenan-induced inflammation promotes ROS generation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation in a mouse model of peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Barth, Cristiane R; Funchal, Giselle A; Luft, Carolina; de Oliveira, Jarbas R; Porto, Bárbara N; Donadio, Márcio V F

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a combination of DNA fibers and granular proteins, such as neutrophil elastase (NE). NETs are released in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli. Carrageenan is a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from Chondrus crispus, a marine algae, used for decades in research for its potential to induce inflammation in different animal models. In this study, we show for the first time that carrageenan injection can induce NET release in a mouse model of acute peritonitis. Carrageenan induced NET release by viable neutrophils with NE and myeloperoxidase (MPO) expressed on DNA fibers. Furthermore, although this polysaccharide was able to stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by peritoneal neutrophils, NADPH oxidase derived ROS were dispensable for NET formation by carrageenan. In conclusion, our results show that carrageenan-induced inflammation in the peritoneum of mice can induce NET formation in an ROS-independent manner. These results may add important information to the field of inflammation and potentially lead to novel anti-inflammatory agents targeting the production of NETs.

  2. Increased NHC Cells in the Peritoneal Cavity of Plasmacytoma Susceptible BALB/c Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-González, Berenice; García-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Farfán-Morales, José Eduardo; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis Antonio

    2015-01-01

    BALB/c strain mice are unique in that they develop murine plasmacytoma (MPC) as a consequence of the inflammation induced by pristane oil injection in the peritoneal cavity. In this work the Treg, Th17, B1, B2, and NHC lymphocyte populations from the peritoneal environment of BALB/c, the susceptible strain, and C57BL/6 mice, which do not develop MPC after oil treatment, were studied. Both oil-treated strains showed decreased levels of Th17 lymphocytes, no significant variation in Treg lymphocytes, and a drastic decrease of all B lymphocyte populations. However, only oil-induced BALB/c showed increased levels of natural helper cells (NHC) which could be important in the myeloma induction. PMID:26504358

  3. The influence of different peritoneal dialysis fluids on the in vitro activity of ampicillin, daptomycin, and linezolid against Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Kussmann, M; Schuster, L; Zeitlinger, M; Pichler, P; Reznicek, G; Wiesholzer, M; Burgmann, H; Poeppl, W

    2015-11-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of antibiotics is recommended for the treatment of peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis. However, little data are available on a possible interference between peritoneal dialysis fluids and the activity of antimicrobial agents. Thus, the present in vitro study set out to investigate the influence of different peritoneal dialysis fluids on the antimicrobial activity of ampicillin, linezolid, and daptomycin against Enterococcus faecalis. Time-kill curves in four different peritoneal dialysis fluids were performed over 24 h with four different concentrations (1 × MIC, 4 × MIC, 8 × MIC, 30 × MIC) of each antibiotic evaluated. Cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth was used as the comparator solution. All four peritoneal dialysis fluids evaluated had a bacteriostatic effect on the growth of Enterococcus faecalis. Compared to the cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth comparator solution, the antimicrobial activity of all antibiotics tested was reduced. For ampicillin and linezolid, no activity was found in any peritoneal dialysis fluid, regardless of the concentration. Daptomycin demonstrated dose-dependent activity in all peritoneal dialysis fluids. Bactericidal activity was observed at the highest concentrations evaluated in Dianeal® PDG4 and Extraneal®, but not in concentrations lower than 30 × MIC and not in Nutrineal® PD4 and Physioneal® 40. The antimicrobial activity of ampicillin and linezolid is limited in peritoneal dialysis fluids in vitro. Daptomycin is highly effective in peritoneal dialysis fluids and might, thus, serve as an important treatment option in peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical impact of the present findings.

  4. Fish oil dietary supplementation reduces Ia expression in rat and mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, J; Rodríguez-Iturbe, B; Parra, G

    1990-07-01

    Preliminary studies suggest that administration of fish oil fatty acids may be beneficial in several immunological diseases; therefore, we studied the effect of fish oil dietary supplementation on the expression of Ia in stimulated murine peritoneal macrophages. Rats (n = 19) and mice (n = 27) on standard rodent feeding were separated in experimental (E) and control (C) groups that received fish oil or saline solution, respectively, daily for 4 weeks by esophageal gavage. Cholesterol serum levels were significantly lowered by fish oil (E vs C, P less than 0.01). E and C groups were injected intraperitoneally with Listeria monocytogenes (LM) and peritoneal cells were harvested 4 and 7 days after infection. Decreased expression of Ia induced by LM was found in rats (C = 49.68 +/- 5.09%, E = 16.95 +/- 4.3%, P less than 0.01) and mice (C = 47.38 +/- 7.63%, E = 26.66 +/- 1.92%, P less than 0.01). Animals with a more pronounced depression of serum cholesterol (reduction of 44.04 +/- 1.52% of baseline levels) had more depression of Ia expression (6.47 +/- 1.22%, P less than 0.001 vs control). Reduction of Ia expression was not related to PGE2 production by peritoneal cells. Reduction of Ia expression by fish oil could induce down-regulation of antigen presentation and alloreactivity.

  5. Vaginal bacterial flora activates rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Brzezińska - Błaszczyk, E.; Wasiela, M.

    2002-01-01

    Sixteen strains of physiological and pathological vaginal bacteria were tested for their ability to secrete histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro. We noticed that Mycoplasma hominis-induced histamine release was very high (up to 53.6%). The stimulation of rat mast cells with Staphylococccus cohnii, Staphylococcus coagulase(-) (two strains), Ureaplasma urealyticum, Peptostreptococcus spp., Bacteroides capillosus, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae resulted in lower but significant histamine secretion (11.2%-17.5%). Other bacteria strains (Staphylococcus epidermidids, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces naeslundii (two strains) and Lactobacillus fermentum (two strains) caused very low (4.2% - 8.8%) histamine release.

  6. Ascitic fluid gamma interferon concentrations and adenosine deaminase activity in tuberculous peritonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Sathar, M A; Simjee, A E; Coovadia, Y M; Soni, P N; Moola, S A; Insam, B; Makumbi, F

    1995-01-01

    The gamma interferon (gamma-IFN) concentration and the adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity were evaluated in 30 patients with tuberculous peritonitis, 21 patients with ascites due to a malignant disorder, and 41 patients with cirrhosis. The gamma-IFN concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in tuberculous peritonitis patients (mean: 6.70 U/ml) than in the malignant (mean: 3.10 U/ml) and cirrhotic (mean: 3.08 U/ml) groups. Use of a cut off value of > or = 3.2 U/ml gave the assay a sensitivity of 93% (25 of 27), a specificity of 98% (54 of 55), positive (P+) and negative (P-) predictive values of 96% and a test accuracy of 96%. The ADA activity was significantly (p < 0.0001) higher in the tuberculous peritonitis group (mean: 101.84 U/l) than in the control groups (cirrhosis (mean: 13.49 U/l) and malignancy (mean: 19.35 U/l)). A cut off value of > 30 U/l gave the ADA test a sensitivity of 93% (26 of 28) a specificity of 96% (51 of 53), a (P+) value of 93%, a (P-) value of 96%, and a test accuracy of 95%. There was a significant (p < 0.0001) correlation (r = 0.72) between ADA activity and gamma-IFN values in patients with tuberculous peritonitis. These results show that a high concentration of gamma-IFN in ascitic fluid is as valuable as the ADA activity in the diagnosis of tuberculous peritonitis. Both are rapid non-invasive diagnostic tests for tuberculous peritonitis. PMID:7698702

  7. [The effect of a mite allergen on Na/H metabolic activity in peritoneal mast cells].

    PubMed

    Khlgatian, S V; Pinelis, V G; Berzhets, V M; Strukova, S M

    1992-12-01

    Mite allergen interacting with mast cells treated with sera from bronchial patient sensitized to home dust Dermatophagoides farinae causes changes in intracellular pH. Regulation of pHi peritoneal mast cells is participated by Na/H metabolism probably activated by protein kinase C.

  8. Effect of viscous macromolecules on peritoneal plasminogen activator activity: a potential mechanism for their ability to reduce postoperative adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M; Yedgar, S; Hurwitz, A; Palti, Z; Finzi, Z; Milwidsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Activity of peritoneal plasminogen activator and its regulation by dextran and other macromolecules that clinically suppress postoperative adhesions was studied. Plasminogen activator activity was assayed by a two-stage globinolytic assay that monitors formation of plasmin, as well as by cleavage of a chromogenic peptide substrate (S-2444) in the presence of aprotinin (Trasylol). Plasminogen activator activity was located on the outer surface of human peritoneum. Incubation of peritoneal tissue with buffer in vitro (conditioning) prompted release of plasminogen activator into the conditioning medium. The released plasminogen activator formed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis at an apparent molecular weight of 174,000 and was markedly suppressed by antiserum raised against human melanoma tissue-type plasminogen activator. Nonspecific proteolytic activity did not accumulate in the medium during conditioning. The presence of dextran 80 during conditioning of peritoneum reversibly suppressed tissue-bound plasminogen activator activity and reduced plasminogen activator activity in the spent medium. A similar inhibition of peritoneal plasminogen activator was induced by dextran 500, methyl cellulose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Dextran, when added to the medium after conditioning, had no direct inhibitory effect on plasminogen activator activity. Dextran did not induce peritoneal production of inhibitor(s) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, or urokinase. On the basis of these findings, two possible mechanisms for the effect of viscous polymers in the reduction of adhesion formation are proposed. These mechanisms consider the importance of peritoneal tissue-type plasminogen activator for removal of fibrin clots and suggest that polymer coating either prevents the shedding of plasminogen activator into the abdominal cavity or reduces the access of fibrin clots to the serosal surfaces. PMID:2459968

  9. The role of IgG subclass of mouse monoclonal antibodies in antibody-dependent enhancement of feline infectious peritonitis virus infection of feline macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hohdatsu, T; Tokunaga, J; Koyama, H

    1994-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection was studied in feline alveolar macrophages and human monocyte cell line U937 using mouse neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed to the spike protein of FIPV. Even among the MAbs that have been shown to recognize the same antigenic site, IgG 2a MAbs enhanced FIPV infection strongly, whereas IgG 1 MAbs did not. These IgG 2a MAbs enhanced the infection even when macrophages pretreated with the MAb were washed and then inoculated with the virus. Immunofluorescence flow cytometric analysis of the macrophages treated with each of the MAbs showed that the IgG 2a MAbs but not the IgG 1 MAbs bound to feline alveolar macrophages. Treatment of the IgG 2a MAb with protein A decreased the binding to the macrophages and, in parallel, diminished the ADE activity. Although no infection was observed by inoculation of FIPV to human monocyte cell line U937 cells, FIPV complexed with either the IgG 2a MAb or the IgG 1 MAb caused infection in U937 cells which are shown to express Fc gamma receptor (Fc gamma R) I and II that can bind mouse IgG 2a and IgG 1, respectively. These results suggest that the enhancing activity of MAb is closely correlated with IgG subclass and that the correlation is involved in binding of MAb to Fc gamma R on feline macrophage.

  10. Activation and trafficking of peritoneal B1a B-cells in response to amphibole asbestos.

    PubMed

    Pfau, Jean C; Hurley, Kristina; Peterson, Cody; Coker, Lindsey; Fowers, Cody; Marcum, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    B1a B-cells are concentrated in peritoneal and pleural cavities, are producers of 'natural auto-antibodies', and have been implicated in autoimmune responses. Their numbers are increased in humans and mice with systemic autoimmune diseases, but their role in the immune pathology is not known. Asbestos causes pulmonary, pleural, and peritoneal pathologies by accessing these tissues after inhalation. Amphibole asbestos has been shown to elicit immune dysfunction, including chronic inflammation, fibrosis, and autoantibody production. This study tested the hypothesis that asbestos affects immune dysfunction by activating B1a B-cells to traffic to secondary lymphatic tissue. C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to amphibole asbestos (Libby 6-Mix) either endotracheally or intraperitoneally, and the B1a B-cells in pleural or peritoneal compartments were tested by multi-parameter flow cytometry. Adoptive transfer of peritoneal lymphocytes from CD45.1 transgenic to wild-type mice was used to track the migration. The percentage and numbers of B1a B-cells in pleural and peritoneal cavities decreased 3-6 days following exposure. During that time, asbestos exposure led to a decrease in cells expressing alpha-4 (α4) integrin and MHC II antigen. Peritoneal cells treated in vitro showed decreased α4 integrin with no change in CD5, IgM, or MHC II antigen. Therefore, B1a cells (IgM(+), CD5(+), MHC II(+)) traffic from the peritoneal cavity following loss of α4 integrin expression. Following adoptive transfer into the peritoneum of asbestos-exposed mice, CD45.1(+) B1a cells were detected in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes after 3 days, peaking at 6 days. Interestingly, the percentage of splenic suppressor B-cells (IgM(+), CD5(+), CD11b(+), CD1d(+)) decreased following amphibole exposure, demonstrating that the B1a cells did not contribute to an increased pool of suppressive B-cells. These results show that B1a B-cells respond to asbestos exposure by trafficking to secondary lymphatic

  11. Bactericidal Activity of Ceragenin CSA-13 in Cell Culture and in an Animal Model of Peritoneal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wnorowska, Urszula; Byfield, Fitzroy J.; Piktel, Ewelina; Wątek, Marzena; Janmey, Paul A.; Savage, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Ceragenins constitute a novel family of cationic antibiotics characterized by a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities, which have mostly been assessed in vitro. Using a polarized human lung epithelial cell culture system, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of the ceragenin CSA-13 against two strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1 and Xen5). Additionally, the biodistribution and bactericidal activity of a CSA-13–IRDye 800CW derivate were assessed using an animal model of peritoneal infection after PAO1 challenge. In cell culture, CSA-13 bactericidal activities against PAO1 and Xen5 were higher than the activities of the human cathelicidin peptide LL-37. Increased CSA-13 activity was observed in polarized human lung epithelial cell cultures subjected to butyric acid treatment, which is known to increase endogenous LL-37 production. Eight hours after intravenous or intraperitoneal injection, the greatest CSA-13–IRDye 800CW accumulation was observed in mouse liver and kidneys. CSA-13–IRDye 800CW administration resulted in decreased bacterial outgrowth from abdominal fluid collected from animals subjected to intraperitoneal PAO1 infection. These observations indicate that CSA-13 may synergistically interact with antibacterial factors that are naturally present at mucosal surfaces and it maintains its antibacterial activity in the infected abdominal cavity. Cationic lipids such as CSA-13 represent excellent candidates for the development of new antibacterial compounds. PMID:26248361

  12. Modulation of peritoneal macrophage antimicrobial activity by peritoneal dialysis fluid, Ca++, and 1,25(OH)2D3 in CAPD patients.

    PubMed

    Carozzi, S; Nasini, M G; Schelotto, C; Caviglia, P M; Barocci, S; Cantaluppi, A; Salit, M

    1990-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that Ca++ and 1,25(OH)2D3 modulate peritoneal macrophage (PM0) antimicrobial activity in CAPD patients. Twenty-four CAPD patients were evaluated in vivo (12 who had never had peritonitis, and 12 with an overall peritonitis incidence of more than one episode per 8 patient/months), for the effects of different peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDF) and Ca++ concentrations (1.25, 1.75, and 2.25 mmol/L) on PM0: cytoplasmic Ca++ concentration; superoxide generation; leukotriene B4 (LTB4) release; and bacterial killing for Staphylococcus epidermidis. The same parameters were also evaluated after adding 1,25(OH)2D3 (0.25 microgram/L) to the PDF. Results showed a direct correlation between the PDF Ca++ concentration and PM0 Ca++ levels, superoxide and LTB4 generation, and bacterial killing such that, with 2.25 mmol/L of Ca++, these values were significantly higher than those seen with 1.75 mmol/L. The addition of 1,25(OH)2D3 potentiated the Ca(++)-induced effects. On the other hand, with PDF Ca++ levels of 1,25 mmol/L, an inhibition of the aforementioned parameters was seen. However, this effect was reversed by the addition of 1,25(OH)2D3. These in vivo results confirm the importance of Ca++ and 1,25(OH)2D3 in PM0 antibacterial function in CAPD patients, and may be useful in determining the prophylaxis and therapy of peritonitis.

  13. Peritoneal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the peritoneum are not common. They include Peritonitis - an inflammation of the peritoneum Cancer Complications from ... peritoneal fluid to diagnose the problem. Treatment of peritoneal disorders depends on the cause.

  14. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects.

  15. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects. PMID:26629697

  16. [Murine peritoneal neutrophil activation upon tungsten nanoparticles exposure in vivo].

    PubMed

    Martinova, E A; Baranov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Two examples of tungsten carbide nanoparticles (d = 15 nm, 50 nm) and tungsten carbide nanoparticles with 8% cobalt (d = 50 nm) have been found to induce the neutrophil activation 3 h and 36 h after intraperitoneal administration in the doses 0.005; 0.025; 0.05; 0.25; 0.5; 1; 2.5 and 5 microgram per 1 gram body weight to FVB mice. Neutrophil activation was calculated based on the CD11b and S100 antigen expression. Effect of nanoparticles is bimodal for all tested examples.

  17. Paricalcitol reduces peritoneal fibrosis in mice through the activation of regulatory T cells and reduction in IL-17 production.

    PubMed

    González-Mateo, Guadalupe T; Fernández-Míllara, Vanessa; Bellón, Teresa; Liappas, Georgios; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Selgas, Rafael; Aroeira, Luiz S

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a significant health problem associated with a chronic inflammatory reaction. The precise mechanisms involved in the fibrotic process are still poorly understood. However, given that inflammation is a major causative factor, immunomodulation is a possible therapeutic approach to reduce fibrosis. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) that is present in all hematopoietic cells has been associated with immunomodulation. We investigated whether the intraperitoneal administration of paricalcitol, a specific activator of the VDR, modulates peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF)-induced peritoneal fibrosis. We characterized the inflammatory process in the peritoneal cavity of mice treated or not treated with paricalcitol and analyzed the ensuing fibrosis. The treatment reduced peritoneal IL-17 levels, which strongly correlated with a significantly lower peritoneal fibrotic response. In vitro studies demonstrate that both CD4+ and CD8+ regulatory T cells appear to impact the regulation of IL-17. Paricalcitol treatment resulted in a significantly increased frequency of CD8+ T cells showing a regulatory phenotype. The frequency of CD4+ Tregs tends to be increased, but it did not achieve statistical significance. However, paricalcitol treatment increased the number of CD4+ and CD8+ Treg cells in vivo. In conclusion, the activation of immunological regulatory mechanisms by VDR signaling could prevent or reduce fibrosis, as shown in peritoneal fibrosis induced by PDF exposure in mice.

  18. Comparative activation states of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages from mice bearing an induced fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; de Alderete, N; Meson, O E; Sirena, A; Perdigon, G

    1990-11-01

    Balb/c mice bearing a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma were used to compare the activation levels of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages. Two stages of tumor growth were examined, namely "small" and "large" tumors, with average diameters of 10 and 30 mm, respectively. The activation state, determined by measurement of both phagocytic index and beta-glucuronidase content, was found to be markedly higher in tumor-associated macrophages than in their peritoneal counterparts and it was, in addition, independent of tumor progression. The percentage of tumor-associated macrophages, which were detected on the basis of Fc receptor expression, remained constant in the growing neoplasm, at approximately 23% of total cell population. None of these parameters were affected by inoculation with an immunopotentiating dose of heat-killed Candida albicans which, on the other hand, seemed not to alter the course of the tumor. These data suggest that within the tumor microenvironment macrophages would somehow be maintained at a constant proportion and at a highly activated state, while outside the tumor they would be at a lower activation level. Our results also suggest that TAM would not possess antitumor activity in vivo, although we have found this activity in vitro.

  19. Action of ubenimex on aminopeptidase activities in spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages from mice.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, H; Motegi, A; Iwabuchi, M; Takahashi, K; Horinishi, H; Umezawa, H

    1987-11-01

    The action of ubenimex on aminopeptidase (APase) activity was studied in intact spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages from mice. Ubenimex strongly inhibited hydrolyzing activities against arginine-beta-naphtylamide (Arg-NA), Lys-NA and Pro-NA in both cells. Inhibition of hydrolysis of Leu-NA, Met-NA and Ala-NA was relatively small or not observed. When both cells were incubated in HANKS' solution, hydrolyzing activities against Arg-NA, Lys-NA and Pro-NA were released to the medium, while Leu-NA and Met-NA-hydrolyzing activities were mostly bound. In addition, the Leu-NA-hydrolyzing activity in the spleen cells was kinetically studied. The Arg-NA and Leu-NA-hydrolyzing activities in four fractions prepared from the homogenate of spleen cells were also studied kinetically. From these studies it was suggested that ubenimex inhibits aminopeptidase B and a Pro-NA-hydrolyzing enzyme more effectively than Leu-APase in intact spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages from mice.

  20. Comparative activation states of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages from mice bearing an induced fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; de Alderete, N; Meson, O E; Sirena, A; Perdigon, G

    1990-11-01

    Balb/c mice bearing a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma were used to compare the activation levels of tumor-associated and peritoneal macrophages. Two stages of tumor growth were examined, namely "small" and "large" tumors, with average diameters of 10 and 30 mm, respectively. The activation state, determined by measurement of both phagocytic index and beta-glucuronidase content, was found to be markedly higher in tumor-associated macrophages than in their peritoneal counterparts and it was, in addition, independent of tumor progression. The percentage of tumor-associated macrophages, which were detected on the basis of Fc receptor expression, remained constant in the growing neoplasm, at approximately 23% of total cell population. None of these parameters were affected by inoculation with an immunopotentiating dose of heat-killed Candida albicans which, on the other hand, seemed not to alter the course of the tumor. These data suggest that within the tumor microenvironment macrophages would somehow be maintained at a constant proportion and at a highly activated state, while outside the tumor they would be at a lower activation level. Our results also suggest that TAM would not possess antitumor activity in vivo, although we have found this activity in vitro. PMID:2099903

  1. The toxic effects of indoor atmospheric fine particulate matter collected from allergic and non-allergic families in Wuhan on mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yan, Biao; Li, Jinquan; Guo, Junhui; Ma, Ping; Wu, Zhuo; Ling, ZhenHao; Guo, Hai; Hiroshi, Yoshino; Yanagi, U; Yang, Xu; Zhu, Shengwei; Chen, Mingqing

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with multiple adverse health outcomes and PM2.5-induced oxidative stress is now commonly known as a proposed mechanism of PM2.5-mediated toxicity. However, the association between allergic symptoms in children and exposure to PM2.5 has not been fully elucidated, particularly the role of PM2.5 on the indoor environment involved in allergy or non-allergy is unknown. The aim of the present study was to explore whether indoor PM2.5 from the homes of children with allergic symptoms had more increased risks of allergy than that of healthy ones and then compare the toxicity and inflammatory response of them. In this study, indoor PM2.5 was collected from the homes of schoolchildren with allergic symptoms and those of healthy ones respectively, and components of PM2.5 were analyzed. PM2.5-mediated oxidative damage and inflammatory response were further evaluated in mouse peritoneal macrophages based on its effects on the levels of reactive oxygen species accumulation, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage or cytokine production. It seems that oxidative stress may contribute to PM2.5-induced toxicity, and PM2.5 from the allergic indoor environment produced more serious toxic effects and an inflammatory response on mouse peritoneal macrophages than that from a non-allergic indoor environment. PMID:26304222

  2. [Effect of low-frequency ultrasound on the chemotactic and phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages in rats].

    PubMed

    Kochemasova, Z N; Davydova, N V; Matveeva, E A; Dratvin, S A; Lobashevskiĭ, A L

    1983-12-01

    The influence of low-frequency ultrasound on the chemotactic, ingestive and digestive activity of peritoneal macrophages in rats was studied. The intraoperative treatment of the peritoneum with ultrasound enhanced chemotactic activity 3.3-fold in comparison with that in the control animals. The digestive function of peritoneal macrophages considerably increased, the stimulation of their ingestive capacity also occurred. The activation of the phagocytic function of macrophages was observed within 7 days after a single sonar treatment. The authors believe that the stimulation of the macrophage system is probably one of the mechanisms of the sanative action of ultrasound which is used at present in purulent surgery.

  3. Cellular Renewal and Improvement of Local Cell Effector Activity in Peritoneal Cavity in Response to Infectious Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    dos Anjos Cassado, Alexandra; de Albuquerque, José Antônio Tavares; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; de Lima Buzzo, Carina; Faustino, Lucas; Nascimento, Rogério; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; D'Império Lima, Maria Regina; Alvarez, Jose Maria Mosig; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho

    2011-01-01

    The peritoneal cavity (PerC) is a singular compartment where many cell populations reside and interact. Despite the widely adopted experimental approach of intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation, little is known about the behavior of the different cell populations within the PerC. To evaluate the dynamics of peritoneal macrophage (MØ) subsets, namely small peritoneal MØ (SPM) and large peritoneal MØ (LPM), in response to infectious stimuli, C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with zymosan or Trypanosoma cruzi. These conditions resulted in the marked modification of the PerC myelo-monocytic compartment characterized by the disappearance of LPM and the accumulation of SPM and monocytes. In parallel, adherent cells isolated from stimulated PerC displayed reduced staining for β-galactosidase, a biomarker for senescence. Further, the adherent cells showed increased nitric oxide (NO) and higher frequency of IL-12-producing cells in response to subsequent LPS and IFN-γ stimulation. Among myelo-monocytic cells, SPM rather than LPM or monocytes, appear to be the central effectors of the activated PerC; they display higher phagocytic activity and are the main source of IL-12. Thus, our data provide a first demonstration of the consequences of the dynamics between peritoneal MØ subpopulations by showing that substitution of LPM by a robust SPM and monocytes in response to infectious stimuli greatly improves PerC effector activity. PMID:21799778

  4. Comparative in vitro antimicrobial activity of vancomycin, teicoplanin, daptomycin and ceftobiprole in four different peritoneal dialysis fluids.

    PubMed

    Tobudic, S; Poeppl, W; Kratzer, C; Vychytil, A; Burgmann, H

    2012-07-01

    Peritoneal dialysis used in the treatment of patients with end-stage renal failure is often complicated by peritonitis. Staphylococcus aureus peritonitis is severe, particularly if caused by a methicillin-resistant strain (MRSA). Intraperitoneal administration of drugs for treatment of peritonitis is preferable to intravenous or oral routes because of the resulting higher local antibiotic concentrations. However, peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDFs) have a bacteriostatic effect, which may compromise the efficacy of antibiotics. The bactericidal efficacy of vancomycin, teicoplanin, daptomycin and ceftobiprole was studied in the PDFs Dianeal PD4® (glucose 1.36%), Physioneal 40® (glucose 1.36%), Extraneal® (7.5% icodextrin), and Nutrineal PD4® (1.1% amino acid) using time-kill curves. To simulate in vivo conditions, human serum albumin was added at a final concentration of 2 g/l. All four PDFs had a bacteriostatic effect on the growth of the MRSA test isolate. All antibiotics showed less activity in PDFs compared to control broth. Vancomycin and teicoplanin achieved the greatest reduction in bacterial numbers in the amino-acid containing PDF Nutrineal PD4®. Daptomycin showed its highest activity in Extraneal® and better overall efficacy than the other tested antibiotics. Ceftobiprole showed no killing activities in any of the four PDFs. Based on these in vitro data we conclude that the choice of PDFs for intraperitoneal administration is not trivial and could be crucial for therapy outcome.

  5. Activity of drug-loaded tumor-penetrating microparticles in peritoneal pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ze; Tsai, Max; Wang, Jie; Cole, David J; Wientjes, M Guillaume; Au, Jessie L-S

    2014-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy confers significant survival benefits in cancer patients. However, several problems, including local toxicity and ineffectiveness against bulky tumors, have prohibited it from becoming a standard of care. We have developed drug-loaded, polymeric tumor-penetrating microparticles (TPM) to address these problems. Initial studies showed that TPM provides tumor-selective delivery and is effective against ovarian SKOV3 tumors of relatively small size (<50 mg). The present study evaluated whether the TPM activity extends to other tumor types that are more bulky and have different morphologies and disease presentation. We evaluated TPM in mice bearing two IP human pancreatic tumors with different growth characteristics and morphologies (rapidly growing, large and porous Hs766T vs. slowly growing, smaller and densely packed MiaPaCa2), and at different disease stage (early stage with smaller tumors vs. late stage with larger tumors plus peritoneal carcinomatosis). Comparison of treatments with TPM or paclitaxel in Cremophor micelles, at equi-toxic doses, shows, in all tumor types: (a) higher paclitaxel levels in tumors (up to 55-fold) for TPM, (b) greater efficacy for TPM, including significantly longer survival and higher cure rate, and (c) a single dose of TPM was equally efficacious as multiple doses of paclitaxel/Cremophor. The results indicate tumor targeting property and superior antitumor activity of paclitaxel-loaded TPM are generalizable to small and large peritoneal tumors, with or without accompanying carcinomatosis.

  6. IL-33 Priming Enhances Peritoneal Macrophage Activity in Response to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vuvi G; Cho, Hong R; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2014-08-01

    IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 cytokine family and plays a role in the host defense against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. In this study, we investigated the function of IL-33 and its receptor in in vitro macrophage responses to Candida albicans. Our results demonstrate that pre-sensitization of isolated peritoneal macrophages with IL-33 enhanced their pro-inflammatory cytokine production and phagocytic activity in response to C. albicans. These macrophage activities were entirely dependent on the ST2-MyD88 signaling pathway. In addition, pre-sensitization with IL-33 also increased ROS production and the subsequent killing ability of macrophages following C. albicans challenge. These results indicate that IL-33 may increase anti-fungal activity against Candida through macrophage-mediated resistance mechanisms. PMID:25177252

  7. beta-Naphthoflavone protects from peritonitis by reducing TNF-alpha-induced endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Yao; Liou, Je-Wen; Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Peng, Shih-Yi; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chu, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Wei-Cheng; Huang, Zheng-Kai; Jiang, Shinn-Jong

    2015-12-01

    β-Naphthoflavone (β-NF), a ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, has been shown to possess anti-oxidative properties. We investigated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory potential of β-NF in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Pretreatment with β-NF significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species, translocation of p67(phox), and TNF-α-induced monocyte binding and transmigration. In addition, β-NF significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. The mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 were reduced by β-NF, as was the infiltration of white blood cells, in a peritonitis model. The inhibition of adhesion molecules was associated with suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and Akt, and suppressed phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38. The translocation of Egr-1, a downstream transcription factor involved in the MEK-ERK signaling pathway, was suppressed by β-NF treatment. Our findings show that β-NF inhibits TNF-α-induced NF-kB and ERK1/2 activation and ROS generation, thereby suppressing the expression of adhesion molecules. This results in reduced adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes in vitro and prevents the infiltration of leukocytes in a peritonitis model. Our findings also suggest that β-NF might prevent TNF-α-induced inflammation.

  8. Rosiglitazone, a Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR)-γ Agonist, Attenuates Inflammation Via NF-κB Inhibition in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Fang; Zou, Xun-Liang; Wu, Jun; Yu, Xue-Qing; Yang, Xiao

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the anti-inflammatory effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonist, rosiglitazone, in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced peritonitis rat model. LPS was intraperitoneally injected into rats to establish peritonitis model. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were assigned to normal saline (the solvent of LPS), LPS, rosiglitazone plus LPS, and rosiglitazone alone. A simple peritoneal equilibrium test was performed with 20 ml 4.25 % peritoneal dialysis fluid. We measured the leukocyte count in dialysate and ultrafiltration volume. Peritoneal membrane histochemical staining was performed, and peritoneal thickness was assessed. CD40 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA (ICAM-1 mRNA) levels in rat visceral peritoneum were detected by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. IL-6 in rat peritoneal dialysis effluent was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 and IκBα was analyzed by Western blot. LPS administration resulted in increased peritoneal thickness and decreased ultrafiltration volume. Rosiglitazone pretreatment significantly decreased peritoneal thickness. In addition to CD40 and ICAM-1 mRNA expression, the IL-6, p-p65, and p-IκBα protein expressions were enhanced in LPS-administered animals. Rosiglitazone pretreatment significantly decreased ICAM-1 mRNA upregulation, secretion of IL-6 protein, and phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 and IκBα without decreasing CD40 mRNA expression. Rosiglitazone has a protective effect in peritonitis, simultaneously decreasing NF-κB phosphorylation, suggesting that NF-κB signaling pathway mediated peritoneal inflammation induced by LPS. PPAR-γ might be considered a potential therapeutic target against peritonitis.

  9. Mouse Activity across Time Scales: Fractal Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lima, G. Z. dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B.; do Nascimento, G. C.; França, Arthur S. C.; Muratori, L.; Ribeiro, S.; Corso, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slow-wave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity - a typical 1/f complex pattern - while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals ( to : waking state and to : SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales ( to : waking state and to : SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anti-correlation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep-wake dynamics could lead to a better

  10. The response of peritoneal macrophages after implantation of several ceramics as measured by the change of ectoenzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Otto, B; Ogilvie, A

    1998-06-01

    The bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics with various calcium: phosphorus ratios: Ca/P = 1.67 (hydroxyapatite, HA), Ca/P = 1.6 and Ca/P = 1.5 (tricalcium phosphate, beta-TCP), the bioinert aluminium oxide ceramic (Al2O3) and the toxic calcium oxide ceramic (CaO) have been investigated with respect to their ability to activate peritoneal macrophages of NMRI-mice and with respect to their influence on the extracellular nucleotide degradation of these macrophages. Two weeks after the intraperitoneal injection of a suspension of ceramic particles in an isotone salt solution (phosphate-buffered saline = PBS), we observed that the peritoneal macrophages were only slightly activated into the responsive state, independent of the type of ceramic. 5'Nucleotidase (5'N) ectoenzyme hydrolyses adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and a decrease of its activity is a general biochemical marker of activated macrophages. This ectoenzyme activity was slightly reduced after ceramic implantation. The lacking rise of the extracellular diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A)-catabolism by the macrophage ectoenzyme alkaline phosphodiesterase I (APD) demonstrated that the peritoneal macrophages did not completely reach the responsive state. After the implantation of calcium phosphate ceramics the extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-reduction was slightly diminished. After the implantation of tricalcium phosphate ceramic about 30% more peritoneal exsudate cells (PEC) were obtained from the peritoneal cavity than after injections of pure PBS (used as non-inflammatory control). Similar to the phenomena following the injection of thioglycollate (Tg, inflammation producing control agent) a slightly but not significantly increased proportion of pseudopodia-building cells was observed after the implantation of the ceramic with Ca/P = 1.6.

  11. Association of mitogen-activated protein kinases with microtubules in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Taxol, a microtubule-binding diterpene, mimics many effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on mouse macrophages. The LPS-mimetic effects of taxol appear to be under the same genetic control as responses to LPS itself. Thus we have postulated a role for microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) in the response of macrophages to LPS. Stimulation of macrophages by LPS quickly induces the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). MAPK are generally considered cytosolic enzymes. Herein we report that much of the LPS-activatable pool of MAPK in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages is microtubule associated. By immunofluorescence, MAPK were localized to colchicine- and nocodazole- disruptible filaments. From both mouse brain and RAW 264.7 macrophages, MAPK could be coisolated with polymerized tubulin. Fractionation of primary macrophages into cytosol-, microfilament-, microtubule-, and intermediated filament-rich extracts revealed that approximately 10% of MAPK but none of MAPK kinase (MEK1A and MEK2) was microtubule bound. Exposure of macrophages to LPS did not change the proportion of MAPK bound to microtubules, but preferentially activated the microtubule- associated pool. These findings confirm the prediction that LPS activates a kinase bound to microtubules. Together with LPS-mimetic actions of taxol and the shared genetic control of responses to LPS and taxol, these results support the hypothesis that a major LPS-signaling pathway in mouse macrophages may involve activation of one or more microtubule-associated kinases. PMID:8666946

  12. Fate of gamma-interferon-activated killer blood monocytes adoptively transferred into the abdominal cavity of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, H.C.; Keenan, A.M.; Woodhouse, C.; Ottow, R.T.; Miller, P.; Steller, E.P.; Foon, K.A.; Abrams, P.G.; Beman, J.; Larson, S.M.

    1987-11-15

    Five patients with colorectal cancer widely metastatic to peritoneal surfaces have been treated i.p. with infusions of autologous blood monocytes made cytotoxic by in vitro incubation with human gamma-interferon. The monocytes were purified by a combination of cytapheresis and counter-current centrifugal elutriation procedures; each week approximately 350 million activated monocytes were given to patients as adoptive immunotherapy by a single i.p. instillation. On the eighth cycle of treatment the trafficking of i.p. infused blood monocytes was studied in two patients by prelabeling the cells with /sup 111/In. These activated cells became distributed widely within the peritoneal cavity. Two and 5 days after infusion their position within the peritoneum had not changed. When peritoneal specimens were obtained 36 h after /sup 111/In-labeled monocyte infusion, labeled monocytes were demonstrated to be associated with the serosal surfaces by autoradiographic analysis. Scintiscanning structures outside the abdominal cavity revealed that /sup 111/In-labeled monocytes infused i.p. did not traffic to other organs during the 5 days of the study. We conclude that i.p. adoptive transfer of autologous killer blood monocytes is an effective way of delivering these cytotoxic cells to sites of tumor burden on peritoneal surfaces in these cancer patients.

  13. Peritonitis activates transcription of the human prolactin locus in myeloid cells in a humanized transgenic rat model.

    PubMed

    Semprini, Sabrina; McNamara, Anne V; Awais, Raheela; Featherstone, Karen; Harper, Claire V; McNeilly, Judith R; Patist, Amanda; Rossi, Adriano G; Dransfield, Ian; McNeilly, Alan S; Davis, Julian R E; White, Michael R H; Mullins, John J

    2012-06-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is mainly expressed in the pituitary in rodents, whereas in humans, expression is observed in many extrapituitary sites, including lymphocytes. Due to the lack of adequate experimental models, the function of locally produced PRL in the immune system is largely unknown. Using transgenic rats that express luciferase under the control of extensive human PRL regulatory regions, we characterized immune cell responses to thioglycollate (TG)-induced peritonitis. Resident populations of myeloid cells in the peritoneal cavity of untreated rats expressed barely detectable levels of luciferase. In contrast, during TG-induced peritonitis, cell-specific expression in both neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages in peritoneal exudates increased dramatically. Elevated luciferase expression was also detectable in peripheral blood and bone marrow CD11b(+) cells. Ex vivo stimulation of primary myeloid cells showed activation of the human extrapituitary promoter by TNF-α, lipopolysaccharide, or TG. These findings were confirmed in human peripheral blood monocytes, showing that the transgenic rat provided a faithful model for the human gene. Thus, the resolution of an inflammatory response is associated with dramatic activation of the PRL gene promoter in the myeloid lineage.

  14. Na+ -K+ pump activity in rat peritoneal mast cells: inhibition by extracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, T.; Johansen, T.

    1989-01-01

    1. Pure populations of rat peritoneal mast cells were used to study cellular potassium uptake. The radioactive potassium analogue, 86rubidium, was used as a tracer for potassium for measurements of the activity of the cellular potassium uptake process. 2. The ouabain-sensitive and the ouabain-resistant potassium (86rubidium) uptake of mast cells incubated in the presence of calcium, 1 mmol l-1, were very low, 52 and 147 pmol per 10(6) cells min-1. 3. Calcium-deprivation of the cells uncovered a large capacity ouabain-sensitive potassium (86rubidium) uptake mechanism. The activity of the uptake mechanism was decreased by reintroduction of calcium into the cell suspension, and it was dependent on cellular energy metabolism, temperature and pH. 4. The potassium (86rubidium) uptake of mast cells incubated in a calcium-free medium occurs through an active and ouabain-sensitive mechanism that has the nature of an enzyme, and it is mediated by the Na+ -K+ pump located in the plasma membrane. It is demonstrated that the activity of the Na+ -K+ pump mechanism is inhibited by low concentrations of extracellular calcium (0.1-1.2 mmol l-1). The possibility is discussed that calcium-deprivation may increase the pump activity by increasing the permeability of the plasma membrane for Na+. PMID:2743077

  15. Activation of peritoneal macrophages to cytoxicity against B16 melanoma cells by Serratia marcescens polyribosome fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    Serratia marcescens polyribosomes (SMPR) have been shown to elicit an anti-tumor response in vivo. The in-vitro effects of SMPR on macrophages as the nonspecific mediators of the anti-tumor response have not previously been examined. The first objective of this research project is to corroborate and analyze the in-vivo results by the development and application of an in-vitro cytotoxicity assay. The second objective is to examine the effect of SMPR upon previously unstimulated peritoneal macrophages as representing the mechanism of cytotoxicity. The third objective is to identify the minimal effective component of SMPR responsible for an effect on macrophages. Results revealed that SMPR preparations exert a number of effects upon macrophages. Morphologic changes included increased spreading and increased perinuclear vacuolization. Macrophages were shown to be metabolically activate by two lines of evidence. SMPR-treated macrophages exhibited increased cellular metabolism by the increased uptake of /sup 3/H-thymidine and by the increased levels of secreted leucine aminopeptidase as compared to control macrophages. Results also showed that SMPR activates macrophages to cytotoxicity against syngeneic tumor target cells. Buoyant-density fractions were isolated and assayed for macrophage activating ability. Results showed 50S ribosomal subunits to be the smallest fraction effective for macrophage activation. Both the RNA and protein were necessary for complete effectiveness.

  16. [Impact of abdominal cavity open EHF irradiation on activity of adhesive process in peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, V V; Ivanova, Iu V; Gamidov, A N; Andreeshchev, S A

    2015-01-01

    In experiment on 45 rats a purulent peritonitis was simulated. There was established, that on background of a standard therapy for peritonitis application of abdominal cavity open irradiation of extreme high frequency (EHF) have promoted rapid stabilization of the lipid metabolism indices and the blood coagulation system, the reduction of intensity of lipids peroxidal oxidation processes and severity of systemic inflammatory reaction. Under the influence of complex treatment the severity of adhesive process was reduced in 5.4 times, comparing with such in animals, to whom a standard treatment was conducted only. The revealed pathogenetic aspects of the adhesions formation witnesses the expediency to add EHF irradiation to complex therapy of peritonitis.

  17. Reducing Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Peritonitis Rate

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Anupkumar

    2014-01-01

    Background Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis is an important negative risk of peritoneal dialysis. Peritonitis results when organisms enter the normally sterile peritoneal space, and the peritoneal immune system is unable to prevent the proliferation of the organisms. Methods The process of reducing the rate of peritonitis includes identification of the need for reducing peritonitis, identification of the cause of the high peritonitis rate through root cause analysis, and intervention. Results Interventions vary depending upon the type of organism causing peritonitis. Nonenterococcal gram-positive peritonitis and Pseudomonas peritonitis are related to contamination and are potentially preventable; enteric peritonitis is difficult to prevent. Conclusion The rate of peritonitis can be reduced through a strong continuous quality improvement team because the majority of peritonitis episodes can be prevented. PMID:25249805

  18. SIGNR1 ligation on murine peritoneal macrophages induces IL-12 production through NFkappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Chiaki; Kojima, Naoya

    2010-07-01

    We have previously shown that murine resident peritoneal macrophages (PEMs) are activated in response to uptake of oligomannose-coated liposomes (OMLs), leading to production of interleukin (IL)-12. To understand the mechanism of activation of PEMs by OMLs, in the present study we investigated the role of a mannose-binding C-type lectin receptor, SIGNR1, in production of proinflammatory cytokines by PEMs, in which SIGNR1 acts as a physiological receptor for OMLs. Engagement of SIGNR1 on PEMs with an anti-SIGNR1-specific rat IgM antibody, ERTR9, induced production of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha from PEMs, while secretion of IL-6 and IL-1beta was not detected with the same treatment. The level of phosphorylated IkappaB kinase in PEMs also increased in response to ERTR9 treatment of the cells. Treatment of PEMs with a specific nuclear factor kappa-B (NFkappaB) inhibitor, BAY11-7082, reduced ERTR9-dependent IL-12 production. Intraperitoneal treatment with BAY11-7082 also led to reduction of subsequent OML-induced IL-12 production from PEMs. These results indicate that SIGNR1-mediated intercellular signaling may induce production of cytokines such as IL-12 through NFkappaB activation.

  19. Mouse activity across time scales: fractal scenarios.

    PubMed

    Lima, G Z dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B; do Nascimento, G C; França, Arthur S C; Muratori, L; Ribeiro, S; Corso, G

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slowwave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity--a typical 1/f complex pattern--while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals (0.01 s to 2 s: waking state and 0.01 s to 0.1 s: SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales (30 s to 300 s: waking state and 0.3 s to 5 s: SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anticorrelation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep

  20. Anti-inflammatory activity of Dasyphyllum brasiliensis (Asteraceae) on acute peritonitis induced by beta-glucan from Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Castelucci, Simone; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre; Ambrosio, Sérgio Ricardo; Arakawa, Nilton Syogo; de Lira, Simone Possedente; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Da Costa, Fernando Batista

    2007-05-30

    The tea prepared from leaves and thorns of Dasyphyllum brasiliensis (Asteraceae) is used in the traditional medicine in Brazil for the treatment of oral and oropharyngeal diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of this plant. The aqueous crude extract (ACE), the methanol-water (MeOH-H(2)O) fraction obtained by solvent partition and its fractionation products were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activities on acute peritonitis induced by beta-glucan from the cell walls of Histoplasma capsulatum. The antiedematogenic activity was also tested using the carrageenan-induced paw edema assay in mice. Oral administration of 100 and 300mg/kg of the ACE in mice caused a significant reduction of neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment in the acute peritonitis assay. In addition, ACE at 300mg/kg inhibited the number of mononuclear cells recruitment. The MeOH-H(2)O fraction and its fractionation products (all at 100mg/kg) also presented anti-inflammatory activities, confirmed by the inhibition of cells recruited to the peritoneal cavity. ACE at 100mg/kg did not show any significant reduction of the edema in the mice paw injected with carrageenan. These data together suggest that Dasyphyllum brasiliensis presents significant anti-inflammatory activity, thus supporting the popular use of the tea in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  1. TLR4-mediated activation of mouse macrophages by Korean mistletoe lectin-C (KML-C).

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Jai; Hong, Ju-ho; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Youngchan; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Jong-Bae; Song, Seong K

    2010-06-01

    Korean mistletoe lectin (KML-C) is an adjuvant that activates systemic and mucosal immune cells to release cytokines including TNF-alpha, which induces immunity against viruses and cancer cells. Although the immunomodulatory activity of KML-C has been well established, the underlying mechanism of action of KML-C has yet to be explored. When mouse peritoneal macrophages were treated with KML-C, both transcription and translation of TLR4 were upregulated. KML-C-induced TLR4 downstream events were similar to those activated by LPS: the upregulation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK1); resulting in macrophage activation and TNF-alpha production. When TLR4 was blocked using a TLR4-specific neutralizing antibody, TNF-alpha production from the macrophages was significantly inhibited. Moreover, TLR4-deficient mouse macrophages treated with KML-C also secreted greatly reduced level of TNF-alpha secretion. Finally, TLR4 molecules were co-precipitated with KML-C, to which agarose beads were conjugated, indicating that those molecules are associated. These data indicate that KML-C activates mouse macrophages to secrete TNF-alpha by interacting with the TLR4 molecule and activating its signaling pathways.

  2. Chemotactic activity from rabbit peritoneal neutrophils. Lack of identity with N-acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-napthyl esterase.

    PubMed

    Tsung, P K; Showell, H J; Kegeles, S W; Becker, E L

    1976-08-12

    The chemotactic and N-acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-naphthyl esterase activities of rabbit peritoneal neutrophils are separable from each other by both DEAE cellulose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. Partially purified esterase obtained from DEAE-cellulose chromatography had molecular weight of 70 000. However, the partially purified fraction contained chemotactic activities with major activity in molecular weight of 28000 and minor activities in the molecular weights of 45000, 21900, 14500 and 10500. Esterase activity is inhibited by 10(-7) M p-nitrophenylethyl-5-chloropentylphosphonate but chemotactic activity is not.

  3. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  4. Peritonitis - secondary

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure. Tests may include: Blood culture Blood chemistry, including pancreatic enzymes Complete blood count Liver and kidney function tests X-rays or CT scan Peritoneal fluid culture Urinalysis

  5. Neutralization of feline infectious peritonitis virus: preparation of monoclonal antibody that shows cell tropism in neutralizing activity after viral absorption into the cells.

    PubMed

    Kida, K; Hohdatsu, T; Kashimoto-Tokunaga, J; Koyama, H

    2000-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection of feline macro-phages is enhanced by mouse anti-FIPV monoclonal antibody (MAb). This anti-body-dependent enhancement (ADE) of FIPV infection is dependent on mouse MAb subclass, and MAb of IgG2a subclass has a strong ADE activity. Furthermore, MAb showing strong neutralizing activity in Felis catus whole fetus (fcwf-4) cells and Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells shows strong enhancing activity in feline macrophages, indicating that the neutralizing epitope and the enhancing epitope are closely related. In this study, we prepared MAb FK50-4 that showed a strong neutralizing activity in feline macrophages, despite the fact that the MAb belonged to the IgG2a subclass. However, MAb FK50-4 did not exhibit neutralizing activity in CrFK cells or fcwf-4 cells, thus showing a very unusual property. MAb FK50-4 recognized FIPV small integral membrane glycoprotein (M protein). Even when feline macrophages were pretreated with MAb FK50-4 prior to FIPV inoculation, this antibody prevented FIPV infection. This reaction disappeared after treatment of FK50-4 with protein A. The neutralizing activity of FK50-4 was also effective on feline macrophages after the cells were inoculated with FIPV. These findings indicated that the FIPV replication mechanism differs between feline macrophages and CrFK/fcwf-4 cells and that a neutralizing epitope that can prevent FIPV infection of feline macrophages after viral absorption is present on M protein.

  6. Effect of swainsonine on the processing and turnover of lysosomal beta-galactosidase and beta-glucuronidase from mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tropea, J E; Swank, R T; Segal, H L

    1988-03-25

    The effect of swainsonine, an inhibitor of Golgi alpha-mannosidase II and lysosomal alpha-mannosidase, on the synthesis, processing, and turnover of two glycoproteins, lysosomal beta-galactosidase and lysosomal beta-glucuronidase, has been studied in cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages. No effect of the inhibitor on the relative rates of synthesis of the precursor form of either enzyme was observed. On the other hand, carbohydrate processing of beta-galactosidase and beta-glucuronidase was markedly altered by swainsonine, consistent with a blockage by the inhibitor of the removal of the alpha-1,3- and alpha-1,6-linked mannose residues which occurs in normal processing. In homogenates of both normal and swainsonine-treated cells, the precursor forms of the enzymes were found exclusively in the light membrane fraction on Percoll gradients and the mature forms exclusively in the lysosomal fractions indicating that translocation from Golgi to lysosomes and proteolytic processing in the lysosome were not impaired by the presence of abnormal oligosaccharide side chains. There was no detectable effect of swainsonine during a 4-day chase period on the total cellular turnover of these enzymes which involves two processes, secretion and degradation. In the absence of swainsonine, secretion represented about 40% of the total turnover of beta-galactosidase and about 50% with beta-glucuronidase. The presence of swainsonine increased these proportions to about 60 and 70%, respectively.

  7. Inhibition of adhesion and proliferation of peritoneally disseminated tumor cells by pegylated catalase.

    PubMed

    Hyoudou, Kenji; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Yuki; Kuramoto, Yukari; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide may aggravate the peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by activating the expression of a variety of genes. In this study, we used pegylated catalase (PEG-catalase) to examine whether prolonged retention of catalase activity within the peritoneal cavity is effective in inhibiting peritoneal dissemination in mouse models. Murine B16-BL6 cells or colon 26 cells labeled with firefly luciferase gene were inoculated intraperitoneally into syngeneic mice. Compared with unmodified catalase, PEG-catalase was retained in the peritoneal cavity for a long period after intraperitoneal injection. A single injection of PEG-catalase just before tumor inoculation significantly reduced the number of the tumor cells at 1 and 7 days. The changes in the expression of molecules involved in the metastasis were evaluated by real time quantitative PCR analysis. Inoculation of the tumor cells increased the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 in the greater omentum, which was inhibited by PEG-catalase. An injection of PEG-catalase at 3 days after tumor inoculation also reduced the number of the tumor cells, suggesting that processes other than the adhesion of tumor cells to peritoneal organs are also inhibited. Daily doses of PEG-catalase significantly prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that intraperitoneal injection of PEG-catalase inhibits the multiple processes of peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by scavenging hydrogen peroxide in the peritoneal cavity. PMID:17086358

  8. Tuberculous peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Udayan; Almusa, Omar; Tung, Ka-wah; Heller, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculous peritonitis is a serious condition with rising prevalence in recent years. It is especially common in those patients with risk factors such as an immunocompromised state, chronic kidney disease, or cirrhosis/liver disease. Spread is typically hematogenous from pulmonary foci. We report on a 34-year-old man who presented with initial complaints of cough, low-grade fevers, abdominal pain, and nausea/vomiting. Chest x-ray showed a cluster of nodular opacities on the right upper lobe, and a CT scan showed diffuse thickening and nodularity of the omentum with prominent mesenteric lymph nodes, consistent with tuberculous peritonitis. PMID:27186257

  9. Chryseobacterium indologenes peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Mehdi; Nobakht, Ehsan; Lew, Susie Q

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis remains a major complication of peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Chryseobacterium indologenes is a rare organism that has been reported to cause infections mostly in hospitalised patients with severe underlying diseases. We report the first case of C indologenes peritonitis in a patient on peritoneal dialysis outside of Asia. Our patient with end-stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis grew C indologenes from peritoneal fluid when he presented with abdominal pain and cloudy effluent. The patient responded well to intraperitoneal antibiotic therapy. Tenckhoff catheter did not require removal. This case demonstrates the importance of considering rare causes of peritonitis, such as C indologenes, in patients on peritoneal dialysis. Given the resistance of such organisms to commonly used broad-spectrum antibiotics, antimicrobial susceptibility testing must be assessed as early as possible to assure appropriate antibiotic coverage to avoid untreated peritonitis leading to peritoneal dialysis failure. PMID:23709544

  10. Chryseobacterium indologenes peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Mehdi; Nobakht, Ehsan; Lew, Susie Q

    2013-05-24

    Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis remains a major complication of peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Chryseobacterium indologenes is a rare organism that has been reported to cause infections mostly in hospitalised patients with severe underlying diseases. We report the first case of C indologenes peritonitis in a patient on peritoneal dialysis outside of Asia. Our patient with end-stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis grew C indologenes from peritoneal fluid when he presented with abdominal pain and cloudy effluent. The patient responded well to intraperitoneal antibiotic therapy. Tenckhoff catheter did not require removal. This case demonstrates the importance of considering rare causes of peritonitis, such as C indologenes, in patients on peritoneal dialysis. Given the resistance of such organisms to commonly used broad-spectrum antibiotics, antimicrobial susceptibility testing must be assessed as early as possible to assure appropriate antibiotic coverage to avoid untreated peritonitis leading to peritoneal dialysis failure.

  11. Dialysis - peritoneal

    MedlinePlus

    ... The number of exchanges and amount of dwell time depends on the method of PD you use and other factors. Your ... PD: Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) . For this ... routine until it is time to drain the fluid. You are not hooked ...

  12. Peritoneal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Guirat, A; Koubaa, M; Mzali, R; Abid, B; Ellouz, S; Affes, N; Ben Jemaa, M; Frikha, F; Ben Amar, M; Beyrouti, M I

    2011-01-01

    The peritoneum is one of the locations outside the most common pulmonary tuberculosis. Peritoneal tuberculosis poses a public health problem in endemic regions of the world. The phenomenon of migration, the increased use of immunosuppressive therapy and the epidemic of AIDS have contributed to a resurgence of this disease in regions where it was previously controlled. The aim of this review is to expose the clinical, biologic end radiologic futures of the peritoneal tuberculosis and to present the methods of diagnosis and treatment. The diagnosis of this disease is difficult and still remains a challenge because of its insidious nature, the variability of presentation and limitations of available diagnostic tests. The disease usually presents a picture of lymphocytic exudative ascites. There are many complementary tests with variable sensitivities and specificities to confirm the diagnosis of peritoneal tuberculosis. Isolation of mycobacteria by culture of ascitic fluid or histological examination of peritoneal biopsy ideally performed by laparoscopy remains the investigation of choice. The role of PCR, ascitic adenosine deaminase, interferon gamma and the radiometric BACTEC system can improve the diagnostic yield. An antituberculous treatment with group 1 of the WHO for 6 months is sufficient in most cases.

  13. β-(1→3)-Glucan of the Southern Bracket Mushroom, Ganoderma australe (Agaricomycetes), Stimulates Phagocytosis and Interleukin-6 Production in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Renan Henrique; do Amaral, Alex Evangelista; Menolli, Rafael Andrade; Ayala, Thais Soprani; de Cassia Garcia Simao, Rita; de Santana-Filho, Arquimedes Paixao; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; da Conceicao Silva, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma australe was studied to determine the composition of the cell wall, and polysaccharide fraction SK5 was obtained after freeze-thawing an aqueous 5% potassium hydroxide extraction. The monosaccharide composition of the SK5 fraction revealed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed 81.3% glucose, and analyses by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed a β-glucan with glycosidic links of the (1→3)-β type and most likely 4-O substituted. In addition, the biological effect of the β-glucan from G. australe was evaluated via in vitro cell cultures of peritoneal macrophages isolated from Swiss mice. Biological assays were assessed for toxicity and cell activation, interleukin-6 cytokine concentrations, and the ability to stimulate phagocytic activity. There was an increase in interleukin-6 by approximately 111% with 1.0 µg/mL of polysaccharide, and phagocyte activity was increased in all concentrations examined, obtaining 52.3% with 0.25 µg/mL polysaccharide. The results indicate that a β-(1→3)-glucan isolated from G. australe can be classified as a biological response modifier. PMID:27481297

  14. The relationships between activation of non-specific inflammatory process and malnutrition in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Katarina; Stompór, Tomasz; Krzanowski, Marcin; Miarka, Przemysław; Zdzienicka, Anna; Sułowicz, Wladyslaw

    2007-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent complication among patients on chronic peritoneal dialysis and early recognition of malnutrition can be a key factor in successful treatment. The aim of the study was to assess the nutritional status of patients on peritoneal dialysis and to search for the relationships between activation of non-specific inflammatory process and progression of malnutrition. The study group included 60 patients (age 50.4+/-14 years) on peritoneal dialysis for 17.6+/-20 months. Fourty-six patients completed the entire 24-month observation period. Nutritional status was assessed using SGA scale, anthropometric measures, bioimpendance, and several biochemical parameters. Inflammatory markers included: IL-6, TNFalpha, fibrinogen and CRP. Severe malnutrition was observed in the range between 8.4% (5 subjects, group C in SGA scale) to 11.7% (7 subjects, BMI <20 kg/m2) of patients. The nutritional status of the entire cohort was constant over 2 years of observation (based on SGA scale), although the mean albumin level decreased significantly after 24 months of observation (from 39.55+/-3.5 to 37.63+/-3.7 g/l; p<0.01). The mean concentrations of CRP (4.8 and 5.25 mg/l), IL-6 (3.45 and 6.8 pg/ml) and leptin (22.95 and 22.2 ng/ml) were above reference ranges both at the initial and final assessment. Moreover, the concentration of IL-6 significantly increased (p<0.001) after 24 months of observation. Patients treated with PD are frequently affected by malnutrition. Our results indicate a strong association between nutritional indices and markers of inflammation. PMID:18928174

  15. Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Upregulating Classical Activation Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-07

    Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection are central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3–4 months) and aged (14–15 months) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in the extent of recruitment of macrophages into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in levels of proteins linked to immune cell pathways under basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways upregulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to the formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins is dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases the levels of many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice

  16. Synthesis of ε-Viniferin Glycosides by Glucosyltransferase from Phytolacca americana and their Inhibitory Activity on Histamine Release from Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiroki; Hamada, Hatsuyuki; Shimoda, Kei

    2015-06-01

    Glycosylation of (+)-ε-viniferin was investigated using glucosyltransferase from Phytolacca americana (PaGT3) as a biocatalyst. (+)-ε-Viniferin was converted by PaGT3 into its 4b- and 13b-β-D-glucosides, the inhibitory activities on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells of which were higher than that of (+)-ε-viniferin.

  17. Protective Effects of Paricalcitol on Peritoneal Remodeling during Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Stavenuiter, Andrea W. D.; Farhat, Karima; Vila Cuenca, Marc; Schilte, Margot N.; Keuning, Eelco D.; Paauw, Nanne J.; ter Wee, Pieter M.; Beelen, Robert H. J.; Vervloet, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is associated with structural and functional alterations of the peritoneal membrane, consisting of fibrosis, angiogenesis, and loss of ultrafiltration capacity. Vitamin D receptor activation (VDRA) plays an important role in mineral metabolism and inflammation, but also antiangiogenic and antifibrotic properties have been reported. Therefore, the effects of active vitamin D treatment on peritoneal function and remodeling were investigated. Rats were either kept naïve to PDF exposure or daily exposed to 10 mL PDF and were treated for five or seven weeks with oral paricalcitol or vehicle control. Non-PDF-exposed rats showed no peritoneal changes upon paricalcitol treatment. Paricalcitol reduced endogenous calcitriol but did not affect mineral homeostasis. However, upon PDF exposure, loss of ultrafiltration capacity ensued which was fully rescued by paricalcitol treatment. Furthermore, PD-induced ECM thickening was significantly reduced and omental PD-induced angiogenesis was less pronounced upon paricalcitol treatment. No effect of paricalcitol treatment on total amount of peritoneal cells, peritoneal leukocyte composition, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) was observed. Our data indicates that oral VDRA reduces tissue remodeling during chronic experimental PD and prevents loss of ultrafiltration capacity. Therefore, VDRA is potentially relevant in the prevention of treatment technique failure in PD patients. PMID:26605330

  18. Hypoxia regulates iNOS expression in human normal peritoneal and adhesion fibroblasts through NF-κB activation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhong L.; Fletcher, Nicole M.; Diamond, Michael P.; Abu-Soud, Husam M.; Saed, Ghassan M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the mechanism by which hypoxia increases expression of iNOS in human normal peritoneal and adhesion fibroblasts. Design Prospective experimental study. Setting University medical center. Patient(s) Primary cultures of fibroblasts from normal peritoneum and adhesion tissues. Intervention(s) Hypoxia treated cells. Main Outcome Measure(s) We utilized real-time RT-PCR to quantify mRNA levels of iNOS and NF-κB. Western blots were used to determine iNOS, NF-κB, IκB-α and phospho-IκB expression levels in normal peritoneal and adhesion fibroblasts in response to hypoxia. Result(s) Hypoxia resulted in a significant increase in iNOS and NF-κB expression in normal and adhesion fibroblasts. Furthermore, both cell types manifested lower levels of NF-κB, cytoplasmic phospho-IκB-α, and iNOS proteins. In contrast, they manifested higher levels of cytoplasmic IκB-α and IκB-α/NF-κB ratios as well as phosphorylated-IκB-α/NF-κB ratio. Under hypoxic conditions, both cell types exhibited significantly decreased cytoplasmic NF-κB, IκB-α levels, and significantly increased cytoplasmic phospho-IκB-α, iNOS, and NF-κB protein levels. Conclusions Hypoxia increases iNOS expression by a mechanism involving activation of NF-κB. The ratio of IκB-α/NF-κB or IκB-α/p-IκB-α can be used to monitor activation. PMID:18281043

  19. Pyk2 activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by directly phosphorylating ASC and contributes to inflammasome-dependent peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, I-Che; OuYang, Chun-Nan; Yuan, Sheng-Ning; Li, Hsin-Pai; Chen, Jeng-Ting; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Chen, Yu-Jen; Ojcius, David M.; Chu, Ching-Liang; Yu, Jau-Song; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chen, Lih-Chyang

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasome adaptor protein, ASC, contributes to both innate immune responses and inflammatory diseases via self-oligomerization, which leads to the activation of the protease, caspase-1. Here, we report that the cytosolic tyrosine kinases, FAK and Pyk2, are differentially involved in NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation. The inhibition of FAK and Pyk2 with RNA interference or chemical inhibitors dramatically abolished ASC oligomerization, caspase-1 activation, and IL-1β secretion in response to NLRP3 or AIM2 stimulation. Pyk2 is phosphorylated by the kinase Syk and relocalizes to the ASC specks upon NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Pyk2, but not FAK, could directly phosphorylate ASC at Tyr146, and only the phosphorylated ASC could participate in speck formation and trigger IL-1β secretion. Moreover, the clinical-trial-tested Pyk2/FAK dual inhibitor PF-562271 reduced monosodium urate-mediated peritonitis, a disease model used for studying the consequences of NLRP3 activation. Our results suggest that although Pyk2 and FAK are involved in inflammasome activation, only Pyk2 directly phosphorylates ASC and brings ASC into an oligomerization-competent state by allowing Tyr146 phosphorylation to participate ASC speck formation and subsequent NLRP3 inflammation. PMID:27796369

  20. Regulation of the surface expression of the platelet-activating factor receptor in IC-21 peritoneal macrophages. Effects of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1992-10-15

    The effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the expression of the receptor for platelet-activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; AGEPC) was examined in cultured IC-21 peritoneal macrophages. AGEPC binding to its receptors reached saturation within 20 min at 25 degrees C and was reversible. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of AGEPC receptors with a Bmax of approximately 170 fmol/mg cellular protein and a Kd of 0.25 nM. Preincubation of IC-21 cells with LPS (0.01-1,000 ng/ml) induced an increase in the surface expression of AGEPC receptors in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. The maximal effect of LPS on the AGEPC receptor was observed between 5 and 8 h, with a typical increase between 150 and 200%. Scatchard analysis indicated that LPS treatment of IC-21 cells increased the number of AGEPC receptors on the cell surface without any apparent change in the affinity of the receptor for the ligand. The effect of LPS on the surface expression of the AGEPC receptor was nearly abolished by cycloheximide (0.1 mM) and by actinomycin D (3 microM), suggesting the involvement of enhanced receptor protein synthesis and mRNA production in this event. Moreover, LPS treatment increased the capability of the IC-21 cell to respond to AGEPC addition by elevating intracellular free Ca2+ without causing an increase in the basal level of intracellular Ca2+. The present study demonstrates that IC-21 peritoneal macrophages possess high affinity AGEPC receptors and provides the evidence that the number of functional AGEPC receptors on a cell can be increased significantly upon exposure to LPS. PMID:1328211

  1. Stability of antimicrobial agents in peritoneal dialysate.

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, D L; Golper, T A

    1982-01-01

    The stability of cephapirin, gentamicin, penicillin G, nafcillin, ticarcillin, and vancomycin was tested in peritoneal dialysate at 25 degrees C for 24 h. All of the antimicrobial agents were stable except penicillin G, which lost 25% of activity over 24 h (P less than 0.01). The once-daily preparation of drug-dialysate solution is feasible for the treatment of peritonitis in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. PMID:7103451

  2. Sources and biology of regulatory factors active on mouse myeloid leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, D.

    1982-01-01

    The action of serum or cells in enforcing differentiation in mouse myelomonocytic leukemic cells was monitored in agar cultures of WEHI-3B leukemic cells. The repeated intravenous injection of 5 ..mu..g endotoxin initially increased serum differentiating activity but after the third injection responses to further injections decreased markedly. Congenitally athymic (nude) mice exhibited normal rises in serum differentiating activity when injected with endotoxin but C3H HeJ mice failed to respond to challenge with purified lipid A. Whole body irradiation up to 1,200 rads did not increase serum differentiating activity but did not suppress responses to challenge injection of endotoxin. Coculture of WEHI-3B cells with peritoneal cells from normal or irradiated BALB/c mice caused marked granulocytic differentiation in WEHI-3B colonies. This effect was not seen if leukemic cells were cultured with thymus, spleen, or bone marrow cells. The serum halflife of the factor in postendotoxin serum enforcing differentiation of WEHI-3B cells was shown to be 1.5-2.3 hr.

  3. Preclinical Activity of New [1,2]Oxazolo[5,4-e]isoindole Derivatives in Diffuse Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Spanò, Virginia; Pennati, Marzia; Parrino, Barbara; Carbone, Anna; Montalbano, Alessandra; Cilibrasi, Vincenzo; Zuco, Valentina; Lopergolo, Alessia; Cominetti, Denis; Diana, Patrizia; Cirrincione, Girolamo; Barraja, Paola; Zaffaroni, Nadia

    2016-08-11

    A series of 22 derivatives of the [1,2]oxazolo[5,4-e]isoindole system were synthesized through an efficient and versatile procedure that involves the annelation of the [1,2]oxazole moiety to the isoindole ring, producing derivatives with a wide substitution pattern. The structure-activity relationship indicates that the N-4-methoxybenzyl group appears crucial for potent activity. In addition, the presence of a 6-phenyl moiety is important and the best activity is reached with a 3,4,5-trimethoxy substituent. The most active compound, bearing both the structural features, was able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation at nanomolar concentrations when tested against the full NCI human tumor cell line panel. Interestingly, this compound was effective in reducing in vitro and in vivo cell growth, impairing cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis, as a consequence of the inhibition of tubulin polymerization, in experimental models of diffuse malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (DMPM), a rapidly lethal disease, poorly responsive to conventional therapeutic strategies. PMID:27428868

  4. Multiple bidirectional alterations of phenotype and changes in proliferative potential during the in vitro and in vivo passage of clonal mast cell populations derived from mouse peritoneal mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakura, Y.; Thompson, H.; Nakano, T.; Yamamura, T.; Asai, H.; Kitamura, Y.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Galli, S.J.

    1988-09-01

    Mouse peritoneal mast cells (PMC) express a connective tissue-type mast cell (CTMC) phenotype, including reactivity with the heparin-binding fluorescent dye berberine sulfate and incorporation of (35S) sulfate predominantly into heparin proteoglycans. When PMC purified to greater than 99% purity were cultured in methylcellulose with IL-3 and IL-4, approximately 25% of the PMC formed colonies, all of which contained both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative mast cells. When these mast cells were transferred to suspension culture, they generated populations that were 100% berberine sulfate-negative, a characteristic similar to that of mucosal mast cells (MMC), and that synthesized predominantly chondroitin sulfate (35S) proteoglycans. When ''MMC-like'' cultured mast cells derived from WBB6F1-+/+ PMC were injected into the peritoneal cavities of mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice, the adoptively transferred mast cell population became 100% berberine sulfate-positive. In methylcellulose culture, these ''second generation PMC'' formed clonal colonies containing both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative cells, but exhibited significantly less proliferative ability than did normal +/+ PMC. Thus, clonal mast cell populations initially derived from single PMC exhibited multiple and bidirectional alterations between CTMC-like and MMC-like phenotypes. However, this process was associated with a progressive diminution of the mast cells' proliferative ability.

  5. Wolbachia-Induced Neutrophil Activation in a Mouse Model of Ocular Onchocerciasis (River Blindness)

    PubMed Central

    Gillette-Ferguson, Illona; Hise, Amy G.; McGarry, Helen F.; Turner, Joseph; Esposito, Andrew; Sun, Yan; Diaconu, Eugenia; Taylor, Mark J.; Pearlman, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria are abundant in the filarial nematodes that cause onchocerciasis (river blindness), including the larvae (microfilariae) that migrate into the cornea. Using a mouse model of ocular onchocerciasis, we recently demonstrated that it is these endosymbiotic bacteria rather than the nematodes per se that induce neutrophil infiltration to the corneal stroma and loss of corneal clarity (Saint Andre et al., Science 295:1892-1895, 2002). To better understand the role of Wolbachia organisms in the pathogenesis of this disease, we examined the fate of these bacteria in the cornea by immunoelectron microscopy. Microfilariae harboring Wolbachia organisms were injected into mouse corneas, and bacteria were detected with antibody to Wolbachia surface protein. Within 18 h of injection, neutrophils completely surrounded the nematodes and were in close proximity to Wolbachia organisms. Wolbachia surface protein labeling was also prominent in neutrophil phagosomes, indicating neutrophil ingestion of Wolbachia organisms. Furthermore, the presence of numerous electron-dense granules around the phagosomes indicated that neutrophils were activated. To determine if Wolbachia organisms directly activate neutrophils, peritoneal neutrophils were incubated with either parasite extracts containing Wolbachia organisms, parasite extracts depleted of Wolbachia organisms (by antibiotic treatment of worms), or Wolbachia organisms isolated from filarial nematodes. After 18 h of incubation, we found that isolated Wolbachia organisms stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and CXC chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and KC by neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, these cytokines were induced by filarial extracts containing Wolbachia organisms but not by Wolbachia-depleted extracts. Taken together, these findings indicate that neutrophil activation is an important mechanism by which Wolbachia organisms contribute to the pathogenesis of

  6. Effect of the native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate on murine peritoneal macrophage modulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Yamassaki, F T; Lenzi, R M; Campestrini, L H; Bovo, F; Seyfried, M; Soldera-Silva, A; Stevan-Hancke, F R; Zawadzki-Baggio, S F; Pettolino, F A; Bacic, A; Maurer, J B B

    2015-07-10

    The native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate (CNTG) and its arabinogalactan-protein component (CNTG-AGP) were tested by using immuno-stimulant and anti-inflammatory in vitro assays of murine peritoneal macrophage activities. In the assay for immuno-stimulant activity (without previous treatment with lipopolysaccharide; LPS), CNTG increased the production of interleukin (IL)-10 and both CNTG and CNTG-AGP decreased the concentrations of IL6. When the macrophages were incubated in the presence of LPS and CNTG a decrease in the levels of nitric oxide (NO(·)) and IFN-γ was observed. The results could explain the popular use of CNTG as an anti-inflammatory. In addition, CNTG is the main component of the cashew-nut tree gum exudate, which has been considered a versatile polymer with potential pharmaceutical and food industry applications. These data may contribute to the study of the immunomodulation activity of plant polysaccharides, as well as encourage future experiments in the field of cashew-nut tree gum exudate applications. PMID:25857980

  7. Effect of the native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate on murine peritoneal macrophage modulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Yamassaki, F T; Lenzi, R M; Campestrini, L H; Bovo, F; Seyfried, M; Soldera-Silva, A; Stevan-Hancke, F R; Zawadzki-Baggio, S F; Pettolino, F A; Bacic, A; Maurer, J B B

    2015-07-10

    The native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate (CNTG) and its arabinogalactan-protein component (CNTG-AGP) were tested by using immuno-stimulant and anti-inflammatory in vitro assays of murine peritoneal macrophage activities. In the assay for immuno-stimulant activity (without previous treatment with lipopolysaccharide; LPS), CNTG increased the production of interleukin (IL)-10 and both CNTG and CNTG-AGP decreased the concentrations of IL6. When the macrophages were incubated in the presence of LPS and CNTG a decrease in the levels of nitric oxide (NO(·)) and IFN-γ was observed. The results could explain the popular use of CNTG as an anti-inflammatory. In addition, CNTG is the main component of the cashew-nut tree gum exudate, which has been considered a versatile polymer with potential pharmaceutical and food industry applications. These data may contribute to the study of the immunomodulation activity of plant polysaccharides, as well as encourage future experiments in the field of cashew-nut tree gum exudate applications.

  8. Zingerone suppresses liver inflammation induced by antibiotic mediated endotoxemia through down regulating hepatic mRNA expression of inflammatory markers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa peritonitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-induced endotoxin release is associated with high mortality rate even when appropriate antibiotics are used for the treatment of severe infections in intensive care units. Since liver is involved in systemic clearance and detoxification of endotoxin hence it becomes a primary target organ for endotoxin mediated inflammation. Currently available anti-inflammatory drugs give rise to serious side effects. Hence, there is an urgent need for safe and effective anti-inflammatory therapy. It is likely that anti-inflammatory phytochemicals and neutraceutical agents may have the potential to reduce the endotoxin mediated inflammation and complications associated with endotoxin release. Keeping this in mind, the present study was planned to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of zingerone (active compound of zingiber officinale) against liver inflammation induced by antibiotic mediated endotoxemia. The selected antibiotics capable of releasing high content of endotoxin were employed for their in vivo efficacy in P.aeruginosa peritonitis model. Released endotoxin induced inflammation and zingerone as co-anti-inflammatory therapy significantly reduced inflammatory response. Improved liver histology and reduced inflammatory markers MDA, RNI, MPO, tissue damage markers (AST, ALT, ALP) and inflammatory cytokines (MIP-2, IL-6 and TNF-α) were indicative of therapeutic potential of zingerone. The mechanism of action of zingerone may be related to significant inhibition of the mRNA expression of inflammatory markers (TLR4, RelA, NF-kB2, TNF- α, iNOS, COX-2) indicating that zingerone interferes with cell signalling pathway and suppresses hyper expression of cell signaling molecules of inflammatory pathway. Zingerone therapy significantly protected liver from endotoxin induced inflammatory damage by down regulating biochemical as well as molecular markers of inflammation. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that zingerone is a potent anti

  9. Immune Activity of BCG Infected Mouse Macrophages Treated with a Novel Recombinant Mouse Lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Kelly M; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin has been investigated for its adjuvant action to boost the BCG vaccine. Previous studies demonstrated that lactoferrin (LF) enhanced efficacy of the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine to protect mice against the virulent Erdman Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The studies here investigate the hypothesis that a novel CHO-derived recombinant mouse LF can modify cytokine production and antigen presentation molecules on macrophages. The mouse LF (rmLF) was examined for effects on bone marrow derived macrophage (BMM) activities when cultured with BCG. Comparisons were made to CHO-derived recombinant human LF (rhLF). Inflammatory cytokine responses were investigated, as were antigen presentation and associated co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine responses were subsequently measured when these cells were co-cultured with naïve or BCG sensitized CD4+ lymphocytes. While overall responses were similar between mouse, human, and bovine forms, the homologous rmLF treated infected BMMs showed unique activation patterns of cytokine production. These results indicate that species-specific LF can have different effects on mouse macrophages exposed to BCG, thus potentially affecting adjuvant activity when used in models of vaccination in mice.

  10. 5-Fluorouracil causes leukocytes attraction in the peritoneal cavity by activating autophagy and HMGB1 release in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cottone, Lucia; Capobianco, Annalisa; Gualteroni, Chiara; Perrotta, Cristiana; Bianchi, Marco E; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Manfredi, Angelo A

    2015-03-15

    Signals released by leukocytes contribute to tumor growth and influence the efficacy of antineoplastic treatments. The outcome of peritoneal carcinomatosis treatments is unsatisfactory, possibly because chemotherapy activates events that have in the long-term deleterious effects. In this study we offer evidence that 5-fluorouracile (5-FU), besides provoking apoptosis of MC38 colon carcinoma cells, induces a striking attraction of leukocytes both in an orthotopic model of colon carcinomatosis in vivo and in monocyte-migration assays in vitro. Leukocyte attraction depends on the presence of High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), an endogenous immune adjuvant and chemoattractant released by dying cells. Leukocyte recruitment is prevented in vivo and in vitro using blocking antibodies against HMGB1 and its competitive antagonist BoxA or by interfering with HMGB1 expression. Autophagy is required for leukocyte chemoattraction, since the latter abates upon pharmacological blockade of the autophagic flux while activation of autophagy per se, in the absence of death of colon carcinoma cells, is not sufficient to attract leukocytes. Our results identify autophagy induction and HMGB1 release in colon carcinoma cells as key events responsible for 5-FU elicited leukocyte attraction and define a novel rate-limiting target for combinatorial therapies.

  11. Evaluation of the Leishmanicidal Activity of Rutaceae and Lauraceae Ethanol Extracts on Golden Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chávez Enciso, N. A.; Coy-barrera, E. D.; Patiño, O. J.; Cuca, L. E.; Delgado, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Traditional medicine has provided a number of therapeutic solutions for the control of infectious agents, cancers, and other diseases. After screening a wide variety of Colombian plant extracts, we have identified promising antileishmanial activity in ethanol extracts from Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae) and Zanthoxyllum monophyllum (Rutaceae). In this study, we evaluated the in vitro activity of two ethanol extracts, one from Ocotea macrophylla and the other from Zanthoxyllum monophyllum and one alkaloid fraction of ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum, on peritoneal macrophages isolated from golden Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) infected with Leishmania panamensis and Leishmania major promastigotes. All of the extracts studied displayed promising (≥2) selectivity indices (S/I), the most significant of which were for ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum against Leishmania panamensis (S/I=12) and alkaloid fraction of ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum against Leishmania major (S/I=11). These results support the use of ethanol extracts and alkaloid fractions isolated from Ocotea macrophylla and Zanthoxyllum monophyllum, respectively; as therapeutic options for cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:25035529

  12. Evaluation of the Leishmanicidal Activity of Rutaceae and Lauraceae Ethanol Extracts on Golden Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chávez Enciso, N A; Coy-Barrera, E D; Patiño, O J; Cuca, L E; Delgado, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    Traditional medicine has provided a number of therapeutic solutions for the control of infectious agents, cancers, and other diseases. After screening a wide variety of Colombian plant extracts, we have identified promising antileishmanial activity in ethanol extracts from Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae) and Zanthoxyllum monophyllum (Rutaceae). In this study, we evaluated the in vitro activity of two ethanol extracts, one from Ocotea macrophylla and the other from Zanthoxyllum monophyllum and one alkaloid fraction of ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum, on peritoneal macrophages isolated from golden Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) infected with Leishmania panamensis and Leishmania major promastigotes. All of the extracts studied displayed promising (≥2) selectivity indices (S/I), the most significant of which were for ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum against Leishmania panamensis (S/I=12) and alkaloid fraction of ethanol extract of Zanthoxyllum monophyllum against Leishmania major (S/I=11). These results support the use of ethanol extracts and alkaloid fractions isolated from Ocotea macrophylla and Zanthoxyllum monophyllum, respectively; as therapeutic options for cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:25035529

  13. The Impact of Myeloperoxidase and Activated Macrophages on Metaphase II Mouse Oocyte Quality

    PubMed Central

    Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N.; Thakur, Mili; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Drewlo, Sascha; Saed, Ghassan M.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme-containing enzyme present in neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, is produced in high levels during inflammation, and associated with poor reproductive outcomes. MPO is known to generate hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) utilizing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride (Cl-). Here we investigate the effect of activated immune cells and MPO on oocyte quality. Mouse metaphase II oocytes were divided into the following groups: 1) Incubation with a catalytic amount of MPO (40 nM) for different incubation periods in the presence of 100 mM Cl- with and without H2O2 and with and without melatonin (100 μM), at 37°C (n = 648/648 total number of oocytes in each group for oocytes with and without cumulus cells); 2) Co-cultured with activated mouse peritoneal macrophage and neutrophils cells (1.0 x 106 cells/ml) in the absence and presence of melatonin (200 μM), an MPO inhibitor/ROS scavenger, for different incubation periods in HTF media, at 37°C (n = 200/200); 3) Untreated oocytes incubated for 4 hrs as controls (n = 73/64). Oocytes were then fixed, stained and scored based on the microtubule morphology and chromosomal alignment. All treatments were found to negatively affect oocyte quality in a time dependent fashion as compared to controls. In all cases the presence of cumulus cells offered no protection; however significant protection was offered by melatonin. Similar results were obtained with oocytes treated with neutrophils. This work provides a direct link between MPO and decreased oocyte quality. Therefore, strategies to decrease MPO mediated inflammation may influence reproductive outcomes. PMID:26982351

  14. The Impact of Myeloperoxidase and Activated Macrophages on Metaphase II Mouse Oocyte Quality.

    PubMed

    Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N; Thakur, Mili; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Drewlo, Sascha; Saed, Ghassan M; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme-containing enzyme present in neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, is produced in high levels during inflammation, and associated with poor reproductive outcomes. MPO is known to generate hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) utilizing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride (Cl-). Here we investigate the effect of activated immune cells and MPO on oocyte quality. Mouse metaphase II oocytes were divided into the following groups: 1) Incubation with a catalytic amount of MPO (40 nM) for different incubation periods in the presence of 100 mM Cl- with and without H2O2 and with and without melatonin (100 μM), at 37°C (n = 648/648 total number of oocytes in each group for oocytes with and without cumulus cells); 2) Co-cultured with activated mouse peritoneal macrophage and neutrophils cells (1.0 x 106 cells/ml) in the absence and presence of melatonin (200 μM), an MPO inhibitor/ROS scavenger, for different incubation periods in HTF media, at 37°C (n = 200/200); 3) Untreated oocytes incubated for 4 hrs as controls (n = 73/64). Oocytes were then fixed, stained and scored based on the microtubule morphology and chromosomal alignment. All treatments were found to negatively affect oocyte quality in a time dependent fashion as compared to controls. In all cases the presence of cumulus cells offered no protection; however significant protection was offered by melatonin. Similar results were obtained with oocytes treated with neutrophils. This work provides a direct link between MPO and decreased oocyte quality. Therefore, strategies to decrease MPO mediated inflammation may influence reproductive outcomes. PMID:26982351

  15. Establishment of a novel method to evaluate peritoneal microdissemination and therapeutic effect using luciferase assay.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryo; Yokobori, Takehiko; Osone, Katsuya; Tatsuki, Hironori; Takada, Takahiro; Suto, Toshinaga; Yajima, Reina; Kato, Toshihide; Fujii, Takaaki; Tsutsumi, Souichi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Asao, Takayuki

    2016-03-01

    Peritoneal dissemination is a major cause of recurrence in patients with malignant tumors in the peritoneal cavity. Effective anticancer agents and treatment protocols are necessary to improve outcomes in these patients. However, previous studies using mouse models of peritoneal dissemination have not detected any drug effect against peritoneal micrometastasis. Here we used the luciferase assay to evaluate peritoneal micrometastasis in living animals and established an accurate mouse model of early peritoneal microdissemination to evaluate tumorigenesis and drug efficacy. There was a positive correlation between luminescence intensity in in vivo luciferase assay and the extent of tumor dissemination evaluated by ex vivo luciferase assay and mesenteric weight. This model has advantages over previous models because optimal luciferin concentration without cell damage was validated and peritoneal microdissemination could be quantitatively evaluated. Therefore, it is a useful model to validate peritoneal micrometastasis formation and to evaluate drug efficacy without killing mice. PMID:26716425

  16. Peritoneal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... based on more than just the peritoneal fluid culture (which may be negative even if you have ...

  17. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pleural Fluid Analysis , Pericardial Fluid ...

  18. The Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells: some aspects of regulation of activity and cellular function.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, T

    1995-11-01

    The mast cell contains potent mediators of inflammation which are released after IgE-directed and non-IgE-directed stimulation of the cell. This highly specialized cell is therefore ascribed a role in the pathogenesis of disease states in which the inflammatory response plays a role for the development of the clinical symptoms. Thus, besides being of interest in basic research, studies of the cellular processes leading to release of inflammatory mediators from the mast cell also have important clinical implications. The aim of the present work has been to document the existence of the Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells, to investigate the regulation of the pump activity and to explore whether modulation of the pump activity interferes with the cellular stimulus/secretion coupling mechanism. The Na+/K(+)-pump activity following stimulation of the mast cell was also investigated. The pump activity was assessed as the ouabain-sensitive cellular potassium uptake with 86Rb+ as a tracer for potassium. The histamine release from the mast cell following IgE-directed and non-IgE directed stimulation of the cell was used as a parameter for cellular degranulation. Histamine was measured by spectrofluorometry. The finding of an ouabain-sensitive uptake mechanism in the mast cell documents the presence of a functional Na+/K(+)-pump in this cell. The pump activity is inhibited by lanthanides and by the divalent cations calcium, magnesium, barium and strontium. The pump has a large reserve capacity which probably is caused by a low intracellular concentration of sodium. This enables the pump to respond to changes in the intracellular sodium concentration. The inhibitory effect of di- and trivalent ions on the pump activity is probably a result of the inhibitory effect of these ions on the cellular sodium uptake. The digitalis glycosides, ouabain and digoxin, but not the more lipophilic drug digitoxigenin, increase both IgE-directed and non-IgE-directed histamine release

  19. A membrane vesicle/ribosome preparation from Serratia marcescens elicits peritoneal exudate cells expressing both tumoricidal and bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    McCall, C; Weimer, L; Baldwin, S; Riches, D W; Canono, B; Campbell, P A

    1992-08-01

    A biological response modifier called ImuVert, derived from the bacterium Serratia marcescens, produced long-lasting elevation of peritoneal exudate cell (PEC) numbers after intraperitoneal injection into mice. These cells had enhanced ability to phagocytose both latex beads and opsonized Listeria monocytogenes. PEC harvested 2-14 days after a single injection of ImuVert killed L. monocytogenes, and ImuVert protected mice from infection by L. monocytogenes, measured both by LD50 and bacterial growth in vivo. Cells harvested 7 and 14 days after ImuVert injection also were tumoricidal, measured as killing of P815 mastocytoma cells, and ImuVert induced macrophages to express tumoricidal properties in vitro. These data suggest that ImuVert has a unique ability to induce a chronic inflammatory response, as other agents do not induce such a long-lasting influx of bactericidal inflammatory cells that also show tumoricidal activity. The consequences of this response appear to include protection from infection by certain bacteria.

  20. Alpha-D-galactosylation of surface fucoglycoconjugate(s) upon stimulation/activation of murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Petryniak, J

    1992-04-01

    Murine resident macrophages express, on their surface, carbohydrate epitopes which undergo changes during their stimulation/activation as monitored by binding of 125I labelled Evonymus europaea and Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 lectins. Treatment of the stimulated macrophages with coffee bean alpha-galactosidase abolished binding of the GS I-B4 isolectin and changed the binding pattern of the Evonymus lectin. The affinity (Ka) of Evonymus lectin for alpha-galactosidase-treated macrophages decreased approximately 23-fold, from 1.25 x 10(8) M-1 to 5.5 x 10(6) M-1. Subsequent digestion of alpha-galactosidase-treated macrophages with alpha-L-fucosidase from Trichomonas foetus, further reduced binding of Evonymus lectin. Resident macrophages showed the same pattern of Evonymus lectin binding, with the same affinity, as alpha-galactosidase-treated, stimulated macrophages. These results, together with a consideration of the carbohydrate binding specificity of the Evonymus lectin which, in the absence of alpha-D-galactosyl groups, requires alpha-L-fucosyl groups for binding, indicate the presence, on resident macrophages, of glycoconjugates with terminal alpha-L-fucosyl residues. It is also concluded that during macrophage stimulation/activation alpha-D-galactosyl residues are added to this glycoconjugate and that they form part of the receptor for Evonymus lectin. The same glycoconjugate(s) is/are also expressed on the activated macrophage IC-21 cell line which exhibits the same characteristics as that of stimulated peritoneal macrophages, i.e., it contains alpha-D-galactosyl end groups and is resistant to the action of trypsin. Both lectins were also specifically bound to Corynaebacterium parvum activated macrophages. PMID:1344714

  1. Is gastrointestinal dysfunction induced by gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis relevant to impairment of interstitial cells of Cajal?

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongqun; He, Yan; Tong, Jinxue; Sun, Lingyu; Yang, Dongdong; Li, Huaming; Ao, Ning; Jin, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qifan

    2011-03-01

    Although impaired gastrointestinal motility from gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis (GCPM) causes extraordinary pain, its cause is unclear. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are apparently pacemaker cells, and their loss could cause motor dysfunction. In this study, we developed a mouse model for GCPM, and investigated electrophysiological changes in the small intestine and attendant changes in ICC. We found decreased ICC and disrupted electrical rhythm in the model. Pathologic ICC changes were well described. Cancer peritoneal metastasis may impair intestinal myoelectrical activity by damaging ICC and ICC networks. Interstitial cells of Cajal will be a target of palliative treatment and merit further study. PMID:21207119

  2. Houttuynia cordata Thunb. volatile oil exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and inhibited nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α production in LPS-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Fan, Ting; Zhang, Yanmin; Fan, Te; Zhou, Ping; Niu, Xiaofeng; He, Langchong

    2013-11-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (HC) is a medicinal herb that generally used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating allergic inflammation. The present study investigated the inhibitory effect of the volatile oil from HC Thunb. on animal models of inflammation and the production of inflammatory mediators in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, xylene-induced mouse ear edema, formaldehyde-induced paw edema and carrageenan-induced mice paw edema were significantly decreased by HC volatile oil. HC volatile oil showed pronounced inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) E2 and malondialdehyde production in the edematous exudates. In vitro exposure of mouse resident peritoneal macrophages to 1, 10, 100 and 1000 µg/mL of HC volatile oil significantly suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated production of NO and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to HC volatile oil had no effect on cell viability and systemic toxicity. Furthermore, HC volatile oil inhibited the production of NO and TNF-α by down-regulating LPS-stimulated iNOS and TNF-α mRNA expression. Western blot analysis showed that HC volatile oil attenuated LPS-stimulated synthesis of iNOS and TNF-α protein in the macrophages, in parallel. These findings add a novel aspect to the biological profile of HC and clarify its anti-inflammatory mechanism. PMID:23280586

  3. CRIg-expressing peritoneal macrophages are associated with disease severity in patients with cirrhosis and ascites

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Katharine M.; Banh, Xuan; Gadd, Victoria L.; Wojcik, Kyle K.; Ariffin, Juliana K.; Jose, Sara; Lukowski, Samuel; Baillie, Gregory J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Powell, Elizabeth E.

    2016-01-01

    Infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and ascites. Hypothesizing that innate immune dysfunction contributes to susceptibility to infection, we assessed ascitic fluid macrophage phenotype and function. The expression of complement receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily (CRIg) and CCR2 defined two phenotypically and functionally distinct peritoneal macrophage subpopulations. The proportion of CRIghi macrophages differed between patients and in the same patient over time, and a high proportion of CRIghi macrophages was associated with reduced disease severity (model for end-stage liver disease) score. As compared with CRIglo macrophages, CRIghi macrophages were highly phagocytic and displayed enhanced antimicrobial effector activity. Transcriptional profiling by RNA sequencing and comparison with human macrophage and murine peritoneal macrophage expression signatures highlighted similarities among CRIghi cells, human macrophages, and mouse F4/80hi resident peritoneal macrophages and among CRIglo macrophages, human monocytes, and mouse F4/80lo monocyte-derived peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that CRIghi and CRIglo macrophages may represent a tissue-resident population and a monocyte-derived population, respectively. In conclusion, ascites fluid macrophage subset distribution and phagocytic capacity is highly variable among patients with chronic liver disease. Regulating the numbers and/or functions of these macrophage populations could provide therapeutic opportunities in cirrhotic patients. PMID:27699269

  4. CRIg-expressing peritoneal macrophages are associated with disease severity in patients with cirrhosis and ascites

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Katharine M.; Banh, Xuan; Gadd, Victoria L.; Wojcik, Kyle K.; Ariffin, Juliana K.; Jose, Sara; Lukowski, Samuel; Baillie, Gregory J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Powell, Elizabeth E.

    2016-01-01

    Infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and ascites. Hypothesizing that innate immune dysfunction contributes to susceptibility to infection, we assessed ascitic fluid macrophage phenotype and function. The expression of complement receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily (CRIg) and CCR2 defined two phenotypically and functionally distinct peritoneal macrophage subpopulations. The proportion of CRIghi macrophages differed between patients and in the same patient over time, and a high proportion of CRIghi macrophages was associated with reduced disease severity (model for end-stage liver disease) score. As compared with CRIglo macrophages, CRIghi macrophages were highly phagocytic and displayed enhanced antimicrobial effector activity. Transcriptional profiling by RNA sequencing and comparison with human macrophage and murine peritoneal macrophage expression signatures highlighted similarities among CRIghi cells, human macrophages, and mouse F4/80hi resident peritoneal macrophages and among CRIglo macrophages, human monocytes, and mouse F4/80lo monocyte-derived peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that CRIghi and CRIglo macrophages may represent a tissue-resident population and a monocyte-derived population, respectively. In conclusion, ascites fluid macrophage subset distribution and phagocytic capacity is highly variable among patients with chronic liver disease. Regulating the numbers and/or functions of these macrophage populations could provide therapeutic opportunities in cirrhotic patients.

  5. Effect of Kramecyne on the Inflammatory Response in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Miranda, E.; Lemus-Bautista, J.; Pérez, S.; Pérez-Ramos, J.

    2013-01-01

    Kramecyne is a new peroxide, it was isolated from Krameria cytisoides, methanol extract, and this plant was mostly found in North and South America. This compound showed potent anti-inflammatory activity; however, the mechanisms by which this compound exerts its anti-inflammatory effect are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of kramecyne on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that kramecyne inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin- (IL-) 6. During the inflammatory process, levels of cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, kramecyne suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23573152

  6. [Peritoneal biofilms: microscopic features].

    PubMed

    Maloman, E; Lepadatu, C; Ciornâi, A; Sainsus, Natalia; Balica, I; Gladun, N

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotherapy remains one of the basic clinical tools, which can influence the evolution of severe peritonitis. Peritoneal biofilm formation may minimize the antibiotic effects due to dramatic growth of Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentrations (MBC) for matrix-enclosed bacteria. In this paper we demonstrate the presence and evolution of bacterial biofilms on the peritoneal surface during the course of severe secondary peritonitis using an experimental model and clinical material. Cecal Ligation Puncture was performed in 20 mice Swiss Webster. Peritoneal samples were studied at optic and electronic microscope at 10, 24, 48 and 72 hours postoperative. Clinical samples were taken from 10 patients with diffuse peritonitis. At 24 hours after the onset of the peritonitis bacterial colonies were detected on the peritoneal surface. The formation of mature multilayer polymicrobial biofilms with deep penetration in abdominal wall by 48-72 hours was documented. The bacterial biofilms appear in first 24 hours in the course of experimental generalized peritonitis. Our experimental and clinical data demonstrate formation of the mature polymicrobial biofilm in 48-72 hours after the onset of peritonitis. The possibility of resistant biofilm formation in secondary diffuse peritonitis should be taken into consideration in elaboration of treatment schemes.

  7. Combined suicide gene therapy for pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis using BGTC liposomes.

    PubMed

    Hajri, Amor; Wack, Séverine; Lehn, Pierre; Vigneron, Jean-Pierre; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Marescaux, Jacques; Aprahamian, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Peritoneal dissemination is a common end-stage complication of pancreatic cancer for which novel therapeutic modalities are actively investigated, as there is no current effective therapy. Thus, we evaluated, in a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis, the therapeutic potential of a novel nonviral gene therapy approach consisting of bis-guanidinium-tren-cholesterol (BGTC)-mediated lipofection of a combined suicide gene system. Human BxPC-3 pancreatic cells secreting the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) tumor marker were injected into the peritoneal cavity of nude mice. After 8 days, intraperitoneal (i.p.) lipofection was performed using BGTC/DOPE cationic liposomes complexed with plasmids encoding the two prodrug-activating enzymes Herpes Simplex Virus thymidine kinase and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase, the latter being expressed from a bicistronic cassette also encoding E. coli uracil phosphoribosyltransferase. Administration of the lipoplexes was followed by treatment with the corresponding prodrugs ganciclovir and 5-fluorocytosine. The results presented herein demonstrate that BGTC/DOPE liposomes can efficiently mediate gene transfection into peritoneal tumor nodules. Indeed, HSV-TK mRNA was detected in tumor nodule tissues by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and X-gal staining were observed in the peritoneal tumor foci following lipofection of the corresponding EGFP and LacZ reporter genes. These expression analyses also showed that transgene expression lasted for about 2 weeks and was preferential for the tumor nodules, this tumor preference being in good agreement with the absence of obvious treatment-related toxicity. Most importantly, mice receiving the full treatment scheme (BGTC liposomes, suicide genes and prodrugs) had significantly lower serum CEA levels than those of the various control groups, a finding indicating that peritoneal

  8. Relationship between cerebral pharmacokinetics and anxiolytic activity of diazepam and its active metabolites after a single intra-peritoneal administration of diazepam in mice.

    PubMed

    Dailly, E; Hascoët, M; Colombel, M C; Jolliet, P; Bourin, M

    2002-07-01

    The relationship between the cerebral pharmacokinetics of diazepam and its active metabolites (desmethyldiazepam, oxazepam) and the anxiolytic effect evaluated by the four-plates test and the light/dark test were investigated after a single intra-peritoneal injection of diazepam (1 mg/kg or 1.5 mg/kg). For up to 30 min after administration, the sedative effect interfered with the anxiolytic effect, thus the results of the anxiolytic effect were not interpretable. From 30 min to 60 min after administration, this interference disappeared, the cerebral level of benzodiazepines was stable (the brain elimination of diazepam was compensated for by the appearance of desmethyldiazepam followed by oxazepam) but the anxiolytic effect decreased dramatically in all the tests with diazepam 1 mg/kg or 1.5 mg/kg. The acute tolerance to benzodiazepines and the difference of affinity for subtypes of GABA(A) receptors between diazepam, desmethyldiazepam, oxazepam could explain this result.

  9. Peroxisome-proliferator activator receptor-gamma activation decreases attachment of endometrial cells to peritoneal mesothelial cells in an in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion.

    PubMed

    Kavoussi, S K; Witz, C A; Binkley, P A; Nair, A S; Lebovic, D I

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma activation has an effect on the attachment of endometrial cells to peritoneal mesothelial cells in a well-established in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion. The endometrial epithelial cell line EM42 and mesothelial cell line LP9 were used for this study. EM42 cells, LP9 cells or both were treated with the PPAR-gamma agonist ciglitazone (CTZ) at varying concentrations (10, 20 and 40 microM) x 48 h with subsequent co-culture of EM42 and LP9 cells. The rate of EM42 attachment and invasion through LP9 cells was then assessed and compared with control (EM42 and LP9 cells co-cultured without prior treatment with CTZ). Next, attachment of CTZ-treated and untreated EM42 cells to hyaluronic acid (HA), a cell adhesion molecule (CAM) on peritoneal mesothelial cells, were assessed. Although there was no difference in EM42 attachment when LP9 cells alone were treated with CTZ, treatment of EM42 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 cells by 27% (P < 0.01). Treatment of both EM42 and LP9 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 by 37% (P < 0.01). Treatment of EM42 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased attachment to HA by 66% (P = 0.056). CTZ did not decrease invasion of EM42 cells through the LP9 monolayer. CTZ may inhibit EM42 cell proliferation. In conclusion, CTZ significantly decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 cells and HA in an in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion. PMID:19643817

  10. Selective Imaging of Malignant Ascites in a Mouse Model of Peritoneal Metastasis Using in Vivo Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Eto, Hinako; Hyodo, Fuminori; Nakano, Kenji; Utsumi, Hideo

    2016-02-16

    The presence of malignant ascites in advanced cancer patients is associated with both a poor prognosis and quality of life with a risk of abdominal infection and sepsis. Contemporary noninvasive visualization methods such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often struggle to differentiate malignant ascites from surrounding tissues. This study aimed to determine the utility of selective H2O imaging in the abdominal cavity with a free radical probe and deuterium oxide (D2O) contrast agent using in vivo dynamic nuclear polarization-MRI (DNP-MRI). Phantom imaging experiments established a linear relationship between H2O volume and image intensity using in vivo DNP-MRI. Similar results were obtained when the radical-D2O probe was used to determine selective and spatial information on H2O in vivo, modeled by the injection of saline into the abdominal cavity of mice. To demonstrate the utility of this method for disease, malignant ascites in peritoneal metastasis animal model was selected as one of the typical examples. In vivo DNP-MRI of peritoneal metastasis animal model was performed 7-21 days after intraperitoneal injection of luciferase, stably expressing the human pancreatic carcinoma (SUIT-2). The image intensity with increasing malignant ascites was significantly increased at days 7, 16, and 21. This increase corresponded to in vivo tumor progression, as measured by bioluminescent imaging. These results suggest that H2O signal enhancement in DNP-MRI using radical-D2O contrast is positively associated with the progression of dissemination and could be a useful biomarker for malignant ascites with cancer metastasis.

  11. Spaceflight Activates Lipotoxic Pathways in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Jonscher, Karen R.; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Suhalim, Jeffrey L.; Orlicky, David J.; Potma, Eric O.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Bateman, Ted A.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Levi, Moshe; Friedman, Jacob E.; Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflight affects numerous organ systems in the body, leading to metabolic dysfunction that may have long-term consequences. Microgravity-induced alterations in liver metabolism, particularly with respect to lipids, remain largely unexplored. Here we utilize a novel systems biology approach, combining metabolomics and transcriptomics with advanced Raman microscopy, to investigate altered hepatic lipid metabolism in mice following short duration spaceflight. Mice flown aboard Space Transportation System -135, the last Shuttle mission, lose weight but redistribute lipids, particularly to the liver. Intriguingly, spaceflight mice lose retinol from lipid droplets. Both mRNA and metabolite changes suggest the retinol loss is linked to activation of PPARα-mediated pathways and potentially to hepatic stellate cell activation, both of which may be coincident with increased bile acids and early signs of liver injury. Although the 13-day flight duration is too short for frank fibrosis to develop, the retinol loss plus changes in markers of extracellular matrix remodeling raise the concern that longer duration exposure to the space environment may result in progressive liver damage, increasing the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27097220

  12. Spaceflight Activates Lipotoxic Pathways in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Jonscher, Karen R; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Suhalim, Jeffrey L; Orlicky, David J; Potma, Eric O; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bouxsein, Mary L; Bateman, Ted A; Stodieck, Louis S; Levi, Moshe; Friedman, Jacob E; Gridley, Daila S; Pecaut, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflight affects numerous organ systems in the body, leading to metabolic dysfunction that may have long-term consequences. Microgravity-induced alterations in liver metabolism, particularly with respect to lipids, remain largely unexplored. Here we utilize a novel systems biology approach, combining metabolomics and transcriptomics with advanced Raman microscopy, to investigate altered hepatic lipid metabolism in mice following short duration spaceflight. Mice flown aboard Space Transportation System -135, the last Shuttle mission, lose weight but redistribute lipids, particularly to the liver. Intriguingly, spaceflight mice lose retinol from lipid droplets. Both mRNA and metabolite changes suggest the retinol loss is linked to activation of PPARα-mediated pathways and potentially to hepatic stellate cell activation, both of which may be coincident with increased bile acids and early signs of liver injury. Although the 13-day flight duration is too short for frank fibrosis to develop, the retinol loss plus changes in markers of extracellular matrix remodeling raise the concern that longer duration exposure to the space environment may result in progressive liver damage, increasing the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27097220

  13. A defect in inducible beta-galactosidase of B lymphocytes in the osteopetrotic (mi/mi) mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1996-01-01

    Macrophages were activated by administration of an inflammatory lipid metabolite, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc), to wild type mice but not murine (microphthalmic) osteopetrotic (mi/mi) mutant mice. In vitro treatment of wild type mouse peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc efficiently activated macrophages whereas lyso-Pc-treatment of mi mutant mouse peritoneal cells resulted in no activation of macrophages. Generation of macrophage activating factor requires a precursor protein, serum vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and participation of lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of B lymphocytes. Lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of B lymphocytes was found to be defective in mi mutant mice. PMID:8881764

  14. Cholinergic signals in mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing.

    PubMed

    Eggermann, Emmanuel; Kremer, Yves; Crochet, Sylvain; Petersen, Carl C H

    2014-12-11

    Internal brain states affect sensory perception, cognition, and learning. Many neocortical areas exhibit changes in the pattern and synchrony of neuronal activity during quiet versus active behaviors. Active behaviors are typically associated with desynchronized cortical dynamics. Increased thalamic firing contributes importantly to desynchronize mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing. However, a whisking-related cortical state change persists after thalamic inactivation, which is mediated at least in part by acetylcholine, as we show here by using whole-cell recordings, local pharmacology, axonal calcium imaging, and optogenetic stimulation. During whisking, we find prominent cholinergic signals in the barrel cortex, which suppress spontaneous cortical activity. The desynchronized state of barrel cortex during whisking is therefore driven by at least two distinct signals with opposing functions: increased thalamic activity driving glutamatergic excitation of the cortex and increased cholinergic input suppressing spontaneous cortical activity.

  15. Activation and regulation of arachidonic acid release in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid release in rabbit neutrophils can be enhanced by the addition of chemotactic fMet-Leu-Phe, platelet-activating factor, PAF, or the calcium ionophore A23187. Over 80% of the release ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid comes from phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The release is dose-dependent and increases with increasing concentration of the stimulus. The A23187-induced release increases with increasing time of the stimulation. ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid release, but not the rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium, is inhibited in pertussis toxin-treated neutrophils stimulated with PAF. The ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid released by A23187 is potentiated while that release by fMET-Leu-Phe or PAF is inhibited in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA, treated rabbit neutrophils. The protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine, H-7, has no effect on the potentiation by PMA of the A23187-induced release, it prevents the inhibition by PMA of the release produced by PAF or fMet-Leu-Phe. In addition, PMA increases arachidonic acid release in H-7-treated cells stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59022 increases the level of diacylglycerol in neutrophils stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. Furthermore, R59022 potentiates ({sup 3}H) arachidonic acid release produced by fMet-Leu-Phe. This potentiation is not inhibited by H-7, in fact, it is increased in H-7-treated neutrophils.

  16. Aqueous extract of Gracilaria tenuistipitata suppresses LPS-induced NF-κB and MAPK activation in RAW 264.7 and rat peritoneal macrophages and exerts hepatoprotective effects on carbon tetrachloride-treated rat.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Yen, Feng-Lin; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chen, Wei-Chun; Yeh, Chi-Chen; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the previous investigations of bioactivity of aqueous extract of the edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT) against H2O2-induced DNA damage and hepatitis C virus replication, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential therapeutic properties of AEGT against inflammation and hepatotoxicity using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse RAW 264.7 cells, primary rat peritoneal macrophages and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced acute hepatitis model in rats. AEGT concentration-dependently inhibited the elevated RNA and protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, thereby reducing nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 levels, respectively. Moreover, AEGT significantly suppressed the production of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. These inhibitory effects were associated with the suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation by AEGT in LPS-stimulated cells. In addition, we highlighted the hepatoprotective and curative effects of AEGT in a rat model of CCl4-intoxicated acute liver injury, which was evident from reduction in the elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels as well as amelioration of histological damage by pre-treatment or post-treatment of AEGT. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that AEGT may serve as a potential supplement in the prevention or amelioration of inflammatory diseases.

  17. Peritonitis caused by Rothia mucilaginosa in a peritoneal dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Gosmanova, Elvira O; Garrett, Tiffani R; Wall, Barry M

    2013-12-01

    Peritonitis is an important cause of morbidity in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Rothia mucilaginosa has been reported as an unusual cause of peritoneal dialysis associated peritonitis. Difficulty in the management of this microorganism lies in the absence of uniform recommendations for anti-microbial therapy directed against this pathogen. The current report describes the clinical course of an episode of peritoneal dialysis associated peritonitis caused by Rothia mucilaginosa. Treatment options for this organism are summarized. PMID:24263080

  18. Screening of In Vivo Activated Genes in Enterococcus faecalis during Insect and Mouse Infections and Growth in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Hanin, Aurelie; Sava, Irina; Bao, YinYin; Huebner, Johannes; Hartke, Axel; Auffray, Yanick; Sauvageot, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is part of the commensal microbiota of humans and its main habitat is the gastrointestinal tract. Although harmless in healthy individuals, E. faecalis has emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections. In order to better understand the transformation of a harmless commensal into a life-threatening pathogen, we developed a Recombination-based In Vivo Expression Technology for E. faecalis. Two R-IVET systems with different levels of sensitivity have been constructed in a E. faecalis V583 derivative strain and tested in the insect model Galleria mellonella, during growth in urine, in a mouse bacteremia and in a mouse peritonitis model. Our combined results led to the identification of 81 in vivo activated genes. Among them, the ef_3196/7 operon was shown to be strongly induced in the insect host model. Deletion of this operonic structure demonstrated that this two-component system was essential to the E. faecalis pathogenic potential in Galleria. Gene ef_0377, induced in insect and mammalian models, has also been further analyzed and it has been demonstrated that this ankyrin-encoding gene was also involved in E. faecalis virulence. Thus these R-IVET screenings led to the identification of new E. faecalis factors implied in in vivo persistence and pathogenic potential of this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:20686694

  19. Fungal peritonitis caused by Lecythophora mutabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, S; Johnson, R J; Hillier, S; Shelton, W R; Rinaldi, M G

    1985-01-01

    Fungal peritonitis caused by Lecythophora mutabilis, a mold rarely isolated from humans, is described. A patient on continuous peritoneal dialysis developed clinical, microbiological, and serological evidence for peritonitis due to this fungus. In vitro susceptibility testing of the fungus revealed marked differences in the activities of various antifungal agents. Although initially responding to treatment with oral ketoconazole, intraperitoneal miconazole, and catheter replacement, the patient had a documented relapse. The patient was eventually cured following the removal of a second catheter in association with prolonged imidazole treatment. Images PMID:4031032

  20. Peritoneal interleukin-8 in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Zeillemaker, A M; Hoynck van Papendrecht, A A; Hart, M H; Roos, D; Verbrugh, H A; Leguit, P

    1996-05-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a chemoattractant that is highly selective for neutrophils. This study was designed to investigate the presence of IL-8 in peritoneal fluid of patients with acute appendicitis. The clinical circumstances underlying the secretion of IL-8 by mesothelium and its mechanism of activation have not been defined. In an in vitro model for bacterial peritonitis the role of bacteria in activating human mesothelial cells to secrete IL-8 was studied. Cultured human mesothelium was incubated with various species of pathogenic bacteria, isolated from peritoneal exudate fluids of patients with appendicitis. The amount of IL-8 secreted by the cultured mesothelial cells was determined in an IL-8 ELISA, as IL-8 was present in the original peritoneal fluid of these patients. Peritoneal fluids from patients with a perforated appendix were found to contain a significantly higher concentration of IL-8 compared to peritoneal fluids from patients with nonperforating appendicitis (121.6 (57.8) ng/ml versus 0.2 (0.07) ng/ml, respectively; mean (SEM), P < or = 0.01). Species of Bacteroïdes and Fusobacterium necrophorum induced IL-8 secretion from cultured mesothelial monolayers to levels comparable to those found in peritoneal fluids in vivo. Heat-killed bacteria and bacterial supernatant were also able to stimulate mesothelium to secrete IL-8. The results suggest that in the early phase of bacterial peritonitis the influx of PMN is regulated by bacteria-induced IL-8 secretion by the mesothelium lining the peritoneal cavity.

  1. Peritonitis during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; Rogers, W A; Taylor, H M; Everett, E D; Prowant, B F; Fruto, L V; Nolph, K D

    1980-01-01

    We initiated a therapeutic program of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for patients with chronic renal failure. Our program resulted in many episodes of peritonitis arising from contamination due to the technical aspects of the procedure. Microbiologic evaluation showed that 73% of 97 episodes were culture positive, with gram-positive organisms causing most of the cases, especially early in dialysis. Gram-negative rods tended to occur later. Gram stains of dialysate effluent resulted in a disappointingly low yield of only 9% positivity. Cell counts were a dependable indicator of the presence of peritoneal inflammation and also of therapeutic success. Most patients responded well to intraperitoneal cephalothin, 125 mg/L for 10 to 14 d. The occurrence of peritonitis resulted in 0.93 years of hospitalization during the total of 15.45 patient-years on dialysis, which essentially negated the financial advantages of this method of treatment of chronic renal failure. For this to be a successful mode of therapy, advances in the prevention of peritonitis must be made. PMID:6985785

  2. Peritoneal dialysis in microencephaly.

    PubMed

    Peters, April

    2008-01-01

    J.T. was able to remain home in her familiar environment and receive safe and adequate treatment for her renal disease. J.T. had no infectious episodes or hospitalizations while under this unit's care for 35 months. She was also able to participate in her regular activities of daily living, interact with her family members, and travel on occasion, thus maintaining a good quality of life. Therefore, unit goals for her care were met. J.T.'s experience demonstrates that with proper teaching, preparation, and support from the dialysis care team working with a dedicated family, peritoneal dialysis can be an ideal modality for the treatment of ESRD in people with mental disabilities. PMID:19260611

  3. Gene Expression during the Generation and Activation of Mouse Neutrophils: Implication of Novel Functional and Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Jeffrey A.; Duffau, Pierre; Yasuda, Kei; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Rothamel, Katherine; Rifkin, Ian R.; Monach, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen), gene expression was determined in unstimulated (circulating) mouse neutrophils and three populations of neutrophils activated in vivo, with comparison among these populations and to other leukocytes. Activation conditions included serum-transfer arthritis (mediated by immune complexes), thioglycollate-induced peritonitis, and uric acid-induced peritonitis. Neutrophils expressed fewer genes than any other leukocyte population studied in ImmGen, and down-regulation of genes related to translation was particularly striking. However, genes with expression relatively specific to neutrophils were also identified, particularly three genes of unknown function: Stfa2l1, Mrgpr2a and Mrgpr2b. Comparison of genes up-regulated in activated neutrophils led to several novel findings: increased expression of genes related to synthesis and use of glutathione and of genes related to uptake and metabolism of modified lipoproteins, particularly in neutrophils elicited by thioglycollate; increased expression of genes for transcription factors in the Nr4a family, only in neutrophils elicited by serum-transfer arthritis; and increased expression of genes important in synthesis of prostaglandins and response to leukotrienes, particularly in neutrophils elicited by uric acid. Up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis, response to microbial products, NFkB family members and their regulators, and MHC class II expression was also seen, in agreement with previous studies. A regulatory model developed from the ImmGen data was used to infer regulatory genes involved in the changes in gene expression during neutrophil activation. Among 64, mostly novel, regulatory genes predicted to influence these changes in gene expression, Irf5 was shown to be important for optimal secretion of IL-10, IP-10, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNF-α by mouse neutrophils in vitro after stimulation through TLR9. This data-set and its analysis using the ImmGen regulatory

  4. Assessments of Thioridazine as a Helper Compound to Dicloxacillin against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: In Vivo Trials in a Mouse Peritonitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Michael; Hendel, Kristoffer; Bollen, Peter; Licht, Peter B.; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Klitgaard, Janne K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rise in antimicrobial resistance is a major global concern and requires new treatment strategies. The use of helper compounds, such as thioridazine (TDZ), an antipsychotic drug, in combination with traditional antibiotics must be investigated. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of TDZ as a helper compound for dicloxacillin (DCX) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in vivo, and compare the combination treatment of DCX+TDZ with vancomycin (VAN). Methods Mice were inoculated with an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of MRSA (108 CFU) and treated in a 12-hour cycle for 48 hours. By termination, bacterial quantities in a peritoneal flush, spleen and kidneys were obtained. In the main trial the drugs were administered subcutaneously in five treatment groups: 1) DCX, 2) TDZ, 3) DCX+TDZ, 4) VAN, 5) SALINE. Additional smaller studies with IP administration and higher subcutaneous dosages (×1.5 and ×4) of the drugs were subsequently performed. Results In the main trial no significant differences were found between DCX+TDZ and DCX or TDZ alone (p≥0.121–0.999). VAN performed significantly better than DCX+TDZ on all bacteriological endpoints (p<0.001). Higher subcutaneous dosages of DCX and TDZ improved the antibacterial efficacy, but the combination treatment was still not significantly better than monotherapy. IP drug administration of DCX+TDZ revealed a significantly better antibacterial effect than DCX or TDZ alone (p<0.001) but not significantly different from VAN (p>0.999). Conclusion In conclusion, TDZ did not prove to be a viable helper compound for dicloxacillin against MRSA in subcutaneous systemic treatment. However, IP-administration of DCX+TDZ, directly at the infection site resulted in a synergetic effect, with efficacy comparable to that of VAN. PMID:26267376

  5. Fibrin activates GPVI in human and mouse platelets

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Osama M.; Montague, Samantha; Watson, Stephanie K.; Frampton, Jon; Bender, Markus; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    The glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor γ (FcRγ) chain is the major platelet signaling receptor for collagen. Paradoxically, in a FeCl3 injury model, occlusion, but not initiation of thrombus formation, is delayed in GPVI-deficient and GPVI-depleted mice. In this study, we demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and speculate that this contributes to development of an occlusive thrombus. We observed a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, including the FcRγ chain and Syk, in human and mouse platelets induced by thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 blocker eptifibatide. This was not seen in platelets stimulated by a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide, which is unable to generate fibrin from fibrinogen. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was similar to that induced by activation of GPVI. Consistent with this, thrombin did not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and the FcRγ chain in GPVI-deficient mouse platelets. Mouse platelets underwent full spreading on fibrin but not fibrinogen, which was blocked in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor or in the absence of GPVI. Spreading on fibrin was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure (procoagulant activity), and this too was blocked in GPVI-deficient platelets. The ectodomain of GPVI was shown to bind to immobilized monomeric and polymerized fibrin. A marked increase in embolization was seen following FeCl3 injury in GPVI-deficient mice, likely contributing to the delay in occlusion in this model. These results demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and provide evidence that this interaction contributes to thrombus growth and stability. PMID:26282541

  6. Shewanella algae Peritonitis in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganathan, Malini; Goh, Bak Leong; Lim, Christopher; NorFadhlina, Zakaria; Fairol, Ibrahim

    Patients with peritonitis present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, and turbid peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluid. Shewanella algae peritonitis has not yet been reported in PD patients in the literature. We present the first 2 cases of Shewanella algae peritonitis in PD patients. Mupirocin cream is applied on the exit site as prophylactic antibiotic therapy. PMID:27659933

  7. Management of secondary peritonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, D H; Schein, M; Condon, R E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The authors review current definition, classification, scoring, microbiology, inflammatory response, and goals of management of secondary peritonitis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA. Despite improved diagnostic modalities, potent antibiotics, modern intensive care, and aggressive surgical treatment, up to one third of patients still die of severe secondary peritonitis. Against the background of current understanding of the local and systemic inflammatory response associated with peritonitis, there is growing controversy concerning the optimal antibiotic and operative therapy, intensified by lack of properly conducted randomized studies. In this overview the authors attempt to outline controversies, suggest a practical clinical approach, and highlight issues necessitating further research. METHODS. The authors review the literature and report their experience. RESULTS. The emerging concepts concerning antibiotic treatment suggest that less-in terms of the number of drugs and the duration of treatment-is better. The classical single operation for peritonitis, which obliterates the source of infection and purges the peritoneal cavity, may be inadequate for severe forms of peritonitis; for the latter, more aggressive surgical techniques are necessary to decompress increased intra-abdominal pressure and prevent or treat persistent and recurrent infection. The widespread acceptance of the more aggressive and demanding surgical methods has been hampered by the lack of randomized trials and reportedly high associated morbidity rates. CONCLUSIONS. Sepsis represents the host's systemic inflammatory response to bacterial peritonitis. To improve results, both the initiator and the biologic consequences of the peritoneal infective-inflammatory process should be addressed. The initiator may be better controlled in severe forms of peritonitis by aggressive surgical methods, whereas the search for methods to abort its systemic consequences is continuing. PMID:8678610

  8. Active diffusion positions the nucleus in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Maria; Ahmed, Wylie W; Bussonnier, Matthias; Mailly, Philippe; Betz, Timo; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2015-04-01

    In somatic cells, the position of the cell centroid is dictated by the centrosome. The centrosome is instrumental in nucleus positioning, the two structures being physically connected. Mouse oocytes have no centrosomes, yet harbour centrally located nuclei. We demonstrate how oocytes define their geometric centre in the absence of centrosomes. Using live imaging of oocytes, knockout for the formin 2 actin nucleator, with off-centred nuclei, together with optical trapping and modelling, we discover an unprecedented mode of nucleus positioning. We document how active diffusion of actin-coated vesicles, driven by myosin Vb, generates a pressure gradient and a propulsion force sufficient to move the oocyte nucleus. It promotes fluidization of the cytoplasm, contributing to nucleus directional movement towards the centre. Our results highlight the potential of active diffusion, a prominent source of intracellular transport, able to move large organelles such as nuclei, providing in vivo evidence of its biological function.

  9. Newer antibiotics for the treatment of peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Terry King-Wing; Leung, Chi Bon; Chow, Kai Ming; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Li, Philip Kam-Tao; Szeto, Cheuk Chun

    2016-08-01

    Peritonitis is a debilitating infectious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Drug-resistant bacterial peritonitis typically has a lower response rate to antibiotics. In the past 15 years, newer antibiotics with activities against drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria have been developed. In most circumstances, peritonitis due to methicillin-resistant staphylococci responds to vancomycin. If vancomycin cannot be used due to allergy and/or non-susceptibility, there is increasing evidence that linezolid and daptomycin are the drugs of choice. It is reasonable to start linezolid orally or intravenously, but subsequent dose reduction may be necessary in case of myelosuppression. Daptomycin can be given intravenously or intraperitoneally and has excellent anti-biofilm activity. Other treatment options for drug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial peritonitis include teicoplanin, tigecycline and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Teicoplanin is not available in some countries (e.g. the USA). Tigecycline can only be given intravenously. Quinupristin/dalfopristin is ineffective against Enterococcus faecalis and there is only low-quality evidence to support its efficacy in the treatment of peritonitis. Effective newer antibiotics against drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria are lacking. Polymyxins can be considered, but evidence on its efficacy is limited. In this review, we will discuss the potential use of newer antibiotics in the treatment of drug-resistant bacterial peritonitis in PD patients. PMID:27478608

  10. Newer antibiotics for the treatment of peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Terry King-Wing; Leung, Chi Bon; Chow, Kai Ming; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Li, Philip Kam-Tao; Szeto, Cheuk Chun

    2016-01-01

    Peritonitis is a debilitating infectious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Drug-resistant bacterial peritonitis typically has a lower response rate to antibiotics. In the past 15 years, newer antibiotics with activities against drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria have been developed. In most circumstances, peritonitis due to methicillin-resistant staphylococci responds to vancomycin. If vancomycin cannot be used due to allergy and/or non-susceptibility, there is increasing evidence that linezolid and daptomycin are the drugs of choice. It is reasonable to start linezolid orally or intravenously, but subsequent dose reduction may be necessary in case of myelosuppression. Daptomycin can be given intravenously or intraperitoneally and has excellent anti-biofilm activity. Other treatment options for drug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial peritonitis include teicoplanin, tigecycline and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Teicoplanin is not available in some countries (e.g. the USA). Tigecycline can only be given intravenously. Quinupristin/dalfopristin is ineffective against Enterococcus faecalis and there is only low-quality evidence to support its efficacy in the treatment of peritonitis. Effective newer antibiotics against drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria are lacking. Polymyxins can be considered, but evidence on its efficacy is limited. In this review, we will discuss the potential use of newer antibiotics in the treatment of drug-resistant bacterial peritonitis in PD patients. PMID:27478608

  11. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells and peritoneal mast cells as targets of a growth activity secreted by BALB/3T3 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Jozaki, K.; Kuriu, A.; Hirota, S.; Onoue, H.; Ebi, Y.; Adachi, S.; Ma, J.Y.; Tarui, S.; Kitamura, Y. )

    1991-03-01

    When fibroblast cell lines were cultured in contact with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (CMC), both NIH/3T3 and BALB/3T3 cell lines supported the proliferation of CMC. In contrast, when contact between fibroblasts and CMC was prohibited by Biopore membranes or soft agar, only BALB/3T3 fibroblasts supported CMC proliferation, suggesting that BALB/3T3 but not NIH/3T3 cells secreted a significant amount of a mast cell growth activity. Moreover, the BALB/3T3-derived growth activity induced the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by CMC and the clonal growth of peritoneal mast cells in methylcellulose. The mast cell growth activity appeared to be different from interleukin 3 (IL-3) and interleukin 4 (IL-4), because mRNAs for these interleukins were not detectable in BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Although mast cells are genetically deficient in tissues of W/Wv mice, CMC did develop when bone marrow cells of W/Wv mice were cultured with pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cell-conditioned medium. Because BALB/3T3 fibroblast-conditioned medium (BALB-FCM) did not induce the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by W/Wv CMC, the growth activity in BALB-FCM appeared to be a ligand for the receptor encoded by the W (c-kit) locus. Because CMC and peritoneal mast cells are obtained as homogeneous suspensions rather easily, these cells may be potentially useful as targets for the fibroblast-derived mast cell growth activity.

  12. Endogenous monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 recruits monocytes in the zymosan peritonitis model.

    PubMed

    Ajuebor, M N; Flower, R J; Hannon, R; Christie, M; Bowers, K; Verity, A; Perretti, M

    1998-01-01

    The role of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in the recruitment of blood-derived monocytes in a model of zymosan peritoneal inflammation was investigated. After zymosan injection (1 mg) a rapid influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and monocytes into the peritoneal cavity associated with mouse MCP-1 (JE) gene activation and protein secretion in the exudates occurred. MCP-1 production (maximal at 4 h) preceded the accumulation of monocytes (F4/80-positive cells, maximally recovered between 16 and 24 h). Treatment of mice with a single injection of anti-mouse MCP-1 antibody inhibited 16-h monocyte accumulation by approximately 40%, however, a significant decrease in the number of PMN was also measured. Finally, intraperitoneal injection of murine recombinant MCP-1 (1 microg) produced a selective accumulation of monocytes (F4/80-positive cells) into the peritoneal cavity. In conclusion, we show the novel existence of a strict relationship between MCP-1 production and leukocyte accumulation in this model of acute inflammation.

  13. Cell wounding activates phospholipase D in primary mouse keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Senthil N.; Xie, Ding; Howard, Amber C.; Zhong, Quincy; Zhong, Xiaofeng; McNeil, Paul L.; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma membrane disruptions occur in mechanically active tissues such as the epidermis and can lead to cell death if the damage remains unrepaired. Repair occurs through fusion of vesicle patches to the damaged membrane region. The enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in membrane traffickiing; therefore, the role of PLD in membrane repair was investigated. Generation of membrane disruptions by lifting epidermal keratinocytes from the substratum induced PLD activation, whereas removal of cells from the substratum via trypsinization had no effect. Pretreatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, previously shown to increase PLD1 expression and activity, had no effect on, and a PLD2-selective (but not a PLD1-selective) inhibitor decreased, cell lifting-induced PLD activation, suggesting PLD2 as the isoform activated. PLD2 interacts functionally with the glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) to produce phosphatidylglycerol (PG); however, wounding resulted in decreased PG production, suggesting a potential PG deficiency in wounded cells. Cell lifting-induced PLD activation was transient, consistent with a possible role in membrane repair, and PLD inhibitors inhibited membrane resealing upon laser injury. In an in vivo full-thickness mouse skin wound model, PG accelerated wound healing. These results suggest that PLD and the PLD2/AQP3 signaling module may be involved in membrane repair and wound healing. PMID:23288946

  14. [Assisted peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Klarić, Dragan; Prkačin, Ingrid

    2014-04-01

    According to the National Registry of Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT), the incidence of chronic kidney disease (end-stage renal disease) and the need of RRT have declined in the last decade renal. One of the reasons for this tendency certainly is transplantation as the best choice. However, transplant procedure has limitations in elderly patients due to the number of comorbidities. This study was designed as retrospective analysis of outcomes in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis for a period of eleven years. Patients were divided into those who had been assisted or unassisted. Out of 100 patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD), 77 completed the treatment, including 26 assisted and 51 unassisted patients. Peritonitis was recorded in 20 assisted and 26 unassisted patients. Peritonitis was more common in unassisted patients, who were more frequently lost from PD. Assisted PD could be a good and safe choice of RRT in this special group of patients.

  15. Decoding Ventromedial Hypothalamic Neural Activity during Male Mouse Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Dollar, Piotr; Perona, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The ventromedial hypothalamus, ventrolateral area (VMHvl) was identified recently as a critical locus for inter-male aggression. Optogenetic stimulation of VMHvl in male mice evokes attack toward conspecifics and inactivation of the region inhibits natural aggression, yet very little is known about its underlying neural activity. To understand its role in promoting aggression, we recorded and analyzed neural activity in the VMHvl in response to a wide range of social and nonsocial stimuli. Although response profiles of VMHvl neurons are complex and heterogeneous, we identified a subpopulation of neurons that respond maximally during investigation and attack of male conspecific mice and during investigation of a source of male mouse urine. These “male responsive” neurons in the VMHvl are tuned to both the inter-male distance and the animal's velocity during attack. Additionally, VMHvl activity predicts several parameters of future aggressive action, including the latency and duration of the next attack. Linear regression analysis further demonstrates that aggression-specific parameters, such as distance, movement velocity, and attack latency, can model ongoing VMHvl activity fluctuation during inter-male encounters. These results represent the first effort to understand the hypothalamic neural activity during social behaviors using quantitative tools and suggest an important role for the VMHvl in encoding movement, sensory, and motivation-related signals. PMID:24760856

  16. Mutagenic activation reduces carcinogenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene for mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, L P; Bogdanova, L A; Kaledin, V I

    2013-03-01

    Pentachlorophenol (aromatic amine and azo stain metabolic stimulation inhibitor) reduced the hepatocarcinogenic activity of 4-aminoazobenzene and reduced that of ortho-aminoazotoluene in suckling mice. Both 4-aminoazobenzene and ortho-aminoazotoluene exhibited mutagenic activity in Ames' test in vitro on S. typhimurium TA 98 strain with activation with liver enzymes; this mutagenic activity was similarly suppressed by adding pentachlorophenol into activation medium. Induction of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes, stimulating the mutagenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene, suppressed its carcinogenic effect on mouse liver. Hence, ortho-aminotoluene (the initial compound), but not its mutagenic metabolites, was the direct active hepatocarcinogen for mice.

  17. Bacterial growth and killing in chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugh, H A; Keane, W F; Conroy, W E; Peterson, P K

    1984-01-01

    We determined the ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli to survive and grow in peritoneal dialysis fluids from patients undergoing chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Staphylococci did not survive in commercially available dialysis solutions but grew readily in peritoneal effluents obtained from patients after the dialysis dwell time. The number of CFU doubled 6 and 13 times in 24 h for S. epidermidis and S. aureus, respectively. E. coli grew well in both the pre- and postdialysis peritoneal fluid. Peritoneal macrophages as well as peripheral blood leukocytes inhibited bacterial growth in peritoneal dialysis fluid. However, 10(6) phagocytes per ml were minimally required to obtain a bacteriostatic effect. The addition of serum to peritoneal dialysis fluid increased the antibacterial activity of macrophages and blood leukocytes. The capacity of the aminoglycoside antibiotic tobramycin to reduce bacterial CFU in peritoneal dialysis fluid was only 10% of its bactericidal capacity in standard Mueller-Hinton brush. Peritoneal dialysis fluid had no effect on the antibacterial activity of imipenem. PMID:6386844

  18. A murine platelet-activating factor receptor gene: cloning, chromosomal localization and up-regulation of expression by lipopolysaccharide in peritoneal resident macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, S; Matsuda, Y; Nakamura, M; Waga, I; Kume, K; Izumi, T; Shimizu, T

    1996-01-01

    A murine gene encoding a platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) was cloned. The gene was mapped to a region of the D2.2 band of chromosome 4 both by fluorescence in situ hybridization and by molecular linkage analysis. Northern blot analysis showed a high expression of the PAFR message in peritoneal macrophages. When C3H/HeN macrophages were treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or synthetic lipid A, the PAFR gene expression was induced. Bacterial LPS, but not lipid A, induced the level of PAFR mRNA in LPS unresponsive C3H/HeJ macrophages. These induction patterns were parallel to those of tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA. Thus the PAFR in macrophages is important in LPS-induced pathologies. PMID:8670084

  19. Isolation and partial characterization of a pectic polysaccharide from the fruit pulp of Spondias cytherea and its effect on peritoneal macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Iacomini, Marcello; Serrato, Rodrigo V; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Lopes, Luciana; Buchi, Dorly F; Gorin, Phillip A J

    2005-12-01

    The total carbohydrate content of the intact pulp of Spondias cytherea was 41%. Polysaccharides were obtained via hot aqueous extraction after defatting with organic solvents. The aqueous extract was treated with excess ethanol to form a precipitate, which was then solubilized in water. The material precipitated upon acidification when HCl was removed. The resulting supernatant fraction was submitted to freeze-thawing treatment yielding a soluble fraction (sFTS). This fraction had Ara, Rha, Gal and GalA in its structure as determined by GC-MS. 13C NMR analysis showed signals assigned to alpha-L-Araf, beta-D-Galp, alpha-D-GalpA and alpha-L-Rhap units, in addition to galacturonic acid units, which were present also as methyl ester. These results suggest a type I rhamnogalacturonan with arabinogalactan branches. Cell eliciting activity in a dose-depending pattern was observed in vitro on peritoneal macrophages treated with sFTS.

  20. Effect of farmorubicin both free and associated with poly(butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles on phagocytic and NK activity of peritoneal exudate cells from tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Simeonova, Margarita Y; Antcheva, Margarita N

    2007-05-01

    The effect of Epirubicin (farmorubicin, FR), either free or associated with poly(butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles (PBCN) upon the phagocytic and natural killer (NK) activity of peritoneal exudate cells (PECs) harvested from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC)-bearing-mice was investigated. Phagocytic and NK activity were tested 72 and 96 h, respectively after the last four intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the tested compounds have been administered to the mice. Phagocytic activity was evaluated in vitro by phagocytic index and ingestion capacity using a phagocytic assay. NK activity was evaluated in a direct cytotoxic test, in which PECs were used as effector cells while human erythroleukemic K-562 cells were used as target cells. The phagocytic activity of PECs, harvested from tumor-bearing mice, was stimulated after treatment with FR free, FR associated with polymer nanoparticles and with unloaded PBCN. The NK activity of PECs was strongly stimulated by unloaded PBCN. FR both free and encapsulated into the polymer matrix during the polymerization of n-butylcyanoacrylate (n-BCA) stimulated the NK activity of PECs, while FR adsorbed onto nanoparticles restrained it. These results suggest that the association of FR with nanoparticles modifies selectively its immunomodulating ability without producing any significant immunological disturbances. The toxicity of some of FR polymer forms towards PECs, displaying NK activity, probably comes from the enhanced local drug concentration on the membrane surface of the immune cells. However, it is insufficient to preclude the use of nanoparticles as drug delivery system.

  1. Origins of choice-related activity in mouse somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongdian; Kwon, Sung E.; Severson, Kyle S.; O’Connor, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    During perceptual decisions about faint or ambiguous sensory stimuli, even identical stimuli can produce different choices. Spike trains from sensory cortex neurons can predict trial-to-trial variability in choice. Choice-related spiking is widely studied to link cortical activity to perception, but its origins remain unclear. Using imaging and electrophysiology, we found that mouse primary somatosensory cortex neurons showed robust choice-related activity during a tactile detection task. Spike trains from primary mechanoreceptive neurons did not predict choices about identical stimuli. Spike trains from thalamic relay neurons showed highly transient, weak choice-related activity. Intracellular recordings in cortex revealed a prolonged choice-related depolarization in most neurons that was not accounted for by feedforward thalamic input. Top-down axons projecting from secondary to primary somatosensory cortex signaled choice. An intracellular measure of stimulus sensitivity determined which neurons converted choice-related depolarization into spiking. Our results reveal how choice-related spiking emerges across neural circuits and within single neurons. PMID:26642088

  2. Origins of choice-related activity in mouse somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongdian; Kwon, Sung E; Severson, Kyle S; O'Connor, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    During perceptual decisions about faint or ambiguous sensory stimuli, even identical stimuli can produce different choices. Spike trains from sensory cortex neurons can predict trial-to-trial variability in choice. Choice-related spiking is widely studied as a way to link cortical activity to perception, but its origins remain unclear. Using imaging and electrophysiology, we found that mouse primary somatosensory cortex neurons showed robust choice-related activity during a tactile detection task. Spike trains from primary mechanoreceptive neurons did not predict choices about identical stimuli. Spike trains from thalamic relay neurons showed highly transient, weak choice-related activity. Intracellular recordings in cortex revealed a prolonged choice-related depolarization in most neurons that was not accounted for by feed-forward thalamic input. Top-down axons projecting from secondary to primary somatosensory cortex signaled choice. An intracellular measure of stimulus sensitivity determined which neurons converted choice-related depolarization into spiking. Our results reveal how choice-related spiking emerges across neural circuits and within single neurons. PMID:26642088

  3. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Ochkur, Sergei I.; Luo, Janice L.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Lee, James J.; Lee, Nancy A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine–driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense. PMID:24297871

  4. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3.70 MB) MedlinePlus Alternate Language URL Peritoneal Dialysis Page Content On this page: What is peritoneal ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is peritoneal dialysis and how does it work? Peritoneal dialysis is ...

  5. Campylobacter jejuni peritonitis complicating continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pepersack, F; D'Haene, M; Toussaint, C; Schoutens, E

    1982-01-01

    We report the occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni peritonitis complicating C. jejuni enteritis in a patient treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Cure followed oral administration of erythromycin and intraperitoneal therapy with gentamicin. PMID:7153322

  6. Aseptic peritonitis in patients on maintenance peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, V C; Kamadana, M R; Ing, T S; Daugirdas, J T; Viol, G W; Robinson, J A; Geis, W P; Hano, J E

    1979-01-01

    An 'epidemic' of aseptic peritonitis occurred in our peritoneal dialysis unit, affecting 5 of 20 patients. Acute and convalescent viral titers were normal in all 5. The peritoneal fluid of the affected patients was not tested for endotoxin, but endotoxin was found in subsequent dialysis fluids from two machines in the unit. This endotoxin might have been the causative agent of this outbreak. Rapid recovery ensued in all patients following peritoneal lavage. PMID:503270

  7. Peritoneal fibrosis intervention.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kayo; Hamada, Chieko; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2007-06-01

    Peritoneal fibrosis (PF) is invariably observed in patients undergoing long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD). The condition is thought to occur in response to a variety of insults, including bioincompatible dialysates (acidic solution, high glucose, glucose degradation products, or a combination), peritonitis, uremia, and chronic inflammation. Recently, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that contribute to the fibrosing process have been intensively studied. Transforming growth factor-beta has been shown to be a key mediator of PF. Loss of the mesothelial cell layer has been identified in several studies and shown to correlate with submesothelial thickening and vasculopathy. An association has also been identified between increased submesothelial thickness in the peritoneal membrane and increased solute transport, suggesting a relationship between PF and loss of ultrafiltration capacity. Thus, to maintain long-term PD and improve quality of life for patients, it is important to develop interventions for prevention and treatment of PF. Several strategies for peritoneal fibrosis intervention have been reported, including developing biocompatible dialysate, targeting mediators responsible for inflammation and fibrosis, and reconstituting the peritoneum using mesothelial or bone marrow-derived cells. Recent experimental trials in animal models and clinical studies are presented in this review.

  8. Hamster bite peritonitis: Pasteurella pneumotropica peritonitis in a dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Campos, A; Taylor, J H; Campbell, M

    2000-11-01

    We report the first case of Pasteurella pneumotropica peritonitis in a peritoneal dialysis patient. This rare infection was the result of contamination of the dialysis tubing by a pet hamster. We stress the importance of household pets as a source of infection in the peritoneal dialysis population. PMID:11095007

  9. In vitro antiviral activity of circular triple helix forming oligonucleotide RNA towards Feline Infectious Peritonitis virus replication.

    PubMed

    Choong, Oi Kuan; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) is a severe fatal immune-augmented disease in cat population. It is caused by FIP virus (FIPV), a virulent mutant strain of Feline Enteric Coronavirus (FECV). Current treatments and prophylactics are not effective. The in vitro antiviral properties of five circular Triple-Helix Forming Oligonucleotide (TFO) RNAs (TFO1 to TFO5), which target the different regions of virulent feline coronavirus (FCoV) strain FIPV WSU 79-1146 genome, were tested in FIPV-infected Crandell-Rees Feline Kidney (CRFK) cells. RT-qPCR results showed that the circular TFO RNAs, except TFO2, inhibit FIPV replication, where the viral genome copy numbers decreased significantly by 5-fold log10 from 10(14) in the virus-inoculated cells to 10(9) in the circular TFO RNAs-transfected cells. Furthermore, the binding of the circular TFO RNA with the targeted viral genome segment was also confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The strength of binding kinetics between the TFO RNAs and their target regions was demonstrated by NanoITC assay. In conclusion, the circular TFOs have the potential to be further developed as antiviral agents against FIPV infection.

  10. In Vitro Antiviral Activity of Circular Triple Helix Forming Oligonucleotide RNA towards Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Oi Kuan; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) is a severe fatal immune-augmented disease in cat population. It is caused by FIP virus (FIPV), a virulent mutant strain of Feline Enteric Coronavirus (FECV). Current treatments and prophylactics are not effective. The in vitro antiviral properties of five circular Triple-Helix Forming Oligonucleotide (TFO) RNAs (TFO1 to TFO5), which target the different regions of virulent feline coronavirus (FCoV) strain FIPV WSU 79-1146 genome, were tested in FIPV-infected Crandell-Rees Feline Kidney (CRFK) cells. RT-qPCR results showed that the circular TFO RNAs, except TFO2, inhibit FIPV replication, where the viral genome copy numbers decreased significantly by 5-fold log10 from 1014 in the virus-inoculated cells to 109 in the circular TFO RNAs-transfected cells. Furthermore, the binding of the circular TFO RNA with the targeted viral genome segment was also confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The strength of binding kinetics between the TFO RNAs and their target regions was demonstrated by NanoITC assay. In conclusion, the circular TFOs have the potential to be further developed as antiviral agents against FIPV infection. PMID:24707494

  11. Evidence for lipoxygenase activity in induction of histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells by chelated iron.

    PubMed Central

    Magro, A M; Brai, M

    1983-01-01

    The ferric iron-desferrioxamine B chelate effectively induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. The release was maximum at exogenous ferric iron concentrations of 10-100 microM, and the chelate was non-toxic, as determined by trypan blue uptake. In many aspects the chelate-induced histamine release paralleled IgE-mediated release. The kinetics, temperature, and Ca2+ dependence resembled antigen-induced release. Phosphatidylserine potentiated the release in Wistar rats but not in fawn-hooded rats, a strain which does not respond to phosphatidylserine potentiation. The chelate-induced histamine release was blocked by the metabolic inhibitors dinitrophenol, potassium cyanide, 2-deoxyglucose, and antimycin A. Lipoxygenase inhibitors also effectively blocked release, indicating an involvement of fatty acid metabolism via the lipoxygenase pathway. Free radical scavengers and antioxidants antagonistic to lipid peroxidation also inhibited the chelate-induced histamine release. Overall the data raise the possibility that endogenous cellular iron may be involved in the generation of free radicals and lipid peroxidation and that these may be early events in IgE-mediated release of histamine. PMID:6188682

  12. Peritoneal infection in acute intermittent peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raj Kumar; Kumar, Jitendra; Gupta, Amit; Gulati, Sanjeev

    2003-11-01

    A prospective study was done to evaluate the incidence and microbiological trend of peritoneal infection in patients undergoing acute intermittent peritoneal dialysis (PD). Complete sterile procedure was ensured and at the completion of the procedure PD fluid was sent for bacteriological culture, sensitivity, and total and differential cell count. During the period September 2000 to February 2001 a total of 100 patients were evaluated. Male female ratio was 72:28. Mean age was 43.17 +/- 17.2 years. In 26 patients cyclers were used. Bacterial culture was positive in total of 30 cases (30%). Gram positive, Gram negative and mixed infection was found in 10%, 15%, and 5% respectively. Number of exchanges (31.61 +/- 7.7 vs. 31.3 +/- 6, p = 0.8) were similar and number of repositioning was significantly more in the infected group (23.3% vs. 11.4%, p < 0.01). Total cell count was significantly higher in infected group (274.3 +/- 502 vs. 31.25 +/- 79.34, p < 0.01). Among Gram +ve organisms Staphylococcus was found in 7, Enterococcus faecalis in 4 and Coryne bacterium sps. in 2 cases. Among Gram -ve organisms, E. coli was found in 4, Enterobacter in 3, Klebsiella 1, Pseudomonas 1, Acinetobacter arinatus 5, Acinetobacter baumani 3, and Citrobacter freundii 3. Mixed flora comprised of Enterococcus faecalis 3, Enterobacter 1, Staphlococcus 1, E. coli 3, Citrobacter 1, Acinobacter baumani 1. Although with the cyclers using collapsible bags, staphylococcus was not isolated, the total incidence of infection (11/26 cases) was not decreased with the use of cyclers. We conclude that in acute intermittent peritoneal dialysis the incidence of bacterial infection is 30% with preponderance of Gram -ve over Gram +ve organisms and organism of fecal origin being commoner than those of skin origin. Use of cycler-assisted over manual PD do not improve the incidence of infection. Repositioning of the stiff catheter significantly increases the incidence of infection.

  13. Peritoneal Dialysis Dose and Adequacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Peritoneal Dialysis Dose and Adequacy Page Content On this page: ... from the abdominal cavity. [ Top ] Types of Peritoneal Dialysis The two types of peritoneal dialysis differ mainly ...

  14. Structure-activity relationship of a series of 17 parabens and related compounds for histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells and skin allergic reaction in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Uramaru, Naoto; Inoue, Toshio; Watanabe, Yoko; Shigematsu, Hidenari; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Parabens, which are a homologous series of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, have been used as preservatives in cosmetics, medicines and foods because of their antimicrobial activity. However, parabens in cosmetics have been suspected to cause allergic contact dermatitis. In this study, we examined paraben-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and skin reaction in guinea pigs using a series of 17 parabens with different alcohol side chains, ranging from methylparaben to dodecylparaben. Octylparaben showed the greatest histamine release-inducing activity from mast cells, and the activity was decreased in shorter- and longer-side-chain parabens. Octyl benzoate, octyl o-hydroxybenzoate and phenyloctane caused no significant degranulation of mast cells, whereas octyl m-hydroxybenzoate, octyl p-hydroxybenzoate and octyl phenol induced concentration-related degranulation. Metabolites of these parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols) did not show histamine release-inducing activity. In the guinea pig skin reaction test, heptylparaben induced a typical strong skin reaction, while butylparaben induced a typical weak skin reaction, and methylparaben and dodecylparaben were inactive. Metabolites of parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols) were also inactive. These results indicate that interaction of parabens with rat mast cells requires a minimum length and adequate lipophilicity of the alkyl side chain. Since metabolites of parabens were inactive, parabens appear to be direct-acting allergens.

  15. Treatment of dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis by adoptive transfer of peritoneal cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wei, Xia-wei; Shen, Guo-bo; Liu, Yan-tong; Luo, Min; Xu, Guang-chao; Shao, Bin; Deng, Sen-yi; He, Zhi-yao; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Wen, Yan-Zhu; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li; Deng, Hong-xin; Wei, Yu-quan

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of the natural regulatory B cells and macrophages should be a useful treatment for inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, it is usually difficult to isolate these cells from the tissues and expand them. Here, we investigated the feasibility of adoptively transferring peritoneal cells (PCs) as a treatment for DSS-induced colitis. We found that peritoneal cavity can provide an easily accessible site for harvesting enough number of PCs, namely, two-dose PCs for the treatment from a mouse in one operation. Adoptive therapy of these cells from healthy mice or those with disease is effectively in reducing the disease activity score. The natural B cells and macrophages of the infused PCs can selectively migrate to lesion sites and regulate the expression of Stat3, NF−κB, Smad3 and Smad7. Additionally, PCs exert dual activity of IL-10 and TGF-β secreted spontaneously by both peritoneal B cells and macrophages, which in turn enhance the induction of regulatory B cells and Macrophages in microenvironment of inflammation. Moreover, PCs can re-establish immunological tolerance in the OVA-immunized mice. Thus, our findings provide a new strategy for colitis therapy and could be of importance in additional exploration of other inflammation and autoimmune diseases therapy. PMID:26565726

  16. Sensitive β-galactosidase-targeting fluorescence probe for visualizing small peritoneal metastatic tumours in vivo.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Daisuke; Sakabe, Masayo; Kamiya, Mako; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Hiratake, Jun; Ogawa, Mikako; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Choyke, Peter L; Nagano, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Urano, Yasuteru

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnostics is one of the most promising approaches for facile detection of cancer in situ. Here we focus on β-galactosidase, which is overexpressed in primary ovarian cancers, as a molecular target for visualizing peritoneal metastases from ovarian cancers. As existing fluorescence probes are unsuitable, we have designed membrane-permeable HMRef-βGal, in which the optimized intramolecular spirocyclic function affords >1,400-fold fluorescence enhancement on activation. We confirm that HMRef-βGal sensitively detects intracellular β-galactosidase activity in several ovarian cancer lines. In vivo, this probe visualizes metastases as small as <1 mm in diameter in seven mouse models of disseminated human peritoneal ovarian cancer (SHIN3, SKOV3, OVK18, OVCAR3, OVCAR4, OVCAR5 and OVCAR8). Because of its high brightness, real-time detection of metastases with the naked eye is possible. Endoscopic fluorescence detection of metastases is also demonstrated. The results clearly indicate preclinical potential value of the probe for fluorescence-guided diagnosis of peritoneal metastases from ovarian cancers.

  17. [Feline infectious peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lutz, H; Hauser, B; Horzinek, M C

    1985-11-15

    This paper gives a summary of our present-day knowledge concerning etiology, clinical aspects, diagnosis, pathology and pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis. Special emphasis is given to the participation of the immune system in the development of lesions. A therapy protocol is proposed and an extensive list of original literature for further study is given.

  18. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fluid to measure: Albumin Protein Red and white blood cell counts Tests will also check for bacteria and other ... be a sign of tumor or injury. High white blood cell counts may be a sign of peritonitis . Milk-colored ...

  19. The novel Aryl hydrocarbon receptor inhibitor biseugenol inhibits gastric tumor growth and peritoneal dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Lai, De-Wei; Karlsson, Anna Isabella; Wang, Keh-Bin; Chen, Yi-Ching; Shen, Chin-Chang; Wu, Sheng-Mao; Liu, Chia-Yu; Tien, Hsing-Ru; Peng, Yen-Chun; Jan, Yee-Jee; Chao, Te-Hsin; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Arbiser, Jack L.; Sheu, Meei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Biseugenol (Eug) is known to antiproliferative of cancer cells; however, to date, the antiperitoneal dissemination effects have not been studied in any mouse cancer model. In this study, Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression was associated with lymph node and distant metastasis in patients with gastric cancer and was correlated with clinicolpathological pattern. We evaluated the antiperitoneal dissemination potential of knockdown AhR and Biseugenol in cancer mouse model and assessed mesenchymal characteristics. Our results demonstrate that tumor growth, peritoneal dissemination and peritoneum or organ metastasis implanted MKN45 cells were significantly decreased in shAhR and Biseugenol-treated mice and that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was caused. Biseugenol-exposure tumors showed acquired epithelial features such as phosphorylation of E-cadherin, cytokeratin-18 and loss mesenchymal signature Snail, but not vimentin regulation. Snail expression, through AhR activation, is an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) determinant. Moreover, Biseugenol enhanced Calpain-10 (Calp-10) and AhR interaction resulted in Snail downregulation. The effect of shCalpain-10 in cancer cells was associated with inactivation of AhR/Snail promoter binding activity. Inhibition of Calpain-10 in gastric cancer cells by short hairpin RNA or pharmacological inhibitor was found to effectively reduced growth ability and vessel density in vivo. Importantly, knockdown of AhR completed abrogated peritoneal dissemination. Herein, Biseugenol targeting ER stress provokes Calpain-10 activity, sequentially induces reversal of EMT and apoptosis via AhR may involve the paralleling processes. Taken together, these data suggest that Calpain-10 activation and AhR inhibition by Biseugenol impedes both gastric tumor growth and peritoneal dissemination by inducing ER stress and inhibiting EMT. PMID:25226618

  20. French National Registry of Rare Peritoneal Surface Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Rare Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Peritoneal Mesothelioma; Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Psammocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Carcinoma; Diffuse Peritoneal Leiomyomatosis; Appendiceal Mucinous Neoplasms

  1. Targeting JAK1/STAT3 signaling suppresses tumor progression and metastasis in a peritoneal model of human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Liang, Wei; Wu, Jun; Kowolik, Claudia M; Buettner, Ralf; Scuto, Anna; Hsieh, Meng-Yin; Hong, Hao; Brown, Christine E; Forman, Stephen J; Horne, David; Morgan, Robert; Wakabayashi, Mark; Dellinger, Thanh H; Han, Ernest S; Yim, John H; Jove, Richard

    2014-12-01

    JAK/STAT3 is one of the major signaling pathways that is aberrantly activated in ovarian cancer and associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of targeting JAK/STAT3 signaling in ovarian cancer using a peritoneal dissemination mouse model. We developed this mouse model by injecting a metastatic human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3-M-Luc, into the peritoneal cavity of immunodeficient mice. This model displayed a phenotype similar to late-stage ovarian cancer, including extensive peritoneal metastasis and ascites production. The constitutive activation of STAT3 in human ovarian cancer cells appeared to be mediated by an autocrine cytokine loop involving the IL6 family of cytokines and JAK1 kinase. shRNA-mediated knockdown of JAK1 or STAT3 in ovarian cancer cells led to reduced tumor growth, decreased peritoneal dissemination, and diminished ascites production, suggesting a critical role of STAT3 in ovarian cancer progression. Similar results were obtained when a small-molecule inhibitor (JAKi) of the JAK1 kinase was used to treat ovarian cancer in this model. In addition, we found that the expression level of IL6 was correlated with activation of STAT3 in ovarian cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a potential application of IL6 as a biomarker. Altogether, our results demonstrate that targeting JAK1/STAT3, using shRNA knockdown or a small-molecule inhibitor, effectively suppressed ovarian tumor progression and, therefore, could be a potential novel therapeutic approach for treating advanced ovarian cancer.

  2. Developmental competence of parthenogenetic mouse and human embryos after chemical or electrical activation.

    PubMed

    Versieren, Karen; Heindryckx, Björn; Lierman, Sylvie; Gerris, Jan; De Sutter, Petra

    2010-12-01

    Parthenogenetic reconstruction is one major strategy to create patient-specific stem cells. The aim of this study was to find the best artificial activation protocol for parthenogenetic activation of mouse and human oocytes comparing different methods. In a first set of experiments, in-vivo matured mouse oocytes and human failed-fertilized, in-vitro and in-vivo matured oocytes were artificially activated by a chemical (ionomycin) or electrical stimulus. In a second set of experiments, a combination of activating agents (electrical pulses followed by ionomycin or SrCl(2)) was applied in an aim to improve developmental competence. All embryos were evaluated daily until day 6 after activation. Mouse blastocysts were differentially stained to evaluate blastocyst quality. For mouse oocytes and human failed-fertilized oocytes, blastocyst development was significantly higher after electrical activation (P<0.05). For human in-vitro and in-vivo matured oocytes, blastocyst formation was only obtained after electrical activation of in-vitro matured oocytes. After combining activating agents, no differences in development could be observed. In conclusion, this study revealed that for both mouse and human oocytes development to the blastocyst stage was significantly better after electrical activation compared with chemical activation. Combining activating agents had no further positive effect on developmental potential.

  3. Comparison of the metabolic activation of environmental carcinogens in mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Krais, Annette M.; Mühlbauer, Karl-Rudolf; Kucab, Jill E.; Chinbuah, Helena; Cornelius, Michael G.; Wei, Quan-Xiang; Hollstein, Monica; Phillips, David H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Schmeiser, Heinz H.

    2015-01-01

    We compared mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and fibroblasts (MEFs) for their ability to metabolically activate the environmental carcinogens benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) and aristolochic acid I (AAI), measuring DNA adduct formation by 32P-postlabelling and expression of xenobiotic-metabolism genes by quantitative real-time PCR. At 2 μM, BaP induced Cyp1a1 expression in MEFs to a much greater extent than in ES cells and formed 45 times more adducts. Nqo1 mRNA expression was increased by 3-NBA in both cell types but induction was higher in MEFs, as was adduct formation. For AAI, DNA binding was over 450 times higher in MEFs than in ES cells, although Nqo1 and Cyp1a1 transcriptional levels did not explain this difference. We found higher global methylation of DNA in ES cells than in MEFs, which suggests higher chromatin density and lower accessibility of the DNA to DNA damaging agents in ES cells. However, AAI treatment did not alter DNA methylation. Thus mouse ES cells and MEFs have the metabolic competence to activate a number of environmental carcinogens, but MEFs have lower global DNA methylation and higher metabolic capacity than mouse ES cells. PMID:25230394

  4. Mycobacterium fortuitum peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, G L; Hall, G S; Schreiber, M J

    1986-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum has been isolated from skin and soft tissue lesions with increasing frequency. Rarely, however, has it been a documented cause of peritonitis in patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. We report here the second such case and discuss both the possibility of M. fortuitum or similar organisms as one cause of "sterile" peritonitis in this patient population and the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of such isolates. PMID:3700629

  5. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  6. Peritoneal tuberculosis: diagnostic options.

    PubMed Central

    Lal, N; Soto-Wright, V

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extrapulmonary tuberculosis has vague symptoms and few signs. It is essential to recognize and diagnose this curable disease prior to performing definitive surgery. Newer tests such as DNA or RNA amplification allow for early diagnosis but have limitations. CASE: We report a case of peritoneal tuberculosis in an immigrant woman. She had vague symptoms of low-grade fever, mild abdominal pain, obstipation, and bloating. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed to establish the diagnosis. Tuberculosis was confirmed by DNA extraction from the frozen section specimen with subsequent analysis using polymerase chain reaction. CONCLUSION: Peritoneal tuberculosis is a disease that often simulates malignancies. With the increasing prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus in developed countries, tuberculosis is also on the rise and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with an abdominal/pelvic mass and ascites. PMID:10524670

  7. Peritoneal dialysis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M

    2003-02-01

    While Mexico has the thirteenth largest economy, a large portion of the population is impoverished. About 90% of the population is Mestizo, the result of the admixture of Mexican Indians and Spaniards, with the Indigenous peoples concentrated in the southeastern region. Treatment for end-stage renal disease (estimated 268 patients per million population) is largely determined by the limited healthcare system and the individual's access to resources such as private insurance ( approximately 15%) and governmental sources ( approximately 85%). With only 5% of the gross national product spent on healthcare and most treatment providers being public health institutions that are often under severe economic restrictions, it is not surprising that many Mexican patients do not receive renal replacement therapy. Mexico uses proportionately more peritoneal dialysis than other countries; 1% of the patients are on automated peritoneal dialysis, 19% on hemodialysis and 80% on CAPD. Malnutrition and diabetes, important risk factors for poor outcome, are prevalent among the patients in CAPD programs.

  8. Intraperitoneal Meropenem for Polymicrobial Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    de Fijter, Caroline W H; Jakulj, Lily; Amiri, Fariba; Zandvliet, Anthe; Franssen, Eric

    With the current rise in multiresistant gram-negative bacteria, carbapenems are more frequently used. Surprisingly, limited data exist on the pharmacokinetics of meropenem in peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related peritonitis. We report on the pharmacokinetics of repeated intraperitoneal (IP) meropenem during 21 days as treatment for polymicrobial multiresistent PD-related peritonitis.Our current report supports daily doses of 125 mg/L intraperitoneal meropenem in all bags as an effective and safe modality in the treatment of PD-associated peritonitis with multiresistant microorganisms. No signs of over- or underdosing were found based on serial drug concentration measurements at fixed time points up to 21 days. PMID:27659932

  9. Sclerosing Encapsulating Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman O.

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) is a rare chronic inflammatory condition of the peritoneum with an unknown aetiology. Also known as abdominal cocoon, the condition occurs when loops of the bowel are encased within the peritoneal cavity by a membrane, leading to intestinal obstruction. Due to its rarity and non-specific clinical features, it is often misdiagnosed. The condition presents with recurrent episodes of small bowel obstruction and can be idiopathic or secondary; the latter is associated with predisposing factors such as peritoneal dialysis or abdominal tuberculosis. In the early stages, patients can be managed conservatively; however, surgical intervention is necessary for those with advanced stage intestinal obstruction. A literature review revealed 118 cases of SEP; the mean age of these patients was 39 years and 68.0% were male. The predominant presentation was abdominal pain (72.0%), distension (44.9%) or a mass (30.5%). Almost all of the patients underwent surgical excision (99.2%) without postoperative complications (88.1%). PMID:27226904

  10. N-ethylmaleimide activates a Cl(-)-independent component of K(+) flux in mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shmukler, Boris E; Hsu, Ann; Alves, Jessica; Trudel, Marie; Rust, Marco B; Hubner, Christian A; Rivera, Alicia; Alper, Seth L

    2013-06-01

    The K-Cl cotransporters (KCCs) of mouse erythrocytes exhibit higher basal activity than those of human erythrocytes, but are similarly activated by cell swelling, by hypertonic urea, and by staurosporine. However, the dramatic stimulation of human erythroid KCCs by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) is obscured in mouse erythrocytes by a prominent NEM-stimulated K(+) efflux that lacks Cl(-)-dependence. The NEM-sensitivity of Cl(-)-independent K(+) efflux of mouse erythrocytes is lower than that of KCC. The genetically engineered absence of the K-Cl cotransporters KCC3 and KCC1 from mouse erythrocytes does not modify Cl(-)-independent K(+) efflux. Mouse erythrocytes genetically devoid of the Gardos channel KCNN4 show increased NEM-sensitivity of both Cl(-)-independent K(+) efflux and K-Cl cotransport. The increased NEM-sensitivity and stimulation magnitude of Cl(-)-independent K(+) efflux in mouse erythrocytes expressing transgenic hypersickling human hemoglobin SAD (HbSAD) are independent of the presence of KCC3 and KCC1, but absence of KCNN4 reduces the stimulatory effect of HbSAD. NEM-stimulated Cl(-)-independent K(+) efflux of mouse red cells is insensitive to ouabain and bumetanide, but partially inhibited by chloroquine, barium, and amiloride. The NEM-stimulated activity is modestly reduced at pH6.0 but not significantly altered at pH8.0, and is abolished at 0°C. Although the molecular identity of this little-studied K(+) efflux pathway of mouse erythrocytes remains unknown, its potential role in the pathophysiology of sickle red cell dehydration will be important for the extrapolation of studies in mouse models of sickle cell disease to our understanding of humans with sickle cell anemia. PMID:23481459

  11. N-ethylmaleimide activates a Cl(-)-independent component of K(+) flux in mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shmukler, Boris E; Hsu, Ann; Alves, Jessica; Trudel, Marie; Rust, Marco B; Hubner, Christian A; Rivera, Alicia; Alper, Seth L

    2013-06-01

    The K-Cl cotransporters (KCCs) of mouse erythrocytes exhibit higher basal activity than those of human erythrocytes, but are similarly activated by cell swelling, by hypertonic urea, and by staurosporine. However, the dramatic stimulation of human erythroid KCCs by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) is obscured in mouse erythrocytes by a prominent NEM-stimulated K(+) efflux that lacks Cl(-)-dependence. The NEM-sensitivity of Cl(-)-independent K(+) efflux of mouse erythrocytes is lower than that of KCC. The genetically engineered absence of the K-Cl cotransporters KCC3 and KCC1 from mouse erythrocytes does not modify Cl(-)-independent K(+) efflux. Mouse erythrocytes genetically devoid of the Gardos channel KCNN4 show increased NEM-sensitivity of both Cl(-)-independent K(+) efflux and K-Cl cotransport. The increased NEM-sensitivity and stimulation magnitude of Cl(-)-independent K(+) efflux in mouse erythrocytes expressing transgenic hypersickling human hemoglobin SAD (HbSAD) are independent of the presence of KCC3 and KCC1, but absence of KCNN4 reduces the stimulatory effect of HbSAD. NEM-stimulated Cl(-)-independent K(+) efflux of mouse red cells is insensitive to ouabain and bumetanide, but partially inhibited by chloroquine, barium, and amiloride. The NEM-stimulated activity is modestly reduced at pH6.0 but not significantly altered at pH8.0, and is abolished at 0°C. Although the molecular identity of this little-studied K(+) efflux pathway of mouse erythrocytes remains unknown, its potential role in the pathophysiology of sickle red cell dehydration will be important for the extrapolation of studies in mouse models of sickle cell disease to our understanding of humans with sickle cell anemia.

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 Mediates Dialysate-Induced Alterations of the Peritoneal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Aroeira, Luiz S.; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Loureiro, Jesús; Aguilera, Abelardo; Ramírez-Huesca, Marta; González-Mateo, Guadalupe; Pérez-Lozano, M. Luisa; Albar-Vizcaíno, Patricia; Bajo, M-Auxiliadora; del Peso, Gloria; Sánchez-Tomero, José Antonio; Jiménez-Heffernan, José Antonio; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), exposure of the peritoneal membrane to nonphysiologic solutions causes inflammation, ultimately leading to altered structure and function. Myofibroblasts, one of the cell types that contribute to dysfunction of the peritoneal membrane, can originate from mesothelial cells (MCs) by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process that has been associated with an increased rate of peritoneal transport. Because cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is induced by inflammation, we studied the role of COX-2 in the deterioration of the peritoneal membrane. We observed that nonepithelioid MCs found in peritoneal effluent expressed higher levels of COX-2 than epithelioid MCs. The mass transfer coefficient for creatinine correlated with MC phenotype and with COX-2 levels. Although COX-2 was upregulated during EMT of MCs in vitro, COX-2 inhibition did not prevent EMT. In a mouse model of PD, however, COX-2 inhibition with Celecoxib resulted in reduced fibrosis and in partial recovery of ultrafiltration, outcomes that were associated with a reduction of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, PD fluid with a low content of glucose degradation products did not induce EMT or COX-2; the peritoneal membranes of mice treated with this fluid showed less worsening than mice exposed to standard fluid. In conclusion, upregulation of COX-2 during EMT may mediate peritoneal inflammation, suggesting COX-2 inhibition as a potential strategy to ameliorate peritoneal deterioration in PD patients. PMID:19158357

  13. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  14. Recombinant immunocytokines targeting the mouse transferrin receptor: construction and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Dreier, T; Lode, H N; Xiang, R; Dolman, C S; Reisfeld, R A; Kang, A S

    1998-01-01

    Localized cytokine therapies with recombinant monoclonal antibody-cytokine fusion proteins, designated immunocytokines, have become of increasing interest for tumor immunotherapy, since they direct immunomodulatory cytokines into the tumor microenvironment. To investigate their mechanisms of action in a variety of syngeneic tumor models, recombinant mouse cytokines IL2 and GM-CSF were engineered as fusion proteins to the carboxyl terminus of a chimeric rat/mouse antitransferrin receptor antibody, ch17217 and expressed in stable-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. The recombinant immunocytokines were readily purified by affinity chromatography and their binding characteristics were identical to those shown for the ch17217 antibody. The IL2 immunocytokine had an activity similar to recombinant mouse IL2, whereas the GM-CSF immunocytokine had enhanced cytokine activity relative to recombinant mouse GM-CSF. The clearance rates of ch17217 and the GM-CSF and IL2 immunocytokines were relatively similar with elimination phases (t1/2alpha) of 1.8 h and distribution phases (t1/2beta) of 83, 88, and 91 h, respectively. Both immunocytokines demonstrated effective antitumor activity by suppressing the growth of hepatic metastases of mouse neuroblastoma and pulmonary metastases of mouse colon carcinoma in syngeneic A/J and BALB/c mice, respectively. These results indicate that biologically effective IL2 and GM-CSF immunocytokines combine the targeting ability of an antitransferrin receptor monoclonal antibody with the immunomodulatory functions of each cytokine. Because of the universal expression of the transferrin receptor on mouse tumor cell lines, these constructs should prove useful to determine their efficacy in a wide variety of syngeneic mouse tumor models and to perform detailed studies of their modes of action.

  15. Microbiological aspects of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    von Graevenitz, A; Amsterdam, D

    1992-01-01

    The process of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis has provided a useful, relatively inexpensive, and safe alternative for patients with end-stage renal disease. Infectious peritonitis, however, has limited a more widespread acceptance of this technique. The definition of peritonitis in this patient population is not universally accepted and does not always include the laboratory support of a positive culture (or Gram stain). In part, the omission of clinical microbiological findings stems from the lack of sensitivity of earlier microbiological efforts. Peritonitis results from decreased host phagocytic efficiency with depressed phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity of peritoneal macrophages. During episodes of peritonitis, fluid movement is reversed, away from the lymphatics and peritoneal membrane and toward the cavity. As a result, bloodstream infections are rare. Most peritonitis episodes are caused by bacteria. Coagulase-negative staphylococci are the most frequently isolated organisms, usually originating from the skin flora, but a wide array of microbial species have been documented as agents of peritonitis. Clinical microbiology laboratories need to be cognizant of the diverse agents so that appropriate primary media can be used. The quantity of dialysate fluid that is prepared for culture is critical and should constitute at least 10 ml. The sensitivity of the cultural approach depends on the volume of dialysate, its pretreatment (lysis or centrifugation), the media used, and the mode of incubation. The low concentration of microorganisms in dialysate fluids accounts for negative Gram stain results. Prevention of infection in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients is associated with the socioeconomic status of the patient, advances in equipment (catheter) technology, and, probably least important, the application of prophylactic antimicrobial agents. PMID:1735094

  16. Feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2005-01-01

    The article discusses feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), an important disease frequently seen in veterinary practice. FIP causes many problems to the veterinarian as it can be difficult to definitively diagnose the disease, as there is no effective treatment, and as prophylactic interventions are not very successful. Although intense research has created a lot of new knowledge about this disease in the last years, there are still many unanswered questions. The objective of this article is to review recent knowledge and to increase understanding of the complex pathogenesis of FIP.

  17. Feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Teresa; Randell, Susan; Moore, Lisa

    2009-10-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) frequently results in death in cats. It is caused by a mutated, highly contagious coronavirus, and it is more common in indoor cats in multicat households. A complex interaction between the coronavirus and the feline immune system causes disseminated vasculitis, which is the hallmark of FIP. New tests are being developed, but the antemortem diagnosis of FIP continues to be difficult and frustrating. Current treatments are crude and involve supportive care and immunosuppression. Minimizing exposure is the best method of preventing infection.

  18. Feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Andrew, S E

    2000-09-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis is a noncurable viral disease affecting cats worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that the FIPV has evolved as a deletion mutation of FECV. Immune complex deposition and vasculitis with pyogranulomatous lesions are the hallmark of FIP. The only definitive antemortem diagnostic test for FIP is histopathologic examination of tissue. Ocular manifestations occur commonly with noneffusive FIP. The most common clinical sign is a bilateral granulomatous anterior uveitis often accompanied by chorioretinitis. Treatment of ocular FIP is symptomatic, and the mainstay of palliative therapy is topical or systemic corticosteroids or both.

  19. Disseminated Peritoneal Leiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Momtahan, Mozhdeh; Nemati, Maryam; Safaei, Akbar

    2011-01-01

    Leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata is a very rare condition characterized by the development of multiple smooth muscle-like nodules in the peritoneal cavity. It is associated with increased serum levels of gonadal steroids. The present report describes a 29-year-old patient underwent transabdominal hysterectomy and Bilateral Salpingo oophorectomy six years ago because of leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata. After six years she referred to us again because of retroperitoneal fibroma, another rare entity, during hormone replacement therapy inspite of lack of uterus and previous castration. PMID:23365481

  20. Paecilomyces variotii in peritoneal dialysate.

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, A; Heron, L G; Pritchard, R C; Butcher, R H; Powell, H R; Disney, A P; Tosolini, F A

    1993-01-01

    Four cases of peritonitis caused by the filamentous fungus Paecilomyces variotii in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis are reported. Removal of the Tenckhoff catheter and antifungal chemotherapy led to resolution of symptoms in all cases. Possible contaminating events are discussed, and reported infections with P. variotii are reviewed. PMID:8408561

  1. The expression profiling and ontology analysis of noncoding RNAs in peritoneal fibrosis induced by peritoneal dialysis fluid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Guo, Runsheng; Hao, Guojun; Xiao, Jun; Bao, Yi; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Qinkai; Wei, Xin

    2015-06-15

    Increasing amounts of evidence have indicated that noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have important regulatory potential in various biological processes. However, the contributions of ncRNAs, especially long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), to peritoneal fibrosis remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate miRNA, lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles and their potential roles in the process of peritoneal fibrosis. Microarray expression profiles of the miRNAs, lncRNAs and mRNAs were determined in normal control peritoneum and in a mouse model of peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF)-induced fibrotic peritoneum. Differential expression, pathway and gene network analyses were developed to identify possible functional RNA molecules in peritoneal fibrosis. Compared to the normal control, 232 lncRNAs (127 up-regulated and 105 down-regulated), 154 mRNAs (87 up-regulated and 67 down-regulated) and 15 miRNAs (14 miRNAs up-regulated and 1 down-regulated) were differentially expressed in the fibrotic peritoneum. Among the differentially expressed ncRNAs, 9 lncRNAs and 5 miRNAs were validated by real-time RT-PCR. Pathway analysis showed that the Jak-STAT, TGF-beta and MAPK signaling pathways had a close relationship with peritoneal fibrosis. Gene co-expression network analysis identified many genes, including JunB, HSP72, and Nedd9. It also identified lncRNAs AK089579, AK080622, and ENSMUST00000053838 and miRNAs miR-182 and miR-488. All of these species potentially play a key role in peritoneal fibrosis. Our results provide a foundation and an expansive view of the roles and mechanisms of ncRNAs in PDF-induced peritoneal fibrosis. PMID:25827714

  2. Encouraging overweight students with intellectual disability to actively perform walking activity using an air mouse combined with preferred stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Jui; Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    This study continues the research on using an air mouse as a physical activity detector. An air mouse is embedded with a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) gyro sensor, which can measure even the slightest movement in the air. The air mouse was strapped to one of each participant's calves to detect walking activity. This study was conducted to evaluate whether four students with intellectual disability who were overweight and disliked exercising could be motivated to engage in walking actively by linking the target response with preferred stimulation. Single-subject research with ABAB design was adopted in this study. The experimental data showed substantial increases in the participants' target responses (i.e. the performance of the activity of walking) during the intervention phases compared to the baseline phases. The practical and developmental implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:27037988

  3. Differential effects of triclosan on the activation of mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Wu, Qiangen; Beland, Frederick A; Ge, Peter; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Fang, Jia-Long

    2014-11-18

    Triclosan is an anti-bacterial agent used in many personal care products, household items, medical devices, and clinical settings. Liver tumors occur in mice exposed to triclosan, a response attributed to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activation; however, the effects of triclosan on mouse and human PPARα have not been fully evaluated. We compared the effects of triclosan on mouse and human PPARα using PPARα reporter assays and on downstream events of PPARα activation using mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells and human hepatoma HepG2 cells. PPARα transcriptional activity was increased by triclosan in a mouse PPARα reporter assay and decreased in a human PPARα reporter assay. Concentrations of triclosan inhibiting 50% cell growth were similar in both human and mouse hepatoma cells. Western blotting analysis showed that triclosan increased acyl-coenzyme A oxidase (ACOX1), a PPARα target, in Hepa1c1c7 cells but decreased the level in HepG2 cells. Treatment of Hepa1c1c7 cells with triclosan enhanced DNA synthesis and suppressed transforming growth factor beta-mediated apoptosis. This did not occur in HepG2 cells. These data demonstrate that triclosan had similar cytotoxicity in Hepa1c1c7 and HepG2 cells, but differential effects on the activation of PPARα, the expression of ACOX1, and downstream events including DNA synthesis and apoptosis.

  4. Jarid2 regulates mouse epidermal stem cell activation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mejetta, Stefania; Morey, Lluis; Pascual, Gloria; Kuebler, Bernd; Mysliwiec, Matthew R; Lee, Youngsook; Shiekhattar, Ramin; Di Croce, Luciano; Benitah, Salvador Aznar

    2011-08-02

    Jarid2 is required for the genomic recruitment of the polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2) in embryonic stem cells. However, its specific role during late development and adult tissues remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we show that deletion of Jarid2 in mouse epidermis reduces the proliferation and potentiates the differentiation of postnatal epidermal progenitors, without affecting epidermal development. In neonatal epidermis, Jarid2 deficiency reduces H3K27 trimethylation, a chromatin repressive mark, in epidermal differentiation genes previously shown to be targets of the PRC2. However, in adult epidermis Jarid2 depletion does not affect interfollicular epidermal differentiation but results in delayed hair follicle (HF) cycling as a consequence of decreased proliferation of HF stem cells and their progeny. We conclude that Jarid2 is required for the scheduled proliferation of epidermal stem and progenitor cells necessary to maintain epidermal homeostasis.

  5. A novel non-mouse mammary tumor virus activation of the Int-3 gene in a spontaneous mouse mammary tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Kordon, E C; Smith, G H; Callahan, R; Gallahan, D

    1995-01-01

    In a mouse mammary tumor model system in which carcinogenic progression can be investigated, we have found a unique mutation of Int-3 associated with progression from premalignant lobular hyperplasia to tumor. Sequence analysis of the rearranged fragment revealed an insertion of an intracisternal type A particle (IAP) within the Int-3 gene. Int-3 is mutated frequently in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors by insertion of MMTV proviral DNA into this intragenic region. In these mutations, the insertion produces a chimeric Int-3 transcript encoding the cytoplasmic portion of the Int-3 protein driven by the MMTV long terminal repeat promoter. In this case, the IAP DNA was inserted in the opposite transcriptional orientation relative to Int-3; nevertheless, a similar chimeric RNA transcript driven by a cryptic promoter in the oppositely oriented 5' IAP long terminal repeat was generated. This is the first demonstration that an insertional mutation unrelated to MMTV activates an Int gene commonly associated with mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:7494323

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 negatively regulates MAPK signaling in mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koichi; Goto, Motomitsu; Onoue, Takeshi; Tsunekawa, Taku; Shibata, Miyuki; Hagimoto, Shigeru; Ito, Yoshihiro; Banno, Ryoichi; Suga, Hidetaka; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Oiso, Yutaka; Arima, Hiroshi

    2014-05-21

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) is shown to negatively regulate MAPK signaling in various peripheral tissues as well as the central nervous system such as cortex, striatum and hippocampus. In this study, we examined whether MKP-1 regulates MAPK signaling in the mouse hypothalamus. Intraperitoneal injection of TNFα significantly increased MKP-1 mRNA expression in paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in the hypothalamus. TNFα treatment induced increases in MKP-1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, accompanied by the inactivation of MAPK signaling in mouse hypothalamic explants. Inhibition of MKP-1 by its inhibitor or siRNA increased MAPK activity in the explants. Our data indicate that MKP-1 negatively regulates MAPK signaling in the mouse hypothalamus.

  7. Lung cancer and peritoneal carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    SERENO, MARÍA; RODRÍGUEZ-ESTEBAN, ISABEL; GÓMEZ-RAPOSO, CÉSAR; MERINO, MARÍA; LÓPEZ-GÓMEZ, MIRIAM; ZAMBRANA, FRANCISCO; CASADO, ENRIQUE

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently one of the most common malignancies in the world and peritoneal involvement is rare in these types of tumors. Clinical manifestations of these metastases are also uncommon and include intestinal perforation and obstruction. The present study reviewed certain aspects of the complication of peritoneal involvement and illustrated it with four cases of patients that were diagnosed with primary lung carcinoma and secondary peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). The outcome of these patients is poor and they rarely respond to chemotherapy. Surgery is successful in the majority of cases. PMID:24137394

  8. Peritonitis due to Rhizobium radiobacter.

    PubMed

    Marta, Raquel; Dâmaso, Catarina; Silva, José Esteves da; Almeida, Margarida

    2011-09-01

    Rhizobium radiobacter (Agrobacterium radiobacter) is an aerobic Gram-negative rod belonging to Agrobacterium genus, a group of phytopathogenic bacteria present in the soil that has been implicated in human opportunistic infections. We report a clinical case of bacterial peritonitis in a 5-year-old child with chronic renal disease in peritoneal dialysis, who had a history of direct soil contact identified. The infection was treated with ceftazidime and piperaciline+tazobactam without relapses or the need to remove the peritoneal dialysis catheter.

  9. Tuberculous peritonitis in a child undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, T C; Hsu, J C; Chou, L H; Lee, M L

    1994-01-01

    We present a 13-year-old girl with Arnold-Chiari syndrome and uremia secondary to neurogenic bladder. She had been treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) for 13 months prior to the development of peritonitis. The patient demonstrated no improvement with a 3-day therapy of intraperitoneal vancomycin and netilmicin. Meanwhile, smear of centrifuged dialysate revealed acid fast bacilli on two occasions. We, then, started anti-TB therapy with oral isoniazid (INAH), rifampin and ethambutal. The symptoms subsided within three days. In the first week, the patient lost her peritoneal ultrafiltration and needed daytime automatic peritoneal dialysis. At the last follow-up examination, 12 months after treatment, she remained well on standard CAPD.

  10. Peritoneal dialysis in Asia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, I K

    1996-01-01

    The socioeconomic status of Asian countries is diverse, and government reimbursement policies for treatment of patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vary greatly from one country to another. Both of these factors have a major impact not only on the choice of treatment for ESRD but also on the utilization of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in this region. Based on the data collected from 11 representative Asian countries, several observations can be made. First, the treatment rates for ESRD in these countries correlated closely with their gross domestic product (GDP) per capita income. Second, the PD utilization rate appeared to have a biphasic relationship with the GDP per capita income and treatment rate, in that countries with the highest and the lowest treatment rates tended to have lower PD utilization rates, whereas countries with modest treatment rates tended to have higher PD utilization rates. The reason for low PD utilization in countries with the highest treatment rates differs from that in countries with low treatment rates. In the former, because of full government reimbursement, there is little physician incentive to introduce PD as an alternative form of ESRD treatment to in-center hemodialysis (HD), whereas in the latter, the complete lack of government reimbursement prevents the introduction of PD as a form of treatment. This pattern is likely to change in the future because, of the 11 countries surveyed, all except Thailand have recorded a growth rate which is higher for PD than HD over the last three years. The rate of utilization of different PD systems varies greatly among different Asian countries. Automated PD has yet to gain popularity in Asia. Conventional straight-line systems remain the dominant PD systems in use in Hong Kong, Korea, Thailand, and the Philippines, while in Malaysia and Singapore UV germicidal connection devices are most popular. However, in all these countries there has been a progressive shift over the last

  11. Presternal peritoneal catheter.

    PubMed

    Twardowski, Zbylut J

    2002-04-01

    The swan neck presternal catheter is composed of 2 flexible (silicon rubber) tubes joined by a titanium connector at the time of implantation. The exit site is located in the parasternal area. The catheter located on the chest was designed to reduce the incidence of exit site infections compared to peritoneal dialysis catheters with abdominal exits. From August 1991 to September 30, 2001, 974 swan neck presternal catheters were implanted worldwide. At the university of Missouri, 150 of these catheters were implanted and followed for over 130 patient years. Presternal catheters tended to perform better than swan neck abdominal catheters regarding exit and tunnel infections, even though they were implanted in several patients in whom regular catheters with the exit on the abdomen would be difficult or impossible to implant. Two-year survival probability of presternal catheters was 0.95. Recurrent/refractory peritonitis was the only reason for catheter failure. The catheter is particularly useful in obese patients (body mass index >35), patients with ostomies, children with diapers and fecal incontinence, and patients who want to take baths without the risk of exit contamination. Many patients prefer presternal catheter because of better body image. Disadvantages of the presternal catheter are minimal. Compared with abdominal catheters, dialysis-solution flow is slightly slower because of the increased catheter length; however, slower flow is insignificant clinically. There is a possibility of catheter disconnection in the tunnel, but this complication is extremely rare in adults and easily corrected. Finally, the implantation technique is more challenging compared with that of single-piece, abdominal catheters. PMID:12085389

  12. Evolution of management in peritoneal surface malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Canbay, Emel; Torun, Bahar Canbay; Torun, Ege Sinan; Yonemura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Management of peritoneal surface malignancies has gradually evolved by the introduction of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy applications. Recently, peritoneal metastases of intraabdominal solid organ tumors and primary peritoneal malignancies such as peritoneal mesothelioma are being treated with this new approach. Selection criteria are important to reduce morbidity and mortality rates of patients who will experience minimal or no benefit from these combined treatment modalities. Management of peritoneal surface malignancies with this current trend is presented in this review. PMID:27528813

  13. Evolution of management in peritoneal surface malignancies.

    PubMed

    Canbay, Emel; Torun, Bahar Canbay; Torun, Ege Sinan; Yonemura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Management of peritoneal surface malignancies has gradually evolved by the introduction of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy applications. Recently, peritoneal metastases of intraabdominal solid organ tumors and primary peritoneal malignancies such as peritoneal mesothelioma are being treated with this new approach. Selection criteria are important to reduce morbidity and mortality rates of patients who will experience minimal or no benefit from these combined treatment modalities. Management of peritoneal surface malignancies with this current trend is presented in this review. PMID:27528813

  14. Functionally Charged Polystyrene Particles Activate Immortalized Mouse Microglia (BV2): Cellular and Genomic Response

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Same size (~850-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) with net negative (carboxyl, COOH-) or positive (dimethyl amino, CH3)2

  15. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-08-27

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  16. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  17. Stage-specific fucosyltransferase activity during mouse spermatogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cardullo, R.A.; Armant, D.R.; Millette, C.F.

    1986-05-01

    This laboratory is involved in the biochemical characterization of developing spermatogenic cells. The authors have measured the in vitro activity of fucosyltransferase (FT) in germ cells. FT activity was assayed with a procedure modified from Letts et al. using GDP-(/sup 14/C)-fucose and asialofetuin as substrates. After incubation for 15 minutes at 33/sup 0/C, the reaction was stopped by adding cold 500 mM EDTA. Radiolabeled asialofetuin was isolated using Bio-Gel P-10 chromatography. The FT activity of germ cells purified from seminiferous tubules was 18.5 +/- 1.7 pmol/mg protein-min. To see if this activity varied at different stages of development, germ cells were further separated in a STAPUT chamber using a 2-4% BSA gradient. Pachytene spermatocytes or round spermatids were purified to at least 87%. The FT activity in isolated pachytene spermatocytes was 24.4 +/- 1.2 pmol/mg protein-min while the activity in isolated round spermatids was 49.0 +/- 7.2 pmol/mg protein-min. These results suggest that the highest FT activity is in developing spermatogenic cells with round spermatids having nearly twice the FT activity as pachytene spermatocytes. This increase in FT activity may be biologically significant since it occurs at a time when the Golgi apparatus is undergoing differentiation and when stage-specific fucosylated proteins appear.

  18. Characterization of T helper (Th)1- and Th2-type immune responses caused by baculovirus-expressed protein derived from the S2 domain of feline infectious peritonitis virus, and exploration of the Th1 and Th2 epitopes in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Hiroshige; Takano, Tomomi; Motokawa, Kenji; Kusuhara, Hajime; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2010-12-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) may cause a lethal infection in cats. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of FIPV infection has been recognized, and cellular immunity is considered to play an important role in preventing the onset of feline infectious peritonitis. In the present study, whether or not the T helper (Th)1 epitope was present in the spike (S)2 domain was investigated, the ADE epitope being thought to be absent from this domain. Three kinds of protein derived from the C-terminal S2 domain of S protein of the FIPV KU-2 strain were developed using a baculovirus expression system. These expressed proteins were the pre-coil region which is the N-terminal side of the putative fusion protein (FP), the region from FP to the heptad repeat (HR)2 (FP-HR2) region, and the inter-helical region which is sandwiched between HR1 and HR2. The ability of three baculovirus-expressed proteins to induce Th1- and Th2-type immune responses was investigated in a mouse model. It was shown that FP-HR2 protein induced marked Th1- and Th2-type immune responses. Furthermore, 30 peptides derived from the FP-HR2 region were synthesized. Five and 16 peptides which included the Th1 and Th2 epitopes, respectively, were identified. Of these, four peptides which included both Th1 and Th2 epitopes were identified. These findings suggest that the identification of Th1 epitopes in the S2 domain of FIPV has important implications in the cat.

  19. Effects of Aloe vera leaf gel extract on rat peritonitis model

    PubMed Central

    Altincik, Ayca; Sönmez, Ferah; Yenisey, Çigdem; Duman, Soner; Can, Ayse; Akev, Nuriye; Kirdar, Sevin; Sezak, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activities and probable toxic effects of Aloe vera (AV) in a rat peritonitis model. Materials and Methods: Rats were divided into five groups: (1) Control group, (2) AV group, (3) peritonitis group (P), (4) peritonitis + AV group (P + AV), and (5) peritonitis + antibiotherapy group (P + Ab). Ultrafiltration (UF) rates were determined and colony and leukocyte counts were calculated in the dialysate. Glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine levels, and alanine transaminase (ALT) activities were studied in blood. Glucose, interleukins (IL-1β, IL-6), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were studied in dialysate and peritoneal tissue for the assessment of the anti-inflammatory effect. Copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitric oxide (NO) were also investigated in peritoneal tissue. Results: Aloe vera increased the UF rate and lowered leukocyte numbers in the peritonitis group. There was no significant difference in blood and dialysate glucose, BUN, creatinine levels and ALT activity among control and AV groups. AV decreased IL-1β, IL-6 and PGE2 in peritonitis, showing good anti-inflammatory effect. AV showed antioxidant effect on the chosen antioxidant parameters Cu, Zn-SOD, MDA, and NO. Conclusion: It was concluded that, AV might be used in peritonitis for its probable UF increasing, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. PMID:24987181

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyptis albida Chloroform Extract on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Miranda, Elizabeth; Pérez Ramos, Julia; Fresán Orozco, Cristina; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a chloroform extract of Hyptis albida (CHA) on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that CHA inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the process, levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in the mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, the extract suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of CHA and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23970974

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyptis albida Chloroform Extract on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Miranda, Elizabeth; Pérez Ramos, Julia; Fresán Orozco, Cristina; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a chloroform extract of Hyptis albida (CHA) on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that CHA inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF- α ) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the process, levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in the mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, the extract suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of CHA and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23970974

  2. Activation of farnesoid X receptor induces RECK expression in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Xiaomin; Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Sun, Zhichao; Ji, Lingling; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Meiling; Zhou, Lei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •RECK is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in mouse liver. •The FXR response element is located within the intron 1 of RECK gene. •FXR agonist reverses the down-regulation of RECK in the liver in mouse NASH model. -- Abstract: Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily, and functions as a transcription factor regulating the transcription of numerous genes involved in bile acid homeostasis, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified RECK, a membrane-anchored inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, as a novel target gene of FXR in mouse liver. We found that FXR agonist substantially augmented hepatic RECK mRNA and protein expression in vivo and in vitro. FXR regulated the transcription of RECK through directly binding to FXR response element located within intron 1 of the mouse RECK gene. Moreover, FXR agonist reversed the down-regulation of RECK in the livers from mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet. In summary, our data suggest that RECK is a novel transcriptional target of FXR in mouse liver, and provide clues to better understanding the function of FXR in liver.

  3. Early microglia activation in a mouse model of chronic glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Alejandra; Steele, Michael R.; Vetter, Monica L.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in microglial cell activation and distribution are associated with neuronal decline in the CNS, particularly under pathological conditions. Activated microglia converge on the initial site of axonal degeneration in human glaucoma, yet, their part in its pathophysiology remains unresolved. To begin with, it is unknown whether microglia activation precedes or is a late consequence of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) neurodegeneration. Here, we address this critical element in DBA/2J (D2) mice, an established model of chronic inherited glaucoma, using as a control the congenic substrain DBA/2J Gpnmb+/SjJ (D2G), which is not affected by glaucoma. We analyzed the spatial distribution and timecourse of microglial changes in the retina, as well as within the proximal optic nerve prior to and throughout ages when neurodegeneration has been reported. Exclusively in D2 mice, we detected early microglia clustering in the inner central retina and unmyelinated optic nerve regions, with microglia activation peaking by 3 months of age. Between 5 and 8 months of age, activated microglia persisted and concentrated in the optic disc, but also localized to the retinal periphery. Collectively, our findings suggest microglia activation is an early alteration in the retina and optic nerve in D2 glaucoma, potentially contributing to disease onset or progression. Ultimately, detection of microglial activation may have value in early disease diagnosis, while modulation of microglial responses may alter disease progression. PMID:21246546

  4. New Developments in Peritoneal Fibroblast Biology: Implications for Inflammation and Fibrosis in Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Witowski, Janusz; Kawka, Edyta; Rudolf, Andras; Jörres, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Uraemia and long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) can lead to fibrotic thickening of the peritoneal membrane, which may limit its dialytic function. Peritoneal fibrosis is associated with the appearance of myofibroblasts and expansion of extracellular matrix. The extent of contribution of resident peritoneal fibroblasts to these changes is a matter of debate. Recent studies point to a significant heterogeneity and complexity of the peritoneal fibroblast population. Here, we review recent developments in peritoneal fibroblast biology and summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of peritoneal fibroblasts in peritoneal inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26495280

  5. Local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity in mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pisauro, M. Andrea; Benucci, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging seek to estimate neural signals in local brain regions through measurements of hemodynamic activity. However, hemodynamic activity is accompanied by large vascular fluctuations of unclear significance. To characterize these fluctuations and their impact on estimates of neural signals, we used optical imaging in visual cortex of awake mice. We found that hemodynamic activity can be expressed as the sum of two components, one local and one global. The local component reflected presumed neural signals driven by visual stimuli in the appropriate retinotopic region. The global component constituted large fluctuations shared by larger cortical regions, which extend beyond visual cortex. These fluctuations varied from trial to trial, but they did not constitute noise; they correlated with pupil diameter, suggesting that they reflect variations in arousal or alertness. Distinguishing local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity may help understand neurovascular coupling and interpret measurements of hemodynamic responses. PMID:26984421

  6. Detecting cardiac contractile activity in the early mouse embryo using multiple modalities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiann-Mun; Miranda, António M. A.; Bub, Gil; Srinivas, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    The heart is one of the first organs to develop during mammalian embryogenesis. In the mouse, it starts to form shortly after gastrulation, and is derived primarily from embryonic mesoderm. The embryonic heart is unique in having to perform a mechanical contractile function while undergoing complex morphogenetic remodeling. Approaches to imaging the morphogenesis and contractile activity of the developing heart are important in understanding not only how this remodeling is controlled but also the origin of congenital heart defects (CHDs). Here, we describe approaches for visualizing contractile activity in the developing mouse embryo, using brightfield time lapse microscopy and confocal microscopy of calcium transients. We describe an algorithm for enhancing this image data and quantifying contractile activity from it. Finally we describe how atomic force microscopy can be used to record contractile activity prior to it being microscopically visible. PMID:25610399

  7. Studies on the Antifatigue Activities of Cordyceps militaris Fruit Body Extract in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Song, Jingjing; Wang, Yingwu; Teng, Meiyu; Cai, Guangsheng; Xu, Hongkai; Guo, Hanxiao; Liu, Yang; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris has been used extensively as a crude drug and a folk tonic food in East Asia due to its various pharmacological activities. Our study aims to investigate the effect of Cordyceps militaris fruit body extract (CM) on antifatigue in mouse model. Two week CM administration significantly delayed fatigue phenomenon which is confirmed via rotating rod test, forced swimming test and forced running test. Compared to nontreated mouse, CM administration increased ATP levels and antioxidative enzymes activity and reduced the levels of lactic acid, lactic dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and reactive oxygen species. Further data suggests that CM-induced fatigue recovery is mainly through activating 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways and regulating serum hormone level. Moreover, CM-enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK contributes to its antioxidant effect. Our data provides experimental evidence in supporting clinical use of CM as an effective agent against fatigue. PMID:26351509

  8. Mouse Splenic Peroxidase and Its Role in Bactericidal Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, R. R.; Paul, B. B.; Jacobs, A. A.; Sbarra, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Spleen cell suspensions from AKR and CD-1 mice contain peroxidase activity as determined by guaiacol oxidation. This activity is found predominately in the 20,000 × g pellet fraction of spleen cell homogenates. In the presence of H2O2 and chloride ion at acidic pH, splenic peroxidase mediates the oxidation of d- or l-alanine to CO2, NH3, and acetaldehyde. The same reaction mixture without added amino acid can kill both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The conditions for both reactions are similar. Both have an absolute requirement for H2O2 and chloride ion, neither is active at neutral or alkaline pH, and both are inhibited by the sulfonic amino acid taurine. In these aspects, splenic peroxidase is qualitatively similar in its activity to myeloperoxidase (MPO) from polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It is quantitatively different from MPO in that the latter is more potent on a per guaiacol unit basis with respect to both amino acid oxidation and bactericidal activity. Still another quantitative difference is that splenic peroxidase requires 0.1 m NaCl for activity, whereas MPO functions with as little as 0.005 m NaCl. Splenic peroxidase and MPO both appear to differ qualitatively from horseradish peroxidase in that the latter enzyme does not mediate amino acid oxidation. PMID:4632463

  9. Knee loading reduces MMP13 activity in the mouse cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Moderate loads with knee loading enhance bone formation, but its effects on the maintenance of the knee are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of knee loading on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase13 (MMP13) and evaluated the role of p38 MAPK and Rac1 GTPase in the regulation of MMP13. Methods Knee loading (0.5–3 N for 5 min) was applied to the right knee of surgically-induced osteoarthritis (OA) mice as well as normal (non-OA) mice, and MMP13 activity in the femoral cartilage was examined. The sham-loaded knee was used as a non-loading control. We also employed primary non-OA and OA human chondrocytes as well as C28/I2 chondrocyte cells, and examined MMP13 activity and molecular signaling in response to shear at 2–20 dyn/cm2. Results Daily knee loading at 1 N for 2 weeks suppressed cartilage destruction in the knee of OA mice. Induction of OA elevated MMP13 activity and knee loading at 1 N suppressed this elevation. MMP13 activity was also increased in primary OA chondrocytes, and this increase was attenuated by applying shear at 10 dyn/cm2. Load-driven reduction in MMP13 was associated with a decrease in the phosphorylation level of p38 MAPK (p-p38) and NFκB (p-NFκB). Molecular imaging using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique showed that Rac1 activity was reduced by shear at 10 dyn/cm2 and elevated by it at 20 dyn/cm2. Silencing Rac1 GTPase significantly reduced MMP13 expression and p-p38 but not p-NFκB. Transfection of a constitutively active Rac1 GTPase mutant increased MMP13 activity, while a dominant negative mutant decreased it. Conclusions Knee loading reduces MMP13 activity at least in part through Rac1-mediated p38 MAPK signaling. This study suggests the possibility of knee loading as a therapy not only for strengthening bone but also preventing tissue degradation of the femoral cartilage. PMID:24180431

  10. NOTCH activation interferes with cell fate specification in the gastrulating mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Souilhol, Céline; Perea-Gomez, Aitana; Camus, Anne; Beck-Cormier, Sarah; Vandormael-Pournin, Sandrine; Escande, Marie; Collignon, Jérôme; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel

    2015-11-01

    NOTCH signalling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway involved in intercellular communication essential for cell fate choices during development. Although dispensable for early aspects of mouse development, canonical RBPJ-dependent NOTCH signalling has been shown to influence lineage commitment during embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation. NOTCH activation in ESCs promotes the acquisition of a neural fate, whereas its suppression favours their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. This suggests that NOTCH signalling is implicated in the acquisition of distinct embryonic fates at early stages of mammalian development. In order to investigate in vivo such a role for NOTCH signalling in shaping cell fate specification, we use genetic approaches to constitutively activate the NOTCH pathway in the mouse embryo. Early embryonic development, including the establishment of anterior-posterior polarity, is not perturbed by forced NOTCH activation. By contrast, widespread NOTCH activity in the epiblast triggers dramatic gastrulation defects. These are fully rescued in a RBPJ-deficient background. Epiblast-specific NOTCH activation induces acquisition of neurectoderm identity and disrupts the formation of specific mesodermal precursors including the derivatives of the anterior primitive streak, the mouse organiser. In addition, we show that forced NOTCH activation results in misregulation of NODAL signalling, a major determinant of early embryonic patterning. Our study reveals a previously unidentified role for canonical NOTCH signalling during mammalian gastrulation. It also exemplifies how in vivo studies can shed light on the mechanisms underlying cell fate specification during in vitro directed differentiation.

  11. A Novel Class of Small Molecule Agonists with Preference for Human over Mouse TLR4 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Heeke, Darren S.; Rao, Eileen; Maynard, Sean K.; Hornigold, David; McCrae, Christopher; Fraser, Neil; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yu, Li; Williams, Nicola; King, Sarah; Cooper, Martin E.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Woo, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    The best-characterized Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands are lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its chemically modified and detoxified variant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). Although both molecules are active for human TLR4, they demonstrate a potency preference for mouse TLR4 based on data from transfected cell lines and primary cells of both species. After a high throughput screening process of small molecule libraries, we have discovered a new class of TLR4 agonist with a species preference profile differing from MPL. Products of the 4-component Ugi synthesis reaction were demonstrated to potently trigger human TLR4-transfected HEK cells but not mouse TLR4, although inclusion of the human MD2 with mTLR4 was able to partially recover activity. Co-expression of CD14 was not required for optimal activity of Ugi compounds on transfected cells, as it is for LPS. The species preference profile for the panel of Ugi compounds was found to be strongly active for human and cynomolgus monkey primary cells, with reduced but still substantial activity for most Ugi compounds on guinea pig cells. Mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret, and cotton rat cells displayed little or no activity when exposed to Ugi compounds. However, engineering the human versions of TLR4 and MD2 to be expressed in mTLR4/MD2 deficient mice allowed for robust activity by Ugi compounds both in vitro and in vivo. These findings extend the range of compounds available for development as agonists of TLR4 and identify novel molecules which reverse the TLR4 triggering preference of MPL for mouse TLR4 over human TLR4. Such compounds may be amenable to formulation as more potent human-specific TLR4L-based adjuvants than typical MPL-based adjuvants. PMID:27736941

  12. Zinc Chloride Transiently Maintains Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Pluripotency by Activating Stat3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Jinbo; Yu, Jia; Guo, Jing; Liu, Shiying; Qian, Chunmei; Song, Liwen; Wu, Yi; Cheng, Jiajing

    2016-01-01

    An improved understanding of the pluripotency maintenance of embryonic stem (ES) cells is important for investigations of early embryo development and for cell replacement therapy, but the mechanism behind pluripotency is still incompletely understood. Recent findings show that zinc, an essential trace element in humans, is critically involved in regulating various signaling pathways and genes expression. However, its role in ES cell fate determination remains to be further explored. Here we showed that 2μM zinc chloride (ZnCl2) transiently maintained mouse ES cell pluripotency in vitro. The cultured mouse ES cells remained undifferentiated under 2μM ZnCl2 treatment in leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) withdrawal, retinoic acid (RA) or embryoid bodies (EBs) differentiation assays. In addition, ZnCl2 increased pluripotency genes expression and inhibited differentiation genes expression. Further mechanistic studies revealed that ZnCl2 transiently activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling through promoting Stat3 phosphorylation. Inhibition of Stat3 signaling abrogated the effects of ZnCl2 on mouse ES cell pluripotency. Taken together, this study demonstrated a critical role of zinc in the pluripotency maintenance of mouse ES cells, as well as an important regulator of Stat3 signaling. PMID:26910359

  13. Difference in Bgp-independent fusion activity among mouse hepatitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, F; Matsuyama, S; Saeki, K

    1999-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) utilizes a mouse biliary glycoprotein (Bgp) as a receptor. Co-cultivation of MHV-nonpermissive hamster BHK cells devoid of mouse Bgp with mouse DBT cells infected with MHV-A59 or JHMV induces syncytia formation on BHK cells (Bgp-independent fusion). This study shows the difference in Bgp-independent fusion activity among various MHV strains. Under a phase contrast microscopy, JHMV (cl-2, sp-4) induced the Bgp-independent syncytia on BHK cells similar to those observed on DBT cells, while such syncytia were not seen with the infection of other MHV strains (MHV-1, MHV-3, MHV-A59, MHV-S, srr7, srr11 and srr18). Tiny syncytia detectable only by immunofluorescence were produced with the latter MHV strains except for srr7 which failed to produce syncytia. MHVs except for srr7 grew in BHK cells after Bgp-independent infection. The Bgp-independent fusion by JHMV was inhibited either by anti-S1 or anti-S2 antibodies. These results showed that the JHMV spike protein had a remarkably high Bgp-independent fusion activity.

  14. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  15. Mouse mammary tumors display Stat3 activation dependent on leukemia inhibitory factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Quaglino, Ana; Schere-Levy, Carolina; Romorini, Leonardo; Meiss, Roberto P; Kordon, Edith C

    2007-01-01

    Introduction It has been demonstrated that leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) induces epithelium apoptosis through Stat3 activation during mouse mammary gland involution. In contrast, it has been shown that this transcription factor is commonly activated in breast cancer cells, although what causes this effect remains unknown. Here we have tested the hypothesis that locally produced LIF can be responsible for Stat3 activation in mouse mammary tumors. Methods The studies were performed in different tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mammary cells. The expression of LIF and LIF receptor was tested by RT-PCR analysis. In tumors, LIF and Stat3 proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, whereas Stat3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 expression and phosphorylation were studied by Western blot analysis. A LIF-specific blocking antibody was used to determine whether this cytokine was responsible for Stat3 phosphorylation induced by conditioned medium. Specific pharmacological inhibitors (PD98059 and Stat3ip) that affect ERK1/2 and Stat3 activation were used to study their involvement in LIF-induced effects. To analyze cell survival, assays with crystal violet were performed. Results High levels of LIF expression and activated Stat3 were found in mammary tumors growing in vivo and in their primary cultures. We found a single mouse mammary tumor cell line, LM3, that showed low levels of activated Stat3. Incidentally, these cells also showed very little expression of LIF receptor. This suggested that autocrine/paracrine LIF would be responsible for Stat3 activation in mouse mammary tumors. This hypothesis was confirmed by the ability of conditioned medium of mammary tumor primary cultures to induce Stat3 phosphorylation, activity that was prevented by pretreatment with LIF-blocking antibody. Besides, we found that LIF increased tumor cell viability. Interestingly, blocking Stat3 activation enhanced this effect in mammary tumor cells. Conclusion LIF is

  16. Screening for Intestinal Microflora Influencing Superoxide Dismutase Activity in Mouse Cecal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    DOBASHI, Yuu; ITOH, Kikuji; TOHEI, Atsushi; AMAO, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have suggested that intestinal microflora reduces the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the mouse cecal mucosa. In this study, gnotobiotic mice were used to examine the species of intestinal microflora influencing SOD activity in the cecal mucosa. The total SOD activity in the cecal mucosa of each germ-free (GF), gnotobiotic mouse with Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bacteroides was significantly higher than that in the cecal mucosa of gnotobiotic mice with chloroform-treated feces (CHF), conventionalized (CVz) mice and conventional (CV) mice (P<0.05). In addition, CuZnSOD mRNA expression showed similar tendencies. Our results suggest that the antioxidant defense status in the cecal mucosa is influenced by CHF inoculation. PMID:24225363

  17. Addition of Alanyl-Glutamine to Dialysis Fluid Restores Peritoneal Cellular Stress Responses – A First-In-Man Trial

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Michael; Herzog, Rebecca; Gruber, Katharina; Lichtenauer, Anton Michael; Kuster, Lilian; Csaicsich, Dagmar; Gleiss, Andreas; Alper, Seth L.; Aufricht, Christoph; Vychytil, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Peritonitis and ultrafiltration failure remain serious complications of chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD). Dysfunctional cellular stress responses aggravate peritoneal injury associated with PD fluid exposure, potentially due to peritoneal glutamine depletion. In this randomized cross-over phase I/II trial we investigated cytoprotective effects of alanyl-glutamine (AlaGln) addition to glucose-based PDF. Methods In a prospective randomized cross-over design, 20 stable PD outpatients underwent paired peritoneal equilibration tests 4 weeks apart, using conventional acidic, single chamber 3.86% glucose PD fluid, with and without 8 mM supplemental AlaGln. Heat-shock protein 72 expression was assessed in peritoneal effluent cells as surrogate parameter of cellular stress responses, complemented by metabolomics and functional immunocompetence assays. Results AlaGln restored peritoneal glutamine levels and increased the primary outcome heat-shock protein expression (effect 1.51-fold, CI 1.07–2.14; p = 0.022), without changes in peritoneal ultrafiltration, small solute transport, or biomarkers reflecting cell mass and inflammation. Further effects were glutamine-like metabolomic changes and increased ex-vivo LPS-stimulated cytokine release from healthy donor peripheral blood monocytes. In patients with a history of peritonitis (5 of 20), AlaGln supplementation decreased dialysate interleukin-8 levels. Supplemented PD fluid also attenuated inflammation and enhanced stimulated cytokine release in a mouse model of PD-associated peritonitis. Conclusion We conclude that AlaGln-supplemented, glucose-based PD fluid can restore peritoneal cellular stress responses with attenuation of sterile inflammation, and may improve peritoneal host-defense in the setting of PD. PMID:27768727

  18. Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Stimulated Mouse Gonadotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Dennis W.; Turgeon, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    GnRH receptor activation elicits release of intracellular Ca2+, which leads to secretion and also activates Ca2+-activated ion channels underlying membrane voltage changes. The predominant Ca2+-activated ion channels in rat and mouse gonadotrophs are Ca2+-activated K+ channels. To establish the temporal relationship between GnRH-induced changes in intracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) and membrane current (Im), and to identify specific Ca2+-activated K+ channels linking GnRH-induced increase in [Ca2+]i to changes in plasma membrane electrical activity, we used single female mouse gonadotrophs in the perforated patch configuration of the patch-clamp technique, which preserves signaling pathways. Simultaneous measurement of [Ca2+]i and Im in voltage-clamped gonadotrophs revealed that GnRH stimulates an increase in [Ca2+]i that precedes outward Im, and that activates two kinetically distinct currents identified, using specific toxin inhibitors, as small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) current (ISK) and large (big) conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) current (IBK). We show that the apamin-sensitive current has an IC50 of 69 pM, consistent with the SK2 channel subtype and confirmed by immunocytochemistry. The magnitude of the SK current response to GnRH was attenuated by 17β-estradiol (E2) pretreatment. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of BK channels, completely blocked the residual apamin-insensitive outward Im, substantiating that IBK is a component of the GnRH-induced outward Im. In contrast to its suppression of ISK, E2 pretreatment augmented peak IBK. SK or BK channel inhibition modulated GnRH-stimulated LH secretion, implicating a role for these channels in gonadotroph function. In summary, in mouse gonadotrophs the GnRH-stimulated increase in [Ca2+]i activates ISK and IBK, which are differentially regulated by E2 and which may be targets for E2 positive feedback in LH secretion. PMID:19106218

  19. Weight loss in obese mice persistently infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is not associated with elevated tumor necrosis factor/cachectin activity in peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Lathey, J. L.; Oldstone, M. B.

    1988-01-01

    C57BL/6 ob/ob (C57 ob/ob) mice infected persistently with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) show cachexia as judged by a weight loss of greater than 20%. Virus persists in a subset of macrophages. Because a cachexic state occurs in several chronic debilitating diseases of humans, often accompanied by persistent microbial infections with macrophage/monocytic involvement and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) cachectin production, the role of TNF in the weightloss of ob/ob mice infected persistently with LCMV was investigated. TNF mRNA expression was not increased in peritoneal cells from such persistently-infected mice, nor did their serum levels of TNF rise above those in uninfected litter-mates. Furthermore, in vitro LCMV infection of adherent peritoneal cells from these C57 ob/ob mice did not enhance TNF mRNA or protein expression. Therefore, the cachexia-like weight loss observed in C57 ob/ob mice during a persistent LCMV infection is apparently not associated with a measurable increase in TNF. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3414785

  20. [Peritonitis in patients treated by continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Georgiev, M; Krivoshiev, S; Kraev, Z

    1989-01-01

    With the present study the authors set themselves the task to compare the number of peritonitis episodes in patients treated with two types of systems: "Sorin-Biomedica" and "Travenol-(UV-XD)", in which disinfection of the connecting devices is achieved accordingly with chemical agents and with ultraviolet irradiation. Eleven patients have been observed from August 1984 through February 1989. The total duration of treatment was 156 months. Twenty one peritonitis episodes were observed--15 with "Sorin-Biomedica" system and 6 with "Travenol-(UV-XD)" system--an average of one episode in 4 1/2 months with the former system and one episode in 14.7 months with the latter. It is pointed out in conclusion that the "Travenol-(UV-XD)" system with ultraviolet disinfection has significantly reduced the incidence of peritonitis at the dialysis center where the authors work.

  1. Systemic neutrophil activation in a mouse model of ischemic stroke and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Helena; McKee, Dana; Ritter, Leslie

    2011-04-01

    As a natural response to injury and disease, neutrophils activate, adhere to the microvasculature, migrate into brain tissue, and release toxic substances such as reactive oxygen species and proteases. This neutrophil response occurs when blood flow is returned to brain tissue (reperfusion) after ischemic stroke. Thus, the presence of activated systemic neutrophils increases the potential for tissue injury during reperfusion after ischemic stroke. Although experiments in rat models suggest that activated neutrophils play a pivotal role in cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury, little is known about systemic neutrophil activation during reperfusion following ischemic stroke in a mouse model. The purpose of this study was to characterize systemic leukocyte responses and neutrophil CD11b expression 15-min and 24-hr post-reperfusion in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. The intraluminal filament method of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) with reperfusion or a sham procedure was performed in male C57Bl/6 mice. Automated leukocyte counts and manual white blood cell (WBC) differential counts were measured. Flow cytometry was used to assess systemic neutrophil surface CD11b expression. The data suggest that the damaging potential of systemic neutrophil activation begins as early as 15 min and remains evident at 24 hr after the initiation of reperfusion. In addition, because transgenic mouse models, bred on a C57Bl/6 background, are increasingly used to elucidate single mechanisms of reperfusion injury after ischemic stroke, findings from this study are foundational for future investigations examining the damaging potential of neutrophil responses post-reperfusion after ischemic stroke in genetically altered mouse models within this background strain. PMID:21044968

  2. Resveratrol lacks protective activity against acute seizures in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Tomaciello, Francesca; Leclercq, Karine; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2016-10-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-stilbenetriol) is a natural product having diverse anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The compound has a wide spectrum of pharmacological and metabolic activity, including cardioprotective, neuroprotective, anticarcinogenic and anti-aging effects reported in numerous studies. Some reports also suggest potential anticonvulsant properties of resveratrol. In the present study, we used in mice three different seizure models which are routinely applied in preclinical drug discovery. The protective effects of resveratrol were evaluated in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), maximal electroshock (MES) and 6-Hz electrical seizure models. Resveratrol (up to 300mg/kg) administered ip (5-60min pre-treatment time) remained without any protective activity against seizures induced in these models. There was only a trend towards a delay in seizure latency, which reached statistical significance after treatment with resveratrol (100mg/kg; 15min) in case of tonic convulsions induced by PTZ. Phenobarbital (PHB, ip, 45min), used as a reference compound, displayed a clear-cut and dose-dependent protection against seizures in all the models. The ED50 values obtained with PHB were as follows: 7.3mg/kg (PTZ model), 13.3mg/kg (MES model) and 29.7mg/kg (6-Hz model). The present data demonstrate that an acute treatment with resveratrol does not provide any significant protection in three seizure models which collectively are able to detect anticonvulsants with diverse mechanisms of action. However, it cannot be excluded that chronic treatment with resveratrol may offer some protection in these or other seizure models.

  3. Water channels in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Devuyst, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis involves diffusive and convective transports and osmosis through the highly vascularized peritoneal membrane. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) corresponds to the ultrasmall pore predicted by the modelization of peritoneal transport. Proof-of-principle studies have shown that up-regulation of the expression of AQP1 in peritoneal capillaries is reflected by increased water permeability and ultrafiltration, without affecting the osmotic gradient and the permeability for small solutes. Inversely, studies in Aqp1 mice have shown that haploinsufficiency in AQP1 is reflected by significant attenuation of water transport. Recent studies have identified lead compounds that could act as agonists of aquaporins, as well as putative binding sites and potential mechanisms of gating the water channel. By modulating water transport, these pharmacological agents could have clinically relevant effects in targeting specific tissues or disease states. These studies on the peritoneal membrane also provide an experimental framework to investigate the role of water channels in the endothelium and various cell types.

  4. Laparoscopic surgery complications: Postoperative peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Drăghici, L; Drăghici, I; Ungureanu, A; Copăescu, C; Popescu, M; Dragomirescu, C

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Complications within laparoscopic surgery, similar to classic surgery are inevitable and require immediate actions both to diminish intraoperative risks and to choose the appropriate therapeutic attitude. Peritonitis and hemorrhagic incidents are both part of the complications aspect of laparoscopic surgery. Fortunately, the incidence is limited, thus excluding the rejection of celioscopic methods. Patient’s risks and benefits are to be analyzed carefully prior recommending laparoscopic surgery. Materials and methods: This study presents a statistical analysis of peritonitis consecutive to laparoscopic surgery, experience of „Sf. Ioan” Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, and Department of Surgery (2000-2010). Results:There were 180 (0,96%) complicated situations requiring reinterventions, from a total of 18676 laparoscopic procedures. 106 cases (0,56%) represented different grades of postoperative peritonitis. Most frequently, there were consecutive laparoscopic appendicectomia and colecistectomia. During the last decade, few severe cases of peritonitis followed laparoscopic bariatric surgical procedures. Conclusions: This study reflects the possibility of unfavorable evolution of postoperative peritonitis comparing with hemorrhagic incidents within laparoscopic surgery. PMID:23049630

  5. ISSLS PRIZE WINNER: INHIBITION OF NF-κB ACTIVITY AMELIORATES AGE-ASSOCIATED DISC DEGENERATION IN A MOUSE MODEL OF ACCELERATED AGING

    PubMed Central

    Nasto, Luigi A.; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Robinson, Andria R.; Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Ngo, Kevin; Dong, Qing; Pola, Enrico; Lee, Joon Y.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Kang, James D.; Robbins, Paul D.; Vo, Nam V.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design NF-κB activity was pharmacologically and genetically blocked in an accelerated aging mouse model to mitigate age-related disc degenerative changes. Objective To study the mediatory role of NF-κB signaling pathway in age-dependent intervertebral disc degeneration. Summary of Background Data Aging is a major contributor to intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD), but the molecular mechanism behind this process is poorly understood. NF-κB is a family of transcription factors which play a central role in mediating cellular response to damage, stress, and inflammation. Growing evidence implicates chronic NF-κB activation as a culprit in many aging-related diseases, but its role in aging-related IDD has not been adequately explored. We studied the effects of NF-κB inhibition on IDD using a DNA repair-deficient mouse model of accelerated aging (Ercc1-/Δ mice) previously been reported to exhibit age-related IDD. Methods Systemic inhibition of NF-κB activation was achieved either genetically by deletion of one allele of the NF-κB subunit p65 (Ercc1-/Δp65+/- mice) or pharmacologically by chronic intra-peritoneal administration of the Nemo Binding Domain (8K-NBD) peptide to block the formation of the upstream activator of NF-κB, IκB Inducible Kinase (IKK), in Ercc1-/Δ mice. Disc cellularity, total proteoglycan content and proteoglycan synthesis of treated mice and untreated controls were assessed. Results Decreased disc matrix proteoglycan content, a hallmark feature of IDD, and elevated disc NF-κB activity were observed in discs of progeroid Ercc1-/Δ mice and naturally aged wild-type compared to young WT mice. Systemic inhibition of NF-κB by the 8K-NBD peptide in Ercc1-/Δ mice increased disc proteoglycan synthesis and ameriolated loss disc cellularity and matrix proteoglycan. These results were confirmed genetically by using the p65 haploinsufficient Ercc1-/Δp65+/- mice. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway

  6. Focal cerebral ischemia activates neurovascular restorative dynamics in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Chu, Min; Hu, Xiaoming; Lu, Shiduo; Gan, Yu; Li, Peiying; Guo, Yanling; Zhang, Jia; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers regeneration of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs), which are associated with neovascularization and white matter repair in the brain. This study analyzed the dynamics of neurogenesis, neovascularization, and white matter injury/repair after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and elucidated their temporal association. Mice were subjected to MCAO for 60 minutes and sacrificed up to 28 days after reperfusion. Neurogenesis and angiogenesis, as measured by double staining of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) with DCX or tomato lectin, respectively, were substantially activated soon after ischemia and persisted for 4 weeks. Despite the moderate recovery of functional vessels in infarct margin from 7 days post-ischemia, a significant decrease in vascular density remained over time. Clusters of immature neurons localized proximal to angiogenic blood vessels beginning 14 days after ischemia, suggesting interplay between neurogenesis and revascularization. Progenitors of oligodendrocytes (NG2+) constitutively presented in the normal brain and proliferated soon after ischemia. However, axon damage and the loss of white matter integrity after ischemic stroke were almost irreversible, as revealed by sustained decreases of myelin basic protein (MBP) and neurofilament-200 expression. PMID:22202008

  7. Intraperitoneal meropenem for peritoneal dialysis peritonitis with Serratia marcescens immediately on commencing dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bhave, P; Tregaskis, P; Walker, R; Wilson, S

    2016-03-01

    A 67-year-old man developed Serratia marcescens peritonitis within a week of commencing peritoneal dialysis. Dialysate cultures isolated multidrug-resistant S. marcescens, which was treated with intraperitoneal meropenem. This unusual case highlights the problem of multidrug-resistant peritoneal dialysis infections and the potential viability of intraperitoneal meropenem as ambulatory peritonitis therapy.

  8. Pseudomonas sp. group Ve-2 bacterial peritonitis in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Amber, I J; Reimer, L G

    1987-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. group Ve-2 peritonitis occurred in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis who had recently completed intraperitoneal cephalosporin therapy for culture-negative peritonitis. This is the second reported case of peritonitis in this population of patients due to this unusual organism, which is usually resistant to most cephalosporin antibiotics. PMID:3571484

  9. Chemically defined medium enhances bioelectric activity in mouse spinal cord-dorsal root ganglion cultures.

    PubMed

    Habets, A M; Baker, R E; Brenner, E; Romijn, H J

    1981-02-23

    Co-cultures of mouse spinal cord with dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures were grown either in horse serum (HS)-supplemented medium or in a serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM). The cytoarchitecture of cord--DRG explants was fully retained in CDM, with little or no distortion due to flattening of the explant, as is invariably observed in HS-supplemented cultures. Functional properties such as bioelectric activity and DRG--spinal cord interconnectivity were well sustained in CDM.

  10. The liver in tuberculous peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Faisal M

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculous peritonitis is a common form of abdominal tuberculosis and is frequently associated with liver disease. Diagnosis of this disease presents a diagnostic dilemma and the presence of liver cirrhosis further confounds the clinical picture. Moreover, the co-existence of these two diseases casts doubt on the validity of various diagnostic tests available. The interpretation of tests of ascitic fluid analysis becomes questionable despite the fact that peritoneal tuberculosis and liver disease cause ascites to develop through separate mechanisms. In addition, the treatment of tuberculosis mandates a better understanding of the co-existent disease in view of the potential hepatotoxicity of anti-tuberculous medication. This review aims to address the prevalence of coexistent liver disease in patients with tuberculous peritonitis, the diagnostic difficulties posed by such and the various treatment approaches to be adopted.

  11. Cloning and sequence analysis of a cDNA clone coding for the mouse GM2 activator protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bellachioma, G; Stirling, J L; Orlacchio, A; Beccari, T

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA (1.1 kb) containing the complete coding sequence for the mouse GM2 activator protein was isolated from a mouse macrophage library using a cDNA for the human protein as a probe. There was a single ATG located 12 bp from the 5' end of the cDNA clone followed by an open reading frame of 579 bp. Northern blot analysis of mouse macrophage RNA showed that there was a single band with a mobility corresponding to a size of 2.3 kb. We deduce from this that the mouse mRNA, in common with the mRNA for the human GM2 activator protein, has a long 3' untranslated sequence of approx. 1.7 kb. Alignment of the mouse and human deduced amino acid sequences showed 68% identity overall and 75% identity for the sequence on the C-terminal side of the first 31 residues, which in the human GM2 activator protein contains the signal peptide. Hydropathicity plots showed great similarity between the mouse and human sequences even in regions of low sequence similarity. There is a single N-glycosylation site in the mouse GM2 activator protein sequence (Asn151-Phe-Thr) which differs in its location from the single site reported in the human GM2 activator protein sequence (Asn63-Val-Thr). Images Figure 1 PMID:7689829

  12. [Analysis of mortality in acute diffuse peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Bondarev, V I; Tatarenko, L D; Golovnia, P F; Sviridov, N V

    1990-01-01

    The causes were studied and the analysis was performed of the lethality in 329 patients with acute diffuse peritonitis (ADP). The incidence of lethal outcome of ADP directly depended on the time of hospitalization, age of the patients, source of peritonitis, and as well on the technique of operative intervention. Progressive peritonitis caused death in 71 (92.2%) of 77 patients.

  13. Novel DNA Motif Binding Activity Observed In Vivo With an Estrogen Receptor α Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A.; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J.; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as “tethering.” Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used “KIKO” mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the “EAAE” ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null–like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo. PMID:24713037

  14. Neurogenic and myogenic motor activity in the colon of the guinea pig, mouse, rabbit, and rat.

    PubMed

    Costa, M; Dodds, K N; Wiklendt, L; Spencer, N J; Brookes, S J H; Dinning, P G

    2013-11-15

    Gastrointestinal motility involves interactions between myogenic and neurogenic processes intrinsic to the gut wall. We have compared the presence of propagating myogenic contractions of the isolated colon in four experimental animals (guinea pig, mouse, rabbit, and rat), following blockade of enteric neural activity. Isolated colonic preparations were distended with fluid, with the anal end either closed or open. Spatiotemporal maps of changes in diameter were constructed from video recordings. Distension-induced peristaltic contractions were abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.6 μM) in all animal species. Subsequent addition of carbachol (0.1-1 μM) did not evoke myogenic motor patterns in the mouse or guinea pig, although some activity was observed in rabbit and rat colon. These myogenic contractions propagated both orally and anally and differed from neurogenic propagating contractions in their frequency, extent of propagation, and polarity. Niflumic acid (300 μM), used to block myogenic activity, also blocked neural peristalsis and thus cannot be used to discriminate between these mechanisms. In all species, except the mouse colon, small myogenic "ripple" contractions were revealed in TTX, but in both rat and rabbit an additional, higher-frequency ripple-type contraction was superimposed. Following blockade of enteric nerve function, a muscarinic agonist can evoke propulsive myogenic peristaltic contractions in isolated rabbit and rat colon, but not in guinea pig or mouse colon. Marked differences between species exist in the ability of myogenic mechanisms to propel luminal content, but in all species there is normally a complex interplay between neurogenic and myogenic processes.

  15. Humicola sp. as a Cause of Peritoneal Dialysis-Associated Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Burns, Nathan; Arthur, Ian; Leung, Michael; Ketharanathan, Selva; Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Gené, Josepa; Guarro, Josep; Chakera, Aron

    2015-09-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is the renal replacement modality used by ∼20% of patients with end-stage kidney disease (S. McDonald, P. Clayton, and K. Hurst, p. 6.2-6.27, in ANZDATA 2012 Annual Report, 35th ed., 2012). A major complication of peritoneal dialysis is the development of peritonitis. We describe a case of Humicola sp. causing peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated peritonitis, successfully treated with a prolonged course of antifungal therapy.

  16. Toxic effects of Hoechst staining and UV irradiation on preimplantation development of parthenogenetically activated mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Versieren, Karen; Heindryckx, Björn; Qian, Chen; Gerris, Jan; De Sutter, Petra

    2014-02-01

    Parthenogenetic activation of oocytes is a helpful tool to obtain blastocysts, of which the inner cell mass may be used for derivation of embryonic stem cells. In order to improve activation and embryonic development after parthenogenesis, we tried to use sperm injection and subsequent removal of the sperm head to mimic the natural Ca2+ increases by release of the oocyte activating factor. Visualization of the sperm could be accomplished by Hoechst staining and ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. To exclude negative effects of this treatment, we examined toxicity on activated mouse oocytes. After activation, oocytes were incubated in Hoechst 33342 or 33258 stain and exposed to UV irradiation. The effects on embryonic development were evaluated. Our results showed that both types of Hoechst combined with UV irradiation have toxic effects on parthenogenetically activated mouse oocytes. Although activation and cleavage rate were not affected, blastocyst formation was significantly reduced. Secondly, we used MitoTracker staining for removal of the sperm. Sperm heads were stained before injection and removed again after 1 h. However, staining was not visible anymore in all oocytes after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. In case the sperm could be removed, most oocytes died after 1 day. As MitoTracker was also not successful, alternative methods for sperm identification should be investigated.

  17. Mapping social behavior-induced brain activation at cellular resolution in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongsoo; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Pradhan, Kith; Mende, Carolin; Taranda, Julian; Turaga, Srinivas C.; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Ng, Lydia; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Rockland, Kathleen; Seung, H. Sebastian; Osten, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how brain activation mediates behaviors is a central goal of systems neuroscience. Here we apply an automated method for mapping brain activation in the mouse in order to probe how sex-specific social behaviors are represented in the male brain. Our method uses the immediate early gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, visualized by serial two-photon tomography: the c-fos-GFP-positive neurons are computationally detected, their distribution is registered to a reference brain and a brain atlas, and their numbers are analyzed by statistical tests. Our results reveal distinct and shared female and male interaction-evoked patterns of male brain activation representing sex discrimination and social recognition. We also identify brain regions whose degree of activity correlates to specific features of social behaviors and estimate the total numbers and the densities of activated neurons per brain areas. Our study opens the door to automated screening of behavior-evoked brain activation in the mouse. PMID:25558063

  18. CD36 and Proteoglycan-Mediated Pathways for (n-3) Fatty Acid–Enriched Triglyceride-Rich Particle Blood Clearance in Mouse Models In Vivo and in Peritoneal Macrophages In Vitro1,2

    PubMed Central

    Densupsoontorn, Narumon; Carpentier, Yvon A.; Racine, Radjini; Murray, Faith M.; Seo, Toru; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Deckelbaum, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Because the mechanisms of (n-3) fatty acid–enriched triglyceride-rich particle [(n-3)-TGRP] uptake are not well characterized, we questioned whether (n-3)-TGRP are removed via “nonclassical” pathways, e.g., pathways other than an LDL receptor and/or involving apolipoprotein E (apoE). Chylomicron-sized model (n-3)-TGRP labeled with [3H]cholesteryl ether were injected into wild-type (WT) and CD36 knockout (CD36−/−) mice at low, nonsaturating and high, saturating doses. Blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP was determined by calculating fractional catabolic rates. At saturating doses, blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP was slower in CD36−/− mice relative to WT mice, suggesting that in part CD36 contributes to (n-3)-TGRP uptake. To further examine the potential nonclassical clearance pathways, peritoneal-elicited macrophages from WT and CD36−/− mice were incubated with (n-3)-TGRP in the presence of apoE, lactoferrin, and/or sodium chlorate. Cellular (n-3)-TGRP uptake was measured to test the roles of apoE-mediated pathways and/or proteoglycans. ApoE-mediated pathways compensated in part for defective (n-3)-TGRP uptake in CD36−/− cells. Lactoferrin decreased (n-3)-TGRP uptake in the presence of apoE. Inhibition of cell proteoglycan synthesis by chlorate reduced (n-3)-TGRP uptake in both groups of macrophages, and chlorate effects were independent of apoE. We conclude that although CD36 is involved, it is not the primary contributor to the blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP. The removal of (n-3)-TGRP likely relies more on nonclassical pathways, such as proteoglycan-mediated pathways. PMID:18203888

  19. VAP-1 in peritoneally dialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Koc-Zorawska, Ewa; Malyszko, Jolanta; Zbroch, Edyta; Malyszko, Jacek; Mysliwiec, Michal

    2013-01-01

    VAP-1 (vascular adhesion protein-1) possesses semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) activity. It has also been found that serum VAP-1 was elevated in acute and chronic hyperglycemia and in patients with diabetes as well as in chronic kidney disease. Renalase, with possible monoamine oxidase activity, which breaks down catecholamines such as SSAO, is expressed in the endothelium as well as in the kidney. The aim of the study was to assess serum VAP-1 levels in peritoneally dialyzed (PD) patients and factors explaining its variability. This pilot study was performed on 25 peritoneally dialyzed patients, including 4 patients with type 2 diabetes. We found that the mean VAP-1 was significantly higher in chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients when compared to the control group (p<0.05). Dopamine was significantly lower in PD patients when compared to the healthy volunteers (p<0.05), whereas noradrenaline was significantly higher in PD patients relative to the healthy volunteers (p<0.01). There was a significant difference in the VAP-1 concentration in the group with and without residual renal function (p<0.05) as well as between 10 patients with hyperglycemia when compared to patients with normoglycemia (p<0.05). There was no effect of gender on the serum VAP-1 levels. In PD patients VAP-1 correlated with systolic blood pressure (r=-0.4, p<005), residual renal function (r=-0.62, p<0.05), and glucose (=0.54, p<0.05). We concluded that VAP-1, elevated in patients on PD, was predominantly dependent on residual kidney function and glucose level, factors both linked to endothelial damage and cardiovascular complications.

  20. Middle molecules in peritoneal equilibration test as a marker of peritoneal stress in children on continuous peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Laux, C; Weiss, B; Bonzel, K E

    1999-01-01

    At 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and more than 6 months after healed peritonitis, we evaluated repeated peritoneal equilibration tests (PETs) for small molecules such as urea, and middle molecules such as cystatin C, beta 2-microglobulin, and alpha 1-microglobulin. We analyzed a total of 104 PETs in 21 children aged 1.7-18.6 years (median: 9.9 years). Equilibration quotients (D/P)--that is, substrate concentration in dialysis fluid (D) divided by substrate concentration in plasma (P)--were calculated after a dwell time of 4 hours. The D/P for urea did not change after healed peritonitis. In a cross-sectional study, the D/P for middle molecules showed an increase in peritoneal permeability between 3 months and 6 months after a healed peritonitis. In a consecutive follow-up of 4 patients for more than 6 months, beta 2-microglobulin and, more impressively, alpha 1-microglobulin showed a statistically significant increase in D/P (p < 0.05) 3 months after a healed peritonitis. All differences seen were completely reversible after more than 6 months, showing that peritoneal function is rather stable if peritonitis is healed. It is noteworthy that peritoneal dysfunction lasts for up to 6 months after a completely healed peritonitis. This period might be a vulnerable phase in continuation of peritoneal dialysis. PMID:10682119

  1. Selective Blocking of TNF Receptor 1 Attenuates Peritoneal Dialysis Fluid Induced Inflammation of the Peritoneum in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kälble, Florian; Damaske, Janine; Heide, Danijela; Arnold, Iris; Richter, Fabian; Maier, Olaf; Eisel, Ulrich; Scheurich, Peter; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Zeier, Martin; Schwenger, Vedat; Ranzinger, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory conditions during peritoneal dialysis (PD)-treatment lead to the impairment of peritoneal tissue integrity. The resulting structural and functional reorganization of the peritoneal membrane diminishes ultrafiltration rate and thereby enhances mortality by limiting dialysis effectiveness over time. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 are key players during inflammatory processes. To date, the role of TNFR1 in peritoneal tissue damage during PD-treatment is completely undefined. In this study, we used an acute PD-mouse model to investigate the role of TNFR1 on structural and morphological changes of the peritoneal membrane. TNFR1-mediated TNF signalling in transgenic mice expressing human TNFR1 was specifically blocked by applying a monoclonal antibody (H398) highly selective for human TNFR1 prior to PD-treatment. Cancer antigen-125 (CA125) plasma concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Western blot analyses were applied to determine TNFR2 protein concentrations. Histological staining of peritoneal tissue sections was performed to assess granulocytes within the peritoneal membrane as well as the content of hyaluronic acid and collagen. We show for the first time that the number of granulocytes within the peritoneal membrane is significantly reduced in mice pre-treated with H398. Moreover, we demonstrate that blocking of TNFR1 not only influences CA125 values but also hyaluronic acid and collagen contents of the peritoneal tissue in these mice. These results strongly suggest that TNFR1 inhibition attenuates peritoneal damage caused by peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF) and therefore may represent a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of PD-related side effects. PMID:27755542

  2. Activity-Dependent Changes in MAPK Activation in the Angelman Syndrome Mouse Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filonova, Irina; Trotter, Justin H.; Banko, Jessica L.; Weeber, Edwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by disruption of the maternal "UBE3A" gene. Ube3a protein is identified as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows neuron-specific imprinting. Despite extensive research evaluating the localization and basal expression profiles of Ube3a in mouse models, the molecular…

  3. Active zone protein CAST is a component of conventional and ribbon synapses in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Deguchi-Tawarada, Maki; Inoue, Eiji; Takao-Rikitsu, Etsuko; Inoue, Marie; Kitajima, Isao; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Takai, Yoshimi

    2006-04-01

    CAST is a novel cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ)-associated protein. In conventional brain synapses, CAST forms a large molecular complex with other CAZ proteins, including RIM, Munc13-1, Bassoon, and Piccolo. Here we investigated the distribution of CAST and its structurally related protein, ELKS, in mouse retina. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that CAST and ELKS showed punctate signals in the outer and inner plexiform layers of the retina that were well-colocalized with those of Bassoon and RIM. Both proteins were found presynaptically at glutamatergic ribbon synapses, and at conventional GABAergic and glycinergic synapses. Moreover, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that CAST, like Bassoon and RIM, localized at the base of synaptic ribbons, whereas ELKS localized around the ribbons. Both proteins also localized in the vicinity of the presynaptic plasma membrane of conventional synapses in the retina. These results indicated that CAST and ELKS were novel components of the presynaptic apparatus of mouse retina.

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity in trophoblast-decidual tissues at organogenesis in CF-1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Vanina; Coll, Tamara A; Sobarzo, Cristian M A; Tito, Leticia Perez; Calvo, Juan Carlos; Cebral, Elisa

    2012-10-01

    During early placentation, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play important roles in decidualization, trophoblast migration, invasion, angiogenesis, vascularization and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling of the endometrium. The aim of our study was to analyze the localization, distribution and differential expression of MMP-2 and -9 in the organogenic implantation site and to evaluate in vivo and in vitro decidual MMP-2 and -9 activities on day 10 of gestation in CF-1 mouse. Whole extracts for Western blotting of organogenic E10-decidua expressed MMP-2 and -9 isoforms. MMP-2 immunoreactivity was found in a granular and discrete pattern in ECM of mesometrial decidua (MD) near maternal blood vessels and slightly in non-decidualized endometrium (NDE). Immunoexpression of MMP-9 was also detected in NDE, in cytoplasm of decidual cells and ECM of vascular MD, in trophoblastic area and in growing antimesometrial deciduum. Gelatin zymography showed that MMP-9 activity was significantly lower in CM compared to the active form of direct (not cultured) and cultured decidua. The decidual active MMP-9 was significantly higher than the active MMP-2. These results show differential localization, protein expression and enzymatic activation of MMPs, suggesting specific roles for MMP-2 and MMP-9 in decidual and trophoblast tissues related to organogenic ECM remodeling and vascularization during early establishment of mouse placentation. PMID:22714107

  5. Zscan4 Is Activated after Telomere Shortening in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakai-Futatsugi, Yoko; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Summary ZSCAN4 is a DNA-binding protein that functions for telomere elongation and genomic stability. In vivo, it is specifically expressed at the two-cell stage during mouse development. In vitro, it is transiently expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), only in 5% of the population at one time. Here we attempted to elucidate when, under what circumstances, Zscan4 is activated in ESCs. Using live cell imaging, we monitored the activity of Zscan4 together with the pluripotency marker Rex1. The lengths of the cell cycles in ESCs were diverse. Longer cell cycles were accompanied by shorter telomeres and higher activation of Zscan4. Since activation of Zscan4 is involved in telomere elongation, we speculate that the extended cell cycles accompanied by Zscan4 activation reflect the time for telomere recovery. Rex1 and Zscan4 did not show any correlation. Taken together, we propose that Zscan4 is activated to recover shortened telomeres during extended cell cycles, irrespective of the pluripotent status. PMID:26997646

  6. A novel approach for reliable detection of cathepsin S activities in mouse antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Steimle, Alex; Kalbacher, Hubert; Maurer, Andreas; Beifuss, Brigitte; Bender, Annika; Schäfer, Andrea; Müller, Ricarda; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a eukaryotic protease mostly expressed in professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Since CTSS activity regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and psoriasis as well as in cancer progression, there is an ongoing interest in the reliable detection of cathepsin S activity. Various applications have been invented for specific detection of this enzyme. However, most of them have only been shown to be suitable for human samples, do not deliver quantitative results or the experimental procedure requires technical equipment that is not commonly available in a standard laboratory. We have tested a fluorogen substrate, Mca-GRWPPMGLPWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, that has been described to specifically detect CTSS activities in human APCs for its potential use for mouse samples. We have modified the protocol and thereby offer a cheap, easy, reproducible and quick activity assay to detect CTSS activities in mouse APCs. Since most of basic research on CTSS is performed in mice, this method closes a gap and offers a possibility for reliable and quantitative CTSS activity detection that can be performed in almost every laboratory. PMID:26899824

  7. Turn up the power –pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Komen, J C; Thorburn, D R

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in mitochondria is responsible for the generation of the majority of cellular energy in the form of ATP. Patients with genetic OXPHOS disorders form the largest group of inborn errors of metabolism. Unfortunately, there is still a lack of efficient therapies for these disorders other than management of symptoms. Developing therapies has been complicated because, although the total group of OXPHOS patients is relatively large, there is enormous clinical and genetic heterogeneity within this patient population. Thus there has been a lot of interest in generating relevant mouse models for the different kinds of OXPHOS disorders. The most common treatment strategies tested in these mouse models have aimed to up-regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, in order to increase the residual OXPHOS activity present in affected animals and thereby to ameliorate the energy deficiency. Drugs such as bezafibrate, resveratrol and AICAR target the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis PGC-1α either directly or indirectly to manipulate mitochondrial metabolism. This review will summarize the outcome of preclinical treatment trials with these drugs in mouse models of OXPHOS disorders and discuss similar treatments in a number of mouse models of common diseases in which pathology is closely linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. In the majority of these studies the pharmacological activation of the PGC-1α axis shows true potential as therapy; however, other effects besides mitochondrial biogenesis may be contributing to this as well. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24102298

  8. Apoptosis and T-cell depletion during feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Haagmans, B L; Egberink, H F; Horzinek, M C

    1996-12-01

    Cats that have succumbed to feline infectious peritonitis, an immune-mediated disease caused by variants of feline coronaviruses, show apoptosis and T-cell depletion in their lymphoid organs. The ascitic fluid that develops in the course of the condition causes apoptosis in vitro but only in activated T cells. Since feline infectious peritonitis virus does not infect T cells, and viral proteins did not inhibit T-cell proliferation, we postulate that soluble mediators released during the infection cause apoptosis and T-cell depletion.

  9. Adolescent mouse takes on an active transcriptomic expression during postnatal cerebral development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xin, Chengqi; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jun; Cui, Peng; Hu, Songnian

    2014-06-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axonrepulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum.

  10. Evaluation of the antigenicity of hydrolyzed cow's milk protein formulas using the mouse basophil activation test.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Takeshi; Nakazato, Yuki; Namba, Kazuyoshi; Takeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Hypoallergenic infant formulas are widely used for infants with cow's milk allergy. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of the mouse basophil activation test (BAT) in the evaluation of residual antigenicity in these formulas. Whole blood samples derived from β-lactoglobulin- or casein-immunized mice were incubated with one of the following formulas: conventional, partially hydrolyzed, or extensively hydrolyzed. Basophilic activation was analyzed by flow cytometry using an IgE-dependent activation marker CD200R1 and an IgG-dependent activation marker CD200R3. Systemic anaphylaxis was induced by i.v. injection of milk formula and results were compared. Conventional formula induced pronounced changes in CD200R1 and CD200R3 expression on basophils, whereas extensively hydrolyzed formulas did not elicit any changes in these markers. Similarly, challenge with conventional formula induced anaphylaxis, whereas extensively hydrolyzed formulas did not induce anaphylaxis. Although the partially hydrolyzed formula also induced basophilic activation and systemic anaphylaxis, the magnitude of these effects was smaller than that observed with the conventional formula. Compared to CD200R1, the observed trend in CD200R3 expression resembled the results obtained from systemic anaphylaxis test more closely. These findings show that mouse BAT, in particular using CD200R3, is highly useful for the evaluation of antigenicity of milk formulas. PMID:26626100

  11. Developmental study of tripeptidyl peptidase I activity in the mouse central nervous system and peripheral organs.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Mashenka; Deleva, Denislava; Pavlova, Velichka; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2011-11-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPPI) - a lysosomal serine protease - is encoded by the CLN2 gene, mutations that cause late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL) connected with profound neuronal loss, severe clinical symptoms and early death at puberty. Developmental studies of TPPI activity levels and distribution have been done in the human and rat central nervous systems (CNS) and visceral organs. Similar studies have not been performed in mouse. In this paper, we follow up on the developmental changes in the enzyme activity and localization pattern in the CNS and visceral organs of mouse over the main periods of life - embryonic, neonate, suckling, infantile, juvenile, adult and aged - using biochemical assays and enzyme histochemistry. In the studied peripheral organs (liver, kidney, spleen, pancreas and lung) TPPI is present at birth but further its pattern is not consistent in different organs over different life periods. TPPI activity starts to be expressed in the brain at the 10th embryonic day but in most neuronal types it appears at the early infantile period, increases during infancy, reaches high activity levels in the juvenile period and is highest in adult and aged animals. Thus, in mice TPPI activity becomes crucial for the neuronal functions later in development (juvenile period) than in humans and does not decrease with aging. These results are essential as a basis for comparison between normal and pathological TPPI patterns in mice. They can be valuable in view of the use of animal models for studying LINCL and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. The role of myeloid differentiation factor 88 on mitochondrial dysfunction of peritoneal leukocytes during polymicrobial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Lin; Chen, Dunjin; Chao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) on mitochondrial dysfunction of peritoneal leukocytes during polymicrobial sepsis. Material and methods Polymicrobial peritonitis, a clinically relevant mouse model of sepsis, was generated by cecum ligation and puncture (CLP) in both male C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) and MyD88 knockout (MyD88–/–) mice. Twenty-four hours after surgeries, peritoneal leukocytes were collected and four parameters of mitochondrial function, including total intracellular and mitochondrial ROS burst, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ATP depletion, were measured by flow cytometry or ATP assay, and then compared. Results Polymicrobial sepsis led to a marked mitochondrial dysfunction of peritoneal leukocytes with total intracellular and mitochondrial ROS overproduction, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced intracellular ATP production. In comparison, there was no significant difference in the extent of mitochondrial dysfunction of peritoneal leukocytes between WT and MyD88–/– septic mice. Conclusions MyD88 may be not sufficient to regulate mitochondrial dysfunction of peritoneal leukocytes during polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:27536200

  13. Experimental systems to study the origin of the myofibroblast in peritoneal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Padwal, Manreet; Margetts, Peter J

    2016-09-01

    Peritoneal fibrosis is one of the major complications occurring in long-term peritoneal dialysis patients as a result of injury. Peritoneal fibrosis is characterized by submesothelial thickening and fibrosis which is associated with a decline in peritoneal membrane function. The myofibroblast has been identified as the key player involved in the development and progression of peritoneal fibrosis. Activation of the myofibroblast is correlated with expansion of the extracellular matrix and changes in peritoneal membrane integrity. Over the years, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been accepted as the predominant source of the myofibroblast. Peritoneal mesothelial cells have been described to undergo EMT in response to injury. Several animal and in vitro studies support the role of EMT in peritoneal fibrosis; however, emerging evidence from genetic fate-mapping studies has demonstrated that myofibroblasts may be arising from resident fibroblasts and pericytes/perivascular fibroblasts. In this review, we will discuss hypotheses currently surrounding the origin of the myofibroblast and highlight the experimental systems predominantly being used to investigate this.

  14. Experimental systems to study the origin of the myofibroblast in peritoneal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Padwal, Manreet; Margetts, Peter J

    2016-09-01

    Peritoneal fibrosis is one of the major complications occurring in long-term peritoneal dialysis patients as a result of injury. Peritoneal fibrosis is characterized by submesothelial thickening and fibrosis which is associated with a decline in peritoneal membrane function. The myofibroblast has been identified as the key player involved in the development and progression of peritoneal fibrosis. Activation of the myofibroblast is correlated with expansion of the extracellular matrix and changes in peritoneal membrane integrity. Over the years, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been accepted as the predominant source of the myofibroblast. Peritoneal mesothelial cells have been described to undergo EMT in response to injury. Several animal and in vitro studies support the role of EMT in peritoneal fibrosis; however, emerging evidence from genetic fate-mapping studies has demonstrated that myofibroblasts may be arising from resident fibroblasts and pericytes/perivascular fibroblasts. In this review, we will discuss hypotheses currently surrounding the origin of the myofibroblast and highlight the experimental systems predominantly being used to investigate this. PMID:27668155

  15. Upper trapezius muscle activity patterns during repetitive manual material handling and work with with a computer mouse.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C; Finsen, L; Hansen, K; Christensen, H

    1999-10-01

    Firstly, upper trapezius EMG activity patterns were recorded on the dominant side of 6 industrial production workers and on the side operating a computer mouse of 14 computer-aided design (CAD) operators to study differences in acute muscular response related to the repetitiveness of the exposure. The work tasks were performed with median arm movement frequencies ranging from 5 min(-1) to 13 min(-1) and were characterized by work cycle times ranging from less than 30 sec to several days. However, the static and median EMG levels and EMG gap frequencies were similar for all work tasks indicating that shoulder muscle loads may be unaffected by large variations in arm movement frequencies and work cycle times. An exposure variation analyses (EVA) showed that the EMG activity patterns recorded during production work were more repetitive than during CAD work, whereas CAD work was associated with more static muscle activity patterns, both may be associated with a risk of developing musculoskeletal symptoms. Secondly, upper trapezius EMG activity patterns recorded on the mouse side of the CAD operators were compared with those recorded on the non-mouse side to study differences in muscular responses potentially related to the risk of developing shoulder symptoms which were more prevalent on the mouse side. The number of EMG gaps on the mouse side were significantly lower than the values for the upper trapezius on the non-mouse side indicating that more continuous activity was present in the upper trapezius muscle on the mouse side and EVA analyses showed a more repetitive muscle activity pattern on the mouse side. These findings may be of importance to explain differences in the prevalence of shoulder symptoms.

  16. Disruption of PPARγ signaling results in mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia involving active autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming; Fernandez, Suzanne; Jerome, W. Gray; He, Yue; Yu, Xiuping; Cai, Hui; Boone, Braden; Yi, Yajun; Magnuson, Mark A.; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Matusik, Robert J.; Shappell, Scott B.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) regulates the interface between cellular lipid metabolism, redox status and organelle differentiation. Conditional prostatic epithelial knockout of PPARγ in mice resulted in focal hyperplasia which developed into mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN). The grade of PIN became more severe with time. Electron microscopy (EM) showed accumulated secondary lysosomes containing cellular organelles and debris suggestive of autophagy. Consistent with this analysis the autophagy marker LC3 was found to be upregulated in areas of PIN in PPARγ KO tissues. We selectively knocked down PPARγ2 isoform in wild-type mouse prostatic epithelial cells and examined the consequences of this in a tissue recombination model. Histopathologically grafted tissues resembled the conditional PPARγ KO mouse prostates. EM studies of PPARγ- and PPARγ2-deficient epithelial cells in vitro were suggestive of autophagy, consistent with the prostatic tissue analysis. This was confirmed by examining expression of beclin-1 and LC3. Gene expression profiling in PPARγ-/γ2-deficient cells indicated a major dysregulation of cell cycle control and metabolic signaling networks related to peroxisomal and lysosomal maturation, lipid oxidation and degradation. The putative autophagic phenotypes of PPARγ-deficient cells could be rescued by re-expression of either γ1 or γ2 isoform. We conclude that disruption of PPARγ signaling results in autophagy and oxidative stress during mPIN pathogenesis. PMID:19834493

  17. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  18. Individual strains of Lactobacillus paracasei differentially inhibit human basophil and mouse mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cassard, Lydie; Lalanne, Ana Inés; Garault, Peggy; Cotillard, Aurélie; Chervaux, Christian; Wels, Michiel; Smokvina, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The microbiota controls a variety of biological functions, including immunity, and alterations of the microbiota in early life are associated with a higher risk of developing allergies later in life. Several probiotic bacteria, and particularly lactic acid bacteria, were described to reduce both the induction of allergic responses and allergic manifestations. Although specific probiotic strains were used in these studies, their protective effects on allergic responses also might be common for all lactobacilli. Methods To determine whether allergic effector cells inhibition is a common feature of lactobacilli or whether it varies among lactobacilli strains, we compared the ability of 40 strains of the same Lactobacillus paracasei species to inhibit IgE‐dependent mouse mast cell and human basophil activation. Results We uncovered a marked heterogeneity in the inhibitory properties of the 40 Lactobacillus strains tested. These segregated into three to four clusters depending on the intensity of inhibition. Some strains inhibited both mouse mast cell and human basophil activation, others strains inhibited only one cell type and another group induced no inhibition of activation for either cell type. Conclusions Individual Lactobacillus strains of the same species differentially inhibit IgE‐dependent activation of mouse mast cells and human basophils, two cell types that are critical in the onset of allergic manifestations. Although we failed to identify specific bacterial genes associated with inhibition by gene‐trait matching analysis, our findings demonstrate the complexity of the interactions between the microbiota and the host. These results suggest that some L. paracasei strains might be more beneficial in allergies than others strains and provide the bases for a rational screening of lactic acid bacteria strains as next‐generation probiotics in the field of allergy.

  19. Increased ghrelin signaling prolongs survival in mouse models of human aging through activation of sirtuin1

    PubMed Central

    Fujitsuka, N; Asakawa, A; Morinaga, A; Amitani, M S; Amitani, H; Katsuura, G; Sawada, Y; Sudo, Y; Uezono, Y; Mochiki, E; Sakata, I; Sakai, T; Hanazaki, K; Yada, T; Yakabi, K; Sakuma, E; Ueki, T; Niijima, A; Nakagawa, K; Okubo, N; Takeda, H; Asaka, M; Inui, A

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is known to retard aging and delay functional decline as well as the onset of diseases in most organisms. Ghrelin is secreted from the stomach in response to CR and regulates energy metabolism. We hypothesized that in CR ghrelin has a role in protecting aging-related diseases. We examined the physiological mechanisms underlying the ghrelin system during the aging process in three mouse strains with different genetic and biochemical backgrounds as animal models of accelerated or normal human aging. The elevated plasma ghrelin concentration was observed in both klotho-deficient and senescence-accelerated mouse prone/8 (SAMP8) mice. Ghrelin treatment failed to stimulate appetite and prolong survival in klotho-deficient mice, suggesting the existence of ghrelin resistance in the process of aging. However, ghrelin antagonist hastened death and ghrelin signaling potentiators rikkunshito and atractylodin ameliorated several age-related diseases with decreased microglial activation in the brain and prolonged survival in klotho-deficient, SAMP8 and aged ICR mice. In vitro experiments, the elevated sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activity and protein expression through the cAMP–CREB pathway was observed after ghrelin and ghrelin potentiator treatment in ghrelin receptor 1a-expressing cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, rikkunshito increased hypothalamic SIRT1 activity and SIRT1 protein expression of the heart in the all three mouse models of aging. Pericarditis, myocardial calcification and atrophy of myocardial and muscle fiber were improved by treatment with rikkunshito. Ghrelin signaling may represent one of the mechanisms activated by CR, and potentiating ghrelin signaling may be useful to extend health and lifespan. PMID:26830139

  20. Sertad1 encodes a novel transcriptional co-activator of SMAD1 in mouse embryonic hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yin; Zhao, Shaomin; Song, Langying; Wang, Manyuan; Jiao, Kai

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •SERTAD1 interacts with SMAD1. •Sertad1 is expressed in mouse embryonic hearts. •SERTAD1 is localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus of cardiomyocytes. •SERTAD1 enhances expression of BMP target cardiogenic genes as a SMAD1 co-activator. -- Abstract: Despite considerable advances in surgical repairing procedures, congenital heart diseases (CHDs) remain the leading noninfectious cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Understanding the molecular/genetic mechanisms underlying normal cardiogenesis will provide essential information for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against CHDs. BMP signaling plays complex roles in multiple cardiogenic processes in mammals. SMAD1 is a canonical nuclear mediator of BMP signaling, the activity of which is critically regulated through its interaction partners. We screened a mouse embryonic heart yeast two-hybrid library using Smad1 as bait and identified SERTAD1 as a novel interaction partner of SMAD1. SERTAD1 contains multiple potential functional domains, including two partially overlapping transactivation domains at the C terminus. The SERTAD1-SMAD1 interaction in vitro and in mammalian cells was further confirmed through biochemical assays. The expression of Sertad1 in developing hearts was demonstrated using RT-PCR, western blotting and in situ hybridization analyses. We also showed that SERTAD1 was localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of immortalized cardiomyocytes and primary embryonic cardiomyocyte cultures. The overexpression of SERTAD1 in cardiomyocytes not only enhanced the activity of two BMP reporters in a dose-dependent manner but also increased the expression of several known BMP/SMAD regulatory targets. Therefore, these data suggest that SERTAD1 acts as a SMAD1 transcriptional co-activator to promote the expression of BMP target genes during mouse cardiogenesis.

  1. Individual strains of Lactobacillus paracasei differentially inhibit human basophil and mouse mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cassard, Lydie; Lalanne, Ana Inés; Garault, Peggy; Cotillard, Aurélie; Chervaux, Christian; Wels, Michiel; Smokvina, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The microbiota controls a variety of biological functions, including immunity, and alterations of the microbiota in early life are associated with a higher risk of developing allergies later in life. Several probiotic bacteria, and particularly lactic acid bacteria, were described to reduce both the induction of allergic responses and allergic manifestations. Although specific probiotic strains were used in these studies, their protective effects on allergic responses also might be common for all lactobacilli. Methods To determine whether allergic effector cells inhibition is a common feature of lactobacilli or whether it varies among lactobacilli strains, we compared the ability of 40 strains of the same Lactobacillus paracasei species to inhibit IgE‐dependent mouse mast cell and human basophil activation. Results We uncovered a marked heterogeneity in the inhibitory properties of the 40 Lactobacillus strains tested. These segregated into three to four clusters depending on the intensity of inhibition. Some strains inhibited both mouse mast cell and human basophil activation, others strains inhibited only one cell type and another group induced no inhibition of activation for either cell type. Conclusions Individual Lactobacillus strains of the same species differentially inhibit IgE‐dependent activation of mouse mast cells and human basophils, two cell types that are critical in the onset of allergic manifestations. Although we failed to identify specific bacterial genes associated with inhibition by gene‐trait matching analysis, our findings demonstrate the complexity of the interactions between the microbiota and the host. These results suggest that some L. paracasei strains might be more beneficial in allergies than others strains and provide the bases for a rational screening of lactic acid bacteria strains as next‐generation probiotics in the field of allergy. PMID:27621812

  2. Induction of mixed-function oxidase activity in mouse lymphoid tissues by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.D.; Egan, B.Z.; Lee, N.E.; Burtis, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure can cause mixed-function oxidase (MFO) enzyme induction in certain tissues of various organisms. Measurements of such induction might serve as a useful bioindicator of human exposure to PAHs, provided readily obtainable human tissues can be utilized for such measurements. The authors have investigated the MFO activity in various lymphoid tissues of the C3H mouse as a model system and have studied the effect of systemic PAH treatment on such enzyme activity. An MFO enzyme assay was used to measure the activity of 7-ethoxyresorufin deethylase, an enzyme activity that may be specific for the cytochrome P-448 subset of MFO enzymes (those enzymes that are induced in cells or tissues following PAH administration). Intraperitoneal injection of mice with 180 mg/kg (4.6 mg) benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) or 160 mg/kg (4.0 mg) 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) produced a significant induction in MFO activity in mouse spleen S9 fractions 48 h after the injection. Induction ratios (induced activity/control activity) between 4 and 5 were seen with BaP; MC produced induction ratios of 2.5-3.0. Enzyme activity was not induced in the spleen within 16 h following BaP or MC administration. Other experiments indicated that MFO activity could be induced in thymus cells 48 h after either BaP or MC treatment. Treatment with BaP or MC did produce significant enzyme induction in the liver and lung tissues from the animals both 16 and 48 h after chemical treatment.

  3. Macroglia-microglia interactions via TSPO signaling regulates microglial activation in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minhua; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Lian; Ma, Wenxin; Rodriguez, Ignacio R; Fariss, Robert N; Wong, Wai T

    2014-03-01

    Chronic retinal inflammation in the form of activated microglia and macrophages are implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases of the retina, including age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. However, molecular biomarkers and targeted therapies for immune cell activation in these disorders are currently lacking. To address this, we investigated the involvement and role of translocator protein (TSPO), a biomarker of microglial and astrocyte gliosis in brain degeneration, in the context of retinal inflammation. Here, we find that TSPO is acutely and specifically upregulated in retinal microglia in separate mouse models of retinal inflammation and injury. Concomitantly, its endogenous ligand, diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI), is upregulated in the macroglia of the mouse retina such as astrocytes and Müller cells. In addition, we discover that TSPO-mediated signaling in microglia via DBI-derived ligands negatively regulates features of microglial activation, including reactive oxygen species production, TNF-α expression and secretion, and microglial proliferation. The inducibility and effects of DBI-TSPO signaling in the retina reveal a mechanism of coordinated macroglia-microglia interactions, the function of which is to limit the magnitude of inflammatory responses after their initiation, facilitating a return to baseline quiescence. Our results indicate that TSPO is a promising molecular marker for imaging inflammatory cell activation in the retina and highlight DBI-TSPO signaling as a potential target for immodulatory therapies.

  4. Effect of ionomycin on oocyte activation and embryo development in mouse.

    PubMed

    Heytens, Elke; Soleimani, Reza; Lierman, Sylvie; De Meester, Simon; Gerris, Jan; Dhont, Marc; Van der Elst, Josiane; De Sutter, Petra

    2008-12-01

    Artificial oocyte activation using the calcium ionophore ionomycin is applied successfully in assisted reproduction but some concern exists on the clinical use. The aims of the present study were to optimize the oocyte activation scheme and to address embryo toxicity in a mouse model. Efficiency of oocyte activation and subsequent development was evaluated and ionomycin was found to be an efficient activator at 10 micromol/l. An improved effect of a second exposure to 5 micromol/l ionomycin on blastocyst development was observed. Toxicity of ionomycin on embryos was then investigated by evaluating pre- and post-implantation development of in-vivo fertilized oocytes following exposure to ionomycin. Blastocyst development, blastocyst cell numbers in trophectoderm and inner cell mass were not different between treated and non-treated zygotes. Also implantation rates and fetal parameters such as length, weight and morphological parameters were similar between the fetuses originating from zygotes treated with ionomycin and non-treated zygotes. Furthermore, healthy offspring originating from ionomycin-treated zygotes was born. In conclusion, no adverse effects of ionomycin on in-vitro or in-vivo mouse embryo development were noticed, giving arguments in favour of the use of ionomycin, although negative long-term effects of this compound cannot be excluded at present.

  5. Studies on the Antifatigue Activities of Cordyceps militaris Fruit Body Extract in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jingjing; Wang, Yingwu; Teng, Meiyu; Cai, Guangsheng; Xu, Hongkai; Guo, Hanxiao; Liu, Yang; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris has been used extensively as a crude drug and a folk tonic food in East Asia due to its various pharmacological activities. Our study aims to investigate the effect of Cordyceps militaris fruit body extract (CM) on antifatigue in mouse model. Two week CM administration significantly delayed fatigue phenomenon which is confirmed via rotating rod test, forced swimming test and forced running test. Compared to nontreated mouse, CM administration increased ATP levels and antioxidative enzymes activity and reduced the levels of lactic acid, lactic dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and reactive oxygen species. Further data suggests that CM-induced fatigue recovery is mainly through activating 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways and regulating serum hormone level. Moreover, CM-enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK contributes to its antioxidant effect. Our data provides experimental evidence in supporting clinical use of CM as an effective agent against fatigue. PMID:26351509

  6. Simplified estimates of ion-activity products of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate in mouse urine.

    PubMed

    Tiselius, Hans-Göran; Ferraz, Renato Ribeiro Nogueira; Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed at formulating simplified estimates of ion-activity products of calcium oxalate (AP(CaOx)) and calcium phosphate (AP(CaP)) in mouse urineto find the most important determinants in order to limit the analytical work-up. Literature data on mouse urine composition was used to determine the relative effect of each urine variable on the two ion-activity products. AP(CaOx) and AP(CaP) were calculated by iterative approximation with the EQUIL2 computerized program. The most important determinants for AP(CaOx) were calcium, oxalate and citrate and for AP(CaP) calcium, phosphate, citrate, magnesium and pH. Urine concentrations of the variables were used. A simplified estimate of AP(CaOx) (AP(CaOx)-index(MOUSE)) that numerically approximately corresponded to 10(8) × AP(CaOx) was given the following expression:[Formula: see text]For a series of urine samples with various composition the coefficient of correlation between AP(CaOx)-index(MOUSE) and 10(8) × AP(CaOx) was 0.99 (p = 0.00000). A similar estimate of AP(CaP) (AP(CaP)-index(MOUSE)) was formulated so that it approximately would correspond numerically to 10(14) × AP(CaP) taking the following form:[Formula: see text]For a series of variations in urine composition the coefficient of correlation was 0.95 (p = 0.00000). The two approximate estimates shown in this article are simplified expressions of AP(CaOx) and AP(CaP). The intention of these theoretical calculations was not to get methods for accurate information on the saturation levels in urine, but to have mathematical tools useful for rough conclusions on the outcome of different experimental situations in mice. It needs to be emphasized that the accuracy will be negatively influenced if urine variables not included in the formulas differ very much from basic concentrations.

  7. Early activation of microglia and astrocytes in mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    PubMed

    Cvetanovic, M; Ingram, M; Orr, H; Opal, P

    2015-03-19

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an incurable, dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease of the cerebellum caused by a polyglutamine-repeat expansion in the protein ataxin-1 (ATXN1). While analysis of human autopsy material indicates significant glial pathology in SCA1, previous research has focused on characterizing neuronal dysfunction. In this study, we characterized astrocytic and microglial response in SCA1 using a comprehensive array of mouse models. We have discovered that astrocytes and microglia are activated very early in SCA1 pathogenesis even when mutant ATXN1 expression was limited to Purkinje neurons. Glial activation occurred in the absence of neuronal death, suggesting that glial activation results from signals emanating from dysfunctional neurons. Finally, in all different models examined glial activation closely correlated with disease progression, supporting the development of glial-based biomarkers to follow disease progression.

  8. Peritonitis with multiple rare environmental bacteria in a patient receiving long-term peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Levitski-Heikkila, Teresa V; Ullian, Michael E

    2005-12-01

    We describe a patient receiving long-term peritoneal dialysis who experienced 2 episodes of peritonitis in successive months caused by unusual bacteria of environmental origin: Agrobacterium radiobacter, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, and Corynebacterium aquaticum. A radiobacter and P oryzihabitans occurred simultaneously in the first episode of peritonitis, and C aquaticum, in the second episode. The patient's vocation necessitated exposure to moist soiled conditions. Both episodes responded promptly to antibiotics commonly used to treat peritonitis. Although these organisms rarely lead to loss of life and commonly are considered to be contaminants, they can cause symptomatic peritonitis and peritoneal dialysis catheter loss. A review of previous case reports is included.

  9. Peritonitis with multiple rare environmental bacteria in a patient receiving long-term peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Levitski-Heikkila, Teresa V; Ullian, Michael E

    2005-12-01

    We describe a patient receiving long-term peritoneal dialysis who experienced 2 episodes of peritonitis in successive months caused by unusual bacteria of environmental origin: Agrobacterium radiobacter, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, and Corynebacterium aquaticum. A radiobacter and P oryzihabitans occurred simultaneously in the first episode of peritonitis, and C aquaticum, in the second episode. The patient's vocation necessitated exposure to moist soiled conditions. Both episodes responded promptly to antibiotics commonly used to treat peritonitis. Although these organisms rarely lead to loss of life and commonly are considered to be contaminants, they can cause symptomatic peritonitis and peritoneal dialysis catheter loss. A review of previous case reports is included. PMID:16310563

  10. A Pathogenetic Role for Endothelin-1 in Peritoneal Dialysis-Associated Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Busnadiego, Oscar; Loureiro-Álvarez, Jesús; Sandoval, Pilar; Lagares, David; Dotor, Javier; Pérez-Lozano, María Luisa; López-Armada, María J.; Lamas, Santiago; López-Cabrera, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    In patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD), chronic exposure to nonphysiologic PD fluids elicits low-grade peritoneal inflammation, leading to fibrosis and angiogenesis. Phenotype conversion of mesothelial cells into myofibroblasts, the so-called mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT), significantly contributes to the peritoneal dysfunction related to PD. A number of factors have been described to induce MMT in vitro and in vivo, of which TGF-β1 is probably the most important. The vasoconstrictor peptide endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a transcriptional target of TGF-β1 and mediates excessive scarring and fibrosis in several tissues. This work studied the contribution of ET-1 to the development of peritoneal damage and failure in a mouse model of PD. ET-1 and its receptors were expressed in the peritoneal membrane and upregulated on PD fluid exposure. Administration of an ET receptor antagonist, either bosentan or macitentan, markedly attenuated PD-induced MMT, fibrosis, angiogenesis, and peritoneal functional decline. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of ET-1 induced MMT in human mesothelial cells in vitro and promoted the early cellular events associated with peritoneal dysfunction in vivo. Notably, TGF-β1–blocking peptides prevented these actions of ET-1. Furthermore, a positive reciprocal relationship was observed between ET-1 expression and TGF-β1 expression in human mesothelial cells. These results strongly support a role for an ET-1/TGF-β1 axis as an inducer of MMT and subsequent peritoneal damage and fibrosis, and they highlight ET-1 as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of PD-associated dysfunction. PMID:25012164

  11. A pathogenetic role for endothelin-1 in peritoneal dialysis-associated fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Busnadiego, Oscar; Loureiro-Álvarez, Jesús; Sandoval, Pilar; Lagares, David; Dotor, Javier; Pérez-Lozano, María Luisa; López-Armada, María J; Lamas, Santiago; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD), chronic exposure to nonphysiologic PD fluids elicits low-grade peritoneal inflammation, leading to fibrosis and angiogenesis. Phenotype conversion of mesothelial cells into myofibroblasts, the so-called mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT), significantly contributes to the peritoneal dysfunction related to PD. A number of factors have been described to induce MMT in vitro and in vivo, of which TGF-β1 is probably the most important. The vasoconstrictor peptide endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a transcriptional target of TGF-β1 and mediates excessive scarring and fibrosis in several tissues. This work studied the contribution of ET-1 to the development of peritoneal damage and failure in a mouse model of PD. ET-1 and its receptors were expressed in the peritoneal membrane and upregulated on PD fluid exposure. Administration of an ET receptor antagonist, either bosentan or macitentan, markedly attenuated PD-induced MMT, fibrosis, angiogenesis, and peritoneal functional decline. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of ET-1 induced MMT in human mesothelial cells in vitro and promoted the early cellular events associated with peritoneal dysfunction in vivo. Notably, TGF-β1-blocking peptides prevented these actions of ET-1. Furthermore, a positive reciprocal relationship was observed between ET-1 expression and TGF-β1 expression in human mesothelial cells. These results strongly support a role for an ET-1/TGF-β1 axis as an inducer of MMT and subsequent peritoneal damage and fibrosis, and they highlight ET-1 as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of PD-associated dysfunction.

  12. Recombinant insulin-like growth factor-1 activates satellite cells in the mouse urethral rhabdosphincter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The goal of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy of a new method for the treatment of urinary incontinence by stimulation of urethral rhabdosphincter satellite cells. We show that satellite cells do exist in the sphincter muscle of retired male mice breeders by staining for c-Met, a satellite cell specific protein. Once activated by recombinant mouse Insulin-like Growth Factor-1(rIgf-1), the satellite cells develop into muscle cells within the rhabdosphincter thereby potentially strengthening it. Methods 20 μl (1 μg/μl) of rIgf-1 was surgically injected directly into the urethral wall of retired male mouse breeders. Mice injected with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were used as controls. 4 weeks later, urethras were harvested and serially-sectioned through the sphincter for routine hematoxylin-eosin staining as well as immunohistochemical staining with satellite cell specific anti-c-Met antibody and proliferation specific anti-Ki-67 antibody. Results Anti-c-Met antibody positive cells (c-Met+) were identified in the rhabdosphincter. c-Met+ cells increased by 161.8% relative to controls four weeks after rIGF-1 injection. Anti- Ki-67 antibody positive cells were identified and characterized as cells with centrally located nuclei in striated muscle bundles of rIGF-1 treated animals. Conclusions Satellite cells in the mouse rhabdosphincter can be activated by rIGF-1 treatment, which subsequently are incorporated into existing skeletal muscle bundles. Using this approach, the rhabdosphincter can be induced to regenerate and potentially strengthen via satellite cell activation and likely improve urinary continence. PMID:24279352

  13. Mast cells aggravate sepsis by inhibiting peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Dahdah, Albert; Gautier, Gregory; Attout, Tarik; Fiore, Frédéric; Lebourdais, Emeline; Msallam, Rasha; Daëron, Marc; Monteiro, Renato C.; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Davoust, Jean; Blank, Ulrich; Malissen, Bernard; Launay, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the overwhelming inflammatory reaction associated with polymicrobial sepsis remains a prevalent clinical challenge with few treatment options. In septic peritonitis, blood neutrophils and monocytes are rapidly recruited into the peritoneal cavity to control infection, but the role of resident sentinel cells during the early phase of infection is less clear. In particular, the influence of mast cells on other tissue-resident cells remains poorly understood. Here, we developed a mouse model that allows both visualization and conditional ablation of mast cells and basophils to investigate the role of mast cells in severe septic peritonitis. Specific depletion of mast cells led to increased survival rates in mice with acute sepsis. Furthermore, we determined that mast cells impair the phagocytic action of resident macrophages, thereby allowing local and systemic bacterial proliferation. Mast cells did not influence local recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes or the release of inflammatory cytokines. Phagocytosis inhibition by mast cells involved their ability to release prestored IL-4 within 15 minutes after bacterial encounter, and treatment with an IL-4–neutralizing antibody prevented this inhibitory effect and improved survival of septic mice. Our study uncovers a local crosstalk between mast cells and macrophages during the early phase of sepsis development that aggravates the outcome of severe bacterial infection. PMID:25180604

  14. Diminution of mouse epidermal superoxide dismutase and catalase activities by tumor promotors

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, V.; Rana, R.S.; Slaga, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of phorbol ester tumor promoters and related compounds on superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase were examined. The treatment of adult mouse skin with 2 ..mu..g 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in a sustained decrease in the basal levels of both SOD and catalase activities in the epidermis. A decline in SOD activity occurred within 2 h after application and the maximum effect was seen at 16-17 h. The decrease in SOD activity was always accompanied by a similar decline in the epidermal catalase activity. The alterations in both enzymes occurred against a high background of enhanced protein synthesis which indicates that the effect of TPA is selective for SOD and catalase. Other tumor promoters such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and the non-phorbol tumor promoter anthraline also lowered the activities of both the enzymes. Mezerein, a resiniferonol derivative with weak promoting activity but a potent stage-II promoter, appeared to be more potent than TPA in lowering the basal levels. These results indicate that damage which favors neoplastic progression would occur in TPA-treated mouse skin due to the accumulation of free radicals resulting from low levels of SOD and catalase activity. In addition, the TPA-caused decrease in the levels of SOD and catalase was not prevented by either retinoic acid, fluocinolone acetonide, tosyl amino-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, or butylated hydroxytoluene, suggesting that inhibition of tumor promotion by these agents is not mediated through alterations in the levels of enzymatic activities which decrease free radical concentrations.

  15. Peritoneal malignant mesothelioma in a patient with recurrent peritonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Riddell, R.H.; Goodman, M.J.; Moossa, A.R.

    1981-07-01

    A patient is presented who developed a peritoneal malignant mesothelioma in association with severe persistent and recurrent diverticulitis. The case is unusual in that a spectrum of mesothelial proliferation was documented beginning initially as benign foci of mesothelial proliferation and passing through a stage of atypical proliferation before terminating as a malignant process. The possible role of the diverticular disease in the pathogenesis of the tumor is discussed.

  16. Physical activity delays hippocampal neurodegeneration and rescues memory deficits in an Alzheimer disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hüttenrauch, M; Brauß, A; Kurdakova, A; Borgers, H; Klinker, F; Liebetanz, D; Salinas-Riester, G; Wiltfang, J; Klafki, H W; Wirths, O

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for a protective role of physical activity on the risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been growing in the last years. Here we studied the influence of a prolonged physical and cognitive stimulation on neurodegeneration, with special emphasis on hippocampal neuron loss and associated behavioral impairment in the Tg4-42 mouse model of AD. Tg4-42 mice overexpress Aβ4-42 without any mutations, and develop an age-dependent hippocampal neuron loss associated with a severe memory decline. We demonstrate that long-term voluntary exercise diminishes CA1 neuron loss and completely rescues spatial memory deficits in different experimental settings. This was accompanied by changes in the gene expression profile of Tg4-42 mice. Deep sequencing analysis revealed an upregulation of chaperones involved in endoplasmatic reticulum protein processing, which might be intimately linked to the beneficial effects seen upon long-term exercise. We believe that we provide evidence for the first time that enhanced physical activity counteracts neuron loss and behavioral deficits in a transgenic AD mouse model. The present findings underscore the relevance of increased physical activity as a potential strategy in the prevention of dementia. PMID:27138799

  17. Physical activity delays hippocampal neurodegeneration and rescues memory deficits in an Alzheimer disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hüttenrauch, M; Brauß, A; Kurdakova, A; Borgers, H; Klinker, F; Liebetanz, D; Salinas-Riester, G; Wiltfang, J; Klafki, H W; Wirths, O

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for a protective role of physical activity on the risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been growing in the last years. Here we studied the influence of a prolonged physical and cognitive stimulation on neurodegeneration, with special emphasis on hippocampal neuron loss and associated behavioral impairment in the Tg4-42 mouse model of AD. Tg4-42 mice overexpress Aβ4-42 without any mutations, and develop an age-dependent hippocampal neuron loss associated with a severe memory decline. We demonstrate that long-term voluntary exercise diminishes CA1 neuron loss and completely rescues spatial memory deficits in different experimental settings. This was accompanied by changes in the gene expression profile of Tg4-42 mice. Deep sequencing analysis revealed an upregulation of chaperones involved in endoplasmatic reticulum protein processing, which might be intimately linked to the beneficial effects seen upon long-term exercise. We believe that we provide evidence for the first time that enhanced physical activity counteracts neuron loss and behavioral deficits in a transgenic AD mouse model. The present findings underscore the relevance of increased physical activity as a potential strategy in the prevention of dementia. PMID:27138799

  18. Stochastic modeling of mouse motor activity under deep brain stimulation: the extraction of arousal information.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Daniel M; Quinkert, Amy W; Pfaff, Donald W

    2015-02-01

    In the present paper, we quantify, with a rigorous approach, the nature of motor activity in response to Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), in the mouse. DBS is currently being used in the treatment of a broad range of diseases, but its underlying principles are still unclear. Because mouse movement involves rapidly repeated starting and stopping, one must statistically verify that the movement at a given stimulation time was not just coincidental, endogenously-driven movement. Moreover, the amount of activity changes significantly over the circadian rhythm, and hence the means, variances and autocorrelations are all time varying. A new methodology is presented. For example, to discern what is and what is not impacted by stimulation, velocity is classified (in a time-evolving manner) as being zero-, one- and two-dimensional movement. The most important conclusions of the paper are: (1) (DBS) stimulation is proven to be truly effective; (2) it is two-dimensional (2-D) movement that strongly differs between light and dark and responds to stimulation; and, (3) stimulation in the light initiates a manner of movement, 2-D movement, that is more commonly seen in the (non-stimulated) dark. Based upon these conclusions, it is conjectured that the above patterns of 2-D movement could be a straightforward, easy to calculate correlate of arousal. The above conclusions will aid in the systematic evaluation and understanding of how DBS in CNS arousal pathways leads to the activation of behavior.

  19. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Neurogenesis and Microglia Activation in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pikhovych, Anton; Stolberg, Nina Paloma; Jessica Flitsch, Lea; Walter, Helene Luise; Graf, Rudolf; Fink, Gereon Rudolf; Schroeter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been suggested as an adjuvant tool to promote recovery of function after stroke, but the mechanisms of its action to date remain poorly understood. Moreover, studies aimed at unraveling those mechanisms have essentially been limited to the rat, where tDCS activates resident microglia as well as endogenous neural stem cells. Here we studied the effects of tDCS on microglia activation and neurogenesis in the mouse brain. Male wild-type mice were subjected to multisession tDCS of either anodal or cathodal polarity; sham-stimulated mice served as control. Activated microglia in the cerebral cortex and neuroblasts generated in the subventricular zone as the major neural stem cell niche were assessed immunohistochemically. Multisession tDCS at a sublesional charge density led to a polarity-dependent downregulation of the constitutive expression of Iba1 by microglia in the mouse cortex. In contrast, both anodal and, to an even greater extent, cathodal tDCS induced neurogenesis from the subventricular zone. Data suggest that tDCS elicits its action through multifacetted mechanisms, including immunomodulation and neurogenesis, and thus support the idea of using tDCS to induce regeneration and to promote recovery of function. Furthermore, data suggest that the effects of tDCS may be animal- and polarity-specific. PMID:27403166

  20. TMEM16F is required for phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release in activated mouse platelets.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Sakata, Asuka; Nishimura, Satoshi; Eto, Koji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-10-13

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of activated platelets requires the action of a phospholipid scramblase(s), and serves as a scaffold for the assembly of the tenase and prothrombinase complexes involved in blood coagulation. Here, we found that the activation of mouse platelets with thrombin/collagen or Ca(2+) ionophore at 20 °C induces PtdSer exposure without compromising plasma membrane integrity. Among five transmembrane protein 16 (TMEM16) members that support Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipid scrambling, TMEM16F was the only one that showed high expression in mouse platelets. Platelets from platelet-specific TMEM16F-deficient mice exhibited defects in activation-induced PtdSer exposure and microparticle shedding, although α-granule and dense granule release remained intact. The rate of tissue factor-induced thrombin generation by TMEM16F-deficient platelets was severely reduced, whereas thrombin-induced clot retraction was unaffected. The imaging of laser-induced thrombus formation in whole animals showed that PtdSer exposure on aggregated platelets was TMEM16F-dependent in vivo. The phenotypes of the platelet-specific TMEM16F-null mice resemble those of patients with Scott syndrome, a mild bleeding disorder, indicating that these mice may provide a useful model for human Scott syndrome. PMID:26417084

  1. A Sleeping Beauty screen reveals NF-kB activation in CLL mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zanesi, Nicola; Balatti, Veronica; Riordan, Jesse; Burch, Aaron; Rizzotto, Lara; Palamarchuk, Alexey; Cascione, Luciano; Lagana, Alessandro; Dupuy, Adam J.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2013-01-01

    TCL1 oncogene is overexpressed in aggressive form of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and its dysregulation in mouse B cells causes a CD5-positive leukemia similar to the aggressive form of human CLLs. To identify oncogenes that cooperate with Tcl1, we performed genetic screen in Eμ−TCL1 mice using Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated mutagenesis. Analysis of transposon common insertion sites identified 7 genes activated by transposon insertions. Overexpression of these genes in mouse CLL was confirmed by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, the main known function of 4 of 7 genes (Nfkb1, Tab2, Map3K14, and Nfkbid) is participation in or activation of the nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) pathway. In addition, activation of the NF-kB is 1 of main functions of Akt2, also identified in the screen. These findings demonstrate cooperation of Tcl1 and the NF-kB pathway in the pathogenesis of aggressive CLL. Identification cooperating cancer genes will result in the development of combinatorial therapies to treat CLL. PMID:23591791

  2. TMEM16F is required for phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release in activated mouse platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Sakata, Asuka; Nishimura, Satoshi; Eto, Koji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of activated platelets requires the action of a phospholipid scramblase(s), and serves as a scaffold for the assembly of the tenase and prothrombinase complexes involved in blood coagulation. Here, we found that the activation of mouse platelets with thrombin/collagen or Ca2+ ionophore at 20 °C induces PtdSer exposure without compromising plasma membrane integrity. Among five transmembrane protein 16 (TMEM16) members that support Ca2+-dependent phospholipid scrambling, TMEM16F was the only one that showed high expression in mouse platelets. Platelets from platelet-specific TMEM16F-deficient mice exhibited defects in activation-induced PtdSer exposure and microparticle shedding, although α-granule and dense granule release remained intact. The rate of tissue factor-induced thrombin generation by TMEM16F-deficient platelets was severely reduced, whereas thrombin-induced clot retraction was unaffected. The imaging of laser-induced thrombus formation in whole animals showed that PtdSer exposure on aggregated platelets was TMEM16F-dependent in vivo. The phenotypes of the platelet-specific TMEM16F-null mice resemble those of patients with Scott syndrome, a mild bleeding disorder, indicating that these mice may provide a useful model for human Scott syndrome. PMID:26417084

  3. A Sleeping Beauty screen reveals NF-kB activation in CLL mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zanesi, Nicola; Balatti, Veronica; Riordan, Jesse; Burch, Aaron; Rizzotto, Lara; Palamarchuk, Alexey; Cascione, Luciano; Lagana, Alessandro; Dupuy, Adam J; Croce, Carlo M; Pekarsky, Yuri

    2013-05-23

    TCL1 oncogene is overexpressed in aggressive form of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and its dysregulation in mouse B cells causes a CD5-positive leukemia similar to the aggressive form of human CLLs. To identify oncogenes that cooperate with Tcl1, we performed genetic screen in Eμ-TCL1 mice using Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated mutagenesis. Analysis of transposon common insertion sites identified 7 genes activated by transposon insertions. Overexpression of these genes in mouse CLL was confirmed by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, the main known function of 4 of 7 genes (Nfkb1, Tab2, Map3K14, and Nfkbid) is participation in or activation of the nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) pathway. In addition, activation of the NF-kB is 1 of main functions of Akt2, also identified in the screen. These findings demonstrate cooperation of Tcl1 and the NF-kB pathway in the pathogenesis of aggressive CLL. Identification cooperating cancer genes will result in the development of combinatorial therapies to treat CLL. PMID:23591791

  4. Propiconazole-induced cytochrome P450 gene expression and enzymatic activities in rat and mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guobin; Thai, Sheau-Fung; Tully, Douglas B; Lambert, Guy R; Goetz, Amber K; Wolf, Douglas C; Dix, David J; Nesnow, Stephen

    2005-02-15

    Propiconazole is a N-substituted triazole used as a fungicide on fruits, grains, seeds, hardwoods, and conifers. In the present study, propiconazole was examined for its effects on the expression of hepatic cytochrome P450 genes and on the activities of P450 enzymes in male Sprague-Dawley rats and male CD-1 mice. Rats and mice were administered propiconazole by gavage daily for 14 days at doses of 10, 75, and 150 mg/kg body weight/day. Quantitative real time RT-PCR assays of rat hepatic RNA samples from animals treated at the 150 mg/kg body weight/day dose revealed significant mRNA overexpression of the following genes compared to control: CYP1A2 (1.62-fold), CYP2B1 (10.8-fold), CYP3A1/CYP3A23 (2.78-fold), and CYP3A2 (1.84-fold). In mouse liver, propiconazole produced mRNA overexpression of Cyp2b10 (2.39-fold) and Cyp3a11 (5.19-fold). mRNA expression of CYP1A1 was not detected in liver tissues from treated or controls animals from either species. Propiconazole significantly induced both pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (PROD) and methoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (MROD) activities in both rat and mouse liver at the 150 mg/kg body weight/day and 75 mg/kg body weight/day doses. In summary, these results indicated that propiconazole induced CYP1A2 in rat liver and CYP2B and CYP3A families of isoforms in rat and mouse liver.

  5. T-2 toxin inhibits gene expression and activity of key steroidogenesis enzymes in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian Ying; Zhang, Yong Fa; Meng, Xiang Ping; Li, Yuan Xiao; Ma, Kai Wang; Bai, Xue Fei

    2015-08-01

    T-2 toxin is one of the mycotoxins, a group of type A trichothecenes produced by several fungal genera including Fusarium species, which may lead to the decrease of the testosterone secretion in the primary Leydig cells derived from the mouse testis. The previous study demonstrated the effects of T-2 toxin through direct decrease of the testosterone biosynthesis in the primary Leydig cells derived from the mouse testis. In this study, we further examined the direct biological effects of T-2 toxin on steroidogenesis production, primarily in Leydig cells of mice. Mature mouse Leydig cells were purified by Percoll gradient centrifugation and the cell purity was determined by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) staining. To examine T-2 toxin-induced testosterone secretion decrease, we measured the transcription levels of 3 key steroidogenic enzymes and 5 enzyme activities including 3β-HSD-1, P450scc, StAR, CYP17A1, and 17β-HSD in T-2 toxin/human chorionicgonadotropin (hCG) co-treated cells. Our previous study showed that T-2 toxin (10(-7) M, 10(-8) M and 10(-9) M) significantly suppressed hCG (10 ng/ml)-induced testosterone secretion. The studies demonstrated that the suppressive effect is correlated with the decreases in the levels of transcription of 3β-HSD-1, P450scc, and StAR (P<0.05) and also in enzyme activities of 3β-HSD-1, P450scc, StAR, CYP17A1, and 17β-HSD (P<0.05).

  6. Peritoneal dialysis and peritonitis rate: Kuwait, four years' experience.

    PubMed

    Alyousef, Anas M; Abdou, Salah M; Mansour, Yasser S; Radi, Ahmad D

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) program was established in Farwaniya Hospital Kidney Center, Kuwait, in February 2011. Patient recruitment for this modality of treatment was growing steadily. One of the major complications of PD is peritonitis. There is a belief that PD therapy is inferior and carries more complications than hemodialysis, we aimed to show that PD is a good and a non-inferior option for dialysis therapy with comparable outcome in both patient and technique survival. This was a retrospective analysis of all patients who were on PD from February 2011 to December 2014. Peritonitis rate, exit site infection rate, and all-cause mortality rate were all assessed for this period. Peritonitis rate during the 1 st year, 2011, was 0.92 incidents/year. This number had progressively declined in the following years; in 2012, it was 0.65 incidents/year; in 2013, it was 0.58 incidents/year; and in 2014, it was 0.38 incidents/year. This improvement in the rate of peritonitis incidence could be explained by better education of patients and meticulous supervision of the nursing staff. Farwaniya Hospital Kidney Center had an all-cause mortality rate of 9.3% among patients on renal replacement therapy in 2011. In 2012, all-cause mortality rate increased to 17.1%. The following year, 2013, it decreased to 14.3%, and in 2014, all-cause mortality rate dropped further to 7.6%. All-cause mortality rate among PD patients was zero in 2011. In 2012, the all-cause mortality rate in PD was 11.54%, and in 2013, it decreased to 10.52%. Then, again in 2014, the all-cause mortality rate among PD patients was zero. This improvement in all-cause mortality rate could be explained by the better medical care offered to the end-stage renal disease patients, in particular PD patients, in Farwaniya Hospital Kidney Center. PMID:27424695

  7. Rhythmic Ganglion Cell Activity in Bleached and Blind Adult Mouse Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Menzler, Jacob; Channappa, Lakshmi; Zeck, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa – a degenerative disease which often leads to incurable blindness- the loss of photoreceptors deprives the retina from a continuous excitatory input, the so-called dark current. In rodent models of this disease this deprivation leads to oscillatory electrical activity in the remaining circuitry, which is reflected in the rhythmic spiking of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). It remained unclear, however, if the rhythmic RGC activity is attributed to circuit alterations occurring during photoreceptor degeneration or if rhythmic activity is an intrinsic property of healthy retinal circuitry which is masked by the photoreceptor’s dark current. Here we tested these hypotheses by inducing and analysing oscillatory activity in adult healthy (C57/Bl6) and blind mouse retinas (rd10 and rd1). Rhythmic RGC activity in healthy retinas was detected upon partial photoreceptor bleaching using an extracellular high-density multi-transistor-array. The mean fundamental spiking frequency in bleached retinas was 4.3 Hz; close to the RGC rhythm detected in blind rd10 mouse retinas (6.5 Hz). Crosscorrelation analysis of neighbouring wild-type and rd10 RGCs (separation distance <200 µm) reveals synchrony among homologous RGC types and a constant phase shift (∼70 msec) among heterologous cell types (ON versus OFF). The rhythmic RGC spiking in these retinas is driven by a network of presynaptic neurons. The inhibition of glutamatergic ganglion cell input or the inhibition of gap junctional coupling abolished the rhythmic pattern. In rd10 and rd1 retinas the presynaptic network leads to local field potentials, whereas in bleached retinas additional pharmacological disinhibition is required to achieve detectable field potentials. Our results demonstrate that photoreceptor bleaching unmasks oscillatory activity in healthy retinas which shares many features with the functional phenotype detected in rd10 retinas. The quantitative physiological differences advance the

  8. T396I Mutation of Mouse Sufu Reduces the Stability and Activity of Gli3 Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Shigeru; Zhulyn, Olena; Mo, Rong; Puviindran, Vijitha; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Murata, Takuya; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Ishitsuka, Yuichi; Kotaki, Hayato; Matsumaru, Daisuke; Ishii, Shunsuke; Hui, Chi-Chung; Gondo, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is primarily transduced by two transcription factors: Gli2, which mainly acts as a full-length activator, and Gli3, which tends to be proteolytically processed from a full-length form (Gli3FL) to an N-terminal repressor (Gli3REP). Recent studies using a Sufu knockout mouse have indicated that Sufu is involved in regulating Gli2 and Gli3 activator and repressor activity at multiple steps of the signaling cascade; however, the mechanism of specific Gli2 and Gli3 regulation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we established an allelic series of ENU-induced mouse strains. Analysis of one of the missense alleles, SufuT396I, showed that Thr396 residue of Sufu played a key role in regulation of Gli3 activity. SufuT396I/T396I embryos exhibited severe polydactyly, which is indicative of compromised Gli3 activity. Concomitantly, significant quantitative reductions of unprocessed Gli3 (Gli3FL) and processed Gli3 (Gli3REP) were observed in vivo as well as in vitro. Genetic experiments showed that patterning defects in the limb buds of SufuT396I/T396I were rescued by a constitutive Gli3REP allele (Gli3∆699), strongly suggesting that SufuT396I reduced the truncated Gli3 repressor. In contrast, SufuT396I qualitatively exhibited no mutational effects on Gli2 regulation. Taken together, the results of this study show that the Thr396 residue of Sufu is specifically required for regulation of Gli3 but not Gli2. This implies a novel Sufu-mediated mechanism in which Gli2 activator and Gli3 repressor are differentially regulated. PMID:25760946

  9. Peritoneal Metastases: Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sugarbaker, Paul H

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is a surgicaly curable disease. It requires multimodality of treatment in Localy advanced and metastatic disease. Molecular markers like RAS mutation has brought in change in the mangement of metastatic disease. Nearly 15 to 20 % presents with peritonieal surface metastasis. The debate continues with systomic vs Cyutoreductive surgery with are without HIPEC. This article highlights management of peritoneal metastasis with special reference to prevention and treatment. PMID:27065703

  10. The potential role of NFAT5 and osmolarity in peritoneal injury.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Harald; Kitterer, Daniel; Latus, Joerg; Alscher, Mark Dominik; Braun, Niko; Segerer, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    A rise in osmotic concentration (osmolarity) activates the transcription factor Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells 5 (NFAT5, also known as Tonicity-responsive Enhancer Binding Protein, TonEBP). This is part of a regulatory mechanism of cells adjusting to environments of high osmolarity. Under physiological conditions these are particularly important in the kidney. Activation of NFAT5 results in the modulation of various genes including some which promote inflammation. The osmolarity increases in patients with renal failure. Additionally, in peritoneal dialysis the cells of the peritoneal cavity are repeatedly exposed to a rise and fall in osmotic concentrations. Here we review the current information about NFAT5 activation in uremic patients and patients on peritoneal dialysis. We suggest that high osmolarity promotes injury in the "uremic" milieu, which results in inflammation locally in the peritoneal membrane, but most likely also in the systemic circulation. PMID:26495302

  11. Activation of transcriptional activity of HSE by a novel mouse zinc finger protein ZNFD specifically expressed in testis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fengqin; Wang, Weiping; Lei, Chen; Liu, Qingmei; Qiu, Hao; Muraleedharan, Vinaydhar; Zhou, Bin; Cheng, Hongxia; Huang, Zhongkai; Xu, Weian; Li, Bichun; Wang, Minghua

    2012-04-01

    Zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) that contain multiple cysteine and/or histidine residues perform important roles in various cellular functions, including transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The Cys-Cys-His-His (C(2)H(2)) type of ZFPs are the well-defined members of this super family and are the largest and most complex proteins in eukaryotic genomes. In this study, we identified a novel C(2)H(2) type of zinc finger gene ZNFD from mice which has a 1,002 bp open reading frame and encodes a protein with 333 amino acid residues. The predicted 37.4 kDa protein contains a C(2)H(2) zinc finger domain. ZNFD gene is located on chromosome 18qD1. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the ZNFD gene was specifically expressed in mouse testis but not in other tissues. Subcellular localization analysis demonstrated that ZNFD was localized in the nucleus. Reporter gene assays showed that overexpression of ZNFD in the COS7 cells activates the transcriptional activities of heat shock element (HSE). Overall, these results suggest that ZNFD is a member of the zinc finger transcription factor family and it participates in the transcriptional regulation of HSE. Many heat shock proteins regulated by HSE are involved in testicular development. Therefore, our results suggest that ZNFD may probably participate in the development of mouse testis and function as a transcription activator in HSE-mediated gene expression and signaling pathways.

  12. A Case of Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis Complicated by Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Genta; Kakuta, Takatoshi; Hirukawa, Takashi; Okamatsu, Chizuko; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of peritoneal mesothelioma discovered in a patient during peritoneal dialysis. The patient was a 55-year-old woman who had no history of asbestos exposure. Owing to end-stage kidney failure, she had been undergoing peritoneal dialysis for over 8 years, and she had been diagnosed with encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis. She was admitted to the hospital for intestinal obstruction. Three months later, she noticed an enlarging mass in the epigastric region. Computed tomography showed a 10-cm mass originating in the abdominal wall that had invaded the liver. It was diagnosed as malignant mesothelioma via biopsy. Cases of sarcoma-like mass-forming peritoneal mesothelioma are rare, and there are no prior reports of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis complicated by malignant peritoneal mesothelioma. Thus, this unique case of peritoneal mesothelioma can provide us with important knowledge about this rare entity. PMID:27628605

  13. Mycobacterium fortuitum Peritonitis in a Patient on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Jyoti; Lathwal, Sumit; Kumar, Satish; Juyal, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, an environmental organism, is capable of producing a variety of clinical infections such as cutaneous infections, abscesses and nosocomial infections. Rarely, it has been a documented as a cause of peritonitis in patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is one of the treatment options which are used for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Although peritonitis rates have declined in parallel with advances in peritoneal dialysis (PD) technology, peritonitis remains a leading complication of CAPD and it is the major cause for transfer to other methods of dialysis. We are reporting a case of M. fortuitum peritonitis in a patient who was undergoing CAPD, which was successfully treated. This case emphasizes the importance of mycobacterial cultures in patients with CAPD-associated peritonitis, whose routine cultures may yield no organisms. PMID:24551685

  14. Mycobacterium fortuitum Peritonitis in a Patient on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD): A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Jyoti; Lathwal, Sumit; Kumar, Satish; Juyal, Deepak

    2013-12-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, an environmental organism, is capable of producing a variety of clinical infections such as cutaneous infections, abscesses and nosocomial infections. Rarely, it has been a documented as a cause of peritonitis in patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is one of the treatment options which are used for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Although peritonitis rates have declined in parallel with advances in peritoneal dialysis (PD) technology, peritonitis remains a leading complication of CAPD and it is the major cause for transfer to other methods of dialysis. We are reporting a case of M. fortuitum peritonitis in a patient who was undergoing CAPD, which was successfully treated. This case emphasizes the importance of mycobacterial cultures in patients with CAPD-associated peritonitis, whose routine cultures may yield no organisms.

  15. Group JK corynebacterium peritonitis in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pierard, D; Lauwers, S; Mouton, M C; Sennesael, J; Verbeelen, D

    1983-01-01

    We describe a case of peritonitis with isolation of a group JK corynebacterium from the peritoneal effluent in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and treated with corticosteroids. Therapy with intraperitoneal vancomycin resulted in a rapid eradication of the organism. However, only 1 month after discontinuation of the 26-day therapy, a second episode of peritonitis with JK corynebacterium occurred. After vancomycin was restarted, the organism disappeared again from the peritoneal fluid, but the patient died a few days later from heart failure apparently unrelated to the infection. Some authors have mentioned the isolation of diphtheroids (without further identification) from peritoneal effluent of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients, but to our knowledge, this is the first report of peritonitis associated with JK corynebacterium, an opportunistic organism that must be differentiated from other corynebacteria. PMID:6630457

  16. Peritonitis and catheter exit-site infection in patients on peritoneal dialysis at home1

    PubMed Central

    Abud, Ana Cristina Freire; Kusumota, Luciana; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Rodrigues, Flávia Fernanda Luchetti; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the complications related to peritonitis and catheter exit-site infections, in patients on peritoneal dialysis at home. Method: quantitative and cross-sectional study, carried out with 90 patients on peritoneal dialysis at home, in a municipality in the Northeast region of Brazil. For data collection, it was used two structured scripts and consultation on medical records. Descriptive analysis and comparison tests among independent groups were used, considering p<0.05 as level of statistical significance. Results: by comparing the frequency of peritonitis and the length of treatment, it was found that patients over two years of peritoneal dialysis were more likely to develop peritonitis (X²=6.39; p=0.01). The number of episodes of peritoneal catheter exit-site infection showed association with the length of treatment (U=224,000; p=0.015). Conclusion: peritonitis and catheter exit-site infection are associated with the length of treatment. PMID:26487141

  17. Spontaneous biliary peritonitis in children.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Supreethi; Singhal, Anu; Arora, Anita; Singhal, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric Spontaneous Bile duct perforation is a rare clinical condition with only around 150 cases reported worldwide. Early management gives excellent prognosis but the condition often presents a diagnostic dilemma. Hepato-biliary Technetium-99m-iminodiacetic acid scintiscan is the diagnostic investigation of choice but its availability in third world countries is limited. We present two cases of spontaneous biliary peritonitis in children, which were diagnosed without scintiscanning. The first case was a one-and -a half-year-old child, who was diagnosed with biliary peritonitis without pneumoperitoneum by a combination of Ultrasound (USG), Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT), and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The child underwent USG-guided drainage and subsequent cholecystectomy with hepatico-jejunostomy. The second child also had biliary peritonitis without pneumoperitoneum, which was initially suspected on USG. CECT revealed dilated gall bladder and fluid collection in sub-hepatic space and pelvis. Abdominal paracentesis revealed presence of bile. The child responded to conservative therapy. Both are doing well on two-year follow-up. In a patient with jaundice, biliary tract abnormalities and/or free fluid, either generalized or localized to peri-cholecystic/sub-hepatic space on USG/CT/MRI, in the absence of pneumoperitoneum, suggest a diagnosis of biliary perforation even in the absence of scintiscanning.

  18. Spontaneous Biliary Peritonitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Supreethi; Singhal, Anu; Arora, Anita; Singhal, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric Spontaneous Bile duct perforation is a rare clinical condition with only around 150 cases reported worldwide. Early management gives excellent prognosis but the condition often presents a diagnostic dilemma. Hepato-biliary Technetium-99m-iminodiacetic acid scintiscan is the diagnostic investigation of choice but its availability in third world countries is limited. We present two cases of spontaneous biliary peritonitis in children, which were diagnosed without scintiscanning. The first case was a one-and -a half-year-old child, who was diagnosed with biliary peritonitis without pneumoperitoneum by a combination of Ultrasound (USG), Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT), and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The child underwent USG-guided drainage and subsequent cholecystectomy with hepatico-jejunostomy. The second child also had biliary peritonitis without pneumoperitoneum, which was initially suspected on USG. CECT revealed dilated gall bladder and fluid collection in sub-hepatic space and pelvis. Abdominal paracentesis revealed presence of bile. The child responded to conservative therapy. Both are doing well on two-year follow-up. In a patient with jaundice, biliary tract abnormalities and/or free fluid, either generalized or localized to peri-cholecystic/sub-hepatic space on USG/CT/MRI, in the absence of pneumoperitoneum, suggest a diagnosis of biliary perforation even in the absence of scintiscanning. PMID:24083062

  19. [Focusing on peritoneal dialysis adequacy].

    PubMed

    Issad, Belkacem; Durand, Pierre-Yves; Siohan, Pascale; Goffin, Eric; Cridlig, Joëlle; Jean, Guillaume; Ryckelynck, Jean-Philippe; Arkouche, W; Bourdenx, J-P; Cridlig, J; Dallaporta, B; Fessy, H; Fischbach, M; Giaime, P; Goffin, E; Issad, B; Jean, G; Joly, D; Mercadal, L; Poux, J-M; Ryckelynck, J-P; Siohan, P; Souid, M; Toledano, D; Verger, C; Vigeral, P; Uzan, M

    2013-11-01

    The optimal method to assess the adequacy of peritoneal dialysis therapies is controversial. Today, the adequacy must not be considered as a number or a concept assessed only by two parameters (total KT/V urea and total solute clearance) but defined by many more items. In the absence of data, based on theoretical considerations, the reanalysis of the CANUSA study showed that renal kidney function, rather than peritoneal clearance, was associated with improved survival. Residual renal function is considered as a major predictor factor of cardiovascular mortality. Results of this reanalysis were supported by the adequacy data in ADEMEX, EAPOS and ANZDATA studies. Therefore, clinical assessment plays a major role in PD adequacy. The management of fluid balance, the regular monitoring of malnutrition, the control of mineral metabolism and particularly the glucose load, considered as the "corner-stone" of the system, are the main points to be considered in the adequacy of PD patients. The essential goal is to minimize glucose load by glucose-sparing strategies in order to reduce the neoangiogenesis of the peritoneal membrane. PMID:23850000

  20. Differences between Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Latent Tuberculous Infection of Mice Ex Vivo and Mycobacterial Infection of Mouse Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The search for factors that account for the reproduction and survival of mycobacteria, including vaccine strains, in host cells is the priority for studies on tuberculosis. A comparison of BCG-mycobacterial loads in granuloma cells obtained from bone marrow and spleens of mice with latent tuberculous infection and cells from mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophage cultures infected with the BCG vaccine in vitro has demonstrated that granuloma macrophages each normally contained a single BCG-Mycobacterium, while those acutely infected in vitro had increased mycobacterial loads and death rates. Mouse granuloma cells were observed to produce the IFNγ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, CD1d, CD25, CD31, СD35, and S100 proteins. None of these activation markers were found in mouse cell cultures infected in vitro or in intact macrophages. Lack of colocalization of lipoarabinomannan-labeled BCG-mycobacteria with the lysosomotropic LysoTracker dye in activated granuloma macrophages suggests that these macrophages were unable to destroy BCG-mycobacteria. However, activated mouse granuloma macrophages could control mycobacterial reproduction in cells both in vivo and in ex vivo culture. By contrast, a considerable increase in the number of BCG-mycobacteria was observed in mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages after BCG infection in vitro, when no expression of the activation-related molecules was detected in these cells. PMID:27066505

  1. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Inhibits Dendritic Cell Activation and Attenuates Nephritis in a Mouse Model of Lupus.

    PubMed

    Elshikha, Ahmed S; Lu, Yuanqing; Chen, Mong-Jen; Akbar, Mohammad; Zeumer, Leilani; Ritter, Andrea; Elghamry, Hanaa; Mahdi, Mahmoud A; Morel, Laurence; Song, Sihong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution and considerable mortality and morbidity. Although the pathogenesis of this disease remains elusive, over-reactive dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the disease development. It has been shown that human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) has protective effects in type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis mouse models. In the present study, we tested the effect of AAT on DC differentiation and functions, as well as its protective effect in a lupus-prone mouse model. We showed that hAAT treatment significantly inhibited LPS (TLR4 agonist) and CpG (TLR9 agonist) -induced bone-marrow (BM)-derived conventional and plasmacytoid DC (cDC and pDC) activation and reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-I, TNF-α and IL-1β. In MRL/lpr mice, hAAT treatment significantly reduced BM-derived DC differentiation, serum autoantibody levels, and importantly attenuated renal pathology. Our results for the first time demonstrate that hAAT inhibits DC activation and function, and it also attenuates autoimmunity and renal damage in the MRL/lpr lupus model. These results imply that hAAT has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of SLE in humans. PMID:27232337

  2. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-01

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity.

  3. Adherence of Salmonella typhimurium to murine peritoneal macrophages is mediated by lipopolysaccharide and complement receptors.

    PubMed

    al-Bahry, S N; Pistole, T G

    1997-06-01

    Adherence of Salmonella typhimurium to mouse peritoneal macrophages (Mø) was monitored using a direct microscopic assay and flow cytometry. Competitive binding studies using wild-type lipopolysaccharide and derivatives confirmed a role for this moiety in bacterial adherence. Mø pretreated with 2-deoxy-D-glucose exhibited lower binding activity than did untreated controls, suggesting involvement of either Fc or complement receptors. Pre-exposing Mø to Fc fragments, however, failed to reduce bacterial binding, thus eliminating a role for Fc receptors in this process. Mø pretreated with neutrophil elastase exhibited a diminished ability to bind S. typhimurium, suggesting involvement of complement receptor 1. Monoclonal antibodies M1/70 and M18/2, specific for epitopes on the alpha and beta chains, respectively, of complement receptor 3, also blocked this adherence. In each case we were unable to eliminate completely bacterial adhesion to Mø. Monoclonal antibodies to two additional Mø receptors, Mac-2 and Mac-3, did not block bacterial attachment. These data indicate that multiple mechanisms are involved in the initial adhesion of S. typhimurium to mouse Mø.

  4. Comparison of the activity and distribution of analog II and related compounds in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Pento, J.T.; Koenig, K.K.; Magarian, R.A.; Shridhar, R.; Griffin, M.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have reported that 1,1-dichloro-Cis-2,3-diphenylcyclopropane (Analog II) is antiestrogenic in the mouse and inhibits the initiation and promotion of DMBA-induced tumors in the rat. Recently the authors have synthesized related cyclopropyl derivative of stilbene and stilbenediol. The object of the present study was to compare the activity of these compounds in the mouse and rat. Estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity of each compound was determined using the 3-day uterotropic assay and uterine histology in immature female Swiss Webster mice and Sprague-Dawley rats. (/sup 3/H)-Analog II was used in the tissue distribution studies. It was found that whereas Analog II was antiestrogenic in the mouse, this compound and related cis-stilbene analogs produced no antiestrogenic activity in the rat. However, trans-stilbenediol derivatives were estrogenic in both the mouse and rat with relatively equivalent activity in both species. In the tissue distribution study (/sup 3/H)-Analog II was found to be specifically concentrated in uterine tissue of the mouse but not the rat. This observation may explain, in part, the difference in antiestrogenic activity of Analog II between these two rodent species.

  5. TRPV3 channels mediate strontium-induced mouse-egg activation.

    PubMed

    Carvacho, Ingrid; Lee, Hoi Chang; Fissore, Rafael A; Clapham, David E

    2013-12-12

    In mammals, calcium influx is required for oocyte maturation and egg activation. The molecular identities of the calcium-permeant channels that underlie the initiation of embryonic development are not established. Here, we describe a transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel current activated by TRP agonists that is absent in TrpV3(-/-) eggs. TRPV3 current is differentially expressed during oocyte maturation, reaching a peak of maximum density and activity at metaphase of meiosis II (MII), the stage of fertilization. Selective activation of TRPV3 channels provokes egg activation by mediating massive calcium entry. Widely used to activate eggs, strontium application is known to yield normal offspring in combination with somatic cell nuclear transfer. We show that TRPV3 is required for strontium influx, because TrpV3(-/-) eggs failed to conduct Sr(2+) or undergo strontium-induced activation. We propose that TRPV3 is a major mediator of calcium influx in mouse eggs and is a putative target for artificial egg activation. PMID:24316078

  6. Characterization of fucosyltransferase activity during mouse spermatogenesis: Evidence for a cell surface fucosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Cardullo, R.A.; Armant, D.R.; Millette, C.F. )

    1989-02-21

    Fucosyltransferase activity was quantified in mouse germ cells at different stages of spermatogenesis. Specifically, fucosyltransferase activities of pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and cauda epididymal sperm were compared. Fucosyltranferase activity of mixed germ cells displayed an apparent V{sub max} of 17 pmol (mg of protein){sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} and an apparent K{sub m} of approximately 13 {mu}M for GDP-L-({sup 14}C)fucose in the presence of saturating amounts of asialofetuin at 33{degree}C. Under these conditions, cellular fucosyltransferase activity was found to increase during spermatogenesis. In agreement with assays of intact cells, examination of subcellular fractions indicated that a large fraction of fucosyltransferase activity was associated with the cell surface. The fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface progressively increased throughout spermatogenesis and epididymal maturation so that nearly all of the fucosyltransferase in epididymal sperm was on the cell surface. Specifically, by comparison of activities in the presence and absence of the detergent NP-40, the fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface in pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and epididymal sperm was 0.36, 0.5, and 0.85, respectively. These results suggest that a cell surface fucosyltransferase may be important during differentiation of spermatogenic cells in the testis as well as during epididymal maturation and fertilization.

  7. Daily variation in the electrophysiological activity of mouse medial habenula neurones

    PubMed Central

    Sakhi, Kanwal; Belle, Mino D C; Gossan, Nicole; Delagrange, Philippe; Piggins, Hugh D

    2014-01-01

    AbstractIntrinsic daily or circadian rhythms arise through the outputs of the master circadian clock in the brain's suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) as well as circadian oscillators in other brain sites and peripheral tissues. SCN neurones contain an intracellular molecular clock that drives these neurones to exhibit pronounced day–night differences in their electrical properties. The epithalamic medial habenula (MHb) expresses clock genes, but little is known about the bioelectric properties of mouse MHb neurones and their potential circadian characteristics. Therefore, in this study we used a brain slice preparation containing the MHb to determine the basic electrical properties of mouse MHb neurones with whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology, and investigated whether these vary across the day–night cycle. MHb neurones (n = 230) showed heterogeneity in electrophysiological state, ranging from highly depolarised cells (∼ −25 to −30 mV) that are silent with no membrane activity or display depolarised low-amplitude membrane oscillations, to neurones that were moderately hyperpolarised (∼40 mV) and spontaneously discharging action potentials. These electrical states were largely intrinsically regulated and were influenced by the activation of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. When considered as one population, MHb neurones showed significant circadian variation in their spontaneous firing rate and resting membrane potential. However, in recordings of MHb neurones from mice lacking the core molecular circadian clock, these temporal differences in MHb activity were absent, indicating that circadian clock signals actively regulate the timing of MHb neuronal states. These observations add to the extracellularly recorded rhythms seen in other brain areas and establish that circadian mechanisms can influence the membrane properties of neurones in extra-SCN sites. Collectively, the results of this study indicate that the MHb may

  8. Histochemical localisation of carboxylesterase activity in rat and mouse oral cavity mucosa.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Darren A; Bogdanffy, Matthew S; Reed, Celia J

    2002-12-01

    Vinyl acetate (VA) is widely used within the chemical industry, in the manufacture of polyvinyl alcohol, and as polyvinyl acetate emulsions in latex paints, adhesives, paper and paper board coatings. Chronic oral exposure of rodents to high concentrations of VA induces tumours within the oral cavity. Carboxylesterase-dependent hydrolysis of VA is thought to be critical in the development of nasal tumours following inhalation exposure of animals to VA. Therefore, carboxylesterase activity was determined histochemically in the oral cavities of male F344 rats and BDF mice in order to explore the potential role of carboxylesterase-dependent hydrolysis of VA in the development of oral tumours. Following fixation in 10% neutral buffered formalin heads were decalcified in neutral saturated EDTA, embedded in resin, sectioned at six levels (three each for the upper and lower jaws), and carboxylesterase activity revealed in the tissue using alpha-naphthyl butyrate as substrate. The localisation of carboxylesterase activity in freshly dissected rat oral tissue was compared to that of the resin sections and found to be identical, thus validating the decalcification process. A similar pattern of carboxylesterase activity was observed for the two species. Staining was low in areas surrounding the teeth, and medium/high in the buccal mucosa, the central/posterior upper palate and those regions of the lower jaw not proximal to the teeth. In general the intensity of staining was greater in sections from the rat compared to those from the mouse. By comparison, carboxylesterase activity was considerably higher in mouse nasal olfactory epithelium than in any of the oral tissues. Thus the mucosa of the oral cavity has the potential to hydrolyse VA to its metabolites, acetic acid and acetaldehyde, and the presence of carboxylesterases at this site is consistent with, and may be an important determining factor in, the development of oral cavity tumours following exposure to VA.

  9. Evaluation of Depigmenting Activity by 8-Hydroxydaidzein in Mouse B16 Melanoma Cells and Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Sorgan Shou-Ku; Lin, Ching-Gong; Wu, Mon-Han; Chang, Te-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    In our previous study, 8-hydroxydaidzein (8-OHDe) was demonstrated to be a potent and unique suicide substrate of mushroom tyrosinase. In this study, the compound was evaluated for in vitro cellular tyrosinase and melanogenesis inhibitory activities in mouse B16 melanoma cells and for in vivo skin-whitening activity in human volunteers. Tyrosinase activity and melanogenesis in the cell culture incubated with 10 μM of 8-OHDe were decreased to 20.1% and 51.8% of control, respectively, while no obvious cytotoxicity was observed in this concentration. In contrast, a standard tyrosinase inhibitor, kojic acid, showed 69.9% and 71.3% of control in cellular tyrosinase and melanogenesis activity, respectively, at a concentration as high as 100 μM. Hence, 8-OHDe exhibited more than an inhibitory effects on melanin production in B16 cells 10-fold stronger than kojic acid. In addition, when a cream containing 4% 8-OHDe was applied to human skin in an in vivo study, significant increases in the dL*-values were observed after three weeks. Moreover, the increase in the dL*-values after 8-week treatment with 4% 8-OHDe (from −0.57 to 1.94) is stronger than those of 2% 8-OHDe treatment (from 0.26 to 0.94) and 2% ascorbic acid-2-glucoside treatment (from 0.07 to 1.54). From the results of the study, it was concluded that 8-OHDe, the potent suicide substrate of mushroom tyrosinase, has depigmenting activities in both mouse melanoma cells and in human volunteers. Thus, the compound has significant potential for use in cosmetics as a skin-whitening ingredient. PMID:20057943

  10. Intra-abdominal benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Jouvin, I; Dohan, A; Gergi, P; Pocard, M

    2014-04-01

    Benign multicystic peritoneal mesotheliomas are rare: pre-operative diagnosis relies on proper imaging. The differential diagnosis includes pseudomyxoma peritonei and other peritoneal cysts. Absence of previous surgical resection offers the best chance of success when complete resection is performed in a specialized center. We report the case of a 43 year-old man with benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma treated by cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. PMID:24433857

  11. Peritoneal dialysis in hypernatraemic, ketoacidotic diabetic coma.

    PubMed

    Køolendorf, K; Møoller, B B

    1976-01-01

    Hypertonic dehydration in a 13-year-old boy with ketoacidotic diabetic coma has been treated successfully with peritoneal dialysis and isotonic fluids. Modes of treatment with either hypotonic or isotonic fluids are discussed, as is the feasibility of peritoneal dialysis. We recommend isotonic solutions composed of equal parts of 5.5% glucose and 0.9% sodium chloride combined with peritoneal dialysis in order to secure a relatively slow correction of the hypertonic state.

  12. Reduced Levels of Hspa9 Attenuates Stat5 Activation in Mouse B-cells

    PubMed Central

    Krysiak, Kilannin; Tibbitts, Justin F.; Shao, Jin; Liu, Tuoen; Ndonwi, Matthew; Walter, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    HSPA9 is located on chromosome 5q31.2 in humans, a region that is commonly deleted in patients with myeloid malignancies [del(5q)], including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). HSPA9 expression is reduced by 50% in patients with del(5q)-associated MDS, consistent with haploinsufficient levels. Zebrafish mutants and knockdown studies in human and mouse cells have implicated a role for HSPA9 in hematopoiesis. To comprehensively evaluate the effects of Hspa9 haploinsufficiency on hematopoiesis, we generated an Hspa9 knockout mouse model. While homozygous knockout of Hspa9 is embryonic lethal, mice with heterozygous deletion of Hspa9 (Hspa9+/−) are viable and have a 50% reduction in Hspa9 expression. Hspa9+/− mice have normal basal hematopoiesis and do not develop MDS. However, Hspa9+/− mice have a cell- intrinsic reduction in bone marrow CFU-PreB colony formation without alterations in the number of B-cell progenitors in vivo, consistent with a functional defect in Hspa9+/− B-cell progenitors. We further reduced Hspa9 expression (<50%) using RNAi and observe reduced B-cell progenitors in vivo, indicating that appropriate levels (≥50%) of Hspa9 are required for normal B- lymphopoiesis in vivo. Knockdown of Hspa9 in an IL-7 dependent mouse B-cell line reduced Stat5 phosphorylation following IL-7 receptor stimulation, supporting a role for Hspa9 in Stat5 signaling in B-cells. Collectively, these data implicate a role for Hspa9 in B-lymphopoiesis and Stat5 activation downstream of IL-7 signaling. PMID:25550197

  13. Raoultella planticola peritonitis in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Woo; Kim, Ji Eun; Hong, Yu Ah; Ko, Gang Jee; Pyo, Heui Jung; Kwon, Young Joo

    2015-12-01

    A 65-year-old man on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis was admitted with peritonitis. Empirical antibiotic therapy was initiated, and Raoultella planticola was identified in the peritoneal fluid culture. We treated the patient with intraperitoneally administered ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime according to the antibiotic susceptibility. His condition improved, and he was well treated with a 2-week antibiotic course.

  14. Laboratory diagnostics of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Danese, Elisa; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Montagnana, Martina

    2014-03-20

    The term peritonitis indicates an inflammatory process involving the peritoneum that is most frequently infectious in nature. Primary or spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) typically occurs when a bacterial infection spreads to the peritoneum across the gut wall or mesenteric lymphatics or, less frequently, from hematogenous transmission in combination with impaired immune system and in absence of an identified intra-abdominal source of infection or malignancy. The clinical presentation of SBP is variable. The condition may manifest as a relatively insidious colonization, without signs and symptoms, or may suddenly occur as a septic syndrome. Laboratory diagnostics play a pivotal role for timely and appropriate management of patients with bacterial peritonitis. It is now clearly established that polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) in peritoneal fluid is the mainstay for the diagnosis, whereas the role of additional biochemical tests is rather controversial. Recent evidence also suggests that automatic cell counting in peritoneal fluid may be a reliable approach for early screening of patients. According to available clinical and laboratory data, we have developed a tentative algorithm for efficient diagnosis of SBP, which is based on a reasonable integration between optimization of human/economical resources and gradually increasing use of invasive and expensive testing. The proposed strategy entails, in sequential steps, serum procalcitonin testing, automated cell count in peritoneal fluid, manual cell count in peritoneal fluid, peritoneal fluid culture and bacterial DNA testing in peritoneal fluid. PMID:24508989

  15. Melanogenesis inhibitory activity of two generic drugs: cinnarizine and trazodone in mouse B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Te-Sheng; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    More than 200 generic drugs were screened to identify the inhibitory activity on melanogenesis in mouse B16 melanoma cells. Cinnarizine and trazodone were identified as melanogenesis inhibitors. The inhibitory effects of the two drugs on cell survival, melanogenesis, and tyrosinase activity were investigated. The results showed that both cinnarizine and trazodone inhibited melanogenesis in B16 cells by a dose-dependent manner at the non-cytotoxic concentrations. Based on the results of the present study, seeking new melanogenesis inhibitors from generic drugs is an alternative approach to developing new depigmenting agents in cosmeceuticals. Moreover, cinnarizine and trazodone were proven to be good candidates as skin-whitening agents for treatment of skin hyperpigmentation. PMID:22272104

  16. Melanogenesis Inhibitory Activity of Two Generic Drugs: Cinnarizine and Trazodone in Mouse B16 Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Te-Sheng; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    More than 200 generic drugs were screened to identify the inhibitory activity on melanogenesis in mouse B16 melanoma cells. Cinnarizine and trazodone were identified as melanogenesis inhibitors. The inhibitory effects of the two drugs on cell survival, melanogenesis, and tyrosinase activity were investigated. The results showed that both cinnarizine and trazodone inhibited melanogenesis in B16 cells by a dose-dependent manner at the non-cytotoxic concentrations. Based on the results of the present study, seeking new melanogenesis inhibitors from generic drugs is an alternative approach to developing new depigmenting agents in cosmeceuticals. Moreover, cinnarizine and trazodone were proven to be good candidates as skin-whitening agents for treatment of skin hyperpigmentation. PMID:22272104

  17. Development of an intact hepatocyte activation system for routine use with the mouse lymphoma assay

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, K.H.; Moore, M.M.; Oglesby, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have developed a method for cocultivating primary rat hepatocytes with L5178Y/TK/sup +/-/-3.7.2C mouse lymphoma cells. This method should provide a means of simulating more closely in-vivo metabolism compared to metabolism by liver homogenates, while still being useful for routine screening. Hepatocytes were isolated from 200-250 gm adult male Sprague-Dawley rats; 1 x 10/sup 6/ viable hepatocytes were seeded per flask. Rapid attachment of the hepatocytes (2 hr) was obtained by using fibronectin-coated 25-cm/sup 2/ tissue culture flasks. Cocultivated cultures were incubated at 37/sup 0/C on a platform rocker at 32 oscillations per minute. A 16-hr cocultivated period was selected. With this hepatocyte activation methodology, CP, DMN, DMBA, and B(a)P, genotoxins that require metabolic activation, could be detected as mutagens in L5178Y/TK/sup +/-/ cells.

  18. Adventitial fibroblasts are activated in the early stages of atherosclerosis in the apolipoprotein E knockout mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Fang; Ji Jian; Li Li; Chen Rong; Hu Weicheng . E-mail: huweicheng@sdu.edu.cn

    2007-01-19

    The role of the adventitia in vascular function and vascular lesion formation has been largely ignored. This study observed the activation of the adventitia and specifically the fibroblasts in the development of atherosclerosis in the apoE(-/-) mouse. The results showed a gradual increase in expression of collagen types I and III after 2, 4, and 8 weeks of hyperlipidic diet. The earliest expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) protein and mRNA was detected in the adventitial fibroblast before the formation of intimal lesions. Proliferation, too, was first found in the adventitial fibroblasts. We hypothesize that the adventitial fibroblast is activated in the early stage of atherosclerosis. Adventitial inflammation may be an early event in the development of atherosclerotic lesions.

  19. DYRK1A overexpression enhances STAT activity and astrogliogenesis in a Down syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Nobuhiro; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Sanada, Kamon

    2015-11-01

    Down syndrome (DS) arises from triplication of genes on human chromosome 21 and is associated with anomalies in brain development such as reduced production of neurons and increased generation of astrocytes. Here, we show that differentiation of cortical progenitor cells into astrocytes is promoted by DYRK1A, a Ser/Thr kinase encoded on human chromosome 21. In the Ts1Cje mouse model of DS, increased dosage of DYRK1A augments the propensity of progenitors to differentiate into astrocytes. This tendency is associated with enhanced astrogliogenesis in the developing neocortex. We also find that overexpression of DYRK1A upregulates the activity of the astrogliogenic transcription factor STAT in wild-type progenitors. Ts1Cje progenitors exhibit elevated STAT activity, and depletion of DYRK1A in these cells reverses the deregulation of STAT. In sum, our findings indicate that potentiation of the DYRK1A-STAT pathway in progenitors contributes to aberrant astrogliogenesis in DS. PMID:26373433

  20. DYRK1A overexpression enhances STAT activity and astrogliogenesis in a Down syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Nobuhiro; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Sanada, Kamon

    2015-11-01

    Down syndrome (DS) arises from triplication of genes on human chromosome 21 and is associated with anomalies in brain development such as reduced production of neurons and increased generation of astrocytes. Here, we show that differentiation of cortical progenitor cells into astrocytes is promoted by DYRK1A, a Ser/Thr kinase encoded on human chromosome 21. In the Ts1Cje mouse model of DS, increased dosage of DYRK1A augments the propensity of progenitors to differentiate into astrocytes. This tendency is associated with enhanced astrogliogenesis in the developing neocortex. We also find that overexpression of DYRK1A upregulates the activity of the astrogliogenic transcription factor STAT in wild-type progenitors. Ts1Cje progenitors exhibit elevated STAT activity, and depletion of DYRK1A in these cells reverses the deregulation of STAT. In sum, our findings indicate that potentiation of the DYRK1A-STAT pathway in progenitors contributes to aberrant astrogliogenesis in DS.

  1. Hemagglutinating activity is directly correlated with colonization ability of shigellae in suckling mouse model.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Soma; Saha, Dhira Rani; Pal, Amit; Niyogi, Swapan Kumar; Mitra, Utpala; Koley, Hemanta

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore a new approach based on the hemagglutination (HA) assay to understand the colonization ability of Shigella spp. To study colonization ability, an animal model of 4-day-old suckling mouse, was exploited. We characterized the HA activity of 48 Shigella strains, with erythrocytes collected from rabbit, guinea pig, chicken, and sheep. Only rabbit and guinea pig erythrocytes showed positive HA reactions in most of the cases. On the basis of HA pattern, 4 strains from each serogroup were selected for in vivo colonization studies. Our results showed a positive correlation between HA activity and colonization ability of the strains belonging to different serogroups (groups A, B, C, and D) of Shigella. In all 4 serogroups, high HA titer was associated with greater intestinal colonization. PMID:22978650

  2. Measurement of the phospholipase activity of endothelial lipase in mouse plasma.

    PubMed

    Basu, Debapriya; Lei, Xia; Josekutty, Joby; Hussain, M Mahmood; Jin, Weijun

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a major negative regulator of plasma HDL levels in mice, rabbits, and most probably, humans. Although this regulatory function is critically dependent on EL's hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids, as yet there is no phospholipase assay specific for EL in plasma. We developed such an assay for the mouse enzyme using a commercially available phospholipid-like fluorescent substrate in combination with an EL neutralizing antibody. The specificity of the assay was established using EL knockout mice and its utility demonstrated by detection of an increase in plasma EL phospholipase activity following exposure of wild-type mice to lipopolysaccharide. The assay revealed that murine pre-heparin plasma does not contain measurable EL activity, indicating that the hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids by EL in vivo likely occurs on the cell surface. PMID:23103358

  3. A Novel Polysaccharide in Insects Activates the Innate Immune System in Mouse Macrophage RAW264 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Takashi; Ido, Atsushi; Kusano, Kie; Miura, Chiemi; Miura, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    A novel water-soluble polysaccharide was identified in the pupae of the melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae) as a molecule that activates the mammalian innate immune response. We attempted to purify this innate immune activator using nitric oxide (NO) production in mouse RAW264 macrophages as an indicator of immunostimulatory activity. A novel acidic polysaccharide was identified, which we named “dipterose”, with a molecular weight of 1.01×106 and comprising nine monosaccharides. Dipterose was synthesized in the melon fly itself at the pupal stage. The NO-producing activity of dipterose was approximately equal to that of lipopolysaccharide, a potent immunostimulator. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) led to the suppression of NO production by dipterose. Furthermore, dipterose induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and interferon β (IFNβ) and promoted the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in macrophages, indicating that it stimulates the induction of various cytokines in RAW264 cells via the TLR4 signaling pathway. Our results thus suggest that dipterose activates the innate immune response against various pathogenic microorganisms and viral infections. This is the first identification of an innate immune-activating polysaccharide from an animal. PMID:25490773

  4. RNA sequencing from neural ensembles activated during fear conditioning in the mouse temporal association cortex.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin-Hyung; Huang, Ben S; Gray, Jesse M

    2016-01-01

    The stable formation of remote fear memories is thought to require neuronal gene induction in cortical ensembles that are activated during learning. However, the set of genes expressed specifically in these activated ensembles is not known; knowledge of such transcriptional profiles may offer insights into the molecular program underlying stable memory formation. Here we use RNA-Seq to identify genes whose expression is enriched in activated cortical ensembles labeled during associative fear learning. We first establish that mouse temporal association cortex (TeA) is required for remote recall of auditory fear memories. We then perform RNA-Seq in TeA neurons that are labeled by the activity reporter Arc-dVenus during learning. We identify 944 genes with enriched expression in Arc-dVenus+ neurons. These genes include markers of L2/3, L5b, and L6 excitatory neurons but not glial or inhibitory markers, confirming Arc-dVenus to be an excitatory neuron-specific but non-layer-specific activity reporter. Cross comparisons to other transcriptional profiles show that 125 of the enriched genes are also activity-regulated in vitro or induced by visual stimulus in the visual cortex, suggesting that they may be induced generally in the cortex in an experience-dependent fashion. Prominent among the enriched genes are those encoding potassium channels that down-regulate neuronal activity, suggesting the possibility that part of the molecular program induced by fear conditioning may initiate homeostatic plasticity. PMID:27557751

  5. RNA sequencing from neural ensembles activated during fear conditioning in the mouse temporal association cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin-Hyung; Huang, Ben S.; Gray, Jesse M.

    2016-01-01

    The stable formation of remote fear memories is thought to require neuronal gene induction in cortical ensembles that are activated during learning. However, the set of genes expressed specifically in these activated ensembles is not known; knowledge of such transcriptional profiles may offer insights into the molecular program underlying stable memory formation. Here we use RNA-Seq to identify genes whose expression is enriched in activated cortical ensembles labeled during associative fear learning. We first establish that mouse temporal association cortex (TeA) is required for remote recall of auditory fear memories. We then perform RNA-Seq in TeA neurons that are labeled by the activity reporter Arc-dVenus during learning. We identify 944 genes with enriched expression in Arc-dVenus+ neurons. These genes include markers of L2/3, L5b, and L6 excitatory neurons but not glial or inhibitory markers, confirming Arc-dVenus to be an excitatory neuron-specific but non-layer-specific activity reporter. Cross comparisons to other transcriptional profiles show that 125 of the enriched genes are also activity-regulated in vitro or induced by visual stimulus in the visual cortex, suggesting that they may be induced generally in the cortex in an experience-dependent fashion. Prominent among the enriched genes are those encoding potassium channels that down-regulate neuronal activity, suggesting the possibility that part of the molecular program induced by fear conditioning may initiate homeostatic plasticity. PMID:27557751

  6. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    PubMed Central

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  7. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal ... primary peritoneal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal ...

  8. Developmental Effects of Perfluorononanoic acid in the Mouse Are Dependent on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-alpha

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is one ofthe perfluoroalkyl acids found in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. Prenatal exposure to PFNA negatively impacts survival and development of mice and activates the mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated recept...

  9. Effect of urethane, dimethylnitrosamine, paraquat, and butylated hydroxytoluene on the activities of glycolytic key enzymes in mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Arany, I.; Rady, P.; Bojan, I.; Kertai, P.

    1981-12-01

    Effects of carcinogens and noncarcinogenic pulmonary toxicants on the activities of glycolytic key enzymes in the mouse lung were investigated. The carcinogens urethane (URTH) and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) permanently enhanced, and the noncarcinogenic pulmonary toxicants paraquat (PAR) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) temporarily, enhanced the activities of hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), and pyruvate kinase (PK) in the lungs of mice.

  10. Targeting the kinase activities of ATR and ATM exhibits antitumoral activity in mouse models of MLL-rearranged AML.

    PubMed

    Morgado-Palacin, Isabel; Day, Amanda; Murga, Matilde; Lafarga, Vanesa; Anton, Marta Elena; Tubbs, Anthony; Chen, Hua-Tang; Ergan, Aysegul; Anderson, Rhonda; Bhandoola, Avinash; Pike, Kurt G; Barlaam, Bernard; Cadogan, Elaine; Wang, Xi; Pierce, Andrew J; Hubbard, Chad; Armstrong, Scott A; Nussenzweig, André; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Among the various subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), those with chromosomal rearrangements of the MLL oncogene (AML-MLL) have a poor prognosis. AML-MLL tumor cells are resistant to current genotoxic therapies because of an attenuated response by p53, a protein that induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage. In addition to chemicals that damage DNA, efforts have focused on targeting DNA repair enzymes as a general chemotherapeutic approach to cancer treatment. Here, we found that inhibition of the kinase ATR, which is the primary sensor of DNA replication stress, induced chromosomal breakage and death of mouse AML(MLL) cells (with an MLL-ENL fusion and a constitutively active N-RAS independently of p53. Moreover, ATR inhibition as a single agent exhibited antitumoral activity, both reducing tumor burden after establishment and preventing tumors from growing, in an immunocompetent allograft mouse model of AML(MLL) and in xenografts of a human AML-MLL cell line. We also found that inhibition of ATM, a kinase that senses DNA double-strand breaks, also promoted the survival of the AML(MLL) mice. Collectively, these data indicated that ATR or ATM inhibition represent potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AML, especially MLL-driven leukemias. PMID:27625305

  11. [Peritonitis caused by spontaneous rupture of pyonephrosis in pregnancy. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Rabii, R; Rais, H; Sarf, I; Joual, A; Aboutaieb, R; Bennani, S; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S; Hamoudi, D; Idali, B; Harti, A; Barrou, L

    1999-01-01

    Peritonitis after spontaneous rupture of pyonephrosis into the peritoneal cavity is a rare complication, usually diagnosed intraoperatively. We report a case of a woman presenting with left lumbar pain and fever during pregnancy. On admission, ultrasonography showed a pregnancy with fetal activity for 16 weeks, and pyonephrosis in the left kidney, but on a normal right kidney. After antibiotic therapy and upper urinary, tract stenting renal drainage revealed purulent urine, fever persisted with acute abdomen. Clinical and radiological assessment showed features of acute peritonitis with pyonephrosis. Treatment consisted of laparotomy with nephrectomy and abdominal lavage and drainage. The postoperative complication was septic shock requiring resuscitation and artificial ventilation and prolonged convalescence.

  12. Intrinsic relative activities of κ opioid agonists in activating Gα proteins and internalizing receptor: Differences between human and mouse receptors.

    PubMed

    DiMattio, Kelly M; Ehlert, Frederick J; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-08-15

    Several investigators recently identified biased κ opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [(35)S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi-G) and receptor internalization (RAi-I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi-G - logRAi-I, RAi-G/RAi-I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1-17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed.

  13. Intrinsic Relative Activities of Opioid Agonists in Activating Gα proteins and Internalizing Receptor: Differences between Human and Mouse Receptors

    PubMed Central

    DiMattio, Kelly M.; Ehlert, Frederick J.; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators recently identified biased opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi−G) and receptor internalization (RAi−I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi−G − Log RAi−I, RAi−G/RAi−I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1–17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed. PMID:26057692

  14. Acute inflammation in peritoneal dialysis: experimental studies in rats. Characterization of regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Farhan

    2005-01-01

    The predominant problems associated with peritoneal dialysis (PD) are ultrafiltration failure and peritonitis. PD maintains a state of intraperitoneal inflammation that affects the structure and function of the peritoneal membrane, potentially impairing ultrafiltration efficiency. Paradoxically, some PD fluids also have anti-inflammatory properties that may compromise the immune defense against peritonitis. This anti-inflammatory feature is mostly due to the glucose degradation products (GDPs), formed during heat-sterilization and storage of PD fluids. The main purpose of the present thesis was to study regulatory mechanisms behind the acute intraperitoneal inflammatory response in PD in the presence and absence of experimental peritonitis. Rats were exposed to a single dose of heat- or filter sterilized PD fluids either as an i.p. injection or as an infusion through an indwelling catheter, with or without supplementations, or pretreatment of the animals. The dwell fluid was analyzed zero, two and four hours later concerning activation of the complement and coagulation cascades, neutrophil recruitment and respiratory burst, ultrafiltration volumes, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC-1), rat mast cell protease 2 (RMCP-2), glucose, urea and histamine concentrations and ex vivo/in vitro intraperitoneal chemotactic activity. Exposure to filter sterilized PD fluid alone induced intraperitoneal complement activation and coagulation, neutrophil recruitment and increased the levels of CINC-1 during the dwell. Intraperitoneal concentrations of the mast cell markers histamine and RMCP-2 changed little during the dwells and did not indicate mast cell activation. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and C5 blockade improved ultrafiltration. Pretreatment with cobra venom factor, known decomplementing agent, blocked the CINC-1 release and the neutrophil recruitment and improved ultrafiltration. In combination with experimental peritonitis, heat sterilized PD fluid

  15. Differential distribution of the sodium‐activated potassium channels slick and slack in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Hans‐Günther; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sodium‐activated potassium channels Slick (Slo2.1, KCNT2) and Slack (Slo2.2, KCNT1) are high‐conductance potassium channels of the Slo family. In neurons, Slick and Slack channels are involved in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization, in the regulation of firing patterns, and in setting and stabilizing the resting membrane potential. The distribution and subcellular localization of Slick and Slack channels in the mouse brain have not yet been established in detail. The present study addresses this issue through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Both channels were widely distributed and exhibited distinct distribution patterns. However, in some brain regions, their expression overlapped. Intense Slick channel immunoreactivity was observed in processes, varicosities, and neuronal cell bodies of the olfactory bulb, granular zones of cortical regions, hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septal nuclei, certain hypothalamic and midbrain nuclei, and several regions of the brainstem. The Slack channel showed primarily a diffuse immunostaining pattern, and labeling of cell somata and processes was observed only occasionally. The highest Slack channel expression was detected in the olfactory bulb, lateral septal nuclei, basal ganglia, and distinct areas of the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellar cortex. In addition, comparing our data obtained from mouse brain with a previously published study on rat brain revealed some differences in the expression and distribution of Slick and Slack channels in these species. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2093–2116, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26587966

  16. NF-kB activation as a biomarker of light injury using a transgenic mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocock, Ginger M.; Boretsky, Adam; Wang, Heuy-Ching; Golden, Dallas; Gupta, Praveena; Vargas, Gracie; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2012-03-01

    The spatial and temporal activation of NF-kB (p65) was monitored in the retina of a transgenic mouse model (cis-NFkB-EGFP) in vivo after receiving varying grades of laser induced thermal injury in one eye. Baseline images of the retinas from 26 mice were collected prior to injury and up to five months post-exposure using a Heidelberg Spectralis HRA confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) with a spectral domain optical coherence tomographer (SDOCT). Injured and control eyes were enucleated at discrete time points following laser exposure for cryosectioning to determine localization of NF-kB dependent enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene expression within the retina using fluorescence microscopy. In addition, EGFP basal expression in brain and retinal tissue from the cis-NFkB-EGFP was characterized using two-photon imaging. Regions of the retina exposed to threshold and supra-threshold laser damage evaluated using fluorescence cSLO showed increased EGFP fluorescence localized to the exposed region for a duration that was dependent upon the degree of injury. Fluorescence microscopy of threshold damage revealed EGFP localized to the outer nuclear region and retinal pigment epithelial layer. Basal expression of EGFP imaged using two-photon microscopy was heterogeneously distributed throughout brain tissue and confined to the inner retina. Results show cis-NF-kB-EGFP reporter mouse can be used for in vivo studies of light induced injury to the retina and possibly brain injury.

  17. Promiscuous activity of the LXR antagonist GSK2033 in a mouse model of fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Griffett, Kristine; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The liver X receptor (LXR) functions as a receptor for oxysterols and plays a critical role in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. We recently described a synthetic LXR inverse agonist that displayed efficacy in treatment of hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This compound, SR9238, was designed to display liver specificity so as to avoid potential detrimental effects on reverse cholesterol transport in peripheral tissues. Here, we examined the effects of a LXR antagonist/inverse agonist, GSK2033, which displays systemic exposure. Although GSK2033 performed as expected in cell-based models as a LXR inverse agonist, it displayed unexpected activity in the mouse NAFLD model. The expression of lipogenic enzyme genes such as fatty acid synthase and sterol regulatory binding protein 1c were induced rather than suppressed and no effect on hepatic steatosis was found. Further characterization of the specificity of GSK2033 revealed that it displayed a significant degree of promiscuity, targeting a number of other nuclear receptors that could clearly alter hepatic gene expression. PMID:27680310

  18. Fluorescence-based visualization of autophagic activity predicts mouse embryo viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Hara, Taichi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kito, Seiji; Minami, Naojiro; Kubota, Toshiro; Sato, Ken; Kokubo, Toshiaki

    2014-03-01

    Embryo quality is a critical parameter in assisted reproductive technologies. Although embryo quality can be evaluated morphologically, embryo morphology does not correlate perfectly with embryo viability. To improve this, it is important to understand which molecular mechanisms are involved in embryo quality control. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process in which cytoplasmic materials sequestered by autophagosomes are degraded in lysosomes. We previously demonstrated that autophagy is highly activated after fertilization and is essential for further embryonic development. Here, we developed a simple fluorescence-based method for visualizing autophagic activity in live mouse embryos. Our method is based on imaging of the fluorescence intensity of GFP-LC3, a versatile marker for autophagy, which is microinjected into the embryos. Using this method, we show that embryonic autophagic activity declines with advancing maternal age, probably due to a decline in the activity of lysosomal hydrolases. We also demonstrate that embryonic autophagic activity is associated with the developmental viability of the embryo. Our results suggest that embryonic autophagic activity can be utilized as a novel indicator of embryo quality.

  19. Proteomic analysis of livers from a transgenic mouse line with activated polyamine catabolism.

    PubMed

    Cerrada-Gimenez, Marc; Häyrinen, Jukka; Juutinen, Sisko; Reponen, Tuula; Jänne, Juhani; Alhonen, Leena

    2010-02-01

    We have generated a transgenic mouse line that over expresses the rate-controlling enzyme of the polyamine catabolism, spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase, under the control of a heavy metal inducible promoter. This line is characterized by a notable increase in SSAT activity in liver, pancreas and kidneys and a moderate increase in the rest of the tissues. SSAT induction results in an enhanced polyamine catabolism manifested as a depletion of spermidine and spermine and an overaccumulation of putrescine in all tissues. To study how the activation of polyamine catabolism affects other metabolic pathways, protein expression pattern of the livers of transgenic animals was analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. A total of 23 proteins were shown to be differentially expressed in the transgenic from the wild-type animals. Many of the identified proteins showed expression patterns associated with polyamine catabolism activation. However, the expression pattern of other proteins, such as repression of GST pi and selenium-binding protein 2 and 60 kDa heat-shock protein, could be explained by the overexpression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1alpha in response to depleted ATP pools. The activation of the latter proteins is thought to lead to the improved insulin sensitivity seen in the MT-SSAT animals.

  20. Evaluation of Neuronal Protective Effects of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Inhibitors on Severe Whole-brain Ischemia in Mouse Model and Analysis of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Activity in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Go; OKAMOTO, Ken; KUSANO, Teruo; MATSUDA, Yoko; FUSE, Akira; YOKOTA, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) often result in high mortality. Free radicals play an important role in global cerebral I/R. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitors, such as allopurinol, have been reported to protect tissues from damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inhibiting its production through XOR inhibition. The recently introduced XOR inhibitor febuxostat, which is a more potent inhibitor than allopurinol, is expected to decrease free radical production more effectively. Here, we analyzed the effects of allopurinol and febuxostat in decreasing global severe cerebral I/R damage in mice. Mice were divided into three groups: a placebo group, an allopurinol group, and a febuxostat group. Pathological examinations, which were performed in each group in the CA1 and CA2 regions of the hippocampus 4 days after I/R surgery, revealed that there was a decrease in the number of neuronal cells in the 14-min occlusion model in both regions and that drugs that were administered to prevent this damage were not effective. The enzymatic activity was extremely low in the mouse brain, and XOR could not be detected in the nonischemic and ischemic mice brains with western blot analyses. Thus, one of the reasons for the decreased effectiveness of XOR inhibitors in controlling severe whole-brain ischemia in a mouse model was the low levels of expression of XOR in the mouse brain. PMID:25744353

  1. Peritoneal dialysis solutions low in glucose degradation products--evidence for clinical benefits.

    PubMed

    Tomo, Tadashi

    2008-06-01

    In Japan, two types of new peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF) are ordinarily used: two-chambered PDF, and icodextrin PDF. Two-chambered PDF has several biocompatible characteristics, one being low glucose degradation products (GDPs). Of the several GDPs in PDF, 3,4-dideoxyglucosone-3-ene (3,4-DGE) is thought to be strongly associated with the cytotoxicity of standard PDF. Using a PDF low in GDPs may reduce exposure of the peritoneum to 3,4-DGE, helping to preserve peritoneal function in PD patients. Additionally, use of a PDF low in GDPs may reduce plasma levels of advanced glycosylation end-products in PD patients, a change that may help to preserve vascular function in PD patients. Peritoneal rest for 24 hours after exposure to a PDF with low GDPs improves the activity of human peritoneal mesothelial cells. As compared with the use of standard PDF, the use of low-GDP PDF in combination therapy (peritoneal dialysis plus hemodialysis) may more effectively preserve peritoneal function. The new PDF low in GDPs has biocompatible characteristics relative to peritoneum and system that may help to preserve peritoneal function or reduce complications such as atherosclerosis or dialysis-related amyloidosis in dialysis patients.

  2. Common fragile sites are conserved features of human and mouse chromosomes and relate to large active genes

    PubMed Central

    Helmrich, Anne; Stout-Weider, Karen; Hermann, Klaus; Schrock, Evelin; Heiden, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) are seen as chromosomal gaps and breaks brought about by inhibition of replication, and it is thought that they cluster with tumor breakpoints. This study presents a comprehensive analysis using conventional and molecular cytogenetic mapping of CFSs and their expression frequencies in two mouse strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, and in human probands. Here we show that induced mouse CFSs relate to sites of spontaneous gaps and breaks and that CFS expression levels in chromosome bands are conserved between the two mouse strains and between syntenic mouse and human DNA segments. Furthermore, four additional mouse CFSs were found to be homologous to human CFSs on the molecular cytogenetic level (Fra2D-FRA2G, Fra4C2-FRA9E, Fra6A3.1-FRA7G, and Fra6B1-FRA7H), increasing the number of such CFSs already described in the literature to eight. Contrary to previous reports, DNA helix flexibility is not increased in the 15 human and eight mouse CFSs molecularly defined so far, compared to large nonfragile control regions. Our findings suggest that the mechanisms that provoke instability at CFSs are evolutionarily conserved. The role that large transcriptionally active genes may play in CFS expression is discussed. PMID:16954539

  3. 129-Derived Mouse Strains Express an Unstable but Catalytically Active DNA Polymerase Iota Variant.

    PubMed

    Aoufouchi, Said; De Smet, Annie; Delbos, Frédéric; Gelot, Camille; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-09-01

    Mice derived from the 129 strain have a nonsense codon mutation in exon 2 of the polymerase iota (Polι) gene and are therefore considered Polι deficient. When we amplified Polι mRNA from 129/SvJ or 129/Ola testes, only a small fraction of the full-length cDNA contained the nonsense mutation; the major fraction corresponded to a variant Polι isoform lacking exon 2. Polι mRNA lacking exon 2 contains an open reading frame, and the corresponding protein was detected using a polyclonal antibody raised against the C terminus of the murine Polι protein. The identity of the corresponding protein was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. Although the variant protein was expressed at only 5 to 10% of the level of wild-type Polι, it retained de novo DNA synthesis activity, the capacity to form replication foci following UV irradiation, and the ability to rescue UV light sensitivity in Polι(-/-) embryonic fibroblasts derived from a new, fully deficient Polι knockout (KO) mouse line. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of 129-derived male mice with Velcade, a drug that inhibits proteasome function, stabilized and restored a substantial amount of the variant Polι in these animals, indicating that its turnover is controlled by the proteasome. An analysis of two xeroderma pigmentosum-variant (XPV) cases corresponding to missense mutants of Polη, a related translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase in the same family, similarly showed a destabilization of the catalytically active mutant protein by the proteasome. Collectively, these data challenge the prevailing hypothesis that 129-derived strains of mice are completely deficient in Polι activity. The data also document, both for 129-derived mouse strains and for some XPV patients, new cases of genetic defects corresponding to the destabilization of an otherwise functional protein, the phenotype of which is reversible by proteasome inhibition.

  4. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangfang; Okawa, Hiroko; Kamano, Yuya; Niibe, Kunimichi; Kayashima, Hiroki; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Pavasant, Prasit; Saeki, Makio; Yatani, Hirofumi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet)-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR) expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR). Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx) cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx). MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional activation

  5. The weight of computer mouse affects the wrist motion and forearm muscle activity during fast operation speed task.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Ming; Lee, Chang-Sian; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu

    2012-06-01

    The frequent use of the computer mouse was reported to be associated with the development of the musculoskeletal disorders in the wrist, forearm, and shoulder regions. This study was to examine the effect of the mouse weights and operation speeds on the wrist motion and muscle activity. 25 subjects (20 males and 5 females) were instructed to repetitively point-and-click the mouse between two targets displaced in the monitor with five different weighted mice (weights around 70, 100, 130, 160, and 190 g) at the fast (50 repetition/min) and slow (25 repetition/min) operation speeds. Surface electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis, extensor carpi ulnaris, extensor digitorum, and upper trapezius muscles were recorded, and the electrogoniometer was used to register the wrist motions. The results showed that the maximal ulnar deviation was not significantly different among the examined conditions. The wrist movement range and the forearm muscle activities showed a V-shape tendency with the lowest value in the mouse weight of 130 g. This tendency was diminished during the slow speed tasks. The results suggested that the proper mouse weight could benefit the users in terms of increasing the movement efficiency and decreasing the muscular costs.

  6. Chlamydia Peritonitis and Ascites Mimicking Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Macer, Matthew; Azodi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) rarely results in diffuse ascites. Severe adhesive disease secondary to PID may lead to the formation of inclusion cysts and even pelvic peritoneal nodularity due to postinflammatory scarring and cause an elevation of serum CA-125 levels. The constellation of these findings may mimic an ovarian neoplasm. Case. We report a case of a 22-year-old female who presented with multiple pelvic cysts and diffuse ascites due to Chlamydia trachomatis infection. The initial gynecologic exam did not reveal obvious evidence of PID; however, a positive Chlamydia trachomatis test, pathologic findings, and the exclusion of other etiologies facilitated the diagnosis. Conclusion. Chlamydia trachomatis and other infectious agents should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a young sexually active female with abdominal pain, ascites, and pelvic cystic masses. Thorough workup in such a population may reduce the number of more invasive procedures as well as unnecessary repeat surgical procedures. PMID:27747116

  7. Mouse Cytotoxic T Cell-derived Granzyme B Activates the Mitochondrial Cell Death Pathway in a Bim-dependent Fashion*

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Elena; Jaime-Sánchez, Paula; Aguiló, Nacho; Simon, Markus M.; Froelich, Christopher J.; Pardo, Julián

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells (Tc) use perforin and granzyme B (gzmB) to kill virus-infected cells and cancer cells. Recent evidence suggests that human gzmB primarily induces apoptosis via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway by either cleaving Bid or activating Bim leading to the activation of Bak/Bax and subsequent generation of active caspase-3. In contrast, mouse gzmB is thought to predominantly induce apoptosis by directly processing pro-caspase-3. However, in certain mouse cell types gzmB-mediated apoptosis mainly occurs via the mitochondrial pathway. To investigate whether Bim is involved under the latter conditions, we have now employed ex vivo virus-immune mouse Tc that selectively kill by using perforin and gzmB (gzmB+Tc) as effector cells and wild type as well as Bim- or Bak/Bax-deficient spontaneously (3T9) or virus-(SV40) transformed mouse embryonic fibroblast cells as targets. We show that gzmB+Tc-mediated apoptosis (phosphatidylserine translocation, mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation) was severely reduced in 3T9 cells lacking either Bim or both Bak and Bax. This outcome was related to the ability of Tc cells to induce the degradation of Mcl-1 and Bcl-XL, the anti-apoptotic counterparts of Bim. In contrast, gzmB+Tc-mediated apoptosis was not affected in SV40-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblast cells lacking Bak/Bax. The data provide evidence that Bim participates in mouse gzmB+Tc-mediated apoptosis of certain targets by activating the mitochondrial pathway and suggest that the mode of cell death depends on the target cell. Our results suggest that the various molecular events leading to transformation and/or immortalization of cells have an impact on their relative resistance to the multiple gzmB+Tc-induced death pathways. PMID:25605735

  8. Activity of potent and selective host defense peptide mimetics in mouse models of oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Lisa K; Freeman, Katie B; Masso-Silva, Jorge A; Falkovsky, Klaudia; Aloyouny, Ashwag; Markowitz, Kenneth; Hise, Amy G; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Scott, Richard W; Diamond, Gill

    2014-07-01

    There is a strong need for new broadly active antifungal agents for the treatment of oral candidiasis that not only are active against many species of Candida, including drug-resistant strains, but also evade microbial countermeasures which may lead to resistance. Host defense peptides (HDPs) can provide a foundation for the development of such agents. Toward this end, we have developed fully synthetic, small-molecule, nonpeptide mimetics of the HDPs that improve safety and other pharmaceutical properties. Here we describe the identification of several HDP mimetics that are broadly active against C. albicans and other species of Candida, rapidly fungicidal, and active against yeast and hyphal cultures and that exhibit low cytotoxicity for mammalian cells. Importantly, specificity for Candida over commensal bacteria was also evident, thereby minimizing potential damage to the endogenous microbiome which otherwise could favor fungal overgrowth. Three compounds were tested as topical agents in two different mouse models of oral candidiasis and were found to be highly active. Following single-dose administrations, total Candida burdens in tongues of infected animals were reduced up to three logs. These studies highlight the potential of HDP mimetics as a new tool in the antifungal arsenal for the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  9. Activity of Potent and Selective Host Defense Peptide Mimetics in Mouse Models of Oral Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lisa K.; Freeman, Katie B.; Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Falkovsky, Klaudia; Aloyouny, Ashwag; Markowitz, Kenneth; Hise, Amy G.; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Scott, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong need for new broadly active antifungal agents for the treatment of oral candidiasis that not only are active against many species of Candida, including drug-resistant strains, but also evade microbial countermeasures which may lead to resistance. Host defense peptides (HDPs) can provide a foundation for the development of such agents. Toward this end, we have developed fully synthetic, small-molecule, nonpeptide mimetics of the HDPs that improve safety and other pharmaceutical properties. Here we describe the identification of several HDP mimetics that are broadly active against C. albicans and other species of Candida, rapidly fungicidal, and active against yeast and hyphal cultures and that exhibit low cytotoxicity for mammalian cells. Importantly, specificity for Candida over commensal bacteria was also evident, thereby minimizing potential damage to the endogenous microbiome which otherwise could favor fungal overgrowth. Three compounds were tested as topical agents in two different mouse models of oral candidiasis and were found to be highly active. Following single-dose administrations, total Candida burdens in tongues of infected animals were reduced up to three logs. These studies highlight the potential of HDP mimetics as a new tool in the antifungal arsenal for the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:24752272

  10. Excess cholesterol induces mouse egg activation and may cause female infertility

    PubMed Central

    Yesilaltay, Ayce; Dokshin, Gregoriy A.; Busso, Dolores; Wang, Li; Galiani, Dalia; Chavarria, Tony; Vasile, Eliza; Quilaqueo, Linda; Orellana, Juan Andrés; Walzer, Dalia; Shalgi, Ruth; Dekel, Nava; Albertini, David F.; Rigotti, Attilio; Page, David C.; Krieger, Monty

    2014-01-01

    The HDL receptor scavenger receptor, class B type I (SR-BI) controls the structure and fate of plasma HDL. Female SR-BI KO mice are infertile, apparently because of their abnormal cholesterol-enriched HDL particles. We examined the growth and meiotic progression of SR-BI KO oocytes and found that they underwent normal germinal vesicle breakdown; however, SR-BI KO eggs, which had accumulated excess cholesterol in vivo, spontaneously activated, and they escaped metaphase II (MII) arrest and progressed to pronuclear, MIII, and anaphase/telophase III stages. Eggs from fertile WT mice were activated when loaded in vitro with excess cholesterol by a cholesterol/methyl-β-cyclodextrin complex, phenocopying SR-BI KO oocytes. In vitro cholesterol loading of eggs induced reduction in maturation promoting factor and MAPK activities, elevation of intracellular calcium, extrusion of a second polar body, and progression to meiotic stages beyond MII. These results suggest that the infertility of SR-BI KO females is caused, at least in part, by excess cholesterol in eggs inducing premature activation and that cholesterol can activate WT mouse eggs to escape from MII arrest. Analysis of SR-BI KO female infertility raises the possibility that abnormalities in cholesterol metabolism might underlie some cases of human female infertility of unknown etiology. PMID:25368174

  11. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is a neuroprotectant in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Ramiro; Wu, Jialing; Haile, Woldeab B; Guzman, Johanna; Yepes, Manuel

    2010-06-01

    The best-known function of the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is as a thrombolytic enzyme. However, it is also found in structures of the brain that are highly vulnerable to hypoxia-induced cell death, where its association with neuronal survival is poorly understood. Here, we have demonstrated that hippocampal areas of the mouse brain lacking tPA activity are more vulnerable to neuronal death following an ischemic insult. We found that sublethal hypoxia, which elicits tolerance to subsequent lethal hypoxic/ischemic injury in a natural process known as ischemic preconditioning (IPC), induced a rapid release of neuronal tPA. Treatment of hippocampal neurons with tPA induced tolerance against a lethal hypoxic insult applied either immediately following insult (early IPC) or 24 hours later (delayed IPC). tPA-induced early IPC was independent of the proteolytic activity of tPA and required the engagement of a member of the LDL receptor family. In contrast, tPA-induced delayed IPC required the proteolytic activity of tPA and was mediated by plasmin, the NMDA receptor, and PKB phosphorylation. We also found that IPC in vivo increased tPA activity in the cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) layer and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus, as well as ischemic tolerance in wild-type but not tPA- or plasminogen-deficient mice. These data show that tPA can act as an endogenous neuroprotectant in the murine hippocampus.

  12. Field potential signature of distinct multicellular activity patterns in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Reichinnek, Susanne; Künsting, Thomas; Draguhn, Andreas; Both, Martin

    2010-11-17

    Cognitive functions go along with complex patterns of distributed activity in neuronal networks, thereby forming assemblies of selected neurons. To support memory processes, such assemblies have to be stabilized and reactivated in a highly reproducible way. The rodent hippocampus provides a well studied model system for network mechanisms underlying spatial memory formation. Assemblies of place-encoding cells are repeatedly activated during sleep-associated network states called sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs). Behavioral studies suggest that at any time the hippocampus harbors a limited number of different assemblies that are transiently stabilized for memory consolidation. We hypothesized that the corresponding field potentials (sharp wave-ripple complexes) contain a specific signature of the underlying neuronal activity patterns. Hence, they should fall into a limited number of different waveforms. Application of unbiased sorting algorithms to sharp wave-ripple complexes in mouse hippocampal slices did indeed reveal the reliable recurrence of defined waveforms that were robust over prolonged recording periods. Single-unit discharges tended to fire selectively with certain SPW-R classes and were coupled above chance level. Thus, field SPW-Rs of different waveforms are directly related to the underlying multicellular activity patterns that recur with high fidelity. This direct relationship between the coordinated activity of distinct groups of neurons and macroscopic electrographic signals may be important for cognition-related physiological studies in humans and behaving animals.

  13. Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in the pathogenesis of post-surgical peritoneal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Pilar; Jiménez-Heffernan, José A; Guerra-Azcona, Gonzalo; Pérez-Lozano, María L; Rynne-Vidal, Ángela; Albar-Vizcaíno, Patricia; Gil-Vera, Fernando; Martín, Paloma; Coronado, María José; Barcena, Carmen; Dotor, Javier; Majano, Pedro Lorenzo; Peralta, Abelardo Aguilera; López-Cabrera, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Peritoneal adhesions (PAs) are fibrotic bands formed between bowel loops, solid organs, and the parietal peritoneum, which may appear following surgery, infection or endometriosis. They represent an important health problem with no effective treatment. Mesothelial cells (MCs) line the peritoneal cavity and undergo a mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) under pathological conditions, transforming into myofibroblasts, which are abundant in peritoneal fibrotic tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate if peritoneal MCs undergo a MMT contributing to the formation of post-surgical adhesions. Biopsies from patients with PAs were analysed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and quantitative RT-PCR. A mouse model of PAs based on ischaemic buttons was used to modulate MMT by blocking the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway. The severity of adhesions and MMT-related marker expression were studied. We observed myofibroblasts derived from the conversion of MCs in submesothelial areas of patients with PAs. In addition, MMT-related markers were dysregulated in adhesion zones when compared to distant normal peritoneal tissue of the same patient. In animal experiments, blockage of TGF-β resulted in molecular reprogramming of markers related to the mesenchymal conversion of MCs and in a significant decrease in the severity of the adhesions. These data indicate for the first time that MMT is involved in PA pathogenesis. This finding opens new therapeutic strategies to interfere with adhesion formation by modulating MMT with a wide range of pharmacological agents. PMID:27071481

  14. Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in the pathogenesis of post-surgical peritoneal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Pilar; Jiménez-Heffernan, José A; Guerra-Azcona, Gonzalo; Pérez-Lozano, María L; Rynne-Vidal, Ángela; Albar-Vizcaíno, Patricia; Gil-Vera, Fernando; Martín, Paloma; Coronado, María José; Barcena, Carmen; Dotor, Javier; Majano, Pedro Lorenzo; Peralta, Abelardo Aguilera; López-Cabrera, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Peritoneal adhesions (PAs) are fibrotic bands formed between bowel loops, solid organs, and the parietal peritoneum, which may appear following surgery, infection or endometriosis. They represent an important health problem with no effective treatment. Mesothelial cells (MCs) line the peritoneal cavity and undergo a mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) under pathological conditions, transforming into myofibroblasts, which are abundant in peritoneal fibrotic tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate if peritoneal MCs undergo a MMT contributing to the formation of post-surgical adhesions. Biopsies from patients with PAs were analysed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and quantitative RT-PCR. A mouse model of PAs based on ischaemic buttons was used to modulate MMT by blocking the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway. The severity of adhesions and MMT-related marker expression were studied. We observed myofibroblasts derived from the conversion of MCs in submesothelial areas of patients with PAs. In addition, MMT-related markers were dysregulated in adhesion zones when compared to distant normal peritoneal tissue of the same patient. In animal experiments, blockage of TGF-β resulted in molecular reprogramming of markers related to the mesenchymal conversion of MCs and in a significant decrease in the severity of the adhesions. These data indicate for the first time that MMT is involved in PA pathogenesis. This finding opens new therapeutic strategies to interfere with adhesion formation by modulating MMT with a wide range of pharmacological agents.

  15. Abdominal Distension and Escherichia coli Peritonitis in Mice Lacking Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Linda K; Widi, Antin Yn; Rowarth, Serrin; Baxter, Alan G

    2015-04-01

    Here we describe the gross and microscopic findings of naturally occurring, β-hemolytic Escherichia coli peritonitis in B6.129-Myd88(tm1Aki) male and female mice. Over approximately 5 mo, 10 homozygous mutant mice deficient in myeloid differentiation factor 88 (C57BL/6 strain; male and female) that had not been used in research protocols developed rapid-onset abdominal swelling associated with copious viscous ascites. Each mouse developed an anterior peritonitis, primarily involving the parietal peritoneum and the visceral surface of the spleen, liver, diaphragm, and stomach. Inflammation was confined to the organ surfaces, with no indication of septicemia or grossly apparent gastrointestinal perforation or other tissue compromise that would initiate peritonitis. Peritonitis was likely attributable to compromised antibacterial innate immunity; cohoused, similarly immunodeficient littermates did not develop similar clinical signs. An unusual finding in all cases was mesothelial cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy. Although the underlying innate immune deficiency accounts for much of the observed pathology, the remarkable mesothelial cell morphology and the episodic nature of the peritonitis in some littermates and not others remain unexplained.

  16. Evaluation of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluid C-reactive protein in patients with peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Kumaresan; Padmanabhan, Giri; Vijayaraghavan, Bhooma

    2016-05-01

    Severe peritonitis causing death is one of the most devastating complications of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Since the predictive value of C-reactive protein (CRP) in PD fluid has not been assessed, the objective of the present study is to evaluate its predictive value and clinical correlation in patients on PD with peritonitis. One hundred and twenty patients on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) were enrolled and their serum and fluid CRP (Fl. CRP) were evaluated at the start of CAPD. All patients who developed peritonitis were further evaluated for serum and fluid CRP. The patients were categorized into four groups, namely: normal patients (control group), patients with peritonitis, patients with peritonitis leading to catheter removal, and death due to peritonitis. Sixty-five patients developed peritonitis of whom, catheter removal was performed in eight patients. Five patients died due to peritonitis-related complications. Fl. CRP showed a significant difference among the three groups, unlike S. CRP. Estimation of CRP in the peritoneal fluid may be a useful marker to monitor the onset of peritonitis. PMID:27215236

  17. Evaluation of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluid C-reactive protein in patients with peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Kumaresan; Padmanabhan, Giri; Vijayaraghavan, Bhooma

    2016-05-01

    Severe peritonitis causing death is one of the most devastating complications of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Since the predictive value of C-reactive protein (CRP) in PD fluid has not been assessed, the objective of the present study is to evaluate its predictive value and clinical correlation in patients on PD with peritonitis. One hundred and twenty patients on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) were enrolled and their serum and fluid CRP (Fl. CRP) were evaluated at the start of CAPD. All patients who developed peritonitis were further evaluated for serum and fluid CRP. The patients were categorized into four groups, namely: normal patients (control group), patients with peritonitis, patients with peritonitis leading to catheter removal, and death due to peritonitis. Sixty-five patients developed peritonitis of whom, catheter removal was performed in eight patients. Five patients died due to peritonitis-related complications. Fl. CRP showed a significant difference among the three groups, unlike S. CRP. Estimation of CRP in the peritoneal fluid may be a useful marker to monitor the onset of peritonitis.

  18. CDK2 activation in mouse epidermis induces keratinocyte proliferation but does not affect skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; De Siervi, Adriana; Conti, Claudio J; Senderowicz, Adrian M; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2008-08-01

    It has been widely assumed that elevated CDK2 kinase activity plays a contributory role in tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that mice overexpressing CDK4 under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK4 mice) develop epidermal hyperplasia and increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. In this model, CDK4 overexpression results in increased CDK2 activity associated with the noncatalytic function of CDK4, sequestration of p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Furthermore, we have shown that ablation of Cdk2 reduces Ras-Cdk4 tumorigenesis, suggesting that increased CDK2 activity plays an important role in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated two transgenic mouse models of elevated CDK2 kinase activity, K5Cdk2 and K5Cdk4(D158N) mice. The D158N mutation blocks CDK4 kinase activity without interfering with its binding capability. CDK2 activation via overexpression of CDK4(D158N), but not of CDK2, resulted in epidermal hyperplasia. We observed elevated levels of p21(Cip1) in K5Cdk2, but not in K5Cdk4(D158N), epidermis, suggesting that CDK2 overexpression elicits a p21(Cip1) response to maintain keratinocyte homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that neither CDK2 overexpression nor the indirect activation of CDK2 enhanced skin tumor development. Thus, although the indirect activation of CDK2 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte hyperproliferation, activation of CDK2 alone does not induce malignant progression in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis.

  19. CDK2 Activation in Mouse Epidermis Induces Keratinocyte Proliferation but Does Not Affect Skin Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Everardo; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; De Siervi, Adriana; Conti, Claudio J.; Senderowicz, Adrian M.; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2008-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that elevated CDK2 kinase activity plays a contributory role in tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that mice overexpressing CDK4 under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK4 mice) develop epidermal hyperplasia and increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. In this model, CDK4 overexpression results in increased CDK2 activity associated with the noncatalytic function of CDK4, sequestration of p21Cip1 and p27Kip1. Furthermore, we have shown that ablation of Cdk2 reduces Ras-Cdk4 tumorigenesis, suggesting that increased CDK2 activity plays an important role in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated two transgenic mouse models of elevated CDK2 kinase activity, K5Cdk2 and K5Cdk4D158N mice. The D158N mutation blocks CDK4 kinase activity without interfering with its binding capability. CDK2 activation via overexpression of CDK4D158N, but not of CDK2, resulted in epidermal hyperplasia. We observed elevated levels of p21Cip1 in K5Cdk2, but not in K5Cdk4D158N, epidermis, suggesting that CDK2 overexpression elicits a p21Cip1 response to maintain keratinocyte homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that neither CDK2 overexpression nor the indirect activation of CDK2 enhanced skin tumor development. Thus, although the indirect activation of CDK2 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte hyperproliferation, activation of CDK2 alone does not induce malignant progression in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:18599613

  20. Neuronal activity of orexin and non-orexin waking-active neurons during wake-sleep states in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Lin, J-S; Sakai, K

    2008-05-15

    Using extracellular single unit recordings alone or in combination with neurobiotin juxtacellular labeling and orexin (hypocretin) immunohistochemistry in the mouse, we have recorded a total of 452 neurons in the orexin neuron field of the posterior hypothalamus. Of these, 76 exhibited tonic discharge highly specific to wakefulness, referred to as waking-active neurons. They showed differences from each other in terms of spike shape, activity profile, and response to an arousing sound stimulus and could be classified into three groups on the basis of spike shape as: 1) biphasic broad; 2) biphasic narrow; and 3) triphasic. Waking-active neurons characterized by biphasic broad spikes were orexin-immunopositive, whereas those characterized by either biphasic narrow or triphasic broad spikes were orexin-immunonegative. Unlike waking-specific histamine neurons, all orexin and non-orexin waking-active neurons exhibited slow (<10 Hz) tonic discharges during wakefulness and ceased firing shortly after the onset of electroencephalogram (EEG) synchronization (deactivation), the EEG sign of sleep (drowsy state). They remained virtually silent during slow-wave sleep, but displayed transient discharges during paradoxical (or rapid eye movement) sleep. During the transition from sleep to wakefulness, both orexin and triphasic non-orexin neurons fired in clusters prior to the onset of EEG activation, the EEG sign of wakefulness, and responded with a short latency to an arousing sound stimulus given during sleep. In contrast, the biphasic narrow non-orexin neurons fired in single spikes either prior to, or after, EEG activation during the same transition and responded to the stimulus with a longer latency. The activity of all waking-active neurons preceded the return of muscle tonus at the transition from paradoxical sleep to wakefulness. These data support the view that the activity of orexin and non-orexin waking-active neurons in the posterior hypothalamus plays an important

  1. A Report of Peritonitis from Aeromonas sobria in a Peritoneal Dialysis (PD) Patient with Necrotizing Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Janma, Jirayut; Linasmita, Patcharasarn; Changsirikulchai, Siribha

    2015-11-01

    A 70-years of age, male patient with underlying type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia and ischemic heart disease had undergone continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)for 3 years without any episodes of peritonitis. He was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis and later developed peritonitis after receiving a laceration from an aquatic injury suffered during the flood disaster of 2011. The blood culture, necrotic tissue and the clear dialysate collected upon admission had shown Aeromonas sobria. The route of peritonitis may be from the hematogenous spread of A. sobria resulting in necrotizing fasciitis. A. sobria should be considered as the pathogen of peritonitis in PD patients who have history of wounds from contaminated water. We suggest that the PD patients who present with septicemia and did not meet the criteria for peritonitis, the initial dialysate effluent should be sent for culture. The benefit of this is to allow early recognition and treatment of peritonitis.

  2. Asymptomatic peritoneal carcinomatosis originating from benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Iacoponi, S; Calleja, J; Hernandez, G; de la Cuesta, R Sainz

    2015-01-01

    Benign multicystic mesothelioma is a rare tumour that originates from the abdominal peritoneum with a predisposition to the pelvic peritoneum. It typically affects women of reproductive age. There have been less than 200 cases of this rare neoplasia reported to date. We present the case of a 35-year-old woman who was referred to our centre because of the detection of a peritoneal carcinomatosis during a gynaecological exam. A diagnostic laparoscopy was performed. The findings included multiple cysts appearing as ‘a bunch of grapes’ occupying the omentum. Biopsies were taken during the surgery and the results showed benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma. Benign multicystic mesothelioma can simulate other conditions, such as malignant ovarian tumours or cystic lymphangioma. It is often diagnosed accidentally during surgery performed for another reason. The diagnosis is interoperative, observing multicystic structures grouped as a ‘bunch of grapes’ containing clear fluid with thin walls made of connective tissue. Immunohistochemistry confirmed mesothelial origin. Surgery is considered the treatment of choice and is based on the removal of the cysts from the abdominal cavity. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy can be considered as a primary treatment in patients with recurrences or even as a part of primary treatment associated with surgery. Survival at 5 years is 100% and invasive or malignant progression is extraordinary. The treatment approach should be multidisciplinary, and the patient should be referred to a referral centre. PMID:26715942

  3. Metastable primordial germ cell-like state induced from mouse embryonic stem cells by Akt activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamano, Noriko; Kimura, Tohru; Watanabe-Kushima, Shoko; Shinohara, Takashi; Nakano, Toru

    2010-02-12

    Specification to primordial germ cells (PGCs) is mediated by mesoderm-induction signals during gastrulation. We found that Akt activation during in vitro mesodermal differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated self-renewing spheres with differentiation states between those of ESCs and PGCs. Essential regulators for PGC specification and their downstream germ cell-specific genes were expressed in the spheres, indicating that the sphere cells had commenced differentiation to the germ lineage. However, the spheres did not proceed to spermatogenesis after transplantation into testes. Sphere cell transfer to the original feeder-free ESC cultures resulted in chaotic differentiation. In contrast, when the spheres were cultured on mouse embryonic fibroblasts or in the presence of ERK-cascade and GSK3 inhibitors, reversion to the ESC-like state was observed. These results indicate that Akt signaling promotes a novel metastable and pluripotent state that is intermediate to those of ESCs and PGCs.

  4. Chaotic electrical activity of living β-cells in the mouse pancreatic islet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Takahiro; Miyano, Takaya; Tokuda, Isao; Galvanovskis, Juris; Wakui, Makoto

    2007-02-01

    To test for chaotic dynamics of the insulin producing β-cell and explore its biological role, we observed the action potentials with the perforated patch clamp technique, for isolated cells as well as for intact cells of the mouse pancreatic islet. The time series obtained were analyzed using nonlinear diagnostic algorithms associated with the surrogate method. The isolated cells exhibited short-term predictability and visible determinism, in the steady state response to 10 mM glucose, while the intact cells did not. In the latter case, determinism became visible after the application of a gap junction inhibitor. This tendency was enhanced by the stimulation with tolbutamide. Our observations suggest that, thanks to the integration of individual chaotic dynamics via gap junction coupling, the β-cells will lose memory of fluctuations occurring at any instant in their electrical activity more rapidly with time. This is likely to contribute to the functional stability of the islet against uncertain perturbations.

  5. Active immunization of rats with cumulus-free mouse ova: induction of infertility and antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Aitken, R J; Richardson, D W

    1981-04-01

    Active immunization of rats with cross-reacting zona pellucida antigens derived from cumulus-free mouse ova resulted in the induction in fertility without adverse side effects. Half of the immunized animals never regained their fertility despite repeated matings with fertile males. Two of the remaining animals conceived when antibody titers fell to basal levels and gave birth to litters of normal healthy young. Post mortem examination of immunized animals 24 hours after finding sperm in the vaginal smears resulted in the recovery of tubal ova exhibiting the presence of a precipitate on the outer surface of the zona pellucida. Some of these ova appeared to have been fertilized, suggesting that anti-zona antibodies may also inhibit fertility through a post-fertilization mechanism of action. PMID:7288384

  6. Chronic peritoneal dialysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Nia; Hussain, Farida K; Connell, Roy; Shenoy, Manoj U

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of end-stage renal disease in children is increasing. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is the modality of choice in many European countries and is increasingly applied worldwide. PD enables children of all ages to be successfully treated while awaiting the ultimate goal of renal transplantation. The advantages of PD over other forms of renal replacement therapy are numerous, in particular the potential for the child to lead a relatively normal life. Indications for commencing PD, the rationale, preparation of family, technical aspects, and management of complications are discussed. PMID:26504404

  7. Telomerase activity in the various regions of mouse brain: non-radioactive telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay.

    PubMed

    Grin, Yossi; Admoni, Tamar; Priel, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein, is responsible for maintaining the telomere length and therefore promoting genomic integrity, proliferation, and lifespan. In addition, telomerase protects the mitochondria from oxidative stress and confers resistance to apoptosis, suggesting its possible importance for the surviving of non-mitotic, highly active cells such as neurons. We previously demonstrated the ability of novel telomerase activators to increase telomerase activity and expression in the various mouse brain regions and to protect motor neurons cells from oxidative stress. These results strengthen the notion that telomerase is involved in the protection of neurons from various lesions. To underline the role of telomerase in the brain, we here compare the activity of telomerase in male and female mouse brain and its dependence on age. TRAP assay is a standard method for detecting telomerase activity in various tissues or cell lines. Here we demonstrate the analysis of telomerase activity in three regions of the mouse brain by non-denaturing protein extraction using CHAPS lysis buffer followed by modification of the standard TRAP assay. In this 2-step assay, endogenous telomerase elongates a specific telomerase substrate (TS primer) by adding TTAGGG 6 bp repeats (telomerase reaction). The telomerase reaction products are amplified by PCR reaction creating a DNA ladder of 6 bp increments. The analysis of the DNA ladder is made by 4.5% high resolution agarose gel electrophoresis followed by staining with highly sensitive nucleic acid stain. Compared to the traditional TRAP assay that utilize (32)P labeled radioactive dCTP's for DNA detection and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for resolving the DNA ladder, this protocol offers a non-toxic time saving TRAP assay for evaluating telomerase activity in the mouse brain, demonstrating the ability to detect differences in telomerase activity in the various female and male mouse brain region. PMID:25225832

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Peritoneal EMT and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Strippoli, Raffaele; Moreno-Vicente, Roberto; Battistelli, Cecilia; Cicchini, Carla; Noce, Valeria; Amicone, Laura; Marchetti, Alessandra; del Pozo, Miguel Angel; Tripodi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is a form of renal replacement alternative to the hemodialysis. During this treatment, the peritoneal membrane acts as a permeable barrier for exchange of solutes and water. Continual exposure to dialysis solutions, as well as episodes of peritonitis and hemoperitoneum, can cause acute/chronic inflammation and injury to the peritoneal membrane, which undergoes progressive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and vasculopathy, eventually leading to discontinuation of the peritoneal dialysis. Among the different events controlling this pathological process, epithelial to mesenchymal transition of mesothelial cells plays a main role in the induction of fibrosis and in subsequent functional deterioration of the peritoneal membrane. Here, the main extracellular inducers and cellular players are described. Moreover, signaling pathways acting during this process are elucidated, with emphasis on signals delivered by TGF-β family members and by Toll-like/IL-1β receptors. The understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying fibrosis of the peritoneal membrane has both a basic and a translational relevance, since it may be useful for setup of therapies aimed at counteracting the deterioration as well as restoring the homeostasis of the peritoneal membrane. PMID:26941801

  9. [The past and present of peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Polner, Kálmán

    2008-01-01

    The author reviews briefly the history of peritoneal dialysis, and highlights the significance of the work of two Hungarian nephrologists, Stephen I. Vas and István Taraba . By now, peritoneal dialysis has been considered as equal renal replacement modality compared to haemodialysis. It is even more advantageous in the protection of the patients' residual renal function, morbidity-mortality indices, and quality of life peritoneal dialysis in the first two years. From economical point of view peritoneal dialysis is less expensive than hemodialysis, therefore in the future its greater role can be expected in the treatment of more and more renal patients. The recently achieved technical development, and also the more widespread use of the automated peritoneal dialysis machines contribute to quality improvement. The peritoneal dialysis therapy, by the patients' self-treatment, establishes a new kind of relationship between the patients and the medical personnel; there is a growing requirement for patient education, the patients' self-esteem and cooperation increase, which altogether provides better results in rehabilitation and higher quality of life. Our national peritoneal dialysis utilization falls behind the European achievements, but has been growing dynamically, and we can expect an increase of the number of renal patients on peritoneal dialysis. PMID:18089476

  10. Peritoneal hydatidosis in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Wani, I; Lone, A M; Hussain, I; Malik, A; Thoker, M; Wani, K A

    2010-12-01

    We report a case of peritoneal hydatidosis that occurred post laparotomy. Patient was diagnosed nine months after she had laparotomy for suspected acute appendicitis. The whole peritoneal cavity was studded with cysts. In view of diffuse involvement, patient was managed conservatively and showed response to medical therapy. PMID:21416052

  11. Deletion of the Slo3 gene abolishes alkalization-activated K+ current in mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xu-Hui; Yang, Chengtao; Kim, Sung Tae; Lingle, Christopher J; Xia, Xiao-Ming

    2011-04-01

    Mouse spermatozoa express a pH-dependent K(+) current (KSper) thought to be composed of subunits encoded by the Slo3 gene. However, the equivalence of KSper and Slo3-dependent current remains uncertain, because heterologous expression of Slo3 results in currents that are less effectively activated by alkalization than are native KSper currents. Here, we show that genetic deletion of Slo3 abolishes all pH-dependent K(+) current at physiological membrane potentials in corpus epididymal sperm. A residual pH-dependent outward current (I(Kres)) is observed in Slo3(-/-) sperm at potentials of >0 mV. Differential inhibition of KSper/Slo3 and I(Kres) by clofilium reveals that the amplitude of I(Kres) is similar in both wild-type (wt) and Slo3(-/-) sperm. The properties of I(Kres) suggest that it likely represents outward monovalent cation flux through CatSper channels. Thus, KSper/Slo3 may account for essentially all mouse sperm K(+) current and is the sole pH-dependent K(+) conductance in these sperm. With physiological ionic gradients, alkalization depolarizes Slo3(-/-) spermatozoa, presumably from CatSper activation, in contrast to Slo3/KSper-mediated hyperpolarization in wt sperm. Slo3(-/-) male mice are infertile, but Slo3(-/-) sperm exhibit some fertility within in vitro fertilization assays. Slo3(-/-) sperm exhibit a higher incidence of morphological abnormalities accentuated by hypotonic challenge and also exhibit deficits in motility in the absence of bicarbonate, revealing a role of KSper under unstimulated conditions. Together, these results show that KSper/Slo3 is the primary spermatozoan K(+) current, that KSper may play a critical role in acquisition of normal morphology and sperm motility when faced with hyperosmotic challenges, and that Slo3 is critical for fertility. PMID:21427226

  12. Antibodies That Block or Activate Mouse B Cell Activating Factor of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Family (BAFF), Respectively, Induce B Cell Depletion or B Cell Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Vigolo, Michele; Willen, Laure; Tardivel, Aubry; Smulski, Cristian R; Zheng, Timothy S; Gommerman, Jennifer; Hess, Henry; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Mackay, Fabienne; Donzé, Olivier; Schneider, Pascal

    2016-09-16

    B cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF), also known as B lymphocyte stimulator, is a ligand required for the generation and maintenance of B lymphocytes. In this study, the ability of different monoclonal antibodies to recognize, inhibit, or activate mouse BAFF was investigated. One of them, a mouse IgG1 named Sandy-2, prevented the binding of BAFF to all of its receptors, BAFF receptor, transmembrane activator and calcium modulating ligand interactor, and B cell maturation antigen, at a stoichiometric ratio; blocked the activity of mouse BAFF on a variety of cell-based reporter assays; and antagonized the prosurvival action of BAFF on primary mouse B cells in vitro A single administration of Sandy-2 in mice induced B cell depletion within 2 weeks, down to levels close to those observed in BAFF-deficient mice. This depletion could then be maintained with a chronic treatment. Sandy-2 and a previously described rat IgG1 antibody, 5A8, also formed a pair suitable for the sensitive detection of endogenous circulating BAFF by ELISA or using a homogenous assay. Interestingly, 5A8 and Sandy-5 displayed activities opposite to that of Sandy-2 by stimulating recombinant BAFF in vitro and endogenous BAFF in vivo These tools will prove useful for the detection and functional manipulation of endogenous mouse BAFF and provide an alternative to the widely used BAFF receptor-Fc decoy receptor for the specific depletion of BAFF in mice. PMID:27451394

  13. Ethanol modifies differently aspartyl- and glutamyl-aminopeptidase activities in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García, María Jesús; Ramírez, Manuel; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2002-01-15

    Aminopeptidase A activity (aspartyl aminopeptidase (AspAP) and glutamyl aminopeptidase (GluAP) exerts angiotensinase activity due to its relation to the metabolism of angiotensins in the regional brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS). This activity may also modify the free amino acid pool through the release of N-terminal acidic amino acids. Ethanol (EtOH) exerts profound effects on the brain, inducing important neurological damages. Our purpose is to study the influence of EtOH on AspAP and GluAP activities on basal and K(+)-stimulated conditions, at the synapse level. We used mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and their incubation supernatant in a Ca(2+)-containing or Ca(2+)-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid. We evaluate the possible contribution of these enzymatic activities on brain blood pressure regulation through RAS and/or the free acidic amino acid pool. The results obtained are correlated with several parameters of oxidative stress, such as free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. Under basal conditions, in synaptosomes, EtOH inhibits AspAP and GluAP activities independently of Ca(2+). In the supernatant, however, EtOH differently modulates the two enzyme activities under the various concentrations. Under K(+)-stimulated conditions, EtOH inhibits the K(+)-stimulated increase on AspAP and GluAP differently depending on the presence or absence of Ca(2+) and the concentration of EtOH used. These results invalidate the idea that excess free acidic amino acids could be released by AspAP and GluAP to induce neurodegeneration. The changes in AspAP and GluAP activities as a consequence of EtOH administration and their role in the brain RAS are discussed.

  14. Apoptotic and proliferative activity of mouse gastric mucosa following oral administration of fumonisin B1

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Mohammadghasemi, Fahimeh; Zendehdel, Kazem; Kamyabi-moghaddam, Zahra; Tavassoli, Abbas; Amini-najafi, Fatemeh; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Fumonisins are a group of toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxins, which contaminate the grains and their products. The aim of this study was to examine the apoptotic and proliferative activity of mouse gastric mucosa following administration of fumonisin B1 (FB1). Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine female mice divided into treatment (n=15) and control (n=14) groups. The treatment group received FB1 (150 mg/kg diet) for 16 weeks. The gastric atrophy was allocated using grading criteria modeled on the updated Sydney System. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed for evaluation of apoptosis and proliferative activity in gastric mucosa. Results: Mild to moderate gastric atrophy were observed in microscopic findings of the gastric mucosa in treated animals (P<0.05). Number of parietal cells significantly decreased in the treatment group in comparison with the control (P<0.05). Treatment with FB1 for 16 weeks significantly reduced both gastric mucosa height and mitotic index in the gastric glands (P<0.05). TUNEL- and Bax-labeled positive cell numbers significantly increased in the FB1-treated group compared to the control (P<0.05). In addition, proliferative activity of gastric glands in the treated group was significantly lower than the control (P<0.05). Conclusion: Oral administration of FB1 caused atrophy in gastric mucosa both via increasing of apoptosis and suppressing the mitotic activity of these cells. PMID:25810870

  15. Antifatigue Activity of Liquid Cultured Tricholoma matsutake Mycelium Partially via Regulation of Antioxidant Pathway in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Wang, Yanzhen; Cai, Guangsheng; Kong, Fange; Wang, Xiaohan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Chuanbin; Wang, Di; Teng, Lirong

    2015-01-01

    Tricholoma matsutake has been popular as food and biopharmaceutical materials in Asian countries for its various pharmacological activities. The present study aims to analyze the antifatigue effects on enhancing exercise performance of Tricholoma matsutake fruit body (ABM) and liquid cultured mycelia (TM) in mouse model. Two-week Tricholoma matsutake treatment significantly enhances the exercise performance in weight-loaded swimming, rotating rod, and forced running test. In TM- and ABM-treated mice, some factors were observed at 60 min after swimming compared with nontreated mice, such as the increased levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), antioxidative enzymes, and glycogen and the reduced levels of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species in muscle, liver, and/or serum. Further data obtained from western blot show that CM and ABM have strongly enhanced the activation of 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and the expressions of peroxisome proliferator have activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1) in liver. Our data suggest that both Tricholoma matsutake fruit body and liquid cultured mycelia possess antifatigue effects related to AMPK-linked antioxidative pathway. The information uncovered in our study may serve as a valuable resource for further identification and provide experimental evidence for clinical trials of Tricholoma matsutake as an effective agent against fatigue related diseases. PMID:26697489

  16. Influence of body temperature on the evoked activity in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Kalatsky, Valery A

    2013-06-01

    Optical imaging of intrinsic signals and conventional electrophysiological methods were used to investigate the correlation between the evoked activity in mouse visual cortex and core body temperature. The results show that hypothermia (25-36 °C) decreases the intensity of optical imaging in the visual cortex and the imaging signal reversibly disappears at 25 °C. Hyperthermia (39-41 °C) increases the intensity but decreases the quality of cortical imaging when body temperature is above 40 °C. The change of optical imaging was in line with that of neuronal activities and local field potentials (LFPs) directly recorded from the visual cortex at 25-39 °C. Hypothermia decreases neuron firing rate and LFPs amplitude. Most of the recorded neurons ceased firing to visual stimulation at 25 °C. Hyperthermia increases neuronal firing rate and LFPs amplitude. Both are reduced when body temperature is above 40 °C, though neither change was statistically significant. These results suggest: (1) Body temperature has an important impact on the visual cortical evoked activities and optical imaging generally reflects these effects when body temperature is between 25 and 39 °C; (2) Optical imaging may not properly reflect the neuronal activity when body temperature is over 40 °C. It is important to maintain core body temperature within 3 °C of the normal body temperature to obtain verifiable results.

  17. Antifatigue Activity of Liquid Cultured Tricholoma matsutake Mycelium Partially via Regulation of Antioxidant Pathway in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Wang, Yanzhen; Cai, Guangsheng; Kong, Fange; Wang, Xiaohan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Chuanbin; Wang, Di; Teng, Lirong

    2015-01-01

    Tricholoma matsutake has been popular as food and biopharmaceutical materials in Asian countries for its various pharmacological activities. The present study aims to analyze the antifatigue effects on enhancing exercise performance of Tricholoma matsutake fruit body (ABM) and liquid cultured mycelia (TM) in mouse model. Two-week Tricholoma matsutake treatment significantly enhances the exercise performance in weight-loaded swimming, rotating rod, and forced running test. In TM- and ABM-treated mice, some factors were observed at 60 min after swimming compared with nontreated mice, such as the increased levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), antioxidative enzymes, and glycogen and the reduced levels of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species in muscle, liver, and/or serum. Further data obtained from western blot show that CM and ABM have strongly enhanced the activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and the expressions of peroxisome proliferator have activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1) in liver. Our data suggest that both Tricholoma matsutake fruit body and liquid cultured mycelia possess antifatigue effects related to AMPK-linked antioxidative pathway. The information uncovered in our study may serve as a valuable resource for further identification and provide experimental evidence for clinical trials of Tricholoma matsutake as an effective agent against fatigue related diseases. PMID:26697489

  18. Abdominal Sarcoidosis May Mimic Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Gorkem, Umit; Gungor, Tayfun; Bas, Yılmaz; Togrul, Cihan

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. It shows a great variety of clinical presentation, organ involvement, and disease progression. Lungs and lymphoid system are the most common sites involved with a frequency of 90% and 30%, respectively. Extrapulmonary involvement of sarcoidosis is reported in 30% of patients and abdomen is the most frequent site. Furthermore, peritoneal involvement is extremely rare in sarcoidosis. The case presented here described peritoneal manifestations of sarcoidosis without involvement of lungs. A 78-year-old woman possessing signs of malignancy on blood test and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging underwent laparatomy with a suspicion of ovarian malignancy. The macroscopic interpretation during surgery was peritoneal carcinomatosis. Total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, peritoneal biopsies, total omentectomy, and appendectomy were performed. Final histopathological result revealed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Clinicians must keep in mind that peritoneal sarcoidosis can mimic intra-abdominal malignancies. PMID:26558122

  19. Postnatal Treatment in Antenatally Diagnosed Meconium Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, S; Andrei, B; Oancea, M; Licsandru, E; Ivanov, M; Marcu, V; Popa-Stanila, R; Mocanu, M

    2015-01-01

    Meconium peritonitis is a rare prenatal disease with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Distinctive features revealed by prenatal and postnatal ultrasoundmay be present: abdominal calcifications, ascites, polyhydramnios, meconium pseudocyst, echogenic mass and dilated bowel or intestinal obstruction. Establishing clear postnatal treatment and prognosis is difficult because of the heterogeneity of the results obtained by ultrasound. The aim of the study is to determine how prenatal diagnosis of meconium peritonitis is associated with perinatal management and further evolution. Clinical results are different depending on the presence of antenatal diagnosis of meconium peritonitis and its form, which can be mild or severe. Surgical treatment and management of meconium peritonitis depend on the clinical presentation of the newborn. Meconium peritonitis diagnosed prenatally differs from that of the newborn, not only concerning the mortality rates but also through reduced morbidity and overall better prognosis.

  20. Activation of glycine receptor phase-shifts the circadian rhythm in neuronal activity in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Mordel, Jérôme; Karnas, Diana; Inyushkin, Alexey; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Meissl, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In mammals, the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is composed of numerous synchronized oscillating cells that drive daily behavioural and physiological processes. Several entrainment pathways, afferent inputs to the SCN with their neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems, can reset the circadian system regularly and also modulate neuronal activity within the SCN. In the present study, we investigated the function of the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine on neuronal activity in the mouse SCN and on resetting of the circadian clock. The effects of glycine on the electrical activity of SCN cells from C57Bl/6 mice were studied either by patch-clamp recordings from acute brain slices or by long-term recordings from organotypic brain slices using multi-microelectrode arrays (MEA). Voltage-clamp recordings confirmed the existence of glycine-induced, chloride-selective currents in SCN neurons. These currents were reversibly suppressed by strychnine, phenylbenzene ω-phosphono-α-amino acid (PMBA) or ginkgolide B, selective blockers of glycine receptors (GlyRs). Long-term recordings of the spontaneous activity of SCN neurons revealed that glycine application induces a phase advance during the subjective day and a phase delay during the early subjective night. Both effects were suppressed by strychnine or by PMBA. These results suggest that glycine is able to modulate circadian activity by acting directly on its specific receptors in SCN neurons. PMID:21486797

  1. Determination of Phosphate-activated Glutaminase Activity and Its Kinetics in Mouse Tissues using Metabolic Mapping (Quantitative Enzyme Histochemistry)

    PubMed Central

    Botman, Dennis; Tigchelaar, Wikky

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) converts glutamine to glutamate as part of the glutaminolysis pathway in mitochondria. Two genes, GLS1 and GLS2, which encode for kidney-type PAG and liver-type PAG, respectively, differ in their tissue-specific activities and kinetics. Tissue-specific PAG activity and its kinetics were determined by metabolic mapping using a tetrazolium salt and glutamate dehydrogenase as an auxiliary enzyme in the presence of various glutamine concentrations. In kidney and brain, PAG showed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Km of 0.6 mM glutamine and a Vmax of 1.1 µmol/mL/min when using 5 mM glutamine. PAG activity was high in the kidney cortex and inner medulla but low in the outer medulla, papillary tip, glomeruli and the lis of Henle. In brain tissue sections, PAG was active in the grey matter and inactive in myelin-rich regions. Liver PAG showed allosteric regulation with a Km of 11.6 mM glutamine and a Vmax of 0.5 µmol/mL/min when using 20 mM glutamine. The specificity of the method was shown after incubation of brain tissue sections with the PAG inhibitor 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine. PAG activity was decreased to 22% in the presence of 2 mM 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine. At low glutamine concentrations, PAG activity was higher in periportal regions, indicating a lower Km for periportal PAG. When compared with liver, kidney and brain, other tissues showed 3-fold to 6-fold less PAG activity. In conclusion, PAG is mainly active in mouse kidney, brain and liver, and shows different kinetics depending on which type of PAG is expressed. PMID:25163927

  2. Regional activation of rapid onset vasodilatation in mouse skeletal muscle: regulation through α-adrenoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alex W; Bearden, Shawn E; Segal, Steven S

    2010-09-01

    Exercise onset entails motor unit recruitment and the initiation of vasodilatation. Dilatation can ascend the arteriolar network to encompass proximal feed arteries but is opposed by sympathetic nerve activity, which promotes vasoconstriction and inhibits ascending vasodilatation through activating α-adrenoreceptors. Whereas contractile activity can antagonize sympathetic vasoconstriction, more subtle aspects of this interaction remain to be defined. We tested the hypothesis that constitutive activation of α-adrenoreceptors governs blood flow distribution within individual muscles. The mouse gluteus maximus muscle (GM) consists of Inferior and Superior regions. Each muscle region is supplied by its own motor nerve and feed artery with an anastomotic arteriole (resting diameter 25 microm) that spans both muscle regions. In anaesthetized male C57BL/6J mice (3-5 months old), the GM was exposed and superfused with physiological saline solution (35 degrees C; pH 7.4). Stimulating the inferior gluteal motor nerve (0.1 ms pulse, 100 Hz for 500 ms) evoked a brief tetanic contraction and produced rapid (<1 s) onset vasodilatation (ROV; diameter change, 10 +/- 1 μm) of the anastomotic arteriole along the active (Inferior) muscle region but not along the inactive (Superior) region (n = 8). In contrast, microiontophoresis of acetylcholine (1 μm micropipette tip, 1 μA, 500 ms) initiated dilatation that travelled along the anastomotic arteriole from the Inferior into the Superior muscle region (diameter change, 5 +/- 2 μm). Topical phentolamine (1 μm) had no effect on resting diameter but this inhibition of α-adrenoreceptors enabled ROV to spread along the anastomotic arteriole into the inactive muscle region (dilatation, 7 +/- 1 μm; P < 0.05), where remote dilatation to acetylcholine then doubled (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that constitutive activation of α-adrenoreceptors in skeletal muscle can restrict the spread of dilatation within microvascular resistance

  3. Plasmodium berghei mouse model: antimalarial activity of new alkaloid salts and of thiosemicarbazone and acridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Loiseau, P M; Nguyen, D X

    1996-06-01

    Sixteen compounds were synthesized and evaluated on Plasmodium berghei in CD1 mouse. The nature of the salt associated to the active principle can give some advantages in the field of activity, bioavailability and toxicity. beta-Resorcylic acid was chosen in this study because of its previously described antimalarial activity and its expected enhancement of quinine antimalarial activity. While treatment with subcutaneous quinine sulphate at 1 mmol/kg cured 6/10 mice, quinine beta-resorcylate cured all the mice under identical conditions. Although such a result appeared promising, in vitro investigation should be performed to draw clear conclusions regarding a synergy between quinine and beta-resorcylate. Cinchonidine beta-resorcylate was also active; all mice were cured at 1 mmol/kg and the mean survival time was 13.8 +/- 2.4 days after a subcutaneous treatment at 0.5 mmol/kg in a single dose. In the series of acridines, (N-alpha, sigma-dioxopentyl)-5-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine cured all mice at 50 mumol/kg under the same conditions. The maximum tolerated doses in mice ranged from 100 to 150 mumol/kg for these acridine derivatives. The chemotherapeutic index of (N-alpha, sigma-dioxopentyl)-5-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine was estimated at 2-3. Other salts expected to reduce the toxicity, such as alpha-ketoglutarate and p-chlorophenoxyacetate, did not enhance the activity of the active principles. These results prompt us to further investigations including plasma kinetic evaluation in rats and in vitro on Plasmodium falciparum.

  4. Efficacy of oncolytic reovirus against human gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis in experimental animal model.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Koji; Etoh, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Kosuke; Mitui, Marcelo Takahiro; Nishizono, Akira; Shiraishi, Norio; Kitano, Seigo

    2010-12-01

    The prognosis of gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination is extremely poor, and the development of an effective treatment is necessary. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of oncolytic reovirus against peritoneal metastasis in human gastric cancer using an experimental animal model. Four human gastric cancer cell lines, including MKN45p, NUGC4, MKN7 and KatoIII, a normal NIH3T3 cell line as a control, and reovirus serotype 3, were used in this study. We evaluated the cytopathic effect of reovirus and the Ras activity in each gastric cancer cell line in vitro. To evaluate oncolytic efficacy in vivo, reovirus (1x10(8) PFU) was administered into the peritoneal cavity of nude mice on days 7, 8 and 9 after inoculation with MKN45p cells. Mean volume of ascites and the total number and weight of the peritoneal tumors were measured after sacrifice. After reovirus infection, cytopathic effect was observed in all four gastric cancer cell lines, but not in the control cells. Ras activation assay showed that Ras activity in all four gastric cancer cell lines increased to a higher level than that in the control cells. In the animal model experiments, mean volume of ascites and the total number and weight of the peritoneal tumors in the reovirus treatment group were significantly lower than those in the control group. In conclusions, intraperitoneal administration of reovirus could be useful as a new modality against peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer. PMID:21042711

  5. Immunologic Effects Of Peritoneal Photodynamic Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, David H.; Haddad, Sandra; Jolles, Christopher J.; King, Vernon J.; Ott, Mark J.; Robertson, Bekkie; Straight, Richard C.

    1989-06-01

    One of the side effects of peritoneal photodynamic treatment (PDT) of mice is a systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CH) responses. Treatment with either laser alone or the photosensitizer, Photofrin II (PFII), alone does not cause suppression of CH responses. Immunosuppression of CH responses is an active process that is adoptively transferable using viable cells, but not serum, from PDT-treated mice. The induction of adoptively transferable suppressor cells in PDT-treated mice requires exposure to an antigenic stimulus, yet the suppressor cells are antigen non-specific in their function. T cell function in PDT-treated mice, as measured by the ability of splenic lymphoid cells to generate allogeneic cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, is comparable to that detected in normal mice. However, the ability of spleen cells from PDT-treated mice to act as stimulators in a mixed lymhocyte reaction is dramatically impaired, suggesting that the major cell type affected by peritoneal PDT is of the macrophage lineage. Support for this concept is provided by experiments in which spleen cells from PDT-treated mice were chromatographically separated into populations of T cells, B cells and macrophages prior to adoptive transfer into naive recipients. The results indicate that the cell type mediating adoptively transferable suppression of CH responsiveness is of the macrophage lineage. Analysis of hematologic parameters revealed that induction of suppression by PDT-treatment was associated with a marked neutrophilia and lymphocytosis, and was also accompanied by a 5-fold increase in concentration of the acute phase protein, Serum Amyloid P. Finally, attempts to ameliorate PDT-induced immunosuppression by pharmacologic intervention have proved successful using implants of pellets that release indomethacin at a rate of 1.25µg/day. Thus, the data suggest that PDT-treatment induces macrophages to produce factors (e.g., prostaglandins) that are known to be potently

  6. Novel Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Inhibitors Prevent Diabetic Kidney Injury in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hi Bahl; Miyata, Toshio; Ha, Hunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, but no effective therapeutic strategy is available. Because plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is increasingly recognized as a key factor in extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy, this study examined the renoprotective effects of TM5275 and TM5441, two novel orally active PAI-1 inhibitors that do not trigger bleeding episodes, in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. TM5275 (50 mg/kg) and TM5441 (10 mg/kg) were administered orally for 16 weeks to STZ-induced diabetic and age-matched control mice. Relative to the control mice, the diabetic mice showed significantly increased (p < 0.05) plasma glucose and creatinine levels, urinary albumin excretion, kidney-to-bodyweight ratios, glomerular volume, and fractional mesangial area. Markers of fibrosis and inflammation along with PAI-1 were also upregulated in the kidney of diabetic mice, and treatment with TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited albuminuria, mesangial expansion, ECM accumulation, and macrophage infiltration in diabetic kidneys. Furthermore, in mouse proximal tubular epithelial (mProx24) cells, both TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited PAI-1-induced mRNA expression of fibrosis and inflammation markers and also reversed PAI-1-induced inhibition of plasmin activity, which confirmed the efficacy of the TM compounds as PAI-1 inhibitors. These data suggest that TM compounds could be used to prevent diabetic kidney injury. PMID:27258009

  7. Dopamine exerts activation-dependent modulation of spinal locomotor circuits in the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Jennifer M; Whelan, Patrick J

    2012-12-01

    Monoamines can modulate the output of a variety of invertebrate and vertebrate networks, including the spinal cord networks that control walking. Here we examined the multiple changes in the output of locomotor networks induced by dopamine (DA). We found that DA can depress the activation of locomotor networks in the neonatal mouse spinal cord following ventral root stimulation. By examining disinhibited rhythms, where the Renshaw cell pathway was blocked, we found that DA depresses a putative recurrent excitatory pathway that projects onto rhythm-generating circuitry of the spinal cord. This depression was D(2) but not D(1) receptor dependent and was not due exclusively to depression of excitatory drive to motoneurons. Furthermore, the depression in excitation was not dependent on network activity. We next compared the modulatory effects of DA on network function by focusing on a serotonin and a N-methyl-dl-aspartate-evoked rhythm. In contrast to the depressive effects on a ventral root-evoked rhythm, we found that DA stabilized a drug-evoked rhythm, reduced the frequency of bursting, and increased amplitude. Overall, these data demonstrate that DA can potentiate network activity while at the same time reducing the gain of recurrent excitatory feedback loops from motoneurons onto the network.

  8. Wavelet methods for spike detection in mouse renal sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Brychta, Robert J; Tuntrakool, Sunti; Appalsamy, Martin; Keller, Nancy R; Robertson, David; Shiavi, Richard G; Diedrich, André

    2007-01-01

    Abnormal autonomic nerve traffic has been associated with a number of peripheral neuropathies and cardiovascular disorders prompting the development of genetically altered mice to study the genetic and molecular components of these diseases. Autonomic function in mice can be assessed by directly recording sympathetic nerve activity. However, murine sympathetic spikes are typically detected using a manually adjusted voltage threshold and no unsupervised detection methods have been developed for the mouse. Therefore, we tested the performance of several unsupervised spike detection algorithms on simulated murine renal sympathetic nerve recordings, including an automated amplitude discriminator and wavelet-based detection methods which used both the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and the stationary wavelet transform (SWT) and several wavelet threshold rules. The parameters of the wavelet methods were optimized by comparing basal sympathetic activity to postmortem recordings and recordings made during pharmacological suppression and enhancement of sympathetic activity. In general, SWT methods were found to outperform amplitude discriminators and DWT methods with similar wavelet coefficient thresholding algorithms when presented with simulations with varied mean spike rates and signal-to-noise ratios. A SWT method which estimates the noise level using a "noise-only" wavelet scale and then selectively thresholds scales containing the physiologically important signal information was found to have the most robust spike detection. The proposed noise-level estimation method was also successfully validated during pharmacological interventions.

  9. Wavelet Methods for Spike Detection in Mouse Renal Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Brychta, Robert J.; Tuntrakool, Sunti; Appalsamy, Martin; Keller, Nancy R.; Robertson, David; Shiavi, Richard G.; Diedrich, André

    2007-01-01

    Abnormal autonomic nerve traffic has been associated with a number of peripheral neuropathies and cardiovascular disorders prompting the development of genetically altered mice to study the genetic and molecular components of these diseases. Autonomic function in mice can be assessed by directly recording sympathetic nerve activity. However, murine sympathetic spikes are typically detected using a manually adjusted voltage threshold and no unsupervised detection methods have been developed for the mouse. Therefore, we tested the performance of several unsupervised spike detection algorithms on simulated murine renal sympathetic nerve recordings, including an automated amplitude discriminator and wavelet-based detection methods which used both the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and the stationary wavelet transform (SWT) and several wavelet threshold rules. The parameters of the wavelet methods were optimized by comparing basal sympathetic activity to postmortem recordings and recordings made during pharmacological suppression and enhancement of sympathetic activity. In general, SWT methods were found to outperform amplitude discriminators and DWT methods with similar wavelet coefficient thresholding algorithms when presented with simulations with varied mean spike rates and signal-to-noise ratios. A SWT method which estimates the noise level using a “noise-only” wavelet scale and then selectively thresholds scales containing the physiologically important signal information was found to have the most robust spike detection. The proposed noise-level estimation method was also successfully validated during pharmacological interventions. PMID:17260859

  10. Connective tissue growth factor production by activated pancreatic stellate cells in mouse alcoholic chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Alyssa; Brigstock, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is characterized by pancreatic necrosis, inflammation, and scarring, the latter of which is due to excessive collagen deposition by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). The aim of this study was to establish a model of ACP in mice, a species that is usually resistant to the toxic effects of alcohol, and to identify the cell type(s) responsible for production of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a pro-fibrotic molecule. C57Bl/6 male mice received intraperitoneal ethanol injections for three weeks against a background of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Peak blood alcohol levels remained consistently high in ethanol-treated mice as compared to control mice. In mice receiving ethanol plus cerulein, there was increased collagen deposition as compared to other treatment groups as well as increased frequency of α-smooth muscle actin and desmin-positive PSC which also demonstrated significantly enhanced CTGF protein production. Expression of mRNA for collagen α1(I), α-smooth muscle actin or CTGF were all increased and co-localized exclusively to activated PSC in ACP. Pancreatic expression of mRNA for key profibrotic markers were all increased in ACP. In conclusion, a mouse model of ACP has been developed that mimics key pathophysiological features of the disease in humans and which shows that activated PSC are the principal producers of collagen and CTGF. PSC-derived CTGF is thus a candidate therapeutic target in anti-fibrotic strategies for ACP. PMID:20368699

  11. Appl1 and Appl2 are Expendable for Mouse Development But Are Essential for HGF-Induced Akt Activation and Migration in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yinfei; Xin, Xiaoban; Coffey, Francis J; Wiest, David L; Dong, Lily Q; Testa, Joseph R

    2016-05-01

    Although Appl1 and Appl2 have been implicated in multiple cellular activities, we and others have found that Appl1 is dispensable for mouse embryonic development, suggesting that Appl2 can substitute for Appl1 during development. To address this possibility, we generated conditionally targeted Appl2 mice. We found that ubiquitous Appl2 knockout (Appl2-/-) mice, much like Appl1-/- mice, are viable and grow normally to adulthood. Intriguingly, when Appl1-/- mice were crossed with Appl2-/- mice, we found that homozygous Appl1;Appl2 double knockout (DKO) animals are also viable and grossly normal with regard to reproductive potential and postnatal growth. Appl2-null and DKO mice were found to exhibit altered red blood cell physiology, with erythrocytes from these mice generally being larger and having a more irregular shape than erythrocytes from wild type mice. Although Appl1/2 proteins have been previously shown to have a very strong interaction with phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (Pi3k) in thymic T cells, Pi3k-Akt signaling and cellular differentiation was unaltered in thymocytes from Appl1;Appl2 (DKO) mice. However, Appl1/2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited defects in HGF-induced Akt activation, migration, and invasion. Taken together, these data suggest that Appl1 and Appl2 are required for robust HGF cell signaling but are dispensable for embryonic development and reproduction.

  12. Clcn2 encodes the hyperpolarization-activated chloride channel in the ducts of mouse salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Romanenko, Victor G.; Nakamoto, Tetsuji; Catalán, Marcelo A.; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Schwartz, George J.; Jaramillo, Yasna; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.; Figueroa, Carlos D.; Melvin, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Transepithelial Cl− transport in salivary gland ducts is a major component of the ion reabsorption process, the final stage of saliva production. It was previously demonstrated that a Cl− current with the biophysical properties of ClC-2 channels dominates the Cl− conductance of unstimulated granular duct cells in the mouse submandibular gland. This inward-rectifying Cl− current is activated by hyperpolarization and elevated intracellular Cl− concentration. Here we show that ClC-2 immunolocalized to the basolateral region of acinar and duct cells in mouse salivary glands, whereas its expression was most robust in granular and striated duct cells. Consistent with this observation, nearly 10-fold larger ClC-2-like currents were observed in granular duct cells than the acinar cells obtained from submandibular glands. The loss of inward-rectifying Cl− current in cells from Clcn2−/− mice confirmed the molecular identity of the channel responsible for these currents as ClC-2. Nevertheless, both in vivo and ex vivo fluid secretion assays failed to identify significant changes in the ion composition, osmolality, or salivary flow rate of Clcn2−/− mice. Additionally, neither a compensatory increase in Cftr Cl− channel protein expression nor in Cftr-like Cl− currents were detected in Clcn2 null mice, nor did it appear that ClC-2 was important for blood-organ barrier function. We conclude that ClC-2 is the inward-rectifying Cl− channel in duct cells, but its expression is not apparently required for the ion reabsorption or the barrier function of salivary ductal epithelium. PMID:18801913

  13. Conditionally Immortalized Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts Retain Proliferative Activity without Compromising Multipotent Differentiation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Enyi; Bi, Yang; Jiang, Wei; Luo, Xiaoji; Yang, Ke; Gao, Jian-Li; Gao, Yanhong; Luo, Qing; Shi, Qiong; Kim, Stephanie H.; Liu, Xing; Li, Mi; Hu, Ning; Liu, Hong; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Wenwen; Li, Ruidong; Chen, Xiang; Shen, Jikun; Kong, Yuhan; Zhang, Jiye; Wang, Jinhua; Luo, Jinyong; He, Bai-Cheng; Wang, Huicong; Reid, Russell R.; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; Yang, Li; He, Tong-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells which reside in many tissues and can give rise to multiple lineages including bone, cartilage and adipose. Although MSCs have attracted significant attention for basic and translational research, primary MSCs have limited life span in culture which hampers MSCs' broader applications. Here, we investigate if mouse mesenchymal progenitors can be conditionally immortalized with SV40 large T antigen and maintain long-term cell proliferation without compromising their multipotency. Using the system which expresses SV40 large T antigen flanked with Cre/loxP sites, we demonstrate that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) can be efficiently immortalized by SV40 large T antigen. The conditionally immortalized MEFs (iMEFs) exhibit an enhanced proliferative activity and maintain long-term cell proliferation, which can be reversed by Cre recombinase. The iMEFs express most MSC markers and retain multipotency as they can differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic lineages under appropriate differentiation conditions in vitro and in vivo. The removal of SV40 large T reduces the differentiation potential of iMEFs possibly due to the decreased progenitor expansion. Furthermore, the iMEFs are apparently not tumorigenic when they are subcutaneously injected into athymic nude mice. Thus, the conditionally immortalized iMEFs not only maintain long-term cell proliferation but also retain the ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. Our results suggest that the reversible immortalization strategy using SV40 large T antigen may be an efficient and safe approach to establishing long-term cell culture of primary mesenchymal progenitors for basic and translational research, as well as for potential clinical applications. PMID:22384246

  14. Inhibition of protein kinase G activity protects neonatal mouse respiratory network from hyperthermic and hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gary A B; López-Guerrero, Juan J; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Peña, Fernando; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2010-01-22

    In spite of considerable research attention focused on clarifying the mechanisms by which the mammalian respiratory rhythm is generated, little attention has been given to examining how this neuronal circuit can be protected from heat stress. Hyperthermia has a profound effect on neuronal circuits including the circuit that generates breathing in mammals. As temperature of the brainstem increases, respiratory frequency concomitantly rises. If temperature continues to increase respiratory arrest (apnea) and death can occur. Previous research has implicated protein kinase G (PKG) activity in regulating neuronal thermosensitivity of neuronal circuits in invertebrates. Here we examine if pharmacological manipulation of PKG activity in a brainstem slice preparation could alter the thermosensitivity of the fictive neonatal mouse respiratory rhythm. We report a striking effect following alteration of PKG activity in the brainstem such that slices treated with the PKG inhibitor KT5823 recovered fictive respiratory rhythm generation significantly faster than control slices and slices treated with a PKG activator (8-Br-cGMP). Furthermore, slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP arrested fictive respiration at a significantly lower temperature than all other treatment groups. In a separate set of experiments we examined if altered PKG activity could regulate the response of slices to hypoxia by altering the protective switch to fictive gasping. Slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP did not switch to the fictive gasp-like pattern following exposure to hypoxia whereas slices treated with KT5823 did display fictive gasping. We propose that PKG activity inversely regulates the amount of stress the neonatal mammalian respiratory rhythm can endure. PMID:19945442

  15. Systemic and local inflammation in peritoneal dialysis: mechanisms, biomarkers and effects on outcome.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Antonio Carlos; Carrero, Juan Jesús; Abensur, Hugo; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Thanks to the technological development in peritoneal dialysis (PD) during the last three decades, the most important problem nowadays for the nephrologists is the maintenance of the long-term function of the peritoneal membrane. Although PD may exert an early survival benefit as compared with hemodialysis (HD), long-term PD is often associated with histopathological alterations in the peritoneal membrane that are linked to peritoneal ultrafiltration deficit and increased mortality risk. These alterations are closely related to the presence of a chronic activated (local and systemic) inflammatory response. PD itself may have other factors associated that could further modulate the inflammatory response, such as the bioincompatibility of dialysis solutions, fluid overload and changes in the body composition. Understanding the pathophysiology of inflammation in PD is essential for the adoption of adequate strategies to improve both membrane and patient survival.

  16. Inflammation and the Peritoneal Membrane: Causes and Impact on Structure and Function during Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Gilberto; Schuinski, Adriana; de Moraes, Thyago P.; Meyer, Fernando; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis therapy has increased in popularity since the end of the 1970s. This method provides a patient survival rate equivalent to hemodialysis and better preservation of residual renal function. However, technique failure by peritonitis, and ultrafiltration failure, which is a multifactorial complication that can affect up to 40% of patients after 3 years of therapy. Encapsulant peritoneal sclerosis is an extreme and potentially fatal manifestation. Causes of inflammation in peritoneal dialysis range from traditional factors to those related to chronic kidney disease per se, as well as from the peritoneal dialysis treatment, including the peritoneal dialysis catheter, dialysis solution, and infectious peritonitis. Peritoneal inflammation generated causes significant structural alterations including: thickening and cubic transformation of mesothelial cells, fibrin deposition, fibrous capsule formation, perivascular bleeding, and interstitial fibrosis. Structural alterations of the peritoneal membrane described above result in clinical and functional changes. One of these clinical manifestations is ultrafiltration failure and can occur in up to 30% of patients on PD after five years of treatment. An understanding of the mechanisms involved in peritoneal inflammation is fundamental to improve patient survival and provide a better quality of life. PMID:22547910

  17. Laboratory indices of clinical peritonitis: total leukocyte count, microscopy, and microbiologic culture of peritoneal dialysis effluent.

    PubMed Central

    Males, B M; Walshe, J J; Amsterdam, D

    1987-01-01

    Total leukocyte count, microscopy, and conventional bacteriologic culture (10-ml sediment) of dialysis effluent were assessed for their ability to detect peritonitis in patients on peritoneal dialysis. A total of 73 patients were surveyed over a 17-month period. Laboratory findings included an examination of 1,774 dialysate samples and culture results from blood, wounds, indwelling catheters, and other specimens. Of 90 peritonitis events, 72 were culture positive. Gram-stained films were positive in no more than 14% of the dialysates collected during periods of clinical peritonitis. Factors which adversely affected the microscopic or cultural detection of microorganisms in effluent included the concentration of organisms in dialysate, antibiotic therapy, and growth medium used. Seeding of the peritoneum with organisms originating from other sites of infection or colonization was documented, although infrequent, yet bacteremia secondary to peritonitis was not seen. Because of the frequent isolation of microorganisms from dialysates in the absence of clinical peritonitis, culture-positive findings were a poor predictor of peritonitis without other evidence of infection. Detection of peritonitis by total leukocyte count (without a differential count) of dialysate specimens was adversely affected by the overlap in cell counts between dialysates collected either during or in the absence of peritonitis. This was attributed in part to nonspecific increases in dialysate cell count in the absence of peritonitis and was associated with intermittent dialysis and extraperitoneal infection. PMID:3429626

  18. Physical Activity and Food Consumption in High- and Low-Active Inbred Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Alan P.; Curtis, Tamera S.; Turner, Michael J.; Lightfoot, J. Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of innate activity level and running wheel access on food consumption in high-active (SWR/J) low-active (DBA/2J) mice. Methods Two strains of inbred mice were used in this study due to their high activity level (SWR/J) and low activity level (DBA/2J). The mice were housed in individual cages, and half of the mice in each strain had free access to running wheels in their cages, while the other mice received no running wheel. All mice consumed standard chow and water ad libitum for 13 weeks during the study period. Running-wheel activity (daily), food consumption (bi-weekly), and body mass (weekly) were recorded. Results SWR/J runners consumed more food (6.0±0.4g/day) than SWR/J non-runners (4.7±0.2g/day; p=0.03), DBA/2J runners (4.6±0.2g/day; p=0.02), and DBA/2J non-runners (4.2±0.2g/day; p=0.006). SWR/J non-runners consumed more food than DBA/2J non-runners (p=0.03). Average daily distance and duration were significantly greater for the SWR/J runners (6.4±0.7km/day and 333.6±40.5min/day, respectively) compared to the DBA/2J runners (1.6±0.4km/day and 91.3±23.0min/day, respectively). There was a significant correlation between food consumption and distance (r=0.74, p<0.001), duration (r=0.68, p<0.001), and speed (r=0.58, p<0.001), respectively, in all mice. However, when considering the individuals strains, the relationship between running-wheel activity and food consumption was only statistically significant for the SWR/J mice. Conclusion Higher running-wheel activity in mice was associated with increased food consumption in the SWR/J mice but not the DBA/2J mice. In DBA/2J mice the addition of a running wheel did not result in increased food consumption, suggesting energy expenditure of non-wheel cage activity in the control DBA/2J mice was similar to the energy expenditure of the wheel activity since body mass was similar between the two groups. PMID:20216465

  19. Genetic variability of respiratory complex abundance, organization, and activity in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Kari J.; Walter, Nicole A.R.; Denmark, Deaunne L.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in the etiology and pathogenesis of numerous human disorders involving tissues with high energy demand. Murine models are widely used to elucidate genetic determinants of phenotypes relevant to human disease, with recent studies of C57BL/6J (B6), DBA/2J (D2) and B6xD2 populations implicating naturally occurring genetic variation in mitochondrial function/dysfunction. Using blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblots, and in-gel activity analyses of complexes I, II, IV and V, our studies are the first to assess abundance, organization, and catalytic activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes and supercomplexes in mouse brain. Remarkable strain differences in supercomplex assembly and associated activity are evident, without differences in individual complexes I, II, III, or IV. Supercomplexes I1III2IV2-3 exhibit robust complex III immunoreactivity and complex I and IV activities in D2, but with little detected in B6 for I1III2IV2, and I1III2IV3 is not detected in B6. I1III2IV1 and I1III2 are abundant and catalytically active in both strains, but significantly more so in B6. Furthermore, while supercomplex III2IV1 is abundant in D2, none is detected in B6. In aggregate, these results indicate a shift toward more highly assembled supercomplexes in D2. Respiratory supercomplexes are thought to increase electron flow efficiency and individual complex stability, and to reduce electron leak and generation of reactive oxygen species. Our results provide a framework to begin assessing the role of respiratory complex suprastructure in genetic vulnerability and treatment for a wide variety of mitochondrial-related disorders. PMID:24164700

  20. Clofazimine Contributes Sustained Antimicrobial Activity after Treatment Cessation in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Rosemary V.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Ngcobo, Bongani; Adamson, John; Moodley, Chivonne; Dorasamy, Afton; Moodley, Sashen; Mgaga, Zinhle; Bester, Linda A.; Singh, Sanil D.; Almeida, Deepak V.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies have indicated that the antileprosy drug clofazimine may contribute treatment-shortening activity when included in tuberculosis treatment regimens. Clofazimine accumulates to high levels in tissues, has a long half-life, and remains in the body for months after administration is stopped. We hypothesized that in tuberculosis treatment, accumulated clofazimine may contribute sustained antimicrobial activity after treatment cessation, and we used the BALB/c mouse model of chronic tuberculosis chemotherapy to address this hypothesis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mice were treated for 4 weeks or 8 weeks with either isoniazid alone, clofazimine alone, the first-line regimen rifampin-isoniazid-pyrazinamide-ethambutol, or a first-line regimen where clofazimine was administered in place of ethambutol. To evaluate posttreatment antimicrobial activity, bacterial regrowth in the lungs and spleens was assessed at the day of treatment cessation and 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after treatment was stopped. Bacterial regrowth was delayed in all mice receiving clofazimine, either alone or in combination, compared to the mice that did not receive clofazimine. This effect was especially evident in mice receiving multidrug therapy. In mice not receiving clofazimine, bacterial regrowth began almost immediately after treatment was stopped, while in mice receiving clofazimine, bacterial regrowth was delayed for up to 6 weeks, with the duration of sustained antimicrobial activity being positively associated with the time that serum clofazimine levels remained at or above the 0.25-μg/ml MIC for M. tuberculosis. Thus, sustained activity of clofazimine may be important in the treatment-shortening effect associated with this drug. PMID:26926638

  1. Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Pamela K.; Woods, Courtney G.; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2009-03-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

  2. Polarized Cdc42 activation promotes polar body protrusion and asymmetric division in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dehapiot, Benoit; Carrière, Virginie; Carroll, John; Halet, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric meiotic divisions in mammalian oocytes rely on the eccentric positioning of the spindle and the remodeling of the overlying cortex, resulting in the formation of small polar bodies. The mechanism of this cortical polarization, exemplified by the formation of a thick F-actin cap, is poorly understood. Cdc42 is a major player in cell polarization in many systems; however, the spatio-temporal dynamics of Cdc42 activation during oocyte meiosis, and its contribution to mammalian oocyte polarization, have remained elusive. In this study, we investigated Cdc42 activation (Cdc42–GTP), dynamics and role during mouse oocyte meiotic divisions. We show that Cdc42–GTP accumulates in restricted cortical regions overlying meiotic chromosomes or chromatids, in a Ran–GTP-dependent manner. This polarized activation of Cdc42 is required for the recruitment of N-WASP and the formation of F-actin-rich protrusions during polar body formation. Cdc42 inhibition in MII oocytes resulted in the release of N-WASP into the cytosol, a loss of the polarized F-actin cap, and a failure to protrude the second polar body. Cdc42 inhibition also resulted in central spindle defects in activated MII oocytes. In contrast, emission of the first polar body during oocyte maturation could occur in the absence of a functional Cdc42/N-WASP pathway. Therefore, Cdc42 is a new protagonist in chromatin-induced cortical polarization in mammalian oocytes, with an essential role in meiosis II completion, through the recruitment and activation of N-WASP, downstream of the chromatin-centered Ran–GTP gradient. PMID:23384564

  3. atRA-induced apoptosis of mouse embryonic palate mesenchymal cells involves activation of MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zengli . E-mail: yuzengli@263.net; Xing Ying . E-mail: xingy@zzu.edu.cn

    2006-08-15

    Our previous studies have shown that atRA treatment resulted in cell-cycle block and growth inhibition in mouse embryonic palatal mesenchymal (MEPM). In the current study, gestation day (GD) 13 MEPM cells were used to test the hypothesis that the growth inhibition by atRA is due to apoptosis. The effects of atRA on apoptosis were assessed by performing MTT assay, Cell Death Detection ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. Data analysis confirmed that atRA treatment induced apoptosis-like cell death, as shown by decreased cell viability and increased fragmented DNA and sub-G1 fraction. atRA-induced apoptosis was associated with upregulation of bcl-2, translocation of bax protein to the mitochondria from the cytosol, activation of caspase-3 and cytochrome c release into cytosol. atRA-induced apoptosis was abrogated by z-DEVD-fmk, a caspase-3 specific inhibitor, and z-VAD-fmk, a general caspase inhibitor, suggesting that the atRA-induced cell death of MEPM cells occurs through the cytochrome c- and caspase-3-dependent pathways. In addition, atRA treatment caused a strong and sustained activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase (p38), as well as an early but transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Importantly, atRA-induced DNA fragmentation and capase-3 activation were prevented by pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and the p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB202190), but not by pretreatment with MEK inhibitor (U0126). From these results, we suggest that mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways is involved in the atRA-induced apoptosis of MEPM cells.

  4. Time-course Comparison of Xenobiotic Activators of CAR and PPARα in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Pamela K.; Woods, Courtney G.; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPARα will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 hrs, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPARα. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPARα in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens. PMID:19136022

  5. 129-Derived Mouse Strains Express an Unstable but Catalytically Active DNA Polymerase Iota Variant

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Annie; Delbos, Frédéric; Gelot, Camille; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Mice derived from the 129 strain have a nonsense codon mutation in exon 2 of the polymerase iota (Polι) gene and are therefore considered Polι deficient. When we amplified Polι mRNA from 129/SvJ or 129/Ola testes, only a small fraction of the full-length cDNA contained the nonsense mutation; the major fraction corresponded to a variant Polι isoform lacking exon 2. Polι mRNA lacking exon 2 contains an open reading frame, and the corresponding protein was detected using a polyclonal antibody raised against the C terminus of the murine Polι protein. The identity of the corresponding protein was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. Although the variant protein was expressed at only 5 to 10% of the level of wild-type Polι, it retained de novo DNA synthesis activity, the capacity to form replication foci following UV irradiation, and the ability to rescue UV light sensitivity in Polι−/− embryonic fibroblasts derived from a new, fully deficient Polι knockout (KO) mouse line. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of 129-derived male mice with Velcade, a drug that inhibits proteasome function, stabilized and restored a substantial amount of the variant Polι in these animals, indicating that its turnover is controlled by the proteasome. An analysis of two xeroderma pigmentosum-variant (XPV) cases corresponding to missense mutants of Polη, a related translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase in the same family, similarly showed a destabilization of the catalytically active mutant protein by the proteasome. Collectively, these data challenge the prevailing hypothesis that 129-derived strains of mice are completely deficient in Polι activity. The data also document, both for 129-derived mouse strains and for some XPV patients, new cases of genetic defects corresponding to the destabilization of an otherwise functional protein, the phenotype of which is reversible by proteasome inhibition. PMID:26124279

  6. Ganglioside GD2-specific trifunctional surrogate antibody Surek demonstrates therapeutic activity in a mouse melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Trifunctional bispecific antibodies (trAb) are a special class of bispecific molecules recruiting and activating T cells and accessory immune cells simultaneously at the targeted tumor. The new trAb Ektomab that targets the melanoma-associated ganglioside antigen GD2 and the signaling molecule human CD3 (hCD3) on T cells demonstrated potent T-cell activation and tumor cell destruction in vitro. However, the relatively low affinity for the GD2 antigen raised the question of its therapeutic capability. To further evaluate its efficacy in vivo it was necessary to establish a mouse model. Methods We generated the surrogate trAb Surek, which possesses the identical anti-GD2 binding arm as Ektomab, but targets mouse CD3 (mCD3) instead of hCD3, and evaluated its chemical and functional quality as a therapeutic antibody homologue. The therapeutic and immunizing potential of Surek was investigated using B78-D14, a B16 melanoma transfected with GD2 and GD3 synthases and showing strong GD2 surface expression. The induction of tumor-associated and autoreactive antibodies was evaluated. Results Despite its low affinity of approximately 107 M-1 for GD2, Surek exerted efficient tumor cell destruction in vitro at an EC50 of 70ng/ml [0.47nM]. Furthermore, Surek showed strong therapeutic efficacy in a dose-dependent manner and is superior to the parental GD2 mono-specific antibody, while the use of a control trAb with irrelevant target specificity had no effect. The therapeutic activity of Surek was strictly dependent on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and cured mice developed a long-term memory response against a second challenge even with GD2-negative B16 melanoma cells. Moreover, tumor protection was associated with humoral immune responses dominated by IgG2a and IgG3 tumor-reactive antibodies indicating a Th1-biased immune response. Autoreactive antibodies against the GD2 target antigen were not induced. Conclusion Our data suggest that Surek revealed strong tumor elimination

  7. Locomotor activity and body temperature in selected mouse lines differing greatly in feed intake.

    PubMed

    Sojka, P A; Griess, R S; Nielsen, M K

    2013-08-01

    Locomotor activity, body temperature, feed intake, and BW were measured on 382 mature male mice sampled from lines previously selected (25 generations) for either high (MH) or low (ML) heat loss and an unselected control (MC). Animals were from all 3 independent replicates of the 3 lines and across 4 generations (68 through 71). Locomotor activity and body temperatures were obtained using implanted transmitters with data collection over 4 d following a 3-d postsurgery recovery period. Data were collected every minute and then averaged into 30-min periods, thus providing 192 data points for each mouse. Least-squares means for feed intake adjusted for BW (Feed/BW, feed·BW(-1)·d(-1), g/g) were 0.1586, 0.1234, and 0.1125 (±0.0022) for MH, MC, and ML, respectively, with line being a highly significant source of variation (P < 0.0003). Line effects for locomotor activity counts, transformed to the 0.25 power for analysis, were significantly different, with MH mice being 2.1 times more active than ML mice (P < 0.003); MC mice were intermediate. Differences in body temperature were significant for both line (P < 0.03) and day effects (P < 0.001), with a 0.32°C difference between the MH and ML lines. Fourier series analysis used the combined significant periodicities of 24, 18, 12, 9, 6, and 3 h to describe circadian cycles for activity and body temperature. All 3 lines expressed daily peaks in body temperature and locomotor activity ∼3 h into darkness and ∼2 h after lights were turned on. There was a stronger relationship between locomotor activity and Feed/BW (P < 0.0001) than between body temperature and Feed/BW (P < 0.01); differences between lines in locomotor activity and body temperature explained 17% and 3%, respectively, of differences between lines in Feed/BW. Thus, line differences in locomotor activity contribute to line differences in maintenance, but approximately 80% of the differences between the MH and ML selection lines in Feed/BW remains

  8. Host and Bacterial Factors Involved in the Innate Ability of Mouse Macrophages To Eliminate Internalized Unopsonized Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hamrick, Terri S.; Havell, Edward A.; Horton, John R.; Orndorff, Paul E.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to better understand genetic and cellular factors that influence innate immunity, we examined host and bacterial factors involved in the nonopsonic phagocytosis and killing of Escherichia coli K-12 by mouse macrophages. Unelicited (resident) peritoneal macrophages from five different mouse strains, BALB/c, C57BL/6, CD-1, C3H/HeJ, and C3H/HeN, were employed. Additional macrophage populations were obtained from CD-1 mice (bone marrow-derived macrophages). Also, for BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, peritoneal macrophages elicited with either thioglycolate or proteose peptone, bone marrow-derived macrophages, and macrophage-like cell lines derived from the two strains were employed. Two E. coli K-12 strains that differed specifically in their abilities to produce type 1 pili containing the adhesive protein FimH were examined. The parameters used to assess macrophage bacteriocidal activity were (i) the killing of internalized (gentamicin-protected) E. coli during the approximately 4-h assay and (ii) the initial rate at which internalized E. coli were eliminated. Data on these parameters allowed the following conclusions: (i) unelicited or proteose peptone-elicited peritoneal macrophages were significantly better at eliminating internalized bacteria than thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages, or macrophage cell lines; (ii) the host genetic background had no significant effect upon the ability of unelicited peritoneal macrophages to kill E. coli (even though the mouse strains differ widely in their in vivo susceptibilities to bacterial infection); and (iii) the FimH phenotype had no significant effect upon E. coli survival once the bacterium was inside a macrophage. Additionally, there was no correlation between the bacteriocidal effectiveness of a macrophage population and the number of bacteria bound per macrophage. However, macrophage populations that were the least bacteriocidal tended to bind higher ratios of FimH+ to Fim

  9. Quiz Making Activities Using the Multi-Mouse Quiz System in an Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Juan; Mori, Mikihiko; Ueda, Hiroshi; Kita, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Mouse Quiz System is an application used to treat quizzes in a classroom or other learning environment. The system comprises the Multi Mouse Quiz (MMQ) and MMQEditor. The MMQ is an application of Single Display Groupware (SDG), which enables multiple users to answer quizzes by connecting several mice to an ordinary computer. The…

  10. Trans-synaptic zinc mobilization improves social interaction in two mouse models of autism through NMDAR activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jae; Lee, Hyejin; Huang, Tzyy-Nan; Chung, Changuk; Shin, Wangyong; Kim, Kyungdeok; Koh, Jae-Young; Hsueh, Yi-Ping; Kim, Eunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Genetic aspects of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have recently been extensively explored, but environmental influences that affect ASDs have received considerably less attention. Zinc (Zn) is a nutritional factor implicated in ASDs, but evidence for a strong association and linking mechanism is largely lacking. Here we report that trans-synaptic Zn mobilization rapidly rescues social interaction in two independent mouse models of ASD. In mice lacking Shank2, an excitatory postsynaptic scaffolding protein, postsynaptic Zn elevation induced by clioquinol (a Zn chelator and ionophore) improves social interaction. Postsynaptic Zn is mainly derived from presynaptic pools and activates NMDA receptors (NMDARs) through postsynaptic activation of the tyrosine kinase Src. Clioquinol also improves social interaction in mice haploinsufficient for the transcription factor Tbr1, which accompanies NMDAR activation in the amygdala. These results suggest that trans-synaptic Zn mobilization induced by clioquinol rescues social deficits in mouse models of ASD through postsynaptic Src and NMDAR activation. PMID:25981743

  11. Trans-synaptic zinc mobilization improves social interaction in two mouse models of autism through NMDAR activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jae; Lee, Hyejin; Huang, Tzyy-Nan; Chung, Changuk; Shin, Wangyong; Kim, Kyungdeok; Koh, Jae-Young; Hsueh, Yi-Ping; Kim, Eunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Genetic aspects of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have recently been extensively explored, but environmental influences that affect ASDs have received considerably less attention. Zinc (Zn) is a nutritional factor implicated in ASDs, but evidence for a strong association and linking mechanism is largely lacking. Here we report that trans-synaptic Zn mobilization rapidly rescues social interaction in two independent mouse models of ASD. In mice lacking Shank2, an excitatory postsynaptic scaffolding protein, postsynaptic Zn elevation induced by clioquinol (a Zn chelator and ionophore) improves social interaction. Postsynaptic Zn is mainly derived from presynaptic pools and activates NMDA receptors (NMDARs) through postsynaptic activation of the tyrosine kinase Src. Clioquinol also improves social interaction in mice haploinsufficient for the transcription factor Tbr1, which accompanies NMDAR activation in the amygdala. These results suggest that trans-synaptic Zn mobilization induced by clioquinol rescues social deficits in mouse models of ASD through postsynaptic Src and NMDAR activation.

  12. Brucella β 1,2 Cyclic Glucan Is an Activator of Human and Mouse Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Anna; Pérez-Gutierrez, Camino; Banchereau, Romain; Dutartre, Hélène; Lecine, Patrick; Dullaers, Melissa; Mello, Marielle; Pinto Salcedo, Suzana; Muller, Alexandre; Leserman, Lee; Levy, Yves; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandy; Moreno, Edgardo; Moriyón, Ignacio; Klechevsky, Eynav; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, SangKon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glucans showed neither toxicity nor immunogenicity compared to LPS and triggered antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in vivo. These cyclic glucans also enhanced antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses including cross-presentation by different human DC subsets. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans increased the memory CD4+ T cell responses of blood mononuclear cells exposed to recombinant fusion proteins composed of anti-CD40 antibody and antigens from both hepatitis C virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus cyclic glucans represent a new class of adjuvants, which might contribute to the development of effective antimicrobial therapies. PMID:23166489

  13. Genetic Suppression of Transgenic APP Rescues Hypersynchronous Network Activity in a Mouse Model of Alzeimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Born, Heather A.; Kim, Ji-Yoen; Savjani, Ricky R.; Das, Pritam; Dabaghian, Yuri A.; Guo, Qinxi; Yoo, Jong W.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Cirrito, John R.; Zheng, Hui; Golde, Todd E.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with an elevated risk for seizures that may be fundamentally connected to cognitive dysfunction. Supporting this link, many mouse models for AD exhibit abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in addition to the expected neuropathology and cognitive deficits. Here, we used a controllable transgenic system to investigate how network changes develop and are maintained in a model characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) overproduction and progressive amyloid pathology. EEG recordings in tet-off mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) from birth display frequent sharp wave discharges (SWDs). Unexpectedly, we found that withholding APP overexpression until adulthood substantially delayed the appearance of epileptiform activity. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile APP overexpression altered cortical development to favor synchronized firing. Regardless of the age at which EEG abnormalities appeared, the phenotype was dependent on continued APP overexpression and abated over several weeks once transgene expression was suppressed. Abnormal EEG discharges were independent of plaque load and could be extinguished without altering deposited amyloid. Selective reduction of Aβ with a γ-secretase inhibitor has no effect on the frequency of SWDs, indicating that another APP fragment or the full-length protein was likely responsible for maintaining EEG abnormalities. Moreover, transgene suppression normalized the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory innervation in the cortex, whereas secretase inhibition did not. Our results suggest that APP overexpression, and not Aβ overproduction, is responsible for EEG abnormalities in our transgenic mice and can be rescued independently of pathology. PMID:24623762

  14. Impaired synaptic development in a maternal immune activation mouse model of neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Coiro, Pierluca; Padmashri, Ragunathan; Suresh, Anand; Spartz, Elizabeth; Pendyala, Gurudutt; Chou, Shinnyi; Jung, Yoosun; Meays, Brittney; Roy, Shreya; Gautam, Nagsen; Alnouti, Yazen; Li, Ming; Dunaevsky, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors are thought to contribute to neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders with maternal immune activation (MIA) being a risk factor for both autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. Although MIA mouse offspring exhibit behavioral impairments, the synaptic alterations in vivo that mediate these behaviors are not known. Here we employed in vivo multiphoton imaging to determine that in the cortex of young MIA offspring there is a reduction in number and turnover rates of dendritic spines, sites of majority of excitatory synaptic inputs. Significantly, spine impairments persisted into adulthood and correlated with increased repetitive behavior, an ASD relevant behavioral phenotype. Structural analysis of synaptic inputs revealed a reorganization of presynaptic inputs with a larger proportion of spines being contacted by both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic terminals. These structural impairments were accompanied by altered excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. Finally, we report that a postnatal treatment of MIA offspring with the anti-inflammatory drug ibudilast, prevented both synaptic and behavioral impairments. Our results suggest that a possible altered inflammatory state associated with maternal immune activation results in impaired synaptic development that persists into adulthood but which can be prevented with early anti-inflammatory treatment. PMID:26218293

  15. Induction of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by inflammatory agents and tumor promoters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Dessypris, E.N.; Koury, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    The production of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity (MEG-CSA) was assayed in acetic acid extracts of skin from mice topically treated with inflammatory and tumor-promoting agents. A rapid induction of MEG-CSA was found in skin treated both with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a strong tumor promoter, and with mezerein, a weak tumor promoter, but no induction was found in untreated skin. The time course of induction of MEG-CSA following treatment of skin with PMA or mezerein was very similar to that previously demonstrated for the induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by these agents. The induced MEG-CSA was found in both the epidermis and the dermis. Pretreatment of the skin with US -methasone abrogated the MEG-CSA induction. The cell number response curve suggests that the MEG-CSA acts directly on the progenitor cells of the megakaryocyte colonies. That topical administration of diterpene esters results in the rapid, local induction of MEG-CSA which can be blocked by US -methasone pretreatment suggests a mechanism for the thrombocytosis associated with some inflammatory states. The indirect action in which diterpene esters induce in certain cells the production or release of growth regulatory factors for other cell types may also aid in understanding their carcinogenic properties.

  16. Six proteins regulate the activation of Myf5 expression in embryonic mouse limbs

    PubMed Central

    Giordani, Julien; Bajard, Lola; Demignon, Josiane; Daubas, Philippe; Buckingham, Margaret; Maire, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Myf5, a member of the myogenic regulatory factor family, plays a major role in determining myogenic cell fate at the onset of skeletal muscle formation in the embryo. Spatiotemporal control of its expression during development requires multiple enhancer elements spread over >100 kb at the Myf5 locus. Transcription in embryonic limbs is regulated by a 145-bp element located at −57.5 kb from the Myf5 gene. In the present study we show that Myf5 expression is severely impaired in the limb buds of Six1−/− and Six1−/−Six4−/+ mouse mutants despite the presence of myogenic progenitor cells. The 145-bp regulatory element contains a sequence that binds Six1 and Six4 in electromobility shift assays in vitro and in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with embryonic extracts. We further show that Six1 is able to transactivate a reporter gene under the control of this sequence. In vivo functionality of the Six binding site is demonstrated by transgenic analysis. Mutation of this site impairs reporter gene expression in the limbs and in mature somites where the 145-bp regulatory element is also active. Six1/4 therefore regulate Myf5 transcription, together with Pax3, which was previously shown to be required for the activity of the 145-bp element. Six homeoproteins, which also directly regulate the myogenic differentiation gene Myogenin and lie genetically upstream of Pax3, thus control hypaxial myogenesis at multiple levels. PMID:17592144

  17. AMPK activation protects from neuronal dysfunction and vulnerability across nematode, cellular and mouse models of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Manrique, Rafael P.; Farina, Francesca; Cambon, Karine; Dolores Sequedo, María; Parker, Alex J.; Millán, José María; Weiss, Andreas; Déglon, Nicole; Neri, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The adenosine monophosphate activated kinase protein (AMPK) is an evolutionary-conserved protein important for cell survival and organismal longevity through the modulation of energy homeostasis. Several studies suggested that AMPK activation may improve energy metabolism and protein clearance in the brains of patients with vascular injury or neurodegenerative disease. However, in Huntington's disease (HD), AMPK may be activated in the striatum of HD mice at a late, post-symptomatic phase of the disease, and high-dose regiments of the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide may worsen neuropathological and behavioural phenotypes. Here, we revisited the role of AMPK in HD using models that recapitulate the early features of the disease, including Caenorhabditis elegans neuron dysfunction before cell death and mouse striatal cell vulnerability. Genetic and pharmacological manipulation of aak-2/AMPKα shows that AMPK activation protects C. elegans neurons from the dysfunction induced by human exon-1 huntingtin (Htt) expression, in a daf-16/forkhead box O-dependent manner. Similarly, AMPK activation using genetic manipulation and low-dose metformin treatment protects mouse striatal cells expressing full-length mutant Htt (mHtt), counteracting their vulnerability to stress, with reduction of soluble mHtt levels by metformin and compensation of cytotoxicity by AMPKα1. Furthermore, AMPK protection is active in the mouse brain as delivery of gain-of-function AMPK-γ1 to mouse striata slows down the neurodegenerative effects of mHtt. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of considering the dynamic of HD for assessing the therapeutic potential of stress-response targets in the disease. We postulate that AMPK activation is a compensatory response and valid approach for protecting dysfunctional and vulnerable neurons in HD. PMID:26681807

  18. Morganella morganii Peritonitis Associated with Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD) after Colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yukihiro; Ito, Ayano; Miyamoto, Kanyu; Suga, Norihiro; Miura, Naoto; Kasagi, Tomomichi; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Imai, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    A 79-year-old man on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) developed abdominal pain and cloudy peritoneal fluid two days after colonoscopy that revealed multiple diverticula. The white blood cell count was 9,000 cells/μL, C-reactive protein level was 6.86 mg/dL, and the white blood cell count of the peritoneal fluid was 7,800 cells/μL, suggesting acute peritonitis. Empiric therapy consisting of cefazolin and ceftazidime slowly improved the patient's symptoms. The initial microbiological examination of the peritoneal fluid demonstrated Morganella morganii. He was changed from CAPD to hemodialysis. It is important to consider M. morganii peritonitis in patients with colonic diverticula.

  19. Peritoneal tuberculosis in pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Alaoui, Fatima Zohra Fdili; Rachad, Myriem; Chaara, Hikmat; Bouguern, Hakima; Melhouf, Moulay Abdilah

    2012-01-01

    Peritoneal tuberculosis in pregnancy is one of the least common forms of extrapulmonory tuberculosis in pregnancy. Early diagnosis is important to prevent obstetrical and neonatal morbidity. We report the case of a 37-year-old pregnant woman who presented with abdominal volume increase, night-sweat, anorexia, loss of weight and abdominal pain at 23 weeks. A peritoneal laparoscopic biopsy was performed and confirmed the diagnosis of tuberculous peritonitis. The patient received antituberculosis chemotherapy. The recovery was good as gave birth to a healthy infant of 3200Kg at 37th week's gestation by vaginal delivery. PMID:23024824

  20. Peritoneal tuberculosis in pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alaoui, Fatima Zohra Fdili; Rachad, Myriem; Chaara, Hikmat; Bouguern, Hakima; Melhouf, Moulay Abdilah

    2012-01-01

    Peritoneal tuberculosis in pregnancy is one of the least common forms of extrapulmonory tuberculosis in pregnancy. Early diagnosis is important to prevent obstetrical and neonatal morbidity. We report the case of a 37-year-old pregnant woman who presented with abdominal volume increase, night-sweat, anorexia, loss of weight and abdominal pain at 23 weeks. A peritoneal laparoscopic biopsy was performed and confirmed the diagnosis of tuberculous peritonitis. The patient received antituberculosis chemotherapy. The recovery was good as gave birth to a healthy infant of 3200Kg at 37th week's gestation by vaginal delivery. PMID:23024824

  1. A case of tuberculous peritonitis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Avcu, Gulhadiye; Sensoy, Gulnar; Karli, Arzu; Caltepe, Gonul; Sullu, Yurdanur; Belet, Nursen; Bilgici, Meltem C

    2015-01-01

    Currently, tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. Peritoneal tuberculosis occurs in approximately 1% of all of tuberculosis cases and is rarely observed in children. Diagnosis and treatment delays caused by mimicking many other intra-abdominal diseases can lead to increases in morbidity and mortality. Here, we present a case of a four-year-old child with tuberculosis peritonitis who was diagnosed by laparoscopic biopsy and histopathological examination and recovered with antituberculosis therapy. Peritoneal tuberculosis should be considered in younger patients and adults with fever, abdominal pain and weight loss in endemic areas. PMID:25868903

  2. [The specific nutritionnal care in peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Castrale, Cindy; Azar, Raymond; Piquet, Marie-Astrid; Lobbedez, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    Protein energy wasting is a major complication in peritoneal dialysis. It is leading to a poor quality of life and increasing mortality. Diagnosis must be early, according to criteria defined by the International society of renal nutrition and metabolism. It is necessary to appropriate the diagnostic tools with dialysis method. The nutritional care is difficult in peritoneal dialysis. Indeed, studies are limited and practical nutrition is complex. In this point of view, we propose to treat guidelines for protein energy wasting, in peritoneal dialysis patients. PMID:27320370

  3. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanyan; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Hongzhi; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Teng, Weiping; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBPα and PPARγ. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  4. Peritoneal dialysis prescription during the third trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Batarse, Rodolfo R; Steiger, Ralph M; Guest, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Management of the pregnant patient on peritoneal dialysis (PD) is potentially challenging because uterine enlargement may negatively affect catheter function and prescribed dwell volumes. Additional reports of the management of these patients are needed. Here, we describe a near-full-term delivery in a 27-year-old woman who had been on dialysis for 7 years. Peritoneal dialysis was continued during the entire pregnancy. In the third trimester, a higher delivered automated PD volume allowed for adequate clearance and control of volume status. A decision to hospitalize the patient to limit activity and facilitate the delivery of increased dialysate is believed to have contributed to the successful outcome for mother and infant. Our report discusses the management of this patient and reviews published dialysis prescriptions used during the third trimester of pregnancy in patients treated with PD. PMID:24711639

  5. [The social environment of patients on peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Gauna, R; Minguela Pesquera, I; Ocharán-Corcuera, J; Gimeno Martín, I; Chena Alejandro, A

    2008-01-01

    Patients suffering chronic illnesses, such as those on replacement therapy, condition and are conditioned by their family, work, and social environment. A continuous psychophysical impairment occurs and alters the hormonal stress mediators from the central nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Such stress situation causes a pathological effect additional to the factors inherent to the disease. Psychological disorders (depression, anxiety, and others) are associated to an increased morbidity, directly acting upon treatment course, subsequent treatment failure, and personal perception of one's own state of health. Individual factors (sex, lifestyles, health and dietary habits, spirituality, financial and family situation, personal skills for coping with disease, cultural level, and social status) condition morbidity in these patients, and the course and complications of peritoneal dialysis. Interactions between healthcare staff and patients on peritoneal dialysis cause these patients to have a more active attitude and a greater involvement in their treatment, which has an impact on the course of disease and clinical status.

  6. Microbiological diagnosis of peritonitis in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Vas, S I; Law, L

    1985-01-01

    The fast and accurate etiological diagnosis of peritonitis in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is essential. The concentration of larger volumes of peritoneal fluids may yield more isolates than conventional methods. The removal of antibiotics present in the fluids as a consequence of therapy by washing or using antibiotic-removing resins increases the yield considerably. The use of anaerobic culture media is justified if fecal organisms are suspected as the cause of the infection. PMID:3886688

  7. microRNA Regulation of Peritoneal Cavity Homeostasis in Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Anton, Melisa; Bowen, Timothy; Jenkins, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of peritoneal cavity homeostasis and peritoneal membrane function is critical for long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment. Several microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the regulation of key molecular pathways driving peritoneal membrane alterations leading to PD failure. miRNAs regulate the expression of the majority of protein coding genes in the human genome, thereby affecting most biochemical pathways implicated in cellular homeostasis. In this review, we report published findings on miRNAs and PD therapy, with emphasis on evidence for changes in peritoneal miRNA expression during long-term PD treatment. Recent work indicates that PD effluent- (PDE-) derived cells change their miRNA expression throughout the course of PD therapy, contributing to the loss of peritoneal cavity homeostasis and peritoneal membrane function. Changes in miRNA expression profiles will alter regulation of key molecular pathways, with the potential to cause profound effects on peritoneal cavity homeostasis during PD treatment. However, research to date has mainly adopted a literature-based miRNA-candidate methodology drawing conclusions from modest numbers of patient-derived samples. Therefore, the study of miRNA expression during PD therapy remains a promising field of research to understand the mechanisms involved in basic peritoneal cell homeostasis and PD failure. PMID:26495316

  8. Continuous Hyperthermic Peritoneal Perfusion (CHPP) With Cisplatin for Children With Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-29

    Peritoneal Neoplasms; Retroperitoneal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Adenocarcinoma; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Neoplasms; Sarcoma; Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor

  9. Campylobacter jejuni: A rare agent in a child with peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Tural Kara, Tugce; Yilmaz, Songul; Ozdemir, Halil; Birsin Ozcakar, Zeynep; Derya Aysev, Ahmet; Ciftci, Ergin; Ince, Erdal

    2016-10-01

    La peritonitis es un problema grave en los niños que reciben diálisis peritoneal. La bacteria Campylobacter jejuni es una causa infrecuente de peritonitis. Un niño de 10 años de edad con insuficiencia renal terminal causada por síndrome urémico hemolítico atípico ingresó a nuestro hospital con dolor abdominal y fiebre. El líquido de la diálisis peritoneal era turbio; en el examen microscópico se observaron leucocitos abundantes. Se inició tratamiento con cefepime intraperitoneal. En el cultivo del líquido peritoneal se aisló Campylobacter jejuni, por lo que se agregó claritromicina oral al tratamiento. Al finalizar el tratamiento, el resultado del cultivo del líquido peritoneal era negativo. Hasta donde sabemos, no se había informado previamente peritonitis por C. jejuni en niños. Conclusión. Si bien la peritonitis por C. jejuni es rara en los niños, debe considerarse como factor etiológico de la peritonitis.

  10. Difficult peritonitis cases in children undergoing chronic peritoneal dialysis: relapsing, repeat, recurrent and zoonotic episodes.

    PubMed

    Bakkaloglu, Sevcan A; Warady, Bradley A

    2015-09-01

    Despite technological improvements in dialysis connectology and dialysis technique, peritonitis remains the most common and most significant complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in children. Most children undergoing chronic PD experience none or only one peritonitis episode, while others have multiple episodes or episodes secondary to unusual organisms. Knowledge of potential risk factors and likely patient outcome is imperative if treatment is to be optimized. In this review we will, in turn, describe episodes of peritonitis that are characterized as either relapsing, recurrent, repeat or zoonosis-related to highlight the clinical issues that are commonly encountered by clinicians treating these infections.

  11. Advanced glycation end-products in the peritoneal fluid and in the peritoneal membrane of continuous ambulant peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Mahiout, A; Ehlerding, G; Brunkhorst, R

    1996-01-01

    In patients on continuous ambulant peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) treatment, the peritoneal membrane is continuously exposed to the high glucose concentration contained in the dialysate. This may lead to the local generation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). To test this hypothesis we evaluated the plasma and dialysate AGE concentrations in five CAPD patients. The dialysate was measured after a 1 h and after a 12 h dwell time. Additionally, in two patients an immunohistochemical investigation of the peritoneal membrane for AGE was performed. For the determination of AGE an ELISA using a polyclonal antibody against AGE bovine serum albumin was used; the immunohistochemical staining was performed using the streptavidin-biotin complex method. We found only low concentrations of AGE in the dialysate after a 1 h dwell time; after 12 h, however, the dialysate AGE was even greater than the plasma concentration. In both peritoneal specimens we found positive staining for AGE in the interstitium of the mesothelial layer. The dialysate AGE contained a high proportion of high-molecular-weight AGE proteins and low-molecular-weight AGE was found to be in the same concentration range as the total serum AGE. We conclude that there is local generation of AGE in the peritoneal membrane and a 'washing out' of AGE from the peritoneal membrane during longer dwell times. We speculate that the accumulation of AGE might lead to some of the functional and morphological alterations observed after long-term CAPD.

  12. Inhibition of peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by cationized catalase in mice.

    PubMed

    Hyoudou, Kenji; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Yuki; Mukai, Sakiko; Ikemura, Mai; Kuramoto, Yukari; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2007-05-14

    To inhibit peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by destroying hydrogen peroxide, ethylenediamine-conjugated catalase (ED-catalase), a cationized derivative, was injected into the peritoneal cavity of mice. ED-catalase had about a 6-fold longer retention time within the cavity than unmodified catalase. Peritoneal dissemination was evaluated after intraperitoneal inoculation of B16-BL6/Luc, a melanoma clone stably expressing firefly luciferase, by measuring luciferase activity. An intraperitoneal injection of ED-catalase just before tumor inoculation significantly reduced the number of tumor cells in peritoneal organs. Catalase was less effective, confirming the importance of the retention of the enzyme within the cavity for the inhibition. ED-catalase injected 3 days after tumor inoculation was also effective in inhibiting tumor growth. A real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that ED-catalase significantly suppressed the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Daily dosing of ED-catalase for 7 days significantly prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. These findings indicate that ED-catalase, which is retained for a long time within the peritoneal cavity, is highly effective in inhibiting the adhesion and proliferation of peritoneally disseminated tumor cells, and in increasing the survival of tumor-bearing mice. PMID:17382424

  13. Influence of peritoneal lavage on objective prognostic signs in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ihse, I; Evander, A; Gustafson, I; Holmberg, J T

    1986-01-01

    In 39 patients with severe attacks of acute pancreatitis, a longitudinal study was done with respect to the influence of peritoneal lavage on objective prognostic signs (WBC, blood-glucose, serum-calcium, hematocrit, serum-creatinine, arterial pO2, base deficit); amylase activities in peritoneal fluid, serum, and urine; serum-hemoglobin, serum-Na, serum-K, and plasma-insulin. In addition to standard care in the ICU, half of the patients (N = 19) were randomly treated with peritoneal lavage. Peritoneal lavage did not influence overall mortality (13%), incidence of major complications (36%), or hospital stay (23 +/- 7 days). None of the prognostic signs was significantly influenced by lavage. Amylase concentration in peritoneal fluid was significantly reduced in the lavaged group after 6 hours compared to 24 hours in controls. Serum and urinary amylase decreased 12 hours earlier in the lavaged group, indicating an efficiency of the lavage procedure per se. Still, this study did not reveal any beneficial clinical effects of peritoneal lavage in acute pancreatitis. PMID:2427042

  14. Catumaxomab for Treatment of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis in Patients With Gastric Adenocarcinomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Gastric Adenocarcinoma With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Siewert Type II Adenocarcinoma of Esophagogastric Junction With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Siewert Type III Adenocarcinoma of Esophagogastric Junction With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

  15. Metformin blocks progression of obesity-activated thyroid cancer in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeongwon; Kim, Won Gu; Zhao, Li; Enomoto, Keisuke; Willingham, Mark; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2016-01-01

    Compelling epidemiologic evidence indicates that obesity is associated with a high risk of human malignancies, including thyroid cancer. We previously demonstrated that a high fat diet (HFD) effectively induces the obese phenotype in a mouse model of aggressive follicular thyroid cancer (ThrbPV/PVPten+/−mice). We showed that HFD promotes cancer progression through aberrant activation of the leptin-JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway. HFD-promoted thyroid cancer progression allowed us to test other molecular targets for therapeutic opportunity for obesity-induced thyroid cancer. Metformin is a widely used drug to treat patients with type II diabetes. It has been shown to reduce incidences of neoplastic diseases and cancer mortality in type II diabetes patients. The present study aimed to test whether metformin could be a therapeutic for obesity-activated thyroid cancer. ThrbPV/PVPten+/−mice were fed HFD together with metformin or vehicle-only, as controls, for 20 weeks. While HFD-ThrbPV/PVPten+/−mice had shorter survival than LFD-treated mice, metformin had no effects on the survival of HFD-ThrbPV/PVPten+/−mice. Remarkably, metformin markedly decreased occurrence of capsular invasion and completely blocked vascular invasion and anaplasia in HFD-ThrbPV/PVPten+/−mice without affecting thyroid tumor growth. The impeded cancer progression was due to the inhibitory effect of metformin on STAT3-ERK-vimentin and fibronectin-integrin signaling to decrease tumor cell invasion and de-differentiation. The present studies provide additional molecular evidence to support the link between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. Importantly, our findings suggest that metformin could be used as an adjuvant in combination with antiproliferative modalities to improve the outcome of patients with obesity-activated thyroid cancer. PMID:27145454

  16. Modulatory activity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus OLL2838 in a mouse model of intestinal immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Tasuku; Bergamo, Paolo; Maurano, Francesco; D'Arienzo, Rossana; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Bozzella, Giuseppina; Luongo, Diomira; Sashihara, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Takuya; Tanabe, Soichi; Rossi, Mauro

    2015-06-01

    Gut microbiota and probiotic strains play an important role in oral tolerance by modulating regulatory and effector cell components of the immune system. We have previously described the ability of Lactobacilli to influence both the innate and adaptive immunity to wheat gluten, a food antigen, in mouse. In this study, we further explored the immunomodulatory mechanisms elicited in this model by testing three specific probiotic strains, namely L. rhamnosus OLL2838, B. infantis ATCC15697 and S. thermophilus Sfi39. In vitro analysis showed the all tested strains induced maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells (DCs). However, only L. rhamnosus induced appreciable levels of IL-10 and nitric oxide productions, whereas S. thermophilus essentially elicited IL-12 and TNF-α. The anti-inflammatory ability of OLL2838 was then tested in vivo by adopting mice that develop a gluten-specific enteropathy. This model is characterized by villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, high levels of intestinal IFN-γ, increased cell apoptosis in lamina propria, and reduced intestinal total glutathione (GSHtot) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. We found that, following administration of OLL2838, GSHtot and GST activity were enhanced, whereas caspase-3 activity was reduced. On the contrary, this probiotic strain failed in recovering the normal histology and further increased intestinal IFN-γ. Confocal microscopy revealed the inability of the probiotic strain to appropriately interact with enterocytes of the small intestine and with Peyer's patches in treated mice. In conclusion, these data highlighted the potential of L. rhamnosus OLL2838 to recover specific toxicity parameters induced by gluten in enteropathic mice through mechanisms that involve induction of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:25623030

  17. Activation of guanylate cyclase-C attenuates stretch responses and sensitization of mouse colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Kiyatkin, Michael E.; La, Jun-Ho; Ge, Pei; Solinga, Robert; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Gebhart, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by altered bowel habits, persistent pain and discomfort, and typically colorectal hypersensitivity. Linaclotide, a peripherally-restricted 14-amino acid peptide approved for the treatment of IBS with constipation, relieves constipation and reduces IBS-associated pain in these patients presumably by activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C), which stimulates production and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) from intestinal epithelial cells. We investigated whether activation of GC-C by the endogenous agonist uroguanylin or the primary downstream effector of that activation, cGMP, directly modulates responses and sensitization of mechanosensitive colorectal primary afferents. The distal 2 cm of mouse colorectum with attached pelvic nerve was harvested, pinned flat mucosal side up for in vitro single-fiber recordings and the encoding properties of mechanosensitive afferents (serosal, mucosal, muscular and muscular-mucosal) to probing and circumferential stretch studied. Both cGMP (10–300μM) and uroguanylin (1–1000nM) applied directly to colorectal receptive endings significantly reduced responses of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents to stretch; serosal and mucosal afferents were not affected. Sensitized responses (i.e., increased responses to stretch) of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents were reversed by cGMP, returning responses to stretch to control. Blocking the transport of cGMP from colorectal epithelia by probenecid, a mechanism validated by studies in cultured intestinal T84 cells, abolished the inhibitory effect of uroguanylin on muscular-mucosal afferents. These results suggest that GC-C agonists like linaclotide alleviate colorectal pain and hypersensitivity by dampening stretch-sensitive afferent mechanosensitivity and normalizing afferent sensitization. PMID:23739979

  18. Post-Spaceflight (STS-135) Mouse Splenocytes Demonstrate Altered Activation Properties and Surface Molecule Expression.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shen-An; Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in immune function have been documented during or post-spaceflight and in ground based models of microgravity. Identification of immune parameters that are dysregulated during spaceflight is an important step in mitigating crew health risks during deep space missions. The in vitro analysis of leukocyte activity post-spaceflight in both human and animal species is primarily focused on lymphocytic function. This report completes a broader spectrum analysis of mouse lymphocyte and monocyte changes post 13 days orbital flight (mission STS-135). Analysis includes an examination in surface markers for cell activation, and antigen presentation and co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine production was measured after stimulation with T-cell mitogen or TLR-2, TLR-4, or TLR-5 agonists. Splenocyte surface marker analysis immediate post-spaceflight and after in vitro culture demonstrated unique changes in phenotypic populations between the flight mice and matched treatment ground controls. Post-spaceflight splenocytes (flight splenocytes) had lower expression intensity of CD4+CD25+ and CD8+CD25+ cells, lower percentage of CD11c+MHC II+ cells, and higher percentage of CD11c+MHC I+ populations compared to ground controls. The flight splenocytes demonstrated an increase in phagocytic activity. Stimulation with ConA led to decrease in CD4+ population but increased CD4+CD25+ cells compared to ground controls. Culturing with TLR agonists led to a decrease in CD11c+ population in splenocytes isolated from flight mice compared to ground controls. Consequently, flight splenocytes with or without TLR-agonist stimulation showed a decrease in CD11c+MHC I+, CD11c+MHC II+, and CD11c+CD86+ cells compared to ground controls. Production of IFN-γ was decreased and IL-2 was increased from ConA stimulated flight splenocytes. This study demonstrated that expression of surface molecules can be affected by conditions of spaceflight and impaired responsiveness persists under culture

  19. Hair growth activity of Crataegus pinnatifida on C57BL/6 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shin, Heon-Sub; Lee, Jung-Min; Park, Sang-Yong; Yang, Jung-Eun; Kim, Ju-Han; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2013-09-01

    Crataegus pinnatifida has a long history of use in traditional oriental herbal medicine to stimulating digestion and improving blood circulation. Based on nutrition of hair, the present study was conducted to assess the effect of C. pinnatifida extract on hair growth using mouse model and its mechanisms of action. The C. pinnatifida extract containing the contents of total polyphenol of 5.88□0.82 g gallic acid/100 g extract and proanthocyanidin of 9.15□1.58 mg cyaniding chloride/100 g extract was orally administered daily at a dosage of 50 mg/kg weight to the 7-week-old C57BL/6 mice in telogen. The C. pinnatifida extract promoted hair growth by inducing anagen phase in mice in telogen, reflected by color of skin, thickness of hair shaft, and density of hair. The ratio of anagento telogen was determined by shape of hair follicles in vertically sectioned slide and increased by oral administration of C. pinnatifida extract. The number and the size of hair follicles were also enlarged, indicating anagen phase induction. The proliferation of human dermal papilla cells (hDPC) was accelerated by addition of C. pinnatifida extract, which activated the signaling of mitogen-activated protein kinases (Erk, p-38, and JNK) and Akt. Moreover, the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax as the determinant of cell fate was also raised in skin. These results suggest that the C. pinnatifida extract promotes hair growth by inducing anagen phase, which might be mediated by the activation of cellular signalings that enhance the survival of cultured hDPC and the increase of the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax that protects cells against cell death.

  20. Post-Spaceflight (STS-135) Mouse Splenocytes Demonstrate Altered Activation Properties and Surface Molecule Expression

    PubMed Central

    Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in immune function have been documented during or post-spaceflight and in ground based models of microgravity. Identification of immune parameters that are dysregulated during spaceflight is an important step in mitigating crew health risks during deep space missions. The in vitro analysis of leukocyte activity post-spaceflight in both human and animal species is primarily focused on lymphocytic function. This report completes a broader spectrum analysis of mouse lymphocyte and monocyte changes post 13 days orbital flight (mission STS-135). Analysis includes an examination in surface markers for cell activation, and antigen presentation and co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine production was measured after stimulation with T-cell mitogen or TLR-2, TLR-4, or TLR-5 agonists. Splenocyte surface marker analysis immediate post-spaceflight and after in vitro culture demonstrated unique changes in phenotypic populations between the flight mice and matched treatment ground controls. Post-spaceflight splenocytes (flight splenocytes) had lower expression intensity of CD4+CD25+ and CD8+CD25+ cells, lower percentage of CD11c+MHC II+ cells, and higher percentage of CD11c+MHC I+ populations compared to ground controls. The flight splenocytes demonstrated an increase in phagocytic activity. Stimulation with ConA led to decrease in CD4+ population but increased CD4+CD25+ cells compared to ground controls. Culturing with TLR agonists led to a decrease in CD11c+ population in splenocytes isolated from flight mice compared to ground controls. Consequently, flight splenocytes with or without TLR-agonist stimulation showed a decrease in CD11c+MHC I+, CD11c+MHC II+, and CD11c+CD86+ cells compared to ground controls. Production of IFN-γ was decreased and IL-2 was increased from ConA stimulated flight splenocytes. This study demonstrated that expression of surface molecules can be affected by conditions of spaceflight and impaired responsiveness persists under culture

  1. Inhibiting cholesterol degradation induces neuronal sclerosis and epileptic activity in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chali, Farah; Djelti, Fathia; Eugene, Emmanuel; Valderrama, Mario; Marquer, Catherine; Aubourg, Patrick; Duykaerts, Charles; Miles, Richard; Cartier, Nathalie; Navarro, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Elevations in neuronal cholesterol have been associated with several degenerative diseases. An enhanced excitability and synchronous firing in surviving neurons are among the sequels of neuronal death in these diseases and also in some epileptic syndromes. Here, we attempted to increase neuronal cholesterol levels, using a short hairpin RNA to suppress expression of the enzyme cytochrome P450 family 46, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 gene (CYP46A1). This protein hydroxylates cholesterol and so facilitates transmembrane extrusion. A short hairpin RNA CYP46A1construction coupled to the adeno-associated virus type 5 was injected focally and unilaterally into mouse hippocampus. It was selectively expressed first in neurons of the cornu ammonis (hippocampus) (CA)3a region. Cytoplasmic and membrane cholesterol increased, and the neuronal soma volume increased and then decreased before pyramidal cells died. As CA3a pyramidal cells died, interictal electroencephalographic (EEG) events occurred during exploration and non-rapid eye movement sleep. With time, neuronal death spread to involve pyramidal cells and interneurons of the CA1 region. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with a delayed local expression of phosphorylated tau. Astrocytes were activated throughout the hippocampus and microglial activation was specific to regions of neuronal death. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with distinct aberrant EEG activity. During exploratory behaviour and rapid eye movement sleep, EEG oscillations at 7-10 Hz (theta) could accelerate to 14-21 Hz (beta) waves. They were accompanied by low-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations of peak power at ~300 Hz and a range of 250-350 Hz. Although episodes of EEG acceleration were not correlated with changes in exploratory behaviour, they were followed in some animals by structured seizure-like discharges. These data strengthen links between increased cholesterol, neuronal sclerosis and epileptic behaviour.

  2. Inhibiting cholesterol degradation induces neuronal sclerosis and epileptic activity in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chali, Farah; Djelti, Fathia; Eugene, Emmanuel; Valderrama, Mario; Marquer, Catherine; Aubourg, Patrick; Duykaerts, Charles; Miles, Richard; Cartier, Nathalie; Navarro, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Elevations in neuronal cholesterol have been associated with several degenerative diseases. An enhanced excitability and synchronous firing in surviving neurons are among the sequels of neuronal death in these diseases and also in some epileptic syndromes. Here, we attempted to increase neuronal cholesterol levels, using a short hairpin RNA to suppress expression of the enzyme cytochrome P450 family 46, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 gene (CYP46A1). This protein hydroxylates cholesterol and so facilitates transmembrane extrusion. A short hairpin RNA CYP46A1construction coupled to the adeno-associated virus type 5 was injected focally and unilaterally into mouse hippocampus. It was selectively expressed first in neurons of the cornu ammonis (hippocampus) (CA)3a region. Cytoplasmic and membrane cholesterol increased, and the neuronal soma volume increased and then decreased before pyramidal cells died. As CA3a pyramidal cells died, interictal electroencephalographic (EEG) events occurred during exploration and non-rapid eye movement sleep. With time, neuronal death spread to involve pyramidal cells and interneurons of the CA1 region. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with a delayed local expression of phosphorylated tau. Astrocytes were activated throughout the hippocampus and microglial activation was specific to regions of neuronal death. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with distinct aberrant EEG activity. During exploratory behaviour and rapid eye movement sleep, EEG oscillations at 7-10 Hz (theta) could accelerate to 14-21 Hz (beta) waves. They were accompanied by low-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations of peak power at ~300 Hz and a range of 250-350 Hz. Although episodes of EEG acceleration were not correlated with changes in exploratory behaviour, they were followed in some animals by structured seizure-like discharges. These data strengthen links between increased cholesterol, neuronal sclerosis and epileptic behaviour. PMID:25847620

  3. Cloning and Transcriptional Activity of the Mouse Omi/HtrA2 Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Liu, Xin; Wu, Ye; Wang, Wen; Ma, Xinliang; Liu, Huirong

    2016-01-01

    HtrA serine peptidase 2 (HtrA2), also named Omi, is a pro-apoptotic protein that exhibits dramatic changes in expression levels in a variety of disorders, including ischemia/reperfusion injury, cancer, and neurodegeneration. In our study, Omi/HtrA2 protein levels were high in the heart, brain, kidney and liver, with elevated heart/brain expression in aging mice. A similar expression pattern was observed at the mRNA level, which suggests that the regulation of Omi/HtrA2 is predominately transcriptional. Promoter binding by transcription factors is the main influencing factor of transcription, and to identify specific promoter elements that contribute to the differential expression of mouse Omi/HtrA2, we constructed truncated Omi/HtrA2 promoter/luciferase reporter vectors and analyzed their relative luciferase activity; it was greatest in the promoter regions at −1205~−838 bp and −146~+93 bp, with the −838~−649 bp region exhibiting negative regulatory activity. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the Omi/HtrA2 gene promoter contains a CpG island at −709~+37 bp, and eight heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) sites, two Sp1 transcription factor (SP1)sites, one activator protein (AP) site, seven p53 sites, and four YY1 transcription factor(YY1) sites were predicted in the core areas. Furthermore, we found that p53 and HSF1 specifically binds to the Omi/HtrA2 promoter using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. These results provide a foundation for understanding Omi/HtrA2 regulatory mechanisms, which could further understanding of HtrA-associated diseases. PMID:26784188

  4. Palisade dorsoventral lavage for neglected peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Losanoff, J; Kjossev, K

    1997-02-01

    A modification of the procedure of laparostomy with palisade dorsoventral lavage for treating neglected peritonitis is described. It consists of adding a polyethylene foil to cover the intestines and thus avoiding the direct contact between them from one side, and the suction drains and the palisade laparostomy screen from the other. Between 1988 and 1995, 19 patients with neglected peritonitis (APACHE II scores from 12 to 42; mean 22.3) were managed using this modified technique. A total of 81 reexplorations were done (average, 4.3 reexplorations per patient). The technique proved effective (21% mortality, n = 4). No intestinal perforations, fistulas, or residual pus collections occurred among survivors or among those who died. Primary fascial closure was achieved in all survivors and during an 18-months followup, no incisional hernia occurred. Based on these results, we believe this technique is extremely useful when both laparostomy and continuous peritoneal irrigations are considered in patients with neglected peritonitis.

  5. Down-regulation of the small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in diabetic mouse atria.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fu; Ling, Tian-You; Lu, Tong; Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Jingchao; Claycomb, William C; Shen, Win-Kuang; Lee, Hon-Chi

    2015-03-13

    The small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels have recently been found to be expressed in the heart, and genome-wide association studies have shown that they are implicated in atrial fibrillation. Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor of atrial fibrillation, but the ionic mechanism underlying this relationship remains unclear. We hypothesized that SK channel function is abnormal in diabetes mellitus, leading to altered cardiac electrophysiology. We found that in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, the expression of SK2 and SK3 isoforms was down-regulated by 85 and 92%, respectively, whereas that of SK1 was not changed. SK currents from isolated diabetic mouse atrial myocytes were significantly reduced compared with controls. The resting potentials of isolated atrial preparations were similar between control and diabetic mice, but action potential durations were significantly prolonged in the diabetic atria. Exposure to apamin significantly prolonged action potential durations in control but not in diabetic atria. Production of reactive oxygen species was significantly increased in diabetic atria and in high glucose-cultured HL-1 cells, whereas exposure of HL-1 cells in normal glucose culture to H2O2 reduced the expression of SK2 and SK3. Tyrosine nitration in SK2 and SK3 was significantly increased by high glucose culture, leading to accelerated channel turnover. Treatment with Tiron prevented these changes. Our results suggest that increased oxidative stress in diabetes results in SK channel-associated electrical remodeling in diabetic atria and may promote arrhythmogenesis. PMID:25605734

  6. Tgif1 Counterbalances the Activity of Core Pluripotency Factors in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bum-Kyu; Shen, Wenwen; Lee, Jiwoon; Rhee, Catherine; Chung, Haewon; Kim, Kun-Yong; Park, In-Hyun; Kim, Jonghwan

    2015-10-01

    Core pluripotency factors, such as Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog, play important roles in maintaining embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity by autoregulatory feedforward loops. Nevertheless, the mechanism that provides precise control of the levels of the ESC core factors without indefinite amplification has remained elusive. Here, we report the direct repression of core pluripotency factors by Tgif1, a previously known terminal repressor of TGFβ/activin/nodal signaling. Overexpression of Tgif1 reduces the levels of ESC core factors, whereas its depletion leads to the induction of the pluripotency factors. We confirm the existence of physical associations between Tgif1 and Oct4, Nanog, and HDAC1/2 and further show the level of Tgif1 is not significantly altered by treatment with an activator/inhibitor of the TGFβ/activin/nodal signaling. Collectively, our findings establish Tgif1 as an integral member of the core regulatory circuitry of mouse ESCs that counterbalances the levels of the core pluripotency factors in a TGFβ/activin/nodal-independent manner. PMID:26411691

  7. Memory retrieval by activating engram cells in mouse models of early Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Dheeraj S.; Arons, Autumn; Mitchell, Teryn I.; Pignatelli, Michele; Ryan, Tomás J.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory decline and subsequent loss of broader cognitive functions1. Memory decline in early stages of Alzheimer’s is mostly limited to episodic memory, for which the hippocampus (HPC) plays a crucial role2. However, it has been uncertain whether the observed amnesia in early stages of Alzheimer’s is due to disrupted encoding and consolidation of episodic information, or an impairment in the retrieval of stored memory information. Here we show that in transgenic mouse models of early Alzheimer’s, direct optogenetic activation of hippocampal memory engram cells results in memory retrieval despite the fact that these mice are amnesic in long-term memory tests when natural recall cues are utilized, revealing a retrieval, rather than a storage impairment. Prior to amyloid plaque deposition, the amnesia in these mice is age-dependent3–5, which correlates with a progressive reduction of spine density of hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) engram cells. We show that optogenetic induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) at perforant path (PP) synapses of DG engram cells restores both spine density and long-term memory. We also demonstrate that an ablation of DG engram cells containing restored spine density prevents the rescue of long-term memory. Thus, selective rescue of spine density in engram cells may lead to an effective strategy for treating memory loss in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26982728

  8. Decline of cell viability and mitochondrial activity in mouse skeletal muscle cell in a hypomagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing-Peng; Mo, Wei-Chuan; Liu, Ying; He, Rong-Qiao

    2016-05-01

    Hypomagnetic field (HMF), one of the key environmental risk factors for astronauts traveling in outer space, has previously been shown to repress locomotion of mammalians. However, underlying mechanisms of how HMF affects the motor system remains poorly understood. In this study, we created an HMF (<3 μT) by eliminating geomagnetic field (GMF, ∼50 μT) and exposed primary mouse skeletal muscle cells to this low magnetic field condition for a period of three days. HMF-exposed cells showed a decline in cell viability relative to GMF control, even though cells appeared normal in terms of morphology and survival rate. After a 3-day HMF-exposure, glucose consumption of skeletal muscle cells was significantly lower than GMF control, accompanied by less adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) content and higher ADP/ATP ratio. In agreement with these findings, mitochondrial membrane potential of HMF-exposed cells was also lower, whereas levels of cellular Reactive Oxygen Species were higher. Moreover, viability and membrane potential of isolated mitochondria were reduced after 1 h HMF-exposure in vitro. Our results indicate that mitochondria can directly respond to HMF at functional level, and suggest that HMF-induced decline in cell functionality results from a reduction in energy production and mitochondrial activity. PMID:27003876

  9. Stem Cell Emergence and Hemopoietic Activity Are Incompatible in Mouse Intraembryonic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Isabelle; Garcia-Porrero, Juan Antonio; Dieterlen-Lièvre, Françoise; Cumano, Ana

    1999-01-01

    In the mouse embryo, the generation of candidate progenitors for long-lasting hemopoiesis has been reported in the paraaortic splanchnopleura (P-Sp)/aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. Here, we address the following question: can the P-Sp/AGM environment support hemopoietic differentiation as well as generate stem cells, and, conversely, are other sites where hemopoietic differentiation occurs capable of generating stem cells? Although P-Sp/AGM generates de novo hemopoietic stem cells between 9.5 and 12.5 days post coitus (dpc), we show here that it does not support hemopoietic differentiation. Among mesoderm-derived sites, spleen and omentum were shown to be colonized by exogenous cells in the same fashion as the fetal liver. Cells colonizing the spleen were multipotent and pursued their evolution to committed progenitors in this organ. In contrast, the omentum, which was colonized by lymphoid-committed progenitors that did not expand, cannot be considered as a hemopoietic organ. From these data, stem cell generation appears incompatible with hemopoietic activity. At the peak of hemopoietic progenitor production in the P-Sp/AGM, between 10.5 and 11.5 dpc, multipotent cells were found at the exceptional frequency of 1 out of 12 total cells and 1 out of 4 AA4.1+ cells. Thus, progenitors within this region constitute a pool of undifferentiated hemopoietic cells readily accessible for characterization. PMID:10429669

  10. Cucumarioside A2-2 causes changes in the morphology and proliferative activity in mouse spleen.

    PubMed

    Pislyagin, E A; Manzhulo, I V; Dmitrenok, P S; Aminin, D L

    2016-05-01

    The immunomodulatory effect of triterpene glycoside cucumarioside A2-2 (CA2-2), isolated from the Far Eastern sea cucumber Cucumaria japonica, on the mouse spleen was investigated in comparison with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It has been shown that the intraperitoneal (i.p.) glycoside administration did not influence on splenic weights, while the statistically significant increase in splenic weight was observed after LPS administration. Changes in the ratio of red to white pulp after CA2-2 or LPS administration were observed. The proportion of splenic white pulp after glycoside or LPS administration increased by up to 34% and 36%, respectively. A detailed study of the distribution of the РСNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) marker showed that the proliferative activity in the white pulp under CA2-2 and LPS influence increased 2.07 and 2.24 times, respectively. The localization of PCNA-positive nuclei in the white pulp region, as well as their dimensional characteristics, suggests that a large proportion of the proliferating cell population consisted of B cells. The mass spectrometry profiles of spleen peptide/protein homogenate were obtained using the MALDI-TOF-MS (Matrix -Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry) approach. It was found that i.p. stimulation of animals with CA2-2 or LPS leads to marked changes in the intensity of revealed characteristic peaks of peptides/proteins after exposure to immunostimulants. PMID:27079859

  11. Memory retrieval by activating engram cells in mouse models of early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dheeraj S; Arons, Autumn; Mitchell, Teryn I; Pignatelli, Michele; Ryan, Tomás J; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2016-03-24

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory decline and subsequent loss of broader cognitive functions. Memory decline in the early stages of AD is mostly limited to episodic memory, for which the hippocampus has a crucial role. However, it has been uncertain whether the observed amnesia in the early stages of AD is due to disrupted encoding and consolidation of episodic information, or an impairment in the retrieval of stored memory information. Here we show that in transgenic mouse models of early AD, direct optogenetic activation of hippocampal memory engram cells results in memory retrieval despite the fact that these mice are amnesic in long-term memory tests when natural recall cues are used, revealing a retrieval, rather than a storage impairment. Before amyloid plaque deposition, the amnesia in these mice is age-dependent, which correlates with a progressive reduction in spine density of hippocampal dentate gyrus engram cells. We show that optogenetic induction of long-term potentiation at perforant path synapses of dentate gyrus engram cells restores both spine density and long-term memory. We also demonstrate that an ablation of dentate gyrus engram cells containing restored spine density prevents the rescue of long-term memory. Thus, selective rescue of spine density in engram cells may lead to an effective strategy for treating memory loss in the early stages of AD. PMID:26982728

  12. Mouse aldehyde-oxidase-4 controls diurnal rhythms, fat deposition and locomotor activity

    PubMed Central

    Terao, Mineko; Barzago, Maria Monica; Kurosaki, Mami; Fratelli, Maddalena; Bolis, Marco; Borsotti, Andrea; Bigini, Paolo; Micotti, Edoardo; Carli, Mirjana; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Bagnati, Renzo; Passoni, Alice; Pastorelli, Roberta; Brunelli, Laura; Toschi, Ivan; Cesari, Valentina; Sanoh, Seigo; Garattini, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde-oxidase-4 (AOX4) is one of the mouse aldehyde oxidase isoenzymes and its physiological function is unknown. The major source of AOX4 is the Harderian-gland, where the enzyme is characterized by daily rhythmic fluctuations. Deletion of the Aox4 gene causes perturbations in the expression of the circadian-rhythms gene pathway, as indicated by transcriptomic analysis. AOX4 inactivation alters the diurnal oscillations in the expression of master clock-genes. Similar effects are observed in other organs devoid of AOX4, such as white adipose tissue, liver and hypothalamus indicating a systemic action. While perturbations of clock-genes is sex-independent in the Harderian-gland and hypothalamus, sex influences this trait in liver and white-adipose-tissue which are characterized by the presence of AOX isoforms other than AOX4. In knock-out animals, perturbations in clock-gene expression are accompanied by reduced locomotor activity, resistance to diet induced obesity and to hepatic steatosis. All these effects are observed in female and male animals. Resistance to obesity is due to diminished fat accumulation resulting from increased energy dissipation, as white-adipocytes undergo trans-differentiation towards brown-adipocytes. Metabolomics and enzymatic data indicate that 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and tryptophan are novel endogenous AOX4 substrates, potentially involved in AOX4 systemic actions. PMID:27456060

  13. Prodigiosin isolated from Hahella chejuensis suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production by inhibiting p38 MAPK, JNK and NF-kappaB activation in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jung-Eun; Yim, Joung-Han; Lee, Hong-Kum; Moon, Eun-Yi; Rhee, Dong-Kwon; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2007-12-15

    Prodigiosin was isolated from marine bacteria Hahella chejuensis which has been recently discovered from Marado, Cheju Island, Republic of Korea. Immunosuppressive properties have been reported for prodigiosin members such as undecylprodigiosin, metacycloprodigiosin, prodigiosin and its synthetic analogue PNU156804 (PNU). However, the effect of this agent on macrophage function has not been characterized in detail. In the present study, we examined the effects of prodigiosin on the production of inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage. When thioglycollate-elicited macrophages pre-exposed to prodigiosin (1-100 ng/ml) were stimulated with LPS, pretreatment with prodigiosin resulted in the inhibition of NO production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein and mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6 was not altered. Inhibition of iNOS protein expression appears to be at the transcriptional level, since prodigiosin decreased LPS-induced NF-kappaB activity through preventing the degradation of IkBalpha, with significant inhibition achieved following pretreatment with prodigiosin. However, prodigiosin did not exert any effect on AP-1 activity. Prodigiosin blocked phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). These results indicate that the inhibition of these signaling molecules expression was correlated with the reduced production of NO in macrophages. Taken together, the present data suggest that prodigiosin reduces NO production and iNOS expression by inhibiting LPS-triggered p38 MAPK and JNK phosphorylation and NF-kappaB activation, thereby implicating a mechanism by which prodigiosin may exert its immunosuppressive effects.

  14. Assisting People with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder by Actively Reducing Limb Hyperactive Behavior with a Gyration Air Mouse through a Controlled Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology turning the gyration air mouse into a high performance limb movement detector, and have assessed whether two persons with multiple disabilities would be able to control an environmental stimulation using limb movement. This study extends gyration air mouse functionality by actively reducing…

  15. Nutrition in Older Adults on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Lina

    2015-11-01

    Nutrition in older adults on peritoneal dialysis is an important aspect of a patient's clinical management as well as being influenced by their overall well-being, both mental and physical. This is especially pertinent as individuals age, since the potential impact of life changes and physical changes contribute to the development of protein-energy wasting and potentially exacerbating sarcopenia and wasting. This article provides an outline of the nutritional issues to consider in older adults on peritoneal dialysis (PD).

  16. The effects of sarcolipin over-expression in mouse skeletal muscle on metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Butler, John; Smyth, Neil; Broadbridge, Robert; Council, Claire E; Lee, Anthony G; Stocker, Claire J; Hislop, David C; Arch, Jonathan R S; Cawthorne, Michael A; Malcolm East, J

    2015-03-01

    Studies in sarcolipin knockout mice have led to the suggestion that skeletal muscle sarcolipin plays a role in thermogenesis. The mechanism proposed is uncoupling of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump. However, in other work sarcolipin was not detected in mouse skeletal tissue. We have therefore measured sarcolipin levels in mouse skeletal muscle using semi-quantitative western blotting and synthetic mouse sarcolipin. Sarcolipin levels were so low that it is unlikely that knocking out sarcolipin would have a measurable effect on thermogenesis by SERCA. In addition, overexpression of neither wild type nor FLAG-tagged variants of mouse sarcolipin in transgenic mice had any major significant effects on body mass, energy expenditure, even when mice were fed on a high fat diet. PMID:25660043

  17. The effects of sarcolipin over-expression in mouse skeletal muscle on metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Butler, John; Smyth, Neil; Broadbridge, Robert; Council, Claire E; Lee, Anthony G; Stocker, Claire J; Hislop, David C; Arch, Jonathan R S; Cawthorne, Michael A; Malcolm East, J

    2015-03-01

    Studies in sarcolipin knockout mice have led to the suggestion that skeletal muscle sarcolipin plays a role in thermogenesis. The mechanism proposed is uncoupling of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump. However, in other work sarcolipin was not detected in mouse skeletal tissue. We have therefore measured sarcolipin levels in mouse skeletal muscle using semi-quantitative western blotting and synthetic mouse sarcolipin. Sarcolipin levels were so low that it is unlikely that knocking out sarcolipin would have a measurable effect on thermogenesis by SERCA. In addition, overexpression of neither wild type nor FLAG-tagged variants of mouse sarcolipin in transgenic mice had any major significant effects on body mass, energy expenditure, even when mice were fed on a high fat diet.

  18. Sildenafil Promotes eNOS Activation and Inhibits NADPH Oxidase in the Transgenic Sickle Cell Mouse Penis

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Champion, Hunter C.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell disease (SCD)-associated vasculopathy in the penis is characterized by aberrant nitric oxide and phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 signaling, and by increased oxidative stress. Preliminary clinical trials show that continuous treatment with PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil unassociated with sexual activity decreases priapic activity in patients with SCD. However, the mechanism of its vasculoprotective effect in the penis remains unclear. Aims We evaluated whether continuous administration of PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil promotes eNOS function at posttranslational levels and decreases superoxide-producing enzyme NADPH oxidase activity in the sickle cell mouse penis. Methods SCD transgenic mice were used as an animal model of SCD. WT mice served as controls. Mice received treatment with the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil (100 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 3 weeks. eNOS phosphorylation on Ser-1177 (positive regulatory site), eNOS interactions with heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) (positive regulator), phosphorylated AKT (upstream mediator of eNOS phosphorylation on Ser-1177), an NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit gp91(phox), and a marker of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]) were measured by Western blot. Main Outcome Measures Effect of continuous sildenafil treatment on eNOS posttranslational activation, NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit, and oxidative stress in the penis of the sickle cell mouse. Results Continuous treatment with sildenafil reversed (P < 0.05) the abnormalities in protein expressions of P-eNOS (Ser-1177), eNOS/HSP90 interaction, P-AKT, protein expression of gp91(phox), and 4-HNE, in the sickle cell mouse penis. Sildenafil treatment of WT mice did not affect any of these parameters. Conclusion Our findings that sildenafil enhances eNOS activation and inhibits NADPH oxidase function in the sickle cell mouse penis offers a vasculoprotective molecular basis for the therapeutic effect of sildenafil in the penis in association with SCD. PMID:24251665

  19. Effect of Curcumin in Experimental Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    D, Savitha; Mani, Indu; Ravikumar, Gayatri; Avadhany, Sandhya T

    2015-12-01

    Despite medical advancements, the inflammatory cascade and oxidative stress worsen the prognosis in most cases of peritonitis. Curcumin has emerged as a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in few of the acute inflammatory and infective conditions. We examined the effect of intraperitoneal injection of curcumin in endotoxin-induced peritonitis in rats. The blood and peritoneal fluid samples were collected at 3 and 24 h following the induction of peritonitis. Animals were sacrificed at 24 h and the organs preserved. The histopathological report of lung, liver, and intestines in the curcumin-treated rats showed maintenance of tissue architecture to a large extent compared to the control group which showed massive congestion, hemorrhage, and necrosis. The blood and peritoneal fluid total count and differential neutrophil counts were significantly higher at 24 h of induction of peritonitis. Serum amyloid assay and lipid peroxidation were significantly lower, and myeloperoxidase assay was higher in the curcumin-treated group at the end of 24 h; thus, curcumin probably demonstrated a neutrophil-mediated immunopotentiation and anti-inflammatory action thereby protecting the animal from endotoxemia-induced multi-organ damage. PMID:26884658

  20. The importance of ultrasonographic measurement of peritoneal wall thickness in pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Yavaşcan, Önder; Aksu, Nejat; Alparslan, Caner; Sarıtaş, Serdar; Elmas, Cengiz Han; Eraslan, Ali Nihat; Duman, Soner; Mir, Sevgi

    2015-04-01

    Loss of peritoneal function due to peritoneal fibrosing syndrome (PFS) is a major factor leading to treatment failure in chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Although the precise biologic mechanisms responsible for these changes have not been defined, the general assumption is that alterations in peritoneal function are related to structural changes in the peritoneal membrane. Studies of the peritoneal membrane by non-invasive ultrasonography (US) in chronic PD patients are limited. The aim of the present study is to assess the relationship between functional parameters of peritoneum and peritoneal thickness measured by US in children treated by chronic PD. We recruited two groups of patients: 23 subjects (13 females, 10 males) on chronic PD (patient group) and 26 (7 females, 19 males) on predialysis out-patient follow-up (creatinine clearance: 20-60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) (control group). Age, sex, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), chronic PD duration, episodes of peritonitis and the results of peritoneal equilibration test (PET) were recorded. Hemoglobin (Hb), blood pressure (BP), left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and renal osteodystrophy (ROD) parameters were also obtained. The thickness of the parietal peritoneum was measured by trans-abdominal US in all children. Statistical analyses were performed by using Student's t and Pearson's correlation tests. Mean peritoneal thickness in chronic PD patients (1028.26 ± 157.26 μm) was significantly higher than control patients (786.52 ± 132.33). Mean peritoneal thickness was significantly correlated with mean body height (R(2) = 0.93, p < 0.05), BMI (R(2) = 0.25, p < 0.05), chronic PD duration (R(2) = 0.64, p < 0.05), episodes of peritonitis (R(2) = 0.93, p < 0.05), D/Pcreatinine (R(2) = 0.76, p < 0.05) and D4/D0glucose (R(2) = 0.81, p < 0.05). No correlation was found between peritoneal thickness and Hb, BP, LVMI and ROD parameters. In conclusion