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Sample records for activated mtor signaling

  1. A role for Raptor phosphorylation in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Frey, John W; Jacobs, Brittany L; Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-02-01

    The activation of mTOR signaling is necessary for mechanically-induced changes in skeletal muscle mass, but the mechanisms that regulate the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling remain poorly defined. In this study, we set out to determine if changes in the phosphorylation of Raptor contribute to the mechanical activation of mTOR. To accomplish this goal, mouse skeletal muscles were subjected to mechanical stimulation via a bout of eccentric contractions (EC). Using mass spectrometry and Western blot analysis, we found that ECs induced an increase in Raptor S696, T706, and S863 phosphorylation, and this effect was not inhibited by rapamycin. This observation suggested that changes in Raptor phosphorylation might be an upstream event in the pathway through which mechanical stimuli activate mTOR. To test this, we employed a phospho-defective mutant of Raptor (S696A/T706A/S863A) and found that the EC-induced activation of mTOR signaling was significantly blunted in muscles expressing this mutant. Furthermore, mutation of the three phosphorylation sites altered the interactions of Raptor with PRAS40 and p70(S6k), and it also prevented the EC-induced dissociation of Raptor from p70(S6k). Combined, these results suggest that changes in the phosphorylation of Raptor play an important role in the pathway through which mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling.

  2. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Sung; Frey, John W; Hornberger, Troy A

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA) may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k) T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  3. The role of phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, T A; Chu, W K; Mak, Y W; Hsiung, J W; Huang, S A; Chien, S

    2006-03-21

    Signaling by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been reported to be necessary for mechanical load-induced growth of skeletal muscle. The mechanisms involved in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling are not known, but several studies indicate that a unique [phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)- and nutrient-independent] mechanism is involved. In this study, we have demonstrated that a regulatory pathway for mTOR signaling that involves phospholipase D (PLD) and the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) plays a critical role in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling. First, an elevation in PA concentration was sufficient for the activation of mTOR signaling. Second, the isozymes of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) are localized to the z-band in skeletal muscle (a critical site of mechanical force transmission). Third, mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle with intermittent passive stretch ex vivo induced PLD activation, PA accumulation, and mTOR signaling. Finally, pharmacological inhibition of PLD blocked the mechanically induced increase in PA and the activation of mTOR signaling. Combined, these results indicate that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling through a PLD-dependent increase in PA. Furthermore, we showed that mTOR signaling was partially resistant to rapamycin in muscles subjected to mechanical stimulation. Because rapamycin and PA compete for binding to the FRB domain on mTOR, these results suggest that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling through an enhanced binding of PA to the FRB domain on mTOR.

  4. mTOR signaling promotes stem cell activation via counterbalancing BMP-mediated suppression during hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhili; Lei, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Huishan; Liu, Shuang; Chen, Qi; Hu, Huimin; Wang, Xinyue; Ning, Lina; Cao, Yujing; Zhao, Tongbiao; Zhou, Jiaxi; Chen, Ting; Duan, Enkui

    2015-02-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cycles of degeneration (catagen), rest (telogen), and regeneration (anagen) phases. Anagen begins when the hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) obtain sufficient activation cues to overcome suppressive signals, mainly the BMP pathway, from their niche cells. Here, we unveil that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is activated in HFSCs, which coincides with the HFSC activation at the telogen-to-anagen transition. By using both an inducible conditional gene targeting strategy and a pharmacological inhibition method to ablate or inhibit mTOR signaling in adult skin epithelium before anagen initiation, we demonstrate that HFs that cannot respond to mTOR signaling display significantly delayed HFSC activation and extended telogen. Unexpectedly, BMP signaling activity is dramatically prolonged in mTOR signaling-deficient HFs. Through both gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro, we show that mTORC1 signaling negatively affects BMP signaling, which serves as a main mechanism whereby mTORC1 signaling facilitates HFSC activation. Indeed, in vivo suppression of BMP by its antagonist Noggin rescues the HFSC activation defect in mTORC1-null skin. Our findings reveal a critical role for mTOR signaling in regulating stem cell activation through counterbalancing BMP-mediated repression during hair regeneration.

  5. FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK and downregulates mTOR signaling in hepatocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Gebhardt, Rolf; Weiss, Thomas S.; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-03-06

    Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the key enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway starting from nicotinamide. Cancer cells have an increased demand for NAD due to their high proliferation and DNA repair rate. Consequently, NAMPT is considered as a putative target for anti-cancer therapies. There is evidence that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) become dysregulated during the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the effects of NAMPT inhibition by its specific inhibitor FK866 on the viability of hepatocarcinoma cells and analyzed the effects of FK866 on the nutrient sensor AMPK and mTOR complex1 (mTORC1) signaling. Results: FK866 markedly decreased NAMPT activity and NAD content in hepatocarcinoma cells (Huh7 cells, Hep3B cells) and led to delayed ATP reduction which was associated with increased cell death. These effects could be abrogated by administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzyme product of NAMPT. Our results demonstrated a dysregulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to non-cancerous hepatocytes with a higher expression of mTOR and a lower AMPKα activation in hepatocarcinoma cells. We found that NAMPT inhibition by FK866 significantly activated AMPKα and inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream targets p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Non-cancerous hepatocytes were less sensitive to FK866 and did not show changes in AMPK/mTOR signaling after FK866 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings reveal an important role of the NAMPT-mediated NAD salvage pathway in the energy homeostasis of hepatocarcinoma cells and suggest NAMPT inhibition as a potential treatment option for HCC. - Highlights: • FK866 increases cell death in p53-deficient hepatocarcinoma cells. • AMPK/mTOR signaling is dysregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells. • FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK

  6. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J.; Aksoylar, H. Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26360589

  7. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, H Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  8. The mechanical activation of mTOR signaling: an emerging role for late endosome/lysosomal targeting.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Brittany L; Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-02-01

    It is well recognized that mechanical signals play a critical role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and the maintenance of muscle mass is essential for mobility, disease prevention and quality of life. Furthermore, over the last 15 years it has become established that signaling through a protein kinase called the mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) is essential for mechanically-induced changes in protein synthesis and muscle mass, however, the mechanism(s) via which mechanical stimuli regulate mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nonetheless, advancements are being made, and an emerging body of evidence suggests that the late endosome/lysosomal (LEL) system might play a key role in this process. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to summarize this body of evidence. Specifically, we will first explain why the Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) and phosphatidic acid (PA) are considered to be direct activators of mTOR signaling. We will then describe the process of endocytosis and its involvement in the formation of LEL structures, as well as the evidence which indicates that mTOR and its direct activators (Rheb and PA) are all enriched at the LEL. Finally, we will summarize the evidence that has implicated the LEL in the regulation of mTOR by various growth regulatory inputs such as amino acids, growth factors and mechanical stimuli.

  9. Phospholipase D regulates the size of skeletal muscle cells through the activation of mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Rami; De Larichaudy, Joffrey; Chanon, Stéphanie; Euthine, Vanessa; Durand, Christine; Naro, Fabio; Bertolino, Philippe; Vidal, Hubert; Lefai, Etienne; Némoz, Georges

    2013-08-02

    mTOR is a major actor of skeletal muscle mass regulation in situations of atrophy or hypertrophy. It is established that Phospholipase D (PLD) activates mTOR signaling, through the binding of its product phosphatidic acid (PA) to mTOR protein. An influence of PLD on muscle cell size could thus be suspected. We explored the consequences of altered expression and activity of PLD isoforms in differentiated L6 myotubes. Inhibition or down-regulation of the PLD1 isoform markedly decreased myotube size and muscle specific protein content. Conversely, PLD1 overexpression induced muscle cell hypertrophy, both in vitro in myotubes and in vivo in mouse gastrocnemius. In the presence of atrophy-promoting dexamethasone, PLD1 overexpression or addition of exogenous PA protected myotubes against atrophy. Similarly, exogenous PA protected myotubes against TNFα-induced atrophy. Moreover, the modulation of PLD expression or activity in myotubes showed that PLD1 negatively regulates the expression of factors involved in muscle protein degradation, such as the E3-ubiquitin ligases Murf1 and Atrogin-1, and the Foxo3 transcription factor. Inhibition of mTOR by PP242 abolished the positive effects of PLD1 on myotubes, whereas modulating PLD influenced the phosphorylation of both S6K1 and Akt, which are respectively substrates of mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes. These observations suggest that PLD1 acts through the activation of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 to induce positive trophic effects on muscle cells. This pathway may offer interesting therapeutic potentialities in the treatment of muscle wasting.

  10. The oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate activates the mTOR signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Carbonneau, Mélissa; M. Gagné, Laurence; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Germain, Marie-Anne; Motorina, Alena; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Secco, Blandine; Vincent, Emma E.; Tumber, Anthony; Hulea, Laura; Bergeman, Jonathan; Oppermann, Udo; Jones, Russell G.; Laplante, Mathieu; Topisirovic, Ivan; Petrecca, Kevin; Huot, Marc-Étienne; Mallette, Frédérick A.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of cancer-associated mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) highlights the prevailing notion that aberrant metabolic function can contribute to carcinogenesis. IDH1/2 normally catalyse the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate (αKG). In gliomas and acute myeloid leukaemias, IDH1/2 mutations confer gain-of-function leading to production of the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) from αKG. Here we show that generation of 2HG by mutated IDH1/2 leads to the activation of mTOR by inhibiting KDM4A, an αKG-dependent enzyme of the Jumonji family of lysine demethylases. Furthermore, KDM4A associates with the DEP domain-containing mTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR), a negative regulator of mTORC1/2. Depletion of KDM4A decreases DEPTOR protein stability. Our results provide an additional molecular mechanism for the oncogenic activity of mutant IDH1/2 by revealing an unprecedented link between TCA cycle defects and positive modulation of mTOR function downstream of the canonical PI3K/AKT/TSC1-2 pathway. PMID:27624942

  11. Loss of C9orf72 Enhances Autophagic Activity via Deregulated mTOR and TFEB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Conchina, Karen; Chu, Justin; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Brady, Nathan R.; Hamacher-Brady, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The most common cause of the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia is a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72. Here we report a study of the C9orf72 protein by examining the consequences of loss of C9orf72 functions. Deletion of one or both alleles of the C9orf72 gene in mice causes age-dependent lethality phenotypes. We demonstrate that C9orf72 regulates nutrient sensing as the loss of C9orf72 decreases phosphorylation of the mTOR substrate S6K1. The transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal and autophagy genes, which is negatively regulated by mTOR, is substantially up-regulated in C9orf72 loss-of-function animal and cellular models. Consistent with reduced mTOR activity and increased TFEB levels, loss of C9orf72 enhances autophagic flux, suggesting that C9orf72 is a negative regulator of autophagy. We identified a protein complex consisting of C9orf72 and SMCR8, both of which are homologous to DENN-like proteins. The depletion of C9orf72 or SMCR8 leads to significant down-regulation of each other’s protein level. Loss of SMCR8 alters mTOR signaling and autophagy. These results demonstrate that the C9orf72-SMCR8 protein complex functions in the regulation of metabolism and provide evidence that loss of C9orf72 function may contribute to the pathogenesis of relevant diseases. PMID:27875531

  12. The role of diacylglycerol kinase ζ and phosphatidic acid in the mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    You, Jae-Sung; Lincoln, Hannah C; Kim, Chan-Ran; Frey, John W; Goodman, Craig A; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-01-17

    The activation of mTOR signaling is essential for mechanically induced changes in skeletal muscle mass, and previous studies have suggested that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling through a phospholipase D (PLD)-dependent increase in the concentration of phosphatidic acid (PA). Consistent with this conclusion, we obtained evidence which further suggests that mechanical stimuli utilize PA as a direct upstream activator of mTOR signaling. Unexpectedly though, we found that the activation of PLD is not necessary for the mechanically induced increases in PA or mTOR signaling. Motivated by this observation, we performed experiments that were aimed at identifying the enzyme(s) that promotes the increase in PA. These experiments revealed that mechanical stimulation increases the concentration of diacylglycerol (DAG) and the activity of DAG kinases (DGKs) in membranous structures. Furthermore, using knock-out mice, we determined that the ζ isoform of DGK (DGKζ) is necessary for the mechanically induced increase in PA. We also determined that DGKζ significantly contributes to the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling, and this is likely driven by an enhanced binding of PA to mTOR. Last, we found that the overexpression of DGKζ is sufficient to induce muscle fiber hypertrophy through an mTOR-dependent mechanism, and this event requires DGKζ kinase activity (i.e. the synthesis of PA). Combined, these results indicate that DGKζ, but not PLD, plays an important role in mechanically induced increases in PA and mTOR signaling. Furthermore, this study suggests that DGKζ could be a fundamental component of the mechanism(s) through which mechanical stimuli regulate skeletal muscle mass.

  13. Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibition Blocks Chronic Stress-Induced Depressive-Like Behaviors via Activation of mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Peng; Wang, Wei; Pan, Bin; Liu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhen; Long, Jonathan Z; Zhang, Han-ting; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Liu, Qing-song

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system regulates mood, emotion, and stress coping, and dysregulation of the eCB system is critically involved in pathophysiology of depression. The eCB ligand 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is inactivated by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). Using chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUS) as a mouse model of depression, we examined how 2-AG signaling in the hippocampus was altered in depressive-like states and how this alteration contributed to depressive-like behavior. We report that CUS led to impairment of depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, and this deficiency in 2-AG-mediated retrograde synaptic depression was rescued by MAGL inhibitor JZL184. CUS induced depressive-like behaviors and decreased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation in the hippocampus, and these biochemical and behavioral abnormalities were ameliorated by chronic JZL184 treatments. The effects of JZL184 were mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Genetic deletion of mTOR with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying the Cre recombinase in the hippocampus of mTORf/f mice recapitulated depressive-like behaviors induced by CUS and abrogated the antidepressant-like effects of chronic JZL184 treatments. Our results suggest that CUS decreases eCB-mTOR signaling in the hippocampus, leading to depressive-like behaviors, whereas MAGL inhibitor JZL184 produces antidepressant-like effects through enhancement of eCB-mTOR signaling. PMID:24476943

  14. Pivotal Role of mTOR Signaling in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Augusto; Chiang, Derek Y.; Newell, Pippa; Peix, Judit; Thung, Swan; Alsinet, Clara; Tovar, Victoria; Roayaie, Sasan; Minguez, Beatriz; Sole, Manel; Battiston, Carlo; van Laarhoven, Stijn; Fiel, Maria I; Di Feo, Analisa; Hoshida, Yujin; Yea, Steven; Toffanin, Sara; Ramos, Alex; Martignetti, John A.; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Bruix, Jordi; Waxman, Samuel; Schwartz, Myron; Meyerson, Matthew; Friedman, Scott L.; Llovet, Josep M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The advent of targeted therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has underscored the importance of pathway characterization to identify novel molecular targets for treatment. Based on its role in cell growth and differentiation, we evaluated mTOR signaling activation in human HCC, as well as the anti-tumoral effect of a dual-level blockade of the mTOR pathway. METHODS The mTOR pathway was assessed using integrated data from mutation analysis (direct sequencing), DNA copy number changes (SNP-array), mRNA levels (qRT-PCR and gene expression microarray), and protein activation (immunostaining) in 351 human samples, including HCC (n=314), and non-tumoral tissue (n=37). Effects of dual blockade of mTOR signaling using a rapamycin analog (everolimus) and an EGFR/VEGFR inhibitor (AEE788) were evaluated in liver cancer cell lines, and in a tumor xenograft model. RESULTS Aberrant mTOR signaling (phosphorylated-RPS6) was present in half of the cases, associated with IGF pathway activation, EGF upregulation, and PTEN dysregulation. PTEN and PI3KCA-B mutations were rare events. Chromosomal gains in RICTOR (25% of patients) and positive pRPS6 staining correlated with recurrence. RICTOR-specific siRNA downregulation reduced tumor cell viability in vitro. Blockage of mTOR signaling with everolimus in vitro and in a xenograft model decelerated tumor growth and increased survival. This effect was enhanced in vivo after EGFR blockade. CONCLUSIONS MTOR signaling has a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCC, with evidence for the role of RICTOR in tumor oncogenesis. MTOR blockade with everolimus is effective in vivo. These findings establish a rationale for targeting mTOR pathway in clinical trials in HCC. PMID:18929564

  15. T cell receptor-dependent activation of mTOR signaling in T cells is mediated by Carma1 and MALT1, but not Bcl10.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristia S; Phong, Binh; Corey, Catherine; Cheng, Jing; Gorentla, Balachandra; Zhong, Xiaoping; Shiva, Sruti; Kane, Lawrence P

    2014-06-10

    Signaling to the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates diverse cellular processes, including protein translation, cellular proliferation, metabolism, and autophagy. Most models place Akt upstream of the mTOR complex, mTORC1; however, in T cells, Akt may not be necessary for mTORC1 activation. We found that the adaptor protein Carma1 [caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing membrane-associated protein 1] and at least one of its associated proteins, the paracaspase MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1), were required for optimal activation of mTOR in T cells in response to stimulation of the T cell receptor (TCR) and the co-receptor CD28. However, Bcl10, which binds to Carma1 and MALT1 to form a complex that mediates signals from the TCR to the transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), was not required. The catalytic activity of MALT1 was required for the proliferation of stimulated CD4+ T cells, but not for early TCR-dependent activation events. Consistent with an effect on mTOR, MALT1 activity was required for the increased metabolic flux in activated CD4+ T cells. Together, our data suggest that Carma1 and MALT1 play previously unappreciated roles in the activation of mTOR signaling in T cells after engagement of the TCR.

  16. Activation of placental insulin and mTOR signaling in a mouse model of maternal obesity associated with fetal overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fetal overgrowth is common in obese women and is associated with perinatal complications and increased risk for the child to develop metabolic syndrome later in life. Placental nutrient transport capacity has been reported to be increased in obese women giving birth to large infants; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well established. Obesity in pregnancy is characterized by elevated maternal serum insulin and leptin, hormones that stimulate placental amino acid transporters in vitro. We hypothesized that maternal obesity activates placental insulin/IGF-I/mTOR and leptin signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis in a mouse model of obesity in pregnancy that is associated with fetal overgrowth. C57BL/6J female mice were fed a control (C) or a high-fat/high-sugar (HF/HS) pelleted diet supplemented by ad libitum access to sucrose (20%) solution. Placentas were collected at embryonic day 18.5. Using Western blot analysis, placental mTOR activity was determined along with energy, inflammatory, leptin, and insulin signaling pathways (upstream modulators of mTOR). Phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein (S-235/236), 4E-BP1 (T-37/46), Insulin receptor substrate 1 (Y-608), Akt (T-308), and STAT-3 (Y-705) was increased in obese dams. In contrast, expression of placental caspase-1, IкBα, IL-1β, and phosphorylated-JNK(p46/54-T183/Y185) was unaltered. Fetal amino acid availability is a key determinant of fetal growth. We propose that activation of placental insulin/IGF-I/mTOR and leptin signaling pathways in obese mice stimulates placental amino acid transport and contributes to increased fetal growth.

  17. Estradiol-Induced Object Recognition Memory Consolidation Is Dependent on Activation of mTOR Signaling in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortress, Ashley M.; Fan, Lu; Orr, Patrick T.; Zhao, Zaorui; Frick, Karyn M.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is an important regulator of protein synthesis and is essential for various forms of hippocampal memory. Here, we asked whether the enhancement of object recognition memory consolidation produced by dorsal hippocampal infusion of 17[Beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) is dependent on mTOR…

  18. Activation of mTOR signaling leads to orthopedic surgery-induced cognitive decline in mice through β-amyloid accumulation and tau phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wenzhen; Lu, Keliang; Wang, Jiawan; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a serious complication following surgery, however, the mechanism of POCD remains to be elucidated. Previous evidence has revealed that POCD may be associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative processes. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has been reported to be crucial in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the implications of mTOR in POCD remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, western blotting and enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay were used to determine the expression of mTOR and any associated downstream targets; contextual fear conditioning was used to estimate the learning and memory ability of mice. Using an animal model of orthopedic surgery, it was found that surgical injury impaired hippocampal‑dependent memory and enhanced the levels of phosphorylated mTOR at Serine‑2448, phosphorylated 70‑kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) at Threonine‑389 with accumulation of β‑amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau at Serine-396, compared with the control group. Pretreatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, restored the abnormal mTOR/p70S6K signaling induced by surgery, attenuated the accumulation of Aβ and reduced the phosphorylation of tau protein. Rapamycin also reversed the surgery‑induced cognitive dysfunction. The results of the present study suggested that the surgical stimulus activated mTOR/p70S6K signaling excessively, and that the inhibition of mTOR signaling with rapamycin may prevent postoperative cognitive deficits, partly through attenuating the accumulation of Aβ and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein.

  19. mTOR complex 2 signaling and functions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Won Jun; Jacinto, Estela

    2011-07-15

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a central role in cellular growth and metabolism. mTOR forms two distinct protein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. Much is known about the regulation and functions of mTORC1 due to availability of a natural compound, rapamycin, that inhibits this complex. Studies that define mTORC2 cellular functions and signaling have lagged behind. The development of pharmacological inhibitors that block mTOR kinase activity, and thereby inhibit both mTOR complexes, along with availability of mice with genetic knockouts in mTOR complex components have now provided new insights on mTORC2 function and regulation. Since prolonged effects of rapamycin can also disrupt mTORC2, it is worth re-evaluating the contribution of this less-studied mTOR complex in cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. In this review, we focus on recent developments on mammalian mTORC2 signaling mechanisms and its cellular and tissue-specific functions.

  20. Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in peritumoral tissues can cause glioma-associated seizures.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yang; Xiang, Wang; Yanhui, Liu; Ruofei, Liang; Jiewen, Luo; Shu, Jiang; Qing, Mao

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic seizures, the most common symptom accompanying glioma, are closely associated with tumor growth and patient quality of life. However, the association between glioma and glioma-related epilepsy is poorly understood. In fact, findings related to the location of epileptogenicity have been inconsistent in previous studies. We investigated seizure foci in patients with glioma and the corresponding association between glioma-related epilepsy and the tumoral and peritumoral microenvironment. Clinical characteristics, extracellular electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and western blots were conducted on 12 patients with glioma; nine patients had histories of preoperative seizures while three did not. Samples from included patients were used to identify seizure foci and mTOR pathway status. Electrophysiological recordings were conducted on 36 samples (tumor, peritumoral, and normal brain tissues) from 12 patients. Interictal-like discharges (ILDs) were observed in seven of nine peritumoral tissues obtained from patients with glioma that had experienced perioperative seizures. No ILDs were observed in any other sample groups. Western blots and immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway proteins (mTOR and S6k) suggested that the mTOR pathway was activated in peritumoral tissues of patients with seizure history, but inactivated in patients without seizure history. Our results suggest that mTOR pathway expression in peritumoral tissues is associated with tumor-related seizures, thus providing a potential target for therapeutics aimed at simultaneously controlling gliomas and seizures.

  1. mTOR Signaling Regulates Protective Activity of Transferred CD4+Foxp3+ T Cells in Repair of Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guochun; Dong, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Liu, Yu; Duan, Shaobin; Liu, Yinghong; Liu, Fuyou; Chen, Huihui

    2016-11-15

    CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are required for normal immune homeostasis. Recent studies suggested that Treg transfer facilitates recovery from acute kidney injury (AKI), but the molecular events that maintain Treg function after adoptive transfer remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the Treg-mediated therapeutic effect on ischemic AKI. We noted significant Treg expansion in C57BL/6 mouse kidney, with enhanced immunosuppressive capacity after renal ischemia/reperfusion. mTOR inhibition significantly increased the frequency of Tregs in cultured CD4(+) T cells, with enhanced production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, which, conversely, was reduced by mTOR activation. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR, was transiently administered to C57BL/6 mice before ischemia/reperfusion surgery. No beneficial effect of rapamycin treatment was seen in the early recovery of AKI as a result of its inhibitory effect on tubular regeneration. However, rapamycin markedly enhanced the expansion of kidney Tregs, with increased mRNA expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Adoptive transfer of rapamycin-treated Tregs markedly suppressed conventional T cells, responder myeloid cells, and reactive myofibroblasts; however, it promoted host Tregs and alternative macrophages, leading to better renal function and less kidney fibrosis. Taken together, Treg transfer with mTOR inhibition markedly improves outcomes of ischemic AKI. These findings reveal an important role for mTOR signaling in maintaining Treg activity after adoptive transfer and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Tregs in acute and chronic kidney disease.

  2. A chronic increase in physical activity inhibits fed-state mTOR/S6K1 signaling and reduces IRS-1 serine phosphorylation in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Erin L; Lujan, Heidi L; Kramer, Victoria J; Drummond, Micah J; DiCarlo, Stephen E; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2008-02-01

    A chronic increase in physical activity and (or) endurance training can improve insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle. Cellular mechanisms responsible for the development of insulin resistance are unclear, though one proposed mechanism is that nutrient overload chronically increases available energy, over-activating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling pathway leading to increased phosphorylation of serine residues on insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). The objective of this study was to determine if increased physical activity would inhibit mTOR/S6K1 signaling and reduce IRS-1 serine phosphorylation in rat skeletal muscle. Soleus muscle was collected from fed male Sprague-Dawley sedentary rats (Inactive) and rats with free access to running wheels for 9 weeks (Active). Immunoblotting methods were used to measure phosphorylation status of mTOR, S6K1, IRS-1, and PKB/Akt (protein kinase B/AKT), and total abundance of proteins associated with the mTOR pathway. Muscle citrate synthase activity and plasma insulin and glucose concentrations were measured. Phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), S6K1 (Thr389), and IRS-1 (Ser636-639) was reduced in Active rats (p<0.05). Total protein abundance of mTOR, S6K1, IRS-1, 4E-BP1, eEF2, PKB/Akt and AMPKalpha, and phosphorylation of PKB/Akt were unaffected (p>0.05). Total SKAR protein, a downstream target of S6K1, and citrate synthase activity increased in Active rats (p<0.05), though plasma insulin and glucose levels were unchanged (p>0.05). Reduced mTOR/S6K1 signaling during chronic increases in physical activity may play an important regulatory role in the serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, which should be examined as a potential mechanism for attenuation of insulin resistance associated with increased IRS-1 serine phosphorylation.

  3. Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in breast cancer MCF‑7 cells by a peptide derived from Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Jin; Ryu, Jina; Kim, In-Hye; Choi, Youn-Hee; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Seaweeds have beneficial nutritional and medicinal properties. Several studies have examined the polysaccharides found in the extracts of Porphyra yezoensis (PPY), although the effects of particular proteins have not been reported, and peptides from the marine alga PPY function in antitumor cell signaling, although the precise mechanism is not well understood. Apoptosis plays an important role in cell death, which affects cell proliferation. Generally, regulation of apoptosis requires participation of the p53 and Bcl-2 family by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, which is activated in a variety of malignant cancers. Autophagy is another signaling pathway that leads to degradation of cellular components by lysosomal activity, and the relationship between autophagy and cancer has been of interest for several years. The present study investigated mTOR pathway activation in MCF-7 cells treated with 500 ng PPY for 24 h by assessing LC3 as a monitor of autophagy. We observed that the p53/NF-κB and mTOR pathways were affected by PPY, which contributes to our understanding of the functional relationship between the Bcl-2 family and mTOR under apoptotic conditions in MCF-7 cells.

  4. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mammalian TOR (mTOR). mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid) synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  5. The metabolic checkpoint kinase mTOR is essential for interleukin-15 signaling during NK cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Marçais, Antoine; Degouve, Sophie; Viel, Sébastien; Fenis, Aurore; Rabilloud, Jessica; Mayol, Katia; Tavares, Armelle; Bienvenu, Jacques; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Gilson, Eric; Vivier, Eric; Walzer, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) controls both the homeostasis and the peripheral activation of Natural Killer (NK) cells. The molecular basis for this duality of action remains unknown. Here we report that the metabolic checkpoint kinase mTOR is activated and boosts bioenergetic metabolism upon NK cell exposure to high concentrations of IL-15 whereas low doses of IL-15 only triggers the phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT5. mTOR stimulates NK cell growth and nutrient uptake and positively feeds back onto the IL-15 receptor. This process is essential to sustain NK cell proliferation during development and acquisition of cytolytic potential upon inflammation or virus infection. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin inhibits NK cell cytotoxicity both in mouse and human, which likely contribute to the immunosuppressant activities of this drug in different clinical settings. PMID:24973821

  6. Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert E. Burke, MD...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System...has been that the mature mammalian central nervous system (CNS), unlike the peripheral nervous system (PNS), is incapable of axon regeneration. There

  7. Activation of mTORC1/mTORC2 signaling in pediatric low-grade glioma and pilocytic astrocytoma reveals mTOR as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Zagzag, David; Shah, Smit; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Cameron, J. Douglas; Jain, Deepali; Eberhart, Charles G.; Raabe, Eric H.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies support a role for mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway signaling, and more recently Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in pediatric low-grade glioma (PLGG), including pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). Here we further evaluate the role of the mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway in order to better direct pharmacologic blockade in these common childhood tumors. Methods We studied 177 PLGGs and PAs using immunohistochemistry and tested the effect of mTOR blockade on 2 PLGG cell lines (Res186 and Res259) in vitro. Results Moderate (2+) to strong (3+) immunostaining was observed for pS6 in 107/177 (59%) PAs and other PLGGs, while p4EBP1 was observed in 35/115 (30%), pElF4G in 66/112 (59%), mTOR (total) in 53/113 (47%), RAPTOR (mTORC1 component) in 64/102 (63%), RICTOR (mTORC2 component) in 48/101 (48%), and pAkt (S473) in 63/103 (61%). Complete phosphatase and tensin homolog protein loss was identified in only 7/101 (7%) of cases. In PA of the optic pathways, compared with other anatomic sites, there was increased immunoreactivity for pS6, pElF4G, mTOR (total), RICTOR, and pAkt (P < .05). We also observed increased pS6 (P = .01), p4EBP1 (P = .029), and RICTOR (P = .05) in neurofibromatosis type 1 compared with sporadic tumors. Treatment of the PLGG cell lines Res186 (PA derived) and Res259 (diffuse astrocytoma derived) with the rapalog MK8669 (ridaforolimus) led to decreased mTOR pathway activation and growth. Conclusions These findings suggest that the mTOR pathway is active in PLGG but varies by clinicopathologic subtype. Additionally, our data suggest that mTORC2 is differentially active in optic pathway and neurofibromatosis type 1–associated gliomas. MTOR represents a potential therapeutic target in PLGG that merits further investigation. PMID:24203892

  8. Adapting the Stress Response: Viral Subversion of the mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Le Sage, Valerie; Cinti, Alessandro; Amorim, Raquel; Mouland, Andrew J

    2016-05-24

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of gene expression, translation and various metabolic processes. Multiple extracellular (growth factors) and intracellular (energy status) molecular signals as well as a variety of stressors are integrated into the mTOR pathway. Viral infection is a significant stress that can activate, reduce or even suppress the mTOR signaling pathway. Consequently, viruses have evolved a plethora of different mechanisms to attack and co-opt the mTOR pathway in order to make the host cell a hospitable environment for replication. A more comprehensive knowledge of different viral interactions may provide fruitful targets for new antiviral drugs.

  9. The mTOR signalling cascade: paving new roads to cure neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Crino, Peter B

    2016-07-01

    Defining the multiple roles of the mechanistic (formerly 'mammalian') target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway in neurological diseases has been an exciting and rapidly evolving story of bench-to-bedside translational research that has spanned gene mutation discovery, functional experimental validation of mutations, pharmacological pathway manipulation, and clinical trials. Alterations in the dual contributions of mTOR - regulation of cell growth and proliferation, as well as autophagy and cell death - have been found in developmental brain malformations, epilepsy, autism and intellectual disability, hypoxic-ischaemic and traumatic brain injuries, brain tumours, and neurodegenerative disorders. mTOR integrates a variety of cues, such as growth factor levels, oxygen levels, and nutrient and energy availability, to regulate protein synthesis and cell growth. In line with the positioning of mTOR as a pivotal cell signalling node, altered mTOR activation has been associated with a group of phenotypically diverse neurological disorders. To understand how altered mTOR signalling leads to such divergent phenotypes, we need insight into the differential effects of enhanced or diminished mTOR activation, the developmental context of these changes, and the cell type affected by altered signalling. A particularly exciting feature of the tale of mTOR discovery is that pharmacological mTOR inhibitors have shown clinical benefits in some neurological disorders, such as tuberous sclerosis complex, and are being considered for clinical trials in epilepsy, autism, dementia, traumatic brain injury, and stroke.

  10. mTOR Activation by PI3K/Akt and ERK Signaling in Short ELF-EMF Exposed Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Patruno, Antonia; Pesce, Mirko; Grilli, Alfredo; Speranza, Lorenza; Franceschelli, Sara; De Lutiis, Maria Anna; Vianale, Giovina; Costantini, Erica; Amerio, Paolo; Muraro, Raffaella; Felaco, Mario; Reale, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    Several reports suggest that ELF-EMF exposures interact with biological processes including promotion of cell proliferation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ELF-EMF controls cell growth are not completely understood. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of ELF-EMF on keratinocytes proliferation and molecular mechanisms involved. Effect of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 1 mT) on HaCaT cell cycle and cells growth and viability was monitored by FACS analysis and BrdU assay. Gene expression profile by microarray and qRT-PCR validation was performed in HaCaT cells exposed or not to ELF-EMF. mTOR, Akt and MAPKs expressions were evaluated by Western blot analysis. In HaCaT cells, short ELF-EMF exposure modulates distinct patterns of gene expression involved in cell proliferation and in the cell cycle. mTOR activation resulted the main molecular target of ELF-EMF on HaCaT cells. Our data showed the increase of the canonical pathway of mTOR regulation (PI3K/Akt) and activation of ERK signaling pathways. Our results indicate that ELF-EMF selectively modulated the expression of multiple genes related to pivotal biological processes and functions that play a key role in physio-pathological mechanisms such as wound healing. PMID:26431550

  11. The Inhibition of microRNA-128 on IGF-1-Activating mTOR Signaling Involves in Temozolomide-Induced Glioma Cell Apoptotic Death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng-Hsu; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Shih, Chwen-Ming; Ho, Kuo-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Chang, Cheng-Kuei

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ), an alkylating agent of the imidazotetrazine series, is a first-line chemotherapeutic drug used in the clinical therapy of glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and high-grade primary glioma in adults. Micro (mi)RNAs, which are small noncoding RNAs, post-transcriptionally regulate gene expressions and are involved in gliomagenesis. However, no studies have reported relationships between TMZ and miRNA gene regulation. We investigated TMZ-mediated miRNA profiles and its molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of glioma cell death. By performing miRNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses, we observed that expression of 248 miRNAs was altered, including five significantly upregulated and 17 significantly downregulated miRNAs, in TMZ-treated U87MG cells. miR-128 expression levels were lower in different glioma cells and strongly associated with poor survival. TMZ treatment significantly upregulated miR-128 expression. TMZ significantly enhanced miR-128-1 promoter activity and transcriptionally regulated miR-128 levels through c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2/c-Jun pathways. The overexpression and knockdown of miR-128 expression significantly affected TMZ-mediated cell viability and apoptosis-related protein expression. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-128 alone enhanced apoptotic death of glioma cells through caspase-3/9 activation, poly(ADP ribose) polymerase degradation, reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, and non-protective autophagy formation. Finally, we identified that key members in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling including mTOR, rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR, insulin-like growth factor 1, and PIK3R1, but not PDK1, were direct target genes of miR-128. TMZ inhibited mTOR signaling through miR-128 regulation. These results indicate that miR-128-inhibited mTOR signaling is involved in TMZ-mediated cytotoxicity. Our findings may provide a better understanding of cytotoxic

  12. mTOR pathway activation is a favorable prognostic factor in human prostate adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stelloo, Suzan; Sanders, Joyce; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; de Jong, Jeroen; Peters, Dennis; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.; Jenster, Guido; Bergman, Andries M.; Zwart, Wilbert

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer patients with localized disease are treated with curative intent. However, the disease will recur in approximately 30% of patients with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. Prognostic biomarkers are needed to identify patients with high risk of relapse. mTOR pathway activation is reported in prostate cancer, but clinical trials testing efficacy of mTOR inhibitors were unsuccessful. To explain this clinical observation, we studied the expression and prognostic impact of mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation in localized prostate carcinomas. mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation is indicative for an activated mTOR pathway in prostate cancer. Surprisingly, the mTOR signaling pathway is activated specifically in prostate cancer patients with a favorable outcome. Since tumors from poor-outcome patients have low levels of mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation, this may explain why mTOR inhibitors proved unsuccessful in prostate cancer trials. PMID:27096957

  13. Overactive mTOR signaling leads to endometrial hyperplasia in aged women and mice.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Preety; Nielsen, Sarah; Lombard, Janine M; Rassam, Loui; Nahar, Pravin; Rueda, Bo R; Wilkinson, J Erby; Miller, Richard A; Tanwar, Pradeep S

    2017-01-31

    During aging, uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation in the uterus results in endometrial hyperplasia and/or cancer development. The mTOR signaling pathway is one of the major regulators of aging as suppression of this pathway prolongs lifespan in model organisms. Genetic alterations in this pathway via mutations and/or amplifications are often encountered in endometrial cancers. However, the exact contribution of mTOR signaling and uterine aging to endometrial pathologies is currently unclear. This study examined the role of mTOR signaling in uterine aging and its implications in the development of endometrial hyperplasia. The hyperplastic endometrium of both postmenopausal women and aged mice exhibited elevated mTOR activity as seen with increased expression of the pS6 protein. Analysis of uteri from Pten heterozygous and Pten overexpressing mice further confirmed that over-activation of mTOR signaling leads to endometrial hyperplasia. Pharmacological inhibition of mTOR signaling using rapamycin treatment suppressed endometrial hyperplasia in aged mice. Furthermore, treatment with mTOR inhibitors reduced colony size and proliferation of a PTEN negative endometrial cancer cell line in 3D culture. Collectively, this study suggests that hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway is involved in the development of endometrial hyperplasia in aged women and mice.

  14. Nutrient ingestion increased mTOR signaling, but not hVps34 activity in human skeletal muscle after sprint exercise

    PubMed Central

    Rundqvist, Håkan C; Lilja, Mats R; Rooyackers, Olav; Odrzywol, Krzysztofa; Murray, James T; Esbjörnsson, Mona; Jansson, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient provision after sprint exercise enhances mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. One suggested that nutrient sensor is the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34), not previously studied in human skeletal muscle. It is hypothesized that oral ingestion of essential amino acids (EAA) and carbohydrates (Carb) increases Vps34 activity and mTOR signaling in human skeletal (hVps34) muscle after sprint exercise. Nine subjects were performed 3 × 30-sec all-out sprints with or without ingestion of EAA + Carb or placebo drinks in a randomized order with a month interval. Muscle biopsies were performed at rest and 140 min after last sprint and analyzed for p-mTOR, p-p70S6k, p-eEF2 and for hVps34 activity and hVps34 protein content. Venous blood samples were collected and analyzed for amino acids, glucose, lactate, and insulin. During the sprint exercise session, EAA, glucose, and insulin in blood increased significantly more in EAA + Carb than in placebo. P-mTOR and p-p70S6k were significantly increased above rest in EAA + Carb (P = 0.03, P = 0.007) 140 min after last sprint, but not in placebo. Activity and protein expression of hVps34 were not significantly changed from rest in EAA + Carb 140 min after the last sprint. However, hVps34 activity and protein expression tended to increase in placebo (both P = 0.08). In conclusion, on the contrary to the hypothesis, no increase in activation of hVps34 was found following sprint exercise in EAA + Carb condition. In spite of this, the results support an activation of mTOR during this condition. However, this does not exclude the permissive role of hVps34 in mediating the amino acid-induced activation of mTOR and muscle protein synthesis. PMID:24303161

  15. The Role of Phospholipase D in Modulating the MTOR Signaling Pathway in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Käch, Andres; Ziegler, Urs; Ong, Albert C. M.; Wallace, Darren P.; Arcaro, Alexandre; Serra, Andreas L.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is aberrantly activated in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Emerging evidence suggests that phospholipase D (PLD) and its product phosphatidic acid (PA) regulate mTOR activity. In this study, we assessed in vitro the regulatory function of PLD and PA on the mTOR signaling pathway in PKD. We found that the basal level of PLD activity was elevated in PKD cells. Targeting PLD by small molecule inhibitors reduced cell proliferation and blocked mTOR signaling, whereas exogenous PA stimulated mTOR signaling and abolished the inhibitory effect of PLD on PKD cell proliferation. We also show that blocking PLD activity enhanced the sensitivity of PKD cells to rapamycin and that combining PLD inhibitors and rapamycin synergistically inhibited PKD cell proliferation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that targeting mTOR did not induce autophagy, whereas targeting PLD induced autophagosome formation. Taken together, our findings suggest that deregulated mTOR pathway activation is mediated partly by increased PLD signaling in PKD cells. Targeting PLD isoforms with pharmacological inhibitors may represent a new therapeutic strategy in PKD. PMID:24009738

  16. Glycolytic-to-oxidative fiber-type switch and mTOR signaling activation are early-onset features of SBMA muscle modified by high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Anna; Milioto, Carmelo; Parodi, Sara; Armirotti, Andrea; Borgia, Doriana; Pellegrini, Matteo; Urciuolo, Anna; Molon, Sibilla; Morbidoni, Valeria; Marabita, Manuela; Romanello, Vanina; Gatto, Pamela; Blaauw, Bert; Bonaldo, Paolo; Sambataro, Fabio; Robins, Diane M; Lieberman, Andrew P; Sorarù, Gianni; Vergani, Lodovica; Sandri, Marco; Pennuto, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the androgen receptor (AR). The mechanism by which expansion of polyglutamine in AR causes muscle atrophy is unknown. Here, we investigated pathological pathways underlying muscle atrophy in SBMA knock-in mice and patients. We show that glycolytic muscles were more severely affected than oxidative muscles in SBMA knock-in mice. Muscle atrophy was associated with early-onset, progressive glycolytic-to-oxidative fiber-type switch. Whole genome microarray and untargeted lipidomic analyses revealed enhanced lipid metabolism and impaired glycolysis selectively in muscle. These metabolic changes occurred before denervation and were associated with a concurrent enhancement of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, which induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) expression. At later stages of disease, we detected mitochondrial membrane depolarization, enhanced transcription factor EB (TFEB) expression and autophagy, and mTOR-induced protein synthesis. Several of these abnormalities were detected in the muscle of SBMA patients. Feeding knock-in mice a high-fat diet (HFD) restored mTOR activation, decreased the expression of PGC1α, TFEB, and genes involved in oxidative metabolism, reduced mitochondrial abnormalities, ameliorated muscle pathology, and extended survival. These findings show early-onset and intrinsic metabolic alterations in SBMA muscle and link lipid/glucose metabolism to pathogenesis. Moreover, our results highlight an HFD regime as a promising approach to support SBMA patients.

  17. Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like activity of the mGlu5 antagonist MTEP and the mGlu7 agonist AMN082 in the FST in rats.

    PubMed

    Pałucha-Poniewiera, Agnieszka; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Pilc, Andrzej

    2014-07-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects of ketamine in depressive patients. It has been proposed that these effects are related to changes in synaptogenesis in the mechanism involving mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation. Similar mechanisms have been proposed for a group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor antagonist, LY341495. We aimed to investigate whether other mGlu receptor ligands that produce antidepressant-like effects, namely, the mGlu5 antagonist MTEP and the mGlu7 agonist AMN082, induce the activation of mTOR signaling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in rats. AMN082 administered 60 min before the test increased the levels of pmTOR and pp70S6K, and the mTORC1 antagonist rapamycin reversed AMN082-induced changes in the forced swim test (FST) in rats. Furthermore, AMN082 administered 23 h before the decapitation of the rats increased the levels of synapsin I and GluR1, although it did not produce any effect in the FST at the same time point. However, MTEP induced a rapid but unsustained antidepressant-like effect, which was not related to the activation of the mTOR cascade. Finally, the antidepressant-like effects of MTEP or AMN082 were not antagonized by NBQX. In summary, the antidepressant-like activity of MTEP did not depend on the activation of mTOR signaling. However, we observed a unique feature of the mechanism of AMN082. The drug stimulated the mTOR signaling pathway and synaptic protein levels (like ketamine), while it did not induce a sustained antidepressant effect and its action was not directly dependent on AMPA receptor activation (as in classic antidepressants (ADs)).

  18. mTOR signaling in growth control and disease

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, Mathieu; Sabatini, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway senses and integrates a variety of environmental cues to regulate organismal growth and homeostasis. The pathway regulates many major cellular processes and is implicated in an increasing number of pathological conditions, including cancer, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the mTOR pathway and its role in health and disease as well as aging. We further discuss pharmacological approaches to treat human pathologies linked to mTOR deregulation. PMID:22500797

  19. Ghrelin regulates GLP-1 production through mTOR signaling in L cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Geyang; Hong, Xiaosi; Tang, Hong; Jiang, Sushi; Liu, Fenting; Shen, Zhemin; Li, Ziru; Zhang, Weizhen

    2015-11-15

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), an intestinal incretin produced in L-cells and released in response to meal intake, functions to promote insulin secretion and to decrease plasma glucose. Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone critical for glucose homeostasis. The molecular mechanism by which ghrelin alters GLP-1 production remains largely unknown. Here we showed that ghrelin attenuates GLP-1 production through mTOR signaling. In GHSR1a null mice, ileal mTOR signaling, proglucagon and circulating GLP-1 were significantly increased. Antagonism of the GHSR1a by D-Lys-3-GHRP-6 increased GLP-1 synthesis and release in STC-1 cells. Treatment of STC-1 cells with ghrelin decreased the production of GLP-1. This effect was associated with a significant inhibition of mTOR signaling. Overexpression of ghrelin inhibited proglucagon promoter activity and GLP-1 production. Inhibition of mTOR activity by mTOR siRNA blocked D-Lys-3-GHRP-6 induced GLP-1 production in STC-1 cells. Our results suggest that mTOR signaling mediates the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on GLP-1 production.

  20. Adapting the Stress Response: Viral Subversion of the mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Le Sage, Valerie; Cinti, Alessandro; Amorim, Raquel; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of gene expression, translation and various metabolic processes. Multiple extracellular (growth factors) and intracellular (energy status) molecular signals as well as a variety of stressors are integrated into the mTOR pathway. Viral infection is a significant stress that can activate, reduce or even suppress the mTOR signaling pathway. Consequently, viruses have evolved a plethora of different mechanisms to attack and co-opt the mTOR pathway in order to make the host cell a hospitable environment for replication. A more comprehensive knowledge of different viral interactions may provide fruitful targets for new antiviral drugs. PMID:27231932

  1. Photic regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway in the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruifeng; Lee, Boyoung; Cho, Hee-Yeon; Saklayen, Sanjida; Obrietan, Karl

    2008-07-01

    Here we analyzed the light-responsiveness of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) cascade, a key regulator of inducible translation, in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the locus of the master circadian clock. Brief light exposure during the subjective night, but not during the subjective day, triggered rapid phosphorylation (a marker of catalytic activity) of the mTOR translation effectors p70 S6K, ribosomal S6 protein (S6) and 4E-BP1. In the absence of photic stimulation, marked S6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation was detected, indicating tonic mTOR activity in the SCN. Light stimulated the colocalized activation of p70 S6K and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), and pharmacological disruption of ERK signaling abolished light-induced mTOR activity, revealing that the MAPK cascade is an essential intermediate that couples light to mTOR. Together these data identify a light-responsive mTOR cascade in the SCN, and thus, raise the possibility that inducible translation contributes to the clock entrainment process.

  2. Modulation of mTOR signaling as a strategy for the treatment of Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeong-A; Li, Lishu; Shirihai, Orian S; Trudeau, Kyle M; Puertollano, Rosa; Raben, Nina

    2017-03-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) coordinates biosynthetic and catabolic processes in response to multiple extracellular and intracellular signals including growth factors and nutrients. This serine/threonine kinase has long been known as a critical regulator of muscle mass. The recent finding that the decision regarding its activation/inactivation takes place at the lysosome undeniably brings mTOR into the field of lysosomal storage diseases. In this study, we have examined the involvement of the mTOR pathway in the pathophysiology of a severe muscle wasting condition, Pompe disease, caused by excessive accumulation of lysosomal glycogen. Here, we report the dysregulation of mTOR signaling in the diseased muscle cells, and we focus on potential sites for therapeutic intervention. Reactivation of mTOR in the whole muscle of Pompe mice by TSC knockdown resulted in the reversal of atrophy and a striking removal of autophagic buildup. Of particular interest, we found that the aberrant mTOR signaling can be reversed by arginine. This finding can be translated into the clinic and may become a paradigm for targeted therapy in lysosomal, metabolic, and neuromuscular diseases.

  3. Activation of protein synthesis in mouse uterine epithelial cells by estradiol-17β is mediated by a PKC-ERK1/2-mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Zhu, Liyin; Kuokkanen, Satu; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-17

    The uterine epithelium of mice and humans undergoes cyclical waves of cell proliferation and differentiation under the regulation of estradiol-17β (E2) and progesterone (P4). These epithelial cells respond to E2 with increased protein and DNA synthesis, whereas P4 inhibits only the E2-induced DNA synthetic response. Here we show that E2 regulates protein synthesis in these epithelial cells through activating PKC that in turn stimulates ERK1/2 to phosphorylate and thereby activate the central regulator of protein synthesis mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). This mTOR pathway is not inhibited by P4. Inhibitor studies with an estrogen receptor (ESR1) antagonist showed the dependence of this mTOR pathway on ESR1 but that once activated, a phosphorylation cascade independent of ESR1 propagates the pathway. E2 also stimulates an IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) to PI3 kinase to AKT to GSK-3β pathway required for activation of the canonical cell cycle machinery that is inhibited by P4. PKC activation did not stimulate this pathway nor does inhibition of PKC or ERK1/2 affect it. These studies therefore indicate a mechanism whereby DNA and protein synthesis are regulated by two ESR1-activated pathways that run in parallel with only the one responsible for the initiation of DNA synthesis blocked by P4. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin in vivo resulted in inhibition of E2-induced protein and DNA synthesis. Proliferative diseases of the endometrium such as endometriosis and cancer are common and E2 dependent. Thus, defining this mTOR pathway suggests that local (intrauterine or peritoneal) rapamycin administration might be a therapeutic option for these diseases.

  4. Cyproheptadine exhibits antitumor activity in urothelial carcinoma cells by targeting GSK3β to suppress mTOR and β-catenin signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Lin, Ru-Inn; Feng, Yu-Min; Huang, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wu, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Cheng-Da; Chan, Michael W Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyproheptadine, a serotonin antagonist, has recently been reported to function as a novel therapeutic agent by inhibiting PI3K/AKT signaling in several human cancers. However, the therapeutic effect of cyproheptadine in urothelial carcinoma (UC) has never been explored. In this study, we determined the effect of cyproheptadine on the growth of five human UC cell lines and an in vivo xenograft model. The results showed that cyproheptadine exerted an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of UC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Cyproheptadine also induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, subsequently followed by apoptosis and necrosis. The underlying mechanisms of cell cycle arrest were associated with the reduction of c-Myc, induction of p21 and p27, and the stabilization of Rb expression. In addition, the suppression of the GSK3β/TSC2/mTOR pathway and deregulation of the GSK3β/β-catenin signaling were observed in cyproheptadine-treated UC cells. Furthermore, cyproheptadine-induced apoptosis was associated with ANGPTL4 expression followed by activation of caspase3 and PARP in UC cells. Our experimental results provide evidence that cyproheptadine is a suitable therapeutic agent for the treatment of UC.

  5. Skeletal myocyte hypertrophy requires mTOR kinase activity and S6K1

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In-Hyun . E-mail: ihpark@uiuc.edu; Erbay, Ebru; Nuzzi, Paul; Chen Jie

    2005-09-10

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell proliferation and growth, with the ribosomal subunit S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) as one of the key downstream signaling effectors. A critical role of mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle differentiation has been identified recently, and an unusual regulatory mechanism independent of mTOR kinase activity and S6K1 is revealed. An mTOR pathway has also been reported to regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy, but the regulatory mechanism is not completely understood. Here, we report the investigation of mTOR's function in insulin growth factor I (IGF-I)-induced C2C12 myotube hypertrophy. Added at a later stage when rapamycin no longer had any effect on normal myocyte differentiation, rapamycin completely blocked myocyte hypertrophy as measured by myotube diameter. Importantly, a concerted increase of average myonuclei per myotube was observed in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes, which was also inhibited by rapamycin added at a time when it no longer affected normal differentiation. The mTOR protein level, its catalytic activity, its phosphorylation on Ser2448, and the activity of S6K1 were all found increased in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes compared to unstimulated myotubes. Using C2C12 cells stably expressing rapamycin-resistant forms of mTOR and S6K1, we provide genetic evidence for the requirement of mTOR and its downstream effector S6K1 in the regulation of myotube hypertrophy. Our results suggest distinct mTOR signaling mechanisms in different stages of skeletal muscle development: While mTOR regulates the initial myoblast differentiation in a kinase-independent and S6K1-independent manner, the hypertrophic function of mTOR requires its kinase activity and employs S6K1 as a downstream effector.

  6. Hypothalamic roles of mTOR complex I: Integration of nutrient and hormone signals to regulate energy homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) senses nutrient, energy, and hormone signals to regulate metabolism and energy homeostasis. mTOR activity in the hypothalamus, which is associated with changes in energy status, plays a critical role in the regulation of food intake and body weight...

  7. Promotion of ovarian follicle growth following mTOR activation: synergistic effects of AKT stimulators.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Kim, Jaehong; Li, Xiao Xiao; Hsueh, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase and mTOR signaling is important in regulating cell growth and proliferation. Recent studies using oocyte- and granulosa cell-specific deletion of mTOR inhibitor genes TSC1 or TSC2 demonstrated the important role of mTOR signaling in the promotion of ovarian follicle development. We now report that treatment of ovaries from juvenile mice with an mTOR activator MHY1485 stimulated mTOR, S6K1 and rpS6 phosphorylation. Culturing ovaries for 4 days with MHY1485 increased ovarian explant weights and follicle development. In vivo studies further demonstrated that pre-incubation of these ovaries with MHY1485 for 2 days, followed by allo-grafting into kidney capsules of adult ovariectomized hosts for 5 days, led to marked increases in graft weights and promotion of follicle development. Mature oocytes derived from MHY1485-activated ovarian grafts could be successfully fertilized, leading the delivery of healthy pups. We further treated ovaries with the mTOR activator together with AKT activators (PTEN inhibitor and phosphoinositol-3-kinase stimulator) before grafting and found additive enhancement of follicle growth. Our studies demonstrate the ability of an mTOR activator in promoting follicle growth, leading to a potential strategy to stimulate preantral follicle growth in infertile patients.

  8. Promotion of Ovarian Follicle Growth following mTOR Activation: Synergistic Effects of AKT Stimulators

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan; Kim, Jaehong; Li, Xiao Xiao; Hsueh, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase and mTOR signaling is important in regulating cell growth and proliferation. Recent studies using oocyte- and granulosa cell-specific deletion of mTOR inhibitor genes TSC1 or TSC2 demonstrated the important role of mTOR signaling in the promotion of ovarian follicle development. We now report that treatment of ovaries from juvenile mice with an mTOR activator MHY1485 stimulated mTOR, S6K1 and rpS6 phosphorylation. Culturing ovaries for 4 days with MHY1485 increased ovarian explant weights and follicle development. In vivo studies further demonstrated that pre-incubation of these ovaries with MHY1485 for 2 days, followed by allo-grafting into kidney capsules of adult ovariectomized hosts for 5 days, led to marked increases in graft weights and promotion of follicle development. Mature oocytes derived from MHY1485-activated ovarian grafts could be successfully fertilized, leading the delivery of healthy pups. We further treated ovaries with the mTOR activator together with AKT activators (PTEN inhibitor and phosphoinositol-3-kinase stimulator) before grafting and found additive enhancement of follicle growth. Our studies demonstrate the ability of an mTOR activator in promoting follicle growth, leading to a potential strategy to stimulate preantral follicle growth in infertile patients. PMID:25710488

  9. Intracerebroventricular administration of ouabain, a Na/K-ATPase inhibitor, activates mTOR signal pathways and protein translation in the rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hyun; Yu, Hyun-Sook; Park, Hong Geun; Ha, Kyooseob; Kim, Yong Sik; Shin, Soon Young; Ahn, Yong Min

    2013-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of ouabain, a specific Na/K-ATPase inhibitor, induces behavioral changes in rats in a putative animal model of mania. The binding of ouabain to Na/K-ATPase affects signaling molecules in vitro, including ERK1/2 and Akt, which promote protein translation. We have also reported that ERK1/2 and Akt in the brain are involved in the ouabain-induced hyperactivity of rats. In this study, rats were given an ICV injection of ouabain, and then their frontal cortices were examined to determine the effects of ouabain on the mTOR/p70S6K/S6 signaling pathway and protein translation, which are important in modifications of neural circuits and behavior. Rats showed ouabain-induced hyperactivity up to 8h following injection, and increased phosphorylation levels of mTOR, p70S6K, S6, eIF4B, and 4E-BP at 1, 2, 4, and 8h following ouabain injection. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that increased p-S6 immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm of neurons by ouabain was evident in the prefrontal, cingulate, and orbital cortex. These findings suggested increased translation initiation in response to ouabain. The rate of protein synthesis was measured as the amount of [(3)H]-leucine incorporation in the cell-free extracts of frontal cortical tissues, and showed a significant increase at 8h after ouabain injection. These results suggest that ICV injection of ouabain induced activation of the protein translation initiation pathway regulated by ERK1/2 and Akt, and prolonged hyperactivity in rats. In conclusion, protein translation pathway could play an important role in ouabain-induced hyperactivity in a rodent model of mania.

  10. The progesterone-induced enhancement of object recognition memory consolidation involves activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways in the dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Orr, Patrick T; Rubin, Amanda J; Fan, Lu; Kent, Brianne A; Frick, Karyn M

    2012-04-01

    Although much recent work has elucidated the biochemical mechanisms underlying the modulation of memory by 17β-estradiol, little is known about the signaling events through which progesterone (P) regulates memory. We recently demonstrated that immediate post-training infusion of P into the dorsal hippocampus enhances object recognition memory consolidation in young ovariectomized female mice (Orr et al., 2009). The goal of the present study was to identify the biochemical alterations that might underlie this mnemonic enhancement. We hypothesized that the P-induced enhancement of object recognition would be dependent on activation of the ERK and mTOR pathways. In young ovariectomized mice, we found that bilateral dorsal hippocampal infusion of P significantly increased levels of phospho-p42 ERK and the mTOR substrate S6K in the dorsal hippocampus 5 min after infusion. Phospho-p42 ERK levels were downregulated 15 min after infusion and returned to baseline 30 min after infusion, suggesting a biphasic effect of P on ERK activation. Dorsal hippocampal ERK and mTOR activation were necessary for P to facilitate memory consolidation, as suggested by the fact that inhibitors of both pathways infused into the dorsal hippocampus immediately after training blocked the P-induced enhancement of object recognition. Collectively, these data provide the first demonstration that the ability of P to enhance memory consolidation depends on the rapid activation of cell signaling and protein synthesis pathways in the dorsal hippocampus.

  11. Annexin A1 Preferentially Predicts Poor Prognosis of Basal-Like Breast Cancer Patients by Activating mTOR-S6 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Anjana; Ganesan, Nivetha; Tachibana, Kazunoshin; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Albarracin, Constance T.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Coarfa, Cristian; Bedrosian, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is an anti-inflammatory protein reported to play a role in cell proliferation and apoptosis, and to be deregulated in breast cancer. The exact role of annexin A1 in the biology of breast cancer remains unclear. We hypothesized that the annexin A1 plays an oncogenic role in basal subtype of breast cancer by modulating key growth pathway(s). Methods By mining the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)-Breast Cancer dataset and manipulating annexin A1 levels in breast cancer cell lines, we studied the role of annexin A1 in breast cancer and underlying signaling pathways. Results Our in-silico analysis of TCGA-breast cancer dataset demonstrated that annexin A1 mRNA expression is higher in basal subtype compared to luminal and HER2 subtypes. Within the basal subtype, patients show significantly poorer overall survival associated with higher expression of annexin A1. In both TCGA patient samples and cell lines, annexin A1 levels were significantly higher in basal-like breast cancer than luminal and Her2/neu-positive breast cancer. Stable annexin A1 knockdown in TNBC cell lines suppressed the mTOR-S6 pathway likely through activation of AMPK but had no impact on the MAPK, c-Met, and EGFR pathways. In a cell migration assay, annexin A1-depleted TNBC cells showed delayed migration as compared to wild-type cells, which could be responsible for poor patient prognosis in basal like breast cancers that are known to express higher annexin A1. Conclusions Our data suggest that annexin A1 is prognostic only in patients with basal like breast cancer. This appears to be in part due to the role of annexin A1 in activating mTOR-pS6 pathway. PMID:26000884

  12. Akt and mTOR in B Cell Activation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Limon, Jose J; Fruman, David A

    2012-01-01

    Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) is required for B cell proliferation and survival. PI3K signaling also controls key aspects of B cell differentiation. Upon engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR), PI3K activation promotes Ca(2+) mobilization and activation of NFκB-dependent transcription, events which are essential for B cell proliferation. PI3K also initiates a distinct signaling pathway involving the Akt and mTOR serine/threonine kinases. It has been generally assumed that activation of Akt and mTOR downstream of PI3K is essential for B cell function. However, Akt and mTOR have complex roles in B cell fate decisions and suppression of this pathway can enhance certain B cell responses while repressing others. In this review we will discuss genetic and pharmacological studies of Akt and mTOR function in normal B cells, and in malignancies of B cell origin.

  13. Activation of mTOR: a culprit of Alzheimer’s disease?

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhiyou; Chen, Guanghui; He, Wenbo; Xiao, Ming; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by cognitive impairment in clinical presentation, and by β-amyloid (Aβ) production and the hyper-phosphorylation of tau in basic research. More highlights demonstrate that the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) enhances Aβ generation and deposition by modulating amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism and upregulating β- and γ-secretases. mTOR, an inhibitor of autophagy, decreases Aβ clearance by scissoring autophagy function. mTOR regulates Aβ generation or Aβ clearance by regulating several key signaling pathways, including phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K)/protein kinase B (Akt), glycogen synthase kinase 3 [GSK-3], AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). The activation of mTOR is also a contributor to aberrant hyperphosphorylated tau. Rapamycin, the inhibitor of mTOR, may mitigate cognitive impairment and inhibit the pathologies associated with amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles by promoting autophagy. Furthermore, the upstream and downstream components of mTOR signaling are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of AD. Hence, inhibiting the activation of mTOR may be an important therapeutic target for AD. PMID:25914534

  14. Fluoxetine regulates mTOR signalling in a region-dependent manner in depression-like mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Luo, Liu; Mu, Rong-Hao; Liu, Bin-Bin; Geng, Di; Liu, Qing; Yi, Li-Tao

    2015-11-02

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has an important role in ketamine-induced, rapid antidepressant effects despite the acute administration of fluoxetine not affecting mTOR phosphorylation in the brain. However, the effects of long-term fluoxetine treatment on mTOR modulation have not been assessed to date. In the present study, we examined whether fluoxetine, a type of commonly used antidepressant agent, alters mTOR signaling following chronic administration in different brain regions, including the frontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus. We also investigated whether fluoxetine enhanced synaptic protein levels in these regions via the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway and its downstream regulators, p70S6K and 4E-BP-1. The results indicated that chronic fluoxetine treatment attenuated the chronic, unpredictable, mild stress (CUMS)-induced mTOR phosphorylation reduction in the hippocampus and amygdala of mice but not in the frontal cortex or the hypothalamus. Moreover, the CUMS-decreased PSD-95 and synapsin I levels were reversed by fluoxetine, and these effects were blocked by rapamycin only in the hippocampus. In conclusion, our findings suggest that chronic treatment with fluoxetine can induce synaptic protein expression by activating the mTOR signaling pathway in a region-dependent manner and mainly in the hippocampus.

  15. Benzofuran derivatives as anticancer inhibitors of mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Salomé, Christophe; Ribeiro, Nigel; Chavagnan, Thierry; Thuaud, Frédéric; Serova, Maria; de Gramont, Armand; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; Désaubry, Laurent

    2014-06-23

    A series of 32 derivatives and isosteres of the mTOR inhibitor 2 were synthesized and compared for their cytotoxicity in radioresistant SQ20B cancer cell line. Several of these compounds, in particular 30b, were significantly more cytotoxic than 2. Importantly, 30b was shown to block both mTORC1 and Akt signaling, suggesting insensitivity to the resistance associated to Akt overactivation observed with rapamycin derivatives currently used in clinic.

  16. Phosphatidic acid enhances mTOR signaling and resistance exercise induced hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The lipid messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) plays a critical role in the stimulation of mTOR signaling. However, the mechanism by which PA stimulates mTOR is currently unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of various PA precursors and phospholipids on their ability to stimulate mTOR signaling and its ability to augment resistance training-induced changes in body composition and performance. Methods In phase one, C2C12 myoblasts cells were stimulated with different phospholipids and phospholipid precursors derived from soy and egg sources. The ratio of phosphorylated p70 (P-p70-389) to total p70 was then used as readout for mTOR signaling. In phase two, resistance trained subjects (n = 28, 21 ± 3 years, 77 ± 4 kg, 176 ± 9 cm) consumed either 750 mg PA daily or placebo and each took part in an 8 week periodized resistance training program. Results In phase one, soy-phosphatidylserine, soy-Lyso-PA, egg-PA, and soy-PA stimulated mTOR signaling, and the effects of soy-PA (+636%) were significantly greater than egg-PA (+221%). In phase two, PA significantly increased lean body mass (+2.4 kg), cross sectional area (+1.0 cm), and leg press strength (+51.9 kg) over placebo. Conclusion PA significantly activates mTOR and significantly improved responses in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, lean body mass, and maximal strength to resistance exercise. PMID:24959196

  17. Cerebral mTOR signal and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Alzheimer’s disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Li, Guang-Jian; Hu, Hai-Xia; Ma, Chi; Ma, Di-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As a part of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) development the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been reported to play a crucial role in regulating cognition and can be used as a neuronal marker. Neuro-inflammation is also a cause of the pathophysiological process in AD. Thus, we examined the protein expression levels of mTOR and its downstream pathways as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) in the brain of AD rats. We further examined the effects of blocking mTOR on PICs, namely IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Our results showed that the protein expression of p-mTOR, mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1) and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) pathways were amplified in the hippocampus of AD rats compared with controls. Blocking mTOR by using rapamycin selectively enhanced activities of IL-6 and TNF-α signaling pathways, which was accompanied with an increase of Caspase-3, indicating cellular apoptosis and worsened learning performance. In conclusion, our data for the first time revealed specific signaling pathways engaged in the development of AD, including a regulatory role by the activation of mTOR in PIC mechanisms. Stimulation of mTOR is likely to play a beneficial role in modulating neurological deficits in AD.Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present with new opportunities for treatment and clinical management of AD PMID:28123835

  18. mTOR links oncogenic signaling to tumor cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yecies, Jessica L; Manning, Brendan D

    2011-03-01

    As a key regulator of cell growth and proliferation, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) has been the subject of intense investigation for its role in tumor development and progression. This research has revealed a signaling network of oncogenes and tumor suppressors lying upstream of mTORC1, and oncogenic perturbations to this network result in the aberrant activation of this kinase complex in the majority of human cancers. However, the molecular events downstream of mTORC1 contributing to tumor cell growth and proliferation are just coming to light. In addition to its better-known functions in promoting protein synthesis and suppressing autophagy, mTORC1 has emerged as a key regulator of cellular metabolism. Recent studies have found that mTORC1 activation is sufficient to stimulate an increase in glucose uptake, glycolysis, and de novo lipid biosynthesis, which are considered metabolic hallmarks of cancer, as well as the pentose phosphate pathway. Here, we focus on the molecular mechanisms of metabolic regulation by mTORC1 and the potential consequences for anabolic tumor growth and therapeutic strategies.

  19. Identification of Palmitoleic Acid Controlled by mTOR Signaling as a Biomarker of Polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Geng; Wang, Ying; Cen, Xiao-Min; Yang, Yuan; Yang, Min; Xie, Qi-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) is a chronic disease characterized by muscle pain, weakness, and increase in muscle-related enzymes, accompanied with inflammations in lymphocytes. However, it is not well understood how the molecular alternations in lymphocytes contribute to the development of polymyositis. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is the central regulator of metabolism and inflammation in mammalian cells. Based on previous studies, we proposed that mTOR signaling may control inflammatory reactions via lipid metabolism. In this study, we aim to figure out the role of mTOR signaling in the development of polymyositis and identify novel biomarkers for the detection and therapy of polymyositis. After screening and validation, we found that palmitoleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, is highly regulated by mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTORC1 activity decreases palmitoleic acid level. Moreover, mTORC1 regulates the level of palmitoleic acid by controlling its de novo synthesis. Importantly, increased palmitoleic acid has been proven to be a marker of polymyositis. Our work identifies palmitoleic acid in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a biomarker of polymyositis and offers new targets to the clinical therapy.

  20. Identification of Palmitoleic Acid Controlled by mTOR Signaling as a Biomarker of Polymyositis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Cen, Xiao-min; Yang, Yuan; Yang, Min

    2017-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) is a chronic disease characterized by muscle pain, weakness, and increase in muscle-related enzymes, accompanied with inflammations in lymphocytes. However, it is not well understood how the molecular alternations in lymphocytes contribute to the development of polymyositis. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is the central regulator of metabolism and inflammation in mammalian cells. Based on previous studies, we proposed that mTOR signaling may control inflammatory reactions via lipid metabolism. In this study, we aim to figure out the role of mTOR signaling in the development of polymyositis and identify novel biomarkers for the detection and therapy of polymyositis. After screening and validation, we found that palmitoleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, is highly regulated by mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTORC1 activity decreases palmitoleic acid level. Moreover, mTORC1 regulates the level of palmitoleic acid by controlling its de novo synthesis. Importantly, increased palmitoleic acid has been proven to be a marker of polymyositis. Our work identifies palmitoleic acid in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a biomarker of polymyositis and offers new targets to the clinical therapy. PMID:28194428

  1. Activation of MTOR in pulmonary epithelium promotes LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Lou, Jian; Mao, Yuan-Yuan; Lai, Tian-Wen; Liu, Li-Yao; Zhu, Chen; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Juan; Li, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Fan; Li, Wen; Ying, Song-Min; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-12-01

    MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin [serine/threonine kinase]) plays a crucial role in many major cellular processes including metabolism, proliferation and macroautophagy/autophagy induction, and is also implicated in a growing number of proliferative and metabolic diseases. Both MTOR and autophagy have been suggested to be involved in lung disorders, however, little is known about the role of MTOR and autophagy in pulmonary epithelium in the context of acute lung injury (ALI). In the present study, we observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation induced MTOR phosphorylation and decreased the expression of MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 β)-II, a hallmark of autophagy, in mouse lung epithelium and in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. The activation of MTOR in HBE cells was mediated by TLR4 (toll-like receptor 4) signaling. Genetic knockdown of MTOR or overexpression of autophagy-related proteins significantly attenuated, whereas inhibition of autophagy further augmented, LPS-induced expression of IL6 (interleukin 6) and IL8, through NFKB signaling in HBE cells. Mice with specific knockdown of Mtor in bronchial or alveolar epithelial cells exhibited significantly attenuated airway inflammation, barrier disruption, and lung edema, and displayed prolonged survival in response to LPS exposure. Taken together, our results demonstrate that activation of MTOR in the epithelium promotes LPS-induced ALI, likely through downregulation of autophagy and the subsequent activation of NFKB. Thus, inhibition of MTOR in pulmonary epithelial cells may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing ALI induced by certain bacteria.

  2. Chronic leucine supplementation of a low protein diet increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs through mTOR signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine acutely stimulates protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. We hypothesized that leucine supplementation of a low protein diet will enhance protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in the neonate for prolonged periods. Fasted 5-d-old pigs (n=6–8...

  3. mTOR activation is critical for betulin treatment in renal cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wenlong; Ji, Shiqi; Zhang, Haijian; Han, Zhixing; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Jianwen; Ping, Hao

    2017-01-22

    Betulin, a natural product isolated from the bark of the birch trees, exhibits multiple anticancer effects. Activation of mTOR signaling pathway has been found in numerous cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Here, we attempted to study whether mTOR signaling was essential for betulin to treat RCC. Based on cell survival and colony formation assays, we found that mTOR hyperactive RCC cell line 786-O cells were more sensitive to betulin treatment compared with mTOR-inactive Caki-2 cells. Knockdown of TSC2 in Caki-2 cells had similar results to 786-O cells, and mTOR silencing in 786-O cells rescued the inhibitory effect of betulin, indicating that betulin inhibited RCC cell proliferation in an mTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, betulin treatment decreases the levels of glucose consumption and lactate production in 786-O cells, while minimal effects were observed in Caki-2 cells. In addition, betulin significantly inhibited the expression of PKM2 and HK2 in 786-O cells. Finally, knockdown of PKM2 or HK2 in 786-O reversed the anti-proliferative effects of betulin, and overexpression of PKM2 or HK2 in Caki-2 cells enhanced the sensitivity to betulin treatment. Taken together, these findings demonstrated the critical role of mTOR activation in RCC cells to betulin treatment, suggesting that betulin might be valuable for targeted therapies in RCC patients with mTOR activation.

  4. The role of mTOR signaling in the regulation of protein synthesis and muscle mass during immobilization in mice

    PubMed Central

    You, Jae-Sung; Anderson, Garrett B.; Dooley, Matthew S.; Hornberger, Troy A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The maintenance of skeletal muscle mass contributes substantially to health and to issues associated with the quality of life. It has been well recognized that skeletal muscle mass is regulated by mechanically induced changes in protein synthesis, and that signaling by mTOR is necessary for an increase in protein synthesis and the hypertrophy that occurs in response to increased mechanical loading. However, the role of mTOR signaling in the regulation of protein synthesis and muscle mass during decreased mechanical loading remains largely undefined. In order to define the role of mTOR signaling, we employed a mouse model of hindlimb immobilization along with pharmacological, mechanical and genetic means to modulate mTOR signaling. The results first showed that immobilization induced a decrease in the global rates of protein synthesis and muscle mass. Interestingly, immobilization also induced an increase in mTOR signaling, eIF4F complex formation and cap-dependent translation. Blocking mTOR signaling during immobilization with rapamycin not only impaired the increase in eIF4F complex formation, but also augmented the decreases in global protein synthesis and muscle mass. On the other hand, stimulating immobilized muscles with isometric contractions enhanced mTOR signaling and rescued the immobilization-induced decrease in global protein synthesis through a rapamycin-sensitive mechanism that was independent of ribosome biogenesis. Unexpectedly, the effects of isometric contractions were also independent of eIF4F complex formation. Similar to isometric contractions, overexpression of Rheb in immobilized muscles enhanced mTOR signaling, cap-dependent translation and global protein synthesis, and prevented the reduction in fiber size. Therefore, we conclude that the activation of mTOR signaling is both necessary and sufficient to alleviate the decreases in protein synthesis and muscle mass that occur during immobilization. Furthermore, these results indicate

  5. Critical role for hypothalamic mTOR activity in energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hiroyuki; Inoki, Ken; Münzberg, Heike; Opland, Darren; Faouzi, Miro; Villanueva, Eneida C.; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Kwiatkowski, David; MacDougald, Ormond A; Myers, Martin G.; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) promotes anabolic cellular processes in response to growth factors and metabolic cues. The TSC1 and TSC2 tumor suppressors are major upstream inhibitory regulators of mTOR signaling. Mice with Rip2/Cre-mediated deletion of Tsc1 (Rip-Tsc1cKO mice) developed hyperphagia and obesity, suggesting that hypothalamic disruption (for which Rip2/Cre is well known) of Tsc1 may dysregulate feeding circuits via mTOR activation. Indeed, Rip-Tsc1cKO mice displayed increased mTOR signaling and enlarged neuron cell size in a number of hypothalamic populations, including Pomc neurons. Furthermore, Tsc1 deletion with Pomc/Cre (Pomc-Tsc1cKO mice) resulted in dysregulation of Pomc neurons and hyperphagic obesity. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, ameliorated the hyperphagia, obesity, and the altered Pomc neuronal morphology in developing or adult Pomc-Tsc1cKO mice, and cessation of treatment reinstated these phenotypes. Thus, ongoing mTOR activation in Pomc neurons blocks the catabolic function of these neurons to promote nutrient intake and increased adiposity. PMID:19356717

  6. BMAL1-dependent regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway delays aging.

    PubMed

    Khapre, Rohini V; Kondratova, Anna A; Patel, Sonal; Dubrovsky, Yuliya; Wrobel, Michelle; Antoch, Marina P; Kondratov, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping system, has been linked with control of aging, but molecular mechanisms of regulation are not known. BMAL1 is a transcriptional factor and core component of the circadian clock; BMAL1 deficiency is associated with premature aging and reduced lifespan. Here we report that activity of mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is increased upon BMAL1 deficiency both in vivo and in cell culture. Increased mTOR signaling is associated with accelerated aging; in accordance with that, treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin increased lifespan of Bmal1-/- mice by 50%. Our data suggest that BMAL1 is a negative regulator of mTORC1 signaling. We propose that the circadian clock controls the activity of the mTOR pathway through BMAL1-dependent mechanisms and this regulation is important for control of aging and metabolism.

  7. Rapamycin-Resistant mTOR Activity Is Required for Sensory Axon Regeneration Induced by a Conditioning Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Na; Ding, Yue; Chan, Leung Ting; Wang, Xu; Gao, Xin; Jiang, Songshan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuronal mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity is a critical determinant of the intrinsic regenerative ability of mature neurons in the adult central nervous system (CNS). However, whether its action also applies to peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons after injury remains elusive. To address this issue unambiguously, we used genetic approaches to determine the role of mTOR signaling in sensory axon regeneration in mice. We showed that deleting mTOR in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons suppressed the axon regeneration induced by conditioning lesions. To establish whether the impact of mTOR on axon regeneration results from functions of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) or 2 (mTORC2), two distinct kinase complexes, we ablated either Raptor or Rictor in DRG neurons. We found that suppressing mTORC1 signaling dramatically decreased the conditioning lesion effect. In addition, an injury to the peripheral branch boosts mTOR activity in DRG neurons that cannot be completely inhibited by rapamycin, a widely used mTOR-specific inhibitor. Unexpectedly, examining several conditioning lesion–induced pro-regenerative pathways revealed that Raptor deletion but not rapamycin suppressed Stat3 activity in neurons. Therefore, our results demonstrate that crosstalk between mTOR and Stat3 signaling mediates the conditioning lesion effect and provide genetic evidence that rapamycin-resistant mTOR activity contributes to the intrinsic axon growth capacity in adult sensory neurons after injury. PMID:28101526

  8. Essential role of D1R in the regulation of mTOR complex1 signaling induced by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Laurie P; Caron, Marc G

    2015-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that is involved in neuronal adaptions that underlie cocaine-induced sensitization and reward. mTOR exists in two functionally distinct multi-component complexes known as mTORC1 and mTORC2. In this study, we show that increased mTORC1 activity induced by cocaine is mediated by the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R). Specifically, cocaine treatment increased the phosphorylation on residues Thr2446 and Ser2481 but not on Ser2448 in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and that this increase in phosphorylated mTOR levels was also apparent when complexed with its binding partner Raptor. Furthermore, the increase in phosphorylated mTOR levels, as well as phosphorylated 4E-BP1 and S6K, downstream targets of mTORC1 were blocked with SCH23390 treatment. Similar results were also observed in the dopamine-transporter knockout mice as the increase in phosphorylated mTOR Thr2446 and Ser2481 was blocked by SCH23390 but not with raclopride. To further validate D1R role in mTORC1 signaling, decrease in phosphorylated mTOR levels were observed in D1R knockout mice, whereas administration of SKF81297 elevated phosphorylated mTOR in the NAc. Lastly deletion of mTOR or Raptor in D1R expressing neurons reduced cocaine-induced locomotor activity. Together, our data supports a mechanism whereby mTORC1 signaling is activated by cocaine administration through the stimulation of D1R.

  9. Fisetin induces autophagic cell death through suppression of mTOR signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yewseok; Afaq, Farrukh; Khan, Naghma; Johnson, Jeremy J.; Khusro, Fatima H.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is an important component of PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, which is frequently deregulated in prostate cancer (CaP). Recent studies suggest that targeting PTEN/PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling pathway could be an effective strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory CaP. Here, we show that the treatment of androgen-independent and PTEN-negative human CaP PC3 cells with fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, resulted in inhibition of mTOR kinase signaling pathway. Treatment of cells with fisetin inhibited mTOR activity and downregulated Raptor, Rictor, PRAS40 and GβL that resulted in loss of mTOR complexes (mTORC)1/2 formation. Fisetin also activated the mTOR repressor TSC2 through inhibition of Akt and activation of AMPK. Fisetin-mediated inhibition of mTOR resulted in hypophosphorylation of 4EBP1 and suppression of Cap-dependent translation. We also found that fisetin treatment leads to induction of autophagic-programmed cell death rather than cytoprotective autophagy as shown by small interfering RNA Beclin1-knockdown and autophagy inhibitor. Taken together, we provide evidence that fisetin functions as a dual inhibitor of mTORC1/2 signaling leading to inhibition of Cap-dependent translation and induction of autophagic cell death in PC3 cells. These results suggest that fisetin could be a useful chemotherapeutic agent in treatment of hormone refractory CaP. PMID:20530556

  10. Oocyte-dependent activation of MTOR in cumulus cells controls the development and survival of cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Shi, Lanying; Gong, Xuhong; Jiang, Mengjie; Yin, Yaoxue; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Yin, Hong; Li, Hui; Emori, Chihiro; Sugiura, Koji; Eppig, John J; Su, You-Qiang

    2016-08-15

    Communication between oocytes and their companion somatic cells promotes the healthy development of ovarian follicles, which is crucial for producing oocytes that can be fertilized and are competent to support embryogenesis. However, how oocyte-derived signaling regulates these essential processes remains largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that oocyte-derived paracrine factors, particularly GDF9 and GDF9-BMP15 heterodimer, promote the development and survival of cumulus-cell-oocyte complexes (COCs), partly by suppressing the expression of Ddit4l, a negative regulator of MTOR, and enabling the activation of MTOR signaling in cumulus cells. Cumulus cells expressed less Ddit4l mRNA and protein than mural granulosa cells, which is in striking contrast to the expression of phosphorylated RPS6 (a major downstream effector of MTOR). Knockdown of Ddit4l activated MTOR signaling in cumulus cells, whereas inhibition of MTOR in COCs compromised oocyte developmental competence and cumulus cell survival, with the latter likely to be attributable to specific changes in a subset of transcripts in the transcriptome of COCs. Therefore, oocyte suppression of Ddit4l expression allows for MTOR activation in cumulus cells, and this oocyte-dependent activation of MTOR signaling in cumulus cells controls the development and survival of COCs.

  11. Regulation of mTOR by mechanically induced signaling events in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Troy Alan; Sukhija, Kunal Balu; Chien, Shu

    2006-07-01

    Mechanical stimuli play a major role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and the maintenance of muscle mass contributes significantly to disease prevention and the quality of life. Although a link between mechanical stimuli and the regulation of muscle mass has been recognized for decades, the mechanisms involved in converting mechanical information into the molecular events that control this process have not been defined. Nevertheless, significant advancements are being made in this field, and it has recently been established that signaling through a rapamycin-sensitive pathway is necessary for mechanically induced growth of skeletal muscle. Since rapamycin is a highly specific inhibitor of a protein kinase called the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), many investigators have concluded that mTOR signaling is necessary for the mechanically induced growth of skeletal muscle. In this review, we have summarized the current knowledge regarding how mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling, discussed the newly discovered role of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this pathway, and considered the potential roles of PLD and PA in the mechanical regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

  12. MHY1485 activates mTOR and protects osteoblasts from dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sai; Chen, Caiyun; Wang, Shouguo; Ji, Feng; Xie, Yue

    2016-12-09

    Dexamethasone (Dex) exerts cytotoxic effects to cultured osteoblasts. The potential effect of MHY1485, a small-molecular mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activator, against the process was studied here. In both osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts, treatment with MHY1485 significantly ameliorated Dex-induced cell death and apoptosis. mTOR inhibition, through mTOR kinase inhibitor OSI-027 or mTOR shRNAs, abolished MHY1485-mediated osteoblast cytoprotection against Dex. Intriguingly, activation of mTOR complex (mTORC1), but not mTORC2, is required for MHY1485's anti-Dex activity. mTORC1 inhibitors (rapamycin and RAD001) or Raptor knockdown almost reversed MHY1485-induced osteoblast cytoprotection. mTORC2 inhibition, via shRNA knockdown of Rictor, failed to affect MHY1485's activity in MC3T3-E1 cells. Further studies showed that MHY1485 treatment in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts significantly inhibited Dex-induced mitochondrial death pathway activation, the latter was tested by mitochondrial depolarization, cyclophilin D-ANT-1 association and cytochrome C cytosol release. Together, these results suggest that MHY1485 activates mTORC1 signaling to protect osteoblasts from Dex.

  13. Reduced AMPK-ACC and mTOR signaling in muscle from older men, and effect of resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengyao; Verdijk, Lex B.; Sakamoto, Kei; Ely, Brian; van Loon, Luc J.C.; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key energy-sensitive enzyme that controls numerous metabolic and cellular processes. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is another energy/nutrient-sensitive kinase that controls protein synthesis and cell growth. In this study we determined whether older versus younger men have alterations in the AMPK and mTOR pathways in skeletal muscle, and examined the effect of a long term resistance type exercise training program on these signaling intermediaries. Older men had decreased AMPKα2 activity and lower phosphorylation of AMPK and its downstream signaling substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). mTOR phosphylation also was reduced in muscle from older men. Exercise training increased AMPKα1 activity in older men, however, AMPKα2 activity, and the phosphorylation of AMPK, ACC and mTOR, were not affected. In conclusion, older men have alterations in the AMPK-ACC and mTOR pathways in muscle. In addition, prolonged resistance type exercise training induces an isoform-selective up regulation of AMPK activity. PMID:23000302

  14. mTOR and differential activation of mitochondria orchestrate neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yi; Ledderose, Carola; Graf, Amelie F.; Brix, Bianca; Birsak, Theresa; Lee, Albert; Zhang, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils use chemotaxis to locate invading bacteria. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and autocrine purinergic signaling via P2Y2 receptors at the front and A2a receptors at the back of cells regulate chemotaxis. Here, we examined the intracellular mechanisms that control these opposing signaling mechanisms. We found that mitochondria deliver ATP that stimulates P2Y2 receptors in response to chemotactic cues, and that P2Y2 receptors promote mTOR signaling, which augments mitochondrial activity near the front of cells. Blocking mTOR signaling with rapamycin or PP242 or mitochondrial ATP production (e.g., with CCCP) reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and membrane potential, and impaired cellular ATP release and neutrophil chemotaxis. Autocrine stimulation of A2a receptors causes cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation at the back of cells, which inhibits mTOR signaling and mitochondrial activity, resulting in uropod retraction. We conclude that mitochondrial, purinergic, and mTOR signaling regulates neutrophil chemotaxis and may be a pharmacological target in inflammatory diseases. PMID:26416965

  15. mTOR and differential activation of mitochondria orchestrate neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yi; Ledderose, Carola; Graf, Amelie F; Brix, Bianca; Birsak, Theresa; Lee, Albert; Zhang, Jingping; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2015-09-28

    Neutrophils use chemotaxis to locate invading bacteria. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and autocrine purinergic signaling via P2Y2 receptors at the front and A2a receptors at the back of cells regulate chemotaxis. Here, we examined the intracellular mechanisms that control these opposing signaling mechanisms. We found that mitochondria deliver ATP that stimulates P2Y2 receptors in response to chemotactic cues, and that P2Y2 receptors promote mTOR signaling, which augments mitochondrial activity near the front of cells. Blocking mTOR signaling with rapamycin or PP242 or mitochondrial ATP production (e.g., with CCCP) reduced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and membrane potential, and impaired cellular ATP release and neutrophil chemotaxis. Autocrine stimulation of A2a receptors causes cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation at the back of cells, which inhibits mTOR signaling and mitochondrial activity, resulting in uropod retraction. We conclude that mitochondrial, purinergic, and mTOR signaling regulates neutrophil chemotaxis and may be a pharmacological target in inflammatory diseases.

  16. Bridges between mitochondrial oxidative stress, ER stress and mTOR signaling in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Jingjing

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic β cell dysfunction, i.e., failure to provide insulin in concentrations sufficient to control blood sugar, is central to the etiology of all types of diabetes. Current evidence implicates mitochondrial oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pancreatic β cell loss and impaired insulin secretion. Oxidative and ER stress are interconnected so that misfolded proteins induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; likewise, oxidative stress disturbs the ER redox state thereby disrupting correct disulfide bond formation and proper protein folding. mTOR signaling regulates many metabolic processes including protein synthesis, cell growth, survival and proliferation. Oxidative stress inhibits mTORC1, which is considered an important suppressor of mitochondrial oxidative stress in β cells, and ultimately, controls cell survival. The interplay between ER stress and mTORC1 is complicated, since the unfolded protein response (UPR) activation can occur upstream or downstream of mTORC1. Persistent activation of mTORC1 initiates protein synthesis and UPR activation, while in the later phase induces ER stress. Chronic activation of ER stress inhibits Akt/mTORC1 pathway, while under particular settings, acute activation of UPR activates Akt-mTOR signaling. Thus, modulating mitochondrial oxidative stress and ER stress via mTOR signaling may be an approach that will effectively suppress obesity- or glucolipotoxicity-induced metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this review, we focus on the regulations between mTOR signaling and mitochondrial oxidative or ER stress in pancreatic β cells.

  17. Putrescine stimulates the mTOR signaling pathway and protein synthesis in porcine trophectoderm cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangfeng; Wang, Xiaoqiu; Yin, Yulong; Li, Xilong; Gao, Haijun; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-11-01

    Insufficient placental growth is a major factor contributing to intrauterine growth retardation in mammals. There is growing evidence that putrescine produced from arginine (Arg) and proline via ornithine decarboxylase is a key regulator of angiogenesis, embryogenesis, as well as placental and fetal growth. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that putrescine stimulates protein synthesis by activating the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in porcine trophectoderm cell line 2 cells. The cells were cultured for 2 to 4 days in customized Arg-free Dulbecco modified Eagle Ham medium containing 0, 10, 25, or 50 μM putrescine or 100 μM Arg. Cell proliferation, protein synthesis, and degradation, as well as the abundance of total and phosphorylated mTOR, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4EBP1), were determined. Our results indicate that putrescine promotes cell proliferation and protein synthesis in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was inhibited by difluoro-methylornithine (an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase). Moreover, supplementation of culture medium with putrescine increased the abundance of phosphorylated mTOR and its downstream targets, 4EBP1 and p70 S6K1 proteins. Collectively, these findings reveal a novel and important role for putrescine in regulating the mTOR signaling pathway in porcine placental cells. We suggest that dietary supplementation with or intravenous administration of putrescine may provide a new and effective strategy to improve survival and growth of embryos/fetuses in mammals.

  18. DUAL INHIBITION OF PI3K/AKT AND mTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER CELLS BY A DIETARY FLAVONOID FISETIN

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naghma; Afaq, Farrukh; Khusro, Fatima H.; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Suh, Yewseok; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most commonly occurring malignancies. It has been reported that mTOR is phosphorylated in lung cancer and its activation was more frequent in tumors with over-expression of PI3K/Akt. Therefore, dual inhibitors of PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling could be valuable agents for treating lung cancer. In the present study, we show that fisetin, a dietary tetrahydroxyflavone inhibits cell-growth with the concomitant suppression of PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Using autodock 4, we found that fisetin physically interacts with the mTOR complex at two sites. Fisetin treatment was also found to reduce the formation of A549 cell colonies in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with fisetin caused decrease in the protein expression of PI3K (p85 and p110), inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, p70S6K1, eIF-4E and 4E-BP1. Fisetin-treated cells also exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of the constituents of mTOR signaling complex like Rictor, Raptor, GβL and PRAS40. There was increase in the phosphorylation of AMPKα and decrease in the phosphorylation of TSC2 on treatment of cells with fisetin. We also found that treatment of cells with mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and mTOR-siRNA caused decrease in phosphorylation of mTOR and its target proteins which were further downregulated on treatment with fisetin, suggesting that these effects are mediated in part, through mTOR signaling. Our results show that fisetin suppressed PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling in NSCLC cells and thus, could be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent against human lung cancer. PMID:21618507

  19. Chronic overload induced hypertrophy is associated with age-related muscle mass loss and diminished mTOR signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to assess activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in young and aging rats in response to chronic muscle overload. Young (6 mo; n = 16) and older (30 mo; n = 23) male rats (F344xBN) were subjected to 4 weeks of bilateral surgical ablation (SA) of two-thirds of the gastr...

  20. A systems study reveals concurrent activation of AMPK and mTOR by amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Pezze, Piero Dalle; Ruf, Stefanie; Sonntag, Annika G.; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Hall, Philip; Heberle, Alexander M.; Navas, Patricia Razquin; van Eunen, Karen; Tölle, Regine C.; Schwarz, Jennifer J.; Wiese, Heike; Warscheid, Bettina; Deitersen, Jana; Stork, Björn; Fäßler, Erik; Schäuble, Sascha; Hahn, Udo; Horvatovich, Peter; Shanley, Daryl P.; Thedieck, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids (aa) are not only building blocks for proteins, but also signalling molecules, with the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) acting as a key mediator. However, little is known about whether aa, independently of mTORC1, activate other kinases of the mTOR signalling network. To delineate aa-stimulated mTOR network dynamics, we here combine a computational–experimental approach with text mining-enhanced quantitative proteomics. We report that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) are acutely activated by aa-readdition in an mTORC1-independent manner. AMPK activation by aa is mediated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). In response, AMPK impinges on the autophagy regulators Unc-51-like kinase-1 (ULK1) and c-Jun. AMPK is widely recognized as an mTORC1 antagonist that is activated by starvation. We find that aa acutely activate AMPK concurrently with mTOR. We show that AMPK under aa sufficiency acts to sustain autophagy. This may be required to maintain protein homoeostasis and deliver metabolite intermediates for biosynthetic processes. PMID:27869123

  1. mTOR Signaling and Entrainment of the Mammalian Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruifeng; Obrietan, Karl

    2010-01-01

    The biochemistry, physiology and behavior of nearly all organisms are influenced by an inherent circadian (24 hr) clock timing mechanism. For mammals, the linchpin of this biological timing process is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. One key feature of the SCN clock is that it is tightly entrained to lighting cues, thus ensuring that the clock is synchronized to the ever-changing seasonal light cycle. Within the field of circadian biology, there has been intense interest in understanding the intracellular signaling events that drive this process. To this end, our recent studies have revealed a role for an evolutionarily conserved translational control kinase, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in the SCN clock entrainment process. Here we provide an overview of mechanisms of inducible mTOR activation in the SCN, and describe the effects of mTOR on clock protein synthesis and behavioral rhythmicity. Given that dysregulation of SCN timing has been associated with an array of clinical conditions (e.g., hypertension, obesity, diabetes, depression), new insights into the molecular mechanisms that regulate clock timing may provide new therapeutic treatments for circadian rhythm-associated disorders.

  2. The Role and Application of Sirtuins and mTOR Signaling in the Control of Ovarian Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sirotkin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    The present short review demonstrates the involvement of sirtuins (SIRTs) in the control of ovarian functions at various regulatory levels. External and endocrine factors can affect female reproduction via SIRTs-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) system, which, via hormones and growth factors, can in turn regulate basic ovarian functions (proliferation, apoptosis, secretory activity of ovarian cells, their response to upstream hormonal regulators, ovarian folliculo- and oogenesis, and fecundity). SIRTs and SIRTs-related signaling molecules and drugs regulating mTOR can be used for characterization, prediction, and regulation of ovarian functions, as well as for diagnostics and treatment of ovarian disorders. PMID:27886120

  3. Dietary and donepezil modulation of mTOR signaling and neuroinflammation in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Dasuri, Kalavathi; Zhang, Le; Kim, Sun OK Fernandez; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical and laboratory evidences suggest that high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity and its associated metabolic syndrome conditions promotes neuropathology in aging and age-related neurological disorders. However, the effects of high fat diet on brain pathology are poorly understood, and the effective strategies to overcome these effects remain elusive. In the current study, we examined the effects of HFD on brain pathology and further evaluated whether donepezil, an AChE inhibitor with neuroprotective functions, could suppress the ongoing HFD induced pathological changes in the brain. Our data demonstrates that HFD induced obesity results in increased neuroinflammation and increased AChE activity in the brain when compared with the mice fed on low fat diet (LFD). HFD administration to mice activated mTOR pathway resulting in increased phosphorylation of mTORser2448, AKTthr308 and S6K proteins involved in the signaling. Interestingly, donepezil administration with HFD suppressed HFD induced increases in AChE activity, and partially reversed HFD effects on microglial reactivity and the levels of mTOR signaling proteins in the brain when compared to the mice on LFD alone. However, gross levels of synaptic proteins were not altered in the brain tissues of mice fed either diet with or without donepezil. In conclusion, these results present a new insight in to the detrimental effects of HFD on brain via microglial activation and involvement of mTOR pathway, and further demonstrates the possible therapeutic role for donepezil in ameliorating the early effects of HFD that could help preserve the brain function in metabolic syndrome conditions. PMID:26554604

  4. The role of mTOR signalling in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass in a rodent model of resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Riki; Fujita, Satoshi; Hornberger, Troy A.; Kitaoka, Yu; Makanae, Yuhei; Nakazato, Koichi; Naokata, Ishii

    2016-01-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) activates signalling by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and it has been suggested that rapamycin-sensitive mTOR signalling controls RE-induced changes in protein synthesis, ribosome biogenesis, autophagy, and the expression of peroxisome proliferator gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α). However, direct evidence to support the aforementioned relationships is lacking. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of rapamycin-sensitive mTOR in the RE-induced activation of muscle protein synthesis, ribosome biogenesis, PGC-1α expression and hypertrophy. The results indicated that the inhibition of rapamycin-sensitive mTOR could prevent the induction of ribosome biogenesis by RE, but it only partially inhibited the activation of muscle protein synthesis. Likewise, the inhibition of rapamycin-sensitive mTOR only partially blocked the hypertrophic effects of chronic RE. Furthermore, both acute and chronic RE promoted an increase in PGC-1α expression and these alterations were not affected by the inhibition of rapamycin-sensitive mTOR. Combined, the results from this study not only establish that rapamycin-sensitive mTOR plays an important role in the RE-induced activation of protein synthesis and the induction of hypertrophy, but they also demonstrate that additional (rapamycin-sensitive mTOR-independent) mechanisms contribute to these fundamentally important events. PMID:27502839

  5. Multiple roles for mTOR signaling in both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Matthew C.; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in neurons integrates a variety of extracellular signals to produce appropriate translational responses. mTOR signaling is hyperactive in neurological syndromes in both humans and mouse models that are characterized by epilepsy, autism and cognitive disturbances. In addition, rapamycin, a clinically important immunosuppressant, is a specific and potent inhibitor of mTOR signaling. While mTOR is known to regulate growth and synaptic plasticity of glutamatergic neurons, its effects on basic parameters of synaptic transmission are less well studied, and its role in regulating GABAergic transmission is unexplored. We therefore performed an electrophysiological and morphological comparison of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in which mTOR signaling was either increased by loss of the repressor Pten or decreased by treatment with rapamycin. We found that hyperactive mTOR signaling increased evoked synaptic responses in both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons by approximately 50%, due to an increase in the number of synaptic vesicles available for release, the number of synapses formed and the miniature event size. Prolonged (72 hours) rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities and also decreased synaptic transmission in wild-type glutamatergic, but not GABAergic, neurons. Further analyses suggested that hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway also impairs presynaptic function, possibly by interfering with vesicle fusion. Despite this presynaptic impairment, the net effect of Pten loss is enhanced synaptic transmission in both GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, which has numerous implications – depending on where in the brain mutations of an mTOR suppressor gene takes place during development. PMID:22895726

  6. Downregulation of cancer stem cell properties via mTOR signaling pathway inhibition by rapamycin in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    YANG, CHUNGUANG; ZHANG, YUE; ZHANG, YU; ZHANG, ZIHENG; PENG, JIANHUA; LI, ZHI; HAN, LIANG; YOU, QUANJIE; CHEN, XIAOYU; RAO, XINGWANG; ZHU, YI; LIAO, ZHISU

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling inhibitor, inhibits cancer cell proliferation and tumor formation, including in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), which we proved in a previous study. However, whether rapamycin affects cancer stem cells (CSCs) is unclear. In examining samples of NPCs, we found regions of CD44-positive cancer cells co-expressing the stem cell biomarker OCT4, suggesting the presence of CSCs. Following this, we used double-label immunohistochemistry to identify whether the mTOR signaling pathway was activated in CD44-positive CSCs in NPCs. We used a CCK-8 assay and western blotting to explore whether the stem cell biomarkers CD44 and SOX2 and the invasion protein MMP-2 could be suppressed by treatment with rapamycin in cultured primary NPC cells and secondary tumors in BALB/c nude mice. Interestingly, we found that rapamycin inhibited mTOR signaling in addition to simultaneously downregulating the expression of CD44, SOX2 and MMP-2 and that it affected cell growth and tumor size and weight both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, we confirmed for the first time that CSC properties are reduced and invasion potential is restrained in response to mTOR signaling inhibition in NPC. This evidence indicates that the targeted inhibition of CSC properties may provide a novel strategy to treat cancer. PMID:26202311

  7. Effects of ketamine administration on mTOR and reticulum stress signaling pathways in the brain after the infusion of rapamycin into prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; de Moura, Airam B; Matos, Danyela; Demo, Júlia P; da Silva, Júlia B I; Michels, Monique; Abatti, Mariane; Sonai, Beatriz; Dal Pizzol, Felipe; Carvalho, André F; Quevedo, João

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies show that activation of the mTOR signaling pathway is required for the rapid antidepressant actions of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists. A relationship between mTOR kinase and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway, also known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) has been shown. We evaluate the effects of ketamine administration on the mTOR signaling pathway and proteins of UPR in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens, after the inhibiton of mTOR signaling in the PFC. Male adult Wistar rats received pharmacological mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin (0.2 nmol), or vehicle into the PFC and then a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). The immunocontent of mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) homologous protein (CHOP), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) - alpha were determined in the brain. The mTOR levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with saline and ketamine in the PFC; p4EBP1 levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine in the PFC and nucleus accumbens; the levels of peEF2K were increased in the PFC in the vehicle group treated with ketamine and reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. The PERK and IRE1-alpha levels were decreased in the PFC in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. Our results suggest that mTOR signaling inhibition by rapamycin could be involved, at least in part, with the mechanism of action of ketamine; and the ketamine antidepressant on ER stress pathway could be also mediated by mTOR signaling pathway in certain brain structures.

  8. Potential anti-aging agents suppress the level of constitutive mTOR- and DNA damage- signaling.

    PubMed

    Halicka, H Dorota; Zhao, Hong; Li, Jiangwei; Lee, Yong-Syu; Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Wu, Joseph M; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2012-12-01

    Two different mechanisms are considered to be the primary cause of aging. Cumulative DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), the by-products of oxidative phosphorylation, is one of these mechanisms (ROS concept). Constitutive stimulation of mitogen- and nutrient-sensing mTOR/S6 signaling is the second mechanism (TOR concept). The flow- and laser scanning- cytometric methods were developed to measure the level of the constitutive DNA damage/ROS- as well as of mTOR/S6- signaling in individual cells. Specifically, persistent activation of ATM and expression of γH2AX in untreated cells appears to report constitutive DNA damage induced by endogenous ROS. The level of phosphorylation of Ser235/236-ribosomal protein (RP), of Ser2448-mTOR and of Ser65-4EBP1, informs on constitutive signaling along the mTOR/S6 pathway. Potential gero-suppressive agents rapamycin, metformin, 2-deoxyglucose, berberine, resveratrol, vitamin D3 and aspirin, all decreased the level of constitutive DNA damage signaling as seen by the reduced expression of γH2AX in proliferating A549, TK6, WI-38 cells and in mitogenically stimulated human lymphocytes. They all also decreased the level of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial trans-membrane potential ΔΨm, the marker of mitochondrial energizing as well as reduced phosphorylation of mTOR, RP-S6 and 4EBP1. The most effective was rapamycin. Although the primary target of each on these agents may be different the data are consistent with the downstream mechanism in which the decline in mTOR/S6K signaling and translation rate is coupled with a decrease in oxidative phosphorylation, (revealed by ΔΨm) that leads to reduction of ROS and oxidative DNA damage. The decreased rate of translation induced by these agents may slow down cells hypertrophy and alleviate other features of cell aging/senescence. Reduction of oxidative DNA damage may lower predisposition to neoplastic transformation which otherwise may result from errors in repair of DNA

  9. Isoflurane Promotes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Malignancy by Activating the Akt-Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhua; Shao, Xueqian

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortalities worldwide, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of all lung cancer cases. Surgery remains one of the front-line treatment options for NSCLC, but events within the perioperative period were found to affect cancer prognosis, such as anesthesia procedures. Isoflurane, a commonly used volatile anesthetic, enhances the malignant potential of renal, prostate, and ovarian cancer cells, but its effects on NSCLC development have not been previously reported. Material/Methods CCK-8 and MTT cell proliferation assays were used to analyze NSCLC cell proliferation. Metastatic ability was examined by wound healing and transwell assays. We used Western blot analysis to study the mechanism of effect of Isoflurane in NSCLC development. Results We demonstrated that isoflurane promotes proliferation, migration and invasiveness of NSCLC cells, as well as upregulation of the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway in NSCLC cells. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt-mTOR signaling abolished the ability of isoflurane to promote proliferation, migration, and invasion of NSCLC cells, indicating that isoflurane promotes NSCLC cell malignancy by activating the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. Conclusions Isoflurane promotes NSCLC proliferation, migration and invasion by activating the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27897153

  10. Caloric restriction protects against electrical kindling of the amygdala by inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Farfán, Bryan V.; Rubio Osornio, María del Carmen; Custodio Ramírez, Verónica; Paz Tres, Carlos; Carvajal Aguilera, Karla G.

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to possess antiepileptic properties; however its mechanism of action is poorly understood. CR might inhibit the activity of the mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling cascade, which seems to participate crucially in the generation of epilepsy. Thus, we investigated the effect of CR on the mTOR pathway and whether CR modified epilepsy generation due to electrical amygdala kindling. The former was studied by analyzing the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B and the ribosomal protein S6. The mTOR cascade is regulated by energy and by insulin levels, both of which may be changed by CR; thus we investigated if CR altered the levels of energy substrates in the blood or the level of insulin in plasma. Finally, we studied if CR modified the expression of genes that encode proteins participating in the mTOR pathway. CR increased the after-discharge threshold and tended to reduce the after-discharge duration, indicating an anti-convulsive action. CR diminished the phosphorylation of protein kinase B and ribosomal protein S6, suggesting an inhibition of the mTOR cascade. However, CR did not change glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate or insulin levels; thus the effects of CR were independent from them. Interestingly, CR also did not modify the expression of any investigated gene. The results suggest that the anti-epileptic effect of CR may be partly due to inhibition of the mTOR pathway. PMID:25814935

  11. miR-199a Links MeCP2 with mTOR Signaling and Its Dysregulation Leads to Rett Syndrome Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Keita; Irie, Koichiro; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Egashira, Yoshihiro; Fukao, Yoichiro; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Itoh, Masayuki; Uesaka, Masahiro; Imamura, Takuya; Nakahata, Yasukazu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Takamori, Shigeo; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2015-09-22

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by MECP2 mutations. Although emerging evidence suggests that MeCP2 deficiency is associated with dysregulation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), which functions as a hub for various signaling pathways, the mechanism underlying this association and the molecular pathophysiology of RTT remain elusive. We show here that MeCP2 promotes the posttranscriptional processing of particular microRNAs (miRNAs) as a component of the microprocessor Drosha complex. Among the MeCP2-regulated miRNAs, we found that miR-199a positively controls mTOR signaling by targeting inhibitors for mTOR signaling. miR-199a and its targets have opposite effects on mTOR activity, ameliorating and inducing RTT neuronal phenotypes, respectively. Furthermore, genetic deletion of miR-199a-2 led to a reduction of mTOR activity in the brain and recapitulated numerous RTT phenotypes in mice. Together, these findings establish miR-199a as a critical downstream target of MeCP2 in RTT pathogenesis by linking MeCP2 with mTOR signaling.

  12. A MAP4 kinase related to Ste20 is a nutrient-sensitive regulator of mTOR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Greg M.; Yan, Lijun; Procter, Julia; Mieulet, Virginie; Lamb, Richard F.

    2007-01-01

    The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling pathway is a key regulator of cell growth and is controlled by growth factors and nutrients such as amino acids. Although signalling pathways from growth factor receptors to mTOR have been elucidated, the pathways mediating signalling by nutrients are poorly characterized. Through a screen for protein kinases active in the mTOR signalling pathway in Drosophila we have identified a Ste20 family member (MAP4K3) that is required for maximal S6K (S6 kinase)/4E-BP1 [eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E)-binding protein 1] phosphorylation and regulates cell growth. Importantly, MAP4K3 activity is regulated by amino acids, but not the growth factor insulin and is not regulated by the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. Our results therefore suggest a model whereby nutrients signal to mTORC1 via activation of MAP4K3. PMID:17253963

  13. Metabolic clock generates nutrient anticipation rhythms in mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Khapre, Rohini V; Patel, Sonal A; Kondratova, Anna A; Chaudhary, Amol; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Antoch, Marina P; Kondratov, Roman V

    2014-08-01

    The mTOR signaling pathway modulates metabolic processes with respect to nutrient availability and other growth-related cues. According to the existing paradigm, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activityin vivo is induced by food and gradually decreases during fasting. We found that mTORC1 activity is controlled by an internal clock mechanism different from the known light-entrainable circadian clock. We observed 24-hr rhythms in phosphorylation of mTORC1 downstream targets, which were entrained by food, persisted during fasting and could be uncoupled from oscillating expression of the canonical circadian clock genes. Furthermore, these rhythms were present in tissues of mice with disrupted light-entrainable circadian clock. We propose tissue-specific rhythms in the expression of tor and its negative regulator deptor as the molecular mechanism of the mTORC1 activity oscillation. Our data demonstrate the existence of at least two independent molecular circadian clocks: one providing metabolic adaptation to periodic light/darkness and the other - to feeding.

  14. MicroRNA-145 inhibits the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway to suppress the proliferation and invasion of invasive pituitary adenoma cells by targeting AKT3 in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kai; Fan, Yan-Dong; Wu, Peng-Fei; Duysenbi, Serick; Feng, Zhao-Hai; Du, Guo-Jia; Zhang, Ting-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to explore how miR-145 regulates the mTOR signaling pathway in invasive pituitary adenoma (IPA) by targeting AKT3. Methods A total of 71 cases of IPA tissues and 66 cases of non-IPA tissues were obtained in this study. In vitro, the IPA cells were assigned into blank control, empty plasmid, miR-145 mimic, miR-145 inhibitor, miR-145 mimic + rapamycin, miR-145 inhibitor + rapamycin and rapamycin groups. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting were performed to detect the protein expressions of PI3K, AKT3, mTOR mRNA and the mRNA expression of miR-145 both in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, the S6K and RPS6 mRNA and protein expressions as well as the relative phosphorylation levels were determined in vitro. MTT assay, flow cytometry and transwell assay were used to testify the cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion ability, respectively. Results The IPA tissues exhibited significantly lower expression of miR-145 but higher PI3K, AKT3 and mTOR mRNA and protein expressions when compared with the non-IPA tissues. Compared with the blank control and empty plasmid groups, the miR-145 mimic group showed significantly decreased PI3K, AKT3, mTOR, S6K and RPS6 mRNA and protein expressions as well as phosphorylation levels; besides, the IPA cell proliferation, migration and invasion ability were strongly inhibited, accompanied with the increased number of apoptotic cells. In the miR-145 inhibitor group, the PI3K, AKT3, mTOR, S6K and RPS6 mRNA and protein expressions as well as the phosphorylation levels were significantly increased; cell proliferation, migration and invasion ability were remarkably elevated, accompanied with reduced apoptotic cell number. Conclusion The study demonstrates that miR-145 inhibits the mTOR signaling pathway to suppress the IPA cell proliferation and invasion and promotes its apoptosis by targeting AKT3. PMID:28352194

  15. In search of antiaging modalities: evaluation of mTOR- and ROS/DNA damage-signaling by cytometry.

    PubMed

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Zhao, Hong; Halicka, H Dorota; Li, Jiangwei; Lee, Yong-Syu; Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Wu, Joseph M

    2014-05-01

    This review presents the evidence in support of the IGF-1/mTOR/S6K1 signaling as the primary factor contributing to aging and cellular senescence. Reviewed are also specific interactions between mTOR/S6K1 and ROS-DNA damage signaling pathways. Outlined are critical sites along these pathways, including autophagy, as targets for potential antiaging (gero-suppressive) and/or chemopreventive agents. Presented are applications of flow- and laser scanning- cytometry utilizing phospho-specific Abs, to monitor activation along these pathways in response to the reported antiaging drugs rapamycin, metformin, berberine, resveratrol, vitamin D3, 2-deoxyglucose, and acetylsalicylic acid. Specifically, effectiveness of these agents to attenuate the level of constitutive mTOR signaling was tested by cytometry and confirmed by Western blotting through measuring phosphorylation of the mTOR-downstream targets including ribosomal protein S6. The ratiometric analysis of phosphorylated to total protein along the mTOR pathway offers a useful parameter reporting the effects of gero-suppressive agents. In parallel, their ability to suppress the level of constitutive DNA damage signaling induced by endogenous ROS was measured. While the primary target of each of these agents may be different the data obtained on several human cancer cell lines, WI-38 fibroblasts and normal lymphocytes suggest common downstream mechanism in which the decline in mTOR/S6K1 signaling and translation rate is coupled with a reduction of oxidative phosphorylation and ROS that leads to decreased oxidative DNA damage. The combined assessment of constitutive γH2AX expression, mitochondrial activity (ROS, ΔΨm), and mTOR signaling provides an adequate gamut of cell responses to test effectiveness of gero-suppressive agents. Described is also an in vitro model of induction of cellular senescence by persistent replication stress, its quantitative analysis by laser scanning cytometry, and application to detect the

  16. Emerging Role of MicroRNAs in mTOR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjie; Huang, Bo; Wang, Hui-Yun; Chang, Augustus; Zheng, X F Steven

    2017-02-25

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase that plays a critical role in the control of cellular growth and metabolism. Hyperactivation of mTOR pathway is common in human cancers, driving uncontrolled proliferation. MicroRNA (miRNA) is a class of short noncoding RNAs that regulate the expression of a wide variety of genes. Deregulation of miRNAs is a hallmark of cancer. Recent studies have revealed interplays between miRNAs and the mTOR pathway during cancer development. Such interactions appear to provide a fine-tuning of various cellular functions and contribute qualitatively to the behavior of cancer. Here we provide an overview of current knowledge regarding the reciprocal relationship between miRNAs and mTOR pathway: regulation of mTOR signaling by miRNAs and control of miRNA biogenesis by mTOR. Further research in this area may prove important for the diagnosis and therapy of human cancer.

  17. TGF-β inhibits the activation and functions of NK cells by repressing the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Viel, Sébastien; Marçais, Antoine; Guimaraes, Fernando Souza-Fonseca; Loftus, Roisin; Rabilloud, Jessica; Grau, Morgan; Degouve, Sophie; Djebali, Sophia; Sanlaville, Amélien; Charrier, Emily; Bienvenu, Jacques; Marie, Julien C; Caux, Christophe; Marvel, Jacqueline; Town, Liam; Huntington, Nicholas D; Bartholin, Laurent; Finlay, David; Smyth, Mark J; Walzer, Thierry

    2016-02-16

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a major immunosuppressive cytokine that maintains immune homeostasis and prevents autoimmunity through its antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties in various immune cell types. We provide genetic, pharmacologic, and biochemical evidence that a critical target of TGF-β signaling in mouse and human natural killer (NK) cells is the serine and threonine kinase mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). Treatment of mouse or human NK cells with TGF-β in vitro blocked interleukin-15 (IL-15)-induced activation of mTOR. TGF-β and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin both reduced the metabolic activity and proliferation of NK cells and reduced the abundances of various NK cell receptors and the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. In vivo, constitutive TGF-β signaling or depletion of mTOR arrested NK cell development, whereas deletion of the TGF-β receptor subunit TGF-βRII enhanced mTOR activity and the cytotoxic activity of the NK cells in response to IL-15. Suppression of TGF-β signaling in NK cells did not affect either NK cell development or homeostasis; however, it enhanced the ability of NK cells to limit metastases in two different tumor models in mice. Together, these results suggest that the kinase mTOR is a crucial signaling integrator of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in NK cells. Moreover, we propose that boosting the metabolic activity of antitumor lymphocytes could be an effective strategy to promote immune-mediated tumor suppression.

  18. Comparative idiosyncrasies in life extension by reduced mTOR signalling and its distinctiveness from dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Michael; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Simons, Mirre J P

    2016-08-01

    Reduced mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling extends lifespan in yeast, nematodes, fruit flies and mice, highlighting a physiological pathway that could modulate aging in evolutionarily divergent organisms. This signalling system is also hypothesized to play a central role in lifespan extension via dietary restriction. By collating data from 48 available published studies examining lifespan with reduced mTOR signalling, we show that reduced mTOR signalling provides similar increases in median lifespan across species, with genetic mTOR manipulations consistently providing greater life extension than pharmacological treatment with rapamycin. In contrast to the consistency in changes in median lifespan, however, the demographic causes for life extension are highly species specific. Reduced mTOR signalling extends lifespan in nematodes by strongly reducing the degree to which mortality rates increase with age (aging rate). By contrast, life extension in mice and yeast occurs largely by pushing back the onset of aging, but not altering the shape of the mortality curve once aging starts. Importantly, in mice, the altered pattern of mortality induced by reduced mTOR signalling is different to that induced by dietary restriction, which reduces the rate of aging. Effects of mTOR signalling were also sex dependent, but only within mice, and not within flies, thus again species specific. An alleviation of age-associated mortality is not a shared feature of reduced mTOR signalling across model organisms and does not replicate the established age-related survival benefits of dietary restriction.

  19. Cellular senescence or EGFR signaling induces Interleukin 6 (IL-6) receptor expression controlled by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, Christoph; Kuck, Fabian; Aparicio-Siegmund, Samadhi; Konzak, Kirstin; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Sommerfeld, Annika; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Philipp A; Brenner, Dirk; Mak, Tak W.; Rose-John, Stefan; Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Piekorz, Roland P; Scheller, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) signaling plays a role in inflammation, cancer, and senescence. Here, we identified soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) as a member of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Senescence-associated sIL-6R upregulation was mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). sIL-6R was mainly generated by a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10)-dependent ectodomain shedding to enable IL-6 trans-signaling. In vivo, heterozygous PTEN-knockout mice exhibited higher mTOR activity and increased sIL-6R levels. Moreover, aberrant EGF receptor (EGFR) activation triggered IL-6 synthesis. In analogy to senescence, EGFR-induced activation of mTOR also induced IL-6R expression and sIL-6R generation. Hence, mTOR activation reprograms IL-6 non-responder cells into IL-6 responder cells. Our data suggest that mTOR serves as a central molecular switch to facilitate cellular IL-6 classic and trans-signaling via IL-6R upregulation with direct implications for cellular senescence and tumor development. PMID:24047696

  20. A Carma1/MALT1-dependent, Bcl10-independent, pathway regulates antigen receptor-mediated mTOR signaling in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kristia S.; Phong, Binh; Corey, Catherine; Cheng, Jing; Gorentla, Balachandra; Zhong, Xiaoping; Shiva, Sruti; Kane, Lawrence P.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling to the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates diverse cellular processes, including protein translation, cellular proliferation, metabolism, and autophagy. These effects are mediated in part by the mTOR targets S6 kinase (S6K) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). Most models place Akt upstream of the best-studied mTOR complex, mTORC1; however, studies have called into question whether Akt is necessary for this pathway, at least in T cells. We found that the adaptor protein Carma1 [caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing membrane-associated protein 1 (Carma1)] and at least one of its associated proteins, the paracaspase MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1), were required for optimal activation of mTOR in T cells in response to stimulation of the T cell receptor (TCR) and the coreceptor CD28. However, another common binding partner of Carma1 and MALT1, Bcl10, was not required for TCR-dependent activation of the mTOR pathway. Consistent with these findings, MALT1 activity was required for the proliferation of CD4+ T cells, but not early TCR-dependent activation events. Also consistent with an effect on mTOR, MALT1 activity was required for the increased metabolic flux in activated CD4+ T cells. Together, our data suggest that Carma1 and MALT1 play previously unappreciated roles in the activation of mTOR signaling in T cells after engagement of the TCR. PMID:24917592

  1. Insights for Oxidative Stress and mTOR Signaling in Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury under Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dajun

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) displays a high morbidity. The diabetic heart is susceptible to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Impaired activation of prosurvival pathways, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, increased basal oxidative state, and decreased antioxidant defense and autophagy may render diabetic hearts more vulnerable to MI/R injury. Oxidative stress and mTOR signaling crucially regulate cardiometabolism, affecting MI/R injury under diabetes. Producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), uncoupling nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and disturbing the mitochondrial quality control may be three major mechanisms of oxidative stress. mTOR signaling presents both cardioprotective and cardiotoxic effects on the diabetic heart, which interplays with oxidative stress directly or indirectly. Antihyperglycemic agent metformin and newly found free radicals scavengers, Sirt1 and CTRP9, may serve as promising pharmacological therapeutic targets. In this review, we will focus on the role of oxidative stress and mTOR signaling in the pathophysiology of MI/R injury in diabetes and discuss potential mechanisms and their interactions in an effort to provide some evidence for cardiometabolic targeted therapies for ischemic heart disease (IHD). PMID:28298952

  2. [Signaling pathways mTOR and AKT in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Romero-Leguizamon, C R; Ramirez-Latorre, J A; Mora-Munoz, L; Guerrero-Naranjo, A

    2016-07-01

    Introduccion. La via de señalizacion AKT/mTOR es un eje central en la regulacion celular, especialmente en las enfermedades neurologicas. En la epilepsia, se ha evidenciado su alteracion dentro de su proceso fisiopatologico. Sin embargo, aun no se han descrito todos los mecanismos de estas rutas de señalizacion, las cuales podrian abrir la puerta hacia nuevas investigaciones y estrategias terapeuticas, que finalmente permitan desarrollar tratamientos efectivos en enfermedades neurologicas como la epilepsia. Objetivo. Revisar las asociaciones existentes entre las rutas de señalizacion intracelular de mTOR y AKT en la fisiopatologia de la epilepsia. Desarrollo. La epilepsia es una enfermedad neurologica con un alto impacto epidemiologico en el mundo, por lo cual es de sumo interes la investigacion de los componentes fisiopatologicos que puedan generar nuevos tratamientos farmacologicos. En esta busqueda se han involucrado diferentes rutas de señalizacion intracelular en neuronas, como determinantes epileptogenos. Los avances en esta materia han permitido incluso la implementacion de nuevas estrategias terapeuticas exitosas y que abren el camino hacia nuevas investigaciones. Conclusiones. Mejorar los conocimientos respecto al papel fisiopatologico de la via de señalizacion mTOR/AKT en la epilepsia permite plantear nuevas investigaciones que ofrezcan nuevas alternativas terapeuticas para el tratamiento de la enfermedad. El uso de inhibidores de mTOR ha surgido en los ultimos años como una alternativa eficaz en el tratamiento de algunos tipos de epilepsias, pero es evidente la necesidad de seguir en la busqueda de nuevas terapias farmacologicas involucradas en estas vias de señalizacion.

  3. Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    phosphorylates and thereby inhibits the GTPase activity of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). This inhibition allows accumulation of activated GTP-bound...Sobue, 2009). Transduction of neurons with a constitutively active form of p70S6K induced the formation of multiple axons, whereas increased expression

  4. Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury (Addendum)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    the surviving dopamine neurons by use of an AAV1 vector with either a constitutively active mutant of the Akt kinase (myristoylated-Akt (MYR-Akt...4) or hRheb(S16H), a constitutively active mutant of the Rheb GTPase (5, 6). Rheb GTPase is activated by Akt and it is a direct activator of the...YEAR 01: To determine whether p70S6K or a constitutively active mutant , or both, are mediators of axon growth in the dopaminergic nigro-striatal

  5. Requirement for lysosomal localization of mTOR for its activation differs between leucine and other amino acids.

    PubMed

    Averous, Julien; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Carraro, Valérie; Gourbeyre, Ophélie; Parry, Laurent; B'Chir, Wafa; Muranishi, Yuki; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Proud, Christopher G; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cell growth and metabolism. It controls many cell functions by integrating nutrient availability and growth factor signals. Amino acids, and in particular leucine, are among the main positive regulators of mTORC1 signaling. The current model for the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids involves the movement of mTOR to the lysosome mediated by the Rag-GTPases. Here, we have examined the control of mTORC1 signaling and mTOR localization by amino acids and leucine in serum-fed cells, because both serum growth factors (or, e.g., insulin) and amino acids are required for full activation of mTORC1 signaling. We demonstrate that mTORC1 activity does not closely correlate with the lysosomal localization of mTOR. In particular, leucine controls mTORC1 activity without any detectable modification of the lysosomal localization of mTOR, indicating that the signal(s) exerted by leucine is likely distinct from those exerted by other amino acids. In addition, knock-down of the Rag-GTPases attenuated the inhibitory effect of amino acid- or leucine-starvation on the phosphorylation of mTORC1 targets. Furthermore, data from cells where Rag expression has been knocked down revealed that leucine can promote mTORC1 signaling independently of the lysosomal localization of mTOR. Our data complement existing models for the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids and provide new insights into this important topic.

  6. Differential effects of chronic overload-induced muscle hypertrophy on mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways in adult and aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in adult (Y; 6 mo old; n = 16) and aged (O; 30 mo old; n = 16) male rats (Fischer 344 x Brown Norway) subjected to chronic overload-induced muscle hypertrophy of the plan...

  7. Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    or the GTPase Rheb in a model of retrograde axonal degeneration induces axon growth by dopamine neurons. However, these molecules cannot be directly...eIF4E, to induce new axon growth. We have found that transduction of dopamine neurons of the SN by AAV eIF4E at three weeks after axonal destruction with...and then transduced the surviving dopamine neurons by use of an AAV1 vector with either a constitutively active mutant of the Akt kinase

  8. Bee pollen improves muscle protein and energy metabolism in malnourished old rats through interfering with the Mtor signaling pathway and mitochondrial activity.

    PubMed

    Salles, Jérôme; Cardinault, Nicolas; Patrac, Véronique; Berry, Alexandre; Giraudet, Christophe; Collin, Marie-Laure; Chanet, Audrey; Tagliaferri, Camille; Denis, Philippe; Pouyet, Corinne; Boirie, Yves; Walrand, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    Although the management of malnutrition is a priority in older people, this population shows a resistance to refeeding. Fresh bee pollen contains nutritional substances of interest for malnourished people. The aim was to evaluate the effect of fresh bee pollen supplementation on refeeding efficiency in old malnourished rats. Male 22-month-old Wistar rats were undernourished by reducing food intake for 12 weeks. The animals were then renourished for three weeks with the same diet supplemented with 0%, 5% or 10% of fresh monofloral bee pollen. Due to changes in both lean mass and fat mass, body weight decreased during malnutrition and increased after refeeding with no between-group differences (p < 0.0001). Rats refed with the fresh bee pollen-enriched diets showed a significant increase in muscle mass compared to restricted rats (p < 0.05). The malnutrition period reduced the muscle protein synthesis rate and mTOR/p70S6kinase/4eBP1 activation, and only the 10%-pollen diet was able to restore these parameters. Mitochondrial activity was depressed with food restriction and was only improved by refeeding with the fresh bee pollen-containing diets. In conclusion, refeeding diets that contain fresh monofloral bee pollen improve muscle mass and metabolism in old, undernourished rats.

  9. Global ischemia induces lysosomal-mediated degradation of mTOR and activation of autophagy in hippocampal neurons destined to die

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jee-Yeon; Gertner, Michael; Pontarelli, Fabrizio; Court-Vazquez, Brenda; Bennett, Michael Vander Laan; Ofengeim, Dimitry; Zukin, Ruth Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of cell growth, autophagy, translation, and survival. Dysregulation of mTOR signaling is associated with cancer, diabetes, and autism. However, a role for mTOR signaling in neuronal death is not well delineated. Here we show that global ischemia triggers a transient increase in mTOR phosphorylation at S2448, whereas decreasing p-mTOR and functional activity in selectively vulnerable hippocampal CA1 neurons. The decrease in mTOR coincides with an increase in biochemical markers of autophagy, pS317-ULK-1, pS14-Beclin-1, and LC3-II, a decrease in the cargo adaptor p62, and an increase in autophagic flux, a functional readout of autophagy. This is significant in that autophagy, a catabolic process downstream of mTORC1, promotes the formation of autophagosomes that capture and target cytoplasmic components to lysosomes. Inhibitors of the lysosomal (but not proteasomal) pathway rescued the ischemia-induced decrease in mTOR, consistent with degradation of mTOR via the autophagy/lysosomal pathway. Administration of the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin or acute knockdown of mTOR promotes autophagy and attenuates ischemia-induced neuronal death, indicating an inverse causal relation between mTOR, autophagy, and neuronal death. Our findings identify a novel and previously unappreciated mechanism by which mTOR self-regulates its own levels in hippocampal neurons in a clinically relevant model of ischemic stroke. PMID:27935582

  10. mTOR signaling in aging and neurodegeneration: At the crossroad between metabolism dysfunction and impairment of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Perluigi, Marzia; Di Domenico, Fabio; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-12-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is involved in cellular senescence, organismal aging and age-dependent diseases. mTOR is a conserved serine/threonine kinase that is known to be part of two different protein complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2, which differ in some components and in upstream and downstream signalling. In multicellular organisms, mTOR regulates cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrients, growth factors and cellular energy conditions. Growing studies highlight that disturbance in mTOR signalling in the brain affects multiple pathways including glucose metabolism, energy production, mitochondrial function, cell growth and autophagy. All these events are key players in age-related cognitive decline such as development of Alzheimer disease (AD). The current review discusses the main regulatory roles of mTOR signalling in the brain, in particular focusing on autophagy, glucose metabolism and mitochondrial functions. Targeting mTOR in the CNS can offer new prospective for drug discovery; however further studies are needed for a comprehensive understanding of mTOR, which lies at the crossroads of multiple signals involved in AD etiology and pathogenesis.

  11. MLN0128, a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, disrupts survival signaling and triggers apoptosis in AML and AML stem/ progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhihong; Wang, Rui-Yu; Qiu, Yi Hua; Mak, Duncan H; Coombes, Kevin; Yoo, Suk Young; Zhang, Qi; Jessen, Katti; Liu, Yi; Rommel, Christian; Fruman, David A; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Kornblau, Steven M; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-08-23

    mTOR activation leads to enhanced survival signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The active-site mTOR inhibitors (asTORi) represent a promising new approach to targeting mTOR in AKT/mTOR signaling. MLN0128 is an orally-administered, second-generation asTORi, currently in clinical development. We examined the anti-leukemic effects and the mechanisms of action of MLN0128 in AML cell lines and primary samples, with a particular focus on its effect in AML stem/progenitor cells. MLN0128 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in AML by attenuating the activity of mTOR complex 1 and 2. Using time-of-flight mass cytometry, we demonstrated that MLN0128 selectively targeted and functionally inhibited AML stem/progenitor cells with high AKT/mTOR signaling activity. Using the reverse-phase protein array technique, we measured expression and phosphorylation changes in response to MLN0128 in 151 proteins from 24 primary AML samples and identified several pro-survival pathways that antagonize MLN0128-induced cellular stress. A combined blockade of AKT/mTOR signaling and these pro-survival pathways facilitated AML cell killing. Our findings provide a rationale for the clinical use of MLN0128 to target AML and AML stem/progenitor cells, and support the use of combinatorial multi-targeted approaches in AML therapy.

  12. MLN0128, a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, disrupts survival signaling and triggers apoptosis in AML and AML stem/ progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhihong; Wang, Rui-Yu; Qiu, Yi Hua; Mak, Duncan H.; Coombes, Kevin; Yoo, Suk Young; Zhang, Qi; Jessen, Katti; Liu, Yi; Rommel, Christian; Fruman, David A.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    mTOR activation leads to enhanced survival signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The active-site mTOR inhibitors (asTORi) represent a promising new approach to targeting mTOR in AKT/mTOR signaling. MLN0128 is an orally-administered, second-generation asTORi, currently in clinical development. We examined the anti-leukemic effects and the mechanisms of action of MLN0128 in AML cell lines and primary samples, with a particular focus on its effect in AML stem/progenitor cells. MLN0128 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in AML by attenuating the activity of mTOR complex 1 and 2. Using time-of-flight mass cytometry, we demonstrated that MLN0128 selectively targeted and functionally inhibited AML stem/progenitor cells with high AKT/mTOR signaling activity. Using the reverse-phase protein array technique, we measured expression and phosphorylation changes in response to MLN0128 in 151 proteins from 24 primary AML samples and identified several pro-survival pathways that antagonize MLN0128-induced cellular stress. A combined blockade of AKT/mTOR signaling and these pro-survival pathways facilitated AML cell killing. Our findings provide a rationale for the clinical use of MLN0128 to target AML and AML stem/progenitor cells, and support the use of combinatorial multi-targeted approaches in AML therapy. PMID:27391151

  13. Adenosine A1-Receptors Modulate mTOR Signaling to Regulate White Matter Inflammatory Lesions Induced by Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pengfei; Zuo, Xuzheng; Ren, Yifei; Bai, Shunjie; Tang, Weiju; Chen, Xiuying; Wang, Gong; Wang, Haoxiang; Huang, Wen; Xie, Peng

    2016-12-01

    We sought to investigate the role of the adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) in white matter lesions under chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) and explore the potential repair mechanisms by activation of the receptors. A right unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (rUCCAO) method was used to construct a CCH model. 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), a specific agonist of A1ARs, was used to explore the biological mechanisms of repair in white matter lesions under CCH. The expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phosphorylation of mTOR (P-mTOR), myelin basic protein (MBP, a marker of white matter myelination) were detected by Western-blot. Pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels were determined by ELISA. Compared with the control groups on week 2, 4 and 6, in CCPA-treated groups, the ratio of P-mTOR/mTOR, expression of MBP and IL-10 increased markedly, while the expression of TNF-α reduced at week 6. In conclusion, A1ARs appears to reduce inflammation in white matter via the mTOR signaling pathway in the rUCCAO mice. Therefore, A1ARs may serve as a therapeutic target during the repair of white matter lesions under CCH.

  14. The Mitochondrial Uncoupler DNP Triggers Brain Cell mTOR Signaling Network Reprogramming and CREB Pathway Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yongqing; Gharavi, Robert; Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Jaewon; Siddiqui, Sana; Telljohann, Richard; Nassar, Matthew R.; Cutler, Roy G.; Becker, Kevin G.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is highly responsive to nutrient availability and ongoing activity in neuronal circuits. The molecular mechanisms by which brain cells respond to an increase in cellular energy expenditure are largely unknown. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling enhances cellular energy expenditure in mitochondria and can be induced with 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a proton ionophore previously used for weight loss. We found that DNP treatment reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, increases intracellular Ca2+ levels and reduces oxidative stress in cerebral cortical neurons. Gene expression profiling of the cerebral cortex of DNP-treated mice revealed reprogramming of signaling cascades that included suppression of the mTOR and insulin – PI3K – MAPK pathways, and up-regulation of tuberous sclerosis complex 2, a negative regulator of mTOR. Genes encoding proteins involved in autophagy processes were up-regulated in response to DNP. CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) signaling, Arc and BDNF, which play important roles in synaptic plasticity and adaptive cellular stress responses, were up-regulated in response to DNP, and DNP-treated mice exhibited improved performance in a test of learning and memory. Immunoblot analysis verified that key DNP-induced changes in gene expression resulted in corresponding changes at the protein level. Our findings suggest that mild mitochondrial uncoupling triggers an integrated signaling response in brain cells characterized by reprogramming of mTOR and insulin signaling, and up-regulation of pathways involved in adaptive stress responses, molecular waste disposal and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26010875

  15. DDIT4 regulates mesenchymal stem cell fate by mediating between HIF1α and mTOR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Gharibi, Borzo; Ghuman, Mandeep; Hughes, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell fate decisions to remain quiescent, self-renew or differentiate are largely governed by the interplay between extracellular signals from the niche and the cell intrinsic signal cascades and transcriptional programs. Here we demonstrate that DNA Damage Inducible Transcript 4 (DDIT4) acts as a link between HIF1α and mTOR signalling and regulation of adult stem cell fate. Global gene expression analysis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) derived from single clones and live RNA cell sorting showed a direct correlation between DDIT4 and differentiation potentials of MSC. Loss and gain of function analysis demonstrated that DDIT4 activity is directly linked to regulation of mTOR signalling, expression of pluripotency genes and differentiation. Further we demonstrated that DDIT4 exert these effects down-stream to HIF1α. Our findings provide an insight in regulation of adult stem cells homeostasis by two major pathways with opposing functions to coordinate between states of self-renewal and differentiation. PMID:27876894

  16. mTOR pathway activation in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumour cells: pomalidomide enhances cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling of mTOR protein

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmelli, Tommasina; Giugliano, Emilia; Brunetto, Vanessa; Rapa, Ida; Cappia, Susanna; Giorcelli, Jessica; Rrodhe, Sokol; Papotti, Mauro; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    mTOR is a protein kinase that plays a central role in regulating critical cellular processes. We evaluated the activation and cellular localization of the mTOR pathway in multiple myeloma (MM) and analyzed the role of pomalidomide in regulating mTOR. By immunohistochemistry cytoplasmic p-mTOR stained positive in 57 out 101 (57.6%) cases with a nuclear p-mTOR localization in 14 out 101 samples (13.8%). In the 70 MM samples analyzed for the entire pathway, p-mTOR expression significantly correlated with p-AKT, p-P70S6K, and p-4E-BP1 suggesting that the AKT/mTOR pathway is activated in a subset of MM patients. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that mTOR protein is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and the nucleus at baseline in MM cell lines and in plasma cells of 13 MM patients and that pomalidomide facilitated the shift of the mTOR protein in the nucleus. By western blotting, treatment with pomalidomide increased nuclear mTOR and p-mTOR expression levels in the nucleus with a concomitant decrease of the cytoplasmic fractions while does not seem to affect significantly AKT phosphorylation status. In MM cells the anti-myeloma activity of pomalidomide may be mediated by the regulation of the mTOR pathway. PMID:26097872

  17. Thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) regulates tubular autophagy and mitophagy in diabetic nephropathy through the mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunling; Zhang, Yuan; Kelly, Darren J.; Tan, Christina Y. R.; Gill, Anthony; Cheng, Delfine; Braet, Filip; Park, Jin-Sung; Sue, Carolyn M.; Pollock, Carol A.; Chen, Xin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia upregulates thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) expression, which in turn induces ROS production, inflammatory and fibrotic responses in the diabetic kidney. Dysregulation of autophagy contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy. However, the interaction of TXNIP with autophagy/mitophagy in diabetic nephropathy is unknown. In this study, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were given TXNIP DNAzyme or scrambled DNAzyme for 12 weeks respectively. Fibrotic markers, mitochondrial function and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) were assessed in kidneys. Tubular autophagy and mitophagy were determined in kidneys from both human and rats with diabetic nephropathy. TXNIP and autophagic signaling molecules were examined. TXNIP DNAzyme dramatically attenuated extracellular matrix deposition in the diabetic kidneys compared to the control DNAzyme. Accumulation of autophagosomes and reduced autophagic clearance were shown in tubular cells of human diabetic compared to non-diabetic kidneys, which was reversed by TXNIP DNAzyme. High glucose induced mitochondrial dysfunction and mtROS production, and inhibited mitophagy in proximal tubular cells, which was reversed by TXNIP siRNA. TXNIP inhibition suppressed diabetes-induced BNIP3 expression and activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. Collectively, hyperglycemia-induced TXNIP contributes to the dysregulation of tubular autophagy and mitophagy in diabetic nephropathy through activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27381856

  18. Baicalein inhibits lipid accumulation by regulating early adipogenesis and m-TOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Seo, Min-Jung; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Jeon, Hui-Jeon; Woo, Mi-Seon; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2014-05-01

    Baicalein is a type of flavonoid that originates from Scutellaria baicalensis. In this study, we examined how baicalein inhibits lipid accumulation during adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Our data show that baicalein inhibited lipid accumulation during adipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Baicalein inhibition was limited to the early adipogenic stage. Cell cycle analysis showed that baicalein induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase through cyclin downregulation. In addition, baicalein suppressed the mRNA expression of early adipogenic factors leading to downregulation of late adipogenic factors at mRNA and protein levels. Inhibition of adipogenic factors by baicalein was correlated with downregulation of lipid synthetic enzymes. Additionally, baicalein negatively regulated the m-TOR signaling pathway involved in lipid accumulation during adipogenesis, thus inhibiting phosphorylation of m-TOR and p70S6K. In a zebrafish study, baicalein significantly reduced lipid accumulation in Nile Red staining. Consistent with a report using cell lines, mRNA expression of adipogenic factors was decreased in a dose-dependent manner by baicalein. This result reflects a reduction in total triglyceride levels based on a triglyceride assay. Our data suggest that baicalein inhibits lipid accumulation by controlling the cell cycle and m-TOR signaling in 3T3-L1 cells, and its anti-adipogenic effect was found in a zebrafish model.

  19. Six1 induces protein synthesis signaling expression in duck myoblasts mainly via up-regulation of mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haohan; Li, Xinxin; Liu, Hehe; Sun, Lingli; Zhang, Rongping; Li, Liang; Wangding, Mincheng; Wang, Jiwen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As a critical transcription factor, Six1 plays an important role in the regulation of myogenesis and muscle development. However, little is known about its regulatory mechanism associated with muscular protein synthesis. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of overexpression ofSix1 on the expression of key protein metabolism-related genes in duck myoblasts. Through an experimental model where duck myoblasts were transfected with a pEGFP-duSix1 construct, we found that overexpression of duckSix1 could enhance cell proliferation activity and increase mRNA expression levels of key genes involved in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, while the expression of FOXO1, MuRF1and MAFbx was not significantly altered, indicating thatSix1 could promote protein synthesis in myoblasts through up-regulating the expression of several related genes. Additionally, in duck myoblasts treated with LY294002 and rapamycin, the specific inhibitors ofPI3K and mTOR, respectively, the overexpression of Six1 could significantly ameliorate inhibitive effects of these inhibitors on protein synthesis. Especially, the mRNA expression levels of mTOR and S6K1 were observed to undergo a visible change, and a significant increase in protein expression of S6K1 was seen. These data suggested that Six1plays an important role in protein synthesis, which may be mainly due to activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27007909

  20. Cyclin B Translation Depends on mTOR Activity after Fertilization in Sea Urchin Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Boulben, Sandrine; Glippa, Virginie; Morales, Julia; Cormier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin B/CDK1 complex is a key regulator of mitotic entry. Using PP242, a specific ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR kinase, we provide evidence that the mTOR signalling pathway controls cyclin B mRNA translation following fertilization in Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus. We show that PP242 inhibits the degradation of the cap-dependent translation repressor 4E-BP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-Binding Protein). PP242 inhibits global protein synthesis, delays cyclin B accumulation, cyclin B/CDK1 complex activation and consequently entry into the mitotic phase of the cell cycle triggered by fertilization. PP242 inhibits cyclin B mRNA recruitment into active polysomes triggered by fertilization. An amount of cyclin B mRNA present in active polysomes appears to be insensitive to PP242 treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that, following sea urchin egg fertilization, cyclin B mRNA translation is controlled by two independent mechanisms: a PP242-sensitive and an additional PP242-insentitive mechanism. PMID:26962866

  1. Cyclin B Translation Depends on mTOR Activity after Fertilization in Sea Urchin Embryos.

    PubMed

    Chassé, Héloïse; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Boulben, Sandrine; Glippa, Virginie; Morales, Julia; Cormier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin B/CDK1 complex is a key regulator of mitotic entry. Using PP242, a specific ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR kinase, we provide evidence that the mTOR signalling pathway controls cyclin B mRNA translation following fertilization in Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus. We show that PP242 inhibits the degradation of the cap-dependent translation repressor 4E-BP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-Binding Protein). PP242 inhibits global protein synthesis, delays cyclin B accumulation, cyclin B/CDK1 complex activation and consequently entry into the mitotic phase of the cell cycle triggered by fertilization. PP242 inhibits cyclin B mRNA recruitment into active polysomes triggered by fertilization. An amount of cyclin B mRNA present in active polysomes appears to be insensitive to PP242 treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that, following sea urchin egg fertilization, cyclin B mRNA translation is controlled by two independent mechanisms: a PP242-sensitive and an additional PP242-insentitive mechanism.

  2. Biphasic activation of the mTOR pathway in the gustatory cortex is correlated with and necessary for taste learning.

    PubMed

    Belelovsky, Katya; Kaphzan, Hanoch; Elkobi, Alina; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2009-06-10

    Different forms of memories and synaptic plasticity require synthesis of new proteins at the time of acquisition or immediately after. We are interested in the role of translation regulation in the cortex, the brain structure assumed to store long-term memories. The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR (also known as FRAP and RAFT-1), is part of a key signal transduction mechanism known to regulate translation of specific subset of mRNAs and to affect learning and synaptic plasticity. We report here that novel taste learning induces two waves of mTOR activation in the gustatory cortex. Interestingly, the first wave can be identified both in synaptoneurosomal and cellular fractions, whereas the second wave is detected in the cellular fraction but not in the synaptic one. Inhibition of mTOR, specifically in the gustatory cortex, has two effects. First, biochemically, it modulates several known downstream proteins that control translation and reduces the expression of postsynaptic density-95 in vivo. Second, behaviorally, it attenuates long-term taste memory. The results suggest that the mTOR pathway in the cortex modulates both translation factor activity and protein expression, to enable normal taste memory consolidation.

  3. Mechanistically distinct cancer-associated mTOR activation clusters predict sensitivity to rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianing; Pham, Can G.; Albanese, Steven K.; Dong, Yiyu; Lee, Chung-Han; Yao, Zhan; Han, Song; Chen, David; Parton, Daniel L.; Chodera, John D.; Rosen, Neal; Cheng, Emily H.; Hsieh, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies have linked mTORC1 pathway–activating mutations with exceptional response to treatment with allosteric inhibitors of mTORC1 called rapalogs. Rapalogs are approved for selected cancer types, including kidney and breast cancers. Here, we used sequencing data from 22 human kidney cancer cases to identify the activating mechanisms conferred by mTOR mutations observed in human cancers and advance precision therapeutics. mTOR mutations that clustered in focal adhesion kinase targeting domain (FAT) and kinase domains enhanced mTORC1 kinase activity, decreased nutrient reliance, and increased cell size. We identified 3 distinct mechanisms of hyperactivation, including reduced binding to DEP domain–containing MTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR), resistance to regulatory associated protein of mTOR–mediated (RAPTOR-mediated) suppression, and altered kinase kinetics. Of the 28 mTOR double mutants, activating mutations could be divided into 6 complementation groups, resulting in synergistic Rag- and Ras homolog enriched in brain–independent (RHEB-independent) mTORC1 activation. mTOR mutants were resistant to DNA damage–inducible transcript 1–mediated (REDD1-mediated) inhibition, confirming that activating mutations can bypass the negative feedback pathway formed between HIF1 and mTORC1 in the absence of von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor expression. Moreover, VHL-deficient cells that expressed activating mTOR mutants grew tumors that were sensitive to rapamycin treatment. These data may explain the high incidence of mTOR mutations observed in clear cell kidney cancer, where VHL loss and HIF activation is pathognomonic. Our study provides mechanistic and therapeutic insights concerning mTOR mutations in human diseases. PMID:27482884

  4. mTOR complex 1 signalling regulates the balance between lipid synthesis and oxidation in hypoxia lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Geng; Liang, Yan; Wang, Ying; Yang, Yuan; Yang, Min; Cen, Xiao-min

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian cells adapt to different environmental conditions and alter cellular metabolic pathways to meet the energy demand for survival. Thus, the metabolic regulation of cells under special conditions, such as hypoxia, should be precisely regulated. During the metabolic regulation, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a vital role in the sensing of extracellular stimulations and regulating intracellular adaptations. Here, we report that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling is a central regulator of lipid homoeostasis in lymphocytes. In hypoxia, mTORC1 activity is reduced and shifts lipid synthesis to lipid oxidation. Moreover, knockdown tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1) constitutively activates mTORC1 activity and impairs the hypoxia-induced metabolic shift. Therefore, TSC1 knockdown enhances hypoxia-induced cell death. Re-inactivation of mTORC1 activity via rapamycin may resist hypoxia-induced cell death in TSC1 knockdown lymphocytes. Our findings provide a deep insight into mTORC1 in the metabolic balance of lipid synthesis and oxidation, and imply that mTORC1 activity should be precisely regulated for the lipid homoeostasis in lymphocytes. PMID:28057888

  5. mTOR complex 1 signalling regulates the balance between lipid synthesis and oxidation in hypoxia lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Geng; Liang, Yan; Wang, Ying; Yang, Yuan; Yang, Min; Cen, Xiao-Min; Xie, Qi-Bing

    2017-02-28

    Mammalian cells adapt to different environmental conditions and alter cellular metabolic pathways to meet the energy demand for survival. Thus, the metabolic regulation of cells under special conditions, such as hypoxia, should be precisely regulated. During the metabolic regulation, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a vital role in the sensing of extracellular stimulations and regulating intracellular adaptations. Here, we report that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling is a central regulator of lipid homoeostasis in lymphocytes. In hypoxia, mTORC1 activity is reduced and shifts lipid synthesis to lipid oxidation. Moreover, knockdown tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1) constitutively activates mTORC1 activity and impairs the hypoxia-induced metabolic shift. Therefore, TSC1 knockdown enhances hypoxia-induced cell death. Re-inactivation of mTORC1 activity via rapamycin may resist hypoxia-induced cell death in TSC1 knockdown lymphocytes. Our findings provide a deep insight into mTORC1 in the metabolic balance of lipid synthesis and oxidation, and imply that mTORC1 activity should be precisely regulated for the lipid homoeostasis in lymphocytes.

  6. Deregulation of mTOR signaling is involved in thymic lymphoma development in Atm-/- mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Xianghong; Shen, Jianjun; Wong, Paul K.Y.; Yan, Mingshan

    2009-06-05

    Abnormal thymocyte development with thymic lymphomagenesis inevitably occurs in Atm-/- mice, indicating that ATM plays a pivotal role in regulating postnatal thymocyte development and preventing thymic lymphomagenesis. The mechanism for ATM controls these processes is unclear. We have shown previously that c-Myc, an oncoprotein regulated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is overexpressed in Atm-/- thymocytes. Here, we show that inhibition of mTOR signaling with its specific inhibitor, rapamycin, suppresses normal thymocyte DNA synthesis by downregulating 4EBP1, but not S6K, and that 4EBP1 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression are coordinately increased in Atm-/- thymocytes. Administration of rapamycin to Atm-/- mice attenuates elevated phospho-4EBP1, c-Myc and cyclin D1 in their thymocytes, and delays thymic lymphoma development. These results indicate that mTOR downstream effector 4EBP1 is essential for normal thymocyte proliferation, but deregulation of 4EBP1 in Atm deficiency is a major factor driving thymic lymphomagenesis in the animals.

  7. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Activation Increases Axonal Growth Capacity of Injured Peripheral Nerves*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Namiko; Borson, Steven H.; Gambello, Michael J.; Wang, Fan; Cavalli, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    Unlike neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), injured neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) can regenerate their axons and reinnervate their targets. However, functional recovery in the PNS often remains suboptimal, especially in cases of severe damage. The lack of regenerative ability of CNS neurons has been linked to down-regulation of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. We report here that PNS dorsal root ganglial neurons (DRGs) activate mTOR following damage and that this activity enhances axonal growth capacity. Furthermore, genetic up-regulation of mTOR activity by deletion of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) in DRGs is sufficient to enhance axonal growth capacity in vitro and in vivo. We further show that mTOR activity is linked to the expression of GAP-43, a crucial component of axonal outgrowth. However, although TSC2 deletion in DRGs facilitates axonal regrowth, it leads to defects in target innervation. Thus, whereas manipulation of mTOR activity could provide new strategies to stimulate nerve regeneration in the PNS, fine control of mTOR activity is required for proper target innervation. PMID:20615870

  8. A lysosome-to-nucleus signalling mechanism senses and regulates the lysosome via mTOR and TFEB.

    PubMed

    Settembre, Carmine; Zoncu, Roberto; Medina, Diego L; Vetrini, Francesco; Erdin, Serkan; Erdin, SerpilUckac; Huynh, Tuong; Ferron, Mathieu; Karsenty, Gerard; Vellard, Michel C; Facchinetti, Valeria; Sabatini, David M; Ballabio, Andrea

    2012-03-07

    The lysosome plays a key role in cellular homeostasis by controlling both cellular clearance and energy production to respond to environmental cues. However, the mechanisms mediating lysosomal adaptation are largely unknown. Here, we show that the Transcription Factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, colocalizes with master growth regulator mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) on the lysosomal membrane. When nutrients are present, phosphorylation of TFEB by mTORC1 inhibits TFEB activity. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1, as well as starvation and lysosomal disruption, activates TFEB by promoting its nuclear translocation. In addition, the transcriptional response of lysosomal and autophagic genes to either lysosomal dysfunction or pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 is suppressed in TFEB-/- cells. Interestingly, the Rag GTPase complex, which senses lysosomal amino acids and activates mTORC1, is both necessary and sufficient to regulate starvation- and stress-induced nuclear translocation of TFEB. These data indicate that the lysosome senses its content and regulates its own biogenesis by a lysosome-to-nucleus signalling mechanism that involves TFEB and mTOR.

  9. mTOR: from growth signal integration to cancer, diabetes and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Zoncu, Roberto; Sabatini, David M.; Efeyan, Alejo

    2012-01-01

    Preface In all eukaryotes, the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway couples energy and nutrient abundance to the execution of cell growth and division, owing to the ability of TOR protein kinase to simultaneously sense energy, nutrients and stress, and, in metazoan, growth factors. Mammalian TOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2) exert their actions by regulating other important kinases, such as S6K and Akt. In the last few years, a significant advance in our understanding of the regulation and functions of mTOR has revealed its critical involvement in the onset and progression of diabetes, cancer and ageing. PMID:21157483

  10. Age related increase in mTOR activity contributes to the pathological changes in ovarian surface epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Preety; Nagendra, Prathima B.; Nielsen, Sarah; Sahoo, Subhransu S.; Bielanowicz, Amanda; Lombard, Janine M.; Wilkinson, Erby J.; Miller, Richard A.; Tanwar, Pradeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a disease of older women. However, the molecular mechanisms of ovarian aging and their contribution to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer are currently unclear. mTOR signalling is a major regulator of aging as suppression of this pathway extends lifespan in model organisms. Overactive mTOR signalling is present in up to 80% of ovarian cancer samples and is associated with poor prognosis. This study examined the role of mTOR signalling in age-associated changes in ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). Histological examination of ovaries from both aged mice and women revealed OSE cell hyperplasia, papillary growth and inclusion cysts. These pathological lesions expressed bonafide markers of ovarian cancer precursor lesions, Pax8 and Stathmin 1, and were presented with elevated mTOR signalling. To understand whether overactive mTOR signalling is responsible for the development of these pathological changes, we analysed ovaries of the Pten trangenic mice and found significant reduction in OSE lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, pharmacological suppression of mTOR signalling significantly decreased OSE hyperplasia in aged mice. Treatment with mTOR inhibitors reduced human ovarian cancer cell viability, proliferation and colony forming ability. Collectively, we have established the role of mTOR signalling in age-related OSE pathologies and initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:27036037

  11. Evodiamine Inhibits Insulin-Stimulated mTOR-S6K Activation and IRS1 Serine Phosphorylation in Adipocytes and Improves Glucose Tolerance in Obese/Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Kusudo, Tatsuya; Takeuchi, Tamaki; Yamashita, Yukari; Kontani, Yasuhide; Okamatsu, Yuko; Saito, Masayuki; Mori, Nozomu; Yamashita, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Evodiamine, an alkaloid extracted from the dried unripe fruit of the tree Evodia rutaecarpa Bentham (Rutaceae), reduces obesity and insulin resistance in obese/diabetic mice; however, the mechanism underlying the effect of evodiamine on insulin resistance is unknown. This study investigated the effect of evodiamine on signal transduction relating to insulin resistance using obese/diabetic KK-Ay mice and an in vitro adipocyte culture. There is a significant decrease in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ribosomal S6 protein kinase (S6K) signaling in white adipose tissue (WAT) in KK-Ay mice treated with evodiamine, in which glucose tolerance is improved. In addition, reduction of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) serine phosphorylation, an indicator of insulin resistance, was detected in their WAT, suggesting suppression of the negative feedback loop from S6K to IRS1. As well as the stimulation of IRS1 and Akt serine phosphorylation, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of mTOR and S6K is time-dependent in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, whereas evodiamine does not affect their phosphorylation except for an inhibitory effect on mTOR phosphorylation. Moreover, evodiamine inhibits the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of mTOR and S6K, leading to down-regulation of IRS1 serine phosphorylation in the adipocytes. Evodiamine also stimulates phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important regulator of energy metabolism, which may cause down-regulation of mTOR signaling in adipocytes. A similar effect on AMPK, mTOR and IRS1 phosphorylation was found in adipocytes treated with rosiglitazone. These results suggest evodiamine improves glucose tolerance and prevents the progress of insulin resistance associated with obese/diabetic states, at least in part, through inhibition of mTOR-S6K signaling and IRS1 serine phosphorylation in adipocytes. PMID:24391749

  12. Anti-Breast Cancer Potential of Quercetin via the Akt/AMPK/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling Cascade.

    PubMed

    Rivera Rivera, Amilcar; Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Gerena, Yamil; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2016-01-01

    The Akt/adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has emerged as a critical signaling nexus for regulating cellular metabolism, energy homeostasis, and cell growth. Thus, dysregulation of this pathway contributes to the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2diabetes, and cancer. We previously reported that a combination of grape polyphenols (resveratrol, quercetin and catechin: RQC), at equimolar concentrations, reduces breast cancer (BC) growth and metastasis in nude mice, and inhibits Akt and mTOR activities and activates AMPK, an endogenous inhibitor of mTOR, in metastatic BC cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the contribution of individual polyphenols to the effect of combined RQC on mTOR signaling. Metastatic BC cells were treated with RQC individually or in combination, at various concentrations, and the activities (phosphorylation) of AMPK, Akt, and the mTOR downstream effectors, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and 4E binding protein (4EBP1), were determined by Western blot. Results show that quercetin was the most effective compound for Akt/mTOR inhibition. Treatment with quercetin at 15μM had a similar effect as the RQC combination in the inhibition of BC cell proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. However, cell cycle analysis showed that the RQC treatment arrested BC cells in the G1 phase, while quercetin arrested the cell cycle in G2/M. In vivo experiments, using SCID mice with implanted tumors from metastatic BC cells, demonstrated that administration of quercetin at 15mg/kg body weight resulted in a ~70% reduction in tumor growth. In conclusion, quercetin appears to be a viable grape polyphenol for future development as an anti BC therapeutic.

  13. Anti-Breast Cancer Potential of Quercetin via the Akt/AMPK/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Rivera Rivera, Amilcar; Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Gerena, Yamil; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2016-01-01

    The Akt/adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has emerged as a critical signaling nexus for regulating cellular metabolism, energy homeostasis, and cell growth. Thus, dysregulation of this pathway contributes to the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2diabetes, and cancer. We previously reported that a combination of grape polyphenols (resveratrol, quercetin and catechin: RQC), at equimolar concentrations, reduces breast cancer (BC) growth and metastasis in nude mice, and inhibits Akt and mTOR activities and activates AMPK, an endogenous inhibitor of mTOR, in metastatic BC cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the contribution of individual polyphenols to the effect of combined RQC on mTOR signaling. Metastatic BC cells were treated with RQC individually or in combination, at various concentrations, and the activities (phosphorylation) of AMPK, Akt, and the mTOR downstream effectors, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and 4E binding protein (4EBP1), were determined by Western blot. Results show that quercetin was the most effective compound for Akt/mTOR inhibition. Treatment with quercetin at 15μM had a similar effect as the RQC combination in the inhibition of BC cell proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. However, cell cycle analysis showed that the RQC treatment arrested BC cells in the G1 phase, while quercetin arrested the cell cycle in G2/M. In vivo experiments, using SCID mice with implanted tumors from metastatic BC cells, demonstrated that administration of quercetin at 15mg/kg body weight resulted in a ~70% reduction in tumor growth. In conclusion, quercetin appears to be a viable grape polyphenol for future development as an anti BC therapeutic. PMID:27285995

  14. Nrf2 Transcription Factor Can Directly Regulate mTOR: LINKING CYTOPROTECTIVE GENE EXPRESSION TO A MAJOR METABOLIC REGULATOR THAT GENERATES REDOX ACTIVITY.

    PubMed

    Bendavit, Gabriel; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Hilmi, Khalid; Shah, Sujay; Batist, Gerald

    2016-12-02

    Nrf2 is a master transcription factor that regulates a wide variety of cellular proteins by recognizing and binding to antioxidant response elements (AREs) in their gene promoter regions. In this study we show that increasing cellular Nrf2 results in transcriptional activation of the gene for mTOR, which is central to the PI3K signaling pathway. This is the case in cells with normal physiological PI3K. However, in cells with abnormally active PI3K increased cellular Nrf2 levels have no effect on mTOR. ChIP assays results show that increased Nrf2 binding is associated with decreased p65 binding and H3-K27me3 signal (marker of gene repression) as well as increased H3-K4me3 signal (marker of gene activation). However, in cells with PI3K activation, no effect of cellular Nrf2 increase on mTOR transcription was observed. In these cells, increasing Nrf2 levels increases Nrf2 promoter binding marginally, whereas p65 binding and H3-K27me3 mark were significantly increased, and H3-K4me3 signal is reduced. Together, these data show for the first time that Nrf2 directly regulates mTOR transcription when the PI3K pathway is intact, whereas this function is lost when PI3K is activated. We have identified a link between the Nrf2 system of sensing environmental stress and mTOR, which is a key cellular protein in metabolism. Studies in cells with activating mutations in the PI3K pathway suggest that Nrf2 transcriptional regulation of mTOR is related to promoter binding of p65 and of methylation of histone residues permissive of transcription.

  15. The mTOR and canonical Wnt signaling pathways mediate the mnemonic effects of progesterone in the dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fortress, Ashley M; Heisler, John D; Frick, Karyn M

    2015-05-01

    Although much is known about the neural mechanisms responsible for the mnemonic effects of 17β-estradiol (E2 ), very little is understood about the mechanisms through which progesterone (P4 ) regulates memory. We previously showed that intrahippocampal infusion of P4 in ovariectomized female mice enhances object recognition (OR) memory consolidation in a manner dependent on activation of dorsal hippocampal ERK and mTOR signaling. However, the role of specific progesterone receptors (PRs) in mediating the effects of progesterone on memory consolidation and hippocampal cell signaling are unknown. Therefore, the goals of this study were to investigate the roles of membrane-associated and intracellular PRs in mediating hippocampal memory consolidation, and identify downstream cell signaling pathways activated by PRs. Membrane-associated PRs were targeted using bovine serum albumin-conjugated progesterone (BSA-P), and intracellular PRs (PR-A, PR-B) were targeted using the intracellular PR agonist R5020. Immediately after OR training, ovariectomized mice received bilateral dorsal hippocampal infusion of vehicle, P4 , BSA-P, or R5020. OR memory consolidation was enhanced by P4 , BSA-P, and R5020. However, only P4 and BSA-P activated ERK and mTOR signaling. Furthermore, dorsal hippocampal infusion of the ERK inhibitor U0126 blocked the memory-enhancing effects of BSA-P, but not R5020. The intracellular PR antagonist RU486 blocked the memory-enhancing effects of R5020, but not BSA-P. Interestingly, P4 robustly activated canonical Wnt signaling in the dorsal hippocampus, which is consistent with our recent findings that canonical Wnt signaling is necessary for OR memory consolidation. R5020, but not BSA-P, also elicited a modest increase in canonical Wnt signaling. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of ERK signaling is necessary for membrane-associated PRs to enhance OR, and indicate a role for canonical Wnt signaling in the memory-enhancing effects of

  16. Neuroprotective Strategy in Retinal Degeneration: Suppressing ER Stress-Induced Cell Death via Inhibition of the mTOR Signal

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bin; Sun, Ying-Jian; Liu, Shu-Yan; Che, Lin; Li, Guang-Yu

    2017-01-01

    The retina is a specialized sensory organ, which is essential for light detection and visual formation in the human eye. Inherited retinal degenerations are a heterogeneous group of eye diseases that can eventually cause permanent vision loss. UPR (unfolded protein response) and ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress plays an important role in the pathological mechanism of retinal degenerative diseases. mTOR (the mammalian target of rapamycin) kinase, as a signaling hub, controls many cellular processes, covering protein synthesis, RNA translation, ER stress, and apoptosis. Here, the hypothesis that inhibition of mTOR signaling suppresses ER stress-induced cell death in retinal degenerative disorders is discussed. This review surveys knowledge of the influence of mTOR signaling on ER stress arising from misfolded proteins and genetic mutations in retinal degenerative diseases and highlights potential neuroprotective strategies for treatment and therapeutic implications. PMID:28106827

  17. Effects of chronic overload on muscle hypertrophy and mTOR signaling in adult and aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effect of 28 days of overload on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in young adult (Y; 6 mo old) and aged (O; 30 mo old) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats subjected to bilateral synergist ablation (SA) of two-thirds of the gas...

  18. A Recollection of mTOR Signaling in Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, Tyson E.; McCamphill, Patrick K.; Sossin, Wayne S.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamcyin (mTOR) is a central player in cell growth throughout the organism. However, mTOR takes on an additional, more specialized role in the developed neuron, where it regulates the protein synthesis-dependent, plastic changes underlying learning and memory. mTOR is sequestered in two multiprotein complexes (mTORC1 and…

  19. Selective regulation of YB-1 mRNA translation by the mTOR signaling pathway is not mediated by 4E-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Lyabin, D. N.; Ovchinnikov, L. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is a key regulator of gene expression at the level of both translation and transcription. The mode of its action on cellular events depends on its subcellular distribution and the amount in the cell. So far, the regulatory mechanisms of YB-1 synthesis have not been adequately studied. Our previous finding was that selective inhibition of YB-1 mRNA translation was caused by suppression of activity of the mTOR signaling pathway. It was suggested that this event may be mediated by phosphorylation of the 4E-binding protein (4E-BP). Here, we report that 4E-BP alone can only slightly inhibit YB-1 synthesis both in the cell and in vitro, although it essentially decreases binding of the 4F-group translation initiation factors to mRNA. With inhibited mTOR kinase, the level of mRNA binding to the eIF4F-group factors was decreased, while that to 4E-BP1 was increased, as was observed for both mTOR kinase-sensitive mRNAs and those showing low sensitivity. This suggests that selective inhibition of translation of YB-1 mRNA, and probably some other mRNAs as well, by mTOR kinase inhibitors is not mediated by the action of the 4E-binding protein upon functions of the 4F-group translation initiation factors. PMID:26931209

  20. Selective regulation of YB-1 mRNA translation by the mTOR signaling pathway is not mediated by 4E-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Lyabin, D N; Ovchinnikov, L P

    2016-03-02

    The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is a key regulator of gene expression at the level of both translation and transcription. The mode of its action on cellular events depends on its subcellular distribution and the amount in the cell. So far, the regulatory mechanisms of YB-1 synthesis have not been adequately studied. Our previous finding was that selective inhibition of YB-1 mRNA translation was caused by suppression of activity of the mTOR signaling pathway. It was suggested that this event may be mediated by phosphorylation of the 4E-binding protein (4E-BP). Here, we report that 4E-BP alone can only slightly inhibit YB-1 synthesis both in the cell and in vitro, although it essentially decreases binding of the 4F-group translation initiation factors to mRNA. With inhibited mTOR kinase, the level of mRNA binding to the eIF4F-group factors was decreased, while that to 4E-BP1 was increased, as was observed for both mTOR kinase-sensitive mRNAs and those showing low sensitivity. This suggests that selective inhibition of translation of YB-1 mRNA, and probably some other mRNAs as well, by mTOR kinase inhibitors is not mediated by the action of the 4E-binding protein upon functions of the 4F-group translation initiation factors.

  1. Modulating mTOR in aging and health.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Simon C; Sangesland, Maya; Kaeberlein, Matt; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    The physiological responses to nutrient availability play a central role in aging and disease. Genetic and pharmacological studies have identified highly conserved cellular signaling pathways that influence aging by regulating the interface between nutrient and hormone cues and cellular growth and maintenance. Among these pathways, the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been most reproducibly shown to modulate aging in evolutionarily diverse organisms as reduction in mTOR activity extends life span from yeast to rodents. mTOR has been shown to play a role in a broad range of diseases, and is of particular interest to human health and aging due to the availability of clinically approved pharmacological agents targeting the mTOR complexes and other components of the mTOR signaling network. Characterizing the role of mTOR in aging and health promises to provide new avenues for intervention in human aging and disease through modulation of this signaling pathway.

  2. Anti-inflammatory action of insulin via induction of Gadd45-β transcription by the mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bortoff, Katherine D; Keeton, Adam B; Franklin, J Lee; Messina, Joseph L

    2010-01-01

    Insulin regulates a large number of genes in a tissue-specific manner. We have previously identified genes modulated by insulin in the liver and in liver-derived cells that have not yet been characterized as insulin regulated, and results of these previous studies indicated that numerous genes are induced by insulin via the MEK-ERK pathway. We now describe new studies indicating that Gadd45-β can be induced by acute insulin treatment. Although other regulators of Gadd45-β expression may utilize the MEK-ERK pathway, the data indicate that insulin utilizes signaling pathways separate from either MEK-ERK, PI3-K, or p38 signaling pathways in the regulation of Gadd45-β transcription. Our findings show that activation of a downstream effector of multiple signaling pathways, mTOR, was required for insulin-induction of Gadd45-β gene transcription. Increased expression of Gadd45-β can inhibit c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. Since TNFα is increased during inflammation, and acts, at least in part, via the JNK signaling pathway, insulin induction of Gadd45-β suggests a mechanism for the anti-inflammatory actions of insulin. PMID:21286247

  3. Geniposide inhibited endothelial-mesenchymal transition via the mTOR signaling pathway in a bleomycin-induced scleroderma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qing; Mao, Yueping; Tian, Yongzhen; Zhu, Ke; Cha, Xushan; Wu, Minghua; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Geniposide is an iridoid glycoside isolated from the gardenia plant. It has multiple biological activities. The roles of geniposide in systemic sclerosis (SSc) and in endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) are unclear. We investigated the protective effects of geniposide in a bleomycin-induced SSc mouse model, and its potential mechanisms. Methods: The effects of geniposide were evaluated as follows: (1) histological and immunochemical changes in mouse skin tissue; (2) changes in cellular morphology of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); (3) expression of endothelial cell biomarkers (E-Cadherin, CD31, and CD34), mesenchymal cell markers (FSP1, Collagen, and α-SMA), and key factors of EndMT (Slug, Snail, and Twist) using real time PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence; (4) tube formation in HUVECs; (5) mTOR signaling pathway transcription factors using Western blot analysis. Results: Treatment with bleomycin induced up-regulation of mesenchymal cell biomarkers and down-regulation of endothelial cell biomarkers in in vivo and in vitro bleomycin-induced scleroderma models. Geniposide treatment suppressed these effects. Geniposide remedied bleomycin-induced dermal capillary loss and fibrosis in mice. The expression of key EndMT factors (Slug, Snail, and Twist) and the mTOR signaling pathway (mTOR and S6) were also attenuated by geniposide treatment. Conclusion: Geniposide had protective effects on endothelial cells in the bleomycin-induced scleroderma mouse model. These effects may occur via inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway activation. The results suggested that geniposide could be a potential candidate drug for treatment of vascular damage in SSc patients. PMID:28386330

  4. CDK1 substitutes for mTOR kinase to activate mitotic cap-dependent protein translation

    PubMed Central

    Shuda, Masahiro; Velásquez, Celestino; Cheng, Erdong; Cordek, Daniel G.; Kwun, Hyun Jin; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Mitosis is commonly thought to be associated with reduced cap-dependent protein translation. Here we show an alternative control mechanism for maintaining cap-dependent translation during mitosis revealed by a viral oncoprotein, Merkel cell polyomavirus small T (MCV sT). We find MCV sT to be a promiscuous E3 ligase inhibitor targeting the anaphase-promoting complex, which increases cell mitogenesis. MCV sT binds through its Large T stabilization domain region to cell division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20) and, possibly, cdc20 homolog 1 (Cdh1) E3 ligase adapters. This activates cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 (CDK1/CYCB1) to directly hyperphosphorylate eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein (4E-BP1) at authentic sites, generating a mitosis-specific, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor-resistant δ phospho-isoform not present in G1-arrested cells. Recombinant 4E-BP1 inhibits capped mRNA reticulocyte translation, which is partially reversed by CDK1/CYCB1 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1. eIF4G binding to the eIF4E–m7GTP cap complex is resistant to mTOR inhibition during mitosis but sensitive during interphase. Flow cytometry, with and without sT, reveals an orthogonal pH3S10+ mitotic cell population having higher inactive p4E-BP1T37/T46+ saturation levels than pH3S10– interphase cells. Using a Click-iT flow cytometric assay to directly measure mitotic protein synthesis, we find that most new protein synthesis during mitosis is cap-dependent, a result confirmed using the eIF4E/4G inhibitor drug 4E1RCat. For most cell lines tested, cap-dependent translation levels were generally similar between mitotic and interphase cells, and the majority of new mitotic protein synthesis was cap-dependent. These findings suggest that mitotic cap-dependent translation is generally sustained during mitosis by CDK1 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 even under conditions of reduced mTOR signaling. PMID:25883264

  5. CDK1 substitutes for mTOR kinase to activate mitotic cap-dependent protein translation.

    PubMed

    Shuda, Masahiro; Velásquez, Celestino; Cheng, Erdong; Cordek, Daniel G; Kwun, Hyun Jin; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S

    2015-05-12

    Mitosis is commonly thought to be associated with reduced cap-dependent protein translation. Here we show an alternative control mechanism for maintaining cap-dependent translation during mitosis revealed by a viral oncoprotein, Merkel cell polyomavirus small T (MCV sT). We find MCV sT to be a promiscuous E3 ligase inhibitor targeting the anaphase-promoting complex, which increases cell mitogenesis. MCV sT binds through its Large T stabilization domain region to cell division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20) and, possibly, cdc20 homolog 1 (Cdh1) E3 ligase adapters. This activates cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 (CDK1/CYCB1) to directly hyperphosphorylate eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein (4E-BP1) at authentic sites, generating a mitosis-specific, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor-resistant δ phospho-isoform not present in G1-arrested cells. Recombinant 4E-BP1 inhibits capped mRNA reticulocyte translation, which is partially reversed by CDK1/CYCB1 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1. eIF4G binding to the eIF4E-m(7)GTP cap complex is resistant to mTOR inhibition during mitosis but sensitive during interphase. Flow cytometry, with and without sT, reveals an orthogonal pH3(S10+) mitotic cell population having higher inactive p4E-BP1(T37/T46+) saturation levels than pH3(S10-) interphase cells. Using a Click-iT flow cytometric assay to directly measure mitotic protein synthesis, we find that most new protein synthesis during mitosis is cap-dependent, a result confirmed using the eIF4E/4G inhibitor drug 4E1RCat. For most cell lines tested, cap-dependent translation levels were generally similar between mitotic and interphase cells, and the majority of new mitotic protein synthesis was cap-dependent. These findings suggest that mitotic cap-dependent translation is generally sustained during mitosis by CDK1 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 even under conditions of reduced mTOR signaling.

  6. Interaction of polyamines and mTOR signaling in the synthesis of antizyme (AZ)

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ramesh M.; Bavaria, Mitul; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue polyamine levels are largely determined by the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, EC 4.1.17), which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine to the diamine putrescine. The activity of the enzyme is primarily regulated by a negative feedback mechanism involving ODC antizyme (AZ). Our previous studies demonstrated that AZ synthesis is stimulated by the absence of amino acids, the levels of which are sensed by the mTOR complex containing TORC1, which is stimulated by amino acids and inhibited by their absence, and TORC2 the function of which is not well defined. Polyamines, which cause a +1 ribosomal frameshift during the translation of AZ mRNA are required to increase AZ synthesis in both the presence and absence of amino acids. Amino acid starvation increases TORC2 activity. We have demonstrated that mTORC2 activity is necessary for AZ synthesis in the absence of amino acids. Tuberous sclerosis protein (TSC), a negative regulator of mTOR function regulates the activities of both the TORC1 and TORC2. TSC2 knockdown increased mTORC1 activity with concomitant inhibition of mTORC2 activity eliminating AZ induction in the absence of amino acids as well as that induced by spermidine. Thus, these results clearly demonstrate that in addition to polyamines, mTORC2 activity is necessary for AZ synthesis. Moreover, our results support a role for mTORC2 in the synthesis of a specific protein, AZ, which regulates growth of intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26093026

  7. mTOR links incretin signaling to HIF induction in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Sam; Hogan, Meghan F; Montminy, Marc

    2011-10-11

    Under feeding conditions, the incretin hormone GLP-1 promotes pancreatic islet viability by triggering the cAMP pathway in beta cells. Increases in PKA activity stimulate the phosphorylation of CREB, which in turn enhances beta cell survival by upregulating IRS2 expression. Although sustained GLP-1 action appears important for its salutary effects on islet function, the transient nature of CREB activation has pointed to the involvement of additional nuclear factors in this process. Following the acute induction of CREB-regulated genes, cAMP triggers a second delayed phase of gene expression that proceeds via the HIF transcription factor. Increases in cAMP promote the accumulation of HIF1α in beta cells by activating the mTOR pathway. As exposure to rapamycin disrupts GLP-1 effects on beta cell viability, these results demonstrate how a pathway associated with tumor growth also mediates salutary effects of an incretin hormone on pancreatic islet function.

  8. Effects of Salidroside on cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia damage and mTOR signaling repression in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoyong; Lin, Ruhui; Li, Zuanfang; Mao, Jingjie; Chen, Lidian

    2014-01-01

    Salidroside (SA), a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., has been documented to exert a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties, including protective effects against neuronal death induced by various stresses. To provide further insights into the neuroprotective functions of SA, this study examined whether SA can attenuate cobalt chloride (CoCl2)-induced hypoxia damage and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling repression in PC12 differentiated cells. Differentiated PC12 cells were exposed to CoCl2 for 12 h to mimic hypoxic/ischemic conditions and treated with SA at the same time, followed by electron microscopy and analysis of cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) level, and the regulated in development and DNA damage responses (REDD1)/mTOR/ p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K) signaling pathway. Our data indicated that SA can dramatically attenuate the ultrastructural damage of mitochondria induced by CoCl2 and significantly decrease CoCl2-induced ROS production. Moreover, phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) was significantly reduced by CoCl2, and this inhibition was relieved by the treatment of SA in PC12 cells, as evidenced by immunoblot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses. The SA effects were blocked by pretreatment of RAD001. The results indicate that SA can rescue CoCl2-induced repression of REDD1/mTOR/ p70S6K signal transduction in PC12 cells. Our data demonstrate that SA is able to attenuate CoCl2-induced hypoxia damage and mTOR signaling repression, suggesting that SA may protect brain neurons from ischemic injury through mTOR signaling, and provide new insights into the prevention and treatment of cerebral ischemic.

  9. Insulin activation of vacuolar protein sorting 34 mediates localized phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate production at lamellipodia and activation of mTOR/S6K1.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Dianne S; Shen, Yi; Dokmanovic, Milos; Yu, Joyce; Mohan, Nishant; Elzarrad, Mohammed Khair; Wu, Wen Jin

    2014-06-01

    The class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, VPS34, phosphorylates the D3 hydroxyl of inositol generating phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (ptdins(3)p). Initial studies suggested that ptdins(3)p solely functioned as a component of vesicular and endosomal membranes and that VPS34 did not function in signal transduction. However, VPS34 has recently been shown to be required for insulin-mediated activation of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). Whether VPS34 activity is directly regulated by insulin is unclear. It is also not known whether VPS34 activity can be spatially restricted in response to extracellular stimuli. Data presented here demonstrate that in response to insulin, VPS34 is activated and translocated to lamellipodia where it produces ptdins(3)p. The localized production of ptdins(3)p is dependent on Src phosphorylation of VPS34. In cells expressing VPS34 with mutations at Y231 or Y310, which are Src-phosphorylation sites, insulin-stimulated VPS34 translocation to the plasma membrane and lamellipodia formation are blocked. mTOR also colocalizes with VPS34 and ptdins(3)p at lamellipodia following insulin-stimulation. In cells expressing the VPS34-Y231F mutant, which blocks lamellipodia formation, mTOR localization at the plasma membrane and insulin-mediated S6K1 activation are reduced. This suggests that mTOR localization at lamellipodia is important for full activation of S6K1 induced by insulin. These data demonstrate that insulin can spatially regulate VPS34 activity through Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation and that this membrane localized activity contributes to lamellipodia formation and activation of mTOR/S6K1signaling.

  10. Targeting mTOR and p53 signaling inhibits muscle invasive bladder cancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Mohammed, Altaf; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yuting; Biddick, Laura; Patlolla, Jagan M.R.; Lightfoot, Stan; Towner, Rheal A.; Wu, Xue-Ru; Steele, Vernon E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Urothelial tumors, accompanied by mutations of the tumor suppressor protein TP53 and dysregulation of mTOR signaling, are frequently associated with aggressive growth and invasiveness. We investigated whether targeting these two pathways would inhibit urothelial tumor growth and progression. Six-week-old transgenic UPII-SV40T male mice (n=15/group) were fed control diet (AIN-76A) or experimental diets containing mTOR inhibitor (rapamycin, 8 or 16 ppm), p53 stabilizing agent (CP31398 [CP], 150 ppm), or a combination. Mice were euthanized at 40 weeks of age. Urinary bladders were collected and evaluated to determine tumor weight and histopathology. Each agent alone, and in combination, significantly inhibited tumor growth. Treatment with rapamycin alone decreased tumor weight up to 67% (p<0.0001). Similarly, CP showed ~77% (p<0.0001) suppression of tumor weight. The combination of low-dose rapamycin and CP led to ~83% (p<0.0001) inhibition of tumor weight. There was no significant difference in tumor weights between rapamycin and CP treatments (p>0.05). However, there was a significant difference between 8 ppm rapamycin and the combination treatment. Tumor invasion was also significantly inhibited in 53% (p<0.005) and 66% (p<0.0005) mice after 8 ppm and 16 ppm rapamycin respectively. While tumor invasion was suppressed in 73% (p<0.0001) mice when CP was combined with 8 ppm rapamycin. These results suggest that targeting two or more pathways achieve better treatment efficacy than a single-agent high-dose strategy that could increase the risk of side effects. A combination of CP and rapamycin may be a promising method of inhibiting muscle-invasive urothelial TCC. PMID:26577454

  11. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) drives mTOR pathway activation and proliferation of human melanoma by reversible nitrosylation of TSC2

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Jayaraman, Padmini; Parikh, Falguni; Davies, Michael A.; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Milton, Denái R.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.; Estrada, Yeriel; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the cancers of fastest-rising incidence in the world. iNOS is overexpressed in melanoma and other cancers, and previous data suggest that iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) drive survival and proliferation of human melanoma cells. However, specific mechanisms through which this occurs are poorly defined. One candidate is the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which plays a major role in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis of melanoma and other cancers. We used the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay to test the hypothesis that melanoma growth is regulated by iNOS-dependent mTOR pathway activation. Both pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA-mediated gene silencing of iNOS suppressed melanoma proliferation and in vivo growth on the CAM in human melanoma models. This was associated with strong downregulation of mTOR pathway activation by Western blot analysis of p-mTOR, p-P70S6K, p-S6RP, and p-4EBP1. iNOS expression and NO were associated with reversible nitrosylation of TSC2, and inhibited dimerization of TSC2 with its inhibitory partner TSC1, enhancing GTPase activity of its target Rheb, a critical activator of mTOR signaling. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from stage III melanoma patients showed a significant correlation between iNOS expression levels and expression of mTOR pathway members. Exogenously-supplied NO was also sufficient to reverse mTOR pathway inhibition by the B-Raf inhibitor Vemurafenib. In summary, covalent modification of TSC2 by iNOS-derived NO is associated with impaired TSC2/TSC1 dimerization, mTOR pathway activation, and proliferation of human melanoma. This model is consistent with the known association of iNOS overexpression and poor prognosis in melanoma and other cancers. PMID:24398473

  12. SIRT1 controls liver regeneration by regulating BA metabolism through FXR and mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodríguez, Juan L.; Barbier-Torres, Lucía; Fernández-Álvarez, Sara; Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez-de; Monte, María J.; Halilbasic, Emina; Herranz, Daniel; Álvarez, Luis; Aspichueta, Patricia; Marín, Jose J. G.; Trauner, Michael; Mato, Jose M.; Serrano, Manuel; Beraza, Naiara; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) regulates central metabolic functions such as lipogenesis, protein synthesis, gluconeogenesis and bile acid (BA) homeostasis through deacetylation. Here, we describe that SIRT1 tightly controls the regenerative response of the liver. We performed partial hepatectomy (PH) to transgenic mice that overexpress SIRT1 (SIRT). SIRT mice showed increased mortality, impaired hepatocyte proliferation, BA accumulation and profuse liver injury after surgery. The damaging phenotype in SIRT mice correlated with impaired FXR activity due to persistent deacetylation and lower protein expression that led to decreased FXR-target gene expression; SHP, BSEP and increased Cyp7A1. Next, we convincingly show that 24-norUrsodeoxycholic acid (NorUDCA) attenuates SIRT protein expression, increases the acetylation of FXR and neighboring histones, restores trimethylation of H3K4 and H3K9 and increases miR34a expression, thus re-establishing BA homeostasis. Consequently, NorUDCA restored liver regeneration in SIRT mice, which showed increased survival and hepatocyte proliferation. Furthermore, a Leucine-enriched diet restored mTOR activation, acetylation of FXR and histones, leading to an overall lower BA production through SHP-inhibition of Cyp7A1 and higher transport (BSEP) and detoxification (Sult2a1) leading to an improved liver regeneration. Finally, we found that human HCC samples have increased presence of SIRT1, which correlated with absence of FXR suggesting its oncogenic potential. Conclusions Overall, we define SIRT1 as a key regulator of the regenerative response in the liver through post-transcriptional modifications that regulate the activity of FXR, histones and mTOR. Moreover, our data suggest that SIRT1 contributes to liver tumorigenesis through dysregulation of BA homeostasis by persistent FXR deacetylation. PMID:24338587

  13. Cannabinoid modulation of hippocampal long-term memory is mediated by mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Puighermanal, Emma; Marsicano, Giovanni; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Lutz, Beat; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2009-09-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the most important negative consequences associated with cannabis consumption. We found that CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) activation transiently modulated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70S6K pathway and the protein synthesis machinery in the mouse hippocampus, which correlated with the amnesic properties of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In addition, non-amnesic doses of either the mTOR blocker rapamycin or the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin abrogated the amnesic-like effects of THC, pointing to a mechanism involving new protein synthesis. Moreover, using pharmacological and genetic tools, we found that THC long-term memory deficits were mediated by CB1Rs expressed on GABAergic interneurons through a glutamatergic mechanism, as both the amnesic-like effects and p70S6K phosphorylation were reduced in GABA-CB1R knockout mice and by NMDA blockade.

  14. Suppression of mTOR signaling pathway promotes bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into osteoblast in degenerative scoliosis: in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Yi, Xiao-Dong; Li, Chun-De

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the role of mTOR signaling pathway in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) differentiation into osteoblast in degenerative scoliosis (DS). The rat model of DS was established. Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were selected and divided into the normal control group, the positive control group (normal rats injected with rapamycin), the negative control group (DS rats injected with PBS) and the experiment group (DS rats injected with rapamycin). H&E staining was performed to observe the osteogenesis of scoliosis. The BMSCs were obtained and assigned into seven groups: the normal control group, the positive control group, the negative control group and 1.0/10.0/100.0/1000.0 nmol/L experiment groups. Flow cytometry was conducted to testify cell cycle. The mRNA and protein expressions of mTOR and osteoblastic differentiation markers were measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting. In vivo, compared with the negative control group, bone trabecular area and the number of differentiated bone cells were significantly increased in the experiment groups. In vitro, at 24 and 48 h after rapamycin treatment, compared with the negative control group, BMSCs at G0/G1 stage increased, but BMSCs at S stage decreased in the 1.0/10.0/100.0/1000.0 nmol/L experiment groups; the expressions of mTOR and p70-S6K1 proteins were reduced in the 1.0/10.0/100.0/1000.0 nmol/L experiment groups, while ALP activity, OC levels, calcium deposition, Co1-I protein expression and the mRNA expressions of OC and Co1-I were significantly increased. Suppression of mTOR signaling pathway by rapamycin could promote BMSCs differentiation into osteoblast in DS.

  15. Mio depletion links mTOR regulation to Aurora A and Plk1 activation at mitotic centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Platani, Melpomeni; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Porter, Michael; Jeyaprakash, A Arockia; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-07-06

    Coordination of cell growth and proliferation in response to nutrient supply is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. In this study, we report that Mio, a highly conserved member of the SEACAT/GATOR2 complex necessary for the activation of mTORC1 kinase, plays a critical role in mitotic spindle formation and subsequent chromosome segregation by regulating the proper concentration of active key mitotic kinases Plk1 and Aurora A at centrosomes and spindle poles. Mio-depleted cells showed reduced activation of Plk1 and Aurora A kinase at spindle poles and an impaired localization of MCAK and HURP, two key regulators of mitotic spindle formation and known substrates of Aurora A kinase, resulting in spindle assembly and cytokinesis defects. Our results indicate that a major function of Mio in mitosis is to regulate the activation/deactivation of Plk1 and Aurora A, possibly by linking them to mTOR signaling in a pathway to promote faithful mitotic progression.

  16. Mio depletion links mTOR regulation to Aurora A and Plk1 activation at mitotic centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Porter, Michael; Jeyaprakash, A. Arockia

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of cell growth and proliferation in response to nutrient supply is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. In this study, we report that Mio, a highly conserved member of the SEACAT/GATOR2 complex necessary for the activation of mTORC1 kinase, plays a critical role in mitotic spindle formation and subsequent chromosome segregation by regulating the proper concentration of active key mitotic kinases Plk1 and Aurora A at centrosomes and spindle poles. Mio-depleted cells showed reduced activation of Plk1 and Aurora A kinase at spindle poles and an impaired localization of MCAK and HURP, two key regulators of mitotic spindle formation and known substrates of Aurora A kinase, resulting in spindle assembly and cytokinesis defects. Our results indicate that a major function of Mio in mitosis is to regulate the activation/deactivation of Plk1 and Aurora A, possibly by linking them to mTOR signaling in a pathway to promote faithful mitotic progression. PMID:26124292

  17. Phosphorylation of zinc channel ZIP7 drives MAPK, PI3K and mTOR growth and proliferation signalling.

    PubMed

    Nimmanon, T; Ziliotto, S; Morris, S; Flanagan, L; Taylor, K M

    2017-02-16

    Zinc is an essential trace element participating in diverse biological processes. Cellular zinc levels are strictly controlled by two families of transport proteins: ZIP channels (SLC39A) and ZnT transporters (SLC30A). ZIP channels increase cytosolic zinc levels by importing zinc into cells or releasing zinc from intracellular stores such as the ER. Among all the 14 human members of the ZIP family, ZIP7 is a gatekeeper of zinc release from intracellular stores, requiring post-translational activation by phosphorylation on residues S275 and S276, resulting in activation of multiple downstream pathways. Employing site-directed mutagenesis, we investigated the importance of these individual serine residues as well as other predicted phosphorylation sites on ZIP7, showing that all four sites are required for maximal ZIP7 activation. Using phosphor-protein arrays, we also discovered the major signalling pathways that were activated as a direct result of ZIP7-mediated zinc release from intracellular stores. These data reveal the role of ZIP7-mediated zinc release from intracellular stores in driving major pathways, such as MAPK, mTOR and PI3K-AKT, involved in providing cell survival and proliferation and often over activated in cancer.

  18. Effect of eccentric exercise velocity on akt/mtor/p70(s6k) signaling in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Roschel, Hamilton; Ugrinowistch, Carlos; Barroso, Renato; Batista, Mauro A B; Souza, Eduardo O; Aoki, Marcelo S; Siqueira-Filho, Mario A; Zanuto, Ricardo; Carvalho, Carla R O; Neves, Manoel; Mello, Marco T; Tricoli, Valmor

    2011-04-01

    It has been suggested that muscle tension plays a major role in the activation of intracellular pathways for skeletal muscle hypertrophy via an increase in mechano growth factor (MGF) and other downstream targets. Eccentric exercise (EE) imposes a greater amount of tension on the active muscle. In particular, high-speed EE seems to exert an additional effect on muscle tension and, thus, on muscle hypertrophy. However, little is known about the effect of EE velocity on hypertrophy signaling. This study investigated the effect of acute EE-velocity manipulation on the Akt/mTORCI/p70(S6K) hypertrophy pathway. Twenty subjects were assigned to either a slow (20°·s(-1); ES) or fast EE (210°·s(-1); EF) group. Biopsies were taken from vastus lateralis at baseline (B), immediately after (T1), and 2 h after (T2) the completion of 5 sets of 8 repetitions of eccentric knee extensions. Akt, mTOR, and p70(S6K) total protein were similar between groups, and did not change postintervention. Further, Akt and p70(S6K) protein phosphorylation were higher at T2 than at B for ES and EF. MGF messenger RNA was similar between groups, and only significantly higher at T2 than at B in ES. The acute manipulation of EE velocity does not seem to differently influence intracellular hypertrophy signaling through the Akt/mTORCI/p70S6K pathway.

  19. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) and mTOR Signaling: Novel Strategies Toward the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    protein and vessel density in xenograft models with constitutive mTOR activity, either through loss of PTEN (PC3 cells) or VHL (C2 cells) [19]. Myc-CaP/AS...et al. (2006) Class II histone deacetylases are associated with VHL -independent regulation of hypoxia- inducible factor 1 alpha. Cancer Res 66: 8814

  20. A novel AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, inhibits phosphorylation of AKT downstream molecules, and activates phosphorylation of mTOR and SMG-1 dependent on the liver cancer cell type

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YUNCHENG; ZHENG, YUANWEN; FAHEEM, ALI; SUN, TIANTONG; LI, CHUNYOU; LI, ZHE; ZHAO, DIANTANG; WU, CHAO; LIU, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Due to frequent phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway dysregulation, AKT is typically accepted as a promising anticancer therapeutic target. mTOR, in particular, represents a suitable therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma, whilst suppressor with morphogenetic effect on genitalia family member-1 (SMG-1) is believed to serve a potential tumor suppressor role in human cancer. Despite SMG-1 and mTOR belonging to the same PI3K-related kinase family, the interactions between them are not yet fully understood. In the present study, a novel pyrrolopyrimidine-derived compound, AZD5363, was observed to suppress proliferation in liver cancer Hep-G2 and Huh-7 cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of downstream molecules in the AKT signal pathway, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. AZD5363 activated the phosphorylation of mTOR, dependent on the liver cancer cell type, as it may have differing effects in various liver cancer cell lines. Additionally, AZD5363 also activated SMG-1 within the same liver cancer cells types, which subsequently activated the phosphorylation of mTOR. In conclusion, the present study indicates that AZD5363 inhibited phosphorylation of AKT downstream molecules, and activated phosphorylation of mTOR and SMG-1, dependent on the liver cancer type. PMID:26998062

  1. Prevention of tumor growth driven by PIK3CA and HPV oncogenes by targeting mTOR signaling with metformin in oral squamous carcinomas expressing OCT3

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Dmitri; Vitale-Cross, Lynn; Martin, Daniel; Schneider, Abraham; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Gangane, Nitin; Carey, Thomas E.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Komarck, Christine M.; Walline, Heather M.; William, William N.; Seethala, Raja R.; Ferris, Robert; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Most head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) exhibit a persistent activation of the PI3K-mTOR signaling pathway. We have recently shown that metformin, an oral antidiabetic drug that is also used to treat lipodystrophy in HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals, diminishes mTOR activity and prevents the progression of chemically-induced experimental HNSCC premalignant lesions. Here, we explored the preclinical activity of metformin in HNSCCs harboring PIK3CA mutations and HPV oncogenes, both representing frequent HNSCC alterations, aimed at developing effective targeted preventive strategies. The biochemical and biological effects of metformin were evaluated in representative HNSCC cells expressing mutated PIK3CA or HPV oncogenes (HPV+). The oral delivery of metformin was optimized to achieve clinical relevant blood levels. Molecular determinants of metformin sensitivity were also investigated, and their expression levels examined in a large collection of HNSCC cases. We found that metformin inhibits mTOR signaling and tumor growth in HNSCC cells expressing mutated PIK3CA and HPV oncogenes, and that these activities require the expression of organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3/SLC22A3), a metformin uptake transporter. Co-expression of OCT3 and the mTOR pathway activation marker pS6 were observed in most HNSCC cases, including those arising in HIV+ patients. Activation of the PI3K-mTOR pathway is a widespread event in HNSCC, including HPV− and HPV+ lesions arising in HIV+ patients, all of which co-express OCT3. These observations may provide a rationale for the clinical evaluation of metformin to halt HNSCC development from precancerous lesions, including in HIV+ individuals at risk of developing HPV-associated cancers. PMID:25681087

  2. PI-103, a dual inhibitor of Class IA phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase and mTOR, has antileukemic activity in AML.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Chapuis, N; Bardet, V; Tamburini, J; Gallay, N; Willems, L; Knight, Z A; Shokat, K M; Azar, N; Viguié, F; Ifrah, N; Dreyfus, F; Mayeux, P; Lacombe, C; Bouscary, D

    2008-09-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathways are frequently activated in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). mTORC1 inhibition with RAD001 induces PI3K/Akt activation and both pathways are activated independently, providing a rationale for dual inhibition of both pathways. PI-103 is a new potent PI3K/Akt and mTOR inhibitor. In human leukemic cell lines and in primary blast cells from AML patients, PI-103 inhibited constitutive and growth factor-induced PI3K/Akt and mTORC1 activation. PI-103 was essentially cytostatic for cell lines and induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. In blast cells, PI-103 inhibited leukemic proliferation, the clonogenicity of leukemic progenitors and induced mitochondrial apoptosis, especially in the compartment containing leukemic stem cells. In contrast, apoptosis was not induced with RAD001 and IC87114 association, which specifically inhibits mTORC1 and p110delta activity, respectively. PI-103 had additive proapoptotic effects with etoposide in blast cells and in immature leukemic cells. Interestingly, PI-103 did not induce apoptosis in normal CD34(+) cells and had moderate effects on their clonogenic and proliferative properties. Here, we demonstrate that multitargeted therapy against PI3K/Akt and mTOR with PI-103 may be of therapeutic value in AML.

  3. The mitochondrial uncoupler DNP triggers brain cell mTOR signaling network reprogramming and CREB pathway up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yongqing; Gharavi, Robert; Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Jaewon; Siddiqui, Sana; Telljohann, Richard; Nassar, Matthew R; Cutler, Roy G; Becker, Kevin G; Mattson, Mark P

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is highly responsive to nutrient availability and ongoing activity in neuronal circuits. The molecular mechanisms by which brain cells respond to an increase in cellular energy expenditure are largely unknown. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling enhances cellular energy expenditure in mitochondria and can be induced with 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a proton ionophore previously used for weight loss. We found that DNP treatment reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, increases intracellular Ca(2+) levels and reduces oxidative stress in cerebral cortical neurons. Gene expression profiling of the cerebral cortex of DNP-treated mice revealed reprogramming of signaling cascades that included suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and insulin--PI3K - MAPK pathways, and up-regulation of tuberous sclerosis complex 2, a negative regulator of mTOR. Genes encoding proteins involved in autophagy processes were up-regulated in response to DNP. CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) signaling, Arc and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which play important roles in synaptic plasticity and adaptive cellular stress responses, were up-regulated in response to DNP, and DNP-treated mice exhibited improved performance in a test of learning and memory. Immunoblot analysis verified that key DNP-induced changes in gene expression resulted in corresponding changes at the protein level. Our findings suggest that mild mitochondrial uncoupling triggers an integrated signaling response in brain cells characterized by reprogramming of mTOR and insulin signaling, and up-regulation of pathways involved in adaptive stress responses, molecular waste disposal, and synaptic plasticity. Physiological bioenergetic challenges such as exercise and fasting can enhance neuroplasticity and protect neurons against injury and neurodegeneration. Here, we show that the mitochondrial uncoupling agent 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) elicits adaptive signaling responses in the

  4. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hagland, Hanne R.; Nilsson, Linn I.H.; Burri, Lena; Nikolaisen, Julie; Berge, Rolf K.; Tronstad, Karl J.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated mechanisms of mitochondrial regulation in rat hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) was employed to activate mitochondrial oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was confirmed that PPAR target genes were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism involved activation mTOR. -- Abstract: The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPAR{alpha}-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR.

  5. L-Arginine promotes protein synthesis and cell growth in brown adipocyte precursor cells via the mTOR signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xi; Han, Meng; Li, Defa; Hu, Shengdi; Gilbreath, Kyler R; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2017-03-04

    L-Arginine has been reported to enhance brown adipose tissue developments in fetal lambs of obese ewes, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that L-arginine stimulates growth and development of brown adipocyte precursor cells (BAPCs) through activation of mammalian target of rapamycin cell signaling. BAPCs isolated from fetal lambs at day 90 of gestation were incubated   for 6 h in arginine-free DMEM, and then cultured in DMEM with concentrations of 50, 100, 200, 500 or 1000 μmol L-arginine/L for 24-96 h. Cell proliferation, protein turnover, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and pre-adipocyte differentiation markers were determined. L-arginine treatment enhanced (P < 0.05) BAPC growth and protein synthesis, while inhibiting proteolysis in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with 50 and 100 μmol/L (the concentrations of arginine in the maternal plasma of obese ewes), 200 μmol L-arginine/L (the concentrations of arginine in the maternal plasma of obese ewes receiving arginine supplementation) increased (P < 0.05) the abundances of phosphorylated mTOR, P70(S6K) and 4EBP1, as well as the abundances of PGC1α, UCP1, BMP7 and PRDM16. These novel findings indicate that increasing extra-cellular arginine concentration from 50 to 200 µmol/L activates mTOR cell signaling in BAPCs and enhances their growth and development in a dose-dependent manner. Our results provide a mechanism for arginine supplementation to enhance the development of brown adipose tissue in fetal lambs.

  6. Modulation of mTOR Signalling Triggers the Formation of Stem Cell-like Memory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Godehard; Jandus, Camilla; Zhang, Lianjun; Grandclément, Camille; Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C.; Soneson, Charlotte; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fajas, Lluis; Held, Werner; Dormond, Olivier; Romero, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Robust, long-lasting immune responses are elicited by memory T cells that possess properties of stem cells, enabling them to persist long-term and to permanently replenish the effector pools. Thus, stem cell-like memory T (TSCM) cells are of key therapeutic value and efforts are underway to characterize TSCM cells and to identify means for their targeted induction. Here, we show that inhibition of mechanistic/mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) by rapamycin or the Wnt-β-catenin signalling activator TWS119 in activated human naive T cells leads to the induction of TSCM cells. We show that these compounds switch T cell metabolism to fatty acid oxidation as favoured metabolic programme for TSCM cell generation. Of note, pharmacologically induced TSCM cells possess superior functional features as a long-term repopulation capacity after adoptive transfer. Furthermore, we provide insights into the transcriptome of TSCM cells. Our data identify a mechanism of pharmacological mTORC1 inhibitors, allowing us to confer stemness to human naive T cells which may be significantly relevant for the design of innovative T cell-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26981571

  7. Muscle weakness and atrophy are associated with decreased regenerative capacity and changes in mTOR signaling in skeletal muscles of venerable (18-24-month-old) dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Mouisel, E; Vignaud, A; Hourdé, C; Butler-Browne, G; Ferry, A

    2010-06-01

    The muscles of mdx mice progressively deteriorate with age. We wanted to know whether this is associated with a decrease in regenerative capacity and/or changes in the mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTOR) signaling pathway. Muscles of mdx mice aged 5 weeks, 5, 12, and 18-24 months were studied. Maximal force and muscle weight of the older mice were decreased as compared to younger adult mice. Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway, i.e., phosphorylation of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) and ribosomal protein S6 was also reduced in the older mice. Moreover, 14 days after cardiotoxin injury the degree of recovery of maximal force and muscle weight were less in the older mice. In contrast to younger mice, there was also activation of the mTOR pathway during regeneration in the older mice. Progressive muscle weakness and atrophy in mdx mouse muscle is associated with a decline in regenerative potential and changes in activation of the mTOR signaling pathway.

  8. The mechanism of insulin-stimulated 4E-BP protein binding to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 and its contribution to mTOR complex 1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Rapley, Joseph; Oshiro, Noriko; Ortiz-Vega, Sara; Avruch, Joseph

    2011-11-04

    Insulin activation of mTOR complex 1 is accompanied by enhanced binding of substrates. We examined the mechanism and contribution of this enhancement to insulin activation of mTORC1 signaling in 293E and HeLa cells. In 293E, insulin increased the amount of mTORC1 retrieved by the transiently expressed nonphosphorylatable 4E-BP[5A] to an extent that varied inversely with the amount of PRAS40 bound to mTORC1. RNAi depletion of PRAS40 enhanced 4E-BP[5A] binding to ∼70% the extent of maximal insulin, and PRAS40 RNAi and insulin together did not increase 4E-BP[5A] binding beyond insulin alone, suggesting that removal of PRAS40 from mTORC1 is the predominant mechanism of an insulin-induced increase in substrate access. As regards the role of increased substrate access in mTORC1 signaling, RNAi depletion of PRAS40, although increasing 4E-BP[5A] binding, did not stimulate phosphorylation of endogenous mTORC1 substrates S6K1(Thr(389)) or 4E-BP (Thr(37)/Thr(46)), the latter already ∼70% of maximal in amino acid replete, serum-deprived 293E cells. In HeLa cells, insulin and PRAS40 RNAi also both enhanced the binding of 4E-BP[5A] to raptor but only insulin stimulated S6K1 and 4E-BP phosphorylation. Furthermore, Rheb overexpression in 293E activated mTORC1 signaling completely without causing PRAS40 release. In the presence of Rheb and insulin, PRAS40 release is abolished by Akt inhibition without diminishing mTORC1 signaling. In conclusion, dissociation of PRAS40 from mTORC1 and enhanced mTORC1 substrate binding results from Akt and mTORC1 activation and makes little or no contribution to mTORC1 signaling, which rather is determined by Rheb activation of mTOR catalytic activity, through mechanisms that remain to be fully elucidated.

  9. Regulation of mTOR activity in Snell dwarf and GH receptor gene-disrupted mice.

    PubMed

    Dominick, Graham; Berryman, Darlene E; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J; Li, Xinna; Miller, Richard A; Garcia, Gonzalo G

    2015-02-01

    The involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in lifespan control in invertebrates, calorie-restricted rodents, and extension of mouse lifespan by rapamycin have prompted speculation that diminished mTOR function may contribute to mammalian longevity in several settings. We show here that mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1) activity is indeed lower in liver, muscle, heart, and kidney tissue of Snell dwarf and global GH receptor (GHR) gene-disrupted mice (GHR-/-), consistent with previous studies. Surprisingly, activity of mTORC2 is higher in fasted Snell and GHR-/- than in littermate controls in all 4 tissues tested. Resupply of food enhanced mTORC1 activity in both controls and long-lived mutant mice but diminished mTORC2 activity only in the long-lived mice. Mice in which GHR has been disrupted only in the liver do not show extended lifespan and also fail to show the decline in mTORC1 and increase in mTORC2 seen in mice with global loss of GHR. The data suggest that the antiaging effects in the Snell dwarf and GHR-/- mice are accompanied by both a decline in mTORC1 in multiple organs and an increase in fasting levels of mTORC2. Neither the lifespan nor mTOR effects appear to be mediated by direct GH effects on liver or by the decline in plasma IGF-I, a shared trait in both global and liver-specific GHR-/- mice. Our data suggest that a more complex pattern of hormonal effects and intertissue interactions may be responsible for regulating both lifespan and mTORC2 function in these mouse models of delayed aging.

  10. PAK2 is an effector of TSC1/2 signaling independent of mTOR and a potential therapeutic target for Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Maria M.; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Queiroz, Karla C.S.; Scholma, Jetse; Goorden, Susan; Anink, Jasper; Arnold Spek, C.; Hoogeveen-Westerveld, Marianne; Bruno, Marco J.; Nellist, Mark; Elgersma, Ype; Aronica, Eleonora; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by inactivating mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 and is characterized by uncontrolled mTORC1 activation. Drugs that reduce mTOR activity are only partially successful in the treatment of TSC, suggesting that mTOR-independent pathways play a role in disease development. Here, kinome profiles of wild-type and Tsc2−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were generated, revealing a prominent role for PAK2 in signal transduction downstream of TSC1/2. Further investigation showed that the effect of the TSC1/2 complex on PAK2 is mediated through RHEB, but is independent of mTOR and p21RAC. We also demonstrated that PAK2 over-activation is likely responsible for the migratory and cell cycle abnormalities observed in Tsc2−/− MEFs. Finally, we detected high levels of PAK2 activation in giant cells in the brains of TSC patients. These results show that PAK2 is a direct effector of TSC1-TSC2-RHEB signaling and a new target for rational drug therapy in TSC. PMID:26412398

  11. Disruption of Parallel and Converging Signaling Pathways Contributes to the Synergistic Antitumor Effects of Simultaneous mTOR and EGFR Inhibition in GBM Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ravi D; Mladek, Ann C; Lamont, Jeffrey D; Goble, Jennie M; Erlichman, Charles; James, C David; Sarkaria, Jann N

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Elevated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling are known to contribute to the malignant properties of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), which include uncontrolled cell proliferation and evasion of apoptosis. Small molecule inhibitors that target these protein kinases have been evaluated in multiple clinical trials for cancer patients, including those with GBM. Here we have examined the cellular and molecular effects of a combined kinase inhibition of mTOR (rapamycin) and EGFR (EKI-785) in U87 and U251 GBM cells. Simultaneous treatment with rapamycin and EKI-785 results in synergistic antiproliferative as well as proapoptotic effects. At a molecular level, rapamycin alone significantly decreases S6 phosphorylation, whereas EKI-785 alone promotes substantially reduced signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) phosphorylation. Treatment with rapamycin alone also increases Akt phosphorylation on Ser-473, but this effect is blocked by a simultaneous administration of EKI-785. Individually, EKI-785 diminishes while rapamycin promotes the binding of the translation inhibitor eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein (4EBP1) to the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). In spite of these opposing effects, the highest level of 4EBP1-eIF4E binding occurs with the combination of the two inhibitors. These results indicate that the inhibition of EGFR and mTOR has distinct as well as common signaling consequences and provides a molecular rationale for the synergistic antitumor effects of EKI-785 and rapamycin administration. PMID:16242075

  12. Impact on Autophagy and Ultraviolet B Induced Responses of Treatment with the MTOR Inhibitors Rapamycin, Everolimus, Torin 1, and pp242 in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Song; Li, Li; Li, Min; Zhang, Mengli

    2017-01-01

    The mechanistic target of Rapamycin (MTOR) protein is a crucial signaling regulator in mammalian cells that is extensively involved in cellular biology. The function of MTOR signaling in keratinocytes remains unclear. In this study, we detected the MTOR signaling and autophagy response in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT and human epidermal keratinocytes treated with MTOR inhibitors. Moreover, we detected the impact of MTOR inhibitors on keratinocytes exposed to the common carcinogenic stressors ultraviolet B (UVB) and UVA radiation. As a result, keratinocytes were sensitive to the MTOR inhibitors Rapamycin, everolimus, Torin 1, and pp242, but the regulation of MTOR downstream signaling was distinct. Next, autophagy induction only was observed in HaCaT cells treated with Rapamycin. Furthermore, we found that MTOR signaling was insensitive to UVB but sensitive to UVA radiation. UVB treatment also had no impact on the inhibition of MTOR signaling by MTOR inhibitors. Finally, MTOR inhibition by Rapamycin, everolimus, or pp242 did not affect the series of biological events in keratinocytes exposed to UVB, including the downregulation of BiP and PERK, activation of Histone H2A and JNK, and cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP. Our study demonstrated that MTOR inhibition in keratinocytes cannot always induce autophagy, and the MTOR pathway does not play a central role in the UVB triggered cellular response.

  13. Inhibitory Effect of mTOR Activator MHY1485 on Autophagy: Suppression of Lysosomal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeon Ja; Park, Yun Jung; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Kim, Dae Hyun; Ha, Young Mi; Kim, Ji Min; Song, Yu Min; Heo, Hyoung-Sam; Yu, Byung Pal; Chun, Pusoon; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Chung, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a major degradative process responsible for the disposal of cytoplasmic proteins and dysfunctional organelles via the lysosomal pathway. During the autophagic process, cells form double-membraned vesicles called autophagosomes that sequester disposable materials in the cytoplasm and finally fuse with lysosomes. In the present study, we investigated the inhibition of autophagy by a synthesized compound, MHY1485, in a culture system by using Ac2F rat hepatocytes. Autophagic flux was measured to evaluate the autophagic activity. Autophagosomes were visualized in Ac2F cells transfected with AdGFP-LC3 by live-cell confocal microscopy. In addition, activity of mTOR, a major regulatory protein of autophagy, was assessed by western blot and docking simulation using AutoDock 4.2. In the result, treatment with MHY1485 suppressed the basal autophagic flux, and this inhibitory effect was clearly confirmed in cells under starvation, a strong physiological inducer of autophagy. The levels of p62 and beclin-1 did not show significant change after treatment with MHY1485. Decreased co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes in confocal microscopic images revealed the inhibitory effect of MHY1485 on lysosomal fusion during starvation-induced autophagy. These effects of MHY1485 led to the accumulation of LC3II and enlargement of the autophagosomes in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Furthermore, MHY1485 induced mTOR activation and correspondingly showed a higher docking score than PP242, a well-known ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, in docking simulation. In conclusion, MHY1485 has an inhibitory effect on the autophagic process by inhibition of fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes leading to the accumulation of LC3II protein and enlarged autophagosomes. MHY1485 also induces mTOR activity, providing a possibility for another regulatory mechanism of autophagy by the MHY compound. The significance of this study is the finding of a novel inhibitor of autophagy

  14. Inhibitory effect of mTOR activator MHY1485 on autophagy: suppression of lysosomal fusion.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeon Ja; Park, Yun Jung; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Kim, Dae Hyun; Ha, Young Mi; Kim, Ji Min; Song, Yu Min; Heo, Hyoung-Sam; Yu, Byung Pal; Chun, Pusoon; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Chung, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a major degradative process responsible for the disposal of cytoplasmic proteins and dysfunctional organelles via the lysosomal pathway. During the autophagic process, cells form double-membraned vesicles called autophagosomes that sequester disposable materials in the cytoplasm and finally fuse with lysosomes. In the present study, we investigated the inhibition of autophagy by a synthesized compound, MHY1485, in a culture system by using Ac2F rat hepatocytes. Autophagic flux was measured to evaluate the autophagic activity. Autophagosomes were visualized in Ac2F cells transfected with AdGFP-LC3 by live-cell confocal microscopy. In addition, activity of mTOR, a major regulatory protein of autophagy, was assessed by western blot and docking simulation using AutoDock 4.2. In the result, treatment with MHY1485 suppressed the basal autophagic flux, and this inhibitory effect was clearly confirmed in cells under starvation, a strong physiological inducer of autophagy. The levels of p62 and beclin-1 did not show significant change after treatment with MHY1485. Decreased co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes in confocal microscopic images revealed the inhibitory effect of MHY1485 on lysosomal fusion during starvation-induced autophagy. These effects of MHY1485 led to the accumulation of LC3II and enlargement of the autophagosomes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, MHY1485 induced mTOR activation and correspondingly showed a higher docking score than PP242, a well-known ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, in docking simulation. In conclusion, MHY1485 has an inhibitory effect on the autophagic process by inhibition of fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes leading to the accumulation of LC3II protein and enlarged autophagosomes. MHY1485 also induces mTOR activity, providing a possibility for another regulatory mechanism of autophagy by the MHY compound. The significance of this study is the finding of a novel inhibitor of autophagy

  15. Judicious Toggling of mTOR Activity to Combat Insulin Resistance and Cancer: Current Evidence and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Pei Shi; Wang, Louis Z.; Dai, Xiaoyun; Tseng, Sheng Hsuan; Loo, Shang Jun; Sethi, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), via its two distinct multiprotein complexes, mTORC1, and mTORC2, plays a central role in the regulation of cellular growth, metabolism, and migration. A dysregulation of the mTOR pathway has in turn been implicated in several pathological conditions including insulin resistance and cancer. Overactivation of mTORC1 and disruption of mTORC2 function have been reported to induce insulin resistance. On the other hand, aberrant mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling via either genetic alterations or increased expression of proteins regulating mTOR and its downstream targets have contributed to cancer development. These underlined the attractiveness of mTOR as a therapeutic target to overcome both insulin resistance and cancer. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the notion of intermittent, low dose rapamycin for treating insulin resistance. It further highlights recent data on the continuous use of high dose rapamycin analogs and related second generation mTOR inhibitors for cancer eradication, for overcoming chemoresistance and for tumor stem cell suppression. Within these contexts, the potential challenges associated with the use of mTOR inhibitors are also discussed. PMID:27826244

  16. Activation of mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, also known as mammalian target of rapamycin) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation and survival. These effects are cell-type-specific, and are elicited in response to stimulation by growth factors, hormones and cytokines, as well as to internal and external metabolic cues. Rapamycin was initially developed as an inhibitor of T-cell proliferation and allograft rejection in the organ transplant setting. Subsequently, its molecular target (mTOR) was identified as a component of two interacting complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, that regulate T-cell lineage specification and macrophage differentiation. mTORC1 drives the proinflammatory expansion of T helper (TH) type 1, TH17, and CD4−CD8− (double-negative, DN) T cells. Both mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibit the development of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory (TREG) cells and, indirectly, mTORC2 favours the expansion of Tfollicular helper (TFH) cells which, similarly to DN T cells, promote B-cell activation and autoantibody production. In contrast to this proinflammatory effect of mTORC2, mTORC1 favours, to some extent, an anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization that is protective against infections and tissue inflammation. Outside the immune system, mTORC1 controls fibroblast proliferation and chondrocyte survival, with implications for tissue fibrosis and osteoarthritis, respectively. Rapamycin (which primarily inhibits mTORC1), ATP-competitive, dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors and upstream regulators of the mTOR pathway are being developed to treat autoimmune, hyperproliferative and degenerative diseases. In this regard, mTOR blockade promises to increase life expectancy through treatment and prevention of rheumatic diseases. PMID:26698023

  17. mTOR inhibitors counteract tamoxifen-induced activation of breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Karthik, Govindasamy-Muralidharan; Ma, Ran; Lövrot, John; Kis, Lorand Levente; Lindh, Claes; Blomquist, Lennart; Fredriksson, Irma; Bergh, Jonas; Hartman, Johan

    2015-10-10

    Breast cancer cells with stem cell characteristics (CSC) are a distinct cell population with phenotypic similarities to mammary stem cells. CSCs are important drivers of tumorigenesis and the metastatic process. Tamoxifen is the most widely used hormonal therapy for estrogen receptor (ER) positive cancers. In our study, tamoxifen was effective in reducing proliferation of ER + adherent cancer cells, but not their CSC population. We isolated, expanded and incubated CSC from seven breast cancers with or without tamoxifen. By genome-wide transcriptional analysis we identified tamoxifen-induced transcriptional pathways associated with ribosomal biogenesis and mRNA translation, both regulated by the mTOR-pathway. We observed induction of the key mTOR downstream targets S6K1, S6RP and 4E-BP1 in-patient derived CSCs by tamoxifen on protein level. Using the mTOR inhibitors rapamycin, everolimus and PF-04691502 (a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor) and in combination with tamoxifen, significant reduction in mammosphere formation was observed. Hence, we suggest that the CSC population play a significant role during endocrine resistance through activity of the mTOR pathway. In addition, tamoxifen further stimulates the mTOR-pathway but can be antagonized using mTOR-inhibitors.

  18. Timosaponin B-II ameliorates diabetic nephropathy via TXNIP, mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways in alloxan-induced mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yong-Liang; Guo, Chang-Run; Cui, Ling-Ling; Ruan, Shi-Xia; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Ji, De; Yang, Zhong-Lin; Li, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background Many synthesized drugs with clinical severe side effects have been used for diabetic nephropathy (DN) treatment. Therefore, it is urgent and necessary to identify natural and safe agents to remedy DN. Timosaponin B-II (TB-II), a major steroidal saponin constituent in Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bunge, exhibits various activities, including anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic functions. However, the anti-DN effects and potential mechanism(s) of TB-II have not been previously reported. Purpose To investigate the effect of TB-II on DN in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Methods TB-II was isolated and purified from A. asphodeloides Bunge using macroporous adsorption resin and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. The effect of TB-II on DN was evaluated in alloxan-induced diabetic mice using an assay kit and immunohistochemical determination in vivo. The expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP), and nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways was also measured using Western blot analysis. Results TB-II significantly decreased the blood glucose levels and ameliorated renal histopathological injury in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. In addition, TB-II remarkably decreased the levels of renal function biochemical factors, such as kidney index, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, urinary uric acid, urine creatinine, and urine protein, and it reduced lipid metabolism levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides and the levels of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in alloxan-induced mice. Furthermore, TB-II inhibited the expression of mTOR, TXNIP, and NF-κB. Conclusion The results revealed that TB-II plays an important role in DN via TXNIP, mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways. Overall, TB-II exhibited a prominently ameliorative effect on alloxan-induced DN. PMID:26664046

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation in response to nutrient excess in rats through mTOR and FOXM1.

    PubMed

    Zarrouki, Bader; Benterki, Isma; Fontés, Ghislaine; Peyot, Marie-Line; Seda, Ondrej; Prentki, Marc; Poitout, Vincent

    2014-03-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning the compensatory increase in β-cell mass in response to insulin resistance are essentially unknown. We previously reported that a 72-h coinfusion of glucose and Intralipid (GLU+IL) induces insulin resistance and a marked increase in β-cell proliferation in 6-month-old, but not in 2-month-old, Wistar rats. The aim of the current study was to identify the mechanisms underlying nutrient-induced β-cell proliferation in this model. A transcriptomic analysis identified a central role for the forkhead transcription factor FOXM1 and its targets, and for heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factor (HB-EGF), a ligand of the EGF receptor (EGFR), in nutrient-induced β-cell proliferation. Phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) target, was increased in islets from GLU+IL-infused 6-month-old rats. HB-EGF induced proliferation of insulin-secreting MIN6 cells and isolated rat islets, and this effect was blocked in MIN6 cells by the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 or the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Coinfusion of either AG1478 or rapamycin blocked the increase in FOXM1 signaling, β-cell proliferation, and β-cell mass and size in response to GLU+IL infusion in 6-month-old rats. We conclude that chronic nutrient excess promotes β-cell mass expansion via a pathway that involves EGFR signaling, mTOR activation, and FOXM1-mediated cell proliferation.

  20. Angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) is an independent prognosticator of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and promotes cells proliferation via mTOR activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shau-Hsuan; Lu, Hung-I; Chang, Alice Y.W.; Huang, Wan-Ting; Lin, Wei-Che; Lee, Ching-Chang; Tien, Wan-Yu; Lan, Ya-Chun; Tsai, Hsin-Ting; Chen, Chang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the angiotensin II/ angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) and angiotensin II type II receptor (AT2R) signaling pathway in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the expression levels of AT1R and AT2R in tissues from 152 surgically resected ESCC patients, and those expression levels were then correlated with treatment outcomes. The angiotensin II/AT1R/AT2R signaling pathway and its biological effects in the context of ESCC were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results In human samples, AT1R overexpression was univariately associated with inferior overall survival and remained multivariately independent (hazard ratio=1.812). In vitro, angiotensin II stimulated the growth of ESCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with irbesartan or AT1R-RNAi knockdown but not treatment with PD123319 significantly decreased the level of angiotensin II-induced ESCC cell proliferation. Angiotensin II also caused mTOR activation in a dose-dependent manner, and everolimus or mTOR-RNAi knockdown significantly suppressed the level of angiotensin II-induced ESCC cell proliferation. Furthermore, AT1R-RNAi knockdown suppressed the activation of mTOR. Clinically, AT1R expression was also correlated with phosphorylated mTOR expression. In a xenograft model, local angiotensin II injection enhanced tumor growth, and this effect could be decreased by treatment with irbesartan or everolimus. In a 4-NQO-induced-ESCC murine model, irbesartan significantly decreased the incidence of esophageal tumor. Conclusions These findings suggest that AT1R overexpression is an independent adverse prognosticator for patients with ESCC and that angiotensin II/AT1R signaling stimulates ESCC growth, in part through mTOR activation. PMID:27564102

  1. Ampelopsin attenuates brain aging of D-gal-induced rats through miR-34a-mediated SIRT1/mTOR signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianbing; Li, Jie; Yang, Xiaoqi; Fan, Jingjing; Yang, Yi; Chen, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The underlying molecular mechanisms for aging-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not fully understood. Currently, growing evidences have revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in aging and aging-related diseases. The up-regulation of miR-34a has been reported to be associated with aging-related diseases, and thus it should be a promising therapeutic target. Ampelopsin, also called dihydromyricetin (DHM), a natural flavonoid from Chinese herb Ampelopsis grossedentata, has been reported to possess multiple pharmacological functions including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-cancer functions. Meanwhile, it has also gained tremendous attention against neurodegenerative diseases as an anti-aging compound. In the present study, the model rats with D-gal-induced brain aging revealed an obvious expression of miR-34a; in contrast, it could be significantly suppressed upon DHM treatment. In addition, target genes associated with miR-34a in the presence of DHM treatment were also explored. DHM supplementation inhibited D-gal-induced apoptosis and rescued impaired autophagy of neurons in hippocampus tissue. Moreover, DHM activated autophagy through up-regulated SIRT1 and down-regulated mTOR signal pathways due to the down-regulated miR-34a. In conclusion, DHM can execute the prevention and treatment of D-gal-induced brain aging by miR-34a-mediated SIRT1-mTOR signal pathway. PMID:27780933

  2. Determination and validation of mTOR kinase-domain 3D structure by homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Lakhlili, Wiame; Chevé, Gwénaël; Yasri, Abdelaziz; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is considered as one of the commonly activated and deregulated signaling pathways in human cancer. mTOR is associated with other proteins in two molecular complexes: mTOR complex 1/Raptor and the mTOR complex 2/Rictor. Using the crystal structure of the related lipid kinase PI3Kγ, we built a model of the catalytic region of mTOR. The modeling of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the mTOR was performed by homology modeling program SWISS-MODEL. The quality and validation of the obtained model were performed using PROCHECK and PROVE softwares. The overall stereochemical property of the protein was assessed by the Ramachandran plot. The model validation was also done by docking of known inhibitors. In this paper, we describe and validate a 3D model for the mTOR catalytic site.

  3. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Hikaru; Ikegami, Ayaka; Kaneko, Chiaki; Kakuma, Hitomi; Nishi, Hisano; Tanaka, Noriko; Aoyama, Michiko; Usami, Makoto; Okimura, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH), prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex)-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs). Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR) mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex’s action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles. PMID:26086773

  4. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Hikaru; Ikegami, Ayaka; Kaneko, Chiaki; Kakuma, Hitomi; Nishi, Hisano; Tanaka, Noriko; Aoyama, Michiko; Usami, Makoto; Okimura, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH), prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex)-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs). Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR) mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex's action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles.

  5. Chronic hypoxia impairs murine hippocampal development and depletes the postnatal progenitor pool by attenuating mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Lakshmi; Kong, Xiangmei; Gilley, Jennifer A.; Kernie, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia (CH) is a major risk factor for impaired cognitive function in various disease states, particularly in the context of cyanotic congenital heart disease. While most brain development occurs prenatally, the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus harbors progenitor stem cells that contribute to its ongoing development postnatally. It is unclear how exposure to CH might affect postnatal hippocampal development, so we utilized a transgenic mouse that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) within this progenitor population to determine the effect of CH on the DG. We find that exposure to 10% oxygen from postnatal day 3 to 28, results in a smaller DG with long-term impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis. Since the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a well-known regulator of cell proliferation and growth and is sensitive to hypoxia, we investigated its activation upon exposure to CH and find it to be attenuated specifically in neural progenitor cells. Systemic inhibition of the mTOR pathway using rapamycin also caused impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis that mimics exposure to CH. Our findings demonstrate that CH results in long-term impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis and is mediated, in part, by attenuation of the mTOR pathway. PMID:21532529

  6. DDX5 promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo through mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Du, Cheng; Li, Dan-qi; Li, Na; Chen, Li; Li, Shi-sen; Yang, Yang; Hou, Ming-xiao; Xie, Man-jiang; Zheng, Zhen-dong

    2017-01-01

    DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box helicase 5 (DDX5) is an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that is overexpressed in various malignancies. Increasing evidence suggests that DDX5 participates in carcinogenesis and cancer progression via promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. However, the functional role of DDX5 in gastric cancer is largely unknown. In this study, we observed that DDX5 was significantly up-regulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with the paired adjacent normal tissues. The expression of DDX5 correlated strongly with Ki67 index and pathological stage of gastric cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies suggested that knockdown of DDX5 inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and xenografts growth, whereas ectopic expression of DDX5 promoted these cellular functions. Mechanically, DDX5 induced gastric cancer cell growth by activating mTOR/S6K1. Treatment of everolimus, the specific mTOR inhibitor, significantly attenuated DDX5-mediated cell proliferation. Interestingly, the expression of DDX5 and p-mTOR in gastric cancer tissues demonstrated a positive correlation. Taken together, these results revealed a novel role of DDX5 in gastric cancer cell proliferation via the mTOR pathway. Therefore, DDX5 may serve as a therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:28216662

  7. Dual Inhibition of PI3K and mTOR Signaling Pathways Decreases Human Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor (PNET) Metastatic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Djukom, Clarisse; Porro, Laura J.; Mrazek, Amy; Townsend, Courtney M.; Hellmich, Mark R.; Chao, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) have limited therapeutic options. RAD001, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, has been shown to increase progression-free survival, but not overall survival, indicating a need to identify additional therapeutic targets. Inhibition of mTORC1 by RAD001 may induce upstream AKT upregulation. We hypothesized that dual inhibition of AKT along with mTOR will overcome the limited activity of RAD001 alone. Methods The BON cell line has been used as a model to study PNET cell biology. Western blots and cell growth assays were performed with mTOR inhibitor RAD001 (50 nM), MEK inhibitor PD0325901 (50 nM), PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (25 μM) or vehicle control. Nude mice were treated daily for 6 weeks with RAD001 (oral gavage), LY29400 (SQ) one week after intrasplenic injection of BON cells. Results Cellular proliferation was most attenuated with the combination therapy LY29400 and RAD001. Similarly, the volume of liver metastasis was lowest in the group treated with both LY29400 (100 mg/kg/week, SQ) and RAD001 (2.5 mg/kg/d) compared to vehicle (p=0.04). Conclusion The combination LY29400 and RAD001 decreased the cell growth in vitro and progression of liver metastasis in vivo compared vehicle or to single drug. PMID:24263107

  8. A Drosophila Model of Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease Demonstrates Lysosomal-Autophagic Defects and Altered mTOR Signalling and Is Functionally Rescued by Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Grönke, Sebastian; Castillo-Quan, Jorge Iván; Woodling, Nathaniel S.; Li, Li; Sirka, Ernestas; Gegg, Matthew; Mills, Kevin; Hardy, John; Bjedov, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) mutations are associated with Gaucher disease (GD), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by functional deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (GBA), a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes glucosylceramide to ceramide and glucose. Neuronopathic forms of GD can be associated with rapid neurological decline (Type II) or manifest as a chronic form (Type III) with a wide spectrum of neurological signs. Furthermore, there is now a well-established link between GBA1 mutations and Parkinson's disease (PD), with heterozygote mutations in GBA1 considered the commonest genetic defect in PD. Here we describe a novel Drosophila model of GD that lacks the two fly GBA1 orthologs. This knock-out model recapitulates the main features of GD at the cellular level with severe lysosomal defects and accumulation of glucosylceramide in the fly brain. We also demonstrate a block in autophagy flux in association with reduced lifespan, age-dependent locomotor deficits and accumulation of autophagy substrates in dGBA-deficient fly brains. Furthermore, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is downregulated in dGBA knock-out flies, with a concomitant upregulation of Mitf gene expression, the fly ortholog of mammalian TFEB, likely as a compensatory response to the autophagy block. Moreover, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin is able to partially ameliorate the lifespan, locomotor, and oxidative stress phenotypes. Together, our results demonstrate that this dGBA1-deficient fly model is a useful platform for the further study of the role of lysosomal-autophagic impairment and the potential therapeutic benefits of rapamycin in neuronopathic GD. These results also have important implications for the role of autophagy and mTOR signaling in GBA1-associated PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We developed a Drosophila model of neuronopathic GD by knocking-out the fly orthologs of the GBA1 gene, demonstrating abnormal lysosomal pathology in the fly brain. Functioning lysosomes are

  9. Transcriptional regulation of the stress response by mTOR.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, Jose; Ortells, M Carmen; Tejedor, Sonia; Buxadé, Maria; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation that integrates inputs from growth factor receptors, nutrient availability, intracellular ATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate), and a variety of stressors. Since early works in the mid-1990s uncovered the role of mTOR in stimulating protein translation, this kinase has emerged as a rather multifaceted regulator of numerous processes. Whereas mTOR is generally activated by growth- and proliferation-stimulating signals, its activity can be reduced and even suppressed when cells are exposed to a variety of stress conditions. However, cells can also adapt to stress while maintaining their growth capacity and mTOR function. Despite knowledge accumulated on how stress represses mTOR, less is known about mTOR influencing stress responses. In this review, we discuss the capability of mTOR, in particular mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), to activate stress-responsive transcription factors, and we outline open questions for future investigation.

  10. Inducible nitric oxide synthase drives mTOR pathway activation and proliferation of human melanoma by reversible nitrosylation of TSC2.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Jayaraman, Padmini; Parikh, Falguni; Davies, Michael A; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Milton, Denái R; Chipuk, Jerry E; Grimm, Elizabeth A; Estrada, Yeriel; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Sikora, Andrew G

    2014-02-15

    Melanoma is one of the cancers of fastest-rising incidence in the world. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is overexpressed in melanoma and other cancers, and previous data suggest that iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) drive survival and proliferation of human melanoma cells. However, specific mechanisms through which this occurs are poorly defined. One candidate is the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway, which plays a major role in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis of melanoma and other cancers. We used the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay to test the hypothesis that melanoma growth is regulated by iNOS-dependent mTOR pathway activation. Both pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA-mediated gene silencing of iNOS suppressed melanoma proliferation and in vivo growth on the CAM in human melanoma models. This was associated with strong downregulation of mTOR pathway activation by Western blot analysis of p-mTOR, p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p-P70S6K), p-S6RP, and p-4EBP1. iNOS expression and NO were associated with reversible nitrosylation of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 2, and inhibited dimerization of TSC2 with its inhibitory partner TSC1, enhancing GTPase activity of its target Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb), a critical activator of mTOR signaling. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from stage III melanoma patients showed a significant correlation between iNOS expression levels and expression of the mTOR pathway members. Exogenously supplied NO was also sufficient to reverse the mTOR pathway inhibition by the B-Raf inhibitor vemurafenib. In summary, covalent modification of TSC2 by iNOS-derived NO is associated with impaired TSC2/TSC1 dimerization, mTOR pathway activation, and proliferation of human melanoma. This model is consistent with the known association of iNOS overexpression and poor prognosis in melanoma and other cancers.

  11. The ketogenic diet inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Sharon S; Rensing, Nicholas R; Thio, Liu Lin; Yamada, Kelvin A; Wong, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for epilepsy, but its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We investigated the hypothesis that the KD inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway signaling. The expression of pS6 and pAkt, markers of mTOR pathway activation, was reduced in hippocampus and liver of rats fed KD. In the kainate model of epilepsy, KD blocked the hippocampal pS6 elevation that occurs after status epilepticus. Because mTOR signaling has been implicated in epileptogenesis, these results suggest that the KD may have anticonvulsant or antiepileptogenic actions via mTOR pathway inhibition.

  12. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong; Jiang, Qinyang; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-07-17

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7{sup CreER} and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes. - Highlights: • Pax7{sup CreER} was used to delete Mtor gene in satellite cells. • Satellite cell specific deletion of Mtor impairs muscle regeneration. • mTOR is necessary for satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. • Deletion of Mtor leads to reduced expression of key myogenic genes.

  13. Decreased mTOR signalling reduces mitochondrial ROS in brain via accumulation of the telomerase protein TERT within mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Tengfei; Bell, Amy; Hill, Kirsten N.; von Zglinicki, Thomas; Saretzki, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase in its canonical function maintains telomeres in dividing cells. In addition, the telomerase protein TERT has non-telomeric functions such as shuttling to mitochondria resulting in a decreased oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. TERT protein persists in adult neurons and can co-localise to mitochondria under various stress conditions. We show here that TERT expression decreased in mouse brain during aging while release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the mitochondrial electron transport chain increased. Dietary restriction (DR) caused accumulation of TERT protein in mouse brain mitochondria correlating to decreased ROS release and improved learning and spatial short-term memory. Decreased mTOR signalling is a mediator of DR. Accordingly, feeding mice with rapamycin increased brain mitochondrial TERT and reduced ROS release. Importantly, the beneficial effects of rapamycin on mitochondrial function were absent in brains and fibroblasts from first generation TERT −/− mice, and when TERT shuttling was inhibited by the Src kinase inhibitor bosutinib. Taken together, our data suggests that the mTOR signalling pathway impinges on the mitochondrial localisation of TERT protein, which might in turn contribute to the protection of the brain by DR or rapamycin against age-associated mitochondrial ROS increase and cognitive decline. PMID:27777385

  14. Structure–activity relationships study of mTOR kinase inhibition using QSAR and structure-based drug design approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lakhlili, Wiame; Yasri, Abdelaziz; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of clinically relevant inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) for anticancer therapy has proved to be a challenging task. The quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) approach is a very useful and widespread technique for ligand-based drug design, which can be used to identify novel and potent mTOR inhibitors. In this study, we performed two-dimensional QSAR tests, and molecular docking validation tests of a series of mTOR ATP-competitive inhibitors to elucidate their structural properties associated with their activity. The QSAR tests were performed using partial least square method with a correlation coefficient of r2=0.799 and a cross-validation of q2=0.714. The chemical library screening was done by associating ligand-based to structure-based approach using the three-dimensional structure of mTOR developed by homology modeling. We were able to select 22 compounds from two databases as inhibitors of the mTOR kinase active site. We believe that the method and applications highlighted in this study will help future efforts toward the design of selective ATP-competitive inhibitors. PMID:27980424

  15. MTOR signaling and ubiquitin-proteosome gene expression in the preservation of fat free mass following high protein, calorie restricted weight loss

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Caloric restriction is one of the most efficient ways to promote weight loss and is known to activate protective metabolic pathways. Frequently reported with weight loss is the undesirable consequence of fat free (lean muscle) mass loss. Weight loss diets with increased dietary protein intake are popular and may provide additional benefits through preservation of fat free mass compared to a standard protein, high carbohydrate diet. However, the precise mechanism by which a high protein diet may mitigate dietary weight loss induced reductions in fat free mass has not been fully elucidated. Maintenance of fat free mass is dependent upon nutrient stimulation of protein synthesis via the mTOR complex, although during caloric restriction a decrease (atrophy) in skeletal muscle may be driven by a homeostatic shift favouring protein catabolism. This review evaluates the relationship between the macronutrient composition of calorie restricted diets and weight loss using metabolic indicators. Specifically we evaluate the effect of increased dietary protein intake and caloric restricted diets on gene expression in skeletal muscle, particularly focusing on biosynthesis, degradation and the expression of genes in the ubiquitin-proteosome (UPP) and mTOR signaling pathways, including MuRF-1, MAFbx/atrogin-1, mTORC1, and S6K1. PMID:22974011

  16. Clustered, Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-coupled Affinity Purification/Mass Spectrometry Analysis Revealed a Novel Role of Neurofibromin in mTOR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Gao, Min; Choi, Jong Min; Kim, Beom-Jun; Zhou, Mao-Tian; Chen, Zhen; Jain, Antrix N; Jung, Sung Yun; Yuan, Jingsong; Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Yi; Chen, Junjie

    2017-04-01

    Neurofibromin (NF1) is a well known tumor suppressor that is commonly mutated in cancer patients. It physically interacts with RAS and negatively regulates RAS GTPase activity. Despite the importance of NF1 in cancer, a high quality endogenous NF1 interactome has yet to be established. In this study, we combined clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated gene knock-out technology with affinity purification using antibodies against endogenous proteins, followed by mass spectrometry analysis, to sensitively and accurately detect NF1 protein-protein interactions in unaltered in vivo settings. Using this system, we analyzed endogenous NF1-associated protein complexes and identified 49 high-confidence candidate interaction proteins, including RAS and other functionally relevant proteins. Through functional validation, we found that NF1 negatively regulates mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling (mTOR) in a LAMTOR1-dependent manner. In addition, the cell growth and survival of NF1-deficient cells have become dependent on hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway, and the tumorigenic properties of these cells have become dependent on LAMTOR1. Taken together, our findings may provide novel insights into therapeutic approaches targeting NF1-deficient tumors.

  17. Activation of 5-HT7 receptor stimulates neurite elongation through mTOR, Cdc42 and actin filaments dynamics.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Luisa; Giuliano, Teresa; Volpicelli, Floriana; De Stefano, M Egle; Lombardi, Loredana; Chambery, Angela; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Bellenchi, Gian C; di Porzio, Umberto; Crispino, Marianna; Perrone-Capano, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7R) plays a crucial role in shaping neuronal morphology during embryonic and early postnatal life. Here we show that pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT7R using a highly selective agonist, LP-211, enhances neurite outgrowth in neuronal primary cultures from the cortex, hippocampus and striatal complex of embryonic mouse brain, through multiple signal transduction pathways. All these signaling systems, involving mTOR, the Rho GTPase Cdc42, Cdk5, and ERK, are known to converge on the reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins that subserve neurite outgrowth. Indeed, our data indicate that neurite elongation stimulated by 5-HT7R is modulated by drugs affecting actin polymerization. In addition, we show, by 2D Western blot analyses, that treatment of neuronal cultures with LP-211 alters the expression profile of cofilin, an actin binding protein involved in microfilaments dynamics. Furthermore, by using microfluidic chambers that physically separate axons from the soma and dendrites, we demonstrate that agonist-dependent activation of 5-HT7R stimulates axonal elongation. Our results identify for the first time several signal transduction pathways, activated by stimulation of 5-HT7R, that converge to promote cytoskeleton reorganization and consequent modulation of axonal elongation. Therefore, the activation of 5-HT7R might represent one of the key elements regulating CNS connectivity and plasticity during development.

  18. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  19. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong; Jiang, Qinyang; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Kuang, Shihuan

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7(CreER) and Mtor(flox/flox) mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes.

  20. mTOR activity in AIDS-related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Perez, Julio A.; Preziosi, Michael; King, Charles C.; Jones, George A.; Jain, Sonia; Sun, Xiaoying; Reid, Erin G.; VandenBerg, Scott; Wang, Huan-You

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients infected with HIV have a significantly increased risk of developing non–Hodgkin lymphomas despite the widespread use of HAART. To investigate mTOR pathway activity in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma AR-DLBCL, we used immunohistochemistry to examine the presence of the phosphorylated 70 ribosomal S6 protein-kinase (p70S6K), an extensively studied effector of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) and the phosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog (pPTEN), a negative regulator of mTORC1 pathway. Materials and methods We evaluated tissue samples from 126 patients with AR-DLBCL. Among them, 98 samples were from tissue microarrays (TMAs) supplied by the Aids and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR), the remaining 28 samples were from cases diagnosed and treated at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). The presence of p70S6K was evaluated with two antibodies directed against the combined epitopes Ser235/236 and Ser240/244, respectively; and additional monoclonal anti-bodies were used to identify pPTEN and phosphorylated proline-rich Akt substrate of 40kDa (pPRAS40). The degree of intensity and percentage of cells positive for p70S6K and pPTEN were assessed in all the samples. In addition, a subgroup of 28 patients from UCSD was studied to assess the presence of pPRAS40, an insulin-regulated activator of the mTORC1. The expression of each of these markers was correlated with clinical and histopathologic features. Results The majority of the patients evaluated were males (88%); only two cases (1.6%) were older than 65 years of age. We found high levels of both p70S6K-paired epitopes studied, 48% positivity against Ser235/236 (44% in ACSR and 64% in UCSD group), and 86% positivity against Ser240/244 (82% in ACSR and 100% in UCSD group). We observed more positive cells and stronger intensity with epitope Ser240/244 in comparison to Ser235/236 (p<0.0001). The degree of intensity and percentage of cells positive

  1. Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gordon I; Yoshino, Jun; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L; Klein, Seth J; Magkos, Faidon; Reeds, Dominic N; Klein, Samuel; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    Increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, and intravenous amino acid infusion blunts insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We tested the hypothesis that protein ingestion impairs insulin-mediated glucose disposal by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling, which can inhibit AKT. We measured glucose disposal and muscle p-mTOR(Ser2448), p-AKT(Ser473), and p-AKT(Thr308) in 22 women during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with and without concomitant ingestion of whey protein (0.6 g/kg fat-free mass; n = 11) or leucine that matched the amount given with whey protein (n = 11). Both whey protein and leucine ingestion raised plasma leucine concentration by approximately twofold and muscle p-mTOR(Ser2448) by ∼30% above the values observed in the control (no amino acid ingestion) studies; p-AKT(Ser473) and p-AKT(Thr308) were not affected by whey protein or leucine ingestion. Whey protein ingestion decreased insulin-mediated glucose disposal (median 38.8 [quartiles 30.8, 61.8] vs. 51.9 [41.0, 77.3] µmol glucose/µU insulin · mL(-1) · min(-1); P < 0.01), whereas ingestion of leucine did not (52.3 [43.3, 65.4] vs. 52.3 [43.9, 73.2]). These results indicate that 1) protein ingestion causes insulin resistance and could be an important regulator of postprandial glucose homeostasis and 2) the insulin-desensitizing effect of protein ingestion is not due to inhibition of AKT by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling.

  2. Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gordon I.; Yoshino, Jun; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L.; Klein, Seth J.; Magkos, Faidon; Reeds, Dominic N.; Klein, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, and intravenous amino acid infusion blunts insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We tested the hypothesis that protein ingestion impairs insulin-mediated glucose disposal by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling, which can inhibit AKT. We measured glucose disposal and muscle p-mTORSer2448, p-AKTSer473, and p-AKTThr308 in 22 women during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with and without concomitant ingestion of whey protein (0.6 g/kg fat-free mass; n = 11) or leucine that matched the amount given with whey protein (n = 11). Both whey protein and leucine ingestion raised plasma leucine concentration by approximately twofold and muscle p-mTORSer2448 by ∼30% above the values observed in the control (no amino acid ingestion) studies; p-AKTSer473 and p-AKTThr308 were not affected by whey protein or leucine ingestion. Whey protein ingestion decreased insulin-mediated glucose disposal (median 38.8 [quartiles 30.8, 61.8] vs. 51.9 [41.0, 77.3] µmol glucose/µU insulin · mL−1 · min−1; P < 0.01), whereas ingestion of leucine did not (52.3 [43.3, 65.4] vs. 52.3 [43.9, 73.2]). These results indicate that 1) protein ingestion causes insulin resistance and could be an important regulator of postprandial glucose homeostasis and 2) the insulin-desensitizing effect of protein ingestion is not due to inhibition of AKT by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling. PMID:25475435

  3. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M.; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A.; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells. PMID:26384306

  4. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Bernhard F; Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Prokhorov, Alexandr; Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-06

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells.

  5. Placental mTOR links maternal nutrient availability to fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Roos, Sara; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling pathway functions as a nutrient sensor, both in individual cells and, more globally, in organs such as the fat body in Drosophila and the hypothalamus in the rat. The activity of placental amino acid transporters is decreased in IUGR (intrauterine growth restriction), and recent experimental evidence suggests that these changes contribute directly to the restricted fetal growth. We have shown that mTOR regulates the activity of the placental L-type amino acid transporter system and that placental mTOR activity is decreased in IUGR. The present review summarizes the emerging evidence implicating placental mTOR signalling as a key mechanism linking maternal nutrient and growth factor concentrations to amino acid transport in the human placenta. Since fetal growth is critically dependent on placental nutrient transport, placental mTOR signalling plays an important role in the regulation of fetal growth.

  6. Unbiased RNAi screen for hepcidin regulators links hepcidin suppression to proliferative Ras/RAF and nutrient-dependent mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Mleczko-Sanecka, Katarzyna; Roche, Franziska; da Silva, Ana Rita; Call, Debora; D'Alessio, Flavia; Ragab, Anan; Lapinski, Philip E; Ummanni, Ramesh; Korf, Ulrike; Oakes, Christopher; Damm, Georg; D'Alessandro, Lorenza A; Klingmüller, Ursula; King, Philip D; Boutros, Michael; Hentze, Matthias W; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2014-03-06

    The hepatic hormone hepcidin is a key regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Its expression is largely regulated by 2 signaling pathways: the "iron-regulated" bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and the inflammatory JAK-STAT pathways. To obtain broader insights into cellular processes that modulate hepcidin transcription and to provide a resource to identify novel genetic modifiers of systemic iron homeostasis, we designed an RNA interference (RNAi) screen that monitors hepcidin promoter activity after the knockdown of 19 599 genes in hepatocarcinoma cells. Interestingly, many of the putative hepcidin activators play roles in signal transduction, inflammation, or transcription, and affect hepcidin transcription through BMP-responsive elements. Furthermore, our work sheds light on new components of the transcriptional machinery that maintain steady-state levels of hepcidin expression and its responses to the BMP- and interleukin-6-triggered signals. Notably, we discover hepcidin suppression mediated via components of Ras/RAF MAPK and mTOR signaling, linking hepcidin transcriptional control to the pathways that respond to mitogen stimulation and nutrient status. Thus using a combination of RNAi screening, reverse phase protein arrays, and small molecules testing, we identify links between the control of systemic iron homeostasis and critical liver processes such as regeneration, response to injury, carcinogenesis, and nutrient metabolism.

  7. Unbiased RNAi screen for hepcidin regulators links hepcidin suppression to proliferative Ras/RAF and nutrient-dependent mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mleczko-Sanecka, Katarzyna; Roche, Franziska; Rita da Silva, Ana; Call, Debora; D’Alessio, Flavia; Ragab, Anan; Lapinski, Philip E.; Ummanni, Ramesh; Korf, Ulrike; Oakes, Christopher; Damm, Georg; D’Alessandro, Lorenza A.; Klingmüller, Ursula; King, Philip D.; Boutros, Michael; Hentze, Matthias W.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatic hormone hepcidin is a key regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Its expression is largely regulated by 2 signaling pathways: the “iron-regulated” bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and the inflammatory JAK-STAT pathways. To obtain broader insights into cellular processes that modulate hepcidin transcription and to provide a resource to identify novel genetic modifiers of systemic iron homeostasis, we designed an RNA interference (RNAi) screen that monitors hepcidin promoter activity after the knockdown of 19 599 genes in hepatocarcinoma cells. Interestingly, many of the putative hepcidin activators play roles in signal transduction, inflammation, or transcription, and affect hepcidin transcription through BMP-responsive elements. Furthermore, our work sheds light on new components of the transcriptional machinery that maintain steady-state levels of hepcidin expression and its responses to the BMP- and interleukin-6–triggered signals. Notably, we discover hepcidin suppression mediated via components of Ras/RAF MAPK and mTOR signaling, linking hepcidin transcriptional control to the pathways that respond to mitogen stimulation and nutrient status. Thus using a combination of RNAi screening, reverse phase protein arrays, and small molecules testing, we identify links between the control of systemic iron homeostasis and critical liver processes such as regeneration, response to injury, carcinogenesis, and nutrient metabolism. PMID:24385536

  8. mTOR function and therapeutic targeting in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Stephen H; Harvey, Amanda J

    2017-01-01

    The mTOR pathway was discovered in the late 1970s after the compound and natural inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin was isolated from the bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus. mTOR is serine/threonine kinase belonging to the phosphoinositide 3-kinase related kinase (PIKK) family. It forms two distinct complexes; mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 has a key role in regulating protein synthesis and autophagy whilst mTORC2 is involved in regulating kinases of the AGC family. mTOR signaling is often over active in multiple cancer types including breast cancer. This can involve mutations in mTOR itself but more commonly, in breast cancer, this is related to an increase in activity of ErbB family receptors or alterations and mutations of PI3K signaling. Rapamycin and its analogues (rapalogues) bind to the intercellular receptor FKBP12, and then predominantly inhibit mTORC1 signaling via an allosteric mechanism. Research has shown that inhibition of mTOR is a useful strategy in tackling cancers, with it acting to slow tumor growth and limit the spread of a cancer. Rapalogues have now made their way into the clinic with the rapalogue everolimus (RAD-001/Afinitor) approved for use in conjunction with exemestane, in post-menopausal breast cancer patients with advanced disease who are HER-2 negative (normal expression), hormone receptor positive and whose prior treatment with non-steroidal aromatase inhibitors has failed. Testing across multiple trials has proven that everolimus and other rapalogues are a viable way of treating certain types of cancer. However, rapalogues have shown some drawbacks both in research and clinically, with their use often activating feedback pathways that counter their usefulness. As such, new types of inhibitors are being explored that work via different mechanisms, including inhibitors that are ATP competitive with mTOR and which act to perturb signaling from both mTOR complexes.

  9. FM19G11: A new modulator of HIF that links mTOR activation with the DNA damage checkpoint pathways.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Mateos-Gregorio, Pablo; Royo, Inmaculada; Erceg, Slaven; Murguia, José Ramón; Sánchez-Puelles, Jose María

    2010-07-15

    The network consisting of mTOR and p53 pathways is crucial to understanding a wide variety of physiological and pathological events, including cancer and aging. In addition, the HIF1alpha protein, a downstream target of mTOR, is a hallmark of different tumor types and was the desired strategy of many drug discovery efforts. Here we present the novel chemical entity FM19G11, a new modulator of HIF1alpha expression, which was used as a molecular tool to dissect and further characterize the cross-talk between these signaling cascades in human colon carcinoma cell lines. To our knowledge, FM19G11 is the first drug that triggers a DNA damage response (DDR) associated with G(1)/S-phase arrest in a p53-dependent manner, due to rapid hyper-activation of the growth signaling pathway through mTOR. Assessment of colonies demonstrated that FM19G11 decreases the clonogenicity of HT29, HCT116/p53(+/+) and HCT116/p53(-/-) cells. Moreover, FM19G11 causes significant lower colony growth in soft agar of p53-proficient human colon cancer cells. Consequently, p53 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to FM19G11 by significant reduction of their viability, lessening their colony formation capability and shrinking their anchorage-independent growth. Cell signaling studies served to assign a new mode of action to FM19G11, whose tumor-suppressant activity compromises the survival of functional p53 malignant cells.

  10. IL-15 activates mTOR and primes stress-activated gene expression leading to prolonged antitumor capacity of NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yumeng; van Hoef, Vincent; Zhang, Xiaonan; Wennerberg, Erik; Lorent, Julie; Witt, Kristina; Masvidal, Laia; Liang, Shuo; Murray, Shannon; Larsson, Ola; Kiessling, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of hematological malignancies by adoptive transfer of activated natural killer (NK) cells is limited by poor postinfusion persistence. We compared the ability of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-15 to sustain human NK-cell functions following cytokine withdrawal to model postinfusion performance. In contrast to IL-2, IL-15 mediated stronger signaling through the IL-2/15 receptor complex and provided cell function advantages. Genome-wide analysis of cytosolic and polysome-associated messenger RNA (mRNA) revealed not only cytokine-dependent differential mRNA levels and translation during cytokine activation but also that most gene expression differences were primed by IL-15 and only manifested after cytokine withdrawal. IL-15 augmented mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, which correlated with increased expression of genes related to cell metabolism and respiration. Consistently, mTOR inhibition abrogated IL-15–induced cell function advantages. Moreover, mTOR-independent STAT-5 signaling contributed to improved NK-cell function during cytokine activation but not following cytokine withdrawal. The superior performance of IL-15–stimulated NK cells was also observed using a clinically applicable protocol for NK-cell expansion in vitro and in vivo. Finally, expression of IL-15 correlated with cytolytic immune functions in patients with B-cell lymphoma and favorable clinical outcome. These findings highlight the importance of mTOR-regulated metabolic processes for immune cell functions and argue for implementation of IL-15 in adoptive NK-cell cancer therapy. PMID:27465917

  11. Seizure-dependent mTOR activation in 5-HT neurons promotes autism-like behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, John J.; Yu, Wilson; Yang, Jun; Feng, Haihua; Helm, Meghan; McMahon, Elizabeth; Zhu, Xinjun; Shin, Damian; Huang, Yunfei

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are common comorbidities of one another. Despite the prevalent correlation between the two disorders, few studies have been able to elucidate a mechanistic link. We demonstrate that forebrain specific Tsc1 deletion in mice causes epilepsy and autism-like behaviors, concomitant with disruption of 5-HT neurotransmission. We find that epileptiform activity propagates to the raphe nuclei, resulting in seizure-dependent hyperactivation of mTOR in 5-HT neurons. To dissect whether mTOR hyperactivity in 5-HT neurons alone was sufficient to recapitulate an autism-like phenotype we utilized Tsc1flox/flox;Slc6a4-cre mice, in which mTOR is restrictively hyperactivated in 5-HT neurons. Tsc1flox/flox;Slc6a4-cre mice displayed alterations of the 5-HT system and autism-like behaviors, without causing epilepsy. Rapamycin treatment in these mice was sufficient to rescue the phenotype. We conclude that the spread of seizure activity to the brainstem is capable of promoting hyperactivation of mTOR in the raphe nuclei, which in turn promotes autism-like behaviors. Thus our study provides a novel mechanism describing how epilepsy can contribute to the development of autism-like behaviors, suggesting new therapeutic strategies for autism. PMID:25315683

  12. Activation of the mTOR Pathway by Oxaliplatin in the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Zessin, Amelia S.; Glover, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Background Standard of care treatment for colorectal cancer liver metastasis consists of a cytotoxic chemotherapy in combination with a targeted agent. Clinical trials have guided the use of these combinatory therapies, but it remains unclear what the optimal combinations of cytotoxic chemotherapy with a targeted agent are. Methods Using a genomic based approach, gene expression profiling was obtained from tumor samples of patient with colorectal cancer liver metastasis who received an oxaliplatin based therapy. Early passaged colorectal cancer liver metastasis cell lines and patient derived xenografts of colorectal cancer liver metastasis were then treated with oxaliplatin and a mTOR inhibitor. Results Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that the mTOR pathway was activated in patients receiving oxaliplatin based therapy. Treatment of early passaged colorectal cancer lines and patient derived xenografts with oxaliplatin resulted in activation of the mTOR pathway. Combination therapy with oxaliplatin and a mTOR inhibitor resulted in a synergistic effect both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion Our findings suggest a genomic based approach can be used to identify optimal combinations of cytotoxic chemotherapy with a targeted agent and that these observations can be validated both in vitro and in vivo using patient derived colorectal cancer cell lines and patient derived xenografts prior to clinical use. PMID:28060954

  13. Sepsis and mechnaical ventilation restrain translation initiation in skeletal muscle by inducing AMPK-associated TSC[2] restriction of mTOR signaling in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In skeletal muscle, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a cellular energy sensor of AMP: ATP and modulates translation by repressing mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation. Endotoxin (LPS)-induced sepsis reduces muscle protein synthesis by blunting translation initiation. We hypothe...

  14. mTOR inhibitors radiosensitize PTEN-deficient non-small-cell lung cancer cells harboring an EGFR activating mutation by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Bae, Sangwoo; Kang, Seongman; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Lim, Young-Bin

    2013-06-01

    Clinical resistance to gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), in patients with lung cancer has been linked to acquisition of the T790M resistance mutation in activated EGFR or amplification of MET. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss has been recently reported as a gefitinib resistance mechanism in lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with acquired gefitinib resistance caused by PTEN deficiency to suggest radiotherapy as an alternative to EGFR TKIs. PTEN deficient-mediated gefitinib resistance was generated in HCC827 cells, an EGFR TKI sensitive NSCLC cell line, by PTEN knockdown with a lentiviral vector expressing short hairpin RNA-targeting PTEN. The impact of PTEN knockdown on sensitivity to radiation in the presence or absence of PTEN downstream signaling inhibitors was investigated. PTEN knockdown conferred acquired resistance not only to gefitinib but also to radiation on HCC827 cells. mTOR inhibitors alone failed to reduce HCC827 cell viability, regardless of PTEN expression, but ameliorated PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance. PTEN knockdown-mediated radioresistance was accompanied by repression of radiation-induced cytotoxic autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors released the repression of cytotoxic autophagy to overcome PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance in HCC827 cells. These results suggest that inhibiting mTOR signaling could be an effective strategy to radiosensitize NSCLC harboring the EGFR activating mutation that acquires resistance to both TKIs and radiotherapy due to PTEN loss or inactivation mutations.

  15. Antidepressant indatraline induces autophagy and inhibits restenosis via suppression of mTOR/S6 kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Sun; Yen, Chih-Na; Shim, Joong Sup; Kang, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sang Won; Liu, Jun O; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2016-10-03

    Indatraline is an antidepressive agent and a non-selective monoamine transporter inhibitor that blocks the reuptake of neurotransmitters (dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine). In this study, we report that indatraline induces autophagy via the suppression of mTOR/S6 kinase signaling. Autophagy induction was examined by a cell-based high content screening system using LysoTracker, which was followed by monodansylcadaverine staining and transmission electron microscope observation. Indatraline increased the number of EGFP-LC3 cells expressing autophagosomes in the cytoplasm. Conversion of LC3 was further validated by immunoblotting. Indatraline induced autophagy by affecting the AMPK/mTOR/S6K signaling axis and had no influence on the PI3K/AKT/ERK signaling. Moreover, indatraline induced autophagy in smooth muscle cells (SMCs); further, it exhibited therapeutic potential for restenosis by inhibiting SMC accumulation in a rat restenosis model. These results provide new insights into the role of monoamine transporters in autophagy regulation and identify indatraline as a novel agent for inducing autophagy.

  16. Antidepressant indatraline induces autophagy and inhibits restenosis via suppression of mTOR/S6 kinase signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Sun; Yen, Chih-na; Shim, Joong Sup; Kang, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sang Won; Liu, Jun O.; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Indatraline is an antidepressive agent and a non-selective monoamine transporter inhibitor that blocks the reuptake of neurotransmitters (dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine). In this study, we report that indatraline induces autophagy via the suppression of mTOR/S6 kinase signaling. Autophagy induction was examined by a cell-based high content screening system using LysoTracker, which was followed by monodansylcadaverine staining and transmission electron microscope observation. Indatraline increased the number of EGFP-LC3 cells expressing autophagosomes in the cytoplasm. Conversion of LC3 was further validated by immunoblotting. Indatraline induced autophagy by affecting the AMPK/mTOR/S6K signaling axis and had no influence on the PI3K/AKT/ERK signaling. Moreover, indatraline induced autophagy in smooth muscle cells (SMCs); further, it exhibited therapeutic potential for restenosis by inhibiting SMC accumulation in a rat restenosis model. These results provide new insights into the role of monoamine transporters in autophagy regulation and identify indatraline as a novel agent for inducing autophagy. PMID:27694974

  17. Tuberin, p27 and mTOR in different cells.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, S; Rosner, M; Lindengrün, C; Hanneder, M; Siegel, N; Valli, A; Fuchs, C; Hengstschläger, M

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in the genes TSC1 or TSC2 cause the autosomal dominantly inherited tumor suppressor syndrome tuberous sclerosis, which is characterized by the development of tumors, named hamartomas, in different organs. The TSC gene products, hamartin and tuberin, form a complex, of which tuberin is assumed to be the functional component. Both, hamartin and tuberin have been implicated in the control of the cell cycle by activating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 and in cell size regulation by inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) a regulator of the p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) and its target the ribosomal protein S6. The tuberin/hamartin complex was shown to protect p27 from protein degradation. Within the mTOR signaling pathway tuberin harbors GTPase activating (GAP) potential toward Rheb, which is a potent regulator of mTOR. In this study, we have analyzed the protein levels of tuberin, p27, cyclin D1, mTOR and phospho mTOR Ser2448 (activated mTOR), S6 and phospho S6 Ser240/244 (activated S6) and as controls alpha-tubulin and topoisomerase IIbeta, in ten different cells, including primary normal cells, immortalized and transformed cell lines.

  18. Metformin inhibits thyroid cancer cell growth, migration, and EMT through the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Baiyu; Cui, Hanzhi; Kang, Lei; Zhang, Xuelin; Jin, Zhitao; Lu, Lanmin; Fan, Zhongyi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways have been shown to be activated in thyroid cancer. Recent evidences have demonstrated that the antidiabetic agent metformin, an activator of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase, can impair the proliferation and migration of cancer cells via inhibition of mTOR. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we show that metformin can inhibit mTOR pathway to impair growth and migration of the thyroid cancer cell lines. Cyclin D1 and c-Myc are important regulators of cancer cell growth, and we observed that treatment of thyroid cancer cells with metformin reduced c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression through suppression of mTOR and subsequent inhibition of P70S6K1 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. Metformin reduced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in thyroid carcinoma cells. Moreover, metformin regulated expression of the EMT-related markers E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and Snail. Additionally, knockdown of TSC2, the upstream regulatory molecule of mTOR pathway, or treatment of rapamycin, the mTOR inhibitor, could abolish the effects of metformin to regulate thyroid cancer cell proliferation, migration, EMT, and mTOR pathway molecules. These results indicate that metformin can suppress the proliferation, migration, and EMT of thyroid cancer cell lines by inhibiting mTOR signaling. These findings suggest that metformin and its molecular targets may be useful in thyroid carcinoma therapy.

  19. An inhibitor of mTOR reduces neoplasia and normalizes p70/S6 kinase activity in Pten+/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Podsypanina, Katrina; Lee, Richard T.; Politis, Chris; Hennessy, Ian; Crane, Allison; Puc, Janusz; Neshat, Mehran; Wang, Hong; Yang, Lin; Gibbons, Jay; Frost, Phil; Dreisbach, Valley; Blenis, John; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Fisher, Peter; Sawyers, Charles; Hedrick-Ellenson, Lora; Parsons, Ramon

    2001-01-01

    PTEN phosphatase acts as a tumor suppressor by negatively regulating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. It is unclear which downstream components of this pathway are necessary for oncogenic transformation. In this report we show that transformed cells of PTEN+/− mice have elevated levels of phosphorylated Akt and activated p70/S6 kinase associated with an increase in proliferation. Pharmacological inactivation of mTOR/RAFT/FRAP reduced neoplastic proliferation, tumor size, and p70/S6 kinase activity, but did not affect the status of Akt. These data suggest that p70/S6K and possibly other targets of mTOR contribute significantly to tumor development and that inhibition of these proteins may be therapeutic for cancer patients with deranged PI3K signaling. PMID:11504907

  20. Differential Regulation of Protein Synthesis and mTOR Signaling in Skeletal Muscle and Visceral Tissues of Neonatal Pigs after a Meal

    PubMed Central

    Gazzaneo, María C.; Orellana, Renán A.; Suryawan, Agus; Tuckow, Alexander P.; Kimball, Scot R.; Wilson, Fiona A.; Nguyen, Hanh V.; Torrazza, Roberto M.; Fiorotto, Marta L.; Davis, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Protein synthesis (PS) increases after a meal in neonates, but the time course of the changes in PS in different tissues after a meal is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the changes in tissue PS, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation, and proportion of ribosomal protein (rp) mRNAs in polysomes over 4 h following a bolus meal in neonatal pigs (n = 6/group; 5- to 7-d-old). The results show a more sustained increase in PS in glycolytic compared to mixed fiber type muscles, and no changes in oxidative muscles. PS increased in liver, jejunum, and pancreas, but not in kidney and heart. Feeding did not affect AMP-activated protein kinase or RAS-related GTP binding B activation. Phosphorylation of tuberous sclerosis complex 2, proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa, mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein, and rp S6 kinase 1 increased in all tissues after feeding. The proportion of mRNAs encoding rp S4 and S8 in liver polysomes increased within 30 min post-feeding. These results suggest that feeding stimulates mTORC1 signaling in muscle and viscera, but mTORC1 activation alone is not sufficient to stimulate PS in all tissues. PMID:21654549

  1. P-Rex1 links mammalian target of rapamycin signaling to Rac activation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Negrete, Ivette; Carretero-Ortega, Jorge; Rosenfeldt, Hans; Hernández-García, Ricardo; Calderón-Salinas, J Victor; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Gutkind, J Silvio; Vázquez-Prado, José

    2007-08-10

    Polarized cell migration results from the transduction of extra-cellular cues promoting the activation of Rho GTPases with the intervention of multidomain proteins, including guanine exchange factors. P-Rex1 and P-Rex2 are Rac GEFs connecting Gbetagamma and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling to Rac activation. Their complex architecture suggests their regulation by protein-protein interactions. Novel mechanisms of activation of Rho GTPases are associated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine/threonine kinase known as a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation. Recently, two independent multiprotein complexes containing mTOR have been described. mTORC1 links to the classical rapamycin-sensitive pathways relevant for protein synthesis; mTORC2 links to the activation of Rho GTPases and cytoskeletal events via undefined mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that P-Rex1 and P-Rex2 establish, through their tandem DEP domains, interactions with mTOR, suggesting their potential as effectors in the signaling of mTOR to Rac activation and cell migration. This possibility was consistent with the effect of dominant-negative constructs and short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of P-Rex1, which decreased mTOR-dependent leucine-induced activation of Rac and cell migration. Rapamycin, a widely used inhibitor of mTOR signaling, did not inhibit Rac activity and cell migration induced by leucine, indicating that P-Rex1, which we found associated to both mTOR complexes, is only active when in the mTORC2 complex. mTORC2 has been described as the catalytic complex that phosphorylates AKT/PKB at Ser-473 and elicits activation of Rho GTPases and cytoskeletal reorganization. Thus, P-Rex1 links mTOR signaling to Rac activation and cell migration.

  2. Leucine supplementation of a chronically restricted protein and energy diet enhances mTOR pathway activation but not muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Manjarín, Rodrigo; Columbus, Daniel A; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Hernandez-García, Adriana D; Hoang, Nguyet-Minh; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal nutrient intake represents a limiting factor for growth and long-term survival of low-birth weight infants. The objective of this study was to determine if in neonates who can consume only 70 % of their protein and energy requirements for 8 days, enteral leucine supplementation will upregulate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in skeletal muscle, leading to an increase in protein synthesis and muscle anabolism. Nineteen 4-day-old piglets were fed by gastric tube 1 of 3 diets, containing (kg body weight(-1) · day(-1)) 16 g protein and 190 kcal (CON), 10.9 g protein and 132 kcal (R), or 10.8 g protein + 0.2 % leucine and 136 kcal (RL) at 4-h intervals for 8 days. On day 8, plasma AA and insulin levels were measured during 6 post-feeding intervals, and muscle protein synthesis rate and mTOR signaling proteins were determined at 120 min post-feeding. At 120 min, leucine was highest in RL (P < 0.001), whereas insulin, isoleucine and valine were lower in RL and R compared to CON (P < 0.001). Compared to RL and R, the CON diet increased (P < 0.01) body weight, protein synthesis, phosphorylation of S6 kinase (p-S6K1) and 4E-binding protein (p-4EBP1), and activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4 complex (eIF4E · eIF4G). RL increased (P ≤ 0.01) p-S6K1, p-4EBP1 and eIF4E · eIF4G compared to R. In conclusion, when protein and energy intakes are restricted for 8 days, leucine supplementation increases muscle mTOR activation, but does not improve body weight gain or enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs.

  3. Leucine supplementation of a chronically restricted protein and energy diet enhances mTOR pathway activation but not muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    PubMed Central

    Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V.; Hernandez-García, Adriana D.; Hoang, Nguyet-Minh; Fiorotto, Marta L.; Davis, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal nutrient intake represents a limiting factor for growth and long-term survival of low-birth weight infants. The objective of this study was to determine if in neonates who can consume only 70 % of their protein and energy requirements for 8 days, enteral leucine supplementation will upregulate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in skeletal muscle, leading to an increase in protein synthesis and muscle anabolism. Nineteen 4-day-old piglets were fed by gastric tube 1 of 3 diets, containing (kg body weight−1·day−1) 16 g protein and 190 kcal (CON), 10.9 g protein and 132 kcal (R), or 10.8 g protein + 0.2 % leucine and 136 kcal (RL) at 4-h intervals for 8 days. On day 8, plasma AA and insulin levels were measured during 6 post-feeding intervals, and muscle protein synthesis rate and mTOR signaling proteins were determined at 120 min post-feeding. At 120 min, leucine was highest in RL (P < 0.001), whereas insulin, isoleucine and valine were lower in RL and R compared to CON (P < 0.001). Compared to RL and R, the CON diet increased (P < 0.01) body weight, protein synthesis, phosphorylation of S6 kinase (p-S6K1) and 4E-binding protein (p-4EBP1), and activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4 complex (eIF4E·eIF4G). RL increased (P ≤ 0.01) p-S6K1, p-4EBP1 and eIF4E · eIF4G compared to R. In conclusion, when protein and energy intakes are restricted for 8 days, leucine supplementation increases muscle mTOR activation, but does not improve body weight gain or enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs. PMID:26334346

  4. Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 Promotes Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development by SRSF1 Upregulation and mTOR Activation.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Pushkar; Shilo, Asaf; Mogilevsky, Adi; Stein, Ilan; Pikarsky, Eli; Nevo, Yuval; Benyamini, Hadar; Elgavish, Sharona; Zong, Xinying; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Karni, Rotem

    2017-03-01

    Several long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA) are abrogated in cancer but their precise contributions to oncogenesis are still emerging. Here we report that the lncRNA MALAT1 is upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and acts as a proto-oncogene through Wnt pathway activation and induction of the oncogenic splicing factor SRSF1. Induction of SRSF1 by MALAT1 modulates SRSF1 splicing targets, enhancing the production of antiapoptotic splicing isoforms and activating the mTOR pathway by modulating the alternative splicing of S6K1. Inhibition of SRSF1 expression or mTOR activity abolishes the oncogenic properties of MALAT1, suggesting that SRSF1 induction and mTOR activation are essential for MALAT1-induced transformation. Our results reveal a mechanism by which lncRNA MALAT1 acts as a proto-oncogene in hepatocellular carcinoma, modulating oncogenic alternative splicing through SRSF1 upregulation. Cancer Res; 77(5); 1155-67. ©2016 AACR.

  5. Involvement of mTOR and Regulation by AMPK in Early Iodine Deficiency-Induced Thyroid Microvascular Activation.

    PubMed

    Craps, J; Joris, V; De Jongh, B; Sonveaux, P; Horman, S; Lengelé, B; Bertrand, L; Many, M-C; Colin, I M; Gérard, A-C

    2016-06-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) induces TSH-independent microvascular activation in the thyroid via the reactive oxygen species/nitric oxide-hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway. We hypothesized the additional involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a positive regulator of this pathway and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as a negative feedback regulator to explain the transient nature of ID-induced microvascular changes under nonmalignant conditions. mTOR and AMPK involvement was investigated using an in vitro model (human thyrocytes in primary cultures) and 2 murine models of goitrogenesis (normal NMRI and RET-PTC mice [a papillary thyroid cancer model]). In NMRI mice, ID had no effect on the phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), a downstream target of mTOR. However, rapamycin inhibited ID-induced thyroid blood flow and VEGF protein expression. In the RET-PTC model, ID strongly increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K, whereas rapamycin completely inhibited the ID-induced increase in p70S6K phosphorylation, thyroid blood flow, and VEGF-A expression. In vitro, although ID increased p70S6K phosphorylation, the ID-stimulated hypoxia-inducible factor/VEGF pathway was inhibited by rapamycin. Activation of AMPK by metformin inhibited ID effects both in vivo and in vitro. In AMPK-α1 knockout mice, the ID-induced increase in thyroid blood flow and VEGF-A protein expression persisted throughout the treatment, whereas both parameters returned to control values in wild-type mice after 4 days of ID. In conclusion, mTOR is required for early ID-induced thyroid microvascular activation. AMPK negatively regulates this pathway, which may account for the transient nature of ID-induced TSH-independent vascular effects under benign conditions.

  6. mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, plays key roles in cell growth and proliferation, acting at the catalytic subunit of two protein kinase complexes: mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2). mTORC1 signaling is switched on by several oncogenic signaling pathways and is accordingly hyperactive in the majority of cancers. Inhibiting mTORC1 signaling has therefore attracted great attention as an anti-cancer therapy. However, progress in using inhibitors of mTOR signaling as therapeutic agents in oncology has been limited by a number of factors, including the fact that the classic mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits only some of the effects of mTOR; the existence of several feedback loops; and the crucial importance of mTOR in normal physiology. PMID:27635236

  7. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaylani, Samer Z.; Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Kopelovich, Levy; Pressey, Joseph G.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  8. Microarray and Proteomic Analyses of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with a Highlight on the mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Čokić, Vladan P.; Mossuz, Pascal; Han, Jing; Socoro, Nuria; Beleslin-Čokić, Bojana B.; Mitrović, Olivera; Subotički, Tijana; Diklić, Miloš; Leković, Danijela; Gotić, Mirjana; Puri, Raj K.; Noguchi, Constance Tom; Schechter, Alan N.

    2015-01-01

    The gene and protein expression profiles in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) may reveal gene and protein markers of a potential clinical relevance in diagnosis, treatment and prediction of response to therapy. Using cDNA microarray analysis of 25,100 unique genes, we studied the gene expression profile of CD34+ cells and granulocytes obtained from peripheral blood of subjects with essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). The microarray analyses of the CD34+ cells and granulocytes were performed from 20 de novo MPN subjects: JAK2 positive ET, PV, PMF subjects, and JAK2 negative ET/PMF subjects. The granulocytes for proteomic studies were pooled in 4 groups: PV with JAK2 mutant allele burden above 80%, ET with JAK2 mutation, PMF with JAK2 mutation and ET/PMF with no JAK2 mutation. The number of differentially regulated genes was about two fold larger in CD34+ cells compared to granulocytes. Thirty-six genes (including RUNX1, TNFRSF19) were persistently highly expressed, while 42 genes (including FOXD4, PDE4A) were underexpressed both in CD34+ cells and granulocytes. Using proteomic studies, significant up-regulation was observed for MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling regulators that control myeloid cell apoptosis and proliferation: RAC2, MNDA, S100A8/9, CORO1A, and GNAI2. When the status of the mTOR signaling pathway related genes was analyzed, PI3K/AKT regulators were preferentially up-regulated in CD34+ cells of MPNs, with down-regulated major components of the protein complex EIF4F. Molecular profiling of CD34+ cells and granulocytes of MPN determined gene expression patterns beyond their recognized function in disease pathogenesis that included dominant up-regulation of PI3K/AKT signaling. PMID:26275051

  9. Alcohol intoxication following muscle contraction in mice decreases muscle protein synthesis but not mTOR signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Jennifer L.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol [ethanol (EtOH)] intoxication antagonizes stimulation of muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signaling. However, whether the anabolic response can be reversed when alcohol is consumed after the stimulus is unknown. Methods A single bout of electrically stimulated muscle contractions (10 sets of 6 contractions) were induced in fasted male C57BL/6 mice 2 h prior to alcohol intoxication. EtOH was injected IP (3g/kg) and the gastrocnemius/plantaris muscle complex was collected 2 h later from the stimulated and contralateral unstimulated control leg. Results Muscle contraction increased protein synthesis 28% in control mice while EtOH abolished this stimulation-induced increase. Further, EtOH suppressed the rate of synthesis ~75% compared to control muscle irrespective of stimulation. This decrease was associated with impaired protein elongation as EtOH increased the phosphorylation of eEF2 Thr56. In contrast, stimulation-induced increases in mTORC1 (S6K1 Thr421/Ser424, S6K1 Thr389, rpS6 Ser240/244, 4E-BP1 Thr37/46) and MAPK (JNK Thr183/Tyr185, p38 Thr180/Tyr182, and rpS6S235/236) signaling were not reversed by acute EtOH. Conclusion These data suggest that EtOH-induced decreases in protein synthesis in fasted mice may be independent of mTORC1 and MAPK signaling following muscle contraction and instead due to the antagonistic actions of EtOH on mRNA translation elongation. Therefore, EtOH suppresses the contraction-induced increase in protein synthesis and over time has the potential to prevent skeletal muscle hypertrophy induced by repeated muscle contraction. PMID:25623400

  10. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling in the Insular Cortex Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minjee; Han, Jeongsoo; Kim, Un Jeng; Cha, Myeounghoon; Um, Sun Woo; Bai, Sun Joon; Hong, Seong-Karp; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Injury of peripheral nerves can trigger neuropathic pain, producing allodynia and hyperalgesia via peripheral and central sensitization. Recent studies have focused on the role of the insular cortex (IC) in neuropathic pain. Because the IC is thought to store pain-related memories, translational regulation in this structure may reveal novel targets for controlling chronic pain. Signaling via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is known to control mRNA translation and influence synaptic plasticity, has been studied at the spinal level in neuropathic pain, but its role in the IC under these conditions remains elusive. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the role of mTOR signaling in neuropathic pain and to assess the potential therapeutic effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, in the IC of rats with neuropathic pain. Mechanical allodynia was assessed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after neuropathic surgery and following microinjections of rapamycin into the IC on postoperative days (PODs) 3 and 7. Optical recording was conducted to observe the neural responses of the IC to peripheral stimulation. Rapamycin reduced mechanical allodynia and downregulated the expression of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), decreased neural excitability in the IC, thereby inhibiting neuropathic pain-induced synaptic plasticity. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling in the IC may be a critical molecular mechanism modulating neuropathic pain. PMID:28377693

  11. Antidepressant action of ketamine via mTOR is mediated by inhibition of nitrergic Rheb degradation

    PubMed Central

    Harraz, Maged M.; Tyagi, Richa; Cortés, Pedro; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2016-01-01

    As traditional antidepressants act only after weeks/months, the discovery that ketamine, an antagonist of glutamate/NMDA receptors, elicits antidepressant actions in hours has been transformative. Its mechanism of action has been elusive, though enhanced mTOR signaling is a major feature. We report a novel signaling pathway wherein NMDA receptor activation stimulates generation of nitric oxide (NO), which S-nitrosylates glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Nitrosylated GAPDH complexes with the ubiquitin-E3-ligase Siah1 and Rheb, a small G protein that activates mTOR. Siah1 degrades Rheb leading to reduced mTOR signaling, while ketamine, conversely, stabilizes Rheb which enhances mTOR signaling. Drugs selectively targeting components of this pathway may offer novel approaches to the treatment of depression. PMID:26782056

  12. L-Leucine improves the anemia and developmental defects associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia and del(5q) MDS by activating the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Payne, Elspeth M; Virgilio, Maria; Narla, Anupama; Sun, Hong; Levine, Michelle; Paw, Barry H; Berliner, Nancy; Look, A Thomas; Ebert, Benjamin L; Khanna-Gupta, Arati

    2012-09-13

    Haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins (RPs) has been proposed to be the common basis for the anemia observed in Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome with loss of chromosome 5q [del(5q) MDS]. We have modeled DBA and del(5q) MDS in zebrafish using antisense morpholinos to rps19 and rps14, respectively, and have demonstrated that, as in humans, haploinsufficient levels of these proteins lead to a profound anemia. To address the hypothesis that RP loss results in impaired mRNA translation, we treated Rps19 and Rps14-deficient embryos with the amino acid L-leucine, a known activator of mRNA translation. This resulted in a striking improvement of the anemia associated with RP loss. We confirmed our findings in primary human CD34⁺ cells, after shRNA knockdown of RPS19 and RPS14. Furthermore, we showed that loss of Rps19 or Rps14 activates the mTOR pathway, and this is accentuated by L-leucine in both Rps19 and Rps14 morphants. This effect could be abrogated by rapamycin suggesting that mTOR signaling may be responsible for the improvement in anemia associated with L-leucine. Our studies support the rationale for ongoing clinical trials of L-leucine as a therapeutic agent for DBA, and potentially for patients with del(5q) MDS.

  13. AdipoRon, an adiponectin receptor agonist, attenuates PDGF-induced VSMC proliferation through inhibition of mTOR signaling independent of AMPK: Implications toward suppression of neointimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Fairaq, Arwa; Shawky, Noha M; Osman, Islam; Pichavaram, Prahalathan; Segar, Lakshman

    2017-02-22

    Hypoadiponectinemia is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Although adiponectin replenishment mitigates neointimal hyperplasia and atherosclerosis in mouse models, adiponectin therapy has been hampered in a clinical setting due to its large molecular size. Recent studies demonstrate that AdipoRon (a small-molecule adiponectin receptor agonist) improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetic mice and attenuates postischemic cardiac injury in adiponectin-deficient mice, in part, through activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). To date, it remains unknown as to whether AdipoRon regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which plays a major role in neointima formation. In the present study, oral administration of AdipoRon (50mg/kg) in C57BL/6J mice significantly diminished arterial injury-induced neointima formation by ∼57%. Under in vitro conditions, AdipoRon treatment led to significant inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced VSMC proliferation, DNA synthesis, and cyclin D1 expression. While AdipoRon induced a rapid and sustained activation of AMPK, it also diminished basal and PDGF-induced phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream targets, including p70S6K/S6 and 4E-BP1. However, siRNA-mediated AMPK downregulation showed persistent inhibition of p70S6K/S6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, indicating AMPK-independent effects for AdipoRon inhibition of mTOR signaling. In addition, AdipoRon treatment resulted in a sustained and transient decrease in PDGF-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, respectively. Furthermore, PDGF receptor-β tyrosine phosphorylation, which controls the phosphorylation state of Akt and ERK, was diminished upon AdipoRon treatment. Together, the present findings suggest that orally-administered AdipoRon has the potential to limit restenosis after angioplasty by targeting mTOR signaling independent of AMPK activation.

  14. A treadmill exercise reactivates the signaling of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) in the skeletal muscles of starved mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong-Mei; Bian, Zehua; Furuya, Norihiko; Oliva Trejo, Juan Alejandro; Takeda-Ezaki, Mitsue; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Hiraoka, Yuka; Mineki, Reiko; Taka, Hikari; Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Komatsu, Masaaki; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Ueno, Takashi; Ezaki, Junji

    2015-01-02

    It has been well established that a starvation-induced decrease in insulin/IGF-I and serum amino acids effectively suppresses the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) signaling to induce autophagy, which is a major degradative cellular pathway in skeletal muscles. In this study, we investigated the systematic effects of exercise on the mTor signaling of skeletal muscles. Wild type C57BL/6J mice were starved for 24h under synchronous autophagy induction conditions. Under these conditions, endogenous LC3-II increased, while both S6-kinse and S6 ribosomal protein were dephosphorylated in the skeletal muscles, which indicated mTor inactivation. Using GFP-LC3 transgenic mice, it was also confirmed that fluorescent GFP-LC3 dots in the skeletal muscles increased, including soleus, plantaris, and gastrocnemius, which clearly showed autophagosomal induction. These starved mice were then subjected to a single bout of running on a treadmill (12m/min, 2h, with a lean of 10 degrees). Surprisingly, biochemical analyses revealed that the exercise elicited a decrease in the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio as well as an inversion from the dephosphorylated state to the rephosphorylated state of S6-kinase and ribosomal S6 in these skeletal muscles. Consistently, the GFP-LC3 dots of the skeletal muscles were diminished immediately after the exercise. These results indicated that exercise suppressed starvation-induced autophagy through a reactivation of mTor signaling in the skeletal muscles of these starved mice.

  15. Tuberous sclerosis complex suppression in cerebellar development and medulloblastoma: separate regulation of mTOR activity and p27Kip1 localization

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Bobby; Northcott, Paul A.; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Govindarajan, Baskaran; Brat, Daniel J.; Arbiser, Jack L.; Holland, Eric C.; Taylor, Michael D.; Kenney, Anna Marie

    2009-01-01

    During development, proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs), candidate cells-of-origin for the pediatric brain tumor medulloblastoma, requires signaling by Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF), whose pathways are also implicated in medulloblastoma. One of the consequences of IGF signaling is inactivation of the mTOR-suppressing Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), comprised of TSC1 and TSC2, leading to increased mRNA translation. We show that mice in which TSC function is impaired display increased mTOR pathway activation, enhanced CGNP proliferation, GSK-3α/β inactivation, and cytoplasmic localization of the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p27Kip1, which has been proposed to cause its inactivation or gain of oncogenic functions. We observed the same characteristics in wild-type primary cultures of CGNPs in which TSC1 and/or TSC2 were knocked down, and in mouse medulloblastomas induced by ectopic Shh pathway activation. Moreover, Shh-induced mouse medulloblastomas manifested Akt-mediated TSC2 inactivation, and the mutant TSC2 allele synergized with aberrant Shh signaling to increase medulloblastoma incidence in mice. Driving exogenous TSC2 expression in Shh-induced medulloblastoma cells corrected p27Kip1 localization and reduced proliferation. GSK-3α/β inactivation in the tumors in vivo and in primary CGNP cultures was mTOR-dependent, whereas p27Kip1 cytoplasmic localization was regulated upstream of mTOR, by TSC2. These results indicate that a balance between Shh mitogenic signaling and TSC function regulating new protein synthesis and cdk inhibition is essential for normal development and prevention of tumor formation or expansion. PMID:19738049

  16. Inhibition of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type II Suppresses Lung Carcinogenesis by Blocking Tumor COX-2 Expression as Well as the ERK and mTOR Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shilin; Yao, Bing; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping; Pozzi, Ambra; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death. Early diagnosis and prevention remain the best approach to reduce the overall morbidity and mortality. Experimental and clinical evidence have shown that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contributes to lung tumorigenesis. COX-2 inhibitors suppress the development and progression of lung cancer. However, increased cardiovascular risks of COX-2 inhibitors limit their use in chemoprevention of lung cancers. Glucocorticoids are endogenous and potent COX-2 inhibitors, and their local actions are down-regulated by 11β–hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II (11ßHSD2)-mediated metabolism. We found that 11βHSD2 expression was increased in human lung cancers and experimental lung tumors. Inhibition of 11βHSD2 activity enhanced glucocorticoid-mediated COX-2 inhibition in human lung carcinoma cells. Furthermore, 11βHSD2 inhibition suppressed lung tumor growth and invasion in association with increased tissue active glucocorticoid levels, decreased COX-2 expression, inhibition of ERK and mTOR signaling pathways, increased tumor endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as increased lifespan. Therefore, 11βHSD2 inhibition represents a novel approach for lung cancer chemoprevention and therapy by increasing tumor glucocorticoid activity, which in turn selectively blocks local COX-2 activity and/or inhibits the ERK and mTOR signaling pathways. PMID:26011146

  17. Estrogen promotes fat mass and obesity-associated protein nuclear localization and enhances endometrial cancer cell proliferation via the mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yaping; Shen, Jiaqi; Gao, Liyan; Feng, Youji

    2016-04-01

    Extensive exposure to estrogen is generally acknowledged as a risk factor for endometrial cancer. Given that the accumulation of adipocytes also contributes to the increased production of estrogen, in the present study, we evaluated the expression of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene in endometrial tumor tissues and further explored the mechanism of how estrogen facilitates FTO nuclear localization and promotes endometrial cancer cell proliferation. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining assay was used to detect the FTO expression in endometrial tumor samples. Western blotting was performed to investigate the mechanism of estrogen-induced FTO nuclear localization. siRNA was used to knock down ERα and further explore its role in FTO nuclear localization. MTT assay was carried out to determine cell proliferation. We found that FTO was overexpressed in endometrial carcinoma tissues and served as a poor prognostic marker. Additionally, estrogen induced FTO nuclear accumulation via the mTOR signaling pathway and the nuclear localization was ERα-dependent, which contributed to enhanced proliferative activity. Therefore, the present study provides new insight into the mechanisms of estrogen-induced proliferation, implying the possibility of using FTO as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  18. MLN4924, an NAE inhibitor, suppresses AKT and mTOR signaling via upregulation of REDD1 in human myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yanyan; Kaufman, Jonathan L; Bernal, Leon; Torre, Claire; Matulis, Shannon M; Harvey, R Donald; Chen, Jing; Sun, Shi-Yong; Boise, Lawrence H; Lonial, Sagar

    2014-05-22

    The function and survival of normal and malignant plasma cells depends on the elaborately regulated ubiquitin proteasome system. Proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib have proved to be highly effective in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), and their effects are related to normal protein homeostasis which is critical for plasma cell survival. Many ubiquitin ligases are regulated by conjugation with NEDD8. Therefore, neddylation may also impact survival and proliferation of malignant plasma cells. Here, we show that MLN4924, a potent NEDD8 activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor, induced cytotoxicity in MM cell lines, and its antitumor effect is associated with suppression of the AKT and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways through increased expression of REDD1. Combining MLN4924 with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces synergistic apoptosis in MM cell lines which can overcome the prosurvival effects of growth factors such as interleukin-6 and insulin-like growth factor-1. Altogether, our findings demonstrate an important function for REDD1 in MLN4924-induced cytotoxicity in MM and also provide a promising therapeutic combination strategy for myeloma.

  19. Novel nervous and multi-system regenerative therapeutic strategies for diabetes mellitus with mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the globe, diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing in incidence with limited therapies presently available to prevent or resolve the significant complications of this disorder. DM impacts multiple organs and affects all components of the central and peripheral nervous systems that can range from dementia to diabetic neuropathy. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a promising agent for the development of novel regenerative strategies for the treatment of DM. mTOR and its related signaling pathways impact multiple metabolic parameters that include cellular metabolic homeostasis, insulin resistance, insulin secretion, stem cell proliferation and differentiation, pancreatic β-cell function, and programmed cell death with apoptosis and autophagy. mTOR is central element for the protein complexes mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR Complex 2 (mTORC2) and is a critical component for a number of signaling pathways that involve phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K), protein kinase B (Akt), AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1), Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1), and growth factors. As a result, mTOR represents an exciting target to offer new clinical avenues for the treatment of DM and the complications of this disease. Future studies directed to elucidate the delicate balance mTOR holds over cellular metabolism and the impact of its broad signaling pathways should foster the translation of these targets into effective clinical regimens for DM. PMID:27127460

  20. Role of Merlin/NF2 in mTOR Signaling and Meningioma Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Nonidet p - 40 (NP- 40 ) containing calyculin (50 nmol/L; Cell Signaling Technology), 1...IP kinase In vitro assay EGF-stimulated arachnoid cells 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 con RNAi NF2 RNAi A ve ra g e re la ti ve A kt S 47 3 p h o...R T - P R T pAKT S473 pp70 S6K T389 Akt pAKT S473 (long exposure) 1 h 24 h BA pAkt S473 DC p70 S6K 1 h 24 h 0 10 20 30 40

  1. Timing of mTOR activation affects tuberous sclerosis complex neuropathology in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Magri, Laura; Cominelli, Manuela; Cambiaghi, Marco; Cursi, Marco; Leocani, Letizia; Minicucci, Fabio; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Galli, Rossella

    2013-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a dominantly inherited disease with high penetrance and morbidity, and is caused by mutations in either of two genes, TSC1 or TSC2. Most affected individuals display severe neurological manifestations - such as intractable epilepsy, mental retardation and autism - that are intimately associated with peculiar CNS lesions known as cortical tubers (CTs). The existence of a significant genotype-phenotype correlation in individuals bearing mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 is highly controversial. Similar to observations in humans, mouse modeling has suggested that a more severe phenotype is associated with mutation in Tsc2 rather than in Tsc1. However, in these mutant mice, deletion of either gene was achieved in differentiated astrocytes. Here, we report that loss of Tsc1 expression in undifferentiated radial glia cells (RGCs) early during development yields the same phenotype detected upon deletion of Tsc2 in the same cells. Indeed, the same aberrations in cortical cytoarchitecture, hippocampal disturbances and spontaneous epilepsy that have been detected in RGC-targeted Tsc2 mutants were observed in RGC-targeted Tsc1 mutant mice. Remarkably, thorough characterization of RGC-targeted Tsc1 mutants also highlighted subventricular zone (SVZ) disturbances as well as STAT3-dependent and -independent developmental-stage-specific defects in the differentiation potential of ex-vivo-derived embryonic and postnatal neural stem cells (NSCs). As such, deletion of either Tsc1 or Tsc2 induces mostly overlapping phenotypic neuropathological features when performed early during neurogenesis, thus suggesting that the timing of mTOR activation is a key event in proper neural development.

  2. Cycle Training Increased GLUT4 and Activation of mTOR in Fast Twitch Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Charles A.; Howell, Mary E.A.; Baker, Jonathan D.; Dykes, Rhesa J.; Duffourc, Michelle M.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Stone, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine if cycle training of sedentary subjects would increase the expression of the principle muscle glucose transporters, six volunteers completed six weeks of progressively increasing intensity stationary cycle cycling. Methods In vastus lateralis muscle biopsies, changes in expression of GLUT1, GLUT4, GLUT5, and GLUT12 were compared using quantitative immunoblots with specific protein standards. Regulatory pathway components were evaluated by immunoblots of muscle homogenates and immunohistochemistry of microscopic sections. Results GLUT1 was unchanged, GLUT4 increased 66%, GLUT12 increased 104%, and GLUT5 decreased 72%. A mitochondrial marker (cytochrome c) and regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α and phospho-AMPK) were unchanged, but the muscle hypertrophy pathway component, phospho-mTOR increased 83% after the exercise program. In baseline biopsies, GLUT4 by immunohistochemical techniques was 37% greater in Type I (slow twitch, red) muscle fibers, but the exercise training increased GLUT4 expression in Type II (fast twitch, white) fibers by 50%, achieving parity with the Type I fibers. Baseline phospho-mTOR expression was 50% higher in Type II fibers and increased more in Type II fibers (62%) with training, but also increased in Type I fibers (34%). Conclusion Progressive intensity stationary cycle training of previously sedentary subjects increased muscle insulin-responsive glucose transporters (GLUT4 and GLUT12) and decreased the fructose transporter (GLUT5). The increase in GLUT4 occurred primarily in Type II muscle fibers and this coincided with activation of the mTOR muscle hypertrophy pathway. There was little impact on Type I fiber GLUT4 expression and no evidence of change in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:20010125

  3. Translational control of entrainment and synchrony of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock by mTOR/4E-BP1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruifeng; Robinson, Barry; Xu, Haiyan; Gkogkas, Christos; Khoutorsky, Arkady; Alain, Tommy; Yanagiya, Akiko; Nevarko, Tatiana; Liu, Andrew C; Amir, Shimon; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2013-08-21

    Protein synthesis is critical for circadian clock function, but little is known of how translational regulation controls the master pacemaker in mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Here we demonstrate that the pivotal translational repressor, the eukaryotic translational initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), is rhythmically regulated via the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the SCN and preferentially represses vasoactive intestinal peptide (Vip) mRNA translation. Knockout (KO) of Eif4ebp1 (gene encoding 4E-BP1) leads to upregulation of VIP and higher amplitude of molecular rhythms in the SCN. Consequently, the 4E-BP1 null mice exhibit accelerated re-entrainment to a shifted light/dark cycle and are more resistant to the rhythm-disruptive effects of constant light. Conversely, in Mtor(+/-) mice VIP expression is decreased and susceptibility to the effects of constant light is increased. These results reveal a key role for mTOR/4E-BP1-mediated translational control in regulating entrainment and synchrony of the master clock.

  4. MTOR inhibition attenuates DNA damage and apoptosis through autophagy-mediated suppression of CREB1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Zhongdong; Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Rongrong; Peng, Haiyong; Guo, Jing; Chen, Xinxin; Zhang, Hongbing

    2013-12-01

    Hyperactivation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) is a common feature of human cancers, and MTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin, are thus becoming therapeutics in targeting certain cancers. However, rapamycin has also been found to compromise the efficacy of chemotherapeutics to cells with hyperactive MTOR. Here, we show that loss of TSC2 or PTEN enhanced etoposide-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, which was blunted by suppression of MTOR with either rapamycin or RNA interference. cAMP response element-binding protein 1 (CREB1), a nuclear transcription factor that regulates genes involved in survival and death, was positively regulated by MTOR in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cancer cell lines. Silencing Creb1 expression with siRNA protected MTOR-hyperactive cells from DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, loss of TSC2 or PTEN impaired either etoposide or nutrient starvation-induced autophagy, which in turn, leads to CREB1 hyperactivation. We further elucidated an inverse correlation between autophagy activity and CREB1 activity in the kidney tumor tissue obtained from a TSC patient and the mouse livers with hepatocyte-specific knockout of PTEN. CREB1 induced DNA damage and subsequent apoptosis in response to etoposide in autophagy-defective cells. Reactivation of CREB1 or inhibition of autophagy not only improved the efficacy of rapamycin but also alleviated MTOR inhibition-mediated chemoresistance. Therefore, autophagy suppression of CREB1 may underlie the MTOR inhibition-mediated chemoresistance. We suggest that inhibition of MTOR in combination with CREB1 activation may be used in the treatment of cancer caused by an abnormal PI3K-PTEN-AKT-TSC1/2-MTOR signaling pathway. CREB1 activators should potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapeutics in treatment of these cancers.

  5. Study of mTOR Signaling Inhibitors as Potential Treatment for TSC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position...this award was to determine the extent to which six drugs reduce or normalize the pathologically high mTORC1 activity seen in TSC-defective cells, to...intracellular   proliferation  of  Mycobacterium   tuberculosis .  PLoS  Path.  8(5):e1002691  (2012)     Appendices     none      

  6. MEK Inhibition Sensitizes Precursor B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) Cells to Dexamethasone through Modulation of mTOR Activity and Stimulation of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Polak, Anna; Kiliszek, Przemysław; Sewastianik, Tomasz; Szydłowski, Maciej; Jabłońska, Ewa; Białopiotrowicz, Emilia; Górniak, Patryk; Markowicz, Sergiusz; Nowak, Eliza; Grygorowicz, Monika A; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Nowis, Dominika; Gołąb, Jakub; Giebel, Sebastian; Lech-Marańda, Ewa; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Juszczyński, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to glucocorticosteroids (GCs) is a major adverse prognostic factor in B-ALL, but the molecular mechanisms leading to GC resistance are not completely understood. Herein, we sought to elucidate the molecular background of GC resistance in B-ALL and characterize the therapeutic potential of targeted intervention in these mechanisms. Using exploratory bioinformatic approaches, we found that resistant cells exhibited significantly higher expression of MEK/ERK (MAPK) pathway components. We found that GC-resistant ALL cell lines had markedly higher baseline activity of MEK and small-molecule MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib increased GCs-induced cell death. MEK inhibitor similarly increased in vitro dexamethasone activity in primary ALL blasts from 19 of 22 tested patients. To further confirm these observations, we overexpressed a constitutively active MEK mutant in GC-sensitive cells and found that forced MEK activity induced resistance to dexamethasone. Since recent studies highlight the role GC-induced autophagy upstream of apoptotic cell death, we assessed LC3 processing, MDC staining and GFP-LC3 relocalization in cells incubated with either DEX, SEL or combination of drugs. Unlike either drug alone, only their combination markedly increased these markers of autophagy. These changes were associated with decreased mTOR activity and blocked 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. In cells with silenced beclin-1 (BCN1), required for autophagosome formation, the synergy of DEX and SEL was markedly reduced. Taken together, we show that MEK inhibitor selumetinib enhances dexamethasone toxicity in GC-resistant B-ALL cells. The underlying mechanism of this interaction involves inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway and modulation of autophagy markers, likely reflecting induction of this process and required for cell death. Thus, our data demonstrate that modulation of MEK/ERK pathway is an attractive therapeutic strategy overcoming GC resistance in B-ALL patients.

  7. MEK Inhibition Sensitizes Precursor B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) Cells to Dexamethasone through Modulation of mTOR Activity and Stimulation of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Anna; Kiliszek, Przemysław; Sewastianik, Tomasz; Szydłowski, Maciej; Jabłońska, Ewa; Białopiotrowicz, Emilia; Górniak, Patryk; Markowicz, Sergiusz; Nowak, Eliza; Grygorowicz, Monika A.; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Nowis, Dominika; Gołąb, Jakub; Giebel, Sebastian; Lech-Marańda, Ewa; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Juszczyński, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to glucocorticosteroids (GCs) is a major adverse prognostic factor in B-ALL, but the molecular mechanisms leading to GC resistance are not completely understood. Herein, we sought to elucidate the molecular background of GC resistance in B-ALL and characterize the therapeutic potential of targeted intervention in these mechanisms. Using exploratory bioinformatic approaches, we found that resistant cells exhibited significantly higher expression of MEK/ERK (MAPK) pathway components. We found that GC-resistant ALL cell lines had markedly higher baseline activity of MEK and small-molecule MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib increased GCs-induced cell death. MEK inhibitor similarly increased in vitro dexamethasone activity in primary ALL blasts from 19 of 22 tested patients. To further confirm these observations, we overexpressed a constitutively active MEK mutant in GC-sensitive cells and found that forced MEK activity induced resistance to dexamethasone. Since recent studies highlight the role GC-induced autophagy upstream of apoptotic cell death, we assessed LC3 processing, MDC staining and GFP-LC3 relocalization in cells incubated with either DEX, SEL or combination of drugs. Unlike either drug alone, only their combination markedly increased these markers of autophagy. These changes were associated with decreased mTOR activity and blocked 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. In cells with silenced beclin-1 (BCN1), required for autophagosome formation, the synergy of DEX and SEL was markedly reduced. Taken together, we show that MEK inhibitor selumetinib enhances dexamethasone toxicity in GC-resistant B-ALL cells. The underlying mechanism of this interaction involves inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway and modulation of autophagy markers, likely reflecting induction of this process and required for cell death. Thus, our data demonstrate that modulation of MEK/ERK pathway is an attractive therapeutic strategy overcoming GC resistance in B-ALL patients. PMID:27196001

  8. Intrinsic MyD88-Akt1-mTOR Signaling Coordinates Disparate Tc17 and Tc1 Responses during Vaccine Immunity against Fungal Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Som Gowda; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Galles, Kevin; Wüthrich, Marcel; Suresh, M; Klein, Bruce S

    2015-09-01

    Fungal infections have skyrocketed in immune-compromised patients lacking CD4+ T cells, underscoring the need for vaccine prevention. An understanding of the elements that promote vaccine immunity in this setting is essential. We previously demonstrated that vaccine-induced IL-17A+ CD8+ T cells (Tc17) are required for resistance against lethal fungal pneumonia in CD4+ T cell-deficient hosts, whereas the individual type I cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and GM-CSF, are dispensable. Here, we report that T cell-intrinsic MyD88 signals are crucial for these Tc17 cell responses and vaccine immunity against lethal fungal pneumonia in mice. In contrast, IFN-γ+ CD8+ cell (Tc1) responses are largely normal in the absence of intrinsic MyD88 signaling in CD8+ T cells. The poor accumulation of MyD88-deficient Tc17 cells was not linked to an early onset of contraction, nor to accelerated cell death or diminished expression of anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Instead, intrinsic MyD88 was required to sustain the proliferation of Tc17 cells through the activation of mTOR via Akt1. Moreover, intrinsic IL-1R and TLR2, but not IL-18R, were required for MyD88 dependent Tc17 responses. Our data identify unappreciated targets for augmenting adaptive immunity against fungi. Our findings have implications for designing fungal vaccines and immune-based therapies in immune-compromised patients.

  9. WAC regulates mTOR activity by acting as an adaptor for the TTT and Pontin/Reptin complexes

    PubMed Central

    David-Morrison, Gabriela; Xu, Zhen; Rui, Yan-Ning; Charng, Wu-Lin; Jaiswal, Manish; Yamamoto, Shinya; Xiong, Bo; Zhang, Ke; Sandoval, Hector; Duraine, Lita; Zuo, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Sheng; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to sense energy status is crucial in the regulation of metabolism via the mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1). The assembly of the TTT-Pontin/Reptin complex is responsive to changes in energy status. In energy sufficient conditions, the TTT-Pontin/Reptin complex promotes mTORC1 dimerization and mTORC1-Rag interaction, which are critical for mTORC1 activation. We show that WAC is a regulator of energy-mediated mTORC1 activity. In a Drosophila screen designed to isolate mutations that cause neuronal dysfunction, we identified wacky, the homolog of WAC. Loss of Wacky leads to neurodegeneration, defective mTOR activity and increased autophagy. Wacky and WAC have conserved physical interactions with mTOR and its regulators, including Pontin and Reptin which bind to the TTT complex to regulate energy-dependent activation of mTORC1. WAC promotes the interaction between TTT and Pontin/Reptin in an energy-dependent manner, thereby promoting mTORC1 activity by facilitating mTORC1 dimerization and mTORC1-Rag interaction. PMID:26812014

  10. Inhibition of mTOR by apigenin in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes: A new implication of skin cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, Bryan B; Wang, Pu; Ye, Boping; Pelling, Jill C; Volpert, Olga V; Tong, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is the major environmental risk factor for developing skin cancer, the most common cancer worldwide, which is characterized by aberrant activation of Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). Importantly, the link between UV irradiation and mTOR signaling has not been fully established. Apigenin is a naturally occurring flavonoid that has been shown to inhibit UV-induced skin cancer. Previously, we have demonstrated that apigenin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which leads to suppression of basal mTOR activity in cultured keratinocytes. Here, we demonstrated that apigenin inhibited UVB-induced mTOR activation, cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in mouse skin and in mouse epidermal keratinocytes. Interestingly, UVB induced mTOR signaling via PI3K/Akt pathway, however, the inhibition of UVB-induced mTOR signaling by apigenin was not Akt-dependent. Instead, it was driven by AMPK activation. In addition, mTOR inhibition by apigenin in keratinocytes enhanced autophagy, which was responsible, at least in part, for the decreased proliferation in keratinocytes. In contrast, apigenin did not alter UVB-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results indicate the important role of mTOR inhibition in UVB protection by apigenin, and provide a new target and strategy for better prevention of UV-induced skin cancer.

  11. CC-223, a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of mTOR Kinase: In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Deborah S; Fultz, Kimberly E; Xu, Shuichan; Xu, Weiming; Packard, Garrick; Khambatta, Godrej; Gamez, James C; Leisten, Jim; Zhao, Jingjing; Apuy, Julius; Ghoreishi, Kamran; Hickman, Matt; Narla, Rama Krishna; Bissonette, Rene; Richardson, Samantha; Peng, Sophie X; Perrin-Ninkovic, Sophie; Tran, Tam; Shi, Tao; Yang, Wen Qing; Tong, Zeen; Cathers, Brian E; Moghaddam, Mehran F; Canan, Stacie S; Worland, Peter; Sankar, Sabita; Raymon, Heather K

    2015-06-01

    mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, metabolism, proliferation, and survival. mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex-2 (mTORC2) are critical mediators of the PI3K-AKT pathway, which is frequently mutated in many cancers, leading to hyperactivation of mTOR signaling. Although rapamycin analogues, allosteric inhibitors that target only the mTORC1 complex, have shown some clinical activity, it is hypothesized that mTOR kinase inhibitors, blocking both mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling, will have expanded therapeutic potential. Here, we describe the preclinical characterization of CC-223. CC-223 is a potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of mTOR kinase, demonstrating inhibition of mTORC1 (pS6RP and p4EBP1) and mTORC2 [pAKT(S473)] in cellular systems. Growth inhibitory activity was demonstrated in hematologic and solid tumor cell lines. mTOR kinase inhibition in cells, by CC-223, resulted in more complete inhibition of the mTOR pathway biomarkers and improved antiproliferative activity as compared with rapamycin. Growth inhibitory activity and apoptosis was demonstrated in a panel of hematologic cancer cell lines. Correlative analysis revealed that IRF4 expression level associates with resistance, whereas mTOR pathway activation seems to associate with sensitivity. Treatment with CC-223 afforded in vivo tumor biomarker inhibition in tumor-bearing mice, after a single oral dose. CC-223 exhibited dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition in multiple solid tumor xenografts. Significant inhibition of mTOR pathway markers pS6RP and pAKT in CC-223-treated tumors suggests that the observed antitumor activity of CC-223 was mediated through inhibition of both mTORC1 and mTORC2. CC-223 is currently in phase I clinical trials.

  12. MicroRNA-184 promotes differentiation of the retinal pigment epithelium by targeting the AKT2/mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao; Qin, Bing; Liu, Guohua; Sun, Xiantao; Shi, Houxia; Ding, Sijia; Liu, Yuan; Zhu, Meidong; Chen, Xue; Zhao, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Dedifferentiation of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells is a crucial contributing factor to the pathology of retinal degenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Herein, we aim to reveal the roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in RPE dedifferentiation and seek for potential therapeutic targets. Based on the microarray data, miR-184 was sorted out as the most up-regulated signature along with the differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) to RPE cells, suggesting its potential promotive role in RPE differentiation. In vitro study indicated that miR-184 insufficiency suppressed RPE differentiation, typified by reduction of RPE markers, and promoted cell proliferation and migration. The role of miR-184 in maintaining regular RPE function was further proved in zebrafish studies. We also noticed that miR-184 expression was reduced in the macular RPE-choroid from a donor with RPE dysfunction compared to a healthy control. We next demonstrated that RAC-beta serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT2) was a direct target for miR-184. MiR-184 promoted RPE differentiation via suppression of AKT2/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. We also found that AKT2 was up-regulated in macular RPE-choroid of the donor with RPE dysfunction and dry AMD patients. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-184 insufficiency is involved in the pathogenesis of dry AMD. MiR-184 promotes RPE differentiation via inhibiting the AKT2/mTOR signaling pathway. MiR-184 based supplementary therapeutics and mTOR blocker, like rapamycin, are prospective options for AMD treatment. PMID:27418134

  13. Reversal of the glycolytic phenotype of primary effusion lymphoma cells by combined targeting of cellular metabolism and PI3K/Akt/ mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bertacchini, Jessika; Frasson, Chiara; Bosco, Raffaella; Accordi, Benedetta; Basso, Giuseppe; Bonora, Massimo; Calabrò, Maria Luisa; Mattiolo, Adriana; Sgarbi, Gianluca; Baracca, Alessandra; Pinton, Paolo; Riva, Giovanni; Rampazzo, Enrico; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Milani, Daniela; Luppi, Mario; Potenza, Leonardo; De Pol, Anto; Cocco, Lucio; Capitani, Silvano; Marmiroli, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    PEL is a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, occurring predominantly as a lymphomatous effusion in body cavities, characterized by aggressive clinical course, with no standard therapy. Based on previous reports that PEL cells display a Warburg phenotype, we hypothesized that the highly hypoxic environment in which they grow in vivo makes them more reliant on glycolysis, and more vulnerable to drugs targeting this pathway. We established here that indeed PEL cells in hypoxia are more sensitive to glycolysis inhibition. Furthermore, since PI3K/Akt/mTOR has been proposed as a drug target in PEL, we ascertained that pathway-specific inhibitors, namely the dual PI3K and mTOR inhibitor, PF-04691502, and the Akt inhibitor, Akti 1/2, display improved cytotoxicity to PEL cells in hypoxic conditions. Unexpectedly, we found that these drugs reduce lactate production/extracellular acidification rate, and, in combination with the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), they shift PEL cells metabolism from aerobic glycolysis towards oxidative respiration. Moreover, the associations possess strong synergistic cytotoxicity towards PEL cells, and thus may reduce adverse reaction in vivo, while displaying very low toxicity to normal lymphocytes. Finally, we showed that the association of 2-DG and PF-04691502 maintains its cytotoxic and proapoptotic effect also in PEL cells co-cultured with human primary mesothelial cells, a condition known to mimic the in vivo environment and to exert a protective and pro-survival action. All together, these results provide a compelling rationale for the clinical development of new therapies for the treatment of PEL, based on combined targeting of glycolytic metabolism and constitutively activated signaling pathways. PMID:26575168

  14. mTOR mediates human trophoblast invasion through regulation of matrix-remodeling enzymes and is associated with serine phosphorylation of STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Susann; Renaud, Stephen J.; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Graham, Charles H.; Markert, Udo R.

    2009-06-10

    The intracellular signaling molecule mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is essential for cell growth and proliferation. It is involved in mouse embryogenesis, murine trophoblast outgrowth and linked to tumor cell invasiveness. In order to assess the role of mTOR in human trophoblast invasion we analyzed the in vitro invasiveness of HTR-8/SVneo immortalized first-trimester trophoblast cells in conjunction with enzyme secretion upon mTOR inhibition and knockdown of mTOR protein expression. Additionally, we also tested the capability of mTOR to trigger signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 by its phosphorylation status. Rapamycin inhibited mTOR kinase activity as demonstrated with a lower phosphorylation level of the mTOR substrate p70 S6 kinase (S6K). With the use of rapamycin and siRNA-mediated mTOR knockdown we could show that cell proliferation, invasion and secretion of matrix-metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9, urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA) and its major physiological uPA inhibitor (PAI)-1 were inhibited. While tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 was unaffected by mTOR inhibition and knockdown, serine phosphorylation was diminished. We conclude that mTOR signaling is one major mechanism in a tightly regulated network of intracellular signal pathways including the JAK/STAT system to regulate invasion in human trophoblast cells by secretion of enzymes that remodel the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) such as MMP-2, -9, uPA and PAI-1. Dysregulation of mTOR may contribute to pregnancy-related pathologies caused through impaired trophoblast invasion.

  15. Effect of supplemental dietary zinc on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in skeletal muscle and liver from post-absorptive mice.

    PubMed

    McClung, James P; Tarr, Tyson N; Barnes, Brian R; Scrimgeour, Angus G; Young, Andrew J

    2007-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element that functions in cellular signaling. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the initiation of protein synthesis. The objective of this study was to determine whether Zn could stimulate protein phosphorylation in the mTOR pathway in vivo. Mice (C57BL/6J, n = 30) were fed Zn marginal diets (ZM, 5 mg/kg) for 4 weeks, followed by fasting (F) and/or refeeding with ZM or Zn supplemental (300 mg/kg, ZS) diets for 3 or 6 h. Plasma insulin was greater (P < 0.05) in refed animals as compared to F animals. Protein phosphorylation was detected using multiplex analysis and Western blotting. Multiplex analysis indicated greater (P < 0.05) p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3 alpha/beta) phosphorylation in livers from 6-h refed ZS animals as compared to F animals. Western blots indicated increased (P < 0.05) Akt (Ser 473) phosphorylation in skeletal muscle from animals refed ZS diets for 3 and 6 h as compared to F animals. The ZS diet affected phosphorylation of GSK-3 (alpha/beta) in liver, as 3-h ZS refed animals had greater (P < 0.01) phosphorylation than F animals. These findings indicate that Zn may contribute to the initiation of protein synthesis as a signaling molecule in vivo.

  16. IL-6 and IGF-1 Signaling Within and Between Muscle and Bone: How Important is the mTOR Pathway for Bone Metabolism?

    PubMed

    Bakker, Astrid D; Jaspers, Richard T

    2015-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) play an important role in the adaptation of both muscle and bone to mechanical stimuli. Here, we provide an overview of the functions of IL-6 and IGF-1 in bone and muscle metabolism, and the intracellular signaling pathways that are well known to mediate these functions. In particular, we discuss the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway which in skeletal muscle is known for its key role in regulating the rate of mRNA translation (protein synthesis). Since the role of the mTOR pathway in bone is explored to a much lesser extent, we discuss what is known about this pathway in bone and the potential role of this pathway in bone remodeling. We will also discuss the possible ways of influencing IGF-1 or IL-6 signaling by osteocytes and the clinical implications of pharmacological or nutritional modulation of the Akt/mTOR pathway.

  17. The mTOR Complex Controls HIV Latency.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Emilie; Hakre, Shweta; Kampmann, Martin; Lim, Hyung W; Hosmane, Nina N; Martin, Alyssa; Bassik, Michael C; Verschueren, Erik; Battivelli, Emilie; Chan, Jonathan; Svensson, J Peter; Gramatica, Andrea; Conrad, Ryan J; Ott, Melanie; Greene, Warner C; Krogan, Nevan J; Siliciano, Robert F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Verdin, Eric

    2016-12-14

    A population of CD4 T lymphocytes harboring latent HIV genomes can persist in patients on antiretroviral therapy, posing a barrier to HIV eradication. To examine cellular complexes controlling HIV latency, we conducted a genome-wide screen with a pooled ultracomplex shRNA library and in vitro system modeling HIV latency and identified the mTOR complex as a modulator of HIV latency. Knockdown of mTOR complex subunits or pharmacological inhibition of mTOR activity suppresses reversal of latency in various HIV-1 latency models and HIV-infected patient cells. mTOR inhibitors suppress HIV transcription both through the viral transactivator Tat and via Tat-independent mechanisms. This inhibition occurs at least in part via blocking the phosphorylation of CDK9, a p-TEFb complex member that serves as a cofactor for Tat-mediated transcription. The control of HIV latency by mTOR signaling identifies a pathway that may have significant therapeutic opportunities.

  18. Keloid disease can be inhibited by antagonizing excessive mTOR signaling with a novel dual TORC1/2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Syed, Farhatullah; Sherris, David; Paus, Ralf; Varmeh, Shohreh; Singh, Subir; Pandolfi, Pier P; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2012-11-01

    Keloid disease (KD) is a fibroproliferative lesion of unknown etiopathogenesis that possibly targets the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. We investigated whether PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitor, Palomid 529 (P529), which targets both mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC-1) and mTORC-2 signaling, could exert anti-KD effects in a novel KD organ culture assay and in keloid fibroblasts (KF). Treatment of KF with P529 significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited cell spreading, attachment, proliferation, migration, and invasive properties at a low concentration (5 ng/mL) and induced substantial KF apoptosis when compared with normal dermal fibroblasts. P529 also inhibited hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression and completely suppressed Akt, GSK3β, mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and S6 phosphorylation. P529 significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclin D and caused considerable apoptosis. Compared with rapamycin and wortmannin, P529 also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced keloid-associated phenotypic markers in KF. P529 caused tissue shrinkage, growth arrest, and apoptosis in keloid organ cultures and substantially inhibited angiogenesis. pS6, pAkt-Ser473, and mTOR phosphorylation were also suppressed in situ. P529 reduced cellularity and expression of collagen, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin (substantially more than rapamycin). These pre-clinical in vitro and ex vivo observations are evidence that the mTOR pathway is a promising target for future KD therapy and that the dual PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitor P529 deserves systematic exploration as a candidate agent for the future treatment of KD.

  19. Germline and somatic mutations in the MTOR gene in focal cortical dysplasia and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Rikke S.; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Chipaux, Mathilde; Marsan, Elise; Taly, Valerie; Bebin, E. Martina; Hiatt, Susan M.; Prokop, Jeremy W.; Bowling, Kevin M.; Mei, Davide; Conti, Valerio; de la Grange, Pierre; Ferrand-Sorbets, Sarah; Dorfmüller, Georg; Lambrecq, Virginie; Larsen, Line H.G.; Leguern, Eric; Guerrini, Renzo; Rubboli, Guido; Cooper, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of somatic MTOR mutations in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and of germline MTOR mutations in a broad range of epilepsies. Methods: We collected 20 blood-brain paired samples from patients with FCD and searched for somatic variants using deep-targeted gene panel sequencing. Germline mutations in MTOR were assessed in a French research cohort of 93 probands with focal epilepsies and in a diagnostic Danish cohort of 245 patients with a broad range of epilepsies. Data sharing among collaborators allowed us to ascertain additional germline variants in MTOR. Results: We detected recurrent somatic variants (p.Ser2215Phe, p.Ser2215Tyr, and p.Leu1460Pro) in the MTOR gene in 37% of participants with FCD II and showed histologic evidence for activation of the mTORC1 signaling cascade in brain tissue. We further identified 5 novel de novo germline missense MTOR variants in 6 individuals with a variable phenotype from focal, and less frequently generalized, epilepsies without brain malformations, to macrocephaly, with or without moderate intellectual disability. In addition, an inherited variant was found in a mother–daughter pair with nonlesional autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. Conclusions: Our data illustrate the increasingly important role of somatic mutations of the MTOR gene in FCD and germline mutations in the pathogenesis of focal epilepsy syndromes with and without brain malformation or macrocephaly. PMID:27830187

  20. The Role of mTOR Signaling in the Regulation of RAG Expression and Genomic Stability During B Lymphocyte Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    physiological or when become malignant. We have also revealed a combination retreatment for leukemia cells with both mTORC2 inhibitor and molecular chaperon...unknown function of mTORC2 through a GSK3-involved c-Myc expression in B cells. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Sin1, mTOR, Rag1/2, p53, B cells, leukemia and...innovative new Sin1/mTORC2 deficient progenitor B cell lines and B cell leukemia cell models. Furthermore, we have explored the role of Sin1 in B cell

  1. Hyperactive mTOR pathway promotes lymphoproliferation and abnormal differentiation in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Völkl, Simon; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Allgäuer, Andrea; Schreiner, Elisabeth; Lorenz, Myriam Ricarda; Rohr, Jan; Klemann, Christian; Fuchs, Ilka; Schuster, Volker; von Bueren, André O; Naumann-Bartsch, Nora; Gambineri, Eleonora; Siepermann, Kathrin; Kobbe, Robin; Nathrath, Michaela; Arkwright, Peter D; Miano, Maurizio; Stachel, Klaus-Daniel; Metzler, Markus; Schwarz, Klaus; Kremer, Anita N; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-07-14

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human disorder characterized by defective Fas signaling, resulting in chronic benign lymphoproliferation and accumulation of TCRαβ(+) CD4(-) CD8(-) double-negative T (DNT) cells. Although their phenotype resembles that of terminally differentiated or exhausted T cells, lack of KLRG1, high eomesodermin, and marginal T-bet expression point instead to a long-lived memory state with potent proliferative capacity. Here we show that despite their terminally differentiated phenotype, human ALPS DNT cells exhibit substantial mitotic activity in vivo. Notably, hyperproliferation of ALPS DNT cells is associated with increased basal and activation-induced phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinases Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abrogated survival and proliferation of ALPS DNT cells, but not of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in vitro. In vivo, mTOR inhibition reduced proliferation and abnormal differentiation by DNT cells. Importantly, increased mitotic activity and hyperactive mTOR signaling was also observed in recently defined CD4(+) or CD8(+) precursor DNT cells, and mTOR inhibition specifically reduced these cells in vivo, indicating abnormal programming of Fas-deficient T cells before the DNT stage. Thus, our results identify the mTOR pathway as a major regulator of lymphoproliferation and aberrant differentiation in ALPS.

  2. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  3. Alcohol impairs skeletal muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in a time-dependent manner following electrically stimulated muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Lang, Charles H

    2014-11-15

    Alcohol (EtOH) decreases protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated signaling and blunts the anabolic response to growth factors in skeletal muscle. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine whether acute EtOH intoxication antagonizes the contraction-induced increase in protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle. Fasted male mice were injected intraperitoneally with 3 g/kg EtOH or saline (control), and the right hindlimb was electrically stimulated (10 sets of 6 contractions). The gastrocnemius muscle complex was collected 30 min, 4 h, or 12 h after stimulation. EtOH decreased in vivo basal protein synthesis (PS) in the nonstimulated muscle compared with time-matched Controls at 30 min, 4 h, and 12 h. In Control, but not EtOH, PS was decreased 15% after 30 min. In contrast, PS was increased in Control 4 h poststimulation but remained unchanged in EtOH. Last, stimulation increased PS 10% in Control and EtOH at 12 h, even though the absolute rate remained reduced by EtOH. The stimulation-induced increase in the phosphorylation of S6K1 Thr(421)/Ser(424) (20-52%), S6K1 Thr(389) (45-57%), and its substrate rpS6 Ser(240/244) (37-72%) was blunted by EtOH at 30 min, 4 h, and 12 h. Phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 Ser(65) was also attenuated by EtOH (61%) at 4 h. Conversely, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase Thr(202)/Tyr(204) was increased by stimulation in Control and EtOH mice at 30 min but only in Control at 4 h. Our data indicate that acute EtOH intoxication suppresses muscle protein synthesis for at least 12 h and greatly impairs contraction-induced changes in synthesis and mTOR signaling.

  4. Evidence of molecular links between PKR and mTOR signalling pathways in Abeta neurotoxicity: role of p53, Redd1 and TSC2.

    PubMed

    Morel, Milena; Couturier, Julien; Pontcharraud, Raymond; Gil, Roger; Fauconneau, Bernard; Paccalin, Marc; Page, Guylène

    2009-10-01

    The control of translation is disturbed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study analysed the crosslink between the up regulation of double-stranded RNA-dependent-protein kinase (PKR) and the down regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathways via p53, the protein Regulated in the Development and DNA damage response 1 (Redd1) and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC2) factors in two beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) neurotoxicity models. In SH-SY5Y cells, Abeta42 induced an increase of P(T451)-PKR and of the ratio p66/(p66+p53) in nuclei and a physical interaction between these proteins. Redd1 gene levels increased and P(T1462)-TSC2 decreased. These disturbances were earlier in rat primary neurons with nuclear co-localization of Redd1 and PKR. The PKR gene silencing in SH-SY5Y cells prevented these alterations. p53, Redd1 and TSC2 could represent the molecular links between PKR and mTOR in Abeta neurotoxicity. PKR could be a critical target in a therapeutic program of AD.

  5. Hyperactive mTOR signals in the proopiomelanocortin-expressing hippocampal neurons cause age-dependent epilepsy and premature death in mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Yuki; Sakai, Yasunari; Shimmura, Mitsunori; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Nishio, Miki; Akamine, Satoshi; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Torisu, Hiroyuki; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Suzuki, Akira; Takada, Hidetoshi; Hara, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a frequent comorbidity in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Recent studies utilizing massive sequencing data identified subsets of genes that are associated with epilepsy and FCD. AKT and mTOR-related signals have been recently implicated in the pathogenic processes of epilepsy and FCD. To clarify the functional roles of the AKT-mTOR pathway in the hippocampal neurons, we generated conditional knockout mice harboring the deletion of Pten (Pten-cKO) in Proopiomelanocortin-expressing neurons. The Pten-cKO mice developed normally until 8 weeks of age, then presented generalized seizures at 8–10 weeks of age. Video-monitored electroencephalograms detected paroxysmal discharges emerging from the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. These mice showed progressive hypertrophy of the dentate gyrus (DG) with increased expressions of excitatory synaptic markers (Psd95, Shank3 and Homer). In contrast, the expression of inhibitory neurons (Gad67) was decreased at 6–8 weeks of age. Immunofluorescence studies revealed the abnormal sprouting of mossy fibers in the DG of the Pten-cKO mice prior to the onset of seizures. The treatment of these mice with an mTOR inhibitor rapamycin successfully prevented the development of seizures and reversed these molecular phenotypes. These data indicate that the mTOR pathway regulates hippocampal excitability in the postnatal brain. PMID:26961412

  6. Niclosamide and its analogs are potent inhibitors of Wnt/β-catenin, mTOR and STAT3 signaling in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arend, Rebecca C.; Londoño-Joshi, Angelina I.; Gangrade, Abhishek; Katre, Ashwini A.; Kurpad, Chandrika; Li, Yonghe; Samant, Rajeev S.; Li, Pui-Kai; Landen, Charles N.; Yang, Eddy S.; Hidalgo, Bertha; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Michael Straughn, John; Forero, Andres; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer mortality worldwide. Platinum-based therapy is the standard first line treatment and while most patients initially respond, resistance to chemotherapy usually arises. Major signaling pathways frequently upregulated in chemoresistant cells and important in the maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) include Wnt/β-catenin, mTOR, and STAT3. The major objective of our study was to investigate the treatment of ovarian cancer with targeted agents that inhibit these three pathways. Here we demonstrate that niclosamide, a salicylamide derivative, and two synthetically manufactured niclosamide analogs (analog 11 and 32) caused significant inhibition of proliferation of two chemoresistant ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780cp20 and SKOV3Trip2), tumorspheres isolated from the ascites of EOC patients, and cells from a chemoresistant patient-derived xenograft (PDX). This work shows that all three agents significantly decreased the expression of proteins in the Wnt/β-catenin, mTOR and STAT3 pathways and preferentially targeted cells that expressed the ovarian CSC surface protein CD133. It also illustrates the potential of drug repurposing for chemoresistant EOC and can serve as a basis for pathway-oriented in vivo studies. PMID:27888804

  7. Signaling through the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Axis Is Responsible for Aerobic Glycolysis mediated by Glucose Transporter in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-mutated Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Makinoshima, Hideki; Takita, Masahiro; Saruwatari, Koichi; Umemura, Shigeki; Obata, Yuuki; Ishii, Genichiro; Matsumoto, Shingo; Sugiyama, Eri; Ochiai, Atsushi; Abe, Ryo; Goto, Koichi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2015-07-10

    Oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling plays an important role in regulating global metabolic pathways, including aerobic glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), and pyrimidine biosynthesis. However, the molecular mechanism by which EGFR signaling regulates cancer cell metabolism is still unclear. To elucidate how EGFR signaling is linked to metabolic activity, we investigated the involvement of the RAS/MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways on metabolic alteration in lung adenocarcinoma (LAD) cell lines with activating EGFR mutations. Although MEK inhibition did not alter lactate production and the extracellular acidification rate, PI3K/mTOR inhibitors significantly suppressed glycolysis in EGFR-mutant LAD cells. Moreover, a comprehensive metabolomics analysis revealed that the levels of glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate as early metabolites in glycolysis and PPP were decreased after inhibition of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, suggesting a link between PI3K signaling and the proper function of glucose transporters or hexokinases in glycolysis. Indeed, PI3K/mTOR inhibition effectively suppressed membrane localization of facilitative glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), which, instead, accumulated in the cytoplasm. Finally, aerobic glycolysis and cell proliferation were down-regulated when GLUT1 gene expression was suppressed by RNAi. Taken together, these results suggest that PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling is indispensable for the regulation of aerobic glycolysis in EGFR-mutated LAD cells.

  8. Targeting mTOR in RET mutant medullary and differentiated thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gild, Matti L; Landa, Iñigo; Ryder, Mabel; Ghossein, Ronald A; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Fagin, James A

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of RET, a tyrosine kinase receptor encoded by a gene that is frequently mutated in medullary thyroid cancer, have emerged as promising novel therapies for the disease. Rapalogs and other mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are effective agents in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, which share lineage properties with medullary thyroid carcinomas. The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of mTOR activity to RET-induced signaling and cell growth and to establish whether growth suppression is enhanced by co-targeting RET and mTOR kinase activities. Treatment of the RET mutant cell lines TT, TPC-1, and MZ-CRC-1 with AST487, a RET kinase inhibitor, suppressed growth and showed profound and sustained inhibition of mTOR signaling, which was recapitulated by siRNA-mediated RET knockdown. Inhibition of mTOR with INK128, a dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 kinase inhibitor, also resulted in marked growth suppression to levels similar to those seen with RET blockade. Moreover, combined treatment with AST487 and INK128 at low concentrations suppressed growth and induced apoptosis. These data establish mTOR as a key mediator of RET-mediated cell growth in thyroid cancer cells and provide a rationale for combinatorial treatments in thyroid cancers with oncogenic RET mutations. PMID:23828865

  9. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling.

  10. TNFAIP3 promotes survival of CD4 T cells by restricting MTOR and promoting autophagy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Yu; Oshima, Shigeru; Takahara, Masahiro; Maeyashiki, Chiaki; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Nibe, Yoichi; Nozaki, Kengo; Nagaishi, Takashi; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ma, Averil; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in metabolism, differentiation, and survival in T cells. TNFAIP3/A20 is a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that is thought to be a negative regulator of autophagy in cell lines. However, the role of TNFAIP3 in autophagy remains unclear. To determine whether TNFAIP3 regulates autophagy in CD4 T cells, we first analyzed Tnfaip3-deficient naïve CD4 T cells in vitro. We demonstrated that Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited reduced MAP1LC3/LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) puncta formation, increased mitochondrial content, and exaggerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These results indicate that TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy after T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation in CD4 T cells. We then investigated the mechanism by which TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy signaling. We found that TNFAIP3 bound to the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex and that Tnfaip3-deficient cells displayed enhanced ubiquitination of the MTOR complex and MTOR activity. To confirm the effects of enhanced MTOR activity in Tnfaip3-deficient cells, we analyzed cell survival following treatment with Torin1, an MTOR inhibitor. Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited fewer cell numbers than the control cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the impaired survival of Tnfaip3-deficient cells was ameliorated with Torin1 treatment in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Torin1 was abolished by Atg5 deficiency. Thus, enhanced MTOR activity regulates the survival of Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells. Taken together, our findings illustrate that TNFAIP3 restricts MTOR signaling and promotes autophagy, providing new insight into the manner in which MTOR and autophagy regulate survival in CD4 T cells.

  11. MTOR ACTIVATION TRIGGERS IL-4 PRODUCTION AND NECROTIC DEATH OF DOUBLE-NEGATIVE T CELLS IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYHTHEMATOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhi-Wei; Borsuk, Rebecca; Shadakshari, Ashwini; Yu, Jianghong; Dawood, Maha; Garcia, Ricardo; Francis, Lisa; Tily, Hajra; Bartos, Adam; Faraone, Stephen V.; Phillips, Paul; Perl, Andras

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is recognized as a sensor of mitochondrial dysfunction and effector of T-cell lineage development, however, its role in autoimmunity, including systemic lupus erythematosus, remains unclear. Here, we prospectively evaluated mitochondrial dysfunction and mTOR activation in PBL relative to SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) during 274 visits of 59 patients and 54 matched healthy subjects. Partial least square-discriminant analysis identified 15 of 212 parameters that accounted for 70.2% of the total variance and discriminated lupus and control samples (p<0.0005); increased mitochondrial mass of CD3+/CD4−/CD8− double-negative (DN) T cells (p=1.1×10−22) and FoxP3 depletion in CD4+/CD25+ T cells were top contributors (p=6.7×10−7). Prominent necrosis and mTOR activation were noted in DN T cells during 15 visits characterized by flares (SLEDAI increase ≥4) relative to 61 visits of remission (SLEDAI decrease ≥4). mTOR activation in DN T cells was also noted at pre-flare visits of SLE patients relative to those of stable disease or healthy controls. DN lupus T cells showed increased production of IL-4, which correlated with depletion of CD25+/CD19+B cells. Rapamycin treatment in vivo blocked the IL-4 production and necrosis of DN T cells, increased the expression of FoxP3 in CD25+/CD4+T cells, and expanded CD25+/CD19+ B cells. These results identify mTOR activation to be a trigger of IL-4 production and necrotic death of DN T cells in patients with SLE. PMID:23913957

  12. Acquired savolitinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer arises via multiple mechanisms that converge on MET-independent mTOR and MYC activation

    PubMed Central

    Castriotta, Lillian; Ladd, Brendon; Markovets, Aleksandra; Beran, Garry; Ren, Yongxin; Zhou, Feng; Adam, Ammar; Zinda, Michael; Reimer, Corinne; Qing, Weiguo; Su, Weiguo; Clark, Edwin; D'Cruz, Celina M.; Schuller, Alwin G.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death globally with a significant, unmet need for more efficacious treatments. The receptor tyrosine kinase MET has been implicated as an oncogene in numerous cancer subtypes, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we explore the therapeutic potential of savolitinib (volitinib, AZD6094, HMPL-504), a potent and selective MET inhibitor, in NSCLC. In vitro, savolitinib inhibits MET phosphorylation with nanomolar potency, which correlates with blockade of PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling as well as MYC down-regulation. In vivo, savolitinib causes inhibition of these pathways and significantly decreases growth of MET-dependent xenografts. To understand resistance mechanisms, we generated savolitinib resistance in MET-amplified NSCLC cell lines and analyzed individual clones. We found that upregulation of MYC and constitutive mTOR pathway activation is a conserved feature of resistant clones that can be overcome by knockdown of MYC or dual mTORC1/2 inhibition. Lastly, we demonstrate that mechanisms of resistance are heterogeneous, arising via a switch to EGFR dependence or by a requirement for PIM signaling. This work demonstrates the efficacy of savolitinib in NSCLC and characterizes acquired resistance, identifying both known and novel mechanisms that may inform combination strategies in the clinic. PMID:27472392

  13. MTOR-Driven Metabolic Reprogramming Regulates Legionella pneumophila Intracellular Niche Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Abshire, Camille F.; Roy, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar bacterial pathogens are sheltered within unique membrane-bound organelles that expand over time to support bacterial replication. These compartments sequester bacterial molecules away from host cytosolic immunosurveillance pathways that induce antimicrobial responses. The mechanisms by which the human pulmonary pathogen Legionella pneumophila maintains niche homeostasis are poorly understood. We uncovered that the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) required a sustained supply of host lipids during expansion. Lipids shortage resulted in LCV rupture and initiation of a host cell death response, whereas excess of host lipids increased LCVs size and housing capacity. We found that lipids uptake from serum and de novo lipogenesis are distinct redundant supply mechanisms for membrane biogenesis in Legionella-infected macrophages. During infection, the metabolic checkpoint kinase Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (MTOR) controlled lipogenesis through the Serum Response Element Binding Protein 1 and 2 (SREBP1/2) transcription factors. In Legionella-infected macrophages a host-driven response that required the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) adaptor protein Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (Myd88) dampened MTOR signaling which in turn destabilized LCVs under serum starvation. Inactivation of the host MTOR-suppression pathway revealed that L. pneumophila sustained MTOR signaling throughout its intracellular infection cycle by a process that required the upstream regulator Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) and one or more Dot/Icm effector proteins. Legionella-sustained MTOR signaling facilitated LCV expansion and inhibition of the PI3K-MTOR-SREPB1/2 axis through pharmacological or genetic interference or by activation of the host MTOR-suppression response destabilized expanding LCVs, which in turn triggered cell death of infected macrophages. Our work identified a host metabolic requirement for LCV homeostasis and demonstrated that L

  14. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-1 upregulation by O-GlcNAcylation of Sp1 protects against hypoxia-induced mouse embryonic stem cell apoptosis via mTOR activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H J; Ryu, J M; Jung, Y H; Lee, K H; Kim, D I; Han, H J

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen signaling is critical for stem cell regulation, and oxidative stress-induced stem cell apoptosis decreases the efficiency of stem cell therapy. Hypoxia activates O-linked β-N-acetyl glucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) of stem cells, which contributes to regulation of cellular metabolism, as well as cell fate. Our study investigated the role of O-GlcNAcylation via glucosamine in the protection of hypoxia-induced apoptosis of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Hypoxia increased mESCs apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, hypoxia also slightly increased the O-GlcNAc level. Glucosamine treatment further enhanced the O-GlcNAc level and prevented hypoxia-induced mESC apoptosis, which was suppressed by O-GlcNAc transferase inhibitors. In addition, hypoxia regulated several lipid metabolic enzymes, whereas glucosamine increased expression of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-1 (GPAT1), a lipid metabolic enzyme producing lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). In addition, glucosamine-increased O-GlcNAcylation of Sp1, which subsequently leads to Sp1 nuclear translocation and GPAT1 expression. Silencing of GPAT1 by gpat1 siRNA transfection reduced glucosamine-mediated anti-apoptosis in mESCs and reduced mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) phosphorylation. Indeed, LPA prevented mESCs from undergoing hypoxia-induced apoptosis and increased phosphorylation of mTOR and its substrates (S6K1 and 4EBP1). Moreover, mTOR inactivation by rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor) increased pro-apoptotic proteins expressions and mESC apoptosis. Furthermore, transplantation of non-targeting siRNA and glucosamine-treated mESCs increased cell survival and inhibited flap necrosis in mouse skin flap model. Conversely, silencing of GPAT1 expression reversed those glucosamine effects. In conclusion, enhancing O-GlcNAcylation of Sp1 by glucosamine stimulates GPAT1 expression, which leads to inhibition of hypoxia-induced mESC apoptosis via mTOR activation. PMID:27010859

  15. BIM and mTOR expression levels predict outcome to erlotinib in EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karachaliou, Niki; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Teixidó, Cristina; Pilotto, Sara; Drozdowskyj, Ana; Codony-Servat, Carles; Giménez-Capitán, Ana; Molina-Vila, Miguel Angel; Bertrán-Alamillo, Jordi; Gervais, Radj; Massuti, Bartomeu; Morán, Teresa; Majem, Margarita; Felip, Enriqueta; Carcereny, Enric; García-Campelo, Rosario; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Verlicchi, Alberto; Crisetti, Elisabetta; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Luis Ramírez, José; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Felipe Cardona, Andrés; de Marinis, Filippo; López-Vivanco, Guillermo; Miguel Sánchez, José; Vergnenegre, Alain; Sánchez Hernández, José Javier; Sperduti, Isabella; Bria, Emilio; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    BIM is a proapoptotic protein that initiates apoptosis triggered by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). mTOR negatively regulates apoptosis and may influence response to EGFR TKI. We examined mRNA expression of BIM and MTOR in 57 patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC from the EURTAC trial. Risk of mortality and disease progression was lower in patients with high BIM compared with low/intermediate BIM mRNA levels. Analysis of MTOR further divided patients with high BIM expression into two groups, with those having both high BIM and MTOR experiencing shorter overall and progression-free survival to erlotinib. Validation of our results was performed in an independent cohort of 19 patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC treated with EGFR TKIs. In EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with high BIM expression, concomitant high mTOR expression increased IC50 of gefitinib for cell proliferation. We next sought to analyse the signalling pattern in cell lines with strong activation of mTOR and its substrate P-S6. We showed that mTOR and phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) strongly correlate in resistant EGFR-mutant cancer cell lines. These data suggest that the combination of EGFR TKI with mTOR or PDE4 inhibitors could be adequate therapy for EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients with high pretreatment levels of BIM and mTOR. PMID:26639561

  16. BIM and mTOR expression levels predict outcome to erlotinib in EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Karachaliou, Niki; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Teixidó, Cristina; Pilotto, Sara; Drozdowskyj, Ana; Codony-Servat, Carles; Giménez-Capitán, Ana; Molina-Vila, Miguel Angel; Bertrán-Alamillo, Jordi; Gervais, Radj; Massuti, Bartomeu; Morán, Teresa; Majem, Margarita; Felip, Enriqueta; Carcereny, Enric; García-Campelo, Rosario; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Verlicchi, Alberto; Crisetti, Elisabetta; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Luis Ramírez, José; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Felipe Cardona, Andrés; de Marinis, Filippo; López-Vivanco, Guillermo; Miguel Sánchez, José; Vergnenegre, Alain; Sánchez Hernández, José Javier; Sperduti, Isabella; Bria, Emilio; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-12-07

    BIM is a proapoptotic protein that initiates apoptosis triggered by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). mTOR negatively regulates apoptosis and may influence response to EGFR TKI. We examined mRNA expression of BIM and MTOR in 57 patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC from the EURTAC trial. Risk of mortality and disease progression was lower in patients with high BIM compared with low/intermediate BIM mRNA levels. Analysis of MTOR further divided patients with high BIM expression into two groups, with those having both high BIM and MTOR experiencing shorter overall and progression-free survival to erlotinib. Validation of our results was performed in an independent cohort of 19 patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC treated with EGFR TKIs. In EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with high BIM expression, concomitant high mTOR expression increased IC50 of gefitinib for cell proliferation. We next sought to analyse the signalling pattern in cell lines with strong activation of mTOR and its substrate P-S6. We showed that mTOR and phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) strongly correlate in resistant EGFR-mutant cancer cell lines. These data suggest that the combination of EGFR TKI with mTOR or PDE4 inhibitors could be adequate therapy for EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients with high pretreatment levels of BIM and mTOR.

  17. Targeting molecules to medicine with mTOR, autophagy and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are significantly increasing in incidence as the age of the global population continues to climb with improved life expectancy. At present, more than 30 million individuals throughout the world are impacted by acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders with limited treatment strategies. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), also known as the mammalian target of rapamycin, is a 289 kDa serine/threonine protein kinase that offers exciting possibilities for novel treatment strategies for a host of neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, epilepsy, stroke and trauma. mTOR governs the programmed cell death pathways of apoptosis and autophagy that can determine neuronal stem cell development, precursor cell differentiation, cell senescence, cell survival and ultimate cell fate. Coupled to the cellular biology of mTOR are a number of considerations for the development of novel treatments involving the fine control of mTOR signalling, tumourigenesis, complexity of the apoptosis and autophagy relationship, functional outcome in the nervous system, and the intimately linked pathways of growth factors, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K), protein kinase B (Akt), AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), silent mating type information regulation two homologue one (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1) and others. Effective clinical translation of the cellular signalling mechanisms of mTOR offers provocative avenues for new drug development in the nervous system tempered only by the need to elucidate further the intricacies of the mTOR pathway.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and has a protective effect in a rat model of status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    SAN, YONG-ZHI; LIU, YU; ZHANG, YU; SHI, PING-PING; ZHU, YU-LAN

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) has a protective role in several neurological diseases. The present study investigated the effect of the PPAR-γ agonist, pioglitazone, on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in a rat model of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced status epilepticus (SE). The investigation proceeded in two stages. First, the course of activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in PTZ-induced SE was examined to determine the time-point of peak activity, as reflected by phopshorylated (p)-mTOR/mTOR and p-S6/S6 ratios. Subsequently, pioglitazone was administrated intragastrically to investigate its effect on the mTOR signaling pathway, through western blot and immunochemical analyses. The levels of the interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 inflammatory cytokines were detected using ELISA, and neuronal loss was observed via Nissl staining. In the first stage of experimentation, the mTOR signaling pathway was activated, and the p-mTOR/mTOR and p-S6/S6 ratios peaked on the third day. Compared with the vehicle treated-SE group, pretreatment with pioglitazone was associated with the loss of fewer neurons, lower levels of IL-1β and IL-6, and inhibition of the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, the mTOR signaling pathway was activated in the PTZ-induced SE rat model, and the PPAR-γ agonist, pioglitazone, had a neuroprotective effect, by inhibiting activation of the mTOR pathway and preventing the increase in the levels of IL-1β and IL-6. PMID:25891824

  19. MHY1485 ameliorates UV-induced skin cell damages via activating mTOR-Nrf2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Xu, Qiu-Yun; Guo, Chun-Yan; Huang, Jin-Wen; Wang, Shu-Mei; Li, Yong-Mei; Tu, Ying; He, Li; Bi, Zhi-Gang; Ji, Chao; Cheng, Bo

    2017-01-04

    Ultra Violet (UV)-caused skin cell damage is a main cause of skin cancer. Here, we studied the activity of MHY1485, a mTOR activator, in UV-treated skin cells. In primary human skin keratinocytes, HaCaT keratinocytes and human skin fibroblasts, MHY1485 ameliorated UV-induced cell death and apoptosis. mTOR activation is required for MHY1485-induced above cytoprotective actions. mTOR kinase inhibitors (OSI-027, AZD-8055 and AZD-2014) or mTOR shRNA knockdown almost abolished MHY1485-induced cytoprotection. Further, MHY1485 treatment in skin cells activated mTOR downstream NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling, causing Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, stabilization/upregulation and nuclear translocation, as well as mRNA expression of Nrf2-dictated genes. Contrarily, Nrf2 knockdown or S40T mutation almost nullified MHY1485-induced cytoprotection. MHY1485 suppressed UV-induced reactive oxygen species production and DNA single strand breaks in skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Together, we conclude that MHY1485 inhibits UV-induced skin cell damages via activating mTOR-Nrf2 signaling.

  20. Reduced neuronal size and mTOR pathway activity in the Mecp2 A140V Rett syndrome mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rangasamy, Sampathkumar; Olfers, Shannon; Gerald, Brittany; Hilbert, Alex; Svejda, Sean; Narayanan, Vinodh

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutation in the X-linked MECP2 gene, encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. We have created a mouse model ( Mecp2 A140V “knock-in” mutant) expressing the recurrent human MECP2 A140V mutation linked to an X-linked mental retardation/Rett syndrome phenotype. Morphological analyses focused on quantifying soma and nucleus size were performed on primary hippocampus and cerebellum granule neuron (CGN) cultures from mutant ( Mecp2 A140V/y) and wild type ( Mecp2 +/y) male mice. Cultured hippocampus and cerebellar granule neurons from mutant animals were significantly smaller than neurons from wild type animals. We also examined soma size in hippocampus neurons from individual female transgenic mice that express both a mutant  (maternal allele) and a wild type Mecp2 gene linked to an eGFP transgene (paternal allele). In cultures from such doubly heterozygous female mice, the size of neurons expressing the mutant (A140V) allele also showed a significant reduction compared to neurons expressing wild type MeCP2, supporting a cell-autonomous role for MeCP2 in neuronal development. IGF-1 (insulin growth factor-1) treatment of neuronal cells from Mecp2 mutant mice rescued the soma size phenotype. We also found that Mecp2   mutation leads to down-regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway, known to be involved in neuronal size regulation. Our results suggest that i) reduced neuronal size is an important in vitro cellular phenotype of Mecp2 mutation in mice, and ii) MeCP2 might play a critical role in the maintenance of neuronal structure by modulation of the mTOR pathway. The definition of a quantifiable cellular phenotype supports using neuronal size as a biomarker in the development of a high-throughput, in vitro assay to screen for compounds that rescue small neuronal phenotype (“phenotypic assay”). PMID:27781091

  1. Reduced neuronal size and mTOR pathway activity in the Mecp2 A140V Rett syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rangasamy, Sampathkumar; Olfers, Shannon; Gerald, Brittany; Hilbert, Alex; Svejda, Sean; Narayanan, Vinodh

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutation in the X-linked MECP2 gene, encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. We have created a mouse model ( Mecp2 A140V "knock-in" mutant) expressing the recurrent human MECP2 A140V mutation linked to an X-linked mental retardation/Rett syndrome phenotype. Morphological analyses focused on quantifying soma and nucleus size were performed on primary hippocampus and cerebellum granule neuron (CGN) cultures from mutant ( Mecp2(A140V/y)) and wild type ( Mecp2(+/y)) male mice. Cultured hippocampus and cerebellar granule neurons from mutant animals were significantly smaller than neurons from wild type animals. We also examined soma size in hippocampus neurons from individual female transgenic mice that express both a mutant  (maternal allele) and a wild type Mecp2 gene linked to an eGFP transgene (paternal allele). In cultures from such doubly heterozygous female mice, the size of neurons expressing the mutant (A140V) allele also showed a significant reduction compared to neurons expressing wild type MeCP2, supporting a cell-autonomous role for MeCP2 in neuronal development. IGF-1 (insulin growth factor-1) treatment of neuronal cells from Mecp2 mutant mice rescued the soma size phenotype. We also found that Mecp2  mutation leads to down-regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway, known to be involved in neuronal size regulation. Our results suggest that i) reduced neuronal size is an important in vitro cellular phenotype of Mecp2 mutation in mice, and ii) MeCP2 might play a critical role in the maintenance of neuronal structure by modulation of the mTOR pathway. The definition of a quantifiable cellular phenotype supports using neuronal size as a biomarker in the development of a high-throughput, in vitro assay to screen for compounds that rescue small neuronal phenotype ("phenotypic assay").

  2. mTOR regulates skeletal muscle regeneration in vivo through kinase-dependent and kinase-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yejing; Wu, Ai-Luen; Warnes, Christine; Liu, Jianming; Zhang, Chongben; Kawasome, Hideki; Terada, Naohiro; Boppart, Marni D; Schoenherr, Christopher J; Chen, Jie

    2009-12-01

    Rapamycin-sensitive signaling is required for skeletal muscle differentiation and remodeling. In cultured myoblasts, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been reported to regulate differentiation at different stages through distinct mechanisms, including one that is independent of mTOR kinase activity. However, the kinase-independent function of mTOR remains controversial, and no in vivo studies have examined those mTOR myogenic mechanisms previously identified in vitro. In this study, we find that rapamycin impairs injury-induced muscle regeneration. To validate the role of mTOR with genetic evidence and to probe the mechanism of mTOR function, we have generated and characterized transgenic mice expressing two mutants of mTOR under the control of human skeletal actin (HSA) promoter: rapamycin-resistant (RR) and RR/kinase-inactive (RR/KI). Our results show that muscle regeneration in rapamycin-administered mice is restored by RR-mTOR expression. In the RR/KI-mTOR mice, nascent myofiber formation during the early phase of regeneration proceeds in the presence of rapamycin, but growth of the regenerating myofibers is blocked by rapamycin. Igf2 mRNA levels increase drastically during early regeneration, which is sensitive to rapamycin in wild-type muscles but partially resistant to rapamycin in both RR- and RR/KI-mTOR muscles, consistent with mTOR regulation of Igf2 expression in a kinase-independent manner. Furthermore, systemic ablation of S6K1, a target of mTOR kinase, results in impaired muscle growth but normal nascent myofiber formation during regeneration. Therefore, mTOR regulates muscle regeneration through kinase-independent and kinase-dependent mechanisms at the stages of nascent myofiber formation and myofiber growth, respectively.

  3. mTOR inhibition decreases SOX2-SOX9 mediated glioma stem cell activity and temozolomide resistance

    PubMed Central

    Garros-Regulez, Laura; Aldaz, Paula; Arrizabalaga, Olatz; Moncho-Amor, Veronica; Carrasco-Garcia, Estefania; Manterola, Lorea; Moreno-Cugnon, Leire; Barrena, Cristina; Villanua, Jorge; Ruiz, Irune; Pollard, Steven; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Sampron, Nicolas; Garcia, Idoia; Matheu, Ander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: SOX2 and SOX9 are commonly overexpressed in glioblastoma, and regulate the activity of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Their specific and overlapping roles in GSCs and glioma treatment remain unclear. Methods: SOX2 and SOX9 levels were examined in human biopsies. Gain and loss of function determined the impact of altering SOX2 and SOX9 on cell proliferation, senescence, stem cell activity, tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. Results: SOX2 and SOX9 expression correlates positively in glioma cells and glioblastoma biopsies. High levels of SOX2 bypass cellular senescence and promote resistance to temozolomide. Mechanistic investigations revealed that SOX2 acts upstream of SOX9. mTOR genetic and pharmacologic (rapamycin) inhibition decreased SOX2 and SOX9 expression, and reversed chemoresistance. Conclusions: Our findings reveal SOX2-SOX9 as an oncogenic axis that regulates stem cell properties and chemoresistance. We identify that rapamycin abrogate SOX protein expression and provide evidence that a combination of rapamycin and temozolomide inhibits tumor growth in cells with high SOX2/SOX9. PMID:26878385

  4. Anti-tumor activity of selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) compounds, is enhanced in non-Hodgkin lymphoma through combination with mTOR inhibitor and dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Muqbil, Irfana; Aboukameel, Amro; Elloul, Sivan; Carlson, Robert; Senapedis, William; Baloglu, Erkan; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Bhutani, Divaya; Zonder, Jeffrey; Azmi, Asfar S; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2016-12-28

    In previous studies we demonstrated that targeting the nuclear exporter protein exportin-1 (CRM1/XPO1) by a selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) compound is a viable therapeutic strategy against Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Our studies along with pre-clinical work from others led to the evaluation of the lead SINE compound, selinexor, in a phase 1 trial in patients with CLL or NHL (NCT02303392). Continuing our previous work, we studied combinations of selinexor-dexamethasone (DEX) and selinexor-everolimus (EVER) in NHL. Combination of selinexor with DEX or EVER resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity in WSU-DLCL2 and WSU-FSCCL cells which was consistent with enhanced apoptosis. Molecular analysis showed enhancement in the activation of apoptotic signaling and down-regulation of XPO1. This enhancement is consistent with the mechanism of action of these drugs in that both selinexor and DEX antagonize NF-κB (p65) and mTOR (EVER target) is an XPO1 cargo protein. SINE compounds, KPT-251 and KPT-276, showed activities similar to CHOP (cyclophosphamide-hydroxydaunorubicin-oncovin-prednisone) regimen in subcutaneous and disseminated NHL xenograft models in vivo. In both animal models the anti-lymphoma activity of selinexor is enhanced through combination with DEX or EVER. The in vivo activity of selinexor and related SINE compounds relative to 'standard of care' treatment is consistent with the objective responses observed in Phase I NHL patients treated with selinexor. Our pre-clinical data provide a rational basis for testing these combinations in Phase II NHL trials.

  5. Differential regulation of mTOR signaling determines sensitivity to AKT inhibition in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ezell, Scott A.; Wang, Suping; Bihani, Teeru; Lai, Zhongwu; Grosskurth, Shaun E.; Tepsuporn, Suprawee; Davies, Barry R.; Huszar, Dennis; Byth, Kate F.

    2016-01-01

    Agents that target components of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway are under investigation for the treatment of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Given the highly heterogeneous nature of DLBCL, it is not clear whether all subtypes of DLBCL will be susceptible to PI3K pathway inhibition, or which kinase within this pathway is the most favorable target. Pharmacological profiling of a panel of DLBCL cell lines revealed a subset of DLBCL that was resistant to AKT inhibition. Strikingly, sensitivity to AKT inhibitors correlated with the ability of these inhibitors to block phosphorylation of S6K1 and ribosomal protein S6. Cell lines resistant to AKT inhibition activated S6K1 independent of AKT either through upregulation of PIM2 or through activation by B cell receptor (BCR) signaling components. Finally, combined inhibition of AKT and BTK, PIM2, or S6K1 proved to be an effective strategy to overcome resistance to AKT inhibition in DLBCL. PMID:26824321

  6. mTOR has distinct functions in generating versus sustaining humoral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Derek D.; Gaudette, Brian T.; Wilmore, Joel R.; Chernova, Irene; Bortnick, Alexandra; Weiss, Brendan M.; Allman, David

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of mTOR signaling in plasma cell differentiation and function. Furthermore, for reasons not understood, mTOR inhibition reverses antibody-associated disease in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we have demonstrated that induced B lineage–specific deletion of the gene encoding RAPTOR, an essential signaling adaptor for rapamycin-sensitive mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), abrogated the generation of antibody-secreting plasma cells in mice. Acute treatment with rapamycin recapitulated the effects of RAPTOR deficiency, and both strategies led to the ablation of newly formed plasma cells in the spleen and bone marrow while also obliterating preexisting germinal centers. Surprisingly, although perturbing mTOR activity caused a profound decline in serum antibodies that were specific for exogenous antigen or DNA, frequencies of long-lived bone marrow plasma cells were unaffected. Instead, mTORC1 inhibition led to decreased expression of immunoglobulin-binding protein (BiP) and other factors needed for robust protein synthesis. Consequently, blockade of antibody synthesis was rapidly reversed after termination of rapamycin treatment. We conclude that mTOR signaling plays critical but diverse roles in early and late phases of antibody responses and plasma cell differentiation. PMID:27760048

  7. KDR Amplification Is Associated with VEGF-Induced Activation of the mTOR and Invasion Pathways but does not Predict Clinical Benefit to the VEGFR TKI Vandetanib

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Monique B.; Giri, Uma; Gudikote, Jayanthi; Tang, Ximing; Lu, Wei; Tran, Hai; Fan, Youhong; Koo, Andrew; Diao, Lixia; Tong, Pan; Wang, Jing; Herbst, Roy; Johnson, Bruce E.; Ryan, Andy; Webster, Alan; Rowe, Philip; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Heymach, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose VEGF pathway inhibitors have been investigated as therapeutic agents in the treatment of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) because of its central role in angiogenesis. These agents have improved survival in patients with advanced NSCLC, but the effects have been modest. Although VEGFR2/KDR is typically localized to the vasculature, amplification of KDR has reported to occur in 9% to 30% of the DNA from different lung cancers. We investigated the signaling pathways activated downstream of KDR and whether KDR amplification is associated with benefit in patients with NSCLC treated with the VEGFR inhibitor vandetanib. Methods NSCLC cell lines with or without KDR amplification were studied for the effects of VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) on cell viability and migration. Archival tumor samples collected from patients with platinum-refractory NSCLC in the phase III ZODIAC study of vandetanib plus docetaxel or placebo plus docetaxel (N = 294) were screened for KDR amplification by FISH. Results KDR amplification was associated with VEGF-induced activation of mTOR, p38, and invasiveness in NSCLC cell lines. However, VEGFR TKIs did not inhibit proliferation of NSCLC cell lines with KDR amplification. VEGFR inhibition decreased cell motility as well as expression of HIF1α in KDR-amplified NSCLC cells. In the ZODIAC study, KDR amplification was observed in 15% of patients and was not associated with improved progression-free survival, overall survival, or objective response rate for the vandetanib arm. Conclusions Preclinical studies suggest KDR activates invasion but not survival pathways in KDR-amplified NSCLC models. Patients with NSCLC whose tumor had KDR amplification were not associated with clinical benefit for vandetanib in combination with docetaxel. PMID:26578684

  8. Apocynin inhibits Toll-like receptor-4-mediated activation of NF-κB by suppressing the Akt and mTOR pathways.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Arum; Sohn, Dong Suep; Lee, Chung Soo

    2016-12-01

    Microbial product lipopolysaccharide has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. Apocynin has demonstrated to have an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of apocynin on the Toll-like receptor-4-dependent activation of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway, which is involved in productions of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes, has not been studied. Using human keratinocytes, we investigated the effect of apocynin on the inflammatory mediator production in relation to the Toll-like receptor-4-mediated-Akt/mTOR and NF-κB pathways, which regulates the transcription genes involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Apocynin, Akt inhibitor SH-5, Bay 11-7085 and N-acetylcysteine each attenuated the lipopolysaccharide-induced production of cytokines, PGE2, and chemokines, changes in the levels of Toll-like receptor-4, p-Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB, and production of reactive oxygen species in keratinocytes. The results show that apocynin appears to attenuate the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes by suppressing the Toll-like receptor-4-mediated activation of the Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB pathways. The effect of apocynin appears to be attributed to its inhibitory effect on the production of reactive oxygen species. Apocynin appears to attenuate the microbial product-mediated inflammatory skin diseases.

  9. Activation of Both the Calpain and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems Contributes to Septic Cardiomyopathy through Dystrophin Loss/Disruption and mTOR Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Ana Caroline Silva; Figueiredo, Maria Jose; Campos, Erica Carolina; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; Ramos, Simone Gusmao; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction caused by the impairment of myocardial contractility has been recognized as an important factor contributing to the high mortality in sepsis. Calpain activation in the heart takes place in response to increased intracellular calcium influx resulting in proteolysis of structural and contractile proteins with subsequent myocardial dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that increased levels of calpain in the septic heart leads to disruption of structural and contractile proteins and that administration of calpain inhibitor-1 (N-acetyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-norleucinal (ALLN)) after sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture prevents cardiac protein degradation. We also tested the hypothesis that calpain plays a role in the modulation of protein synthesis/degradation through the activation of proteasome-dependent proteolysis and inhibition of the mTOR pathway. Severe sepsis significantly increased heart calpain-1 levels and promoted ubiquitin and Pa28β over-expression with a reduction in the mTOR levels. In addition, sepsis reduced the expression of structural proteins dystrophin and β-dystroglycan as well as the contractile proteins actin and myosin. ALLN administration prevented sepsis-induced increases in calpain and ubiquitin levels in the heart, which resulted in decreased of structural and contractile proteins degradation and basal mTOR expression levels were re-established. Our results support the concept that increased calpain concentrations may be part of an important mechanism of sepsis-induced cardiac muscle proteolysis. PMID:27880847

  10. New insights into the Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome-related haematological disorder: hyper-activation of mTOR and STAT3 in leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bezzerri, Valentino; Vella, Antonio; Calcaterra, Elisa; Finotti, Alessia; Gasparello, Jessica; Gambari, Roberto; Assael, Baroukh Maurice; Cipolli, Marco; Sorio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an inherited disease caused by mutations of a gene encoding for SBDS protein. So far little is known about SBDS exact function. SDS patients present several hematological disorders, including neutropenia and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), with increased risk of leukemic evolution. So far, the molecular mechanisms that underlie neutropenia, MDS and AML in SDS patients have been poorly investigated. STAT3 is a key regulator of several cellular processes including survival, differentiation and malignant transformation. Moreover, STAT3 has been reported to regulate neutrophil granulogenesis and to induce several kinds of leukemia and lymphoma. STAT3 activation is known to be regulated by mTOR, which in turn plays an important role in cellular growth and tumorigenesis. Here we show for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that both EBV-immortalized B cells and primary leukocytes obtained from SDS patients present a constitutive hyper-activation of mTOR and STAT3 pathways. Interestingly, loss of SBDS expression is associated with this process. Importantly, rapamycin, a well-known mTOR inhibitor, is able to reduce STAT3 phosphorylation to basal levels in our experimental model. A novel therapeutic hypothesis targeting mTOR/STAT3 should represent a significant step forward into the SDS clinical practice. PMID:27658964

  11. Activation of the mTOR pathway by low levels of xenoestrogens in breast epithelial cells from high-risk women

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, William H.; Luciani, Maria Gloria; Sayeed, S. Aejaz; Jaffee, Ian M.; Moore, Dan H.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is an estrogen-driven disease. Consequently, hormone replacement therapy correlates with disease incidence. However, increasing male breast cancer rates over the past three decades implicate additional sources of estrogenic exposure including wide spread estrogen-mimicking chemicals or xenoestrogens (XEs), such as bisphenol-A (BPA). By exposing renewable, human, high-risk donor breast epithelial cells (HRBECs) to BPA at concentrations that are detectable in human blood, placenta and milk, we previously identified gene expression profile changes associated with activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway genesets likely to trigger prosurvival changes in human breast cells. We now provide functional validation of mTOR activation using pairwise comparisons of 16 independent HRBEC samples with and without BPA exposure. We demonstrate induction of key genes and proteins in the PI3K-mTOR pathway—AKT1, RPS6 and 4EBP1 and a concurrent reduction in the tumor suppressor, phosphatase and tensin homolog gene protein. Altered regulation of mTOR pathway proteins in BPA-treated HRBECs led to marked resistance to rapamycin, the defining mTOR inhibitor. Moreover, HRBECs pretreated with BPA, or the XE, methylparaben (MP), surmounted antiestrogenic effects of tamoxifen showing dose-dependent apoptosis evasion and induction of cell cycling. Overall, XEs, when tested in benign breast cells from multiple human subjects, consistently initiated specific functional changes of the kind that are attributed to malignant onset in breast tissue. Our observations demonstrate the feasibility of studying renewable human samples as surrogates and reinforce the concern that BPA and MP, at low concentrations detected in humans, can have adverse health consequences. PMID:21890461

  12. Allomyrina Dichotoma Larvae Regulate Food Intake and Body Weight in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice Through mTOR and Mapk Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongwan; Yun, Eun-Young; Park, Seong-Won; Goo, Tae-Won; Seo, Minchul

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the Korean horn beetle (Allomyrina dichotoma) has anti-hepatofibrotic, anti-neoplastic, and antibiotic effects and is recognized as a traditional medicine. In our previous works, Allomyrina dichotoma larvae (ADL) inhibited differentiation of adipocytes both in vitro and in vivo. However, the anorexigenic and endoplasmic reticulum(ER) stress-reducing effects of ADL in obesity has not been examined. In this study, we investigated the anorexigenic and ER stress-reducing effects of ADL in the hypothalamus of diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of ethanol extract of ADL (ADE) suggested that an antagonizing effect on ghrelin-induced feeding behavior through the mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways. Especially, ADE resulted in strong reduction of ER stress both in vitro and in vivo. These findings strongly suggest that ADE and its constituent bioactive compounds are available and valuable to use for treatment of various diseases driven by prolonged ER stress. PMID:26901224

  13. Insights into significance of combined inhibition of MEK and m-TOR signalling output in KRAS mutant non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Broutin, Sophie; Stewart, Adam; Thavasu, Parames; Paci, Angelo; Bidart, Jean-Michel; Banerji, Udai

    2016-01-01

    Background: We aimed to understand the dependence of MEK and m-TOR inhibition in EGFRWT/ALKnon-rearranged NSCLC cell lines. Methods: In a panel of KRASM and KRASWT NSCLC cell lines, we determined growth inhibition (GI) following maximal reduction in p-ERK and p-S6RP caused by trametinib (MEK inhibitor) and AZD2014 (m-TOR inhibitor), respectively. Results: GI caused by maximal m-TOR inhibition was significantly greater than GI caused by maximal MEK inhibition in the cell line panel (52% vs 18%, P<10−4). There was no significant difference in GI caused by maximal m-TOR compared with maximal m-TOR+MEK inhibition. However, GI caused by the combination was significantly greater in the KRASM cell lines (79% vs 61%, P=0.017). Conclusions: m-TOR inhibition was more critical to GI than MEK inhibition in EGFRWT/ALKnon-rearranged NSCLC cells. The combination of MEK and m-TOR inhibition was most effective in KRASM cells. PMID:27441499

  14. Effects of the single and combined treatment with dopamine agonist, somatostatin analog and mTOR inhibitors in a human lung carcinoid cell line: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Claudia; Rousaki, Panagoula; Negri, Mariarosaria; Sarnataro, Maddalena; Napolitano, Maria; Marino, Federica Zito; Patalano, Roberta; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Sciammarella, Concetta; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Rocco, Gaetano; Franco, Renato; Kaltsas, Gregory A; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario

    2016-09-29

    Somatostatin analogues and mTOR inhibitors have been used as medical therapy in lung carcinoids with variable results. No data are available on dopamine agonists as treatment for lung carcinoids. The main aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of the combined treatment of somatostatin analogue octreotide and the dopamine agonist cabergoline with mTOR inhibitors in an in vitro model of typical lung carcinoids: the NCI-H727 cell line. In NCI-H727 cell line, reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence were assessed to characterize the expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 and 5, dopamine receptor 2 and mTOR pathway components. Fifteen typical lung carcinoids tissue samples have been used for somatostatin receptor 2, dopamine receptor 2, and the main mTOR pathway component p70S6K expression and localization by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and western blot have been assessed to test the pharmacological effects of octreotide, cabergoline and mTOR inhibitors, and to evaluate the activation of specific cell signaling pathways in NCI-H727 cell line. NCI-H727 cell line expressed somatostatin receptor 2, somatostatin receptor 5 and dopamine receptor 2 and all mTOR pathway components at messenger and protein levels. Somatostatin receptor 2, dopamine receptor 2, and p70S6K (non phosphorylated and phosphorylated) proteins were expressed in most typical lung carcinoids tissue samples. Octreotide and cabergoline did not reduce cell viability as single agents but, when combined with mTOR inhibitors, they potentiate mTOR inhibitors effect after long-term exposure, reducing Akt and ERK phosphorylation, mTOR escape mechanisms, and increasing the expression DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4, an mTOR suppressor. In conclusion, the single use of octreotide and cabergoline is not sufficient to block cell viability but the combined approach of these agents with mTOR inhibitors

  15. mTOR inhibition and BMP signaling act synergistically to reduce muscle fibrosis and improve myofiber regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shailesh; Cholok, David; Loder, Shawn; Li, John; Breuler, Christopher; Chung, Michael T.; Sung, Hsiao Hsin; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Habbouche, Joe; Drake, James; Peterson, Joshua; Priest, Caitlin; Li, Shuli; Mishina, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Muscle trauma is highly morbid due to intramuscular scarring, or fibrosis, and muscle atrophy. Studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) reduce muscle atrophy. However, increased BMP signaling at muscle injury sites causes heterotopic ossification, as seen in patients with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), or patients with surgically placed BMP implants for bone healing. We use a genetic mouse model of hyperactive BMP signaling to show the development of intramuscular fibrosis surrounding areas of ectopic bone following muscle injury. Rapamycin, which we have previously shown to eliminate ectopic ossification in this model, also eliminates fibrosis without reducing osteogenic differentiation, suggesting clinical value for patients with FOP and with BMP implants. Finally, we use reporter mice to show that BMP signaling is positively associated with myofiber cross-sectional area. These findings underscore an approach in which 2 therapeutics (rapamycin and BMP ligand) can offset each other, leading to an improved outcome. PMID:27942591

  16. Characterization of Torin2, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR, ATM and ATR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingsong; Xu, Chunxiao; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Zhang, Xin; Hur, Wooyoung; Liu, Yan; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas P.; Wang, Jinhua; Westover, Kenneth D.; Gao, Peng; Ercan, Dalia; Niepel, Mario; Thoreen, Carson C.; Kang, Seong A.; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Wang, Yuchuan; Tupper, Tanya; Altabef, Abigail; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D.; Chou, Danny M.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Janne, Pasi A.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2013-01-01

    mTOR is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase that serves as a central regulator of cell growth, survival and autophagy. Deregulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway occurs commonly in cancer and numerous inhibitors targeting the ATP-binding site of these kinases are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. Here we report the characterization of Torin2, a second generation ATP-competitive inhibitor that is potent and selective for mTOR with a superior pharmacokinetic profile to previous inhibitors. Torin2 inhibited mTORC1-dependent T389 phosphorylation on S6K (RPS6KB1) with an EC50 of 250 pM with approximately 800-fold selectivity for cellular mTOR versus PI3K. Torin2 also exhibited potent biochemical and cellular activity against PIKK family kinases including ATM (EC50 28 nM), ATR (EC50 35 nM) and DNA-PK (EC50 118 nM) (PRKDC), the inhibition of which sensitized cells to Irradiation. Similar to the earlier generation compound Torin1 and in contrast to other reported mTOR inhibitors, Torin2 inhibited mTOR kinase and mTORC1 signaling activities in a sustained manner suggestive of a slow dissociation from the kinase. Cancer cell treatment with Torin2 for 24 hours resulted in a prolonged block in negative feedback and consequent T308 phosphorylation on Akt. These effects were associated with strong growth inhibition in vitro. Single agent treatment with Torin2 in vivo did not yield significant efficacy against KRAS-driven lung tumors, but the combination of Torin2 with MEK inhibitor AZD6244 yielded a significant growth inhibition. Taken together, our findings establish Torin2 as a strong candidate for clinical evaluation in a broad number of oncological settings where mTOR signaling has a pathogenic role. PMID:23436801

  17. Activating the translational repressor 4E-BP or reducing S6K-GSK3β activity prevents accelerated axon growth induced by hyperactive mTOR in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xuan; Zhang, Longbo; Huang, Tianxiang; Lin, Tiffany V.; Miyares, Laura; Wen, John; Hsieh, Lawrence; Bordey, Angélique

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal axonal connectivity and hyperactive mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) are shared features of several neurological disorders. Hyperactive mTORC1 alters axon length and polarity of hippocampal neurons in vitro, but the impact of hyperactive mTORC1 on axon growth in vivo and the mechanisms underlying those effects remain unclear. Using in utero electroporation during corticogenesis, we show that increasing mTORC1 activity accelerates axon growth without multiple axon formation. This was prevented by counteracting mTORC1 signaling through p70S6Ks (S6K1/2) or eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4E-BP1/2), which both regulate translation. In addition to regulating translational targets, S6K1 indirectly signals through GSK3β, a regulator of axogenesis. Although blocking GSK3β activity did not alter axon growth under physiological conditions in vivo, blocking it using a dominant-negative mutant or lithium chloride prevented mTORC1-induced accelerated axon growth. These data reveal the contribution of translational and non-translational downstream effectors such as GSK3β to abnormal axon growth in neurodevelopmental mTORopathies and open new therapeutic options for restoring long-range connectivity. PMID:26220974

  18. Novel Proteins Regulated by mTOR in Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytomas of Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex and New Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Tyburczy, Magdalena Ewa; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Pokarowski, Piotr; Mieczkowski, Jakub; Kucharska, Joanna; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Roszkowski, Maciej; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Kaminska, Bozena

    2010-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) are rare brain tumors associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a disease caused by mutations in TSC1 or TSC2, resulting in enhancement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity, dysregulation of cell growth, and tumorigenesis. Signaling via mTOR plays a role in multifaceted genomic responses, but its effectors in the brain are largely unknown. Therefore, gene expression profiling on four SEGAs was performed with Affymetrix Human Genome arrays. Of the genes differentially expressed in TSC, 11 were validated by real-time PCR on independent tumor samples and 3 SEGA-derived cultures. Expression of several proteins was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The differentially-regulated proteins were mainly involved in tumorigenesis and nervous system development. ANXA1, GPNMB, LTF, RND3, S100A11, SFRP4, and NPTX1 genes were likely to be mTOR effector genes in SEGA, as their expression was modulated by an mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, in SEGA-derived cells. Inhibition of mTOR signaling affected size of cultured SEGA cells but had no influence on their proliferation, morphology, or migration, whereas inhibition of both mTOR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways led to significant alterations of these processes. For the first time, we identified genes related to the occurrence of SEGA and regulated by mTOR and demonstrated an effective modulation of SEGA growth by pharmacological inhibition of both mTOR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways, which could represent a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:20133820

  19. Naoxintong/PPARγ Signaling Inhibits Cardiac Hypertrophy via Activation of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuping; Jin, Jianhua; Chen, Lu

    2017-01-01

    As a traditional Chinese medicine, Naoxintong capsule (NXT) has been approved by China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA), which is used for cardiocerebrovascular disease treatment. Here we found that NXT extract significantly promoted H9c2 cardiomyocyte cell autophagy involved in increased autophagy-associated gene expression leading to inhibition of mTOR signaling. Moreover, NXT extract increased PPARγ protein expression and transcription activity of H9c2 cell. Consistent with this, in PPARγ gene silenced H9c2 cells, NXT had no effect on autophagy and mTOR signaling. Furthermore, NXT/PPARγ-mediated H9c2 autophagy led to inhibition of cardiomyocyte cell hypertrophy. These findings suggest that the extract of NXT inhibited H9c2 cardiomyocyte cell hypertrophy via PPARγ-mediated cell autophagy. PMID:28293264

  20. Long Non-Coding RNA (lncRNA) Urothelial Carcinoma-Associated 1 (UCA1) Enhances Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer Cells via Inhibiting mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chihua; Luo, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) UCA1 is an oncogene in breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of UCA1 in tamoxifen resistance of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells. Material/Methods Tamoxifen sensitive MCF-7 cells were transfected for UCA1 overexpression, while tamoxifen resistant LCC2 and LCC9 cells were transfected with UCA siRNA for UCA1 knockdown. qRT-PCR was performed to analyze UCA1 expression. CCK-8 assay, immunofluorescence staining of cleaved caspase-9, and flow cytometric analysis of Annexin V/PI staining were used to assess tamoxifen sensitivity. Western blot analysis was performed to detect p-AKT and p-mTOR expression. Results LncRNA UCA1 was significantly upregulated in tamoxifen resistant breast cancer cells compared to tamoxifen sensitive cells. LCC2 and LCC9 cells transfected with UCA1 siRNA had significantly higher ratio of apoptosis after tamoxifen treatment. UCA1 siRNA significantly decreased the protein levels of p-AKT and p-mTOR in LCC2 and LCC9 cells. Enforced UCA1 expression substantially reduced tamoxifen induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, while rapamycin treatment abrogated the protective effect of UCA1. Conclusions UCA1 upregulation was associated with tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer. Mechanistically, UCA1 confers tamoxifen resistance to breast cancer cells partly via activating the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27765938

  1. Activation of Autophagic Flux against Xenoestrogen Bisphenol-A-induced Hippocampal Neurodegeneration via AMP kinase (AMPK)/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Swati; Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Seth, Brashket; Yadav, Anuradha; Singh, Anshuman; Mudawal, Anubha; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Gupta, Shailendra Kumar; Choubey, Vinay; Tripathi, Anurag; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Ratan Singh; Shukla, Shubha; Parmar, Devendra; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The human health hazards related to persisting use of bisphenol-A (BPA) are well documented. BPA-induced neurotoxicity occurs with the generation of oxidative stress, neurodegeneration, and cognitive dysfunctions. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) of the effects of BPA on autophagy and association with oxidative stress and apoptosis are still elusive. We observed that BPA exposure during the early postnatal period enhanced the expression and the levels of autophagy genes/proteins. BPA treatment in the presence of bafilomycin A1 increased the levels of LC3-II and SQSTM1 and also potentiated GFP-LC3 puncta index in GFP-LC3-transfected hippocampal neural stem cell-derived neurons. BPA-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis were mitigated by a pharmacological activator of autophagy (rapamycin). Pharmacological (wortmannin and bafilomycin A1) and genetic (beclin siRNA) inhibition of autophagy aggravated BPA neurotoxicity. Activation of autophagy against BPA resulted in intracellular energy sensor AMP kinase (AMPK) activation, increased phosphorylation of raptor and acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and decreased phosphorylation of ULK1 (Ser-757), and silencing of AMPK exacerbated BPA neurotoxicity. Conversely, BPA exposure down-regulated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway by phosphorylation of raptor as a transient cell's compensatory mechanism to preserve cellular energy pool. Moreover, silencing of mTOR enhanced autophagy, which further alleviated BPA-induced reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis. BPA-mediated neurotoxicity also resulted in mitochondrial loss, bioenergetic deficits, and increased PARKIN mitochondrial translocation, suggesting enhanced mitophagy. These results suggest implication of autophagy against BPA-mediated neurodegeneration through involvement of AMPK and mTOR pathways. Hence, autophagy, which arbitrates cell survival and demise during stress conditions, requires further assessment to be

  2. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) and mTOR Signaling: Novel Strategies Towards the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    of the combination of the HDAC inhibitor panobinostat with the mTORC1 inhibitor everolimus . Panobinostat/ everolimus combination treatment resulted in...to single treatments. We identified that panobinostat/ everolimus combination resulted in enhanced anti-tumor activity mediated by decreased tumor...that low dose concurrent panobinostat/ everolimus combination therapy is well tolerated and results in greater anti-tumor activity and therapeutic

  3. Potential of GPCRs to modulate MAPK and mTOR pathways in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Franco, Rafael; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Navarro, Gemma; Zamarbide, Marta

    2017-02-09

    Despite efforts to understand the mechanism of neuronal cell death, finding effective therapies for neurodegenerative diseases is still a challenge. Cognitive deficits are often associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Remarkably, in the absence of consensus biomarkers, diagnosis of diseases such as Alzheimer's still relies on cognitive tests. Unfortunately, all efforts to translate findings in animal models to the patients have been unsuccessful. Alzheimer's disease may be addressed from two different points of view, neuroprotection or cognitive enhancement. Based on recent data, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway arises as a versatile player whose modulation may impact on mechanisms of both neuroprotection and cognition. Whereas direct targeting of mTOR does not seem to constitute a convenient approach in drug discovery, its indirect modulation by other signaling pathways seems promising. In fact, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the most common 'druggable' targets and as such pharmacological manipulation of GPCRs with selective ligands may modulate phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and mTOR signaling pathways. Thus, GPCRs become important targets for potential drug treatments in different neurodegenerative disorders including, but not limited to, Alzheimer's disease. GPCR-mediated modulation of mTOR may take advantage of different GPCRs coupled to different G-dependent and G-independent signal transduction routes, of functional selectivity and/or of biased agonism. Signals mediated by GPCRs may act as coincidence detectors to achieve different benefits in different stages of the neurodegenerative disease.

  4. GSK621 Targets Glioma Cells via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Shi-Kun; Pan, Yi-Xin; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang; Pan, Si-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the anti-glioma cell activity by a novel AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator GSK621. We showed that GSK621 was cytotoxic to human glioma cells (U87MG and U251MG lines), possibly via provoking caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Its cytotoxicity was alleviated by caspase inhibitors. GSK621 activated AMPK to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downregulate Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) in glioma cells. AMPK inhibition, through shRNA knockdown of AMPKα or introduction of a dominant negative (T172A) AMPKα, almost reversed GSK621-induced AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition and Tspan8 degradation. Consequently, GSK621’s cytotoxicity in glioma cells was also significantly attenuated by AMPKα knockdown or mutation. Further studies showed that GSK621, at a relatively low concentration, significantly potentiated temozolomide (TMZ)’s sensitivity and lethality against glioma cells. We summarized that GSK621 inhibits human glioma cells possibly via activating AMPK signaling. This novel AMPK activator could be a novel and promising anti-glioma cell agent. PMID:27532105

  5. MTOR downregulates iodide uptake in thyrocytes.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Elaine Cristina Lima; Padrón, Alvaro Souto; Braga, William Miranda Oliveira; de Andrade, Bruno Moulin; Vaisman, Mário; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Ferreira, Andrea Claudia Freitas; de Carvalho, Denise Pires

    2010-07-01

    Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition increases functional sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expression in both FRTL-5 rat thyroid cell line and papillary thyroid cancer lineages. In several cell types, the stimulation of PI3K results in downstream activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR), a serine-threonine protein kinase that is a critical regulator of cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation. MTOR activation is involved in the regulation of thyrocyte proliferation by TSH. Here, we show that MTOR inhibition by rapamycin increases iodide uptake in TSH-stimulated PCCL3 thyroid cell line, although the effect of rapamycin was less pronounced than PI3K inhibition. Thus, NIS inhibitory pathways stimulated by PI3K might also involve the activation of proteins other than MTOR. Insulin downregulates iodide uptake and NIS protein expression even in the presence of TSH, and both effects are counterbalanced by MTOR inhibition. NIS protein expression levels were correlated with iodide uptake ability, except in cells treated with TSH in the absence of insulin, in which rapamycin significantly increased iodide uptake, while NIS protein levels remained unchanged. Rapamycin avoids the activation of both p70 S6 and AKT kinases by TSH, suggesting the involvement of MTORC1 and MTORC2 in TSH effect. A synthetic analog of rapamycin (everolimus), which is clinically used as an anticancer agent, was able to increase rat thyroid iodide uptake in vivo. In conclusion, we show that MTOR kinase participates in the control of thyroid iodide uptake, demonstrating that MTOR not only regulates cell survival, but also normal thyroid cell function both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Polycystin-1 Regulates Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase-Dependent Phosphorylation of Tuberin To Control Cell Size through mTOR and Its Downstream Effectors S6K and 4EBP1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Distefano, Gianfranco; Boca, Manila; Rowe, Isaline; Wodarczyk, Claas; Ma, Li; Piontek, Klaus B.; Germino, Gregory G.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Boletta, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease characterized by bilateral renal cyst formation. Both hyperproliferation and hypertrophy have been previously observed in ADPKD kidneys. Polycystin-1 (PC-1), a large orphan receptor encoded by the PKD1 gene and mutated in 85% of all cases, is able to inhibit proliferation and apoptosis. Here we show that overexpression of PC-1 in renal epithelial cells inhibits cell growth (size) in a cell cycle-independent manner due to the downregulation of mTOR, S6K1, and 4EBP1. Upregulation of the same pathway leads to increased cell size, as found in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Pkd1−/− mice. We show that PC-1 controls the mTOR pathway in a Tsc2-dependent manner, by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated phosphorylation of tuberin in Ser664. We provide a detailed molecular mechanism by which PC-1 can inhibit the mTOR pathway and regulate cell size. PMID:19255143

  7. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks: effects of dietary leucine and age.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huiling; Zheng, Aijuan; Liu, Guohua; Chang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is necessary for cellular protein synthesis regulation. Leucine was reported to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in mammalian embryos and neonates, but in higher animals (chickens) the effect of dietary leucine on mTOR signaling is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effects of dietary leucine and age on mRNA expression and phosphorylation of mTOR as well as its downstream targets, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) in chick pectoral muscles. One hundred eighty newly hatched male chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary leucine treatment groups (1.43, 1.73, and 2.03% leucine) for 14 d, respectively. Each treatment group consisted of 6 cages with 10 chicks each. On d 3, 7, and 14, plasma insulin and leucine were measured and target gene expression and phosphorylation was assessed. Dietary leucine influenced plasma leucine but not insulin, and plasma leucine and insulin declined with chick age. The mTOR, S6K1, and 4E-BP1 mRNA expression and phosphorylation within chick pectoral muscles were upregulated with increased dietary leucine but downregulated with increased chick age. Thus, high dietary leucine activates target of rapamycin signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks to stimulate muscle protein synthesis, and this pathway is attenuated with aging.

  8. Janus-faced Sestrin2 controls ROS and mTOR signalling through two separate functional domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hanseong; An, Sojin; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Teixeira, Filipa; Jin Park, Gyeong; Kim, Cheal; Cho, Chun-Seok; Kim, Jeong-Sig; Jakob, Ursula; Hee Lee, Jun; Cho, Uhn-Soo

    2015-11-01

    Sestrins are stress-inducible metabolic regulators with two seemingly unrelated but physiologically important functions: reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). How Sestrins fulfil this dual role has remained elusive so far. Here we report the crystal structure of human Sestrin2 (hSesn2), and show that hSesn2 is twofold pseudo-symmetric with two globular subdomains, which are structurally similar but functionally distinct from each other. While the N-terminal domain (Sesn-A) reduces alkylhydroperoxide radicals through its helix-turn-helix oxidoreductase motif, the C-terminal domain (Sesn-C) modified this motif to accommodate physical interaction with GATOR2 and subsequent inhibition of mTORC1. These findings clarify the molecular mechanism of how Sestrins can attenuate degenerative processes such as aging and diabetes by acting as a simultaneous inhibitor of ROS accumulation and mTORC1 activation.

  9. Synergistic activity of ALK and mTOR inhibitors for the treatment of NPM-ALK positive lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Sara; Ceccon, Monica; Antolini, Laura; Rigolio, Roberta; Pirola, Alessandra; Peronaci, Marco; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    ALK-positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) represents a subset of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma whose treatment benefited from crizotinib development, a dual ALK/MET inhibitor. Crizotinib blocks ALK-triggered pathways such as PI3K/AKT/mTOR, indispensable for survival of ALK-driven tumors. Despite the positive impact of targeted treatment in ALCL, resistant clones are often selected during therapy. Strategies to overcome resistance include the design of second generation drugs and the use of combined therapies that simultaneously target multiple nodes essential for cells survival. We investigated the effects of combined ALK/mTOR inhibition. We observed a specific synergistic effect of combining ALK inhibitors with an mTOR inhibitor (temsirolimus), in ALK+ lymphoma cells. The positive cooperation resulted in an increased inhibition of mTOR effectors, compared to single treatments, a block in G0/G1 phase and induction of apoptosis. The combination was able to prevent the selection of resistant clones, while long-term exposure to single agents led to the establishment of resistant cell lines, with either ALK inhibitor or temsirolimus. In vivo, mice injected with Karpas 299 cells and treated with low dose combination showed complete regression of tumors, while only partial inhibition was obtained in single agents-treated mice. Upon treatment stop the combination was able to significantly delay tumor relapses. Re-challenge of relapsed tumors at a higher dose led to full regression of xenografts in the combination group, but not in mice treated with lorlatinib alone. In conclusion, our data suggest that the combination of ALK and mTOR inhibitors could be a valuable therapeutic option for ALK+ ALCL patients. PMID:27662658

  10. Signaling pathways regulating cartilage growth plate formation and activity.

    PubMed

    Samsa, William E; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Guang

    2017-02-01

    The growth plate is a highly specialized and dynamic cartilage structure that serves many essential functions in skeleton patterning, growth and endochondral ossification in developing vertebrates. Major signaling pathways initiated by classical morphogens and by other systemic and tissue-specific factors are intimately involved in key aspects of growth plate development. As a corollary of these essential functions, disturbances in these pathways due to mutations or environmental factors lead to severe skeleton disorders. Here, we review these pathways and the most recent progress made in understanding their roles in chondrocyte differentiation in growth plate development and activity. Furthermore, we discuss newly uncovered pathways involved in growth plate formation, including mTOR, the circadian clock, and the COP9 signalosome.

  11. Tsc2 null murine neuroepithelial cells are a model for human tuber giant cells, and show activation of an mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Onda, Hiroaki; Crino, Peter B; Zhang, Hongbing; Murphey, Ryan D; Rastelli, Luca; Gould Rothberg, Bonnie E; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2002-12-01

    Cortical tubers are developmental brain malformations in the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) that cause epilepsy and autism in TSC patients whose pathogenesis is uncertain. Tsc2 null murine neuroepithelial progenitor (NEP) cells display persistent growth when growth factors are withdrawn, express GFAP at high levels, and have reduced expression of a set of early neuronal lineage markers. Tsc2 null NEP cells exhibit aberrant differentiation into giant cells that express both beta III-tubulin and GFAP and that are morphologically similar to giant cells in human tubers. Tsc2 null giant cells and tuber giant cells have similar transcriptional profiles. Tsc2 null NEP cells express high levels of phosphorylated S6kinase, S6, Stat3, and 4E-BP-1, which is reversed by treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR. We conclude that giant cells in human tubers likely result from a complete loss of TSC2 expression and activation of an mTOR pathway during cortical development.

  12. Perfluorooctanoic acid induces human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell migration and invasion through activation of ERK/mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fujun; Wang, Yixong; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Ying, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xuesen

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a common environmental pollutant that has been associated with various diseases, including cancer. We explored the molecular mechanisms underlying PFOA-induced endometrial cancer cell invasion and migration. PFOA treatment enhanced migration and invasion by human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells, which correlated with decreased E-cadherin expression, a marker of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PFOA also induced activation of ERK1/2/mTOR signaling. Treatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, antagonized the effects of PFOA and reversed the effects of PFOA activation in a xenograft mouse model of endometrial cancer. Consistent with these results, pre-treatment with rapamycin abolished PFOA-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin expression. These results indicate that PFOA is a carcinogen that promotes endometrial cancer cell migration and invasion through activation of ERK/mTOR signaling. PMID:27589685

  13. PACAP Protects Adult Neural Stem Cells from the Neurotoxic Effect of Ketamine Associated with Decreased Apoptosis, ER Stress and mTOR Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Shiva; Agartz, Ingrid; Ögren, Sven-Ove; Patrone, Cesare; Lundberg, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Ketamine administration is a well-established approach to mimic experimentally some aspects of schizophrenia. Adult neurogenesis dysregulation is associated with psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. The potential role of neurogenesis in the ketamine-induced phenotype is largely unknown. Recent results from human genetic studies have shown the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) gene is a risk factor for schizophrenia. Its potential role on the regulation of neurogenesis in experimental model of schizophrenia remains to be investigated. We aimed to determine whether ketamine affects the viability of adult neural stem cells (NSC). We also investigated whether the detrimental effect mediated by ketamine could be counteracted by PACAP. NSCs were isolated from the subventricular zone of the mouse and exposed to ketamine with/without PACAP. After 24 hours, cell viability, potential involvement of apoptosis, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, mTOR and AMPA pathway activation were assessed by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. We show that ketamine impairs NSC viability in correlation with increased apoptosis, ER stress and mTOR activation. The results also suggest that the effect of ketamine occurs via AMPA receptor activation. Finally, we show that PACAP counteracted the decreased NSC viability induced by ketamine via the specific activation of the PAC-1 receptor subtype. Our study shows that the NSC viability may be negatively affected by ketamine with putative importance for the development of a schizophrenia phenotype in the ketamine induced animal model of schizophrenia. The neuroprotective effect via PAC-1 activation suggests a potentially novel pharmacological target for the treatment of schizophrenia, via neurogenesis normalization. PMID:28125634

  14. Chronic Repression of mTOR Complex 2 Induces Changes in the Gut Microbiota of Diet-induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mi-Ja; Lee, Jina; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Min-Soo; Hyun, Dong-Wook; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Pil Soo; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota play a crucial role in host physiology and metabolism; however, the molecular pathways underlying these changes in diet-induced obesity are unclear. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Therefore, we examined whether changes in the regulation of mTOR signaling induced by diet (a high-fat diet [HFD] or normal-chow diet) and/or therapeutics (resveratrol [a specific inhibitor of mTOR complex 1] or rapamycin [an inhibitor of both mTOR complex 1 and 2]) altered the composition of the gut microbiota in mice. Oral administration of resveratrol prevented glucose intolerance and fat accumulation in HFD-fed mice, whereas rapamycin significantly impaired glucose tolerance and exacerbated intestinal inflammation. The abundance of Lactococcus, Clostridium XI, Oscillibacter, and Hydrogenoanaerobacterium increased under the HFD condition; however, the abundance of these species declined after resveratrol treatment. Conversely, the abundance of unclassified Marinilabiliaceae and Turicibacter decreased in response to a HFD or rapamycin. Taken together, these results demonstrated that changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota induced by changes in mTOR activity correlate with obese and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:27471110

  15. Defining the Role of Autophagy Kinase ULK1 Signaling in Therapeutic Response of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex to mTOR Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Tuberous Sclerosis Complex tumor suppressors are known to be critical negative regulators of the mTORC1 kinase complex that controls cell growth...demonstrate that mTORC1 inactivates another kinase complex composed of the autophagy kinase ULK1 and its associated subunits. One prediction of these findings...is that in cells and tumors with TSC mutations and hyperactive mTOR, the ULK1 complex --and the process of autophagy---will be suppressed. There were

  16. IKKbeta suppression of TSC1 function links the mTOR pathway with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dung-Fang; Kuo, Hsu-Ping; Chen, Chun-Te; Wei, Yongkun; Chou, Chao-Kai; Hung, Jen-Yu; Yen, Chia-Jui; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2008-11-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine TNFalpha is one of the factors that links obesity-derived chronic inflammation with insulin resistance. Activation of mTOR signaling pathway has been found to suppress insulin sensitivity through serine phosphorylation and the inhibition of IRS1 by mTOR and its downstream effector, S6K1. It remains elusive that whether the mTOR pathway has a role in TNFalpha-mediated insulin resistance. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNFalpha-IKKbeta-mediated inactivation of TSC1 resulted in increasing phosphorylation of IRS1 serine 307 and serine 636/639, impaired insulin-induced glucose uptake, tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS1, and the association between IRS1 and PI3K p85. Furthermore, a higher expression of pIKKbeta (S181), pTSC1(S511), and pS6(S240/244) was found in livers obtained from both C57BL/6J mice on a high-fat diet and B6.V-Lepob/J mice. Collectively, dysregulation of the TSC1/ TSC2/mTOR signaling pathway by IKKbeta is a common molecular switch for both cancer pathogenesis and diet- and obesity-induced insulin resistance.

  17. B cell-specific deficiencies in mTOR limit humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuling; Pruitt, Margaret; Tran, Dena; Du Bois, Wendy; Zhang, Ke; Patel, Rushi; Hoover, Shelley; Simpson, R Mark; Simmons, John; Gary, Joy; Snapper, Clifford M; Casellas, Rafael; Mock, Beverly A

    2013-08-15

    Generation of high-affinity Abs in response to Ags/infectious agents is essential for developing long-lasting immune responses. B cell maturation and Ab responses to Ag stimulation require Ig somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) for high-affinity responses. Upon immunization with either the model Ag 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten (NP) conjugated to chicken γ globulin lysine (NP-CGG) or heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular type 14 protein (Pn14), knock-in (KI) mice hypomorphic for mTOR function had a decreased ability to form germinal centers, develop high-affinity anti-NP-specific or anti-Pn14-specific Abs, and perform SHM/CSR. Hypomorphic mTOR mice also had a high mortality (40%) compared with wild-type (WT) (0%) littermates and had lower pneumococcal surface protein A-specific Ab titers when immunized and challenged with live S. pneumoniae infection. Mice with mTOR deleted in their B cell lineage (knockout [KO]) also produced fewer splenic germinal centers and decreased high-affinity Ab responses to NP-CGG than did their WT littermates. CSR rates were lower in mTOR KI and KO mice, and pharmacologic inhibition of mTOR in WT B cells resulted in decreased rates of ex vivo CSR. RNA and protein levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a protein essential for SHM and CSR, were lower in B cells from both KI and B cell-specific KO mice, concomitant with increases in phosphorylated AKT and FOXO1. Rescue experiments increasing AID expression in KI B cells restored CSR levels to those in WT B cells. Thus, mTOR plays an important immunoregulatory role in the germinal center, at least partially through AID signaling, in generating high-affinity Abs.

  18. B Cell-specific Deficiencies in mTOR Limit Humoral Immune Responses1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuling; Pruitt, Margaret; Tran, Dena; Bois, Wendy Du; Zhang, Ke; Patel, Rushi; Hoover, Shelley; Simpson, R. Mark; Simmons, John; Gary, Joy; Snapper, Clifford M.; Casellas, Rafael; Mock, Beverly A.

    2013-01-01

    Generation of high-affinity antibodies in response to antigens/infectious agents is essential for developing long-lasting immune responses. B cell maturation and antibody responses to antigen stimulation require immunoglobulin (Ig) somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) for high-affinity responses. Upon immunization with either the model antigen NP-CGG or heat-killed Pn14 derived from Streptococcus pneumoniae, knock-in (KI) mice hypomorphic for mTOR function had decreased ability to form germinal centers, develop high-affinity anti-NP or –Pn14 specific antibodies, and perform SHM/CSR. Hypomorphic mTOR mice also had a high mortality rate (40%) compared to WT (0%) littermates and had lower PspA specific antibody titers when immunized and challenged with live S. pneumoniae infection. Mice with mTOR deleted in their B cell lineage (KO) also produced fewer splenic germinal centers and decreased high-affinity antibody responses to NP-CGG than their WT littermates. CSR rates were lower in mTOR KI and KO mice, and pharmacologic inhibition of mTOR in WT B cells resulted in decreased rates of ex vivo CSR. RNA and protein levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a protein essential for SHM and CSR, were lower in B cells from both KI and B-cell specific KO mice, concomitant with increases in phosphorylated AKT and FOXO1. Rescue experiments increasing AID expression in KI B cells restored CSR levels to those in wild-type B cells. Thus, mTOR plays an important immunoregulatory role in the germinal center, at least partially through AID signaling, in generating high affinity antibodies. PMID:23858034

  19. Alteration of mTOR signaling occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD): analysis of brain from subjects with pre-clinical AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment and late-stage AD.

    PubMed

    Tramutola, Antonella; Triplett, Judy C; Di Domenico, Fabio; Niedowicz, Dana M; Murphy, Michael P; Coccia, Raffaella; Perluigi, Marzia; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-06-01

    The clinical symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD) include a gradual memory loss and subsequent dementia, and neuropathological deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. At the molecular level, AD subjects present overt amyloid β (Aβ) production and tau hyperphosphorylation. Aβ species have been proposed to overactivate the phosphoinositide3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) axis, which plays a central role in proteostasis. The current study investigated the status of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in post-mortem tissue from the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) at three different stages of AD: late AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and pre-clinical AD (PCAD). Our findings suggest that the alteration of mTOR signaling and autophagy occurs at early stages of AD. We found a significant increase in Aβ (1-42) levels, associated with reduction in autophagy (Beclin-1 and LC-3) observed in PCAD, MCI, and AD subjects. Related to the autophagy impairment, we found a hyperactivation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in IPL of MCI and AD subjects, but not in PCAD, along with a significant decrease in phosphatase and tensin homolog. An increase in two mTOR downstream targets, p70S6K and 4EBP1, occurred in AD and MCI subjects. Both AD and MCI subjects showed increased, insulin receptor substrate 1, a candidate biomarker of brain insulin resistance, and GSK-3β, a kinase targeting tau phosphorylation. Nevertheless, tau phosphorylation was increased in the clinical groups. The results hint at a link between Aβ and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis and provide further insights into the relationship between AD pathology and insulin resistance. In addition, we speculate that the alteration of mTOR signaling in the IPL of AD and MCI subjects, but not in PCAD, is due to the lack of substantial increase in oxidative stress. The figure represents the three different stages of Alzheimer Disease: Preclinical Alzheimer Disease (PCAD), Mild cognitive impairment (MCI

  20. mTOR is involved in 17β-estradiol-induced, cultured immature boar Sertoli cell proliferation via regulating the expression of SKP2, CCND1, and CCNE1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Rong; Wang, Yong; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Jia-Hua; Lu, Cheng; Wang, Xian-Zhong

    2015-04-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is known to be involved in mammalian cell proliferation, while S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (SKP2) plays a vital role in the cell cycle. Within the testis, estrogen also plays an important role in Sertoli cell proliferation, although it is not clear how. The present study asked if mTOR is involved in 17β-estradiol-dependent Sertoli cell proliferation. We specifically assessed if extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and/or phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) exert convergent effects toward the activation of mTOR signaling, and if this signaling regulates the expression of SKP2 through retinoblastoma (RB) and early mitotic inhibitor 1 (EMI1) protein and on CCNE1 and CCND1 mRNA levels. Treatment with 17β-estradiol for 15-90 min activated mTOR, with mTOR phosphorylation peaking after 30 min. U0126 (5 μM), a specific inhibitor of (MEK1/2), and 10-DEBC (2 μM), a selective inhibitor of AKT, both significantly reduced 17β-estradiol-induced phosphorylation of mTOR. Rapamycin suppressed 17β-estradiol-induced Sertoli cell proliferation, appearing to act by reducing the abundance of SKP2, CCND1, and CCNE1 mRNA as well as RB and EMI1 protein. These data indicated that 17β-estradiol enhances Sertoli cell proliferation via mTOR activation, which involves both ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling. Activated mTOR subsequently increases SKP2 mRNA and protein expression by enhancing the expression of CCND1 and CCNE1, and inhibits SKP2 protein degradation by increasing EMI1 abundance.

  1. Obesity Increases Vascular Senescence and Susceptibility to Ischemic Injury Through Chronic Activation of Akt and mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Yung; Kim, Hyung-Hwan; Hiroi, Yukio; Sawada, Naoki; Salomone, Salvatore; Benjamin, Laura E.; Walsh, Kenneth; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Liao, James K.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity and age are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, the signaling mechanism linking obesity with age-related vascular senescence is unknown. Here we show that mice fed a high-fat diet show increased vascular senescence and vascular dysfunction compared to mice fed standard chow and are more prone to peripheral and cerebral ischemia. All of these changes involve long-term activation of the protein kinase Akt. In contrast, mice with diet-induced obesity that lack Akt1 are resistant to vascular senescence. Rapamycin treatment of diet-induced obese mice or of transgenic mice with long-term activation of endothelial Akt inhibits activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)–rictor complex 2 and Akt, prevents vascular senescence without altering body weight, and reduces the severity of limb necrosis and ischemic stroke. These findings indicate that long-term activation of Akt-mTOR signaling links diet-induced obesity with vascular senescence and cardiovascular disease. PMID:19293429

  2. Foxp3+ T cells inhibit antitumor immune memory modulated by mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Sparwasser, Tim; Figlin, Robert; Kim, Hyung L

    2014-04-15

    Inhibition of mTOR signaling enhances antitumor memory lymphocytes. However, pharmacologic mTOR inhibition also enhances regulatory T-cell (Treg) activity. To counter this effect, Treg control was added to mTOR inhibition in preclinical models. Tregs were controlled with CD4-depleting antibodies because CD4 depletion has high translational potential and already has a well-established safety profile in patients. The antitumor activity of the combination therapy was CD8 dependent and controlled growth of syngeneic tumors even when an adoptive immunotherapy was not used. Lymphocytes resulting from the combination therapy could be transferred into naïve mice to inhibit aggressive growth of lung metastases. The combination therapy enhanced CD8 memory formation as determined by memory markers and functional studies of immune recall. Removal of FoxP3-expressing T lymphocytes was the mechanism underlying immunologic memory formation following CD4 depletion. This was confirmed using transgenic DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells) mice to specifically remove Foxp3(+) T cells. It was further confirmed with reciprocal studies where stimulation of immunologic memory because of CD4 depletion was completely neutralized by adoptively transferring tumor-specific Foxp3(+) T cells. Also contributing to tumor control, Tregs that eventually recovered following CD4 depletion were less immunosuppressive. These results provide a rationale for further study of mTOR inhibition and CD4 depletion in patients.

  3. cAMP-Induced Histones H3 Dephosphorylation Is Independent of PKA and MAP Kinase Activations and Correlates With mTOR Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Pedro; Rojas, Juan

    2016-03-01

    cAMP is a second messenger well documented to be involved in the phosphorylation of PKA, MAP kinase, and histone H3 (H3). Early, we reported that cAMP also induced H3 dephosphorylation in a variety of proliferating cell lines. Herein, it is shown that cAMP elicits a biphasic H3 dephosphorylation independent of PKA activation in cycling cells. H89, a potent inhibitor of PKA catalytic sub-unite, could not abolish this effect. Additionally, H89 induces a rapid and biphasic H3 serine 10 dephosphorylation, while a decline in the basal phosphorylation of CREB/ATF-1 is observed. Rp-cAMPS, an analog of cAMP and specific inhibitor of PKA, is unable to suppress cAMP-mediated H3 dephosphorylation, whereas Rp-cAMPS effectively blocks CREB/ATF-1 hyper-phosphorylation by cAMP and its inducers. Interestingly, cAMP exerts a rapid and profound H3 dephosphorylation at much lower concentration (50-fold lower, 0.125 mM) than the concentration required for maximal CREB/ATF-1 phosphorylation (5 mM). Much higher cAMP concentration is required to fully induce CREB/ATF-1 gain in phosphate (5 mM), which correlates with the inhibition of H3 dephosphorylation. Also, the dephosphorylation of H3 does not overlap at onset of MAP kinase phosphorylation pathways, p38 and ERK. Surprisingly, rapamycin (an mTOR inhibitor), cAMP, and its natural inducer isoproterenol, elicit identical dephosphorylation kinetics on both S6K1 ribosomal kinase (a downstream mTOR target) and H3. Finally, cAMP-induced H3 dephosphorylation is PP1/2-dependent. The results suggest that a pathway, requiring much lower cAMP concentration to that required for CREB/ATF-1 hyper-phosphorylation, is responsible for histone H3 dephosphorylation and may be linked to mTOR down regulation.

  4. mTOR plays an important role in cow's milk allergy-associated behavioral and immunological deficits.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiangbo; de Theije, Caroline G M; da Silva, Sofia Lopes; van der Horst, Hilma; Reinders, Margot T M; Broersen, Laus M; Willemsen, Linette E M; Kas, Martien J H; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D

    2015-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is multifactorial, with both genetic as well as environmental factors working in concert to develop the autistic phenotype. Immunological disturbances in autistic individuals have been reported and a role for food allergy has been suggested in ASD. Single gene mutations in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway are associated with the development of ASD and enhanced mTOR signaling plays a central role in directing immune responses towards allergy as well. Therefore, the mTOR pathway may be a pivotal link between the immune disturbances and behavioral deficits observed in ASD. In this study it was investigated whether the mTOR pathway plays a role in food allergy-induced behavioral and immunological deficits. Mice were orally sensitized and challenged with whey protein. Meanwhile, cow's milk allergic (CMA) mice received daily treatment of rapamycin. The validity of the CMA model was confirmed by showing increased allergic immune responses. CMA mice showed reduced social interaction and increased repetitive self-grooming behavior. Enhanced mTORC1 activity was found in the brain and ileum of CMA mice. Inhibition of mTORC1 activity by rapamycin improved the behavioral and immunological deficits of CMA mice. This effect was associated with increase of Treg associated transcription factors in the ileum of CMA mice. These findings indicate that mTOR activation may be central to both the intestinal, immunological, and psychiatric ASD-like symptoms seen in CMA mice. It remains to be investigated whether mTOR can be seen as a therapeutic target in cow's milk allergic children suffering from ASD-like symptoms.

  5. mTOR Signal Transduction Pathways Contribute to TN-C FNIII A1 Overexpression by Mechanical Stress in Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lianhe; Zhang, Dianzhong; Zhang, Yunfei; Wen, Yanhua; Wang, Yucai

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor with a very poor prognosis. Treating osteosarcoma remains a challenge due to its high transitivity. Tenascin-C, with large molecular weight variants including different combinations of its alternative spliced FNIII repeats, is specifically over expressed in tumor tissues. This study examined the expression of Tenascin-C FNIIIA1 in osteosarcoma tissues, and estimated the effect of mechanical stimulation on A1 expression in MG-63 cells. Through immunohistochemical analysis, we found that the A1 protein was expressed at a higher level in osteosarcoma tissues than in adjacent normal tissues. By cell migration assay, we observed that there was a significant correlation between A1 expression and MG-63 cell migra-tion. The relation is that Tenascin-C FNIIIA1 can promote MG-63 cell migration. According to our further study into the effect of mechanical stimulation on A1 expression in MG-63 cells, the mRNA and protein levels of A1 were significantly up-regulated under mechanical stress with the mTOR molecule proving indispensable. Meanwhile, 4E-BP1 and S6K1 (downstream molecule of mTOR) are necessary for A1 normal expression in MG-63 cells whether or not mechanical stress has been encountered. We found that Tenascin-C FNIIIA1 is over-expressed in osteosar-coma tissues and can promote MG-63 cell migration. Furthermore, mechanical stress can facilitate MG-63 cell migration though facilitating A1 overexpression with the necessary molecules (mTOR, 4E-BP1 and S6K1). In con-clusion, high expression of A1 may promote the meta-stasis of osteosarcoma by facilitating MG-63 cell migration. Tenascin-C FNIIIA1 could be used as an indicator in metastatic osteosarcoma patients. PMID:24598996

  6. Rapamycin reverses the senescent phenotype and improves immuno-regulation of mesenchymal stem cells from MRL/lpr mice and systemic lupus erythematosus patients through inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guijian; Meng, Yan; Da, Zhanyun; Guo, Genkai; Xia, Yunfei; Zhu, Xinhang; Shi, Guixiu; Cheng, Chun

    2016-01-01

    We have shown that bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) from SLE patients exhibit senescent behavior and are involved in the pathogenesis of SLE. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin (RAPA) on the senescences and immunoregulatory ability of MSCs of MRL/lpr mice and SLE patients and the underlying mechanisms. Cell morphology, senescence associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining, F-actin staining were used to detect the senescence of cells. BM-MSCs and purified CD4+ T cells were co-cultured indirectly. Flow cytometry was used to inspect the proportion of regulatory T (Treg) /T helper type 17 (Th17). We used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to interfere the expression of mTOR, and detect the effects by RT-PCR, WB and immunofluorescence. Finally, 1×106 of SLE BM-MSCs treated with RAPA were transplanted to cure the 8 MRL/lpr mice aged 16 weeks for 12 weeks. We demonstrated that RAPA alleviated the clinical symptoms of lupus nephritis and prolonged survival in MRL/lpr mice. RAPA reversed the senescent phenotype and improved immunoregulation of MSCs from MRL/lpr mice and SLE patients through inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway. Marked therapeutic effects were observed in MRL/lpr mice following transplantation of BM-MSCs from SLE patients pretreated with RAPA. PMID:27048648

  7. The novel combination of dual mTOR inhibitor AZD2014 and pan-PIM inhibitor AZD1208 inhibits growth in acute myeloid leukemia via HSF pathway suppression.

    PubMed

    Harada, Masako; Benito, Juliana; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Kaur, Surinder; Arslan, Dirim; Ramirez, Santiago; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Platanias, Leonidas; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kazuno, Saiko; Kojima, Kensuke; Tabe, Yoko; Konopleva, Marina

    2015-11-10

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is a critical pathway in the biology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Proviral integration site for moloney murine leukemia virus (PIM) serine/threonine kinase signaling takes part in various pathways exerting tumorigenic properties. We hypothesized that the combination of a PIM kinase inhibitor with an mTOR inhibitor might have complementary growth-inhibitory effects against AML. The simultaneous inhibition of the PIM kinase by pan-PIM inhibitor AZD1208 and of mTOR by selective mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor AZD2014 exerted anticancer properties in AML cell lines and in cells derived from primary AML samples with or without supportive stromal cell co-culture, leading to suppressed proliferation and increased apoptosis. The combination of AZD1208 and AZD2014 rapidly activated AMPKα, a negative regulator of translation machinery through mTORC1/2 signaling in AML cells; profoundly inhibited AKT and 4EBP1 activation; and suppressed polysome formation. Inhibition of both mTOR and PIM counteracted induction of heat-shock family proteins, uncovering the master negative regulation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), the dominant transcription factor controlling cellular stress responses. The novel combination of the dual mTOR inhibitor and pan-PIM inhibitor synergistically inhibited AML growth by effectively reducing protein synthesis through heat shock factor pathway suppression.

  8. MicroRNA-224 aggrevates tumor growth and progression by targeting mTOR in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Chang-Feng; Ma, Lian-Jun; Ding, Meng; Zhang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Growing evidence suggests that microRNA plays an essential role in the development and metastasis of many tumors, including gastric cancer. Aberrant miR-224 expression has been indicated in tumor growth, the mechanism of miR-224 promoting the proliferation and metastatic ability for gastric cancer remains unclear. Accumulating evidence reports that mTOR signal pathway plays an important role in the cellular process, such as apoptosis, cell growth and proliferation. The goal of the present study was to identify whether miR-224 could inhibit the growth, migration, invasion, proliferation and metastasis of gastric cancer through targeting mTOR expression. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was used to quantify miR-224 expression in vitro and in vivo experiments. Luciferase reporter assays were performed to confirm the activity of mTOR pathway, and immunofluorescence staining assay was conducted to observe apoptosis and cell proliferation ability. Bioinformatics as well as cell luciferase function studies distinguished the direct modulation of miR-224 on the 3'-UTR of the mTOR, which leads to the inactivation of apoptosis signaling and the activation of cell proliferation. In addition, inhibition of miR-224 significantly reduced the expression of mTOR and improved caspase-9/3 expression while decreased cyclin D1/2 levels, attenuating gastric cancer cell proliferation. Therefore, the present study revealed the mechanistic links between miR-224 and mTOR in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer through modulation of caspase-9/3 and cyclin D1/2. In addition, targeting miR-224 could serve as a novel strategy for future gastric cancer therapy.

  9. Combined inhibition of MEK and mTOR has a synergic effect on angiosarcoma tumorgrafts

    PubMed Central

    ANDERSEN, NICHOLAS J.; BOGUSLAWSKI, ELISSA B.; KUK, CYNTHIA Y.; CHAMBERS, CHRISTOPHER M.; DUESBERY, NICHOLAS S.

    2015-01-01

    Angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare neoplasm of endothelial origin that has limited treatment options and poor five-year survival. Using tumorgraft models, we previously showed that AS is sensitive to small-molecule inhibitors that target mitogen-activated/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinases 1 and 2 (MEK). The objective of this study was to identify drugs that combine with MEK inhibitors to more effectively inhibit AS growth. We examined the in vitro synergy between the MEK inhibitor PD0325901 and inhibitors of eleven common cancer pathways in melanoma cell lines and canine angiosarcoma cell isolates. Combination indices were calculated using the Chou-Talalay method. Optimized combination therapies were evaluated in vivo for toxicity and efficacy using canine angiosarcoma tumorgrafts. Among the drugs we tested, rapamycin stood out because it showed strong synergy with PD0325901 at nanomolar concentrations. We observed that angiosarcomas are insensitive to mTOR inhibition. However, treatment with nanomolar levels of mTOR inhibitor renders these cells as sensitive to MEK inhibition as a melanoma cell line with mutant BRAF. Similar results were observed in B-Raf wild-type melanoma cells as well as in vivo, where treatment of canine AS tumorgrafts with MEK and mTOR inhibitors was more effective than monotherapy. Our data show that a low dose of an mTOR inhibitor can dramatically enhance angiosarcoma and melanoma response to MEK inhibition, potentially widening the field of applications for MEK-targeted therapy. PMID:25955301

  10. Circadian regulation of mTOR by the ubiquitin pathway in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Naoya; Fujioka, Takashi; Okazaki, Fumiyasu; Akagawa, Yui; Tsurudome, Yuuya; Ono, Mayumi; Kuwano, Michihiko; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-01-15

    Circadian clock systems regulate many biologic functions, including cell division and hormone secretion in mammals. In this study, we explored the effects of circadian control on the pivot cell growth regulatory mTOR, the activity of which is deregulated in tumor cells compared with normal cells. Specifically, we investigated whether the antitumor effect of an mTOR inhibitor could be improved by changing its dosing schedule in RenCa tumor-bearing mice. Active, phosphorylated mTOR displayed a 24-hour rhythm, and levels of total mTOR protein (but not mRNA) also showed a circadian rhythm in RenCa tumor masses. Through investigations of the oscillation mechanism for mTOR expression, we identified the ubiquitination factor Fbxw7 as an mTOR regulator that oscillated in its expression in a manner opposite from mTOR. Fbxw7 transcription was regulated by the circadian regulator D-site-binding protein. Notably, administration of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus during periods of elevated mTOR improved survival in tumor-bearing mice. Our findings demonstrate that the circadian oscillation of mTOR activity is regulated by circadian clock systems, which influence the antitumor effect of mTOR inhibitors.

  11. mTOR Inhibitors Alone and in Combination with JAK2 Inhibitors Effectively Inhibit Cells of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Serena; Tozzi, Lorenzo; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bosi, Alberto; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dysregulated signaling of the JAK/STAT pathway is a common feature of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), usually associated with JAK2V617F mutation. Recent clinical trials with JAK2 inhibitors showed significant improvements in splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms in patients with myelofibrosis but meaningful molecular responses were not documented. Accordingly, there remains a need for exploring new treatment strategies of MPN. A potential additional target for treatment is represented by the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway that has been found constitutively activated in MPN cells; proof-of-evidence of efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 has been obtained recently in a Phase I/II trial in patients with myelofibrosis. The aim of the study was to characterize the effects in vitro of mTOR inhibitors, used alone and in combination with JAK2 inhibitors, against MPN cells. Findings Mouse and human JAK2V617F mutated cell lines and primary hematopoietic progenitors from MPN patients were challenged with an allosteric (RAD001) and an ATP-competitive (PP242) mTOR inhibitor and two JAK2 inhibitors (AZD1480 and ruxolitinib). mTOR inhibitors effectively reduced proliferation and colony formation of cell lines through a slowed cell division mediated by changes in cell cycle transition to the S-phase. mTOR inhibitors also impaired the proliferation and prevented colony formation from MPN hematopoietic progenitors at doses significantly lower than healthy controls. JAK2 inhibitors produced similar antiproliferative effects in MPN cell lines and primary cells but were more potent inducers of apoptosis, as also supported by differential effects on cyclinD1, PIM1 and BcLxL expression levels. Co-treatment of mTOR inhibitor with JAK2 inhibitor resulted in synergistic activity against the proliferation of JAK2V617F mutated cell lines and significantly reduced erythropoietin-independent colony growth in patients with polycythemia vera

  12. Emerging evidence of a link between the polycystins and the mTOR pathways.

    PubMed

    Boletta, Alessandra

    2009-10-28

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetic disease characterized by the formation of renal cysts. This disease can be caused by mutations in two genes, PKD1 and PKD2, which encode polycystin-1 (PC-1) and -2 (PC-2), respectively.PC-1 is a large plasma membrane receptor involved in the regulation of several biological functions and signaling pathways, and PC-2 is a calcium channel of the TRP family. The two proteins associate in a complex to prevent cyst formation, but the precise mechanism(s) involved remain largely unknown.This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of the functions of polycystins and their role in signal transduction.Increased activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase has been observed in cysts found in ADPKD tissues. Rapamycin has been shown to have beneficial effects in rodent models of polycystic kidney disease, prompting the initiation of pilot clinical trials with human patients. Furthermore, a direct role for PC-1 in the regulation of cell growth (size) via mTOR has recently been demonstrated.Major advancements in the study of mTOR biology have highlighted that this kinase exists in association with two different complexes, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). The mTORC1 complex regulates cell growth (size), proliferation, translation and autophagy, and mTORC2 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and apoptosis. Interestingly, mTORC2 has been shown to contain the kinase responsible for the phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473. Previous studies have shown that PC-1 controls the PI 3-kinase/Akt cascade to regulate apoptosis and the actin cytoskeleton, suggesting that this receptor might regulate mTOR at several levels.This review aims to discuss three different, inter-related themes emerging from the literature: (i) studies performed in our and other laboratories collectively suggest that PC-1 might be able to differentially regulate the two mTOR complexes; (ii) several

  13. Inhibition of mTOR pathway restrains astrocyte proliferation, migration and production of inflammatory mediators after oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Yu; Li, Xiao; Liu, Shuang-Feng; Qu, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Wei; Tian, Dai-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Glial scar is a major impediment to axonal regeneration in central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Overcoming this physical and biochemical barrier might be crucial for axonal regeneration and functional compensation during the progression of CNS disorders. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase, involved in process of cell proliferation, migration, autophagy and protein synthesis. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR signaling, can exert neuroprotective effects in several CNS diseases. However, its role in the process of reactive astrogliosis including cell proliferation, migration and cytokine production after cerebral ischemia still remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of mTOR blockade in cultured astrocytes exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R), a wildly used cellular ischemia model which mimics ideally cerebral ischemia model in vivo. We found that astrocytes became activated after OGD/R, characterized by change of astrocytic morphology, upregulation of GFAP expression, the increase number of Edu positive cells, and accompanied with phosphorylation of mTOR protein and its substrate S6K1. Rapamycin significantly inhibited mTOR signal pathway, suppressed proliferation of astrocytes via modulation of cell cycle progression. Moreover, rapamycin attenuated astrocytic migration and mitigated production of inflammatory factors such as TNF-α and iNOS induced by astrocytes exposed to OGD/R. Taken together, our findings indicated that mTOR blockade by rapamycin attenuates astrocyte migration, proliferation and production of inflammation mediators. We suggest that targeting mTOR pathway in astrocyte activation may represent a potentially new therapeutic strategy against deleterious neurotoxic processes of reactive astrogliosis in CNS disorders such as ischemic stroke.

  14. Radiation persistently promoted oxidative stress, activated mTOR via PI3K/Akt, and downregulated autophagy pathway in mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Fornace, Albert J

    2014-12-01

    While acute effects of toxic radiation doses on intestine are well established, we are yet to acquire a complete spectrum of sub-lethal radiation-induced chronic intestinal perturbations at the molecular level. We investigated persistent effects of a radiation dose (2 Gy) commonly used as a daily fraction in radiotherapy on oxidants and anti-oxidants, and autophagy pathways, which are interlinked processes affecting intestinal homeostasis. Six to eight weeks old C57BL/6J mice (n=10) were exposed to 2 Gy γ-ray. Mice were euthanized two or twelve months after radiation, intestine surgically removed, and flushed using sterile PBS. Parts of the intestine from jejunal-ilial region were fixed, frozen, or used for intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) isolation. While oxidant levels and mitochondrial status were assessed in isolated IEC, autophagy and oxidative stress related signaling pathways were probed in frozen and fixed samples using PCR-based expression arrays and immunoprobing. Radiation exposure caused significant alterations in the expression level of 26 autophagy and 17 oxidative stress related genes. Immunoblot results showed decreased Beclin1 and LC3-II and increased p62, PI3K/Akt, and mTOR. Flow cytometry data showed increased oxidant production and compromised mitochondrial integrity in irradiated samples. Immunoprobing of intestinal sections showed increased 8-oxo-dG and nuclear PCNA, and decreased autophagosome marker LC3-II in IEC after irradiation. We show that sub-lethal radiation could persistently downregulate anti-oxidants and autophagy signaling, and upregulate oxidant production and proliferative signaling. Radiation-induced promotion of oxidative stress and downregulation of autophagy could work in tandem to alter intestinal functions and have implications for post-radiation chronic gastrointestinal diseases.

  15. Retraction: "Down-regulation of Notch-1 and Jagged-1 inhibits prostate cancer cell growth, migration and invasion, and induces apoptosis via inactivation of Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways" by Wang et al.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on January 5, 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 5A to be inappropriately manipulated. REFERENCE Wang Z, Li Y, Banerjee S, Kong D, Ahmad A, Nogueira V, Hay N, Sarkar FH. 2010. Down-regulation of Notch-1 and Jagged-1 inhibits prostate cancer cell growth, migration and invasion, and induces apoptosis via inactivation of Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways. J Cell Biochem 109:726-736; doi: 10.1002/jcb.22451.

  16. mTOR inhibitor for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a central role in the regulation of cellular growth, proliferation, and survival via a cytoplasmic serine/threonine kinase. mTOR also works as a nutrition sensor to monitor cellular metabolism. mTOR is located downstream in the PI3K/Akt pathway, in which Akt and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1/2 are involved, to form a signal transduction pathway. New anticancer agents that target mTOR in the PI3K/Akt pathway of the signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation control have recently been developed and are already commercially available. A phase III clinical trial of mTOR inhibitor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is now ongoing worldwide to expand indications. RAD001 is a signal-transduction inhibitor (STI) that targets mTOR (more specifically, mTORC1). mTORC1 signaling is intricately regulated by mitogens, growth factors, energy, and nutrients. mTORC1 is a regulator essential for general protein synthesis, located downstream of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which is dysregulated in most human cancers. Inhibiting mTOR with molecules, such as RAD001, generates additive effects that accompany upstream and downstream target inhibition; alternatively, upstream receptor inhibition is compensated for by inhibiting the downstream pathway, even if some resistance develops against receptor inhibition regardless of initial or acquired resistance. In conclusion, RAD001 is a potential targeted agent for HCC and therefore final results of a phase III study are awaited.

  17. Akt- or MEK-mediated mTOR inhibition suppresses Nf1 optic glioma growth

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Aparna; Toonen, Joseph A.; Cimino, Patrick J.; Gianino, Scott M.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop optic pathway gliomas, which result from impaired NF1 protein regulation of Ras activity. One obstacle to the implementation of biologically targeted therapies is an incomplete understanding of the individual contributions of the downstream Ras effectors (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase [MEK], Akt) to optic glioma maintenance. This study was designed to address the importance of MEK and Akt signaling to Nf1 optic glioma growth. Methods Primary neonatal mouse astrocyte cultures were employed to determine the consequence of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MEK inhibition on Nf1-deficient astrocyte growth. Nf1 optic glioma–bearing mice were used to assess the effect of Akt and MEK inhibition on tumor volume, proliferation, and retinal ganglion cell dysfunction. Results Both MEK and Akt were hyperactivated in Nf1-deficient astrocytes in vitro and in Nf1 murine optic gliomas in vivo. Pharmacologic PI3K or Akt inhibition reduced Nf1-deficient astrocyte proliferation to wild-type levels, while PI3K inhibition decreased Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Akt inhibition of Nf1-deficient astrocyte and optic glioma growth reflected Akt-dependent activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Sustained MEK pharmacologic blockade also attenuated Nf1-deficient astrocytes as well as Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Importantly, these MEK inhibitory effects resulted from p90RSK-mediated, Akt-independent mTOR activation. Finally, both PI3K and MEK inhibition reduced optic glioma–associated retinal ganglion cell loss and nerve fiber layer thinning. Conclusion These findings establish that the convergence of 2 distinct Ras effector pathways on mTOR signaling maintains Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth, supporting the evaluation of pharmacologic inhibitors that target mTOR function in future human NF1–optic pathway glioma clinical trials. PMID:25534823

  18. Polyphenolics from mango (Mangifera indica L.) suppress breast cancer ductal carcinoma in situ proliferation through activation of AMPK pathway and suppression of mTOR in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Matthew J; Kim, Hyemee; Marciante, Alexandria B; Barnes, Ryan C; Hendrick, Erik D; Bisson, William H; Talcott, Stephen T; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the underlying mechanisms of mango polyphenol decreased cell proliferation and tumor volume in ductal carcinoma in situ breast cancer. We hypothesized that mango polyphenols suppress signaling along the AKT/mTOR axis while up-regulating AMPK. To test this hypothesis, mango polyphenols (0.8 mg gallic acid equivalents per day) and pyrogallol (0.2 mg/day) were administered for 4 weeks to mice xenografted with MCF10DCIS.com cells subcutaneously (n=10 per group). Tumor volumes were significantly decreased, both mango and pyrogallol groups displayed greater than 50% decreased volume compared to control. There was a significant reduction of phosphorylated protein levels of IR, IRS1, IGF-1R, and mTOR by mango; while pyrogallol significantly reduced the phosphorylation levels of IR, IRS1, IGF-1R, p70S6K, and ERK. The protein levels of Sestrin2, which is involved in AMPK-signaling, were significantly elevated in both groups. Also, mango significantly elevated AMPK phosphorylation and pyrogallol significantly elevated LKB1 protein levels. In an in vitro model, mango and pyrogallol increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and arrested cells in S phase. In silico modeling indicates that pyrogallol has the potential to bind directly to the allosteric binding site of AMPK, inducing activation. When AMPK expression was down-regulated using siRNA in vitro, pyrogallol reversed the reduced expression of AMPK. This indicates that pyrogallol not only activates AMPK, but also increases constitutive protein expression. These results suggest that mango polyphenols and their major microbial metabolite, pyrogallol, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells through ROS-dependent up-regulation of AMPK and down-regulation of the AKT/mTOR pathway.

  19. Suppression of mTOR Signaling Pathways in Skeletal Muscle of Finishing Pigs by Increasing the Ratios of Ether Extract and Neutral Detergent Fiber at the Expense of Starch in Iso-energetic Diets.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changning; Li, Yanjiao; Zhang, Bolin; Lin, Meng; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Tianjiao; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-02-24

    Three iso-energetic and iso-nitrogenous diets were fed to finishing pigs for 28 days to investigate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ubiquitin-proteasome signaling pathways of skeletal muscle by altering compositions of dietary energy sources. Diet A, diet B, and diet C contained 44.1%, 37.6%, and 30.9% starch; 5.9%, 9.5%, and 14.3% ether extract (EE); and 12.6%, 15.4%, and 17.8% neutral detergent fiber (NDF), respectively. An increase of mRNA expression of MuRF1 (1.09 ± 0.10 vs 1.00 ± 0.08) and MAFbx (1.10 ± 0.06 vs 1.00 ± 0.11) and a decrease of concentrations of plasma insulin (8.2 ± 0.8 vs 10.8 ± 1.2) and glucose (5.76 ± 0.12 vs 6.43 ± 0.33) together with mRNA expression of IRS (0.78 ± 0.19 vs 1.01 ± 0.05) and Akt (0.92 ± 0.01 vs 1.00 ± 0.05) were observed in pigs fed diet C compared with diet A. Protein levels of total and phosphorylated mTOR (0.31 ± 0.04 vs 0.48 ± 0.03 and 0.39 ± 0.01 vs 0.56 ± 0.02), 4EBP1 (0.66 ± 0.06 vs 0.90 ± 0.09 and 0.60 ± 0.12 vs 0.84 ± 0.09), and S6K1 (0.66 ± 0.01 vs 0.89 ± 0.01 and 0.48 ± 0.03 vs 0.79 ± 0.02) were decreased; however, total and phosphorylated AMPK (0.96 ± 0.06 vs 0.64 ± 0.04 and 0.97 ± 0.09 vs 0.61 ± 0.09) were increased in pigs fed diet C compared with diet A. In conclusion, diet C suppressed the mTOR pathway and accelerated the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in skeletal muscle of finishing pigs.

  20. Acylcarnitines activate proinflammatory signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rutkowsky, Jennifer M; Knotts, Trina A; Ono-Moore, Kikumi D; McCoin, Colin S; Huang, Shurong; Schneider, Dina; Singh, Shamsher; Adams, Sean H; Hwang, Daniel H

    2014-06-15

    Incomplete β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria is a feature of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Previous studies revealed that plasma concentrations of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines (by-products of incomplete β-oxidation) are elevated in T2DM and insulin resistance. In a previous study, we reported that mixed D,L isomers of C12- or C14-carnitine induced an NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene in RAW 264.7 cells, suggesting potential activation of proinflammatory pathways. Here, we determined whether the physiologically relevant L-acylcarnitines activate classical proinflammatory signaling pathways and if these outcomes involve pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-associated pathways. Acylcarnitines induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in a chain length-dependent manner in RAW 264.7 cells. L-C14 carnitine (5-25 μM), used as a representative acylcarnitine, stimulated the expression and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, L-C14 carnitine induced phosphorylation of JNK and ERK, common downstream components of many proinflammatory signaling pathways including PRRs. Knockdown of MyD88, a key cofactor in PRR signaling and inflammation, blunted the proinflammatory effects of acylcarnitine. While these results point to potential involvement of PRRs, L-C14 carnitine promoted IL-8 secretion from human epithelial cells (HCT-116) lacking Toll-like receptors (TLR)2 and -4, and did not activate reporter constructs in TLR overexpression cell models. Thus, acylcarnitines have the potential to activate inflammation, but the specific molecular and tissue target(s) involved remain to be identified.

  1. Acylcarnitines activate proinflammatory signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowsky, Jennifer M.; Knotts, Trina A.; Ono-Moore, Kikumi D.; McCoin, Colin S.; Huang, Shurong; Schneider, Dina; Singh, Shamsher; Hwang, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Incomplete β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria is a feature of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Previous studies revealed that plasma concentrations of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines (by-products of incomplete β-oxidation) are elevated in T2DM and insulin resistance. In a previous study, we reported that mixed d,l isomers of C12- or C14-carnitine induced an NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene in RAW 264.7 cells, suggesting potential activation of proinflammatory pathways. Here, we determined whether the physiologically relevant l-acylcarnitines activate classical proinflammatory signaling pathways and if these outcomes involve pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-associated pathways. Acylcarnitines induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in a chain length-dependent manner in RAW 264.7 cells. l-C14 carnitine (5–25 μM), used as a representative acylcarnitine, stimulated the expression and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, l-C14 carnitine induced phosphorylation of JNK and ERK, common downstream components of many proinflammatory signaling pathways including PRRs. Knockdown of MyD88, a key cofactor in PRR signaling and inflammation, blunted the proinflammatory effects of acylcarnitine. While these results point to potential involvement of PRRs, l-C14 carnitine promoted IL-8 secretion from human epithelial cells (HCT-116) lacking Toll-like receptors (TLR)2 and -4, and did not activate reporter constructs in TLR overexpression cell models. Thus, acylcarnitines have the potential to activate inflammation, but the specific molecular and tissue target(s) involved remain to be identified. PMID:24760988

  2. mTOR regulates the expression of DNA damage response enzymes in long-lived Snell dwarf, GHRKO, and PAPPA-KO mice.

    PubMed

    Dominick, Graham; Bowman, Jacqueline; Li, Xinna; Miller, Richard A; Garcia, Gonzalo G

    2017-02-01

    Studies of the mTOR pathway have prompted speculation that diminished mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1) function may be involved in controlling the aging process. Our previous studies have shown diminished mTORC1 activity in tissues of three long-lived mutant mice: Snell dwarf mice, growth hormone receptor gene disrupted mice (GHRKO), and in this article, mice deficient in the pregnancy-associated protein-A (PAPPA-KO). The ways in which lower mTOR signals slow aging and age-related diseases are, however, not well characterized. Here, we show that Snell, GHKRO, and PAPPA-KO mice express high levels of two proteins involved in DNA repair, O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1). Furthermore, we report that lowering mTOR enhances MGMT and NDRG1 protein expression via post-transcriptional mechanisms. We show that the CCR4-NOT complex, a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression, is downstream of the mTORC1 pathway and may be responsible for the upregulation of MGMT and NDRG1 in all three varieties of long-lived mice. Our data thus suggest a novel link between DNA repair and mTOR signaling via post-transcriptional regulation involving specific alteration in the CCR4-NOT complex, whose modulation could control multiple aspects of the aging process.

  3. Phosphorylated mTOR expression correlates with podoplanin expression and high tumor grade in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Wen-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chao, Yin-Kai; Yeh, Chi-Ju; Ueng, Shir-Hwa; Chang, Chiu-Yueh; Liu, Yun-Hen; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Chang, Hsien-Kun; Wan, Yung-Liang; Hsueh, Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic (or mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays important roles in cell growth and proliferation. In esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), high expression of phosphorylated (activated) mTOR (p-mTOR) has been reported as an adverse prognostic factor in some but not all studies. The signals of mTOR pathway and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway converge on 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1), which drives the downstream proliferative signals. We previously found that high expression of phosphorylated 4EBP1 (p-4EBP1) is an adverse prognostic factor in esophageal SCC. Podoplanin is a type-1 transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in various normal human tissues, including lymphatic endothelium. Our previous study showed that high podoplanin expression correlates with clinical nodal metastasis, which is associated with short survival in esophageal SCC. In current study, we investigated p-mTOR expression by immunohistochemistry in 75 cases of surgically resected esophageal SCC. The result was correlated with p-4EBP1 expression, podoplanin expression, clinicopathologic features and patient survival. We found that high p-mTOR expression was significantly associated with high podoplanin expression (P = 0.0030) and high tumor grade (P = 0.0014). No correlation with p-4EBP1 expression, patient survival or other clinicopathologic features was found. Recently, podoplanin expression in astrocytic brain tumors was found to be regulated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/activator protein-1 (AP-1) pathway. Similarly, mTOR is activated by a PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. The association of p-mTOR and podoplanin expression in our study could be due to a common upstream pathway. Since both mTOR and podoplanin are potential therapeutic targets, the possible benefit of combined targeted therapy warrants further investigation. PMID:26722465

  4. Erythropoietin and mTOR: A “One-Two Punch” for Aging-Related Disorders Accompanied by Enhanced Life Expectancy

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy continues to increase throughout the world, but is accompanied by a rise in the incidence of non-communicable diseases. As a result, the benefits of an increased lifespan can be limited by aging-related disorders that necessitate new directives for the development of effective and safe treatment modalities. With this objective, the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a 289-kDa serine/threonine protein, and its related pathways of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1), mTOR Complex 2 (mTORC2), proline rich Akt substrate 40 kDa (PRAS40), AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), Wnt signaling, and silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1), have generated significant excitement for furthering novel therapies applicable to multiple systems of the body. Yet, the biological and clinical outcome of these pathways can be complex especially with oversight of cell death mechanisms that involve apoptosis and autophagy. Growth factors, and in particular erythropoietin (EPO), are one avenue under consideration to implement control over cell death pathways since EPO can offer potential treatment for multiple disease entities and is intimately dependent upon mTOR signaling. In experimental and clinical studies, EPO appears to have significant efficacy in treating several disorders including those involving the developing brain. However, in mature populations that are affected by aging-related disorders, the direction for the use of EPO to treat clinical disease is less clear that may be dependent upon a number of factors including the understanding of mTOR signaling. Continued focus upon the regulatory elements that control EPO and mTOR signaling could generate critical insights for targeting a broad range of clinical maladies. PMID:27488211

  5. Targeting bone metastatic cancer: Role of the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Bertoldo, Francesco; Silvestris, Franco; Ibrahim, Toni; Cognetti, Francesco; Generali, Daniele; Ripamonti, Carla Ida; Amadori, Dino; Colleoni, Marco Angelo; Conte, Pierfranco; Del Mastro, Lucia; De Placido, Sabino; Ortega, Cinzia; Santini, Daniele

    2014-04-01

    One of the great challenges of cancer medicine is to develop effective treatments for bone metastatic cancer. Most patients with advanced solid tumors will develop bone metastasis and will suffer from skeletal related events associated with this disease. Although some therapies are available to manage symptoms derived from bone metastases, an effective treatment has not been developed yet. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates cell growth and survival. Alterations in mTOR signaling have been associated with pathological malignancies, including bone metastatic cancer. Inhibition of mTOR signaling might therefore be a promising alternative for bone metastatic cancer management. This review summarizes the current knowledge on mTOR pathway signaling in bone tissue and provides an overview on the known effects of mTOR inhibition in bone cancer, both in in vitro and in vivo models.

  6. Targeting Focal Adhesion Kinase and Resistance to mTOR Inhibition in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    François, Rony A.; Maeng, Kyungah; Nawab, Akbar; Kaye, Frederic J.; Hochwald, Steven N.; Zajac-Kaye, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) mediates survival of normal pancreatic islets through activation of AKT. Upon malignant transformation of islet cells into pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), AKT is frequently overexpressed and mutations in the AKT/mTOR pathway are detected. Because mTOR inhibitors rarely induce PanNET tumor regression, partly because of feedback activation of AKT, novel combination strategies are needed to target FAK/AKT/mTOR signaling. Methods: We characterized the activation of FAK in PanNETs using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis and tested the FAK inhibitor PF-04554878 in human PanNET cells in vitro and in vivo (at least three mice per group). In addition, we evaluated the effect of combined FAK and mTOR inhibition on PanNET viability and apoptosis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We found that FAK is overexpressed and hyperphosphorylated in human PanNETs and that PF-04554878 strongly inhibited FAK (Tyr397) autophosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. We found that PF-04554878 inhibited cell proliferation and clonogenicity and induced apoptosis in PanNET cells. Moreover, oral administration of PF-04554878 statistically significantly reduced tumor growth in a patient-derived xenograft model of PanNET (P = .02) and in a human PanNET xenograft model of peritoneal carcinomatosis (P = .03). Importantly, PF-04554878 synergized with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus by preventing feedback AKT activation. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that FAK is overexpressed in PanNETs and that inhibition of FAK activity induces apoptosis and inhibits PanNET proliferation. We found that the novel FAK inhibitor PF-04554878 synergizes with everolimus, a US Food and Drug Administration–approved agent for PanNETs. Our findings warrant the clinical investigation of combined FAK and mTOR inhibition in PanNETs. PMID:25971297

  7. Reciprocal regulation of cilia and autophagy via the MTOR and proteasome pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixuan; Livingston, Man J; Su, Yunchao; Dong, Zheng

    2015-04-03

    Primary cilium is an organelle that plays significant roles in a number of cellular functions ranging from cell mechanosensation, proliferation, and differentiation to apoptosis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular function in biology and indispensable for cellular homeostasis. Both cilia and autophagy have been linked to different types of genetic and acquired human diseases. Their interaction has been suggested very recently, but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. We examined autophagy in cells with suppressed cilia and measured cilium length in autophagy-activated or -suppressed cells. It was found that autophagy was repressed in cells with short cilia. Further investigation showed that MTOR activation was enhanced in cilia-suppressed cells and the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin could largely reverse autophagy suppression. In human kidney proximal tubular cells (HK2), autophagy induction was associated with cilium elongation. Conversely, autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) as well as bafilomycin A1 (Baf) led to short cilia. Cilia were also shorter in cultured atg5-knockout (KO) cells and in atg7-KO kidney proximal tubular cells in mice. MG132, an inhibitor of the proteasome, could significantly restore cilium length in atg5-KO cells, being concomitant with the proteasome activity. Together, the results suggest that cilia and autophagy regulate reciprocally through the MTOR signaling pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  8. Delineating the mTOR kinase pathway using a dual TORC1/2 inhibitor, AZD8055, in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cirstea, Diana; Santo, Loredana; Hideshima, Teru; Eda, Homare; Mishima, Yuko; Nemani, Neeharika; Mahindra, Anuj; Yee, Andrew; Gorgun, Gullu; Hu, Yiguo; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Suzuki, Rikio; Cottini, Francesca; Guichard, Sylvie M; Anderson, Kenneth C; Raje, Noopur

    2014-11-01

    Despite promising preclinical results with mTOR kinase inhibitors in multiple myeloma, resistance to these drugs may arise via feedback activation loops. This concern is especially true for insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R), because IGF1R signaling is downregulated by multiple AKT and mTOR feedback mechanisms. We have tested this hypothesis in multiple myeloma using the novel selective mTOR kinase inhibitor AZD8055. We evaluated p-mTOR S(2481) as the readout for mTORC2/Akt activity in multiple myeloma cells in the context of mTOR inhibition via AZD8055 or rapamycin. We next validated AZD8055 inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 functions in multiple myeloma cells alone or in culture with bone marrow stroma cells and growth factors. Unlike rapamycin, AZD8055 resulted in apoptosis of multiple myeloma cells. AZD8055 treatment, however, induced upregulation of IGF1R phosphorylation in p-Akt S(473)-expressing multiple myeloma cell lines. Furthermore, exposure of AZD8055-treated cells to IGF1 induced p-Akt S(473) and rescued multiple myeloma cells from apoptosis despite mTOR kinase inhibition and TORC2/Akt blockage. The addition of blocking IGF1R antibody resulted in reversing this effect and increased AZD8055-induced apoptosis. Our study suggests that combination treatment with AZD8055 and IGF1R-blocking agents is a promising strategy in multiple myeloma with potential IGF1R/Akt signaling-mediated survival.

  9. Role of mTOR Inhibitors in Growth Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenomas Harboring Different FGFR4 Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Shahrzad; Monsalves, Eric; Tateno, Toru; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-09-01

    Pituitary adenomas (PAs) are common intracranial lesions. Available medical therapies are limited in PAs, and therefore, it is essential to identify treatments that control PA growth when surgery is not an option. Fibroblast growth factor 4 is implicated in PA pathogenesis; therefore, in this study, we used an isogenic mammosomatotroph cell line (GH4C1) harboring different fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-4 genotypes to establish and characterize intracranial xenograft mouse models that can be used for preclinical drug testing. We show that proliferating GH4C1 tumors have an average latency of 3 weeks to form. Histological analysis revealed that prototypic FGFR4 (G388) tumors express increased prolactin and less GH, whereas tumors possessing the polymorphic variant of FGFR4 (R388) express increased GH relative to prolactin. All tumors show abundant mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling as confirmed using phosphorylated (p)-S6 and p-4E-binding protein 1 as downstream regulators of this pathway. We subsequently demonstrate that the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 decreases tumor growth rate and reduces p-S6 but not p-4E-binding protein 1 activation, regardless of FGFR4 status. More importantly, GH activity was significantly reduced after mTOR inhibition in the R388 polymorphic variant tumors. This reduction was also associated with a concomitant reduction in serum IGF-1 levels in the R388 group. In summary, we demonstrate that the GH4C1 FGFR polymorphic xenograft is a useful model for examining PAs. Furthermore, we show that RAD001 can efficiently reduce tumor growth rate by a reduction in mTOR signaling and more importantly results in control of GH expression and IGF-1 secretion, providing further support for using mTOR inhibitors in PA patients, in particular GH-producing adenomas.

  10. Ubiquitin hydrolase UCH-L1 destabilizes mTOR complex 1 by antagonizing DDB1-CUL4-mediated ubiquitination of raptor.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajjad; Feldman, Andrew L; Das, Chittaranjan; Ziesmer, Steven C; Ansell, Stephen M; Galardy, Paul J

    2013-03-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates processes including mRNA translation, proliferation, and survival. By assembling with different cofactors, mTOR forms two complexes with distinct biological functions. Raptor-bound mTOR (mTORC1) governs cap-dependent mRNA translation, whereas mTOR, rictor, and mSin1 (mTORC2) activate the survival and proliferative kinase Akt. How the balance between the competing needs for mTORC1 and -2 is controlled in normal cells and deregulated in disease is poorly understood. Here, we show that the ubiquitin hydrolase UCH-L1 regulates the balance of mTOR signaling by disrupting mTORC1. We find that UCH-L1 impairs mTORC1 activity toward S6 kinase and 4EBP1 while increasing mTORC2 activity toward Akt. These effects are directly attributable to a dramatic rearrangement in mTOR complex assembly. UCH-L1 disrupts a complex between the DDB1-CUL4 ubiquitin ligase complex and raptor and counteracts DDB1-CUL4-mediated raptor ubiquitination. These events lead to mTORC1 dissolution and a secondary increase in mTORC2. Experiments in Uchl1-deficient and transgenic mice suggest that the balance between these pathways is important for preventing neurodegeneration and the development of malignancy. These data establish UCH-L1 as a key regulator of the dichotomy between mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling.

  11. The chemokine CCL5 regulates glucose uptake and AMP kinase signaling in activated T cells to facilitate chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Olivia; Burke, J Daniel; Gao, Darrin F; Fish, Eleanor N

    2012-08-24

    Recruitment of effector T cells to sites of infection or inflammation is essential for an effective adaptive immune response. The chemokine CCL5 (RANTES) activates its cognate receptor, CCR5, to initiate cellular functions, including chemotaxis. In earlier studies, we reported that CCL5-induced CCR5 signaling activates the mTOR/4E-BP1 pathway to directly modulate mRNA translation. Specifically, CCL5-mediated mTOR activation contributes to T cell chemotaxis by initiating the synthesis of chemotaxis-related proteins. Up-regulation of chemotaxis-related proteins may prime T cells for efficient migration. It is now clear that mTOR is also a central regulator of nutrient sensing and glycolysis. Herein we describe a role for CCL5-mediated glucose uptake and ATP accumulation to meet the energy demands of chemotaxis in activated T cells. We provide evidence that CCL5 is able to induce glucose uptake in an mTOR-dependent manner. CCL5 treatment of ex vivo activated human CD3(+) T cells also induced the activation of the nutrient-sensing kinase AMPK and downstream substrates ACC-1, PFKFB-2, and GSK-3β. Using 2-deoxy-d-glucose, an inhibitor of glucose uptake, and compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, experimental data are presented that demonstrate that CCL5-mediated T cell chemotaxis is dependent on glucose, as these inhibitors inhibit CCL5-mediated chemotaxis in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, these findings suggest that both glycolysis and AMPK signaling are required for efficient T cell migration in response to CCL5. These studies extend the role of CCL5 mediated CCR5 signaling beyond lymphocyte chemotaxis and demonstrate a role for chemokines in promoting glucose uptake and ATP production to match energy demands of migration.

  12. Hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling controls sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure and mediates leptin effects.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Shannon M; Guo, Deng-Fu; Morgan, Donald A; Fernandes-Santos, Caroline; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-04-02

    The fundamental importance of the hypothalamus in the regulation of autonomic and cardiovascular functions is well established. However, the molecular processes involved are not well understood. Here, we show that the mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the hypothalamus is tied to the activity of the sympathetic nervous system and to cardiovascular function. Modulation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling caused dramatic changes in sympathetic traffic, blood flow, and arterial pressure. Our data also demonstrate the importance of hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling in transducing the sympathetic and cardiovascular actions of leptin. Moreover, we show that the PI3K pathway links the leptin receptor to mTORC1 signaling and that changes in its activity impact sympathetic traffic and arterial pressure. These findings establish mTORC1 activity in the hypothalamus as a key determinant of sympathetic and cardiovascular regulation and suggest that dysregulated hypothalamic mTORC1 activity may influence the development of cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Neurotrophic Effect of Asiatic acid, a Triterpene of Centella asiatica Against Chronic 1-Methyl 4-Phenyl 1, 2, 3, 6-Tetrahydropyridine Hydrochloride/Probenecid Mouse Model of Parkinson's disease: The Role of MAPK, PI3K-Akt-GSK3β and mTOR Signalling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Jagatheesan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed

    2017-02-08

    Regulation of various signalling (Ras-MAPK, PI3K and AKT) pathways by augmented activity of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) could prevent or halt the progress of dopaminergic loss in Parkinson's disease (PD). Various in vitro and in vivo experimental studies indicated anti-parkinsonic potential of asiatic acid (AA), a pentacyclic triterpene obtained from Centella asiatica. So the present study is designed to determine the neurotrophic effect of AA against 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride/probenecid (MPTP/p) neurotoxicity in mice model of PD. AA treatment for 5 weeks significantly attenuated MPTP/p induced motor abnormalities, dopamine depletion and diminished expressions NTFs and tyrosine kinase receptors (TrKB). We further, revealed that AA treatment significantly inhibited the MPTP/p-induced phosphorylation of MAPK/P38 related proteins such as JNK and ERK. Moreover, AA treatment increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, GSK-3β and mTOR, suggesting that AA activated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway, which might be the cause of neuroprotection offered by AA. The present findings provided more elaborate in vivo evidences to support the neuroprotective effect of AA on dopaminergic neurons of chronic Parkinson's disease mouse model and the potential of AA to be developed as a possible new therapeutic target to treat PD.

  14. Role of mTOR Inhibitors in Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kajiwara, Moto; Masuda, Satohiro

    2016-01-01

    The first compound that inhibited the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), sirolimus (rapamycin) was discovered in the 1970s as a soil bacterium metabolite collected on Easter Island (Rapa Nui). Because sirolimus showed antiproliferative activity, researchers investigated its molecular target and identified the TOR1 and TOR2. The mTOR consists of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2. Rapalogues including sirolimus, everolimus, and temsirolimus exert their effect mainly on mTORC1, whereas their inhibitory effect on mTORC2 is mild. To obtain compounds with more potent antiproliferative effects, ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR targeting both mTORC1 and mTORC2 have been developed and tested in clinical trials as anticancer drugs. Currently, mTOR inhibitors are used as anticancer drugs against several solid tumors, and immunosuppressive agents for transplantation of various organs. This review discusses the role of mTOR inhibitors in renal disease with a particular focus on renal cancer, diabetic nephropathy, and kidney transplantation. PMID:27338360

  15. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Activation by Resveratrol Modulates Amyloid-β Peptide Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giliberto, Luca; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Wu, Qingli; Simon, James E.; Janle, Elsa M.; Lobo, Jessica; Ferruzzi, Mario G.; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition into cerebral amyloid plaques. The natural polyphenol resveratrol promotes anti-aging pathways via the activation of several metabolic sensors, including the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Resveratrol also lowers Aβ levels in cell lines; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for this effect is largely unknown. Moreover, the bioavailability of resveratrol in the brain remains uncertain. Here we show that AMPK signaling controls Aβ metabolism and mediates the anti-amyloidogenic effect of resveratrol in non-neuronal and neuronal cells, including in mouse primary neurons. Resveratrol increased cytosolic calcium levels and promoted AMPK activation by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β. Direct pharmacological and genetic activation of AMPK lowered extracellular Aβ accumulation, whereas AMPK inhibition reduced the effect of resveratrol on Aβ levels. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited the AMPK target mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) to trigger autophagy and lysosomal degradation of Aβ. Finally, orally administered resveratrol in mice was detected in the brain where it activated AMPK and reduced cerebral Aβ levels and deposition in the cortex. These data suggest that resveratrol and pharmacological activation of AMPK have therapeutic potential against Alzheimer disease. PMID:20080969

  16. The Role of mTOR Inhibitors in the Treatment of Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Evidence-based and Expert Opinions.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Paolo; Bjørnvold, Marit; Dill, Patricia E; Ferreira, José Carlos; Feucht, Martha; Hertzberg, Christoph; Jansen, Anna; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Kingswood, J Christopher; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Macaya, Alfons; Moavero, Romina; Nabbout, Rima; Zonnenberg, Bernard A

    2016-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disorder arising from mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. The resulting over-activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway leaves patients with TSC susceptible to the growth of non-malignant tumours in multiple organs. Previously, surgery was the main therapeutic option for TSC. However, pharmacological therapy with mTOR inhibitors such as everolimus and sirolimus is now emerging as an alternate approach. Everolimus and sirolimus have already been shown to be effective in treating subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) and renal angiomyolipoma (AML), and everolimus is currently being evaluated in treating TSC-related epilepsy. In November 2013 a group of European experts convened to discuss the current options and practical considerations for treating various manifestations of TSC. This article provides evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of SEGA, TSC-related epilepsy and renal AML, with a focus on where mTOR inhibitor therapy may be considered alongside other treatment options. Safety considerations regarding mTOR inhibitor therapy are also reviewed. With evidence of beneficial effects in neurological and non-neurological TSC manifestations, mTOR inhibitors may represent a systemic treatment for TSC.

  17. Regulation of FANCD2 by the mTOR pathway contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Changxian; Oswald, Duane; Phelps, Doris; Cam, Hakan; Pelloski, Christopher E; Pang, Qishen; Houghton, Peter J

    2013-06-01

    Deregulation of the mTOR pathway is closely associated with tumorigenesis. Accordingly, mTOR inhibitors such as rapamycin and mTOR-selective kinase inhibitors have been tested as cancer therapeutic agents. Inhibition of mTOR results in sensitization to DNA-damaging agents; however, the molecular mechanism is not well understood. We found that an mTOR-selective kinase inhibitor, AZD8055, significantly enhanced sensitivity of a pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma xenograft to radiotherapy and sensitized rhabdomyosarcoma cells to the DNA interstrand cross-linker (ICL) melphalan. Sensitization correlated with drug-induced downregulation of a key component of the Fanconi anemia pathway, FANCD2 through mTOR regulation of FANCD2 gene transcripts via mTORC1-S6K1. Importantly, we show that FANCD2 is required for the proper activation of ATM-Chk2 checkpoint in response to ICL and that mTOR signaling promotes ICL-induced ATM-Chk2 checkpoint activation by sustaining FANCD2. In FANCD2-deficient lymphoblasts, FANCD2 is essential to suppress endogenous and induced DNA damage, and FANCD2-deficient cells showed impaired ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1 activation, which was rescued by reintroduction of wild-type FANCD2. Pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K-mTOR-AKT pathway in Rh30 rhabdomyosarcoma cells attenuated ICL-induced activation of ATM, accompanied with the decrease of FANCD2. These data suggest that the mTOR pathway may promote the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by sustaining FANCD2 and provide a novel mechanism of how the Fanconi anemia pathway modulates DNA damage response and repair.

  18. The ever-evolving role of mTOR in translation.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Bruno D; Smith, Ewan M; Yelle, Nicolas; Alain, Tommy; Bushell, Martin; Pause, Arnim

    2014-12-01

    Control of translation allows for the production of stoichiometric levels of each protein in the cell. Attaining such a level of fine-tuned regulation of protein production requires the coordinated temporal and spatial control of numerous cellular signalling cascades impinging on the various components of the translational machinery. Foremost among these is the mTOR signalling pathway. The mTOR pathway regulates both the initiation and elongation steps of protein synthesis through the phosphorylation of numerous translation factors, while simultaneously ensuring adequate folding of nascent polypeptides through co-translational degradation of misfolded proteins. Perhaps most remarkably, mTOR is also a key regulator of the synthesis of ribosomal proteins and translation factors themselves. Two seminal studies have recently shown in translatome analysis that the mTOR pathway preferentially regulates the translation of mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins and translation factors. Therefore, the role of the mTOR pathway in the control of protein synthesis extends far beyond immediate translational control. By controlling ribosome production (and ultimately ribosome availability), mTOR is a master long-term controller of protein synthesis. Herein, we review the literature spanning the early discoveries of mTOR on translation to the latest advances in our understanding of how the mTOR pathway controls the synthesis of ribosomal proteins.

  19. Mechanotransduction and the regulation of mTORC1 signaling in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Troy A

    2011-09-01

    Mechanical stimuli play a major role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and the maintenance of muscle mass contributes significantly to disease prevention and issues associated with the quality of life. Although the link between mechanical signals and the regulation of muscle mass has been recognized for decades, the mechanisms involved in converting mechanical information into the molecular events that control this process remain poorly defined. Nevertheless, our knowledge of these mechanisms is advancing and recent studies have revealed that signaling through a protein kinase called the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a central role in this event. In this review we will, (1) discuss the evidence which implicates mTOR in the mechanical regulation of skeletal muscle mass, (2) provide an overview of the mechanisms through which signaling by mTOR can be regulated, and (3) summarize our current knowledge of the potential mechanisms involved in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling.

  20. Mechanotransduction and the Regulation of mTORC1 Signaling in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hornberger, Troy A.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli play a major role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and the maintenance of muscle mass contributes significantly to disease prevention and issues associated with the quality of life. Although the link between mechanical signals and the regulation of muscle mass has been recognized for decades, the mechanisms involved in converting mechanical information into the molecular events that control this process remain poorly defined. Nevertheless, our knowledge of these mechanisms is advancing and recent studies have revealed that signaling through a protein kinase called the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a central role in this event. In this review we will, 1) discuss the evidence which implicates mTOR in the mechanical regulation of skeletal muscle mass, 2) provide an overview of the mechanisms through which signaling by mTOR can be regulated, and 3) summarize our current knowledge of the potential mechanisms involved in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling. PMID:21621634

  1. Antifungal drug itraconazole targets VDAC1 to modulate the AMPK/mTOR signaling axis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Head, Sarah A.; Shi, Wei; Zhao, Liang; Gorshkov, Kirill; Pasunooti, Kalyan; Chen, Yue; Deng, Zhiyou; Li, Ruo-jing; Shim, Joong Sup; Tan, Wenzhi; Hartung, Thomas; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Yingming; Colombini, Marco; Liu, Jun O.

    2015-01-01

    Itraconazole, a clinically used antifungal drug, was found to possess potent antiangiogenic and anticancer activity that is unique among the azole antifungals. Previous mechanistic studies have shown that itraconazole inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which is known to be a critical regulator of endothelial cell function and angiogenesis. However, the molecular target of itraconazole that mediates this activity has remained unknown. Here we identify the major target of itraconazole in endothelial cells as the mitochondrial protein voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), which regulates mitochondrial metabolism by controlling the passage of ions and small metabolites through the outer mitochondrial membrane. VDAC1 knockdown profoundly inhibits mTOR activity and cell proliferation in human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC), uncovering a previously unknown connection between VDAC1 and mTOR. Inhibition of VDAC1 by itraconazole disrupts mitochondrial metabolism, leading to an increase in the cellular AMP:ATP ratio and activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an upstream regulator of mTOR. VDAC1-knockout cells are resistant to AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition by itraconazole, demonstrating that VDAC1 is the mediator of this activity. In addition, another known VDAC-targeting compound, erastin, also activates AMPK and inhibits mTOR and proliferation in HUVEC. VDAC1 thus represents a novel upstream regulator of mTOR signaling in endothelial cells and a promising target for the development of angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:26655341

  2. Beclin 1-mediated autophagy in hepatocellular carcinoma cells: implication in anticancer efficiency of oroxylin A via inhibition of mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Zou, Meijuan; Lu, Na; Hu, Chen; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yajing; Wang, Xiaotang; You, Qidong; Gu, Cong; Xi, Tao; Guo, Qinglong

    2012-08-01

    Autophagy is a tightly-regulated catabolic process that involves the degradation of intracellular components via lysosomes. Although the pivotal role of autophagy in cell growth, development, and homeostasis has been well understood, its function in cancer prevention and intervention remains to be delineated. The aim of this study was to investigate the function and mechanism of autophagy induced by oroxylin A, a natural mono-flavonoid extracted from Scutellariae radix. We found for the first time that oroxylin A induced Beclin 1-mediated autophagy in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Time-lapse video microscopy and western blotting studies showed that treatment of cells with 80 μM oroxylin A resulted in the conversion of water soluble MAP-LC3 (LC3-I) to the lipidated and autophagosome-associated form (LC3-II) after 12hours; then autophagosome-lysosome fusion and lysosome degradation after 24 hours was required in oroxylin A-mediated cell death. This induction was associated with the suppressing of PI3K-PTEN-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway by oroxylin A. Our results also showed that autophagy took place before noticeable apoptosis can be observed. It was further demonstrated that oroxylin A-triggered autophagy contributed to cell death using over-expression of autophagy-related gene (Atg5 and Atg7) and inhibition of autophagy by siBeclin 1 and 3-methyladenine (3-MA). In vivo study, oroxylin A inhibited xenograft tumor growth and induced obvious autophagy in tumors. Taken together, we conclude that oroxylin A exhibits autophagy-mediated antitumor activity in a dose and time-dependent manner in vivo and in vitro. These findings define and support a novel function of autophagy in promoting death of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  3. Systemic inhibition of mTOR kinase via rapamycin disrupts consolidation and reconsolidation of auditory fear memory.

    PubMed

    Mac Callum, Phillip E; Hebert, Mark; Adamec, Robert E; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a critical regulator of mRNA translation and is known to be involved in various long lasting forms of synaptic and behavioural plasticity. However, information concerning the temporal pattern of mTOR activation and susceptibility to pharmacological intervention during both consolidation and reconsolidation of long-term memory (LTM) remains scant. Male C57BL/6 mice were injected systemically with rapamycin at various time points following conditioning or retrieval in an auditory fear conditioning paradigm, and compared to vehicle (and/or anisomycin) controls for subsequent memory recall. Systemic blockade of mTOR with rapamycin immediately or 12h after training or reactivation impairs both consolidation and reconsolidation of an auditory fear memory. Further behavioural analysis revealed that the enduring effects of rapamycin on reconsolidation are dependent upon reactivation of the memory trace. Rapamycin, however, has no effect on short-term memory or the ability to retrieve an established fear memory. Collectively, our data suggest that biphasic mTOR signalling is essential for both consolidation and reconsolidation-like activities that contribute to the formation, re-stabilization, and persistence of long term auditory-fear memories, while not influencing other aspects of the memory trace. These findings also provide evidence for a cogent treatment model for reducing the emotional strength of established, traumatic memories analogous to those observed in acquired anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and specific phobias, through pharmacologic blockade of mTOR using systemic rapamycin following reactivation.

  4. Targeting mTOR in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Iriana, Sentia; Ahmed, Shahzad; Gong, Jun; Annamalai, Alagappan Anand; Tuli, Richard; Hendifar, Andrew Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options for advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are limited; however, new therapies targeting specific tumor-related molecular characteristics may help certain patient cohorts. Emerging preclinical data have shown that inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in specific KRAS-dependent PDAC subtypes leads to inhibition of tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Early phase II studies of mono-mTOR inhibition have not shown promise. However, studies have shown that combined inhibition of multiple steps along the mTOR signaling pathway may lead to sustained responses by targeting mechanisms of tumor resistance. Coordinated inhibition of mTOR along with specific KRAS-dependent mutations in molecularly defined PDAC subpopulations may offer a viable alternative for treatment in the future. PMID:27200288

  5. Resveratrol induces autophagy by directly inhibiting mTOR through ATP competition

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dohyun; Jeong, Heeyoon; Lee, Mi Nam; Koh, Ara; Kwon, Ohman; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Noh, Jungeun; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Park, Hwangseo; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a natural polyphenol that has a beneficial effect on health, and resveratrol-induced autophagy has been suggested to be a key process in mediating many beneficial effects of resveratrol, such as reduction of inflammation and induction of cancer cell death. Although various resveratrol targets have been suggested, the molecule that mediates resveratrol-induced autophagy remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that resveratrol induces autophagy by directly inhibiting the mTOR-ULK1 pathway. We found that inhibition of mTOR activity and presence of ULK1 are required for autophagy induction by resveratrol. In line with this mTOR dependency, we found that resveratrol suppresses the viability of MCF7 cells but not of SW620 cells, which are mTOR inhibitor sensitive and insensitive cancer cells, respectively. We also found that resveratrol-induced cancer cell suppression occurred ULK1 dependently. For the mechanism of action of resveratrol on mTOR inhibition, we demonstrate that resveratrol directly inhibits mTOR. We found that resveratrol inhibits mTOR by docking onto the ATP-binding pocket of mTOR (i.e., it competes with ATP). We propose mTOR as a novel direct target of resveratrol, and inhibition of mTOR is necessary for autophagy induction. PMID:26902888

  6. Vasopressin activates Akt/mTOR pathway in smooth muscle cells cultured in high glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, Daniela K.; Brenet, Marianne; Muñoz, Vanessa C.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Villanueva, Carolina I.; Figueroa, Carlos D.; González, Carlos B.

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •AVP induces mTOR phosphorylation in A-10 cells cultured in high glucose concentration. •The mTOR phosphorylation is mediated by the PI3K/Akt pathway activation. •The AVP-induced mTOR phosphorylation inhibited autophagy and stimulated cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex is a key regulator of autophagy, cell growth and proliferation. Here, we studied the effects of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on mTOR activation in vascular smooth muscle cells cultured in high glucose concentration. AVP induced the mTOR phosphorylation in A-10 cells grown in high glucose, in contrast to cells cultured in normal glucose; wherein, only basal phosphorylation was observed. The AVP-induced mTOR phosphorylation was inhibited by a PI3K inhibitor. Moreover, the AVP-induced mTOR activation inhibited autophagy and increased thymidine incorporation in cells grown in high glucose. This increase was abolished by rapamycin which inhibits the mTORC1 complex formation. Our results suggest that AVP stimulates mTOR phosphorylation by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and, subsequently, inhibits autophagy and raises cell proliferation in A-10 cells maintained in high glucose concentration.

  7. Modulation of the cell growth regulator mTOR by Epstein-Barr virus-encoded LMP2A.

    PubMed

    Moody, Cary A; Scott, Rona S; Amirghahari, Nazanin; Nathan, Cherie-Ann; Young, Lawrence S; Dawson, Chris W; Sixbey, John W

    2005-05-01

    Control of translation initiation is one means by which cells regulate growth and proliferation, with components of the protein-synthesizing machinery having oncogenic potential. Expression of latency protein LMP2A by the human tumor virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt located upstream of an essential mediator of growth signals, mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). We show that mTOR is activated by expression of LMP2A in carcinoma cells, leading to wortmannin- and rapamycin-sensitive inhibition of the negative regulator of translation, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and increased c-Myc protein translation. Intervention by this DNA tumor virus in cellular translational controls is likely to be an integral component of EBV tumorigenesis.

  8. Rictor/mTORC2 signaling mediates TGFβ1-induced fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhong; Ren, Jiafa; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Lei; He, Weichun; Yuan, Weiping; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was recently identified in two structurally distinct multiprotein complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. Previously, we found that Rictor/mTORC2 protects against cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, but the role and mechanisms for Rictor/mTORC2 in TGFβ1-induced fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis remains unknown. To study this, we initially treated NRK-49F cells with TGFβ1 and found that TGFβ1 could activate Rictor/mTORC2 signaling in cultured cells. Blocking Rictor/mTORC2 signaling with Rictor or Akt1 small interfering RNAs markedly inhibited TGFβ1-induced fibronection and α-smooth muscle actin expression. Ensuing western blotting or immunostaining results showed that Rictor/mTORC2 signaling was activated in kidney interstitial myofibroblasts from mice with unilateral ureteral obstruction. Next, a mouse model with fibroblast-specific deletion of Rictor was generated. These knockout mice were normal at birth and had no obvious kidney dysfunction or kidney morphological abnormality within 2 months of birth. Compared with control littermates, the kidneys of Rictor knockout mice developed less interstitial extracellular matrix deposition and inflammatory cell infiltration at 1 or 2 weeks after ureteral obstruction. Thus our study suggests that Rictor/mTORC2 signaling activation mediates TGFβ1-induced fibroblast activation and contributes to the development of kidney fibrosis. This may provide a therapeutic target for chronic kidney diseases.

  9. Demethoxycurcumin inhibits energy metabolic and oncogenic signaling pathways through AMPK activation in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Chen, Yung-Chan; Lin, Ying-Chao; Lin, Jia-Ni; Chen, Wei-Chih; Chen, Yang-Yuan; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2013-07-03

    Demethoxycurcumin (DMC), curcumin (Cur), and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) are major forms of curcuminoids found in the rhizomes of turmeric. This study examined the effects of three curcuminoid analogues on breast cancer cells. The results revealed that DMC demonstrated the most potent cytotoxic effects on breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Compared with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive or HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, DMC demonstrated the most efficient cytotoxic effects on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. However, nonmalignant MCF-10A cells were unaffected by DMC treatment. The study showed that DMC activated AMPK in TNBC cells. Once activated, AMPK inhibited eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1) signaling and mRNA translation via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and decreased the activity and/or expression of lipogenic enzymes, such as fatty acid synthase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). DMC also targeted multiple AMPK downstream pathways. Among these, the dephosphorylation of Akt is noteworthy because it circumvents the feedback activation of Akt that results from mTOR inhibition. Moreover, DMC suppressed LPS-induced IL-6 production, thereby blocking subsequent Stat3 activation. In addition, DMC also sustained epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation by suppressing the phosphatases, PP2a and SHP-2. These results suggest that DMC is a potent AMPK activator that acts through a broad spectrum of anti-TNBC activities.

  10. [Regulative mechanisms of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in glomerular hypertrophy in diabetic nephropathy and interventional effects of Chinese herbal medicine].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Jing; Huang, Yan-ru; Wan, Yi-gang; Shen, Shan-mei; Mao, Zhi-min; Wu, Wei; Yao, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Glomerular hypertrophy is the main pathological characteristic in the early stage of diabetic nephropathy (DN), and its regulatory mechanism is closely related to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway activity. mTOR includes mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2(mTORC2), in which, the upstream pathway of mTORC1 is phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/serine-threonine kinase(Akt)/adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase(AMPK), and the representative signaling molecules in the downstream pathway of mTORC1 are 4E-binding proteins(4EBP) and phosphoprotein 70 S6Kinase(p70S6K). Some Chinese herbal extracts could improve cell proliferation via intervening the expressions of the key molecules in the upstream or downstream of PIK/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in vivo. As for glomerular mesangial cells(MC) and podocyte, mTOR plays an important role in regulating glomerular inherent cells, including adjusting cell cycle, energy metabolism and matrix protein synthesis. Rapamycin, the inhibitor of mTOR, could suppress glomerular inherent cell hypertrophy, cell proliferation, glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickening and mesangial matrix deposition in model rats with DN. Some Chinese herbal extracts could alleviate glomerular lesions by intervening mTOR signaling pathway activity in renal tissue of DN animal models or in renal inherent cells in vivo and in vitro.

  11. PRL-3 activates mTORC1 in Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zu; Al-Aidaroos, Abdul Qader Omer; Park, Jung Eun; Yuen, Hiu Fung; Zhang, Shu Dong; Gupta, Abhishek; Lin, Youbin; Shen, Han-Ming; Zeng, Qi

    2015-11-24

    PRL-3, a metastasis-associated phosphatase, is known to exert its oncogenic functions through activation of PI3K/Akt, which is a key regulator of the rapamycin-sensitive mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), but a coherent link between PRL-3 and activation of mTOR has not yet been formally demonstrated. We report a positive correlation between PRL-3 expression and mTOR phospho-activation in clinical tumour samples and mouse models of cancer and demonstrate that PRL-3 increased downstream signalling to the mTOR substrates, p70S6K and 4E-BP1, by increasing PI3K/Akt-mediated activation of Rheb-GTP via TSC2 suppression. We also show that PRL-3 increases mTOR translocation to lysosomes via increased mTOR binding affinity to Rag GTPases in an Akt-independent manner, demonstrating a previously undescribed mechanism of action for PRL-3. PRL-3 also enhanced matrix metalloproteinase-2 secretion and cellular invasiveness via activation of mTOR, attributes which were sensitive to rapamycin treatment. The downstream effects of PRL-3 were maintained even under conditions of environmental stress, suggesting that PRL-3 provides a strategic survival advantage to tumour cells via its effects on mTOR.

  12. Potential therapeutic effects of the MTOR inhibitors for preventing ageing and progeria‐related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Camilla; Cenni, Vittoria

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is an highly conserved signal transduction axis involved in many cellular processes, such as cell growth, survival, transcription, translation, apoptosis, metabolism, motility and autophagy. Recently, this signalling pathway has come to the attention of the scientific community owing to the unexpected finding that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin, an antibiotic with immunosuppressant and chemotherapeutic properties, extends lifespan in diverse animal models. Moreover, rapamycin has been reported to rescue the cellular phenotype in a progeroid syndrome [Hutchinson–Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS)] that recapitulates most of the traits of physiological ageing. The promising perspectives raised by these results warrant a better understanding of mTOR signalling and the potential applications of mTOR inhibitors to counteract ageing‐associated diseases and increase longevity. This review is focused on these issues. PMID:26952863

  13. The DPYSL2 gene connects mTOR and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pham, X; Song, G; Lao, S; Goff, L; Zhu, H; Valle, D; Avramopoulos, D

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a schizophrenia-associated polymorphic CT di-nucleotide repeat (DNR) at the 5′-untranslated repeat (UTR) of DPYSL2, which responds to mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) signaling with allelic differences in reporter assays. Now using microarray analysis, we show that the DNR alleles interact differentially with specific proteins, including the mTOR-related protein HuD/ELAVL4. We confirm the differential binding to HuD and other known mTOR effectors by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. We edit HEK293 cells by CRISPR/Cas9 to carry the schizophrenia risk variant (13DNR) and observe a significant reduction of the corresponding CRMP2 isoform. These edited cells confirm the response to mTOR inhibitors and show a twofold shortening of the cellular projections. Transcriptome analysis of these modified cells by RNA-seq shows changes in 12.7% of expressed transcripts at a false discovery rate of 0.05. These transcripts are enriched in immunity-related genes, overlap significantly with those modified by the schizophrenia-associated gene, ZNF804A, and have a reverse expression signature from that seen with antipsychotic drugs. Our results support the functional importance of the DPYSL2 DNR and a role for mTOR signaling in schizophrenia. PMID:27801893

  14. NRSN2 promotes osteosarcoma cell proliferation and growth through PI3K/Akt/MTOR and Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Keremu, Ajimu; Maimaiti, Xiayimaierdan; Aimaiti, Abudusaimi; Yushan, Maimaiaili; Alike, Yamuhanmode; Yilihamu, Yilizati; Yusufu, Aihemaitijiang

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children and adults. However, its pathogenesis, especially molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In current study, we screened GEO Database and found a poorly studied protein Neurensin-2 (NRSN2), which is highly expressed in osteosarcoma tissues. Neurensin-2 (NRSN2) is a small neuronal membrane protein and localized in small vesicles in neural cells, previous study found that it has been implicated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We here report that the expression of NRSN2 is more commonlyelevated in 18 fresh osteosarcoma tissues. Furthermore, both loss- and gain-functions assays revealed that NRSN2 could promote osteosarcoma cell proliferation and growth both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we further found that those effects on osteosarcoma by NRSN2 are associated with the dysregulated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In conclusion, our study found a novel oncogenic protein, NRSN2, which promotes osteosarcoma cell proliferation and as a membrane protein, NRSN2 also could be a potential treatment target for osteosarcoma.

  15. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  16. CDPK Activation in PRR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Heike; Boudsocq, Marie; Romeis, Tina

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases undergo a rapid biochemical activation in response to an intracellular Ca increase induced by the PRR-dependent perception of a pathogen-related stimulus. Based on SDS gel resolution, the in-gel kinase assay allows the analysis of multiple in vivo protein samples in parallel, combining the advantage of protein separation according to molecular mass with the activity read-out of a protein kinase assay. It thus enables to follow the transient CDPK activation and inactivation in response to in vivo elicitation with a time-wise resolution. In addition, changes of CDPK phosphorylation activity often correlate with slight shifts in the enzyme's apparent molecular mass, indicating posttranslational modifications and a conformational change of the active enzyme compared to its inactive resting form. These band shifts can be detected by a simple immunoblotting to monitor CDPK activation.

  17. mTOR Hyperactivation in down syndrome hippocampus appears early during development.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Anand M; van Scheppingen, Jackelien; Milenkovic, Ivan; Anink, Jasper J; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Kovacs, Gabor G; Aronica, Eleonora

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is a key developmental pathway involved in mechanisms underlying cellular aging and neurodegeneration. We hypothesized that its deregulation may occur during early brain development in patients with Down syndrome (DS). The expression patterns and cellular distribution of components of mTOR signaling (phosphorylated S6, phosphorylated S6 kinase, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1, and phosphorylated mTOR) were investigated in developing hippocampi from controls and patients with DS and from adults with DS and Alzheimer disease-associated pathology using immunocytochemistry. In control hippocampi, only phosphorylated S6 was detected prenatally (19-41 gestational weeks); it became undetectable 2 months postnatally. Increased expression of phosphorylated S6, phosphorylated S6 kinase, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1, and phosphorylated mTOR was observed in DS hippocampus compared with controls. Phosphorylated S6 and phosphorylated S6 kinase were detected prenatally and persisted throughout postnatal development. Prominent expression of mTOR components was observed in pyramidal neurons with granulovacuolar degeneration and in neurons containing neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampi of DS subjects with Alzheimer disease pathology. These findings suggest that a dysregulated mTOR pathway may contribute to both early hippocampal developmental abnormalities and hippocampal functional impairment developing before neurodegeneration. Moreover, the expression patterns of mTOR components in adult DS hippocampus support its association with Alzheimer disease-related histopathologic changes.

  18. Lkb1/Stk11 regulation of mTOR signaling controls the transition of chondrocyte fates and suppresses skeletal tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lick Pui; Lilley, Brendan N; Sanes, Joshua R; McMahon, Andrew P

    2013-11-26

    Liver kinase b1 (Lkb1) protein kinase activity regulates cell growth and cell polarity. Here, we show Lkb1 is essential for maintaining a balance between mitotic and postmitotic cell fates in development of the mammalian skeleton. In this process, Lkb1 activity controls the progression of mitotic chondrocytes to a mature, postmitotic hypertrophic fate. Loss of this Lkb1-dependent switch leads to a dramatic expansion of immature chondrocytes and formation of enchondroma-like tumors. Pathway analysis points to a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1-dependent mechanism that can be partially suppressed by rapamycin treatment. These findings highlight a critical requirement for integration of mammalian target of rapamycin activity into developmental decision-making during mammalian skeletogenesis.

  19. Differential regulation of protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs after a meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein synthesis (PS) increases after a meal in neonates, but the time course of the changes in PS in different tissues after a meal is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the changes in tissue PS, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation, and proportion of ribosomal protein (rp) mRNAs...

  20. De novo somatic mutations in components of the PI3K-AKT3-mTOR pathway cause hemimegalencephaly

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Huynh, My; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Kim, Sangwoo; Dixon-Salazar, Tracy; Heiberg, Andrew; Scott, Eric; Bafna, Vineet; Hill, Kiley J; Collazo, Adrienne; Funari, Vincent; Russ, Carsten; Gabriel, Stacey B; Mathern, Gary W; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-01-01

    De novo somatic mutations in focal areas are well documented in diseases such as neoplasia but are rarely reported in malformation of the developing brain. Hemimegalencephaly (HME) is characterized by overgrowth of either one of the two cerebral hemispheres. The molecular etiology of HME remains a mystery. The intractable epilepsy that is associated with HME can be relieved by the surgical treatment hemispherectomy, allowing sampling of diseased tissue. Exome sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis in paired brain-blood samples from individuals with HME (n = 20 cases) identified de novo somatic mutations in 30% of affected individuals in the PIK3CA, AKT3 and MTOR genes. A recurrent PIK3CA c.1633G>A mutation was found in four separate cases. Identified mutations were present in 8–40% of sequenced alleles in various brain regions and were associated with increased neuronal S6 protein phosphorylation in the brains of affected individuals, indicating aberrant activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Thus HME is probably a genetically mosaic disease caused by gain of function in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT3-mTOR signaling. PMID:22729223

  1. New perspectives on the involvement of mTOR in depression as well as in the action of antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Ignácio, Zuleide M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Arent, Camila O; Abelaira, Helena M; Pitcher, Meagan R; Quevedo, João

    2016-11-01

    Despite the revolution in recent decades regarding monoamine involvement in the management of major depressive disorder (MDD), the biological mechanisms underlying this psychiatric disorder are still poorly understood. Currently available treatments require long time courses to establish antidepressant response and a significant percentage of people are refractory to single drug or combination drug treatment. These issues, and recent findings demonstrating the involvement of synaptic plasticity in the pathophysiological mechanisms of MDD, are encouraging researchers to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying psychiatric disease in more depth. The discovery of the rapid antidepressant effect exerted by glutamatergic and cholinergic agents highlights the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway as a critical pathway that contributes to the efficacy of these pharmacological agents in clinical and pre-clinical research. The mTOR pathway is a downstream intracellular signal that transmits information after the direct activation of α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) and neurotrophic factor receptors. Activation of these receptors is hypothesized to be one of the major axes involved in the synthesis of synaptogenic proteins underlying synaptic plasticity and critical to both the rapid and delayed effects exerted by classic antidepressants. This review focuses on the involvement of mTOR in the pathophysiology of depression and on molecular mechanisms involved in the activity of emerging and classic antidepressant agents.

  2. Novel agents and associated toxicities of inhibitors of the pi3k/Akt/mtor pathway for the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chia, S.; Gandhi, S.; Joy, A.A.; Edwards, S.; Gorr, M.; Hopkins, S.; Kondejewski, J.; Ayoub, J.P.; Califaretti, N.; Rayson, D.; Dent, S.F.

    2015-01-01

    The pi3k/Akt/mtor (phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/ Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling pathway is an established driver of oncogenic activity in human malignancies. Therapeutic targeting of this pathway holds significant promise as a treatment strategy. Everolimus, an mtor inhibitor, is the first of this class of agents approved for the treatment of hormone receptor–positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative advanced breast cancer. Everolimus has been associated with significant improvements in progression-free survival; however, it is also associated with increased toxicity related to its specific mechanism of action. Methods A comprehensive review of the literature conducted using a focused medline search was combined with a search of current trials at http://ClinicalTrials.gov/. Summary tables of the toxicities of the various classes of pi3k/Akt/mtor inhibitors were created. A broad group of Canadian health care professionals was assembled to review the data and to produce expert opinion and summary recommendations for possible best practices in managing the adverse events associated with these pathway inhibitors. Results Differing toxicities are associated with the various classes of pi3k/Akt/mtor pathway inhibitors. The most common unique adverse events observed in everolimus clinical trials in breast cancer include stomatitis (all grades: approximately 60%), noninfectious pneumonitis (15%), rash (40%), hyperglycemia (15%), and immunosuppression (40%). To minimize grades 3 and 4 toxicities and to attempt to attain optimal outcomes, effective management of those adverse events is critical. Management should be interdisciplinary and should use approaches that include education, early recognition, active intervention, and potentially prophylactic strategies. Discussion Everolimus likely represents the first of many complex oral targeted therapies for the treatment of breast cancer. Using this agent as a template, it is essential to

  3. Dietary Fructose Activates Insulin Signaling and Inflammation in Adipose Tissue: Modulatory Role of Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Pektas, Mehmet Bilgehan; Koca, Halit Bugra; Sadi, Gokhan; Akar, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    The effects of high-fructose diet on adipose tissue insulin signaling and inflammatory process have been poorly documented. In this study, we examined the influences of long-term fructose intake and resveratrol supplementation on the expression of genes involved in insulin signaling and the levels of inflammatory cytokines and sex hormones in the white adipose tissues of male and female rats. Consumption of high-fructose diet for 24 weeks increased the expression of genes involved in insulin signaling including IR, IRS-1, IRS-2, Akt, PI3K, eNOS, mTOR, and PPARγ, despite induction of proinflammatory markers, iNOS, TNFα, IL-1β, IL-18, MDA, and ALT, as well as anti-inflammatory factors, IL-10 and Nrf2 in adipose tissues from males and females. Total and free testosterone concentrations of adipose tissues were impaired in males but increased in females, although there were no changes in their blood levels. Resveratrol supplementation markedly restored the levels of MDA, IL6, IL-10, and IL-18, as well as iNOS, Nrf2, and PI3K mRNA, in adipose tissues of both genders. Dietary fructose activates both insulin signaling and inflammatory pathway in the adipose tissues of male and female rats proposing no correlation between the tissue insulin signaling and inflammation. Resveratrol has partly modulatory effects on fructose-induced changes. PMID:27066503

  4. Cadmium induces autophagy through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling in skin epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang Xin; Hitron, John Andrew; Zhang Zhuo; Cheng Senping; Budhraja, Amit; Ding Songze; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi Xianglin

    2011-09-15

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal which is environmentally and occupationally relevant. The mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced autophagy are not yet completely understood. The present study shows that cadmium induces autophagy, as demonstrated by the increase of LC3-II formation and the GFP-LC3 puncta cells. The induction of autophagosomes was directly visualized by electron microscopy in cadmium-exposed skin epidermal cells. Blockage of LKB1 or AMPK by siRNA transfection suppressed cadmium-induced autophagy. Cadmium-induced autophagy was inhibited in dominant-negative AMPK-transfected cells, whereas it was accelerated in cells transfected with the constitutively active form of AMPK. mTOR signaling, a negative regulator of autophagy, was downregulated in cadmium-exposed cells. In addition, cadmium generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) at relatively low levels, and caused poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) activation and ATP depletion. Inhibition of PARP by pharmacological inhibitors or its siRNA transfection suppressed ATP reduction and autophagy in cadmium-exposed cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced autophagy signaling was attenuated by either exogenous addition of catalase and superoxide dismutase, or by overexpression of these enzymes. Consequently, these results suggest that cadmium-mediated ROS generation causes PARP activation and energy depletion, and eventually induces autophagy through the activation of LKB1-AMPK signaling and the down-regulation of mTOR in skin epidermal cells. - Highlights: > Cadmium, a toxic heavy metal, induces autophagic cell death through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling. > Cadmium generates intracellular ROS at low levels and this leads to severe DNA damage and PARP activation, resulting in ATP depletion, which are the upstream events of LKB1-AMPK-mediated autophagy. > This novel finding may contribute to further understanding of cadmium-mediated diseases.

  5. The emerging role of m-TOR up-regulation in brain Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Ryskalin, Larisa; Limanaqi, Fiona; Biagioni, Francesca; Frati, Alessandro; Esposito, Vincenzo; Calierno, Maria Teresa; Lenzi, Paola; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    The present manuscript is an overview of various effects of mTOR up-regulation in astrocytoma with an emphasis on its deleterious effects on the proliferation of Glioblastoma Multiforme. The manuscript reports consistent evidence indicating the occurrence of mTOR up-regulation both in experimental and human astrocytoma. The grading of human astrocytoma is discussed in relationship with mTOR up-regulation. In the second part of the manuscript, the biochemical pathways under the influence of mTOR are translated to cell phenotypes which are generated by mTOR up-regulation and reverted by its inhibition. A special section is dedicated to the prominent role of autophagy in mediating the effects of mTOR in glioblastoma. In detail, autophagy inhibition produced by mTOR up-regulation determines the fate of cancer stem cells. On the other hand, biochemical findings disclose the remarkable effects of autophagy activators as powerful inducers of cell differentiation with a strong prevalence towards neuronal phenotypes. Thus, mTOR modulation acts on the neurobiology of glioblastoma just like it operates in vivo at the level of brain stem cell niches by altering autophagy-dependent cell differentiation. In the light of such a critical role of autophagy we analyzed the ubiquitin proteasome system. The merging between autophagy and proteasome generates a novel organelle, named autophagoproteasome which is strongly induced by mTOR inhibitors in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, when mTOR is maximally inhibited the proteasome component selectively moves within autophagy vacuoles, thus making the proteasome activity dependent on the entry within autophagy compartment.

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase deficiency results in mTOR activation, failed translocation of lipin 1α to the nucleus and hypersensitivity to glucose: Implications for the inherited glycolytic disease.

    PubMed

    Haller, Jorge F; Krawczyk, Sarah A; Gostilovitch, Lubov; Corkey, Barbara E; Zoeller, Raphael A

    2011-11-01

    Inherited glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is the second most frequent glycolytic erythroenzymopathy in humans. Patients present with non-spherocytic anemia of variable severity and with neuromuscular dysfunction. We previously described Chinese hamster (CHO) cell lines with mutations in GPI and loss of GPI activity. This resulted in a temperature sensitivity and severe reduction in the synthesis of glycerolipids due to a reduction in phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP). In the current article we attempt to describe the nature of this pleiotropic effect. We cloned and sequenced the CHO lipin 1 cDNA, a gene that codes for PAP activity. Overexpression of lipin 1 in the GPI-deficient cell line, GroD1 resulted in increased PAP activity, however it failed to restore glycerolipid biosynthesis. Fluorescence microscopy showed a failure of GPI-deficient cells to localize lipin 1α to the nucleus. We also found that glucose-6-phosphate levels in GroD1 cells were 10-fold over normal. Lowering glucose levels in the growth medium partially restored glycerolipid biosynthesis and nuclear localization of lipin 1α. Western blot analysis of the elements within the mTOR pathway, which influences lipin 1 activity, was consistent with an abnormal activation of this system. Combined, these data suggest that GPI deficiency results in an accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate, and possibly other glucose-derived metabolites, leading to activation of mTOR and sequestration of lipin 1 to the cytosol, preventing its proper functioning. These results shed light on the mechanism underlying the pathologies associated with inherited GPI deficiency and the variability in the severity of the symptoms observed in these patients.

  7. The combination of ursolic acid and leucine potentiates the differentiation of C2C12 murine myoblasts through the mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjung; Sung, Bokyung; Kang, Yong Jung; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Yujin; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Kim, Cheol Min; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-03-01

    Aging causes phenotypic changes in skeletal muscle progenitor cells that lead to the progressive loss of myogenic differentiation and thus a decrease in muscle mass. The naturally occurring triterpene, ursolic acid, has been reported to be an effective agent for the prevention of muscle loss by suppressing degenerative muscular dystrophy. Leucine, a branched-chain amino acid, and its metabolite, β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyric acid, have been reported to enhance protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether the combination of ursolic acid and leucine promotes greater myogenic differentiation compared to either agent alone in C2C12 murine myoblasts. Morphological changes were observed and creatine kinase (CK) activity analysis was performed to determine the conditions through which the combination of ursolic acid and leucine would exert the most prominent effects on muscle cell differentiation. The effect of the combination of ursolic acid and leucine on the expression of myogenic differentiation marker genes was examined by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The combination of ursolic acid (0.5 µM) and leucine (10 µM) proved to be the most effective in promoting myogenic differentiation. The combination of ursolic acid and leucine significantly increased CK activity than treatment with either agent alone. The level of myosin heavy chain, a myogenic differentiation marker protein, was also enhanced by the combination of ursolic acid and leucine. The combination of ursolic acid and leucine significantly induced the expression of myogenic differentiation marker genes, such as myogenic differentiation 1 (MyoD) and myogenin, at both the mRNA and protein level. In addition, the number of myotubes and the fusion index were increased. These findings indicate that the combination of ursolic acid and leucine promotes muscle cell differentiation, thus suggesting that this combination of agents may prove to be beneficial

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) activates the Mtor signaling through a PI3-kinase-Akt-dependent pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GLP-2 is a nutrient-responsive enterotrophic neuropeptide that exerts diverse actions in the gastrointestinal tract including enhancing mucosal cell survival and proliferation, inducing mucosal blood flow and anabolic metabolism, and suppressing gastric motility and secretion. GLP-2-stimulated muco...

  9. L-Alanylglutamine inhibits signaling proteins that activate protein degradation, but does not affect proteins that activate protein synthesis after an acute resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanyi; Choi, Ran Hee; Solares, Geoffrey J; Tseng, Hung-Min; Ding, Zhenping; Kim, Kyoungrae; Ivy, John L

    2015-07-01

    Sustamine™ (SUS) is a dipeptide composed of alanine and glutamine (AlaGln). Glutamine has been suggested to increase muscle protein accretion; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms of glutamine on muscle protein metabolism following resistance exercise have not been fully addressed. In the present study, 2-month-old rats climbed a ladder 10 times with a weight equal to 75 % of their body mass attached at the tail. Rats were then orally administered one of four solutions: placebo (PLA-glycine = 0.52 g/kg), whey protein (WP = 0.4 g/kg), low dose of SUS (LSUS = 0.1 g/kg), or high dose of SUS (HSUS = 0.5 g/kg). An additional group of sedentary (SED) rats was intubated with glycine (0.52 g/kg) at the same time as the ladder-climbing rats. Blood samples were collected immediately after exercise and at either 20 or 40 min after recovery. The flexor hallucis longus (FHL), a muscle used for climbing, was excised at 20 or 40 min post exercise and analyzed for proteins regulating protein synthesis and degradation. All supplements elevated the phosphorylation of FOXO3A above SED at 20 min post exercise, but only the SUS supplements significantly reduced the phosphorylation of AMPK and NF-kB p65. SUS supplements had no effect on mTOR signaling, but WP supplementation yielded a greater phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6k, and rpS6 compared with PLA at 20 min post exercise. However, by 40 min post exercise, phosphorylation of mTOR and rpS6 in PLA had risen to levels not different than WP. These results suggest that SUS blocks the activation of intracellular signals for MPB, whereas WP accelerates mRNA translation.

  10. Mechanisms regulating neuronal excitability and seizure development following mTOR pathway hyperactivation

    PubMed Central

    LaSarge, Candi L.; Danzer, Steve C.

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates a variety of neuronal functions, including cell proliferation, survival, growth, and plasticity. Dysregulation of the pathway is implicated in the development of both genetic and acquired epilepsies. Indeed, several causal mutations have been identified in patients with epilepsy, the most prominent of these being mutations in PTEN and tuberous sclerosis complexes 1 and 2 (TSC1, TSC2). These genes act as negative regulators of mTOR signaling, and mutations lead to hyperactivation of the pathway. Animal models deleting PTEN, TSC1, and TSC2 consistently produce epilepsy phenotypes, demonstrating that increased mTOR signaling can provoke neuronal hyperexcitability. Given the broad range of changes induced by altered mTOR signaling, however, the mechanisms underlying seizure development in these animals remain uncertain. In transgenic mice, cell populations with hyperactive mTOR have many structural abnormalities that support recurrent circuit formation, including somatic and dendritic hypertrophy, aberrant basal dendrites, and enlargement of axon tracts. At the functional level, mTOR hyperactivation is commonly, but not always, associated with enhanced synaptic transmission and plasticity. Moreover, these populations of abnormal neurons can affect the larger network, inducing secondary changes that may explain paradoxical findings reported between cell and network functioning in different models or at different developmental time points. Here, we review the animal literature examining the link between mTOR hyperactivation and epileptogenesis, emphasizing the impact of enhanced mTOR signaling on neuronal form and function. PMID:24672426

  11. A Review of mTOR Pathway Inhibitors in Gynecologic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Eduardo; Garces, Álvaro Henrique Ingles

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of advanced gynecologic cancers remains palliative in most of cases. Although systemic treatment has entered into the era of targeted drugs the antitumor efficacies of current therapies are still limited. In this context there is a great need for more active treatment and rationally designed targeted therapies. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR is a signaling pathway in mammal cells that coordinates important cell activities. It has a critical function in the survival, growth, and proliferation of malignant cells and was object of important research in the last two decades. The mTOR pathway emerges as an attractive therapeutic target in cancer because it serves as a convergence point for many growth stimuli and, through its downstream substrates, controls cellular processes that contribute to the initiation and maintenance of cancer. Aberrant PI3K-dependent signaling occurs frequently in a wide range of tumor types, including endometrial, cervical, and ovarian cancers. The present study reviewed the available evidence regarding the potential impact of some mTOR pathway inhibitors in the treatment of gynecological cancer. Few advances in medical management have occurred in recent years in the treatment of advanced or recurrent gynecological malignancies, and a poor prognosis remains. Rationally designed molecularly targeted therapy is an emerging and important option in this setting; then more investigation in PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway-targeted therapies is warranted. PMID:28286604

  12. Combination of a STAT3 Inhibitor and an mTOR Inhibitor Against a Temozolomide-resistant Glioblastoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA*, HARUO; ASHIZAWA*, TADASHI; IIZUKA, AKIRA; KONDOU, RYOTA; NONOMURA, CHIZU; SUGINO, TAKASHI; URAKAMI, KENICHI; ASAI, AKIRA; HAYASHI, NAKAMASA; MITSUYA, KOICHI; NAKASU, YOKO; YAMAGUCHI, KEN; AKIYAMA, YASUTO

    2016-01-01

    Background: Temozolomide-resistant (TMZ-R) glioblastoma is very difficult to treat, and a novel approach to overcome resistance is needed. Materials and Methods: The efficacy of a combination treatment of STAT3 inhibitor, STX-0119, with rapamycin was investigated against our established TMZ-resistant U87 cell line. Results: The growth-inhibitory effect of the combination treatment was significant against the TMZ-R U87 cell line (IC50: 78 μM for STX-0119, 30.5 μM for rapamycin and 11.3 μM for combination of the two). Western blotting analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of STX-0119 on S6 and 4E-BP1 activation through regulation of YKL-40 expression occurred in addition to the inhibitory effect of rapamycin against the mTOR pathway. Conclusion: These results suggest that the STAT3 pathway is associated with the mTOR downstream pathway mediated by YKL-40 protein, and the combination therapy of the STAT3 inhibitor and rapamycin could be worth developing as a novel therapeutic approach against TMZ-resistant relapsed gliomas. Abbreviations: GB: Glioblastoma, TMZ: temozolomide, MGMT: O6-methylguanine-O6-methylguanine-DNAmethyltransferase, STAT: signal transducer and activator of transcription, mTOR: mammalian target of rapamycin, shRNA: small hairpin RNA. PMID:28031240

  13. Characterization of pomiferin triacetate as a novel mTOR and translation inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bajer, Magdalena M.; Kunze, Michael M.; Blees, Johanna S.; Bokesch, Heidi R.; Chen, Hanyong; Brauß, Thilo F.; Dong, Zigang; Gustafson, Kirk R.; Biondi, Ricardo M.; Henrich, Curtis J.; McMahon, James B.; Colburn, Nancy H.; Schmid, Tobias; Brüne, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K) pathway is commonly observed in many tumors. This pathway controls proliferation, survival, and translation, and its overactivation is associated with poor prognosis for tumor-associated survival. Current efforts focus on the development of novel inhibitors of this pathway. In a cell-based high-throughput screening assay of 15 272 pure natural compounds, we identified pomiferin triacetate as a potent stabilizer of the tumor suppressor programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4). Mechanistically, pomiferin triacetate appeared as a general inhibitor of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR-p70S6K cascade. Interference with this pathway occurred downstream of Akt but upstream of p70S6K. Specifically, mTOR kinase emerged as the molecular target of pomiferin triacetate, with similar activities against mTOR complexes 1 and 2. In an in vitro mTOR kinase assay pomiferin triacetate dose-dependently inhibited mTOR with an IC50 of 6.2 µM. Molecular docking studies supported the interaction of the inhibitor with the catalytic site of mTOR. Importantly, pomiferin triacetate appeared to be highly selective for mTOR compared to a panel of 17 lipid and 50 protein kinases tested. As a consequence of the mTOR inhibition, pomiferin triacetate efficiently attenuated translation. In summary, pomiferin triacetate emerged as a novel and highly specific mTOR inhibitor with strong translation inhibitory effects. Thus, it might be an interesting lead structure for the development of mTOR- and translation-targeted anti-tumor therapies. PMID:24513322

  14. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway in abdominal aortic aneurysm: implication of smooth muscle cell contractile phenotype, inflammation and aneurysm expansion.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangxin; Qin, Lingfeng; Wang, Lei; Li, Xuan; Caulk, Alexander W; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Pei-Yu; Xin, Shijie

    2017-02-17

    The development of effective pharmacological treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) potentially offers great benefit to patients with pre-aneurysmal aortic dilation by slowing the expansion of aneurysms and reducing the need for surgery. To date, therapeutic targets for slowing aortic dilation have had low efficacy. Thus, in this study, we aim to elucidate possible mechanisms driving aneurysm progression in order to identify potential targets for pharmacological intervention. We demonstrate that mTOR signaling is over activated in aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) which contributes to murine AAA. Rapamycin, a typical mTOR pathway inhibitor, dramatically limits the expansion of the abdominal aorta following intraluminal elastase perfusion. Furthermore, reduction of aortic diameter is achieved by inhibition of the mTOR pathway, which preserves and/or restores the contractile phenotype of SMCs and downregulates macrophage infiltration, MMPs expression, and inflammatory cytokine production. Taken together, these results highlight the important role of the mTOR cascade in aneurysm progression and the potential application of rapamycin as a therapeutic candidate for AAA.

  15. Aberrant overexpression of ADAR1 promotes gastric cancer progression by activating mTOR/p70S6K signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Ning; Yu, Shijun; Ye, Xiaojuan; Yang, Dong; Li, Yandong; Gao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    ADAR1, one of adenosine deaminases acting on RNA, modulates RNA transcripts through converting adenosine (A) to inosine (I) by deamination. Emerging evidence has implicated that ADAR1 plays an important role in a few of human cancers, however, its expression and physiological significance in gastric cancer remain undefined. In the present study, we demonstrated that ADAR1 was frequently overexpressed in gastric cancer samples by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. In a gastric cancer tissue microarray, ADAR1 staining was closely correlated with tumor stage (P < 0.001) and N classification (P < 0.001). Functional analysis indicated that ADAR1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation and migration in vitro, whereas ADAR1 knockdown resulted in an opposite phenotypes. Furthermore, ADAR1 knockdown also inhibited tumorigenicity and lung metastasis potential of gastric cancer cells in nude mice models. Mechanistically, ADAR1 expression had a significant effect on phosphorylation level of mTOR, p70S kinase, and S6 ribosomal protein, implying its involvement in the regulation of mTOR signaling pathway. We conclude that ADAR1 contributes to gastric cancer development and progression via activating mTOR/p70S6K/S6 ribosomal protein signaling axis. Our findings suggest that ADAR1 may be a valuable biomarker for GC diagnosis and prognosis and may represent a new novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:27863387

  16. Salmonella Typhimurium disrupts Sirt1/AMPK checkpoint control of mTOR to impair autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Raja; Hos, Nina Judith; Gutierrez, Saray; Fischer, Julia; Stepek, Joanna Magdalena; Daglidu, Evmorphia; Krönke, Martin

    2017-01-01

    During intracellular infections, autophagy significantly contributes to the elimination of pathogens, regulation of pro-inflammatory signaling, secretion of immune mediators and in coordinating the adaptive immune system. Intracellular pathogens such as S. Typhimurium have evolved mechanisms to circumvent autophagy. However, the regulatory mechanisms targeted by S. Typhimurium to modulate autophagy have not been fully resolved. Here we report that cytosolic energy loss during S. Typhimurium infection triggers transient activation of AMPK, an important checkpoint of mTOR activity and autophagy. The activation of AMPK is regulated by LKB1 in a cytosolic complex containing Sirt1 and LKB1, where Sirt1 is required for deacetylation and subsequent activation of LKB1. S. Typhimurium infection targets Sirt1, LKB1 and AMPK to lysosomes for rapid degradation resulting in the disruption of the AMPK-mediated regulation of mTOR and autophagy. The degradation of cytosolic Sirt1/LKB1/AMPK complex was not observed with two mutant strains of S. Typhimurium, ΔssrB and ΔssaV, both compromising the pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2). The results highlight virulence factor-dependent degradation of host cell proteins as a previously unrecognized strategy of S. Typhimurium to evade autophagy. PMID:28192515

  17. Scaffolds are 'active' regulators of signaling modules.

    PubMed

    Alexa, Anita; Varga, János; Reményi, Attila

    2010-11-01

    Signaling cascades, in addition to proteins with obvious signaling-relevant activities (e.g. protein kinases or receptors), also employ dedicated 'inactive' proteins whose functions appear to be the organization of the former components into higher order complexes through protein-protein interactions. The core function of signaling adaptors, anchors and scaffolds is the recruitment of proteins into one macromolecular complex. Several recent studies have demonstrated that the recruiter and the recruited molecules mutually influence each other in a scaffolded complex. This yields fundamentally novel properties for the signaling complex as a whole. Because these are not merely additive to the properties of the individual components, scaffolded signaling complexes may behave as functionally distinct modules.

  18. mTOR regulates neuroprotective effect of immunized CD4+Foxp3+ T cells in optic nerve ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guochun; Tang, Luosheng; Wei, Wei; Li, Zhuo; Li, Yunping; Duan, Xuanchu; Chen, Huihui

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of targeting CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) remains controversial under the condition of neuroinflammation. This study aims to explore the neuroprotective role of Tregs in optic nerve ischemia (ONI) and evaluate the therapeutic strategy of Tregs transfer with a focus on targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Intraocular pressure was transiently increased in adult C57BL/6 mice to induce ONI. Mucosal tolerance of myelin basic protein (MBP) markedly increased retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival after ONI through enhanced Tregs suppression. mTOR inhibition significantly promoted the frequency of MBP-immunized Tregs in vitro with increased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Transient rapamycin treatment highly promoted the immunosuppressive capacity of Tregs and inhibited retinal inflammation in ONI animals. Intravenous infusion of MBP-immunized Tregs, instead of regular Tregs, beneficially modulated immune activities of host retinal CD11b+ cells and CD4+ effector T cells, leading to significant improvement of RGC survival. Importantly, rapamycin treatment further enhanced the neuroprotective effect of Tregs transfer. Taken together, these findings reveal a fine regulation of mTOR signaling on immunized Tregs after acute retinal injury. Adoptive transfer with targeting-mTOR strategy markedly improves neuronal recovery after ONI, supporting the therapeutic potentials of Tregs in acute and chronic neurological disorder. PMID:27886260

  19. A carbazole alkaloid deactivates mTOR through the suppression of rictor and that induces apoptosis in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Priyajit; Seal, Soma; Mukherjee, Sandip; Kundu, Rakesh; Bhuyan, Mantu; Barua, Nabin C; Baruah, Pranab K; Babu, Santi Prasad Sinha; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2015-07-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is known to be a difficult cancer to treat because of its poor prognosis, limited option for surgery, and resistance to chemo or radiotherapy. In this study, we have demonstrated that suppression of rictor expression in A549 and H1299 NSCLC cells by mahanine, a carbazole alkaloid, disrupted constitutive activation of mTOR and Akt. Mahanine suppression of rictor gene expression and consequent attenuation of its protein expression affected the inhibition of mTOR (Ser-2481) and Akt (Ser-473) phosphorylation. Since mahanine treatment revealed this new insight of rictor-mTOR relationship, we examined an association between mTOR activation with rictor expression. Interestingly, in rictor knockdown (KD) NSCLC cells, mTOR activation was significantly impaired. Transfection of rictor over-expression vector into the NSCLC cells reversed this situation. In fact, both rictor KD and mahanine treated cells showed considerably depleted phospho-mTOR level. These results indicate that rictor is required to maintain constitutive activation of mTOR in lung cancer cells. When mTOR kinase activity in rictor KD cells was examined with Akt as substrate, a significant reduction of Akt phosphorylation indicated impairment of mTOR kinase potentiality. Disruption of mTOR and Akt activation caused drastic mortality of NSCLC cancer cells through apoptosis. Hence, our study reveals a new dimension in mTOR-rictor relationship, where rictor stands to be a suitable therapeutic target for lung cancer.

  20. Adenosine triphosphate-competitive mTOR inhibitors: a new class of immunosuppressive agents that inhibit allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Rosborough, B R; Raïch-Regué, D; Liu, Q; Venkataramanan, R; Turnquist, H R; Thomson, A W

    2014-09-01

    The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is inhibited clinically to suppress T cell function and prevent allograft rejection. mTOR is the kinase subunit of two mTOR-containing complexes, mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and 2. Although mTORC1 is inhibited by the macrolide immunosuppressant rapamycin (RAPA), its efficacy may be limited by its inability to block mTORC1 completely and its limited effect on mTORC2. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-competitive mTOR inhibitors are an emerging class of mTOR inhibitors that compete with ATP at the mTOR active site and inhibit any mTOR-containing complex. Since this class of compounds has not been investigated for their immunosuppressive potential, our goal was to determine the influence of a prototypic ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor on allograft survival. AZD8055 proved to be a potent suppressor of T cell proliferation. Moreover, a short, 10-day course of the agent successfully prolonged murine MHC-mismatched, vascularized heart transplant survival. This therapeutic effect was associated with increased graft-infiltrating regulatory T cells and reduced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ production. These studies establish for the first time, that ATP-competitive mTOR inhibition can prolong organ allograft survival and warrant further investigation of this next generation mTOR inhibitors.

  1. Antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates Wnt signaling and elicits antitumor responses in tumors with activating APC mutations.

    PubMed

    Osada, Takuya; Chen, Minyong; Yang, Xiao Yi; Spasojevic, Ivan; Vandeusen, Jeffrey B; Hsu, David; Clary, Bryan M; Clay, Timothy M; Chen, Wei; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-06-15

    Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation caused by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations occurs in approximately 80% of sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC). The antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates components of the Wnt pathway, specifically Dishevelled-2 (Dvl2) expression, resulting in diminished downstream β-catenin signaling. In this study, we determined whether niclosamide could inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in human CRCs and whether its inhibition might elicit antitumor effects in the presence of APC mutations. We found that niclosamide inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation, downregulated Dvl2, decreased downstream β-catenin signaling, and exerted antiproliferative effects in human colon cancer cell lines and CRC cells isolated by surgical resection of metastatic disease, regardless of mutations in APC. In contrast, inhibition of NF-κB or mTOR did not exert similar antiproliferative effects in these CRC model systems. In mice implanted with human CRC xenografts, orally administered niclosamide was well tolerated, achieved plasma and tumor levels associated with biologic activity, and led to tumor control. Our findings support clinical explorations to reposition niclosamide for the treatment of CRC.

  2. mTOR ensures increased release and reduced uptake of the organic osmolyte taurine under hypoosmotic conditions in mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ian Henry; Jensen, Jane Vendelbo; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that modulates translation in response to growth factors and alterations in nutrient availability following hypoxia and DNA damage. Here we demonstrate that mTOR activity in Ehrlich Lettré ascites (ELA) cells is transiently increased within minutes following osmotic cell swelling and that inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphatase (PTEN) counteracts the upstream phosphatidylinositol kinase and potentiates mTOR activity. PTEN inhibition concomitantly potentiates swelling-induced taurine release via the volume-sensitive transporter for organic osmolytes and anion channels (VSOAC) and enhances swelling-induced inhibition of taurine uptake via the taurine-specific transporter (TauT). Chronic osmotic stress, i.e., exposure to hypotonic or hypertonic media for 24 h, reduces and increases mTOR activity in ELA cells, respectively. Using rapamycin, we demonstrate that mTOR inhibition is accompanied by reduction in TauT activity and increase in VSOAC activity in cells expressing high (NIH3T3 fibroblasts) or low (ELA) amounts of mTOR protein. The effect of mTOR inhibition on TauT activity reflects reduced TauT mRNA, TauT protein abundance, and an overall reduction in protein synthesis, whereas the effect on VSOAC is mimicked by catalase inhibition and correlates with reduced catalase mRNA abundance. Hence, mTOR activity favors loss of taurine following hypoosmotic cell swelling, i.e., release via VSOAC and uptake via TauT during acute hypotonic exposure is potentiated and reduced, respectively, by phosphorylation involving mTOR and/or the kinases upstream to mTOR. Decrease in TauT activity during chronic hypotonic exposure, on the other hand, involves reduction in expression/activity of TauT and enzymes in antioxidative defense.

  3. CXCR2 Inhibition in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Induces Predominant Differentiation to Mesoderm and Endoderm Through Repression of mTOR, β-Catenin, and hTERT Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji-Hye; Kang, Ka-Won; Kim, Jihea; Hong, Soon-Chul; Park, Yong

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of our previous report verifying that chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2) ligands in human placenta-derived cell conditioned medium (hPCCM) support human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) propagation without exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), this study was designed to identify the effect of CXCR2 manipulation on the fate of hPSCs and the underlying mechanism, which had not been previously determined. We observed that CXCR2 inhibition in hPSCs induces predominant differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm with concomitant loss of hPSC characteristics and accompanying decreased expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), β-catenin, and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). These phenomena are recapitulated in hPSCs propagated in conventional culture conditions, including bFGF as well as those in hPCCM without exogenous bFGF, suggesting that the action of CXCR2 on hPSCs might not be associated with a bFGF-related mechanism. In addition, the specific CXCR2 ligand growth-related oncogene α (GROα) markedly increased the expression of ectodermal markers in differentiation-committed embryoid bodies derived from hPSCs. This finding suggests that CXCR2 inhibition in hPSCs prohibits the propagation of hPSCs and leads to predominant differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm owing to the blockage of ectodermal differentiation. Taken together, our results indicate that CXCR2 preferentially supports the maintenance of hPSC characteristics as well as facilitates ectodermal differentiation after the commitment to differentiation, and the mechanism might be associated with mTOR, β-catenin, and hTERT activities. PMID:27188501

  4. mTOR Overactivation in Mesenchymal cells Aggravates CCl4− Induced liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Lanlan; Ding, Yan; Fu, You; Zhou, Ling; Dong, Xiaoying; Chen, Shunzhi; Wu, Hongyuan; Nai, Wenqing; Zheng, Hang; Xu, Wanfu; Bai, Xiaochun; Jia, Chunhong; Dai, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells are of mesenchymal cell type located in the space of Disse. Upon liver injury, HSCs transactivate into myofibroblasts with increase in expression of fibrillar collagen, especially collagen I and III, leading to liver fibrosis. Previous studies have shown mTOR signaling is activated during liver fibrosis. However, there is no direct evidence in vivo. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of conditional deletion of TSC1 in mesenchymal on pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Crossing mice bearing the floxed TSC1 gene with mice harboring Col1α2-Cre-ER(T) successfully generated progeny with a conditional knockout of TSC1 (TSC1 CKO) in collagen I expressing mesenchymal cells. TSC1 CKO and WT mice were subjected to CCl4, oil or CCl4+ rapamycin treatment for 8 weeks. TSC1 CKO mice developed pronounced liver fibrosis relative to WT mice, as examined by ALT, hydroxyproline, histopathology, and profibrogenic gene. Absence of TSC1 in mesenchymal cells induced proliferation and prevented apoptosis in activated HSCs. However, there were no significant differences in oil-treated TSC1 CKO and WT mice. Rapamycin, restored these phenotypic changes by preventing myofibroblasts proliferation and enhancing their apoptosis. These findings revealed mTOR overactivation in mesenchymal cells aggravates CCl4− induced liver fibrosis and the rapamycin prevent its occurance. PMID:27819329

  5. Berberine regulates AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and inhibits colon tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Saud, Shakir M; Lin, Hongsheng; Hou, Wei; Matter, Matthias S; Jia, Libin; Colburn, Nancy H; Young, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer, a leading cause of cancer death, has been linked to inflammation and obesity. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes and anti-tumor properties. In the azoxymethane initiated and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) promoted colorectal carcinogenesis mouse model, berberine treated mice showed a 60% reduction in tumor number (P = 0.009), a 48% reduction in tumors <2 mm, (P = 0.05); 94% reduction in tumors 2-4 mm, (P = 0.001), and 100% reduction in tumors >4 mm (P = 0.02) compared to vehicle treated mice. Berberine also decreased AOM/DSS induced Ki-67 and COX-2 expression. In vitro analysis showed that in addition to its anti-proliferation activity, berberine also induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines. Berberine activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major regulator of metabolic pathways, and inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream target of AMPK. Furthermore, 4E-binding protein-1 and p70 ribosomal S6 kinases, downstream targets of mTOR, were down regulated by berberine treatment. Berberine did not affect Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) activity or the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Berberine inhibited Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin, induced phosphorylation of p53 and increased caspase-3 cleavage in vitro. Berberine inhibition of mTOR activity and p53 phosphorylation was found to be AMPK dependent, while inhibition NF-κB was AMPK independent. In vivo, berberine also activated AMPK, inhibited mTOR and p65 phosphorylation and activated caspase-3 cleavage. Our data suggests that berberine suppresses colon epithelial proliferation and tumorigenesis via AMPK dependent inhibition of mTOR activity and AMPK independent inhibition of NF-κB.

  6. Promoting axon regeneration in the adult CNS by modulation of the melanopsin/GPCR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songshan; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Li; Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuejie; Liu, Wen; Wang, Yuqi; Jiang, Songshan; Wong, Yung Hou; Zhang, Yifeng; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Cell-type–specific G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling regulates distinct neuronal responses to various stimuli and is essential for axon guidance and targeting during development. However, its function in axonal regeneration in the mature CNS remains elusive. We found that subtypes of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) in mice maintained high mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) levels after axotomy and that the light-sensitive GPCR melanopsin mediated this sustained expression. Melanopsin overexpression in the RGCs stimulated axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush by up-regulating mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). The extent of the regeneration was comparable to that observed after phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) knockdown. Both the axon regeneration and mTOR activity that were enhanced by melanopsin required light stimulation and Gq/11 signaling. Specifically, activating Gq in RGCs elevated mTOR activation and promoted axonal regeneration. Melanopsin overexpression in RGCs enhanced the amplitude and duration of their light response, and silencing them with Kir2.1 significantly suppressed the increased mTOR signaling and axon regeneration that were induced by melanopsin. Thus, our results provide a strategy to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury by modulating neuronal activity through GPCR signaling. PMID:26831088

  7. xCT deficiency induces autophagy via endoplasmic reticulum stress activated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase and mTOR in sut melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, XueTing; Li, Yang; Zhao, Rui; Yan, Fei; Ma, YiXuan; Zhao, LiPing; Qiao, Haixuan

    2016-01-01

    xCT, the functional subunit of the system xc(-) encoded by the Slc7a11 gene, plays an important role in maintaining intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels. In previous study, we have indicated that xCT deficiency induces OS and that OS triggers apoptosis through JNK pathway, however, this induction of apoptotic features did not fully explain the cell death induced by xCT deficiency. In the current study, we demonstrated that sut melanocytes of xCT deficiency showed activation of both ER stress and autophagy. And that the activation of autophagy by xCT deficiency was mediated by ER stress induced activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB pathways and subsequently inhibited functions of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K survival pathways, ultimately led to autophagic cell death of sut melanocytes. Our novel results provided important insights into understanding the mechanism associated with xCT deficiency.

  8. Prostaglandin E2 activates and utilizes mTORC2 as a central signaling locus for the regulation of mast cell chemotaxis and mediator release.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Hye Sun; Jung, Mi-Yeon; Beaven, Michael A; Metcalfe, Dean D; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2011-01-07

    Prostaglandin (PG) E(2), a potent mediator produced in inflamed tissues, can substantially influence mast cell responses including adhesion to basement membrane proteins, chemotaxis, and chemokine production. However, the signaling pathways by which PGE(2) induces mast cell chemotaxis and chemokine production remains undefined. In this study, we identified the downstream target of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), as a key regulator of these responses. In mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells, PGE(2) was found to induce activation of mTORC1 (mTOR complexed to raptor) as indicated by increased p70S6K and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, and activation of mTORC2 (mTOR complexed to rictor), as indicated by increased phosphorylation of AKT at position Ser(473). Selective inhibition of the mTORC1 cascade by rapamycin or by the use of raptor-targeted shRNA failed to decrease PGE(2)-mediated chemotaxis or chemokine generation. However, inhibition of the mTORC2 cascade through the dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitor Torin, or through rictor-targeted shRNA, resulted in a significant attenuation in PGE(2)-mediated chemotaxis, which was associated with a comparable decrease in actin polymerization. Furthermore, mTORC2 down-regulation decreased PGE(2)-induced production of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2), which was linked to a significant reduction in ROS production. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that activation of mTORC2, downstream of PI3K, represents a critical signaling locus for chemotaxis and chemokine release from PGE(2)-activated mast cells.

  9. Ciliary transport regulates PDGF-AA/αα signaling via elevated mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and diminished PP2A activity.

    PubMed

    Umberger, Nicole L; Caspary, Tamara

    2015-01-15

    Primary cilia are built and maintained by intraflagellar transport (IFT), whereby the two IFT complexes, IFTA and IFTB, carry cargo via kinesin and dynein motors for anterograde and retrograde transport, respectively. Many signaling pathways, including platelet- derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA/αα, are linked to primary cilia. Active PDGF-AA/αα signaling results in phosphorylation of Akt at two residues: P-Akt(T308) and P-Akt(S473), and previous work showed decreased P-Akt(S473) in response to PDGF-AA upon anterograde transport disruption. In this study, we investigated PDGF-AA/αα signaling via P-Akt(T308) and P-Akt(S473) in distinct ciliary transport mutants. We found increased Akt phosphorylation in the absence of PDGF-AA stimulation, which we show is due to impaired dephosphorylation resulting from diminished PP2A activity toward P-Akt(T308). Anterograde transport mutants display low platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)α levels, whereas retrograde mutants exhibit normal PDGFRα levels. Despite this, neither shows an increase in P-Akt(S473) or P-Akt(T308) upon PDGF-AA stimulation. Because mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is increased in ciliary transport mutant cells and mTOR signaling inhibits PDGFRα levels, we demonstrate that inhibition of mTORC1 rescues PDGFRα levels as well as PDGF-AA-dependent phosphorylation of Akt(S473) and Akt(T308) in ciliary transport mutant MEFs. Taken together, our data indicate that the regulation of mTORC1 signaling and PP2A activity by ciliary transport plays key roles in PDGF-AA/αα signaling.

  10. Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) - Rapamycin and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Lamming, Dudley W.

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin is an FDA-approved immunosuppressant and anti-cancer agent discovered in the soil of Easter Island in the early 1970s. Rapamycin is a potent and selective inhibitor of the mTOR (mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin) protein kinase, which acts as a central integrator of nutrient signaling pathways. During the last decade, genetic and pharmaceutical inhibition of mTOR pathway signaling has been found to promote longevity in yeast, worms, flies and mice. In this chapter, we will discuss the molecular biology underlying the effects of rapamycin and its physiological effects; evidence for rapamycin as an anti-aging compound; mechanisms by which rapamycin may extend lifespan; and the potential limitations of rapamycin as an anti-aging molecule. Finally, we will discuss possible strategies that may allow us to inhibit mTOR signaling safely while minimizing side effects, and reap the health, social and economic benefits from slowing the aging process. PMID:27048303

  11. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) mediates tau protein dyshomeostasis: implication for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhi; Bereczki, Erika; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Shan; Li, Chunxia; Ji, Xinying; Branca, Rui M; Lehtiö, Janne; Guan, Zhizhong; Filipcik, Peter; Xu, Shaohua; Winblad, Bengt; Pei, Jin-Jing

    2013-05-31

    Previous evidence from post-mortem Alzheimer disease (AD) brains and drug (especially rapamycin)-oriented in vitro and in vivo models implicated an aberrant accumulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) in tangle-bearing neurons in AD brains and its role in the formation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau. Compelling evidence indicated that the sequential molecular events such as the synthesis and phosphorylation of tau can be regulated through p70 S6 kinase, the well characterized immediate downstream target of mTor. In the present study, we further identified that the active form of mTor per se accumulates in tangle-bearing neurons, particularly those at early stages in AD brains. By using mass spectrometry and Western blotting, we identified three phosphoepitopes of tau directly phosphorylated by mTor. We have developed a variety of stable cell lines with genetic modification of mTor activity using SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells as background. In these cellular systems, we not only confirmed the tau phosphorylation sites found in vitro but also found that mTor mediates the synthesis and aggregation of tau, resulting in compromised microtubule stability. Changes of mTor activity cause fluctuation of the level of a battery of tau kinases such as protein kinase A, v-Akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-1, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, cyclin-dependent kinase 5, and tau protein phosphatase 2A. These results implicate mTor in promoting an imbalance of tau homeostasis, a condition required for neurons to maintain physiological function.

  12. The integrated role of ACh, ERK and mTOR in the mechanisms of hippocampal inhibitory avoidance memory.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Maria Grazia; Lana, Daniele; Pepeu, Giancarlo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the present knowledge on the interplay among the cholinergic system, Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathways in the development of short and long term memories during the acquisition and recall of the step-down inhibitory avoidance in the hippocampus. The step-down inhibitory avoidance is a form of associative learning that is acquired in a relatively simple one-trial test through several sensorial inputs. Inhibitory avoidance depends on the integrated activity of hippocampal CA1 and other brain areas. Recall can be performed at different times after acquisition, thus allowing for the study of both short and long term memory. Among the many neurotransmitter systems involved, the cholinergic neurons that originate in the basal forebrain and project to the hippocampus are of crucial importance in inhibitory avoidance processes. Acetylcholine released from cholinergic fibers during acquisition and/or recall of behavioural tasks activates muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and brings about a long-lasting potentiation of the postsynaptic membrane followed by downstream activation of intracellular pathway (ERK, among others) that create conditions favourable for neuronal plasticity. ERK appears to be salient not only in long term memory, but also in the molecular mechanisms underlying short term memory formation in the hippocampus. Since ERK can function as a biochemical coincidence detector in response to extracellular signals in neurons, the activation of ERK-dependent downstream effectors is determined, in part, by the duration of ERK phosphorylation itself. Long term memories require protein synthesis, that in the synapto-dendritic compartment represents a direct mechanism that can produce rapid changes in protein content in response to synaptic activity. mTOR in the brain regulates protein translation in response to neuronal activity, thereby modulating

  13. Cucurbitacin E Induces Autophagy via Downregulating mTORC1 Signaling and Upregulating AMPK Activity.

    PubMed

    Zha, Qing-Bing; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Lin, Qiu-Ru; Xu, Li-Hui; Zhao, Gao-Xiang; Pan, Hao; Zhou, Dan; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; Liu, Ze-Huan; He, Xian-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbitacins, the natural triterpenoids possessing many biological activities, have been reported to suppress the mTORC1/p70S6K pathway and to induce autophagy. However, the correlation between such activities is largely unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue in human cancer cells in response to cucurbitacin E (CuE) treatment. Our results showed that CuE induced autophagy as evidenced by the formation of LC3-II and colocalization of punctate LC3 with the lysosomal marker LAMP2 in HeLa and MCF7 cells. However, CuE induced much lower levels of autophagy in ATG5-knocked down cells and failed to induce autophagy in DU145 cells lacking functional ATG5 expression, suggesting the dependence of CuE-induced autophagy on ATG5. Consistent with autophagy induction, mTORC1 activity (as reflected by p70S6K and ULK1S758 phosphorylation) was inhibited by CuE treatment. The suppression of mTORC1 activity was further confirmed by reduced recruitment of mTOR to the lysosome, which is the activation site of mTORC1. In contrast, CuE rapidly activated AMPK leading to increased phosphorylation of its substrates. AMPK activation contributed to CuE-induced suppression of mTORC1/p70S6K signaling and autophagy induction, since AMPK knockdown diminished these effects. Collectively, our data suggested that CuE induced autophagy in human cancer cells at least partly via downregulation of mTORC1 signaling and upregulation of AMPK activity.

  14. Differentiating the mTOR inhibitors everolimus and sirolimus in the treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    MacKeigan, Jeffrey P; Krueger, Darcy A

    2015-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic autosomal dominant disorder characterized by benign tumor-like lesions, called hamartomas, in multiple organ systems, including the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and lung. These hamartomas cause a diverse set of clinical problems based on their location and often result in epilepsy, learning difficulties, and behavioral problems. TSC is caused by mutations within the TSC1 or TSC2 genes that inactivate the genes' tumor-suppressive function and drive hamartomatous cell growth. In normal cells, TSC1 and TSC2 integrate growth signals and nutrient inputs to downregulate signaling to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionarily conserved serine-threonine kinase that controls cell growth and cell survival. The molecular connection between TSC and mTOR led to the clinical use of allosteric mTOR inhibitors (sirolimus and everolimus) for the treatment of TSC. Everolimus is approved for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas in patients with TSC. Sirolimus, though not approved for TSC, has undergone considerable investigation to treat various aspects of the disease. Everolimus and sirolimus selectively inhibit mTOR signaling with similar molecular mechanisms, but with distinct clinical profiles. This review differentiates mTOR inhibitors in TSC while describing the molecular mechanisms, pathogenic mutations, and clinical trial outcomes for managing TSC.

  15. Heparin activates Wnt signaling for neuronal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Colombres, Marcela; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Reig, Germán F; Scheu, Jessica; Calderón, Rosario; Alvarez, Alejandra; Brandan, Enrique; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2008-09-01

    Wnt factors are secreted ligands that affect different aspects of the nervous system behavior like neurodevelopment, synaptogenesis and neurodegeneration. In different model systems, Wnt signaling has been demonstrated to be regulated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Whether HSPGs modulate Wnt signaling in the context of neuronal behavior is currently unknown. Here we demonstrate that activation of Wnt signaling with the endogenous ligand Wnt-7a results in an increased of neurite outgrowth in the neuroblastoma N2a cell line. Interestingly, heparin induces glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) inhibition, beta-catenin stabilization and morphological differentiation in both N2a cells and in rat primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. We also show that heparin modulates Wnt-3a-induced stabilization of beta-catenin. Several extracellular matrix and membrane-attached HSPGs were found to be expressed in both in vitro neuronal models. Changes in the expression of specific HSPGs were observed upon differentiation of N2a cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that HSPGs may modulate canonical Wnt signaling for neuronal morphogenesis.

  16. Co-targeting of Bcl-2 and mTOR pathway triggers synergistic apoptosis in BH3 mimetics resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Matteo; Mirabilii, Simone; Licchetta, Roberto; Bergamo, Paola; Rinaldo, Cinzia; Zeuner, Ann; Foà, Robin; Milella, Michele; McCubrey, James A.; Martelli, Alberto M.; Tafuri, Agostino

    2015-01-01

    Several chemo-resistance mechanisms including the Bcl-2 protein family overexpression and constitutive activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling have been documented in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), encouraging targeted approaches to circumvent this clinical problem. Here we analyzed the activity of the BH3 mimetic ABT-737 in ALL, exploring the synergistic effects with the mTOR inhibitor CCI-779 on ABT-737 resistant cells. We showed that a low Mcl-1/Bcl-2 plus Bcl-xL protein ratio determined ABT-737 responsiveness. ABT-737 exposure further decreased Mcl-1, inducing apoptosis on sensitive models and primary samples, while not affecting resistant cells. Co-inhibition of Bcl-2 and the mTOR pathway resulted cytotoxic on ABT-737 resistant models, by downregulating mTORC1 activity and Mcl-1 in a proteasome-independent manner. Although Mcl-1 seemed to be critical, ectopic modulation did not correlate with apoptosis changes. Importantly, dual targeting proved effective on ABT-737 resistant samples, showing additive/synergistic effects. Together, our results show the efficacy of BH3 mimetics as single agent in the majority of the ALL samples and demonstrate that resistance to ABT-737 mostly correlated with Mcl-1 overexpression. Co-targeting of the Bcl-2 protein family and mTOR pathway enhanced drug-induced cytotoxicity by suppressing Mcl-1, providing a novel therapeutic approach to overcome BH3 mimetics resistance in ALL. PMID:26392332

  17. Systemic and CNS activity of the RET inhibitor vandetanib combined with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in KIF5B-RET re-arranged non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Berry, Jenny; Roxas, Michael; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Subbiah, Ishwaria Mohan; Ali, Siraj M; McMahon, Caitlin; Miller, Vincent; Cascone, Tina; Pai, Shobha; Tang, Zhenya; Heymach, John V

    2015-07-01

    In-frame fusion KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene)-RET transcripts have been characterized in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancers and are known oncogenic drivers. The RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, suppresses fusion-induced, anchorage-independent growth activity. In vitro studies have shown that vandetanib is a high-affinity substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) but is not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), limiting its blood-brain barrier penetration. A co-administration strategy to enhance the brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-gp/Abcb1- and Bcrp1/Abcg2-mediated efflux with mTOR inhibitors, specifically everolimus, was shown to increase the blood-brain barrier penetration. We report the first bench-to-bedside evidence that RET inhibitor combined with an mTOR inhibitor is active against brain-metastatic RET-rearranged lung cancer and the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration. A 74-year-old female with progressive adenocarcinoma of the lung (wild-type EGFR and no ALK rearrangement) presented for therapy options. A deletion of 5'RET was revealed by FISH assay, indicating RET-gene rearrangement. Because of progressive disease in the brain, she was enrolled in a clinical trial with vandetanib and everolimus (NCT01582191). Comprehensive genomic profiling revealed fusion of KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene) and RET, in addition to AKT2 gene amplification. After two cycles of therapy a repeat MRI brain showed a decrease in the intracranial disease burden and PET/CT showed systemic response as well. Interestingly, AKT2 amplification seen is a critical component of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, alterations of which has been associated with both de novo and acquired resistance to targeted therapy. The addition of everolimus may have both overcome the AKT2 amplification to produce a response in addition to its direct effects on the RET gene. Our case report forms the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration by

  18. mTOR inactivation by ROS-JNK-p53 pathway plays an essential role in psedolaric acid B induced autophagy-dependent senescence in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Min; Zhou, Haiyan; Fan, Simiao; Li, Zhao; Yao, Guodong; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Xia, Mingyu; Ikejima, Takashi

    2013-09-05

    Pseudolaric acid B (PAB), the primary biologically active compound isolated from the root bark of P. kaempferi Gordon, has been reported to exhibit anti-tumor effect primarily via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our previous study demonstrated that PAB triggered mitotic catastrophe in L929 cells. In addition, a small percentage of the cells undergoing mitotic catastrophe displayed an apoptotic phenotype. Therefore, we continued to investigate the fate of the other cells. The results indicated that PAB induced senescence through p19-p53-p21 and p16-Rb pathways in L929 cells. PAB also triggered autophagy via inhibiting Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity in L929 cells. In addition, autophagy was demonstrated to reinforce senescence through regulating the senescence pathways. Thus, we focused on the detailed molecular mechanisms whereby autophagy promoted senescence. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays an important in autophagy and senescence. We found that PAB triggered a ROS-JNK-p53 positive feedback loop and this feedback loop played a crucial role in autophagy via repressing the activation of mTOR. Furthermore, ROS-JNK-p53 positive feedback loop was demonstrated to regulate senescence. Tuberous sclerosis proteins1 and 2, also known as TSC1 and TSC2, form a protein-complex. TSC1/TSC2 heterodimer is a downstream target of growth factor-phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signaling which negatively regulates mTOR activity. Activation of mTOR by insulin or inhibition of endogenous TSC2 levels by siRNA obviously delayed PAB-induced senescence. In conclusion, mTOR inactivation by ROS-JNK-p53 pathway played an important role in autophagy-dependent senescence in PAB-treated L929 cells.

  19. Sulforaphane inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by targeting mTOR/p70S6kinase signaling independent of Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Shawky, Noha M; Segar, Lakshman

    2017-02-14

    Activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, a transcription factor) and/or inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) are implicated in the suppression of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. The present study has examined the likely regulatory effects of sulforaphane (SFN, an antioxidant) on Nrf2 activation and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced mTOR signaling in VSMCs. Using human aortic VSMCs, nuclear extraction and siRNA-mediated downregulation studies were performed to determine the role of Nrf2 on SFN regulation of PDGF-in