Science.gov

Sample records for activated nuclear factor

  1. Nuclear factor Y regulates ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus core promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongliang; Liu, Yanfeng; Luo, Mengjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wei; Pan, Shaokun; Xie, Youhua

    2016-09-16

    Endogenous viral elements (EVE) in animal genomes are the fossil records of ancient viruses and provide invaluable information on the origin and evolution of extant viruses. Extant hepadnaviruses include avihepadnaviruses of birds and orthohepadnaviruses of mammals. The core promoter (Cp) of hepadnaviruses is vital for viral gene expression and replication. We previously identified in the budgerigar genome two EVEs that contain the full-length genome of an ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus (eBHBV1 and eBHBV2). Here, we found eBHBV1 Cp and eBHBV2 Cp were active in several human and chicken cell lines. A region from nt -85 to -11 in eBHBV1 Cp was critical for the promoter activity. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a putative binding site of nuclear factor Y (NF-Y), a ubiquitous transcription factor, at nt -64 to -50 in eBHBV1 Cp. The NF-Y core binding site (ATTGG, nt -58 to -54) was essential for eBHBV1 Cp activity. The same results were obtained with eBHBV2 Cp and duck hepatitis B virus Cp. The subunit A of NF-Y (NF-YA) was recruited via the NF-Y core binding site to eBHBV1 Cp and upregulated the promoter activity. Finally, the NF-Y core binding site is conserved in the Cps of all the extant avihepadnaviruses but not of orthohepadnaviruses. Interestingly, a putative and functionally important NF-Y core binding site is located at nt -21 to -17 in the Cp of human hepatitis B virus. In conclusion, our findings have pinpointed an evolutionary conserved and functionally critical NF-Y binding element in the Cps of avihepadnaviruses.

  2. Nuclear factor Y regulates ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus core promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongliang; Liu, Yanfeng; Luo, Mengjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wei; Pan, Shaokun; Xie, Youhua

    2016-09-16

    Endogenous viral elements (EVE) in animal genomes are the fossil records of ancient viruses and provide invaluable information on the origin and evolution of extant viruses. Extant hepadnaviruses include avihepadnaviruses of birds and orthohepadnaviruses of mammals. The core promoter (Cp) of hepadnaviruses is vital for viral gene expression and replication. We previously identified in the budgerigar genome two EVEs that contain the full-length genome of an ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus (eBHBV1 and eBHBV2). Here, we found eBHBV1 Cp and eBHBV2 Cp were active in several human and chicken cell lines. A region from nt -85 to -11 in eBHBV1 Cp was critical for the promoter activity. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a putative binding site of nuclear factor Y (NF-Y), a ubiquitous transcription factor, at nt -64 to -50 in eBHBV1 Cp. The NF-Y core binding site (ATTGG, nt -58 to -54) was essential for eBHBV1 Cp activity. The same results were obtained with eBHBV2 Cp and duck hepatitis B virus Cp. The subunit A of NF-Y (NF-YA) was recruited via the NF-Y core binding site to eBHBV1 Cp and upregulated the promoter activity. Finally, the NF-Y core binding site is conserved in the Cps of all the extant avihepadnaviruses but not of orthohepadnaviruses. Interestingly, a putative and functionally important NF-Y core binding site is located at nt -21 to -17 in the Cp of human hepatitis B virus. In conclusion, our findings have pinpointed an evolutionary conserved and functionally critical NF-Y binding element in the Cps of avihepadnaviruses. PMID:27501758

  3. Mapping neural circuits with activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Masuyama, Kaoru; Zhang, Yi; Rao, Yi; Wang, Jing W

    2012-03-01

    Abstract: Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is a calcium-responsive transcription factor. We describe here an NFAT-based neural tracing method-CaLexA (calcium-dependent nuclear import of LexA)-for labeling active neurons in behaving animals. In this system, sustained neural activity induces nuclear import of the chimeric transcription factor LexA-VP16-NFAT, which in turn drives green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter expression only in active neurons. We tested this system in Drosophila and found that volatile sex pheromones excite specific neurons in the olfactory circuit. Furthermore, complex courtship behavior associated with multi-modal sensory inputs activated neurons in the ventral nerve cord. This method harnessing the mechanism of activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor can be used to identify active neurons in specific neuronal population in behaving animals. PMID:22236090

  4. Hypoxic preconditioning decreases nuclear factor κB activity via Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ren; Liu, Qian; Khoury, Joseph; Li, Yue-Jin; Han, Xiao-Hui; Li, Jing; Ibla, Juan C

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor κB is a key mediator of inflammation during conditions of hypoxia. Here, we used models of hypoxic pre-conditioning as mechanism to decrease nuclear factor κB activity induced by hypoxia. Our initial studies suggested that Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 may be induced by hypoxic pre-conditioning and possibly involved in the regulation of nuclear factor κB. In this study we used Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 exogenous over-expression and knock-down to determine its effect on ataxia telangiectasia mutated--nuclear factor κB activation cascade. Our results demonstrated that hypoxic pre-conditioning significantly increased the expression of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 at mRNA and protein levels both in vitro and in vivo. Over-expression of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 significantly attenuated the hypoxia-mediated ataxia telangiectasia mutated phosphorylation and prevented its cytoplasm translocation where it functions to activate nuclear factor κB. We further determined that Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 activated the protein phosphatase 2A, preventing the phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated serine-1981, the main regulatory site of ataxia telangiectasia mutated activity. Cellular levels of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 protein significantly decreased nuclear factor κB activation profiles and pro-inflammatory gene expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypoxic pre-conditioning decreases the activation of nuclear factor κB through the transcriptional induction of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1.

  5. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Transcription Factor Nfatp Controls Superantigen-Induced Lethal Shock

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is the key mediator of superantigen-induced T cell lethal shock. Here, we show that nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor, NFATp, controls susceptibility to superantigen-induced lethal shock in mice through its activation of TNF-α gene transcription. In NFATp-deficient mice, T cell stimulation leads to delayed induction and attenuation of TNF-α mRNA levels, decreased TNF-α serum levels, and resistance to superantigen-induced lethal shock. By contrast, after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, serum levels of TNF-α and susceptibility to shock are unaffected. These results demonstrate that NFATp is an essential activator of immediate early TNF-α gene expression in T cells and they present in vivo evidence of the inducer- and cell type–specific regulation of TNF-α gene expression. Furthermore, they suggest NFATp as a potential selective target in the treatment of superantigen-induced lethal shock. PMID:10952728

  6. The nuclear factor SPBP contains different functional domains and stimulates the activity of various transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Rekdal, C; Sjøttem, E; Johansen, T

    2000-12-22

    SPBP (stromelysin-1 platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element binding protein) was originally cloned from a cDNA expression library by virtue of its ability to bind to a platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element in the human stromelysin-1 promoter. A 937-amino acid-long protein was deduced from a 3995-nucleotide murine cDNA sequence. By analyses of both human and murine cDNAs, we now show that SPBP is twice as large as originally found. The human SPBP gene contains six exons and is located on chromosome 22q13.1-13.3. Two isoforms differing in their C termini are expressed due to alternative splicing. PCR analyses of multitissue cDNA panels showed that SPBP is expressed in most tissues except for ovary and prostate. Functional mapping revealed that SPBP is a nuclear, multidomain protein containing an N-terminal region with transactivating ability, a novel type of DNA-binding domain containing an AT hook motif, and a bipartite nuclear localization signal as well as a C-terminal zinc finger domain. This type of zinc finger domain is also found in the trithorax family of chromatin-based transcriptional regulator proteins. Using cotransfection experiments, we find that SPBP enhances the transcriptional activity of various transcription factors such as c-Jun, Ets1, Sp1, and Pax6. Hence, SPBP seems to act as a transcriptional coactivator. PMID:10995766

  7. Binding site requirements and differential representation of TGF factors in nuclear ASF-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Lam, E; Lam, Y K

    1995-09-25

    Activating sequence factor 1 (ASF-1) is a nuclear DNA-binding activity that is found in monocots and dicots. It interacts with several TGACG-containing elements that have been characterized from viral and T-DNA genes, the prototypes of which are the as-1 element of the CaMV 35S promoter and the ocs element from the octopine synthase promoter. This class of cis-acting elements can respond to auxin and salicylic acid treatments. Consistent with these observations, we have shown that ASF-1 can interact with promoter elements of an auxin-inducible tobacco gene GNT35, encoding a glutathione S-transferase. Characterization of the nuclear factors that make up ASF-1 activity in vivo will be an important step toward understanding this induction phenomenon. The TGA family of basic-leucine-zipper (bZIP) proteins are good candidates for the ASF-1 nuclear factor. However, there may be as many as seven distinct TGA genes in Arabidopsis, five of which have now been reported. In this study, we expressed the cDNAs that encode four of these five Arabidopsis TGA factors in vitro and compared their DNA-binding behavior using two types of TGACG-containing elements. With specific antisera prepared against three of the five known Arabidopsis TGA factors, we also investigated the relative abundance of these three proteins within the ASF-1 activities of root and leaf nuclear extracts. Our results indicate that these TGA factors bind to DNA with different degrees of cooperativity and their relative affinity toward as-1 also can differ significantly. The results of a supershift assay suggested that only one of the three TGA factors represented a significant component of nuclear ASF-1 activity. Arabidopsis TGA2 comprises approximately 33 and 50% of the ASF-1 activity detected in root and leaf nuclear extracts respectively. These results suggest that each member of the TGA factor family may be differentially regulated and that they may play different roles by virtue of their distinct DNA

  8. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) as a quantitative pharmacodynamic parameter for tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Orla; Tornatore, Kathleen M; O'Loughlin, Kieran L; Venuto, Rocco C; Minderman, Hans

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is a family of transcription factors involved in regulating the immune response. The canonical NFAT pathway is calcium-dependent and upon activation, NFAT is dephosphorylated by the phosphatase, calcineurin. This results in its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and transcription of downstream target genes that include the cytokines IL-2, IL-10, and IFNγ. Calcineurin inhibitors including tacrolimus inhibit the NFAT pathway and are used as immunosuppressants in transplant settings to prevent graft rejection. There is, as yet, no direct means to monitor tacrolimus pharmacodynamics. In this study, a rapid, quantitative, image cytometry-based measurement of nuclear translocation of NFAT1 is used to evaluate NFAT activation in T cells and its tacrolimus-induced inhibition. A strong dose-dependent correlation between NFAT1 inhibition and tacrolimus dose is demonstrated in vitro. Time kinetic analysis of NFAT1 inhibition in plasma from stable renal transplant recipients before and after an in vivo dose with tacrolimus correlated with the expected pharmacokinetic profile of tacrolimus. This was further corroborated by analysis of patients' autologous CD4 and CD8 T cells. This is the first report to show that the measurement of NFAT1 activation potential by nuclear translocation can be used as a direct, sensitive, reproducible and quantitative pharmacodynamic readout for tacrolimus action. These results, and the rapid turnaround time for this assay, warrant its evaluation in a larger clinical setting to assess its role in therapeutic drug monitoring of calcineurin inhibitors.

  9. Nuclear localization of platelet-activating factor receptor controls retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    K Bhosle, Vikrant; Rivera, José Carlos; Zhou, Tianwei (Ellen); Omri, Samy; Sanchez, Melanie; Hamel, David; Zhu, Tang; Rouget, Raphael; Rabea, Areej Al; Hou, Xin; Lahaie, Isabelle; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a pleiotropic phospholipid with proinflammatory, procoagulant and angiogenic actions on the vasculature. We and others have reported the presence of PAF receptor (Ptafr) at intracellular sites such as the nucleus. However, mechanisms of localization and physiologic functions of intracellular Ptafr remain poorly understood. We hereby identify the importance of C-terminal motif of the receptor and uncover novel roles of Rab11a GTPase and importin-5 in nuclear translocation of Ptafr in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Nuclear localization of Ptafr is independent of exogenous PAF stimulation as well as intracellular PAF biosynthesis. Moreover, nuclear Ptafr is responsible for the upregulation of unique set of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, in vitro and ex vivo. We further corroborate the intracrine PAF signaling, resulting in angiogenesis in vivo, using Ptafr antagonists with distinct plasma membrane permeability. Collectively, our findings show that nuclear Ptafr translocates in an agonist-independent manner, and distinctive functions of Ptafr based on its cellular localization point to another dimension needed for pharmacologic selectivity of drugs. PMID:27462464

  10. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) plays a role in SV40 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, Kate; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2008-03-01

    Recent evidence highlighted a role for the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), in the transcription of the human polyomavirus JCV. Here we show that NFAT is also important in the transcriptional control of the related polyomavirus, Simian Virus 40 (SV40). Inhibition of NFAT activity reduced SV40 infection of Vero, 293A, and HeLa cells, and this block occurred at the stage of viral transcription. Both NFAT3 and NFAT4 bound to the SV40 promoter through {kappa}B sites located within the 72 bp repeated enhancer region. In Vero cells, NFAT was involved in late transcription, but in HeLa and 293A cells both early and late viral transcription required NFAT activity. SV40 large T-Ag was found to increase NFAT activity and provided a positive feedback loop to transactivate the SV40 promoter.

  11. Daily variation of constitutively activated nuclear factor kappa B (NFKB) in rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Cecon, Erika; Fernandes, Pedro A; Pinato, Luciana; Ferreira, Zulma S; Markus, Regina P

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, the production of melatonin by the pineal gland is mainly controlled by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the master clock of the circadian system. We have previously shown that agents involved in inflammatory responses, such as cytokines and corticosterone, modulate pineal melatonin synthesis. The nuclear transcription factor NFKB, detected by our group in the rat pineal gland, modulates this effect. Here, we evaluated a putative constitutive role for the pineal gland NFKB pathway. Male rats were kept under 12 h:12 h light-dark (LD) cycle or under constant darkness (DD) condition. Nuclear NFKB was quantified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay on pineal glands obtained from animals killed throughout the day at different times. Nuclear content of NFKB presented a daily rhythm only in LD-entrained animals. During the light phase, the amount of NFKB increased continuously, and a sharp drop occurred when lights were turned off. Animals maintained in a constant light environment until ZT 18 showed diurnal levels of nuclear NFKB at ZT15 and ZT18. Propranolol (20 mg/kg, i.p., ZT 11) treatment, which inhibits nocturnal sympathetic input, impaired nocturnal decrease of NFKB only at ZT18. A similar effect was observed in free-running animals, which secreted less nocturnal melatonin. Because melatonin reduces constitutive NFKB activation in cultured pineal glands, we propose that this indolamine regulates this transcription factor pathway in the rat pineal gland, but not at the LD transition. The controversial results regarding the inhibition of pineal function by constant light or blocking sympathetic neurotransmission are discussed according to the hypothesis that the prompt effect of lights-off is not mediated by noradrenaline, which otherwise contributes to maintaining low levels of nuclear NFKB at night. In summary, we report here a novel transcription factor in the pineal gland, which exhibits a constitutive rhythm dependent on environmental photic

  12. Nuclear Factor-κB Activation in Schwann Cells Regulates Regeneration and Re-myelination

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Paul D.; Johnstone, Joshua T.; Ramos, Angel Y.; Liebl, Daniel J.; Bunge, Mary B.; Bethea, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are crucial for peripheral nerve development and regeneration; however, the intrinsic regulatory mechanisms governing post-injury responses are poorly understood. Activation and deacetylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF- κB) in SCs have been implicated as prerequisites for peripheral nerve myelination. Using GFAP-IκBα-dn mice in which NF- κB transcriptional activation is inhibited in SCs we found no discernable differences in the quantity or structure of myelinated axons in adult facial nerves. Following crush injury, axonal regeneration was impaired at 31 days and significantly enhanced at 65 days in transgenic animals. Compact re-myelination and Remak bundle organization were significantly compromised at 31 days and restored by 65 days post injury. Together, these data indicate that inhibition of NF- κB activation in SCs transiently delays axonal regeneration and compact re-myelination. Manipulating the temporal activation of nuclear factor-κB in Schwann cells may offer new therapeutic avenues for PNS and CNS regeneration. PMID:22275133

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus M2-1 protein induces the activation of nuclear factor kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, Kerstin . E-mail: reimers.kerstin@mh-hannover.de; Buchholz, Katja; Werchau, Hermann

    2005-01-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induces the production of a number of cytokines and chemokines by activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). The activation of NF-{kappa}B has been shown to depend on viral replication in the infected cells. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of RSV M2-1 protein, a transcriptional processivity and anti-termination factor, is sufficient to activate NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells. Electromobility shift assays show increased NF-{kappa}B complexes in the nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells. M2-1 protein is found in nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells and in RSV-infected cells. Co-immunoprecipitations of nuclear extracts of M2-1-expressing cells and of RSV-infected cells revealed an association of M2-1 with Rel A protein. Furthermore, the activation of NF-{kappa}B depends on the C-terminus of the RSV M2-1 protein, as shown by NF-{kappa}B-induced gene expression of a reporter gene construct.

  14. Modulation of nuclear factor-κB activity can influence the susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kalergis, Alexis M; Iruretagoyena, Mirentxu I; Barrientos, Magaly J; González, Pablo A; Herrada, Andres A; Leiva, Eduardo D; Gutiérrez, Miguel A; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Jacobelli, Sergio H

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), result from deficiencies in self-antigen tolerance processes, which require regulated dendritic cell (DC) function. In this study we evaluated the phenotype of DCs during the onset of SLE in a mouse model, in which deletion of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb leads to the production of anti-nuclear antibodies and glomerulonephritis. Splenic DCs from FcγRIIb-deficient mice suffering from SLE showed increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Furthermore, diseased mice showed an altered function of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor, which is involved in DC maturation. Compared with healthy animals, expression of the inhibitory molecule IκB-α was significantly decreased in mice suffering from SLE. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activity in FcγRIIb-deficient mice led to reduced susceptibility to SLE and prevented symptoms, such as anti-nuclear antibodies and kidney damage. Our data suggest that the occurrence of SLE is significantly influenced by alterations of NF-κB function, which can be considered as a new therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:19016912

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of BK Virus by Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Joslynn A.; Manley, Kate; Dugan, Aisling S.; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    The human polyomavirus BK virus (BKV) is a common virus for which 80 to 90% of the adult population is seropositive. BKV reactivation in immunosuppressed patients or renal transplant patients is the primary cause of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVN). Using the Dunlop strain of BKV, we found that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important regulatory role in BKV infection. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that NFAT4 bound to the viral promoter and regulated viral transcription and infection. The mutational analysis of the NFAT binding sites demonstrated complex functional interactions between NFAT, c-fos, c-jun, and the p65 subunit of NF-κB that together influence promoter activity and viral growth. These data indicate that NFAT is required for BKV infection and is involved in a complex regulatory network that both positively and negatively influences promoter activity and viral infection. PMID:19955309

  16. Nuclear translocation of phospholipase C-zeta, an egg-activating factor, during early embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Yoshie; Ito, Masahiko; Shirakawa, Hideki; Shikano, Tomohide; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Katsuyuki; Miyazaki, Shunichi . E-mail: shunm@research.twmu.ac.jp

    2005-05-13

    Phospholipase C-zeta (PLC{zeta}), a strong candidate of the egg-activating sperm factor, causes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} oscillations and egg activation, and is subsequently accumulated into the pronucleus (PN), when expressed in mouse eggs by injection of RNA encoding PLC{zeta}. Changes in the localization of expressed PLC{zeta} were investigated by tagging with a fluorescent protein. PLC{zeta} began to translocate into the PN formed at 5-6 h after RNA injection and increased there. Observation in the same embryo revealed that PLC{zeta} in the PN dispersed to the cytoplasm upon nuclear envelope breakdown and translocated again into the nucleus after cleavage. The dynamics was found in the second mitosis as well. When RNA was injected into fertilization-originated 1-cell embryos or blastomere(s) of 2-8-cell embryos, the nuclear localization of expressed PLC{zeta} was recognized in every embryo up to blastocyst. Thus, PLC{zeta} exhibited alternative cytoplasm/nucleus localization during development. This supports the view that the sperm factor could control cell cycle-dependent generation of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in early embryogenesis.

  17. Hyperglycemia Exacerbates Burn-Induced Liver Inflammation via Noncanonical Nuclear Factor-κB Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Gabriela A; Tilton, Ronald G; Herndon, David N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemia and inflammation are hallmarks of burn injury. In this study, we used a rat model of hyperglycemia and burn injury to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia on inflammatory responses in the liver. Hyperglycemia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats with streptozotocin (STZ) (35–40 mg/kg), followed by a 60% third-degree scald burn injury. Cytokine levels (by multiplex, in cytosolic liver extracts), hormones (by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], in serum), nuclear factor (NF)-κB protein deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) binding (by ELISA, in nuclear liver extracts) and liver functional panel (using VetScan, in serum) were measured at different time points up to 7 d after burn injury. Blood glucose significantly increased after burn injury in both groups with different temporal patterns. Hyperglycemic rats were capable of endogenous insulin secretion, which was enhanced significantly versus controls 12 h after burn injury. DNA binding data of liver nuclear extracts showed a robust and significant activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway in the hyperglycemic versus control burn animals, including increased NF-κB–inducing kinase expression (p < 0.05). Liver acute-phase proteins and cytokine expression were increased, whereas secretion of constitutive proteins was decreased after burn injury in hyperglycemic versus control animals (p < 0.05). These results indicate that burn injury to the skin rapidly activated canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in the liver. Robust activation of the NF-κB noncanonical pathway was associated with increased expression of inflammatory markers and acute-phase proteins, and impaired glucose metabolism. Hyperglycemia is detrimental to burn outcome by augmenting inflammation mediated by hepatic noncanonical NF-κB pathway activation. PMID:22572938

  18. Macrophage activation: role of toll-like receptors, nitric oxide, and nuclear factor kappa B.

    PubMed

    Billack, Blase

    2006-10-15

    Macrophages play an important role in host-defense and inflammation. In response to an immune challenge, macrophages become activated and produce proinflammatory mediators that contribute to nonspecific immunity. The mediators released by activated macrophages include: superoxide anion; reactive nitrogen intermediates, such as nitric oxide and peroxynitrite; bioactive lipids; and cytokines. Although essential to the immune response, overproduction of certain macrophage-derived mediators during an immune challenge or inflammatory response can result in tissue injury and cellular death. The present report is focused on understanding some of the molecular mechanisms used by macrophages to produce reactive nitrogen intermediates in response to immunostimulatory agents such as heat shock protein 60 and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The role of Toll-like receptors and transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) in the innate immune response is also described. A basic understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for macrophage activation should serve as a foundation for novel drug development aimed at modulating macrophage activity.

  19. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and osteoprotegerin levels in gingival crevicular fluid

    PubMed Central

    Sarlati, Fatemeh; Sattari, Mandana; Razzaghi, Shilan; Nasiri, Malihe

    2012-01-01

    Background: Osteoclastogenesis is coordinated by the interaction of three members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily: Osteoprotegerin (OPG)/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL)/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK). The aim of this study was to investigate RANKL and OPG levels, and their relative ratio in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis, as well as healthy controls. Materials and Methods: In this analytical study, GCF was obtained from healthy (n = 10), mild chronic periodontitis (n = 18), moderate chronic periodontitis (n = 18), severe chronic periodontitis (n = 20), and generalized aggressive periodontitis (n = 20) subjects. RANKL and OPG concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical tests used were Kruskal–Wallis test, Mann–Whitney U rank sum test, and Spearman's rank correlation analysis. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Mean RANKL concentration showed no statistically significant differences between groups (P = 0.58). There were also no significant differences between mean OPG concentration in the five groups (P = 0.0.56). Moreover, relative RANKL/OPG ratio did not reveal a significant difference between the three study group subjects: healthy, chronic periodontitis (mild, moderate, severe), and aggressive periodontitis (P = 0.41). There was statistically significant correlation between the concentration of sRANKL and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) in moderate chronic periodontitis patients (R = 0.48, P = 0.04). There was also negative correlation between OPG concentration and CAL in moderate chronic periodontitis patients, although not significant (R = −0.13). Conclusion: RANKL was prominent in periodontitis sites, especially in moderate periodontitis patients, whereas OPG was not detectable in some diseased sites with bleeding on probing, supporting the role of these two molecules in

  20. Diabetes-induced activation of nuclear transcriptional factor in the retina, and its inhibition by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Kowluru, Renu A; Koppolu, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Chen, Shali

    2003-11-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in the retina in diabetes, and long-term administration of antioxidants inhibits the development of retinopathy in diabetic rats. The purpose of this study is to determine how diabetes affects the activation of a redox-sensitive nuclear transcriptional factor in the retina, NF-kappaB, and its inhibition by antioxidants. Alloxan diabetic rats were assigned to receive standard diet or the diet supplemented with multiple antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, Trolox, dl alpha-tocopherol acetate, N-acetyl cysteine, beta-carotene, and selenium for up to 14 months. NF-kappaB activation, oxidative stress and nitric oxides were measured in the retina at 2, 8 and 14 months of diabetes. Retinal NF-kappaB was activated by about 60% at two months after induction of diabetes, remained activated for up to 14 months of diabetes, and the duration of diabetes had no effect on the intensity of NF-kappaB activation. Similarly, oxidative stress and nitric oxides were elevated by over 50% in the retina of rats diabetic for 14 months, and nitrotyrosine levels were elevated by over two folds. Administration of the antioxidants to the rats for the entire duration of diabetes inhibited activation of NF-kappaB and elevations in oxidative stress, nitric oxides and nitrotyrosine formation without ameliorating the severity of hyperglycemia. These in vivo results were confirmed by in vitro studies showing that high glucose activates NF-kappaB and elevates NO and lipid peroxides in both retinal endothelial cells and pericytes that can be inhibited by antioxidants. Thus, the results suggest that the activation of retinal NF-KB in diabetes is an early event in the development of retinopathy, and it remains active when the retinal capillary cell death is accelerating, and histopathology is developing. Beneficial effects of antioxidants on the development of diabetic retinopathy might involve inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and its downstream pathways in the retina.

  1. Molecular imaging of nuclear factor-Y transcriptional activity maps proliferation sites in live animals

    PubMed Central

    Goeman, Frauke; Manni, Isabella; Artuso, Simona; Ramachandran, Balaji; Toietta, Gabriele; Bossi, Gianluca; Rando, Gianpaolo; Cencioni, Chiara; Germoni, Sabrina; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Bacchetti, Silvia; Maggi, Adriana; Sacchi, Ada; Ciana, Paolo; Piaggio, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    In vivo imaging involving the use of genetically engineered animals is an innovative powerful tool for the noninvasive assessment of the molecular and cellular events that are often targets of therapy. On the basis of the knowledge that the activity of the nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factor is restricted in vitro to proliferating cells, we have generated a transgenic reporter mouse, called MITO-Luc (for mitosis-luciferase), in which an NF-Y–dependent promoter controls luciferase expression. In these mice, bioluminescence imaging of NF-Y activity visualizes areas of physiological cell proliferation and regeneration during response to injury. Using this tool, we highlight for the first time a role of NF-Y activity on hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. MITO-Luc reporter mice should facilitate investigations into the involvement of genes in cell proliferation and provide a useful model for studying aberrant proliferation in disease pathogenesis. They should be also useful in the development of new anti/proproliferative drugs and assessment of their efficacy and side effects on nontarget tissues. PMID:22379106

  2. Molecular imaging of nuclear factor-Y transcriptional activity maps proliferation sites in live animals.

    PubMed

    Goeman, Frauke; Manni, Isabella; Artuso, Simona; Ramachandran, Balaji; Toietta, Gabriele; Bossi, Gianluca; Rando, Gianpaolo; Cencioni, Chiara; Germoni, Sabrina; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Bacchetti, Silvia; Maggi, Adriana; Sacchi, Ada; Ciana, Paolo; Piaggio, Giulia

    2012-04-01

    In vivo imaging involving the use of genetically engineered animals is an innovative powerful tool for the noninvasive assessment of the molecular and cellular events that are often targets of therapy. On the basis of the knowledge that the activity of the nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factor is restricted in vitro to proliferating cells, we have generated a transgenic reporter mouse, called MITO-Luc (for mitosis-luciferase), in which an NF-Y-dependent promoter controls luciferase expression. In these mice, bioluminescence imaging of NF-Y activity visualizes areas of physiological cell proliferation and regeneration during response to injury. Using this tool, we highlight for the first time a role of NF-Y activity on hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. MITO-Luc reporter mice should facilitate investigations into the involvement of genes in cell proliferation and provide a useful model for studying aberrant proliferation in disease pathogenesis. They should be also useful in the development of new anti/proproliferative drugs and assessment of their efficacy and side effects on nontarget tissues. PMID:22379106

  3. Structure activity relationship of phenolic diterpenes from Salvia officinalis as activators of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Fischedick, Justin T; Standiford, Miranda; Johnson, Delinda A; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to activate cytoprotective genes which may be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. In order to better understand the structure activity relationship of phenolic diterpenes from Salvia officinalis L., we isolated carnosic acid, carnosol, epirosmanol, rosmanol, 12-methoxy-carnosic acid, sageone, and carnosaldehyde using polyamide column, centrifugal partition chromatography, and semi-preparative high performance liquid chromatography. Isolated compounds were screened in vitro for their ability to active the Nrf2 and general cellular toxicity using mouse primary cortical cultures. All compounds except 12-methoxy-carnosic acid were able to activate the antioxidant response element. Furthermore both carnosol and carnoasldehyde were able to induce Nrf2-dependent gene expression as well as protect mouse primary cortical neuronal cultures from H(2)O(2) induced cell death.

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Activation in Diabetic Nephropathy: A Hidden Target

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Shaaban; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S.D.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, oxidative stress and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) dysfunction have been implicated in diabetic nephropathy (DN) progression, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are far from being fully understood. In addition to the systemic RAS, the existence of a local intrarenal RAS in renal proximal tubular cells has been recognized. Angiotensinogen is the sole precursor of all angiotensins (Ang). Intrarenal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, Ang II level and RAS gene expression are up-regulated in diabetes, indicating that intrarenal ROS and RAS activation play an important role in DN. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway is one of the major protective processes that occurs in response to intracellular oxidative stress. Nrf2 stimulates an array of antioxidant enzymes that convert excessive ROS to less reactive or less damaging forms. Recent studies have, however, revealed that Nrf2 activation might have other undesirable effects in diabetic animals and in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge of the relationship between ROS, Nrf2 and intra renal RAS activation in DN progression as well as possible novel target(s) for DN treatment. PMID:26213634

  5. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Feldman, Nicole E; Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T; Strand, Matthew J; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R; Kinney, William H; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Voelker, Dennis R; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy.

  6. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Feldman, Nicole E; Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T; Strand, Matthew J; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R; Kinney, William H; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Voelker, Dennis R; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  7. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activation Decreases Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T.; Strand, Matthew J.; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R.; Kinney, William H.; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ordway, Diane J.; Chan, Edward D.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  8. Nuclear factor kappaB/p49 is a negative regulatory factor in nerve growth factor-induced choline acetyltransferase promoter activity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Toliver-Kinsky, T; Wood, T; Perez-Polo, J R

    2000-12-01

    Anovel nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) binding site has been identified within the promoter region of the mouse gene encoding choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the enzyme that synthesizes acetylcholine and has been implicated in the cognitive deficits associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease. This binding site, which is located within the nerve growth factor (NGF)-responsive enhancer element, was recognized by the NF-kappaB protein p49 but not p65 or p50. p49 from both basal forebrain and PC12 nuclear extracts interacted with this specific sequence in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Mutation of the NF-kappaB site caused an increase in NGF-induced promoter activation, whereas overexpression of p49 in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells caused a decrease in endogenous ChAT enzyme activity and a decrease in promoter activity that was specifically mediated through this NF-kappaB binding site. Treatment of PC12 cells with NGF resulted in a drastic reduction in nuclear p49 binding to the ChAT NF-kappaB site after 24 h, but nuclear p49 levels were not altered, suggesting that late NGF-mediated events prevent binding of p49 to the ChAT promoter by an unknown mechanism other than nuclear translocation. Decreased ChAT expression and increased NF-kappaB activity in the brain are associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease. These data indicate that p49 is a negative regulator of ChAT expression and suggest a possible mechanism for aging-associated declines in cholinergic function.

  9. Activity and function of the nuclear factor kappaB pathway in human parathyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Corbetta, S; Vicentini, L; Ferrero, S; Lania, A; Mantovani, G; Cordella, D; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies indicate that nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription factor is deregulated and overexpressed in several human neoplasias. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the NF-kappaB pathway may be involved in parathyroid tumorigenesis. For this purpose, we determined the level of NF-kappaB activity, evaluated as phosphorylation of the transcription subunit p65, its modulation by specific and non-specific agents and its impact on cyclin D1 expression. Phosphorylated p65 levels present in parathyroid neoplasias (n = 13) were significantly lower than those found in normal tissues (n = 3; mean optical density (OD) 0.19 +/- 0.1 vs 0.4 +/- 0.1, P = 0.007), but there was no significant difference between adenomas and secondary and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)-related hyperplasia. Conversely, MEN2A (Cys634Arg)-related parathyroid samples showed extremely high levels of phosphorylated p65 that exhibited a nuclear localization at immunohistochemistry (n = 3). Phosphorylated p65 levels negatively correlated with menin expression (r(2) = 0.42, P = 0.05). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) caused a significant increase in phosphorylated p65 levels (183 +/- 13.8% of basal) while calcium sensing receptor (CaR) agonists exerted a significant inhibition (19.2 +/- 3.3% of basal). Although TNFalpha was poorly effective in increasing cyclin D1 expression, NF-kappaB blockade by the specific inhibitor BAY11-7082 reduced FCS-stimulated cyclin D1 by about 60%. Finally, the inhibitory effects of CaR and BAY11-7082 on cyclin D1 expression were not additive - by blocking NF-kappaB CaR activation did not induce a further reduction in cyclin D1 levels. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that in parathyroid tumors: (1) p65 phosphorylation was dramatically increased by RET constitutive activation and was negatively correlated with menin expression, (2) p65 phosphorylation was increased and reduced by TNFalpha and CaR agonists respectively

  10. Activation of hippocampal nuclear factor-kappa B by retrieval is required for memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Mariano; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Blake, Mariano; de la Fuente, Veronica; Acosta, Gabriela; Baratti, Carlos; Romano, Arturo

    2007-12-01

    Initially, memory is labile and requires consolidation to become stable. However, several studies support that consolidated memories can undergo a new period of lability after retrieval. The mechanistic differences of this process, termed reconsolidation, with the consolidation process are under debate, including the participation of hippocampus. Up to this point, few reports describe molecular changes and, in particular, transcription factor (TF) involvement in memory restabilization. Increasing evidence supports the participation of the TF nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) in memory consolidation. Here, we demonstrate that the inhibition of NF-kappaB after memory reactivation impairs retention of a hippocampal-dependent inhibitory avoidance task in mice. We used two independent disruptive strategies to reach this conclusion. First, we administered intracerebroventricular or intrahippocampal sulfasalazine, an inhibitor of IKK (IkappaB kinase), the kinase that activates NF-kappaB. Second, we infused intracerebroventricular or intrahippocampal kappaB decoy, a direct inhibitor of NF-kappaB consisting of a double-stranded DNA oligonucleotide that contains the kappaB consensus sequence. When injected immediately after memory retrieval, sulfasalazine or kappaB decoy (Decoy) impaired long-term retention. In contrast, a one base mutated kappaB decoy (mDecoy) had no effect. Furthermore, we also found NF-kappaB activation in the hippocampus, with a peak 15 min after memory retrieval. This activation was earlier than that found during consolidation. Together, these results indicate that NF-kappaB is an important transcriptional regulator in memory consolidation and reconsolidation in hippocampus, although the temporal kinetics of activation differs between the two processes.

  11. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Is Activated in the Endothelium of Retinal Microvessels in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zetterqvist, Anna V.; Blanco, Fabiana; Öhman, Jenny; Kotova, Olga; Berglund, Lisa M.; de Frutos Garcia, Sergio; Al-Naemi, Raed; Wigren, Maria; McGuire, Paul G.; Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V.; Gomez, Maria F.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR) remains unclear but hyperglycemia is an established risk factor. Endothelial dysfunction and changes in Ca2+ signaling have been shown to precede the onset of DR. We recently demonstrated that high extracellular glucose activates the Ca2+/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor NFAT in cerebral arteries and aorta, promoting the expression of inflammatory markers. Here we show, using confocal immunofluorescence, that NFAT is expressed in the endothelium of retinal microvessels and is readily activated by high glucose. This was inhibited by the NFAT blocker A-285222 as well as by the ectonucleotidase apyrase, suggesting a mechanism involving the release of extracellular nucleotides. Acute hyperglycemia induced by an IP-GTT (intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test) resulted in increased NFATc3 nuclear accumulation and NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity in retinal vessels of NFAT-luciferase reporter mice. In both Akita (Ins2+/−) and streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic mice, NFAT transcriptional activity was elevated in retinal vessels. In vivo inhibition of NFAT with A-285222 decreased the expression of OPN and ICAM-1 mRNA in retinal vessels, prevented a diabetes driven downregulation of anti-inflammatory IL-10 in retina, and abrogated the increased vascular permeability observed in diabetic mice. Results identify NFAT signaling as a putative target for treatment of microvascular complications in diabetes. PMID:25918731

  12. Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and not activator protein-1 in cellular response to nickel compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; Davidson, Gerard; Li, Jingxia; Yan, Yan; Chen, Fei; Costa, Max; Chen, Lung Chi; Huang, Chuanshu

    2002-01-01

    The predominant exposure route for nickel compounds is by inhalation, and several studies have indicated the correlation between nickel exposure and respiratory cancers. The tumor-promoting effects of nickel compounds are thought to be associated with their transactivation of transcription factors. We have investigated the possible activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor KB (NF-kappaB) in mouse C141 epidermal cells and fibroblasts 3T3 and B82, and human bronchoepithelial BEAS-2B cells in response to nickel compound exposure. Our results show that NF-kappaB activity is induced by nickel exposure in 3T3 and BEAS-2B cells. Conversely, similar nickel treatment of these cells did not induce AP-1 activity, suggesting that nickel tumorigenesis occurs through NF-kappaB and not AP-1. We also investigated the role of NF-kappaB in the induction of Cap43 by nickel compounds using dominant negative mutant Ikappabeta kinase b-KM BEAS-2B transfectants. PMID:12426142

  13. Nuclear factor RIP140 modulates transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Cavaillès, V; Dauvois, S; L'Horset, F; Lopez, G; Hoare, S; Kushner, P J; Parker, M G

    1995-01-01

    A conserved region in the hormone-dependent activation domain AF2 of nuclear receptors plays an important role in transcriptional activation. We have characterized a novel nuclear protein, RIP140, that specifically interacts in vitro with this domain of the estrogen receptor. This interaction was increased by estrogen, but not by anti-estrogens and the in vitro binding capacity of mutant receptors correlates with their ability to stimulate transcription. RIP140 also interacts with estrogen receptor in intact cells and modulates its transcriptional activity in the presence of estrogen, but not the anti-estrogen 4-hydroxytamoxifen. In view of its widespread expression in mammalian cells, RIP140 may interact with other members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors and thereby act as a potential co-activator of hormone-regulated gene transcription. Images PMID:7641693

  14. Aberrant activation of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Tsung-Chieh; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Hsieh, Yi-Yueh; Chen, Tse-Chin; Yeh, Chien-Yu; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lin, Deng-Yn; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 (NFAT2), the major NFAT protein in peripheral T cells, in sustained T cell activation and intractable inflammation in human ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: We used two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis, immunohistochemistry, double immunohistochemical staining, and confocal microscopy to inspect the expression of NFAT2 in 107, 15, 48 and 5 cases of UC, Crohn’s disease (CD), non-specific colitis, and 5 healthy individuals, respectively. RESULTS: Up-regulation with profound nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 of lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) of colonic mucosa was found specifically in the affected colonic mucosa from patients with UC, as compared to CD or NC (P < 0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 primarily occurred in CD8+T, but was less prominent in CD4+ T cells or CD20+B cells. It was strongly associated with the disease activity, including endoscopic stage (τ = 0.2145, P = 0.0281) and histologic grade (τ = 0.4167, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: We disclose for the first time the nucleo-translocation/activatin of NFAT2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis. Activation of NFAT2 was specific for ulcerative colitis and highly associated with disease activity. Since activation of NFAT2 is implicated in an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop of sustained T-cell activation and NFAT proteins play key roles in the calcium/calcineurin signaling pathways, our results not only provide new insights into the mechanism for sustained intractable inflammation, but also suggest the calcium-calcineurin/NFAT pathway as a new therapeutic target for ulcerative colitis. PMID:18350607

  15. Activation of nuclear factor kappa B pathway and reduction of hypothalamic oxytocin following hypothalamic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Christian L.; D’Ambrosio, Gabrielle; Elfers, Clinton

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothalamic obesity (HO) occurs in patients with tumors and lesions in the medial hypothalamic region. In this study, a hyperphagic rat model of combined medial hypothalamic lesions (CMHL) was used to test which specific inflammatory molecules are involved. Methods In order to target specific homeostatic medial hypothalamic nuclei (arcuate, ventromedial, and dorsomedial nuclei), male Sprague-Dawley rats (age of 8 weeks, ~250 g body weight) received four electrolytic lesions or sham surgery. Post-surgery food intake and weight changes were tracked and hypothalamic gene expression for inflammatory molecules as well as anorexigenic peptide oxytocin 7 days and 7 months post-surgery were tested. Results Seven days post-surgery, average food intake increased by 23%, and body weight gain had increased by 68%. Toll-like 4 receptor/nuclear factor–κB (TLR4/NF–κB)—pathway was specifically activated in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), resulting in 3-fold higher tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, 10-fold higher interleukin (IL) 1-β mRNA levels, and higher expression of suppression of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 3, while oxytocin mRNA levels were significantly reduced in CMHL rats versus sham surgery rats 7 days post-surgery. At 7 months, inflammation was less stimulated in MBH of CMHL rats compared to 7 days post-surgery and SOCS 3 as well as oxytocin mRNA levels were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion Medial hypothalamic lesions are associated with strong post-surgery hyperphagia and activation of TLR4/NF–κB—pathway as well as reduced expression of oxytocin in the hypothalamus. PMID:27512604

  16. Lymphotoxin β receptor activation promotes bladder cancer in a nuclear factor-κB-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, MO; DUAN, XIUZHI; ZHOU, PING; ZHOU, WU; WU, XIULING; XU, SIQI; CHEN, YUHUA; TAO, ZHIHUA

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) is the most common tumor of the urinary system. Chronic inflammation in the papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP)may contribute to carcinogenesis, including that of BCa, via poorly understood mechanisms. In this study, we show that the lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) is upregulated in BCa via activation of the canonical and non-canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. The mRNA expression of LTβR in 81 BCa, 10 chronic cystitis and 23 healthy bladder mucosa tissues was investigated by reverse transcription-fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-FQ-PCR), and protein expression was studied in 73 BCa, 30 cystitis and 15 healthy paraffin-embedded tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. Both LTβR mRNA and protein were upregulated in BCa and cystitis compared to the healthy group (P<0.05). The mRNA level of the downstream NF-κB canonical pathway p65 gene and of the non-canonical pathway RelB gene were higher in the BCa and cystitis groups compared to the healthy one. The level of phosphorylated p65 (p-p65) protein of the canonical NF-κB pathway and that of p52, a protein of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway, were also higher in the BCa and cystitis group compared to the healthy group. The levels of these proteins significantly correlated to the pathological grade, clinical stage and lymph node metastasis of BCa patients (P<0.05). In addition, there was a positive correlation between LTβR and NF-κB pathway proteins. Thus, LTβR signaling may be involved in promoting BCa through the NF-κB pathway, and which may represent the molecular link between inflammation and BCa. PMID:25369740

  17. Lymphotoxin β receptor activation promotes bladder cancer in a nuclear factor-κB-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mo; Duan, Xiuzhi; Zhou, Ping; Zhou, Wu; Wu, Xiuling; Xu, Siqi; Chen, Yuhua; Tao, Zhihua

    2015-02-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) is the most common tumor of the urinary system. Chronic inflammation in the papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP)may contribute to carcinogenesis, including that of BCa, via poorly understood mechanisms. In this study, we show that the lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) is upregulated in BCa via activation of the canonical and non-canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. The mRNA expression of LTβR in 81 BCa, 10 chronic cystitis and 23 healthy bladder mucosa tissues was investigated by reverse transcription-fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-FQ-PCR), and protein expression was studied in 73 BCa, 30 cystitis and 15 healthy paraffin-embedded tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. Both LTβR mRNA and protein were upregulated in BCa and cystitis compared to the healthy group (P<0.05). The mRNA level of the downstream NF-κB canonical pathway p65 gene and of the non-canonical pathway RelB gene were higher in the BCa and cystitis groups compared to the healthy one. The level of phosphorylated p65 (p-p65) protein of the canonical NF-κB pathway and that of p52, a protein of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway, were also higher in the BCa and cystitis group compared to the healthy group. The levels of these proteins significantly correlated to the pathological grade, clinical stage and lymph node metastasis of BCa patients (P<0.05). In addition, there was a positive correlation between LTβR and NF-κB pathway proteins. Thus, LTβR signaling may be involved in promoting BCa through the NF-κB pathway, and which may represent the molecular link between inflammation and BCa.

  18. Da0324, an inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB activation, demonstrates selective antitumor activity on human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Xia, Yiqun; Chen, Qiuxiang; Li, Wulan; Chen, Dahui; Ye, Hui; Zhao, Chengguang; Du, Xiaojing; Shi, Dengjian; Wu, Jianzhang; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is constitutively activated in a variety of human cancers, including gastric cancer. NF-κB inhibitors that selectively kill cancer cells are urgently needed for cancer treatment. Curcumin is a potent inhibitor of NF-κB activation. Unfortunately, the therapeutic potential of curcumin is limited by its relatively low potency and poor cellular bioavailability. In this study, we presented a novel NF-κB inhibitor named Da0324, a synthetic asymmetric mono-carbonyl analog of curcumin. The purpose of this study is to research the expression of NF-κB in gastric cancer and the antitumor activity and mechanism of Da0324 on human gastric cancer cells. Methods The expressions between gastric cancer tissues/cells and normal gastric tissues/cells of NF-κB were evaluated by Western blot. The inhibition viability of compounds on human gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901, BGC-823, MGC-803, and normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell line GES-1 was assessed with the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Absorption spectrum method and high-performance liquid chromatography method detected the stability of the compound in vitro. The compound-induced changes of inducible NF-κB activation in the SGC-7901 and BGC-823 cells were examined by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence methods. The antitumor activity of compound was performed by clonogenic assay, matrigel invasion assay, flow cytometric analysis, Western blot analysis, and Hoechst 33258 staining assay. Results High levels of p65 were found in gastric cancer tissues and cells. Da0324 displayed higher growth inhibition against several types of gastric cancer cell lines and showed relatively low toxicity to GES-1. Moreover, Da0324 was more stable than curcumin in vitro. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence methods showed that Da0324 blocked NF-κB activation. In addition, Da0324 significantly inhibited tumor proliferation

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide Levels and Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) Activity Are Attenuated in the Setting of Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI)

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Kazi N; Polhemus, David J; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brewster, Luke P; Lefer, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystathionine γ-lyase, cystathionine β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase are endogenous enzymatic sources of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Functions of H2S are mediated by several targets including ion channels and signaling proteins. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 is responsible for the expression of antioxidant response element–regulated genes and is known to be upregulated by H2S. We examined the levels of H2S, H2S-producing enzymes, and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation status in skeletal muscle obtained from critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients. Methods and Results Gastrocnemius tissues were attained postamputation from human CLI and healthy control patients. We found mRNA and protein levels of cystathionine γ-lyase, cystathionine β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase were significantly decreased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients as compared to control. H2S and sulfane sulfur levels were significantly decreased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients. We also observed significant reductions in nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation as well as antioxidant proteins, such as Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in skeletal muscle of CLI patients. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, such as malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl formation, were significantly increased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients as compared to healthy controls. Conclusions The data demonstrate that H2S bioavailability and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation are both attenuated in CLI tissues concomitant with significantly increased oxidative stress. Reductions in the activity of H2S-producing enzymes may contribute to the pathogenesis of CLI. PMID:25977470

  20. Inhibition of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation by pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ).

    PubMed

    Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Koide, Naoki; Haque, Abedul; Tsolmongyn, Bilegtsaikhan; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Hashimoto, Shoji; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2012-02-29

    The effect of pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ) on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation was examined using RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. RANKL led to the formation of osteoclasts identified as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells in the culture of RAW 264.7 cells. However, PQQ inhibited the appearance of osteoclasts and prevented the decrease of F4/80 macrophage maturation marker on RANKL-stimulated cells, suggesting a preventive action of PQQ on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. PQQ inhibited the activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1), a key transcription factor of osteoclastogenesis, in RANKL-stimulated cells. On the other hand, PQQ did not inhibit the signaling pathway from RANK/RANKL binding to NFATc1 activation, including NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). PQQ augmented the expression of type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) and enhanced the IFN-β-mediated janus kinase (JAK1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1) expression. Moreover, PQQ reduced the expression level of c-Fos leading to the activation of NFATc1. Taken together, PQQ was suggested to prevent RANKL-induced osteoclast formation via the inactivation of NFATc1 by reduced c-Fos expression. The reduced c-Fos expression might be mediated by the enhanced IFN-β signaling due to augmented IFNAR expression.

  1. The AP-1 family member FOS blocks transcriptional activity of the nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Sirianni, Rosa; Nogueira, Edson; Bassett, Mary H.; Carr, Bruce R.; Suzuki, Takashi; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Andò, Sebastiano; Rainey, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Steroid production in the adrenal zona glomerulosa is under the control of angiotensin II (Ang II), which, upon binding to its receptor, activates protein kinase C (PKC) within these cells. PKC is a potent inhibitor of the steroidogenic enzyme CYP17. We have demonstrated that, in the ovary, PKC activates expression of FOS, a member of the AP-1 family, and increased expression of this gene is linked to CYP17 downregulation. However, the pathway and the molecular mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of PKC on CYP17 expression are not defined. Herein, we demonstrated that Ang II inhibited CYP17 through PKC and ERK1/2-activated FOS and that blocking FOS expression decreased PKC-mediated inhibition. Although CYP17 transcription was activated by the nuclear receptor SF-1, expression of FOS resulted in a decrease in SF-1-mediated gene transcription. FOS physically interacted with the hinge region of SF-1 and modulated its transactivity, thus preventing binding of cofactors such as SRC1 and CBP, which were necessary to fully activate CYP17 transcription. Collectively, these results indicate a new regulatory mechanism for SF-1 transcriptional activity that might influence adrenal zone-specific expression of CYP17, a mechanism that can potentially be applied to other steroidogenic tissues. PMID:20980388

  2. Phytol metabolites are circulating dietary factors that activate the nuclear receptor RXR.

    PubMed Central

    Kitareewan, S; Burka, L T; Tomer, K B; Parker, C E; Deterding, L J; Stevens, R D; Forman, B M; Mais, D E; Heyman, R A; McMorris, T; Weinberger, C

    1996-01-01

    RXR is a nuclear receptor that plays a central role in cell signaling by pairing with a host of other receptors. Previously, 9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA) was defined as a potent RXR activator. Here we describe a unique RXR effector identified from organic extracts of bovine serum by following RXR-dependent transcriptional activity. Structural analyses of material in active fractions pointed to the saturated diterpenoid phytanic acid, which induced RXR-dependent transcription at concentrations between 4 and 64 microM. Although 200 times more potent than phytanic acid, 9cRA was undetectable in equivalent amounts of extract and cannot be present at a concentration that could account for the activity. Phytanic acid, another phytol metabolite, was synthesized and stimulated RXR with a potency and efficacy similar to phytanic acid. These metabolites specifically displaced [3H]-9cRA from RXR with Ki values of 4 microM, indicating that their transcriptional effects are mediated by direct receptor interactions. Phytol metabolites are compelling candidates for physiological effectors, because their RXR binding affinities and activation potencies match their micromolar circulating concentrations. Given their exclusive dietary origin, these chlorophyll metabolites may represent essential nutrients that coordinate cellular metabolism through RXR-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:8856661

  3. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) in pearl oyster Pinctada fucata: molecular cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian-De; Wei, Guo-jian; Zhang, Hua; He, Mao-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important role in nonimmune cells and also in T cells and many other cells of the immune system, by regulating the expression of a variety of genes involved in the immune response, organ development, developmental apoptosis and angiogenesis. In the present study, the NFAT homology gene, PfNFAT, from the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata was cloned and its genomic structure and promoter were analyzed. PfNFAT encodes a putative protein of 1226 amino acids, and contains a highly conserved Rel homology region (RHR) with DNA-binding specificity, and a regulatory domain (NFAT homology region, NHR) containing a potent transactivation domain (TAD). The PfNFAT gene consists of 12 exons and 11 introns, and its promoter contains potential binding sites for transcription factors such as NF-κB (Nuclear factor κB), STATx (signal transducer and activator of transcription), AP-1 (activator protein-1) and Sox-5/9 (SRY type HMG box-5/9), MyoD (Myogenic Differentiation Antigen) and IRF (Interferon regulatory factor). Comparison and phylogenetic analysis revealed that PfNFAT shows high identity with other invertebrate NFAT, and clusters with the NFAT5 subgroup. Furthermore, gene expression analysis revealed that PfNFAT is involved in the immune response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) stimulation and in the nucleus inserting operation. The study of PfNFAT may increase understanding of molluscan innate immunity.

  4. Esculetin attenuates receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-mediated osteoclast differentiation through c-Fos/nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jong Min; Park, Sun-Hyang; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Ahn, Sung-Jun; Lee, Myeung Su; Oh, Jaemin; Kim, Ju-Young

    2015-05-29

    Esculetin exerts various biological effects on anti-oxidation, anti-tumors, and anti-inflammation. However, the involvement of esculetin in the bone metabolism process, particularly osteoclast differentiation has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we first confirmed the inhibitory effect of esculetin on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation. We then revealed the relationship between esculetin and the expression of osteoclast-specific molecules to elucidate its underlying mechanisms. Esculetin interfered with the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1) both at the mRNA and protein level with no involvement in osteoclast-associated early signaling pathways, suppressing the expression of various transcription factors exclusively expressed in osteoclasts such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap), osteoclast-associated receptor (Oscar), dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dcstamp), osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Ocstamp), cathepsin K, αvβ3 integrin, and calcitonin receptor (Ctr). Additionally, esculetin inhibited the formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) ring-positive osteoclasts during osteoclast differentiation. However, the development of F-actin structures and subsequent bone resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts, which are observed in osteoclast/osteoblast co-culture systems were not affected by esculetin. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that esculetin inhibits RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis via direct suppression of c-Fos and NFATc1 expression and exerts an inhibitory effect on actin ring formation during osteoclastogenesis.

  5. Down-regulation of PTEN by HCV core protein through activating nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Rong-Qing; Feng, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Yan-Hua; Wang, Li

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is an important causative agent in HCV related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tumor suppressor gene PTEN appears to act in the liver at the crossroad of processes controlling cell proliferation. In this study we investigated the effect of the HCV core protein on the PTEN pathway in hepatocarcinogenesis. The HCV core was transfected stably into HepG2 cell. The effect of HCV core on cell proliferation and viability were detected by 3-(4, 5)-dimethylthiahiazo-(-z-y1)-3, 5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay, clonogenic survival assay and Fluorescence Activating Cell Sorter (FACS) analysis. The expressions of PTEN were detected by real time RT-PCR and/or Western blot analysis, also the mechanism of down-regulation of PTEN was explored by western blot, luciferase assay and RNA interference. We found the HCV core promoted cell proliferation, survival and G2/M phase accumulation. It downregulated PTEN at mRNA and protein level and activated PTEN downstream gene Akt accompanied with NF-κB activation. Furthermore, the inhibition of HCV core by its specific shRNAs decreased the effect of growth promotion and G2/M phase arrest, inhibited the expression of nuclear p65 and increased PTEN expression. The activity of PTEN was restored when treated with NF-κB inhibitor PDTC. By luciferase assay we found that NF-κB inhibited PTEN promoter transcription activity directly in HCV core cells, while PDTC was contrary. Our study suggests that HCV proteins could modulate PTEN by activating NF-κB. Furthermore strategies designed to restore the expression of PTEN may be promising therapies for preventing HCV dependent hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:25550771

  6. Controls of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Signaling Activity by 5’-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activation With Examples in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Generally, both lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and hypoxia-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) effects are alleviated through differential posttranslational modification of NF-κB phosphorylation after pretreatment with 5´-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators such as 5´-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) or the hypoglycemic agent metformin. We found that AICAR or metformin acts as a regulator of LPS/NF-κB-or hypoxia/NF-κB-mediated cyclooxygenase induction by an AMPK-dependent mechanism with interactions between p65-NF-κB phosphorylation and acetylation, including in a human bladder cancer cell line (T24). In summary, we highlighted the regulatory interactions of AMPK activity on NF-κB induction, particularly in posttranslational phosphorylation and acetylation of NF-κB under inflammatory conditions or hypoxia environment. PMID:27706018

  7. Chronic intermittent hypoxia activates nuclear factor-{kappa}B in cardiovascular tissues in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Harly; Ye Xiaobing; Wilson, David; Htoo, Aung K.; Hendersen, Todd; Liu Shufang . E-mail: sliu@lij.edu

    2006-05-05

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms through which OSA promotes the development of cardiovascular disease are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that chronic exposure to intermittent hypoxia and reoxygenation (CIH) is a major pathologic factor causing cardiovascular inflammation, and that CIH-induces cardiovascular inflammation and pathology by activating the NF-{kappa}B pathway. We demonstrated that exposure of mice to CIH activated NF-{kappa}B in cardiovascular tissues, and that OSA patients had markedly elevated monocyte NF-{kappa}B activity, which was significantly decreased when obstructive apneas and their resultant CIH were eliminated by nocturnal CPAP therapy. The elevated NF-{kappa}B activity induced by CIH is accompanied by and temporally correlated to the increased expression of iNOS protein, a putative and important NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene product. Thus, CIH-mediated NF-{kappa}B activation may be a molecular mechanism linking OSA and cardiovascular pathologies seen in OSA patients.

  8. Dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor is regulated by an RNA-protein scaffold complex.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonia; Findlay, Gregory M; Bandukwala, Hozefa S; Oberdoerffer, Shalini; Baust, Beate; Li, Zhigang; Schmidt, Valentina; Hogan, Patrick G; Sacks, David B; Rao, Anjana

    2011-07-12

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) proteins are Ca(2+)-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression in many cell types. NFAT proteins are heavily phosphorylated and reside in the cytoplasm of resting cells; when cells are stimulated by a rise in intracellular Ca(2+), NFAT proteins are dephosphorylated by the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and translocate to the nucleus to activate target gene expression. Here we show that phosphorylated NFAT1 is present in a large cytoplasmic RNA-protein scaffold complex that contains a long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA), NRON [noncoding (RNA) repressor of NFAT]; a scaffold protein, IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAP); and three NFAT kinases, casein kinase 1, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase. Combined knockdown of NRON and IQGAP1 increased NFAT dephosphorylation and nuclear import exclusively after stimulation, without affecting the rate of NFAT rephosphorylation and nuclear export; and both NRON-depleted T cells and T cells from IQGAP1-deficient mice showed increased production of NFAT-dependent cytokines. Our results provide evidence that a complex of lincRNA and protein forms a scaffold for a latent transcription factor and its regulatory kinases, and support an emerging consensus that lincRNAs that bind transcriptional regulators have a similar scaffold function.

  9. Up-stream events in the nuclear factor κB activation cascade in response to sparsely ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Langen, Britta; Klimow, Galina; Ruscher, Roland; Schmitz, Claudia; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Reitz, Günther

    2009-10-01

    Radiation is a potentially limiting factor for manned long-term space missions. Prolonged exposure to galactic cosmic rays may shorten the healthy life-span after return to Earth due to cancer induction. During the mission, a solar flare can be life threatening. For better risk estimation and development of appropriate countermeasures, the study of the cellular radiation response is necessary. Since apoptosis may be a mechanism the body uses to eliminate damaged cells, the induction by cosmic radiation of the nuclear anti-apoptotic transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) could influence the cancer risk of astronauts exposed to cosmic radiation by improving the survival of radiation-damaged cells. In previous studies using a screening assay for the detection of NF-κB-dependent gene induction (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells), the activation of this transcription factor by heavy ions was shown [Baumstark-Khan, C., Hellweg, C.E., Arenz, A., Meier, M.M. Cellular monitoring of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway for assessment of space environmental radiation. Radiat. Res. 164, 527-530, 2005]. Studies with NF-κB inhibitors can map functional details of the NF-κB pathway and the influence of radiation-induced NF-κB activation on various cellular outcomes such as survival or cell cycle arrest. In this work, the efficacy and cytotoxicity of four different NF-κB inhibitors, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), capsaicin, the proteasome inhibitor MG-132, and the cell permeable peptide NF-κB SN50 were analyzed using HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells. In the recommended concentration range, only CAPE displayed considerable cytotoxicity. CAPE and capsaicin partially inhibited NF-κB activation by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor α. MG-132 completely abolished the activation and was therefore used for experiments with X-rays. NF-κB SN-50 could not reduce NF-κB dependent expression of the reporter destabilized Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (d2EGFP). MG-132

  10. Suppression of nuclear factor-κB activation and inflammation in microglia by physically modified saline.

    PubMed

    Khasnavis, Saurabh; Jana, Arundhati; Roy, Avik; Mazumder, Monalisa; Bhushan, Bharat; Wood, Tony; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-08-24

    Chronic inflammation involving activated microglia and astroglia is becoming a hallmark of many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Although NF-κB is a multifunctional transcription factor, it is an important target for controlling inflammation as the transcription of many proinflammatory molecules depends on the activation of NF-κB. Here, we have undertaken a novel approach to attenuate NF-κB activation and associated inflammation in activated glial cells. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanostructures that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not normal saline, RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen), and PNS60 (saline containing excess oxygen without TCP modification) were found to inhibit the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of inducible NO synthase in activated microglia. Similarly, RNS60 also inhibited the expression of inducible NO synthase in activated astroglia. Inhibition of NF-κB activation by RNS60 suggests that RNS60 exerts its anti-inflammatory effect through the inhibition of NF-κB. Interestingly, RNS60 induced the activation of type IA phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and Akt and rapidly up-regulated IκBα, a specific endogenous inhibitor of NF-κB. Inhibition of PI 3-kinase and Akt by either chemical inhibitors or dominant-negative mutants abrogated the RNS60-mediated up-regulation of IκBα. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RNS60 induced the activation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) via the PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway and that RNS60 up-regulated IκBα via CREB. These results describe a novel anti-inflammatory property of RNS60 via type IA PI 3-kinase-Akt-CREB-mediated up-regulation of IκBα, which may be of therapeutic benefit in neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Suppression of Nuclear Factor-κB Activation and Inflammation in Microglia by Physically Modified Saline*

    PubMed Central

    Khasnavis, Saurabh; Jana, Arundhati; Roy, Avik; Mazumder, Monalisa; Bhushan, Bharat; Wood, Tony; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation involving activated microglia and astroglia is becoming a hallmark of many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Although NF-κB is a multifunctional transcription factor, it is an important target for controlling inflammation as the transcription of many proinflammatory molecules depends on the activation of NF-κB. Here, we have undertaken a novel approach to attenuate NF-κB activation and associated inflammation in activated glial cells. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanostructures that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not normal saline, RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen), and PNS60 (saline containing excess oxygen without TCP modification) were found to inhibit the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of inducible NO synthase in activated microglia. Similarly, RNS60 also inhibited the expression of inducible NO synthase in activated astroglia. Inhibition of NF-κB activation by RNS60 suggests that RNS60 exerts its anti-inflammatory effect through the inhibition of NF-κB. Interestingly, RNS60 induced the activation of type IA phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and Akt and rapidly up-regulated IκBα, a specific endogenous inhibitor of NF-κB. Inhibition of PI 3-kinase and Akt by either chemical inhibitors or dominant-negative mutants abrogated the RNS60-mediated up-regulation of IκBα. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RNS60 induced the activation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) via the PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway and that RNS60 up-regulated IκBα via CREB. These results describe a novel anti-inflammatory property of RNS60 via type IA PI 3-kinase-Akt-CREB-mediated up-regulation of IκBα, which may be of therapeutic benefit in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22753407

  12. Distinct activation properties of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) isoforms NFATc3 and NFATc4 in neurons.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Jason D; Kim, Man-Su; Houlihan, Patrick R; Shutov, Leonid P; Mohapatra, Durga P; Strack, Stefan; Usachev, Yuriy M

    2012-11-01

    The Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) is implicated in regulating dendritic and axonal development, synaptogenesis, and neuronal survival. Despite the increasing appreciation for the importance of NFAT-dependent transcription in the nervous system, the regulation and function of specific NFAT isoforms in neurons are poorly understood. Here, we compare the activation of NFATc3 and NFATc4 in hippocampal and dorsal root ganglion neurons following electrically evoked elevations of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). We find that NFATc3 undergoes rapid dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation that are essentially complete within 20 min, although NFATc4 remains phosphorylated and localized to the cytosol, only exhibiting nuclear localization following prolonged (1-3 h) depolarization. Knocking down NFATc3, but not NFATc4, strongly diminished NFAT-mediated transcription induced by mild depolarization in neurons. By analyzing NFATc3/NFATc4 chimeras, we find that the region containing the serine-rich region-1 (SRR1) mildly affects initial NFAT translocation, although the region containing the serine-proline repeats is critical for determining the magnitude of NFAT activation and nuclear localization upon depolarization. Knockdown of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) significantly increased the depolarization-induced nuclear localization of NFATc4. In contrast, inhibition of p38 or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinases had no significant effect on nuclear import of NFATc4. Thus, electrically evoked [Ca(2+)](i) elevation in neurons rapidly and strongly activates NFATc3, whereas activation of NFATc4 requires a coincident increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and suppression of GSK3β, with differences in the serine-proline-containing region giving rise to these distinct activation properties of NFATc3 and NFATc4.

  13. Porcine circovirus type 2 induces the activation of nuclear factor kappa B by I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Li; Kwang, Jimmy; Wang Jin; Shi Lei; Yang Bing; Li Yongqing; Liu Jue

    2008-08-15

    The transcription factor NF-{kappa}B is commonly activated upon virus infection and a key player in the induction and regulation of the host immune response. The present study demonstrated for the first time that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which is the primary causative agent of an emerging swine disease, postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, can activate NF-{kappa}B in PCV2-infected PK15 cells. In PCV2-infected cells, NF-{kappa}B was activated concomitantly with viral replication, which was characterized by increased DNA binding activity, translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, as well as degradation and phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} protein. We further demonstrated PCV2-induced activation of NF-{kappa}B and colocalization of p65 nuclear translocation with virus replication in cultured cells. Treatment of cells with CAPE, a selective inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, reduced virus protein expression and progeny production followed by decreasing PCV2-induced apoptotic caspase activity, indicating the involvement of this transcription factor in induction of cell death. Taken together, these data suggest that NF-{kappa}B activation is important for PCV2 replication and contributes to virus-mediated changes in host cells. The results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular mechanism of PCV2 infection.

  14. Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation and Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor Transactivational Effects of Chemical Components of the Roots of Polygonum multiflorum

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ya Nan; Li, Wei; Song, Seok Bean; Yan, Xi Tao; Yang, Seo Young; Kim, Young Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polygonum multiflorum is well-known as “Heshouwu” in traditional Chinese herbal medicine. In Northeast Asia, it is often used as a tonic to prevent premature aging of the kidney and liver, tendons, and bones and strengthening of the lower back and knees. Objective: To research the anti-inflammatory activities of components from P. multiflorum. Materials and Methods: The compounds were isolated by a combination of silica gel and YMC R-18 column chromatography, and their structures were identified by analysis of spectroscopic data (1D, 2D-nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry). The anti-inflammatory activities of the isolated compounds 1−15 were evaluated by luciferase reporter gene assays. Results: Fifteen compounds (1–15) were isolated from the roots of P. multiflorum. Compounds 1−5 and 14−15 significantly inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α-induced nuclear factor kappa B-luciferase activity, with IC50 values of 24.16-37.56 μM. Compounds 1−5 also greatly enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors transcriptional activity with EC50 values of 18.26−31.45 μM. Conclusion: The anthraquinone derivatives were the active components from the roots of P. multiflorum as an inhibitor on inflammation-related factors in human hepatoma cells. Therefore, we suggest that the roots of P. multiflorum can be used to treat natural inflammatory diseases. SUMMARY This study presented that fifteen compounds (1-15) isolated from the roots of Polygonum multiflrum exert signifiant anti inflmmatory effects by inhibiting TNF α induced NF κB activation and PPARs transcription. Abbreviation used: NF κB: Nuclear factor kappa B, PPARs: Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, PPREs: Peroxisome proliferator response elements, TNF α: Tumor necrosis factor α, ESI-MS: Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, HepG2: Human hepatoma cells PMID:27019559

  15. Esculetin attenuates receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-mediated osteoclast differentiation through c-Fos/nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong Min; Park, Sun-Hyang; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Ahn, Sung-Jun; Lee, Myeung Su; Oh, Jaemin; Kim, Ju-Young

    2015-05-29

    Esculetin exerts various biological effects on anti-oxidation, anti-tumors, and anti-inflammation. However, the involvement of esculetin in the bone metabolism process, particularly osteoclast differentiation has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we first confirmed the inhibitory effect of esculetin on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation. We then revealed the relationship between esculetin and the expression of osteoclast-specific molecules to elucidate its underlying mechanisms. Esculetin interfered with the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1) both at the mRNA and protein level with no involvement in osteoclast-associated early signaling pathways, suppressing the expression of various transcription factors exclusively expressed in osteoclasts such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap), osteoclast-associated receptor (Oscar), dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dcstamp), osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Ocstamp), cathepsin K, αvβ3 integrin, and calcitonin receptor (Ctr). Additionally, esculetin inhibited the formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) ring-positive osteoclasts during osteoclast differentiation. However, the development of F-actin structures and subsequent bone resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts, which are observed in osteoclast/osteoblast co-culture systems were not affected by esculetin. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that esculetin inhibits RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis via direct suppression of c-Fos and NFATc1 expression and exerts an inhibitory effect on actin ring formation during osteoclastogenesis. - Highlights: • We first investigated the effects of esculetin on osteoclast differentiation and function. • Our data demonstrate for the first time that esculetin can suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • Esculetin acts as an inhibitor of c-Fos and NFATc1 activation.

  16. Tissue transglutaminase constitutively activates HIF-1α promoter and nuclear factor-κB via a non-canonical pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Mehta, Kapil

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) has been linked with carcinogenesis and cancer progression, including metastasis, chemoresistance, and radiation resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that result in constitutive activation of NF-κB are poorly understood. Here we show that chronic expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) reprograms the transcription regulatory network in epithelial cells via constitutive activation of NF-κB. TG2-induced NF-κB binds the functional NF-κB binding site in hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1α) promoter and results in its increased expression at transcription and protein levels even under normoxic conditions. TG2/NF-κB-induced HIF-1 was deemed essential for increased expression of some transcription repressors, like Zeb1, Zeb2, Snail, and Twist. Unlike tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), TG2 did not require IκB kinase (IKK) for NF-κB activation. Our data suggest that TG2 binds with IκBα and results in its rapid degradation via a non-proteasomal pathway. Importantly, the catalytically inactive (C277S) mutant form of TG2 was as effective as was wild-type TG2 in activating NF-κB and inducing HIF-1 expression. We also found that TG2 interacted with p65/RelA protein, both in the cytosolic and the nuclear compartment. The TG2/p65(NF-κB) complex binds to the HIF-1 promoter and induced its transcriptional regulation. Inhibition of TG2 or p65/RelA also inhibited the HIF-1α expression and attenuated Zeb1, Zeb2, and Twist expression. To our knowledge, these findings show for the first time a direct link between TG2, NF-κB, and HIF-1α, demonstrating TG2's important role in cancer progression. PMID:23185316

  17. Tensile force on human macrophage cells promotes osteoclastogenesis through receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand induction.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Chien, Chien-Fang; Shie, Ming-You; Yeh, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the effects of tensile forces on osteoclastogenesis by human monocytes in the absence of mechanosensitive cells, including osteoblasts and fibroblasts. In this study we consider the effects of tensile force on osteoclastogenesis in human monocytes. The cells were treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) to promote osteoclastogenesis. Then,expression and secretion of cathepsin K were examined. RANKL and the formation of osteoclasts during the osteoclast differentiation process under continual tensile stress were evaluated by Western blot. It was also found that -100 kPa or lower induces RANKL-enhanced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, an increased tensile force raises the expression and secretion of cathepsin K elevated by RANKL, and is concurrent with the increase of TNF-receptor-associated factor 6 induction and nuclear factor κB activation. Overall, the current report demonstrates that tensile force reinforces RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by retarding osteoclast differentiation. The tensile force is able to modify every cell through dose-dependent in vitro RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis, affecting the fusion of preosteoclasts and function of osteoclasts. However, tensile force increased TNF-receptor-associated factor 6 expression. These results are in vitro findings and were obtained under a condition of tensile force. The current results help us to better understand the cellular roles of human macrophage populations in osteoclastogenesis as well as in alveolar bone remodeling when there is tensile stress.

  18. Cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus L. suppresses photoaging of skin by inhibiting the transcription activity of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka Tsuda; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tomoji; Masutani, Teruaki; Tsuboi, Makoto; Akao, Yukihiro

    2013-01-15

    Aging of skin is characterized by skin wrinkling, laxity, and pigmentation induced by several environmental stress factors. Histological changes during the photoaging of skin include hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes causing skin wrinkles and pigmentation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the representative transcription factors active in conjunction with inflammation. NF-κB is activated by stimulation such as ultraviolet rays and inflammatory cytokines and induces the expression of various genes such as those of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1). We screened several plant extracts for their possible inhibitory effect on the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. One of them, an extract from Cynara scolymus L., showed a greatest effect on the suppression of NF-κB transactivation. As a result, we found that cynaropicrin, which is a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the NF-κB-mediated transactivation of bFGF and MMP-1. Furthermore, it was confirmed that in an in vivo mouse model cynaropicrin prevented skin photoaging processes leading to the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. These findings taken together indicate that cynaropicrin is an effective antiphotoaging agent that acts by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated transactivation. PMID:23232059

  19. Cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus L. suppresses photoaging of skin by inhibiting the transcription activity of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka Tsuda; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tomoji; Masutani, Teruaki; Tsuboi, Makoto; Akao, Yukihiro

    2013-01-15

    Aging of skin is characterized by skin wrinkling, laxity, and pigmentation induced by several environmental stress factors. Histological changes during the photoaging of skin include hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes causing skin wrinkles and pigmentation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the representative transcription factors active in conjunction with inflammation. NF-κB is activated by stimulation such as ultraviolet rays and inflammatory cytokines and induces the expression of various genes such as those of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1). We screened several plant extracts for their possible inhibitory effect on the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. One of them, an extract from Cynara scolymus L., showed a greatest effect on the suppression of NF-κB transactivation. As a result, we found that cynaropicrin, which is a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the NF-κB-mediated transactivation of bFGF and MMP-1. Furthermore, it was confirmed that in an in vivo mouse model cynaropicrin prevented skin photoaging processes leading to the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. These findings taken together indicate that cynaropicrin is an effective antiphotoaging agent that acts by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated transactivation.

  20. Modulation of both activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappa B signal transduction of human T cells by amiodarone

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shu-Meng; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Ho, Ling-Jun; Tsai, Tsung-Neng; Wu, Chun-Hsien; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2015-01-01

    Amiodarone, a common and effective antiarrhythmic drug, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects such as reducing the activation and movement of neutrophils. However, its effects on human T cells remain unclear. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects and possible underlying mechanisms of amiodarone on human T cells. We isolated human primary T cells from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, luciferase assay, and Western blotting to evaluate the modulatory effects of amiodarone on human T cells. We found that amiodarone dose dependently inhibited the production of cytokines, including interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in activated human T cells. By flow cytometry, we demonstrated that amiodarone suppressed the expression of IL-2 receptor-alpha (CD25) and CD69, the cell surface markers of activated T cells. Moreover, molecular investigations revealed that amiodarone down-regulated activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) DNA-binding activities in activated human T cells and also inhibited DNA binding and transcriptional activities of both AP-1 and NF-κB in Jurkat cells. Finally, by Western blotting, we showed that amiodarone reduced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and suppressed stimuli-induced I-kappa B-alpha degradation in activated human T cells. Through regulation of AP-1 and NF-κB signaling, amiodarone inhibits cytokine production and T cell activation. These results show the pleiotropic effects of amiodarone on human T cells and suggest its therapeutic potential in inflammation-related cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25073960

  1. Improved efficacy of soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) fusion protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Jun; Han, Jihye; Lee, Jae Yeon; Kim, HaHyung; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-06-01

    Soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B fusion immunoglobulin (hRANK-Ig) has been considered as one of the therapeutic agents to treat osteoporosis or diseases associated with bone destruction by blocking the interaction between RANK and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, no scientific record showing critical amino acid residues within the structural interface between the human RANKL and RANK complex is yet available. In this study, we produced several mutants of hRANK-Ig by replacement of amino acid residue(s) and tested whether the mutants had increased binding affinity to human RANKL. Based on the results from flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analyses, the replacement of E(125) with D(125), or E(125) and C(127) with D(125) and F(127) within loop 3 of cysteine-rich domain 3 of hRANK-Ig increases binding affinity to human RANKL over the wild-type hRANK-Ig. This result may provide the first example of improvement in the efficacy of hRANK-Ig by protein engineering and may give additional information to understand a more defined structural interface between hRANK and RANKL.

  2. Chlamydial Protease-Like Activity Factor and Type III Secreted Effectors Cooperate in Inhibition of p65 Nuclear Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Michael John; McCorrister, Stuart; Grant, Chris; Westmacott, Garrett; Fariss, Robert; Hu, Pingzhao; Zhao, Kaiqiong; Blake, Mary; Whitmire, Bill; Yang, Chunfu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF) is hypothesized to be an important secreted virulence factor; however, challenges in denaturing its proteolytic activity have hampered attempts to identify its legitimate targets. Here, we use a genetic and proteomic approach to identify authentic CPAF targets. Human epithelial cells infected with CPAF-sufficient and CPAF-deficient chlamydiae were lysed using known CPAF-denaturing conditions. Their protein profiles were analyzed using isobaric mass tags and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Comparative analysis of CPAF-sufficient and CPAF-deficient infections identified a limited number of CPAF host and chlamydial protein targets. Host targets were primarily interferon-stimulated gene products, whereas chlamydial targets were type III secreted proteins. We provide evidence supporting a cooperative role for CPAF and type III secreted effectors in blocking NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, resulting in decreased beta interferon and proinflammatory cytokine synthesis. Genetic complementation of null organisms with CPAF restored p65 nuclear translocation inhibition and proteolysis of chlamydial type III secreted effector proteins (T3SEs). We propose that CPAF and T3SEs cooperate in the inhibition of host innate immunity. PMID:27677792

  3. Matricellular Protein Periostin Mediates Intestinal Inflammation through the Activation of Nuclear Factor κB Signaling.

    PubMed

    Koh, Seong-Joon; Choi, Younjeong; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is a matricellular protein that interacts with various integrin molecules on the cell surface. Although periostin is expressed in inflamed colonic mucosa, its role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation remains unclear. We investigated the role of periostin in intestinal inflammation using Postn-deficient (Postn-/-) mice. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) were transfected by Postn small interfering RNAs. Periostin expression was determined in colon tissue samples from ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. Oral administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or rectal administration of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, induced severe colitis in wild-type mice, but not in Postn-/- mice. Administration of recombinant periostin induced colitis in Postn-/- mice. The periostin neutralizing-antibody ameliorated the severity of colitis in DSS-treated wild-type mice. Silencing of Postn inhibited inteleukin (IL)-8 mRNA expression and NF-κB DNA-binding activity in IECs. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α upregulated mRNA expression of Postn in IECs, and recombinant periostin strongly enhanced IL-8 expression in combination with TNF-α, which was suppressed by an antibody against integrin αv (CD51). Periostin and CD51 were expressed at significantly higher levels in UC patients than in controls. Periostin mediates intestinal inflammation through the activation of NF-κB signaling, which suggests that periostin is a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory bowel disease.

  4. Predictive value of nuclear factor kappaB activity and plasma cytokine levels in patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Arnalich, F; Garcia-Palomero, E; López, J; Jiménez, M; Madero, R; Renart, J; Vázquez, J J; Montiel, C

    2000-04-01

    The relationship between fluctuating cytokine concentrations in plasma and the outcome of sepsis is complex. We postulated that early measurement of the activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), a transcriptional regulatory protein involved in proinflammatory cytokine expression, may help to predict the outcome of sepsis. We determined NF-kappaB activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 34 patients with severe sepsis (23 survivors and 11 nonsurvivors) and serial concentrations of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, interleukin-1, and tumor necrosis factor) and various endogenous antagonists in plasma. NF-kappaB activity was significantly higher in nonsurvivors and correlated strongly with the severity of illness (APACHE II score), although neither was related to the cytokine levels. Apart from NF-kappaB activity, the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was the only cytokine tested whose level in plasma was of value in predicting mortality by logistic regression analysis. These results underscore the prognostic value of early measurement of NF-kappaB activity in patients with severe sepsis.

  5. Predictive Value of Nuclear Factor κB Activity and Plasma Cytokine Levels in Patients with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Arnalich, Francisco; Garcia-Palomero, Esther; López, Julia; Jiménez, Manuel; Madero, Rosario; Renart, Jaime; Vázquez, Juan José; Montiel, Carmen

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between fluctuating cytokine concentrations in plasma and the outcome of sepsis is complex. We postulated that early measurement of the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), a transcriptional regulatory protein involved in proinflammatory cytokine expression, may help to predict the outcome of sepsis. We determined NF-κB activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 34 patients with severe sepsis (23 survivors and 11 nonsurvivors) and serial concentrations of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, interleukin-1, and tumor necrosis factor) and various endogenous antagonists in plasma. NF-κB activity was significantly higher in nonsurvivors and correlated strongly with the severity of illness (APACHE II score), although neither was related to the cytokine levels. Apart from NF-κB activity, the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was the only cytokine tested whose level in plasma was of value in predicting mortality by logistic regression analysis. These results underscore the prognostic value of early measurement of NF-κB activity in patients with severe sepsis. PMID:10722586

  6. Modulation of transcriptional activation and coactivator interaction by a splicing variation in the F domain of nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha1.

    PubMed

    Sladek, F M; Ruse, M D; Nepomuceno, L; Huang, S M; Stallcup, M R

    1999-10-01

    Transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, often exist in various forms that are generated by highly conserved splicing events. Whereas the functional significance of these splicing variants is often not known, it is known that nuclear receptors activate transcription through interaction with coactivators. The parameters, other than ligands, that might modulate those interactions, however, are not well characterized, nor is the role of splicing variants. In this study, transient transfection, yeast two-hybrid, and GST pulldown assays are used to show not only that nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha1 (HNF4alpha1, NR2A1) interacts with GRIP1, and other coactivators, in the absence of ligand but also that the uncommonly large F domain in the C terminus of the receptor inhibits that interaction. In vitro, the F domain was found to obscure an AF-2-independent binding site for GRIP1 that did not map to nuclear receptor boxes II or III. The results also show that a natural splicing variant containing a 10-amino-acid insert in the middle of the F domain (HNF4alpha2) abrogates that inhibition in vivo and in vitro. A series of protease digestion assays indicates that there may be structural differences between HNF4alpha1 and HNF4alpha2 in the F domain as well as in the ligand binding domain (LBD). The data also suggest that there is a direct physical contact between the F domain and the LBD of HNF4alpha1 and -alpha2 and that that contact is different in the HNF4alpha1 and HNF4alpha2 isoforms. Finally, we propose a model in which the F domain of HNF4alpha1 acts as a negative regulatory region for transactivation and in which the alpha2 insert ameliorates the negative effect of the F domain. A conserved repressor sequence in the F domains of HNF4alpha1 and -alpha2 suggests that this model may be relevant to other nuclear receptors as well. PMID:10490591

  7. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Activators of Nuclear Factor-κB With Neuroprotective Action Via High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Manuvakhova, Marina S.; Johnson, Guyla G.; White, Misti C.; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Sosa, Melinda; Maddox, Clinton; McKellip, Sara; Rasmussen, Lynn; Wennerberg, Krister; Hobrath, Judith V.; White, E. Lucile; Maddry, Joseph A.; Grimaldi, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal noncytokine-dependent p50/p65 nuclear factor-κB (the primary NF-κB complex in the brain) activation has been shown to exert neuroprotective actions. Thus neuronal activation of NF-κB could represent a viable neuroprotective target. We have developed a cell-based assay able to detect NF-κB expression enhancement, and through its use we have identified small molecules able to up-regulate NF-κB expression and hence trigger its activation in neurons. We have successfully screened approximately 300,000 compounds and identified 1,647 active compounds. Cluster analysis of the structures within the hit population yielded 14 enriched chemical scaffolds. One high-potency and chemically attractive representative of each of these 14 scaffolds and four singleton structures were selected for follow-up. The experiments described here highlighted that seven compounds caused noncanonical long-lasting NF-κB activation in primary astrocytes. Molecular NF-κB docking experiments indicate that compounds could be modulating NF-κB-induced NF-κB expression via enhancement of NF-κB binding to its own promoter. Prototype compounds increased p65 expression in neurons and caused its nuclear translocation without affecting the inhibitor of NF-κB (I-κB). One of the prototypical compounds caused a large reduction of glutamate-induced neuronal death. In conclusion, we have provided evidence that we can use small molecules to activate p65 NF-κB expression in neurons in a cytokine receptor-independent manner, which results in both long-lasting p65 NF-κB translocation/activation and decreased glutamate neurotoxicity. PMID:21046675

  8. Ongoing Space Nuclear Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Most ongoing US activities related to space nuclear power and propulsion are sponsored by NASA. NASA-spons0red space nuclear work is currently focused on evaluating potential fission surface power (FSP) systems and on radioisotope power systems (RPS). In addition, significant efforts related to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been completed and will provide a starting point for potential future NTP work.

  9. p120-Catenin modulating nuclear factor-κB activation is partially RhoA/ROCKdependent in scratch injury.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shenghui; Qin, Lingzhi; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Liwei; Sun, Wenjia; Li, Naping; Wu, Renliang; Wang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    p120-catenin (p120) is known as a cadherin-associated protein that participates in tumor metastasis and invasion, as well as an anti-inflammatory mediator. Recently, its anti-inflammatory role is drawing increasing attention, but the regulatory mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we report that p120 modulated inflammatory responses partially depends on RhoA/ROCK pathway in scratch-induced injury in human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs). For the first time, we found that p120 was significantly reduced in BECs after scratching, which could induce interleukin-8 (IL-8) production through nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation accompanied with IκBα phosphorylation. Over-expression of p120 3A could inhibit NF-κB activation and IL-8 mRNA expression and protein synthesis after scratching, while p120 knockdown by small interfering RNA could promote NF-κB activation and IL-8 mRNA expression and protein synthesis after scratching. Furthermore, we found that RhoA was the binding partner of p120 in BECs. Although total RhoA and p120-binded RhoA remained unchanged, the RhoA activity was increased after scratching. Chemical blockade of RhoA/ROCK signaling (Y27632) inhibited scratch-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. Over-expression of p120 3A attenuated scratch-induced RhoA activation, whereas silence of p120 significantly elevated scratch-induced RhoA activation in BCEs. Conclusively, these results indicate an anti-inflammatory effect of p120 in bronchial epithelial cells through its modulation of NF-κB signaling depending on RhoA/ROCK pathway.

  10. Tyrosol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced ocular inflammation in rats via inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    SATO, Kazuaki; MIHARA, Yuko; KANAI, Kazutaka; YAMASHITA, Yohei; KIMURA, Yuya; ITOH, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of tyrosol (Tyr) on endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in rats. EIU was induced in male Lewis rats by subcutaneous injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Tyr (10, 50 or 100 mg/kg) was intravenously injected 2 hr before, simultaneously and 2 hr after LPS injection. The aqueous humor (AqH) was collected 24 hr after LPS injection; the infiltrating cell number, protein concentration, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, prostaglandin (PG)-E2 and nitric oxide (NO) levels were determined. Histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical studies for nuclear factor (NF)-κB, inhibitor of κB (IκB)-α, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the iris–ciliary body (ICB) were performed at 3 or 24 hr after LPS injection. To further clarify the anti-inflammatory effects, RAW264.7 macrophages were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of Tyr. Tyr reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the infiltrating cell number, protein concentration, and TNF-α, PGE2 and NO levels in AqH and improved histopathologic scores of EIU. Tyr also inhibited LPS-induced COX-2 and iNOS expression, IκB-α degradation and nuclear translocation of activated NF-κB in ICB. Tyr significantly suppressed inflammatory mediator production in the culture medium and COX-2 and iNOS expression and activated NF-κB translocation in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that Tyr suppresses ocular inflammation of EIU by inhibiting NF-κB activation and subsequent proinflammatory mediator production. PMID:27238160

  11. Functional interplay of SP family members and nuclear factor Y is essential for transcriptional activation of the human Calreticulin gene.

    PubMed

    Schardt, Julian A; Keller, Manuela; Seipel, Katja; Pabst, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Calreticulin (CALR) is a highly conserved, multifunctional protein involved in a variety of cellular processes including the maintenance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, proper protein folding, differentiation and immunogenic cell death. More recently, a crucial role for CALR in the pathogenesis of certain hematologic malignancies was discovered: in clinical subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia, CALR overexpression mediates a block in differentiation, while somatic mutations have been found in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) or thrombopoietin receptor gene (MPL). However, the mechanisms underlying CALR promoter activation have insufficiently been investigated so far. By dissecting the core promoter region, we could identify a functional TATA-box relevant for transcriptional activation. In addition, we characterized two evolutionary highly conserved cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) within the proximal promoter each composed of one binding site for the transcription factors SP1 and SP3 as well as for the nuclear transcription factor Y (NFY) and we verified binding of these factors to their cognate sites in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Factors Limiting Microbial Growth and Activity at a Proposed High-Level Nuclear Repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, T. L.; Kovacik, W. P.; Ringelberg, D. B.; White, D. C.; Haldeman, D. L.; Amy, P. S.; Hersman, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nev., as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste, volcanic tuff was analyzed for microbial abundance and activity. Tuff was collected aseptically from nine sites along a tunnel in Yucca Mountain. Microbial abundance was generally low: direct microscopic cell counts were near detection limits at all sites (3.2 x 10(sup4) to 2.0 x 10(sup5) cells g(sup-1) [dry weight]); plate counts of aerobic heterotrophs ranged from 1.0 x 10(sup1) to 3.2 x 10(sup3) CFU g(sup-1) (dry weight). Phospholipid fatty acid concentrations (0.1 to 3.7 pmol g(sup-1)) also indicated low microbial biomasses; diglyceride fatty acid concentrations, indicative of dead cells, were in a similar range (0.2 to 2.3 pmol g(sup-1)). Potential microbial activity was quantified as (sup14)CO(inf2) production in microcosms containing radiolabeled substrates (glucose, acetate, and glutamic acid); amendments with water and nutrient solutions (N and P) were used to test factors potentially limiting this activity. Similarly, the potential for microbial growth and the factors limiting growth were determined by performing plate counts before and after incubating volcanic tuff samples for 24 h under various conditions: ambient moisture, water-amended, and amended with various nutrient solutions (N, P, and organic C). A high potential for microbial activity was demonstrated by high rates of substrate mineralization (as much as 70% of added organic C in 3 weeks). Water was the major limiting factor to growth and microbial activity, while amendments with N and P resulted in little further stimulation. Organic C amendments stimulated growth more than water alone. PMID:16535670

  13. Aberrant nuclear factor-kappa B activity in acute myeloid Leukemia: from molecular pathogenesis to therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Ching, Ying Qing; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2015-01-01

    The overall survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been improved significantly over the last decade. Molecularly targeted agents hold promise to change the therapeutic landscape in AML. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) controls a plethora of biological process through switching on and off its long list of target genes. In AML, constitutive NF-κB has been detected in 40% of cases and its aberrant activity enable leukemia cells to evade apoptosis and stimulate proliferation. These facts suggest that NF-κB signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in the development of AML and it represents an attractive target for the intervention of AML. This review summarizes our current knowledge of NF-κB signaling transduction including canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways. Then we specifically highlight what factors contribute to the aberrant activation of NF-κB activity in AML, followed by an overview of 8 important clinical trials of the first FDA approved proteasome inhibitor, Bortezomib (Velcade®), which is a NF-κB inhibitor too, in combination with other therapeutic agents in patients with AML. Finally, this review discusses the future directions of NF-κB inhibitor in treatment of AML, especially in targeting leukemia stem cells (LSCs). PMID:25823927

  14. Aberrant nuclear factor-kappa B activity in acute myeloid leukemia: from molecular pathogenesis to therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Ching, Ying Qing; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2015-03-20

    The overall survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been improved significantly over the last decade. Molecularly targeted agents hold promise to change the therapeutic landscape in AML. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) controls a plethora of biological process through switching on and off its long list of target genes. In AML, constitutive NF-κB has been detected in 40% of cases and its aberrant activity enable leukemia cells to evade apoptosis and stimulate proliferation. These facts suggest that NF-κB signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in the development of AML and it represents an attractive target for the intervention of AML. This review summarizes our current knowledge of NF-κB signaling transduction including canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways. Then we specifically highlight what factors contribute to the aberrant activation of NF-κB activity in AML, followed by an overview of 8 important clinical trials of the first FDA approved proteasome inhibitor, Bortezomib (Velcade), which is a NF-κB inhibitor too, in combination with other therapeutic agents in patients with AML. Finally, this review discusses the future directions of NF-κB inhibitor in treatment of AML, especially in targeting leukemia stem cells (LSCs). PMID:25823927

  15. Stably transfected human cell lines as fluorescent screening assay for nuclear factor KB activation dependent gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Horneck, Gerda

    2004-06-01

    Activation of the Nuclear Factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway as a possible antiapoptotic route represents one important cellular stress response. For identifying conditions which are capable to modify this pathway, a screening assay for detection of NF-kappaB-dependent gene activation using the reporter proteins Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) and its destabilized variant (d2EGFP) has been developed. Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK/293) cells were stably transfected with a vector carrying EGFP or d2EGFP under control of a synthetic promoter containing four copies of the NF-kappaB response element. Treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gave rise to substantial EGFP / d2EGFP expression in up to 90 % of the cells and was therefore used to screen different stably transfected clones for induction of NF-kappaB dependent gene expression. The time course of d2EGFP expression after treatment with TNF-alpha or phorbol ester was measured using flow cytometry. Cellular response to TNF-alpha was faster than to phorbol ester. Treatment of cells with TNF-alpha and DMSO revealed antagonistic interactions of these substances in the activation NF-kappaB dependent gene expression. The detection of d2EGFP expression required FACS analysis or fluorescence microscopy, while EGFP could also be measured in the microplate reader, rendering the assay useful for high-throughput screening.

  16. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor κB Activation and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression by Aqueous Extracts of Hispanic Medicinal Herbs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Amanda M.; Hunsaker, Lucy A.; Franco, Carolina R.; Royer, Robert E.; Vander Jagt, David L.; Vander Jagt, Dorothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a primary choice of therapy for diseases with a chronic inflammatory component. Unfortunately, long-term NSAID therapy is often accompanied by severe side effects, including cardiovascular and gastrointestinal complications. Because of this, there is critical need for identification of new and safer treatments for chronic inflammation to circumvent these side effects. Inflammatory diseases have been successfully remedied with natural herbs by many cultures. To better understand the potential of natural herbs in treating chronic inflammation and to identify their mechanism of action, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory activities of 20 medicinal herbs commonly used in the Hispanic culture. We have established a standardized method for preparing aqueous extracts (teas) from the selected medicinal herbs and screened for inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which is the central signaling pathway of the inflammatory response. A number of herbal teas were identified that exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity. In particular, tea from the herb commonly called laurel was found to be an especially potent inhibitor of NF-κB-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression and prostaglandin E2 production in cultured murine macrophages. These findings indicate that laurel tea extract contains potent anti-inflammatory compounds that function by inhibiting the major signal transduction pathway responsible for inducing an inflammatory event. Based on these results, laurel may represent a new, safe therapeutic agent for managing chronic inflammation. PMID:20482259

  17. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells.

    PubMed

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT. PMID:26160345

  18. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide and TNF-alpha activate the nuclear factor kappa B pathway in the human placental JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Lappas, M; Yee, K; Permezel, M; Rice, G E

    2006-01-01

    Up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and prostaglandins is a critical factor driving human term labour and inflammation-associated preterm labour. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) is activated in response to a number of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The aim of this study was (i) to investigate if TNF-alpha and LPS activate the NF-kappaB pathway; and (ii) to use short interfering RNA (siRNA) against inhibitor kappaB kinase (IKK)-beta to confirm the role of the NF-kappaB pathway in the regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in human placental JEG-3 cells. JEG-3 cells (3 independent experiments) were (i) incubated in the presence or absence of 10 microg/ml LPS or 20 ng/ml TNF-alpha, or (ii) transfected with 100 nM IKK-beta siRNA. Incubation of JEG-3 cells with LPS and TNF-alpha increased the expression of cytoplasmic IKK-beta and phosphorylated IkappaB-alpha, and nuclear NF-kappaB proteins p50 and p65. This was associated with a concurrent increase in COX-2 protein, and IL-6 and PGF2alpha release from JEG-3 cells. Treatment of cells with BAY 11-7082 at 50 microM significantly inhibited basal, LPS- and TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB and COX-2 expression, and IL-6 and PGF2alpha release. Transfection of JEG-3 cells with IKK-beta siRNA significantly decreased IL-6 and PGF2alpha release. The data presented in this study demonstrate that pro-inflammatory mediators regulate the NF-kappaB transcription pathway in human JEG-3 cells, and the IKK-beta/NF-kappaB pathway is a regulator of inflammatory mediators in placental JEG-3 cells.

  20. Silica-induced apoptosis in murine macrophage: involvement of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Gozal, Evelyne; Ortiz, Luis A; Zou, Xiaoyan; Burow, Matthew E; Lasky, Joseph A; Friedman, Mitchell

    2002-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in silica-induced lung fibrosis. Silica exposure induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, and apoptotic mechanisms have been implicated in silica-induced pathogenesis. To characterize potential relationships between these signaling events, we studied their induction in two murine macrophage cell lines. The RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line was more sensitive, and the IC-21 macrophage cell line more tolerant to silica exposure (0.2 or 1 mg/ml for 6 h) as evidenced by significantly higher apoptotic responses in RAW 264.7 (P < 0.05). RAW 264.7 macrophages exhibited enhanced TNF-alpha production and NF-kappaB activation in response to silica, whereas IC-21 macrophages did not produce TNF-alpha in response to silica and did not induce NF-kappaB nuclear binding. Inhibition of NF-kappaB in RAW 264.7 cells with BAY11-7082 significantly increased apoptosis while inhibiting TNF-alpha release. In addition, TNF-alpha and NF-kappaB activation, but not apoptosis, were induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in both cell lines, and NF-kappaB inhibition reduced LPS-induced TNF-alpha release. These data suggest that TNF-alpha induction is dependent on NF-kappaB activation in both cell lines. However, silica can induce apoptosis in murine macrophages, independently of TNF-alpha stimulation, as in IC-21 macrophages. Furthermore, NF-kappaB activation in macrophages may play dual roles, both pro- and antiapoptotic during silica injury. PMID:12091251

  1. Structural characterization and immunomodulatory activity of Grifola frondosa polysaccharide via toll-like receptor 4-mitogen-activated protein kinases-nuclear factor κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaolei; Meng, Meng; Han, Lirong; Cheng, Dai; Cao, Xiaohong; Wang, Chunling

    2016-06-15

    We isolated a neutral polysaccharide from the fruiting body of a mushroom Grifola frondosa (GFP-A). The aim of this study was to characterize a neutral α-d-polysaccharide derived from G. frondosa and evaluate its immunomodulatory effect on toll-like receptor 4, mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor κB pathways of protein expression in macrophages. The structural features of GFP-A were characterized by physicochemical and instrumental analyses. Its molecular weight was found to be 8.48 × 10(2) kDa. The main chain of GFP-A consisted of (1 → 4)-linked and (1 → 6)-linked α-d-glucopyranosyl, and (1 → 3,6)-linked α-d-mannopyranosyl residues, which branched at C-3. The branches consisted of (1 → 6)-linked α-d-galactopyranosyl and t-l-rhamnopyranosyl residues. An in vitro immunomodulatory assay for pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, etc.) using the macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, revealed that GFP-A exhibited significant immunomodulatory activity by stimulating the toll-like receptor 4, mitogen-activated protein kinases to nuclear factor κB/pathway. PMID:27220562

  2. Rosmarinic Acid Attenuates Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats by Inhibiting Nuclear Factor-κB Activation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Ting; Yin, Guo-Jian; Xiao, Wen-Qin; Qiu, Lei; Yu, Ge; Hu, Yan-Ling; Xing, Miao; Wu, De-Qing; Cang, Xiao-Feng; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xing-Peng; Hu, Guo-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Rosmarinic Acid (RA), a caffeic acid ester, has been shown to exert anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant and antiallergic effects. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of RA in sodium taurocholate ( NaTC )-induced acute pancreatitis, both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, RA (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 2 h before sodium taurocholate injection. Rats were sacrificed 12 h, 24 h or 48 h after sodium taurocholate injection. Pretreatment with RA significantly ameliorated pancreas histopathological changes, decreased amylase and lipase activities in serum, lowered myeloperoxidase activity in the pancreas, reduced systematic and pancreatic interleukin-1 β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, and inhibited NF-κB translocation in pancreas. In vitro, pretreating the fresh rat pancreatic acinar cells with 80 μ mol/L RA 2 h before 3750 nmol/L sodium taurocholate or 10 ng/L TNF-α administration significantly attenuated the reduction of isolated pancreatic acinar cell viability and inhibited the nuclear activation and translocation of NF-κB. Based on our findings, RA appears to attenuate damage in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and reduce the release of inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB. These findings might provide a basis for investigating the therapeutic role of RA in managing acute pancreatits. PMID:26364660

  3. Dehydrodiisoeugenol, an isoeugenol dimer, inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nuclear factor kappa B activation and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yukio; Shoji, Masao; Hirata, Atsushi; Tanaka, Shoji; Yokoe, Ichiro; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2005-02-15

    o-Methoxyphenols such as eugenol and isoeugenol exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, but at higher concentrations act as oxidants and potent allergens. We recently demonstrated the eugenol dimer bis-eugenol to be an efficient inhibitor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages without cytotoxicity. This result suggested that dimer compound of o-methoxyphenols may possess anti-inflammatory activity. Thus, we further synthesized dehydrodiisoeugenol and alpha-diisoeugenol from isoeugenols, and investigated whether these dimers could inhibit LPS-stimulated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 gene expression, both of which are closely involved in inflammation and mutagenesis. The expression of the COX-2 gene was strongly inhibited by dehydrodiisoeugenol in RAW264.7 murine macrophages stimulated with LPS. In contrast, isoeugenol and alpha-diisoeugenol did not inhibit it. Dehydrodiisoeugenol also significantly inhibited LPS-stimulated phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis of inhibitor kappaB-alpha and transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB in the cells. These findings suggest that dehydrodiisoeugenol acts as a potent anti-inflammatory agent.

  4. Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Drives Podocyte-Specific Expression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Essential for Resistance to Crescentic GN.

    PubMed

    Henique, Carole; Bollee, Guillaume; Lenoir, Olivia; Dhaun, Neeraj; Camus, Marine; Chipont, Anna; Flosseau, Kathleen; Mandet, Chantal; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Karras, Alexandre; Thervet, Eric; Bruneval, Patrick; Nochy, Dominique; Mesnard, Laurent; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing and crescentic rapidly progressive GN (RPGN) is a life-threatening syndrome characterized by a rapid loss of renal function. Evidence suggests that podocyte expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) may prevent podocyte injury, but the function of glomerular PPARγ in acute, severe inflammatory GN is unknown. Here, we observed marked loss of PPARγ abundance and transcriptional activity in glomerular podocytes in experimental RPGN. Blunted expression of PPARγ in podocyte nuclei was also found in kidneys from patients diagnosed with crescentic GN. Podocyte-specific Pparγ gene targeting accentuated glomerular damage, with increased urinary loss of albumin and severe kidney failure. Furthermore, a PPARγ gain-of-function approach achieved by systemic administration of thiazolidinedione (TZD) failed to prevent severe RPGN in mice with podocyte-specific Pparγ gene deficiency. In nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-deficient mice, loss of podocyte PPARγ was observed at baseline. NRF2 deficiency markedly aggravated the course of RPGN, an effect that was partially prevented by TZD administration. Furthermore, delayed administration of TZD, initiated after the onset of RPGN, still alleviated the severity of experimental RPGN. These findings establish a requirement for the NRF2-PPARγ cascade in podocytes, and we suggest that these transcription factors have a role in augmenting the tolerance of glomeruli to severe immune-complex mediated injury. The NRF2-PPARγ pathway may be a therapeutic target for RPGN. PMID:25999406

  5. Activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB in mouse brain induced by a simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kimberly C.; Manna, Sunil K.; Yamauchi, Keiko; Ramesh, Vani; Wilson, Bobby L.; Thomas, Renard L.; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kulkarni, Anil D.; Pellis, Neil R.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity induces inflammatory responses and modulates immune functions that may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to a microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects; however, there is little research exploring the etiology of these effects resulting from exposure to such an environment. It is also known that spaceflight is associated with increase in oxidative stress; however, this phenomenon has not been reproduced in land-based simulated microgravity models. In this study, an attempt has been made to show the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mice brain, using ground-based microgravity simulator. Increased ROS was observed in brain stem and frontal cortex with concomitant decrease in glutathione, on exposing mice to simulated microgravity for 7 d. Oxidative stress-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB was observed in all the regions of the brain. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase was phosphorylated equally in all regions of the brain exposed to simulated microgravity. These results suggest that exposure of brain to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors, and these have been earlier argued to be oxidative stress dependent.

  6. Estrogen receptor beta inhibits transcriptional activity of hypoxia inducible factor-1 through the downregulation of arylhydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Estrogen receptor (ER) β is predicted to play an important role in prevention of breast cancer development and metastasis. We have shown previously that ERβ inhibits hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α mediated transcription, but the mechanism by which ERβ works to exert this effect is not understood. Methods Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was measured in conditioned medium by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, luciferase assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were used to ascertain the implication of ERβ on HIF-1 function. Results In this study, we found that the inhibition of HIF-1 activity by ERβ expression was correlated with ERβ's ability to degrade aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) via ubiquitination processes leading to the reduction of active HIF-1α/ARNT complexes. HIF-1 repression by ERβ was rescued by overexpression of ARNT as examined by hypoxia-responsive element (HRE)-driven luciferase assays. We show further that ERβ attenuated the hypoxic induction of VEGF mRNA by directly decreasing HIF-1α binding to the VEGF gene promoter. Conclusions These results show that ERβ suppresses HIF-1α-mediated transcription via ARNT down-regulation, which may account for the tumour suppressive function of ERβ. PMID:21435239

  7. Acetylation-deacetylation of the transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) regulates its transcriptional activity and nucleocytoplasmic localization.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yumiko; Garduño, Lakisha; Theodore, Melanie; Yang, Jianqi; Arinze, Ifeanyi J

    2011-03-01

    Activation of Nrf2 by covalent modifications that release it from its inhibitor protein Keap1 has been extensively documented. In contrast, covalent modifications that may regulate its action after its release from Keap1 have received little attention. Here we show that CREB-binding protein induced acetylation of Nrf2, increased binding of Nrf2 to its cognate response element in a target gene promoter, and increased Nrf2-dependent transcription from target gene promoters. Heterologous sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) decreased acetylation of Nrf2 as well as Nrf2-dependent gene transcription, and its effects were overridden by dominant negative SIRT1 (SIRT1-H355A). The SIRT1-selective inhibitors EX-527 and nicotinamide stimulated Nrf2-dependent gene transcription, whereas resveratrol, a putative activator of SIRT1, was inhibitory, mimicking the effect of SIRT1. Mutating lysine to alanine or to arginine at Lys(588) and Lys(591) of Nrf2 resulted in decreased Nrf2-dependent gene transcription and abrogated the transcription-activating effect of CREB-binding protein. Furthermore, SIRT1 had no effect on transcription induced by these mutants, indicating that these sites are acetylation sites. Microscope imaging of GFP-Nrf2 in HepG2 cells as well as immunoblotting for Nrf2 showed that acetylation conditions resulted in increased nuclear localization of Nrf2, whereas deacetylation conditions enhanced its cytoplasmic rather than its nuclear localization. We posit that Nrf2 in the nucleus undergoes acetylation, resulting in binding, with basic-region leucine zipper protein(s), to the antioxidant response element and consequently in gene transcription, whereas deacetylation disengages it from the antioxidant response element, thereby resulting in transcriptional termination and subsequently in its nuclear export. PMID:21196497

  8. Phytochemicals of Aristolochia tagala and Curcuma caesia exert anticancer effect by tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated decrease in nuclear factor kappaB binding activity

    PubMed Central

    Hadem, Khetbadei Lysinia Hynniewta; Sharan, Rajeshwar Nath; Kma, Lakhan

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The active compounds or metabolites of herbal plants exert a definite physiological action on the human body and thus are widely used in human therapy for various diseases including cancer. Previous studies by our group have reported the anticarcinogenic properties of the two herbal plants extracts (HPE) of Aristolochia tagala (AT) Cham. and Curcuma caesia (CC) Roxb. in diethylnitrosamine-induced mouse liver cancer in vivo. The anticarcinogenic properties of these extracts may be due to the active compounds present in them. Objectives: Our objective was to analyze the phytochemical constituents present in AT and CC, to assay their antioxidant properties and to determine their role in a possible intervention on tumor progression. Materials and Methods: Qualitative and quantitative analysis of constituent with anticancer properties present in the crude methanol extract of the two plants CC and AT was carried out following standard methods. Separation of the phytochemical compounds was done by open column chromatography. The extracts were eluted out with gradients of chloroform-methanol solvents. Ultraviolet-visible spectra of individual fractions were recorded, and the fractions were combined based on their λmax. The free radical scavenging activity of crude extracts and fractions obtained was also determined; the radical scavenging activity was expressed as IC50. High-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis of fractionated compounds was carried out to identify partially the phytochemical compounds. The anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity of AT and CC extracts was studied in DEN induced BALB/c mice by analyzing the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in serum and the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) binding activity in nuclear extracts of the liver. Results: It was observed that both AT and CC contained compounds such as phenolics, tannins, flavonoids, terpenoids, etc., and both extracts exhibited antioxidant capacity. HPTLC

  9. Protein-energy malnutrition increases activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor kappaB, in the gerbil hippocampus following global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ji, Liang; Nazarali, Adil J; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2008-11-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) exacerbates functional impairment caused by brain ischemia. This is correlated with reactive gliosis, which suggests an increased inflammatory response. The objective of the current study was to investigate if PEM increases hippocampal activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB), a transcription factor that amplifies the inflammatory response involved in ischemic brain injury. Mongolian gerbils (11-12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to control diet (12.5% protein) or protein-deficient diet (2%) for 4 weeks. The 2% protein group had a 15% decrease in voluntary food intake (P<.001; unpaired t test), resulting in PEM. Body weight after 4 weeks was 20% lower in the PEM group (P<.001). Gerbils were then exposed to sham surgery or global ischemia induced by 5-min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion. PEM independently increased hippocampal NFkappaB activation detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay at 6 h after surgery (P=.014; 2-factor ANOVA). Ischemia did not significantly affect NFkappaB activation nor was there interaction between diet and ischemia. Serum glucose and cortisol concentrations at 6 h postischemia were unaltered by diet or ischemia. A second experiment using gerbils of the same age and feeding paradigm demonstrated that PEM also increases hippocampal NFkappaB activation in the absence of surgery. These findings suggest that PEM, which exists in 16% of elderly patients at admission for stroke, may worsen outcome by increasing activation of NFkappaB. Since PEM increased NFkappaB activation independent of ischemia or surgery, the data also have implications for the inflammatory response of the many individuals affected globally by PEM.

  10. Upregulation of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin by ErbB2 through nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shau-Hsuan; Hawthorne, Valerie S; Neal, Christopher L; Sanghera, Sartaj; Xu, Jia; Yang, Jun; Guo, Hua; Steeg, Patricia S; Yu, Dihua

    2009-12-15

    ErbB2 (HER2, neu) is a receptor tyrosine kinase overexpressed in about 25% of invasive breast carcinomas. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a secreted glycoprotein expressed in a variety of cancers, including breast carcinomas. NGAL can inhibit erythroid cell production, leading to anemia. Anemia usually occurs in cancer patients and negatively affects quality of life. However, current treatment for cancer-related anemia has potential complications. ErbB2, NGAL, and anemia have all been associated with increased metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients, although the relationship between ErbB2 and NGAL expression is not clear. Here, using breast cancer cell lines in vitro and transgenic mice carrying the activated c-neu oncogene driven by a mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-neu) in vivo, we show that ErbB2 overexpression leads to NGAL upregulation, which is dependent on nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity. MMTV-neu transgenic mice developed anemia after tumor onset, and anemia progression could be partially arrested by a NF-kappaB inhibitor and ErbB2-targeted therapy. Taken together, upregulation of NGAL by ErbB2 through NF-kappaB activation is involved in cancer-related anemia, and the ErbB2, NF-kappaB, and NGAL pathways may serve as potential therapeutic targets for cancer-related anemia.

  11. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  12. Sphingosine kinase 1 regulates tumor necrosis factor-mediated RANTES induction through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase but independently of nuclear factor κB activation.

    PubMed

    Adada, Mohamad M; Orr-Gandy, K Alexa; Snider, Ashley J; Canals, Daniel; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M; Clarke, Christopher J

    2013-09-20

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) produces the pro-survival sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate and has been implicated in inflammation, proliferation, and angiogenesis. Recent studies identified TRAF2 as a sphingosine 1-phosphate target, implicating SK1 in activation of the NF-κB pathway, but the functional consequences of this connection on gene expression are unknown. Here, we find that loss of SK1 potentiates induction of the chemokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted; also known as CCL5) in HeLa cells stimulated with TNF-α despite RANTES induction being highly dependent on the NF-κB pathway. Additionally, we find that SK1 is not required for TNF-induced IKK phosphorylation, IκB degradation, nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunits, and transcriptional NF-κB activity. In contrast, loss of SK1 prevented TNF-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, and inhibition of p38 MAPK, like SK1 knockdown, also potentiates RANTES induction. Finally, in addition to RANTES, loss of SK1 also potentiated the induction of multiple chemokines and cytokines in the TNF response. Taken together, these data identify a potential and novel anti-inflammatory function of SK1 in which chemokine levels are suppressed through SK1-mediated activation of p38 MAPK. Furthermore, in this system, activation of NF-κB is dissociated from SK1, suggesting that the interaction between these pathways may be more complex than currently thought.

  13. Potential drugs which activate nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 signaling to prevent diabetic cardiovascular complications: A focus on fumaric acid esters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shanshan; Jin, Jingpeng; Bai, Tao; Sachleben, Leroy R; Cai, Lu; Zheng, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes and its cardiovascular complications have been a major public health issue. These complications are mainly attributable to a severe imbalance between free radical and reactive oxygen species production and the antioxidant defense systems. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that controls the basal and inducible expression of a battery of antioxidant enzyme genes and other cyto-protective phase II detoxifying enzymes. As a result, Nrf2 has gained great attention as a promising drug target for preventing diabetic cardiovascular complications. And while animal studies have shown that several Nrf2 activators manifest a potential to efficiently prevent the diabetic complications, their use in humans has not been approved due to the lack of substantial evidence regarding safety and efficacy of the Nrf2 activation. We provide here a brief review of a few clinically-used drugs that can up-regulate Nrf2 with the potential of extending their usage to diabetic patients for the prevention of cardiovascular complications and conclude with a closer inspection of dimethyl fumarate and its mimic members. PMID:26044512

  14. Modulation of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases via activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 by food-derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Denzer, Isabel; Münch, Gerald; Friedland, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are early events in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mitochondria are important key players in cellular function based on mitochondrial energy production and their major role in cell physiology. Since neurons are highly depending on mitochondrial energy production due to their high energy demand and their reduced glycolytic capacity mitochondrial dysfunction has fatal consequences for neuronal function and survival. The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular response to oxidative stress. Activation of Nrf2 induces the transcriptional regulation of antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent expression of a battery of cytoprotective and antioxidant enzymes and proteins. Moreover, activation of Nrf2 protects mitochondria from dysfunction and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, the Nrf2/ARE pathway has become an attractive target for the prevention and treatment of oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative diseases. Small food-derived inducers of the Nrf2/ARE pathway including l-sulforaphane from broccoli and isoliquiritigenin from licorice displayed promising protection of mitochondrial function in models of oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases and represent a novel approach to prevent and treat aging-associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio is increased in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients have lower bone mineral density and increased fracture risk when compared with healthy individuals, due to distinct factors and mechanisms. Bone remodeling is a tightly orchestrated process dependent on several factors, including the balance between receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Our aim was to assess serum OPG and soluble RANKL (sRANKL) levels as well as sRANKL/OPG ratio in female SLE patients and compare it with female controls. Methods We have evaluated 103 SLE patients and 114 healthy controls, all Caucasian females. All participants underwent a clinical and laboratory evaluation. sRANKL and OPG were quantified in serum by ELISA based methods. sRANKL, OPG and sRANKL/OPG ratio levels were compared between SLE patients and age, sex and race matched healthy controls. For SLE patients, a multivariate analysis was performed, to find the possible predictors of the changes in sRANKL, OPG and sRANKL/OPG ratio levels. Results Although sRANKL levels did not differ between the two groups, serum OPG was lower in SLE patients (P < 0.001). This led to an increased sRANKL/OPG ratio (P = 0.010) in the patients' group. The multivariate analysis was performed considering age and other clinical and laboratorial potential confounders for these variations in the SLE patients group. We have showed that age (P = 0.001) and levels of anti-Sm antibodies (P = 0.016) were independent predictors of sRANKL/OPG ratio variations in SLE patients. No relationship with therapy or disease activity measured by SLEDAI2K was found. Conclusions These results are suggestive of increased osteoclastic stimuli driven by the SLE disease mechanisms. PMID:22027240

  16. Staphylococcus aureus protein A binding to osteoblast tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 results in activation of nuclear factor kappa B and release of interleukin-6 in bone infection.

    PubMed

    Claro, Tânia; Widaa, Amro; McDonnell, Cormac; Foster, Timothy J; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kerrigan, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the major pathogen among the staphylococci and the most common cause of bone infections. These infections are mainly characterized by bone destruction and inflammation, and are often debilitating and very difficult to treat. Previously we demonstrated that S. aureus protein A (SpA) can bind to osteoblasts, which results in inhibition of osteoblast proliferation and mineralization, apoptosis, and activation of osteoclasts. In this study we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to demonstrate that osteoblast tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR-1) is responsible for the recognition of and binding to SpA. TNFR-1 binding to SpA results in the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). In turn, NFκB translocates to the nucleus of the osteoblast, which leads to release of interleukin 6 (IL-6). Silencing TNFR-1 in osteoblasts or disruption of the spa gene in S. aureus prevented both NFκB activation and IL-6 release. As well as playing a key role in proinflammatory reactions, IL-6 is also an important osteotropic factor. Release of IL-6 from osteoblasts results in the activation of the bone-resorbing cells, the osteoclasts. Consistent with our results described above, both silencing TNFR-1 in osteoblasts and disruption of spa in S. aureus prevented osteoclast activation. These studies are the first to demonstrate the importance of the TNFR-1-SpA interaction in bone infection, and may help explain the mechanism through which osteoclasts become overactivated, leading to bone destruction. Anti-inflammatory drug therapy could be used either alone or in conjunction with antibiotics to treat osteomyelitis or for prophylaxis in high-risk patients.

  17. Nuclear presence of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c3 and c4 is required for Toll-like receptor-activated innate inflammatory response of monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Minematsu, Hiroshi; Shin, Mike J; Celil Aydemir, Ayse B; Kim, Kyung-Ok; Nizami, Saqib A; Chung, Gook-Jin; Lee, Francis Young-In

    2011-11-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATs) are crucial transcription factors that tightly control proinflammatory cytokine expression for adaptive immunity in T and B lymphocytes. However, little is known about the role of NFATs for innate immunity in macrophages. In this study, we report that NFAT is required for Toll-like receptor (TLR)-initiated innate immune responses in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). All TLR ligand stimulation including LPS, a TLR4 ligand, and Pam(3)CSK(4), a TLR1/2 ligand, induced expression of TNF which was inhibited by VIVIT, an NFAT-specific inhibitor peptide. BMMs from NFATc4 knock-out mouse expressed less TNF than wild type. Despite apparent association between NFAT and TNF, LPS did not directly activate NFAT based on NFAT-luciferase reporter assay, whereas NF-κB was inducibly activated by LPS. Instead, macrophage exhibited constitutive NFAT activity which was not increased by LPS and was decreased by VIVIT. Immunocytochemical examination of NFATc1-4 of BMMs exhibited nuclear localization of NFATc3/c4 regardless of LPS stimulation. LPS stimulation did not cause nuclear translocation of NFATc1/c2. Treatment with VIVIT resulted in nuclear export of NFATc3/c4 and inhibited TLR-activated TNF expression, suggesting that nuclear residence of NFATc is required for TLR-related innate immune response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using anti-RNA polymerase II (PolII) antibody suggested that VIVIT decreased PolII binding to TNF gene locus, consistent with VIVIT inhibition of LPS-induced TNF mRNA expression. This study identifies a novel paradigm of innate immune regulation rendered by NFAT which is a well known family of adaptive immune regulatory proteins.

  18. Hind Limb Unloading Model Alters Nuclear Factor kappa B and Activator Protein-1 Signaling in Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Vani, Vani; Renard, Renard; Vera, Vera; Wilosn, Wilosn; Ramesh, Govindarajan

    Microgravity induces inflammatory response and also modulates immune functions, which may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to the microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects. However, there is little research exploring the etiology of neurological effects of exposure to this environment. To explore this area we evaluated changes in Nuclear Factor kappa B, Activator Protein 1, MAPP kinase and N terminal c-Jun kinase in mouse brain exposed to a simulated microgravity environment using the hindlimb unloading model. BALB/c male mice were randomly assigned to hindlimb unloading group (n=12) and control group (n=12) to simulate a microgravity environment, for 7 days. Changes observed in NF-κB, AP- 1 DNA binding, MAPKK and N terminal c-Jun kinase were measured using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and western blot analysis and compared to unexposed brain regions. Hindlimb unloading exposed mice showed significant increases in generated NF-κB, AP-1, MAPKK and Kinase in all regions of the brain exposed to hindlimb unloading as compared to the control brain regions. Results suggest that exposure to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors and protein kinases. This work was supported by funding from NASA NCC 9-165. 504b030414000600080000002100828abc13fa0000001c020000130000005b436f6e74656e745f54797065735d2e78

  19. Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Lin; Dai, Weiqi; Mao, Yuqing; Li, Sainan; Wang, Jingjie; Li, Huanqing; Guo, Chuanyong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-02-27

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of ghrelin on intestinal barrier dysfunction in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Methods and results: Acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administering 2.5% DSS. Saline or 25, 125, 250 μg/kg ghrelin was administrated intraperitoneally (IP) to mice 1 day before colitis induction and on days 4, 5, and 6 after DSS administration. IP injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist, [D-lys{sup 3}]-GHRP-6, was performed immediately prior to ghrelin injection. Ghrelin (125 or 250 μg/kg) could reduce the disease activity index, histological score, and myeloperoxidase activities in experimental colitis, and also prevented shortening of the colon. Ghrelin could prevent the reduction of transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression, and bolstered tight junction structural integrity and regulated cytokine secretion. Ultimately, ghrelin inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory κB-α, myosin light chain kinase, and phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 activation. Conclusions: Ghrelin prevented the breakdown of intestinal barrier function in DSS-induced colitis. The protective effects of ghrelin on intestinal barrier function were mediated by its receptor GHSR-1a. The inhibition of NF-κB activation might be part of the mechanism underlying the effects of ghrelin that protect against barrier dysfunction. - Highlights: • Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis. • The effect of ghrelin is mediated by GHSR-1a. • Inhibition of NF-κB activation.

  20. MicroRNA-200a mediates nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation through the activation of nuclear factor-κB.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhuliang; Hu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Delu; Huang, Jie; Fan, Jie; Zhou, Subo; Wang, Xin; Hu, Jiandao; Huang, Fei

    2016-02-01

    In nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway is highly active. The constitutive activation of NF-κB prompts malignant cell proliferation, and microRNAs are considered an important mediator in regulating the NF-κB signaling pathway. The current study investigated the effect of microRNA-200a (miR-200a) on NF-κB activation. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the relative level of miR-200a in NPC tissue samples and CNE2 cells. An MTT assay was used to investigate the effect of miR-200a on cell proliferation. To investigate the activation of NF-κB, western blotting was used to measure the protein levels of NF-κB and its downstream targets. To identify the target genes of miR-200a, a luciferase reporter assay was used. The current study demonstrated that miR-200a was upregulated in NPC tissue samples and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-200a resulted in the proliferation of CNE2 cells. Western blot analysis indicated that the protein levels of p65 increased when CNE2 cells were transfected with miR-200a mimics. Additionally, the downstream targets of miR-200a were upregulated, including vascular cell adhesion molecule, intercellular adhesion molecule and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. The luciferase assay indicated that IκBα was the target gene of miR-200a. In conclusion, miR-200a was demonstrated to enhance NPC cell proliferation by activating the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  1. Acetylbritannilactone Inhibits Neointimal Hyperplasia after Balloon Injury of Rat Artery by Suppressing Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B Activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Han, Mei; Wen, Jin-Kun

    2008-01-01

    Based on our previous observations that 1-O-acetylbritannilactone (R)-4((3aS,4S,7aR)-4-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-methylene-2-oxo-2,3,3a,4,7,7a-hexahydrobenzofuran-5-yl)pentyl acetate (ABL) suppresses prostaglandin E(2) and nitric oxide synthesis in macrophages, the present study was designed to explore the effect of ABL on neointimal hyperplasia after balloon injury and its mechanism of action. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, 26 mg/kg ABL or polyglycol (control) was administered daily from 3 days before injury to 2 weeks after conventional balloon injury. ABL administration led to a significant reduction in neointimal formation (neointima to media ratio, 1.94 +/- 0.43 versus 0.84 +/- 0.29, P < 0.01) and proliferative activity of vascular smooth muscle cells after balloon injury in rats. Western blot analysis revealed that this is correlated to the inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and to the reduced expression of cyclooxygenase-2. Investigation of potential signaling pathways demonstrated that ABL inhibited NF-kappaB activation via the blockade of the inhibitor of NF-kappaB kinase-beta activation and the suppression of the degradation of the inhibitors of NF-kappaB-alpha. These findings suggest that ABL is a potential inhibitor of neointimal formation because it blocks injury-induced NF-kappaB activation and may have beneficial effects in reducing the risk of restenosis after angioplasty. PMID:17911374

  2. Pomegranate Polyphenols and Extract Inhibit Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Cell Activity and Microglial Activation In Vitro and in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease123

    PubMed Central

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Puig, Kendra L.; Combs, Colin K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) brain is characterized by extracellular plaques of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide with reactive microglia. This study aimed to determine whether a dietary intervention could attenuate microgliosis. Memory was assessed in 12-mo-old male amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice via Barnes maze testing followed by division into either a control-fed group provided free access to normal chow and water or a treatment group provided free access to normal chow and drinking water supplemented with pomegranate extract (6.25 mL/L) for 3 mo followed by repeat Barnes maze testing for both groups. Three months of pomegranate feeding decreased the path length to escape of mice compared with their initial 12-mo values (P < 0.05) and their control-fed counterparts (P < 0.05). Brains of the 3-mo study pomegranate-fed mice had lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) concentrations (P < 0.05) and lower nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) transcriptional activity (P < 0.05) compared with controls. Brains of the 3-mo pomegranate or control mice were also compared with an additional control group of 12-mo-old mice for histologic analysis. Immunocytochemistry showed that pomegranate- but not control-fed mice had attenuated microgliosis (P < 0.05) and Aβ plaque deposition (P < 0.05) compared with 12-mo-old mice. An additional behavioral study again used 12-mo-old male APP/PS1 mice tested by T-maze followed by division into a control group provided with free access to normal chow and sugar supplemented drinking water or a treatment group provided with normal chow and pomegranate extract–supplemented drinking water (6.25 mL/L) for 1 mo followed by repeat T-maze testing in both groups. One month of pomegranate feeding increased spontaneous alternations versus control-fed mice (P < 0.05). Cell culture experiments verified that 2 polyphenol components of pomegranate extract, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated NFAT activity in a reporter

  3. Menadione cytotoxicity to Hep G2 cells and protection by activation of nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Cederbaum, A I

    1997-10-01

    Menadione (vitamin K-3,2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), a redox cycling reagent, generates reactive oxygen intermediates and causes oxidative injury. The addition of menadione to Hep G2 cells produced a time- and concentration-dependent loss of cell viability. Preincubation of Hep G2 cells with low, nontoxic concentrations of menadione increased the viability of the cells against toxic doses of menadione or H2O2. Maximum protection was found with menadione concentrations of approximately 3 microM and preincubation times of approximately 45 min. This protective effect could be blocked by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide and by a variety of antioxidants. The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaF (NF-kappaB) is known to be activated by many compounds, including reactive oxygen intermediates. Menadione activated NF-kappaB as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. This activation was prevented by the same antioxidants that blocked protection against cytotoxicity produced by preincubation with menadione. Anti-p50 IgG prevented the menadione-stimulated binding of NF-kappaB to the oligonucleotide probe, whereas anti-p65 IgG produced a supershift of the NF-kappaB/oligonucleotide complex. Salicylate prevented the activation of NF-kappaB by menadione, and under these conditions, salicylate potentiated the cytotoxicity of menadione or H2O2. Transfection with a plasmid containing cDNA encoding mouse IkappaBbeta, an inhibitor of NF-kappaB, resulted in increased toxicity by menadione. Furthermore, when protein kinase C was down-regulated by prolonged treatment with active phorbol ester (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate), the Hep G2 cells became more sensitive to menadione treatment. However, short term treatment with PMA, which activated NF-kappaB, resulted in protection against menadione cytotoxicity. Menadione cytotoxicity was enhanced when the Hep G2 cells were depleted of GSH. An increased level of GSH was observed after menadione pretreatment

  4. Endotoxin activates de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis via nuclear factor kappa B-mediated upregulation of Sptlc2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhi-Qiang; Lee, Su-Yeon; Kim, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jung Ran; Kim, Su-Jung; Hong, In-Kyung; Oh, Byung-Chul; Choi, Cheol-Soo; Goldberg, Ira J; Park, Tae-Sik

    2011-02-01

    Sphingolipids are membrane components and are involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis and metabolic regulation. In this study we investigated whether de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis in macrophages is regulated by inflammatory stimuli. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment upregulated Sptlc2, a subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), mRNA and protein in Raw264.7 and mouse peritoneal macrophages, but Sptlc1, another subunit of SPT, was not altered. SPT activation by LPS elevated cellular levels of ceramides and sphingomyelin (SM). Pharmacological inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) prevented LPS-induced upregulation of Sptlc2 while transfection of p65 subunit of NFκB upregulated Sptlc2 and increased cellular ceramide levels. In contrast, MAP kinases were not involved in regulation of sphingolipid biosynthesis. Analysis of Sptlc2 promoter and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed that NFκB binding sites are located in Sptlc2 promoter region. Our results demonstrate that inflammatory stimuli activate de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis via NFκB and may play a critical role in lipid metabolism in macrophages. PMID:21167294

  5. Salivary soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio in periodontal disease and health

    PubMed Central

    Tabari, Zahra Alizadeh; Azadmehr, Abbas; Tabrizi, Mohammad Amir Alizadeh; Hamissi, Jalaloddin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK)/RANK ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) system plays a significant role in osteoclastogenesis, activation of osteoclasts, and regulation of bone resorption. This study aimed to evaluate the use of the salivary soluble RANKL (sRANKL)/OPG ratio as a diagnostic marker for periodontitis in nonsmokers. Methods Twenty-five patients with chronic periodontitis and 25 individuals with a healthy periodontium were enrolled in this study. Samples containing 5 mL of unstimulated saliva were obtained from each subject. Salivary sRANKL and OPG concentrations were determined using a standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS ver. 18.0. Results The levels of sRANKL and OPG were detectable in all of the samples. Positive relationships were found between the plaque index and clinical attachment level and both the salivary concentration of sRANKL and the salivary sRANKL/OPG ratio (P<0.05). The salivary concentration of sRANKL and the sRANKL/OPG ratio were significantly higher in the periodontitis group than in the healthy group (P=0.004 and P=0.001, respectively). In contrast, the OPG concentration showed no significant differences between the groups (P=0.455). Conclusions These findings suggest that the salivary sRANKL/OPG ratio may be helpful in the screening and diagnosis of periodontitis. However, longitudinal studies with larger populations are needed to confirm these results. PMID:24236245

  6. Molecular basis of requirement of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB signaling for interleukin 1-mediated osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jules, Joel; Zhang, Ping; Ashley, Jason W; Wei, Shi; Shi, Zhenqi; Liu, Jianzhong; Michalek, Suzanne M; Feng, Xu

    2012-05-01

    IL-1, a proinflammatory cytokine, is implicated in bone loss in various pathological conditions by promoting osteoclast formation, survival, and function. Although IL-1 alone can sufficiently prolong osteoclast survival and activate osteoclast function, IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis requires the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL). However, the molecular basis of the dependence of IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis on RANKL is not fully understood. Here we show that although IL-1 cannot activate the expression of the osteoclast genes encoding matrix metalloproteinase 9, cathepsin K, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and carbonic anhydrase II in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs), RANKL renders these osteoclast genes responsive to IL-1. We further demonstrate that IL-1 alone fails to induce the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a master transcriptional regulator of osteoclastogenesis), in BMMs but can up-regulate its expression in the presence of permissive levels of RANKL or with RANKL pretreatment. The RANK IVVY motif, which has been previously shown to commit BMMs to the osteoclast lineage in RANKL- and TNF α-mediated osteoclastogenesis, also plays a crucial role in IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis by changing the four osteoclast marker and NFATc1 genes to an IL-1-inducible state. Finally, we show that MyD88, a known critical component of the IL-1 receptor I signaling pathway, plays a crucial role in IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis from RANKL-primed BMMs by up-regulating the expression of the osteoclast marker and NFATc1 genes. This study reveals a novel mechanism of IL-1-mediated osteoclastogenesis and supports the promising potential of the IVVY motif to serve as a therapeutic target for inflammatory bone loss.

  7. Identifying panaxynol, a natural activator of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) from American ginseng as a suppressor of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Chen; Li, Bin; Lai, Yimu; Li, Hechu; Windust, Anthony; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Janicki, Joseph S.; Tian, Xingsong; Cui, Taixing

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance American ginseng is capable of ameliorating cardiac dysfunction and activating Nrf2, a master regulator of antioxidant defense, in the heart. This study was designed to isolate compounds from American ginseng and to determine those responsible for the Nrf2-mediated resolution of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Materials and methods A standardized crude extract of American ginseng was supplied by the National Research Council of Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards. A bioassay-based fractionization of American ginseng was performed to identify the putative substances which could activate Nrf2-mediated suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages and macrophage-mediated pro-hypertrophic growth in cardiomyocytes. Results A hexane fraction of an anti-inflammatory crude extract of American ginseng was found to be most effective in suppressing the inflammatory responses in macrophages. Preparative, reverse-phase HPLC and a comparative analysis by analytical scale LC–UV/MS revealed the hexane fraction contains predominantly C17 polyacetylenes and linolenic acid. Panaxynol, one of the major polyacetylenes, was found to be a potent Nrf2 activator. Panaxynol posttranscriptionally activated Nrf2 by inhibiting Kelch-like ECH-associated protein (Keap) 1-mediated degradation without affecting the binding of Keap1 and Nrf2. Moreover, panaxynol suppressed a selected set of cytokine expression via the activation of Nrf2 while minimally regulating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated cytokine expression in macrophages. It also dramatically inhibited the inflamed macrophage-mediated cardiomyocyte death and hypertrophy by activating Nrf2 in macrophages. Conclusions These results demonstrate that American ginseng-derived panaxynol is a specific Nrf2 activator and panaxynol-activated Nrf2 signaling is at least partly responsible for American ginseng-induced health benefit in the heart. PMID

  8. Transforming growth factor beta 1-responsive element: closely associated binding sites for USF and CCAAT-binding transcription factor-nuclear factor I in the type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, A; Pedone, P V; Lund, L R; Olesen, T; Olsen, H S; Andreasen, P A

    1992-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is the name of a group of closely related polypeptides characterized by a multiplicity of effects, including regulation of extracellular proteolysis and turnover of the extracellular matrix. Its cellular mechanism of action is largely unknown. TGF-beta 1 is a strong and fast inducer of type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor gene transcription. We have identified a TGF-beta 1-responsive element in the 5'-flanking region of the human type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor gene and shown that it is functional both in its natural context and when fused to a heterologous nonresponsive promoter. Footprinting and gel retardation experiments showed that two different nuclear factors, present in extracts from both TGF-beta 1-treated and nontreated cells, bind to adjacent sequences contained in the responsive unit. A palindromic sequence binds a trans-acting factor(s) of the CCAAT-binding transcription factor-nuclear factor I family. A partially overlapping dyad symmetry interacts with a second protein that much evidence indicates to be USF. USF is a transactivator belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. Mutations which abolish the binding of either CCAAT-binding transcription factor-nuclear factor I or USF result in reduction of transcriptional activation upon exposure to TGF-beta 1, thus showing that both elements of the unit are necessary for the TGF-beta 1 response. We discuss the possible relationship of these findings to the complexity of the TGF-beta action. Images PMID:1549130

  9. Methamphetamine activates nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and induces human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transcription in human microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Wires, Emily S; Alvarez, David; Dobrowolski, Curtis; Wang, Yun; Morales, Marisela; Karn, Jonathan; Harvey, Brandon K

    2012-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) primarily infects glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent evidence suggests that HIV-infected individuals who abuse drugs such as methamphetamine (METH) have higher viral loads and experience more severe neurological complications than HIV-infected individuals who do not abuse drugs. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of METH on HIV expression from the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter and on an HIV integrated provirus in microglial cells, the primary host cells for HIV in the CNS. Primary human microglial cells immortalized with SV40 T antigen (CHME-5 cells) were cotransfected with an HIV LTR reporter and the HIV Tat gene, a key regulator of viral replication and gene expression, and exposed to METH. Our results demonstrate that METH treatment induced LTR activation, an effect potentiated in the presence of Tat. We also found that METH increased the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a key cellular transcriptional regulator of the LTR promoter, and the activity of an NF-κB-specific reporter plasmid in CHME-5 cells. The presence of a dominant-negative regulator of NF-κB blocked METH-related activation of the HIV LTR. Furthermore, treatment of HIV-latently infected CHME-5 (CHME-5/HIV) cells with METH induced HIV expression and nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB. These results suggest that METH can stimulate HIV gene expression in microglia cells through activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. This mechanism may outline the initial biochemical events leading to the observed increased neurodegeneration in HIV-positive individuals who use METH.

  10. Mutation of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 induces glioma cell proliferation via nuclear factor-κB activation in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoliang; Sai, Ke; Gong, Fanghe; Yang, Qunying; Chen, Furong; Lin, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Recently, mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 gene, which specifically occur in the majority of low-grade and secondary high-grade gliomas, have drawn particular attention of neuro-oncologists. Mutations of the IDH1 gene have been proposed to have significant roles in the tumorigenesis, progression and prognosis of gliomas. However, the molecular mechanism of the role of IDH1 mutants in gliomagenesis remains to be elucidated. The present study, showed that forced expression of an IDH1 mutant, of which the 132th amino acid residue arginine is substituted by histidine (IDH1R132H), promoted cell proliferation in cultured cells, while wild-type IDH1 overexpression had no effect on cell proliferation. Consistent with previous studies, it was also observed that expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α) was upregulated in IDH1R132H expressing cells with the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. However, knockdown of VEGF via small RNA interference had no significant influence on the cell proliferation induced by overexpression of IDH1R132H, implying that another signaling pathway may be involved. Next, forced expression of IDH1R132H was found to activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), since the inhibitory IκB protein (IκBα) was highly phosphorylated and the NF-κB p65 subunit was translocated into the nucleus. Notably, knockdown of HIF1-α significantly blocked NF-κB activation, which was induced by the overexpression of IDH1 mutants. In addition, expression of IDH1 mutants markedly induced the NF-κB target gene expression, including cyclin D1 and E and c-myc, which were involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the IDH1 mutant activated NF-κB in a HIF1-α‑dependent manner and was involved in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  11. Increased receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio exacerbates cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ji-Zhou; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Ma, Li-Feng; Meng, Hai; Yu, Hao-Miao; Cheng, Wen-Hao; Zhang, Ya-Kui; Guo, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive cartilage destruction, matrix degradation and bony changes. Subchondral bone alterations in osteoarthritis are associated with cartilage destruction. It has previously been demonstrated that osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL) mediate this process. The RANKL/OPG ratio is altered in OA chondrocytes compared with normal chondrocytes. In the pathogenesis of OA, abnormal expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) are secreted by chondrocytes has a vital role in the progression of cartilage erosion. In the present study, the effect of various RANKL/OPG ratios on MMP-13 expression levels was investigated in interleukin-1β-stimulated SW1353 human chondrosarcoma cells. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay and MMP-13 mRNA and protein expression levels were analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, ELISA and western blot analyses, respectively. The results demonstrated that an increase in MMP-13 mRNA and protein expression levels was observed with increasing RANKL/OPG ratio. These findings suggest that this mechanism may be used as a novel therapeutic strategy against OA.

  12. Flesh-eating Streptococcus pyogenes triggers the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hidenori; Nakatani, Yuriko; Yoshida, Haruno; Takizawa, Asako; Takeuchi, Osamu; Øverby, Anders; Takahashi, Takashi; Murayama, Somay Y; Matsuo, Koichi

    2016-10-01

    Human CD46 is a receptor for the M protein of group A streptococcus (GAS). The emm1 GAS strain GAS472 was isolated from a patient suffering from streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Human CD46-expressing transgenic (Tg) mice developed necrotizing fasciitis associated with osteoclast-mediated progressive and severe bone destruction in the hind paws 3 days after subcutaneous infection with 5 × 10(5) colony-forming units of GAS472. GAS472 infection induced expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) while concomitantly reducing osteoprotegerin expression in the hind limb bones of CD46 Tg mice. Micro-computed tomography analysis of the bones suggested that GAS472 infection induced local bone erosion and systemic bone loss in CD46 Tg mice. Because treatment with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mouse CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes did not inhibit osteoclastogenesis, T lymphocyte-derived RANKL was not considered a major contributor to massive bone loss during GAS472 infection. However, immunohistochemical analysis of the hind limb bones showed that GAS472 infection stimulated RANKL production in various bone marrow cells, including fibroblast-like cells. Treatment with a mAb against mouse RANKL significantly inhibited osteoclast formation and bone resorption. These data suggest that increased expression of RANKL in heterogeneous bone marrow cells provoked bone destruction during GAS infection.

  13. Increased receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio exacerbates cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ji-Zhou; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Ma, Li-Feng; Meng, Hai; Yu, Hao-Miao; Cheng, Wen-Hao; Zhang, Ya-Kui; Guo, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive cartilage destruction, matrix degradation and bony changes. Subchondral bone alterations in osteoarthritis are associated with cartilage destruction. It has previously been demonstrated that osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL) mediate this process. The RANKL/OPG ratio is altered in OA chondrocytes compared with normal chondrocytes. In the pathogenesis of OA, abnormal expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) are secreted by chondrocytes has a vital role in the progression of cartilage erosion. In the present study, the effect of various RANKL/OPG ratios on MMP-13 expression levels was investigated in interleukin-1β-stimulated SW1353 human chondrosarcoma cells. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay and MMP-13 mRNA and protein expression levels were analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, ELISA and western blot analyses, respectively. The results demonstrated that an increase in MMP-13 mRNA and protein expression levels was observed with increasing RANKL/OPG ratio. These findings suggest that this mechanism may be used as a novel therapeutic strategy against OA. PMID:27698783

  14. Identification of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins with nuclear export activity: cell cycle-regulated transcription factor ace2p shows cell cycle-independent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling.

    PubMed

    Jensen, T H; Neville, M; Rain, J C; McCarthy, T; Legrain, P; Rosbash, M

    2000-11-01

    Nuclear export of proteins containing leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NESs) is mediated by the NES receptor CRM1/Crm1p. We have carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen with Crm1p as a bait. The Crm1p-interacting clones were subscreened for nuclear export activity in a visual assay utilizing the Crm1p-inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB). This approach identified three Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins not previously known to have nuclear export activity. These proteins are the 5' RNA triphosphatase Ctl1p, the cell cycle-regulated transcription factor Ace2p, and a protein encoded by the previously uncharacterized open reading frame YDR499W. Mutagenesis analysis show that YDR499Wp contains an NES that conforms to the consensus sequence for leucine-rich NESs. Mutagenesis of Ctl1p and Ace2p were unable to identify specific NES residues. However, a 29-amino-acid region of Ace2p, rich in hydrophobic residues, contains nuclear export activity. Ace2p accumulates in the nucleus at the end of mitosis and activates early-G(1)-specific genes. We now provide evidence that Ace2p is nuclear not only in late M-early G(1) but also during other stages of the cell cycle. This feature of Ace2p localization explains its ability to activate genes such as CUP1, which are not expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner.

  15. Nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) in neurons via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man-Su; Shutov, Leonid P; Gnanasekaran, Aswini; Lin, Zhihong; Rysted, Jacob E; Ulrich, Jason D; Usachev, Yuriy M

    2014-11-01

    The Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) plays an important role in regulating many neuronal functions, including excitability, axonal growth, synaptogenesis, and neuronal survival. NFAT can be activated by action potential firing or depolarization that leads to Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation of NFAT and its translocation to the nucleus. Recent data suggest that NFAT and NFAT-dependent functions in neurons can also be potently regulated by NGF and other neurotrophins. However, the mechanisms of NFAT regulation by neurotrophins are not well understood. Here, we show that in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, NGF markedly facilitates NFAT-mediated gene expression induced by mild depolarization. The effects of NGF were not associated with changes in [Ca(2+)]i and were independent of phospholipase C activity. Instead, the facilitatory effect of NGF depended on activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway downstream of the TrkA receptor and on inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a protein kinase known to phosphorylate NFAT and promote its nuclear export. Knockdown or knockout of NFATc3 eliminated this facilitatory effect. Simultaneous monitoring of EGFP-NFATc3 nuclear translocation and [Ca(2+)]i changes in dorsal root ganglion neurons indicated that NGF slowed the rate of NFATc3 nuclear export but did not affect its nuclear import rate. Collectively, our data suggest that NGF facilitates depolarization-induced NFAT activation by stimulating PI3K/Akt signaling, inactivating GSK3β, and thereby slowing NFATc3 export from the nucleus. We propose that NFAT serves as an integrator of neurotrophin action and depolarization-driven calcium signaling to regulate neuronal gene expression.

  16. Plant Extracts of the Family Lauraceae: A Potential Resource for Chemopreventive Agents that Activate the Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2/Antioxidant Response Element Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Chen, Xue-Mei; Harder, Bryan; Long, Min; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Lou, Hong-Xiang; Wondrak, Georg T.; Ren, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Donna D.

    2015-01-01

    Cells and tissues counteract insults from exogenous or endogenous carcinogens through the expression of genes encoding antioxidants and phase II detoxifying enzymes regulated by antioxidant response element promoter regions. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 plays a key role in regulating the antioxidant response elements-target gene expression. Hence, the Nrf2/ARE pathway represents a vital cellular defense mechanism against damage caused by oxidative stress and xenobiotics, and is recognized as a potential molecular target for discovering chemo-preventive agents. Using a stable antioxidant response element luciferase reporter cell line derived from human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells combined with a 96-well high-throughput screening system, we have identified a series of plant extracts from the family Lauraceae that harbor Nrf2-inducing effects. These extracts, including Litsea garrettii (ZK-08), Cinnamomum chartophyllum (ZK-02), C. mollifolium (ZK-04), C. camphora var. linaloolifera (ZK-05), and C. burmannii (ZK-10), promoted nuclear translocation of Nrf2, enhanced protein expression of Nrf2 and its target genes, and augmented intracellular glutathione levels. Cytoprotective activity of these extracts against two electrophilic toxicants, sodium arsenite and H2O2, was investigated. Treatment of human bronchial epithelial cells with extracts of ZK-02, ZK-05, and ZK-10 significantly improved cell survival in response to sodium arsenite and H2O2, while ZK-08 showed a protective effect against only H2O2. Importantly, their protective effects against insults from both sodium arsenite and H2O2 were Nrf2-dependent. Therefore, our data provide evidence that the selected plants from the family Lauraceae are potential sources for chemopreventive agents targeting the Nrf2/ARE pathway. PMID:24585092

  17. Osteonecrosis of the jaw induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (Denosumab) - Review

    PubMed Central

    Brizeno, Luiz-André-Cavalcante; de Sousa, Fabrício-Bitu; Mota, Mário-Rogério-Lima; Alves, Ana-Paula-Negreiros-Nunes

    2016-01-01

    Background Denosumab, an anti-resorptive agent, IgG2 monoclonal antibody for human Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL), has been related to the occurrence of osteonecrosis of the jaws. Thus, the aim of this study was to review the literature from clinical case reports, regarding the type of patient and the therapeutic approach used for osteonecrosis of the jaws induced by chronic use of Denosumab. Material and Methods For this, a literature review was performed on PubMed, Medline and Cochrane databases, using the keywords “Denosumab” “anti-RANK ligand” and “Osteonecrosis of jaw”. To be included, articles should be a report or a serie of clinical cases, describing patients aged 18 years or over who used denosumab therapy and have received any therapy for ONJ. Results Thirteen complete articles were selected for this review, totaling 17 clinical cases. The majority of ONJ cases, patients receiving Denosumab as treatment for osteoporosis and prostate cancer therapy. In most cases, patients affected by ONJ were women aged 60 or over and posterior mandible area was the main site of involvement. Diabetes pre-treatment with bisphosphonates and exodontia were the most often risk factors related to the occurrence of this condition. It is concluded that the highest number of ONJ cases caused by the use of anti-RANKL agents occurred in female patients, aged 60 years or older, under treatment for osteoporosis and cancer metastasis, and the most affected region was the mandible posterior. Conclusions The results presented in this article are valid tool supporting the non-invasive mapping of facial vascularization. Key words:Denosumab, osteonecrosis, adverse effects, osteoporosis, antineoplastic protocols. PMID:26827069

  18. Importance of osteoprotegrin and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB in breast cancer response to hepatocyte growth factor and the bone microenvironment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Owen, Sioned; Sanders, Andrew J; Mason, Malcolm D; Jiang, Wen G

    2016-03-01

    Osteoprotegrin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) and RANK ligand (RANKL) are signal transducers which have pleiotropic actions. Each tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily member has unique structural attributes which directly couples them to signalling pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Previous studies have clinically linked OPG, RANK and RANKL to increasing tumour burden, metastatic bone involvement and estrogen status. This study aimed to establish the potential implications of targeting endogenously produced OPG and RANK in the osteotropic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB‑231 in vitro. Subsequently this study also aimed to explore the potential links between these molecules with regards to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signalling and extracted bone proteins (BME). OPG and RANK expression was successfully suppressed using hammerhead ribozyme technology. Subsequently effects were explored in MDA-MB‑231 cell proliferation, matrix adhesion, migration and invasion in vitro function assays. Reduced OPG expression resulted in increased breast cancer cell migration and invasion. These increases, particularly invasion, appeared to however be reduced under the influence of the exogenous stimuli (HGF and BME). In contrast, suppression of RANK in MDA-MB‑231 breast cancer cells resulted in decreased cancer cell proliferation, matrix-adhesion, motility and invasion with little cumulative effect being noted after the addition of exogenous stimuli. The complexity of the bone environment underpins the vast number of soluble factors and signalling pathways which can influence osteotropic cancer behaviour and progression. Further work into elucidating all the pathways affected could potentially lead to better identification of those patients most at risk. PMID:26781475

  19. Long term environmental tobacco smoke activates nuclear transcription factor-kappa B, activator protein-1, and stress responsive kinases in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sunil K; Rangasamy, Thirumalai; Wise, Kimberly; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Shishodia, Shishir; Biswal, Shyam; Ramesh, Govindarajan T

    2006-05-28

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is a key mediator of several diseases. Tobacco smoke contains a mixture of over 4700 chemical components many of which are toxic and have been implicated in the etiology of oxidative stress related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Parkinson's disease, asthma, cancer and cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism of action of cigarette smoke in the onset of these diseases is still largely unknown. Previous studies have revealed that the free radicals generated by cigarette smoke may contribute to many of these chronic health problems and this study sought to address the role of environmental tobacco smoke in oxidative stress related damage in different regions of the mouse brain. In this study, male mice were exposed for 7h/day, 7 days/week, for 6 months. Our results show that tobacco smoke led to increased generation of reactive oxygen species with an increase in NF-kappaB activation. Gel shift analysis also revealed the elevated level of the oxidative stress sensitive proinflammatory nuclear transcription factor-kappa B and activator protein-1 in different regions of the brain of cigarette smoke exposed mice. Tobacco smoke led to activation of COX-2 in all the regions of the brain. Activation of mitogen activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase were also observed in various regions of brain of ETS exposed mice. Overall our results indicate that exposure to long-term cigarette smoke induces oxidative stress leading to activation of stress induced kinases and activation of proinflammatory transcription factors.

  20. GrpL, a Grb2-related Adaptor Protein, Interacts with SLP-76 to Regulate Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Law, Che-Leung; Ewings, Maria K.; Chaudhary, Preet M.; Solow, Sasha A.; Yun, Theodore J.; Marshall, Aaron J.; Hood, Leroy; Clark, Edward A.

    1999-01-01

    Propagation of signals from the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) involves a number of adaptor molecules. SH2 domain–containing protein 76 (SLP-76) interacts with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav to activate the nuclear factor of activated cells (NF-AT), and its expression is required for normal T cell development. We report the cloning and characterization of a novel Grb2-like adaptor molecule designated as Grb2-related protein of the lymphoid system (GrpL). Expression of GrpL is restricted to hematopoietic tissues, and it is distinguished from Grb2 by having a proline-rich region. GrpL can be coimmunoprecipitated with SLP-76 but not with Sos1 or Sos2 from Jurkat cell lysates. In contrast, Grb2 can be coimmunoprecipitated with Sos1 and Sos2 but not with SLP-76. Moreover, tyrosine-phosphorylated LAT/pp36/38 in detergent lysates prepared from anti-CD3 stimulated T cells associated with Grb2 but not GrpL. These data reveal the presence of distinct complexes involving GrpL and Grb2 in T cells. A functional role of the GrpL–SLP-76 complex is suggested by the ability of GrpL to act alone or in concert with SLP-76 to augment NF-AT activation in Jurkat T cells. PMID:10209041

  1. Sodium arsenite induced reactive oxygen species generation, nuclear factor (erythroid-2 related) factor 2 activation, heme oxygenase-1 expression, and glutathione elevation in Chang human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Li, Xin; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Yi; Xu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huihui; Hou, Yongyong; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan

    2013-07-01

    Liver is one of the major target organs of arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis. Nuclear factor (erythroid-2 related) factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor, regulating critically cellular defense responses against the toxic metallic arsenic in many cell types and tissues. This study was conducted to evaluate the hepato-cellular Nrf2 and Nrf2-regulated antioxidant reactions of sodium arsenite exposure in Chang human hepatocytes. Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein levels were detected by Western blot, and Nrf2-regulated HO-1 mRNA expressions were determined using semiquantitative RT-PCR by 0∼50 μmol/L of sodium arsenite exposure for 2, 6, 12, and 24 h. We also observed the changes of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and total cellular glutathione (GSH) by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry, respectively. Our results showed that intracellular ROS were both dose- and time-dependent induced by inorganic arsenic; Cellular Nrf2 protein levels increased rapidly after 2 h of exposure, elevated significantly at 6 h, and reached the maximum at 12 h. The endogenous Nrf2-regulated downstream HO-1 mRNA and protein were also induced dramatically and lasted for as long as 24 h. In addition, intracellular GSH levels elevated in consistent with Nrf2 activation. Our findings here suggest that inorganic arsenic alters cellular redox balance in hepatocytes to trigger Nrf2-regulated antioxidant responses promptly, which may represent an adaptive cell defense mechanism against inorganic arsenic induced liver injuries and hepatoxicity.

  2. Quetiapine Attenuates Glial Activation and Proinflammatory Cytokines in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice via Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shenghua; Shi, Ruoyang; Li, Victor; Wang, Junhui; Zhang, Ruiguo; Tempier, Adrien; He, Jue; Kong, Jiming; Wang, Jun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Alzheimer’s disease, growing evidence has shown that uncontrolled glial activation and neuroinflammation may contribute independently to neurodegeneration. Antiinflammatory strategies might provide benefits for this devastating disease. The aims of the present study are to address the issue of whether glial activation and proinflammatory cytokine increases could be modulated by quetiapine in vivo and in vitro and to explore the underlying mechanism. Methods: Four-month–old amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic and nontransgenic mice were treated with quetiapine (5mg/kg/d) in drinking water for 8 months. Animal behaviors, total Aβ levels, and glial activation were evaluated by behavioral tests, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot accordingly. Inflammatory cytokines and the nuclear factor kappa B pathway were analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Results: Quetiapine improves behavioral performance, marginally affects total Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels, attenuates glial activation, and reduces proinflammatory cytokines in APP/PS1 mice. Quetiapine suppresses Aβ1-42-induced activation of primary microglia by decresing proinflammatory cytokines. Quetiapine inhibits the activation of nuclear factor kappa B p65 pathway in both transgenic mice and primary microglia stimulated by Aβ1–42. Conclusions: The antiinflammatory effects of quetiapine in Alzheimer’s disease may be involved in the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Quetiapine may be an efficacious and promising treatment for Alzheimer’s disease targeting on neuroinflammation. PMID:25618401

  3. Calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells-coupled vanilliod transient receptor potential channel 4 ca2+ sparklets stimulate airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Limin; Sullivan, Michelle N; Chase, Marlee; Gonzales, Albert L; Earley, Scott

    2014-06-01

    Proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) contributes to the remodeling and irreversible obstruction of airways during severe asthma, but the mechanisms underlying this disease process are poorly understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that Ca(2+) influx through the vanilliod transient receptor potential channel (TRPV) 4 stimulates ASMC proliferation. We found that synthetic and endogenous TRPV4 agonists increase proliferation of primary ASMCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Ca(2+) influx through individual TRPV4 channels produces Ca(2+) microdomains in ASMCs, called "TRPV4 Ca(2+) sparklets." We also show that TRPV4 channels colocalize with the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin in ASMCs. Activated calcineurin dephosphorylates nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factors cytosolic (c) to allow nuclear translocation and activation of synthetic transcriptional pathways. We show that ASMC proliferation in response to TRPV4 activity is associated with calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of the NFATc3 isoform tagged with green florescent protein. Our findings suggest that Ca(2+) microdomains created by TRPV4 Ca(2+) sparklets activate calcineurin to stimulate nuclear translocation of NFAT and ASMC proliferation. These findings further suggest that inhibition of TRPV4 could diminish asthma-induced airway remodeling.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide prevents valproic acid-induced apoptosis via activation of nuclear factor-κB and inhibition of p53 activation.

    PubMed

    Tsolmongyn, Bilegtsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Haque, Abedul; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on valproic acid (VPA)-induced cell death was examined by using mouse RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS inhibited the activation of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS inhibited VPA-induced p53 activation and pifithrin-α as a p53 inhibitor as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS abolished the increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which is a critical indicator of p53-mediated mitochondrial damage, in response to VPA. The nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors, Bay 11-7082 and parthenolide, abolished the preventive action of LPS on VPA-induced apoptosis. A series of toll-like receptor ligands, Pam3CSK4, poly I:C, and CpG DNA as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. Taken together, LPS was suggested to prevent VPA-induced apoptosis via activation of anti-apoptotic NF-κB and inhibition of pro-apoptotic p53 activation. The detailed inhibitory mechanism of VPA-induced apoptosis by LPS is discussed.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide prevents valproic acid-induced apoptosis via activation of nuclear factor-κB and inhibition of p53 activation.

    PubMed

    Tsolmongyn, Bilegtsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Haque, Abedul; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on valproic acid (VPA)-induced cell death was examined by using mouse RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS inhibited the activation of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS inhibited VPA-induced p53 activation and pifithrin-α as a p53 inhibitor as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS abolished the increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which is a critical indicator of p53-mediated mitochondrial damage, in response to VPA. The nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors, Bay 11-7082 and parthenolide, abolished the preventive action of LPS on VPA-induced apoptosis. A series of toll-like receptor ligands, Pam3CSK4, poly I:C, and CpG DNA as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. Taken together, LPS was suggested to prevent VPA-induced apoptosis via activation of anti-apoptotic NF-κB and inhibition of pro-apoptotic p53 activation. The detailed inhibitory mechanism of VPA-induced apoptosis by LPS is discussed. PMID:23770718

  6. Calcineurin Aβ regulates NADPH oxidase (Nox) expression and activity via nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) in response to high glucose.

    PubMed

    Williams, Clintoria R; Gooch, Jennifer L

    2014-02-21

    Hypertrophy is an adaptive response that enables organs to appropriately meet increased functional demands. Previously, we reported that calcineurin (Cn) is required for glomerular and whole kidney hypertrophy in diabetic rodents (Gooch, J. L., Barnes, J. L., Garcia, S., and Abboud, H. E. (2003). Calcineurin is activated in diabetes and is required for glomerular hypertrophy and ECM accumulation. Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol. 284, F144-F154; Reddy, R. N., Knotts, T. L., Roberts, B. R., Molkentin, J. D., Price, S. R., and Gooch, J. L. (2011). Calcineurin Aβ is required for hypertrophy but not matrix expansion in the diabetic kidney. J. Cell Mol. Med. 15, 414-422). Because studies have also implicated the reactive oxygen species-generating enzymes NADPH oxidases (Nox) in diabetic kidney responses, we tested the hypothesis that Nox and Cn cooperate in a common signaling pathway. First, we examined the role of the two main isoforms of Cn in hypertrophic signaling. Using primary kidney cells lacking a catalytic subunit of Cn (CnAα(-/-) or CnAβ(-/-)), we found that high glucose selectively activates CnAβ, whereas CnAα is constitutively active. Furthermore, CnAβ but not CnAα mediates hypertrophy. Next, we found that chronic reactive oxygen species generation in response to high glucose is attenuated in CnAβ(-/-) cells, suggesting that Cn is upstream of Nox. Consistent with this, loss of CnAβ reduces basal expression and blocks high glucose induction of Nox2 and Nox4. Inhibition of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), a CnAβ-regulated transcription factor, decreases Nox2 and Nox4 expression, whereas NFAT overexpression increases Nox2 and Nox4, indicating that the CnAβ/NFAT pathway modulates Nox. These data reveal that the CnAβ/NFAT pathway regulates Nox and plays an important role in high glucose-mediated hypertrophic responses in the kidney.

  7. The intergenic region of maize streak virus contains a GC-rich element that activates rightward transcription and binds maize nuclear factors.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, C; Schwarz, J J; Black, D M; Schneider, M; Howell, S H

    1990-12-01

    Maize streak virus (MSV) is transcribed bidirectionally from an intergenic region and rightward transcription produces an RNA that encodes the coat protein. The intergenic region contains promoter elements required for rightward transcription including an upstream activating sequence (UAS) which endows the promoter with full activity in a maize transient expression system. The UAS contains two GC-rich repeats (GC boxes) and a long inverted repeat or hairpin with a loop harboring a TAATATTAC sequence common to all geminiviruses. Deletions through the UAS demonstrated the presence of an element, called the rightward promoter element (rpe1), which is responsible for transcriptional activation. Rpe1 includes the two GC-rich boxes, which are similar in sequence to Sp1 binding sites in mammalian cells, but not the conserved hairpin loop. Rpe1 binds maize nuclear factors in vitro and the characteristics of the binding interaction have been determined by 1) binding competition with oligonucleotides, 2) methidiumpropyl-EDTA footprinting and 3) methylation interference assays. Binding of maize nuclear factors to the UAS generates two major bands, slow and fast migrating bands, in gel retardation assays. Footprinting and factor titration data suggest that the fast bands arise by the binding of factors to one GC box while the slow bands are generated by factors binding to both boxes. The data further indicate that the factors bind to the two GC-rich boxes with little cooperativity and bind on opposite faces of the DNA helix.

  8. Death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) mediated apoptosis in hantavirus infection is counter-balanced by activation of interferon-stimulated nuclear transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.; Morzunov, Sergey P.; Boichuk, Sergei V.; Palotás, András; Jeor, Stephen St.; Lombardi, Vincent C.; Rizvanov, Albert A.

    2013-09-01

    Hantaviruses are negative strand RNA species that replicate predominantly in the cytoplasm. They also activate numerous cellular responses, but their involvement in nuclear processes is yet to be established. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), this study investigates the molecular finger-print of nuclear transcription factors during hantavirus infection. The viral-replication-dependent activation of pro-myelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was followed by subsequent localization in nuclear bodies (NBs). PML was also found in close proximity to activated Sp100 nuclear antigen and interferon-stimulated gene 20 kDa protein (ISG-20), but co-localization with death-domain associated protein-6 (DAXX) was not observed. These data demonstrate that hantavirus triggers PML activation and localization in NBs in the absence of DAXX-PLM-NB co-localization. The results suggest that viral infection interferes with DAXX-mediated apoptosis, and expression of interferon-activated Sp100 and ISG-20 proteins may indicate intracellular intrinsic antiviral attempts.

  9. Glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} regulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform c1 in the vascular smooth muscle cell response to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Chow Winsion; Hou Guangpei; Bendeck, Michelle P.

    2008-10-01

    The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) are critical events in neointima formation during atherosclerosis and restenosis. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells-isoform c1 (NFATc1) is regulated by atherogenic cytokines, and has been implicated in the migratory and proliferative responses of vSMCs through the regulation of gene expression. In T-cells, calcineurin de-phosphorylates NFATc1, leading to its nuclear import, while glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK3{beta}) phosphorylates NFATc1 and promotes its nuclear export. However, the relationship between NFATc1 and GSK3{beta} has not been studied during SMC migration and proliferation. We investigated this by scrape wounding vSMCs in vitro, and studying wound repair. NFATc1 protein was transiently increased, reaching a peak at 8 h after wounding. Cell fractionation and immunocytochemistry revealed that NFATc1 accumulation in the nucleus was maximal at 4 h after injury, and this was coincident with a significant 9 fold increase in transcriptional activity. Silencing NFATc1 expression with siRNA or inhibition of NFAT with cyclosporin A (CsA) attenuated wound closure by vSMCs. Phospho-GSK3{beta} (inactive) increased to a peak at 30 min after injury, preceding the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1. Overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3{beta} delayed the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1, caused a 50% decrease in NFAT transcriptional activity, and attenuated vSMC wound repair. We conclude that NFATc1 promotes the vSMC response to injury, and that inhibition of GSK3{beta} is required for the activation of NFAT during wound repair.

  10. Glycemia-dependent Nuclear Factor κB Activation Contributes to Mechanical Allodynia in Rats with Chronic Postischemia Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Huot, Marie-Christine; Laferrière, André; Khorashadi, Mina; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemia-reperfusion injury causes chronic postischemia pain (CPIP), and rats with higher glycemia during ischemia-reperfusion injury exhibit increased allodynia. Glycemia-induced elevation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB) may contribute to increased allodynia. Methods Glycemia during a 3 h ischemia-reperfusion injury was manipulated by: normal feeding; or normal feeding with administration of insulin; dextrose; or insulin/dextrose. In these groups, NFκB was measured in ipsilateral hind paw muscle and spinal dorsal horn by ELISA, and SN50, an NFκB inhibitor, was administered to determine its differential anti-allodynic effects depending on glycemia. Results CPIP fed/insulin rats (12.03 ± 4.9, N = 6) had less allodynia than fed, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed/dextrose rats (6.29 ± 3.37 N = 7, 4.57 ± 3.03 g, N = 6, 2.95 ± 1.10, N = 9), respectively. Compared to fed rats (0.209 ± 0.022, N = 7), NFκB in ipsilateral plantar muscles was significantly lower for fed/insulin rats and significantly higher for fed/dextrose rats (0.152 ± 0.053, N = 6; 0.240 ± 0.057, N = 7, respectively). Furthermore, NFκB in the dorsal horn of fed, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed/dextrose rats (0.293 ± 0.049, N = 6) was significantly higher than in fed/insulin animals (0.267 ± 0.037, N = 6). The anti-allodynic SN50 dose-response curves of CPIP rats in the fed/insulin/dextrose, fed/dextrose and fed conditions exhibited a rightward shift compared to the fed/insulin group. The threshold SN50 dose of CPIP fed/dextrose, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed rats (328.94 ± 92.4, 77.80 ± 44.50 and 24.89 ± 17.20, respectively) was higher than that for fed/insulin rats (4.06 ± 7.04). Conclusions NFκB was activated in a glycemia-dependent manner in CPIP rats. Hypoglycemic rats were more sensitive to SN50 than rats with higher glycemia. The finding that SN50 reduces mechanical allodynia suggests that NFκB inhibitors might be useful for treating postischemia pain. PMID:23695173

  11. The effect of ex vivo CDDO-Me activation on nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway in white blood cells from patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Noel, Sanjeev; Zheng, Laura; Navas-Acien, Ana; Fuchs, Ralph J

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) has been shown to protect against experimental sepsis in mice and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in ex vivo white blood cells from healthy subjects by upregulating cellular antioxidant genes. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that ex vivo methyl 2-cyano-3,12-dioxoolean-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) activates NRF2-regulated antioxidant genes in white blood cells from patients with septic shock and protects against LPS-induced inflammation and reactive oxidative species production. Peripheral blood was collected from 18 patients with septic shock who were being treated in medical and surgical intensive care units. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the expression of NRF2 target genes (NQO1, HO-1, GCLM, and FTL) and IL-6 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), monocytes, and neutrophils after CDDO-Me treatment alone or after subsequent LPS exposure. Superoxide anion (O2) was measured to assess the effect of CDDO-Me pretreatment on subsequent LPS exposure. Treatment with CDDO-Me increased the gene expression of NQO1 (P = 0.04) and decreased the expression of HO-1 (P = 0.03) in PBMCs from patients with septic shock. Purified monocytes exhibited significant increases in the expression of NQO1 (P = 0.01) and GCLM (P = 0.003) after CDDO-Me treatment. Levels of other NRF2 target genes (HO-1 and FTL) remained similar to those of vehicle-treated cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed a trend toward increased IL-6 gene expression after CDDO-Me treatment, whereas purified monocytes showed a trend toward decreased IL-6. There was no discernible trend in the IL-6 expression subsequent to LPS treatment in either vehicle-treated or CDDO-Me-treated PBMCs and monocytes. Treatment with CDDO-Me significantly increased O2 production in PBMCs (P = 0.04). Although CDDO-Me pretreatment significantly attenuated O2 production to subsequent LPS exposure (P = 0.03), the

  12. Placotylene A, an Inhibitor of the Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κB Ligand-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation, from a Korean Sponge Placospongia sp.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hiyoung; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Yeon, Jeong-Tae; Kim, Seong Hwan; Won, Dong Hwan; Choi, Hyukjae; Nam, Sang-Jip; Son, Young-Jin; Kang, Heonjoong

    2014-01-01

    A new inhibitor, placotylene A (1), of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation, and a regioisomer of placotylene A, placotylene B (2), were isolated from a Korean marine sponge Placospongia sp. The chemical structures of placotylenes A and B were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR, along with MS spectral analysis and revealed as an iodinated polyacetylene class of natural products. Placotylene A (1) displayed inhibitory activity against RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation at 10 μM while placotylene B (2) did not show any significant activity up to 100 μM, respectively. PMID:24705502

  13. Vitamin K3 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury through inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, S; Nishiumi, S; Nishida, M; Mizushina, Y; Kobayashi, K; Masuda, A; Fujita, T; Morita, Y; Mizuno, S; Kutsumi, H; Azuma, T; Yoshida, M

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin K is a family of fat-soluble compounds including phylloquinone (vitamin K1), menaquinone (vitamin K2) and menadione (vitamin K3). Recently, it was reported that vitamin K, especially vitamins K1 and K2, exerts a variety of biological effects, and these compounds are expected to be candidates for therapeutic agents against various diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin K3 in in vitro cultured cell experiments and in vivo animal experiments. In human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells, vitamin K3 inhibited the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-evoked translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB into the nucleus, although vitamins K1 and K2 did not. Vitamin K3 also suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and production of TNF-α in mouse macrophage RAW264·7 cells. Moreover, the addition of vitamin K3 before and after LPS administration attenuated the severity of lung injury in an animal model of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which occurs in the setting of acute severe illness complicated by systemic inflammation. In the ARDS model, vitamin K3 also suppressed the LPS-induced increase in the serum TNF-α level and inhibited the LPS-evoked nuclear translocation of NF-κB in lung tissue. Despite marked efforts, little therapeutic progress has been made, and the mortality rate of ARDS remains high. Vitamin K3 may be an effective therapeutic strategy against acute lung injury including ARDS. PMID:20030669

  14. Physical interaction between GATA-5 and hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha results in synergistic activation of the human lactase-phlorizin hydrolase promoter.

    PubMed

    van Wering, Herbert M; Huibregtse, Inge L; van der Zwan, Sanne M; de Bie, Maartje S; Dowling, Lauren N; Boudreau, Francois; Rings, Edmond H H M; Grand, Richard J; Krasinski, Stephen D

    2002-08-01

    GATA-4, -5, and -6 zinc finger and hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1alpha) homeodomain transcription factors are expressed in the intestinal epithelium and synergistically activate the promoter of intestinal genes. Here, we demonstrate that GATA-5 and HNF-1alpha physically associate both in vivo and in vitro and that this interaction is necessary for cooperative activation of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase promoter. Furthermore, physical association is mediated by the C-terminal zinc finger of GATA factors and the homeodomain of HNF-1alpha. Deletion of HNF-1alpha activation domains or interruption of HNF-1-binding sites in the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase promoter resulted in a complete loss of cooperativity, whereas deletion of GATA-5 activation domains or interruption of GATA-binding sites resulted in a reduction, but not an elimination, of cooperativity. We hypothesize that GATA/HNF-1alpha cooperativity is mediated by HNF-1alpha through its activation domains, which are oriented for high levels of activation through binding to DNA and physical association with GATA factors. These data suggest a paradigm whereby intestine-specific gene expression is regulated by unique interactions among tissue-restricted transcription factors coexpressed in the intestine. Parallel mechanisms in other tissues as well as in Drosophila suggest that zinc finger/homeodomain interactions are an efficient pathway of cooperative activation of gene transcription that has been conserved throughout evolution.

  15. Cocaine induces cell death and activates the transcription nuclear factor kappa-B in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lepsch, Lucilia B; Munhoz, Carolina D; Kawamoto, Elisa M; Yshii, Lidia M; Lima, Larissa S; Curi-Boaventura, Maria F; Salgado, Thais M L; Curi, Rui; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Scavone, Cristoforo

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine is a worldwide used drug and its abuse is associated with physical, psychiatric and social problems. The mechanism by which cocaine causes neurological damage is very complex and involves several neurotransmitter systems. For example, cocaine increases extracellular levels of dopamine and free radicals, and modulates several transcription factors. NF-kappaB is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression involved in cellular death. Our aim was to investigate the toxicity and modulation of NF-kappaB activity by cocaine in PC 12 cells. Treatment with cocaine (1 mM) for 24 hours induced DNA fragmentation, cellular membrane rupture and reduction of mitochondrial activity. A decrease in Bcl-2 protein and mRNA levels, and an increase in caspase 3 activity and cleavage were also observed. In addition, cocaine (after 6 hours treatment) activated the p50/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB complex and the pretreatment of the cells with SCH 23390, a D1 receptor antagonist, attenuated the NF-kappaB activation. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by using PDTC and Sodium Salicilate increased cell death caused by cocaine. These results suggest that cocaine induces cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) and activates NF-kappaB in PC12 cells. This activation occurs, at least partially, due to activation of D1 receptors and seems to have an anti-apoptotic effect on these cells. PMID:19183502

  16. Baicalin attenuates focal cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury through inhibition of nuclear factor {kappa}B p65 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Xia; Qu, Xian-Jun; Yang, Ying; Sheng, Xie-Huang; Cheng, Fang; Jiang, E-Nang; Wang, Jian-hua; Bu, Wen; Liu, Zhao-Ping

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Permanent NF-{kappa}B p65 activation contributes to the infarction after ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. {yields} Baicalin can markedly inhibit the nuclear NF-{kappa}B p65 expression and m RNA levels after ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. {yields} Baicalin decreased the cerebral infarction area via inhibiting the activation of nuclear NF-{kappa}B p65. -- Abstract: Baicalin is a flavonoid compound purified from plant Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi. We aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of baicalin against cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury. Male Wistar rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 h followed by reperfusion for 24 h. Baicalin at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg was intravenously injected after ischemia onset. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, the neurological deficit was scored and infarct volume was measured. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining was performed to analyze the histopathological changes of cortex and hippocampus neurons. We examined the levels of NF-{kappa}B p65 in ischemic cortexes by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR assay. The results showed that the neurological deficit scores were significantly decreased from 2.0 {+-} 0.7 to 1.2 {+-} 0.4 and the volume of infarction was reduced by 25% after baicalin injection. Histopathological examination showed that the increase of neurons with pycnotic shape and condensed nuclear in cortex and hippocampus were not observed in baicalin treated animals. Further examination showed that NF-{kappa}B p65 in cortex was increased after ischemia reperfusion injury, indicating the molecular mechanism of ischemia reperfusion injury. The level of NF-{kappa}B p65 was decreased by 73% after baicalin treatment. These results suggest that baicalin might be useful as a potential neuroprotective agent in stroke therapy. The neuroprotective effects of baicalin may relate to inhibition of NF-{kappa}B p65.

  17. Influence of receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL), macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and fetal calf serum on human osteoclast formation and activity.

    PubMed

    Kreja, Ludwika; Liedert, Astrid; Schmidt, Carla; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2007-10-01

    Human osteoclast (OC) formation and activity was studied in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) from six healthy donors after stimulation with fetal calf serum (FCS), under the influence of the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and the macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). The results showed that selected FCS could stimulate OC formation without any medium supplementation with osteoclastogenic factors. The OC formation, investigated by quantification of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells (TRAP+ cells), and the sensitivity of OC progenitors to RANKL and M-CSF, varied widely between individual donors. The OC resorption activity, measured in the "pit-assay" on dentine, was strictly dependent on the presence of RANKL and M-CSF in the medium and was also donor dependent. The considerable donor variability should be considered in culture studies investigating, e.g. the interactions of OC with biomaterials or the influence of cytokines, growth factors and drugs on osteoclastogenesis. PMID:18161075

  18. Ajoene, a compound of garlic, induces apoptosis in human promyeloleukemic cells, accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of nuclear factor kappaB.

    PubMed

    Dirsch, V M; Gerbes, A L; Vollmar, A M

    1998-03-01

    The pharmacological role of garlic in prevention and treatment of cancer has received increasing attention, but thorough investigations into the molecular mechanisms of action of garlic compounds are rare. The present study demonstrates that ajoene, a major compound of garlic induces apoptosis in human leukemic cells, but not in peripheral mononuclear blood cells of healthy donors. The effect was dose and time dependent. Apoptosis was judged by three criteria, morphology of cells, quantification of subdiploid DNA content by flow cytometry, and detection of DNA fragmentation by gel electrophoresis. Ajoene increased the production of intracellular peroxide in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, which could be partially blocked by preincubation of the human leukemic cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Interestingly, N-acetylcysteine-treated cells showed a 50% loss of ajoene-induced apoptosis. Moreover, ajoene was demonstrated to activate nuclear translocation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB, an effect that was abrogated in N-acetylcysteine-loaded cells. These results suggested that ajoene might induce apoptosis in human leukemic cells via stimulation of peroxide production and activation of nuclear factor kappaB. This is a novel aspect in the biological profile of this garlic compound and an important step in elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms of its antitumor action.

  19. Transcriptional activation of human adult alpha-globin genes by hypersensitive site-40 enhancer: function of nuclear factor-binding motifs occupied in erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rombel, I; Hu, K Y; Zhang, Q; Papayannopoulou, T; Stamatoyannopoulos, G; Shen, C K

    1995-01-01

    The developmental stage- and erythroid lineage-specific activation of the human embryonic zeta- and fetal/adult alpha-globin genes is controlled by an upstream regulatory element [hypersensitive site (HS)-40] with locus control region properties, a process mediated by multiple nuclear factor-DNA complexes. In vitro DNase I protection experiments of the two G+C-rich, adult alpha-globin promoters have revealed a number of binding sites for nuclear factors that are common to HeLa and K-562 extracts. However, genomic footprinting analysis has demonstrated that only a subset of these sites, clustered between -130 and +1, is occupied in an erythroid tissue-specific manner. The function of these in vivo-occupied motifs of the alpha-globin promoters, as well as those previously mapped in the HS-40 region, is assayed by site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression in embryonic/fetal erythroid K-562 cells. These studies, together with our expression data on the human embryonic zeta-globin promoter, provide a comprehensive view of the functional roles of individual nuclear factor-DNA complexes in the final stages of transcriptional activation of the human alpha-like globin promoters by the HS-40 element. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7604012

  20. Ozone induces a proinflammatory response in primary human bronchial epithelial cells through mitogen-activated protein kinase activation without nuclear factor-κB activation.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Shaun D; Duncan, Kelly E; Swanton, Samantha M; Dailey, Lisa A; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Devlin, Robert B

    2014-09-01

    Ground-level ozone (O3) is a ubiquitous environmental air pollutant that is a potent inducer of airway inflammation and has been linked with respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Some studies using transformed or immortalized cells have attributed O3-mediated expression of inflammatory cytokines with activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway. In this study, we sought to characterize the O3-mediated activation of cellular signaling pathways using primary human bronchial epithelial cells obtained from a panel of donors. We demonstrate that the O3-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines requires the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor/MEK/ERK and MKK4/p38 mitogen-activated signaling pathways but does not appear to involve activation of canonical NF-κB signaling. In addition to providing a novel mechanistic model for the O3-mediated induction of proinflammatory cytokines, these findings highlight the importance of using primary cells over cell lines in mechanistic studies.

  1. AMPK activation represses the human gene promoter of the cardiac isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase: Role of nuclear respiratory factor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Tasneem; Opie, Lionel H.; Essop, M. Faadiel

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} AMPK inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta gene promoter activity. {yields} Nuclear respiratory factor-1 inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta promoter activity. {yields} AMPK regulates acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta at transcriptional level. -- Abstract: The cardiac-enriched isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC{beta}) produces malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. AMPK inhibits ACC{beta} activity, lowering malonyl-CoA levels and promoting mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation. Previously, AMPK increased promoter binding of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), a pivotal transcriptional modulator controlling gene expression of mitochondrial proteins. We therefore hypothesized that NRF-1 inhibits myocardial ACC{beta} promoter activity via AMPK activation. A human ACC{beta} promoter-luciferase construct was transiently transfected into neonatal cardiomyocytes {+-} a NRF-1 expression construct. NRF-1 overexpression decreased ACC{beta} gene promoter activity by 71 {+-} 4.6% (p < 0.001 vs. control). Transfections with 5'-end serial promoter deletions revealed that NRF-1-mediated repression of ACC{beta} was abolished with a pPII{beta}-18/+65-Luc deletion construct. AMPK activation dose-dependently reduced ACC{beta} promoter activity, while NRF-1 addition did not further decrease it. We also investigated NRF-1 inhibition in the presence of upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF1), a known transactivator of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter. Here NRF-1 blunted USF1-dependent induction of ACC{beta} promoter activity by 58 {+-} 7.5% (p < 0.001 vs. control), reversed with a dominant negative NRF-1 construct. NRF-1 also suppressed endogenous USF1 transcriptional activity by 55 {+-} 6.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control). This study demonstrates that NRF-1 is a novel transcriptional inhibitor of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter in the mammalian heart. Our data extends AMPK regulation of ACC{beta} to the transcriptional level.

  2. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  3. Role of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-kappa B in 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol-induced hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Chul; Lee, Sang-Min; Ko, Je-Won; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Shin, In-Sik; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the potential hepatotoxicity of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol and its hepatotoxic mechanisms in rats was investigated. The test chemical was administered orally to male rats at 0, 27.5, 55, and 110 mg/kg body weight. 1,3-Dichloro-2-propanol administration caused acute hepatotoxicity, as evidenced by an increase in serum aminotransferases, total cholesterol, and total bilirubin levels and a decrease in serum glucose concentration in a dose-dependent manner with corresponding histopathological changes in the hepatic tissues. The significant increase in malondialdehyde content and the significant decrease in glutathione content and antioxidant enzyme activities indicated that 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol-induced hepatic damage was mediated through oxidative stress, which caused a dose-dependent increase of hepatocellular apoptotic changes in the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay and immunohistochemical analysis for caspase-3. The phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases caused by 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol possibly involved in hepatocellular apoptotic changes in rat liver. Furthermore, 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol induced an inflammatory response through activation of nuclear factor-kappa B signaling that coincided with the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators or cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hepatotoxicity may be related to oxidative stress-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-kappa B-mediated inflammatory response. PMID:27051440

  4. Human Factors Research and Nuclear Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moray, Neville P., Ed.; Huey, Beverly M., Ed.

    The Panel on Human Factors Research Needs in Nuclear Regulatory Research was formed by the National Research Council in response to a request from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC asked the research council to conduct an 18-month study of human factors research needs for the safe operation of nuclear power plants. This report…

  5. MicroRNA-19a mediates gastric carcinoma cell proliferation through the activation of nuclear factor-κB.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Hongjian; Jiang, Zhenyu; Hu, Anxiang; Chu, Lisha; Sun, Yiling; Han, Junqing

    2015-10-01

    In gastric carcinoma, the nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) signaling pathway is highly active, and the constitutive activation of NF‑κB prompts malignant cell proliferation. MicroRNAs are considered to be important mediators in the regulation of the NF‑κB signaling pathway. The present study predominantly focussed on the effects of microRNA (miR)‑19a on NF‑κB activation. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the relative levels of miR‑19a in gastric carcinoma cells. MTT assays were used to determine the effect of miR‑19a on cellular proliferation. To detect the activation of NF‑κB, western blotting was performed to measure the protein levels of NF‑κB and the products of its downstream target genes. To define the target genes, luciferase reporter assays were used. miR‑19a was found to be markedly upregulated in gastric carcinoma cells. The overexpression of miR‑19a resulted in proliferation and enhanced migratory capabilities of the MGC‑803 gastric carcinoma cell line. The results of the western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels of p65 increased when the MGC‑803 cells were transfected with miR‑19a mimics. In addition, the downstream target genes of miR‑19a, including intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule and monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1, were upregulated. The results of the luciferase assay indicated that IκB‑α was the target gene of miR‑19a. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that miR‑19a enhances malignant gastric cell proliferation by constitutively activating the NF‑κB signaling pathway.

  6. The Nuclear Protein IκBζ Forms a Transcriptionally Active Complex with Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) p50 and the Lcn2 Promoter via the N- and C-terminal Ankyrin Repeat Motifs.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Akira; Yamazaki, Soh; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2016-09-23

    The nuclear protein IκBζ, comprising the N-terminal trans-activation domain and the C-terminal ankyrin repeat (ANK) domain composed of seven ANK motifs, activates transcription of a subset of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-dependent innate immune genes such as Lcn2 encoding the antibacterial protein lipocalin-2. Lcn2 activation requires formation of a complex containing IκBζ and NF-κB p50, a transcription factor that harbors the DNA-binding Rel homology region but lacks a trans-activation domain, on the promoter with the canonical NF-κB-binding site (κB site) and its downstream cytosine-rich element. Here we show that IκBζ productively interacts with p50 via Asp-451 in the N terminus of ANK1, a residue that is evolutionarily conserved among IκBζ and the related nuclear IκB proteins Bcl-3 and IκBNS Threonine substitution for Asp-451 abrogates direct association with the κB-site-binding protein p50, complex formation with the Lcn2 promoter DNA, and activation of Lcn2 transcription. The basic residues Lys-717 and Lys-719 in the C-terminal region of ANK7 contribute to IκBζ binding to the Lcn2 promoter, probably via interaction with the cytosine-rich element required for Lcn2 activation; glutamate substitution for both lysines results in a loss of transcriptionally active complex formation without affecting direct contact of IκBζ with p50. Both termini of the ANK domain in Bcl-3 and IκBNS function in a manner similar to that of IκBζ to interact with promoter DNA, indicating a common mechanism in which the nuclear IκBs form a regulatory complex with NF-κB and promoter DNA via the invariant aspartate in ANK1 and the conserved basic residues in ANK7.

  7. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 and C/EBP are essential for the activity of the human apolipoprotein B gene second-intron enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, A R; Levy-Wilson, B

    1992-01-01

    The tissue-specific transcriptional enhancer of the human apolipoprotein B gene contains multiple protein-binding sites spanning 718 bp. Most of the enhancer activity is found in a 443-bp fragment (+621 to +1064) that is located entirely within the second intron of the gene. Within this fragment, a 147-bp region (+806 to +952) containing a single 97-bp DNase I footprint exhibits significant enhancer activity. We now report that this footprint contains four distinct protein-binding sites that have the potential to bind nine distinct liver nuclear proteins. One of these proteins was identified as hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1), which binds with relatively low affinity to the 5' half of a 20-bp palindrome located at the 5' end of the large footprint. A binding site for C/EBP (or one of the related proteins that recognize similar sequences) was identified in the center of the 97-bp footprint. This binding site is coincident or overlaps with the binding sites for five other proteins, two of which appear to be distinct from the C/EBP-related family of proteins. The binding site for a nuclear factor designated protein I is located between the HNF-1 and C/EBP binding sites. Finally, the 3'-most 15 bp of the footprinted sequence contain a binding site for another nuclear protein, which we have called protein II. Mutations that abolish the binding of either HNF-1, protein II, or the C/EBP-related proteins severely reduce enhancer activity. However, deletion experiments demonstrated that neither the HNF-1-binding site alone, nor the combination of binding sites for HNF-1, protein I, and C/EBP, nor the C/EBP-binding site plus the protein II-binding site is sufficient to enhance transcription from a strong apolipoprotein B promoter. Rather, HNF-1 and C/EBP act synergistically with protein II to enhance transcription of the apolipoprotein B gene. Images PMID:1545795

  8. Osteoblast Lineage Cells Play an Essential Role in Periodontal Bone Loss Through Activation of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Pacios, Sandra; Xiao, Wenmei; Mattos, Marcelo; Lim, Jason; Tarapore, Rohinton S.; Alsadun, Sarah; Yu, Bo; Wang, Cun-Yu; Graves, Dana T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens stimulate periodontitis, the most common osteolytic disease in humans and the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. Previous studies identified leukocytes and their products as key factors in this process. We demonstrate for the first time that osteoblast lineage cells play a critical role in periodontal disease. Oral infection stimulated nuclear localization of NF-κB in osteoblasts and osteocytes in the periodontium of wild type but not transgenic mice that expressed a lineage specific dominant negative mutant of IKK (IKK-DN) in osteoblast lineage cells. Wild-type mice were also susceptible to bacteria induced periodontal bone loss but transgenic mice were not. The lack of bone loss in the experimental group was linked to reduced RANKL expression by osteoblast lineage cells that led to diminished osteoclast mediated bone resorption and greater coupled new bone formation. The results demonstrate that osteoblast lineage cells are key contributors to periodontal bone loss through an NF-κB mediated mechanism. PMID:26666569

  9. 2-Methoxystypandrone inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and nuclear factor-κB signaling by inhibiting Janus kinase 2 and IκB kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shan; Qi, Chunting; Liu, Jiawei; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Qing; Sima, Zhenhua; Liu, Jingli; Li, Wuguo; Yu, Qiang

    2014-04-01

    Constitutive activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) or the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway occurs frequently in cancer cells and contributes to oncogenesis. The activation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and IκB kinase (IKK) are key events in STAT3 and NF-κB signaling, respectively. We have identified 2-methoxystypandrone (2-MS) from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb Polygonum cuspidatum as a novel dual inhibitor of JAK2 and IKK. 2-MS inhibits both interleukin-6-induced and constitutively-activated STAT3, as well as tumor necrosis factor-α-induced NF-κB activation. 2-MS specifically inhibits JAK and IKKβ kinase activities but has little effect on activities of other kinases tested. The inhibitory effects of 2-MS on STAT3 and NF-κB signaling can be eliminated by DTT or glutathione and can last for 4 h after a pulse treatment. Furthermore, 2-MS inhibits growth and induces death of tumor cells, particularly those with constitutively-activated STAT3 or NF-κB signaling. We propose that the natural compound 2-MS, as a potent dual inhibitor of STAT3 and NF-κB pathways, is a promising anticancer drug candidate. PMID:24450414

  10. HT-29 and Caco-2 Reporter Cell Lines for Functional Studies of Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mastropietro, Giuliana; Tiscornia, Inés; Perelmuter, Karen; Astrada, Soledad; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela

    2015-01-01

    The NF-κB is a transcription factor which plays a key role in regulating biological processes. In response to signals, NF-κB activation occurs via phosphorylation of its inhibitor, which dissociates from the NF-κB dimer allowing the translocation to the nucleus, inducing gene expression. NF-κB activation has direct screening applications for drug discovery for several therapeutic indications. Thus, pathway-specific reporter cell systems appear as useful tools to screen and unravel the mode of action of probiotics and natural and synthetic compounds. Here, we describe the generation, characterization, and validation of human epithelial reporter cell lines for functional studies of NF-κB activation by different pro- and anti-inflammatory agents. Caco-2 and HT-29 cells were transfected with a pNF-κB-hrGFP plasmid which contains the GFP gene under the control of NF-κB binding elements. Three proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and LPS) were able to activate the reporter systems in a dose-response manner, which corresponds to the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Finally, the reporter cell lines were validated using lactic acid bacteria and a natural compound. We have established robust Caco-2-NF-κB-hrGFP and HT-29-NF-κB-hrGFP reporter cell lines which represent a valuable tool for primary screening and identification of bacterial strains and compounds with a potential therapeutic interest. PMID:25861164

  11. Nuclear Factor-κB Activation and Postischemic Inflammation Are Suppressed in CD36-Null Mice after Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Alexander; Abe, Takato; Hochrainer, Karin; Shimamura, Munehisa; Anrather, Josef; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Zhou, Ping; Iadecola, Costantino

    2008-01-01

    CD36, a class-B scavenger receptor involved in multiple functions, including inflammatory signaling, may also contribute to ischemic brain injury through yet unidentified mechanisms. We investigated whether CD36 participates in the molecular events underlying the inflammatory reaction that accompanies cerebral ischemia and may contribute to the tissue damage. We found that activation of nuclear factor-κB, a transcription factor that coordinates postischemic gene expression, is attenuated in CD36-null mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion. The infiltration of neutrophils and the glial reaction induced by cerebral ischemia were suppressed. Treatment with an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase, an enzyme that contributes to the tissue damage, reduced ischemic brain injury in wild-type mice, but not in CD36 nulls. In contrast to cerebral ischemia, the molecular and cellular inflammatory changes induced by intracerebroventricular injection of interleukin-1β were not attenuated in CD36-null mice. The findings unveil a novel role of CD36 in early molecular events leading to nuclear factor-κB activation and postischemic inflammation. Inhibition of CD36 signaling may be a valuable therapeutic approach to counteract the deleterious effects of postischemic inflammation. PMID:18272685

  12. Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and phospholipase D are respectively implicated in mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor kappaB activation in tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha-treated immature acute-myeloid-leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Plo, I; Lautier, D; Levade, T; Sekouri, H; Jaffrézou, J P; Laurent, G; Bettaïeb, A

    2000-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) has been reported to induce potent growth inhibition of committed myeloid progenitor cells, whereas it is a potential growth stimulator of human CD34(+)CD38(-) multipotent haematopoietic cells. The present study was aimed at evaluating the respective role of two phospholipases, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) in the response of the CD34(+) CD38(-) KG1a cells to TNFalpha. In these cells TNFalpha triggered phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent PC hydrolysis within 4-8 min with concomitant production of both diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphocholine (P-chol). DAG and P-chol production was accompanied by extracellular-signal-related protein kinase-1 ('ERK-1') activation and DNA-synthesis stimulation. PC-PLC stimulation was followed by PI3K-independent PLD activation with concomitant phosphatidic acid (PA) production followed by PA-derived DAG accumulation and sustained nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. PLD/NF-kappaB signalling activation played no role in the TNFalpha proliferative effect and conferred no consistent protection of KG1a cells towards antileukaemic agents. Altogether these results suggest that, in KG1a cells, TNFalpha can stimulate in parallel PC-PLC and PLD, whose lipid products activate in turn mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) and NF-kappaB signalling respectively. Finally, our study suggests that PC-PLC, but not PLD, plays a role in the TNFalpha proliferative effect in immature myeloid cells. PMID:11023832

  13. Activation of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 in hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 and its role in survival and tumor development.

    PubMed

    Marhenke, Silke; Lamlé, Jutta; Buitrago-Molina, Laura Elisa; Cañón, José Manuel Fernández; Geffers, Robert; Finegold, Milton; Sporn, Michael; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Manns, Michael P; Grompe, Markus; Vogel, Arndt

    2008-08-01

    In tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1), accumulation of toxic metabolites results in oxidative stress and DNA damage, leading to a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas. Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor important for cellular protection against oxidative stress and chemical induced liver damage. To specifically address the role of Nrf2 in HT1, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah)/Nrf2(-/-) mice were generated. In acute HT1, loss of Nrf2 elicited a strong inflammatory response and dramatically increased the mortality of mice. Following low grade injury, Fah/Nrf2(-/-) mice develop a more severe hepatitis and liver fibrosis. The glutathione and cellular detoxification system was significantly impaired in Fah/Nrf2(-/-) mice, resulting in increased oxidative stress and DNA damage. Consequently, tumor development was significantly accelerated by loss of Nrf2. Potent pharmacological inducers of Nrf2 such as the triterpenoid analogs 1[2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oyl]imidazole have been developed as cancer chemoprevention agents. Pretreatment with 1[2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oyl]imidazole dramatically protected Fah(-/-) mice against fumarylacetoacetate (Faa)-induced toxicity. Our data establish a central role for Nrf2 in the protection against Faa-induced liver injury; the Nrf2 regulated cellular defense not only prevents acute Faa-induced liver failure but also delays hepatocarcinogenesis in HT1.

  14. Cilostazol prevents retinal ischemic damage partly via inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced nuclear factor-kappa B/activator protein-1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Fumiya; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Egashira, Yusuke; Ogishima, Hiromi; Nakamura, Shinsuke; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Cilostazol is a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase III and is widely used to treat ischemic symptoms of peripheral vascular disease. We evaluated the protective effects of cilostazol in a murine model of ocular ischemic syndrome in which retinal ischemia was induced by 5-h unilateral ligation of both the pterygopalatine artery (PPA) and the external carotid artery (ECA) in anesthetized mice. The effects of cilostazol (30 mg/kg, p.o.) on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced retinal damage were examined by histological, retinal vascular permeability, and electrophysiological analyses. Using immunoblotting, the protective mechanism for cilostazol was evaluated by examining antiinflammatory effects of cilostazol on the expression of tumor necrosis factors-α (TNF-α) and tight junction proteins (ZO-1 and claudin-5), and the phosphorylations of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and c-Jun. The histological analysis revealed that I/R decreased the cell number in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and the thicknesses of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and inner nuclear layer (INL), and that cilostazol attenuated these decreases. Additionally, cilostazol prevented the hyperpermeability of blood vessels. Electroretinogram (ERG) measurements revealed that cilostazol prevented the I/R-induced reductions in a-, b-, and oscillatory potential (OP) wave amplitudes seen at 5 days after I/R. Cilostazol inhibited the increased expression of TNF-α and the phosphorylation levels of NF-κB and c-Jun in the retina after I/R. In addition, cilostazol prevented TNF-α-induced reduction of ZO-1 and claudin-5 expression in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs). These findings indicate that cilostazol may prevent I/R-induced retinal damage partly through inhibition of TNF-α-induced NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathway. PMID:25505560

  15. Physiological and receptor-selective retinoids modulate interferon gamma signaling by increasing the expression, nuclear localization, and functional activity of interferon regulatory factor-1.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin M; Ross, A Catharine

    2005-10-28

    Synergistic actions between all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) and interferon gamma (IFNgamma) on modulation of cellular functions have been reported both in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism of atRA-mediated regulation of IFNgamma signaling is poorly understood. In this study, we have used the human lung epithelial cell line A549 to examine the effect of atRA on IFNgamma-induced expression of IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1), an important transcription factor involved in cell growth and apoptosis, differentiation, and antiviral and antibacterial immune responses. At least 4 h of pretreatment with atRA followed by suboptimal concentrations of IFNgamma induced a faster, higher, and more stable expression of IRF-1 than IFNgamma alone. Actinomycin D completely blocked the induction of IRF-1 by the combination, suggesting regulation at the transcriptional level. Further, we found that activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 was induced more dramatically by atRA and IFNgamma than by IFNgamma alone. Expression of IFNgamma receptor-1 on the cell surface was also increased upon atRA pretreatment. Experiments using receptor-selective retinoids revealed that ligands for retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RARalpha), including atRA, 9-cis-retinoic acid, and Am580, sequentially increased the levels of IFNgamma receptor-1, activated signal transducer and activator of transcription-1, and IRF-1 and that an RARalpha antagonist was able to inhibit the effects of atRA and Am580. In addition, atRA pretreatment affected the transcriptional functions of IFNgamma-induced IRF-1, increasing its nuclear localization and DNA binding activity as well as the transcript levels of IRF-1 target genes. These results suggest that atRA, an RARalpha ligand, regulates IFNgamma-induced IRF-1 by affecting multiple components of the IFNgamma signaling pathway, from the plasma membrane to the nuclear transcription factors.

  16. Critical role of charged residues in helix 7 of the ligand binding domain in Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4alpha dimerisation and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Oxombre, Bénédicte; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe; Laine, Bernard

    2003-11-15

    Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha, NR2A1) is central to hepatocyte and pancreatic beta-cell functions. Along with retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha), HNF4alpha belongs to the nuclear receptor subfamily 2 (NR2), characterised by a conserved arginyl residue and a glutamate residue insert in helix 7 (H7) of the ligand binding domain (LBD). Crystallographic studies indicate that R348 and E352 residues in RXRalpha H7 are involved in charge-driven interactions that improve dimerisation. Consistent with these findings, we showed that removing the charge of the corresponding residues in HNF4alpha H7, R258 and E262, impaired dimerisation in solution. Moreover, our results provide a new concept according to which helices of the HNF4alpha LBD dimerisation interface contribute differently to dimerisation required for DNA binding; unlike H9 and H10, H7 is not involved in DNA binding. Substitutions of E262 decreased the repression of HNF4alpha transcriptional activity by a dominant-negative HNF4alpha mutant, highlighting the importance of this residue for dimerisation in the cell context. The E262 insert is crucial for HNF4alpha function since its deletion abolished HNF4alpha transcriptional activity and coactivator recruitment. The glutamate residue insert and the conserved arginyl residue in H7 most probably represent a signature of the NR2 subfamily of nuclear receptors.

  17. The nuclear splicing factor RNA binding motif 5 promotes caspase activation in human neuronal cells, and increases after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Travis C; Du, Lina; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Vagni, Vincent A; Dezfulian, Cameron; Poloyac, Samuel M; Jackson, Edwin K; Clark, Robert SB; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Splicing factors (SFs) coordinate nuclear intron/exon splicing of RNA. Splicing factor disturbances can cause cell death. RNA binding motif 5 (RBM5) and 10 (RBM10) promote apoptosis in cancer cells by activating detrimental alternative splicing of key death/survival genes. The role(s) of RBM5/10 in neurons has not been established. Here, we report that RBM5 knockdown in human neuronal cells decreases caspase activation by staurosporine. In contrast, RBM10 knockdown augments caspase activation. To determine whether brain injury alters RBM signaling, we measured RBM5/10 protein in mouse cortical/hippocampus homogenates after controlled cortical impact (CCI) traumatic brain injury (TBI) plus hemorrhagic shock (CCI+HS). The RBM5/10 staining was higher 48  to 72 hours after injury and appeared to be increased in neuronal nuclei of the hippocampus. We also measured levels of other nuclear SFs known to be essential for cellular viability and report that splicing factor 1 (SF1) but not splicing factor 3A (SF3A) decreased 4  to 72 hours after injury. Finally, we confirm that RBM5/10 regulate protein expression of several target genes including caspase-2, cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP), LETM1 Domain-Containing Protein 1 (LETMD1), and amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) in neuronal cells. Knockdown of RBM5 appeared to increase expression of c-FLIP(s), LETMD1, and APLP2 but decrease caspase-2. PMID:25586139

  18. Lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius Inhibits Nuclear Transcription Factor-kappa B Activation, Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression and Prostaglandin E2 Production in Stimulated Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Naila; Alghasham, Abdullah; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive joint disorder, which remains the leading cause of chronic disability in aged people. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF)-κB is a major cellular event in OA and its activation by interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays a critical role in cartilage breakdown in these patients. Objective: In this study, we examined the effect of lactoferrin on NF-κB activation, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in stimulated human articular chondrocytes. Materials and Methods: Human chondrocytes were derived from OA articular cartilage and treated with camel lactoferrin and then stimulated with IL-1β. Gene expression was determined by TaqMan assays and protein expression was studied by Western immunoblotting. NF-κB activity and PGE2 levels were determined by ELISA based assays. NF-κB activity was also determined by treatment of chondrocytes with NF-κB specific inhibitor Bay 11–7082. Results: Lactoferrin inhibited IL-1β-induced activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in human OA chondrocytes. Lactoferrin also inhibited mRNA/protein expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. Moreover, Bay 11–7082 also inhibited IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. The inhibitory effect of lactoferrin on the IL-1β induced expression of COX-2 or production of PGE2 was mediated at least in part via suppression of NF-κB activation. Conclusions: Our data determine camel lactoferrin as a novel inhibitor of IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB signaling events and production of cartilage-degrading molecule PGE2 via inhibition of COX-2 expressions. These results may have important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the prevention/treatment of OA and other degenerative/inflammatory diseases. SUMMARY Lactoferrin shows anti-arthritic activity in IL-1β stimulated primary human chondrocytes.Lactoferrin inhibits IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation.Lactoferrin inhibits

  19. Identification of two nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT)-response elements in the 5'-upstream regulatory region of the ET-1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Strait, Kevin A; Stricklett, Peter K; Kohan, Rachel M; Kohan, Donald E

    2010-09-10

    Collecting duct-derived ET-1 regulates salt excretion and blood pressure. We have reported the presence of an inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD)-specific enhancer region in the 5'-upstream ET-1 promoter (Strait, K. A., Stricklett, P. K., Kohan, J. L., Miller, M. B., and Kohan, D. E. (2007) Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol. 293, F601-F606). The current studies provide further characterization of the ET-1 5'-upstream distal promoter to identify the IMCD-specific enhancer elements. Deletion studies identified two regions of the 5'-upstream ET-1 promoter, -1725 to -1319 bp and -1319 to -1026 bp, which were required for maximal promoter activity in transfected rat IMCD cells. Transcription factor binding site analysis of these regions identified two consensus nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) binding sites at -1263 and -1563. EMSA analysis using nuclear extracts from IMCD cells showed that both the -1263 and the -1563 NFAT sites in the ET-1 distal promoter competed for NFAT binding to previously identified NFAT sites in the IL-2 and TNF genes. Gel supershift analysis showed that each of the NFAT binding sites in the ET-1 promoter bound NFAT proteins derived from IMCD nuclear extracts, but they selectively bound different NFAT isoforms; ET-1263 bound NFATc1, whereas ET-1563 bound NFATc3. Site-directed mutagenesis of either the ET-1263 or the ET-1563 sites prevented NFAT binding and reduced ET-1 promoter activity. Thus, NFAT appears to be an important regulator of ET-1 transcription in IMCD cells, and thus, it may play a role in controlling blood pressure through ET-1 regulation of renal salt excretion.

  20. Cholesterol inhibits the nuclear entry of estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF) and its dimerization with the nonactivated estrogen receptor (naER) in goat uterus.

    PubMed

    Thampan, R V; Zafar, A; Imam, N S; Sreeja, S; Suma, K; Vairamani, M

    2000-04-01

    An alternative form of estrogen receptor isolated from goat uterus, the nonactivated estrogen receptor (naER), has no DNA-binding function, although it is closely similar to the classical estrogen receptor (ER) in its hormone binding affinity and specificity. The naER dimerizes with a DNA binding protein, estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF). The heterodimer binds to the DNA. Assays carried out during the purification of E-RAF showed that an endogenous inhibitor that is heat stable and dialyzable bound to the E-RAF and prevented the formation of the heterodimer. The inhibitor has been isolated and purified. GC-MS analysis identifies this molecule to be cholesterol. Circular dichroism measurement has shown that the high-affinity binding of cholesterol to E-RAF results in subtle changes in the secondary and the tertiary structure of the protein. The E-RAF with altered conformation fails to dimerize with the naER. Instead of facilitating E-RAF entry into the nucleus, dimerization with the naER prevents it. Similarly, cholesterol binding blocks the nuclear entry of the protein, showing that E-RAF with altered conformation is incapable of interaction with the nuclear pore complex/membrane proteins. The naER-E-RAF heterodimer remains at the nuclear periphery, incapable of further transport. These results indicate the possibility that the dimerization between naER and the E-RAF takes place only within the nuclear compartment. The observation that cholesterol binding prevents nuclear entry of the E-RAF reflects the similarity of E-RAF with the sterol regulatory element (SRE) binding protein that enters the nucleus and binds to SRE only when the intracellular level of cholesterol remains low. PMID:10760947

  1. Cholesterol inhibits the nuclear entry of estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF) and its dimerization with the nonactivated estrogen receptor (naER) in goat uterus.

    PubMed

    Thampan, R V; Zafar, A; Imam, N S; Sreeja, S; Suma, K; Vairamani, M

    2000-04-01

    An alternative form of estrogen receptor isolated from goat uterus, the nonactivated estrogen receptor (naER), has no DNA-binding function, although it is closely similar to the classical estrogen receptor (ER) in its hormone binding affinity and specificity. The naER dimerizes with a DNA binding protein, estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF). The heterodimer binds to the DNA. Assays carried out during the purification of E-RAF showed that an endogenous inhibitor that is heat stable and dialyzable bound to the E-RAF and prevented the formation of the heterodimer. The inhibitor has been isolated and purified. GC-MS analysis identifies this molecule to be cholesterol. Circular dichroism measurement has shown that the high-affinity binding of cholesterol to E-RAF results in subtle changes in the secondary and the tertiary structure of the protein. The E-RAF with altered conformation fails to dimerize with the naER. Instead of facilitating E-RAF entry into the nucleus, dimerization with the naER prevents it. Similarly, cholesterol binding blocks the nuclear entry of the protein, showing that E-RAF with altered conformation is incapable of interaction with the nuclear pore complex/membrane proteins. The naER-E-RAF heterodimer remains at the nuclear periphery, incapable of further transport. These results indicate the possibility that the dimerization between naER and the E-RAF takes place only within the nuclear compartment. The observation that cholesterol binding prevents nuclear entry of the E-RAF reflects the similarity of E-RAF with the sterol regulatory element (SRE) binding protein that enters the nucleus and binds to SRE only when the intracellular level of cholesterol remains low.

  2. Monocyte-Induced Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion is Mediated by Chemokine ligand 2 and Nuclear Factor-κB Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lindholm, Paul F; Sivapurapu, Neela; Jovanovic, Borko; Kajdacsy-Balla, André

    2015-01-01

    Study Background The tumor microenvironment contains inflammatory cells which can influence cancer growth and progression; however the mediators of these effects vary with different cancer types. The mechanisms by which prostate cancer cells communicate with monocytes to promote cancer progression are incompletely understood. This study tested prostate cancer cell and monocyte interactions that lead to increased prostate cancer cell invasion. Methods We analyzed the prostate cancer cell invasion and NF-κB activity and cytokine expression during interaction with monocyte-lineage cells in co-cultures. The roles of monocyte chemotactic factor (MCP-1/CCL2) and NF-κB activity for co-culture induced prostate cancer invasion were tested. Clinical prostate cancer NF-κB expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results In co-cultures of prostate cancer cell lines with monocyte-lineage cells, (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) levels were significantly increased when compared with monocytes or cancer cells cultured alone. Prostate cancer cell invasion was induced by recombinant CCL2 in a dose dependent manner, similar to co-cultures with monocytes. The monocyte-induced prostate cancer cell invasion was inhibited by CCL2 neutralizing antibodies and by the CCR2 inhibitor, RS102895. Prostate cancer cell invasion and CCL2 expression induced in the co-cultures was inhibited by Lactacystin and Bay11-7082 NF-κB inhibitors. Prostate cancer cell NF-κB DNA binding activity depended on CCL2 dose and was inhibited by CCL2 neutralizing antibodies. Clinical prostate cancer NF-κB expression correlated with tumor grade. Conclusions Co-cultures with monocyte-lineage cell lines stimulated increased prostate cancer cell invasion through increased CCL2 expression and increased prostate cancer cell NF-κB activity. CCL2 and NF-κB may be useful therapeutic targets to interfere with inflammation-induced prostate cancer invasion. PMID:26317041

  3. Cell fate regulated by nuclear factor-κB- and activator protein-1-dependent signalling in human melanocytes exposed to ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B

    PubMed Central

    Wäster, P; Rosdahl, I; Öllinger, K

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Ultraviolet (UV) radiation constitutes an important risk factor for malignant melanoma, but the wavelength responsible for the initiation of this disease is not fully elucidated. Solar UV induces multiple signalling pathways that are critical for initiation of apoptotic cell death as a cellular defence against malignant transformation. Objectives To evaluate the involvement of the transcription factors nuclear factor (NF)-κB and activator protein (AP)-1 in the signalling pathways induced by UVA or UVB irradiation in human melanocytes. Methods Primary cultures of normal human melanocytes were irradiated with UVA or UVB, and the concomitant DNA damage and redox alterations were monitored. The resulting activation of the NF-κB and AP-1 signalling pathways and subsequent apoptosis were studied. Results UVB irradiation causes DNA damage detected as formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, while UVA induces increased levels of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and lipid peroxidation. UVA and UVB initiate phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and the apoptosis signalling pathways converge into a common mechanism. Downregulation of c-Jun suppresses AP-1-mediated signalling and prevents apoptosis upstream of lysosomal and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, whereas inhibition of NF-κB by SN50 increases apoptosis. Conclusions We conclude that AP-1 induces proapoptotic signalling, whereas NF-κB is a key antiapoptotic/prosurvival factor in both UVA- and UVB-induced cellular damage in human melanocytes, which might in turn impact melanoma development and progression. What's already known about this topic? Melanocytes are the target cells of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and the cells from which melanoma originates. The mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway is important for regulation of UV-induced cellular responses. Previous studies have strongly implicated the transcription factors

  4. Berberine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of inflammatory molecules and activation of nuclear factor-κB via the activation of AMPK in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su-Jian; Yin, Cai-Xia; Ding, Ming-Chao; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Berberine, which is a well‑known drug used in traditional medicine, has been demonstrated to exert diverse pharmacological effects, including anti‑inflammatory effects. However, whether berberine can affect the production of inflammatory molecules in vascular endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effects of berberine, and the underlying molecular mechanisms of these effects. The effect of berberine on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑induced inflammatory molecule expression was examined in cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). The HAECs were stimulated with TNF‑α and incubated with or without berberine. The activation of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB and adenosine monophosphate‑activated protein kinase (AMPK) were analyzed using western blotting, and the protein secretion of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)‑1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)‑1 was measured using ELISA kits. The mRNA expression levels of ICAM‑1 and MCP‑1 were analyzed using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study demonstrated that berberine significantly inhibited the TNF‑α‑induced expression of ICAM‑1 and MCP‑1, as well as the activation of NF‑κB in the HAECs. These effects were attenuated following co‑treatment with AMPK inhibitor compound C, or specific small interfering RNAs. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that berberine inhibits the TNF‑α‑induced expression of ICAM‑1 and MCP‑1, and the activation of NF‑κB in HAECs in vitro, possibly through the AMPK‑dependent pathway.

  5. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Controls Lung Proteasomal Degradation and Nuclear Factor-κB Activity in Conditions of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Boncoeur, Emilie; Roque, Telma; Bonvin, Elise; Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Bonora, Monique; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Jacquot, Jacky

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a lethal inherited disorder caused by mutations in a single gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, resulting in progressive oxidative lung damage. In this study, we evaluated the role of CFTR in the control of ubiquitin-proteasome activity and nuclear factor (NF)-κB/IκB-α signaling after lung oxidative stress. After a 64-hour exposure to hyperoxia-mediated oxidative stress, CFTR-deficient (cftr−/−) mice exhibited significantly elevated lung proteasomal activity compared with wild-type (cftr+/+) animals. This was accompanied by reduced lung caspase-3 activity and defective degradation of NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α. In vitro, human CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress exhibited increased proteasomal activity and decreased NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity compared with CFTR-sufficient lung cells. Inhibition of the CFTR Cl− channel by CFTRinh-172 in the normal bronchial immortalized cell line 16HBE14o− increased proteasomal degradation after exposure to oxidative stress. Caspase-3 inhibition by Z-DQMD in CFTR-sufficient lung cells mimicked the response profile of increased proteasomal degradation and reduced NF-κB activity observed in CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress. Taken together, these results suggest that functional CFTR Cl− channel activity is crucial for regulation of lung proteasomal degradation and NF-κB activity in conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:18372427

  6. Commitment and Differentiation of Osteoclast Precursor Cells by the Sequential Expression of C-Fms and Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κb (Rank) Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Fumio; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Ohneda, Osamu; Inada, Tomohisa; Sudo, Tetsuo; Brasel, Kenneth; Miyata, Takashi; Anderson, Dirk M.; Suda, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    Osteoclasts are terminally differentiated cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. However, how their precursor cells diverge from macrophagic lineages is not known. We have identified early and late stages of osteoclastogenesis, in which precursor cells sequentially express c-Fms followed by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK), and have demonstrated that RANK expression in early-stage of precursor cells (c-Fms+RANK−) was stimulated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Although M-CSF and RANKL (ligand) induced commitment of late-stage precursor cells (c-Fms+RANK+) into osteoclasts, even late-stage precursors have the potential to differentiate into macrophages without RANKL. Pretreatment of precursors with M-CSF and delayed addition of RANKL showed that timing of RANK expression and subsequent binding of RANKL are critical for osteoclastogenesis. Thus, the RANK–RANKL system determines the osteoclast differentiation of bipotential precursors in the default pathway of macrophagic differentiation. PMID:10601350

  7. C/EBPβ and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Differentially Regulate Adamts-1 Induction by Stimuli Associated with Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Oller, Jorge; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Villahoz, Silvia; Lozano-Vidal, Noelia; Martín-Alonso, Mara; Arroyo, Alicia G.; Escolano, Amelia; Armesilla, Angel Luis

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that the metalloproteinase Adamts-1 plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of vessel remodeling, but little is known about the signaling pathways that control Adamts-1 expression. We show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiotensin-II, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor α, stimuli implicated in pathological vascular remodeling, increase Adamts-1 expression in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. Analysis of the intracellular signaling pathways implicated in this process revealed that VEGF and angiotensin-II upregulate Adamts-1 expression via activation of differential signaling pathways that ultimately promote functional binding of the NFAT or C/EBPβ transcription factors, respectively, to the Adamts-1 promoter. Infusion of mice with angiotensin-II triggered phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of C/EBPβ proteins in aortic cells concomitantly with an increase in the expression of Adamts-1, further underscoring the importance of C/EBPβ signaling in angiotensin-II-induced upregulation of Adamts-1. Similarly, VEGF promoted NFAT activation and subsequent Adamts-1 induction in aortic wall in a calcineurin-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that Adamts-1 upregulation by inducers of pathological vascular remodeling is mediated by specific signal transduction pathways involving NFAT or C/EBPβ transcription factors. Targeting of these pathways may prove useful in the treatment of vascular disease. PMID:26217013

  8. Dependence on nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) levels discriminates conventional T cells from Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Vaeth, Martin; Schliesser, Ulrike; Müller, Gerd; Reissig, Sonja; Satoh, Kazuki; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Jonuleit, Helmut; Waisman, Ari; Müller, Martin R; Serfling, Edgar; Sawitzki, Birgit S; Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike

    2012-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to control regulatory T cells: thymus-derived naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTreg) depend on calcium signals, the Foxp3 gene harbors several NFAT binding sites, and the Foxp3 (Fork head box P3) protein interacts with NFAT. Therefore, we investigated the impact of NFAT on Foxp3 expression. Indeed, the generation of peripherally induced Treg (iTreg) by TGF-β was highly dependent on NFAT expression because the ability of CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into iTreg diminished markedly with the number of NFAT family members missing. It can be concluded that the expression of Foxp3 in TGF-β-induced iTreg depends on the threshold value of NFAT rather than on an individual member present. This is specific for iTreg development, because frequency of nTreg remained unaltered in mice lacking NFAT1, NFAT2, or NFAT4 alone or in combination. Different from expectation, however, the function of both nTreg and iTreg was independent on robust NFAT levels, reflected by less nuclear NFAT in nTreg and iTreg. Accordingly, absence of one or two NFAT members did not alter suppressor activity in vitro or during colitis and transplantation in vivo. This scenario emphasizes an inhibition of high NFAT activity as treatment for autoimmune diseases and in transplantation, selectively targeting the proinflammatory conventional T cells, while keeping Treg functional.

  9. Involvement of Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κB Ligand (RANKL)-induced Incomplete Cytokinesis in the Polyploidization of Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Takegahara, Noriko; Kim, Hyunsoo; Mizuno, Hiroki; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Tomura, Michio; Kanagawa, Osami; Ishii, Masaru; Choi, Yongwon

    2016-02-12

    Osteoclasts are specialized polyploid cells that resorb bone. Upon stimulation with receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), myeloid precursors commit to becoming polyploid, largely via cell fusion. Polyploidization of osteoclasts is necessary for their bone-resorbing activity, but the mechanisms by which polyploidization is controlled remain to be determined. Here, we demonstrated that in addition to cell fusion, incomplete cytokinesis also plays a role in osteoclast polyploidization. In in vitro cultured osteoclasts derived from mice expressing the fluorescent ubiquitin-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci), RANKL induced polyploidy by incomplete cytokinesis as well as cell fusion. Polyploid cells generated by incomplete cytokinesis had the potential to subsequently undergo cell fusion. Nuclear polyploidy was also observed in osteoclasts in vivo, suggesting the involvement of incomplete cytokinesis in physiological polyploidization. Furthermore, RANKL-induced incomplete cytokinesis was reduced by inhibition of Akt, resulting in impaired multinucleated osteoclast formation. Taken together, these results reveal that RANKL-induced incomplete cytokinesis contributes to polyploidization of osteoclasts via Akt activation.

  10. Interference of fisetin with targets of the nuclear factor-κB signal transduction pathway activated by Epstein-Barr virus encoded latent membrane protein 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Liang, Hong-Ying; Li, Ming-Yong; Lin, Chun-Yan; Shi, Meng-Jie; Zhang, Xiu-Juan

    2014-01-01

    Fisetin is an effective compound extracted from lacquer which has been used in the treatment of various diseases. Preliminary data indicate that it also exerts specific anti-cancer effects. However, the manner in which fisetin regulates cancer growth remains unknown. In this study, we elucidated interference of fisetin with targets of the nuclear factorκB signal transduction pathway activated by Epstein-Barr virus encoding latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1)in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells, Results showed that fisetin inhibited the survival rate of CNE-LMP1 cells and NF-κB activation caused by LMP1. Fisetin also suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65) and IκBα phosphorylation, while inhibiting CyclinD1, all key targets of the NF-κB signal transduction pathway. It was suggested that interference effects of fisetin with signal transduction activated by LMP1 encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus may play an important role in its anticancer potential.

  11. Expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand is related to sex differences in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Pan, Xiongxiong; Zhu, Qin; Lu, Hao; Wang, Kunpeng; Ni, Xuhao; Lu, Yunjie; Gu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclasts are responsible for bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis, and women show greater disease activity and functional disability than men. This study aimed to examine differences in the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis and osteoclastogenesis between female and male mice in vivo and in vitro. Female mice exhibited worse disease progression and increased osteoclastogenesis, as measured by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining than male mice. Significantly higher levels of CD11b(+) cells were detected in the bone marrow of female mice than that of male mice. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand was higher in female mice that were immunized with or without collagen II. These findings highlighted sex differences in arthritis morbidity and suggested that female mice are more likely to develop arthritis than male mice. Further studies are needed to investigate the mechanisms of sex differences in collagen-induced arthritis. PMID:25863233

  12. A new phenolic derivative with soluble epoxide hydrolase and nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitory activity from the aqueous extract of Acacia catechu.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya Nan; Li, Wei; Song, Seok Bean; Yan, Xi Tao; Zhao, Yan; Jo, A Reum; Kang, Jong Seong; Young Ho, Kim

    2016-09-01

    One novel phenolic compound, (4S,5R)-4-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5-(3-oxobutyl)dihydrofuran-2(3H)-one (1), as well as 12 known compounds (2-13) was obtained from the aqueous extract of Acacia catechu and their chemical structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis. Compounds 8 and 9 exhibited significant soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 26.6 ± 0.5 and 24.4 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Compounds 7-10 showed significant inhibitory effects on TNFα-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values ranging from 11.15 to 19.45 μM. PMID:26647286

  13. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Reduces Endothelin-1-Caused Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy by Inhibiting Nuclear Factor-κB and Adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Hsu-Lung; Liu, Po-Len; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) plays a role in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy, although its underlying mechanism remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of PPARα activation on endothelin-1- (ET-1-) caused cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and explore its underlying mechanisms. Human cardiomyocytes (HCMs) were cultured with or without ET-1, whereafter the inhibitory effects of fenofibrate, a PPARα activator, on cell size and adiponectin protein were tested. We examined the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 proteins caused by ET-1 and the inhibition of the ERK and p38 pathways on ET-1-induced cell size and adiponectin expression. Moreover, we investigated the interaction of PPARα with adiponectin and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and coimmunoprecipitation. ET-1 treatment significantly increased cell size, suppressed PPARα expression, and enhanced the expression of adiponectin. Pretreatment with fenofibrate inhibited the increase in cell size and enhancement of adiponectin expression. ET-1 significantly activated the ERK and p38 pathways, whereas PD98059 and SB205380, respectively, inhibited them. Our results suggest that activated PPARα can decrease activation of adiponectin and NF-κB and inhibit ET-1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PMID:27807394

  14. Teaching Activities on Horizontal Nuclear Proliferation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zola, John

    1990-01-01

    Provides learning activities concerning the horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons. Includes step-by-step directions for four activities: (1) the life cycle of nuclear weapons; (2) nuclear nonproliferation: pros and cons; (3) the nuclear power/nuclear weapons connection; and (4) managing nuclear proliferation. (NL)

  15. Silica nanoparticles induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in vitro via activation of the MAPK/Nrf2 pathway and nuclear factor-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Caixia; Xia, Yinye; Niu, Piye; Jiang, Lizhen; Duan, Junchao; Yu, Yang; Zhou, Xianqing; Li, Yanbo; Sun, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread application of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) in industrial, commercial, and biomedical fields, their response to human cells has not been fully elucidated. Overall, little is known about the toxicological effects of SiNPs on the cardiovascular system. In this study, SiNPs with a 58 nm diameter were used to study their interaction with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Dose- and time-dependent decrease in cell viability and damage on cell plasma-membrane integrity showed the cytotoxic potential of the SiNPs. SiNPs were found to induce oxidative stress, as evidenced by the significant elevation of reactive oxygen species generation and malondialdehyde production and downregulated activity in glutathione peroxidase. SiNPs also stimulated release of cytoprotective nitric oxide (NO) and upregulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) messenger ribonucleic acid, while downregulating endothelial NOS and ET-1 messenger ribonucleic acid, suggesting that SiNPs disturbed the NO/NOS system. SiNP-induced oxidative stress and NO/NOS imbalance resulted in endothelial dysfunction. SiNPs induced inflammation characterized by the upregulation of key inflammatory mediators, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MCP-1. In addition, SiNPs triggered the activation of the Nrf2-mediated antioxidant system, as evidenced by the induction of nuclear factor-κB and MAPK pathway activation. Our findings demonstrated that SiNPs could induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and NO/NOS system imbalance, and eventually lead to endothelial dysfunction via activation of the MAPK/Nrf2 pathway and nuclear factor-κB signaling. This study indicated a potential deleterious effect of SiNPs on the vascular endothelium, which warrants more careful assessment of SiNPs before their application. PMID:25759575

  16. Chronic unpredictable stress exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB in the frontal cortex and hippocampus via glucocorticoid secretion.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Carolina Demarchi; Lepsch, Lucilia B; Kawamoto, Elisa Mitiko; Malta, Marília Brinati; Lima, Larissa de Sá; Avellar, Maria Christina Werneck; Sapolsky, Robert M; Scavone, Cristoforo

    2006-04-01

    Although the anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids (GCs) are well established in the periphery, these stress hormones can increase inflammation under some circumstances in the brain. The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), which is inhibited by GCs, regulates numerous genes central to inflammation. In this study, the effects of stress, GCs, and NMDA receptors on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of NF-kappaB in the brain were investigated. One day after chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), nonstressed and CUS rats were treated with saline or LPS and killed 2 h later. CUS potentiated the increase in LPS-induced activation of NF-kappaB in frontal cortex and hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus. This stress effect was blocked by pretreatment of rats with RU-486, an antagonist of the GC receptor. MK-801 [(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a,d] cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate], an NMDA receptor antagonist, also reduced the effect of LPS in all three brain regions. However, the combined antagonism of both GC and NMDA receptors produced no further reduction in NF-kappaB activation when compared with the effect of each treatment alone. Our results indicate that stress, via GC secretion, can increase LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, agreeing with a growing literature demonstrating proinflammatory effects of GCs.

  17. PNRC: a proline-rich nuclear receptor coregulatory protein that modulates transcriptional activation of multiple nuclear receptors including orphan receptors SF1 (steroidogenic factor 1) and ERRalpha1 (estrogen related receptor alpha-1).

    PubMed

    Zhou, D; Quach, K M; Yang, C; Lee, S Y; Pohajdak, B; Chen, S

    2000-07-01

    PNRC (proline-rich nuclear receptor coregulatory protein) was identified using bovine SF1 (steroidogenic factor 1) as the bait in a yeast two-hybrid screening of a human mammary gland cDNA expression library. PNRC is unique in that it has a molecular mass of 35 kDa, significantly smaller than most of the coregulatory proteins reported so far, and it is proline-rich. PNRC's nuclear localization was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. In the yeast two-hybrid assays, PNRC interacted with the orphan receptors SF1 and ERRalpha1 in a ligand-independent manner. PNRC was also found to interact with the ligand-binding domains of all the nuclear receptors tested including estrogen receptor (ER), androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), progesterone receptor (PR), thyroid hormone receptor (TR), retinoic acid receptor (RAR), and retinoid X receptor (RXR) in a ligand-dependent manner. Functional AF2 domain is required for nuclear receptors to bind to PNRC. Furthermore, in vitro glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assay was performed to demonstrate a direct contact between PNRC and nuclear receptors such as SF1. Coimmunoprecipitation experiment using Hela cells that express PNRC and ER was performed to confirm the interaction of PNRC and nuclear receptors in vivo in a ligand-dependent manner. PNRC was found to function as a coactivator to enhance the transcriptional activation mediated by SF1, ERR1 (estrogen related receptor alpha-1), PR, and TR. By examining a series of deletion mutants of PNRC using the yeast two-hybrid assay, a 23-amino acid (aa) sequence in the carboxy-terminal region, aa 278-300, was shown to be critical and sufficient for the interaction with nuclear receptors. This region is proline rich and contains a SH3-binding motif, S-D-P-P-S-P-S. Results from the mutagenesis study demonstrated that the two conserved proline (P) residues in this motif are crucial for PNRC to interact with the nuclear receptors. The exact 23

  18. Monascin attenuates oxidative stress-mediated lung inflammation via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf-2) modulation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Lee, Bao-Hong; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2014-06-11

    We speculated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonists may modulate the oxidative stress pathway to ameliorate the development of airway inflammation. The effect of Monascus-fermented metabolite monascin (MS) and rosiglitazone (Rosi) on oxidative stress-induced lung inflammation was evaluated. Luciferase assay and DNA binding activity assay were used to point out that MS may be a novel PPAR-γ agonist and nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf-2) activator. We used hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to induce inflammation in lung epithelial cells. MS and Rosi prevented H2O2-induced ROS generation in A549 epithelial cells through PPAR-γ translocation, avoiding inflammatory mediator expression via inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB translocation. The regulatory ability of MS was abolished by siRNA against PPAR-γ. MS also elevated antioxidant enzyme expression via Nrf-2 activation. Both PPAR-γ and Nrf-2 might have benefits against lung inflammation. MS regulated PPAR-γ and Nrf-2 to improve lung oxidative inflammation. PMID:24865672

  19. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic an...

  20. 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate is a novel nuclear factor kappaB inhibitor with significant activity against multiple myeloma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keisuke; Nakazato, Tomonori; Xian, Ming Ji; Yamada, Taketo; Hozumi, Nobumichi; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime; Ikeda, Yasuo; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2005-05-15

    1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) is a component of a traditional Asian condiment obtained from the rhizomes of the commonly used ethno-medicinal plant Languas galanga. Here, we show for the first time that ACA dramatically inhibits the cellular growth of human myeloma cells via the inhibition of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity. In myeloma cells, cultivation with ACA induced G0-G1 phase cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis. Treatment with ACA induced caspase 3, 9, and 8 activities, suggesting that ACA-induced apoptosis in myeloma cells mediates both mitochondrial- and Fas-dependent pathways. Furthermore, we showed that ACA significantly inhibits the serine phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha. ACA rapidly decreased the nuclear expression of NF-kappaB, but increased the accumulation of cytosol NF-kappaB in RPMI8226 cells, indicating that ACA inhibits the translocation of NF-kappaB from the cytosol to the nucleus. To evaluate the effects of ACA in vivo, RPMI8226-transplanted NOD/SCID mice were treated with ACA. Tumor weight significantly decreased in the ACA-treated mice compared with the control mice. In conclusion, ACA has an inhibitory effect on NF-kappaB, and induces the apoptosis of myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo. ACA, therefore, provides a new biologically based therapy for the treatment of multiple myeloma patients as a novel NF-kappaB inhibitor.

  1. Effect of The Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor кB and RANK Ligand on In Vitro Differentiation of Cord Blood CD133+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Nasim; Abroun, Saeid; Soleimani, Masoud; Kaviani, Saeid; Azad, Mehdi; Eskandari, Fatemeh; Habibi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) appears to be an osteoclast-activating factor, bearing an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. Some studies demonstrated that U-266 myeloma cell line and primary myeloma cells expressed RANK and RANKL. It had been reported that the expression of myeloid and monocytoid markers was increased by co-culturing myeloma cells with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This study also attempted to show the molecular mechanism of RANK and RANKL on differentiation capability of human cord blood HSC to osteoclast, as well as expression of calcitonin receptor (CTR) on cord blood HSC surface. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood and cultured in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL. Osteoclast differentiation was characterized by using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, giemsa staining, immunophenotyping, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for specific genes. Results Hematopoietic stem cells expressed RANK before and after differentiation into osteoclast. Compared to control group, flow cytometric results showed an increased expression of RANK after differentiation. Expression of CTR mRNA showed TRAP reaction was positive in some differentiated cells, including osteoclast cells. Conclusion Presence of RANKL and M-CSF in bone marrow could induce HSCs differentiation into osteoclast.

  2. Effect of The Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor кB and RANK Ligand on In Vitro Differentiation of Cord Blood CD133+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Nasim; Abroun, Saeid; Soleimani, Masoud; Kaviani, Saeid; Azad, Mehdi; Eskandari, Fatemeh; Habibi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) appears to be an osteoclast-activating factor, bearing an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. Some studies demonstrated that U-266 myeloma cell line and primary myeloma cells expressed RANK and RANKL. It had been reported that the expression of myeloid and monocytoid markers was increased by co-culturing myeloma cells with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This study also attempted to show the molecular mechanism of RANK and RANKL on differentiation capability of human cord blood HSC to osteoclast, as well as expression of calcitonin receptor (CTR) on cord blood HSC surface. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood and cultured in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL. Osteoclast differentiation was characterized by using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, giemsa staining, immunophenotyping, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for specific genes. Results Hematopoietic stem cells expressed RANK before and after differentiation into osteoclast. Compared to control group, flow cytometric results showed an increased expression of RANK after differentiation. Expression of CTR mRNA showed TRAP reaction was positive in some differentiated cells, including osteoclast cells. Conclusion Presence of RANKL and M-CSF in bone marrow could induce HSCs differentiation into osteoclast. PMID:27602313

  3. Sustained activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in podoctyes leads to oxidative stress, mobilization of transient receptor potential canonical 6 channels, nuclear factor of activated T cells activation, and apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Anderson, Marc; Dryer, Stuart E

    2012-10-01

    Atypical N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are expressed in podocytes. Sustained (≥24 h) application of 50 to100 μM NMDA to immortalized mouse podocytes evoked a marked increase in the production of reactive oxygen species(ROS) such as H₂O₂. This effect of NMDA was associated with increased cell-surface expression of p47(phox), a cytosolic regulatory subunit of the NADPH oxidase NOX2. NMDA-evoked generation of ROS drove an increase in steady-state surface expression of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 6 channels, which was blocked by the NMDA antagonist dizocilpine(MK-801) and by a membrane-permeable scavenger of ROS. The effect of NMDA on TRPC6 was observed using cell surface biotinylation assays and also with whole-cell recordings made under conditions designed to facilitate detection of current through TRPC6. NMDA mobilization of TRPC6 channels was blocked by concurrent treatment with the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and by a membrane-permeable scavenger ofROS. Mobilization of TRPC6 was also evoked by L-homocysteic acid. NMDA treatment also increased nuclear localization of endogenous nuclear factor of activated T cells, which could be blocked by MK-801, by scavenging ROS, by the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine, and by the TRPC channel inhibitor 1-[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]ethyl]imidazole (SKF-96365). NMDA treatment also evoked robust activation of Rho but not Rac,consistent with previous studies of downstream effectors of TRPC6 activation. Exposing cells to NMDA for 24 h reduced total and cell surface expression of the podocyte markers nephrin and podocin, but there was no loss of cells. With longer NMDA exposure (72 h), we observed loss of cells associated with nuclear fragmentation and increased expression of caspase-3, caspase-6, and Bax, suggesting an apoptotic process.

  4. BaeR protein acts as an activator of nuclear factor-kappa B and Janus kinase 2 to induce inflammation in murine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jin; Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Awji, Elias Gebru; Kim, Myung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2016-09-01

    BaeR, a response regulator protein, takes part in multidrug efflux, bacterial virulence activity, and other biological functions. Recently, BaeR was shown to induce inflammatory responses by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In this study, we investigated additional pathways used by BaeR to induce an inflammatory response. BaeR protein was purified from Salmonella enterica Paratyphi A and subcloned into a pPosKJ expression vector. RAW 264.7 cells were treated with BaeR, and RNA was extracted by TRIzol reagent for RT-PCR. Cytokine gene expression was analyzed by using the comparative cycle threshold method, while western blotting and ELISA were used to assess protein expression. We confirmed that BaeR activates nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), thereby inducing an inflammatory response and increases the production of interleukins (IL-)1β and IL-6. During this process, the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)-STAT1 signaling pathway was activated, resulting in an increase in the release of interferons I and II. Additionally, COX-2 was activated and its expression increased with time. In conclusion, BaeR induced an inflammatory response through activation of NF-κB in addition to the MAPKs. Furthermore, activation of the JAK2-STAT1 pathway and COX-2 facilitated the cytokine binding activity, suggesting an additional role for BaeR in the modulation of the immune system of the host and the virulence activity of the pathogen. PMID:27374640

  5. Nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) transcription proteins regulate genes involved in adipocyte metabolism and lipolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holowachuk, Eugene W. . E-mail: geneh@telenet.net

    2007-09-21

    NFAT involvement in adipocyte physiological processes was examined by treatment with CsA and/or GSK3{beta} inhibitors (Li{sup +} or TZDZ-8), which prevent or increase NFAT nuclear translocation, respectively. CsA treatment reduced basal and TNF{alpha}-induced rates of lipolysis by 50%. Adipocytes preincubated with Li{sup +} or TZDZ-8 prior to CsA and/or TNF{alpha}, exhibited enhanced basal rates of lipolysis and complete inhibition of CsA-mediated decreased rates of lipolysis. CsA treatment dramatically reduced the mRNA levels of adipocyte-specific genes (aP2, HSL, PPAR{gamma}, ACS and Adn), compared with control or TNF{alpha}-treatment, whereas Li{sup +} pretreatment blocked the inhibitory effects of CsA, and mRNA levels of aP2, HSL, PPAR{gamma}, and ACS were found at or above control levels. NFAT nuclear localization, assessed by EMSA, confirmed that CsA or Li{sup +} treatments inhibited or increased NFAT nuclear translocation, respectively. These results show that NFAT proteins in mature adipocytes participate in the transcriptional control of genes involved in adipocyte metabolism and lipolysis.

  6. Joint erosion in rheumatoid arthritis: interactions between tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 1, and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) regulate osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    O', G; Ireland, D; Bord, S; Compston, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Osteoclasts, specialised bone resorbing cells regulated by RANKL and M-CSF, are implicated in rheumatoid joint erosion. Lymphocyte-monocyte interactions activate bone resorption, this being attributed to tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin 1 ß (IL1ß) enhanced osteoblast expression of RANKL. In animal studies, TNF potently increases osteoclast formation in the presence of RANKL. RANKL-independent osteoclastogenesis also occurs, though IL1 is required for resorptive function in most studies. These inflammatory cytokines have a pivotal role in rheumatoid arthritis, Objective: To study the interactions of TNFα and IL1ß with RANKL, particularly the time course of the interactions and the role of lymphocytes. Method: Cultures of lymphocytes and monocytes (osteoclast precursors) or of purified CD14+ cells alone (osteoclast precursors) were exposed to various combinations of TNFα, RANKL, and IL1ß or the inhibitors osteoprotegerin, IL1 receptor antagonist, or neutralising antibodies to RANKL or to IL1. Osteoclastogenesis and resorptive activity were assessed on microscopy of dentine slices. Results: TNFα potently increased osteoclast proliferation/differentiation in the presence of RANKL. This effect was greatest when RANKL was present before but not after exposure of osteoclast precursor cells to TNFα. The resorptive activity of osteoclasts generated by TNFα in the absence of RANKL was critically dependent upon IL1, which was expressed by lymphocyte-monocyte interaction. Conclusion: TNFα potently enhances RANKL mediated osteoclast activity. Interactions between TNFα and IL1 also result in osteoclastic activity independently of RANKL. These findings will inform therapeutic approaches to the prevention of joint erosion in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:15020327

  7. Arctigenin suppresses receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Ram; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Jeong Min; Choi, Jung Ho; Kim, Se Na; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Jie Wan; Jeon, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2012-05-01

    Osteoclasts, multinucleated bone-resorbing cells, are closely associated with bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic precursor cells, and their differentiation is mediated by two cytokines, including macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Previous studies have shown that arctigenin exhibits an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of arctigenin on osteoclast differentiation is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that arctigenin inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed RANKL-mediated bone resorption. Additionally, the expression of typical marker proteins, such as NFATc1, c-Fos, TRAF6, c-Src, and cathepsin K, were significantly inhibited. Arctigenin inhibited the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, but not p38 and JNK, in a dose-dependent manner. Arctigenin also dramatically suppressed immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated costimulatory signaling molecules, including Syk and PLCγ2, and Gab2. Notably, arctigenin inhibited the activation of Syk through RANKL stimulation. Furthermore, arctigenin prevented osteoclast differentiation in the calvarial bone of mice following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Our results show that arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, arctigenin may be useful for treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.

  8. Diosmetin ameliorates the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice by inhibiting the activation of the nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Yin, Guojian; Xiong, Jie; Hu, Yanling; Xing, Miao; Cang, Xiaofeng; Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Qiu, Lei; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2014-01-01

    Diosmetin (3’, 5, 7-trihydroxy-4’-methoxyflavone), the aglycone part of the flavonoid glycosides diosmin occurs naturally in citrus fruit, was considered to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of diosmetin in a murine model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). Experimental AP was induced in mice by seven intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 ug/kg) at hourly intervals. Diosmetin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle was pretreated 2 h before the first cerulein injection. After 6 h, 9 h, 12 h of the first cerulein injection, the severity of acute pancreatitis was evaluated biochemically and morphologically. Pretreatment with diosmetin significantly reduced serum levels of amylase and lipase; the histological injury; the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6; myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP) level, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); and the nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in cerulein-induced AP. This study showed that administration of diosmetin demonstrated a beneficial effect on the course of cerulein-induced AP in mice. Therefore, diosmetin may become a new therapeutic agent in future clinical trials for treatment of AP. PMID:24966921

  9. Preventive effect of bis-eugenol, a eugenol ortho dimer, on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nuclear factor kappa B activation and inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yukio; Shoji, Masao; Hanazawa, Shigemasa; Tanaka, Shoji; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2003-09-15

    Eugenol exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, but at higher concentrations acts as an oxidant and potent allergen. It was earlier shown that bis-eugenol synthesized by the oxidation of eugenol was less cytotoxic and more highly antioxidative than eugenol. But its anti-inflammatory mechanism remains yet unclear. Since nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) is a key transcriptional factor in the expression of inflammatory cytokines, we examined whether eugenol and bis-eugenol are inhibitors of NF-kappa B activation. We observed that bis-eugenol, but not eugenol, clearly inhibited the degradation of inhibitory kappa B-alpha in RAW264.7 murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and, consequently, the transcriptional activity of the stimulated NF-kappa B in the cells. In addition, bis-eugenol actually inhibited LPS-stimulated expression of inflammatory cytokines at both gene and protein levels. These findings suggest that bis-eugenol acts as a potent inhibitor of NF-kappa B.

  10. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 increases intestinal goblet cell differentiation through an mTOR/Notch signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuning; Wang, Qingding; Weiss, Heidi L.; Evers, B. Mark

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa undergoes a continual process of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways. Previously, we have shown that the nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5) is involved in the regulation of intestinal enterocyte differentiation. Here we show that treatment with sodium chloride (NaCl), which activates NFAT5 signaling, increased mTORC1 repressor regulated in development and DNA damage response 1 (REDD1) protein expression and inhibited mTOR signaling; these alterations were attenuated by knockdown of NFAT5. Knockdown of NFAT5 activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and significantly inhibited REDD1 mRNA expression and protein expression. Consistently, overexpression of NFAT5 increased REDD1 expression. In addition, knockdown of REDD1 activated mTOR and Notch signaling, whereas treatment with mTOR inhibitor rapamycin repressed Notch signaling and increased the expression of the goblet cell differentiation marker mucin 2 (MUC2). Moreover, knockdown of NFAT5 activated Notch signaling and decreased MUC2 expression, while overexpression of NFAT5 inhibited Notch signaling and increased MUC2 expression. Our results demonstrate a role for NFAT5 in the regulation of mTOR signaling in intestinal cells. Importantly, these data suggest that NFAT5 participates in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis via the suppression of mTORC1/Notch signaling pathway. PMID:25057011

  11. Transcriptional activation of the H-ferritin gene in differentiated Caco-2 cells parallels a change in the activity of the nuclear factor Bbf.

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, M A; Faniello, M C; D'Agostino, P; Quaresima, B; Tiano, M T; Pignata, S; Russo, T; Cimino, F; Costanzo, F

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the mechanisms that regulate the expression of the heavy (H) ferritin subunit in the colon carcinoma Caco-2 cell line allowed to differentiate spontaneously in vitro. The differentiation process of these cells in continuous culture is accompanied by an accumulation of the mRNA coding for the apoferritin H chain. The analysis of Caco-2 subclones stably transfected with an H-chain promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) construct revealed that the mRNA increase is paralleled by an enhanced transcription of the H gene, driven by the -100 to +4 region of the H promoter. The H gene transcriptional activation seems to be a specific feature of differentiated Caco-2 cells, since the activity of other promoters did not change upon differentiation. The -100 to +4 region of the H promoter binds a transcription factor called Bbf (B-box binding factor); electrophoretic-mobility-shift-assay analyses showed that the retarded complex due to Bbf-H promoter interaction is significantly increased in the differentiated cells. We propose that the activation of H-ferritin gene expression may be associated with the establishment of a differentiated phenotype in Caco-2 cells, and that the H-ferritin gene transcriptional up-regulation is accompanied by a modification in the activity of the transcription factor Bbf. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7487931

  12. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation is required for phagocytosis of staphylococcus aureus by RAW 264.7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Fei Yue, Wanfu; Wang, Yongxia

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor which controls the expression of various genes involved in immune responses. However, it is not clear whether NF-κB activation is critical for phagocytosis when Staphylococcus aureus is the pathogen. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we investigated whether NF-κB cascade genes are altered in a mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) when the cells were stimulated to activate a host innate immune response against live S. aureus or heat-inactivated S. aureus (HISA). NF-κB cascade genes such as Nfκb1, Nfκbiz, Nfκbie, Rel, Traf1 and Tnfaip3 were up-regulated by all treatments at one hour after incubation. NF-κB play an important role in activating phagocytosis in RAW 264.7 cells infected with S. aureus. Inhibition of NF-κB significantly blocked phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled S. aureus and decreased the expression of NFκB1, IL1α, IL1β and TLR2 in this cell line. Our results demonstrate that S. aureus may activate the NF-κB pathway and that NF-κB activation is required for phagocytosis of S. aureus by macrophages. - Highlights: • NF-κB cascade genes such as Nfκb1 and Traf1 were up-regulated by heat-inactivated S. aureus. • Inhibition of NF-κB significantly blocked phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled S. aureus. • NF-κB activation is required for phagocytosis of S. aureus by macrophages.

  13. Uterine leiomyosarcoma with osteoclast-like giant cells associated with high expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Mika; Terasaki, Yasuhiro; Yoneyama, Koichi; Kuwahara, Naomi; Wakamatsu, Kyoko; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Kunugi, Shinobu; Takeshita, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Akira

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of osteoclast-like giant cells (OLGCs) in uterine leiomyosarcomas (LMSs) is a rare phenomenon. The nature of OLGCs and the significance of their accumulation in these tumors are poorly understood. Recent studies revealed that the formation of osteoclasts requires a specific cytokine, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), in bone. In this study, we investigated the expression of RANKL in 2 cases of uterine LMS with OLGCs by means of immunohistochemistry and compared the extent of RANKL expression with that in conventional uterine LMSs and leiomyomas by using real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Our cases of uterine LMS with OLGCs showed markedly high expression of RANKL messenger RNA with clear RANKL immunoreactivity compared with messenger RNA expression and immunoreactivity of conventional uterine LMSs and leiomyomas. These findings suggest that the tumors producing RANKL may account for accumulation of OLGCs in tumor tissue because of RANKL-related osteoclastogenesis.

  14. Positive regulation by γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor subunit-1 of chondrogenesis through acceleration of nuclear translocation of activating transcription factor-4.

    PubMed

    Takahata, Yoshifumi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Takarada, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yukari; Ogawa, Shinya; Yoneda, Yukio

    2012-09-28

    A view that signaling machineries for the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are functionally expressed by cells outside the central nervous system is now prevailing. In this study, we attempted to demonstrate functional expression of GABAergic signaling molecules by chondrocytes. In cultured murine costal chondrocytes, mRNA was constitutively expressed for metabotropic GABA(B) receptor subunit-1 (GABA(B)R1), but not for GABA(B)R2. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the predominant expression of GABA(B)R1 by prehypertrophic to hypertrophic chondrocytes in tibial sections of newborn mice. The GABA(B)R agonist baclofen failed to significantly affect chondrocytic differentiation determined by Alcian blue staining and alkaline phosphatase activity in cultured chondrocytes, whereas newborn mice knocked out of GABA(B)R1 (KO) showed a decreased body size and delayed calcification in hyoid bone and forelimb and hindlimb digits. Delayed calcification was also seen in cultured metatarsals from KO mice with a marked reduction of Indian hedgehog gene (Ihh) expression. Introduction of GABA(B)R1 led to synergistic promotion of the transcriptional activity of activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) essential for normal chondrogenesis, in addition to facilitating ATF4-dependent Ihh promoter activation. Although immunoreactive ATF4 was negligibly detected in the nucleus of chondrocytes from KO mice, ATF4 expression was again seen in the nucleus and cytoplasm after the retroviral introduction of GABA(B)R1 into cultured chondrocytes from KO mice. In nuclear extracts of KO chondrocytes, a marked decrease was seen in ATF4 DNA binding. These results suggest that GABA(B)R1 positively regulates chondrogenesis through a mechanism relevant to the acceleration of nuclear translocation of ATF4 for Ihh expression in chondrocytes. PMID:22879594

  15. Antitumor effect of beta2-microglobulin in leukemic cell-bearing mice via apoptosis-inducing activity: activation of caspase-3 and nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Mori, M; Terui, Y; Tanaka, M; Tomizuka, H; Mishima, Y; Ikeda, M; Kasahara, T; Uwai, M; Ueda, M; Inoue, R; Itoh, T; Yamada, M; Hayasawa, H; Furukawa, Y; Ishizaka, Y; Ozawa, K; Hatake, K

    2001-06-01

    We have reported previously that beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) induces apoptosis in leukemic cells in vitro, and that an interaction between beta2m and HLA class I antigen induces apoptosis. Here we examined whether beta2m can induce apoptosis in leukemic cells in vivo and whether it has an antitumor effect in tumor-bearing mice. Daily administration of 50 or 250 microg of beta2m induced apoptosis and an antitumor effect on K562 leukemia cell-bearing mice in the same manner as tumor necrosis factor-alpha. In tumor tissues in beta2m-treated mice, both caspase-3 and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) were stained more strongly than in control mice by anti-caspase-3 and anti-NF-kappaB p65/Rel A polyclonal antibodies. We also observed the in vivo immunological effects of beta2m on lymphoid and hematopoietic organs, such as thymus, bone marrow, Peyer's patches, liver, and spleen in normal mice. Using antibodies against caspase-3 and NF-kappaB, immunohistochemical staining showed that no specific tissues were damaged or stained in normal mice. We conclude that beta2m stimulates caspase-3 and NF-kappaB pathways to induce apoptosis, making it a useful approach to a new therapy for leukemia.

  16. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) during testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury in nuclear factor-kappaB knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Antonuccio, Pietro; Polito, Francesca; Bitto, Alessandra; Fiumara, Tiziana; Squadrito, Francesco; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Arena, Salvatore; Marini, Herbert; Romeo, Carmelo; Altavilla, Domenica

    2007-07-12

    Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB), extracellular regulated kinase (ERK 1/2) and c-jun-N terminal kinase (JNK) play an important role in testicular ischemia. We investigated the patterns of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 activation in NF-kappaB knockout (KO) mice subjected to testicular torsion. KO and normal littermate wild-type (WT) animals underwent at 1 h testicular ischemia followed by 24 h reperfusion (TI/R). Sham testicular ischemia-reperfusion mice served as controls. ERK 1/2, JNK and p38 expression by western blot analysis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression (RT-PCR and western blot analysis) and a complete histological examination were carried out. TI/R caused a greater increase in phosphorylated form of ERK 1/2 in KO mice than in WT animals in either the ischemic testis and the contralateral one. By contrary, active form of JNK and p38 were completely abrogated in both testes of KO mice, while WT animals showed a significant activation of those kinases in both testes. TNF-alpha expression was markedly reduced in KO mice when compared to WT mice either at the mRNA and the protein level. Finally TI/R-induced histological damage was markedly reduced in KO mice. Our data indicate that NF-kappaB plays a pivotal role in the development of testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury and suggest that, in the absence of the transcriptional factor, the up-stream signal JNK and p38 may be abrogated while ERK 1/2 activity is enhanced.

  17. The effect of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) in kidney I/R mediated by C5a/C5aR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ze-Ying; Wu, Yang-Qian; Luo, Heng; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between NFAT and C5a/C5aR in C5a/C5aR-mediated kidney Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, the rats' NRK-52E cell line was used in this study and was distributed into 4 groups, I: the normal control (NC), II: the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury cell model (MG), III: the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury cell model treated with C5a (50 nmol/l) (MG + C5a), IV: the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury cell model treated with C5aR antagonist (2.5 μmol/l) (MG + anti-C5aR). Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry were performed. Nuclear Factor Activated T Cell (NFAT), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL-6) were detected in this study. The results of immunofluorescence showed that NFAT had a nuclear translocation phenomenon during the study. The RT-PCR and WB data indicated that the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 in group III were higher than any other groups. Apoptosis in group III was much serious than other groups. All the results in this study showed that NFAT plays an important role in ischemia/reperfusion injury, it can be induced to up-regulate the inflammatory factor TNF-α and IL-6 by the complement system member C5a/C5aR.

  18. Keap1 silencing boosts lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of interleukin 6 via activation of nuclear factor κB in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Peng; Xue, Peng; Dong, Jian; Peng, Hui; Clewell, Rebecca; Wang, Aiping; Wang, Yue; Peng, Shuangqing; Qu, Weidong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-11-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL6) is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates immune and inflammatory responses. Multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), regulate IL6 transcription. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) is a substrate adaptor protein for the Cullin 3-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which regulates the degradation of many proteins, including Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ). Here, we found that stable knockdown of Keap1 (Keap1-KD) in RAW 264.7 (RAW) mouse macrophages and human monocyte THP-1 cells significantly increased expression of Il6, and Nrf2-target genes, under basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.001–0.1 μg/ml)-challenged conditions. However, Nrf2 activation alone, by tert-butylhydroquinone treatment of RAW cells, did not increase expression of Il6. Compared to cells transduced with scrambled non-target negative control shRNA, Keap1-KD RAW cells showed enhanced protein levels of IKKβ and increased expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 under non-stressed and LPS-treated conditions. Because the expression of Il6 in Keap1-KD RAW cells was significantly attenuated by silencing of Ikkβ, but not Nrf2, it appears that stabilized IKKβ is responsible for the enhanced transactivation of Il6 in Keap1-KD cells. This study demonstrated that silencing of Keap1 in macrophages boosts LPS-induced transcription of Il6 via NF-κB activation. Given the importance of IL6 in the inflammatory response, the Keap1–IKKβ–NF-κB pathway may be a novel target for treatment and prevention of inflammation and associated disorders. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Keap1 increases expression of Il6 in macrophages. • Silencing of Keap1 results in protein accumulation of IKKβ and NF-κB p65. • Induction of Il6 resulting from Keap1 silencing is attributed to NF-κB activation.

  19. Involvement of nuclear factor-kB activation through RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway in LPS-induced IL-8 production in human cervical stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shoko; Tahara, Masahiro; Ogata, Seiji; Hashimoto, Kae; Morishige, Kenichiro; Tasaka, Keiichi; Murata, Yuji

    2007-03-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a chemokine that recruits and activates neutrophils in stromal tissue and plays an essential role in cervical ripening. Nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) is known to be important for the up-regulation of IL-8 gene expression. We examined the molecular mechanisms responsible for NF-kB activation in IL-8 production in cervical stromal cells. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and IL-1beta stimulated IL-8 production by cervical stromal cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of cervical stromal cells with inhibitors of RhoA (C3 transferase exoenzyme), Rho-kinase (Y-27632) or NF-kB (BAY11-7082) effectively blocked LPS-induced IL-8 release. In contrast, IL-1beta-induced IL-8 production was significantly blocked by BAY11-7082, but not by C3 transferase exoenzyme or Y-27632. Pull-down assays showed that LPS activated RhoA, but IL-1beta caused only a lower level of activation. Transfection of the cervical stromal cells with RhoA small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited LPS-stimulated IL-8 production, whereas IL-1beta-induced IL-8 production was not significantly inhibited by knockdown of RhoA with siRNA. Using an NF-kB transcription reporter vector, luciferase assays demonstrated that incubation with LPS or IL-1beta induced the activation of NF-kB in cervical stromal cells. Activation of NF-kB by LPS was inhibited by treatment with C3 exoenzyme, Y-27632 or RhoA siRNA. However, inhibition of the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway did not attenuate the activation of NF-kB by IL-1beta. These results suggest that LPS-induced IL-8 production is accompanied by enhanced NF-kB activation through the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway in human cervical cells.

  20. The nuclear calcium signaling target, activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), protects against dendrotoxicity and facilitates the recovery of synaptic transmission after an excitotoxic insult.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Hanna; Bas-Orth, Carlos; Freitag, H Eckehard; Hellwig, Andrea; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Bading, Hilmar

    2014-04-01

    The focal swellings of dendrites ("dendritic beading") are an early morphological hallmark of neuronal injury and dendrotoxicity. They are associated with a variety of pathological conditions, including brain ischemia, and cause an acute disruption of synaptic transmission and neuronal network function, which contribute to subsequent neuronal death. Here, we show that increased synaptic activity prior to excitotoxic injury protects, in a transcription-dependent manner, against dendritic beading. Expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), a nuclear calcium-regulated gene and member of the core gene program for acquired neuroprotection, can protect against dendritic beading. Conversely, knockdown of ATF3 exacerbates dendritic beading. Assessment of neuronal network functions using microelectrode array recordings revealed that hippocampal neurons expressing ATF3 were able to regain their ability for functional synaptic transmission and to participate in coherent neuronal network activity within 48 h after exposure to toxic concentrations of NMDA. Thus, in addition to attenuating cell death, synaptic activity and expression of ATF3 render hippocampal neurons more resistant to acute dendrotoxicity and loss of synapses. Dendroprotection can enhance recovery of neuronal network functions after excitotoxic insults.

  1. Cooperative signaling through the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and nuclear factor-κB pathways in subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lloyd T.; Wright, George; Davis, R. Eric; Lenz, Georg; Farinha, Pedro; Dang, Lenny; Chan, John W.; Rosenwald, Andreas; Gascoyne, Randy D.

    2008-01-01

    The activated B cell–like (ABC) subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is characterized by constitutive activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we showed that the NF-κB pathway induced the expression of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 in ABC DLBCL cell lines, which also have high levels of total and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 protein, suggesting autocrine signaling. Using RNA interference for STAT3, we defined a gene expression signature of IL-6 and IL-10 signaling through STAT3. Based on this signature, we constructed a molecular predictor of STAT3 signaling that defined a subset of ABC DLBCL tumors with high expression of STAT3, IL-6, and/or IL-10 and their downstream targets. Although the STAT3-high and STAT3-low subsets had equivalent expression of genes that distinguish ABC DLBCL from germinal center B cell–like DLBCL, STAT3-high ABC DLBCLs had higher expression of signatures that reflected NF-κB activity, proliferation, and glycolysis. A small-molecule inhibitor of Janus kinase signaling, which blocked STAT3 signature expression, was toxic only for ABC DLBCL lines and synergized with an inhibitor of NF-κB signaling. These findings suggest that the biological interplay between the STAT3 and NF-κB pathways may be exploited for the treatments of a subset of ABC DLBCLs. PMID:18160665

  2. Artemisia asiatica Nakai Attenuates the Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in Stimulated Macrophages Through Modulation of Nuclear Factor-κB and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Tang, Yujiao; Cha, Kwang-Suk; Choi, Heeri; Lee, Chun Bok; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Sang Bae; Kim, Jong-Shik; Kim, Jong Moon; Han, Weon Cheol; Choi, Suck-Jun; Lee, Sangmin; Choi, Eun-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to examine the anti-inflammatory effects and potential mechanism of action of Artemisia asiatica Nakai (A. asiatica Nakai) extract in activated murine macrophages. A. asiatica Nakai extract showed dose-dependent suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 activity. It also showed dose-dependent inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus and as an inhibitor of NF-κB-alpha phosphorylation. The extract's inhibitory effects were found to be mediated through NF-κB inhibition and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 murine macrophages, suggesting a potential mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of A. asiatica Nakai. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the anti-inflammatory effects of A. asiatica Nakai on J774A.1 murine macrophages; these results may help develop functional foods possessing an anti-inflammatory activity.

  3. Artemisia asiatica Nakai Attenuates the Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in Stimulated Macrophages Through Modulation of Nuclear Factor-κB and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Tang, Yujiao; Cha, Kwang-Suk; Choi, Heeri; Lee, Chun Bok; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Sang Bae; Kim, Jong-Shik; Kim, Jong Moon; Han, Weon Cheol; Choi, Suck-Jun; Lee, Sangmin; Choi, Eun-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to examine the anti-inflammatory effects and potential mechanism of action of Artemisia asiatica Nakai (A. asiatica Nakai) extract in activated murine macrophages. A. asiatica Nakai extract showed dose-dependent suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 activity. It also showed dose-dependent inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus and as an inhibitor of NF-κB-alpha phosphorylation. The extract's inhibitory effects were found to be mediated through NF-κB inhibition and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 murine macrophages, suggesting a potential mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of A. asiatica Nakai. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the anti-inflammatory effects of A. asiatica Nakai on J774A.1 murine macrophages; these results may help develop functional foods possessing an anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:26061361

  4. Low-molecular-weight fractions of Alcalase hydrolyzed egg ovomucin extract exert anti-inflammatory activity in human dermal fibroblasts through the inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-mediated nuclear factor κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohong; Chakrabarti, Subhadeep; Fang, Jun; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Jianping

    2016-07-01

    Ovomucin is a mucin-like protein from egg white with a variety of biological functions. We hypothesized that ovomucin-derived peptides might exert anti-inflammatory activity. The specific objectives were to test the anti-inflammatory activities of different ovomucin hydrolysates and its various fractions in human dermal fibroblasts, and to understand the possible molecular mechanisms. Three ovomucin hydrolysates were prepared and desalted; only the desalted Alcalase hydrolysate showed anti-inflammatory activity. Desalting of ovomucin hydrolysate enriched the proportion of low-molecular-weight (MW) peptides. Indeed, ultrafiltration of this hydrolysate displayed comparable anti-inflammatory activity in dermal fibroblasts, indicating the responsible role of low-MW bioactive peptides in exerting the beneficial biological function. The anti-inflammatory activity of low-MW peptides was regulated through the inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-mediated nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells activity. Our study demonstrated that both peptide composition and MW distribution play important roles in anti-inflammatory activity. The low-MW fractions prepared from ovomucin Alcalase hydrolysate may have potential applications for maintenance of dermal health and treatment of skin diseases. PMID:27333955

  5. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation of RAW 264.7 monocytic cells by suppressing nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Haruyo; Murakami, Akira; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2006-04-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is commonly associated with various age-related diseases, including cancer. A member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) ligand (RANKL), has been shown to play a critical role in osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Thus, agents that suppress RANKL signaling have a potential to suppress bone loss. In this report, we investigated the effect of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a component of Alpina galanga, on RANKL signaling and consequent osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 cells, a murine monocytic cell line. Treatment of these cells with RANKL activated NF-kappaB, and coexposure of the cells to ACA completely suppressed RANKL-induced NF-kappaB activation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The suppression of NF-kappaB by ACA was mediated through suppression of RANKL-induced activation of IkappaBalpha kinase, IkappaBalpha phosphorylation, and IkappaBalpha degradation. Furthermore, incubation of monocytic cells with RANKL induced osteoclastogenesis, and ACA suppressed it. Inhibition of osteoclastogenesis was maximal when cells were simultaneously exposed to ACA and RANKL and minimum when ACA was added 2 days after RANKL. ACA also inhibited the osteoclastogenesis induced by human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, multiple myeloma MM1 cells, and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma LICR-LON-HN5 cells. These results indicate that ACA is an effective blocker of RANKL-induced NF-kappaB activation and of osteoclastogenesis induced by RANKL and tumor cells, suggesting its potential as a therapeutic agent for osteoporosis and cancer-associated bone loss.

  6. Up-regulation of Store-operated Ca2+ Entry and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Promote the Acinar Phenotype of the Primary Human Salivary Gland Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Shyh-Ing; Ong, Hwei Ling; Liu, Xibao; Alevizos, Ilias; Ambudkar, Indu S

    2016-04-15

    The signaling pathways involved in the generation and maintenance of exocrine gland acinar cells have not yet been established. Primary human salivary gland epithelial cells, derived from salivary gland biopsies, acquired an acinar-like phenotype when the [Ca(2+)] in the serum-free medium (keratinocyte growth medium, KGM) was increased from 0.05 mm (KGM-L) to 1.2 mm (KGM-H). Here we examined the mechanism underlying this Ca(2+)-dependent generation of the acinar cell phenotype. Compared with cells in KGM-L, those in KGM-H display enhancement of Orai1, STIM1, STIM2, and nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) expression together with an increase in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), SOCE-dependent nuclear translocation of pGFP-NFAT1, and NFAT-dependent but not NFκB-dependent gene expression. Importantly, AQP5, an acinar-specific protein critical for function, is up-regulated in KGM-H via SOCE/NFAT-dependent gene expression. We identified critical NFAT binding motifs in the AQP5 promoter that are involved in Ca(2+)-dependent up-regulation of AQP5. These important findings reveal that the Ca(2+)-induced switch of salivary epithelial cells to an acinar-like phenotype involves remodeling of SOCE and NFAT signaling, which together control the expression of proteins critically relevant for acinar cell function. Our data provide a novel strategy for generating and maintaining acinar cells in culture.

  7. Fisetin Ameliorated Photodamage by Suppressing the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase/Matrix Metalloproteinase Pathway and Nuclear Factor-κB Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chan, Shih-Yun; Chu, Yin; Wen, Kuo-Ching

    2015-05-13

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is one of the most important extrinsic factors contributing to skin photodamage. After UV irradiation, a series of signal transductions in the skin will be activated, leading to inflammatory response and photoaged skin. In this study, fisetin, a flavonol that exists in fruits and vegetables, was investigated for its photoprotective effects. The results revealed that 5-25 μM fisetin inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3, MMP-9 expression induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation in human skin fibroblasts. In addition, fisetin suppressed UVB-induced collagen degradation. With regard to its effect on upper-stream signal transduction, we found that fisetin reduced the expression of ultraviolet (UV)-induced ERK, JNK, and p38 phosphorylation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) pathway. Furthermore, fisetin reduced inhibitor κB (IκB) degradation and increased the amount of p65, which is a major subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), in cytoplasm. It also suppressed NF-κB translocated to the nucleus and inhibited cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) Ser-133 phosphorylation level in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/CREB (PI3K/AKT/CREB) pathway. Finally, fisetin inhibited UV-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and nitric oxide (NO) generation. The mentioned effects and mechanisms suggest that fisetin can be used in the development of photoprotective agents.

  8. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K and nucleolin as transcriptional activators of the vascular endothelial growth factor promoter through interaction with secondary DNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Diana J.; Guo, Kexiao; Shin, Yoon-Joo; Sun, Daekyu

    2011-01-01

    The human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promoter contains a polypurine/polypyrimidine (pPu/pPy) tract that is known to play a critical role in its transcriptional regulation. This pPu/pPy tract undergoes a conformational transition between B-DNA, single stranded DNA and atypical secondary DNA structures such as G-quadruplexes and i-motifs. We studied the interaction of the cytosine-rich (C-rich) and guanine-rich (G-rich) strands of this tract with transcription factors heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K and nucleolin, respectively, both in vitro and in vivo and their potential role in the transcriptional control of VEGF. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay for our in vivo studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) for our in vitro studies, we demonstrated that both nucleolin and hnRNP K bind selectively to the G- and C-rich sequences, respectively, in the pPu/pPy tract of the VEGF promoter. The small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of either nucleolin or hnRNP K resulted in the down-regulation of basal VEGF gene, suggesting that they act as activators of VEGF transcription. Taken together, the identification of transcription factors that can recognize and bind to atypical DNA structures within the pPu/pPy tract will provide new insight into mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the VEGF gene. PMID:21466159

  9. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chien-Sheng; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Peng, Ximei; Tochigi, Naobumi; Shigemura, Norihisa; Billiar, Timothy R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Toyoda, Yoshiya

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. {yields} There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. {yields} Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF{kappa}B) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NF{kappa}B activation, as indicated by NF{kappa}B DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NF{kappa}B during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NF{kappa}B activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NF{kappa}B activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the

  10. Fat-specific protein 27 modulates nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 and the cellular response to stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27), a member of the cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor a-like effector (Cide) family, is highly expressed in adipose tissues and is a lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein that induces the accumulation of LDs. Using a yeast two-hybrid system to examine potentia...

  11. Tetramethylpyrazine inhibits agiontensin II-induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and bone morphogenetic protein-2 downregulation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xin-Yu; Ruan, Qiu-Rong; Zhu, Da-He; Zhu, Min; Qu, Zhi-Ling; Lu, Jun

    2007-06-25

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), an effective component of traditional Chinese medicine Chuanxiong, is commonly used to resolve embolism. Its possible therapeutic effect against atherosclerosis has received considerable attention recently. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is highly implicated in the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), resulting in atherosclerosis. The mechanisms of TMP in the proliferation of VSMCs induced by Ang II remain to be defined. The present study was aimed to study the effect of TMP on Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation through detection of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) expression. Primary cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were divided into the control group, Ang II group, Ang II + TMP group and TMP group. Cells in each group were harvested at different time points (15, 30 and 60 min for detection of NF-kappaB activity; 6, 12 and 24 h for measurement of BMP-2 expression). NF-kappaB activation was identified as nuclear staining by immunohistochemistry. BMP-2 expression was observed through Western blot, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. The results showed that: (1) Ang II stimulated the activation of NF-kappaB. Translocation of NF-kappaB p65 subunit from cytoplasm to nucleus appeared as early as 15 min, peaked at 30 min (P<0.01) and declined after 1 h. (2) TMP inhibited Ang II-induced NF-kappaB activation (P<0.01). (3) Ang II increased BMP-2 expression at 6 h but declined it significantly at 12 and 24 h (P<0.01). (4) BMP-2 expression was also kept at high level at 6 h in Ang II + TMP group but maintained at the normal level at 12 and 24 h. (5) There was no significant difference in NF-kappaB activation and BMP-2 expression between the control group and TMP group. These results indicate that TMP inhibits Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation through repression of NF-kappaB activation and BMP-2 reduction, and BMP-2 expression is independent of the NF-kappaB pathway. In

  12. Electrophilic nitro-fatty acids prevent astrocyte-mediated toxicity to motor neurons in a cell model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis via nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor activation.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Amarilla, Pablo; Miquel, Ernesto; Trostchansky, Andrés; Trias, Emiliano; Ferreira, Ana M; Freeman, Bruce A; Cassina, Patricia; Barbeito, Luis; Vargas, Marcelo R; Rubbo, Homero

    2016-06-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in tissues during inflammation, which are able to induce pleiotropic cytoprotective and antioxidant pathways including up regulation of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) responsive genes. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of motor neurons associated to an inflammatory process that usually aggravates the disease progression. In ALS animal models, the activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 in astrocytes confers protection to neighboring neurons. It is currently unknown whether NO2-FA can exert protective activity in ALS through Nrf2 activation. Herein we demonstrate that nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA) or nitro-oleic acid (NO2-OA) administrated to astrocytes expressing the ALS-linked hSOD1(G93A) induce antioxidant phase II enzyme expression through Nrf2 activation concomitant with increasing intracellular glutathione levels. Furthermore, treatment of hSOD1(G93A)-expressing astrocytes with NO2-FA prevented their toxicity to motor neurons. Transfection of siRNA targeted to Nrf2 mRNA supported the involvement of Nrf2 activation in NO2-FA-mediated protective effects. Our results show for the first time that NO2-FA induce a potent Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response in astrocytes capable of preventing motor neurons death in a culture model of ALS. PMID:27012417

  13. Electrophilic nitro-fatty acids prevent astrocyte-mediated toxicity to motor neurons in a cell model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis via nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor activation.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Amarilla, Pablo; Miquel, Ernesto; Trostchansky, Andrés; Trias, Emiliano; Ferreira, Ana M; Freeman, Bruce A; Cassina, Patricia; Barbeito, Luis; Vargas, Marcelo R; Rubbo, Homero

    2016-06-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in tissues during inflammation, which are able to induce pleiotropic cytoprotective and antioxidant pathways including up regulation of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) responsive genes. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of motor neurons associated to an inflammatory process that usually aggravates the disease progression. In ALS animal models, the activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 in astrocytes confers protection to neighboring neurons. It is currently unknown whether NO2-FA can exert protective activity in ALS through Nrf2 activation. Herein we demonstrate that nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA) or nitro-oleic acid (NO2-OA) administrated to astrocytes expressing the ALS-linked hSOD1(G93A) induce antioxidant phase II enzyme expression through Nrf2 activation concomitant with increasing intracellular glutathione levels. Furthermore, treatment of hSOD1(G93A)-expressing astrocytes with NO2-FA prevented their toxicity to motor neurons. Transfection of siRNA targeted to Nrf2 mRNA supported the involvement of Nrf2 activation in NO2-FA-mediated protective effects. Our results show for the first time that NO2-FA induce a potent Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response in astrocytes capable of preventing motor neurons death in a culture model of ALS.

  14. Simvastatin Reduces Lipopolysaccharides-Accelerated Cerebral Ischemic Injury via Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-kappa B Activity

    PubMed Central

    Anthony Jalin, Angela M. A.; Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Geum-Sil; Kim, Chunsook; Ju, Chung; Pahk, Kisoo; Song, Hwa Young; Kim, Won-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Preceding infection or inflammation such as bacterial meningitis has been associated with poor outcomes after stroke. Previously, we reported that intracorpus callosum microinjection of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) strongly accelerated the ischemia/reperfusion-evoked brain tissue damage via recruiting inflammatory cells into the ischemic lesion. Simvastatin, 3-hydroxy-3-methylgultaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor, has been shown to reduce inflammatory responses in vascular diseases. Thus, we investigated whether simvastatin could reduce the LPS-accelerated ischemic injury. Simvastatin (20 mg/kg) was orally administered to rats prior to cerebral ischemic insults (4 times at 72, 48, 25, and 1-h pre-ischemia). LPS was microinjected into rat corpus callosum 1 day before the ischemic injury. Treatment of simvastatin reduced the LPS-accelerated infarct size by 73%, and decreased the ischemia/reperfusion-induced expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators such as iNOS, COX-2 and IL-1β in LPS-injected rat brains. However, simvastatin did not reduce the infiltration of microglial/macrophageal cells into the LPS-pretreated brain lesion. In vitro migration assay also showed that simvastatin did not inhibit the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-evoked migration of microglial/macrophageal cells. Instead, simvastatin inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, a key signaling event in expressions of various proinflammatory mediators, by decreasing the degradation of IκB. The present results indicate that simvastatin may be beneficial particularly to the accelerated cerebral ischemic injury under inflammatory or infectious conditions. PMID:26535078

  15. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Suppresses Inflammation-Induced Expression of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 by Blocking Nuclear Factor-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunzi; Kong, Juan; Sun, Tao; Li, George; Szeto, Frances L.; Liu, Weicheng; Deb, Dilip K.; Wang, Youli; Zhao, Qun; Thadhani, Ravi; Li, Yan Chun

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is a major fibrinolytic inhibitor. High PAI-1 is associated with increased renal and cardiovascular disease risk. Previous studies demonstrated PAI-1 down-regulation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), but the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that exposure of mouse embryonic fibroblasts to TNFα or LPS led to a marked induction of PAI-1, which was blunted by 1,25(OH)2D3, NF-κB inhibitor or p65 siRNA, suggesting the involvement of NF-κB in 1,25(OH)2D3-induced repression. In mouse Pai-1 promoter a putative cis-κB element was identified at −299. EMSA and ChIP assays showed that TNF-α increased p65/p50 binding to this κB site, which was disrupted by 1,25(OH)2D3. Luciferase reporter assays showed that PAI-1 promoter activity was induced by TNFα or LPS, and the induction was blocked by 1,25(OH)2D3. Mutation of the κB site blunted TNFα, LPS or 1,25(OH)2D3 effects. 1,25(OH)2D3 blocked IκBα degradation and arrested p50/p65 nuclear translocation. In mice LPS stimulated PAI-1 expression in the heart and macrophages, and the stimulation was blunted by pre-treatment with a vitamin D analog. Together these data demonstrate that 1,25(OH)2D3 down-regulates PAI-1 by blocking NF-κB activation. Inhibition of PAI-1 production may contribute to the reno- and cardio-protective effects of vitamin D. PMID:21176770

  16. Chronic ethanol feeding modulates inflammatory mediators, activation of nuclear factor-κB, and responsiveness to endotoxin in murine Kupffer cells and circulating leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Maraslioglu, Miriam; Oppermann, Elsie; Blattner, Carolin; Weber, Roxane; Henrich, Dirk; Jobin, Christian; Schleucher, Elke; Marzi, Ingo; Lehnert, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse is known to increase susceptibility to infections after injury, in part, by modification of macrophage function. Several intracellular signalling mechanisms are involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses, including the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we investigated the systemic and hepatic effect of chronic ethanol feeding on in vivo activation of NF-κB in NF-κB(EGFP) reporter gene mice. Specifically, the study focused on Kupffer cell proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and activation of NF-κB after chronic ethanol feeding followed by in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that chronic ethanol upregulated NF-κB activation and increased hepatic and systemic proinflammatory cytokine levels. Similarly, LPS-stimulated IL-1 β release from whole blood was significantly enhanced in ethanol-fed mice. However, LPS significantly increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding can improve the responsiveness of macrophage LPS-stimulated IL-6 and TNF-α production and indicate that this effect may result from ethanol-induced alterations in intracellular signalling through NF-κB. Furthermore, LPS and TNF-α stimulated the gene expression of different inflammatory mediators, in part, in a NF-κB-dependent manner. PMID:24623963

  17. Isoliquiritigenin Inhibits Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell-induced Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin Ratio in Human Osteoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Kim, Ki Rim; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Bone destruction induced by the metastasis of breast cancer cells is a frequent complication that is caused by the interaction between cancer cells and bone cells. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and the endogenous soluble RANKL inhibitor, osteoprotegerin (OPG), directly play critical roles in the differentiation, activity, and survival of osteoclasts. In patients with bone metastases, osteoclastic bone resorption promotes the majority of skeletal-related events and propagates bone metastases. Therefore, blocking osteoclast activity and differentiation via RANKL inhibition can be a promising therapeutic approach for cancer-associated bone diseases. We investigated the potential of isoliquiritigenin (ISL), which has anti-proliferative, anti-angiogenic, and anti-invasive effects, as a preventive and therapeutic agent for breast cancer cell-induced bone destruction. ISL at non-toxicity concentrations significantly inhibited the RANKL/OPG ratio by reducing the production of RANKL and restoring OPG production to control levels in hFOB1.19 cells stimulated with conditioned medium (CM) of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, ISL reduced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in hFOB1.19 cells stimulated by CM of MDA-MB-231 cells. Therefore, ISL may have inhibitory potential on breast cancer-induced bone destruction. PMID:26734591

  18. Chronic ethanol feeding modulates inflammatory mediators, activation of nuclear factor-κB, and responsiveness to endotoxin in murine Kupffer cells and circulating leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Maraslioglu, Miriam; Oppermann, Elsie; Blattner, Carolin; Weber, Roxane; Henrich, Dirk; Jobin, Christian; Schleucher, Elke; Marzi, Ingo; Lehnert, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse is known to increase susceptibility to infections after injury, in part, by modification of macrophage function. Several intracellular signalling mechanisms are involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses, including the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we investigated the systemic and hepatic effect of chronic ethanol feeding on in vivo activation of NF-κB in NF-κB(EGFP) reporter gene mice. Specifically, the study focused on Kupffer cell proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and activation of NF-κB after chronic ethanol feeding followed by in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that chronic ethanol upregulated NF-κB activation and increased hepatic and systemic proinflammatory cytokine levels. Similarly, LPS-stimulated IL-1 β release from whole blood was significantly enhanced in ethanol-fed mice. However, LPS significantly increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding can improve the responsiveness of macrophage LPS-stimulated IL-6 and TNF-α production and indicate that this effect may result from ethanol-induced alterations in intracellular signalling through NF-κB. Furthermore, LPS and TNF-α stimulated the gene expression of different inflammatory mediators, in part, in a NF-κB-dependent manner.

  19. Chronic Ethanol Feeding Modulates Inflammatory Mediators, Activation of Nuclear Factor-κB, and Responsiveness to Endotoxin in Murine Kupffer Cells and Circulating Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, Elsie; Jobin, Christian; Schleucher, Elke; Marzi, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse is known to increase susceptibility to infections after injury, in part, by modification of macrophage function. Several intracellular signalling mechanisms are involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses, including the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we investigated the systemic and hepatic effect of chronic ethanol feeding on in vivo activation of NF-κB in NF-κBEGFP reporter gene mice. Specifically, the study focused on Kupffer cell proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and activation of NF-κB after chronic ethanol feeding followed by in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that chronic ethanol upregulated NF-κB activation and increased hepatic and systemic proinflammatory cytokine levels. Similarly, LPS-stimulated IL-1β release from whole blood was significantly enhanced in ethanol-fed mice. However, LPS significantly increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding can improve the responsiveness of macrophage LPS-stimulated IL-6 and TNF-α production and indicate that this effect may result from ethanol-induced alterations in intracellular signalling through NF-κB. Furthermore, LPS and TNF-α stimulated the gene expression of different inflammatory mediators, in part, in a NF-κB-dependent manner. PMID:24623963

  20. Contributions of mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor kappa B to N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Keiji; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Ishida, Eiwa; Kishi, Munehiro; Yonehara, Shin; Konishi, Noboru

    2002-11-01

    The synthetic retinoid N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR) has been shown to induce apoptosis in various types of tumors, including prostate cancer. We sought to examine the key mechanisms affecting the resistance to 4-HPR-induced apoptosis in three human prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP. Concentrations of more than 40 microM 4-HPR produced apoptosis to almost the same extent in all cell lines; however, only the LNCaP line remained highly sensitive to concentrations less than 10 microM. These differing sensitivities at low concentrations correlated well with the level of constitutive activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) in the individual cell lines. We found that NFkappaB activation inhibited c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and caspase 3 activation induced by 4-HPR and that NFkappaB inhibition by the I kappa B alpha phosphorylation inhibitor compound Bay 117082 resulted in increasing sensitization of both PC-3 and DU145 lines to apoptosis induced by 4-HPR at low concentrations. Furthermore, we found that inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) enhanced the suppression of NFkappaB by 4-HPR and also resulted in sensitization to apoptosis in the DU145 cell line, in which ERK is activated constitutively. It thus appears that mitogen-activated protein kinase associated with the activity of NFkappaB plays an important role in the degree of resistance to 4-HPR-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells.

  1. Nuclear factor kappaB activity determines the sensitivity of kidney epithelial cells to apoptosis: implications for mercury-induced renal failure.

    PubMed

    Dieguez-Acuña, Francisco J; Polk, William W; Ellis, Maureen E; Simmonds, P Lynne; Kushleika, John V; Woods, James S

    2004-11-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) is a thiol-dependent transcriptional factor that promotes cell survival and protects cells from apoptotic stimuli. Numerous studies have demonstrated increased sensitivity to apoptosis associated with inhibition of NF-kappaB activation in various cell types. We have previously demonstrated that mercuric ion (Hg(2+)), one of the strongest thiol-binding agents known, impairs NF-kappaB activation and DNA binding at low microM concentrations in kidney epithelial cells. In the present studies we investigated the hypothesis that inhibition of NF-kappaB activation by Hg(2+) and other selective NF-kappaB inhibitors would increase the sensitivity of kidney epithelial (NRK52E) cells to apoptogenic agents to which these cells are normally resistant. Fewer than 10% of untreated cells in culture were found to be apoptotic when evaluated by DNA fragmentation (TUNEL) assay. Treatment of cells with Hg(2+) in concentrations up to 5 microM or with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) (300 units/ml) did not significantly increase the proportion of apoptotic cells, compared with untreated controls. However, when TNF was given following Hg(2+) pretreatment (0.5 to 5 microM for 30 min), the proportion of cells undergoing apoptosis increased by 2- to 6-fold over that seen in untreated controls. Kidney cells pretreated with specific NF-kappaB inhibitors (Bay11-7082 or SN50) prior to TNF also showed a significant increase in apoptosis. Increased sensitivity to apoptotic cell death following these treatments was significantly attenuated in cells transfected with a p65 expression vector. In studies in vivo, rats pretreated by intraperitoneal injection with Hg(2+) (0.75 mg/kg) 18 h prior to administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 mg/kg) displayed impaired NF-kappaB activation and an increased mitochondrial cytochrome c release in kidney cortical cells. These findings are consistent with the view that prevention of NF-kappaB activity in vitro or

  2. The Inhibitory Effect of Angelica tenuissima Water Extract on Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-Kappa-B Ligand-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Resorbing Activity of Mature Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung-Jun; Baek, Jong Min; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Park, Sun-Hyang; Lee, Myeung Su; Oh, Jaemin; Kim, Ju-Young

    2015-01-01

    Angelica tenuissima has been traditionally used in oriental medicine for its therapeutic effects in headache, toothache, and flu symptoms. It also exerts anti-inflammatory activity via the inhibition of the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, the effect of Angelica tenuissima on osteoclast differentiation has not been identified until recently. In this study, we first confirmed that Angelica tenuissima water extract (ATWE) significantly interrupted the formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells (MNCs) in a dose-dependent manner without any cytotoxicity. Next, we clarified the underlying mechanisms linking the suppression effects of ATWE on the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. At the molecular level, ATWE induced the dephosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Akt and decreased the degradation of IκB in RANKL-dependent early signaling pathways. Subsequently, ATWE caused impaired activation of the protein and mRNA levels of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1). Moreover, the disassembly of filamentous actin (F-actin) ring and anti-resorptive activity of mature osteoclasts were triggered by ATWE treatment. Although ATWE did not enhance osteogenesis in primary osteoblasts, our results showed that ATWE is a potential candidate for anti-resorptive agent in osteoporosis, a common metabolic bone disorder.

  3. Activated nuclear transcription factor {kappa}B in patients with myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy-relation to inflammation and cardiac function

    SciTech Connect

    Alter, Peter . E-mail: palter@med.uni-marburg.de; Rupp, Heinz; Maisch, Bernhard

    2006-01-06

    Objectives and background: Myocarditis is caused by various agents and autoimmune processes. It is unknown whether viral genome persistence represents inactive remnants of previous infections or whether it is attributed to ongoing adverse processes. The latter also applies to the course of autoimmune myocarditis. One principal candidate for an adverse remodeling is nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF{kappa}B). Methods: A total of 93 patients with suspected myocarditis/cardiomyopathy was examined. Hemodynamics were assessed by echocardiography as well as right and left heart catheterization. Endomyocardial biopsies were taken from the left ventricle. Biopsies were examined by immunohistochemistry and PCR for viral genomes. Selective immunostaining of activated NF{kappa}B was performed. Results: NF{kappa}B was increased in patients with myocarditis when compared with controls (11.1 {+-} 7.1% vs. 5.0 {+-} 5.3%, P < 0.005) whereas dilated cardiomyopathy showed no significant increase. Patients with myocarditis and preserved left ventricular function exhibited increased activated NF{kappa}B when compared with reduced function (r {sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.001). In parallel, inverse correlation of NF{kappa}B and left ventricular enddiasstolic volume was found (r {sup 2} = 0.43, P < 0.02). Increased activated NF{kappa}B was found in adenovirus persistence when compared with controls (P = 0.001). Only a trend of increased NF{kappa}B activation was seen in cytomegalovirus persistence. Parvovirus B19 persistence did not affect NF{kappa}B activation. Conclusions: Increased activation of NF{kappa}B is related to inflammatory processes in myocarditis. Since activated NF{kappa}B correlates with left ventricular function, it could be assumed that NF{kappa}B activation occurs at early stages of inflammation. Potentially, NF{kappa}B could inhibit loss of cardiomyocytes by apoptosis and protect from cardiac dilation. Since NF{kappa}B is a crucial key transcription factor of inflammation, its

  4. Expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), TNF related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) in human breast tumours

    PubMed Central

    Van Poznak, C; Cross, S S; Saggese, M; Hudis, C; Panageas, K S; Norton, L; Coleman, R E; Holen, I

    2006-01-01

    Background Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is involved in the regulation of bone turnover through binding to the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), and has also been reported to be a potential survival factor for several different cell types. The survival effects are mediated through inhibition of the activity of tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Both breast and prostate cancer cells produce sufficient amounts of OPG to be protected against the effects of TRAIL in vitro. Aims To investigate the spatial expression of OPG, RANKL, and TRAIL in non‐neoplastic breast tissue and breast cancer, and its relation with oestrogen receptor (ER) expression. Methods Forty breast cancers (20 ER+, 20 ER−) and five non‐neoplastic breast tissue samples were stained with antibodies against OPG, RANKL, and TRAIL. Results OPG was not expressed in non‐neoplastic breast tissue except when colocalised with altered columnar epithelium. RANKL was expressed at the apical surface of luminal epithelial cells and TRAIL was expressed in myoepithelial cells. All three proteins were expressed in some breast cancers but showed no significant association with tumour type. OPG expression showed a significant positive correlation with ER expression (p = 0.011). Conclusions This is the first published study of the spatial expression of OPG, RANKL, and TRAIL in breast tissue and breast cancer. The localisation of each protein was specific and they were not colocalised. This specificity may provide a useful marker of functional differentiation in breast cancer; for example, TRAIL expression as a marker of myoepithelial differentiation. PMID:16394281

  5. Evaluating Nuclear Factor NF-κB Activation following Bone Trauma: A Pilot Study in a Wistar Rats Model

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Marcos Barbosa; Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Allegrini, Sergio; Yoshimoto, Marcelo; König, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the moment of peak NF-kB activation and its dissipation in the cortical bone in the femur of Wistar rat stimulated by surgical trauma. Sixty-five Wistar rats were divided into 13 groups (n = 5 per group): eight experimental groups (expG 1–8) divided based on the euthanasia time point (zero, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 12 h and 24 h) and five sham control groups (conG 1–5) killed at zero, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h and 6 h, respectively. A 1.8-mm-diameter defect was generated 0.5 mm from the femur proximal joint using a round bur to induce the surgical trauma. Overall, the activation peak of NF-κB in the cortical bone was 6 h (expG5 group) independent of the evaluated position; this peak was significantly different compared to those in the other groups (p < 0.05). The surgical trauma resulted in a spread of immune markings throughout the cortical bone with an accentuation in the knee region. The present study provides the first evidence that the NF-κB activation peak was established after 6 hours in the cortical bone of Wistar rats. The signs from a surgical trauma can span the entire cortical bone and are not limited to the damaged region. PMID:26465330

  6. Evaluating Nuclear Factor NF-κB Activation following Bone Trauma: A Pilot Study in a Wistar Rats Model.

    PubMed

    Salles, Marcos Barbosa; Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Allegrini, Sergio; Yoshimoto, Marcelo; König, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the moment of peak NF-kB activation and its dissipation in the cortical bone in the femur of Wistar rat stimulated by surgical trauma. Sixty-five Wistar rats were divided into 13 groups (n = 5 per group): eight experimental groups (expG 1-8) divided based on the euthanasia time point (zero, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 12 h and 24 h) and five sham control groups (conG 1-5) killed at zero, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h and 6 h, respectively. A 1.8-mm-diameter defect was generated 0.5 mm from the femur proximal joint using a round bur to induce the surgical trauma. Overall, the activation peak of NF-κB in the cortical bone was 6 h (expG5 group) independent of the evaluated position; this peak was significantly different compared to those in the other groups (p < 0.05). The surgical trauma resulted in a spread of immune markings throughout the cortical bone with an accentuation in the knee region. The present study provides the first evidence that the NF-κB activation peak was established after 6 hours in the cortical bone of Wistar rats. The signs from a surgical trauma can span the entire cortical bone and are not limited to the damaged region. PMID:26465330

  7. Expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and downstream muscle-specific proteins in ground squirrel skeletal and heart muscle during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    The thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) undergoes remarkable adaptive changes during hibernation. Interestingly, skeletal muscle remodelling occurs during the torpor-arousal cycle of hibernation to prevent net muscle loss despite inactivity. Reversible cardiomyocyte hypertrophy occurs in cardiac muscle, allowing the heart to preserve cardiac output during hibernation, while avoiding chronic maladaptive hypertrophy post-hibernation. We propose that calcium signalling proteins [calcineurin (Cn), calmodulin (CaM), and calpain], the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) family of transcription factors, and the NFAT targets myoferlin and myomaker contribute significantly to adaptations taking place in skeletal and cardiac muscle during hibernation. Protein-level analyses were performed over several conditions: euthermic room temperature (ER), euthermic cold room (EC), entrance into (EN), early (ET), and late torpor (LT) time points, in addition to early (EA), interbout (IA), and late arousal (LA) time points using immunoblotting and DNA-protein interaction (DPI) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISAs). In skeletal and cardiac muscle, NFATc2 protein levels were elevated during torpor. NFATc4 increased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle in both tissues, and NFATc1 showed this trend in cardiac muscle only. NFATc3 showed an elevation in DNA-binding activity but not expression during torpor. Myoferlin protein levels dramatically increased during torpor in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Myomaker levels also increased significantly in cardiac muscle during torpor. Cardiac Cn levels remained stable, whereas CaM and calpain decreased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle. Activation and/or upregulation of NFATc2, c3, myoferlin, and myomaker at torpor could be part of a stress-response mechanism to preserve skeletal muscle mass, whereas CaM and calpain appear to initiate the rapid reversal of cardiac hypertrophy during arousal through

  8. The Emerging Roles of the Calcineurin-Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Lymphocytes Pathway in Nervous System Functions and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kipanyula, Maulilio John; Kimaro, Wahabu Hamisi; Seke Etet, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing epidemics of metabolic diseases and increase in the older population have increased the incidences of neurodegenerative diseases. Evidence from murine and cell line models has implicated calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-lymphocytes (NFAT) signaling pathway, a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent major proinflammatory pathway, in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Neurotoxins such as amyloid-β, tau protein, and α-synuclein trigger abnormal calcineurin/NFAT signaling activities. Additionally increased activities of endogenous regulators of calcineurin like plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) and regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) also cause neuronal and glial loss and related functional alterations, in neurodegenerative diseases, psychotic disorders, epilepsy, and traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries. Treatment with calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors induces some degree of neuroprotection and decreased reactive gliosis in the central and peripheral nervous system. In this paper, we summarize and discuss the current understanding of the roles of calcineurin/NFAT signaling in physiology and pathologies of the adult and developing nervous system, with an emphasis on recent reports and cutting-edge findings. Calcineurin/NFAT signaling is known for its critical roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Its role in physiological and pathological processes is still controversial. However, available data suggest that its beneficial and detrimental effects are context-dependent. In view of recent reports calcineurin/NFAT signaling is likely to serve as a potential therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases and conditions. This review further highlights the need to characterize better all factors determining the outcome of calcineurin/NFAT signaling in diseases and the downstream targets mediating the beneficial and detrimental effects. PMID:27597899

  9. The Emerging Roles of the Calcineurin-Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Lymphocytes Pathway in Nervous System Functions and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kimaro, Wahabu Hamisi; Etet, Paul F. Seke

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing epidemics of metabolic diseases and increase in the older population have increased the incidences of neurodegenerative diseases. Evidence from murine and cell line models has implicated calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-lymphocytes (NFAT) signaling pathway, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent major proinflammatory pathway, in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Neurotoxins such as amyloid-β, tau protein, and α-synuclein trigger abnormal calcineurin/NFAT signaling activities. Additionally increased activities of endogenous regulators of calcineurin like plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) and regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) also cause neuronal and glial loss and related functional alterations, in neurodegenerative diseases, psychotic disorders, epilepsy, and traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries. Treatment with calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors induces some degree of neuroprotection and decreased reactive gliosis in the central and peripheral nervous system. In this paper, we summarize and discuss the current understanding of the roles of calcineurin/NFAT signaling in physiology and pathologies of the adult and developing nervous system, with an emphasis on recent reports and cutting-edge findings. Calcineurin/NFAT signaling is known for its critical roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Its role in physiological and pathological processes is still controversial. However, available data suggest that its beneficial and detrimental effects are context-dependent. In view of recent reports calcineurin/NFAT signaling is likely to serve as a potential therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases and conditions. This review further highlights the need to characterize better all factors determining the outcome of calcineurin/NFAT signaling in diseases and the downstream targets mediating the beneficial and detrimental effects.

  10. The Emerging Roles of the Calcineurin-Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Lymphocytes Pathway in Nervous System Functions and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kimaro, Wahabu Hamisi; Etet, Paul F. Seke

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing epidemics of metabolic diseases and increase in the older population have increased the incidences of neurodegenerative diseases. Evidence from murine and cell line models has implicated calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-lymphocytes (NFAT) signaling pathway, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent major proinflammatory pathway, in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Neurotoxins such as amyloid-β, tau protein, and α-synuclein trigger abnormal calcineurin/NFAT signaling activities. Additionally increased activities of endogenous regulators of calcineurin like plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) and regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) also cause neuronal and glial loss and related functional alterations, in neurodegenerative diseases, psychotic disorders, epilepsy, and traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries. Treatment with calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors induces some degree of neuroprotection and decreased reactive gliosis in the central and peripheral nervous system. In this paper, we summarize and discuss the current understanding of the roles of calcineurin/NFAT signaling in physiology and pathologies of the adult and developing nervous system, with an emphasis on recent reports and cutting-edge findings. Calcineurin/NFAT signaling is known for its critical roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Its role in physiological and pathological processes is still controversial. However, available data suggest that its beneficial and detrimental effects are context-dependent. In view of recent reports calcineurin/NFAT signaling is likely to serve as a potential therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases and conditions. This review further highlights the need to characterize better all factors determining the outcome of calcineurin/NFAT signaling in diseases and the downstream targets mediating the beneficial and detrimental effects. PMID:27597899

  11. DJ-1 upregulates anti-oxidant enzymes and attenuates hypoxia/re-oxygenation-induced oxidative stress by activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yu-Feng; Yang, Wen-Jie; Xu, Qiang; Chen, He-Ping; Huang, Xiao-Shan; Qiu, Ling-Yu; Liao, Zhang-Ping; Huang, Qi-Ren

    2015-09-01

    DJ-1 protein, as a multifunctional intracellular protein, has an important role in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidant stress. A recent study by our group showed that DJ-1 can regulate the expression of certain anti‑oxidant enzymes and attenuate hypoxia/re‑oxygenation (H/R)‑induced oxidative stress in the cardiomyocyte cell line H9c2; however, the detailed molecular mechanisms have remained to be elucidated. Nuclear factor erythroid 2‑like 2 (Nrf2) is an essential transcription factor that regulates the expression of several anti‑oxidant genes via binding to the anti‑oxidant response element (ARE). The present study investigated whether activation of the Nrf2 pathway is responsible for the induction of anti‑oxidative enzymes by DJ‑1 and contributes to the protective functions of DJ‑1 against H/R‑induced oxidative stress in H9c2 cells. The results demonstrated that DJ‑1‑overexpressing H9c2 cells exhibited anti‑oxidant enzymes, including manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, to a greater extent and were more resistant to H/R‑induced oxidative stress compared with native cells, whereas DJ‑1 knockdown suppressed the induction of these enzymes and further augmented the oxidative stress injury. Determination of the importance of Nrf2 in DJ‑1‑mediated anti‑oxidant enzymes induction and cytoprotection against oxidative stress induced by H/R showed that overexpression of DJ‑1 promoted the dissociation of Nrf2 from its cytoplasmic inhibitor Keap1, resulting in enhanced levels of nuclear translocation, ARE‑binding and transcriptional activity of Nrf2. Of note, Nrf2 knockdown abolished the DJ‑1‑mediated induction of anti‑oxidant enzymes and cytoprotection against oxidative stress induced by H/R. In conclusion, these findings indicated that activation of the Nrf2 pathway is a critical mechanism by which DJ-1 upregulates anti-oxidative enzymes and attenuates H/R-induced oxidative stress in H9c2

  12. Induction of interleukin-8 production via nuclear factor-kappaB activation in human intestinal epithelial cells infected with Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Lee, B C; Kim, S H; Choi, S H; Kim, T S

    2005-08-01

    Vibrio vulnificus, a Gram-negative estuarine bacterium, is a causative agent of food-borne diseases, such as life-threatening septicaemia and wound infection disease. V. vulnificus penetrating into the epithelial barrier stimulates an inflammatory response in the adjacent mucosa. Therefore, interaction between V. vulnificus and epithelial cells is important for understanding of both the immunology of mucosal surfaces and V. vulnificus. In this study, we investigated the effect and action mechanism of V. vulnificus infection on production of interleukin (IL)-8, a proinflammatory cytokine, in human intestinal epithelial INT-407 cells. V. vulnificus infection significantly induced IL-8 production in a time- and multiplicity of infection (MOI)-dependent manner, as determined by human IL-8 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, V. vulnificus infection significantly increased IL-8 mRNA levels in INT-407 cells, indicating that the increased IL-8 production by V. vulnificus occurred at the transcriptional level. V. vulnificus infection also enhanced IL-8 gene promoter activity in INT-407 cells transiently transfected with IL-8 promoter constructs, but this effect was impaired in INT-407 cells transfected with IL-8 promoter constructs deleted or mutated of a kappaB site. V. vulnificus infection increased the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) binding activity to a kappaB site and the degradation of IkappaB-alpha protein in a time- and a MOI-dependent manner. Furthermore, BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation, significantly reduced the IL-8 production, NF-kappaB binding activity and IkappaB-alpha degradation induced by V. vulnificus infection. Taken together, these results indicate clearly that V. vulnificus infection significantly induces IL-8 production in human intestinal epithelial cells via NF-kappaB activation.

  13. Transcriptional activation of LON Gene by a new form of mitochondrial stress: A role for the nuclear respiratory factor 2 in StAR overload response (SOR).

    PubMed

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Isaac, Sara; Eden, Amir; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas; Orly, Joseph

    2015-06-15

    High output of steroid hormone synthesis in steroidogenic cells of the adrenal cortex and the gonads requires the expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) that facilitates cholesterol mobilization to the mitochondrial inner membrane where the CYP11A1/P450scc enzyme complex converts the sterol to the first steroid. Earlier studies have shown that StAR is active while pausing on the cytosolic face of the outer mitochondrial membrane while subsequent import of the protein into the matrix terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity. Consequently, during repeated activity cycles, high level of post-active StAR accumulates in the mitochondrial matrix. To prevent functional damage due to such protein overload effect, StAR is degraded by a sequence of three to four ATP-dependent proteases of the mitochondria protein quality control system, including LON and the m-AAA membranous proteases AFG3L2 and SPG7/paraplegin. Furthermore, StAR expression in both peri-ovulatory ovarian cells, or under ectopic expression in cell line models, results in up to 3-fold enrichment of the mitochondrial proteases and their transcripts. We named this novel form of mitochondrial stress as StAR overload response (SOR). To better understand the SOR mechanism at the transcriptional level we analyzed first the unexplored properties of the proximal promoter of the LON gene. Our findings suggest that the human nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), also known as GA binding protein (GABP), is responsible for 88% of the proximal promoter activity, including the observed increase of transcription in the presence of StAR. Further studies are expected to reveal if common transcriptional determinants coordinate the SOR induced transcription of all the genes encoding the SOR proteases.

  14. Cultivated ginseng suppresses ultraviolet B-induced collagenase activation via mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor κB/activator protein-1-dependent signaling in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Choi, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Choi, Jun Min; Hwang, Sang Kyu; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2012-06-01

    Cultivated ginseng (CG) (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer), an herb used in Korean herbal medicine, has been widely used in China and Japan to treat fatigue and to enhance resistance to many diseases. It contains many bioactive constituents, including various ginsenosides that are believed to have antioxidant, immunostimulatory, and antiaging activities. Previous studies have revealed that treatment with Panax ginseng is significantly associated with reduced photoaging, but the underlying mode of action has not been elucidated. In this study, we hypothesized that CG inhibits ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced collagenase activation through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/activator protein-1 (AP-1)-dependent signaling in human skin fibroblasts. HS68 cells were treated with CG, followed by irradiation with UVB. Those effects were assessed by semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and enzymic activity assays. We found that CG increased cell viability and inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species in HS68 cells exposed to UVB irradiation. Pretreatment of HS68 cells with CG inhibited UVB-induced production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1 and MMP-13. Western blot analysis further revealed that CG markedly suppressed the enhancement of collagen degradation in UVB-exposed HS68 cells. Cultivated ginseng also suppressed UVB-induced activation of NF-κB, c-Jun, and c-Fos and the phosphorylation of MAPKs, which are upstream modulators of NF-κB and AP-1. These results indicate that CG inhibits UVB-induced collagenolytic MMP production by interfering with MAPK/AP-1 and NF-κB signaling and thus may be useful in the prevention and treatment of skin photoaging.

  15. Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κB Ligand (RANKL)/Osteoprotegerin (OPG) Ratio Is Increased in Severe Osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Grimaud, Eva; Soubigou, Luc; Couillaud, Séverine; Coipeau, Patrick; Moreau, Anne; Passuti, Norbert; Gouin, François; Redini, Françoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Pathological osteolyses are considered a consequence of a disturbance in the mechanisms that govern the bone remodeling, mainly the communication between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) are newly discovered molecules that play a key role in these communications. RANKL is essential for osteoclast differentiation via its receptor RANK located on the osteoclast membrane. OPG is a soluble decoy receptor that inhibits osteoclast differentiation through its binding to RANKL. The aim of this study is the analysis of the RANKL/OPG balance by complementary methods (semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) in human osteolysis associated to various bone etiologies (n = 60), tumoral (primitive, secondary) or not, compared to healthy tissues (n = 16). Results demonstrated that RANKL/OPG ratio was significantly increased in patients suffering from severe osteolysis compared to the control group and that this imbalance is involved in bone resorption mechanisms. In this study, OPG expression appears to reflect a protective mechanism of the skeleton to compensate increased bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast formation and bone resorbing activity. Moreover, as revealed by immunohistochemistry, RANKL and OPG were colocalized in all of the tissues analyzed. To define the veracity of RANKL/OPG index in assessing and managing patients with severe osteolysis, an extended population of patients suffering from severe osteolysis must be now monitored. PMID:14578201

  16. Factorized molecular wave functions: Analysis of the nuclear factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, R.

    2015-06-07

    The exact factorization of molecular wave functions leads to nuclear factors which should be nodeless functions. We reconsider the case of vibrational perturbations in a diatomic species, a situation usually treated by combining Born-Oppenheimer products. It was shown [R. Lefebvre, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074106 (2015)] that it is possible to derive, from the solutions of coupled equations, the form of the factorized function. By increasing artificially the interstate coupling in the usual approach, the adiabatic regime can be reached, whereby the wave function can be reduced to a single product. The nuclear factor of this product is determined by the lowest of the two potentials obtained by diagonalization of the potential matrix. By comparison with the nuclear wave function of the factorized scheme, it is shown that by a simple rectification, an agreement is obtained between the modified nodeless function and that of the adiabatic scheme.

  17. Systemic Delivery of MicroRNA-181b Inhibits Nuclear Factor-κB Activation, Vascular Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E–Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wara, A.K.M.; Icli, Basak; Shvartz, Eugenia; Tesmenitsky, Yevgenia; Belkin, Nathan; Li, Dazhu; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Sukhova, Galina K.; Croce, Kevin; Feinberg, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Activated nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling in the vascular endothelium promotes the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Targeting endothelial NF-κB may provide a novel strategy to limit chronic inflammation. Objective To examine the role of microRNA-181b (miR-181b) in endothelial NF-κB signaling and effects on atherosclerosis. Methods and Results MiR-181b expression was reduced in the aortic intima and plasma in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice fed a high-fat diet. Correspondingly, circulating miR-181b in the plasma was markedly reduced in human subjects with coronary artery disease. Systemic delivery of miR-181b resulted in a 2.3-fold overexpression of miR-181b in the aortic intima of apolipoprotein E–deficient mice and suppressed NF-κB signaling revealed by bioluminescence imaging and reduced target gene expression in the aortic arch in apolipoprotein E–deficient/NF-κB-luciferase transgenic mice. MiR-181b significantly inhibited atherosclerotic lesion formation, proinflammatory gene expression and the influx of lesional macrophages and CD4+ T cells in the vessel wall. Mechanistically, miR-181b inhibited the expression of the target gene importin-α3, an effect that reduced NF-κB nuclear translocation specifically in the vascular endothelium of lesions, whereas surprisingly leukocyte NF-κB signaling was unaffected despite a 7-fold overexpression of miR-181b. Our findings uncover that NF-κB nuclear translocation in leukocytes does not involve importin-α3, but rather importin-α5, which miR-181b does not target, highlighting that inhibition of NF-κB signaling in the endothelium is sufficient to mediate miR-181b's protective effects. Conclusions Systemic delivery of miR-181b inhibits the activation of NF-κB and atherosclerosis through cell-specific mechanisms in the vascular endothelium. These findings support the rationale that delivery of miR-181b may provide a novel therapeutic approach to treat chronic inflammatory diseases

  18. Autophagy Mediates HBx-Induced Nuclear Factor-κB Activation and Release of IL-6, IL-8, and CXCL2 in Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Millore X M; Wong, Sunny H; Chan, Matthew T V; Yu, Le; Yu, Sidney S B; Wu, Feng; Xiao, Zhangang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lin; Cheng, Alfred S L; Ng, Simon S M; Chan, Francis K L; Cho, Chi H; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y; Wu, William K K

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and one of its encoded proteins, HBV X protein (HBx), have been shown to induce autophagy in hepatoma cells. Substantial evidence indicates that autophagy is a potent suppressor of inflammation. However, sporadic reports suggest that autophagy could promote pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and inflammation in some biological contexts. Here, we show that overexpression of HBx induces LC3B-positive autophagosome formation, increases autophagic flux and enhances the expression of ATG5, ATG7, and LC3B-II in normal hepatocytes. Abrogation of autophagy by small interfering RNA against ATG5 and ATG7 prevents HBx-induced formation of autophagosomes. Autophagy inhibition also abrogates HBx-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and CXCL2. These findings suggest that autophagy is required for HBx-induced NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production and could shed new light on the complex role of autophagy in the modulation of inflammation.

  19. Cyclic stretch induces cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in vascular endothelial cells via activation of nuclear factor kappa-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haige; Hiroi, Toyoko; Hansen, Baranda S.; Rade, Jeffrey J.

    2009-11-27

    Vascular endothelial cells respond to biomechanical forces, such as cyclic stretch and shear stress, by altering gene expression. Since endothelial-derived prostanoids, such as prostacyclin and thromboxane A{sub 2}, are key mediators of endothelial function, we investigated the effects of cyclic stretch on the expression of genes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells controlling prostanoid synthesis: cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) and thromboxane A{sub 2} synthase (TXAS). COX-2 and TXAS mRNAs were upregulated by cyclic stretch for 24 h. In contrast, PGIS mRNA was decreased and stretch had no effect on COX-1 mRNA expression. We further show that stretch-induced upregulation of COX-2 is mediated by activation of the NF-{kappa}{beta} signaling pathway.

  20. Phosphorylation of the protein kinase C-theta activation loop and hydrophobic motif regulates its kinase activity, but only activation loop phosphorylation is critical to in vivo nuclear-factor-kappaB induction.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Graham, Caroline; Li, Aiqun; Fisher, Robert J; Shaw, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC)-theta, a member of the 'novel' subfamily of PKC isoforms, is of singular importance in transducing signals in T-lymphocytes. Since understanding of regulatory phosphorylation of novel PKCs is fragmentary and inconsistent with findings for 'classical' PKC isoforms, we investigated three potential phosphorylation sites on PKC-theta; in the activation loop (Thr(538)), turn motif (Ser(676)) and hydrophobic motif (Ser(695)). Combined evidence from phospho-specific antisera and MS demonstrates phosphorylation at all three sites. Unlike its closest paralogue, PKC-delta, lack of negative charge in the activation loop of PKC-theta results in a profound catalytic defect (>100-fold reduction in the T538A mutant); the high sequence similarity between PKC-theta and -delta assists in the formulation of structural hypotheses to account for this major difference. In contrast with mechanisms proposed for other PKC isoforms, phosphorylation at the other two sites does not reconstitute catalytic activity. Activation loop phosphorylation is critical in vivo, since the T538A mutant completely lost its capacity to mediate T-cell receptor-stimulation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation in Jurkat T-cells. Hydrophobic motif phosphorylation also substantially influences PKC-theta catalytic activity (5-fold reduction in the S695A mutant), but does not impair NF-kappaB activation in Jurkat T-cells. Its mechanism is independent of secondary effects on activation loop phosphorylation and cannot be explained by thermal instability. Turn motif phosphorylation has a limited effect on kinase activity, but negatively regulates other aspects of PKC-theta function, since the S676A mutant is more efficient than wild-type in inducing NF-kappaB activation in Jurkat T-cells. These findings expand our understanding of the roles of phosphorylation in novel PKCs, and indicate that PKC-theta is a constitutively competent kinase as a consequence of constitutive

  1. Nuclear Factor κ-B Is Activated in the Pulmonary Vessels of Patients with End-Stage Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Price, Laura C.; Caramori, Gaetano; Perros, Frederic; Meng, Chao; Gambaryan, Natalia; Dorfmuller, Peter; Montani, David; Casolari, Paolo; Zhu, Jie; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Shao, Dongmin; Girerd, Barbara; Mumby, Sharon; Proudfoot, Alastair; Griffiths, Mark; Papi, Alberto; Humbert, Marc; Adcock, Ian M.; Wort, S. John

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess activation of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-kappa B (NF-κB) in human idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Background Idiopathic PAH is a severe progressive disease characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling and excessive proliferation of vascular cells. Increasing evidence indicates that inflammation is important in disease pathophysiology. Methods NF-κB-p65 and CD68, CD20 and CD45 were measured by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy on lung specimens from patients with idiopathic PAH (n = 12) and controls undergoing lung surgery (n = 14). Clinical data were recorded for all patients including invasive pulmonary hemodynamics for the PAH patients. Immunohistochemical images were analyzed by blinded observers to include standard pulmonary vascular morphometry; absolute macrophage counts/mm2 and p65-positivity (p65+) using composite images and image-analysis software; and cytoplasmic:nuclear p65+ of individual pulmonary arterial endothelial and smooth muscle cells (PASMC) in 10–20 pulmonary arteries or arterioles per subject. The expression of ET-1 and CCL5 (RANTES) in whole lung was determined by RT-qPCR. Results Macrophage numbers were increased in idiopathic PAH versus controls (49.0±4.5 vs. 7.95±1.9 macrophages/100 mm2, p<0.0001): these macrophages demonstrated more nuclear p65+ than in macrophages from controls (16.9±2.49 vs. 3.5±1.25%, p<0.001). An increase in p65+ was also seen in perivascular lymphocytes in patients with PAH. Furthermore, NF-κB activation was increased in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (62.3±2.9 vs. 14.4±3.8, p<0.0001) and PASMC (22.6±2.3 vs. 11.2±2.0, p<0.001) in patients with PAH versus controls, with similar findings in arterioles. Gene expression of both ET-1 mRNA ((0.213±0.069 vs. 1.06±0.23, p<0.01) and CCL5 (RANTES) (0.16±0.045 vs. 0.26±0.039, p<0.05) was increased in whole lung homogenates from patients with PAH. Conclusions NF-κB is activated in

  2. Regulation of p53, nuclear factor {kappa}B and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by bromelain through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Neetu; Bhui, Kulpreet; Roy, Preeti; Srivastava, Smita; George, Jasmine; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and immature fruits of pineapples (Ananas cosmosus), which has been shown to have anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-metastatic properties. In the present study, antitumorigenic activity of bromelain was recorded in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted 2-stage mouse skin model. Results showed that bromelain application delayed the onset of tumorigenesis and reduced the cumulative number of tumors, tumor volume and the average number of tumors/mouse. To establish a cause and effect relationship, we targeted the proteins involved in the cell death pathway. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in mouse skin. Since persistent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is frequently implicated in tumorigenesis and is regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), we also investigated the effect of bromelain on Cox-2 and NF-{kappa}B expression. Results showed that bromelain application significantly inhibited Cox-2 and inactivated NF-{kappa}B by blocking phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. In addition, bromelain treatment attenuated DMBA-TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Taken together, we conclude that bromelain induces apoptosis-related proteins along with inhibition of NF-{kappa}B-driven Cox-2 expression by blocking the MAPK and Akt/protein kinase B signaling in DMBA-TPA-induced mouse skin tumors, which may account for its anti-tumorigenic effects.

  3. Suppression of UVB-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor kappa B by green tea polyphenol in SKH-1 hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Afaq, Farrukh; Ahmad, Nihal; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2003-12-18

    Studies from our laboratory have shown that epigallocatechin-3-gallate, the major polyphenol present in green tea, inhibits ultraviolet (UV)B-exposure-mediated phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 176: 110-117, 2001) and activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) (Oncogene 22: 1035-1044, 2003) pathways in normal human epidermal keratinocytes. This study was designed to investigate the relevance of these findings to the in vivo situations in SKH-1 hairless mouse model, which is regarded to have relevance to human situations. SKH-1 hairless mice were topically treated with GTP (5 mg/0.2 ml acetone/mouse) and were exposed to UVB 30 min later (180 mJ/cm2). These treatments were repeated every alternate day for 2 weeks, for a total of seven treatments. The animals were killed 24 h after the last UVB exposure. Topical application of GTP resulted in significant decrease in UVB-induced bifold-skin thickness, skin edema and infiltration of leukocytes. Employing Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical studies, we found that GTP resulted in inhibition of UVB-induced: (i) phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), (ii) c-Jun N-terminal kinases, and (iii) p38 protein expression. Since NF-kappaB plays a major role in inflammation and cell proliferation, we assessed the effect of GTP on UVB-mediated modulations in the NF-kappaB pathway. Our data demonstrated that GTP inhibited UVB-induced: (i) activation of NF-kappaB, (ii) activation of IKKalpha, and (iii) phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha. Our data suggest that GTP protects against the adverse effects of UV radiation via modulations in MAPK and NF-kappaB signaling pathways, and provides molecular basis for the photochemopreventive effect of GTP in an in vivo animal model system.

  4. Activation of heat shock gene transcription by heat shock factor 1 involves oligomerization, acquisition of DNA-binding activity, and nuclear localization and can occur in the absence of stress.

    PubMed Central

    Sarge, K D; Murphy, S P; Morimoto, R I

    1993-01-01

    The existence of multiple heat shock factor (HSF) genes in higher eukaryotes has promoted questions regarding the functions of these HSF family members, especially with respect to the stress response. To address these questions, we have used polyclonal antisera raised against mouse HSF1 and HSF2 to examine the biochemical, physical, and functional properties of these two factors in unstressed and heat-shocked mouse and human cells. We have identified HSF1 as the mediator of stress-induced heat shock gene transcription. HSF1 displays stress-induced DNA-binding activity, oligomerization, and nuclear localization, while HSF2 does not. Also, HSF1 undergoes phosphorylation in cells exposed to heat or cadmium sulfate but not in cells treated with the amino acid analog L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, indicating that phosphorylation of HSF1 is not essential for its activation. Interestingly, HSF1 and HSF2 overexpressed in transfected 3T3 cells both display constitutive DNA-binding activity, oligomerization, and transcriptional activity. These results demonstrate that HSF1 can be activated in the absence of physiological stress and also provide support for a model of regulation of HSF1 and HSF2 activity by a titratable negative regulatory factor. Images PMID:8441385

  5. Aldosterone stimulates nuclear factor-kappa B activity and transcription of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and connective tissue growth factor in rat mesangial cells via serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yoshio; Ueda, Satoko; Hamada, Kazu; Shimamura, Yoshiko; Ogata, Koji; Inoue, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Kagawa, Toru; Horino, Taro; Takao, Toshihiro

    2012-02-01

    Several clinical and experimental data support the hypothesis that aldosterone contributes to the progression of renal injury. To determine the signaling pathway of aldosterone in relation to fibrosis and inflammation in mesangial cells, we investigated the effects of aldosterone on expression and activation of serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase-1 (SGK1), the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB activation, and the expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Aldosterone stimulated SGK1 expression, phosphorylation (Ser-256), and kinase activity. The increments of phosphorylation and expression of SGK1 induced by aldosterone were inhibited by mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) inhibitor (eplerenone). Aldosterone stimulated NF-κB activity measured by NF-κB responsive elements, luciferase assay, and the levels of inhibitor of kappa B (IκB) phosphorylation. This aldosterone-induced activation of NF-κB was inhibited by the transfection of dominant-negative SGK1. Furthermore, aldosterone augmented the promoter activities and protein expressions of ICAM-1 and CTGF. The effects of aldosterone on ICAM-1 and CTGF promoter activities and protein expressions were inhibited by the transfection of dominant-negative SGK1 and dominant-negative IκBα. We also found that the MR antagonist significantly ameliorated the glomerular injury and enhancements in SGK1, ICAM-1, and CTGF expressions induced by 1% sodium chloride and aldosterone in vivo. In conclusion, our findings suggest that aldosterone stimulates ICAM-1 and CTGF transcription via activation of SGK1 and NF-κB, which may be involved in the progression of aldosterone-induced mesangial fibrosis and inflammation. MR antagonists may serve as useful therapeutic targets for the treatment of glomerular inflammatory disease.

  6. Dose-rate effects of protons on in vivo activation of nuclear factor-kappa B and cytokines in mouse bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rithidech, K.N.; Rusek, A.; Reungpatthanaphong, P.; Honikel, L.; Simon, S.R.

    2010-05-28

    The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation and cytokine expression in bone marrow (BM) cells of exposed mice as a function of the dose rate of protons. The cytokines included in this study are pro-inflammatory [i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}), interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), and IL-6] and anti-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL-4 and IL-10). We gave male BALB/cJ mice a whole-body exposure to 0 (sham-controls) or 1.0 Gy of 100 MeV protons, delivered at 5 or 10 mGy min{sup -1}, the dose and dose rates found during solar particle events in space. As a reference radiation, groups of mice were exposed to 0 (sham-controls) or 1 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays (10 mGy min{sup -1}). After irradiation, BM cells were collected at 1.5, 3, 24 h, and 1 month for analyses (five mice per treatment group per harvest time). The results indicated that the in vivo time course of effects induced by a single dose of 1 Gy of 100 MeV protons or {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays, delivered at 10 mGy min{sup -1}, was similar. Although statistically significant levels of NF-{kappa}B activation and pro-inflammatory cytokines in BM cells of exposed mice when compared to those in the corresponding sham controls (Student's t-test, p < 0.05 or < 0.01) were induced by either dose rate, these levels varied over time for each protein. Further, only a dose rate of 5 mGy min{sup -1} induced significant levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The results indicate dose-rate effects of protons.

  7. Lipid Peroxidation Inhibition Blunts Nuclear Factor-κB Activation, Reduces Skeletal Muscle Degeneration, and Enhances Muscle Function in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Sonia; Altavilla, Domenica; Aguennouz, M’hammed; Seminara, Paolo; Minutoli, Letteria; Monici, Maria C.; Bitto, Alessandra; Mazzeo, Anna; Marini, Herbert; Squadrito, Francesco; Vita, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle-wasting disease resulting from lack of the sarcolemmal protein dystrophin. However, the mechanism leading to the final disease status is not fully understood. Several lines of evidence suggest a role for nuclear factor (NF)-κB in muscle degeneration as well as regeneration in DMD patients and mdx mice. We investigated the effects of blocking NF-κB by inhibition of oxidative stress/lipid peroxidation on the dystrophic process in mdx mice. Five-week-old mdx mice received three times a week for 5 weeks either IRFI-042 (20 mg/kg), a strong antioxidant and lipid peroxidation inhibitor, or its vehicle. IRFI-042 treatment increased forelimb strength (+22%, P < 0.05) and strength normalized to weight (+23%, P < 0.05) and decreased fatigue (−45%, P < 0.05). It also reduced serum creatine kinase levels (P < 0.01) and reduced muscle-conjugated diene content and augmented muscle-reduced glutathione (P < 0.01). IRFI-042 blunted NF-κB DNA-binding activity and tumor necrosis factor-α expression in the dystrophic muscles (P < 0.01), reducing muscle necrosis (P < 0.01) and enhancing regeneration (P < 0.05). Our data suggest that oxidative stress/lipid peroxidation represents one of the mechanisms activating NF-κB and the consequent pathogenetic cascade in mdx muscles. Most importantly, these new findings may have clinical implications for the pharmacological treatment of patients with DMD. PMID:16507907

  8. Luteolin is a bioflavonoid that attenuates adipocyte-derived inflammatory responses via suppression of nuclear factor-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinases pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nepali, Sarmila; Son, Ji-Seon; Poudel, Barun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, Dae-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammation of adipocytes has been a therapeutic target for treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders which cause insulin resistance and hence lead to type II diabetes. Luteolin is a bioflavonoid with many beneficial properties such as antioxidant, antiproliferative, and anti-cancer. Objectives: To elucidate the potential anti-inflammatory response and the underlying mechanism of luteolin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Materials and Methods: We stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes with the mixture of tumor necrosis factor-α, lipopolysaccharide, and interferon-γ (TLI) in the presence or absence of luteolin. We performed Griess’ method for nitric oxide (NO) production and measure mRNA and protein expressions by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. Results: Luteolin opposed the stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and NO production by simultaneous treatment of adipocytes with TLI. Furthermore, it reduced the pro-inflammatory genes such as cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-6, resistin, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Furthermore, luteolin improved the insulin sensitivity by enhancing the expression of insulin receptor substrates (IRS1/2) and glucose transporter-4 via phosphatidylinositol-3K signaling pathway. This inhibition was associated with suppression of Iκ-B-α degradation and subsequent inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 translocation to the nucleus. In addition, luteolin blocked the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, c-Jun N-terminal Kinases and also p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Conclusions: These results illustrate that luteolin attenuates inflammatory responses in the adipocytes through suppression of NF-κB and MAPKs activation, and also improves insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 cells, suggesting that luteolin may represent a therapeutic agent to prevent obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:26246742

  9. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 activates apoptosis during testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury in a nuclear factor-kappaB-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Antonuccio, Pietro; Polito, Francesca; Bitto, Alessandra; Squadrito, Francesco; Di Stefano, Vincenzo; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Fazzari, Carmine; Maisano, Daniele; Romeo, Carmelo; Altavilla, Domenica

    2009-02-14

    Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB), mitogen-activated protein kinase3/MAPK1 and MAPK8 are involved in testicular ischemia reperfusion injury (testicular-I/R). NF-kappaB knock-out mice (KO) subjected to testicular-I/R have a reduced testicular damage, blunted MAPK8 activation and enhanced MAPK3/MAPK1 activity. To better understand the role of MAPK3/MAPK1 up-regulation during testicular-I/R, we investigated the effects of PD98059, an inhibitor of MAPK3/MAPK1, in KO mice during testicular-I/R. KO and wild-type (WT) animals underwent 1 h testicular ischemia followed by 24 h reperfusion or a sham testicular-I/R. Animals received either PD98059 (5 mg/kg/ip) or its vehicle. MAPK3/MAPK1, BAX, caspase-3 and -9 and TNF-alpha expression were assessed along with histological examination and an immunostaining for protein of apoptosis. Testicular-I/R caused a greater increase in MAPK3/MAPK1 in KO than in WT animals in both testes. KO mice had a lower expression of the apoptotic proteins and TNF-alpha as well as reduced histological damage compared to WT. Immunostaining confirmed the lower expression of BAX in the Leydig cells of KO mice. Administration of PD98059, abrogated MAPK3/MAPK1 expression and slightly reduced TNF-alpha but did not improve or reverse the histological damage in KO. PD98059 significantly reduced the histological damage in WT mice and markedly reduced the apoptotic proteins in KO and WT mice. These results suggest that testicular-I/R triggers also a pathway of organ damage involving MAPK3/MAPK1, TNF-alpha, BAX, caspase-3 and -9 that activates an apoptotic machinery in an NF-kappaB independent manner. These findings should contribute to better understand testicular torsion-induced damage.

  10. Toll-like receptor 4-mediated nuclear factor-κB activation in spinal cord contributes to chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liying; Zhai, Caihong; Han, Kun; Li, Zhisong; Qian, Junliang; Jing, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Ji-Tian

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the spinal cord is involved in pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated pain facilitation. However, the role of NF-κB activation in chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we found that the level of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) was increased in the dorsal horn of the lumbar 4-6 segments after intrathecal administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days, and the p-p65 was co-localized with neurons and astrocytes. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β was also increased in the same area. In addition, pretreatment with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) or SN50, inhibitors of NF-κB, prevented the development of morphine analgesic tolerance and alleviated morphine withdrawal-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. The increase in TNF-α and IL-1β expression induced by chronic morphine exposure was also partially blocked by PDTC pretreatment. In another experiment, rats receiving PDTC or SN50 beginning on day 7 of morphine injection showed partial recovery of the anti-nociceptive effects of morphine and attenuation of the withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. Meanwhile, intrathecal pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an antagonist of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), blocked the activation of NF-κB, and prevented the development of morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. These data indicated that TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation in the spinal cord is involved in the development and maintenance of morphine analgesic tolerance and withdrawal-induced pain hypersensitivity.

  11. Toll-like receptor 4-mediated nuclear factor-κB activation in spinal cord contributes to chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liying; Zhai, Caihong; Han, Kun; Li, Zhisong; Qian, Junliang; Jing, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Ji-Tian

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the spinal cord is involved in pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated pain facilitation. However, the role of NF-κB activation in chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we found that the level of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) was increased in the dorsal horn of the lumbar 4-6 segments after intrathecal administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days, and the p-p65 was co-localized with neurons and astrocytes. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β was also increased in the same area. In addition, pretreatment with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) or SN50, inhibitors of NF-κB, prevented the development of morphine analgesic tolerance and alleviated morphine withdrawal-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. The increase in TNF-α and IL-1β expression induced by chronic morphine exposure was also partially blocked by PDTC pretreatment. In another experiment, rats receiving PDTC or SN50 beginning on day 7 of morphine injection showed partial recovery of the anti-nociceptive effects of morphine and attenuation of the withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. Meanwhile, intrathecal pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an antagonist of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), blocked the activation of NF-κB, and prevented the development of morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. These data indicated that TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation in the spinal cord is involved in the development and maintenance of morphine analgesic tolerance and withdrawal-induced pain hypersensitivity. PMID:25446875

  12. Characterization of osteoprotegerin binding to glycosaminoglycans by surface plasmon resonance: Role in the interactions with receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and RANK

    SciTech Connect

    Theoleyre, S.; Kwan Tat, S.; Vusio, P.; Blanchard, F.; Gallagher, J.; Ricard-Blum, S.; Fortun, Y.; Padrines, M.; Redini, F.; Heymann, D. . E-mail: dominique.heymann@univ-nantes.fr

    2006-08-25

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a decoy receptor for receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL), a key inducer of osteoclastogenesis via its receptor RANK. We previously showed that RANK, RANKL, and OPG are able to form a tertiary complex and that OPG must be also considered as a direct effector of osteoclast functions. As OPG contains a heparin-binding domain, the present study investigated the interactions between OPG and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) by surface plasmon resonance and their involvement in the OPG functions. Kinetic data demonstrated that OPG binds to heparin with a high-affinity (K {sub D}: 0.28 nM) and that the pre-incubation of OPG with heparin inhibits in a dose-dependent manner the OPG binding to the complex RANK-RANKL. GAGs from different structure/origin (heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate) exert similar activity on OPG binding. The contribution of the sulfation pattern and the size of the oligosaccharide were determined in this inhibitory mechanism. The results demonstrated that sulfation is essential in the OPG-blocking function of GAGs since a totally desulfated heparin loses its capacity to bind and to block OPG binding to RANKL. Moreover, a decasaccharide is the minimal structure that totally inhibits the OPG binding to the complex RANK-RANKL. Western blot analysis performed in 293 cells surexpressing RANKL revealed that the pre-incubation of OPG with these GAGs strongly inhibits the OPG-induced decrease of membrane RANKL half-life. These data support an essential function of the related glycosaminoglycans heparin and heparan sulfate in the activity of the triad RANK-RANKL-OPG.

  13. Role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 in regulating hypertonic-mediated secretin receptor expression in kidney collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Chua, Oscar W H; Wong, Kenneth K L; Ko, Ben C; Chung, Sookja K; Chow, Billy K C; Lee, Leo T O

    2016-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that secretin (SCT) is an important element in the osmoregulatory pathway. It is interesting to note that both SCT and its receptor (SCTR) gene are activated upon hyperosmolality in the kidney. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of the SCTR gene expression in response to changes in osmolality have yet to be clarified. Detailed DNA sequence analysis of the promoter regions of the SCTR gene reveals the presence of multiple osmotic response elements (ORE). The ORE is the binding site of a key osmosensitive transactivator, namely, the nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5). SCTR and NFAT5 are co-expressed in the kidney cortex and medulla collecting duct cells. We therefore hypothesize that NFAT5 is responsible for modulating SCTR expression in hypertonic environments. In this study, we found hypertonicity stimulates the promoter activities and endogenous gene expression of SCTR in mouse kidney cortex collecting duct cells (M1) and inner medulla collecting duct cells (mIMCD3). The overexpression and silencing of NFAT5 further confirmed it to be responsible for the up-regulation of the SCTR gene under hypertonic conditions. A significant increase in the interaction between NFAT5 and the SCTR promoter was also observed following chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In vivo, osmotic stress up-regulates the SCTR gene in the kidney cortex and medulla of wild-type mice, but does not do so in NFAT5(+/-) animals. Hence, this study provides comprehensive information on how NFAT5 regulates SCTR expression in different osmotic environments.

  14. Age-Related Nuclear Translocation of P2X6 Subunit Modifies Splicing Activity Interacting with Splicing Factor 3A1

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Hernández, Juan Ignacio; Sebastián-Serrano, Álvaro; Gómez-Villafuertes, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    P2X receptors are ligand-gated ion channels sensitive to extracellular nucleotides formed by the assembling of three equal or different P2X subunits. In this work we report, for the first time, the accumulation of the P2X6 subunit inside the nucleus of hippocampal neurons in an age-dependent way. This location is favored by its anchorage to endoplasmic reticulum through its N-terminal domain. The extracellular domain of P2X6 subunit is the key to reach the nucleus, where it presents a speckled distribution pattern and is retained by interaction with the nuclear envelope protein spectrin α2. The in vivo results showed that, once inside the nucleus, P2X6 subunit interacts with the splicing factor 3A1, which ultimately results in a reduction of the mRNA splicing activity. Our data provide new insights into post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA splicing, describing a novel mechanism that could explain why this process is sensitive to changes that occur with age. PMID:25874565

  15. Molecular Profiling of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone and the Osteoclastic Localization of Ligand for Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κB

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Teresa; Atkins, Gerald J.; Trivett, Melanie K.; Johnson, Sandra A.; Kansara, Maya; Schlicht, Stephen L.; Slavin, John L.; Simmons, Paul; Dickinson, Ian; Powell, Gerald; Choong, Peter F.M.; Holloway, Andrew J.; Thomas, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a generally benign, osteolytic neoplasm comprising stromal cells and osteoclast-like giant cells. The osteoclastic cells, which cause bony destruction, are thought to be recruited from normal monocytic pre-osteoclasts by stromal cell expression of the ligand for receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANKL). This model forms the foundation for clinical trials in GCTs of novel cancer therapeutics targeting RANKL. Using expression profiling, we identified both osteoblast and osteoclast signatures within GCTs, including key regulators of osteoclast differentiation and function such as RANKL, a C-type lectin, osteoprotegerin, and the wnt inhibitor SFRP4. After ex vivo generation of stromal- and osteoclast-enriched cultures, we unexpectedly found that RANKL mRNA and protein were more highly expressed in osteoclasts than in stromal cells, as determined by expression profiling, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The expression patterns of molecules implicated in signaling between stromal cells and monocytic osteoclast precursors were analyzed in both primary and fractionated GCTs. Finally, using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, neither GCTs nor the derived stromal cells demonstrated significant genomic gains or losses. These data raise questions regarding the role of RANKL in GCTs that may be relevant to the development of molecularly targeted therapeutics for this disease. PMID:15972958

  16. The nuclear factor kappaB-activator gene PLEKHG5 is mutated in a form of autosomal recessive lower motor neuron disease with childhood onset.

    PubMed

    Maystadt, Isabelle; Rezsöhazy, René; Barkats, Martine; Duque, Sandra; Vannuffel, Pascal; Remacle, Sophie; Lambert, Barbara; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne; Munnich, Arnold; Viollet, Louis; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine

    2007-07-01

    Lower motor neuron diseases (LMNDs) include a large spectrum of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders. Studying a large inbred African family, we recently described a novel autosomal recessive LMND variant characterized by childhood onset, generalized muscle involvement, and severe outcome, and we mapped the disease gene to a 3.9-cM interval on chromosome 1p36. We identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1940 T-->C [p.647 Phe-->Ser]) of the Pleckstrin homology domain-containing, family G member 5 gene, PLEKHG5. In transiently transfected HEK293 and MCF10A cell lines, we found that wild-type PLEKHG5 activated the nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B) signaling pathway and that both the stability and the intracellular location of mutant PLEKHG5 protein were altered, severely impairing the NF kappa B transduction pathway. Moreover, aggregates were observed in transiently transfected NSC34 murine motor neurons overexpressing the mutant PLEKHG5 protein. Both loss of PLEKHG5 function and aggregate formation may contribute to neurotoxicity in this novel form of LMND.

  17. Integrin-linked Kinase Modulates Lipopolysaccharide- and Helicobacter pylori-induced Nuclear Factor κB-activated Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production via Regulation of p65 Serine 536 Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Afsar U.; Sarvestani, Soroush T.; Gantier, Michael P.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Hannigan, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved serine-threonine protein kinase that regulates cellular responses to a wide variety of extracellular stimuli. ILK is involved in cell-matrix interactions, cytoskeletal organization, and cell signaling. ILK signaling has also been implicated in oncogenesis and progression of cancers. However, its role in the innate immune system remains unknown. Here, we show that ILK mediates pro-inflammatory signaling in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of ILK in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and macrophages selectively blocks LPS-induced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). ILK is required for LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and transcriptional induction of TNF-α. The modulation of LPS-induced TNF-α synthesis by ILK does not involve the classical NF-κB pathway, because IκB-α degradation and p65 nuclear translocation are both unaffected by ILK inhibition. Instead, ILK is involved in an alternative activation of NF-κB signaling by modulating the phosphorylation of p65 at Ser-536. Furthermore, ILK-mediated alternative NF-κB activation through p65 Ser-536 phosphorylation also occurs during Helicobacter pylori infection in macrophages and gastric cancer cells. Moreover, ILK is required for H. pylori-induced TNF-α secretion in macrophages. Although ILK-mediated phosphorylation of p65 at Ser-536 is independent of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway during LPS stimulation, upon H. pylori infection this event is dependent on the PI3K/Akt pathway. Our findings implicate ILK as a critical regulatory molecule for the NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling pathway, which is essential for innate immune responses against pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:25100717

  18. Integrin-linked kinase modulates lipopolysaccharide- and Helicobacter pylori-induced nuclear factor κB-activated tumor necrosis factor-α production via regulation of p65 serine 536 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Afsar U; Sarvestani, Soroush T; Gantier, Michael P; Williams, Bryan R G; Hannigan, Gregory E

    2014-10-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved serine-threonine protein kinase that regulates cellular responses to a wide variety of extracellular stimuli. ILK is involved in cell-matrix interactions, cytoskeletal organization, and cell signaling. ILK signaling has also been implicated in oncogenesis and progression of cancers. However, its role in the innate immune system remains unknown. Here, we show that ILK mediates pro-inflammatory signaling in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of ILK in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and macrophages selectively blocks LPS-induced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). ILK is required for LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and transcriptional induction of TNF-α. The modulation of LPS-induced TNF-α synthesis by ILK does not involve the classical NF-κB pathway, because IκB-α degradation and p65 nuclear translocation are both unaffected by ILK inhibition. Instead, ILK is involved in an alternative activation of NF-κB signaling by modulating the phosphorylation of p65 at Ser-536. Furthermore, ILK-mediated alternative NF-κB activation through p65 Ser-536 phosphorylation also occurs during Helicobacter pylori infection in macrophages and gastric cancer cells. Moreover, ILK is required for H. pylori-induced TNF-α secretion in macrophages. Although ILK-mediated phosphorylation of p65 at Ser-536 is independent of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway during LPS stimulation, upon H. pylori infection this event is dependent on the PI3K/Akt pathway. Our findings implicate ILK as a critical regulatory molecule for the NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling pathway, which is essential for innate immune responses against pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:25100717

  19. Ethanol Extract of Cirsium japonicum var. ussuriense Kitamura Exhibits the Activation of Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2-dependent Antioxidant Response Element and Protects Human Keratinocyte HaCaT Cells Against Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ok-Kyung; Choi, Bu Young; Park, Jin-Oh; Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Byoung-Kwon; Joo, Chul Gue; Heo, Hyo-Jung; Keum, Young-Sam

    2016-01-01

    Keratinocytes are constantly exposed to extracellular insults, such as ultraviolet B, toxic chemicals and mechanical stress, all of which can facilitate the aging of keratinocytes via the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in protecting keratinocytes against oxidants and xenobiotics by binding to the antioxidant response element (ARE), a cis-acting element existing in the promoter of most phase II cytoprotective genes. In the present study, we have attempted to find novel ethanol extract(s) of indigenous plants of Jeju island, Korea that can activate the Nrf2/ARE-dependent gene expression in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. As a result, we identified that ethanol extract of Cirsium japonicum var. ussuriense Kitamura (ECJUK) elicited strong stimulatory effect on the ARE-dependent gene expression. Supporting this observation, we found that ECJUK induced the expression of Nrf2, hemoxygenase-1, and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 and this event was correlated with Akt1 phosphorylation. We also found that ECJUK increased the intracellular reduced glutathione level and suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol acetate-induced 8-hydroxyguanosine formation without affecting the overall viability. Collectively, our results provide evidence that ECJUK can protect against oxidative stress-mediated damages through the activation of Nrf2/ARE-dependent phase II cytoprotective gene expression. PMID:27051652

  20. Activation of transcription factor IL-6 (NF-IL-6) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) by lipid ozonation products is crucial to interleukin-8 gene expression in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kafoury, Ramzi M; Hernandez, Jazmir M; Lasky, Joseph A; Toscano, William A; Friedman, Mitchell

    2007-04-01

    Ozone (O(3)) is a major component of smog and an inhaled toxicant to the lung. O(3) rapidly reacts with the airway epithelial cell membrane phospholipids to generate lipid ozonation products (LOP). 1-Hydroxy-1-hydroperoxynonane (HHP-C9) is an important LOP, produced from the ozonation of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine. This LOP, at a biologically relevant concentration (100 microM), increases the activity of phospholipase C, nuclear factors-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and interleukin-6 (NF-IL-6) and the expression of the inflammatory gene, interleukin-8 (IL-8) in a cultured human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B). The signaling pathways of ozone and its biologically-active products are as yet undefined. In the present study, we report that the HHP LOP, HHP-C9 (100 microM x 4 h), activated the expression of IL-8 (218 +/- 26% increase over control, n = 4, P < 0.01) through an apparent interaction between the two transcription factors, NF-kappaB and NF-IL-6. Transfection studies using luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that HHP-C9 induced a significant increase in NF-kappaB-DNA binding activity (37 +/- 7% increase over control, n = 6, P < 0.05). Inhibition of NF-kappaB showed a statistically significant but modest decrease in IL-8 release, which suggested a role for another transcription factor, NF-IL-6. Exposure of BEAS-2B cells to HHP-C9 induced a significant increase in the DNA binding activity of NF-IL-6 (45 +/- 11% increase over control, n = 6, P < 0.05). The results of the present study indicate that NF-IL-6 interacts with NF-kappaB in regulating the expression of IL-8 in cultured human airway epithelial cells exposed to LOP, the biological products of ozone in the lung. PMID:17366569

  1. Nuclear Factor {kappa}-Light Chain-Enhancer of Activated B Cells is Activated by Radiotherapy and is Prognostic for Overall Survival in Patients With Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Fluorouracil-Based Chemoradiotheraphy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Bert H.; Funkhouser, William K.; Calvo, Benjamin F.; Meyers, Michael O.; Kim, Hong Jin; Goldberg, Richard M.; Bernard, Stephen A.; Caskey, Laura; Deal, Allison M.; Wright, Fred; Baldwin, Albert S.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Rectal cancer is often clinically resistant to radiotherapy (RT) and identifying molecular markers to define the biologic basis for this phenomenon would be valuable. The nuclear factor {kappa}-light chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-{kappa}B) is a potential anti-apoptotic transcription factor that has been associated with resistance to RT in model systems. The present study was designed to evaluate NF-{kappa}B activation in patients with rectal cancer undergoing chemoradiotherapy to determine whether NF-{kappa}B activity correlates with the outcome in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients underwent biopsy at multiple points in a prospective study and the data from another 50 were analyzed retrospectively. The pretreatment tumor tissue was analyzed for multiple NF-{kappa}B subunits by immunohistochemistry. Serial tumor biopsy cores were analyzed for NF-{kappa}B-regulated gene expression using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and for NF-{kappa}B subunit nuclear localization using immunohistochemistry. Results: Several NF-{kappa}B target genes (Bcl-2, cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein [cIAP]2, interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated-1) were significantly upregulated by a single fraction of RT at 24 h, demonstrating for the first time that NF-{kappa}B is activated by RT in human rectal tumors. The baseline NF-{kappa}B p50 nuclear expression did not correlate with the pathologic response to RT. However, an increasing baseline p50 level was prognostic for overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.15; p = .040). Conclusion: NF-{kappa}B nuclear expression at baseline in rectal cancer was prognostic for overall survival but not predictive of the response to RT. Larger patient numbers are needed to assess the effect of NF-{kappa}B target gene upregulation on the response to RT. Our results suggest that NF-{kappa}B might play an important role in tumor metastasis but not to the resistance to

  2. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), but not Receptor Activator for Nuclear Factor Kappa B Ligand (RANKL), is Associated with Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in HIV-infected Men

    PubMed Central

    Ketlogetswe, Kerunne S; McKibben, Rebeccah; Jacobson, Lisa P; Li, Xuihong; Dobs, Adrian S; Budoff, Matthew; Witt, Mallory D; Palella, Frank J; Kingsley, Lawrence; Margolick, Joseph B.; Post, Wendy S; Brown, Todd T.

    2015-01-01

    Context Abnormalities in the osteoprotegerin (OPG)/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) axis have been observed in HIV-infected persons and have been implicated in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis in the general population. Objective To determine associations of serum OPG and RANKL concentrations with HIV infection and subclinical atherosclerosis. Design Cross-sectional study nested within the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study Setting Four US academic medical centers Participants There were 578 HIV-infected and 344 HIV-uninfected men. Main Outcome Measures Coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by non-contrast cardiac computed tomography (CT), and coronary stenosis and plaque characteristics (composition, presence and extent) were measured by coronary CT angiography. All statistical models were adjusted for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Results OPG concentrations were higher and RANKL concentrations were lower among HIV-infected men compared to –uninfected men (p<0.0001 each). Among the HIV-infected men, higher OPG concentrations were associated with the presence of CAC, mixed plaque, and coronary stenosis > 50%, but not with plaque extent. In contrast, among HIV-uninfected men, higher OPG concentrations were associated with extent of both CAC and calcified plaque, but not their presence. RANKL concentrations were not associated with plaque presence or extent among HIV-infected men, but among HIV-uninfected men, lower RANKL concentrations were associated with greater extent of CAC and total plaque. Conclusions OPG and RANKL are dysregulated in HIV-infected men and their relationship to the presence and extent of subclinical atherosclerosis varies by HIV-status. The role of these biomarkers in CVD pathogenesis and risk prediction may be different in HIV-infected men. PMID:26090754

  3. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited.

    PubMed

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker's yeast. PMID:26473931

  4. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  5. Effects of globularifolin on cell survival, nuclear factor-κB activity, neopterin production, tryptophan breakdown and free radicals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Hande; Becker, Kathrin; Gostner, Johanna M; Charehsaz, Mohammad; Kirmizibekmez, Hasan; Schennach, Harald; Aydin, Ahmet; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    The potential effects of globularifolin, an acylated iridoid glucoside, on cell survival, inflammation markers and free radicals scavenging were investigated. Viability assay on human myelomomonocytic cell line THP-1 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using the Cell-Titer Blue assay proved that globularifolin had no toxic effect at the tested concentrations. Conversely, it is proportional to the dose globularifolin increased growth of THP-1 cells (p <0.01). On human PBMC, globularifolin at 6.25 and 12.5 μM concentrations showed a stimulatory effect, while at 12.5-200 μM it suppressed response of PBMC to stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Globularifolin (50-200 μM) enhanced neopterin formation dose-dependently, whereas tryptophan breakdown was not influenced. At 50-200 μM in unstimulated PBMC in THP-1 cells, globularifolin induced a significant expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) as was quantified by Quanti-Blue assay. By contrast, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cells, the higher concentrations of globularifolin suppressed NF-κB expression dose-dependently and a significant decrease was observed at 200 μM concentration. A positive correlation was found between increased neopterin and NF-κB activity (p <0.01). Similarly, a positive correlation was observed between neopterin levels in mitogen-induced cells and NF-κB activity in LPS-stimulated cells after treatment with globularifolin (p=0.001). The free radical scavenging capacity of globularifolin evaluated by Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assay showed relative ORAC values of 0.36±0.05 μmol Trolox equivalent/μmol. All together, results show that natural antioxidant globularifolin might represent a potential immunomodulatory as well as proliferative agent, which deserves further in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:24185011

  6. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Oxymatrine Through Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-kappa B and Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Activation in Lipopolysaccharide-induced BV2 Microglia Cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao-Qiao; Du, Quan; Yu, Wen-Hua; Zhang, Zu-Yong; Zhu, Qiang; Che, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Feng; Wang, Hao; Chen, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Oxymatrine, a potent monosomic alkaloid extracted from Chinese herb Sophora japonica (Sophora flavescens Ait.). possesses anti-inflammatory activittyes. This study was designed to investigate the effects of oxymatrine on nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia. In this paper, BV2 microglia were pretreated with different concentrations of oxymatrine (1, 10 and 20 μg/mL) for 30 min as followed by stimulation with LPS (1 μg/mL) for different times (30 min, 1 h, 3 h, and 6 h). Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in supernatant, mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cytosolic inhibitor of kappa B-alpha (I-κBα) and phospho- I-κBα and nuclear p65 protein levels, and the phosphorylations of MAPK molecules such as extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were determined. It was shown that oxymatrine inhibited the productions of NO, PGE2, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, attenuated the mRNA levels of iNOS and COX-2, suppressed the phosphorylation of I-κBα in cytosol, decreased the nuclear levels of p65, and also blocked ERK, p38 and JNK pathway in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells in a dose-dependent manner. According to the results; It is suggested that oxymatrine may attenuate inflammatory responses of microglia and could be potentially useful in modulation of inflammatory status in the brain disorders. PMID:24250585

  7. Proteins that mediate the nuclear entry of the goat uterine estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF): identification of a molecular basis for the inhibitory effect of progesterone on estrogen action.

    PubMed

    Govind, Anitha P; Sreeja, S; Thampan, Raghava Varman

    2003-05-01

    A 66 kDa transport protein, tp66, has been identified as the protein that mediates the nuclear transport of the estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF). Indirect evidence shows that tp66 influences the transport of E-RAF mainly by recognizing the nuclear localization signals (NLS) on the latter. A 38 kDa nuclear pore complex protein (npcp38) has been identified to which tp66-E-RAF complex gets 'docked' prior to the nuclear entry of E-RAF. Progesterone binding to E-RAF serves to dissociate E-RAF from the tp66 thereby inhibiting the nuclear entry of E-RAF. The demonstration of the high affinity progesterone binding property of E-RAF adds credibility to the above findings. A change in conformation of E-RAF being brought about by progesterone binding is evident from the results of the circular dichroism (CD) analysis. This appears to be the fundamental reason behind the dissociation of the tp66-E-RAF complex under progesterone influence and provides a molecular basis for the estrogen 'antagonistic' action of progesterone. A nuclear run-on transcription assay clearly demonstrates the transcription-activation function of E-RAF II, also reaffirming the functional role of tp66 in the nuclear entry of E-RAF. PMID:12682912

  8. Role of Osteoprotegerin and Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κB Ligand in Bone Loss Related to Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ugay, Ludmila; Kochetkova, Evgenia; Nevzorova, Vera; Maistrovskaia, Yuliya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a common complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recent clinical and biological researches have increasingly delineated the biomolecular pathways of bone metabolism regulation in COPD. We extended this work by examining the specific association and potential contribution of the osteoprotegerin (OPG)/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) axis to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in advanced COPD. The aim of this study was to assess the relationships of serum OPG, RANKL, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) with bone turnover in men with very severe COPD. Methods: Pulmonary function, T-score at the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN), serum OPG, RANKL, soluble receptor of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-I and II (sTNFR-I, sTNFR-II), osteocalcin (OC), and β-CrossLaps (βCL) levels were measured in 45 men with very severe stage COPD and 36 male non-COPD volunteers. COPD patients and healthy controls were compared using an independent t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test. The Pearson coefficient was used to assess the relationships between variables. Results: OPG and OC were lower in male COPD patients than in control subjects whereas RANKL, serum βCL, TNF-α, and its receptors were higher. OPG directly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) % predicted (r = 0.46, P < 0.005), OC (r = 0.34, P < 0.05), LS (r = 0.56, P < 0.001), and FN T-score (r = 0.47, P < 0.01). In contrast, serum RANKL inversely associated with LS and FN T-score (r = −0.62, P < 0.001 and r = −0.48, P < 0.001) but directly correlated with βCL (r = 0.48, P < 0.001). In addition, OPG was inversely correlated with RANKL (r = −0.39, P < 0.01), TNF-α (r = −0.56, P < 0.001), and sTNFR-I (r = −0.40, P < 0.01). Conclusion: Our results suggest that serum OPG and RANKL levels are inversely associated with bone loss in men with advanced stage COPD. PMID:27411457

  9. Activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 coordinates dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase/PPAR-γ/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathways that enhance nitric oxide generation in human glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zaiming; Aslam, Shakil; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) degrades asymmetric dimethylarginine, which inhibits nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS). Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional factor that binds to antioxidant response elements and transcribes many antioxidant genes. Because the promoters of the human DDAH-1 and DDAH-2, endothelial NOS (eNOS) and PPAR-γ genes contain 2 to 3 putative antioxidant response elements, we hypothesized that they were regulated by Nrf2/antioxidant response element. Incubation of human renal glomerular endothelial cells with the Nrf2 activator tert-butylhydroquinone (20 μmol·L(-1)) significantly (P<0.05) increased NO and activities of NOS and DDAH and decreased asymmetric dimethylarginine. It upregulated genes for hemoxygenase-1, eNOS, DDAH-1, DDAH-2, and PPAR-γ and partitioned Nrf2 into the nucleus. Knockdown of Nrf2 abolished these effects. Nrf2 bound to one antioxidant response element on DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 and PPAR-γ promoters but not to the eNOS promoter. An increased eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS (P-eNOSser-1177) expression with tert-butylhydroquinone was prevented by knockdown of PPAR-γ. Expression of Nrf2 was reduced by knockdown of PPAR-γ, whereas PPAR-γ was reduced by knockdown of Nrf2, thereby demonstrating 2-way positive interactions. Thus, Nrf2 transcribes HO-1 and other genes to reduce reactive oxygen species, and DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 to reduce asymmetric dimethylarginine and PPAR-γ to increase eNOS and its phosphorylation and activity thereby coordinating 3 pathways that enhance endothelial NO generation. PMID:25691623

  10. Review of EPRI Nuclear Human Factors Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hanes, L.F.; O`Brien, J.F.

    1996-03-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Human Factors Program, which is part of the EPRI Nuclear Power Group, was established in 1975. Over the years, the Program has changed emphasis based on the shifting priorities and needs of the commercial nuclear power industry. The Program has produced many important products that provide significant safety and economic benefits for EPRI member utilities. This presentation will provide a brief history of the Program and products. Current projects and products that have been released recently will be mentioned.

  11. TRIB3 mediates the expression of Wnt5a and activation of nuclear factor-κB in Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide-treated osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Qiu, L; Guo, J; Yang, D; Qu, L; Yu, J; Zhan, F; Xue, M; Zhong, M

    2015-08-01

    Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is considered to be correlated with the progression of bone resorption in periodontal and periapical diseases. Wnt5a has recently been implicated in inflammatory processes, but its role is unclear as a P. endodontalis LPS-induced mediator in osteoblasts. Tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3) encodes a pseudokinase and has been linked to inflammation in certain situations. Here, we found that P. endodontalis LPS induced Wnt5a expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner and it also upregulated translocation, phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in MC3T3-E1 cells. Bay 11-7082 blocked the translocation of NF-κB and Wnt5a expression induced by P. endodontalis LPS. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay further established that induction of Wnt5a by P. endodontalis LPS was mediated through the NF-κB p65 subunit. Additionally, P. endodontalis LPS increased expression of TRIB3 in osteoblasts after 10 h simulated time. Overexpression of TRIB3 enhanced NF-κB phosphorylation and Wnt5a induction, whereas knockdown of TRIB3 inhibited NF-κB phosphorylation and Wnt5a expression in P. endodontalis LPS-stimulated osteoblasts. These results suggest that P. endodontalis LPS has the ability to promote the expression of Wnt5a in mouse osteoblasts, and this induction is mainly mediated by NF-κB pathway. TRIB3 seems to modulate the sustained expression of Wnt5a in osteoblasts stimulated by P. endodontalis LPS, as well as regulating NF-κB phosphorylation. PMID:25601649

  12. TRIB3 mediates the expression of Wnt5a and activation of nuclear factor-κB in Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide-treated osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Qiu, L; Guo, J; Yang, D; Qu, L; Yu, J; Zhan, F; Xue, M; Zhong, M

    2015-08-01

    Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is considered to be correlated with the progression of bone resorption in periodontal and periapical diseases. Wnt5a has recently been implicated in inflammatory processes, but its role is unclear as a P. endodontalis LPS-induced mediator in osteoblasts. Tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3) encodes a pseudokinase and has been linked to inflammation in certain situations. Here, we found that P. endodontalis LPS induced Wnt5a expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner and it also upregulated translocation, phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in MC3T3-E1 cells. Bay 11-7082 blocked the translocation of NF-κB and Wnt5a expression induced by P. endodontalis LPS. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay further established that induction of Wnt5a by P. endodontalis LPS was mediated through the NF-κB p65 subunit. Additionally, P. endodontalis LPS increased expression of TRIB3 in osteoblasts after 10 h simulated time. Overexpression of TRIB3 enhanced NF-κB phosphorylation and Wnt5a induction, whereas knockdown of TRIB3 inhibited NF-κB phosphorylation and Wnt5a expression in P. endodontalis LPS-stimulated osteoblasts. These results suggest that P. endodontalis LPS has the ability to promote the expression of Wnt5a in mouse osteoblasts, and this induction is mainly mediated by NF-κB pathway. TRIB3 seems to modulate the sustained expression of Wnt5a in osteoblasts stimulated by P. endodontalis LPS, as well as regulating NF-κB phosphorylation.

  13. Zeta isoform of protein kinase C prevents oxidant-induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and I-kappaBalpha degradation: a fundamental mechanism for epidermal growth factor protection of the microtubule cytoskeleton and intestinal barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Banan, A; Fields, J Z; Zhang, L J; Shaikh, M; Farhadi, A; Keshavarzian, A

    2003-10-01

    Oxidant damage and gut barrier disruption contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In our studies using a model of the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelial barrier, monolayers of intestinal (Caco-2) cells, we investigated damage to and protection of the monolayer barrier. We reported that activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) via degradation of its endogenous inhibitor I-kappaBalpha is key to oxidant-induced disruption of barrier integrity and that growth factor (epidermal growth factor, EGF) protects against this injury by stabilizing the cytoskeletal filaments. Protein kinase C (PKC) activation seems to be required for monolayer maintenance, especially activation of the atypical zeta isoform of PKC. In an attempt to investigate, at the molecular level, the fundamental events underlying EGF protection against oxidant disruption, we tested the intriguing hypothesis that EGF-induced activation of PKC-zeta prevents oxidant-induced activation of NF-kappaB and the consequences of NF-kappaB activation, namely, cytoskeletal and barrier disruption. Monolayers of wild-type (WT) Caco-2 cells were incubated with oxidant (H2O2) with or without EGF or modulators. In other studies, we used the first gastrointestinal cell clones created by stable transfection of varying levels (1-5 microg) of cDNA to either overexpress PKC-zeta or to inhibit its expression. Transfected cell clones were then pretreated with EGF or a PKC activator (diacylglycerol analog 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol, OAG) before oxidant. We monitored the following endpoints: monolayer barrier integrity, stability of the microtubule cytoskeleton, subcellular distribution and activity of the PKC-zeta isoform, intracellular levels and phosphorylation of the NF-kappaB inhibitor I-kappaBalpha, and nuclear translocation and activity of NF-kappaB subunits p65 and p50. Monolayers were also fractionated and processed to assess

  14. Inhibiting the Calcineurin-NFAT (Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells) Signaling Pathway with a Regulator of Calcineurin-derived Peptide without Affecting General Calcineurin Phosphatase Activity*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Mulero, Ma Carme; Aubareda, Anna; Orzáez, Mar; Messeguer, Joaquim; Serrano-Candelas, Eva; Martínez-Hoyer, Sergio; Messeguer, Àngel; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Pérez-Riba, Mercè

    2009-01-01

    Calcineurin phosphatase plays a crucial role in T cell activation. Dephosphorylation of the nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFATs) by calcineurin is essential for activating cytokine gene expression and, consequently, the immune response. Current immunosuppressive protocols are based mainly on calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporine A and FK506. Unfortunately, these drugs are associated with severe side effects. Therefore, immunosuppressive agents with higher selectivity and lower toxicity must be identified. The immunosuppressive role of the family of proteins regulators of calcineurin (RCAN, formerly known as DSCR1) which regulate the calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway, has been described recently. Here, we identify and characterize the minimal RCAN sequence responsible for the inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signaling in vivo. The RCAN-derived peptide spanning this sequence binds to calcineurin with high affinity. This interaction is competed by a peptide spanning the NFAT PXIXIT sequence, which binds to calcineurin and facilitates NFAT dephosphorylation and activation. Interestingly, the RCAN-derived peptide does not inhibit general calcineurin phosphatase activity, which suggests that it may have a specific immunosuppressive effect on the calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway. As such, the RCAN-derived peptide could either be considered a highly selective immunosuppressive compound by itself or be used as a new tool for identifying innovative immunosuppressive agents. We developed a low throughput assay, based on the RCAN1-calcineurin interaction, which identifies dipyridamole as an efficient in vivo inhibitor of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway that does not affect calcineurin phosphatase activity. PMID:19189965

  15. Temporal expression of the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene family during liver development correlates with differential promoter activation by hepatocyte nuclear factor 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, liver activator protein, and D-element-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    van Ooij, C; Snyder, R C; Paeper, B W; Duester, G

    1992-01-01

    The human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family consists of ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3, which are sequentially activated in early fetal, late fetal, and postnatal liver, respectively. Analysis of ADH promoters revealed differential activation by several factors previously shown to control liver transcription. In cotransfection assays, the ADH1 promoter, but not the ADH2 or ADH3 promoter, was shown to respond to hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1), which has previously been shown to regulate transcription in early liver development. The ADH2 promoter, but not the ADH1 or ADH3 promoter, was shown to respond to CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha), a transcription factor particularly active during late fetal liver and early postnatal liver development. The ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3 promoters all responded to the liver transcription factors liver activator protein (LAP) and D-element-binding protein (DBP), which are most active in postnatal liver. For all three promoters, the activation by LAP or DBP was higher than that seen by HNF-1 or C/EBP alpha, and a significant synergism between C/EBP alpha and LAP was noticed for the ADH2 and ADH3 promoters when both factors were simultaneously cotransfected. A hierarchy of ADH promoter responsiveness to C/EBP alpha and LAP homo- and heterodimers is suggested. In all three ADH genes, LAP bound to the same four sites previously reported for C/EBP alpha (i.e., -160, -120, -40, and -20 bp), but DBP bound strongly only to the site located at -40 bp relative to the transcriptional start. Mutational analysis of ADH2 indicated that the -40 bp element accounts for most of the promoter regulation by the bZIP factors analyzed. These studies suggest that HNF-1 and C/EBP alpha help establish ADH gene family transcription in fetal liver and that LAP and DBP help maintain high-level ADH gene family transcription in postnatal liver. Images PMID:1620113

  16. Agonist-induced activation releases peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta from its inhibition by palmitate-induced nuclear factor-kappaB in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mireia; Laguna, Juan C; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel

    2005-05-01

    The mechanisms by which elevated levels of free fatty acids cause insulin resistance are not well understood, but there is a strong correlation between insulin resistance and intramyocellular lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle. In addition, accumulating evidence suggests a link between inflammation and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this work was to study whether the exposure of skeletal muscle cells to palmitate affected peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) beta/delta activity. Here, we report that exposure of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells to 0.75 mM palmitate reduced (74%, P<0.01) the mRNA levels of the PPARbeta/delta-target gene pyruvatedehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK-4), which is involved in fatty acid utilization. This reduction was not observed in the presence of the PPARbeta/delta agonist L-165041. This drug prevented palmitate-induced nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation. Increased NF-kappaB activity after palmitate exposure was associated with enhanced protein-protein interaction between PPARbeta/delta and p65. Interestingly, treatment with the PPARbeta/delta agonist L-165041 completely abolished this interaction. These results indicate that palmitate may reduce fatty acid utilization in skeletal muscle cells by reducing PPARbeta/delta signaling through increased NF-kappaB activity.

  17. Oncovirus Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) represses tumor suppressor PDLIM2 to persistently activate nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and STAT3 transcription factors for tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fan; Xiao, Yadong; Qu, Zhaoxia

    2015-03-20

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is the most common cause of malignancies among AIDS patients. However, how KSHV induces tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that one important mechanism underlying the tumorigenesis of KSHV is through transcriptional repression of the tumor suppressor gene PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein 2 (PDLIM2). PDLIM2 expression is repressed in KSHV-transformed human umbilical vascular endothelial cells as well as in KSHV-associated cancer cell lines and primary tumors. Importantly, PDLIM2 repression is essential for KSHV-induced persistent activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and subsequent tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance. Our mechanistic studies indicate that PDLIM2 repression by KSHV involves DNA methylation. Notably, the epigenetic repression of PDLIM2 can be reversed by 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and vitamin D to suppress KSHV-associated cancer cell growth. These studies not only improve our understanding of KSHV pathogenesis but also provide immediate therapeutic strategies for KSHV-mediated cancers, particularly those associated with AIDS.

  18. Antiosteoclastogenesis activity of a CO2 laser antagonizing receptor activator for nuclear factor kappaB ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation of murine macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chun-Liang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-03-01

    Macrophage cells are the important effector cells in the immune reaction which are indispensable for osteoclastogenesis; their heterogeneity and plasticity renders macrophages a primer target for immune system modulation. In recent years, there have been very few studies about the effects of macrophage cells on laser treatment-regulated osteoclastogenesis. In this study, RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were treated with RANKL to regulate osteoclastogenesis. We used a CO2 laser as a model biostimulation to investigate the role of osteoclastogenic. We also evaluated cell viability, cell death and cathepsin K expression. The CO2 laser inhibited a receptor activator of the NF-ĸB ligand (RANKL)-induced formation of osteoclasts during the osteoclast differentiation process. It was also found that irradiation for two times reduced RANKL-enhanced TRAP activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CO2 laser-treatment diminished the expression and secretion of cathepsin K elevated by RANKL and was concurrent with the inhibition of TRAF6 induction and NF-ĸB activation. The current report demonstrates that CO2 laser abrogated RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by retarding osteoclast differentiation. The CO2 laser can modulate every cell through dose-dependent in vitro RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis, such as the proliferation and fusion of preosteoclasts and the maturation of osteoclasts. Therefore, the current results serve as an improved explanation of the cellular roles of macrophage cell populations in osteoclastogenesis as well as in alveolar bone remodeling by CO2 laser-treatment.

  19. Combination of nifedipine and subtherapeutic dose of cyclosporin additively suppresses mononuclear cells activation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal individuals via Ca2+–calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lai, N-S; Yu, C-L; Yin, W-Y; Yu, H-C; Huang, H-B; Tung, C-H; Lu, M-C

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal Ca2+-mediated signalling contributes to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the potential implication of calcium channel blocker in RA remained unknown. We hypothesized that nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, combined with a calcineurin inhibitor, could suppress T cell activation via targeting different level of the Ca2+ signalling pathway. The percentage of activated T cells and the apoptotic rate of mononuclear cells (MNCs) was measured by flow cytometry. The MNC viability, cytokine production, cytosolic Ca2+ level and activity of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The NFAT-regulated gene expression, including interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-γ and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We found that the percentage of activated T cells in anti-CD3 + anti-CD28-activated MNC was higher in RA patients. High doses of nifedipine (50 µM) increased MNCs apoptosis, inhibited T cell activation and decreased T helper type 2 (Th1) (IFN-γ)/Th2 (IL-10) cytokine production in both groups. The Ca2+ influx was lower in anti-CD3 + anti-CD28-activated MNC from RA patients than healthy volunteers and suppressed by nifedipine. When combined with a subtherapeutic dose (50 ng/ml) of cyclosporin, 1 µM nifedipine suppressed the percentage of activated T cells in both groups. Moreover, this combination suppressed more IFN-γ secretion and NFAT-regulated gene (GM-CSF and IFN-γ) expression in RA-MNCs than normal MNCs via decreasing the activity of NFATc1. In conclusion, we found that L-type Ca2+ channel blockers and subtherapeutic doses of cyclosporin act additively to suppress the Ca2+-calcineurin-NFAT signalling pathway, leading to inhibition of T cell activity. We propose that this combination may become a potential treatment of RA. PMID:22385242

  20. Abscisic acid affects transcription of chloroplast genes via protein phosphatase 2C-dependent activation of nuclear genes: repression by guanosine-3'-5'-bisdiphosphate and activation by sigma factor 5.

    PubMed

    Yamburenko, Maria V; Zubo, Yan O; Börner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) represses the transcriptional activity of chloroplast genes (determined by run-on assays), with the exception of psbD and a few other genes in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings and mature rosette leaves. Abscisic acid does not influence chloroplast transcription in the mutant lines abi1-1 and abi2-1 with constitutive protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) activity, suggesting that ABA affects chloroplast gene activity by binding to the pyrabactin resistance (PYR)/PYR1-like or regulatory component of ABA receptor protein family (PYR/PYL/RCAR) and signaling via PP2Cs and sucrose non-fermenting protein-related kinases 2 (SnRK2s). Further we show by quantitative PCR that ABA enhances the transcript levels of RSH2, RSH3, PTF1 and SIG5. RelA/SpoT homolog 2 (RSH2) and RSH3 are known to synthesize guanosine-3'-5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp), an inhibitor of the plastid-gene-encoded chloroplast RNA polymerase. We propose, therefore, that ABA leads to an inhibition of chloroplast gene expression via stimulation of ppGpp synthesis. On the other hand, sigma factor 5 (SIG5) and plastid transcription factor 1 (PTF1) are known to be necessary for the transcription of psbD from a specific light- and stress-induced promoter (the blue light responsive promoter, BLRP). We demonstrate that ABA activates the psbD gene by stimulation of transcription initiation at BLRP. Taken together, our data suggest that ABA affects the transcription of chloroplast genes by a PP2C-dependent activation of nuclear genes encoding proteins involved in chloroplast transcription. PMID:25976841

  1. G-protein coupled receptor 56 promotes myoblast fusion through serum response factor- and nuclear factor of activated T-cell-mediated signalling but is not essential for muscle development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Melissa P; Doyle, Jamie R; Barry, Brenda; Beauvais, Ariane; Rozkalne, Anete; Piao, Xianhua; Lawlor, Michael W; Kopin, Alan S; Walsh, Christopher A; Gussoni, Emanuela

    2013-12-01

    Mammalian muscle cell differentiation is a complex process of multiple steps for which many of the factors involved have not yet been defined. In a screen to identify the regulators of myogenic cell fusion, we found that the gene for G-protein coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) was transiently up-regulated during the early fusion of human myoblasts. Human mutations in the gene for GPR56 cause the disease bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria; however, the consequences of receptor dysfunction on muscle development have not been explored. Using knockout mice, we defined the role of GPR56 in skeletal muscle. GPR56(-/-) myoblasts have decreased fusion and smaller myotube sizes in culture. In addition, a loss of GPR56 expression in muscle cells results in decreases or delays in the expression of myogenic differentiation 1, myogenin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT)c2. Our data suggest that these abnormalities result from decreased GPR56-mediated serum response element and NFAT signalling. Despite these changes, no overt differences in phenotype were identified in the muscle of GPR56 knockout mice, which presented only a mild but statistically significant elevation of serum creatine kinase compared to wild-type. In agreement with these findings, clinical data from 13 bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria patients revealed mild serum creatine kinase increase in only two patients. In summary, targeted disruption of GPR56 in mice results in myoblast abnormalities. The absence of a severe muscle phenotype in GPR56 knockout mice and human patients suggests that other factors may compensate for the lack of this G-protein coupled receptor during muscle development and that the motor delay observed in these patients is likely not a result of primary muscle abnormalities.

  2. Follicular development and expression of nuclear respiratory factor-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 alpha in ovaries of fetal and neonatal doelings.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z; Wan, Y; Zhang, Y; Wang, Z; Jia, R; Fan, Y; Nie, H; Ying, S; Huang, P; Wang, F

    2012-11-01

    In livestock, the ovarian reserve of follicles is established during the fetal stage. However, at least two-thirds of the oocytes present in the reserve die because of apoptosis before birth. Notably, mitochondria have been reported to play a crucial role in the fate (life/death) of oocytes. In this study, mitochondrial regulators nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) and PPAR γ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) were examined during this period of follicle development to investigate their effects on follicular development and apoptosis. Fetal and neonatal Capra haimen were used, ranging in age from 60 d postcoitum (dpc) to 30 d postpartum (dpp). Our data demonstrated that egg nests were the earliest recognizable gamete cells in ovaries of fetal and neonatal doelings. Proportions of egg nests decreased from 92.68 to 25.08% whereas single follicles increased from 7.32 to 74.92% between 60 and 120 dpc. Subsequently, between 90 and 120 dpc, the proportion of primordial follicles increased from 9.98 to 61.56% (P < 0.01). However, it did not change between 1 and 30 dpp (P = 0.12). The proportion of primary follicles increased from 1.23 to 37.93% between 90 dpc to 1 dpp (P = 0.01) but did not change between 1 and 30 dpp (P = 0.11). Meanwhile, proportions of secondary and tertiary follicles increased in an age-dependent manner. In addition, results of this study suggested that NRF-1 and PGC-1α proteins are mainly localized in germ cells of egg nests, cytoplasm of oocytes, and granulosa cells of follicles ranging from primordial to tertiary follicles. The transcript abundance of NRF-1 mRNA was up-regulated in 60-dpc-old ovaries compared with 1-dpp-old ovaries (P < 0.05), but the PGC-1α mRNA expression pattern did not change (P = 0.05). Nevertheless, the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase UTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells and caspase-3 activity in 60-dpc-old ovaries was less than those in 1-dpp-old ovaries (P < 0.01, P = 0.01). In conclusion, our results

  3. Genome-wide approaches reveal functional vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-inducible nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 binding to angiogenesis-related genes in the endothelium.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Jun-ichi; Kanki, Yasuharu; Makihara, Chihiro; Schadler, Keri; Miura, Mai; Manabe, Yuuka; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Minami, Takashi

    2014-10-17

    VEGF is a key regulator of endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and inflammation, which leads to activation of several signaling cascades, including the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway. NFAT is not only important for immune responses but also for cardiovascular development and the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. By using Down syndrome model mice and clinical patient samples, we showed recently that the VEGF-calcineurin-NFAT signaling axis regulates tumor angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. However, the connection between genome-wide views of NFAT-mediated gene regulation and downstream gene function in the endothelium has not been studied extensively. Here we performed comprehensive mapping of genome-wide NFATc1 binding in VEGF-stimulated primary cultured endothelial cells and elucidated the functional consequences of VEGF-NFATc1-mediated phenotypic changes. A comparison of the NFATc1 ChIP sequence profile and epigenetic histone marks revealed that predominant NFATc1-occupied peaks overlapped with promoter-associated histone marks. Moreover, we identified two novel NFATc1 regulated genes, CXCR7 and RND1. CXCR7 knockdown abrogated SDF-1- and VEGF-mediated cell migration and tube formation. siRNA treatment of RND1 impaired vascular barrier function, caused RhoA hyperactivation, and further stimulated VEGF-mediated vascular outgrowth from aortic rings. Taken together, these findings suggest that dynamic NFATc1 binding to target genes is critical for VEGF-mediated endothelial cell activation. CXCR7 and RND1 are NFATc1 target genes with multiple functions, including regulation of cell migration, tube formation, and barrier formation in endothelial cells.

  4. A supercritical CO₂ extract from seabuckthorn leaves inhibits pro-inflammatory mediators via inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase p38 and transcription factor nuclear factor-κB.

    PubMed

    Jayashankar, Bindhya; Mishra, K P; Kumar, M S Y; Udayasankar, K; Misra, K; Ganju, L; Singh, S B

    2012-08-01

    In the present study, we have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory properties of supercritical CO₂ extract of seabuckthorn leaves (SCE) on mouse alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S), human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) in-vitro and in-vivo. Treatment of MH-S cells with SCE (0.5-100 μg/ml) significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production. It also inhibited the release of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, which was further confirmed by suppression of LPS induced TNF-α in hPBMCs by ELISPOT assay. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that SCE decreased LPS-induced inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression in MH-S cells. Furthermore, SCE treatment also reduced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation in nucleus induced by LPS in MH-S cells. To elucidate the molecular mechanism for inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators by SCE (100 μg/ml), we further studied the effect of SCE on LPS-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). It was observed that the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in LPS-stimulated MH-S cells was significantly inhibited by SCE, which was further proven by suppression of LPS induced CD40 expression. The in-vivo model of AIA mice also showed a significant reduction in the inflammation of paw edema. These data collectively suggest that SCE suppressed the LPS-induced production of NO, IL-6, and TNF-α and expression of CD40, iNOS and COX-2 proteins by inhibiting NF-κB activation and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Hence, the SCE has potent anti-inflammatory activity and might be useful in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22664145

  5. Palmitate induces tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells by a mechanism involving protein kinase C and nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mireia; Planavila, Anna; Sánchez, Rosa M; Merlos, Manuel; Laguna, Juan Carlos; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for increased expression of TNF-alpha in skeletal muscle cells in diabetic states are not well understood. We examined the effects of the saturated acid palmitate on TNF-alpha expression. Exposure of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells to 0.75 mm palmitate enhanced mRNA (25-fold induction, P < 0.001) and protein (2.5-fold induction) expression of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. This induction was inversely correlated with a fall in GLUT4 mRNA levels (57% reduction, P < 0.001) and glucose uptake (34% reduction, P < 0.001). PD98059 and U0126, inhibitors of the ERK-MAPK cascade, partially prevented the palmitate-induced TNF-alpha expression. Palmitate increased nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and incubation of the cells with the NF-kappaB inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and parthenolide partially prevented TNF-alpha expression. Incubation of palmitate-treated cells with calphostin C, a strong and specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), abolished palmitate-induced TNF-alpha expression, and restored GLUT4 mRNA levels. Palmitate treatment enhanced the expression of phospho-PKCtheta, suggesting that this PKC isoform was involved in the changes reported, and coincubation of palmitate-treated cells with the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine prevented the palmitate-induced reduction in the expression of IkappaBalpha and insulin-stimulated Akt activation. These findings suggest that enhanced TNF-alpha expression and GLUT4 down-regulation caused by palmitate are mediated through the PKC activation, confirming that this enzyme may be a target for either the prevention or the treatment of fatty acid-induced insulin resistance.

  6. Activation of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed

    Di Scipio, R G; Kurachi, K; Davie, E W

    1978-06-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) is a single-chain plasma glycoprotein (mol wt 57,000) that participates in the middle phase of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It is present in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease, Factor IXabeta, by Factor XIa (activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent) in the presence of calcium ions. In the activation reaction, two internal peptide bonds are hydrolyzed in Factor IX. These cleavages occur at a specific arginyl-alanine peptide bond and a specific arginyl-valine peptide bond. This results in the release of an activation peptide (mol wt approximately equal to 11,000) from the internal region of the precursor molecule and the generation of Factor IXabeta (mol wt approximately equal to 46,000). Factor IXabeta is composed of a light chain (mol wt approximately equal to 18,000) and a heavy chain (mol wt approximately equal to 28,000), and these chains are held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain originates from the amino terminal portion of the precursor molecule and has an amino terminal sequence of Tyr-Asn-Ser-Gly-Lys. The heavy chain originates from the carboxyl terminal region of the precursor molecule and contains an amino terminal sequence of Val-Val-Gly-Gly-Glu. The heavy chain of Factor IXabeta also contains the active site sequence of Phe-Cys-Ala-Gly-Phe-His-Glu-Gly-Arg-Asp-Ser-Cys-Gln-Gly-Asp-SER-Gly-Gly-Pro. The active site serine residue is shown in capital letters. Factor IX is also converted to Factor IXaalpha by a protease from Russell's viper venom. This activation reaction, however, occurs in a single step and involves only the cleavage of the internal arginyl-valine peptide bond. Human Factor IXabeta was inhibited by human antithrombin III by the formation of a one-to-one complex of enzyme and inhibitor. In this reaction, the inhibitor was tightly bound to the heavy chain of the enzyme. These data indicate that the mechanism of activation of human Factor IX and its

  7. Organizational factors and nuclear power plant safety

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.

    1995-12-31

    There are many organizations in our society that depend on human performance to avoid incidents involving significant adverse consequences. As our culture and technology have become more sophisticated, the management of risk on a broad basis has become more and more critical. The safe operation of military facilities, chemical plants, airlines, and mass transit, to name a few, are substantially dependent on the performance of the organizations that operate those facilities. The nuclear power industry has, within the past 15 years, increased the attention given to the influence of human performance in the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPP). While NPPs have been designed through engineering disciplines to intercept and mitigate events that could cause adverse consequences, it has been clear from various safety-related incidents that human performance also plays a dominant role in preventing accidents. Initial efforts following the 1979 Three Mile Island incident focused primarily on ergonomic factors (e.g., the best design of control rooms for maximum performance). Greater attention was subsequently directed towards cognitive processes involved in the use of NPP decision support systems and decision making in general, personnel functions such as selection systems, and the influence of work scheduling and planning on employees` performance. Although each of these approaches has contributed to increasing the safety of NPPS, during the last few years, there has been a growing awareness that particular attention must be paid to how organizational processes affect NPP personnel performance, and thus, plant safety. The direct importance of organizational factors on safety performance in the NPP has been well-documented in the reports on the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents as well as numerous other events, especially as evaluated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  8. AUY922 effectively targets against activated B cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and low-grade lymphoma cells harboring genetic alteration-associated nuclear factor-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Jen; Shih, Neng-Yao; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Lin, Hui-You; Chen, Tsai-Yun; Chang, Kung-Chao; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Chang, Jeffrey S; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent genetic alterations that are frequently observed in some low-grade lymphomas, such as activated B cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type lymphoma (MALT lymphoma) are usually associated with nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and confer resistance to therapy. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of AUY922, a novel Hsp90 inhibitor, in representative cell lines OCI-Ly3 (ABC-DLBCL) and MA-1 (a low-grade lymphoma cell line with t(14;18)/IgH-MALT1translocation) to explore its potential use in the treatment of refractory B-cell lymphoma. Our results showed that AUY922 effectively induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of OCI-Ly3 and MA-1 cells, which were accompanied by down-regulation of the expression levels of NF-κB and Bcl-2 family proteins, as well as molecules of multiple signaling pathways involving cell proliferation, growth and survival. The growth inhibitory effect of AUY922 was further confirmed in a mouse xenograft model. These findings indicate the potential use of AUY922 in B cell lymphomas.

  9. The Nurr1 Activator 1,1-Bis(3'-Indolyl)-1-(p-Chlorophenyl)Methane Blocks Inflammatory Gene Expression in BV-2 Microglial Cells by Inhibiting Nuclear Factor κB.

    PubMed

    De Miranda, Briana R; Popichak, Katriana A; Hammond, Sean L; Jorgensen, Bryce A; Phillips, Aaron T; Safe, Stephen; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2015-06-01

    NR4A family orphan nuclear receptors are an important class of transcription factors for development and homeostasis of dopaminergic neurons that also inhibit expression of inflammatory genes in glial cells. The identification of NR4A2 (Nurr1) as a suppressor of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-related neuroinflammatory genes in microglia and astrocytes suggests that this receptor could be a target for pharmacologic intervention in neurologic disease, but compounds that promote this activity are lacking. Selected diindolylmethane compounds (C-DIMs) have been shown to activate or inactivate nuclear receptors, including Nurr1, in cancer cells and also suppress astrocyte inflammatory signaling in vitro. Based upon these data, we postulated that C-DIM12 [1,1-bis(3'-indolyl)-1-(p-chlorophenyl) methane] would suppress inflammatory signaling in microglia by a Nurr1-dependent mechanism. C-DIM12 inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of NF-κB-regulated genes in BV-2 microglia including nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), and the effects were attenuated by Nurr1-RNA interference. Additionally, C-DIM12 decreased NF-κB activation in NF-κB-GFP (green fluorescent protein) reporter cells and enhanced nuclear translocation of Nurr1 primary microglia. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that C-DIM12 decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced p65 binding to the NOS2 promoter and concurrently enhanced binding of Nurr1 to the p65-binding site. Consistent with these findings, C-DIM12 also stabilized binding of the Corepressor for Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription Factor (CoREST) and the Nuclear Receptor Corepressor 2 (NCOR2). Collectively, these data identify C-DIM12 as a modulator of Nurr1 activity that results in inhibition of NF-κB-dependent gene expression in glial cells by stabilizing nuclear corepressor proteins, which reduces binding of p65 to inflammatory gene promoters.

  10. Study of Arsenic Sulfide in Solid Tumor Cells Reveals Regulation of Nuclear Factors of Activated T-cells by PML and p53

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wenping; Tong, Yingying; Zhang, Xiuli; Pan, Minggui; Chen, Siyu

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic sulfide (AS) has excellent cytotoxic activity in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) but its activity in solid tumors remains to be explored. Here we show that AS and cyclosporine A (CsA) exerted synergistic inhibitory effect on cell growth and c-Myc expression in HCT116 cells. AS inhibited the expression of PML, c-Myc, NFATc1, NFATc3, and NFATc4, while stimulating the expression of p53 and NFATc2. Knockdown of PML reduced NFATc1, NFATc2, NFATc3 and NFATc4 expression while overexpression of p53 stimulated NFATc2-luciferase activity that was further augmented by AS by binding to a set of p53 responsive elements (PREs) on the NFATc2 promoter. Additionally, overexpression of p53 suppressed NFATc3 and NFATc4. Reciprocally, NFATc3 knockdown enhanced p53 while reducing MDM2 expression indicating that NFATc3 is a negative regulator of p53 while a positive regulator of MDM2, consistent with its tumor-promoting property as knockdown of NFATc3 retarded cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in xenograft. In patients with colon cancer, tumor expression of NFATc2 correlated with superior survival, while nuclear NFATc1 with inferior survival. These results indicate that AS differentially regulates NFAT pathway through PML and p53 and reveal an intricate reciprocal regulatory relationship between NFAT proteins and p53 pathway. PMID:26795951

  11. Wogonin prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury and inflammation in mice via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-mediated attenuation of the nuclear factor-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Pan, Di; Zhao, Yue; Zhao, Li; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yu; You, Qi-Dong; Xi, Tao; Guo, Qing-Long; Lu, Na

    2014-10-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) from a variety of clinical disorders, characterized by diffuse inflammation, is a cause of acute respiratory failure that develops in patients of all ages. Previous studies reported that wogonin, a flavonoid-like chemical compound which was found in Scutellaria baicalensis, has anti-inflammatory effects in several inflammation models, but not in ALI. Here, the in vivo protective effect of wogonin in the amelioration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced lung injury and inflammation was assessed. In addition, the in vitro effects and mechanisms of wogonin were studied in the mouse macrophage cell lines Ana-1 and RAW264.7. In vivo results indicated that wogonin attenuated LPS-induced histological alterations. Peripheral blood leucocytes decreased in the LPS-induced group, which was ameliorated by wogonin. In addition, wogonin inhibited the production of several inflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissues after LPS challenge, while the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) inhibitor GW9662 reversed these effects. In vitro results indicated that wogonin significantly decreased the secretion of IL-6, IL-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α in Ana-1 and RAW264.7 cells, which was suppressed by transfection of PPARγ small interfering RNA and GW9662 treatment. Moreover, wogonin activated PPARγ, induced PPARγ-mediated attenuation of the nuclear translocation and the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, all of these results showed that wogonin may serve as a promising agent for the attenuation of ALI-associated inflammation and pathology by regulating the PPARγ-involved nuclear factor-κB pathway. PMID:24766487

  12. T Cell Receptor-induced Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling and Transcriptional Activation Are Regulated by STIM1- and Orai1-mediated Calcium Entry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohong; Berry, Corbett T; Ruthel, Gordon; Madara, Jonathan J; MacGillivray, Katelyn; Gray, Carolyn M; Madge, Lisa A; McCorkell, Kelly A; Beiting, Daniel P; Hershberg, Uri; May, Michael J; Freedman, Bruce D

    2016-04-15

    T cell activation following antigen binding to the T cell receptor (TCR) involves the mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) to activate the key transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T lymphocytes (NFAT) and NF-κB. The mechanism of NFAT activation by Ca(2+) has been determined. However, the role of Ca(2+) in controlling NF-κB signaling is poorly understood, and the source of Ca(2+) required for NF-κB activation is unknown. We demonstrate that TCR- but not TNF-induced NF-κB signaling upstream of IκB kinase activation absolutely requires the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) via STIM1-dependent Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+)/Orai channels. We further show that Ca(2+) influx controls phosphorylation of the NF-κB protein p65 on Ser-536 and that this posttranslational modification controls its nuclear localization and transcriptional activation. Notably, our data reveal that this role for Ca(2+) is entirely separate from its upstream control of IκBα degradation, thereby identifying a novel Ca(2+)-dependent distal step in TCR-induced NF-κB activation. Finally, we demonstrate that this control of distal signaling occurs via Ca(2+)-dependent PKCα-mediated phosphorylation of p65. Thus, we establish the source of Ca(2+) required for TCR-induced NF-κB activation and define a new distal Ca(2+)-dependent checkpoint in TCR-induced NF-κB signaling that has broad implications for the control of immune cell development and T cell functional specificity.

  13. Gastro-duodenal fluid induced nuclear factor-κappaB activation and early pre-malignant alterations in murine hypopharyngeal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Vageli, Dimitra P.; Prasad, Manju L.; Sasaki, Clarence T.

    2016-01-01

    We recently described the role of gastro-duodenal fluids (GDFs) in generating changes consistent with hypopharyngeal neoplasia through activation of NF-κB pathway, using an in vitro model of human hypopharyngeal normal keratinocytes. Here, we further provide evidence that gastro-duodenal reflux is a risk factor for early pre-malignant alterations in hypopharyngeal mucosa (HM) related to an activated NF-κB oncogenic pathway, using both an in vitro and a novel in vivo model of C57Bl/6J mice. Histological, immunohistochemical and automated quantitative analysis documents significant NF-κB activation and early pre-malignant alterations in HM topically exposed to GDFs, compared to acid alone and other controls. Early pre-malignant histologic lesions exhibited increased Ki67, CK14 and ΔNp63, cell proliferation markers, changes of cell adhesion molecules, E-Cadherin and β-catenin, and STAT3 activation. The in vivo effect of NF-κB activation is positively correlated with p-STAT3, Ki67, CK14 or β-catenin expression, while GDFs induce significant transcriptional activation of RELA(p65), bcl-2, TNF-α, STAT3, EGFR and wnt5A, in vivo. Our in vivo model demonstrates selectively activated NF-κB in response to topically administrated GDFs, leading to early pre-malignant events in HM. PMID:26745676

  14. [Influence of work factors on health state in personnel servicing military nuclear technical objects].

    PubMed

    Poluboiarinov, V N; Iusov, I G; Ivanchenko, A V; Turlakov, Iu S

    2014-01-01

    Complex of occupational studies and medical, statistical research helped to reveal climate, geographic and other factors influencing health state of personnel servicing military nuclear technical objects. Considering peculiarities of occupational activities in various specialists, the authors specified measures to improve medical service for nuclear technical military officers directly working with nuclear ammunition. Practical application of the measures helped to gain 1.5-1.7 times improvement in morbidity parameters among nuclear technical military officers. PMID:25069272

  15. Nuclear Speckle-related Protein 70 Binds to Serine/Arginine-rich Splicing Factors 1 and 2 via an Arginine/Serine-like Region and Counteracts Their Alternative Splicing Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Young-Dae; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Hye-Ran; Na, Bo-Ra; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2016-03-18

    Nuclear speckles are subnuclear storage sites containing pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Proteins assembled in nuclear speckles are known to modulate transcription and pre-mRNA processing. We have previously identified nuclear speckle-related protein 70 (NSrp70) as a novel serine/arginine (SR)-related protein that co-localizes with classical SR proteins such as serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1 or ASF/SF2) and SRSF2 (SC35). NSrp70 mediates alternative splice site selection, targeting several pre-mRNAs, including CD44 exon v5. Here we demonstrated that NSrp70 interacts physically with two SR proteins, SRSF1 and SRSF2, and reverses their splicing activity in terms of CD44 exon v5 as exon exclusion. The NSrp70 RS-like region was subdivided into three areas. Deletion of the first arginine/serine-rich-like region (RS1) completely abrogated binding to the SR proteins and to target mRNA and also failed to induce splicing of CD44 exon v5, suggesting that RS1 is critical for NSrp70 functioning. Interestingly, RS1 deletion also resulted in the loss of NSrp70 and SR protein speckle positioning, implying a potential scaffolding role for NSrp70 in nuclear speckles. NSrp70 contains an N-terminal coiled-coil domain that is critical not only for self-oligomerization but also for splicing activity. Consistently, deletion of the coiled-coil domain resulted in indefinite formation of nuclear speckles. Collectively, these results demonstrate that NSrp70 acts as a new molecular counterpart for alternative splicing of target RNA, counteracting SRSF1 and SRSF2 splicing activity.

  16. Growth inhibition and regression of lung tumors by silibinin: modulation of angiogenesis by macrophage-associated cytokines and nuclear factor-kappaB and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Alpna; Singh, Rana P; Ramasamy, Kumaraguruparan; Raina, Komal; Redente, Elizabeth F; Dwyer-Nield, Lori D; Radcliffe, Richard A; Malkinson, Alvin M; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    The latency period for lung tumor progression offers a window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Herein, we studied the effect of oral silibinin (742 mg/kg body weight, 5 d/wk for 10 weeks) on the growth and progression of established lung adenocarcinomas in A/J mice. Silibinin strongly decreased both tumor number and tumor size, an antitumor effect that correlates with reduced antiangiogenic activity. Silibinin reduced microvessel size (50%, P < 0.01) with no change in the number of tumor microvessels and reduced (by 30%, P < 0.05) the formation of nestin-positive microvessels in tumors. Analysis of several proteins involved in new blood vessel formation showed that silibinin decreased the tumor expression of interleukin-13 (47%) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (47%), and increased tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (2-fold) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (7-fold) expression, without significant changes in vascular endothelial growth factor levels. Hypoxia- inducible factor-1 alpha expression and nuclear localization were also decreased by silibinin treatment. Cytokines secreted by tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages regulate angiogenesis by activating nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT). Silibinin decreased the phosphorylation of p65NF-kappaB (ser276, 38%; P < 0.01) and STAT-3 (ser727, 16%; P < 0.01) in tumor cells and decreased the lung macrophage population. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and Ang-receptor tyrosine kinase (Tie-2) expression were increased by silibinin. Therapeutic efficacy of silibinin in lung tumor growth inhibition and regression by antiangiogenic mechanisms seem to be mediated by decreased tumor-associated macrophages and cytokines, inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha, NF-kappaB, and STAT-3 activation, and up-regulation of the angiogenic inhibitors, Ang-2 and Tie-2.

  17. Manassantin B isolated from Saururus chinensis inhibits cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin D2 generation by blocking Fyn-mediated nuclear factor-kappaB and mitogen activated protein kinase pathways in bone marrow derived-mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of manassantin B (Man B) isolated from Saururus chinensis (S. chinensis) on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) generation in mouse bone marrow derived-mast cells (BMMCs). Man B inhibited the generation of PGD2 dose-dependently by inhibiting COX-2 expression in immunoglobulin E (IgE)/Ag-stimulated BMMCs. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for the inhibition of COX-2 expression by Man B, the effects of Man B on the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), a transcription factor essential and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) for COX-2 induction, were examined. Man B attenuated the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and its DNA-binding activity by inhibiting inhibitors of kappa Bα (IκBα) degradation and concomitantly suppressing IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation. In addition, Man B suppressed phosphorylation of MAPKs including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. It was also found that Man B suppressed Fyn kinase activation and consequent downstream signaling processes, including those involving Syk, Gab2, and Akt. Taken together, the present results suggest that Man B suppresses COX-2 dependent PGD2 generation by primarily inhibiting Fyn kinase in FcεRI-mediated mast cells.

  18. Argon protects against hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats through activation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hailin; Mitchell, Sian; Ciechanowicz, Sarah; Savage, Sinead; Wang, Tianlong; Ji, Xunming; Ma, Daqing

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) has a high mortality rate with neuropsychological impairment. This study investigated the neuroprotective effects of argon against neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. In vitro cortical neuronal cell cultures derived from rat foetuses were subjected to an oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) challenge for 90 minutes and then exposed to 70% argon or nitrogen with 5% carbon dioxide and balanced with oxygen for 2 hours. In vivo, seven-day-old rats were subjected to unilateral common carotid artery ligation followed by hypoxic (8% oxygen balanced with nitrogen) insult for 90 minutes. They were exposed to 70% argon or nitrogen balanced with oxygen for 2 hours. In vitro, argon treatment of cortical neuronal cultures resulted in a significant increase of p-mTOR and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2(Nrf2) and protection against OGD challenge. Inhibition of m-TOR through Rapamycin or Nrf2 through siRNA abolished argon-mediated cyto-protection. In vivo, argon exposure significantly enhanced Nrf2 and its down-stream effector NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase, Quinone 1(NQO1) and superoxide dismutase 1(SOD1). Oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death were significantly decreased and brain infarction was markedly reduced. Blocking PI-3K through wortmannin or ERK1/2 through U0126 attenuated argon-mediated neuroprotection. These data provide a new molecular mechanism for the potential application of argon as a neuroprotectant in HIE. PMID:27016422

  19. Argon protects against hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats through activation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailin; Mitchell, Sian; Ciechanowicz, Sarah; Savage, Sinead; Wang, Tianlong; Ji, Xunming; Ma, Daqing

    2016-05-01

    Perinatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) has a high mortality rate with neuropsychological impairment. This study investigated the neuroprotective effects of argon against neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury.In vitro cortical neuronal cell cultures derived from rat foetuses were subjected to an oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) challenge for 90 minutes and then exposed to 70% argon or nitrogen with 5% carbon dioxide and balanced with oxygen for 2 hours.In vivo, seven-day-old rats were subjected to unilateral common carotid artery ligation followed by hypoxic (8% oxygen balanced with nitrogen) insult for 90 minutes. They were exposed to 70% argon or nitrogen balanced with oxygen for 2 hours. In vitro, argon treatment of cortical neuronal cultures resulted in a significant increase of p-mTOR and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2(Nrf2) and protection against OGD challenge. Inhibition of m-TOR through Rapamycin or Nrf2 through siRNA abolished argon-mediated cyto-protection. In vivo, argon exposure significantly enhanced Nrf2 and its down-stream effector NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase, Quinone 1(NQO1) and superoxide dismutase 1(SOD1). Oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death were significantly decreased and brain infarction was markedly reduced. Blocking PI-3K through wortmannin or ERK1/2 through U0126 attenuated argon-mediated neuroprotection.These data provide a new molecular mechanism for the potential application of Argon as a neuroprotectant in HIE.

  20. Active genes at the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Angela

    2007-06-01

    The nucleus is spatially and functionally organized and its architecture is now seen as a key contributor to genome functions. A central component of this architecture is the nuclear envelope, which is studded with nuclear pore complexes that serve as gateways for communication between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Although the nuclear periphery has traditionally been described as a repressive compartment and repository for gene-poor chromosome regions, several recent studies in yeast have demonstrated that repressive and activating domains can both be positioned at the periphery of the nucleus. Moreover, association with the nuclear envelope favors the expression of particular genes, demonstrating that nuclear organization can play an active role in gene regulation. PMID:17467257

  1. Factors to be Considered in Long-Term Monitoring of a Former Nuclear Test Site in a Geophysically Active and Water-rich Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J.; Hill, G.; Patrick, M.; Freymueller, J.; Barnes, D.; Kelley, J.; Layer, P.

    2001-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) is currently undertaking an ambitious program of environmental remediation of the surface of Amchitka Island in the western Aleutians, where three underground nuclear tests were conducted during 1963-1971. Among these tests was Cannikin, at approximately 5 megatons the largest nuclear device ever exploded underground by the United States and equivalent in seismic energy release to a magnitude 7 earthquake. The blast caused about 1 m of uplift of the Bering Sea coastline in the 3-km-wide fault-bounded block within which it was detonated. The impending final transfer of stewardship of this area to the US Fish and Wildlife Service as part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge raises anew the question of the potential for transport of radionuclides from the shot cavity, located at 1791 m depth in mafic laharic breccias, into the accessible environment. In particular, there is concern about whether such contaminants could become concentrated in the marine food chain that is used for subsistence by Alaskan Natives (and by the broader international community through the North Pacific and Bering Fisheries). Both possible transport pathways in the form of faults and transport medium in the form of abundant water are present. Since the pre-plate tectonics paradigm days of active testing, the scientific community's understanding of the tectonic context of the Aleutian Islands has grown tremendously. Recently, the first direct measurements of motion within the arc have been made. How this new understanding should guide plans for long-term monitoring of the site is an important question. Convergence due to subduction of the North Pacific plate beneath North America ranges from near-normal at the Alaska Peninsula and eastern Aleutian islands to highly oblique in the west. Amchitka itself can be seen as a subaerial portion of a 200-km-long Rat Island arc crest segment. This fragment has torn from the Andreanof Islands to the east at

  2. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic analysis of new in vitro human NR activity data on 309 environmental chemicals in relationship to their liver cancer-related chronic outcomes in rodents. Results The effects of 309 environmental chemicals on human constitutive androstane receptors (CAR/NR1I3), pregnane X receptor (PXR/NR1I2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR/NR1C), liver X receptors (LXR/NR1H), retinoic X receptors (RXR/NR2B) and steroid receptors (SR/NR3) were determined using in vitro data. Hepatic histopathology, observed in rodents after two years of chronic treatment for 171 of the 309 chemicals, was summarized by a cancer lesion progression grade. Chemicals that caused proliferative liver lesions in both rat and mouse were generally more active for the human receptors, relative to the compounds that only affected one rodent species, and these changes were significant for PPAR (p0.001), PXR (p0.01) and CAR (p0.05). Though most chemicals exhibited receptor promiscuity, multivariate analysis clustered them into relatively few NR activity combinations. The human NR activity pattern of chemicals weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer lesion progression (p0.05). Conclusions The rodent carcinogens had higher in vitro potency for human NR relative to non-carcinogens. Structurally diverse chemicals with similar NR promiscuity patterns weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer progression. While these results do not prove the role of NR activation in human liver cancer, they do have implications for nuclear receptor chemical biology and provide insights into putative toxicity pathways. More importantly, these findings suggest the

  3. Antisense-mediated loss of calcium homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP; ERPROT213-21) impairs Ca2+ mobilization, nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) activation and cell proliferation in Jurkat T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Flavia A; LaPlante, Janice M; Feinstein, Maurice B

    2003-01-01

    We recently discovered a novel gene on chromosome 19p13.1 and its product, an integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, termed CHERP (calcium homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein). A monoclonal antibody against its C-terminal domain inhibits Ins(1,4,5) P (3)-induced Ca(2+) release from ER membrane vesicles of many cell types, and an antisense-mediated knockdown of CHERP in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells greatly impaired Ca(2+) mobilization by thrombin. In the present paper, we explore further CHERP's function in Jurkat T-lymphocytes. Confocal laser immunofluorescence microscopy showed that CHERP was co-localized with the Ins(1,4,5) P (3) receptor throughout the cytoplasmic and perinuclear region, as previously found in HEL cells. Transfection of Jurkat cells with a lac I-regulated mammalian expression vector containing CHERP antisense cDNA caused a knockdown of CHERP and impaired the rise of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) (measured by fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester fluorescence) caused by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and thrombin. A 50% fall of CHERP decreased the PHA-induced rise of the cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), but Ca(2+) influx was unaffected. Greater depletion of CHERP (>70%) did not affect the concentration of Ins(1,4,5) P (3) receptors, but diminished the rise of [Ca(2+)](i) in response to PHA to activation and translocation of the key transcription factor NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) from cytoplasm to nucleus was suppressed. Furthermore, cell proliferation was greatly slowed (as in HEL cells) along with a 60% decrease in cyclin D1, a key regulator of progression through the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. These findings

  4. Heat shock protein 70 protects against seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation-induced nitric oxide synthase II expression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chen, Shang-Der; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2014-02-01

    Status epilepticus induces subcellular changes that may eventually lead to neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. Based on an animal model of status epilepticus, our laboratory showed previously that sustained hippocampal seizure activity activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and upregulates nitric oxide synthase (NOS) II gene expression, leading to apoptotic neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. The present study examined the potential modulatory role of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on NF-κB signaling in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus. In Sprague-Dawley rats, kainic acid (KA) was microinjected unilaterally into the hippocampal CA3 subfield to induce prolonged bilateral seizure activity. Expression of HSP70 was elevated as early as 1h after the elicitation of sustained seizure activity, followed by a progressive elevation that peaked at 24h. Pretreatment with an antisense oligonucleotide against hsp70 decreased the HSP70 expression, and significantly augmented IκB kinase (IKK) activity and phosphorylation of IκBα, alongside enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB in the hippocampal CA3 neurons and glial cells. These cellular events were followed by enhanced upregulation of NOS II and peroxynitrite expression 3h after sustained seizure activity that led to an increase of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation in the hippocampal CA3 neurons 7days after experimental status epilepticus. We concluded that HSP70 protects against apoptotic cell death induced by NF-κB activation and NOS II-peroxynitrite signaling cascade in the hippocampal CA3 and glial cells following experimental status epilepticus via suppression of IKK activity and deactivation of IκBα.

  5. A mechanistic insight into a proteasome-independent constitutive inhibitor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation pathway in WEHI-231 B-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shumway, Stuart D; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2004-01-01

    Inducible activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) is classically mediated by proteasomal degradation of its associated inhibitors, IkappaBalpha (inhibitory kappaBalpha) and IkappaBbeta. However, certain B-lymphocytes maintain constitutively nuclear NF-kappaB activity (a p50-c-Rel heterodimer) which is resistant to inhibition by proteasome inhibitors. This activity in the WEHI-231 B-cell line is associated with continual and preferential degradation of IkappaBalpha, which is also unaffected by proteasome inhibitors. Pharmacological studies indicated that there was a correlation between inhibition of IkappaBalpha degradation and constitutive p50-c-Rel activity. Domain analysis of IkappaBalpha by deletion mutagenesis demonstrated that an N-terminal 36-amino-acid sequence of IkappaBalpha represented an instability determinant for constitutive degradation. Moreover, domain grafting studies indicated that this sequence was sufficient to cause IkappaBbeta, but not chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, to be rapidly degraded in WEHI-231 B-cells. However, this sequence was insufficient to target IkappaBbeta to the non-proteasome degradation pathway, suggesting that there was an additional cis-element(s) in IkappaBalpha that was required for complete targeting. Nevertheless, the NF-kappaB pool associated with IkappaBbeta now became constitutively active by virtue of IkappaBbeta instability in these cells. These findings further support the notion that IkappaB instability governs the maintenance of constitutive p50-c-Rel activity in certain B-cells via a unique degradation pathway. PMID:14763901

  6. Nuclear Receptor Activity and Liver Cancer Lesion Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. We explored this question using human CAR, PXR, PPARα,...

  7. Palmitate-induced interleukin 6 production is mediated by protein kinase C and nuclear-factor kappaB activation and leads to glucose transporter 4 down-regulation in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mireia; Planavila, Anna; Laguna, Juan Carlos; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel

    2005-07-01

    The mechanisms by which elevated levels of free fatty acids cause insulin resistance are not well understood. In addition, accumulating evidence suggests a link between inflammation and type 2 diabetes. Here, we report that exposure of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells to 0.5 mm palmitate results in increased mRNA levels (3.5-fold induction; P < 0.05) and secretion (control 375 +/- 57 vs. palmitate 1129 +/- 177 pg/ml; P < 0.001) of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6. Palmitate increased nuclear factor-kappaB activation and coincubation of the cells with palmitate and the nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate prevented both IL-6 expression and secretion. Furthermore, incubation of palmitate-treated cells with calphostin C, a strong and specific inhibitor of protein kinase C, and phorbol myristate acetate, that down-regulates protein kinase C in long-term incubations, abolished induction of IL-6 production. Finally, exposure of skeletal muscle cells to palmitate caused a fall in the mRNA levels of glucose transporter 4 and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, whereas in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibody, which neutralizes the biological activity of mouse IL-6 in cell culture, these reductions were prevented. These findings suggest that IL-6 may mediate several of the prodiabetic effects of palmitate.

  8. Sitagliptin inhibits endothelin-1 expression in the aortic endothelium of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes by suppressing the nuclear factor-κB/IκBα system through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    TANG, SONG-TAO; SU, HUAN; ZHANG, QIU; TANG, HAI-QIN; WANG, CHANG-JIANG; ZHOU, QING; WEI, WEI; ZHU, HUA-QING; WANG, YUAN

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, including sitagliptin, exert favourable effects on the vascular endothelium. DPP-4 inhibitors suppress the degradation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which has been reported to enhance nitric oxide (NO) production. However, the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors on endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in the aorta, as well as the underlying mechanisms responsible for these effects, have yet to be investigated in animal models of diabetes mellitus (DM). In the present study, the rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: i) control; ii) DM; iii) DM + low-dose sitagliptin (10 mg/kg); and iv) DM + high-dose sitagliptin (30 mg/kg). Apart from the control group, all the rats received a high-fat diet for 8 weeks prior to the induction of diabetes with an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The treatments were then administered for 12 weeks. The serum levels of ET-1, NO, GLP-1 and insulin were measured as well as endothelial function. The expression of ET-1, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB/IκBα were determined. After 12 weeks of treatment, the diabetic rats receiving sitagliptin showed significantly elevated serum levels of GLP-1 and NO, and reduced levels of ET-1. Moreover, sitagliptin significantly attenuated endothelial dysfunction as well as the remodeling of the aortic wall. Notably, sitagliptin inhibited ET-1 expression at the transcriptional and translational level in the aorta, which may have been mediated by the suppression of the NF-κB/IκBα system induced by AMPK activation. The majority of the above-mentioned effects were dose dependent. Taken together, the findings of the present study indicate that sitagliptin inhibits ET-1 expression in the aortic endothelium by suppressing the NF-κB/IκBα system through the activation of the AMPK pathway in diabetic rats. These findings further demonstrate some of the vasoprotective properties

  9. Sitagliptin inhibits endothelin-1 expression in the aortic endothelium of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes by suppressing the nuclear factor-κB/IκBα system through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Song-Tao; Su, Huan; Zhang, Qiu; Tang, Hai-Qin; Wang, Chang-Jiang; Zhou, Qing; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Hua-Qing; Wang, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, including sitagliptin, exert favourable effects on the vascular endothelium. DPP-4 inhibitors suppress the degradation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP‑1), which has been reported to enhance nitric oxide (NO) production. However, the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors on endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in the aorta, as well as the underlying mechanisms responsible for these effects, have yet to be investigated in animal models of diabetes mellitus (DM). In the present study, the rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: i) control; ii) DM; iii) DM + low‑dose sitagliptin (10 mg/kg); and iv) DM + high‑dose sitagliptin (30 mg/kg). Apart from the control group, all the rats received a high-fat diet for 8 weeks prior to the induction of diabetes with an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The treatments were then administered for 12 weeks. The serum levels of ET-1, NO, GLP-1 and insulin were measured as well as endothelial function. The expression of ET-1, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB/IκBα were determined. After 12 weeks of treatment, the diabetic rats receiving sitagliptin showed significantly elevated serum levels of GLP-1 and NO, and reduced levels of ET-1. Moreover, sitagliptin significantly attenuated endothelial dysfunction as well as the remodeling of the aortic wall. Notably, sitagliptin inhibited ET-1 expression at the transcriptional and translational level in the aorta, which may have been mediated by the suppression of the NF-κB/IκBα system induced by AMPK activation. The majority of the above-mentioned effects were dose dependent. Taken together, the findings of the present study indicate that sitagliptin inhibits ET-1 expression in the aortic endothelium by suppressing the NF-κB/IκBα system through the activation of the AMPK pathway in diabetic rats. These findings further demonstrate some of the

  10. Flavonoids as dietary regulators of nuclear receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Avior, Yishai; Bomze, David; Ramon, Ory

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, type II diabetes, and dyslipidemia are a rising cause of mortality worldwide. The progression of many metabolic diseases is fundamentally regulated on the transcriptional level by a family of ligand-activated transcription factors, called nuclear receptors, which detect and respond to metabolic changes. Their role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis makes nuclear receptors an important pharmaceutical and dietary target. This review will present the growing evidence that flavonoids, natural secondary plant metabolites, are important regulators of nuclear receptor activity. Structural similarities between flavonoids and cholesterol derivatives combined with the promiscuous nature of most nuclear receptors provide a wealth of possibilities for pharmaceutical and dietary modulation of metabolism. While the challenges of bringing flavonoid-derived therapeutics to the market are significant, we consider this rapidly growing field to be an essential aspect of the functional food initiative and an important mine for pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:23598551

  11. Berberis aristata Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis by Inhibition of NF-κB and Activating Nuclear Factor-E2-related Factor 2/hem Oxygenase (HO)-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Nair, Vinod; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Singh, Surender; Arunraja, S

    2016-08-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the anti-arthritic activity of Berberis aristata hydroalcoholic extract (BAHE) in formaldehyde-induced arthritis and adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Arthritis was induced by administration of either formaldehyde (2% v/v) or CFA into the subplantar surface of the hind paw of the animal. In formaldehyde-induced arthritis and AIA, treatment of BAHE at doses 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg orally significantly decreased joint inflammation as evidenced by decrease in joint diameter and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration in histopathological examination. BAHE treatment demonstrated dose-dependent improvement in the redox status of synovium (decrease in GSH, MDA, and NO levels and increase in SOD and CAT activities). The beneficial effect of BAHE was substantiated with decreased expression of inflammatory markers such as IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-R1, and VEGF by immunohistochemistry analysis in AIA model. BAHE increased HO-1/Nrf-2 and suppressed NF-κB mRNA and protein expression in adjuvant immunized joint. Additionally, BAHE abrogated degrading enzymes, as there was decreased protein expression of MMP-3 and -9 in AIA. In conclusion, we demonstrated the anti-arthritic activity of Berberis aristata hydroalcoholic extract via the mechanism of inhibition of NF-κB and activation of Nrf-2/HO-1.

  12. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B.

    1991-12-31

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry`s practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  13. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry's practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  14. Folate deprivation enhances invasiveness of human colon cancer cells mediated by activation of sonic hedgehog signaling through promoter hypomethylation and cross action with transcription nuclear factor-kappa B pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tz-Ping; Hsu, Shu-Han; Feng, Hsin-Chun; Huang, Rwei-Fen S

    2012-06-01

    Low folate status is well recognized as one of the metabolic stressors for colorectal cancer carcinogenesis, but its role in colon cancer invasion remains unknown. Activation of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal in interaction with the transcription nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway is crucial for cancer aggressiveness. The aims of this study were to investigate whether and how folate deprivation promotes invasion by colon cancer cells in relation to Shh signaling and NF-κB pathway activation. Cultivation of epithelial colon carcinoma-derived cells (HCT116) in folate-deficient (FD) medium enhanced cellular migration and invasion, in correlation with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with Snail expression and E-cadherin suppression, increased production of β1 integrin and increased proteolysis by matrix metalloproteinase 2. Blockade of Shh signaling by cyclopamine (CYC) or of NF-κB activation by BAY abolished FD-enhanced EMT and invasion by HCT116 cells. FD cells had 50-80% less intracellular folate, associated with aberrant hypomethylation of the Shh promoter, than control cells, and increased binding of nuclear NF-κB subunit p65 to the Shh promoter region, which coincided with increased Shh expression and protein production of Shh ligand; in addition, the FD-induced Shh signaling targeted Gli1 transcription activator as well as Ptch receptor. The FD-induced Shh induction and activated signaling were blocked by NF-κB inhibitor BAY. Blockade of Shh signaling abrogated FD-promoted NF-κB activation measured by IκBα degradation and by target gene TNFα expression. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that folate deprivation enhanced invasiveness of colon cancer cells mediated by activation of Shh signaling through promoter hypomethylation and cross actions with the NF-κB pathway.

  15. Mulberry leaf aqueous fractions inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) expression in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yusuke; Kume, Noriaki; Arai, Hidenori; Hayashida, Kazutaka; Inui-Hayashida, Atsuko; Minami, Manabu; Mukai, Eri; Toyohara, Masako; Harauma, Akiko; Murayama, Toshinori; Kita, Toru; Hara, Saburo; Kamei, Kaeko; Yokode, Masayuki

    2007-07-01

    Mulberry (Morus Alba L., family Moraceae) leaf extracts have various biological effects including inhibition of oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which is the major cause of atherosclerosis. Endothelial dysfunction elicited by oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL) has been implicated in atherogenesis. Lectin-like Ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), a cell-surface receptor for atherogenic Ox-LDL, appears to mediate Ox-LDL-induced inflammation, which may be crucial in atherogenesis. Previous studies revealed that expression of LOX-1 is highly inducible by proinflammatory stimuli, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Therefore, we examined whether mulberry leaf aqueous fractions inhibit LOX-1 expression induced by proinflammatory stimuli. Pretreatment of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) with mulberry leaf aqueous fractions inhibited TNF-alpha- and LPS-induced expression of LOX-1 at both protein and mRNA levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, mulberry leaf aqueous fractions did not affect TGF-beta-induced LOX-1 expression. Furthermore, mulberry leaf aqueous fractions inhibited TNF-alpha-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and phosphorylation of inhibitory factor of NF-kappaB-alpha (IkappaB-alpha) in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. Thus, mulberry leaf aqueous fractions suppress TNF-alpha- and LPS-induced LOX-1 gene expression, by inhibiting NF-kappaB activation.

  16. Factors affecting the development of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Takahashi, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle.

  17. Human factors design guidelines for maintainability of Department of Energy nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bongarra, J.P. Jr.; VanCott, H.P.; Pain, R.F.; Peterson, L.R.; Wallace, R.I.

    1985-06-18

    Intent of these guidelines is to provide design and design review teams of DOE nuclear facilities with human factors principles to enhance the design and aid in the inspection of DOE nuclear facilities, systems, and equipment. These guidelines are concerned with design features of DOE nuclear facilities which can potentially affect preventive and corrective maintenance of systems within DOE nuclear facilities. Maintenance includes inspecting, checking, troubleshooting, adjusting, replacing, repairing, and servicing activities. Other factors which influence maintainability such as repair and maintenance suport facilities, maintenance information, and various aspects of the environment are also addressed.

  18. Kpna7 interacts with egg-specific nuclear factors in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nuclear proteins are required for initiation of transcription in early embryos before embryonic genome activation. The regulation of transportation of nuclear proteins is mediated by transport factors known as importins (karyopherins). Kpna7 is a newly discovered member of the importin a family, whi...

  19. Variance Reduction Factor of Nuclear Data for Integral Neutronics Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, G. Tsuji, M.; Narabayashi, T.

    2015-01-15

    We propose a new quantity, a variance reduction factor, to identify nuclear data for which further improvements are required to reduce uncertainties of target integral neutronics parameters. Important energy ranges can be also identified with this variance reduction factor. Variance reduction factors are calculated for several integral neutronics parameters. The usefulness of the variance reduction factors is demonstrated.

  20. Interleukin-7 induces HIV replication in primary naive T cells through a nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT)-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Managlia, Elizabeth Z. . E-mail: lalharth@rush.edu

    2006-07-05

    Interleukin (IL)-7 plays several roles critical to T cell maturation, survival, and homeostasis. Because of these functions, IL-7 is under investigation as an immune-modulator for therapeutic use in lymphopenic clinical conditions, including HIV. We reported that naive T cells, typically not permissive to HIV, can be productively infected when pre-treated with IL-7. We evaluated the mechanism by which IL-7-mediates this effect. IL-7 potently up-regulated the transcriptional factor NFAT, but had no effect on NF{kappa}B. Blocking NFAT activity using a number of reagents, such as Cyclosporin A, FK-506, or the NFAT-specific inhibitor known as VIVIT peptide, all markedly reduced IL-7-mediated induction of HIV replication in naive T cells. Additional neutralization of cytokines present in IL-7-treated cultures and/or those that have NFAT-binding sequences within their promotors indicated that IL-10, IL-4, and most significantly IFN{gamma}, all contribute to IL-7-induction of HIV productive replication in naive T cells. These data clarify the mechanism by which IL-7 can overcome the block to HIV productive infection in naive T cells, despite their quiescent cell status. These findings are relevant to the treatment of HIV disease and understanding HIV pathogenesis in the naive CD4+ T cell compartment, especially in light of the vigorous pursuit of IL-7 as an in vivo immune modulator.

  1. Induction of mouse UDP-glucuronosyltransferase mRNA expression in liver and intestine by activators of aryl-hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, pregnane X receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2.

    PubMed

    Buckley, David B; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2009-04-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) catalyze the addition of UDP-glucuronic acid to endo- and xenobiotics, enhancing their water solubility and elimination. Many exogenous compounds, such as microsomal enzyme inducers (MEIs), alter gene expression through xenobiotic-responsive transcription factors, namely, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). These transcription factors regulate xenobiotic-inducible expression of hepatic and intestinal biotransformation enzymes and transporters. The purpose of this study was to determine hepatic and intestinal inducibility of mouse Ugt mRNA by MEIs. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated for four consecutive days with activators of AhR [2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD), polychlorinated biphenyl 126, and beta-naphthoflavone], CAR [1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP), phenobarbital, and diallyl sulfide], PXR [pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), spironolactone, and dexamethasone], PPARalpha (clofibrate, ciprofibrate, and diethylhexylphthalate), and Nrf2 (oltipraz, ethoxyquin, and butylated hydroxyanisole), respectively. Ugt1a1 mRNA expression in liver was induced by activators of all five transcription factor pathways, Ugt1a5 by Nrf2 activators, Ugt1a6 by all the pathways except CAR, and Ugt1a9 by all the pathways except Nrf2. Ugt2b35 mRNA in liver was induced by AhR activators and Ugt2b36 by CAR and PPARalpha activators. Throughout the small and large intestine, the AhR ligand TCDD increased Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7 mRNA. In small intestine, the PXR activator PCN increased Ugt1a1, Ugt1a6, Ugt1a7, Ugt2b34, and Ugt2b35 mRNA in the duodenum. In conclusion, chemical activation of AhR, CAR, PXR, PPARalpha, and Nrf2 in mouse results in induction of distinct Ugt gene sets in liver and intestine, predominantly the Ugt1a isoforms.

  2. Morris Water Maze Training in Mice Elevates Hippocampal Levels of Transcription Factors Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 and Nuclear Factor Kappa B p65

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Wanda M.; Pahlavan, Payam S.; Djordjevic, Jelena; McAllister, Danielle; Platt, Eric E.; Alashmali, Shoug; Bernstein, Michael J.; Suh, Miyoung; Albensi, Benedict C.

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified several transcription factors that regulate activity-dependent plasticity and memory, with cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) being the most well-studied. In neurons, CREB activation is influenced by the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), considered central to immunity but more recently implicated in memory. The transcription factor early growth response-2 (Egr-2), an NF-κB gene target, is also associated with learning and memory. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), an antioxidant transcription factor linked to NF-κB in pathological conditions, has not been studied in normal memory. Given that numerous transcription factors implicated in activity-dependent plasticity demonstrate connections to NF-κB, this study simultaneously evaluated protein levels of NF-κB, CREB, Egr-2, Nrf2, and actin in hippocampi from young (1 month-old) weanling CD1 mice after training in the Morris water maze, a hippocampal-dependent spatial memory task. After a 6-day acquisition period, time to locate the hidden platform decreased in the Morris water maze. Mice spent more time in the target vs. non-target quadrants of the maze, suggestive of recall of the platform location. Western blot data revealed a decrease in NF-κB p50 protein after training relative to controls, whereas NF-κB p65, Nrf2 and actin increased. Nrf2 levels were correlated with platform crosses in nearly all tested animals. These data demonstrate that training in a spatial memory task results in alterations in and associations with particular transcription factors in the hippocampus, including upregulation of NF-κB p65 and Nrf2. Training-induced increases in actin protein levels caution against its use as a loading control in immunoblot studies examining activity-dependent plasticity, learning, and memory. PMID:26635523

  3. Morris Water Maze Training in Mice Elevates Hippocampal Levels of Transcription Factors Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 and Nuclear Factor Kappa B p65.

    PubMed

    Snow, Wanda M; Pahlavan, Payam S; Djordjevic, Jelena; McAllister, Danielle; Platt, Eric E; Alashmali, Shoug; Bernstein, Michael J; Suh, Miyoung; Albensi, Benedict C

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified several transcription factors that regulate activity-dependent plasticity and memory, with cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) being the most well-studied. In neurons, CREB activation is influenced by the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), considered central to immunity but more recently implicated in memory. The transcription factor early growth response-2 (Egr-2), an NF-κB gene target, is also associated with learning and memory. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), an antioxidant transcription factor linked to NF-κB in pathological conditions, has not been studied in normal memory. Given that numerous transcription factors implicated in activity-dependent plasticity demonstrate connections to NF-κB, this study simultaneously evaluated protein levels of NF-κB, CREB, Egr-2, Nrf2, and actin in hippocampi from young (1 month-old) weanling CD1 mice after training in the Morris water maze, a hippocampal-dependent spatial memory task. After a 6-day acquisition period, time to locate the hidden platform decreased in the Morris water maze. Mice spent more time in the target vs. non-target quadrants of the maze, suggestive of recall of the platform location. Western blot data revealed a decrease in NF-κB p50 protein after training relative to controls, whereas NF-κB p65, Nrf2 and actin increased. Nrf2 levels were correlated with platform crosses in nearly all tested animals. These data demonstrate that training in a spatial memory task results in alterations in and associations with particular transcription factors in the hippocampus, including upregulation of NF-κB p65 and Nrf2. Training-induced increases in actin protein levels caution against its use as a loading control in immunoblot studies examining activity-dependent plasticity, learning, and memory.

  4. Ebselen Is a Potential Anti-Osteoporosis Agent by Suppressing Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B Ligand-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation In vitro and Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Bone Destruction In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Min; Kim, Ju-Young; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Oh, Jaemin; Lee, Myeung Su

    2016-01-01

    Ebselen is a non-toxic seleno-organic drug with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that is currently being examined in clinical trials to prevent and treat various diseases, including atherosclerosis, stroke, and cancer. However, no reports are available for verifying the pharmacological effects of ebselen on major metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. In this study, we observed that ebselen suppressed the formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells in an osteoblast/osteoclast co-culture by regulating the ratio of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin secreted by osteoblasts. In addition, ebselen treatment in the early stage of osteoclast differentiation inhibited RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis by decreasing the phosphorylation of IκB, PI3K, and Akt in early signaling pathways and by subsequently inducing c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1. Further, ebselen induced apoptosis of osteoclasts in the late stage of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, ebselen treatment suppressed filamentous actin ring formation and bone resorption activity of mature osteoclasts. Reflecting these in vitro effects, administration of ebselen recovered bone loss and its µ-CT parameters in lipopolysaccharide-mediated mouse model. Histological analysis confirmed that ebselen prevented trabecular bone matrix degradation and osteoclast formation in the bone tissues. Finally, it was proved that the anti-osteoclastogenic action of ebselen is achieved through targeting N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. These results indicate that ebselen is a potentially safe drug for treating metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27019631

  5. Examination of psychological variables related to nuclear attitudes and nuclear activism

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    It was hypothesized that knowledge about nuclear arms developments would not be correlated with nuclear attitudes, that sense of efficacy would be positively correlated with magnitude of nuclear activism, and that death anxiety would be correlated with high level of nuclear knowledge and anti-nuclear attitudes, but not with sense of power. It was also hypothesized that positive correlations would be found between nuclear activism and political activism, knowledge of nuclear facts, and degree of adherence to anti-nuclear attitudes. One hundred and forty three women and 90 men participated in this questionnaire study. Major findings are as follows. In general, the more people knew about nuclear developments, the more anti-nuclear were their attitudes. Also, regardless of nuclear attitudes, a positive correlation was found between knowledge of nuclear facts and nuclear activism. Death anxiety and powerlessness were not correlated. There was a positive correlation between anxiety and both nuclear knowledge and anti-nuclear attitudes. A strong positive correlation was found between nuclear activism and anti-nuclear attitudes, and between political activism and nuclear activism. Internal locus of control did not correlate significantly with high sense of power or with high degree of nuclear activism.

  6. Oxygen-evoked changes in transcriptional activity of the 5'-flanking region of the human amiloride-sensitive sodium channel (alphaENaC) gene: role of nuclear factor kappaB.

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Deborah L; Janes, Mandy; Newman, David J; Best, Oliver G

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the alpha-subunit of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel (alphaENaC) is regulated by a number of factors in the lung, including oxygen partial pressure (PO2). As transcriptional activation is a mechanism for raising cellular mRNA levels, we investigated the effect of physiological changes in PO2 on the activity of the redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and transcriptional activity of 5'-flanking regions of the human alphaENaC gene using luciferase reporter-gene vectors transiently transfected into human adult alveolar carcinoma A549 cells. By Western blotting we confirmed the presence of NF-kappaB p65 but not p50 in these cells. Transiently increasing PO2 from 23 to 42 mmHg for 24 h evoked a significant increase in NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity and transactivation of a NF-kappaB-driven luciferase construct (pGLNF-kappaBpro), which was blocked by the NF-kappaB activation inhibitor sulphasalazine (5 mM). Transcriptional activity of alphaENaC-luciferase constructs containing 5'-flanking sequences (including the NF-kappaB consensus) were increased by raising PO2 from 23 to 142 mmHg if they contained transcriptional initiation sites (TIS) for exons 1A and 1B (pGL3E2.2) or the 3' TIS of exon 1B alone (pGL3E0.8). Sulphasalazine had no significant effect on the activity of these constructs, suggesting that the PO2-evoked rise in activity was not a direct consequence of NF-kappaB activation. Conversely, the relative luciferase activity of a construct that lacked the 3' TIS, a 3' intron and splice site but still retained the 5' TIS and NF-kappaB consensus sequence was suppressed significantly by raising PO2. This effect was reversed by sulphasalazine, suggesting that activation of NF-kappaB mediated PO2-evoked suppression of transcription from the exon 1A TIS of alphaENaC. PMID:12023897

  7. Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin induces intestinal epithelial cell secretion of interleukin-8 through mitogen-activated protein kinases and a tyrosine kinase-regulated nuclear factor-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoguang; Powell, Jan; Mathioudakis, Nes; Kane, Sheryl; Fernandez, Ellen; Sears, Cynthia L

    2004-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) secretes a 20-kDa metalloprotease toxin termed B. fragilis toxin (BFT). ETBF disease in animals is associated with an acute inflammatory response in the intestinal mucosa, and lethal hemorrhagic colitis may occur in rabbits. In this study, we confirmed recent reports (J. M. Kim, Y. K. Oh, Y. J. Kim, H. B. Oh, and Y. J. Cho, Clin. Exp. Immunol. 123:421-427, 2001; L. Sanfilippo, C. K. Li, R. Seth, T. J. Balwin, M. J. Menozzi, and Y. R. Mahida, Clin. Exp. Immunol. 119:456-463, 2000) that purified BFT stimulates interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion by human intestinal epithelial cells (HT29/C1 cells) and demonstrate that stimulation of IL-8 production is dependent on biologically active BFT and independent of serum. Induction of IL-8 mRNA expression occurs rapidly and ceases by 6 h after BFT treatment, whereas IL-8 secretion continues to increase for at least 18 h. Our data suggest that BFT-stimulated IL-8 secretion involves tyrosine kinase-dependent activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) as well as activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), p38 and extracellular signal-related kinase. Simultaneous activation of NF-kappaB and MAPKs appears necessary for secretion of IL-8 by HT29/C1 cells treated with BFT.

  8. Binding of nuclear factors to functional domains of the duck hepatitis B virus enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Lilienbaum, A; Crescenzo-Chaigne, B; Sall, A A; Pillot, J; Elfassi, E

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed the structures, relative organization, and activities of binding sites for nuclear factors in the duck hepatitis B virus (duck HBV) enhancer. DNase I footprinting analysis and mobility shift assays demonstrate that this enhancer of 192 bp contains at least three binding sites for transcription factors: one for hepatocyte-adipocyte C/EBP, a second for the liver-specific transactivator hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 HNF-1, and a third for a factor, called F3, which binds to a DNA sequence bearing some resemblance to that for the ubiquitous factor EF-C. Analysis of transcriptional activity reveals that oligonucleotides corresponding to the individual binding sites, inserted upstream from a heterologous promoter, display very weak enhancer activity, whereas the enhancer encompassing these three sites displays very high activity. Analysis of duck HBV enhancer mutants indicates that the deletion of any of these sites leads to a modification of transcriptional enhancer activity. The hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 binding site is crucial, since an internal deletion of 14 bp abolishes the activity. The C/EBP site can act as repressor, and the F3 site is required for full activity. Comparative analysis reveals that the nuclear factors are similar to those bound to the human HBV enhancer but that the organization of their binding sites in the duck HBV enhancer is different. Images PMID:8371357

  9. Nuclear Science Teaching Aids and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodburn, John H.

    This publication is a sourcebook for science teachers. It provides guides for basic laboratory work in nuclear energy, suggesting various teacher and student demonstrations. Ideas for science clubs, science fairs, and project research seminars are presented. Problem-solving activities for both science and mathematics classes are included, as well…

  10. Activation of the canonical nuclear factor-κB pathway is involved in isoflurane-induced hippocampal interleukin-1β elevation and the resultant cognitive deficits in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng-Qian; Rong, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Ya-Jie; Ni, Cheng; Tian, Xiao-Sheng; Mo, Na; Chui, De-Hua; Guo, Xiang-Yang

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Isoflurane induces hippocampal IL-1β elevation and cognitive deficits in aged rats. •Isoflurane transiently activates the canonical NF-κB pathway in aged rat hippocampus. •NF-κB inhibitor mitigates isoflurane-induced IL-1β elevation and cognitive deficits. •We report a linkage between NF-κB signaling, IL-1β expression, and cognitive changes. -- Abstract: Although much recent evidence has demonstrated that neuroinflammation contributes to volatile anesthetic-induced cognitive deficits, there are few existing mechanistic explanations for this inflammatory process. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane on canonical nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling, and to explore its association with hippocampal interleukin (IL)-1β levels and anesthetic-related cognitive changes in aged rats. After a 4-h exposure to 1.5% isoflurane in 20-month-old rats, increases in IκB kinase and IκB phosphorylation, as well as a reduction in the NF-κB inhibitory protein (IκBα), were observed in the hippocampi of isoflurane-exposed rats compared with control rats. These events were accompanied by an increase in NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation at 6 h after isoflurane exposure and hippocampal IL-1β elevation from 1 to 6 h after isoflurane exposure. Nevertheless, no significant neuroglia activation was observed. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate markedly suppressed the IL-1β increase and NF-κB signaling, and also mitigated the severity of cognitive deficits in the Morris water maze task. Overall, our results demonstrate that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits may stem from upregulation of hippocampal IL-1β, partially via activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway, in aged rats.

  11. SRSF1 regulates the assembly of pre-mRNA processing factors in nuclear speckles.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vidisha; Song, David Y; Zong, Xinying; Shevtsov, Sergey P; Hearn, Stephen; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Dundr, Miroslav; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V

    2012-09-01

    The mammalian cell nucleus is compartmentalized into nonmembranous subnuclear domains that regulate key nuclear functions. Nuclear speckles are subnuclear domains that contain pre-mRNA processing factors and noncoding RNAs. Many of the nuclear speckle constituents work in concert to coordinate multiple steps of gene expression, including transcription, pre-mRNA processing and mRNA transport. The mechanism that regulates the formation and maintenance of nuclear speckles in the interphase nucleus is poorly understood. In the present study, we provide evidence for the involvement of nuclear speckle resident proteins and RNA components in the organization of nuclear speckles. SR-family splicing factors and their binding partner, long noncoding metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 RNA, can nucleate the assembly of nuclear speckles in the interphase nucleus. Depletion of SRSF1 in human cells compromises the association of splicing factors to nuclear speckles and influences the levels and activity of other SR proteins. Furthermore, on a stably integrated reporter gene locus, we demonstrate the role of SRSF1 in RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription. Our results suggest that SR proteins mediate the assembly of nuclear speckles and regulate gene expression by influencing both transcriptional and posttranscriptional activities within the cell nucleus.

  12. RNA export factor Ddx19 is required for nuclear import of the SRF coactivator MKL1

    PubMed Central

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Viita, Tiina; Kyheröinen, Salla; Huet, Guillaume; Treisman, Richard; Vartiainen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled transport of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and nucleus is essential for homeostatic regulation of cellular functions. For instance, gene expression entails coordinated nuclear import of transcriptional regulators to activate transcription and nuclear export of the resulting messenger RNAs for cytoplasmic translation. Here we link these two processes by reporting a novel role for the mRNA export factor Ddx19/Dbp5 in nuclear import of MKL1, the signal-responsive transcriptional activator of SRF. We show that Ddx19 is not a general nuclear import factor, and that its specific effect on MKL1 nuclear import is separate from its role in mRNA export. Both helicase and nuclear pore-binding activities of Ddx19 are dispensable for MKL1 nuclear import, but RNA binding is required. Mechanistically, Ddx19 operates by modulating the conformation of MKL1, which affects its interaction with Importin-β for efficient nuclear import. Thus, Ddx19 participates in mRNA export, translation and nuclear import of a key transcriptional regulator. PMID:25585691

  13. Human factors aspects of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in regards to the use of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry is the interface between the instrumentation system and the human. A survey, oriented towards identifying the human factors aspects of digital instrumentation, was conducted at a number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities. Human factors issues, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays, controls, organizational support, training, and related topics were identified. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Induction of reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis by purified Schisandrae semen essential oil in human leukemia U937 cells through activation of the caspase cascades and nuclear relocation of mitochondrial apoptogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gyeong Jin; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Cheol Min; Kim, Wun-Jae; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the beneficial effects of Schisandrae semen essential oil (SSeo) on apoptosis events and the mechanisms associated with these effects in human leukemia U937 cells. The treatment of U937 cells with SSeo significantly inhibited survival and induced apoptosis. Schisandrae semen essential oil treatment increased the levels of death receptors and Fas, and activated caspases accompanied by proteolytic degradation of poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase, which was associated with the downregulation of members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family protein expression; however, a pan-caspase inhibitor reversed SSeo-induced apoptosis. Treating the cells with SSeo also caused truncation of Bid, translocation of proapoptotic Bax to the mitochondria, and loss of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, thereby inducing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. Subsequently, SSeo upregulated the translocation of mitochondrial apoptogenic factors, such as endonuclease G and apoptosis-inducing factor, into the nucleus during the apoptotic process. Notably, SSeo immediately increased the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine, a common ROS quencher, almost completely blocked SSeo-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these findings indicate that SSeo caused ROS- and caspase-dependent cell death involving mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear translocation of mitochondrial proapoptosis proteins. Based on our data, the consumption of Schisandrae semen or its essential oil is a good natural therapeutic agent for anticancer activity and regression.

  15. The Exposure Rate Conversion Factor for Nuclear Fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, G D

    2009-02-11

    Nuclear fallout is comprised of approximately 2000 radionuclides. About 1000 of these radionuclides are either primary fission products or activated fission products that are created during the burn process. The exposure rate one meter above the surface produced by this complex mixture of radionuclides varies rapidly with time since many of the radionuclides are short-lived and decay numerous times before reaching a stable isotope. As a result, the mixture of radionuclides changes rapidly with time. Using a new code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the mixture of radionuclides at any given point in time can be calculated. The code also calculates the exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for all 3864 individual isotopes contained in its database based on the total gamma energy released per decay. Based on the combination of isotope mixture and individual ECFs, the time-dependent variation of the composite exposure rate conversion factor for nuclear fallout can be easily calculated. As example of this new capability, a simple test case corresponding to a 10 kt, uranium-plutonium fuel has been calculated. The results for the time-dependent, composite ECF for this test case are shown in Figure 1. For comparison, we also calculated the composite exposure rate conversion factor using the conversion factors found in Federal Guidance Report No.12 (FGR-12) published by ORNL, which contains the conversion factors for approximately 1000 isotopes. As can be noted from Figure 1, the two functions agree reasonably well at times greater than about 30 minutes. However, they do not agree at early times since FGR-12 does not include all of the short-lived isotopes that are produced in nuclear fallout. It should also be noted that the composite ECF at one hour is 19.7 R/hr per Ci/m{sup 2}. This corresponds to 3148 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile, which agrees reasonably well with the value of 3000 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile as quoted by Glasstone. We have

  16. Nuclear factor-kappa B links carcinogenic and chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Ralhan, Ranju; Pandey, Manoj K; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2009-01-01

    Cancer prevention requires avoidance of tobacco, alcohol, high-fat diet, polluted air and water, sedentary lifestyle, and of mechanical, physical, psychological, or chemical stress. How these factors can cause cancer, is suggested by the transcription nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B), that is activated by tobacco, alcohol, high-fat diet, environment pollutants, cancer-causing viruses (human papillomavirus, hepatitis B and C viruses, HIV) and bacteria (Helicobacter pylori), ultraviolet light, ionizing radiation, obesity, and stress. Furthermore, NF-kappa B-regulated gene products have been implicated in transformation of cells, and in proliferation, survival, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Suppression of NF-kappa B activation by the phytochemicals present in fruits and vegetables provides the molecular basis for their ability to prevent cancer. Other agents identified from spices and Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicines also been found to suppress NF-kappa B activation and thus may have potential for cancer prevention. The classic chemopreventive agent should offer long-term safety, low cost, and efficacy. The current review discuses in detail numerous agents such as curcumin, resveratrol, silymarin, catechins and others as potential chemopreventive agents. Thus, cancer, an ancient problem, may have an ancient solution. PMID:19482682

  17. Artemisinin triggers a G1 cell cycle arrest of human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase-4 promoter activity and expression by disrupting nuclear factor-κB transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kalvin Q; Tin, Antony S; Firestone, Gary L

    2014-03-01

    Relatively little is known about the antiproliferative effects of artemisinin, a naturally occurring antimalarial compound from Artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood, in human endometrial cancer cells. Artemisinin induced a G1 cell cycle arrest in cultured human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) and CDK4 transcript and protein levels. Analysis of CDK4 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs showed that the artemisinin ablation of CDK4 gene expression was accounted for by the loss of CDK4 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that artemisinin inhibited nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) subunit p65 and p50 interactions with the endogenous Ishikawa cell CDK4 promoter. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that artemisinin disrupts endogenous p65 and p50 nuclear translocation through increased protein-protein interactions with IκB-α, an NF-κB inhibitor, and disrupts its interaction with the CDK4 promoter, leading to a loss of CDK4 gene expression. Artemisinin treatment stimulated the cellular levels of IκB-α protein without altering the level of IκB-α transcripts. Finally, expression of exogenous p65 resulted in the accumulation of this NF-κB subunit in the nucleus of artemisinin-treated and artemisinin-untreated cells, reversed the artemisinin downregulation of CDK4 protein expression and promoter activity, and prevented the artemisinin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a key event in the artemisinin antiproliferative effects in endometrial cancer cells is the transcriptional downregulation of CDK4 expression by disruption of NF-κB interactions with the CDK4 promoter. PMID:24296733

  18. CCAAT Enhancer Binding Protein and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Regulate HIV-1 LTR via a Novel Conserved Downstream Site in Cells of the Monocyte-Macrophage Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Satinder; Liu, Yujie; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Dampier, Will; Wigdahl, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) promoter, the long terminal repeat (LTR), is achieved by interactions with cis-acting elements present both upstream and downstream of the start site. In silico transcription factor binding analysis of the HIV-1 subtype B LTR sequences revealed a potential downstream CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) binding site. This binding site (+158 to+172), designated DS3, was found to be conserved in 67% of 3,858 unique subtype B LTR sequences analyzed in terms of nucleotide sequence as well as physical location in the LTR. DS3 was found to be well represented in other subtypes as well. Interestingly, DS3 overlaps with a previously identified region that bind members of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) family of proteins. NFATc2 exhibited a higher relative affinity for DS3 as compared with members of the C/EBP family (C/EBP α and β). DS3 was able to compete efficiently with the low-affinity upstream C/EBP binding site I with respect to C/EBP binding, suggesting utilization of both NFAT and C/EBP. Moreover, cyclosporine A treatment, which has been shown to prevent dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NFAT isoforms, resulted in enhanced C/EBPα binding. The interactions at DS3 were also validated in an integrated HIV-1 LTR in chronically infected U1 cells. A binding knockout of DS3 demonstrated reduced HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription under both basal and interleukin-6-stimulated conditions only in cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage cells and not in cells of T-cell origin. Thus, the events at DS3 positively regulate the HIV-1 promoter in cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. PMID:24551078

  19. Interleukin-25-induced chemokines and interleukin-6 release from eosinophils is mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chun K; Cheung, Phyllis F Y; Ip, Wai K; Lam, Christopher W K

    2005-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-25, a novel Th2 cytokine, is capable of amplifying allergic inflammation. We investigated the modulation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways in IL-25-activated eosinophils, the principal effector cells of allergic inflammation, for the in vitro release of chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8, and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, and inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Gene expression of chemokines and IL-6 was evaluated by RT-PCR, and concentrations of chemokines and cytokine were measured by cytokine protein array, cytometric bead array, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-kappaB, c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK activities in eosinophils were assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and Western blot. IL-25 was found to upregulate the gene expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, and IL-8, and cytokine IL-6, in eosinophils, and to significantly increase the release of the above chemokines and IL-6 from eosinophils. IL-25 could also activate the JNK, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB activities of eosinophils, while inhibitor of IkappaB-alpha phosphorylation (BAY11-7082), JNK (SP600125), and p38 MAPK (SB203580) could suppress the release of IL-8, MIP-1alpha, MCP-1, and IL-6. Together, the above results showed that the induction of MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, IL-8, and IL-6 in IL-25-activated eosinophils are regulated by JNK, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB pathways.

  20. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  1. Interaction with plant transcription factors can mediate nuclear import of phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Anne; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Popp, Claudia; Wüst, Florian; Bindics, János; Viczián, András; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Nagy, Ferenc; Kunkel, Tim; Schäfer, Eberhard

    2012-04-10

    Phytochromes (phy) are red/far-red-absorbing photoreceptors that regulate the adaption of plant growth and development to changes in ambient light conditions. The nuclear transport of the phytochromes upon light activation is regarded as a key step in phytochrome signaling. Although nuclear import of phyA is regulated by the transport facilitators far red elongated hypocotyl 1 (FHY1) and fhy1-like, an intrinsic nuclear localization signal was proposed to be involved in the nuclear accumulation of phyB. We recently showed that nuclear import of phytochromes can be analyzed in a cell-free system consisting of isolated nuclei of the unicellular green algae Acetabularia acetabulum. We now show that this system is also versatile to elucidate the mechanism of the nuclear transport of phyB. We tested the nuclear transport characteristics of full-length phyB as well as N- and C-terminal phyB fragments in vitro and showed that the nuclear import of phyB can be facilitated by phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3). In vivo measurements of phyB nuclear accumulation in the absence of PIF1, -3, -4, and -5 indicate that these PIFs are the major transport facilitators during the first hours of deetiolation. Under prolonged irradiations additional factors might be responsible for phyB nuclear transport in the plant.

  2. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates cross-talk between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and nuclear factor-κB in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Necela, Brian M; Su, Weidong; Thompson, E Aubrey

    2008-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is expressed in macrophages and plays an important role in suppressing the inflammatory response. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), reduced PPARγ expression and function in peritoneal macrophages and macrophage cell lines. Moreover, pretreatment with the synthetic PPARγ ligand, rosiglitazone did not prevent LPS-mediated downregulation of PPARγ. Inhibition of PPARγ expression was not blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that de novo protein synthesis is not required for LPS-mediated suppression of PPARγ. Destabilization of PPARγ messenger RNA (mRNA) was not observed in LPS-stimulated macrophages, suggesting that LPS regulates the synthesis of PPARγ mRNA. LPS had no effect on PPARγ expression in macrophages from TLR4 knockout mice, whereas LPS inhibited PPARγ expression in cells that had been reconstituted to express functional TLR4. Targeting the TLR4 pathway with inhibitors of MEK1/2, p38, JNK and AP-1 had no effect on PPARγ downregulation by LPS. However, inhibitors that target NEMO, IκB and NF-κB abolished LPS-mediated downregulation of PPARγ in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Our data indicate that activation of TLR4 inhibits PPARγ mRNA synthesis by an NF-κB-dependent mechanism. Low-density genomic profiling of macrophage-specific PPARγ knockout cells indicated that PPARγ suppresses inflammation under basal conditions, and that loss of PPARγ expression is sufficient to induce a proinflammatory state. Our data reveal a regulatory feedback loop in which PPARγ represses NF-κB-mediated inflammatory signalling in unstimulated macrophages; however, upon activation of TLR4, NF-κB drives down PPARγ expression and thereby obviates any potential anti-inflammatory effects of PPARγ in LPS-stimulated macrophages. PMID:18422969

  3. MicroRNA-500 sustains nuclear factor-κB activation and induces gastric cancer cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhongyu; Liu, Junling; Sun, Jian; Lei, Fangyong; Wu, Shu; Li, Su; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin deconjugation of key signalling molecules by deubiquitinases (DUBs) such as cylindromatosis (CYLD), A20, and OTU deubiquitinase 7B (OTUD7B) has emerged as an important regulatory mechanism in the downregulation of NF-κB signalling and homeostasis. However, how these serial negative regulations are simultaneously disrupted to result in constitutive activation of NF-κB signalling in cancers remains puzzling. Here, we report that the miR-500 directly repressed the expression of CYLD, OTUD7B, and the A20 complex component Tax1-binding protein 1 (TAX1BP1), leading to ubiquitin conjugation of receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) and sustained NF-ĸB activation. Furthermore, we found that miR-500 promoted gastric cancer cell proliferation, survival, and tumorigenicity. Importantly, miR-500 was upregulated in gastric cancer and was highly correlated with malignant progression and poor survival. Hence, we report the uncovering of a novel mechanism for constitutive NF-κB activation, indicating the potentially pivotal role of miR-500 in the progression of gastric cancer. PMID:25595906

  4. Advanced Glycation End Products (AGE) Potently Induce Autophagy through Activation of RAF Protein Kinase and Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB).

    PubMed

    Verma, Neeharika; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-01-15

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) accumulate in diabetic patients and aging people because of high amounts of three- or four-carbon sugars derived from glucose, thereby causing multiple consequences, including inflammation, apoptosis, obesity, and age-related disorders. It is important to understand the mechanism of AGE-mediated signaling leading to the activation of autophagy (self-eating) that might result in obesity. We detected AGE as one of the potent inducers of autophagy compared with doxorubicin and TNF. AGE-mediated autophagy is inhibited by suppression of PI3K and potentiated by the autophagosome maturation blocker bafilomycin. It increases autophagy in different cell types, and that correlates with the expression of its receptor, receptor for AGE. LC3B, the marker for autophagosomes, is shown to increase upon AGE stimulation. AGE-mediated autophagy is partially suppressed by inhibitor of NF-κB, PKC, or ERK alone and significantly in combination. AGE increases sterol regulatory element binding protein activity, which leads to an increase in lipogenesis. Although AGE-mediated lipogenesis is affected by autophagy inhibitors, AGE-mediated autophagy is not influenced by lipogenesis inhibitors, suggesting that the turnover of lipid droplets overcomes the autophagic clearance. For the first time, we provide data showing that AGE induces several cell signaling cascades, like NF-κB, PKC, ERK, and MAPK, that are involved in autophagy and simultaneously help with the accumulation of lipid droplets that are not cleared effectively by autophagy, therefore causing obesity.

  5. Small GTPase Rho signaling is involved in {beta}1 integrin-mediated up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand on osteoblasts and osteoclast maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Fumihiko; Nakayamada, Shingo; Okada, Yosuke; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Kurose, Hitoshi; Mogami, Akira; Tanaka, Yoshiya . E-mail: tanaka@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp

    2007-04-27

    We assessed the characteristics of human osteoblasts, focusing on small GTPase Rho signaling. {beta}1 Integrin were highly expressed on osteoblasts. Engagement of {beta}1 integrins by type I collagen augmented expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) on osteoblasts. Rho was activated by {beta}1 stimulation in osteoblasts. {beta}1 Integrin-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 and RANKL was inhibited by transfection with adenoviruses encoding C3 transferase or pretreated with Y-27632, specific Rho and Rho-kinase inhibitors. Engagement of {beta}1 integrin on osteoblasts induced formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cells (MNC) in a coculture system of osteoblasts and peripheral monocytes, but this action was completely abrogated by transfection of C3 transferase. Our results indicate the direct involvement of Rho-mediated signaling in {beta}1 integrin-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 and RANKL and RANKL-dependent osteoclast maturation. Thus, Rho-mediated signaling in osteoblasts seems to introduce major biases to bone resorption.

  6. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 prevents silencing of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 expression in hepatoma x fibroblast cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Bulla, G A

    1997-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factors-1alpha (HNF1alpha) and -4 (HNF4) are components of a liver-enriched transcription activation pathway which is thought to play a critical role in hepatocyte-specific gene expression, including activation of alpha1-antitrypsin gene expression. HNF1alpha, HNF4 and alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) genes are extinguished in hepatoma/fibroblast somatic cell hybrids, suggesting that fibroblasts contain a repressor-like activity. To determine the molecular basis for silencing of these genes in cell hybrids, ectopic expression of HNF1alpha and HNF4 was used. Results show that constitutive expression of HNF4 prevents extinction of HNF1alpha gene expression in hepatoma/fibroblast hybrids. In contrast, forced HNF1alpha expression failed to prevent extinction of the HNF4 locus in cell hybrids. Likewise, the alpha1AT gene remained silent in the presence of both HNF1alpha and HNF4. These results suggest that extinction of HNF1alpha is a simple lack-of-activation phenotype, whereas extinction of HNF4 andalpha1AT loci is more complex, perhaps involving negative regulation. PMID:9171105

  7. Galaxy interactions and strength of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkin, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of data in the literature for differential velocities and projected separations of nearby Seyfert galaxies with possible companions shows a clear difference in projected separations between type 1's and type 2's. This kinematic difference between the two activity classes reinforces other independent evidence that their different nuclear characteristics are related to a non-nuclear physical distinction between the two classes. The differential velocities and projected separations of the galaxy pairs in this sample yield mean galaxy masses, sizes, and mass to light ratios which are consistent with those found by the statistical methods of Karachentsev. Although the galaxy sample discussed here is too small and too poorly defined to provide robust support for these conclusions, the results strongly suggest that nuclear activity in Seyfert galaxies is associated with gravitational perturbations from companion galaxies, and that there are physical distinctions between the host companions of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 nuclei which may depend both on the environment and the structure of the host galaxy itself.

  8. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: a possible role in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Senthil Kumar, K J; Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25-200μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE2 production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease.

  9. Activation of the nuclear factor-κB pathway during postnatal lung inflammation preserves alveolarization by suppressing macrophage inflammatory protein-2.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanli; Liu, Min; Husted, Cristiana; Chen, Chihhsin; Thiagarajan, Kavitha; Johns, Jennifer L; Rao, Shailaja P; Alvira, Cristina M

    2015-09-15

    A significant portion of lung development is completed postnatally during alveolarization, rendering the immature lung vulnerable to inflammatory stimuli that can disrupt lung structure and function. Although the NF-κB pathway has well-recognized pro-inflammatory functions, novel anti-inflammatory and developmental roles for NF-κB have recently been described. Thus, to determine how NF-κB modulates alveolarization during inflammation, we exposed postnatal day 6 mice to vehicle (PBS), systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or the combination of LPS and the global NF-κB pathway inhibitor BAY 11-7082 (LPS + BAY). LPS impaired alveolarization, decreased lung cell proliferation, and reduced epithelial growth factor expression. BAY exaggerated these detrimental effects of LPS, further suppressing proliferation and disrupting pulmonary angiogenesis, an essential component of alveolarization. The more severe pathology induced by LPS + BAY was associated with marked increases in lung and plasma levels of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). Experiments using primary neonatal pulmonary endothelial cells (PEC) demonstrated that MIP-2 directly impaired neonatal PEC migration in vitro; and neutralization of MIP-2 in vivo preserved lung cell proliferation and pulmonary angiogenesis and prevented the more severe alveolar disruption induced by the combined treatment of LPS + BAY. Taken together, these studies demonstrate a key anti-inflammatory function of the NF-κB pathway in the early alveolar lung that functions to mitigate the detrimental effects of inflammation on pulmonary angiogenesis and alveolarization. Furthermore, these data suggest that neutralization of MIP-2 may represent a novel therapeutic target that could be beneficial in preserving lung growth in premature infants exposed to inflammatory stress.

  10. Combined glutamine and arginine decrease proinflammatory cytokine production by biopsies from Crohn's patients in association with changes in nuclear factor-kappaB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Lecleire, Stéphane; Hassan, Aktham; Marion-Letellier, Rachel; Antonietti, Michel; Savoye, Guillaume; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Lerebours, Eric; Ducrotté, Philippe; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2008-12-01

    Glutamine (Gln) and arginine (Arg) are conditionally essential amino acids with immunomodulatory properties. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of Gln and Arg alone or in combination on cytokine release by cultured colonic biopsies from patients with active Crohn's disease (CD). Ten consecutive patients [mean (range) age 26 (18-39) y] with active colonic CD (mean CD activity index: 383.7 +/- 129.8) were prospectively included in the study. Eight colonic biopsies were obtained via a colonoscopy and incubated during 18 h with low (physiological) or high (pharmacological) doses of Arg (0.1 or 2 mmol/L designated as Arg(low) or Arg(high), respectively) and Gln (0.6 or 10 mmol/L designated as Gln(low) or Gln(high), respectively). The concentrations of cytokines [interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-8, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), IL-1beta, interferon-gamma) were assessed by ELISA, and nitric oxide (NO) production was evaluated by Griess assay. Nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB p65 subunit, inhibitor of NFkappaB-alpha, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were assessed by immunoblotting. Arg(high)/Gln(high) decreased the production of TNFalpha, IL-1beta, IL-8, and IL-6 (each P < 0.01). Arg(low)/Gln(high) decreased IL-6 and IL-8 production (both P < 0.01), whereas Arg(high)/Gln(low) did not affect cytokine and NO production. Arg(low)/Gln(high) and Arg(high)/Gln(high) decreased NF-kappaB p65 subunit expression, whereas p38 MAPK was decreased only by Arg(high)/Gln(high). Combined pharmacological doses of Arg and Gln decreased TNFalpha and the main proinflammatory cytokines release in active colonic CD biopsies via NF-kappaB and p38 MAPK pathways. These results could be the basis of prospective studies evaluating the effects of enteral supply of combined Arg and Gln during active CD.

  11. Osteoblastic γ-aminobutyric acid, type B receptors negatively regulate osteoblastogenesis toward disturbance of osteoclastogenesis mediated by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand in mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Takahata, Yoshifumi; Takarada, Takeshi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Nakamura, Yukari; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Yoneda, Yukio

    2011-09-23

    The prevailing view is that signaling machineries for the neurotransmitter GABA are also expressed by cells outside the CNS. In cultured murine calvarial osteoblasts, mRNA was constitutively expressed for both subunits 1 and 2 of metabotropic GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R), along with inhibition by the GABA(B)R agonist baclofen of cAMP formation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and Ca(2+) accumulation. Moreover, baclofen significantly inhibited the transactivation of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) gene in a manner sensitive to a GABA(B)R antagonist, in addition to decreasing mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2), osteocalcin, and osterix. In osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells stably transfected with GABA(B)R1 subunit, significant reductions were seen in ALP activity and Ca(2+) accumulation, as well as mRNA expression of osteocalcin, osteopontin, and osterix. In cultured calvarial osteoblasts from GABA(B)R1-null mice exhibiting low bone mineral density in tibia and femur, by contrast, both ALP activity and Ca(2+) accumulation were significantly increased together with promoted expression of both mRNA and proteins for BMP2 and osterix. No significant change was seen in the number of multinucleated cells stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase during the culture of osteoclasts prepared from GABA(B)R1-null mice, whereas a significant increase was seen in the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated cells in co-culture of osteoclasts with osteoblasts isolated from GABA(B)R1-null mice. These results suggest that GABA(B)R is predominantly expressed by osteoblasts to negatively regulate osteoblastogenesis through down-regulation of BMP2 expression toward disturbance of osteoclastogenesis after down-regulation of RANKL expression in mouse bone.

  12. The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

  13. Dual-energy precursor and nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 activator treatment additively improve redox glutathione levels and neuron survival in aging and Alzheimer mouse neurons upstream of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debolina; LeVault, Kelsey R; Brewer, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether glutathione (GSH) loss or increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) are more important to neuron loss, aging, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we stressed or boosted GSH levels in neurons isolated from aging 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those from age-matched nontransgenic (non-Tg) neurons. Here, using titrating with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (GCL), we observed that GSH depletion increased neuronal death of 3xTg-AD cultured neurons at increasing rates across the age span, whereas non-Tg neurons were resistant to GSH depletion until old age. Remarkably, the rate of neuron loss with ROS did not increase in old age and was the same for both genotypes, which indicates that cognitive deficits in the AD model were not caused by ROS. Therefore, we targeted for neuroprotection activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2) by 18 alpha glycyrrhetinic acid to stimulate GSH synthesis through GCL. This balanced stimulation of a number of redox enzymes restored the lower levels of Nrf2 and GCL seen in 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those of non-Tg neurons and promoted translocation of Nrf2 to the nucleus. By combining the Nrf2 activator together with the NADH precursor, nicotinamide, we increased neuron survival against amyloid beta stress in an additive manner. These stress tests and neuroprotective treatments suggest that the redox environment is more important for neuron survival than ROS. The dual neuroprotective treatment with nicotinamide and an Nrf2 inducer indicates that these age-related and AD-related changes are reversible.

  14. Morin suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression by downregulation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated primary bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Guo, Changming; Wei, Zhengkai; He, Xuexiu; Kou, Jinhua; Zhou, Ershun; Yang, Zhengtao; Fu, Yunhe

    2016-04-01

    Morin, a flavonoid isolated from Chinese herbs of the Moraceae family, has been reported to possess antiinflammatory activity. However, the effects of morin on mastitis have not been investigated. The present study was conducted to elucidate the antiinflammatory properties of morin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated primary bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC). The viability of bMEC was analyzed by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium] assay. Subsequently, bMEC were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of morin. Gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines was determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were detected by Western blotting. The results showed that cell viability was not affected by morin. Moreover, morin inhibited the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, and IL-1β in LPS-stimulated bMEC in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis showed that morin suppressed the phosphorylation of IκBα, NF-κB unit p65, ERK, p38, and JNK in LPS-stimulated bMEC. In conclusion, the protective effects of morin on LPS-induced inflammatory response in bMEC may be due to its ability to suppress NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. These findings suggest that morin may be used as antiinflammatory drug for mastitis.

  15. Aloperine attenuated neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury via anti-oxidation activity and suppression of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ya-Qiong; Jin, Shao-Ju; Liu, Ning; Li, Yu-Xiang; Zheng, Jie; Ma, Lin; Du, Juan; Zhou, Ru; Zhao, Cheng-Jun; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Aloperine has anti-nociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced CCI. • Aloperine reduces ROS in neuropathic pain mice. • Aloperine down-regulates the expression of NF-κB and its downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines in neuropathic pain mice. - Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether aloperine (ALO) has antinociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury, whether ALO reduces ROS against neuropathic pain, and what are the mechanisms involved in ALO attenuated neuropathic pain. Methods: Mechanical and cold allodynia, thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and spinal thermal hyperalgesia were estimated by behavior methods such as Von Frey filaments, cold-plate, radiant heat, paw pressure and tail immersion on one day before surgery and days 7, 8, 10, 12 and 14 after surgery, respectively. In addition, T-AOC, GSH-PX, T-AOC and MDA in the spinal cord (L4/5) were measured to evaluate anti-oxidation activity of ALO on neuropathic pain. Expressions of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β) in the spinal cord (L4/5) were analyzed by using Western blot. Results: Administration of ALO (80 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased paw withdrawal threshold, paw pressure, paw withdrawal latencies, tail-curling latencies, T-AOC, GSH-PX and T-SOD concentration, reduced the numbers of paw lifts and MDA concentration compared to CCI group. ALO attenuated CCI induced up-regulation of expressions of NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β at the dose of 80 mg/kg (i.p.). Pregabalin produced similar effects serving as positive control at the dose of 10 mg/kg (i.p.). Conclusion: ALO has antinociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced by CCI. The antinociceptive effects of ALO against neuropathic pain is related to reduction of ROS, via suppression of NF-κB pathway.

  16. Sevoflurane Inhibits Nuclear Factor-κB Activation in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Inflammatory Lung Injury via Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xi Jia; Li, Xiao Qian; Wang, Xiao Long; Tan, Wen Fei; Wang, Jun Ke

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection is a common cause of acute lung injury (ALI). This study was aimed to explore whether Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) play a role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and potential mechanisms. Methods In vivo: A sensitizing dose of LPS (50 µg) was administered i.p. to female mice before anesthesia with either 3% sevoflurane or phenobarbital i.p. After stabilization, the mice were challenged with 5 µg of intratracheal LPS to mimic inflammatory attack. The effects of sevoflurane were assessed by measurement of airway responsiveness to methacholine, histological examination, and IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Protein and gene expression of TLR4 and NF-κB were also assessed. In vitro: After pre-sensitization of ASMCs and ASM segments for 24h, levels of TLR4 and NF-κB proteins in cultured ASMCs were measured after continuous LPS exposure for 1, 3, 5, 12 and 24h in presence or absence of sevoflurane. Constrictor and relaxant responsiveness of ASM was measured 24 h afterwards. Results The mRNA and protein levels of NF-κB and TLR4 in ASM were increased and maintained at high level after LPS challenge throughout 24h observation period, both in vivo and in vitro. Sevoflurane reduced LPS-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, lung inflammatory cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokines release in BALF as well as maximal isometric contractile force of ASM segments to acetylcholine, but it increased maximal relaxation response to isoproterenol. Treatment with specific NF-κB inhibitor produced similar protections as sevoflurane, including decreased expressions of TLR4 and NF-κB in cultured ASMCs and improved pharmacodynamic responsiveness of ASM to ACh and isoproterenol. Conclusions This study demonstrates the crucial role of TLR4 activation in ASMCs during ALI in response to LPS. Sevoflurane exerts direct relaxant and anti-inflammatory effects in vivo

  17. ATP1B3 Protein Modulates the Restriction of HIV-1 Production and Nuclear Factor κ Light Chain Enhancer of Activated B Cells (NF-κB) Activation by BST-2.

    PubMed

    Nishitsuji, Hironori; Sugiyama, Ryuichi; Abe, Makoto; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2016-02-26

    Here, we identify ATP1B3 and fibrillin-1 as novel BST-2-binding proteins. ATP1B3 depletion in HeLa cells (BST-2-positive cells), but not 293T cells (BST-2-negative cells), induced the restriction of HIV-1 production in a BST-2-dependent manner. In contrast, fibrillin-1 knockdown reduced HIV-1 production in 293T and HeLa cells in a BST-2-independent manner. Moreover, NF-κB activation was enhanced by siATP1B3 treatment in HIV-1- and HIV-1ΔVpu-infected HeLa cells. In addition, ATP1B3 silencing induced high level BST-2 expression on the surface of HeLa cells. These results indicate that ATP1B3 is a co-factor that accelerates BST-2 degradation and reduces BST-2-mediated restriction of HIV-1 production and NF-κB activation.

  18. Parvoviruses Cause Nuclear Envelope Breakdown by Activating Key Enzymes of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Porwal, Manvi; Cohen, Sarah; Snoussi, Kenza; Popa-Wagner, Ruth; Anderson, Fenja; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Wodrich, Harald; Dinsart, Christiane; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A.; Panté, Nelly; Kann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Disassembly of the nuclear lamina is essential in mitosis and apoptosis requiring multiple coordinated enzymatic activities in nucleus and cytoplasm. Activation and coordination of the different activities is poorly understood and moreover complicated as some factors translocate between cytoplasm and nucleus in preparatory phases. Here we used the ability of parvoviruses to induce nuclear membrane breakdown to understand the triggers of key mitotic enzymes. Nuclear envelope disintegration was shown upon infection, microinjection but also upon their application to permeabilized cells. The latter technique also showed that nuclear envelope disintegration was independent upon soluble cytoplasmic factors. Using time-lapse microscopy, we observed that nuclear disassembly exhibited mitosis-like kinetics and occurred suddenly, implying a catastrophic event irrespective of cell- or type of parvovirus used. Analyzing the order of the processes allowed us to propose a model starting with direct binding of parvoviruses to distinct proteins of the nuclear pore causing structural rearrangement of the parvoviruses. The resulting exposure of domains comprising amphipathic helices was required for nuclear envelope disintegration, which comprised disruption of inner and outer nuclear membrane as shown by electron microscopy. Consistent with Ca++ efflux from the lumen between inner and outer nuclear membrane we found that Ca++ was essential for nuclear disassembly by activating PKC. PKC activation then triggered activation of cdk-2, which became further activated by caspase-3. Collectively our study shows a unique interaction of a virus with the nuclear envelope, provides evidence that a nuclear pool of executing enzymes is sufficient for nuclear disassembly in quiescent cells, and demonstrates that nuclear disassembly can be uncoupled from initial phases of mitosis. PMID:24204256

  19. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: A possible role in atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Senthil Kumar, K.J.; Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25–200 μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE{sub 2} production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease. - Highlights: • Humic acid (HA) induce pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators in macrophages. • HA-induced inflammation is mediated by ROS and NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathways. • The inflammatory potential of HA correlated with activation of Nrf2/HO-1 genes. • HA exposure to mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokines production in vivo. • HA may be one of the main causes of early

  20. LANSCE nuclear science facilities and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald O

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear science activities at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) encompass measurements spanning the neutron energy range from thermal to 600 MeV. The neutron sources use spallation of the LANSCE 800 MeV pulsed proton beam with the time-of-flight technique to measure properties of neutron-induced reactions as a function of energy over this large energy range. Current experiments are conducted at the Lujan Center moderated neutron source, the unmoderated WNR target, and with a lead-slowing-down spectrometer. Instruments in use include the DANCE array of BaF{sub 2} scintillators for neutron capture studies, the FIGARO array of liquid scintillator neutron detectors, the GEANIE array of high-resolution HPGe x-ray and gamma-ray detectors, and a number of fission chambers, and other detectors. The LANL capabilities for production and handling of radioactive materials coupled with the neutron sources and detectors at LANSCE are enabling new and challenging measurements for a variety of applications including nuclear energy and nuclear astrophysics. An overview of recent research and examples of results is presented.

  1. Nuclear modification factor using Tsallis non-extensive statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sushanta; Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Garg, Prakhar; Kumar, Prateek; Sahoo, Raghunath; Cleymans, Jean

    2016-09-01

    The nuclear modification factor is derived using Tsallis non-extensive statistics in relaxation time approximation. The variation of the nuclear modification factor with transverse momentum for different values of the non-extensive parameter, q, is also observed. The experimental data from RHIC and LHC are analysed in the framework of Tsallis non-extensive statistics in a relaxation time approximation. It is shown that the proposed approach explains the R_{AA} of all particles over a wide range of transverse momentum but does not seem to describe the rise in R_{AA} at very high transverse momenta.

  2. Epigallocatechin gallate stimulates the neuroreactive salivary secretomotor system in autoimmune sialadenitis of MRL-Fas(lpr) mice via activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and inactivation of nuclear factor κB.

    PubMed

    Saito, Keiichi; Mori, Shiro; Date, Fumiko; Hong, Guang

    2015-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5) plays a crucial role in regulating salivary flow rates. Xerostomia is often observed in patients with Sjögren's syndrome, and this is attributed to reduced AQP5 expression in the salivary glands. Recently, anti-type 3 muscarinic cholinergic receptors (M3R) autoantibodies and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) have been found to be negative regulators of AQP5 expression in the salivary gland. Anti-M3R autoantibodies desensitize M3R to salivary secretagogues in Sjögren's syndrome, while activated NF-κB translocates to nuclei and binds to the AQP5 gene promoter, resulting in the suppression of AQP5 expression. We previously documented that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is a robust antioxidant contained in green tea, ameliorates oxidative stress-induced tissue damage to the salivary glands of MRL/MpJ-lpr/lpr (MRL-Fas(lpr)) mice, which are widely used as a model of Sjögren's syndrome. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can activate NF-κB and inactivate protein kinase A (PKA), which is a key driver of AQP5 expression. In this study, we examined the effects of administering EGCG to MRL-Fas(lpr) mice with autoimmune sialadenitis on the levels of AQP5, activated NF-κB p65 subunit, activated PKA, activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) (an activator of NF-κB), inhibitor κB (IκB) and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) (an inhibitor of NF-κB). In EGCG-treated mice, intense aster-like immunostaining for AQP5 was observed on the apical plasma membranes (APMs) of submandibular gland acinar cells. Likewise, PKA, IκB and HDAC1 were highly expressed in salivary gland tissues, whereas the expression of JNK and NF-κB p65 was negligible. Rank correlation and partial correlation analyses revealed that treatment with EGCG upregulated AQP5 expression on the APM of acinar cells through activation of PKA and inactivation of NF-κB, while IκB and HDAC1 played a pivotal role in the induction of AQP5 expression by PKA. Our study indicates that EGCG may

  3. Polymorphic membrane protein (PMP) 20 and PMP 21 of Chlamydia pneumoniae induce proinflammatory mediators in human endothelial cells in vitro by activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Niessner, Alexander; Kaun, Christoph; Zorn, Gerlinde; Speidl, Walter; Türel, Zeynep; Christiansen, Gunna; Pedersen, Anna-Sofie; Birkelund, Svend; Simon, Susan; Georgopoulos, Apostolos; Graninger, Wolfgang; de Martin, Rainer; Lipp, Joachim; Binder, Bernd R; Maurer, Gerald; Huber, Kurt; Wojta, Johann

    2003-07-01

    We tested whether polymorphic membrane proteins (PMPs) of Chlamydia pneumoniae might play a role in triggering an inflammatory response in human endothelial cells. Of 15 purified, recombinant chlamydial PMPs tested, 2 (PMP 20 and PMP 21) dose-dependently increased the production of the inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), in cultured human endothelial cells; production of IL-8 was also increased. When endothelial cells were infected by live C. pneumoniae, an increase in the production of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 was seen. We used adenovirus-induced overexpression of IkappaBalpha-an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB-to demonstrate that PMP 20 and PMP 21 increase the production of IL-6 and MCP-1 in human endothelial cells by activation of the NF-kappaB pathway, because, in cells overexpressing IkappaBalpha, treatment with the respective PMP did not result in increased production of IL-6 and MCP-1. Thus, C. pneumoniae could, by interactions of its PMPs with the endothelium, contribute to the process of vascular injury during the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions.

  4. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinases/nuclear factor κB-dependent inflammation by a novel chalcone protects the kidney from high fat diet-induced injuries in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qilu; Deng, Liancheng; Wang, Lintao; Zhang, Yali; Weng, Qiaoyou; Yin, Haimin; Pan, Yong; Tong, Chao; Wang, Jingying; Liang, Guang

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically worldwide leading to increases in obesity-related complications, such as obesity-related glomerulopathy (ORG). Obesity is a state of chronic, low-grade inflammation, and increased inflammation in the adipose and kidney tissues has been shown to promote the progression of renal damage in obesity. Current therapeutic options for ORG are fairly limited and, as a result, we are seeing increased rates of progression to end-stage renal disease. Chalcones are a class of naturally occurring compounds with various pharmacological properties. 1-(3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl)-3-(2-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (L2H17) is a chalcone that we have previously synthesized and found capable of inhibiting the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in macrophages. In this study, we investigated L2H17's effect on obesity-induced renal injury using palmitic acid-induced mouse peritoneal macrophages and high fat diet-fed mice. Our results indicate that L2H17 protects against renal injury through the inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor κB pathways significantly by decreasing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules and improving kidney histology and pathology. These findings lead us to believe that L2H17, as an anti-inflammatory agent, can be a potential therapeutic option in treating ORG.

  5. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions and those key factors that may impact the deployment of AdvSMRs or any other new nuclear power plants. Thus, this report serves as a reference document for DOE as it moves forward with its plans to develop advanced reactors, including AdvSMRs. For the purpose of this analysis, information on electricity markets and nuclear power plant operating costs will be combined to examine the current state of the nuclear industry and the process required to successfully move forward with new nuclear power in general and AdvSMRs in particular. The current electricity market is generally unfavorable to new nuclear construction, especially in deregulated markets with heavy competition from natural gas and subsidized renewables. The successful and profitable operation of a nuclear power plant (or any power plant) requires the rate at which the electricity is sold to be sufficiently greater than the cost to operate. The wholesale rates in most US markets have settled into values that provide profits for most operating nuclear power plants but are too low to support the added cost of capital recovery for new nuclear construction. There is a strong geographic dependence on the wholesale rate, with some markets currently able to support new nuclear construction. However, there is also a strong geographic dependence on pronuclear public opinion; the areas where power prices are high tend to have unfavorable views on the construction of new nuclear power plants. The use of government-backed incentives, such as subsidies, can help provide a margin to help justify construction projects that otherwise may not seem viable. Similarly, low interest rates for the project will also add a positive margin to the economic

  6. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the proliferation of human nucleus pulposus cells via nuclear factor-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Hu; Hong, Xin; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Yun-Tao; Bao, Jun-Ping; Liu, Lei; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is known to play a critical role in intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the effect of TNF-α on nucleus pulposus (NP) cells has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of TNF-α on proliferation of human NP cells. NP cells were treated with different concentrations of TNF-α. Cell proliferation was determined by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, and expression of cyclin B1 was studied by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell cycle was measured by flow cytometry and cell apoptosis was analyzed using an Annexin V–fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) & propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis detection kit. To identify the mechanism by which TNF-α induced proliferation of NP cells, selective inhibitors of major signaling pathways were used and Western blotting was carried out. Treatment with TNF-α increased cell viability (as determined by CCK-8 analysis) and expression of cyclin B1 and the number of Ki67-positive and S-phase NP cells, indicating enhancement of proliferation. Consistent with this, NP cell apoptosis was suppressed by TNF-α treatment. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) blocked TNF-α-stimulated proliferation of NP cells. In conclusion, the current findings suggest that the effect of TNF-α on IVD degeneration involves promotion of the proliferation of human NP cells via the NF-κB, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways. PMID:25304312

  7. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the proliferation of human nucleus pulposus cells via nuclear factor-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Hu; Hong, Xin; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Yun-Tao; Bao, Jun-Ping; Liu, Lei; Wang, Feng; Wu, Xiao-Tao

    2015-04-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is known to play a critical role in intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the effect of TNF-α on nucleus pulposus (NP) cells has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of TNF-α on proliferation of human NP cells. NP cells were treated with different concentrations of TNF-α. Cell proliferation was determined by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, and expression of cyclin B1 was studied by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell cycle was measured by flow cytometry and cell apoptosis was analyzed using an Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) & propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis detection kit. To identify the mechanism by which TNF-α induced proliferation of NP cells, selective inhibitors of major signaling pathways were used and Western blotting was carried out. Treatment with TNF-α increased cell viability (as determined by CCK-8 analysis) and expression of cyclin B1 and the number of Ki67-positive and S-phase NP cells, indicating enhancement of proliferation. Consistent with this, NP cell apoptosis was suppressed by TNF-α treatment. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) blocked TNF-α-stimulated proliferation of NP cells. In conclusion, the current findings suggest that the effect of TNF-α on IVD degeneration involves promotion of the proliferation of human NP cells via the NF-κB, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways.

  8. Propanil inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by reducing nuclear levels of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappab in the macrophage cell line ic-21.

    PubMed

    Frost, L L; Neeley, Y X; Schafer, R; Gibson, L F; Barnett, J B

    2001-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an essential proinflammatory cytokine whose production is normally stimulated by bacterial cell wall components, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), during an infection. Macrophages stimulated with LPS in vitro produce several cytokines, including TNF-alpha. LPS-stimulated primary mouse macrophages produced less TNF-alpha protein and message after treatment with the herbicide propanil (Xie et al., Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 145, 184-191, 1997). Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) tightly regulates TNF-alpha transcription. Therefore, as a step toward understanding the mechanism of the effect of propanil on TNF-alpha transcription, IC-21 cells were transfected with a TNF-alpha promoter-luciferase construct, and the effect of propanil on luciferase activity was measured. Cells transfected with promoter constructs containing a kappaB site showed decreased luciferase activity relative to controls after propanil treatment. These observations implicated NF-kappaB binding as an intracellular target of propanil. Further studies demonstrated a marked reduction in the nuclear levels of the stimulatory p65 subunit of NF-kappaB after propanil treatment, as measured by fluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. The p50 subunit of NF-kappaB was not found to be reduced after propanil exposure by Western blot. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays showed decreased DNA binding of both p65/p50 heterodimers and p50/p50 homodimers to the kappaB3 site of the TNF-alpha promoter of propanil-treated cells. The marked reduction in nuclear p65/p50 NF-kappaB levels and diminished binding to the TNF-alpha promoter in propanil-treated cells are consistent with reduced TNF-alpha levels induced by LPS. PMID:11312646

  9. Summary of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world

    SciTech Connect

    Mellinger, P.J.; Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.

    1984-11-01

    This review of international practices for nuclear fuel reprocessing was prepared to provide a nontechnical summary of the current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world. The sources of information are widely varied.

  10. Personality Factors and Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Initial License Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVita-Cochrane, Cynthia

    Commercial nuclear power utilities are under pressure to effectively recruit and retain licensed reactor operators in light of poor candidate training completion rates and recent candidate failures on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license exam. One candidate failure can cost a utility over $400,000, making the successful licensing of new operators a critical path to operational excellence. This study was designed to discover if the NEO-PI-3, a 5-factor measure of personality, could improve selection in nuclear utilities by identifying personality factors that predict license candidate success. Two large U.S. commercial nuclear power corporations provided potential participant contact information and candidate results on the 2014 NRC exam from their nuclear power units nation-wide. License candidates who participated (n = 75) completed the NEO-PI-3 personality test and results were compared to 3 outcomes on the NRC exam: written exam, simulated operating exam, and overall exam result. Significant correlations were found between several personality factors and both written and operating exam outcomes on the NRC exam. Further, a regression analysis indicated that personality factors, particularly Conscientiousness, predicted simulated operating exam scores. The results of this study may be used to support the use of the NEO-PI-3 to improve operator selection as an addition to the current selection protocol. Positive social change implications from this study include support for the use of a personality measure by utilities to improve their return-on-investment in candidates and by individual candidates to avoid career failures. The results of this study may also positively impact the public by supporting the safe and reliable operation of commercial nuclear power utilities in the United States.

  11. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  12. Phytochrome activation of two nuclear genes requires cytoplasmic protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, E; Green, P J; Wong, M; Chua, N H

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of protein synthesis inhibitors on light-induced expression of two plant nuclear genes, Cab and rbcS, in wheat, pea and transgenic tobacco. Light activation of these two genes is very sensitive to cycloheximide, an inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis but not to chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of organellar protein synthesis. Studies with chimeric gene constructs in transgenic tobacco seedlings show that cycloheximide exerts its effect at the transcriptional level. As a control, we show that the expression of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter is enhanced by cycloheximide treatment, irrespective of the coding sequence used. Escape-time analyses with green wheat seedlings show that the cycloheximide block for Cab gene expression is after the primary signal transduction step linked to phytochrome photoconversion. Our results suggest that phytochrome activation of Cab and rbcS is mediated by a labile protein factor(s) synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Images PMID:2583082

  13. Hepatocyte uptake and nuclear binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF)

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarity, D.M.; Underwood, T.

    1987-05-01

    The internalization of /sup 125/I-EGF and its cell-membrane receptor by target cells suggests a possible intracellular role for EGF and/or its receptor. They have examined the uptake of /sup 125/I-EGF by primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes after 1, 24 and 48 hours of incubation in the presence of the growth factor. A significant increase in the association of radioactivity with various nuclear fractions was observed between 1 and 24 hours incubation. After 1 hour approximately 2% of the total specific binding was associated with both the nuclear sap proteins extractable with 0.14 M NaCl and with the residual nucleoplasm, while about 1% or less was associated with the nuclear membrane and the chromatin fractions. After 24 hours the percentage associated with the nuclear membrane and chromatin fractions increased 2-4 fold. Binding of /sup 125/I-EGF to isolated nuclei from intact livers of adult rats followed by fractionation of the nuclei after incubation with /sup 125/I-EGF indicated that after 60 min at 37/sup 0/C there was a substantial amount of specific binding associated with the nucleoplasm, nuclear membranes and chromatin fractions. These data indicate that specific interactions of EGF with nuclear components occur in both intact normal hepatocytes and in isolated nuclei from intact liver.

  14. Nuclear factor-kappa B signaling in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Malhotra, Shweta; Kumar, Ashok

    2008-10-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy/wasting is a serious complication of a wide range of diseases and conditions such as aging, disuse, AIDS, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, space travel, muscular dystrophy, chronic heart failure, sepsis, and cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is one of the most important signaling pathways linked to the loss of skeletal muscle mass in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Activation of NF-kappaB in skeletal muscle leads to degradation of specific muscle proteins, induces inflammation and fibrosis, and blocks the regeneration of myofibers after injury/atrophy. Recent studies employing genetic mouse models have provided strong evidence that NF-kappaB can serve as an important molecular target for the prevention of skeletal muscle loss. In this article, we have outlined the current understanding regarding the role of NF-kappaB in skeletal muscle with particular reference to different models of muscle wasting and the development of novel therapy.

  15. Possible mechanisms and function of nuclear trafficking of the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Rovida, Elisabetta; Dello Sbarba, Persio

    2014-10-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) have long being studied with respect to the "canonical" signaling. This includes ligand-induced activation of a receptor tyrosine kinase at the cell surface that leads to receptor dimerization, followed by its phosphorylation in the intracellular domain and activation. The activated receptor then recruits cytoplasmic signaling molecules including other kinases. Activation of the downstream signaling cascade frequently leads to changes in gene expression following nuclear translocation of downstream targets. However, RTK themselves may localize within the nucleus, as either full-length molecules or cleaved fragments, with or without their ligands. Significant differences in this mechanism have been reported depending on the individual RTK, cellular context or disease. Accumulating evidences indicate that the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) may localize within the nucleus. To date, however, little is known about the mechanism of CSF-1R nuclear shuttling, as well as the functional role of nuclear CSF-1R.

  16. Featured Article: Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α dependent nuclear entry of factor inhibiting HIF-1

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ke; Ding, Xue-qin; Lin, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcriptional activity in the nucleus is related to factor inhibiting HIF-1 (FIH-1). FIH-1 hydrolyzes asparagine at the C-terminal of HIF-1α, preventing the interaction between HIF-1α and its associated cofactors, and leading to suppressed activation of HIF-1. FIH-1 is a cytosolic protein and its entry to the nucleus has to be coordinated with HIF-1α. The present study was undertaken to examine the correlation between HIF-1α and FIH-1 in their nuclear entry. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were treated with dimethyloxalylglycine at a final concentration of 100 µM for 4 h, resulting in an accumulation of HIF-1α and an increase of FIH-1 in the nucleus as determined by Western blot analysis. Pretreatment of the cells with copper (Cu) chelator tetraethylenepentamine at 50 µM in cultures for 24 h reduced both HIF-1α protein levels and the HIF-1α entry to the nucleus, along with decreased FIH-1 protein levels in the nucleus but no changes in the total FIH-1 protein levels in the cells. These effects were prevented by simultaneous addition of 50 µM CuSO4 with tetraethylenepentamine. Gene-silencing of HIF-1α significantly inhibited FIH-1 entry to the nucleus, but did not affect the total protein levels of FIH-1 in the cells. This work demonstrates that the nuclear entry of FIH-1 depends on HIF-1α. Cu deficiency caused a decrease of HIF-1α, leading to suppression of FIH-1 entry to the nucleus. PMID:25687434

  17. Differential effect of immune cells on non-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria-induced nuclear factor-κB activation and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Haller, D; Holt, L; Parlesak, A; Zanga, J; Bäuerlein, A; Sartor, R B; Jobin, C

    2004-01-01

    We have previously shown that non-pathogenic Gram negative bacteria induce RelA phosphorylation, nuclear factor (NF)-κB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of immune-epithelial cell cross-talk on Gram-negative enteric bacteria-induced NF-κB signalling and pro-inflammatory gene expression in IEC using HT-29/MTX as well as CaCO-2 transwell cultures Interestingly, while differentiated HT-29/MTX cells are unresponsive to non-pathogenic Gram negative bacterial stimulation, interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA accumulation is strongly induced in Escherichia coli- but not Bacteroides vulgatus-stimulated IEC cocultured with peripheral blood (PBMC) and lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC). The presence of PBMC triggered both E. coli- and B. vulgatus-induced mRNA expression of the Toll-like receptor-4 accessory protein MD-2 as well as endogenous IκBα phosphorylation, demonstrating similar capabilities of these bacteria to induce proximal NF-κB signalling. However, B. vulgatus failed to trigger IκBα degradation and NF-κB transcriptional activity in the presence of PBMC. Interestingly, B. vulgatus- and E. coli-derived lipopolysaccharide-induced similar IL-8 mRNA expression in epithelial cells after basolateral stimulation of HT-29/PBMC cocultures. Although luminal enteric bacteria have adjuvant and antigenic properties in chronic intestinal inflammation, PBMC from patients with active ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease differentially trigger epithelial cell activation in response to E. coli and E. coli-derived LPS. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for a differential regulation of non-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria-induced NF-κB signalling and IL-8 gene expression in IEC cocultured with immune cells and suggests the presence of mechanisms that assure hyporesponsiveness of the intestinal epithelium to certain commensally

  18. Methamphetamine oxidative stress, neurotoxicity, and functional deficits are modulated by nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2.

    PubMed

    Ramkissoon, Annmarie; Wells, Peter G

    2015-12-01

    Activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors like nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) can enhance the transcription of cytoprotective genes during oxidative stress. We investigated whether Nrf2 is activated by methamphetamine (METH) thereby altering neurotoxicity in Nrf2 +/+ and -/- adult mouse brain. A single dose of METH can induce the mRNA levels of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant and cytoprotective proteins in mouse brain. Multiple-day dosing with METH enhanced DNA oxidation and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter staining in the striatum, indicating dopaminergic nerve terminal toxicity, which was more severe in -/- mice, as were deficits in motor coordination and olfactory discrimination. These Nrf2-dependent effects were independent of changes in METH metabolism or the induction of hyperthermia. Similarly, METH increased striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein, indicating neurotoxicity. METH neurotoxicity was also observed in the glial cells and in the GABAergic system of the olfactory bulbs and was enhanced in -/- mice, whereas dopaminergic parameters were unaffected. With one-day dosing of METH, there were no differences between +/+ and -/- mice in either basal or METH-enhanced DNA oxidation and neurotoxicity markers. Nrf2-mediated pathways accordingly may protect against the neurodegenerative effects and functional deficits initiated by METH and perhaps other reactive oxygen species-enhancing neurotoxicants, when there is time for transcriptional activation and protein induction. In human users of METH, this mechanism may be essential when differences in drug abuse patterns may alter the induction and duration of Nrf2 activation thereby modulating susceptibility to the neurotoxic effects of METH.

  19. An overview of a nuclear reprocessing plant Human Factors programme.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Barry

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a case study of a large Human Factors programme applied in the nuclear fuel reprocessing industry (1987-1991). The paper outlines the key Human Factors issues addressed, as well as the impacts achieved, and gives an indication of the resources utilised (approximately 15 person-years of effort). It also considers the starting point of the programme, in terms of the factors that led to the need for such an extensive programme. Some general lessons learned are given at the end of the paper. PMID:12963330

  20. Multi-Tasking: Nuclear Transcription Factors with Novel Roles in the Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanek, Karol; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Larner, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated responses between the nucleus and mitochondria are essential for maintenance of homeostasis. For over 15 years, pools of nuclear transcription factors (TFs), such as p53 and nuclear hormone receptors, have been observed in the mitochondria. The contribution of the mitochondrial pool of these TFs to their well-defined biological actions is in some cases clear and in others not well understood. Recently, a small mitochondrial pool of the TF signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) was shown to modulate the activity of the electron transport chain. The mitochondrial function of STAT3 encompasses both its biological actions in the heart as well as its oncogenic effects. This review highlights advances in our understanding of how mitochondrial pools of nuclear TFs may influence the function of this organelle. PMID:22705015

  1. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β controls nephron tubular development.

    PubMed

    Massa, Filippo; Garbay, Serge; Bouvier, Raymonde; Sugitani, Yoshinobu; Noda, Tetsuo; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Heidet, Laurence; Pontoglio, Marco; Fischer, Evelyne

    2013-02-01

    Nephron morphogenesis is a complex process that generates blood-filtration units (glomeruli) connected to extremely long and patterned tubular structures. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) is a divergent homeobox transcription factor that is expressed in kidney from the first steps of nephrogenesis. Mutations in HNF1B (OMIM #137920) are frequently found in patients with developmental renal pathologies, the mechanisms of which have not been completely elucidated. Here we show that inactivation of Hnf1b in the murine metanephric mesenchyme leads to a drastic tubular defect characterized by the absence of proximal, distal and Henle's loop segments. Nephrons were eventually characterized by glomeruli, with a dilated urinary space, directly connected to collecting ducts via a primitive and short tubule. In the absence of HNF1β early nephron precursors gave rise to deformed S-shaped bodies characterized by the absence of the typical bulge of epithelial cells at the bend between the mid and lower segments. The lack of this bulge eventually led to the absence of proximal tubules and Henle's loops. The expression of several genes, including Irx1, Osr2 and Pou3f3, was downregulated in the S-shaped bodies. We also observed decreased expression of Dll1 and the consequent defective activation of Notch in the prospective tubular compartment of comma- and S-shaped bodies. Our results reveal a novel hierarchical relationship between HNF1β and key genes involved in renal development. In addition, these studies define a novel structural and functional component of S-shaped bodies at the origin of tubule formation.

  2. Effect of the interactions and environment on nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, J.; Best, P. N.; Argudo-Fernández, M.

    2013-03-01

    We present a study of the prevalence of optical and radio nuclear activity with respect to the environment and interactions in a sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. The aim is to determine the independent effects of distinct aspects of source environment on the triggering of different types of nuclear activity. We defined a local density parameter and a tidal force estimator and used a cluster richness estimator from the literature to trace different aspects of environment and interaction. The possible correlations between the environmental parameters were removed using a principal component analysis. By far, the strongest trend found for the active galactic nuclei (AGN) fractions, of all AGN types, is with galaxy mass. We therefore applied a stratified statistical method that takes into account the effect of possible confounding factors like the galaxy mass. We found that (at fixed mass) the prevalence of optical AGN is a factor of 2-3 lower in the densest environments, but increases by a factor of ˜2 in the presence of strong one-on-one interactions. These effects are even more pronounced for star-forming nuclei. The importance of galaxy interactions decreases from star-forming nuclei to Seyferts to low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions to passive galaxies, in accordance with previous suggestions of an evolutionary time-sequence. The fraction of radio AGN increases very strongly (by nearly an order of magnitude) towards denser environments, and is also enhanced by galaxy interactions. Overall, the results agree with a scenario in which the mechanisms of accretion into the black hole are determined by the presence and nature of a supply of gas, which in turn is controlled by the local density of galaxies and their interactions. A plentiful cold gas supply is required to trigger star formation, optical AGN and radiatively efficient radio AGN. This is less common in the cold-gas-poor environments of groups and clusters, but is enhanced by

  3. Phospholipase Cϵ Activates Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling by Causing Cytoplasmic Localization of Ribosomal S6 Kinase and Facilitating Its Phosphorylation of Inhibitor κB in Colon Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masahiro; Edamatsu, Hironori; Li, Mingzhen; Emi, Aki; Kitazawa, Sohei; Kataoka, Tohru

    2016-06-10

    Phospholipase Cϵ (PLCϵ), an effector of Ras and Rap small GTPases, plays a crucial role in inflammation by augmenting proinflammatory cytokine expression. This proinflammatory function of PLCϵ is implicated in its facilitative role in tumor promotion and progression during skin and colorectal carcinogenesis, although their direct link remains to be established. Moreover, the molecular mechanism underlying these functions of PLCϵ remains unknown except that PKD works downstream of PLCϵ. Here we show by employing the colitis-induced colorectal carcinogenesis model, where Apc(Min) (/+) mice are administered with dextran sulfate sodium, that PLCϵ knock-out alleviates the colitis and suppresses the following tumorigenesis concomitant with marked attenuation of proinflammatory cytokine expression. In human colon epithelial Caco2 cells, TNF-α induces sustained expression of proinflammatory molecules and sustained activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and PKD, the late phases of which are suppressed by not only siRNA-mediated PLCϵ knockdown but also treatment with a lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor antagonist. Also, LPA stimulation induces these events in an early time course, suggesting that LPA mediates TNF-α signaling in an autocrine manner. Moreover, PLCϵ knockdown results in inhibition of phosphorylation of IκB by ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) but not by IκB kinases. Subcellular fractionation suggests that enhanced phosphorylation of a scaffolding protein, PEA15 (phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes 15), downstream of the PLCϵ-PKD axis causes sustained cytoplasmic localization of phosphorylated RSK, thereby facilitating IκB phosphorylation in the cytoplasm. These results suggest the crucial role of the TNF-α-LPA-LPA receptor-PLCϵ-PKD-PEA15-RSK-IκB-NF-κB pathway in facilitating inflammation and inflammation-associated carcinogenesis in the colon. PMID:27053111

  4. Occupational Employment in Nuclear-Related Activities, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Joe G.; Olsen, Kathryn

    Employment in nuclear- and nuclear energy-related activities in 1981 was examined and compared to that in previous years. Survey instruments were returned by 784 establishments. Total 1981 nuclear-related employment was estimated to be 249,500--a growth of 22,600 (10%) workers over the 1977 total. Government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO)…

  5. Factors affecting recognition of cancer risks of nuclear workers.

    PubMed Central

    Kneale, G W; Stewart, A M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To discover whether direct estimates of the risks of cancer for nuclear workers agree with indirect estimates based on survivors of the atomic bomb; whether relations between age at exposure and risk of cancer are the same for workers and survivors, and whether dosimetry standards are sufficiently uniform to allow pooling of data from different nuclear industrial sites. METHOD--Data from five nuclear sites in the United States were included in a cohort analysis that as well as controlling for all the usual factors also allowed for possible effects of three cancer modulating factors (exposure age, cancer latency, and year of exposure). This analysis was first applied to three distinct cohorts, and then to two sets of pooled data. RESULTS--From each study cohort there was evidence of a risk of cancer related to dose, and evidence that the extra radiogenic cancers had the same overall histological manifestations as naturally occurring cancers and were largely the result of exposures after 50 years of age causing deaths after 70 years. There were, however, significant differences between the five sets of risk estimates. CONCLUSIONS--Although the risks of cancer in nuclear workers were appreciably higher than estimates based on the cancer experiences of survivors of the atomic bomb, some uncertainties remained as there were non-uniform standards of dosimetry in the nuclear sites. The differences between nuclear workers and survivors of the atomic bomb were largely the result of relations between age at exposure and risk of cancer being totally different for workers and survivors and, in the occupational data, there were no signs of the special risks of leukaemia found in atomic bomb data and other studies of effects of high doses. PMID:7663636

  6. Regulated nuclear export of the homeodomain transcription factor Prospero.

    PubMed

    Demidenko, Z; Badenhorst, P; Jones, T; Bi, X; Mortin, M A

    2001-04-01

    Subcellular distribution of the Prospero protein is dynamically regulated during Drosophila embryonic nervous system development. Prospero is first detected in neuroblasts where it becomes cortically localized and tethered by the adapter protein, Miranda. After division, Prospero enters the nucleus of daughter ganglion mother cells where it functions as a transcription factor. We have isolated a mutation that removes the C-terminal 30 amino acids from the highly conserved 100 amino acid Prospero domain. Molecular dissection of the homeo- and Prospero domains, and expression of chimeric Prospero proteins in mammalian and insect cultured cells indicates that Prospero contains a nuclear export signal that is masked by the Prospero domain. Nuclear export of Prospero, which is sensitive to the drug leptomycin B, is mediated by Exportin. Mutation of the nuclear export signal-mask in Drosophila embryos prevents Prospero nuclear localization in ganglion mother cells. We propose that a combination of cortical tethering and regulated nuclear export controls Prospero subcellular distribution and function in all higher eukaryotes. PMID:11262236

  7. Nuclear Factor-Y is an adipogenic factor that regulates leptin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Hsueh; Dallner, Olof Stefan; Birsoy, Kivanc; Fayzikhodjaeva, Gulya; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Leptin gene expression is highly correlated with cellular lipid content in adipocytes but the transcriptional mechanisms controlling leptin expression in vivo are poorly understood. In this report, we set out to identify cis- and trans-regulatory elements controlling leptin expression. Methods Leptin-BAC luciferase transgenic mice combining with other computational and molecular techniques were used to identify transcription regulatory elements including a CCAAT-binding protein Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y). The function of NF-Y in adipocyte was studied in vitro with 3T3-L1 cells and in vivo with adipocyte-specific knockout of NF-Y. Results Using Leptin-BAC luciferase mice, we showed that DNA sequences between −22 kb and +8.8 kb can confer quantitative expression of a leptin reporter. Computational analysis of sequences and gel shift assays identified a 32 bp sequence (chr6: 28993820–2899385) consisting a CCAAT binding site for Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) and this was confirmed by a ChIP assay in vivo. A deletion of this 32 bp sequence in the −22 kb to +8.8 kb leptin-luciferase BAC reporter completely abrogates luciferase reporter activity in vivo. RNAi mediated knockdown of NF-Y interfered with adipogenesis in vitro and adipocyte-specific knockout of NF-Y in mice reduced expression of leptin and other fat specific genes in vivo. Further analyses of the fat specific NF-Y knockout revealed that these animals develop a moderately severe lipodystrophy that is remediable with leptin therapy. Conclusions These studies advance our understanding of leptin gene expression and show that NF-Y controls the expression of leptin and other adipocyte genes and identifies a new form of lipodystrophy. PMID:25973387

  8. Regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pulmonary neutrophil aggregation mediated by nuclear factor-κB in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongman; Zhao, Jiping; Xue, Guansheng; Wang, Junfei; Wu, Jinxiang; Wang, Donghui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78) on pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mice, and the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), was investigated. BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups using a random number table. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was detected using a western blot, and the mRNA expression levels of CINC were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 was detected using immunohistochemistry. The production of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total number of leukocytes and proportion of PMNs in BALF was also determined. Following injection with LPS (20 mg/kg), the expression levels of p-NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 were increased in lung tissue, and the expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the number of PMNs increased in serum and BALF. However, in comparison with the LPS group, the degree of lung injury was reduced in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC. In addition, the expression level of p-NF-κB and the production of chemokines in lung tissue decreased in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC, and the number of PMNs in BALF also decreased. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB may result in the synthesis and release of CINC and ENA-78, which induce the accumulation of PMNs in the lung. Therefore, PDTC may be used to reduce the production of chemokines and cytokines, thereby decreasing the activation of PMNs in lung tissue and reducing the damage of lung tissue in ARDS. PMID:27602092

  9. Regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pulmonary neutrophil aggregation mediated by nuclear factor-κB in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongman; Zhao, Jiping; Xue, Guansheng; Wang, Junfei; Wu, Jinxiang; Wang, Donghui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78) on pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mice, and the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), was investigated. BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups using a random number table. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was detected using a western blot, and the mRNA expression levels of CINC were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 was detected using immunohistochemistry. The production of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total number of leukocytes and proportion of PMNs in BALF was also determined. Following injection with LPS (20 mg/kg), the expression levels of p-NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 were increased in lung tissue, and the expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the number of PMNs increased in serum and BALF. However, in comparison with the LPS group, the degree of lung injury was reduced in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC. In addition, the expression level of p-NF-κB and the production of chemokines in lung tissue decreased in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC, and the number of PMNs in BALF also decreased. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB may result in the synthesis and release of CINC and ENA-78, which induce the accumulation of PMNs in the lung. Therefore, PDTC may be used to reduce the production of chemokines and cytokines, thereby decreasing the activation of PMNs in lung tissue and reducing the damage of lung tissue in ARDS.

  10. Galaxy interactions and the stimulation of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.

    1990-01-01

    The author discusses the idea that interactions between galaxies can lead to enhanced galactic activity. He discusses whether, apart from the observational evidence, there is a strong theoretical or heuristic motivation for investigating galaxy interactions as stimulators of nuclear activity in galaxies. Galactic interactions as mechanisms for triggering nuclear starbursts are covered.

  11. Nuclear fear and children: the impact of parental nuclear activism, responsivity, and fear

    SciTech Connect

    LaGuardia, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which parental nuclear fear, parental activism, and parental responsivity is associated with children's (age 10) nuclear fear. Other associated variables investigated include: nuclear denial, general anxiety and fear, and the personal characteristics of sex, socio-economic status, and academic aptitude. Findings indicate that children attend to nuclear issues when their parents attend to a significant degree. Children's hopelessness about the arms race is increased as parents' worry about nuclear war increases. Children's fear about not surviving a nuclear war increases as parents' worry about survivability decreases. Children who have more general fears also indicated that they have a high level of hopelessness, pervasive worry, and much concern about being able to survive a nuclear war. Children with a high degree of general anxiety did not indicate high degrees of nuclear fears. Children with high academic aptitude were more knowledgeable about nuclear issues and expressed more fears about the nuclear threat. Boys demonstrated more knowledge about nuclear issues than girls, and girls expressed much more frequent fear and worry about the nuclear threat than boys. Parents of lower socio-economic statues (SES) expressed more denial about the nuclear threat and were more pro-military than the higher SES parents.

  12. Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, B R; Dillon, M B

    2009-01-21

    Despite hundreds of above-ground nuclear tests and data gathered from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the effects of a ground-level, low-yield nuclear detonation in a modern urban environment are still the subject of considerable scientific debate. Extensive review of nuclear weapon effects studies and discussions with nuclear weapon effects experts from various federal agencies, national laboratories, and technical organizations have identified key issues and bounded some of the unknowns required to support response planning for a low-yield, ground-level nuclear detonation in a modern U.S. city. This study, which is focused primarily upon the hazards posed by radioactive fallout, used detailed fallout predictions from the advanced suite of three-dimensional (3-D) meteorology and plume/fallout models developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including extensive global Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism geographical and real-time meteorological databases to support model calculations. This 3-D modeling system provides detailed simulations that account for complex meteorology and terrain effects. The results of initial modeling and analysis were presented to federal, state, and local working groups to obtain critical, broad-based review and feedback on strategy and messaging. This effort involved a diverse set of communities, including New York City, National Capitol Regions, Charlotte, Houston, Portland, and Los Angeles. The largest potential for reducing casualties during the post-detonation response phase comes from reducing exposure to fallout radiation. This can be accomplished through early, adequate sheltering followed by informed, delayed evacuation.B The response challenges to a nuclear detonation must be solved through multiple approaches of public education, planning, and rapid response actions. Because the successful response will require extensive coordination of a large number of organizations, supplemented by

  13. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1)

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T.; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K.; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.; Buck, Michael J.; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development. PMID:25923916

  14. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 promotes triple-negative breast cancer cell migration and invasion via activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Metastasis is the main cause of breast cancer morbidity and mortality. Processes that allow for tumor cell migration and invasion are important therapeutic targets. Here we demonstrate that receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2), a kinase known to be involved in inflammatory processes, also has novel roles in cancer cell migration and invasion. Methods A total of six breast cancer expression databases, including The Cancer Genome Atlas, were assessed for RIP2 expression among various clinical subtypes and its role as a prognostic biomarker. mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for RIP2 was performed on 17 stage III breast cancers to determine if there was a correlation between RIP2 expression and lymph node involvement. RNA-interference was used to knock-down RIP2 expression in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, T47D, and HCC1428 cells. Cell migration and invasion were measured in vitro by scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays. A xenograft mouse model was used to assess tumor growth and chemosensitivity to docetaxel in vivo in MDA-MB-231 cells with and without RIP2 small hairpin RNA knockdown. Western blot and immunofluorescence imaging were used to evaluate protein expressions. Results Interrogation of expression databases showed that RIP2 expression is significantly over-expressed in triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC: estrogen-receptor (ER) negative, progesterone-receptor (PR) negative, Her2/neu- (Her2) negative), compared to other clinical subtypes. High RIP2 expression correlates with worse progression-free survival using a combined breast cancer expression array dataset consisting of 946 patients. Multivariate analysis shows RIP2 as an independent prognostic biomarker. Knock-down of RIP2 significantly decreases migration in both scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, and T47D cells and is correlated with decreased Nuclear Factor-kappaB and c-Jun N

  15. Approximate penetration factors for nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humblet, J.; Fowler, W. A.; Zimmerman, B. A.

    1987-01-01

    The ranges of validity of approximations of P(l), the penetration factor which appears in the parameterization of nuclear-reaction cross sections at low energies and is employed in the extrapolation of laboratory data to even lower energies of astrophysical interest, are investigated analytically. Consideration is given to the WKB approximation, P(l) at the energy of the total barrier, approximations derived from the asymptotic expansion of G(l) for large eta, approximations for small values of the parameter x, applications of P(l) to nuclear reactions, and the dependence of P(l) on channel radius. Numerical results are presented in tables and graphs, and parameter ranges where the danger of serious errors is high are identified.

  16. Nuclear localization of Src-family tyrosine kinases is required for growth factor-induced euchromatinization

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akinori; Obata, Yuuki; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Nakayama, Yuji; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kuga, Takahisa; Higashiyama, Yukihiro; Saito, Takashi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2009-04-15

    Src-family kinases (SFKs), which participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also several subcellular compartments, including the nucleus. Nuclear structural changes are frequently observed during transcription, cell differentiation, senescence, tumorigenesis, and cell cycle. However, little is known about signal transduction in the alteration of chromatin texture. Here, we develop a pixel imaging method for quantitatively evaluating chromatin structural changes. Growth factor stimulation increases euchromatic hypocondensation and concomitant heterochromatic hypercondensation in G{sub 1} phase, and the levels reach a plateau by 30 min, sustain for at least 5 h and return to the basal levels after 24 h. Serum-activated SFKs in the nucleus were more frequently detected in the euchromatin areas than the heterochromatin areas. Nuclear expression of kinase-active SFKs, but not unrelated Syk kinase, drastically increases both euchromatinization and heterochromatinization in a manner dependent on the levels of nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation. However, growth factor stimulation does not induce chromatin structural changes in SYF cells lacking SFKs, and reintroduction of one SFK member into SYF cells can, albeit insufficiently, induce chromatin structural changes. These results suggest that nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation by SFKs plays an important role in chromatin structural changes upon growth factor stimulation.

  17. Germ Cell Nuclear Factor Regulates Gametogenesis in Developing Gonads

    PubMed Central

    Sabour, Davood; Xu, Xueping; Chung, Arthur C. K.; Le Menuet, Damien; Ko, Kinarm; Tapia, Natalia; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Gentile, Luca; Greber, Boris; Hübner, Karin; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Wu, Guangming; Schöler, Hans R.; Cooney, Austin J.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF; Nr6a1), an orphan member of the nuclear receptor gene family of transcription factors, during gastrulation and neurulation is critical for normal embryogenesis in mice. Gcnf represses the expression of the POU-domain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1) during mouse post-implantation development. Although Gcnf expression is not critical for the embryonic segregation of the germ cell lineage, we found that sexually dimorphic expression of Gcnf in germ cells correlates with the expression of pluripotency-associated genes, such as Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog, as well as the early meiotic marker gene Stra8. To elucidate the role of Gcnf during mouse germ cell differentiation, we generated an ex vivo Gcnf-knockdown model in combination with a regulated CreLox mutation of Gcnf. Lack of Gcnf impairs normal spermatogenesis and oogenesis in vivo, as well as the derivation of germ cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro. Inactivation of the Gcnf gene in vivo leads to loss of repression of Oct4 expression in both male and female gonads. PMID:25140725

  18. TRAF Family Member-associated NF-κB Activator (TANK) Inhibits Genotoxic Nuclear Factor κB Activation by Facilitating Deubiquitinase USP10-dependent Deubiquitination of TRAF6 Ligase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Xuan; Xin, Hong-Bo; Fu, Mingui; Xue, Aimin; Wu, Zhao-Hui

    2015-05-22

    DNA damage-induced NF-κB activation plays a critical role in regulating cellular response to genotoxic stress. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling the magnitude and duration of this genotoxic NF-κB signaling cascade are poorly understood. We recently demonstrated that genotoxic NF-κB activation is regulated by reversible ubiquitination of several essential mediators involved in this signaling pathway. Here we show that TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK) negatively regulates NF-κB activation by DNA damage via inhibiting ubiquitination of TRAF6. Despite the lack of a deubiquitination enzyme domain, TANK has been shown to negatively regulate the ubiquitination of TRAF proteins. We found TANK formed a complex with MCPIP1 (also known as ZC3H12A) and a deubiquitinase, USP10, which was essential for the USP10-dependent deubiquitination of TRAF6 and the resolution of genotoxic NF-κB activation upon DNA damage. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated deletion of TANK in human cells significantly enhanced NF-κB activation by genotoxic treatment, resulting in enhanced cell survival and increased inflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, we found that the TANK-MCPIP1-USP10 complex also decreased TRAF6 ubiquitination in cells treated with IL-1β or LPS. In accordance, depletion of USP10 enhanced NF-κB activation induced by IL-1β or LPS. Collectively, our data demonstrate that TANK serves as an important negative regulator of NF-κB signaling cascades induced by genotoxic stress and IL-1R/Toll-like receptor stimulation in a manner dependent on MCPIP1/USP10-mediated TRAF6 deubiquitination.

  19. Tissue factor activity under flow.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Scott L

    2010-04-01

    Coagulation processes under flow conditions are fundamentally different when compared to whole blood clotting in a tube. Due to red blood cell migration toward the center of the vessel, platelet concentrations are elevated several-fold in the plasma layer near the wall or thrombus. Evaluation of platelet function, coagulation proteases, and pharmacological agents can utilize closed systems of constant volume that lack flow (eg. intracellular calcium measurement, automated calibrated thrombography) or include flow (eg. aggregometry or cone-and-plate viscometry). However, these laboratory approaches fail to recreate the fact that intravascular thrombosis is an open system where blood is continually flowing over a thrombotic site. In open systems, the rapid accumulation of platelets at a surface leads to platelet concentrations greatly exceeding those found in whole blood and the delivery/removal of species by convection may impact the efficacy of pharmacological agents. During a clotting event under flow, platelets can accumulate via adhesion receptors to concentrations that are 10 to 50-fold higher than that of platelet-rich plasma. Using controlled in vitro perfusions of whole blood, it is possible to determine the critical level of surface tissue factor needed to trigger full scale coagulation on collagen. Such in vitro perfusion systems also allow a determination of the potency of anti-platelet agents as a function of wall shear rate.

  20. Activation of factor X by rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, A.K.; Matschiner, J.T.

    1986-05-01

    Synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factor X was studied in hepatocytes prepared by perfusion of rat livers with collagenase. Hepatocytes were incubated in the presence of vitamin K and /sup 3/H-leucine for up to 4h at 37/sup 0/C. Factor X was isolated from the incubation medium by immunochemical techniques and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The recovered /sup 3/H-labeled proteins migrated, after reduction of disulfides, as two polypeptide chains with apparent molecular weights (M/sub r/) of approximately 42,000 and 22,000 representing the heavy and light chains of factor X respectively. The apparent M/sub r/ of the heavy chain was about 10,000 daltons lighter than seen with the heavy chain of factor X isolated from rat plasma and was more characteristic of the heavy chain of factor Xa. When the levels of factor X secreted by hepatocytes were determined by clotting assays, activity was present as factor Xa. Also, when purified plasma factor X was added to incubations of hepatocytes (>95% parenchymal cells) the added factor X was rapidly converted to factor Xa. Plasma membranes prepared from isolated hepatocytes or from liver homogenates contained an enzyme that converted factor X to factor Xa in a calcium dependent reaction. The physiological significance of a factor X activating enzyme on hepatocyte plasma membranes is not clear.

  1. Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

    2008-02-14

    This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

  2. Factors limiting microbial activity in volcanic tuff at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.; Kovacik, W.P.; Taylor, J.

    1996-09-01

    Samples of tuff aseptically collected from 10 locations in the Exploratory Shaft Facility at the site of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site were analyzed for microbiological populations, activities, and factors limiting microbial activity. Radiotracer assays ({sup 14}C-labeled organic substrate mineralization), direct microscopic counts, and plate counts were used. Radiolabeled substrates were glucose, acetate, and glutamate. Radiotracer experiments were carried out with and without moisture and inorganic nutrient amendments to determine factors limiting to microbial activities. Nearly all samples showed the presence of microorganisms with the potential to mineralize organic substrates. Addition of inorganic nutrients stimulated activities in a small number of samples. The presence of viable microbial communities within the tuff has implications for transport of contaminants.

  3. PIASy, a nuclear matrix–associated SUMO E3 ligase, represses LEF1 activity by sequestration into nuclear bodies

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Shrikesh; Bruhn, Laurakay; Sieber, Heidemarie; Pichler, Andrea; Melchior, Frauke; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2001-01-01

    The Wnt-responsive transcription factor LEF1 can activate transcription in association with β-catenin and repress transcription in association with Groucho. In search of additional regulatory mechanisms of LEF1 function, we identified the protein inhibitor of activated STAT, PIASy, as a novel interaction partner of LEF1. Coexpression of PIASy with LEF1 results in potent repression of LEF1 activity and in covalent modification of LEF1 with SUMO. PIASy markedly stimulates the sumoylation of LEF1 and multiple other proteins in vivo and functions as a SUMO E3 ligase for LEF1 in a reconstituted system in vitro. Moreover, PIASy binds to nuclear matrix–associated DNA sequences and targets LEF1 to nuclear bodies, suggesting that PIASy-mediated subnuclear sequestration accounts for the repression of LEF1 activity. PMID:11731474

  4. Establishing a value chain for human factors in nuclear power plantcontrol room modernization

    SciTech Connect

    Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Thomas, Kenneth David; Boring, Ronald Laurids

    2015-07-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) have operated reliably and efficiently for decades. With the life extensions of plants now being planned for operation beyond their original operating licenses, there are opportunities to achieve even greater efficiencies, while maintaining high operational reliabilities, with strategic, risk- and economically-informed, upgrades to plant systems and infrastructure. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program supports the commercial nuclear industry’s modernization efforts through research and development (R&D) activities across many areas to help establish the technical and economic bases for modernization activities. The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies pathway is one R&D focus area for the LWRS program, and has researchers at Idaho National Laboratory working with select utility partners to use human factors and instrumentation and controls R&D to help modernize the plant’s main control room. However, some in the nuclear industry have not been as enthusiastic about using human factors R&D to inform life extension decision making. Part of the reason for this may stem from uncertainty decision-makers have regarding how human factors fits into the value chain for nuclear power plant control room modernization. This paper reviews past work that has attempted to demonstrate the value of human factors, and then describes the value chain concept, how it applies to control room modernization, and then makes a case for how and why human factors is an essential link in the modernization value chain.

  5. Selective Activation of Transcription by a Novel CCAAT Binding Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sankar N.; Golumbek, Paul T.; Karsenty, Gerard; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    1988-07-01

    A novel CCAAT binding factor (CBF) composed of two different subunits has been extensively purified from rat liver. Both subunits are needed for specific binding to DNA. Addition of this purified protein to nuclear extracts of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts stimulates transcription from several promoters including the α 2(I) collagen, the α 1(I) collagen, the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat (RSV-LTR), and the adenovirus major late promoter. Point mutations in the CCAAT motif that show either no binding or a decreased binding of CBF likewise abolish or reduce activation of transcription by CBF. Activation of transcription requires, therefore, the specific binding of CBF to its recognition sites.

  6. Featured Article: Nuclear export of opioid growth factor receptor is CRM1 dependent.

    PubMed

    Kren, Nancy P; Zagon, Ian S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2016-02-01

    Opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) facilitates growth inhibition in the presence of its specific ligand opioid growth factor (OGF), chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin. The function of the OGF-OGFr axis requires the receptor to translocate to the nucleus. However, the mechanism of nuclear export of OGFr is unknown. In this study, endogenous OGFr, as well as exogenously expressed OGFr-EGFP, demonstrated significant nuclear accumulation in response to leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of CRM1-dependent nuclear export, suggesting that OGFr is exported in a CRM1-dependent manner. One consensus sequence for a nuclear export signal (NES) was identified. Mutation of the associated leucines, L217 L220 L223 and L225, to alanine resulted in decreased nuclear accumulation. NES-EGFP responded to LMB, indicating that this sequence is capable of functioning as an export signal in isolation. To determine why the sequence functions differently in isolation than as a full length protein, the localization of subNES was evaluated in the presence and absence of MG132, a potent inhibitor of proteosomal degradation. MG132 had no effect of subNES localization. The role of tandem repeats located at the C-terminus of OGFr was examined for their role in nuclear trafficking. Six of seven tandem repeats were removed to form deltaTR. DeltaTR localized exclusively to the nucleus indicating that the tandem repeats may contribute to the localization of the receptor. Similar to the loss of cellular proliferation activity (i.e. inhibition) recorded with subNES, deltaTR also demonstrated a significant loss of inhibitory activity indicating that the repeats may be integral to receptor function. These experiments reveal that OGFr contains one functional NES, L217 L220 L223 and L225 and can be exported from the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner.

  7. Featured Article: Nuclear export of opioid growth factor receptor is CRM1 dependent

    PubMed Central

    Kren, Nancy P; Zagon, Ian S

    2015-01-01

    Opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) facilitates growth inhibition in the presence of its specific ligand opioid growth factor (OGF), chemically termed [Met5]-enkephalin. The function of the OGF-OGFr axis requires the receptor to translocate to the nucleus. However, the mechanism of nuclear export of OGFr is unknown. In this study, endogenous OGFr, as well as exogenously expressed OGFr-EGFP, demonstrated significant nuclear accumulation in response to leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of CRM1-dependent nuclear export, suggesting that OGFr is exported in a CRM1-dependent manner. One consensus sequence for a nuclear export signal (NES) was identified. Mutation of the associated leucines, L217 L220 L223 and L225, to alanine resulted in decreased nuclear accumulation. NES-EGFP responded to LMB, indicating that this sequence is capable of functioning as an export signal in isolation. To determine why the sequence functions differently in isolation than as a full length protein, the localization of subNES was evaluated in the presence and absence of MG132, a potent inhibitor of proteosomal degradation. MG132 had no effect of subNES localization. The role of tandem repeats located at the C-terminus of OGFr was examined for their role in nuclear trafficking. Six of seven tandem repeats were removed to form deltaTR. DeltaTR localized exclusively to the nucleus indicating that the tandem repeats may contribute to the localization of the receptor. Similar to the loss of cellular proliferation activity (i.e. inhibition) recorded with subNES, deltaTR also demonstrated a significant loss of inhibitory activity indicating that the repeats may be integral to receptor function. These experiments reveal that OGFr contains one functional NES, L217 L220 L223 and L225 and can be exported from the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner. PMID:26429201

  8. Roles of hepatocyte nuclear factors in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo Hyun; Kang, Hong Seok; Kim, Kyun-Hwan

    2016-08-21

    Approximately 350 million people are estimated to be persistently infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) worldwide. HBV maintains persistent infection by employing covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), a template for all HBV RNAs. Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients are currently treated with nucleos(t)ide analogs such as lamivudine, adefovir, entecavir, and tenofovir. However, these treatments rarely cure CHB because they are unable to inhibit cccDNA transcription and inhibit only a late stage in the HBV life cycle (the reverse transcription step in the nucleocapsid). Therefore, an understanding of the factors regulating cccDNA transcription is required to stop this process. Among numerous factors, hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) play the most important roles in cccDNA transcription, especially in the generation of viral genomic RNA, a template for HBV replication. Therefore, proper control of HNF function could lead to the inhibition of HBV replication. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current understanding of the roles of HNFs in the HBV life cycle and the upstream factors that regulate HNFs. This knowledge will enable the identification of new therapeutic targets to cure CHB. PMID:27610013

  9. Roles of hepatocyte nuclear factors in hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doo Hyun; Kang, Hong Seok; Kim, Kyun-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 350 million people are estimated to be persistently infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) worldwide. HBV maintains persistent infection by employing covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), a template for all HBV RNAs. Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients are currently treated with nucleos(t)ide analogs such as lamivudine, adefovir, entecavir, and tenofovir. However, these treatments rarely cure CHB because they are unable to inhibit cccDNA transcription and inhibit only a late stage in the HBV life cycle (the reverse transcription step in the nucleocapsid). Therefore, an understanding of the factors regulating cccDNA transcription is required to stop this process. Among numerous factors, hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) play the most important roles in cccDNA transcription, especially in the generation of viral genomic RNA, a template for HBV replication. Therefore, proper control of HNF function could lead to the inhibition of HBV replication. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current understanding of the roles of HNFs in the HBV life cycle and the upstream factors that regulate HNFs. This knowledge will enable the identification of new therapeutic targets to cure CHB. PMID:27610013

  10. Roles of hepatocyte nuclear factors in hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doo Hyun; Kang, Hong Seok; Kim, Kyun-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 350 million people are estimated to be persistently infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) worldwide. HBV maintains persistent infection by employing covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), a template for all HBV RNAs. Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients are currently treated with nucleos(t)ide analogs such as lamivudine, adefovir, entecavir, and tenofovir. However, these treatments rarely cure CHB because they are unable to inhibit cccDNA transcription and inhibit only a late stage in the HBV life cycle (the reverse transcription step in the nucleocapsid). Therefore, an understanding of the factors regulating cccDNA transcription is required to stop this process. Among numerous factors, hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) play the most important roles in cccDNA transcription, especially in the generation of viral genomic RNA, a template for HBV replication. Therefore, proper control of HNF function could lead to the inhibition of HBV replication. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current understanding of the roles of HNFs in the HBV life cycle and the upstream factors that regulate HNFs. This knowledge will enable the identification of new therapeutic targets to cure CHB.

  11. PARP activation promotes nuclear AID accumulation in lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Sandra; Jeschke, Julia; Böttcher, Katrin; Schmidt, Angelika; Davari, Kathrin; Müller, Peter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hemmerich, Peter; Pfeil, Ines; Jungnickel, Berit

    2016-03-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin diversification in germinal center B cells by targeted introduction of DNA damage. As aberrant nuclear AID action contributes to the generation of B cell lymphoma, the protein's activity is tightly regulated, e.g. by nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear degradation. In the present study, we asked whether DNA damage may affect regulation of the AID protein. We show that exogenous DNA damage that mainly activates base excision repair leads to prevention of proteasomal degradation of AID and hence its nuclear accumulation. Inhibitor as well as knockout studies indicate that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by DNA damaging agents promotes both phenomena. These findings suggest that PARP inhibitors influence DNA damage dependent AID regulation, with interesting implications for the regulation of AID function and chemotherapy of lymphoma.

  12. PARP activation promotes nuclear AID accumulation in lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Katrin; Schmidt, Angelika; Davari, Kathrin; Müller, Peter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hemmerich, Peter; Pfeil, Ines; Jungnickel, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin diversification in germinal center B cells by targeted introduction of DNA damage. As aberrant nuclear AID action contributes to the generation of B cell lymphoma, the protein's activity is tightly regulated, e.g. by nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear degradation. In the present study, we asked whether DNA damage may affect regulation of the AID protein. We show that exogenous DNA damage that mainly activates base excision repair leads to prevention of proteasomal degradation of AID and hence its nuclear accumulation. Inhibitor as well as knockout studies indicate that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by DNA damaging agents promotes both phenomena. These findings suggest that PARP inhibitors influence DNA damage dependent AID regulation, with interesting implications for the regulation of AID function and chemotherapy of lymphoma. PMID:26921193

  13. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  14. [AHH activity and life environmental factors].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, J

    1987-04-01

    To investigate life environmental factors which affect aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity, basal and 3-methylcholanthrene(3-MC)-induced AHH activities were determined by the formation of 3-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene in cultured lymphocytes obtained from 111 healthy male subjects who lived in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. Fold induction (3-MC-induced/basal) was calculated. Relationship between the absolute activities and the fold induction of AHH and life environmental factors was statistically examined. Study of simple correlation indicated the following: Basal AHH activity was positively correlated with age and habitual intake of drugs. Induced AHH activity was positively correlated with coffee intake, smoking and habitual intake of drugs. Fold induction was positively correlated with coffee intake and smoking, and negatively with age. Using multiple regression analysis, habitual intake of drugs showed positive relation to both basal and induced enzyme activity, and age showed positive relation to the basal activity and negative relation to the fold induction.

  15. Active Faults and Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Neil; Berryman, Kelvin; Villamor, Pilar; Epstein, Woody; Cluff, Lloyd; Kawamura, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    The destruction of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) following the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami brought into sharp focus the susceptibility of NPPs to natural hazards. This is not a new issue—seismic hazard has affected the development of plants in the United States, and volcanic hazard was among the reasons for not commissioning the Bataan NPP in the Philippines [Connor et al., 2009].

  16. Complexes between nuclear factor-κB p65 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 are key actors in inducing activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and immunoglobulin A production in CD40L plus interleukin-10-treated human blood B cells.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, S; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Richard, Y; Pozzetto, B; Cogné, M; Cognasse, F; Garraud, O

    2011-11-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor pathway plays an important role in many biological phenomena. STAT3 transcription is triggered by cytokine-associated signals. Here, we use isolated human B cells to analyse the role of STAT3 in interleukin (IL)-10 induced terminal B cell differentiation and in immunoglobulin (Ig)A production as a characteristic readout of IL-10 signalling. We identified optimal conditions for inducing in-vitro IgA production by purified blood naive B cells using IL-10 and soluble CD40L. We show that soluble CD40L consistently induces the phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 but not of STAT3, while IL-10 induces the phosphorylation of STAT3 but not of NF-κB p65. Interestingly, while soluble CD40L and IL-10 were synergistic in driving the terminal maturation of B cells into IgA-producing plasma cells, they did not co-operate earlier in the pathway with regard to the transcription factors NF-κB p65 or STAT3. Blocking either NF-κB p65 or STAT3 profoundly altered the production of IgA and mRNA for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme strictly necessary for Ig heavy chain recombination. Finally, the STAT3 pathway was directly activated by IL-10, while IL-6, the main cytokine otherwise known for activating the STAT3 pathway, did not appear to be involved in IL-10-induced-STAT3 activation. Our results suggest that STAT3 and NF-κB pathways co-operate in IgA production, with soluble CD40L rapidly activating the NF-κB pathway, probably rendering STAT3 probably more reactive to IL-10 signalling. This novel role for STAT3 in B cell development reveals a potential therapeutic or vaccine target for eliciting IgA humoral responses at mucosal interfaces.

  17. The Dose Rate Conversion Factors for Nuclear Fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, G D

    2009-02-13

    In a previous paper, the composite exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for nuclear fallout was calculated using a simple theoretical photon-transport model. The theoretical model was used to fill in the gaps in the FGR-12 table generated by ORNL. The FGR-12 table contains the individual conversion factors for approximate 1000 radionuclides. However, in order to calculate the exposure rate during the first 30 minutes following a nuclear detonation, the conversion factors for approximately 2000 radionuclides are needed. From a human-effects standpoint, it is also necessary to have the dose rate conversion factors (DCFs) for all 2000 radionuclides. The DCFs are used to predict the whole-body dose rates that would occur if a human were standing in a radiation field of known exposure rate. As calculated by ORNL, the whole-body dose rate (rem/hr) is approximately 70% of the exposure rate (R/hr) at one meter above the surface. Hence, the individual DCFs could be estimated by multiplying the individual ECFs by 0.7. Although this is a handy rule-of-thumb, a more consistent (and perhaps, more accurate) method of estimating the individual DCFs for the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table is to use the linear relationship between DCF and total gamma energy released per decay. This relationship is shown in Figure 1. The DCFs for individual organs in the body can also be estimated from the estimated whole-body DCF. Using the DCFs given FGR-12, the ratio of the organ-specific DCFs to the whole-body DCF were plotted as a function of the whole-body DCF. From these plots, the asymptotic ratios were obtained (see Table 1). Using these asymptotic ratios, the organ-specific DCFs can be estimated using the estimated whole-body DCF for each of the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table. Although this procedure for estimating the organ-specific DCFs may over-estimate the value for some low gamma-energy emitters, having a finite value for the organ-specific DCFs in the table is

  18. Diverse roles of assembly factors revealed by structures of late nuclear pre-60S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shan; Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Yan, Kaige; Brown, Hailey; Zhang, Yixiao; Tan, Dan; Gamalinda, Michael; Yuan, Yi; Li, Zhifei; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Ma, Chengying; Lei, Jianlin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Woolford, John L; Gao, Ning

    2016-05-25

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex process in eukaryotes, involving temporally and spatially regulated ribosomal protein (r-protein) binding and ribosomal RNA remodelling events in the nucleolus, nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Hundreds of assembly factors, organized into sequential functional groups, facilitate and guide the maturation process into productive assembly branches in and across different cellular compartments. However, the precise mechanisms by which these assembly factors function are largely unknown. Here we use cryo-electron microscopy to characterize the structures of yeast nucleoplasmic pre-60S particles affinity-purified using the epitope-tagged assembly factor Nog2. Our data pinpoint the locations and determine the structures of over 20 assembly factors, which are enriched in two areas: an arc region extending from the central protuberance to the polypeptide tunnel exit, and the domain including the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) that separates 5.8S and 25S ribosomal RNAs. In particular, two regulatory GTPases, Nog2 and Nog1, act as hub proteins to interact with multiple, distant assembly factors and functional ribosomal RNA elements, manifesting their critical roles in structural remodelling checkpoints and nuclear export. Moreover, our snapshots of compositionally and structurally different pre-60S intermediates provide essential mechanistic details for three major remodelling events before nuclear export: rotation of the 5S ribonucleoprotein, construction of the active centre and ITS2 removal. The rich structural information in our structures provides a framework to dissect molecular roles of diverse assembly factors in eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  19. Diverse roles of assembly factors revealed by structures of late nuclear pre-60S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shan; Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Yan, Kaige; Brown, Hailey; Zhang, Yixiao; Tan, Dan; Gamalinda, Michael; Yuan, Yi; Li, Zhifei; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Ma, Chengying; Lei, Jianlin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Woolford, John L; Gao, Ning

    2016-06-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex process in eukaryotes, involving temporally and spatially regulated ribosomal protein (r-protein) binding and ribosomal RNA remodelling events in the nucleolus, nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Hundreds of assembly factors, organized into sequential functional groups, facilitate and guide the maturation process into productive assembly branches in and across different cellular compartments. However, the precise mechanisms by which these assembly factors function are largely unknown. Here we use cryo-electron microscopy to characterize the structures of yeast nucleoplasmic pre-60S particles affinity-purified using the epitope-tagged assembly factor Nog2. Our data pinpoint the locations and determine the structures of over 20 assembly factors, which are enriched in two areas: an arc region extending from the central protuberance to the polypeptide tunnel